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Sample records for hypertensive retinopathy microalbuminuria

  1. [Hypertensive retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Genevois, Olivier; Paques, Michel

    2010-01-20

    Acute hypertensive retinopathy should be distinguished from retinal arteriolosclerosis. The presence of microvascular abnormalities in the ocular fundus increases the risk of heart and/or brain attack. At the clinical level, the current classification of chronic hypertensive retinopathy is based on the long-term risk of stroke. In research, a great number of studies are focused on the predictive value of retinal vascular diameters related to the general micro- and macrovascular disease. PMID:20222306

  2. [Hypertensive retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Genevois, Olivier; Paques, Michel

    2010-01-20

    Acute hypertensive retinopathy should be distinguished from retinal arteriolosclerosis. The presence of microvascular abnormalities in the ocular fundus increases the risk of heart and/or brain attack. At the clinical level, the current classification of chronic hypertensive retinopathy is based on the long-term risk of stroke. In research, a great number of studies are focused on the predictive value of retinal vascular diameters related to the general micro- and macrovascular disease.

  3. Retinopathy and microalbuminuria in type II diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Manaviat, Masoud R; Afkhami, Mohammad; Shoja, Mohammad R

    2004-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for the development of retinopathy and microalbuminuria and their correlation in type II diabetic patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study 590 patients suffering from diabetis type II were examined. Fundoscopy was performed by practising ophthalmologist. The ratio of urinary albumin to creatinine was assessed by clinitek 100 (Bayer corporation–USA). HbA1C, height and weight also were measured. Results The overall prevalence of retinopathy was 39.3% (232 patients), 5.4% of which showed to be prolifrative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The diabetic retinopathy had significant inverse correlation with body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.02). HbA1C was higher in patients with PDR (mean = 10.5%) than in patients with no signs of retinopathy (mean = 9.5%) and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.001). The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 25.9% while 14.5% of the patients revealed to have macroalbuminuria. As expected, diabetic retinopathy and renal involvement were highly positively correlated. (P = 0.001). Conclusion Microalbuminuria is associated with diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients and is a reliable marker of retinopathy. PMID:15228626

  4. [Hypertensive retinopathy--assessment].

    PubMed

    Barar, A; Apatachioaie, Ioana Daniela; Apatachioaie, C; Marceanu, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors intend to make a synthesis of several recent studies available on the Internet regarding hypertensive retinopathy. From the physiopathologic point of view, it is considered that the blood circulation at the level of the retina, choroid and optical nerve has distinct anatomo-physiological properties. It has a different response to the changes in the blood pressure, the result consisting of distinct individual types of the hypertensive disease which can be rendered evident during the optical fundus examination. The retina is considered to be one of the target organs in the hypertensive disease. Ascertaining the retinal changes has advanced from ophthalmoscopy to digital photography studied with appropriate software. The assessment of the hypertensive microangiopathy is subjected to a wide intra- and interobserver variability an accurate assessment requiring specialized software and standardized protocols. There is also a lack of consensus regarding the classification of hypertensive retinopathy and the usefulness of retinal examination in the assessment of cardiovascular risk. The Keith and Scheie staging scales are still in use, but they do not allow the clinician to differentiate slight or even moderate changes at the level of the retina of hypertensive patients. Furthermore, they do not correlate enough with the severity of the high blood pressure and they are not supported by the angiofluorography studies. There are not enough motives for the recommendation of a routine ophthalmoscopic examination for all hypertensive patients. It is required for patients with stage-3 hypertension. It is also recommended when the initial clinical signs are equivocal, as in borderline or fluctuating high blood pressure without any other obvious signs from the target organs, for diabetic patients, or in the presence of visual symptoms. The clinical implications of hypertensive retinopathy being unclear, many of the authors do not recommend ophthalmoscopic examination as

  5. Prevalence and Association of Microalbuminuria in Essential Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Bibek; Yadav, Binod Kumar; Nepal, Ashwini Kumar; Jha, Bharat; Raut, Kanak Bahadur

    2012-01-01

    Background: Microalbuminuria in hypertension has been described as an early sign of kidney damage and a predictor for end stage renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Thus, it is of great importance to study urinary albumin creatinine ratio and progression of kidney disease in hypertensive patients. Aims: The present study was undertaken to find out the prevalence and association of microalbuminuria in newly diagnosed essential hypertension. Materials and Methods: Newly diagnosed essential hypertensive cases (n = 106) and normotensive controls (n = 106) were enrolled. Hypertension was defined according to Joint national committee-VII definitions. Microalbuminuria was measured using an U-Albumin (NycoCard, Norway) and adjusted for urine creatinine. Descriptive statistics and testing of hypothesis were used for the analysis using SPSS 16 software. Results: 51.88% of hypertension cases and 13.2% of normotensive controls had microalbuminuria in total population (odds ratio 7.086, P-value <0.001). 46.67% of cases and 12.08% of controls had microalbuminuria in male population (odds ratio 6.375, P-value <0.001). Similarly, 58.7% of cases and 14.58% of controls had microalbuminuria in female population (odds ratio 8.32, P-value <0.001). Conclusions: By showing strong association between microalbuminuria and hypertension, our findings suggest that microalbuminuria could be a useful marker to assess risk management of cardiovascular disease and renal disease. PMID:22912940

  6. Correlation between Microalbuminuria and Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alia; Taj, Azeem; Amin, Muhammad Joher; Iqbal, Farrukh; Iqbal, Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is commonly found in patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD). Microalbuminuria is the first clinical sign of involvement of kidneys in patients with type 2 diabetes. Uncontrolled hypertension induces a higher risk of cardiovascular events, including death, increasing proteinuria and progression to kidney disease. Objectives: To determine the correlation between microalbuminuria and hypertension and their association with other risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: One hundred and thirteen type 2 diabetic patients attending the diabetic clinic of Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore, Pakistan were screened for microalbuminuria and raised blood pressure. The study was conducted from November 2012 to June 2013. Results: Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1, those with normoalbuminuria (n=63) and Group 2, those having microalbuminuria (n=50). Group 2 patients showed higher blood pressure values as compared to Group 1. The results were statistically significant and showed poor glycemic control as a contributing risk factor. Conclusion: The study concluded that there is high frequency of hypertension among type 2 diabetics but still much higher among those having microalbuminuria. So, early recognition of renal dysfunction through detection of microalbuminuria and to start treatment without any delay will confer future protection from end stage renal disease as well as hypertension and its complications in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:24948969

  7. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Neuropathy in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes without Retinopathy or Microalbuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes W. S.; Alam, Uazman; Fadavi, Hassan; Marshall, Andrew; Asghar, Omar; Efron, Nathan; Tavakoli, Mitra; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Corneal innervation is increasingly used as a surrogate marker of human diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) however its temporal relationship with the other microvascular complications of diabetes is not fully established. In this cross-sectional, observational study we aimed to assess whether neuropathy occurred in patients with type 1 diabetes, without retinopathy or microalbuminuria. Materials and Methods All participants underwent detailed assessment of peripheral neuropathy [neuropathy disability score (NDS), vibration perception threshold (VPT), peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity (PMNCV), sural sensory nerve conduction velocity (SSNCV) and in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (IVCCM)], retinopathy (digital fundus photography) and albuminuria status [albumin: creatinine ratio (ACR)]. Results 53 patients with Type 1 diabetes with (n=37) and without retinopathy (n=16) were compared to control subjects (n=27). SSNCV, corneal nerve fibre (CNFD) and branch (CNBD) density and length (CNFL) were reduced significantly (p<0.001) in diabetic patients without retinopathy compared to control subjects. Furthermore, CNFD, CNBD and CNFL were also significantly (p<0.001) reduced in diabetic patients without microalbuminuria (n=39), compared to control subjects. Greater neuropathic severity was associated with established retinopathy and microalbuminuria. Conclusions IVCCM detects early small fibre damage in the absence of retinopathy or microalbuminuria in patients with Type 1 diabetes. PMID:25853247

  8. Microalbuminuria and hypertension in pregnancy: role of aldosterone and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Ambrosini, Guido; Sabbadin, Chiara; Donà, Gabriella; Clari, Giulio; Bordin, Luciana

    2013-09-01

    Women with a history of hypertension in pregnancy are at increased risk of microalbuminuria later in life. Microalbuminuria is a marker of kidney dysfunction frequently related to an inflammatory event. Pregnancy is a dynamic process characterized by immune tolerance, angiogenesis, and hormonal regulation. Menstruation and pregnancy are associated with a physiological inflammation, which is altered in preeclampsia and probably in other hypertensive situations of pregnancy. An imbalance between pro-oxidant factors and the ability to scavenge these factors produces oxidative stress, which has been evaluated in many cells, but leukocytes are the main source of inflammatory cytokines and experimental and clinical evidence support a possible role of aldosterone as a mediator of placental and renal damage mediated by growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and cytokines. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and aldosterone receptor blockers are frequently effective in reducing the risk of progression of cardiovascular and renal disease. PMID:24034651

  9. Prognostic value of microalbuminuria during antihypertensive treatment in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Jose Maria; Rodilla, Enrique; Costa, Jose Antonio; Garcia-Escrich, Miguel; Gonzalez, Carmen; Redon, Josep

    2014-12-01

    Whether changes over time of urinary albumin excretion have prognostic value is a matter of discussion. The objective was to assess the prognostic value of changes in urinary albumin excretion over time in cardiovascular risk during antihypertensive treatment. Follow-up study of 2835 hypertensives in the absence of previous cardiovascular disease (mean age 55 years, 47% men, BP 138/80 mm Hg, 19.1% diabetics, and calibrated systemic coronary risk estimation 5 or >10.6%). Usual-care of antihypertensive treatment was implemented to maintain blood pressure<140/90 mm Hg. Urinary albumin excretion was assessed yearly, and the values were expressed as the creatinine ratio. Incidence of cardiovascular events, fatal and nonfatal, was recorded during the follow-up. During a median follow-up of 4.7 years (17 028 patients-year), 294 fatal and first nonfatal cardiovascular events were recorded (1.73 CVD per 100 patients/year). Independently of blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, level of cardiovascular risk, and antihypertensive treatment, microalbuminuria at baseline and at any time during the follow-up resulted in higher risk for events, hazard ratio (HR) 1.35 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.79) and HR 1.49 (95% CI, 1.14-1.94), respectively. Likewise, development of microalbuminuria (HR 1.60; 95% CI, 1.04-2.46) or persistence from the beginning (1.53; 95% CI, 1.13-2.06) had a significantly higher rate of events than if remained normoalbuminuric (HR 1) or regress to normoalbuminuria (HR 1.37; 95% CI, 0.92-2.06) with an 18%, 18%, 8%, and 11% events, respectively, P<0.001. The study supports the value of urinary albumin excretion assessment as a prognostic factor for cardiovascular risk, but also opens the way to consider it as an intermediate objective in hypertension.

  10. The importance of the relationship between microalbuminuria, subclinical proteinuria and arterial hypertension in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Serban, V; Dabelea, D

    1994-01-01

    Arterial hypertension represents, among others, an important risk factor for the development of microalbuminuria in diabetics. On the other hand, with microalbuminuria, it has been observed an important rise in the prevalence of high blood pressure. This study stresses the importance of the relationship between subclinical proteinuria and microalbuminuria, on one hand, and arterial hypertension on the other hand. There have been studied 343 diabetics hospitalized in our Clinic. We estimated the presence of hypertension (according to WHO criteria) and the values of subclinical proteinuria (biuret method) and microalbuminuria (MICRAL-test). We observed that 70.8% of hypertensives and 49.4% of normotensives presented values of proteinuria that ranked between 300 and 500 mg/24 h (p < 0.001). Meanwhile, 25.8% of proteinuric patients and 14.8% of non-proteinuric ones were hypertensives (p < 0.05). In hypertensive diabetics the prevalence of subclinical proteinuria is higher than in normotensive ones. The prevalence of hypertension is significantly higher in microalbuminuric patients than in normoalbuminuric ones.

  11. Cystatin C, CRP, log TG/HDLc and metabolic syndrome are associated with microalbuminuria in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Rafaela do Socorro Souza e Silva; Vasconcelos, Daniel França; Freitas, Eduardo; de Moura, Flavio José Dutra; Rosa, Tânia Torres; Veiga, Joel Paulo Russomano

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients with systemic hypertension, microalbuminuria is a marker of endothelial damage and is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Objective To determine the factors that may lead to the occurrence of microalbuminuria in hypertensive patients with serum creatinine lower than 1.5 mg/dL. Methods This cross-sectional study included 133 Brazilians with essential hypertension followed up at a hypertension outpatient clinic. Those with serum creatinine higher than 1.5 mg/dL, as well as those with diabetes mellitus, were excluded. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured, and body mass index (BMI) and GFR estimated by using the CKD-EPI formula were calculated. The serum levels of the following were assessed: CysC, creatinine, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP) and fasting glucose. Microalbuminuria was determined in 24-hour urine. Hypertensive patients were classified according to the presence of one or more criteria for metabolic syndrome. Results In a multiple regression analysis, the serum levels of CysC and CRP, the atherogenic index log TG/HDLc and the presence of three or more criteria for metabolic syndrome were positively correlated with microalbuminuria (r2: 0.277, p < 0.05). Conclusion CysC, CRP, log TG/HDLc, and the presence of three or more criteria for metabolic syndrome, regardless of serum creatinine, were associated with microalbuminuria, an early marker of kidney damage and cardiovascular risk in patients with essential hypertension. PMID:24162470

  12. Intravitreal bevacizumab in persistent retinopathy secondary to malignant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Abdelrahman Gaber

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) injection in persistent retinopathy secondary to malignant hypertension (MHT). Patients and methods Single IVB injection of 1.25 mg/0.05 ml in 12 cases with persistent retinopathy secondary to MHT more than one month after control of MHT with pre and post injection evaluation of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and anatomical outcome up to sixth month and postinjection complications were evaluated. Results Progressive reductions in retinal hemorrhages, exudates, cotton-wool spots, and macular star were documented by photography, angiography, and central macular thickness (CMT) measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Decreased macular edema was the most common finding. Improvement or stabilization of visual acuity was noted in all cases. Conclusions In addition to proper medical management of MHT, IVB injection is an effective and safe approach to treat persistent retinopathy associated with MHT. PMID:23964183

  13. Abdominal obesity is associated with microalbuminuria and an elevated cardiovascular risk profile in patients with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Thoenes, Martin; Reil, Jan-Christian; Khan, Bobby Varkey; Bramlage, Peter; Volpe, Massimo; Kirch, Wilhelm; Böhm, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity are frequently associated with preventable death and have emerged as a major challenge to public health. There is an ongoing debate on the role of abdominal obesity and its value in predicting cardiovascular and renal outcomes. The present analysis evaluates the prevalence of microalbuminuria (MAU) and conventional cardiovascular risk factors in relation to measures of general and abdominal obesity. Methods In this multinational, observational study, 20828 hypertensive out-patients from 26 countries including Europe, North and Latin America, Middle East, and Asia were analyzed. Urinary dipstick screening for MAU was performed as well as data on patient demographics, anthropometric measures, cardiovascular risk factors, comorbid conditions, and cardiovascular drug therapy collected. MAU prevalence was determined by a stepwise logistic regression analysis with cardiovascular risk factors as univariate. Results In the univariate analysis, MAU prevalence systematically increased with body mass index (BMI) from 54.4% (1st tertial) to 62.1% (3rd tertial) (p < 0.0001), an increase which was also observed for waist circumference (WC). At any level of BMI, MAU increased with WC from 53.5%, 54.8%, and 55.0% (1st tertial of WC in all three BMI tertials) to 61.4%, 62.1%, and 64.0% (3rd tertial of WC in all BMI tertials) (p < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, WC, but not BMI was independently associated with MAU. Furthermore, overweight/obesity were associated with the presence of modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors. Conclusion An abnormal WC, but not BMI appears to be independently associated with MAU, an early marker of cardiovascular and renal risk. Increasing WC confers an incremental risk for MAU at any level of BMI, underlining the prognostic importance of abdominal fat accumulation beyond general obesity. PMID:19649308

  14. Detection of hypertensive retinopathy using vessel measurements and textural features.

    PubMed

    Agurto, Carla; Joshi, Vinayak; Nemeth, Sheila; Soliz, Peter; Barriga, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Features that indicate hypertensive retinopathy have been well described in the medical literature. This paper presents a new system to automatically classify subjects with hypertensive retinopathy (HR) using digital color fundus images. Our method consists of the following steps: 1) normalization and enhancement of the image; 2) determination of regions of interest based on automatic location of the optic disc; 3) segmentation of the retinal vasculature and measurement of vessel width and tortuosity; 4) extraction of color features; 5) classification of vessel segments as arteries or veins; 6) calculation of artery-vein ratios using the six widest (major) vessels for each category; 7) calculation of mean red intensity and saturation values for all arteries; 8) calculation of amplitude-modulation frequency-modulation (AM-FM) features for entire image; and 9) classification of features into HR and non-HR using linear regression. This approach was tested on 74 digital color fundus photographs taken with TOPCON and CANON retinal cameras using leave-one out cross validation. An area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.84 was achieved with sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 67%, respectively. PMID:25571216

  15. Microalbuminuria and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Konen, J C; Shihabi, Z K

    1993-12-01

    Small concentrations of albumin detected in the urine predict renal dysfunction and reflect vascular abnormalities such as atherosclerosis, retinopathy and, probably, neuropathy. Although microalbuminuria is not specific for diabetic complications, it has been most extensively studied in diabetics. The rate of urinary albumin excretion can also be used to determine therapeutic response to pharmacologic and lifestyle interventions such as diet, smoking cessation and physical activity. The pathophysiology of microalbuminuria and its clinical significance in diabetes is presented, along with a discussion of measurement issues and implications for clinical management. An algorithm for the evaluation of diabetic patients is included. PMID:8249773

  16. Investigating kidney donation as a risk factor for hypertension and microalbuminuria: findings from the Swiss prospective follow-up of living kidney donors

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Gilbert T; Nolte, Christa; Tsinalis, Dimitrios; Steiger, Jürg; Bachmann, Lucas M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the role of nephrectomy as a risk factor for the development of hypertension and microalbuminuria. Design Prospective, long-term follow-up study. Setting Swiss Organ Living-Donor Health Registry. Participants All living kidney donors in Switzerland between 1993 and 2009. Interventions Data on health status and renal function before 1 year and biennially after donation were collected. Primary and secondary outcome measures Comparison of 1-year and 5-year occurrences of hypertension among normotensive donors with 1-year and 5-year estimates from the Framingham hypertension risk score. Multivariate random intercept models were used to investigate changes of albumin excretion after donation, correcting for repeated measurements and cofactors such as age, male gender and body mass index. Results A total of 1214 donors contributed 3918 data entries with a completed biennial follow-up rate of 74% during a 10-year period. Mean (SD) follow-up of donors was 31.6 months (34.4). Median age at donation was 50.5 years (IQR 42.2–58.8); 806 donors (66.4%) were women. Donation increased the risk of hypertension after 1 year by 3.64 (95% CI 3.52 to 3.76; p<0.001). Those participants remaining normotensive 1 year after donation return to a risk similar to that of the healthy Framingham population. Microalbuminuria before donation was dependent on donor age but not on the presence of hypertension. After nephrectomy, hypertension became the main driver for changes in albumin excretion (OR 1.19; 95% CI 0.13 to 2.25; p=0.03) and donor age had no effect. Conclusions Nephrectomy propagates hypertension and increases susceptibility for the development of hypertension-induced microalbuminuria. PMID:27006347

  17. Implications of microalbuminuria in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Walker, J D

    1991-01-01

    Microalbuminuria is defined as small elevations of urinary albumin excretion not detected by conventional tests. It is associated with elevated arterial pressure, proliferative retinopathy, lipoprotein abnormalities and left ventricular hypertrophy and is predictive of later diabetic nephropathy. Improved glycaemic control and antihypertensive treatment lower urinary albumin excretion but it is not known whether these manoeuvres affect long-term outcome. PMID:2009439

  18. Microalbuminuria in rheumatoid arthritis in the post penicillamine/gold era: association with hypertension, but not therapy or inflammation.

    PubMed

    Daoussis, Dimitrios; Panoulas, Vasileios F; John, Holly; Toms, Tracey E; Antonopoulos, Ioannis; Treharne, Gareth; Nightingale, Peter; Douglas, Karen M J; Kitas, George D

    2011-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) associates with excess cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. New screening tools are needed to better identify patients at increased CV risk. Microalbuminuria (MA) has been shown to associate with inflammation and future cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the present study, we assessed the prevalence of MA in a secondary care cohort of RA patients, aimed to identify factors associated with its presence and addressed its relationship to CVD and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). A total of 342 RA patients were studied. MA was defined as an albumin-creatinine ratio ≥22 (males) or ≥31 (females) milligrams per gram creatinine. The independence of the associations of MA was evaluated using binary logistic regression analysis. Prevalence of MA was 11.9%. Subjects with MA had increased prevalence of hypertension (HT), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In binary logistic regression, only HT (OR = 5.22, 95%CI: 1.51-18.07, p = 0.009) was significantly associated with MA. There was no association between prevalent CVD and MA, but patients with MA had twofold increased odds of having the MetS. MA is relatively common in RA patients and is independently associated with the presence of HT. Given the association of MA with MetS, future prospective studies are needed to establish the use of MA as a screening tool for RA patients at increased CVD risk. PMID:20396921

  19. Association between Body Mass Index, Waist Circumference and Prevalence of Microalbuminuria in Korean Adults of Age 30 Years and Older without Diabetes, Hypertension, Renal Failure, or Overt Proteinuria: The 2013 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Woo-Jeong; Lee, Gong-Myung; Hwang, Ji-Hye; Lee, Mi-Na

    2016-01-01

    Background Microalbuminuria and obesity markers are known risk factors for cardiovascular or renal disease. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of microalbuminuria according to body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity criteria. Methods The study subjects included 3,979 individuals aged 30 years or older who did not have diabetes, hypertension, renal failure, or overt proteinuria, from among those who participated in The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2013, a cross-sectional, nationally representative, stratified survey. Microalbuminuria was defined as a urinary albumin to creatinine ratio of 30 to 300 mg/g. BMI and waist circumference were classified according to the Asia-Pacific criteria. Results The prevalence of microalbuminuria was found to be 5.1%. In the normoalbuminuria group, 3.4%, 41.7%, 24%, 27.6%, and 3.2% of participants were included in the underweight, normal, overweight, obesity 1, and obesity 2 groups, respectively. These percentages in the microalbuminuria group were 7.1%, 34.5%, 19.2%, 28.6%, and 10.6%, respectively (P<0.001). The waist circumference in men was 21.4% in the normoalbuminuria group and 36.5% in the microalbuminuria group (P=0.004). Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between the presence of microalbuminuria and BMI or waist circumference groups. The risk of microalbuminuria was significant only in the underweight group (odds ratio, 13.22; 95% confidence interval, 2.55–68.63; P=0.002) after adjusting for confounding factors, abdominal obesity was not significantly associated with microalbuminuria. Conclusion The prevalence of microalbuminuria in a general population in Korea was associated with underweight in men and was not associated with waist circumference in either men or women. PMID:26885324

  20. Malignant Hypertensive Retinopathy in an Infant with Mid-Aortic Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Winlaw, David S.; Donaldson, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Case report describing an eight-month-old infant presenting with intermittent esotropia and irritability who was found to have malignant (grade 4) hypertensive retinopathy and mid-aortic syndrome. Methods. Visual acuity was 6/140 in the right eye and not recordable in the left eye. Blood pressure was as high as 230/120 mmHg. Fundoscopy revealed bilateral optic disc swelling, macular stars, and serous retinal detachment in the left eye, findings that are consistent with malignant (grade 4) hypertensive retinopathy. CT abdominal angiogram revealed a severe mid-aortic syndrome with occlusion of the abdominal aorta at T12. Results. The patient was treated with medical management of his hypertension, improving the subretinal exudate. Binocular visual acuity improved to 6/9.5 over 9 months. There was a persistent left relative afferent pupillary defect and moderate left esotropia. Conclusion. This is the first reported case of malignant hypertensive retinopathy in an infant with concomitant mid-aortic occlusion. The authors emphasize the need for an ophthalmological and pediatric examination in a child presenting with intermittent squint and irritability. The esotropia was found to be a false localizing sign of raised intracranial pressure secondary to the severe mid-aortic syndrome. PMID:27795862

  1. A pilot study for evaluation of the efficacy and safety of telmisartan in reducing microalbuminuria in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, R B; Kulkarni, B N; Hariharan, R S; Naikwadi, Akram; Gawde, Ashish; Baliga, Vidyagauri; Desai, Anish

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate efficacy and tolerability of telmisartan, an angiotensim II receptor blocker, in reducing microalbuminuria in adult Indian hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prospective, open-label, non-comparative, assessor-blind, multicentric, pilot study was conducted in 60 eligible hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and microalbuminuria after obtaining their informed consent. The study was approved by the respective institutional review boards. Each patient received telmisartan 40 mg initially once daily for first 4 weeks which was titrated upwards to 80 mg once daily for the next 8 weeks. Blood pressure was assessed at the end of every 2 weeks and urinary albumin excretion and creatinine clearance were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of therapy. Safety outcome measures included monitoring of physical examination, laboratory parameters and monitoring treatment-emergent adverse events. Fifty-five patients completed the study while 5 cases were lost to follow-up. The mean age of the patients was 48.27 years. Of the total patients 63.6% were males and 46.4% were females. At baseline the mean urinary albumin excretion rate was 131.81 +/- 38.82 mg/minute. A statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction (32.96%) in urinary albumin excretion rate occurred after 12 weeks of therapy (118.36 +/- 37.22). The mean pre-study systolic blood pressure was 165.05 +/- 15.24 mmHg which was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced to 123.72 +/- 5.88 mmHg at the end of 12 weeks. At baseline the mean diastolic blood pressure was 103.55 +/- 9.84 mmHg which was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced to 84.71 +/- 8.54 mmHg. The JNC-VII goal of blood pressure below 130/80 was achieved in 34 (61.8%)of the 55 patients at the end of 12 weeks. Both fasting and postprandial blood sugar levels were well-controlled at the end of the study. Telmisartan was well tolerated with only 9.09% of the patients reported mild and transient adverse events like fatigue

  2. TNF-α and Microalbuminuria in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lampropoulou, I.-Th.; Stangou, M.; Papagianni, A.; Didangelos, T.; Iliadis, F.; Efstratiadis, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Recent evidence suggests that chronic subclinical inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Aim of the present study was to investigate possible correlation between the presence and degree of microalbuminuria and markers of inflammation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients-Methods. Eighty patients were enrolled and clinical and laboratory data were recorded. Albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was calculated in first-morning urine samples. Serum and urinary tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were determined by ELISA. Results. Forty-five patients had normoalbuminuria, 33 microalbuminuria, and 2 macroalbuminuria. Patients with microalbuminuria were older, with higher glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c) and they more frequently had diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease and were on treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and/or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). ACR was significantly correlated with the presence of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and HbA1c levels and the administration of clopidogrel and ACEi or ARBs. ACR was not correlated with C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, or serum TNF-α levels but had a strong correlation with urinary TNF-α levels. Conclusions. In patients with type 2 DM, urinary, but not serum, TNF-α levels are associated with the presence and severity of microalbuminuria. PMID:25587544

  3. Long term reduction of microalbuminuria after 1 year of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition by perindopril in hypertensive insulin-treated diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Brichard, S M; Santoni, J P; Thomas, J R; van de Voorde, K; Ketelslegers, J M; Lambert, A E

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of perindopril, an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor administered during 12 months, on creatinine clearance, albuminuria and glycaemic control in diabetic subjects with mild to moderate hypertension. After 1 month placebo, 40 insulin-treated patients were divided into 3 groups based upon their urinary albumin excretion rate (AER). Group I had a normoalbuminuria (AER less than 15 mg/24 h), group II had a microalbuminuria (AER : 15-150 mg/24 h) and group III had a macroproteinuria (AER greater than 150 mg/24 h and Albustix (+)). They were given perindopril, 4 to 8 mg orally once daily, and received a stable diet. Diastolic blood pressure was normalized within the first 3 months in 80% of the patients. From these, 28 (14.7 and 7 from groups I, II and III respectively) were followed during a total active treatment period of 12 months. They were matched for age, duration of diabetes and hypertension, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, daily insulin dose, postprandial plasma C-peptide and quality of glycaemic control. Mean supine diastolic blood pressure was decreased by 15 and 18% at 1 and 12 months respectively. Heart rate was not significantly modified. At 3 months, plasma ACE activity was nearly totally inhibited while plasma renin activity was markedly increased. In patients of group II, microalbuminuria was reduced from 66 +/- 13 (mean +/- SEM after placebo) to 39 +/- 6 mg/24 h after 1 month perindopril and this effect was maintained at 12 months. In group I, albuminuria remained within the normal range. In group III, macroproteinuria was not consistently modified by perindopril.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Association of Gestational Hypertensive Disorders with Retinopathy of prematurity: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Priscilla Y. L.; Tang, Shu-Min; Au, Sunny C. L.; Rong, Shi-Song; Lau, Henry H. W.; Ko, Simon T. C.; Ng, Danny S. C.; Chen, Li Jia; Yam, Jason C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The role of gestational hypertensive disorders, which includes both pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension, in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has been controversial. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the association between gestational hypertensive disoders and ROP. Eligible studies published up to June 5, 2016 were identified from MEDLINE and EMBASE that evaluated the association between the two conditions. Totally 1142 published records were retrieved for screening, 925 of them eligible for detailed evaluation. Finally 19 studies involving 45281 infants with 5388 cases of ROP met our criteria for meta-analysis. Gestational hypertensive disorders were not associated with ROP (unadjusted OR: 0.89; P = 0.38; adjusted OR: 1.35; P = 0.18). Subgroup analyses also revealed no significant association between ROP with pre-eclampsia (unadjusted OR: 0.85; P = 0.29; adjusted OR:1.29; P = 0.28) or with gestational hypertension (unadjusted OR: 1.10; P = 0.39; adjusted OR: 1.25; P = 0.60) separately. Sensitivity analysis indicated our results were robust. We concluded no significant association between gestational hypertensive disorders and ROP. More large scale well-conducted prospective cohorts on the topic are needed. PMID:27491726

  5. Hypertensive retinopathy in a transgenic angiotensin-based model.

    PubMed

    Reichhart, Nadine; Haase, Nadine; Crespo-Garcia, Sergio; Skosyrski, Sergej; Herrspiegel, Christina; Kociok, Norbert; Fuchshofer, Rudolf; Dillinger, Andrea; Poglitsch, Marco; Müller, Dominik N; Joussen, Antonia M; Luft, Friedrich C; Dechend, Ralf; Strauß, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    Severe hypertension destroys eyesight. The RAS (renin-angiotensin system) may contribute to this. This study relied on an established angiotensin, AngII (angiotensin II)-elevated dTGR (double-transgenic rat) model and same-background SD (Sprague-Dawley) rat controls. In dTGRs, plasma levels of AngII were increased. We determined the general retinal phenotype and observed degeneration of ganglion cells that we defined as vascular degeneration. We also inspected relevant gene expression and lastly observed alterations in the outer blood-retinal barrier. We found that both scotopic a-wave and b-wave as well as oscillatory potential amplitude were significantly decreased in dTGRs, compared with SD rat controls. However, the b/a-wave ratio remained unchanged. Fluorescence angiography of the peripheral retina indicated that exudates, or fluorescein leakage, from peripheral vessels were increased in dTGRs compared with controls. Immunohistological analysis of blood vessels in retina whole-mount preparations showed structural alterations in the retina of dTGRs. We then determined the general retinal phenotype. We observed the degeneration of ganglion cells, defined vascular degenerations and finally found differential expression of RAS-related genes and angiogenic genes. We found the expression of both human angiotensinogen and human renin in the hypertensive retina. Although the renin gene expression was not altered, the AngII levels in the retina were increased 4-fold in the dTGR retina compared with that in SD rats, a finding with mechanistic implications. We suggest that alterations in the outer blood-retinal barrier could foster an area of visual-related research based on our findings. Finally, we introduce the dTGR model of retinal disease. PMID:27026533

  6. Novel Method for Automated Analysis of Retinal Images: Results in Subjects with Hypertensive Retinopathy and CADASIL

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Michele; Stamile, Claudio; Umeton, Renato; Calimeri, Francesco; Orzi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Morphological analysis of the retinal vessels by fundoscopy provides noninvasive means for detecting and staging systemic microvascular damage. However, full exploitation of fundoscopy in clinical settings is limited by paucity of quantitative, objective information obtainable through the observer-driven evaluations currently employed in routine practice. Here, we report on the development of a semiautomated, computer-based method to assess retinal vessel morphology. The method allows simultaneous and operator-independent quantitative assessment of arteriole-to-venule ratio, tortuosity index, and mean fractal dimension. The method was implemented in two conditions known for being associated with retinal vessel changes: hypertensive retinopathy and Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). The results showed that our approach is effective in detecting and quantifying the retinal vessel abnormalities. Arteriole-to-venule ratio, tortuosity index, and mean fractal dimension were altered in the subjects with hypertensive retinopathy or CADASIL with respect to age- and gender-matched controls. The interrater reliability was excellent for all the three indices (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 85%). The method represents simple and highly reproducible means for discriminating pathological conditions characterized by morphological changes of retinal vessels. The advantages of our method include simultaneous and operator-independent assessment of different parameters and improved reliability of the measurements. PMID:26167496

  7. Hypertensive Retinopathy as the First Manifestation of Advanced Renal Disease in a Young Patient: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Arriozola-Rodríguez, Karen Janeth; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Hernández, Virginia Alejandra; Rodríguez-Loaiza, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report the case of a 23-year-old patient suffering from bilateral acute visual loss who received the diagnosis of hypertensive retinopathy. After systemic evaluation, he was diagnosed with bilateral renal disease and chronic renal failure, requiring a kidney transplantation to manage the systemic illness, followed by gradual improvement of his visual acuity. PMID:26955342

  8. Malignant hypertensive retinopathy as a presenting sign of an occult dead fetus

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Joana; Tavares-Ferreira, João; Penas, Susana; Figueira, Luís; Paiva, Flávio Prézia; Falcão-Reis, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We report one case of malignant hypertensive retinopathy as a presenting sign of fetal death in utero. Ophthalmic examination (including intravenous fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography) and obstetric and systemic evaluation were performed, providing a multidisciplinary approach. A 33-year-old overweight woman (body mass index 47 kg/m2) with no systemic or ocular known disease was admitted to our emergency department with a one-week history of bilateral vision loss and no systemic complaints. On examination, best corrected visual acuity was 1/10 in the right eye and 1/10 in the left eye. Anterior segment examination of both eyes was unremarkable. Ophthalmoscopic fundus findings included bilateral optic disc edema, diffuse cotton wool spots, intraretinal exudates, retinal hemorrhages, and multiple serous retinal detachments involving both maculae. Physical examination revealed a blood pressure of 220/110 mmHg. Further systemic workup revealed a previously unknown 35-week pregnancy with a dead fetus. An emergency cesarean section was performed. Pre-eclampsia is a life-threatening disorder for both mother and fetus. This case highlights the need to rule out pre-eclampsia in all women of childbearing age presenting with ocular signs of malignant hypertension, even without external signs of pregnancy. PMID:26082609

  9. Systemic hypertension and hypertensive retinopathy following PPA overdose in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Jennifer A; Bentley, Ellison; Stepien, Rebecca L

    2013-01-01

    A 4 yr old spayed female Labrador retriever was examined 4 hr after ingesting an overdose of phenylpropanolamine (PPA). Clinical signs included anxiety, piloerection, mucosal ulceration, cardiac arrhythmia, mydriasis, and hyphema. Clinicopathologic abnormalities included elevated creatine kinase (CK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), proteinuria, and pigmenturia. Ventricular tachycardia and severe systemic hypertension were documented. Hyphema and retinal detachment were documented oculus uterque (OU). Phenoxybenzamine, sotalol, and esmolol resolved the ventricular tachycardia, and blood pressure was controlled with nitroprusside. All clinicopathologic and cardiac abnormalities resolved within 7 days, and ocular changes resolved within 1 mo. Monitoring of blood pressure and rapid pharmacologic intervention were successful in controlling hypertension secondary to PPA overdose and minimizing retinal damage.

  10. Microalbuminuria: prognostic and therapeutic implications in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, R E; Cooper, M E; McNally, P G; O'Brien, R C; Taft, J; Jerums, G

    1994-01-01

    Thirty years following the development of the first radioimmunoassay for albumin, microalbuminuria is widely acknowledged as an important predictor of overt nephropathy in patients with Type 1 diabetes and of cardiovascular mortality in Type 2 diabetes. In addition, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that diabetic patients with microalbuminuria may have more advanced retinopathy, higher blood pressure, and worse dyslipidaemia than patients with normal albumin excretion rates. Recent studies have focused on the role of intervention, principally with antihypertensive therapy and intensive glycaemic control, in reducing microalbuminuria. While successful in reducing urinary albumin excretion it remains to be established whether such therapies will be translated into a reduction in renal failure and decreased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:7955987

  11. Four-Year Incidence of Diabetic Retinopathy in a Spanish Cohort: The MADIABETES Study

    PubMed Central

    Salinero-Fort, Miguel Á.; San Andrés-Rebollo, Francisco Javier; de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen; Arrieta-Blanco, Francisco Jesús; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, to identify the risk factors associated with the incidence of retinopathy and to develop a risk table to predict four-year retinopathy risk stratification for clinical use, from a four-year cohort study. Design The MADIABETES Study is a prospective cohort study of 3,443 outpatients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, sampled from 56 primary health care centers (131 general practitioners) in Madrid (Spain). Results The cumulative incidence of retinopathy at four-year follow-up was 8.07% (95% CI = 7.04–9.22) and the incidence density was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.75–2.33) cases per 1000 patient-months or 2.43 (95% CI = 2.10–2.80) cases per 100 patient-years. The highest adjusted hazard ratios of associated risk factors for incidence of diabetic retinopathy were LDL-C >190 mg/dl (HR = 7.91; 95% CI = 3.39–18.47), duration of diabetes longer than 22 years (HR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.18–3.39), HbA1c>8% (HR = 1.90; 95% CI = 1.30–2.77), and aspirin use (HR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.22–2.24). Microalbuminuria (HR = 1.17; 95% CI = 0.75–1.82) and being female (HR = 1.12; 95% CI = 0.84–1.49) showed a non-significant increase of diabetic retinopathy. The greatest risk is observed in females who had diabetes for more than 22 years, with microalbuminuria, HbA1c>8%, hypertension, LDL-Cholesterol >190 mg/dl and aspirin use. Conclusions After a four-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of retinopathy was relatively low in comparison with other studies. Higher baseline HbA1c, aspirin use, higher LDL-Cholesterol levels, and longer duration of diabetes were the only statistically significant risk factors found for diabetic retinopathy incidence. This is the first study to demonstrate an association between aspirin use and diabetic retinopathy risk in a well-defined cohort of patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at low risk of

  12. Fenofibrate and Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Knickelbein, Jared E; Abbott, Akshar B; Chew, Emily Y

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common and sight-threatening microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is a leading cause of blindness among working-aged adults. Medical therapies including intensive control of hyperglycemia and hypertension have been shown to reduce the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. The association of dyslipidemia and treatment with statins with diabetic retinopathy is inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. However, two recent randomized clinical trials have demonstrated beneficial effects of systemic fenofibrate therapy in reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy independently of serum lipid levels. These findings suggest that fenofibrate may be an effective strategy for reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy, thus reducing the large and growing public health burden of treating the sight-threatening complications of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27525681

  13. Diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Lozano, M; Salinas, P

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the importance of diabetic retinopathy in the loss of visual function. We exposed the most important risk factors, such as diabetes duration, poor metabolic control, pregnancy, puberty, hypertension, poor control of blood lipids, renal disease, and sleep apnea syndrome. We describe the pathogenesis of the disease, small retinal vessel microangiopathies which produce extravasation, edema and ischemia phenomena. We put special emphasis on the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its pathogenic importance. They are also described the main clinical symptoms as microaneurysms, intraretinal hemorrhages, hard and soft exudates, intraretinal microvascular abnormalities (IRMA), venous disorders, formation of new vessels and diabetic macular edema (the latter being the most common cause of vision loss). Finally we describe the latest diagnostic techniques and eye treatment, with special emphasis on obesity surgery importance as more important preventive factor to eliminate the predisposing and precipitating disease symptoms.

  14. [Treatment of hypertension in diabetes: threshold of intervention and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Plouin, P F; Lebrun, P; Azizi, M; Day, M

    1992-01-01

    Early screening for hypertension in diabetic patients and for glycoregulation abnormalities in hypertensives is justified by the additive cardiovascular risks when hypertension and diabetes co-exist and by the accelerated development of diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy if hypertension co-exists. In insulin-dependent diabetes, hypertension is generally preceded by microalbuminuria, known to be reduced by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The requirement for nephropathy prevention and the hemodynamic and/or tissular effects of this therapeutic class could justify their use at a blood pressure level less than that conventionally considered hypertensive. This strategy must be confirmed by prospective trials, already underway, evaluating the nephroprotective efficacy of this therapy. In non-insulin-dependent diabetes, hypertension is often present before the diabetes is diagnosed and antihypertensive therapy, especially thiazide diuretics, could play a demasking or favorizing role. The optimal blood pressure level to which these patients at high renal and coronary risk should be lowered still has to be determined. A prospective study, comparing the effects of strict (treated diastolic blood pressure less than 80 mmHg) and less strict (treated diastolic blood pressure between 90 and 100 mmHg) hypertensive control on coronary event prevention in essential hypertension, is in progress and will have important implications for hypertension treatment in diabetics. Appropriate treatment of other risk factors, such as hyperlipidaemia and smoking, contributes to coronary and renal prevention in all diabetic hypertensives. PMID:1639206

  15. Risk factors for development of microalbuminuria in insulin dependent diabetic patients: a cohort study. Microalbuminuria Collaborative Study Group, United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the risk factors for the development of persistent microalbuminuria in insulin dependent diabetic patients. DESIGN--Four year follow up of a cohort of diabetic patients. SETTING--Outpatient departments of teaching and district general hospitals in England. SUBJECTS--148 non-microalbuminuric, non-hypertensive insulin dependent diabetic patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Urinary albumin excretion rate and arterial blood pressure. RESULTS--137 patients completed four year follow up, of whom 11 developed persistent microalbumin-uria (albumin excretion rate > or = 30 micrograms/min on at least two consecutive occasions), giving a cumulative frequency of 8%. 103 remained normoalbuminuric and 23 exhibited intermittent microalbuminuria. At baseline the persistent microalbuminuric group had had significantly raised blood pressure (mean 137.9 (SD 14.9)/82.3 (7.6) v 123.5 (13.2)/72.8 (9.1) mm Hg), glycated haemoglobin concentration 10.4% (2.0%) v 8-9% (2.0%), and albumin excretion rate (median (interquartile range) 17.5 (13.0-22.3) v 4.8 (3.7-6.7) micrograms/min) (p < 0.05 for all) compared with the normo-albuminuric group. Blood pressure and glycated haemoglobin remained significantly higher in the persistent microalbuminuric group throughout the study (p < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed initial albumin excretion rate, blood pressure, and smoking to be significant determinants of persistent microalbuminuria (p < 0.02). CONCLUSION--In insulin dependent diabetic patients with poor glucose control, which may initially increase albumin excretion rate, an early rise of arterial pressure and smoking are implicated in the development of persistent microalbuminuria. Images p1237-a PMID:8499853

  16. Diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael; Sharma, Sanjay; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved. Complex interrelated pathophysiological mechanisms triggered by hyperglycaemia underlie the development of DR. These mechanisms include genetic and epigenetic factors, increased production of free radicals, advanced glycosylation end products, inflammatory factors and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser photocoagulation prevents severe vision loss in eyes with proliferative DR. These measures, together with increasing public awareness and access to regular screening for DR with retinal photography, and the development of new treatments to address early disease stages, will lead to better outcomes and prevent blindness for patients with DR. PMID:27159554

  17. A Cost-Benefit and Accurate Method for Assessing Microalbuminuria: Single versus Frequent Urine Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati, Roholla; Gharipour, Mojgan; Khosravi, Alireza; Jozan, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to answer the question whether a single testing for microalbuminuria results in a reliable conclusion leading costs saving. Methods. This current cross-sectional study included a total of 126 consecutive persons. Microalbuminuria was assessed by collection of two fasting random urine specimens on arrival to the clinic as well as one week later in the morning. Results. In overall, 17 out of 126 participants suffered from microalbuminuria that, among them, 12 subjects were also diagnosed as microalbuminuria once assessing this factor with a sensitivity of 70.6%, a specificity of 100%, a PPV of 100%, a NPV of 95.6%, and an accuracy of 96.0%. The measured sensitivity, specificity, PVV, NPV, and accuracy in hypertensive patients were 73.3%, 100%, 100%, 94.8%, and 95.5%, respectively. Also, these rates in nonhypertensive groups were 50.0%, 100%, 100%, 97.3%, and 97.4%, respectively. According to the ROC curve analysis, a single measurement of UACR had a high value for discriminating defected from normal renal function state (c = 0.989). Urinary albumin concentration in a single measurement had also high discriminative value for diagnosis of damaged kidney (c = 0.995). Conclusion. The single testing of both UACR and urine albumin level rather frequent testing leads to high diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy as well as high predictive values in total population and also in hypertensive subgroups. PMID:24455207

  18. Renal implications of arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ruilope, L M

    1997-03-01

    Renal vascular damage caused by arterial hypertension participates in alterations of the systemic vascular function and structure. Nephrosclerosis seems to run in parallel with the systemic atherosclerosis that accounts for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in hypertensive patients. Parameters indicating the existence of an alteration in renal function (increased serum creatinine, proteinuria and microalbuminuria) are independent predictors for an increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Hence, parameters of renal function must be considered in any stratification of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients.

  19. Lifestyle-Related Factors, Obesity, and Incident Microalbuminuria: The CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alex; Van Horn, Linda; Jacobs, David R.; Liu, Kiang; Muntner, Paul; Newsome, Britt; Shoham, David; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Reis, Jared; Kramer, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Background Modifiable lifestyle-related factors are associated with risk of coronary heart disease and may also influence kidney disease risk. Study Design Community-based prospective cohort study. Setting & Participants 2354 African-American and white participants ages 28–40 years, without baseline microalbuminuria or estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min/1.73 m2 recruited from four U.S. centers: Birmingham AL, Chicago IL, Minneapolis MN, and Oakland CA. Factors Current smoking, physical activity, fast food habits, obesity, and diet quality, which was based on 8 fundamental components of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, including increased intake of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, whole grains, nuts and legumes, and reduced intake of sodium, sugar sweetened beverages, and red and processed meats. Outcomes & Measurements Spot urine albumin-creatinine ratios (ACRs) were obtained at baseline (1995–96) and 3 5-year follow-up examinations (5, 10, and 15 years follow-up). Incident microalbuminuria was defined as presence of race and sex-adjusted ACR ≥25 mg/g at 2 or more of the successive follow-up examinations. Results Over the 15-year follow-up period, 77 individuals (3.3%) developed incident microalbuminuria. After multivariable adjustment, poor diet quality (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1–3.4) and obesity (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1–3.3) were significantly associated with microalbuminuria; current smoking (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.9–2.8) was associated with microalbuminuria although the CI crossed 1.0. Neither low physical activity (OR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5–1.8) nor fast food consumption (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.7–2.3) were associated with microalbuminuria. Compared to individuals with no unhealthy lifestyle-related factors (poor diet quality, current smoking and obesity), adjusted odds of incident microalbuminuria were 131%, 273%, and 634% higher for presence of 1 (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.3–4.3), 2 (OR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.8–7.7), and 3 (OR

  20. Free Triiodothyronine Concentrations Are Inversely Associated with Microalbuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yulin; Ye, Lei; Wang, Tiange; Hong, Jie; Bi, Yufang; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Baihui; Huang, Xiaolin; Xu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid function and microalbuminuria are both associated with vascular disease and endothelial damage. However, whether thyroid function is associated with microalbuminuria is not well established. The objective was to explore the relationship between thyroid hormones and microalbuminuria in Chinese population. A community-based cross-sectional study was performed among 3,346 Chinese adults (aged ≥ 40 years). Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) were determined by chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. A single-void first morning urine sample was obtained for urinary albumin-creatinine ratio measurement. The prevalence of microalbuminuria decreased according to FT3 quartiles (13.2, 9.5, 8.6, and 8.2%, P for trend = 0.0005). A fully adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that high FT3 levels were associated with low prevalent microalbuminuria. The adjusted odds ratios for microalbuminuria were 0.61 (95% CI, 0.43–0.87, P = 0.007) when comparing the highest with the lowest quartile of FT3. The exclusion of participants with abnormal FT3 did not appreciably change the results (OR = 0.69, 95% CI, 0.49–0.98, P = 0.02). We concluded that serum FT3 levels, even within the normal range, were inversely associated with microalbuminuria in middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults. FT3 concentrations might play a role in the pathogenesis of microalbuminuria. PMID:25484900

  1. Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    LePine, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is responsible for roughly one-in-six adult deaths annually in the United States and is associated with five of the top nine causes of death.1 Ten trillion dollars is the estimated annual cost worldwide of the direct and indirect effects of hypertension.2,3 In the U.S. alone, costs estimated at almost $74 billion in 2009 placed a huge economic burden on the health care system.4 The prevalence of hypertension increases with advancing age to the point where more than half of people 60 to 69 years of age and at least three-fourths of those 70 years of age and older are affected.5 Most individuals with hypertension do not have it adequately controlled.1,6 Medication noncompliance due to avoidance of side effects is suggested to be a primary factor.6 The epidemic incidence of hypertension and its significant cost to society indicate that a well-tolerated, cost-effective approach to treatment is urgently needed. PMID:24278815

  2. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Lepine, Todd

    2012-05-01

    Hypertension is responsible for roughly one-in-six adult deaths annually in the United States and is associated with five of the top nine causes of death.(1) Ten trillion dollars is the estimated annual cost worldwide of the direct and indirect effects of hypertension.(2,3) In the U.S. alone, costs estimated at almost $74 billion in 2009 placed a huge economic burden on the health care system.(4) The prevalence of hypertension increases with advancing age to the point where more than half of people 60 to 69 years of age and at least three-fourths of those 70 years of age and older are affected.(5) Most individuals with hypertension do not have it adequately controlled.(1,6) Medication noncompliance due to avoidance of side effects is suggested to be a primary factor.(6) The epidemic incidence of hypertension and its significant cost to society indicate that a well-tolerated, cost-effective approach to treatment is urgently needed.

  3. [Solar retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Kawa, P; Mańkowska, A; Mackiewicz, J; Zagórski, Z

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the present clinical evaluation of 21 patients (number of affected eyes--33), who watched eclipse of the sun on 12 October 1996. All patients had general ophthalmic examination with emphasis on visual acuity, visual field, Amsler test, fluorescein angiography and fundus appearance. Eleven out of 21 patients had at least one follow up examination (number of affected eyes--17). None of the patient received any treatment. All patients revealed tiny, central scotomata--positive Amsler test and decreased visual acuity on the first visit; reading Snellen chart could be improved in all patients by adequate head tilt or eye movement (improvement up to 3 Snellen chart lines). No signs of retinopathy were observed in two eyes with uncorrected refractive error and one amblyopic eye. After 7-8 weeks the visual acuity was decreased to 5/30 in two eyes and to 5/10 in ten eyes. In all those eyes persisted a tiny, central scotoma. Looking at the eclipse of the sun in spite of using primitive eye protection may cause irreversible retinal damage. Return of visual acuity to 5/5 does not always imply complete recovery because of persistent central scotoma.

  4. The Randomized Olmesartan and Diabetes Microalbuminuria Prevention (ROADMAP) Observational Follow‐Up Study: Benefits of RAS Blockade With Olmesartan Treatment Are Sustained After Study Discontinuation

    PubMed Central

    Menne, Jan; Ritz, Eberhard; Ruilope, Luis M.; Chatzikyrkou, Christos; Viberti, Giancarlo; Haller, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Background The Randomized Olmesartan and Diabetes Microalbuminuria Prevention (ROADMAP) study showed that 40 mg Olmesartan medoxomil (OM) versus placebo delayed microalbuminuria onset in patients with type 2 diabetes and normoalbuminuria. Methods and Results One thousand seven hundred and fifty‐eight ROADMAP patients (placebo arm: 877; OM arm: 881) participated in the observational follow up (OFU) with an average of 3.3 years. They received standard medical care and micro‐ and macrovascular events were documented. During observational follow‐up 62.9% and 60.1% in the former OM and placebo group, respectively, received treatment with a RAS blocking agent. During the OFU period the systolic blood pressure (SBP) increased to mean values of 135 mm Hg in both groups. Patients who had developed microalbuminuria during ROADMAP had a higher incidence of cardio‐ and cerebrovascular events (OR 1.77, CI 1.03 to 3.03, P=0.039) during the OFU period compared with patients in whom this was not the case. Diabetic retinopathy was significantly reduced in the former OM group (8 [0.9%] versus 23 [2.6%], OR: 0.34, CI 0.15 to 0.78, P=0.011) and the rate of microalbuminuria was numerically reduced. Congestive heart failure requiring hospitalization (3 [0.3%] versus 12 [1.4%], OR: 0.23, CI 0.06 to 0.85, P=0.027) was reduced and there was a trend of reduced cardio‐/cerebrovascular events (OM versus Pb: 73 [8.3%] versus 86 [9.8%] patients). Seven (0.8%) deaths (including 2 CV events) were reported in former placebo patients versus 3 (0.3%) (non‐CV events) in former OM patients. Conclusions Development of microalbuminuria is a valid marker for future CV events. RAS blockade with Olmesartan might cause sustained reduction (legacy effect) of micro‐ and macrovascular events. PMID:24772521

  5. Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Mar. 03, 2014 How does non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy affect your vision? Nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, also known as background retinopathy, ...

  6. Teleophthalmology in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been rapid strides in progress in the fields of telecommunication and medical imaging. There is growing evidence regarding use of teleophthalmology for screening of diabetic retinopathy. This article highlights some pertinent questions regarding use of telescreening for diabetic retinopathy. It deals with evidence regarding accuracy of diagnosis, patients satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. The American Telemedicine Association have given certain guidelines for teleheath practices for diabetic retinopathy. The article discusses regarding these guidelines. Finally, a working model for diabetic retinopathy screening through teleophthalmology has been described. Telescreening for diabetic retinopathy seems to be a cost-effective, accurate, and reliable method for screening for diabetic retinopathy. The American Telemedicine Association has set up guidelines for telescreening that should be adhered to provide quality screening services to people with diabetes. PMID:24876576

  7. 'Progressive diabetic nephropathy. How useful is microalbuminuria?: contra'.

    PubMed

    MacIsaac, Richard J; Ekinci, Elif I; Jerums, G

    2014-07-01

    The concept of microalbuminuria has been central to the development of clinical practice and research in the area of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). However, in recent times, the value of a paradigm of DKD based solely on microalbuminuria has been questioned. Although both the absolute level and rate of change of microalbuminuria are linked to the development and progression of DKD, microalbuminuria on its own lacks the necessary sensitivity or specificity to accurately predict kidney outcomes for people with diabetes. The development of microalbumiuria can no longer be viewed as a committed and irreversible stage of DKD, as spontaneous remission is now reported as a common occurrence. In addition, the absence of microalbuminuria or its progression to proteinuria does not signify that an individual patient is safe from a progressive decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Furthermore, although reductions in albuminuria within the microalbuminuric range can be linked to a slower GFR decline in observational studies, this relationship has not been robustly demonstrated in intervention studies. Conclusions regarding the kidney health of individuals with diabetes will continue to be flawed if an inappropriate emphasis is placed on the presence or absence of albuminuria or changes in albuminuria within the microalbuminuric range. This has important implications in terms of undermining the value of microalbuminuria as a surrogate renal end point for intervention trials. There is a need to develop broader models of progressive DKD that include novel pathways and risk markers apart from those related to the traditional 'albuminuric pathway' to renal impairment.

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

  9. Regular physical activity and reduced occurrence of microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Calle-Pascual, A L; Martin-Alvarez, P J; Reyes, C; Calle, J R

    1993-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of regular non-strenuous physical exercise on the appearance of microalbuminuria in Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients, we have studied a cohort of 372 Type 2 diabetic patients (152 males and 220 females, mean age: 63.59 +/- 0.70 years, evolution time: 10.31 +/- 0.4 years, M +/- SEM). One hundred and ninety seven (52.9%) presented normo-albuminuria, 124 (33.3%) microalbuminuria and 51 (13.7%) proteinuria. These three groups were different with regard to evolution time, weight, BMI, waist-hip ratio, Hb1Ac value, prevalence of hypertension and physical activity level. 132 (35.4%) patients had a regular exercise-induced caloric expenditure under 500 kcal/wk whereas 122 (32.7%) were between 500 and 1.000 kcal/wk and 118 (31.7%) over 1.000 kcal/wk. Prevalence of normo-albuminuric patients was 40.1%, 52.4% and 67.7% respectively (p < 0.01). Prevalence of normo-albuminuric patients remained significatively higher in the patient with the greater physical activity level when adjusted to systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, evolution time and HbA1c value. Our results stress the fact that regular non-strenuous physical activity may have a protective effect on the appearance of microalbuminuria in Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Whether the cardiovascular protective influence of exercise in these patients depends on such an effect remains unknown. On the basis of this cross-sectional evidence, a longitudinal study is now under way.

  10. Association of Microalbuminuria with Metabolic Syndrome among Aged Population.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Shu-Hua; Guan, Li-Ying; Wang, Yi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of the various components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on chronic kidney disease has been conflicting. We aim to investigate the association between MetS and microalbuminuria and identify the major contributing components of MetS that result in microalbuminuria in the Chinese aged population. Methods. A total of 674 adults aged 55-98 years (males: 266; mean age: 66.5 ± 7.5 years) were studied. MetS was defined by the 2004 Chinese Diabetes Society criteria and microalbuminuria by urine albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) ≥3 mg/mmoL. Results. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was gradually increased with increasing number of MetS components (P < 0.05). In multivariate regression, after adjusting for age and sex, MetS was the strongest correlate of microalbuminuria (OR = 1.781, 95% CI = 1.226-2.587; P < 0.05) followed by the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (OR = 1.217, 95% CI = 1.044-1.092; P < 0.05), systolic blood pressure (SBP) (OR = 1.011, 95% CI = 1.107-1.338; P < 0.05), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (OR = 0.576, 95% CI = 0.348-0.953; P < 0.05). Conclusions. MetS is independently associated with microalbuminuria in the Chinese aged population. Elevated FPG is the most predominant component of metabolic syndrome associated with microalbuminuria followed by elevated SBP and reduced HDL-C. PMID:27200378

  11. Triad of metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, and coronary heart disease with a focus on microalbuminuria death by overeating.

    PubMed

    Gobal, Freij; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Shah, Sudhir; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2011-06-01

    Coronary heart disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and its incidence is rising worldwide. Because atherosclerosis is a chronic process, and it is often associated with certain lifestyle and risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, much emphasis is being placed on lifestyle modification and control of risk factors. It is being recognized that some lifestyle patterns such as overeating result in metabolic syndrome, which may play a role in the development of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease. Here, we focus on an important relationship between these 3 conditions, and we provide evidence that microalbuminuria develops in many patients with metabolic syndrome, may be an important correlate of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease, and may represent an important prognostic marker. Although the pathogenesis of microalbuminuria in metabolic syndrome is not clear, we suggest that microalbuminuria, chronic kidney disease, and coronary heart disease share common pathways involving inflammation and oxidative stress. We also discuss that a healthy lifestyle is essential for preventing and treating chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease seen in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  12. Retinopathy of Prematurity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinweg, Sue Byrd; Griffin, Harold C.; Griffin, Linda W.; Gingras, Happy

    2005-01-01

    The eyes of premature infants are especially vulnerable to injury after birth. A serious complication is called retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), which is abnormal growth of the blood vessels in an infant's eye. Retinopathy of prematurity develops when abnormal blood vessels grow and spread throughout the retina, which is the nerve tissue at the…

  13. Relationship between endothelial dysfunction and microalbuminuria in familial Mediterranean fever

    PubMed Central

    Güneş, Hakan; Kıvrak, Tarık; Tatlısu, Mustafa; Kaya, Hakkı; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between microalbuminuria and flow-mediated dilatation in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients. Material and Methods In our study, there were two groups consisting of 54 patients who were out of the attack period (43 of whom had no microalbuminuria and 11 of whom had microalbuminuria) and 40 healthy controls (M/F: 12/28). Results There was no statistically difference between patient and control groups’age (25.06±8.07, 22.89±6.00 years, respectively). Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) percentages were significantly different between the three groups (p=0.01). It was observed that there was a correlation between microalbuminuria and FMD percentage. Conclusion Endothelial dysfunction and renal damage occurred as a result of low-grade chronic inflammation. Microalbuminuria, which is the indicator of renal damage and endothelial dysfunction, and FMD show that endothelial functions can be used in the following of early detection of renal damage and endothelial functions in FMF patients.

  14. [Systemic arterial hypertension in child and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Medina-Concebida, Luz Elena; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus where is the search for microalbuminuria justified. PMID:27284843

  15. [Systemic arterial hypertension in child and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Medina-Concebida, Luz Elena; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus where is the search for microalbuminuria justified.

  16. How does hypertension affect your eyes?

    PubMed

    Bhargava, M; Ikram, M K; Wong, T Y

    2012-02-01

    Hypertension has profound effects on various parts of the eye. Classically, elevated blood pressure results in a series of retinal microvascular changes called hypertensive retinopathy, comprising of generalized and focal retinal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous nicking, retinal hemorrhages, microaneurysms and, in severe cases, optic disc and macular edema. Studies have shown that mild hypertensive retinopathy signs are common and seen in nearly 10% of the general adult non-diabetic population. Hypertensive retinopathy signs are associated with other indicators of end-organ damage (for example, left ventricular hypertrophy, renal impairment) and may be a risk marker of future clinical events, such as stroke, congestive heart failure and cardiovascular mortality. Furthermore, hypertension is one of the major risk factors for development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and control of blood pressure has been shown in large clinical trials to prevent visual loss from diabetic retinopathy. In addition, several retinal diseases such as retinal vascular occlusion (artery and vein occlusion), retinal arteriolar emboli, macroaneurysm, ischemic optic neuropathy and age-related macular degeneration may also be related to hypertension; however, there is as yet no evidence that treatment of hypertension prevents vision loss from these conditions. In management of patients with hypertension, physicians should be aware of the full spectrum of the relationship of blood pressure and the eye. PMID:21509040

  17. Microalbuminuria measurements by two in-house ELISA methods.

    PubMed

    Ng, L C; Teng, L C; Ng, M L; Sazali, B S; Khalid, B A

    2000-12-01

    Detection of microalbuminuria is important in the management of diabetic patients since it is predictive of development of proteinuria and nephropathy. Two sensitive and specific in-house ELISAs for microalbuminuria were established and validated. One of the ELISAs was based on antigen coating while the other employed antibody coating. Recovery and linearity experiments gave acceptable results of 100 +/- 10%, while precision results were <10% for intra-assay and <12% for inter-assay coefficients of variation (CVs). The standard curve ranged from 10-625 ug/l, equivalent to 0.2-12.5 mg/l for urine samples diluted 1:20 fold. When the antibody coated ELISA was compared to antigen coated ELISA, a correlation of r=0.996 was obtained. When compared to commercial kits, the in-house ELISAs gave good correlations of r=0.961 versus the Boehringer Mannheim Micral Test strips and r=0.940 versus Ames Microalb Turbidimetry. The normal microalbumin reference ranges determined for 12h, first morning and random urine samples were 0.7-5.3 mg, 0.1-10.2 mg/l and 0.8-26.1 mg/l respectively. The normal albumin excretion rate (AER) was 1.0-7.3 ug/min while untimed urine samples gave results of 0.1-0.9 and 0.2-1.6 mg/mmol after dividing by creatinine concentrations. The ELISAs were used to detect microalbuminuria in 338 random urine samples from diabetic patients. A high percentage 47.9% was found to be positive for microalbuminuria and 18.0% had macroalbuminuria >25 mg/mmol. Thus screening for microalbuminuria together with creatinine measurements using random urine samples can be used for management of diabetic patients. PMID:16329538

  18. Microalbuminuria measurements by two in-house ELISA methods.

    PubMed

    Ng, L C; Teng, L C; Ng, M L; Sazali, B S; Khalid, B A

    2000-12-01

    Detection of microalbuminuria is important in the management of diabetic patients since it is predictive of development of proteinuria and nephropathy. Two sensitive and specific in-house ELISAs for microalbuminuria were established and validated. One of the ELISAs was based on antigen coating while the other employed antibody coating. Recovery and linearity experiments gave acceptable results of 100 +/- 10%, while precision results were <10% for intra-assay and <12% for inter-assay coefficients of variation (CVs). The standard curve ranged from 10-625 ug/l, equivalent to 0.2-12.5 mg/l for urine samples diluted 1:20 fold. When the antibody coated ELISA was compared to antigen coated ELISA, a correlation of r=0.996 was obtained. When compared to commercial kits, the in-house ELISAs gave good correlations of r=0.961 versus the Boehringer Mannheim Micral Test strips and r=0.940 versus Ames Microalb Turbidimetry. The normal microalbumin reference ranges determined for 12h, first morning and random urine samples were 0.7-5.3 mg, 0.1-10.2 mg/l and 0.8-26.1 mg/l respectively. The normal albumin excretion rate (AER) was 1.0-7.3 ug/min while untimed urine samples gave results of 0.1-0.9 and 0.2-1.6 mg/mmol after dividing by creatinine concentrations. The ELISAs were used to detect microalbuminuria in 338 random urine samples from diabetic patients. A high percentage 47.9% was found to be positive for microalbuminuria and 18.0% had macroalbuminuria >25 mg/mmol. Thus screening for microalbuminuria together with creatinine measurements using random urine samples can be used for management of diabetic patients.

  19. [Interdisciplinary interaction in vascular diseases of the eye, diabetes and diabetic retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Kleophas, W; Dellanna, F

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 is greatly increasing worldwide. An early therapy with intensified control of diabetes and blood pressure is especially important to avoid delayed complications. In addition to diabetic foot syndrome, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy still represent commonly occurring problems. Despite improvements in the quality of care, the targets of the St. Vincent Declaration have still not yet been achieved. Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy show parallels in the course of the disease and in the pathological anatomical alterations which have led to the inauguration of a diabetic renal-retinal syndrome. The ophthalmological assessment of the retina was previously considered to be a diagnostic aid for assessment of diabetic nephropathy; however, nowadays a simple estimation of the glomerular filtration rate using the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) formula and determination of microalbuminuria can in contrast give ophthalmologists an early indication of the possible presence of microangiopathic alterations.

  20. Zinc and Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xiao; Sun, Weixia; Miao, Lining; Fu, Yaowen; Wang, Yonggang; Su, Guanfang; Liu, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an important nutrient that is involved in various physiological metabolisms. Zn dyshomeostasis is often associated with various pathogeneses of chronic diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and related complications. Zn is present in ocular tissue in high concentrations, particularly in the retina and choroid. Zn deficiencies have been shown to affect ocular development, cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, and even diabetic retinopathy. However, the mechanism by which Zn deficiency increases the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy remains unclear. In addition, due to the negative effect of Zn deficiency on the eye, Zn supplementation should prevent diabetic retinopathy; however, limited available data do not always support this notion. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to summarize these pieces of available information regarding Zn prevention of diabetic retinopathy. Current theories and possible mechanisms underlying the role of Zn in the eye-related diseases are discussed. The possible factors that affect the preventive effect of Zn supplementation on diabetic retinopathy were also discussed. PMID:23671870

  1. Diabetic retinopathy and the associated risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients in Abha, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Razia A.; Khalil, Shamsun N.; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the proportion and grades of retinopathy and its risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 401 type 2 diabetic patients. A questionnaire and checklist were used to collect the data. Retinopathy was diagnosed and graded by fundus photographs and slit lamp examination. The duration of diabetes, age of patients, age at onset of diabetes, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c level, blood pressure, and complications were noted. Results: The mean age of male and female patients was 54.93 and 54.25 years; 57.6% were males. The mean age of onset and mean duration of diabetes were 43.91 and 13.4 years, respectively. The proportion of retinopathy was 36.4%. Grades of retinopathy were: Mild 57.5%, moderate 19.9%, severe nonproliferative 11%, and proliferative retinopathy 11.6%; 7.2% of patients had maculopathy. Retinopathy was significantly associated with older age, younger age at onset, longer duration of disease, poorly controlled blood sugar, hypertension, insulin use; the presence of neuropathy and nephropathy appeared as a significant risk. Younger age at onset, longer duration, and insulin use appeared as the strongest predictors for diabetic retinopathy. Conclusions: More than a third (36.4%) of the diabetic patients attending a diabetic center had retinopathy. The control of the risk factors may reduce both prevalence and consequences of retinopathy. PMID:26929725

  2. Arginase in Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, S. Priya; Rojas, Modesto; Suwanpradid, Jutamas; Toque, Haroldo A.; Caldwell, R. William; Caldwell, Ruth B.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic retinopathies, such as diabetic retinopathy (DR), retinopathy of prematurity and retinal vein occlusion are a major cause of blindness in developed nations worldwide. Each of these conditions is associated with early neurovascular dysfunction. However, conventional therapies target clinically significant macula edema or neovascularization, which occur much later. Intraocular injections of anti-VEGF show promise in reducing retinal edema, but the effects are usually transient and the need for repeated injections increases the risk of intraocular infection. Laser photocoagulation can control pathological neovascularization, but may impair vision and in some patients the retinopathy continues to progress. Moreover, neither treatment targets early stage disease or promotes repair. This review examines the potential role of the ureahydrolase enzyme arginase as a therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic retinopathy. Arginase metabolizes L-arginine to form proline, polyamines and glutamate. Excessive arginase activity reduces the L-arginine supply for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), causing it to become uncoupled and produce superoxide and less NO. Superoxide and NO react and form the toxic oxidant peroxynitrite. The catabolic products of polyamine oxidation and glutamate can induce more oxidative stress and DNA damage, both of which can cause cellular injury. Studies indicate that neurovascular injury during retinopathy is associated with increased arginase expression/activity, decreased NO, polyamine oxidation, formation of superoxide and peroxynitrite and dysfunction and injury of both vascular and neural cells. Furthermore, data indicate that the cytosolic isoform arginase I (AI) is involved in hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction and injury of vascular endothelial cells whereas the mitochondrial isoform arginase II (AII) is involved in neurovascular dysfunction and death following hyperoxia exposure. Thus, we postulate that activation of the arginase

  3. Arginase in retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, S Priya; Rojas, Modesto; Suwanpradid, Jutamas; Toque, Haroldo A; Caldwell, R William; Caldwell, Ruth B

    2013-09-01

    Ischemic retinopathies, such as diabetic retinopathy (DR), retinopathy of prematurity and retinal vein occlusion are a major cause of blindness in developed nations worldwide. Each of these conditions is associated with early neurovascular dysfunction. However, conventional therapies target clinically significant macula edema or neovascularization, which occur much later. Intra-ocular injections of anti-VEGF show promise in reducing retinal edema, but the effects are usually transient and the need for repeated injections increases the risk of intraocular infection. Laser photocoagulation can control pathological neovascularization, but may impair vision and in some patients the retinopathy continues to progress. Moreover, neither treatment targets early stage disease or promotes repair. This review examines the potential role of the ureahydrolase enzyme arginase as a therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic retinopathy. Arginase metabolizes l-arginine to form proline, polyamines and glutamate. Excessive arginase activity reduces the l-arginine supply for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), causing it to become uncoupled and produce superoxide and less NO. Superoxide and NO react and form the toxic oxidant peroxynitrite. The catabolic products of polyamine oxidation and glutamate can induce more oxidative stress and DNA damage, both of which can cause cellular injury. Studies indicate that neurovascular injury during retinopathy is associated with increased arginase expression/activity, decreased NO, polyamine oxidation, formation of superoxide and peroxynitrite and dysfunction and injury of both vascular and neural cells. Furthermore, data indicate that the cytosolic isoform arginase I (AI) is involved in hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction and injury of vascular endothelial cells whereas the mitochondrial isoform arginase II (AII) is involved in neurovascular dysfunction and death following hyperoxia exposure. Thus, we postulate that activation of the arginase

  4. Early Treatment With Olmesartan Prevents Juxtamedullary Glomerular Podocyte Injury and the Onset of Microalbuminuria in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sofue, Tadashi; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Urushihara, Maki; Nishijima, Yoko; Kaifu, Kumiko; Hara, Taiga; Matsumoto, Sachiko; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Hayden, Melvin R.; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R.; Ito, Sadayoshi; Kohno, Masakazu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies were performed to determine if early treatment with an angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor blocker (ARB), olmesartan, prevents the onset of microalbuminuria by attenuating glomerular podocyte injury in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods OLETF rats were treated with either a vehicle, olmesartan (10 mg/kg/day) or a combination of nonspecific vasodilators (hydralazine 15 mg/kg/day, hydrochlorothiazide 6 mg/kg/day, and reserpine 0.3 mg/kg/day; HHR) from the age of 7–25 weeks. Results OLETF rats were hypertensive and had microalbuminuria from 9 weeks of age. At 15 weeks, OLETF rats had higher Ang II levels in the kidney, larger glomerular desmin-staining areas (an index of podocyte injury), and lower gene expression of nephrin in juxtamedullary glomeruli, than nondiabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats. At 25 weeks, OLETF rats showed overt albuminuria, and higher levels of Ang II in the kidney and larger glomerular desmin-staining areas in superficial and juxtamedullary glomeruli compared to LETO rats. Reductions in mRNA levels of nephrin were also observed in superficial and juxtamedullary glomeruli. Although olmesartan did not affect glucose metabolism, it decreased blood pressure and prevented the renal changes in OLETF rats. HHR treatment also reduced blood pressure, but did not affect the renal parameters. Conclusions This study demonstrated that podocyte injury occurs in juxtamedullary glomeruli prior to superficial glomeruli in type 2 diabetic rats with microalbuminuria. Early treatment with an ARB may prevent the onset of albuminuria through its protective effects on juxtamedullary glomerular podocytes. PMID:22318512

  5. Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trief, E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has increased due to a high incidence of premature, low birthweight infants. Stages of severity range from no visual damage to total blindness, and educational problems of ROP children parallel those of other visually impaired children, early intervention being crucial. Treatments are either pharmacological or…

  6. Retinopathy of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Hellström, Ann; Smith, Lois E H; Dammann, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    The immature retinas of preterm neonates are susceptible to insults that disrupt neurovascular growth, leading to retinopathy of prematurity. Suppression of growth factors due to hyperoxia and loss of the maternal–fetal interaction result in an arrest of retinal vascularisation (phase 1). Subsequently, the increasingly metabolically active, yet poorly vascularised, retina becomes hypoxic, stimulating growth factor-induced vasoproliferation (phase 2), which can cause retinal detachment. In very premature infants, controlled oxygen administration reduces but does not eliminate retinopathy of prematurity. Identification and control of factors that contribute to development of retinopathy of prematurity is essential to prevent progression to severe sight-threatening disease and to limit comorbidities with which the disease shares modifiable risk factors. Strategies to prevent retinopathy of prematurity will depend on optimisation of oxygen saturation, nutrition, and normalisation of concentrations of essential factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, as well as curbing of the effects of infection and inflammation to promote normal growth and limit suppression of neurovascular development. PMID:23782686

  7. Neuropeptides and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gábriel, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common complication of diabetes, develops in 75% of patients with type 1 and 50% of patients with type 2 diabetes, progressing to legal blindness in about 5%. In the recent years, considerable efforts have been put into finding treatments for this condition. It has been discovered that peptidergic mechanisms (neuropeptides and their analogues, activating a diverse array of signal transduction pathways through their multiple receptors) are potentially important for consideration in drug development strategies. A considerable amount of knowledge has been accumulated over the last three decades on human retinal neuropeptides and those elements in the pathomechanisms of diabetic retinopathy which might be related to peptidergic signal transduction. Here, human retinal neuropeptides and their receptors are reviewed, along with the theories relevant to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy both in humans and in experimental models. By collating this information, the curative potential of certain neupeptides and their analogues/antagonists can also be discussed, along with the existing clinical treatments of diabetic retinopathy. The most promising peptidergic pathways for which treatment strategies may be developed at present are stimulation of the somatostatin-related pathway and the pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide-related pathway or inhibition of angiotensinergic mechanisms. These approaches may result in the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor production and neuronal apoptosis; therefore, both the optical quality of the image and the processing capability of the neural circuit in the retina may be saved. PMID:23043302

  8. Predictive factors of diabetic complications: a possible link between family history of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was assessment of predictive factors of diabetic retinopathy. Methods A cross-sectional study was designed by recruiting 1228 type 2 diabetic patients from a diabetes referral clinic over a six-month period (from July to December, 2012). Diabetes risk factors, complications, laboratory results have been recorded. Results Of the 1228 diabetic patients (54% women, mean age 58.48 ± 9.94 years), prevalence of diabetes retinopathy was 26.6%. There were significant associations between retinopathy and family history of diabetes (p = 0.04), hypertension (p = 0.0001), diabetic duration (p = 0.0001), poor glycemic control (p = 0.0001) and age of onset of diabetes (p = 0.0001). However, no significant associations were found between retinopathy with dyslipidemia and obesity. In logistic regression model, poor glycemic control (p = 0.014), hypertension (p = 0.0001), duration of diabetes (p = 0.0001) and family history of diabetes (p = 0.012) independently predicted retinopathy after adjustment for age and sex. Conclusions Diabetic complications are resulting from an interaction from genes and environmental factors. A family history of diabetes is pointing toward a possible genetic and epigenetic basis for diabetic retinopathy. Our findings suggest the role of epigenetic modifications and metabolic memory in diabetic retinopathy in subjects with family history of diabetes. PMID:24860795

  9. Blood pressure control for diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Do, Diana V; Wang, Xue; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; Marrone, Michael; Sleilati, Gina; Hawkins, Barbara S; Frank, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness. Research has established the importance of blood glucose control to prevent development and progression of the ocular complications of diabetes. Simultaneous blood pressure control has been advocated for the same purpose, but findings reported from individual studies have supported varying conclusions regarding the ocular benefit of interventions on blood pressure. Objectives The primary aim of this review was to summarize the existing evidence regarding the effect of interventions to control or reduce blood pressure levels among diabetics on incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy, preservation of visual acuity, adverse events, quality of life, and costs. A secondary aim was to compare classes of anti-hypertensive medications with respect to the same outcomes. Search methods We searched a number of electronic databases including CENTRAL as well as ongoing trial registries. We last searched the electronic databases on 25 April 2014. We also reviewed reference lists of review articles and trial reports selected for inclusion. In addition, we contacted investigators of trials with potentially pertinent data. Selection criteria We included in this review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which either type 1 or type 2 diabetic participants, with or without hypertension, were assigned randomly to intense versus less intense blood pressure control, to blood pressure control versus usual care or no intervention on blood pressure, or to different classes of anti-hypertensive agents versus placebo. Data collection and analysis Pairs of review authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts from electronic and manual searches and the full text of any document that appeared to be relevant. We assessed included trials independently for risk of bias with respect to outcomes reported in this review. We extracted data regarding trial

  10. Dutch guideline for the management of hypertensive crisis -- 2010 revision.

    PubMed

    van den Born, B J H; Beutler, J J; Gaillard, C A J M; de Gooijer, A; van den Meiracker, A H; Kroon, A A

    2011-05-01

    Hypertensive crises are divided into hypertensive urgencies and emergencies. Together they form a heterogeneous group of acute hypertensive disorders depending on the presence or type of target organs involved. Despite better treatment options for hypertension, hypertensive crisis and its associated complications remain relatively common. In the Netherlands the number of patients starting renal replacement therapy because of 'malignant hypertension' has increased in the past two decades. In 2003, the first Dutch guideline on hypertensive crisis was released to allow a standardised evidence-based approach for patients presenting with a hypertensive crisis. In this paper we give an overview of the current management of hypertensive crisis and discuss several important changes incorporated in the 2010 revision. These changes include a modification in terminology replacing 'malignant hypertension' with 'hypertensive crisis with retinopathy and reclassification of hypertensive crisis with retinopathy under hypertensive emergencies instead of urgencies. With regard to the treatment of hypertensive emergencies, nicardipine instead of nitroprusside or labetalol is favoured for the management of perioperative hypertension, whereas labetalol has become the drug of choice for the treatment of hypertension associated with pre-eclampsia. For the treatment of hypertensive urgencies, oral administration of nifedipine retard instead of captopril is recommended as first-line therapy. In addition, a section on the management of hypertensive emergencies according to the type of target organ involved has been added. Efforts to increase the awareness and treatment of hypertension in the population at large may lower the incidence of hypertensive crisis and its complications.

  11. Genetics of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Heeyoon

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a polygenic disorder. Twin studies and familial aggregation studies have documented clear familial clustering. Heritability has been estimated to be as high as 27% for any DR and 52% for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), an advanced form of the disease. Linkage analyses, candidate gene association studies and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) performed to date have not identified any widely reproducible risk loci for DR. Combined analysis of the data from multiple GWAS is emerging as an important next step to explain the unaccounted heritability. Key factors to future discovery of the genetic underpinnings of DR are precise DR ascertainment, a focus on the more heritable disease forms such as PDR, stringent selection of control participants with regards to duration of diabetes, and methods that allow combination of existing datasets from different ethnicities to achieve sufficient sample sizes to detect variants with modest effect sizes. PMID:24952107

  12. Pathophysiology of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Joanna M.; Kaul, Kirti; Chopra, Mohit; Kohner, Eva M.; Chibber, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is now regarded as an epidemic, with the population of patients expected to rise to 380 million by 2025. Tragically, this will lead to approximately 4 million people around the world losing their sight from diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in patients aged 20 to 74 years. The risk of development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is closely associated with the type and duration of diabetes, blood glucose, blood pressure, and possibly lipids. Although landmark cross-sectional studies have confirmed the strong relationship between chronic hyperglycaemia and the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, the underlying mechanism of how hyperglycaemia causes retinal microvascular damage remains unclear. Continued research worldwide has focussed on understanding the pathogenic mechanisms with the ultimate goal to prevent DR. The aim of this paper is to introduce the multiple interconnecting biochemical pathways that have been proposed and tested as key contributors in the development of DR, namely, increased polyol pathway, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), increased expression of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), haemodynamic changes, accelerated formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), oxidative stress, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and subclinical inflammation and capillary occlusion. New pharmacological therapies based on some of these underlying pathogenic mechanisms are also discussed. PMID:24563789

  13. Prevalence of renal disease in elderly hypertensive patients with cardiovascular problems.

    PubMed

    Ruilope, L M

    1997-01-01

    Renal vascular damage caused by arterial hypertension participates in the alterations to systemic vascular function and structure. Nephrosclerosis seems to run in parallel with systemic atherosclerosis, which accounts for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in hypertensive patients. Parameters indicating the existence of an alteration in renal function (increased serum creatinine, proteinuria and microalbuminuria) are independent predictors for an increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Hence, parameters of renal function have to be considered in any stratification of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients.

  14. Screen-printed carbon electrode-based electrochemical immunosensor for rapid detection of microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jang-Zern; Chen, Ching-Jung; Settu, Kalpana; Lin, Yu-Feng; Chen, Chien-Lung; Liu, Jen-Tsai

    2016-03-15

    A urinary microalbumin test is used to detect early signs of kidney damage in people who have a risk of chronic kidney disease, such as those with diabetes or hypertension. In this study, we developed a screen-printed carbon electrode-based immunosensor for the detection of microalbumin in urine. Anti-human albumin antibodies were immobilized on the screen-printed sensor surface by the covalent immobilization method. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectroscopical (SEM-EDS) analysis demonstrated that the modification process was well performed. Chronoamperometric (CA) electrochemical measurement technique was employed for the quantitative detection of albumin. The electrochemical measurements performed with some possible interfering compounds normally present in urine (ascorbic acid, uric acid, glucose and creatinine samples) demonstrated a high specificity and selectivity of this immunosensor in albumin detection. Under optimum conditions, the immunosensor can detect urinary albumin in a wide linear range from 10 µg/ml to 300 µg/ml with a detection limit of 9.7 µg/ml. The excellent performance of this immunosensor was confirmed by analyzing microalbumin in urine samples; the results were in good agreement with those obtained by the standard immunoturbidimetric method. The biosensor proposed herein is easy to prepare and can be used for low-cost, rapid, and sensitive screening of microalbuminuria. This approach provides a promising platform for developing clinical point-of-care diagnostic applications. PMID:26579935

  15. The retinal renin-angiotensin system: implications for therapy in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sjølie, A K; Chaturvedi, N

    2002-08-01

    Retinopathy is the most common complication of diabetes, and a leading cause of blindness in people of working age. Optimal blood pressure and metabolic control can reduce the risk of diabetic retinopathy, but are difficult to achieve in clinical practice. In the EUCLID Study, the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor lisinopril reduced the risk of progression of retinopathy by approximately 50%, and also significantly reduced the risk of progression to proliferative retinopathy. These findings are consistent with extensive evidence that the renin-angiotensin system is expressed in the eye, and that adverse effects of angiotensin II on retinal angiogenesis and function can be inhibited by ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II-receptor blockers. However, in the EUCLID Study retinopathy was not a primary end-point and the study was not sufficiently powered for the eye-related outcomes. Hence, the Diabetic Retinopathy Candesartan Trials (DIRECT) programme has been established to determine whether AT(1)-receptor blockade with candesartan can prevent the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. This programme comprises three studies, involving a total of 4500 patients recruited from about 300 centres worldwide. The patients are normotensive or treated hypertensive individuals, and so the DIRECT programme should assess the potential of an AT(1)-receptor blocker to protect against the pathological changes in the eye following diabetes.

  16. The retinal renin-angiotensin system: implications for therapy in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sjølie, A K; Chaturvedi, N

    2002-08-01

    Retinopathy is the most common complication of diabetes, and a leading cause of blindness in people of working age. Optimal blood pressure and metabolic control can reduce the risk of diabetic retinopathy, but are difficult to achieve in clinical practice. In the EUCLID Study, the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor lisinopril reduced the risk of progression of retinopathy by approximately 50%, and also significantly reduced the risk of progression to proliferative retinopathy. These findings are consistent with extensive evidence that the renin-angiotensin system is expressed in the eye, and that adverse effects of angiotensin II on retinal angiogenesis and function can be inhibited by ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II-receptor blockers. However, in the EUCLID Study retinopathy was not a primary end-point and the study was not sufficiently powered for the eye-related outcomes. Hence, the Diabetic Retinopathy Candesartan Trials (DIRECT) programme has been established to determine whether AT(1)-receptor blockade with candesartan can prevent the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. This programme comprises three studies, involving a total of 4500 patients recruited from about 300 centres worldwide. The patients are normotensive or treated hypertensive individuals, and so the DIRECT programme should assess the potential of an AT(1)-receptor blocker to protect against the pathological changes in the eye following diabetes. PMID:12140727

  17. Solar retinopathy. A biophysical analysis.

    PubMed

    Sadun, A C; Sadun, A A; Sadun, L A

    1984-10-01

    Funduscopic examination of two young adults complaining of blurred vision revealed small symmetrical macular lesions suggestive of solar retinopathy. Although both patients had recently looked at the sun for less than one minute, it is common to look at the sun for longer periods (ie, sunsets) without incurring visual symptoms of retinal lesions. Our biophysical analysis revealed the important parameters of solar retinopathy and the minimum exposure to the sun that would produce such lesions. Under ideal optical conditions, solar retinopathy can occur following extremely short observations of the sun.

  18. Relationship between urinary albumin excretion rate and renal histology in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: with reference to the clinical significance of microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Inomata, S; Nakamoto, Y; Inoue, M; Itoh, M; Ohsawa, Y; Masamune, O

    1989-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the relationship between urinary albumin excretion rate (AER) and renal structural changes in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) without clinical proteinuria. Resting AER in 30 control subjects and 67 NIDDM patients were 10.4 +/- 4.8 (mean +/- SD) micrograms/min (range 4.3-21.1 micrograms/min) and 26.4 +/- 32.3 micrograms/min (range 0.4-155 micrograms/min), respectively. Persistent normoalbuminuria (less than 20 micrograms/min) and microalbuminuria (20-200 micrograms/min) were found in 43 (Group A) and 24 (Group B) diabetics. There were significant differences in age, diabetes duration, and frequency of retinopathy (background and proliferative) as well as that of proliferative retinopathy between Groups A and B, but not in the other clinical parameters such as body mass index, HbA1, Ccr, or systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP). When compared with 11 normoalbuminuric patients of similar age and equal diabetes duration to those in Group B, the sole difference in clinical parameters was the existence of proliferative retinopathy in Group B. Renal structural changes were investigated by light microscopy in 14 people in Group A and 13 people in Group B, and additionally in 5 NIDDM patients with both macroalbuminuria (greater than or equal to 200 micrograms/min) and normal or nearly normal renal function (Group C). The diffuse glomerular lesion (Gellman's classification) was grade I or II in A, II or III in B, and III in C.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. The National Diabetic Retinopathy Laser Treatment Audit. II. Proliferative retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C C; Sparrow, J M; Grey, R H; Cheng, H

    1998-01-01

    The National Diabetic Retinopathy Laser Treatment Audit is a prospective survey of laser treatment for diabetic retinopathy throughout the United Kingdom. This paper presents data on 284 patients who were undergoing their first panretinal photocoagulation for proliferative retinopathy during a 2 month period in 1995, describing the demographic features, the level of systematic screening, the sources of referral, and the waiting times. For those cases where proliferative retinopathy was present at the first ophthalmology outpatient visit, the retinopathy was detected as a result of systematic screening in 46.8%, whilst 28.7% presented symptomatically. Of these patients 28.4% waited for more than 12 weeks from referral to the time of laser treatment, but once the patient had been listed for laser treatment this was performed within 8 weeks in 95.3%. The retinopathy features and the type of treatment given are also described. Compared with the DRS and ETDRS recommendations, at least 32.5-40.2% of eyes may be undertreated initially, and for those with high-risk characteristics these figures were at least 30.8-38.5%.

  20. Associations between apolipoprotein CIII concentrations and microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    HU, ZHI-JUAN; REN, LU-PING; WANG, CHAO; LIU, BING; SONG, GUANG-YAO

    2014-01-01

    Microalbuminuria (MAU) is a strong predictor of diabetic nephropathy (DN), which is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Dyslipidemia exists in the majority of patients with DM and contributes to micro- and macrovascular complications associated with DM. Apolipoprotein CIII (apoCIII) is an inhibitor of the activity of lipoprotein lipase, which metabolizes triglyceride (TG) in very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and facilitates its clearance from plasma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between apoCIII and MAU and the effects of atorvastatin in type 2 diabetes. In total, 120 subjects were divided into type 2 diabetes and type 2 DN groups, while 60 healthy subjects were selected as controls. The patients with DN were administered 20 mg atorvastatin daily for 16 weeks. Blood pressure, body mass index (BMI) and levels of HbA1c, FBG, TG, VLDL-cholesterol (VLDL-C), apoCIII and MAU were markedly elevated in the type 2 diabetes and type 2 DN groups compared with those in the control group (P<0.01), while high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were decreased significantly (P<0.01). All patients with type 2 DN showed significantly elevated blood pressure, apoCIII levels, MAU, course of the disease and rate of stroke and retinopathy compared with the patients with type 2 diabetes (P<0.01). MAU was significantly positively correlated with the course of the disease, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, BMI and HbA1c, FBG, TG, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, VLDL-C and apoCIII levels (P<0.05), whereas negatively correlated with HDL-C levels (r=−0.194, P=0.020). Logistic regression analysis showed that apoCIII levels were independently associated with MAU (odds ratio, 1.100; 95% confidence interval, 1.037–1.153; P<0.001). Atorvastatin improved the lipid profile and MAU in patients with type 2 DN (P<0.01). Therefore, the present study demonstrated

  1. Ocular Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Ocular Hypertension Sections What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes ... Hypertension Diagnosis Ocular Hypertension Treatment What Is Ocular Hypertension? Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: J Kevin ...

  2. Insulin Pump Therapy Is Associated with Lower Rates of Retinopathy and Peripheral Nerve Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Zabeen, Bedowra; Craig, Maria E.; Virk, Sohaib A.; Pryke, Alison; Chan, Albert K. F.; Cho, Yoon Hi; Benitez-Aguirre, Paul Z.; Hing, Stephen; Donaghue, Kim C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of microvascular complications in adolescents with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) versus multiple daily injections (MDI). Research Design and Methods Prospective cohort of 989 patients (aged 12–20 years; diabetes duration >5 years) treated with CSII or MDI for >12 months. Microvascular complications were assessed from 2000–14: early retinopathy (seven-field fundal photography), peripheral nerve function (thermal and vibration threshold testing), autonomic nerve abnormality (heart rate variability analysis of electrocardiogram recordings) and albuminuria (albumin creatinine ratio/timed overnight albumin excretion). Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to examine the relationship between treatment and complications rates, adjusting for socio-economic status (SES) and known risk factors including HbA1c and diabetes duration. Results Comparing CSII with MDI: HbA1C was 8.6% [70mmol/mol] vs. 8.7% [72 mmol/mol]) (p = 0.7), retinopathy 17% vs. 22% (p = 0.06); microalbuminuria 1% vs. 4% (p = 0.07), peripheral nerve abnormality 27% vs. 33% (p = 0.108) and autonomic nerve abnormality 24% vs. 28% (p = 0.401). In multivariable GEE, CSII use was associated with lower rates of retinopathy (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.45–0.95, p = 0.029) and peripheral nerve abnormality (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42–0.95, p = 0.026), but not albuminuria (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.10–2.17, p = 0.33). SES was not associated with any of the complication outcomes. Conclusions In adolescents, CSII use is associated with lower rates of retinopathy and peripheral nerve abnormality, suggesting an apparent benefit of CSII over MDI independent of glycemic control or SES. PMID:27050468

  3. Scanning laser edema index: a reliable tool to correlate with diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors?

    PubMed

    Peyman, Mohammadreza; Tajunisah, Iqbal; Loo, Angela; Chuah, Khai Choon; Subrayan, Visvaraja

    2012-01-01

    To correlate Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) derived macular edema (DME) index with severity of diabetic retinopathy and systemic factors. A total of 300 diabetic patients were recruited for the study for each of them a value for the macular edema index was obtained using the HRT II. Patients' age, gender, duration and type of diabetes mellitus, latest HbA1c result and presence or absence of co-morbid factors (hypertension, ischemic heart disease, nephropathy) were recorded together with the stage of diabetic retinopathy. These were correlated with DME. Out of 300 patients, HRT defined macula edema was seen in 68 patients (22.6%). There is a wider and higher range (95% percentile) of macula edema index in the severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) group. Independent samples t test showed significant difference between the severe NPDR group and no DR group (p<0.001), mild NPDR group (p<0.05) and moderate NPDR group (p<0.05). A higher macula edema index was also found to have a low degree of correlation with more advanced stages of retinopathy (r=0.310; p<0.001). Also nephropathy showed a strong and significant correlation with DME. Hypertension had moderately significant correlation with DME. This study found no correlation between ischemic heart disease and DME. HRT derived scanning laser edema index is a reliable objective tool to evaluate diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors. PMID:22520399

  4. Preventing radiation retinopathy with hyperfractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, Alan T.; Bhandare, Niranjan; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M. . E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with the development of radiation retinopathy in a large series of patients with head-and-neck cancer. In particular, we addressed whether the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy was effective in reducing the risk of retinopathy. Methods and materials: One hundred eighty-six patients received a significant dose to the retina as part of curative radiotherapy. Primary sites included: nasopharynx, 46; paranasal sinus, 64; nasal cavity, 69; and palate, 7. Prescription doses varied depending on primary site and histology. Hyperfractionated (twice-daily) radiation was delivered to 42% of the patients in this study, typically at 1.10 to 1.20 Gy per fraction. The remainder were treated once-daily. Retinal doses were determined from computerized dosimetry plans when available. For all other patients, retinal doses were retrospectively calculated using reconstructed off-axis dosimetry taken from contours through the center of the globes. Retinal dose was defined as the minimum dose received by at least 25% of the globe. The median retinal dose was 56.85 Gy. Patients were followed for a median of 7.6 years. Results: Thirty-one eyes in 30 patients developed radiation retinopathy, resulting in monocular blindness in 25, bilateral blindness in 1, and decreased visual acuity in 4. The median time to the diagnosis of retinopathy was 2.6 years (range, 11 months to 5.3 years). The actuarial incidence of developing radiation retinopathy was 20% at both 5 and 10 years. The incidence of developing ipsilateral blindness due to retinopathy was 16% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. Site-specific incidences varied considerably, with ethmoid sinus (9 of 25, 36%), nasal cavity (13 of 69, 19%), and maxillary sinus (6 of 35, 17%) being the most common sites associated with radiation retinopathy. Three of 72 patients (4%) receiving retinal doses less than 50 Gy developed retinopathy. Higher retinal doses resulted in a

  5. Experimental chloroquine retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, M; Ohkuma, M; Tsukahara, I

    1986-01-01

    Chloroquine retinopathy was produced experimentally in the eye of the albino corydoras (one of the tropical fish) by daily administration of chloroquine (0.1 mg per os). The enucleated eyes were examined from the 14th day to 3 months after the beginning of drug administration under light and electron microscopy. The first change of retina was the appearance of membraneous cytoplasmic body (MCB) in the cytoplasm of ganglion, amacrine, bipolar and horizontal cells. MCB might be degenerated lysosome. They showed lamellar figures or crystalline lattice-like structures. Secondarily, these MCB appeared in the inner segments of photoreceptor cells. The outer segments of rod cells disappeared, and then those of cone cells. Although photoreceptor cells were diminished in number in advanced degeneration, the cells of inner nuclear layer and ganglion cells were maintained in number. The presence of MCB dose not mean death of cells. The retinal pigment epithelial cells contained MCB in its cytoplasm only in severe degenerative cases, and did not show other remarkable changes. MCB also appeared in the cytoplasm of pericytes of retinal vessels. Chloroquine is considered to damage directly photoreceptor cells most severely. PMID:3018650

  6. All Components of Metabolic Syndrome Are Associated with Microalbuminuria in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Yen; Yang, Chih-Kai; Weng, Yi-Ming; Chuang, Chung-Hsun; Yu, Wei; Chen, Jih-Chang; Li, Wen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Albuminuria is a well-known predictor of poor renal and cardiovascular outcomes and associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality. The study aimed to evaluate the associations between metabolic characteristics and the presence of albuminuria. Methods This cross-sectional study included 18,384 adult Chinese who participated in health examinations during 2013–2014. Differences in clinical characteristics were compared for microalbuminuria (MAU) and albuminuria, and between genders. Potential risk factors associated with the risk of developing MAU and albuminuria were analyzed using univariate logistic regression. Multiple logistic regression was applied to further identify the independent associations between different levels of risk factors and the presence of MAU and albuminuria. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was used to determine the discriminatory ability of metabolic risk factors in detecting albuminuria. Results There were significant gender differences in clinical characteristics according to albuminuria status. Risk for the presence of albuminuria was significantly associated with age, male gender, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), hypertension, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (TG/HDL-C) in univariate logistic regression. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the factors significantly associated with the presence of MAU were WC > 90cm, WHtR at 0.6–0.7, hypertension, FPG > 6.1 mmole/L, and TG/HDL-C ratio > 1.6. The optimal cutoffs for risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS) to predict albuminuria in males and females were: WC, 90.8 vs. 80.0 cm; WHtR, 0.53 vs. 0.52; MAP, 97.9 vs. 91.9 mmHg; FPG, 5.40 vs. 5.28 mmole/L; and TG/HDL-C, 1.13 vs. 1.08. Conclusion MetS and all its components were associated with the presence of MAU in a health check-up population in China. Gender specific and optimal cutoffs for MetS components

  7. Posterior microphthalmos pigmentary retinopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pehere, Niranjan; Jalali, Subhadra; Deshmukh, Himanshu; Kannabiran, Chitra

    2011-04-01

    Posterior Microphthalmos Pigmentary Retinopathy Syndrome (PMPRS). Posterior microphthalmos (PM) is a relatively infrequent type of microphthalmos where posterior segment is predominantly affected with normal anterior segment measurements. Herein, we report two siblings with posterior microphthalmos retinopathy syndrome with postulated autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A 13-year-old child had PM and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and his 7-year-old sister had PM, RP, and foveoschisis. The genetics of this syndrome and variable phenotype is discussed. Importance of being aware of posterior microphthalmos and its posterior segment associations is highlighted.

  8. Performance of 'Micro-Bumintest' tablets for detection of microalbuminuria in Nauruans.

    PubMed

    Collins, V; Zimmet, P; Dowse, G K; Finch, C F; Linnane, A W

    1989-05-15

    Subclinical elevation of urinary albumin excretion (microalbuminuria) is useful for the detection of individuals at high risk of developing nephropathy in both insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. We have evaluated the performance of Micro-Bumintest, a semi-quantitative test for the rapid detection of microalbuminuria. A total of 1186 samples from a population-based survey of the high diabetes prevalence community of Nauru were studied. Compared with a radioimmunoassay method, the Micro-Bumintest had a sensitivity of 97.6%, specificity of 93.2% and overall efficiency of 94.8%, when 40 micrograms/ml was used as the discriminating albumin concentration defining microalbuminuria. Significant differences in radioimmunoassay results between categories of the Micro-Bumintest were found, indicating its usefulness as a semi-quantitative test. Compared with subjects with normal glucose tolerance, there was a statistically significant progressive increase in the prevalence of microalbuminuria as detected by Micro-Bumintest in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus. Micro-Bumintest performs well as a screening test for detection of microalbuminuria not only in the clinical situation, but also in population-based epidemiological studies.

  9. Prevalence of hypertension and diabetes and coexistence of chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular risk in the population of the republic of moldova.

    PubMed

    Codreanu, Igor; Sali, Vera; Gaibu, Sergiu; Suveica, Luminita; Popa, Sergiu; Perico, Norberto; Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Carminati, Sergio; Feehally, John; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) established the Global Outreach Program (GO) aimed at building a capacity for detecting and managing chronic kidney disease and its complications in low- and middle-income countries. Here we report data from the 2006-2007 screening program (1025 subjects from the general population) in the Republic of Moldova aimed to determine the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and their coexistence with microalbuminuria. The likelihood of a serious cardiovascular (CV) event was also estimated. Hypertension and diabetes were very common among screened subjects. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 16.9% and that of estimated GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (decreased renal function) was 9.4%. Male gender was associated with an increased prevalence of hypertension and microalbuminuria. Hypertension and diabetes clustered in subjects with microalbuminuria and renal dysfunction. Risk factors such as preobesity/obesity, physical inactivity and smoking were relatively common, even in younger participants. The prevalence of subjects with predicted 10-year CV risk ≥10% was 10.0%. In conclusion, in the Republic of Moldova patients with hypertension and diabetes should be screened for the coexistence of renal abnormalities, with the intention of developing disease-specific health-care interventions with the primary goal to reduce CV morbidity and mortality and prevent renal disease progression to end stage renal disease.

  10. [Hypertension and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Navalesi, R; Rizzo, L; Nannipieri, M; Rapuano, A; Bandinelli, S; Pucci, L; Bertacca, A; Penno, G

    1995-10-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in diabetes is significantly higher than in non-diabetics, perhaps twice as common. The excess is related to diabetic nephropathy, mainly in type 1 diabetes, to obesity, mainly in type 2 diabetes, but also to increased sympathetic activity. Furthermore, the increased prevalence of hypertension may relate to insulin resistance and its sequelae. Insulin resistance leads to hyperinsulinemia, relates to increased LDL and reduced HDL levels, causes the development of impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes and might also be causally related to the onset of hypertension. Syndrome X has relevant therapeutic implications in the management of hypertension. Hypertension is a major risk factor for large vessel disease in diabetics and also a risk factor for microangiopathy, particularly nephropathy. The incidence of atherosclerotic disease is dramatically increased in both type 1 and type 2 diabetics and is the major cause of morbidity and premature death mainly in patients with raised urinary albumin excretion. Thus, diabetics show a two-fold increased risk of coronary heart disease, 2-6 fold increased risk of stroke and a several-fold increased risk of peripheral vessel disease. Some evidence suggests that hypertension may be a risk factor for retinopathy, particularly its progression, but surely hypertension is a significant risk factor for nephropathy, accelerating its progression and perhaps even causing the onset of the glomerulopathy. The mechanisms by which hypertension might contribute to the evolution of both large vessel as well as small vessel disease is still unknown, although increased capillary leakage and vascular endothelium alterations might be important factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8562258

  11. Prognostic Impact of Subclinical Microalbuminuria in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Miura, Masanobu; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Miyata, Satoshi; Nochioka, Kotaro; Takada, Tsuyoshi; Tadaki, Soichiro; Ushigome, Ryoichi; Yamauchi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Jun; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2014-10-30

    Background:Microalbuminuria, traditionally defined as urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) ≥30 mg/g, is a risk factor for mortality even in patients with preserved glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The prognostic impact of subclinical microalbuminuria, however, remains unknown in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF).Methods and Results:In the Chronic Heart Failure Analysis and Registry in the Tohoku District 2 Study, we enrolled 2,039 consecutive symptomatic CHF patients (median age, 67.4 years; 68.9% male) after excluding those on hemodialysis. On classification and regression tree analysis, UACR=10.2 mg/g and 27.4 mg/g were identified as the first and second discriminating points to stratify the risk for composite of death, acute myocardial infarction, HF admission and stroke, therefore subclinical microalbuminuria was defined as UACR ≥10.2 and <27.4 mg/g. There were 506 composite endpoints (24.8%) during the median follow-up of 2.69 years. On Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox modeling, subclinical microalbuminuria was significantly associated with increased composite endpoints with hazard ratios of 1.90 (P<0.001) and 2.29 (P<0.001) in patients with preserved (>60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2), n=1,129) or mildly reduced eGFR (30-59.9 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2), n=789), respectively. In patients with severely reduced GFR (eGFR <30 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2), n=121), >80% had microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria, and only 9.1% were free from any composite endpoints.Conclusions:Subclinical microalbuminuria was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events in CHF patients with mildly reduced or preserved renal function. PMID:25354552

  12. [Target organ effects in untreated hypertension].

    PubMed

    Babici, D; M'Pio, I; Hadj-Aïssa, A; Ducher, M; Laville, M; Fauvel, J P

    2003-01-01

    The parallel investigation of the renal and cardiac complications of recent and never treated systemic hypertension has only rarely been undertaken. The aim of this study was to define the renal function of never treated hypertensive subjects, separated into white coat hypertensives (HTbb: n = 19, BP at consultation 153/97 mmHg) or permanent hypertensives (HT: n = 49, BP at consultation 169/104 mmHg) as a function of their 24 hour BP. Their renal functions were then compared with those of normotensive subjects (NT: n = 10). The 68 hypertensive subjects seen consecutively underwent renal function investigation (DFG: glomerular filtration rate, DPR: renal plasmatic debit, and muAlb: microalbuminuria over 24 hours), and myocardial echography (measurement of the left ventricular mass index, IMVG). The white coat hypertensives had a normal renal function, while the permanent hypertensives had a significant decrease in DPR and a significantly higher muAlb compared to the normotensives. Compared to the white coat hypertensives, the permanent hypertensives had a significantly lower DFG and DPR, as well as a higher muAlb and IMVG. In all the hypertensives (white coat and permanent) the 24 hour systolic BP was significantly correlated with muAlb (r = 0.51, p < 0.001), filtration fraction (r = 0.30, p < 0.05), and IMVG (r = 0.52, p < 0.001). The renal and myocardial parameters were not significantly correlated. In conclusion, there seems to be a continuum between the level of ambulatory BP and the effect on target organs without a parallel progression of the renal and myocardial effects. From a practical point of view, only ambulatory BP measurement allows differentiation of permanent hypertensives who have a very early renal and/or myocardial effect, while white coat hypertensives are spared.

  13. Choroidal neovascular membrane in radiation retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Berker, Nilufer; Aslan, Ozlem; Batman, Cosar; Elgin, Ufuk; Ozkan, Seyhan Sonar

    2006-08-01

    Radiation retinopathy can occur years after the initial radiotherapy of the cancers of head and neck. It generally has a fulminant course, and can cause a variety of severe retinal abnormalities. Choroidal neovascularization has been rarely reported in radiation retinopathy. In this case report, a 21-year-old boy is presented who developed fulminant radiation retinopathy and choroidal neovascular membrane 4 years after receiving radiotherapy for his nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  14. Hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Price, Raymond S; Kasner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    The definition of hypertension has continuously evolved over the last 50 years. Hypertension is currently defined as a blood pressure greater than 140/90mmHg. One in every four people in the US has been diagnosed with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension increases further with age, affecting 75% of people over the age of 70. Hypertension is by far the most common risk factor identified in stroke patients. Hypertension causes pathologic changes in the walls of small (diameter<300 microns) arteries and arterioles usually at short branches of major arteries, which may result in either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Reduction of blood pressure with diuretics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have all been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of stroke. Hypertensive emergency is defined as a blood pressure greater than 180/120mmHg with end organ dysfunction, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, encephalopathy, or focal neurologic deficits. Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by acute failure of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Hypertensive emergency is treated with intravenous antihypertensive agents to reduce blood pressure by 25% within the first hour. Selective inhibition of cerebrovascular blood vessel permeability for the treatment of hypertensive emergency is beginning early clinical trials.

  15. Galectin-3 Serum Levels Are Independently Associated With Microalbuminuria in Chronic Heart Failure Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Iacoviello, Massimo; Aspromonte, Nadia; Leone, Marta; Paradies, Valeria; Antoncecchi, Valeria; Valle, Roberto; Caldarola, Pasquale; Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Gesualdo, Loreto; Serio, Francesca Di

    2015-01-01

    Background: Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a novel biomarker reflecting inflammation status and fibrosis involving worsening of both cardiac and renal functions. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between Gal-3 serum levels and microalbuminuria in a group of chronic heart failure (CHF) outpatients. Patients and Methods: We enrolled CHF outpatients having stable clinical conditions and receiving conventional therapy. All patients underwent clinical evaluation, routine chemistry analysis, echocardiography, and evaluation of the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR). Results: Among the patients enrolled, 61 had microalbuminuria (UACR, 30-299) and 133 normoalbuminuria (UACR, < 30). Patients with normoalbuminuria showed significantly higher levels of Gal-3 than those without (19.9 ± 8.8 vs. 14.6 ± 5.5 ng/mL). The stepwise regression analysis indicated that Gal-3 was the first determinant of microalbuminuria (odds ratio [OR]: 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02 - 1.14, P = 0.012), followed by diabetes (OR 2.14; 95% CI: 1.00 - 4.57; P = 0.049) and high central venous pressure (OR 2.80; 95% CI: 1.04 - 7.58; P= 0.042). Conclusions: Our findings indicate an independent association between Gal-3 levels and microalbuminuria, an early marker of altered renal function. This suggests the possible role of Gal-3 in the progression of cardiorenal syndrome in CHF outpatients. PMID:26870715

  16. Albuminuria induced by exercise in hypertensive type I and type II diabetic patients: a randomised, double-blind study on the effects of acute administration of captopril and nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, G; Giustina, A; Cravarezza, P; Caldonazzo, A; Agabiti-Rosei, E; Giustina, G

    1991-06-01

    Physical exercise can increase urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) in diabetic patients without microalbuminuria at rest (stage II diabetic nephropathy) or with baseline microalbuminuria (stage III diabetic nephropathy). The aim of this study was to compare the acute effects of captopril, an ACE inhibitor, and nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, on exercise-induced microalbuminuria in hypertensive insulin-dependent (Type I) and non-insulin-dependent (Type II) diabetic patients with early stage nephropathy. Non-obese diabetic patients, 13 Type I (7 with stage II and 6 with stage III nephropathy) and 14 Type II (6 with stage II and 8 with stage III nephropathy), with hypertension, WHO stages I-II, underwent five submaximal cycloergometric tests: the first two in basal conditions, the other three after 24 hour administration of captopril (25 mg twice daily), placebo (1 tab twice daily) or nifedipine AR (20 mg twice daily) according to a randomised, double-blind design. Acute administration of both captopril and nifedipine was able to reduce exercise-induced microalbuminuria in hypertensive Type I and Type II diabetic patients regardless of the stage of their nephropathy. Captopril reduced systolic blood pressure less than nifedipine, in both Type I and Type II diabetics, but was more effective than nifedipine in blunting exercise-induced microalbuminuria, especially in Type I diabetics.

  17. [Relevance of chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular prognosis in arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Segura de la Morena, Julián; García Donaire, José Antonio; Ruilope Urioste, Luis Miguel

    2004-06-26

    Recently published guidelines recognize the relevance of the finding of chronic kidney disease in the stratification of risk of the hypertensive patient. Determination of the presence of microalbuminuria and estimation of glomerular filtration rate are mandatory in order to ensure an adequate evaluation of global cardiovascular risks in the hypertensive patient. The presence of subtle elevations of serum creatinine concentrations and/or proteinuria are also potent predictors of a poor cardiovascular prognosis. Clustering of associated risk factors seems to justify the elevated cardiovascular risk observed in patients with essential hypertension and mild alterations of renal function.

  18. [Growth factors in proliferative diabetic retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Ioniţă, M

    1997-01-01

    This work presents the possible implications of the angiogenic growth factors and some cell mediators in the initiation and development of the neovascular proliferation in diabetic retinopathy. According to the physiopathologic theories stated above, that are implied in the generation of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, here are some therapeutic experiments based on the action of the angiogenic growth factors. PMID:9409959

  19. Systematic Review of Digital Imaging Screening Strategies for Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Alex R.; Wallace, David K.; Quinn, Graham E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Retinal imaging with remote interpretation could decrease the number of diagnostic eye examinations that premature infants need for the detection of retinopathy of prematurity and thus decrease the time demand on the relatively small pool of ophthalmologists who perform retinopathy of prematurity examinations. OBJECTIVE Our goal was to review systematically the evidence regarding the reliability, validity, safety, costs, and benefits of retinal imaging to screen infants who are at risk for retinopathy of prematurity. METHODS We searched Medline, the Cochrane library, CINAHL, and the bibliographies of all relevant articles. All English-language studies regardless of design with primary data about our study questions were included. We excluded (1) studies that only included subjects with retinopathy of prematurity, (2) hypothetical models other than cost-effectiveness studies, and (3) validity studies without sufficient data to determine prevalence, sensitivity, and specificity or that only evaluated subjects for 1 component of retinopathy of prematurity (eg, plus disease only). RESULTS Studies of only 1 retinal imaging device (RetCam [Clarity Medical Systems, Inc, Pleasanton, CA]) met the inclusion criteria. There was a wide range in reported sensitivity, but specificity was high. There were several important limitations noted, including the eye as the unit of analysis instead of the individual or variations in the criteria for determining a true-positive or true-negative screening result. The risk of retinal hemorrhage resulting from imaging is low, and systemic effects (eg, bradycardia, hypertension, decreased oxygen saturation) are mild. No generalizable cost-effectiveness data were found. CONCLUSIONS The evidence base is not sufficient to recommend that retinal imaging be routinely adopted by NICUs to identify infants who have serious retinopathy of prematurity. PMID:18829807

  20. Corneal autofluorescence in presence of diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovati, Luigi; Docchio, Franco; Azzolini, Claudio; Van Best, Jaap A.

    1998-06-01

    Recently corneal autofluorescence has been proposed as an ocular diagnostic tool for diabetic retinopathy. The method is based on the sensible increase of the natural fluorescence of corneal tissue within specific wavelength in presence of early stage of diabetic retinopathy. The main advantages of this method are that the corneal autofluorescence has been demonstrated to be not age-related and that the cornea is readily accessible to be investigated. In this study 47 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 51 non-insulin- dependent diabetes mellitus patients aged 20 - 90 years have been considered. Patients were selected from the Eye Clinic of S. Raffaele Hospital. The modified Airlie House classification was used to grade the diabetic retinopathy. Corneal autofluorescence has been measured by using both a specifically designed instrument and the Fluorotron Master. Corneal autofluorescence mean value for each diabetic retinopathy measured by using both the instruments correlated with the retinopathy grade.

  1. Diagnosis, Epidemiology, and Management of Hypertension in Children.

    PubMed

    Rao, Goutham

    2016-08-01

    National guidelines for the diagnosis and management of hypertension in children have been available for nearly 40 years. Unfortunately, knowledge and recognition of the problem by clinicians remain poor. Prevalence estimates are highly variable because of differing standards, populations, and blood pressure (BP) measurement techniques. Estimates in the United States range from 0.3% to 4.5%. Risk factors for primary hypertension include overweight and obesity, male sex, older age, high sodium intake, and African American or Latino ancestry. Data relating hypertension in childhood to later cardiovascular events is currently lacking. It is known that BP in childhood is highly predictive of BP in adulthood. Compelling data about target organ damage is available, including the association of hypertension with left ventricular hypertrophy, carotid-intima media thickness, and microalbuminuria. Guidelines from both the United States and Europe include detailed recommendations for diagnosis and management. Diagnostic standards are based on clinic readings, ambulatory BP monitoring is useful in confirming diagnosis of hypertension and identifying white-coat hypertension, masked hypertension, and secondary hypertension, as well as monitoring response to therapy. Research priorities include the need for reliable prevalence estimates based on diverse populations and data about the long-term impact of childhood hypertension on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Priorities to improve clinical practice include more education among clinicians about diagnosis and management, clinical decision support to aid in diagnosis, and routine use of ambulatory BP monitoring to aid in diagnosis and to monitor response to treatment. PMID:27405770

  2. Statin Use and the Presence of Microalbuminuria. Results from the ERICABEL Trial: A Non-Interventional Epidemiological Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Tol, Arjan; Van Biesen, Wim; Van Laecke, Steven; Bogaerts, Kris; De Lombaert, Koen; Warrinnier, Hans; Vanholder, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Background Microalbuminuria (MAU) is considered as a predictor or marker of cardiovascular and renal events. Statins are widely prescribed to reduce cardiovascular risk and to slow down progression of kidney disease. But statins may also generate tubular MAU. The current observational study evaluated the impact of statin use on the interpretation of MAU as a predictor or marker of cardiovascular or renal disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We used cross-sectional data of ERICABEL, a cohort with 1,076 hypertensive patients. MAU was defined as albuminuria ≥20 mg/l. A propensity score was created to correct for “bias by indication” to receive a statin. As expected, subjects using statins vs. no statins had more cardiovascular risk factors, pointing to bias by indication. Statin users were more likely to have MAU (OR: 2.01, 95%CI: 1.34–3.01). The association between statin use and MAU remained significant after adjusting for the propensity to receive a statin based on cardiovascular risk factors (OR: 1.82, 95%CI: 1.14–2.91). Next to statin use, only diabetes (OR: 1.92, 95%CI: 1.00–3.66) and smoking (OR: 1.49, 95%CI: 0.99–2.26) were associated with MAU. Conclusions Use of statins is independently associated with MAU, even after adjusting for bias by indication to receive a statin. In the hypothesis that this MAU is of tubular origin, statin use can result in incorrect labeling of subjects as having a predictor or marker of cardiovascular or renal risk. In addition, statin use affected the association of established cardiovascular risk factors with MAU, blurring the interpretation of multivariable analyses. PMID:22359611

  3. From malignant hypertension to hypertension-MOD: a modern definition for an old but still dangerous emergency.

    PubMed

    Cremer, A; Amraoui, F; Lip, G Y H; Morales, E; Rubin, S; Segura, J; Van den Born, B J; Gosse, P

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of malignant hypertension has clearly fallen with the advent of anti-hypertensive medication but has remained stable over the past 30-40 years in spite of progress in diagnosis and management of hypertension. A diagnosis of malignant hypertension is usually based on the association of severely elevated blood pressure with a Keith and Wagener stage III or IV retinopathy. We believe that this definition can be reconsidered for several reasons. Although simple and pragmatic, this definition corresponds to a time when there were few techniques for assessment of hypertensive target organ involvement, and does not take into account involvement of kidney, brain and heart; whereas the overall prognosis largely depends on how much they are affected. On the contrary, the acute blood pressure level and especially diastolic should not be a hard diagnostic criterion as it does not itself constitute the prognosis of the condition. We propose to consider that malignant hypertension with retinopathy is only one of a number of possible presentation(s) of acute hypertension with multi organ damage (hypertension multi organ damage (MOD)) and that the recognition of these hypertensive emergencies, when retinopathy is lacking, be based on acute elevation of BP associated with impairment of at least three different target organs. The objective of a new and expanded definition is to facilitate recognition of these true emergencies. The condition is more common than usually perceived and would have a much worse prognosis than the usual forms of hypertension. Early recognition and management of hypertension-MOD are fundamental to any improvement in prognosis.

  4. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Hepatitis C Additional Content Medical News Portal Hypertension By Steven K. Herrine, MD NOTE: This is ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Jaundice in Adults Liver Failure Portal Hypertension Portal hypertension is abnormally high blood pressure in ...

  5. [Secondary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuichi; Shibata, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is a common disease and a crucial predisposing factor of cardiovascular diseases. Approximately 10% of hypertensive patients are secondary hypertension, a pathogenetic factor of which can be identified. Secondary hypertension consists of endocrine, renal, and other diseases. Primary aldosteronism, Cushing's syndrome, pheochromocytoma, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism result in endocrine hypertension. Renal parenchymal hypertension and renovascular hypertension result in renal hypertension. Other diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are also very prevalent in secondary hypertension. It is very crucial to find and treat secondary hypertension at earlier stages since most secondary hypertension is curable or can be dramatically improved by specific treatment. One should keep in mind that screening of secondary hypertension should be done at least once in a daily clinical practice. PMID:26619670

  6. Electrophysiological changes in juvenile diabetics without retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Juen, S; Kieselbach, G F

    1990-03-01

    Several components of the electroretinogram were studied in 31 juvenile diabetics and 15 age-matched normal controls. The diabetic group consisted of 18 patients without retinopathy and 13 with mild background retinopathy. Oscillatory potentials were measured at low-stimulation energies. Significantly reduced amplitudes and component-specific delayed peak implicit times were found in both diabetic groups compared with the data from the controls. Similar results were obtained in the photopic and scotopic electroretinogram. From these findings, we suggest that retinal dysfunction is already present in juvenile diabetics without photographic evidence of retinopathy after a mean duration of diabetes of 7 years. PMID:2310337

  7. Changing prevalence of retinopathy in newly diagnosed non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wang, W Q; Ip, T P; Lam, K S

    1998-03-01

    In this retrospective study, the prevalence of chronic microangiopathic complications was determined in 474 Chinese patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) who presented within 1 year of diagnosis to the diabetes clinic from January 1990 to December 1996. Mean age (+/- S.E.) was 53.6 (+/- 0.6) years. The overall prevalence of retinopathy was 21.9%. A significant increase was observed from 1990 to 1994 (P < 0.005), with the prevalence being 14.8, 13.0, 24.5, 32.3 and 35.4%, respectively, in consecutive years. A decreasing prevalence was seen from 1994 to 1996 (P < 0.001), being 8.2 and 7.4% in 1995 and 1996, respectively. A total of 95% of patients had nonproliferative retinopathy--proliferative retinopathy was found in 5% only. The overall prevalence of clinical nephropathy (proteinuria > 0.5 g/day) was 3.7%. Clinical neuropathy (increased vibration perception threshold) was found in 12.8% of patients. Patients with retinopathy and neuropathy were older (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.005, respectively) than those without the complications and systolic hypertension was more prevalent in patients with retinopathy (P < 0.05). In conclusion, a high prevalence of diabetic microangiopathic complications, especially of retinopathy, is present in newly diagnosed NIDDM patients in our population. It remains to be determined whether the changing prevalence of retinopathy at diagnosis bears any relationship to the increasing public awareness of diabetes and its complications in Hong Kong in recent years. Examination for chronic microangiopathic complications should be carried out in all newly diagnosed NIDDM patients.

  8. Retinopathy and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study).

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Juan E; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker-Ostroff, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan C; Townsend, Raymond R; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W; Xie, Dawei

    2015-11-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience other diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether retinopathy predicts future CVD events in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this ancillary investigation, 2,605 participants of the CRIC study were invited to participate, and nonmydriatic fundus photographs were obtained in 1,936 subjects. Using standard protocols, presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive, or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed at a central photograph reading center by trained graders masked to study participant's information. Patients with a self-reported history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. Incident CVD events were adjudicated using medical records. Kidney function measurements, traditional and nontraditional risk factors, for CVD were obtained. Presence and severity of retinopathy were associated with increased risk of development of any CVD in this population of CKD patients, and these associations persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. We also found a direct relation between increased venular diameter and risk of development of CVD; however, the relation was not statistically significant after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In conclusion, the presence of retinopathy was associated with future CVD events, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. Assessment of retinal morphology may be valuable in assessing risk of CVD in patients with CKD, both clinically and in research settings.

  9. Solar retinopathy without abnormal exposure: case report.

    PubMed

    Stock, Ricardo Alexandre; Savaris, Simone Louise; de Lima Filho, Erasmo Carlos Rodrigues; Bonamigo, Elcio Luiz

    2013-01-01

    Solar retinopathy is photochemical damage to the retina, usually caused, by direct or indirect solar observation resulting from the use of hallucinogenic drugs, mental disorders or during eclipses. There may be a loss of visual acuity. We report the case of a 38-year-old patient who presented with a clinical diagnosis of solar retinopathy in the left eye, no prior history of sun exposure, normal visual acuity and complaints of metamorphopsia. Optical coherence tomography showed a rupture of the retinal pigment epithelium, confirming class II solar retinopathy. Visual acuity tends to normalize after 3 to 9 months, but not always. Thus, there is a real need to educate people about using eye protection during sun exposure especially given that some people may be highly susceptible to retinal damage, which was presumably the case for this patient. Finally, we note the importance of optical coherence tomography in diagnosing solar retinopathy. PMID:23828473

  10. Solar retinopathy without abnormal exposure: case report.

    PubMed

    Stock, Ricardo Alexandre; Savaris, Simone Louise; de Lima Filho, Erasmo Carlos Rodrigues; Bonamigo, Elcio Luiz

    2013-01-01

    Solar retinopathy is photochemical damage to the retina, usually caused, by direct or indirect solar observation resulting from the use of hallucinogenic drugs, mental disorders or during eclipses. There may be a loss of visual acuity. We report the case of a 38-year-old patient who presented with a clinical diagnosis of solar retinopathy in the left eye, no prior history of sun exposure, normal visual acuity and complaints of metamorphopsia. Optical coherence tomography showed a rupture of the retinal pigment epithelium, confirming class II solar retinopathy. Visual acuity tends to normalize after 3 to 9 months, but not always. Thus, there is a real need to educate people about using eye protection during sun exposure especially given that some people may be highly susceptible to retinal damage, which was presumably the case for this patient. Finally, we note the importance of optical coherence tomography in diagnosing solar retinopathy.

  11. Telehealth practice recommendations for diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Cavallerano, Jerry; Lawrence, Mary G; Zimmer-Galler, Ingrid; Bauman, Wendell; Bursell, Sven; Gardner, W Kelley; Horton, Mark; Hildebrand, Lloyd; Federman, Jay; Carnahan, Lisa; Kuzmak, Peter; Peters, John M; Darkins, Adam; Ahmed, Jehanara; Aiello, Lloyd M; Aiello, Lloyd P; Buck, Gary; Cheng, Ying Ling; Cunningham, Denise; Goodall, Eric; Hope, Ned; Huang, Eugene; Hubbard, Larry; Janczewski, Mark; Lewis, J W L; Matsuzaki, Hiro; McVeigh, Francis L; Motzno, Jordana; Parker-Taillon, Diane; Read, Robert; Soliz, Peter; Szirth, Bernard; Vigersky, Robert A; Ward, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Telehealth holds the promise of increased adherence to evidenced-based medicine and improved consistency of care. Goals for an ocular telehealth program include preserving vision, reducing vision loss, and providing better access to medicine. Establishing recommendations for an ocular telehealth program may improve clinical outcomes and promote informed and reasonable patient expectations. This document addresses current diabetic retinopathy telehealth clinical and administrative issues and provides recommendations for designing and implementing a diabetic retinopathy ocular telehealth care program. The recommendations also form the basis for evaluating diabetic retinopathy telehealth techniques and technologies. Recommendations in this document are based on careful reviews of current evidence, medical literature and clinical practice. They do not, however, replace sound medical judgment or traditional clinical decision-making. "Telehealth Practice Recommendations for Diabetic Retinopathy" will be annually reviewed and updated to reflect evolving technologies and clinical guidelines. PMID:15689653

  12. [Proliferative diabetic retinopathy -- therapeutic approach (clinical case)].

    PubMed

    Burcea, M; Muşat, Ovidiu; Mahdi, Labib; Gheorghe, Andreea; Spulbar, F; Gobej, I

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 54 year old pacient diagnosed with neglected insulin dependent diabetes and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Surgery was recommended and we practiced posterior vitrectomy, endolaser and heavy silicone oil endotamponade. Post-operative evolution was favorable.

  13. Diabetic Retinopathy in Native and Nonnative Canadians

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Stuart A.; McKenna, Anne; Mozejko, Sheila; Fick, Gordon H.

    2007-01-01

    High prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes are being observed in native Canadian communities. It is believed that native populations have a higher prevalence rate of vascular complications than nonnatives. The Southern Alberta Study of Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) examined the prevalence and incidence of DR and associated metabolic abnormalities in native and nonnative subjects. Prevalence rates of DR in type 2 diabetic native and nonnative subjects were identical, with a prevalence rate of 40%. Native subjects with retinopathy, however, tended to have more advanced changes of retinopathy compared to the nonnative subjects. Key factors such as A1c, blood pressure, duration of diabetes, and lipid values were not significantly different between the two cohorts. These data indicate that ethnicity does play a role in the development and severity of DR but potential risk factors that may affect the development of retinopathy are not significantly different between native and nonnative groups. PMID:18317512

  14. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of <140/90 mmHg, which is a similar target to that proposed for individuals without diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data.

  15. Retinal fibrosis in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sayon; Amin, Shruti; Roy, Sumon

    2016-01-01

    In response to injury, reparative processes are triggered to restore the damaged tissue; however, such processes are not always successful in rebuilding the original state. The formation of fibrous connective tissue is known as fibrosis, a hallmark of the reparative process. For fibrosis to be successful, delicately balanced cellular events involving cell proliferation, cell migration, and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling must occur in a highly orchestrated manner. While successful repair may result in a fibrous scar, this often restores structural stability and functionality to the injured tissue. However, depending on the functionality of the injured tissue, a fibrotic scar can have a devastating effect. For example, in the retina, fibrotic scarring may compromise vision and ultimately lead to blindness. In this review, we discuss some of the retinal fibrotic complications and highlight mechanisms underlying the development of retinal fibrosis in diabetic retinopathy.

  16. Burden of Diabetes Related Complications Among Hypertensive and Non Hypertensive Diabetics: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kesavamoorthy, Goutham; Singh, Awnish K; Sharma, Shruti; Kasav, Jyoti Bala; Joshi, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes and hypertension are the conditions with overlapping risk factors and complications. Objective of present study was to compare the burden of complications of diabetes among hypertensive and non hypertensive diabetes individuals. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at Saveetha medical college and hospital, Chennai, India. A total of 100 diabetics having hypertension and 50 non-hypertensive diabetic patients were enrolled on the basis of purposive sampling. Information about sociodemograpic characteristics, general health, health distress, diabetes symptoms, communication with physician, healthcare utilization and lifetime occurrence of diabetes related complications. Mean, standard deviation and median of continuous variables and proportion of categorical variables were recorded. Results Average age of the hypertensive diabetes patients (M=57; SD=11) was higher than non hypertensive diabetes patients (M=52; SD=11) which was statistically significant (p=.009). Diabetic neuropathy was reported by 45% of the hypertensive and 38% of the non-hypertensive diabetics. Mean self reported general health score was higher among hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3.4; SD=1) in comparison to non hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3; SD=1) and it was found statistically significant (p=.03) indicating towards poor self health perception among hypertensive’s. Results of the study have shown that the proportion of participants who have prepared any list of questions before visiting doctor’s clinic (fairly often to always) was significantly higher among hypertensive diabetics (30%) in comparison to non-hypertensive diabetics (14%). Conclusion The proportion of participants reporting diabetes neuropathy and retinopathy was higher among hypertensive diabetics in comparison to non hypertensive diabetics. PMID:26500926

  17. A survey of high risk factors affecting retinopathy in full-term infants in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Na; He, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Li-Ping

    2012-01-01

    AIM To investigate the possible relationship between the influencing factors occurring before and during birth in full-term infants and the outcome of retinopathy. METHODS Totally 816 full-term infants admitted in the neonate intensive unit of Boai Hospital of Zhongshan between 1 May, 2008 and 30 June, 2011 were included in the study. Fundus examination was performed and evaluated individually on them at the age of 48 hours after delivery, 2 weeks and 1 month. Some possible risk factors happening prenatally or during delivery such as pregnant related hypertension, placenta previa, placental abruption etc, as well as some neonatal risk factors such as neonatal asphyxia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), low birth weight etc, were recorded and evacuated. Then the effect of the risk factors of full-term infants on retinopathy was studied. RESULTS The incidence of retinal hemorrhage of full-term infants with prenatal pregnant related hypertension (PRH) of the mother (43.6%) was significantly higher than that of full-term infants without (8.0%). (P<0.001). The incidence of retinal hemorrhage of full-term infants with neonatal asphyxia and /or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE)(29.3%) was significantly higher than that of those without (15.7%), but correlation was not found between the severity of retina hemorrhage and the degree of hypoxic disease. A pale color of optic disc was associated with a low birth weight of full-term infant. Full-term infants with birth weigh less than 2500g had a significant higher incidence of retinopathy than those with birth weight equal or more than 2500g ( P<0.001). CONCLUSION The main influencing factors which lead to retinopathy of high risk full-term infants are prenatal factors such as PRH, and some neonatal risk factors such as asphyxia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, and low birth weight. PMID:22762045

  18. The Effect of Resting Heart Rate on the New Onset of Microalbuminuria in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Schmieder, Roland E.; Bramlage, Peter; Haller, Hermann; Ruilope, Luis M.; Böhm, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The association between resting heart rate and new-onset microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes is not clear. The objective of the current analysis was to assess the relationship between heart rate and incidence of microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes. Data from the Randomised Olmesartan and Diabetes Microalbuminuria Prevention (ROADMAP) study were retrospectively analyzed. New-onset microalbuminuria was documented and related to heart rate as recorded at baseline and last assessment, and the mean of the measurements taken during the double-blind part of the ROADMAP trial. Patients (n = 4299) had a mean age of 57.8 ± 8.7 years and 46.3% were male. Characteristics were not different between the olmesartan and the placebo groups, except for a higher systolic blood pressure (136.7 vs 135.7 mm Hg; P = 0.04) and albumin creatinine ratio (5.9 vs 5.5; P = 0.03). Increased risk of microalbuminuria was found with increasing heart rate, independent of whether baseline [highest vs lowest quartile odds ratio (OR) 1.39; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03–1.87; P = 0.032], last assessment (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.26–2.31; P = 0.001), or mean heart rate was considered (OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.30–2.41; P = 0.0003). The greater risk of new-onset microalbuminuria with a high baseline heart rate was also found when data were adjusted for mean systolic blood pressure (OR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.00–1.82; P = 0.0496; interaction P < 0.0001). Although there was no risk increase with baseline heart rate in the placebo group (P = 0.8253 for trend), microalbuminuria was less frequent in patients receiving olmesartan in the low heart rate quartiles (P = 0.002 for trend). A low heart rate reduces the risk of patients with type 2 diabetes developing microalbuminuria, independent of blood pressure. The data demonstrate potential benefits of reducing the heart rate of type 2 diabetes patients, and indicate that olmesartan

  19. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetic retinopathy among inpatients with diabetes: the diabetic retinopathy inpatient study (DRIPS)

    PubMed Central

    Kovarik, Jessica J; Eller, Andrew W; Willard, Lauren A; Ding, Jiaxi; Johnston, Jann M; Waxman, Evan L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient diabetic population in the USA and to determine the barriers to ophthalmic examinations and treatment among this population. Research design and methods A cross-sectional analysis of 113 inpatients with diabetes mellitus admitted to an inner city community teaching hospital in Pittsburgh. Digital fundus photographs of the posterior pole were taken of each eye after pharmacological dilation. Presence, absence and severity of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema were graded on the basis of internationally accepted criteria. An investigator-administered questionnaire and review of the medical record were used to obtain data about patient demographics, clinical characteristics and barriers to ophthalmic care. The association between these data and the presence of diabetic retinopathy was tested. Results The estimated prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient population was 44% (95% CI 34% to 53%). The prevalence of previously undiagnosed diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening retinopathy was 25% (95% CI 17% to 33%) and 19% (95% CI 11% to 26%), respectively. Renal disease was independently associated with the presence of diabetic retinopathy (OR, 3.86; 95% CI 1.22 to 12.27), as well as a longer duration of diabetes (OR, 1.08 per year; 95% CI 1.014 to 1.147). Diabetic retinopathy was seen in 15 of 17 patients admitted with diabetic foot ulcers or osteomyelitis. Frequently reported barriers to ophthalmic examinations included lack of transportation and physical disability. Conclusions The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient population is likely significantly higher than in the general diabetic population in the USA. These patients have barriers to care that need to be addressed to make standard of care ophthalmic examinations and treatment possible in this population. PMID:26925238

  20. Genetic components in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Bibhudatta; Swaroop, Anand; Kandpal, Raj P

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious complication of diabetes, which is fast reaching epidemic proportions worldwide. While tight glycemic control remains the standard of care for preventing the progression of DR, better insights into DR etiology require understanding its genetic basis, which in turn may assist in the design of novel treatments. During the last decade, genomic medicine is increasingly being applied to common multifactorial diseases such as diabetes and age-related macular degeneration. The contribution of genetics to the initiation and progression of DR has been recognized for some time, but the involvement of specific genes and genetic variants remains elusive. Several investigations are currently underway for identifying DR susceptibility loci through linkage studies, candidate gene approaches, and genome-wide association studies. Advent of next generation sequencing and high throughput genomic technologies, development of novel bioinformatics tools and collaborations among research teams should facilitate such investigations. Here, we review the current state of genetic studies in DR and discuss reported findings in the context of biochemical, cell biological and therapeutic advances. We propose the development of a consortium in India for genetic studies with large cohorts of patients and controls from limited geographical areas to stratify the impact of the environment. Uniform guidelines should be established for clinical phenotyping and data collection. These studies would permit identification of genetic loci for DR susceptibility in the Indian population and should be valuable for better diagnosis and prognosis, and for clinical management of this blinding disease. PMID:26953025

  1. Hypertension - overview

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    If left untreated, hypertension can lead to the thickening of arterial walls causing its lumen, or blood passage way, to narrow in diameter. ... the narrowed arterial openings. In addition, people with hypertension may be more susceptible to stroke.

  2. Malignant hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... NY: McGraw Hill; 2008:chap 280. Linas SL. Hypertensive crisis: emergency and urgency. In: Vincent J-L, Abraham ... Saunders; 2011:chap 88. Shayne P, Lynch CA. Hypertensive crisis. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine: Clinical Essentials . ...

  3. ERK5 Mediated Signalling in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuexiu; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the lead among causes of blindness in North America. Glucose-induced endothelial injury is the most important cause of diabetic retinopathy and other vascular complications. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (BMK1), is a member of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) family. Physiologically, it is critical for cardiovascular development and maintenance of the endothelial cell integrity. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 is protective for endothelial cells under stimulation and stress. Decreased activation of ERK5 results in increased endothelial cell death. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 signaling may be subject to alteration by hyperglycemia, while signaling pathway including ERK5 may be subject to alteration during pathogenesis of diabetic complications. In this review, the role of ERK5 in diabetic macro- and microvascular complications with a focus on diabetic retinopathy are summarized and discussed. PMID:25861671

  4. Eye Conditions in Older Adults: Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Scott; Iroku-Malize, Tochi

    2016-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is related to neovascularization of the retina stimulated by an elevated blood glucose level. This can lead to macular edema, vascular hemorrhage, retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma. Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness in the United States, and is estimated to affect between 28% and 40% of patients older than 40 years. Significant visual deficit from diabetic retinopathy can lead to social isolation of older individuals by limiting driving, the ability to leave the home or remain in the home safely, and the ability to watch television or read. Primary and secondary prevention includes adequate control of A1c levels. Screening is important for early detection of ocular damage and intervention. Retinal benefits of therapy may predict cardiovascular benefits over a longer period. PMID:27348530

  5. An effective programme to systematic diabetic retinopathy screening in order to reduce diabetic retinopathy blindness.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, Evangelia; Dereklis, Dimitrios; Oikonomidis, Panayiotis; Grixti, Andre; Vineeth Kumar, Balakrishna; Prasad, Som

    2014-01-01

    The number of people identified with diabetes in England increased by nearly 5% during 2011-2012 to well over 2.5 million. During 2011-2012 the NHS Diabetic Eye Screening Programme screened more than 1.9 million people. In general, the UK is doing very well with its DR screening targets. It is a world leader in diabetic retinopathy screening, having offered 85.7% of eligible diabetic patients the screening programme. However, the target is 100% and efforts are still being made to improve screening locally. Our aim is to evaluate the prevalence of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR) (proliferative retinopathy or maculopathy), the number of patients needing laser treatment or vitrectomy and registered blind in the last 12 months in a defined population. We did a twelve-month retrospective database review at the Systematic Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Service at Wirral University Hospital Trust, United Kingdom. The effectiveness of different screening modalities has been widely investigated. UK studies show sensitivity levels for the detection of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy of 41%-67% for general practitioners, 48%-82% for optometrists, 65% for ophthalmologists, and 27%-67% for diabetologists and hospital physicians using direct ophthalmoscopy. Sensitivity for the detection of referable retinopathy by optometrists have been found to be 77%-100%, with specificity of 94%-100%. Photographic methods currently use digital images with subsequent grading by trained individuals. Sensitivity for the detection of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy have been found 87%-100% for a variety of trained personnel reading mydriatic 45° retinal photographs, with specificities of 83%-96%. The British Diabetic Association (Diabetes UK) has established standard values for any diabetic retinopathy screening programme of at least 80% sensitivity and 95% specificity. We used descriptive analyses to characterise the study population and patterns of diabetic

  6. Replication Analysis for Severe Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Michael A.; Tikhomirov, Anna; Ramalingam, Sudha; Lee, Kristine E.; Hosseini, S. M.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Lussier, Yves A.; Cox, Nancy J.; Nicolae, Dan L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to attempt to replicate the top single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations from a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) for the sight-threatening complications of diabetic retinopathy in an independent cohort of diabetic subjects from the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy (WESDR). Methods. This study included 469 type 1 diabetic, Caucasian subjects from WESDR. Cases (n = 208) were defined by prior laser treatment for either proliferative diabetic retinopathy or diabetic macular edema. Controls (n = 261) were all other subjects in the cohort. Three hundred eighty-nine SNPs were tested for association using the Illumina GoldenGate custom array. A retinopathy-only subanalysis was conducted in 437 subjects by removing those with end-stage renal disease. Evaluation for association between cases and controls was conducted by using chi-square tests. A combined analysis incorporated the results from WESDR with the prior GWAS. Results. No associations were significant at a genome-wide level. The analysis did identify SNPs that can be pursued in future replication studies. The top association was at rs4865047, an intronic SNP, in the gene CEP135 (P value 2.06 × 10−5). The top association from the subanalysis was at rs1902491 (P value 2.81 × 10−5), a SNP that sits upstream of the gene NPY2R. Conclusions. This study nominates several novel genetic loci that may be associated with severe diabetic retinopathy. In order to confirm these findings, replication and extension in additional cohorts will be necessary as susceptibility alleles for diabetic retinopathy appear to be of modest effect. PMID:22427569

  7. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy in typical retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Preethi, Srinivasaraghavan; Rajalakshmi, Adithyapuram Ramachandran

    2015-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman with typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP) for 9 years and a positive family history of night blindness was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM). She developed proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) during the course of disease. She was promptly managed with pan retinal photocoagulation (PRP). PDR developing in a case of typical RP is extremely rare and has not been reported in the literature to date. Recognition of this rare, vision threatening complication, points out a definite need to further look deep into the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26021380

  8. Retinopathy of Prematurity in Triplets

    PubMed Central

    Şekeroğlu, Mehmet Ali; Hekimoğlu, Emre; Çelik, Ülker; Kale, Yusuf; Baş, Ahmet Yağmur

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the incidence, severity and risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in triplets. Materials and Methods: The medical records of consecutive premature triplets who had been screened for ROP in a single maternity hospital were analyzed and presence and severity of ROP; birth weight, gender, gestational age of the infant; route of delivery and the mode of conception were recorded. Results: A total of 54 triplets (40 males, 14 females) who were screened for ROP between March 2010 and February 2013 were recruited for the study. All triplets were delivered by Caesarean section and 36 (66.7%) were born following an assisted conception. During follow-up, seven (13%) of the infants developed ROP of any stage and two (3.7%) required laser photocoagulation. The mean gestational age of triplets with ROP was 27.6±1.5 (27-31) weeks whereas it was 32.0±1.5 (30-34) weeks in those without ROP (p=0.002). The mean birth weights of triplets with and without ROP were 1290.0±295.2 (970-1600) g and 1667.5±222.2 (1130-1960) g, respectively (p<0.001). The presence of ROP was not associated with gender (p=0.358) or mode of conception (p=0.674). Conclusion: ROP in triplets seems to be mainly related to low gestational age and low birth weight. Further prospective randomized studies are necessary to demonstrate risk factors of ROP in triplets and to determine if and how gemelarity plays a role in the development of ROP. PMID:27800273

  9. [Childhood hypertension].

    PubMed

    Takemura, Tsukasa

    2015-11-01

    For accurate diagnosis of childhood hypertension, selection of appropriate manchette size according to the child age and the circumstantial size of upper limb is essentially important. In addition, except for the emergency case of hypertension, repeated measurement of blood pressure would be desirable in several weeks interval. Recently, childhood hypertension might be closely related to the abnormality of maternal gestational period caused by the strict diet and the maternal smoking. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease(DOHaD) theory is now highlighted in the pathogenesis of adulthood hypertension. To prevent hypertension of small-for-date baby in later phase of life, maternal education for child nursing should be conducted. In children, secondary hypertension caused by renal, endocrinologic, or malignant disease is predominant rather than idiopathic hypertension. PMID:26619664

  10. [Cardiovascular risk stratification and therapeutic implications in arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Handschin, Anja; Henny-Fullin, Katja; Buess, Daniel; Dieterle, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    To improve the prevention of cardiovascular complications and events in hypertensive patients, it is of major importance to estimate the patient's individual risk for cardiovascular events. Antihypertensive treatment should not only be based on blood pressure values anymore, but also on the patient's comorbidities and risk profile. Risk stratification takes into account cardiovascular risk factors, diabetes, asymptomatic organ damage and established cardiovascular or renal disease. The most important markers for asymptomatic organ damage which should be searched for are microalbuminuria and LVH. Current guidelines emphasize the importance of the adaption and selection of treatment according to asymptomatic and established organ damage and provide assistance for treatment decisions. They focus also on the different non-pharmacological therapy options and lifestyle modifications. The goal of this article is to summarize the most important innovations and to point out the importance of simple tools for the implementation of cardiovascular risk stratification in hypertensive patients.

  11. Successful Treatment with an Antihypertensive Drug Regimen Including Eplerenone in a Patient with Malignant Phase Hypertension with Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumihiko; Goto, Masahide; Wada, Yoshiki; Hasebe, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 28-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the treatment of congestive heart failure and severe hypertension. The patient was diagnosed with malignant phase hypertension based on the presence of marked hypertension with left ventricular hypertrophy, exudate retinopathy, and renal failure. Intensive therapy for hypertension and heart failure with a combination of antihypertensive drugs including nitroglycerin, nifedipine, eplerenone and candesartan successfully lowered his blood pressure and further improved the renal function. Eplerenone could be one of the choices of antihypertensive drugs in combination therapy in patients with malignant phase hypertension with progressive heart and renal failure.

  12. Kidney histology and clinical correlates in malignant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kadiri, S; Thomas, J O

    1993-02-01

    In this clinico-pathologic study, post-mortem kidney material from 30 cases with malignant hypertension (MHT) defined as severe hypertension with bilateral retinal haemorrhages and exudates (grade III retinopathy) with (grade IV retinopathy) or without papilloedema, were studied. Mucoid intimal proliferation (MIP) in interlobular artery and ischaemic collapse of the glomerular tufts occurred in all cases, whereas fibrinoid necrosis (FN) was seen in only 24 (80%) of the cases. FN was not correlated nor associated with sex, age, blood pressure, retinopathy or serum creatinine. Tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis occurred in 24 (80%) and correlated best (rS = 0.8, p < 0.05) with serum creatinine in comparison to glomerular sclerosis (rS = 0.6, p = n.s), fibrinoid necrosis (rS = 0.49, p = n.s) and epithelial crescents (rS = 0.43, p = n.s). This study provides histologic evidence of lack of difference between grades III and IV retinopathy, shows MIP as the more characteristic vascular lesion in MHT and also, good correlation between renal function and tubulointerstitial involvement.

  13. Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Doroszko, Adrian; Janus, Agnieszka; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a severe medical condition which is estimated to appear in 9-18% of hypertensive patients. Due to higher cardiovascular risk, this disorder requires special diagnosis and treatment. The heterogeneous etiology, risk factors and comorbidities of resistant hypertension stand in need of sophisticated evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and select the best therapeutic options, which should consider lifestyle modifications as well as pharmacological and interventional treatment. After having excluded pseudohypertension, inappropriate blood pressure measurement and control as well as the white coat effect, suspicion of resistant hypertension requires an analysis of drugs which the hypertensive patient is treated with. According to one definition - ineffective treatment with 3 or more antihypertensive drugs including diuretics makes it possible to diagnose resistant hypertension. A multidrug therapy including angiotensin - converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, diuretics, long-acting calcium channel blockers and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists has been demonstrated to be effective in resistant hypertension treatment. Nevertheless, optional, innovative therapies, e.g. a renal denervation or baroreflex activation, may create a novel pathway of blood pressure lowering procedures. The right diagnosis of this disease needs to eliminate the secondary causes of resistant hypertension e.g. obstructive sleep apnea, atherosclerosis and renal or hormonal disorders. This paper briefly summarizes the identification of the causes of resistant hypertension and therapeutic strategies, which may contribute to the proper diagnosis and an improvement of the long term management of resistant hypertension.

  14. Proliferative retinopathies: animal models and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Villacampa, Pilar; Haurigot, Virginia; Bosch, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathies are the leading causes of blindness in Western societies. The development of new, more efficacious treatments that take advantage of recent advances in the fields of gene and cell therapy requires further investigations on the mechanisms underlying disease onset and progression, and adequate animal models that recapitulate the pathogenesis of human proliferative retinopathy and allow evaluation of the long-term therapeutic benefits that these therapies can offer. Unfortunately, most models of retinal neovascularization have short-term evolution and diabetic rodents show a very mild retinal phenotype, limited to non-proliferative changes, and do not develop proliferative retinopathy at all. Transgenic mice overexpressing Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) in the retina (TgIGF-I) constitute the only rodent model currently available that develops most of the retinal alterations observed in diabetic eyes, with a temporal evolution that resembles that of the human disease. TgIGF-I have retinal vascular alterations that progress as animals age from non-proliferative to proliferative disease, making these mice an excellent model of proliferative retinopathy that, due to its slow progression, allows long-term evaluation of novel antiangiogenic therapies. At the molecular level, transgenic retinas recapitulate a variety of changes that are also observed in diabetic retinas, which reinforces the validity of this model. In addition to vascular and glial alterations, Tg-IGF-I mice show progressive neurodegeneration that leads to blindness in old animals. Thus, TgIGF-I are a useful model for testing the long-term efficacy and safety of innovative antiangiogenic, glial-modulating and neuroprotective therapies for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and other retinal proliferative disorders.

  15. [Endocrine hypertension].

    PubMed

    Takeda, R

    1993-03-01

    Endocrine Hypertension, is, in a narrow sense, defined as adrenal hypertension, including mainly pheochromocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, a syndrome of primary aldosteronism and it's related mineralocorticoid excess disorders. In memory of a great contribution to hypertensiology by the late Prof. Murakami, who was the first author to write on pheochromocytoma in Japan, this paper is dedicated to reviewing the current status of adrenal hypertension in Japan from the epidemiological viewpoint, putting emphasis upon the clinical characteristics of aged patients with adrenal hypertension. Secondly, some topics in the research field of each adrenal hypertension are briefly introduced. Thirdly, our recent data are presented, showing 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-HSD) mRNA expression in resistance vessels and decreased 11 beta-HSD activities in vessels in SHR which supports the hypothesis that there might exist a subtype identified as partial impairment of 11 beta-HSD in patients with essential hypertension. PMID:8331819

  16. Mineralocorticoid hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 10 – 25% of the population and is an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. The renin-angiotensin system is frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension, be it primary or secondary. The prevalence of primary aldosteronism increases with the severity of hypertension, from 2% in patients with grade 1 hypertension to 20% among resistant hypertensives. Mineralcorticoid hypertension includes a spectrum of disorders ranging from renin-producing pathologies (renin-secreting tumors, malignant hypertension, coarctation of aorta), aldosterone-producing pathologies (primary aldosteronism – Conns syndrome, familial hyperaldosteronism 1, 2, and 3), non-aldosterone mineralocorticoid producing pathologies (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Liddle syndrome, deoxycorticosterone-secreting tumors, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormones (ACTH) syndrome, congenitalvadrenal hyperplasia), and drugs with mineraocorticoid activity (locorice, carbenoxole therapy) to glucocorticoid receptor resistance syndromes. Clinical presentation includes hypertension with varying severity, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. Ratio of plasma aldosterone concentraion to plasma renin activity remains the best screening tool. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling is the best diagnostic test coupled with a CT scan. Treatment is either surgical (adrenelectomy) for unilateral adrenal disease versus medical therapy for idiopathic, ambiguous, or bilateral disease. Medical therapy focuses on blood pressure control and correction of hypokalemia using a combination of anti-hypertensives (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers) and potassium-raising therapies (mineralcorticoid receptor antagonist or potassium sparing diuretics). Direct aldosterone synthetase antagonists represent a promising future therapy. PMID:22145132

  17. Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: Development and Progression.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Chi-Juei; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chung-May; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wang, I-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of current study aims to investigate the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a nationwide population-based cohort in Taiwan. Newly diagnosed DN patients and age- and sex-matched controls were identified from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2010. We studied the effects of age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), and medications on the development of nonproliferative DR (NPDR), proliferative DR (PDR), and diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients with DN. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of the development of DR. Our results show that the adjusted HRs of NPDR and PDR were 5.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.68-5.37) and 9.7 (95% CI = 8.15-11.5), respectively, in patients with DN as compared with patients in the non-DN cohort. At 5-year follow-up, patients with DN showed an increased HR of NPDR progression to PDR (HR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.68-3.03), and the major comorbidities were hypertension (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.10-1.38 with NPDR; HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.02-1.72 with PDR) and DPN (HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.72-2.41 in NPDR; HR = 2.95, 95% CI = 2.16-4.03 in PDR). Dyslipidemia increased the HR of developing NPDR but not PDR or DME. Moreover, DN did not significantly affect DME development (HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 0.87-2.48) or progression (HR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.11-1.20). We concluded that DN was an independent risk factor for DR development and progression; however, DN did not markedly affect DME development in this study, and the potential association between these disorders requires further investigation. PMID:27564383

  18. Hypertensive emergencies.

    PubMed

    Feitosa-Filho, Gilson Soares; Lopes, Renato Delascio; Poppi, Nilson Tavares; Guimarães, Hélio Penna

    2008-09-01

    Emergencies and hypertensive crises are clinical situations which may represent more than 25% of all medical emergency care. Considering such high prevalence, physicians should be prepared to correctly identify these crises and differentiate between urgent and emergent hypertension. Approximately 3% of all visits to emergency rooms are due to significant elevation of blood pressure. Across the spectrum of blood systemic arterial pressure, hypertensive emergency is the most critical clinical situation, thus requiring special attention and care. Such patients present with high blood pressure and signs of acute specific target organ damage (such as acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, acute pulmonary edema, eclampsia, and stroke). Key elements of diagnosis and specific treatment for the different presentations of hypertensive emergency will be reviewed in this article. The MedLine and PubMed databases were searched for pertinent abstracts, using the key words "hypertensive crises" and "hypertensive emergencies". Additional references were obtained from review articles. Available English language clinical trials, retrospective studies and review articles were identified, reviewed and summarized in a simple and practical way. The hypertensive crisis is a clinical situation characterized by acute elevation of blood pressure followed by clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms may be mild (headache, dizziness, tinnitus) or severe (dyspnea, chest pain, coma or death). If the patient presents with mild symptoms, but without acute specific target organ damage, diagnosis is hypertensive urgency. However, if severe signs and symptoms and acute specific target organ damage are present, then the patient is experiencing a hypertensive emergency. Some patients arrive at the emergency rooms with high blood pressure, but without any other sign or symptom. In these cases, they usually are not taking their medications correctly. Therefore, this is not a

  19. Hypertensive Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Bae

    2014-01-01

    An exclusive interview by Prof. Jeong Bae Park conducted with Dr. Rhian M. Touyz in Seoul while she was visiting for the Korean Society of Hypertension, May 10, 2014. In this interview, Dr. Touyz explains and describes hypertensive vasculopathy. PMID:26587442

  20. Retinopathy secondary to radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Groomer, A.E.; Gutwein, D.E. )

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses a case of radiotherapy-induced retinopathy following treatment of squamous cell carcinoma. Treatment of the carcinoma with external beam radiotherapy to the supraorbital region and base of the skull was followed by the onset of retinopathy. The sensory retina, as well as other central nervous system tissues, is highly resistant to radiation damage; however, the retinal vasculature is extremely sensitive to radiation damage, producing a retinopathy that is characteristic of other vascular occlusive diseases. Management is discussed.

  1. [Resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2008-04-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as a persistent blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg despite the use of three antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic, is unusual. The diagnosis requires ruling out initially pseudoresistance and a lack of compliance with treatment. Ambulatory blood pressure recording allow the recognition of white coat hypertension. When there is a clinical or laboratory suspicion, secondary causes of hypertension should be discarded. Excessive salt intake, the presence of concomitant diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, obesity, and psychiatric conditions such as panic attacks, anxiety and depression, should also be sought. The presence of target organ damage requires a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. Recent clinical studies indicate that the administration of aldosterone antagonists as a fourth therapeutic line provides significant additional blood pressure reduction, when added to previous antihypertensive regimens in subjects with resistant hypertension. The possible blood pressure lowering effects of prolonged electrical activation of carotid baroreceptors is under investigation. PMID:18769797

  2. [Resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2008-04-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as a persistent blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg despite the use of three antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic, is unusual. The diagnosis requires ruling out initially pseudoresistance and a lack of compliance with treatment. Ambulatory blood pressure recording allow the recognition of white coat hypertension. When there is a clinical or laboratory suspicion, secondary causes of hypertension should be discarded. Excessive salt intake, the presence of concomitant diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, obesity, and psychiatric conditions such as panic attacks, anxiety and depression, should also be sought. The presence of target organ damage requires a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. Recent clinical studies indicate that the administration of aldosterone antagonists as a fourth therapeutic line provides significant additional blood pressure reduction, when added to previous antihypertensive regimens in subjects with resistant hypertension. The possible blood pressure lowering effects of prolonged electrical activation of carotid baroreceptors is under investigation.

  3. Models of Oxygen Induced Retinopathy in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Gammons, Melissa V; Bates, David O

    2016-01-01

    Much of the knowledge we have gained into the development of pathological ocular angiogenesis has come from the development of in vivo models that enable functional assessment of key components of signaling pathways in disease progression. Indeed, rodent models have facilitated identification of several therapeutics that target pathological angiogenesis. Two of the most widely used rodent models of oxygen induced retinopathy (OIR), Smith's mouse model and Penn's rat model reproducibly induce neovascularization reminiscent of the disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). In this chapter we discuss development of ROP in humans and compare features with that of the rat and mouse models, focusing both on the benefits and caveats of using such models. Furthermore, we discuss in detail the methodology of both procedures and discuss the importance of various features of the model. PMID:27172964

  4. Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ola, Mohammad Shamsul; Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; Khan, Haseeb A.; Alhomida, Abdullah S.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is widely considered to be a neurovascular disease. This is in contrast to its previous identity as solely a vascular disease. Early in the disease progression of diabetes, the major cells in the neuronal component of the retina consist of retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, both of which have been found to be compromised. A number of retinal function tests also indicated a functional deficit in diabetic retina, which further supports dysfunction of neuronal cells. As an endocrinological disorder, diabetes alters metabolism both systemically and locally in several body organs, including the retina. A growing body of evidences indicates increased levels of excitotoxic metabolites, including glutamate, branched chain amino acids and homocysteine in cases of diabetic retinopathy. Also present, early in the disease, are decreased levels of folic acid and vitamin-B12, which are potential metabolites capable of damaging neurons. These altered levels of metabolites are found to activate several metabolic pathways, leading to increases in oxidative stress and decreases in the level of neurotrophic factors. As a consequence, they may damage retinal neurons in diabetic patients. In this review, we have discussed those potential excitotoxic metabolites and their implications in neuronal damage. Possible therapeutic targets to protect neurons are also discussed. However, further research is needed to understand the exact molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration so that effective neuroprotection strategies can be developed. By protecting retinal neurons early in diabetic retinopathy cases, damage of retinal vessels can be protected, thereby helping to ameliorate the progression of diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. PMID:23358247

  5. Diabetic Retinopathy: Animal Models, Therapies, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xue; McGinnis, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the major complications of diabetes. Although great efforts have been made to uncover the mechanisms underlying the pathology of DR, the exact causes of DR remain largely unknown. Because of multifactor involvement in DR etiology, currently no effective therapeutic treatments for DR are available. In this paper, we review the pathology of DR, commonly used animal models, and novel therapeutic approaches. Perspectives and future directions for DR treatment are discussed. PMID:26881246

  6. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nentwich, Martin M; Ulbig, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the most frequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and the most common cause of blindness in the working-age population. In the next 15 years, the number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected to increase significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 million people in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to be suffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence 7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people with diabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts for an increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e., exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema. PMID:25897358

  7. Diabetic Retinopathy: Animal Models, Therapies, and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xue; McGinnis, James F

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the major complications of diabetes. Although great efforts have been made to uncover the mechanisms underlying the pathology of DR, the exact causes of DR remain largely unknown. Because of multifactor involvement in DR etiology, currently no effective therapeutic treatments for DR are available. In this paper, we review the pathology of DR, commonly used animal models, and novel therapeutic approaches. Perspectives and future directions for DR treatment are discussed. PMID:26881246

  8. Insulin, insulin analogues and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, Ernst; Kimmerle, Renate; Meyer-Schwickerath, Rolf

    2008-02-01

    Insulin is absolutely vital for living beings. It is not only involved in metabolism, but also in the regulation of growth factors, e.g. IGF-1. In this review we address the role insulin has in the natural evolution of diabetic retinopathy. On the one hand, chronic deficiency of insulin and IGF-1 at the retina is thought to cause capillary degeneration, with subsequent ischaemia. On the other hand, acute abundance of (exogenously administered) insulin and IGF-1 enhances ischaemia-induced VEGF expression. A critical ratio of tissue VEGF-susceptibility: VEGF-availability triggers vascular proliferation (i.e. of micro-aneurysms and/or abnormal vessels). The patent-protected insulin analogues Lispro, Glulisine, Aspart, Glargine and Detemir are artificial insulin derivatives with altered biological responses compared to natural insulin (e.g. divergent insulin and /or IGF-1 receptor-binding characteristics, signalling patterns, and mitogenicity). Their safety profiles concerning diabetic retinopathy remain to be established by randomised controlled trials. Anecdotal reports and circumstantial evidence suggest that Lispro and Glargine might worsen diabetic retinopathy.

  9. Hemorrhagic Retinopathy Following Spondylosis Surgery and Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Valeshabad, Ali Kord; Francis, Andrew W.; Setlur, Vikram; Chang, Peter; Mieler, William F.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy in an adult female following lumbar spinal surgery and seizure. Case Report A 38 year old female presented with bilateral blurry vision and spots in the visual field. The patient had lumbar spondylosis surgery which was complicated by a dural tear with persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak. Visual symptoms started immediately following witnessed seizure-like activity. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 and 20/25 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination demonstrated bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy with subhyaloid, intraretinal and subretinal involvement. At 4 month follow up, visual acuity improved to 20/60 and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination and fundus photography showed resolution of retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. Conclusions The first case of bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy following lumbar spondylosis surgery and witnessed seizure in an adult was reported. Ophthalmic examination may be warranted following episodes of seizure in adults. PMID:26099062

  10. The role of CTGF in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Ingeborg; van Geest, Rob J; Kuiper, Esther J; van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Schlingemann, Reinier O

    2015-04-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, CCN2) contributes to fibrotic responses in diabetic retinopathy, both before clinical manifestations occur in the pre-clinical stage of diabetic retinopathy (PCDR) and in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), the late clinical stage of the disease. CTGF is a secreted protein that modulates the actions of many growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, leading to tissue reorganization, such as ECM formation and remodeling, basal lamina (BL) thickening, pericyte apoptosis, angiogenesis, wound healing and fibrosis. In PCDR, CTGF contributes to thickening of the retinal capillary BL and is involved in loss of pericytes. In this stage, CTGF expression is induced by advanced glycation end products, and by growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. In PDR, the switch from neovascularization to a fibrotic phase - the angio-fibrotic switch - in PDR is driven by CTGF, in a critical balance with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We discuss here the roles of CTGF in the pathogenesis of DR in relation to ECM remodeling and wound healing mechanisms, and explore whether CTGF may be a potential novel therapeutic target in the clinical management of early as well as late stages of DR.

  11. Association of Salivary Osteopontin Levels with Glycaemic Status and Microalbuminuria - in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rajagambeeram, Reeta; Venkatkumar, Shruthi; Vijayan, Mohana Valli; Murugaiyan, Sathish Babu; Gopal, Shyam Prakash; Ramsamy, Sathiya; Alwar, Velayutharaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The monitoring of glycaemic status in patients with T2DM is mainly through blood tests (Fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c), which are invasive and involves painful pricks. This leads to poor patient compliance and soon could lead to various micro and macro vascular complications, which hamper the quality of life. There are no sensitive and specific markers to predict these complications at the earliest. Sialochemistry has recently gained attention for monitoring chronic diseases. Osteopontin is a phospho-glycoprotein molecule, elevated in many inflammatory conditions. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of serum and salivary osteopontin in Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Materials and Methods In this case-control study, we recruited 33 cases of T2DM and 31 age and gender matched healthy controls. Body Mass Index (BMI), Waist/Hip Ratio (WHR), Waist Circumference (WC) and blood pressure was recorded. Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG), salivary glucose, HbA1c, microalbuminuria, systolic BP, serum and salivary osteopontin levels were estimated. Results FPG, salivary glucose, HbA1c, microalbuminuria, systolic BP, BMI, waist / hip ratio serum and salivary osteopontin levels were significantly high in T2DM cases compared to control subjects. Serum and salivary osteopontin levels were significantly correlated with HbA1c and microalbuminuria in T2DM cases. Conclusion Serum and salivary osteopontin levels are significantly elevated in subjects with T2DM and are associated with glycaemic control and microalbuminuria. PMID:27656430

  12. Assessment of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Microalbuminuria by High-Frequency Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hong; Gao, Yuan; Mao, Xin; Shang, Jing; Su, Ben-Li

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate carotid atherosclerosis in patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus with microalbuminuria (MA) by high-frequency ultrasonography. Two hundred and fifty patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus were divided into two groups according to urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER): normoalbuminuria group (130 cases) and microalbuminuria group (120 cases). The intimal-medial thickness (IMT) and the atherosclerotic plaques of carotid artery were observed in both groups by high-frequency ultrasound. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), hemoglobin A1c, and lipid profiles were measured. The values of IMT of microalbuminuria group were significantly higher than those of normoalbuminuria group (P < 0.05). In univariate analysis, IMT was positively and significantly associated with age (r = 0.265, P < 0.05), waist circumference (r = 0.263, P < 0.05), body mass index (r = 0.285, P < 0.05), systolic blood pressure (r = 0.276, P < 0.05), UAER (r = 0.359, P < 0.05), HbA1c (r = 0.462, P < 0.05) and, duration of diabetes (r = 0.370, P < 0.05). In multivariate linear regression analysis, UAER and HbA1c were independent predictors of IMT (P < 0.05 for all). In the two groups, the rate of soft plaques was higher than that of dense plaques and calcified plaques. In conclusion, there is a significant association between microalbuminuria and IMT which is regarded as the early sign of carotid atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:23573090

  13. Clinical application of a novel sliver nanoparticles biosensor based on localized surface plasmon resonance for detecting the microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ting; Hou, Qiannan; Yang, Huan; Luo, Xiangang; Xi, Mingrong

    2010-11-01

    In order to explore the clinical application of the nanobiosensor based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), we used our LSPR biosensor to detect the microalbuminuria in this work. The sliver nanoparticles were fabricated by using nanosphere lithography. The anti-human albumin antibody was immobilized on the sensor surface by amine coupling method. The different concentrations of commercial albumin and albumin in urine samples from three mild preeclampsia patients were determined according to the peak of LSPR extinction spectra. Under optimum conditions, our results showed that the biosensor displayed a detection limit of 1 ng/ml and wide dynamic range of 1 ng/ml to 1 μg/ml. Furthermore, the microalbuminuria of three patients was determined by our biosensor within a short assay time, without sample purification. This biosensor proposed herein is easy to prepare and could be used for low-cost, rapid, label-free, and sensitive screening of the microalbuminuria. This approach provides a promising platform for developing clinical diagnostic applications.

  14. Primary Medullary Hemorrhage Associated with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyung-Min; Park, Jong-Moo; Lee, Jee-Young

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous primary medullary hemorrhage is a rare event. A 64-year-old man was admitted for sudden-onset vertigo and vomiting. His clinical features were similar to those of lateral medullary syndrome. The patient had no anticoagulant therapy, vascular malformation, or a caudal extension of a pontine hemorrhage. The patient had multiple hypertensive changes, including retinopathy, left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiography, multiple cerebral microbleeds, and small-vessel changes on MRI. T2*-weighted gradient echo MRI performed 3 months prior to admission and contrast-enhanced MRI showed no evidence of vascular malformation. We concluded that the patient had uncontrolled hypertension that may have lead to primary medullary hemorrhage. PMID:20396466

  15. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  17. Elevated urinary D-lactate levels in patients with diabetes and microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chu-Kuang; Lee, Ya-Ting; Chen, Shih-Ming; Hsieh, Chi-Wen; Huang, Tzu-Chuan; Li, Yi-Chieh; Lee, Jen-Ai

    2015-12-10

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) has become the major cause of end-stage renal disease. Early detection of disease risk, to enable intervention before advanced renal damage occurs, is an important goal. Microalbuminuria has been used to monitor renal damage in clinical settings for years. In this study, we divided patients with diabetes into different groups based on their microalbumin values to elucidate the relationship between urinary D-lactate and corresponding microalbumin values. Group DM1 comprised of patients with an albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) of less than 30 μg albumin/mg creatinine (normal range); Group DM2 comprised of patients with an ACR of 30-299 μg albumin/mg creatinine (microalbuminuria); and Group DM3 comprised of patients with an ACR of ≥300 μg albumin/mg creatinine (macroalbuminuria). The urinary D-lactate concentration of patients with diabetes was determined by pre-column fluorescence derivatization with 4-nitro-7-piperazino-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-PZ), and the accuracy (recovery) and precision (relative standard deviation; RSD) were validated. The measured values showed an accuracy that was in the acceptable range (91.59-112.96%), with an RSD in the range of 3.13-13.21%. The urinary D-lactate levels of the 3 diabetic groups (groups DM1, DM2, and DM3) were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects (78.31 ± 22.13, 92.47 ± 21.98, and 47.29 ± 17.51 vs. 6.28 ± 2.39 nmol/mg creatinine, respectively; p<0.05), with urinary D-lactate levels in the DM2 group being the highest. This modified fluorescence-based, high-performance liquid chromatography method to quantify D-lactate concentrations in the urine of patients with diabetes was established. Also, measuring the new risk marker identified in this study (D-lactate) in combination with microalbumin may facilitate the prevention of DN. PMID:26166004

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  19. A Review on Recent Developments for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the retinal micro vasculature which may be formed as a result of diabetes mellitus. Blindness may appear as a result of unchecked and severe cases of diabetic retinopathy. Manual inspection of fundus images to check morphological changes in microaneurysms, exudates, blood vessels, hemorrhages, and macula is a very time-consuming and tedious work. It can be made easily with the help of computer-aided system and intervariability for the observer. In this paper, several techniques for detecting microaneurysms, hemorrhages, and exudates are discussed for ultimate detection of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Blood vessels detection techniques are also discussed for the diagnosis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, the paper elaborates a discussion on the experiments accessed by authors for the detection of diabetic retinopathy. This work will be helpful for the researchers and technical persons who want to utilize the ongoing research in this area. PMID:27777811

  20. Cytometric analysis of retinopathies in retinal trypsin digests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanian, Zahra; Staniszewski, Kevin; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader; Ranji, Mahsa

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this work was to design an automated image cytometry tool for determination of various retinal vascular parameters including extraction of features that are relevant to postnatal retinal vascular development, and the progression of diabetic retinopathy. To confirm the utility and accuracy of the software, retinal trypsin digest from TSP1-/- and diabetic Akita/+; TSP1-/- mice were analyzed. TSP1 is a critical inhibitor of development of retinopathies and lack of TSP1 exacerbates progression of early diabetic retinopathies. Loss of vascular cells of and gain more acellular capillaries as two major signs of diabetic retinopathies were used to classify a retina as normal or injured. This software allows quantification and high throughput assessment of retinopathy changes associated with diabetes.

  1. Does the severity of diabetic retinopathy predict pregnancy outcome?

    PubMed

    Klein, B E; Klein, R; Meuer, S M; Moss, S E; Dalton, D D

    1988-01-01

    The authors sought to determine whether the severity of diabetic retinopathy is a predictor of subsequent pregnancy outcome. One hundred and seventy-nine pregnant diabetic women were evaluated in their first trimester of pregnancy. Stereoscopic color photographs of the ocular fundus were taken and graded by the Fundus Photography Reading Center. Thirty-nine women had no retinopathy, while 28 had proliferative retinopathy in the worse eye. The women's history and hospital delivery room charts were reviewed with regard to pregnancy outcome. Thirty-three pregnancies terminated with an adverse outcome. A logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate significant predictors of pregnancy outcome. Of maternal age, duration of diabetes, glycosylated hemoglobin, proteinuria, cigarette smoking status, and severity of diabetic retinopathy, only the last variable significantly predicted an adverse outcome. These data suggest that the severity of retinopathy should be considered when counseling a pregnant diabetic woman.

  2. Managing hypertension in diabetic patients – focus on trandolapril/verapamil combination

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanjib Kumar; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Hypertensive diabetes individuals are at higher risk for cardiovascular events and progression to end stage renal disease. Several well conducted clinical trials indicate that aggressive treatment of hypertension in individual with diabetes reduces these complications. Combinations of two or more antihypertensive drugs are frequently required to reach the target blood pressure and to improve the cardiovascular and renal outcomes in these patients. There are physiological and clinical rationales for renin-angiotensin system blockade in hypertensive diabetics. Trandolapril/verapamil sustained released (SR) is a fixed-dose combination of trandolapril and a sustained release formulation of verapamil and indicated in treatment of hypertension in patients who require more than one drug to reach target blood pressure. The antihypertensive efficacy of trandolapril/verapamil SR has been evaluated extensively in large trials. In the INVEST trial, a verapamil SR-based treatment strategy that included trandolapril in most patients was effective in reducing the primary outcome in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease. The new onset of diabetes was also significantly lower in the verapamil SR/trandolapril treatment group in comparison with those on the atenolol/hydroclorothiazide treatment group. The BErgamo NEphrologic DIabetes Complications Trial (BENEDICT) documented that in hypertensive diabetes and normoalbuminuria, trandolapril plus verapamil or trandolapril alone delayed the onset of microalbuminuria independent of their blood pressure-reducing effect. Thus, trandolapril/verapamil is an effective option for treatment of hypertensive diabetes patients requiring more than one agent to achieve target blood pressure. PMID:17969376

  3. Diabetic Retinopathy and Inflammation: Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Rangasamy, Sampathkumar; McGuire, Paul G.; Das, Arup

    2012-01-01

    Most anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapies in diabetic macular edema are not as robust as in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Although the VEGF appears to be a good target in diabetic macular edema, the anti-VEGF therapies appear to be of transient benefit as the edema recurs within a few weeks, and repeated injections are necessary. There is new evidence that indicates ‘retinal inflammation’ as an important player in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. There are common sets of inflammatory cytokines that are upregulated in both the serum and vitreous and aqueous samples, in subjects with diabetic retinopathy, and these cytokines can have multiple interactions to impact the pathogenesis of the disease. The key inflammatory events involved in the blood retinal barrier (BRB) alteration appear to be: (1) Increased expression of endothelial adhesion molecules such as ICAM1, VCAM1, PECAM-1, and P-selectin, (2) adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium, (3) release of inflammatory chemokines, cytokines, and vascular permeability factors, (4) alteration of adherens and tight junctional proteins between the endothelial cells, and (5) infiltration of leukocytes into the neuro-retina, resulting in the alteration of the blood retinal barrier (diapedesis). VEGF inhibition itself may not achieve neutralization of other inflammatory molecules involved in the inflammatory cascade of the breakdown of the BRB. It is possible that the novel selective inhibitors of the inflammatory cascade (like angiopoietin-2, TNFα, and chemokines) may be useful therapeutic agents in the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME), either alone or in combination with the anti-VEGF drugs. PMID:22346115

  4. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  5. Growth Factors in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zia Ali

    2003-01-01

    Many growth factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Alteration of growth factors and their receptors in diabetes has been shown in both experimental and clinical studies. Sustained hyperglycemia resulting from long-standing diabetes leads to several biochemical abnormalities that consequently result in retinal hypoxia. Retinal oxygenation state regulates various growth factors that promote angiogenesis in order to meet the oxygen demands of the tissue. However, unregulated expression of these growth factors and induction of complex cascades leading to augmentation of other proangiogenic factors, which may not be regulated by tissue oxygenation, leads to uncontrolled retinal neovascularization and blindness in diabetic patients. PMID:14668050

  6. [Ophthalmological screening for retinopathy of prematurity].

    PubMed

    Oberacher-Velten, I; Segerer, H; Helbig, H

    2012-12-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is one of the three leading causes of legal blindness in childhood in developed countries. Adequate screening is one of the most important steps towards successful treatment. During the last decades, international and national guidelines for ROP screening have been continually updated. These guidelines correspond to progress in neonatal care and to a better understanding of the relationship between different neonatal parameters and the risk of developing ROP. The present article surveys ROP classification, the current national and international guidelines and new aspects of ROP screening. PMID:23212355

  7. Laser therapy for retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Banach, M J; Berinstein, D M

    2001-06-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a potentially blinding condition that afflicts preterm infants in the neonatal period. Although advances in scleral buckling and vitrectomy techniques offer hope for those infants suffering from stage 4 or 5 ROP, prevention of progression to these stages offers the most promise for favorable structural and visual outcomes. Proper screening for threshold ROP and treatment with peripheral retinal ablation are the keys to successfully managing ROP. Technological advances in screening tools and portable diode lasers enable ophthalmologists to provide prompt, effective, and safe treatment for patients with threshold ROP.

  8. Ultra widefield fundus imaging for diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Szilárd; Berenberg, Thomas L

    2014-08-01

    For decades, the standard method for screening and grading severity of diabetic retinal disease has relied upon a montage of photographs using normal angle fundus cameras. With the development of ultrawide field (UWF) fundus imaging, more of the retina can be imaged with fewer pictures, less dependence on photographer skill, and, often, greater ease on the patient. Recent studies have shown comparability between traditional and UWF imaging for standard grading of diabetic retinopathy. Moreover, UWF images can detect peripheral pathology not typically seen in standard photographs, which may enlighten our understanding of disease severity and suggest new indications for treatment. PMID:24935049

  9. The Effect of Resting Heart Rate on the New Onset of Microalbuminuria in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Subanalysis of the ROADMAP Study.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Bramlage, Peter; Haller, Hermann; Ruilope, Luis M; Böhm, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The association between resting heart rate and new-onset microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes is not clear. The objective of the current analysis was to assess the relationship between heart rate and incidence of microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes. Data from the Randomised Olmesartan and Diabetes Microalbuminuria Prevention (ROADMAP) study were retrospectively analyzed. New-onset microalbuminuria was documented and related to heart rate as recorded at baseline and last assessment, and the mean of the measurements taken during the double-blind part of the ROADMAP trial. Patients (n = 4299) had a mean age of 57.8 ± 8.7 years and 46.3% were male. Characteristics were not different between the olmesartan and the placebo groups, except for a higher systolic blood pressure (136.7 vs 135.7 mm Hg; P = 0.04) and albumin creatinine ratio (5.9 vs 5.5; P = 0.03). Increased risk of microalbuminuria was found with increasing heart rate, independent of whether baseline [highest vs lowest quartile odds ratio (OR) 1.39; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03-1.87; P = 0.032], last assessment (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.26-2.31; P = 0.001), or mean heart rate was considered (OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.30-2.41; P = 0.0003). The greater risk of new-onset microalbuminuria with a high baseline heart rate was also found when data were adjusted for mean systolic blood pressure (OR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.00-1.82; P = 0.0496; interaction P < 0.0001). Although there was no risk increase with baseline heart rate in the placebo group (P = 0.8253 for trend), microalbuminuria was less frequent in patients receiving olmesartan in the low heart rate quartiles (P = 0.002 for trend). A low heart rate reduces the risk of patients with type 2 diabetes developing microalbuminuria, independent of blood pressure. The data demonstrate potential benefits of reducing the heart rate of type 2 diabetes patients, and indicate that olmesartan could, in

  10. Medication adherence and quality of life among the elderly with diabetic retinopathy 1

    PubMed Central

    Jannuzzi, Fernanda Freire; Cintra, Fernanda Aparecida; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus; São-João, Thaís Moreira; Gallani, Maria Cecília Bueno Jayme

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to investigate the factors related to medication adherence and its relation to Health- Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in elderly people with diabetic retinopathy. METHOD: one hundred (n=100) elderly outpatients with diabetic retinopathy taking antihypertensives and/or oral antidiabetics/insulin were interviewed. Adherence was evaluated by the adherence proportion and its association with the care taken in administrating medications and by the Morisky Scale. The National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25) was used to evaluate HRQoL. RESULTS: most (58%) reported the use of 80% or more of the prescribed dose and care in utilizing the medication. The item "stopping the drug when experiencing an adverse event", from the Morisky Scale, explained 12.8% and 13.5% of the variability of adherence proportion to antihypertensives and oral antidiabetics/insulin, respectively. CONCLUSION: there was better HRQoL in the Color Vision, Driving and Social Functioning domains of the NEI VFQ-25. Individuals with lower scores on the NEI VFQ-25 and higher scores on the Morisky Scale presented greater chance to be nonadherent to the pharmacological treatment of diabetes and hypertension. PMID:25591084

  11. Comprehensive automatic assessment of retinal vascular abnormalities for computer-assisted retinopathy grading.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vinayak; Agurto, Carla; VanNess, Richard; Nemeth, Sheila; Soliz, Peter; Barriga, Simon

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important signs of systemic disease that presents on the retina is vascular abnormalities such as in hypertensive retinopathy. Manual analysis of fundus images by human readers is qualitative and lacks in accuracy, consistency and repeatability. Present semi-automatic methods for vascular evaluation are reported to increase accuracy and reduce reader variability, but require extensive reader interaction; thus limiting the software-aided efficiency. Automation thus holds a twofold promise. First, decrease variability while increasing accuracy, and second, increasing the efficiency. In this paper we propose fully automated software as a second reader system for comprehensive assessment of retinal vasculature; which aids the readers in the quantitative characterization of vessel abnormalities in fundus images. This system provides the reader with objective measures of vascular morphology such as tortuosity, branching angles, as well as highlights of areas with abnormalities such as artery-venous nicking, copper and silver wiring, and retinal emboli; in order for the reader to make a final screening decision. To test the efficacy of our system, we evaluated the change in performance of a newly certified retinal reader when grading a set of 40 color fundus images with and without the assistance of the software. The results demonstrated an improvement in reader's performance with the software assistance, in terms of accuracy of detection of vessel abnormalities, determination of retinopathy, and reading time. This system enables the reader in making computer-assisted vasculature assessment with high accuracy and consistency, at a reduced reading time.

  12. Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Chi-Juei; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chung-May; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Li

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of current study aims to investigate the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a nationwide population-based cohort in Taiwan. Newly diagnosed DN patients and age- and sex-matched controls were identified from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2010. We studied the effects of age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), and medications on the development of nonproliferative DR (NPDR), proliferative DR (PDR), and diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients with DN. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of the development of DR. Our results show that the adjusted HRs of NPDR and PDR were 5.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.68–5.37) and 9.7 (95% CI = 8.15–11.5), respectively, in patients with DN as compared with patients in the non-DN cohort. At 5-year follow-up, patients with DN showed an increased HR of NPDR progression to PDR (HR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.68–3.03), and the major comorbidities were hypertension (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.10–1.38 with NPDR; HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.02–1.72 with PDR) and DPN (HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.72–2.41 in NPDR; HR = 2.95, 95% CI = 2.16–4.03 in PDR). Dyslipidemia increased the HR of developing NPDR but not PDR or DME. Moreover, DN did not significantly affect DME development (HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 0.87–2.48) or progression (HR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.11–1.20). We concluded that DN was an independent risk factor for DR development and progression; however, DN did not markedly affect DME development in this study, and the potential association between these disorders requires further investigation. PMID:27564383

  13. Current and future management of diabetic retinopathy: a personalized evidence-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Fante, Ryan J; Gardner, Thomas W; Sundstrom, Jeffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of new-onset blindness in working-age individuals in the USA and represents a growing worldwide epidemic. Classic risk factors for onset or progression of DR include poor glycemic control, hypertension and hyperlipidemia; however, these factors account for only a small proportion of the risk of DR. New systemic risk factors are emerging, which may allow for personalized risk profiling and targeted treatment by physicians. In addition, early studies of vitreous fluid in patients with DR have resulted in a new paradigm: diabetes causes inflammation in the retina, which is mediated by multiple small signaling molecules that induce angiogenesis and vascular permeability. Future treatment of DR may involve two approaches: early vitreous analysis, followed by drug treatment targeted to the unique vitreous composition of the patient; and collaboration between ophthalmologists and primary care providers to address the unique systemic risk profile of each diabetic patient. PMID:24932222

  14. Macular edema. A complication of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ferris, F L; Patz, A

    1984-05-01

    Diabetic macular edema is the leading cause of decreased vision from diabetic retinopathy. This decreased vision is caused by an increase in extracellular fluid within the retina distorting the retinal architecture and frequently taking on a pattern of cystoid macular edema. This fluid accumulates within the retina because of the breakdown of the barriers within the retinal blood vessels and possibly the pigment epithelium. Diabetic macular edema tends to be a chronic disorder. Although spontaneous recovery is not an uncommon occurrence, over one-half of diabetics with macular edema will lose two or more lines of visual acuity within two years. The most promising treatment for diabetic macular edema has been photocoagulation. It is recommended that in all patients with diabetic macular edema attempts be made to normalize elevated blood glucose, decrease elevated blood pressure, and improve cardiac or renal status. Reduction of serum lipids by diet or pharmacologic means is an unproven treatment at this time. The Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study hopefully will provide more definitive information as to whether photocoagulation is effective in various subgroups of patients with diabetic macular edema.

  15. Photocoagulation as treatment of diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, J.; Fernandez, L.; de Pedraza, Maria L.; Gamella, C.; Santervas, R.

    1992-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic disease that is revealed with a lot of alterations due to factors such as an absolute or relative reduction of the insulin. It is usually accompanied by generalized arteriosclerosis and prepares for certain microvasculares pathologies such as retinopathy, nefropathy, and neuropathy. The first effects of diabetes in the retina seem to act on the capillaries. The functional modifications of the retinal circulation appear before the structural ones. These consist of the blood flux damage and the obligation of the hematorretinal barrier with extravasacy as can be proved in the fluorophotometry of the vitreous humor. Nowadays, medical treatments are more effective and only vitrectomy and photocoagulation are used in diabetic retinopathy. For that, the argon laser and the xenon arch are used. The treatment is usually spread panretine, with coagulation in a grid pattern around the eye, avoiding the macula and other vital structures, and treating the neoformed blood vessels. The rate of grave visual loss in the studies carried out with there techniques was 12 in relation to 28 in the non-treated cases. The most important factors of risk found, were the discal neoformed blood vessels and the hemorrhage of the vitreous humor. Adverse effects were found such as the reduction of visual sharpness and the contrition of the visual field, these are greater in patients treated with the xenon arch than in those treated with the argon laser.

  16. Inflammation and Pharmacological Treatment in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kaštelan, Snježana; Tomić, Martina; Gverović Antunica, Antonela; Salopek Rabatić, Jasminka; Ljubić, Spomenka

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is estimated to be the leading cause of new blindness in the working population of developed countries. Primary interventions such as intensive glycemic control, strict blood pressure regulation, and lipid-modifying therapy as well as local ocular treatment (laser photocoagulation and pars plana vitrectomy) can significantly reduce the risk of retinopathy occurrence and progression. Considering the limitations of current DR treatments development of new therapeutic strategies, it becomes necessary to focus on pharmacological treatment. Currently, there is increasing evidence that inflammatory processes have a considerable role in the pathogenesis of DR with multiple studies showing an association of various systemic as well as local (vitreous and aqueous fluid) inflammatory factors and the progression of DR. Since inflammation is identified as a relevant mechanism, significant effort has been directed to the development of new concepts for the prevention and treatment of DR acting on the inflammatory processes and the use of pharmacological agents with anti-inflammatory effect. Inhibiting the inflammatory pathway could be an appealing treatment option for DR in future practices, and as further prospective randomized clinical trials accumulate data, the role and guidelines of anti-inflammatory pharmacologic treatments will become clearer. PMID:24288441

  17. The Comorbidities of Diabetes and Hypertension: Mechanisms and Approach to Target Organ Protection

    PubMed Central

    Long, Amanda N.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Up to 75% of adults with diabetes also have hypertension, and patients with hypertension alone often show evidence of insulin resistance. Thus, hypertension and diabetes are common, intertwined conditions that share a significant overlap in underlying risk factors (including ethnicity, familial, dyslipidemia, and lifestyle determinants) and complications. These complications include microvascular and macrovascular disorders. The macrovascular complications, which are well recognized in patients with longstanding diabetes or hypertension, include coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, and peripheral vascular disease. Although microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) are conventionally linked to hyperglycemia, studies have shown that hypertension constitutes an important risk factor, especially for nephropathy. The familial predisposition to diabetes and hypertension appears to be polygenic in origin, which militates against the feasibility of a “gene therapy” approach to the control or prevention of these conditions. On the other hand, the shared lifestyle factors in the etiology of hypertension and diabetes provide ample opportunity for nonpharmacological intervention. Thus, the initial approach to the management of both diabetes and hypertension must emphasize weight control, physical activity, and dietary modification. Interestingly, lifestyle intervention is remarkably effective in the primary prevention of diabetes and hypertension. These principles also are pertinent to the prevention of downstream macrovascular complications of the two disorders. In addition to lifestyle modification, most patients will require specific medications to achieve national treatment goals for hypertension and diabetes. Management of hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia and the underlying hypercoagulable and proinflammatory states requires the use of multiple medications in combination. PMID:21466619

  18. Association between Urine Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio within the Normal Range and Incident Hypertension in Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Kang, Dae Ryong; Koh, Sang-Baek; Kim, Jang-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There have been few studies on gender difference in the impact of a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) within the normal range on the risk of hypertension. We evaluated whether the association between the UACR below the microalbuminuria range and the incident risk of hypertension is different between men and women. Materials and Methods A total of 1173 individuals (442 men and 731 women) aged 40 to 70 years without hypertension was examined at baseline (2005–2008) and followed (2008–2011). We defined the UACR as the amount of albumin (mg/dL) divided by creatinine (g/dL) in randomly voided urine. The subjects were classified according to UACR tertile. Results During an average of 2.6 years of follow-up, 57 men (12.9%) and 66 women (9.0%) developed hypertension. In multivariable-adjusted models, the odds ratio for new-onset hypertension comparing the highest and lowest tertiles of UACR was 1.83 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85–3.94] in men and 2.69 (95% CI 1.27–5.73) in women. In stratified analyses by menopausal status, higher tertiles of UACR were associated with an increased risk of incident hypertension in postmenopausal women. Conclusion Higher normal UACR levels were associated with an increased risk of incident hypertension in women. The UACR could have a clinical role in predicting the development of hypertension. PMID:27593874

  19. Portopulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong; Han, Guohong; Fan, Daiming

    2016-07-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) refers to the condition that pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) occur in the stetting of portal hypertension. The development of PoPH is thought to be independent of the severity of portal hypertension or the etiology or severity of liver disease. PoPH results from excessive vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling, and proliferative and thrombotic events within the pulmonary circulation that lead to progressive right ventricular failure and ultimately to death. Untreated PoPH is associated with a poor prognosis. As PoPH is frequently asymptomatic or symptoms are generally non-specific, patients should be actively screened for the presence of PoPH. Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography is a useful non-invasive screening tool, but a definitive diagnosis requires invasive hemodynamic confirmation by right heart catheterization. Despite a dearth of randomized, prospective data, an ever-expanding clinical experience shows that patients with PoPH benefit from therapy with PAH-specific medications including with endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and/or prostanoids. Due to high perioperative mortality, transplantation should be avoided in those patients who have severe PoPH that is refractory to medical therapy. PMID:27002212

  20. Hypertensive leucocytosis.

    PubMed

    Rajkumari, Rolinda; Laishram, Deben; Thiyam, Joshna; Javan, Ng

    2013-04-01

    There are studies showing association of high WBC count with the higher incidence of hypertension though a few are done in the Indian population. The present study was conducted with the view to find any significant increase in total leucocyte count and differential leucocyte count in hypertensive patient Twenty-seven hypertensives with 12 males and 15 females and 27 age and sex matched control subjects (normotensive) were studied. Hypertension was defined when the systolic BP > or = 140 mmHg or diastolic BP > or = 90 mmHg or history of taking antihypertensive medicine. Three blood pressure recordings at an interval of 2 minutes were taken after the patient was made to sit for 30 minutes with a standard mercury sphygmomanometer in the left arm. The disappearance of sound was used for diastolic blood pressure. Blood was drawn into EDTA containing vials. Two separate counts were performed: First for total leucocyte count (TLC) and second for determination of percentage of polymorphonuclear cells. For the TLC, 0.5 part of blood mixed with 10 part of Turk's fluid followed by counting of leucocyte in a counting chamber under light microscope. The percentage of polymorphonuclear leucocyte was performed on a slide after making the slide and staining it with Leishman's stain. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was performed using Wintrobe's methods. The first 1 hour reading on the Wintrobe's tube was taken for analysis. The total leucocyte count (TLC) for the study group as compared to the controls were 7413.70 +/- 735.45 cells/cmm and 5236.30 +/- 528.77 cells/ cmm which was statistically significant. The mean percentage neutrophils were 62.04 +/- 4.99 for study group and 53.00 +/- 3.44 for the controls; the mean percentage lymphocytes for the study group and the controls were 34.37 +/- 4.55 and 39.11 +/- 4.40 respectively. Both the mean percentage neutrophils and lymphocytes showed significant differences. The mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) also showed

  1. Hyperuricemia Is an Independent Risk Factor for New Onset Micro-Albuminuria in a Middle-Aged and Elderly Population: A Prospective Cohort Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hung-Yu; Lee, Pei-Hsien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Tung, Chun-Wu; Hsu, Yung-Chien; Huang, Tung-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyperuricemia is now regarded as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Micro-albuminuria is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. We hypothesized that elevated serum uric acid (UA) is associated with development of micro-albuminuria in the general population. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a community-based prospective cohort study. A total of 1862 subjects from southern Taiwan, all older than 40 years, were screened and 993 of these participants without micro-albuminuria were followed for 4 years. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio was measured two times per year. A multiple linear regression model indicated that serum UA was independently associated with ln(ACR) after adjustment for 8 factors (age, sex, and 6 metabolic metrics) (β = 0.194, p<0.01). Logistic regression analysis indicated that each 1 mg/dL increase of UA was associated with a 1.42-fold increased risk of micro-albuminuria after adjustment for the same 8 factors (OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.27–1.59, p<0.01). A Cox regression model using subjects with serum UA less than 5 mg/dL as reference group indicated higher hazard ratios (HRs) only found in subjects with serum UA more than 7 mg/dL (HR = 3.54, 95% CI: 2.11–5.93, p<0.01) and not in subjects with serum UA of 5 to 7 mg/dL (HR = 1.30, 95% CI: 0.82–2.07, p = 0.15). Conclusion Hyperuricemia is significantly associated with micro-albuminuria in middle-aged and elderly males and females from a general population in Taiwan. Elevated serum UA is an independent predictor for development of micro-albuminuria in this population. PMID:23637835

  2. Presence of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors Is Not Associated with Microalbuminuria in 14-to-20-Years Old Slovak Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional, Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Gurecká, Radana; Koborová, Ivana; Šebek, Jozef; Šebeková, Katarína

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In adults, microalbuminuria indicates generalized endothelial dysfunction, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all cause mortality. Slovak adults present one of the highest cardiovascular mortality rates in Europe. Thus Slovak adolescents are on a high-risk to develop cardiovascular afflictions early, and screening for microalbuminuria might be useful in early assessment of their cardiovascular risk. We aimed to study the prevalence of microalbuminuria in Slovak adolescents, and the association of urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) to cardiovascular risk factors. Subjects and methods Anthropometric data, blood pressure, blood count, glucose homeostasis, lipid profile, renal function, inflammatory status, concentrations of homocysteine and uric acid were determined and associated with ACR in 2 666 adolescents (49.4% boys, 51.6% girls) aged 14-to-20 years. Microalbuminuria was classified as ACR 2.5–25.0 mg/mmol in boys and 3.5–35.0 mg/mmol in girls. Results Prevalence of microalbuminuria in both genders reached 3.3%, and did not differ significantly between lean and centrally obese subjects. Girls presented higher ACR than boys (normoalbuminuric: 0.6±0.5 mg/mmol vs. 0.5±0.4 mg/mmol, p>0.001; microalbuminuric: 9.3±7.3 mg/mmol vs. 5.0±3.8 mg/mmol; p>0.001). Microalbuminuric adolescents and those presenting normoalbuminuria within the upper ACR quartile were slimmer than their normoalbuminuric counterparts or adolescents with normoalbuminuria within the lower quartile, respectively. No association between microalbuminuria and cardiovascular risk markers was revealed. Conclusion Results obtained in this study do not support our assumption that ACR associates with cardiometabolic risk factors in apparently healthy adolescents. Follow-up studies until adulthood are needed to estimate the potential cardiometabolic risk of apparently healthy microalbuminuric adolescents. PMID:26046923

  3. Assessment of global risk: a foundation for a new, better definition of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Giles, Thomas D

    2006-08-01

    The prevalence of individuals with increased blood pressure (BP) is growing. A greater understanding of the various pathogenetic mechanisms of hypertension and associated BP increases would provide a better strategy for preventing and treating this condition. Hypertension is strongly associated with other cardiovascular risk factors. Additionally, there is no threshold of BP >115/70 mm Hg that identifies cardiovascular risk (i.e., risk is linear and doubles for each 20/10-mm Hg BP rise). These insights have led a group of hypertension experts to propose a new definition of hypertension as "a progressive cardiovascular syndrome arising from complex and interrelated etiologies," which features early markers that are "often present before blood pressure elevation is sustained." Early cardiovascular markers include widened pulse pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy, increased arterial stiffness, endothelial dysfunction, and microalbuminuria. Importantly, antihypertensive treatment for patients with prehypertension (systolic BP of 120-139 mm Hg or diastolic BP of 80-89 mm Hg) has recently been shown to prevent the development of frank hypertension. This revision of the definition of hypertension and the need to assess BP levels in the context of global cardiovascular risk should lead to earlier detection of at-risk patients.

  4. Effect of proteinuria and glomerular filtration rate on cardiovascular risk in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Segura, Julian; Campo, Carlos; Ruilope, Luis M

    2004-11-01

    Changes in renal function related with essential hypertension are associated with an elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Indices of altered renal function (e.g., microalbuminuria, increased serum creatinine concentrations, decrease in estimated creatinine clearance or GFR, and overt proteinuria) are independent predictors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The Framingham Heart Study documented the relevance of proteinuria for cardiovascular prognosis in the community. The INSIGHT Study assessed the role of proteinuria as a risk factor in essential hypertension. The presence of proteinuria at baseline turned out to be a very potent predictor for the development of cardiovascular events and death in patients with essential hypertension and one or more associated cardiovascular risk factors. Recent data indicate that minor derangements of renal function, including proteinuria, are associated, both in the community and in the hypertensive population, with the clustering of cardiovascular risk factors observed in metabolic syndrome that promote progression of atherosclerosis. Renal function has to be routinely evaluated in every hypertensive patient, and the presence of minor alterations considered in the stratification of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients.

  5. Incidence, risk factors, and morphology in operating microscope light retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Khwarg, S.G.; Linstone, F.A.; Daniels, S.A.; Isenberg, S.J.; Hanscom, T.A.; Geoghegan, M.; Straatsma, B.R.

    1987-03-15

    A review of 135 consecutive cataract operations identified ten cases (7.4%) of operating microscope light retinopathy. Ophthalmoscopically, these light retinopathy lesions appeared as a focal pigment epithelial change with varying degrees of pigment clumping in the center. Fluorescein angiography accentuated the lesion by demonstrating a sharply demarcated transmission defect, occasionally with multiple satellite lesions. The shape of the lesion matched the shape of the illuminating source of the particular operating microscope used during the surgery. The most significant risk factor associated with the production of these light retinopathy lesions was prolonged operating time. Mean total operating time for the ten patients with light retinopathy was 51 minutes longer than for those without (P less than .0001). Other significant associated factors were the presence of diabetes mellitus (P less than .03), younger age (P less than .05), and the use of hydrochlorothiazide (P less than .04).

  6. A case study of a patient with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mohammad Hossein; Gharibi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    The patient, in this report, is a 52 years old male driver who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) five years ago without diabetic retinopathy at the baseline. The patient was being monitored for two intervals. It was at the second interval which he was diagnosed with proliferative retinopathy; in fact, the progression rate of retinopathy from its first sign, which occurred at the middle of the first and second interval, to the point at which the patient lost his vision from the left eye occurred within a year. In this work, we introduce a new factor ignored through all the previously conducted studies, namely, type of profession. This factor which contributes to occupational stress plays an important role in the progression of proliferative retinopathy. We speculate that this factor can accelerate the progression of this disease dramatically, even when the other risk factors are not present. PMID:26907970

  7. Evaluation of the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy A Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupfer, Carl

    1973-01-01

    Evaluated is the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (blindness due to ruptured vessels of the retina as a side effect of diabetes), and described is a research project comparing two types of photocoagulation treatment. (DB)

  8. Multifocal retinopathy in Dachshunds with CLN2 neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Rebecca E H; Pearce, Jacqueline W; Castaner, Leilani J; Jensen, Cheryl A; Katz, Rebecca J; Gilliam, Douglas H; Katz, Martin L

    2015-05-01

    The CLN2 form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is an autosomal recessively inherited lysosomal storage disease that is characterized by progressive vision loss culminating in blindness, cognitive and motor decline, neurodegeneration, and premature death. CLN2 disease results from mutations in the gene that encodes the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1. A null mutation in the TPP1 gene encoding this enzyme causes a CLN2-like disease in Dachshunds. Dachshunds that are homozygous for this mutation serve as a model for human CLN2 disease, exhibiting clinical signs and neuropathology similar to those of children with this disorder. Affected dogs reach end-stage terminal disease status at 10-11 months of age. In addition to retinal changes typical of CLN2 disease, a retinopathy consisting of multifocal, bullous retinal detachment lesions was identified in 65% of (TPP1-/-) dogs in an established research colony. These lesions did not occur in littermates that were heterozygous or homozygous for the normal TPP1 allele. Retinal changes and the functional effects of this multifocal retinopathy were examined objectively over time using ophthalmic examinations, fundus photography, electroretinography (ERG), quantitative pupillary light response (PLR) recording, fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and histopathology. The retinopathy consisted of progressive multifocal serous retinal detachments. The severity of the disease-related retinal thinning was no more serious in most detached areas than in adjacent areas of the retina that remained in close apposition to the retinal pigment epithelium. The retinopathy observed in these dogs was somewhat similar to canine multifocal retinopathy (CMR), a disease caused by a mutation of the bestrophin gene BEST1. ERG a-wave amplitudes were relatively preserved in the Dachshunds with CLN2 disease, whether or not they developed the multifocal retinopathy. The retinopathy also had minimal effects on the

  9. Update on genetics and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Blake M; Schwartz, Stephen G; Brantley, Milam A; Flynn, Harry W

    2015-01-01

    Clinical risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR), such as duration of disease and degree of glucose control, do not adequately predict disease progression in individual patients, suggesting the presence of a genetic component. Multiple smaller studies have investigated genotype–phenotype correlations in genes encoding vascular endothelial growth factor, aldose reductase, the receptor for advanced glycation end products, and many others. In general, reported results have been conflicting, due to factors including small sample sizes, variations in study design, differences in clinical end points, and underlying genetic differences between study groups. At this time, there is no confirmed association with any risk allele reported. As we continue to collect data from additional studies, the role of genetics in DR may become more apparent. PMID:26648684

  10. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with occult bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nivean, M; Muttuvelu, Danson V; Afzelius, Pia; Berman, Dalia C

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to report the first case of cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) presenting before bladder cancer diagnosis. A 71-year-old woman with a history of bilateral vision loss underwent subsequent complete ophthalmic examination include a fluorescein angiography, full-field electroretinogram (ERG), serology including serum antibodies for CAR, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. The patient was diagnosed with bladder carcinoma revealed by PET-CT. Timely recognition of this entity may be crucial for an increased patient survival thus adult onset progressive photoreceptor dysfunction, confirmed by ERG, should alert to a possible remote effect of known or occult malignancy. In the latter, PET-CT may be exploited as a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:27146943

  11. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with occult bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Nivean, M; Muttuvelu, Danson V; Afzelius, Pia; Berman, Dalia C

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to report the first case of cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) presenting before bladder cancer diagnosis. A 71-year-old woman with a history of bilateral vision loss underwent subsequent complete ophthalmic examination include a fluorescein angiography, full-field electroretinogram (ERG), serology including serum antibodies for CAR, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. The patient was diagnosed with bladder carcinoma revealed by PET-CT. Timely recognition of this entity may be crucial for an increased patient survival thus adult onset progressive photoreceptor dysfunction, confirmed by ERG, should alert to a possible remote effect of known or occult malignancy. In the latter, PET-CT may be exploited as a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:27146943

  12. Steroid-induced central serous retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Samidh P; Desai, Chetna K; Desai, Mira K; Dikshit, R K

    2011-09-01

    A-24 year-old male was prescribed prednisolone (60 mg/day) for left sided facial palsy. After three days of therapy, the patient complained of black spots in his vision in right eye. Fluorescein angiography of right eye showed evidence of central serous retinopathy (CSR). Prednisolone dose was withdrawn gradually and the patient improved within a week. There were no other systemic or ophthalmic diseases reported by the patient, which could have caused this condition. An improvement after dechallenge confirmed steroid-induced CSR. Recurrent CSR is known to cause permanent loss of vision. Hence, awareness regarding this adverse drug reaction (ADR) with steroids and its reporting can minimize this complication and help in better patient management.

  13. Purtscher-like retinopathy: A rare complication of peribulbar anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Narendran, Siddharth; Saravanan, V R; Pereira, Merlyn

    2016-01-01

    Purtscher and Purtscher-like retinopathy is a distinctive retinal syndrome characterized by ischemic retinal whitening in a peripapillary pattern. We report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy in a healthy 64-year-old man after a routine peribulbar anesthetic injection for cataract surgery. Although peribulbar anesthesia is considered to be a safer alternative to retrobulbar anesthesia, it has been associated with unusual but grave complications including central retinal artery occlusion. PMID:27488158

  14. Diabetic retinopathy in Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites.

    PubMed

    Haffner, S M; Fong, D; Stern, M P; Pugh, J A; Hazuda, H P; Patterson, J K; van Heuven, W A; Klein, R

    1988-07-01

    Mexican Americans (MAs) have a threefold greater prevalence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) than non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). Because MA diabetic subjects have greater hyperglycemia and an earlier age of onset than NHW diabetic subjects, we postulated that diabetic MAs might also have more severe diabetic retinopathy. Stereoscopic retinal photographs of the seven standard fields of each eye were taken in 257 MAs and 56 NHWs with NIDDM. The photographs were read by the University of Wisconsin Fundus Photographic Reading Center and graded with standardized criteria. The MAs had a nonsignificantly increased risk of retinopathy relative to the NHWs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.71; 95% confidence interval (Cl) = (0.93, 3.17)]. The risk of severe retinopathy (proliferative or preproliferative) relative to background or no retinopathy was significantly greater in MAs than in NHWs [OR = 2.37; 95% Cl = (1.04, 5.39)]. After control by logistic regression for duration of disease, severity of hyperglycemia, age, and systolic blood pressure, MAs still had an increased risk of severe retinopathy relative to NHWs [OR = 3.18; 95% Cl = (1.32, 7.66)]. Severe retinopathy was related to duration of disease, hyperglycemia, and insulin therapy in both ethnic groups. Previously diagnosed MA diabetic subjects also had an increased prevalence of any retinopathy [OR = 2.39; 95% Cl = (1.63, 3.50)] and severe retinopathy [OR = 3.21; 95% Cl = (2.24, 4.59)] relative to previously diagnosed White diabetic subjects (n = 896) from Wisconsin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Diabetic retinopathy in Victoria, Australia: the Visual Impairment Project

    PubMed Central

    McKay, R.; McCarty, C.; Taylor, H.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To establish the prevalence, severity, and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in a representative sample of Victorian residents aged 40 years and older.
METHODS—A population based, cluster sampling method was used to recruit 4744 participants (86% participation rate). Nine randomly selected, suburban Melbourne clusters and four randomly selected, rural Victorian clusters were used. Participants provided a detailed medical and personal history and underwent an ocular examination including funduscopy and fundus photography. Rural participants provided a blood sample, from which the glycosylated haemoglobin percentage was measured. The diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy was based on fundus photographs from participants with self reported diabetes.
RESULTS—The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among people with self reported diabetes was 29.1%. The prevalence of untreated, vision threatening retinopathy was 2.8%. Retinopathy was positively associated with a longer reported duration of diabetes diagnosis (p<0.01) and with higher fractions of glycosylated haemoglobin (p<0.01). Retinopathy was not significantly associated with age, ethnicity, body mass index, glaucoma, myopia or intake of alcohol, tobacco, or aspirin (all p > 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—Most people in Victoria with proliferative diabetic retinopathy or clinically significant macular oedema have received laser treatment. There remains however, a small but important group who have not received treatment and whose vision is threatened. People with diabetes should be encouraged to maintain strict glycaemic control and to undergo regular screening to delay or prevent the development of retinopathy.

 PMID:10906093

  16. Amiloride lowers blood pressure and attenuates urine plasminogen activation in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oxlund, Christina S; Buhl, Kristian B; Jacobsen, Ib A; Hansen, Mie R; Gram, Jeppe; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Schousboe, Karoline; Tarnow, Lise; Jensen, Boye L

    2014-12-01

    In conditions with albuminuria, plasminogen is aberrantly filtered across the glomerular barrier and activated along the tubular system to plasmin. In the collecting duct, plasmin activates epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) proteolytically. Hyperactivity of ENaC could link microalbuminuria/proteinuria to resistant hypertension. Amiloride, an ENaC inhibitor, inhibits urokinase-type plasminogen activator. We hypothesized that amiloride (1) reduces blood pressure (BP); (2) attenuates plasminogen-to-plasmin activation; and (3) inhibits urine urokinase-type plasminogen activator in patients with resistant hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).In an open-label, non-randomized, 8-week intervention study, a cohort (n = 80) of patients with resistant hypertension and T2DM were included. Amiloride (5 mg/d) was added to previous triple antihypertensive treatment (including a diuretic and an inhibitor of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) and increased to 10 mg if BP control was not achieved at 4 weeks. Complete dataset for urine analysis was available in 60 patients. Systolic and diastolic BP measured by ambulatory BP monitoring and office monitoring were significantly reduced. Average daytime BP was reduced by 6.3/3.0 mm Hg. Seven of 80 cases (9%) discontinued amiloride due to hyperkalemia >5.5 mol/L, the most frequent adverse event. Urinary plasmin(ogen) and albumin excretions were significantly reduced after amiloride treatment (P < .0001). Urokinase activity was detectable in macroalbuminuric urine, with a tendency toward reduction in activity after amiloride treatment. Amiloride lowers BP, urine plasminogen excretion and activation, and albumin/creatinine ratio, and is a relevant add-on medication for the treatment of resistant hypertension in patients with T2DM and microalbuminuria.

  17. Early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Baez, Maria Valeria; Barcenas-Contreras, Rodolfo; Morales Montoya, Carlos; Espinosa-Garcia, Laura Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of a strategy for early detection of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2) in Quintana Roo, México. Methods: Study transversal, observational, prospective, analytical, eight primary care units from Mexican Social Security Institute in the northern delegation of the State of Quintana Roo, Mexico were included. A program for early detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in adult 376,169 was designed. Were diagnosed 683 cases of type 2 diabetes, in 105 patients randomized was conducted to direct ophthalmoscopy were subjected to a secondary hospital were assigned. Will determine the degree of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema was performed. Results: In population were 55.2% female, mean age 48+11.1 years, 23.8 % had some degree of DR, 28.0% with mild non- proliferative diabetic retinopathy 48.0 % moderate 16.0% and severe and 8.0% showed proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Those over age 30 are 2.8 times more risk of developing DR, OR= 2.8; 95%CI: 0.42-18.0, and OR= 1.7; 95%CI: 1.02-2.95 women. Conclusions: The implementation of programs aimed at the early detection of debilitating conditions such as diabetic retinopathy health impact beneficiaries, effective links between primary care systems and provide second level positive health outcomes for patient diseases. PMID:26019380

  18. Impediment of the progressions of microalbuminuria and hyperlipidemia in normotensive type 2 diabetes by low-dose ramipril.

    PubMed

    Vongterapak, S; Dahlan, W; Nakasatien, S; Anuntakulnatee, T; Suppanich, M; Kittipoom, W; Surasingchaidet, C; Tamwiwat, C; Tepkasetkul, M; Bunnag, P; Ongphiphadhanakul, B; Rajatanavin, R; Himathongkam, T

    1998-09-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we investigated in normotensive type 2 diabetics with microalbuminuria the effect of ramipril, an ACE inhibitor, on urine albumin excretion and serum lipids. A total of 1,882 patients were screened for urine microalbumin consecutively by dipstick test, Rapi Tex-Albumin test and RIA. The final 28 normotensive and microalbuminuric patients were assigned to receive either ramipril (1.25 mg/d, n = 16) or placebo (n = 12) for 12 weeks. Throughout the study, both groups had no changes in blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1C, serum creatinine and electrolytes and no difference in creatinine clearance. At week 12 only the placebo group showed the significant increment of urine albumin excretion and triacylglycerol (30.6 +/- 38.3 to 39.0 +/- 19.7 and 167 +/- 64 to 208 +/- 77 mg/dl, respectively) but the decrement of HDL-cholesterol (46 +/- 16 to 35 +/- 6 mg/dl). During a 3 month period, increased urine albumin excretion was observed in normotensive type 2 diabetes with microalbuminuria who received only placebo. We conclude that ramipril may arrest the progression of albumin excretion and had favorable effects on serum lipids. Ramipril was safe and well-tolerated without untoward side effects during the study period.

  19. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  20. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the ... different types of PH. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may have no known cause, or the ...

  1. Hormones and Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Hormones and Hypertension What is hypertension? Hypertension, or chronic (long-term) high blood pressure, is a main cause of ... tobacco, alcohol, and certain medications play a part. Hormones made in the kidneys and in blood vessels ...

  2. Does Insulin Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Deficiency Have a “Protective” Role in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in Thalassamia Major Patients?

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Incorvaia, Carlo; Soliman, Ashraf T; Candini, Giancarlo; Pepe, Alessia; Kattamis, Christos; Soliman, Nada A.; Elsedfy, Heba; Kholy, Mohamed El

    2015-01-01

    (32.2 %) had IGF-1 levels below the 2.5th percentile of the normal values for the Italian population. The mean serum IGF-1 concentrations were significantly lower in the diabetic versus the non-diabetic TM groups (p < 0.001). DR was present in 4 (21 %) of 19 TM patients with IDDM and was associated with the main classical risk factors, namely inefficient glycemic control and duration of the disease but not hypertension. Using the scale developed by the Global Diabetic Retinopathy Group, the DR in our patients was classified as non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). Only a few numbers of microaneurysms [1–3] were detected. Our data also confirm the strong association of IDDM in TM patients with other endocrine and non-endocrine complications. PMID:26075045

  3. FT011, a Novel Cardiorenal Protective Drug, Reduces Inflammation, Gliosis and Vascular Injury in Rats with Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Deliyanti, Devy; Zhang, Yuan; Khong, Fay; Berka, David R.; Stapleton, David I.; Kelly, Darren J.; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy features inflammation as well as injury to glial cells and the microvasculature, which are influenced by hypertension and overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system. FT011 is an anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic agent that has been reported to attenuate organ damage in diabetic rats with cardiomyopathy and nephropathy. However, the potential therapeutic utility of FT011 for diabetic retinopathy has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that FT011 would attenuate retinopathy in diabetic Ren-2 rats, which exhibit hypertension due to an overactive extra-renal renin-angiotensin system. Diabetic rats were studied for 8 and 32 weeks and received intravitreal injections of FT011 (50 μM) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl). Comparisons were to age-matched controls. In the 8-week study, retinal inflammation was examined by quantitating vascular leukocyte adherence, microglial/macrophage density and the expression of inflammatory mediators. Macroglial Müller cells, which exhibit a pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic phenotype in diabetes, were evaluated in the 8-week study as well as in culture following exposure to hyperglycaemia and FT011 (10, 30, 100 μM) for 72 hours. In the 32-week study, severe retinal vasculopathy was examined by quantitating acellular capillaries and extracellular matrix proteins. In diabetic rats, FT011 reduced retinal leukostasis, microglial density and mRNA levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In Müller cells, FT011 reduced diabetes-induced gliosis and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunolabeling and the hyperglycaemic-induced increase in ICAM-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, CCL20, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, VEGF and IL-6. Late intervention with FT011 reduced acellular capillaries and the elevated mRNA levels of collagen IV and fibronectin in diabetic rats. In conclusion, the protective effects of FT011 in cardiorenal disease extend to key elements of diabetic retinopathy and

  4. Retinopathy in non diabetics, diabetic retinopathy and oxidative stress: a new phenotype in Central Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Longo-Mbenza, Benjamin; Mvitu Muaka, Moise; Masamba, Wayiza; Muizila Kini, Lucien; Longo Phemba, Igor; Kibokela Ndembe, Dalida; Tulomba Mona, Doris

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the rates of retinopathy without diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR), associated with some markers of oxidative stress, antioxidants and cardiometabolic risk factors. METHODS We determined the prevalence of DR in 150 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients, that of retinopathy in 50 non diabetics, the levels of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), blood pressure, lipids, 8-isoprostane, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), gamma-glutamyl transferase GT (GGT), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL), thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), uric acid, creatinine, albumin, total antioxidant status (TAOS), zinc, selenium, magnesium, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, glucose, apolipoprotein B (ApoB). RESULTS The prevalences of DR at 53y and Rtp at 62y were 44% (n=66) and 10% (n=5), respectively. The highest levels of 8-isoprostane, 8-OHdG, TBARS, SOD, and OxLDL were in DR. The lowest levels of vitamin D, vitamin C, TAOS, and vitamin E were in DR. In the case-control study discriminant analysis, the levels of vitamin C, vitamin D, ApoB, 8-OHdG, creatinine, Zn, vitamin E, and WC distinguished significantly non-diabetics without DR (controls), T2DM patients without DR and T2DM patients with DR. CONCLUSION Anticipation of DR onset is significantly associated with the exageration of oxidative stress biomarkers or decrease of antioxidants in African type 2 diabetics. Prevention of oxidative stress and abdominal obesity is needed. Supplementation in vitamin C, D, and E should be recommended as complement therapies of T2DM. PMID:24790873

  5. Clinical features of 8295 patients with resistant hypertension classified on the basis of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Segura, Julián; Banegas, José R; Gorostidi, Manuel; de la Cruz, Juan J; Armario, Pedro; Oliveras, Anna; Ruilope, Luis M

    2011-05-01

    We aimed to estimate the prevalence of resistant hypertension through both office and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in a large cohort of treated hypertensive patients from the Spanish Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Registry. In addition, we also compared clinical features of patients with true or white-coat-resistant hypertension. In December 2009, we identified 68 045 treated patients with complete information for this analysis. Among them, 8295 (12.2% of the database) had resistant hypertension (office blood pressure ≥140 and/or 90 mm Hg while being treated with ≥3 antihypertensive drugs, 1 of them being a diuretic). After ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, 62.5% of patients were classified as true resistant hypertensives, the remaining 37.5% having white-coat resistance. The former group was younger, more frequently men, with a longer duration of hypertension and a worse cardiovascular risk profile. The group included larger proportions of smokers, diabetics, target organ damage (including left ventricular hypertrophy, impaired renal function, and microalbuminuria), and documented cardiovascular disease. Moreover, true resistant hypertensives exhibited in a greater proportion a riser pattern (22% versus 18%; P<0.001). In conclusion, this study first reports the prevalence of resistant hypertension in a large cohort of patients in usual daily practice. Resistant hypertension is present in 12% of the treated hypertensive population, but among them more than one third have normal ambulatory blood pressure. A worse risk profile is associated with true resistant hypertension, but this association is weak, thus making it necessary to assess ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for a correct diagnosis and management.

  6. Cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, D P; Sanidas, E A; Viniou, N A; Gennimata, V; Chantziara, V; Barbetseas, I; Makris, T K

    2015-02-01

    Inevitably, a small proportion of patients with systematic hypertension will develop hypertensive crisis at some point. Hypertensive crises can be divided into hypertensive emergency or hypertensive urgency according to the presence or lack of acute target organ damage. In this review, we discuss cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, aortic dissection, congestive heart failure, and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises, including those caused by cocaine use. Each presents in a unique fashion, although some hypertensive emergency patients report nonspecific symptoms. Treatment includes several effective and rapid-acting medications to safely reduce the blood pressure, protect remaining end-organ function, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications, and thereby improve patient outcomes.

  7. Homocysteine Serum Levels in Diabetic Patients with Non Proliferative, Proliferative and without Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gagliano, Caterina; Giordano, Maria; Vacante, Marco; Caraci, Filippo; Drago, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio; Motta, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine has been associated with extracellular matrix changes. The diabetic retinopathy is a neurovascular complication of diabetes mellitus and it is the leading cause of vision loss among working adults worldwide. In this study, we evaluate the role of homocysteine in diabetic retinopathy analyzing the plasma levels of homocysteine in 63 diabetic type 2 patients with nonproliferative retinopathy (NPDR), 62 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), 50 healthy subjects used as control group, and 75 randomly selected patients. PMID:24877066

  8. Homocysteine serum levels in diabetic patients with non proliferative, proliferative and without retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Gagliano, Caterina; Giordano, Maria; Salomone, Salvatore; Vacante, Marco; Bucolo, Claudio; Caraci, Filippo; Reibaldi, Michele; Drago, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio; Motta, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine has been associated with extracellular matrix changes. The diabetic retinopathy is a neurovascular complication of diabetes mellitus and it is the leading cause of vision loss among working adults worldwide. In this study, we evaluate the role of homocysteine in diabetic retinopathy analyzing the plasma levels of homocysteine in 63 diabetic type 2 patients with nonproliferative retinopathy (NPDR), 62 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), 50 healthy subjects used as control group, and 75 randomly selected patients. PMID:24877066

  9. Essential Hypertension vs. Secondary Hypertension Among Children

    PubMed Central

    Banker, Ashish; Shete, Sanjay; Hashmi, Syed Sharukh; Tyson, John E.; Barratt, Michelle S.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Milewicz, Diane M.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to determine the proportions and correlates of essential hypertension among children in a tertiary pediatric hypertension clinic. METHODS We evaluated 423 consecutive children and collected demographic and clinical history by retrospective chart review. RESULTS We identified 275 (65%) hypertensive children (blood pressure >95th percentile per the “Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents”) from 423 children referred to the clinic for history of elevated blood pressure. The remainder of the patients had normotension (11%), white coat hypertension (11%), prehypertension (10%), and pending diagnosis (3%). Among the 275 hypertensive children, 43% (n = 119; boys = 56%; median age = 12 years; range = 3–17 years) had essential hypertension and 57% (n = 156; boys = 66%; median age = 9 years; range = 0.08–19 years) had secondary hypertension. When compared with those with secondary hypertension, those with essential hypertension had a significantly older age at diagnosis (P = 0.0002), stronger family history of hypertension (94% vs. 68%; P < 0.0001), and lower prevalence of preterm birth (20% vs. 46%; P < 0.001). There was a bimodal distribution of age of diagnosis in those with secondary hypertension. CONCLUSIONS The phenotype of essential hypertension can present as early as 3 years of age and is the predominant form of hypertension in children after age of 6 years. Among children with hypertension, those with essential hypertension present at an older age, have a stronger family history of hypertension, and have lower prevalence of preterm birth. PMID:24842390

  10. Prolactin and vasoinhibins: Endogenous players in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Triebel, Jakob; Macotela, Yazmín; de la Escalera, Gonzalo Martínez; Clapp, Carmen

    2011-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a disease of the retinal microvasculature that develops as a complication of diabetes mellitus and constitutes a major cause of blindness in adults of all ages. Diabetic retinopathy is characterized by the loss of capillary cells leading to increased vasopermeability, ischemia, and hypoxia that trigger the excessive formation of new blood vessels in the retina. The influence of the pituitary gland in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy was recognized nearly six decades ago, but the contribution of pituitary hormones to this disease remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that the pituitary hormone prolactin is proteolytically cleaved to vasoinhibins, a family of peptides with potent antivasopermeability, vasoconstrictive, and antiangiogenic actions that can protect the eye against the deleterious effects of the diabetic state. In this review, we summarize what is known about the changes in the circulating levels of prolactin and vasoinhibins during diabetes and diabetic retinopathy as well as the implications of these changes for the development and progression of the disease with particular attention to hyperprolactinemia in pregnancy and postpartum. We discuss the effects of prolactin and vasoinhibins that may impact diabetic retinopathy and suggest these hormones as important targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:21913303

  11. Retinopathy of prematurity: Recommendations for screening

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, AL

    2010-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a disorder of the developing retinal blood vessels of the preterm infant. New recommendations for screening and treatment of ROP have been published in the past few years. Current evidence suggests that screening infants with gestational ages of 30 6/7 weeks or less (regardless of birth weight) and birth weights of 1250 g or less is a strategy with a very small likelihood that an unscreened baby would have treatable ROP. Individual centres may choose to extend birth weight screening criteria to 1500 g. Initial screening should be performed at 31 weeks’ postmenstrual age in infants with gestational ages of 26 6/7 weeks or less at birth, and at four weeks’ chronological age in infants with gestational ages of 27 weeks or more at birth by an ophthalmologist skilled in the detection of ROP. Follow-up examinations are conducted according to the ophthalmologist’s recommendation. Infants with high-risk prethreshold ROP and threshold ROP are referred for retinal ablative therapy. Developing processes for ROP screening, documenting results and communicating results to parents as well as health professionals involved in the infant’s care are important responsibilities for all nurseries providing care for preterm infants. PMID:22131866

  12. Plasma Metabonomic Profiling of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyan; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Choi, Hyungwon; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Tan, Gavin S W; Tian, Dechao; Zhang, Liang; Venkatesan, Gopalakrishnan; Tai, E Shyong; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul; Cheung, Chiu Ming Gemmy; Beuerman, Roger Wilmer; Zhou, Lei; Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common microvascular complication of diabetes and the leading cause of visual impairment in working-age adults. Patients with diabetes often develop DR despite appropriate control of systemic risk factors, suggesting the involvement of other pathogenic factors. We hypothesize that the plasma metabolic signature of DR is distinct and resolvable from that of diabetes alone. A nested population-based case-control metabonomic study was first performed on 40 DR cases and 40 control subjects with diabetes using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Eleven metabolites were found to be correlated with DR, and the majority were robust when adjusted for metabolic risk factors and confounding kidney disease. The metabolite markers 2-deoxyribonic acid; 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid; erythritol; gluconic acid; and ribose were validated in an independent sample set with 40 DR cases, 40 control subjects with diabetes, and 40 individuals without diabetes. DR cases and control subjects with diabetes were matched by HbA1c in the validation set. Activation of the pentose phosphate pathway was identified from the list of DR metabolite markers. The identification of novel metabolite markers for DR provides insights into potential new pathogenic pathways for this microvascular complication and holds translational value in DR risk stratification and the development of new therapeutic measures. PMID:26822086

  13. Retinopathy of prematurity: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Shah, Parag K; Prabhu, Vishma; Karandikar, Smita S; Ranjan, Ratnesh; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Kalpana, Narendran

    2016-02-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vasoproliferative disorder of the retina occurring principally in new born preterm infants. It is an avoidable cause of childhood blindness. With the increase in the survival of preterm babies, ROP has become the leading cause of preventable childhood blindness throughout the world. A simple screening test done within a few weeks after birth by an ophthalmologist can avoid this preventable blindness. Although screening guidelines and protocols are strictly followed in the developed nations, it lacks in developing economies like India and China, which have the highest number of preterm deliveries in the world. The burden of this blindness in these countries is set to increase tremendously in the future, if corrective steps are not taken immediately. ROP first emerged in 1940s and 1950s, when it was called retrolental fibroplasia. Several epidemics of this disease were and are still occurring in different regions of the world and since then a lot of research has been done on this disease. However, till date very few comprehensive review articles covering all the aspects of ROP are published. This review highlights the past, present and future strategies in managing this disease. It would help the pediatricians to update their current knowledge on ROP. PMID:26862500

  14. The Vitreomacular Interface in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Daniel; Gelman, Rachel; Prospero Ponce, Claudia; Stevenson, William; Christoforidis, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading health concern and a major cause of blindness. DR can be complicated by scar tissue formation, macular edema, and tractional retinal detachment. Optical coherence tomography has found that patients with DR often have diffuse retinal thickening, cystoid macular edema, posterior hyaloid traction, and tractional retinal detachment. Newer imaging techniques can even detect fine tangential folds and serous macular detachment. The interplay of the vitreous and the retina in the progression of DR involves multiple chemokine and other regulatory factors including VEGF. Understanding the cells infiltrating pathologic membranes at the vitreomacular interface has opened up the possibility of new targets for pharmacotherapy. Vitrectomies for DR remain a vital tool to help relieve tension on the macula by removing membranes, improving edema absorption, and eliminating the scaffold for new membrane formation. Newer treatments such as triamcinolone acetonide and VEGF inhibitors have become essential as a rapid way to control DR at the vitreomacular interface, improve macular edema, and reduce retinal neovascularization. These treatments alone, and in conjunction with PRP, help to prevent worsening of the VMI in patients with DR. PMID:26425349

  15. The Vitreomacular Interface in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Daniel; Gelman, Rachel; Prospero Ponce, Claudia; Stevenson, William; Christoforidis, John B

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading health concern and a major cause of blindness. DR can be complicated by scar tissue formation, macular edema, and tractional retinal detachment. Optical coherence tomography has found that patients with DR often have diffuse retinal thickening, cystoid macular edema, posterior hyaloid traction, and tractional retinal detachment. Newer imaging techniques can even detect fine tangential folds and serous macular detachment. The interplay of the vitreous and the retina in the progression of DR involves multiple chemokine and other regulatory factors including VEGF. Understanding the cells infiltrating pathologic membranes at the vitreomacular interface has opened up the possibility of new targets for pharmacotherapy. Vitrectomies for DR remain a vital tool to help relieve tension on the macula by removing membranes, improving edema absorption, and eliminating the scaffold for new membrane formation. Newer treatments such as triamcinolone acetonide and VEGF inhibitors have become essential as a rapid way to control DR at the vitreomacular interface, improve macular edema, and reduce retinal neovascularization. These treatments alone, and in conjunction with PRP, help to prevent worsening of the VMI in patients with DR. PMID:26425349

  16. Retinopathy of prematurity: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parag K; Prabhu, Vishma; Karandikar, Smita S; Ranjan, Ratnesh; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Kalpana, Narendran

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vasoproliferative disorder of the retina occurring principally in new born preterm infants. It is an avoidable cause of childhood blindness. With the increase in the survival of preterm babies, ROP has become the leading cause of preventable childhood blindness throughout the world. A simple screening test done within a few weeks after birth by an ophthalmologist can avoid this preventable blindness. Although screening guidelines and protocols are strictly followed in the developed nations, it lacks in developing economies like India and China, which have the highest number of preterm deliveries in the world. The burden of this blindness in these countries is set to increase tremendously in the future, if corrective steps are not taken immediately. ROP first emerged in 1940s and 1950s, when it was called retrolental fibroplasia. Several epidemics of this disease were and are still occurring in different regions of the world and since then a lot of research has been done on this disease. However, till date very few comprehensive review articles covering all the aspects of ROP are published. This review highlights the past, present and future strategies in managing this disease. It would help the pediatricians to update their current knowledge on ROP. PMID:26862500

  17. Association between Sickle Cell Trait and the Prevalence and Severity of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Al Harbi, Majed; Khandekar, Rajiv; Kozak, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether Sickle cell trait (SCT) is associated with an increased severity of diabetic retinopathy. Methods This was a single center retrospective study case control study of 100 eyes of 100 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) with SCT (SCT group) and 100 eyes of 100 age-matched patients with DM without SCT (control group). The main outcome measure was the difference in the prevalence of sight threatening DR [here defined as diabetic macular edema (DME) and/or proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR)], between the SCT and control groups. Secondary outcome measures included differences in visual acuity, ocular comorbidities, intraocular pressure, glycemic control as assessed by random blood glucose measurement, diabetes duration, nephropathy, hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Results The SCT group had statistically significantly shorter duration of DM (median [25% quartile] 15 [8.3] years versus 20 [14.7] years, respectively)(P<0.001) and presented with statistically better metabolic control (mean difference 1.6 mmol/l, (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1–3.3;P = 0.03). The prevalence of PDR and/or DME was significantly lower in the SCT group (58%) compared to the control group, (95%)(P<0.001). The absence of SCT (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 24; 95% CI, 8–72; P<0.001) and longer duration of DM (AOR = 1.1 [95% CI, 1.02–1.13]; P = 0.003) were independent predictors of PDR and/or DME. Conclusions SCT seems to protect against the development and progression of DR. This may have implications for monitoring and screening. Prospective studies are required to confirm this association. If true, this association may indicate an increased blood glucose buffering capacity of abnormal hemoglobin. PMID:27414024

  18. Radiation retinopathy as an experimental model for ischemic proliferative retinopathy and rubeosis iridis

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, A.R.; Wood, I.S.

    1987-06-15

    We produced radiation retinopathy in capuchin monkeys and studied them with fluorescein angiography and light and electron microscopy. The animals were followed up from ten days to 3 1/2 years after radiation in order to determine whether this could provide an experimental model for other chronic ischemic-proliferative retinopathies, such as diabetes. The first change detected after radiation was the focal loss of capillary endothelial cells and pericytes. As the areas of acellular capillaries became confluent, cotton-wool spots became visible ophthalmoscopically. These increased in number and then faded away, leaving large areas of retinal capillary perfusion. Histologic studies showed occlusion first of the deeper, smaller retinal vessels and then gradually of the larger vessels. Intraretinal neovascularization as well as apparent recanalization then developed, but no new vessels extended through the internal limiting lamina into the vitreous. Rubeosis iridis with neovascular glaucoma developed 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 years postirradiation, and vitreous aspirate demonstrated a high level of angiogenic factor.

  19. Is there any effect of bolus and/or infusion 5-fluorouracil treatment on microalbuminuria in immediate or long term?

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Ozgur

    2014-07-01

    5-Fluorouracil is a widely used cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment settings particularly in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. Various studies on the cardiac adverse effects of 5-fluorouracil, reported the likelihood of altered myocardial contractility and vascular endothelial damage caused by this agent. However, the mechanism underlying 5-fluorouracil-related cardiotoxicity is not clear. In certain experimental studies, thrombotic processes occurring in microvascular field were supposed to play a role in this condition. In the light of this knowledge, the administration of 5-fluorouracil may be considered to cause renal vascular endothelial damage that may result in the altered endothelial permeability. As a result of endothelial dysfunction, increased urinary albumin excretion may be in question and no study investigating this potential direct relationship has been available in medical literature. Based on this evidence, the hypothesis of that 5-fluorouracil might cause renal vascular dysfunction and microalbuminuria, was discussed in this article along with the basic knowledge. PMID:24755457

  20. The Medical Check-Up for Potentially Serious Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Iain S.

    1986-01-01

    In developed countries diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of visual impairment and the leading cause of blindness in the population aged 20-65 years. Serious retinopathy has a presymptomatic phase which underscores the importance of ophthalmoscopy in screening patients to detect microvascular abnormalities that are early and late predictors of increasing severity. The diagnosis of “high risk characteristics” for visual loss and “clinically significant macular edema” is essential, as photocoagulation treatment has been shown conclusively to reduce the rate of blindness and slow the rate of progression of retinopathy. The complete medical check-up and early referral for diagnostic work-up should lead to less disability. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:21267098

  1. Ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Rubens Camargo; Kaiser Junior, Roberto Luiz; Ruiz, Lilian Piron; Ruiz, Milton Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a patient with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease. Case report This report presents a case of a 28-year-old female patient with Crohn’s disease and sudden decrease of visual acuity in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal electroretinography confirmed the clinical features of ischemic retinopathy. After systemic corticosteroid treatment, the patient developed epiretinal membrane without significant improvement in visual acuity. Discussion The patient presented with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease with deficiency of central visual acuity. Periodic examination by a retina specialist is recommended for patients being treated for Crohn’s disease. PMID:27524921

  2. Photographic grading in the retinopathy of prematurity cryotherapy trial.

    PubMed

    Watzke, R C; Robertson, J E; Palmer, E A; Wallace, P R; Evans, M S; Soldevilla, J E

    1990-07-01

    We report a system for photographic grading of the posterior fundus features of retinopathy of prematurity and correlation of such features with potential future visual function. The severity of temporal vessel traction, retinal fold, macular ectopia, retinal detachment, retrolental mass, blood vessel attenuation, retinal pigment epithelial scarring, and cataract was assessed by review of photographs at the Fundus Photograph Reading Center, Portland, Ore, according to a scheme designed to avoid bias or knowledge of treatment status. Reliability for all features was in the fair to excellent range (kappa greater than .40), except for blood vessel attenuation (kappa = .18), which was not a factor in the final outcome determination. The grading scheme provided the basis for the 3-month conclusions of the multicenter trial of cryotherapy for retinopathy of prematurity. This system will have further application in the 12-month Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity Study conclusions and in future long-term correlation with visual acuity as the trial patients mature.

  3. Hypertensive Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Olson-Chen, Courtney; Seligman, Neil S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is increasing. The etiology and pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain poorly understood. Hypertensive disorders are a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of hypertension decreases the incidence of severe hypertension, but it does not impact rates of preeclampsia or other pregnancy complications. Several antihypertensive medications are commonly used in pregnancy, although there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Severe hypertension should be treated immediately to prevent maternal end-organ damage. Appropriate antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum management is important in caring for patients with hypertensive disorders. PMID:26600442

  4. Hypertensive Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Olson-Chen, Courtney; Seligman, Neil S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is increasing. The etiology and pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain poorly understood. Hypertensive disorders are a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of hypertension decreases the incidence of severe hypertension, but it does not impact rates of preeclampsia or other pregnancy complications. Several antihypertensive medications are commonly used in pregnancy, although there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Severe hypertension should be treated immediately to prevent maternal end-organ damage. Appropriate antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum management is important in caring for patients with hypertensive disorders.

  5. Color Doppler imaging of the retrobulbar vessels in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Pauk-Domańska, Magdalena; Walasik-Szemplińska, Dorota

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by elevated blood glucose level due to impaired insulin secretion and activity. Chronic hyperglycemia leads to functional disorders of numerous organs and to their damage. Vascular lesions belong to the most common late complications of diabetes. Microangiopathic lesions can be found in the eyeball, kidneys and nervous system. Macroangiopathy is associated with coronary and peripheral vessels. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common microangiopathic complication characterized by closure of slight retinal blood vessels and their permeability. Despite intensive research, the pathomechanism that leads to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is not fully understood. The examinations used in assessing diabetic retinopathy usually involve imaging of the vessels in the eyeball and the retina. Therefore, the examinations include: fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography of the retina, B-mode ultrasound imaging, perimetry and digital retinal photography. There are many papers that discuss the correlations between retrobulbar circulation alterations and progression of diabetic retinopathy based on Doppler sonography. Color Doppler imaging is a non-invasive method enabling measurements of blood flow velocities in small vessels of the eyeball. The most frequently assessed vessels include: the ophthalmic artery, which is the first branch of the internal carotid artery, as well as the central retinal vein and artery, and the posterior ciliary arteries. The analysis of hemodynamic alterations in the retrobulbar vessels may deliver important information concerning circulation in diabetes and help to answer the question whether there is a relation between the progression of diabetic retinopathy and the changes observed in blood flow in the vessels of the eyeball. This paper presents the overview of literature regarding studies on blood flow in the vessels of the eyeball in patients with diabetic

  6. Color Doppler imaging of the retrobulbar vessels in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Walasik-Szemplińska, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by elevated blood glucose level due to impaired insulin secretion and activity. Chronic hyperglycemia leads to functional disorders of numerous organs and to their damage. Vascular lesions belong to the most common late complications of diabetes. Microangiopathic lesions can be found in the eyeball, kidneys and nervous system. Macroangiopathy is associated with coronary and peripheral vessels. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common microangiopathic complication characterized by closure of slight retinal blood vessels and their permeability. Despite intensive research, the pathomechanism that leads to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is not fully understood. The examinations used in assessing diabetic retinopathy usually involve imaging of the vessels in the eyeball and the retina. Therefore, the examinations include: fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography of the retina, B-mode ultrasound imaging, perimetry and digital retinal photography. There are many papers that discuss the correlations between retrobulbar circulation alterations and progression of diabetic retinopathy based on Doppler sonography. Color Doppler imaging is a non-invasive method enabling measurements of blood flow velocities in small vessels of the eyeball. The most frequently assessed vessels include: the ophthalmic artery, which is the first branch of the internal carotid artery, as well as the central retinal vein and artery, and the posterior ciliary arteries. The analysis of hemodynamic alterations in the retrobulbar vessels may deliver important information concerning circulation in diabetes and help to answer the question whether there is a relation between the progression of diabetic retinopathy and the changes observed in blood flow in the vessels of the eyeball. This paper presents the overview of literature regarding studies on blood flow in the vessels of the eyeball in patients with diabetic

  7. Autoantibodies against retinal proteins in paraneoplastic and autoimmune retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adamus, Grazyna; Ren, Gaoying; Weleber, Richard G

    2004-01-01

    Background Autoimmune retinal degeneration may occur in patients who present with sudden or, less commonly, subacute loss of vision of retinal origin, associated with an abnormal ERG, through the action of autoantibodies against retinal proteins. Often the patients are initially diagnosed with or suspected of having a paraneoplastic retinopathy (PR), such as cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR). However, there is limited information on the occurrence, the specificity of autoantibodies in these patients, and their association with clinical symptoms. Methods Sera were obtained from 193 retinopathy patients who presented with clinical symptoms resembling PR or autoimmune retinopathy (AR), including sudden painless loss of vision, typically associated with visual field defects and photopsias, and abnormal rod and/or cone responses on the electroretinogram (ERG). Sera were tested for the presence of anti-retinal autoantibodies by Western blot analysis using proteins extracted from human retina and by immunohistochemistry. Autoantibody titers against recoverin and enolase were measured by ELISA. Results We identified a higher prevalence of anti-retinal autoantibodies in retinopathy patients. Ninety-one patients' sera (47.1%) showed autoantibodies of various specificities with a higher incidence of antibodies present in retinopathy patients diagnosed with cancer (33/52; 63.5%; p = 0.009) than in retinopathy patients without cancer (58/141; 41.1%). The average age of PR patients was 62.0 years, and that of AR patients was 55.9 years. Autoantibodies against recoverin (p23) were only present in the sera of PR patients, autoantibodies against unknown p35 were more common in patients with AR, while anti-enolase (anti-p46) autoantibodies were nearly equally distributed in the sera of patients with PR and those with AR. In the seropositive patients, the autoantibodies persisted over a long period of time – from months to years. A rebound in anti-recoverin autoantibody titer was

  8. Anti-VEGF in a Marathon Runner's Retinopathy Case

    PubMed Central

    Soon, Alexander Kahjun

    2016-01-01

    Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is one of the most common retinal vascular disorders. Intense exercise associated CRVO have been described in otherwise healthy young patients. We describe a case of a young male ultramarathoner who presented with a CRVO, presumably associated with dehydration, making part of a marathon runner's retinopathy. Resolution of macular edema and subretinal fluid, with visual acuity improvement, was observed after 3 monthly injections of ranibizumab. Our case suggests that dehydration could be involved in the mechanism of CRVO in healthy young patients and ranibizumab may be an effective treatment option for marathon runner's retinopathy. PMID:27418990

  9. Vessel discoloration detection in malarial retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Barriga, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Harding, S.; Lewallen, S.; Joshi, V.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening clinical syndrome associated with malarial infection. It affects approximately 200 million people, mostly sub-Saharan African children under five years of age. Malarial retinopathy (MR) is a condition in which lesions such as whitening and vessel discoloration that are highly specific to CM appear in the retina. Other unrelated diseases can present with symptoms similar to CM, therefore the exact nature of the clinical symptoms must be ascertained in order to avoid misdiagnosis, which can lead to inappropriate treatment and, potentially, death. In this paper we outline the first system to detect the presence of discolored vessels associated with MR as a means to improve the CM diagnosis. We modified and improved our previous vessel segmentation algorithm by incorporating the `a' channel of the CIELab color space and noise reduction. We then divided the segmented vasculature into vessel segments and extracted features at the wall and in the centerline of the segment. Finally, we used a regression classifier to sort the segments into discolored and not-discolored vessel classes. By counting the abnormal vessel segments in each image, we were able to divide the analyzed images into two groups: normal and presence of vessel discoloration due to MR. We achieved an accuracy of 85% with sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 67%. In clinical practice, this algorithm would be combined with other MR retinal pathology detection algorithms. Therefore, a high specificity can be achieved. By choosing a different operating point in the ROC curve, our system achieved sensitivity of 67% with specificity of 100%.

  10. Retinylamine Benefits Early Diabetic Retinopathy in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Lee, Chieh Allen; Golczak, Marcin; Muthusamy, Arivalagan; Antonetti, David A.; Veenstra, Alexander A.; Amengual, Jaume; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests an important role for outer retinal cells in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Here we investigated the effect of the visual cycle inhibitor retinylamine (Ret-NH2) on the development of early DR lesions. Wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice (male, 2 months old when diabetes was induced) were made diabetic with streptozotocin, and some were given Ret-NH2 once per week. Lecithin-retinol acyltransferase (LRAT)-deficient mice and P23H mutant mice were similarly studied. Mice were euthanized after 2 (WT and Lrat−/−) and 8 months (WT) of study to assess vascular histopathology, accumulation of albumin, visual function, and biochemical and physiological abnormalities in the retina. Non-retinal effects of Ret-NH2 were examined in leukocytes treated in vivo. Superoxide generation and expression of inflammatory proteins were significantly increased in retinas of mice diabetic for 2 or 8 months, and the number of degenerate retinal capillaries and accumulation of albumin in neural retina were significantly increased in mice diabetic for 8 months compared with nondiabetic controls. Administration of Ret-NH2 once per week inhibited capillary degeneration and accumulation of albumin in the neural retina, significantly reducing diabetes-induced retinal superoxide and expression of inflammatory proteins. Superoxide generation also was suppressed in Lrat−/− diabetic mice. Leukocytes isolated from diabetic mice treated with Ret-NH2 caused significantly less cytotoxicity to retinal endothelial cells ex vivo than did leukocytes from control diabetics. Administration of Ret-NH2 once per week significantly inhibited the pathogenesis of lesions characteristic of early DR in diabetic mice. The visual cycle constitutes a novel target for inhibition of DR. PMID:26139608

  11. Transthyretin represses neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells has been reportedly induced by the protein transthyretin (TTR). In human ocular tissue, TTR is generally considered to be secreted mainly by retinal pigment epithelial cells (hRPECs); however, whether TTR affects the development of neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy (DR) remains unclear. Methods Natural and simulated DR media were used to culture human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hRECs). Hyperglycemia was simulated by increasing the glucose concentration from 5.5 mM up to 25 mM, while hypoxia was induced with 200 µM CoCl2. To understand the effects of TTR on hRECs, cell proliferation was investigated under natural and DR conditions. Overexpression of TTR, an in vitro wound-healing assay, and a tube formation assay were employed to study the repression of TTR on hRECs. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to study the mRNA levels of DR-related genes, such as Tie2, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, Angpt1, and Angpt2. Results The proliferation of hRECs was significantly decreased in the simulated hyperglycemic and hypoxic DR environments. The cells were further repressed by added exogenous or endogenous TTR only under hyperglycemic conditions. The in vitro migration and tube formation processes of the hRECs were inhibited with TTR; furthermore, in the hyperglycemia and hyperglycemia/hypoxia environments, the levels of Tie2 and Angpt1 mRNA were enhanced with exogenous TTR, while those of VEGFR1, VEGFR2, and Angpt1 were repressed. Conclusions In hyperglycemia, the proliferation, migration, and neovascularization of hRECs were significantly inhibited by TTR. The key genes for DR neovascularization, including Tie2, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, Angpt1, and Angpt2, were regulated by TTR. Under DR conditions, TTR significantly represses neovascularization by inhibiting the proliferation, migration and tube formation of hRECs. PMID:27746673

  12. Plasma Cardiotrophin-1 as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes-Induced Target Organ Damage and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Recio-Rodriguez, José I.; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Fernández-Martín, José L.; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B.; López-Novoa, José M.; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The search for biomarkers of hypertension and diabetes-induced damage to multiple target organs is a priority. We analyzed the correlation between plasma cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a chemokine that participates in cardiovascular remodeling and organ fibrosis, and a wide range of parameters currently used to diagnose morphological and functional progressive injury in left ventricle, arteries, and kidneys of diabetic and hypertensive patients, in order to validate plasma levels of CT-1 as clinical biomarker. This is an observational study with 93 type 2-diabetic patients, 209 hypertensive patients, and 82 healthy controls in which we assessed the following parameters: plasma CT-1, basal glycaemia, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH by electrocardiographic indexes), peripheral vascular disease (by pulse wave velocity—PWV, carotid intima-media thickness—C-IMT, and ankle-brachial index—ABI), and renal impairment (by microalbuminuria, albumin/creatinine urinary ratio, plasma creatinine concentrations, and glomerular filtration rate). Hypertensive or diabetic patients have higher plasma CT-1 than control patients. CT-1 positively correlates with basal glycaemia, SBP, DBP, PP, LVH, arterial damage (increased IMT, decreased ABI), and early renal damage (microalbuminuria, elevated albumin/creatinine ratio). CT-1 also correlates with increased 10-year cardiovascular risk. Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that CT-1 was associated with arterial injury assessed by PWV, IMT, ABI, and cardiac damage evaluated by Cornell voltage duration product. Increases in plasma CT-1 are strongly related to the intensity of several parameters associated to target organ damage supporting further investigation of its diagnostic capacity as single biomarker of cardiovascular injury and risk and, possibly, of subclinical renal damage. PMID:26222851

  13. Hyperhomocysteinemia predicts renal function decline: a prospective study in hypertensive adults

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Di; Yuan, Yan; Guo, Jiangnan; Yang, Shenglin; Xu, Xin; Wang, Qin; Li, Youbao; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Huo, Yong; Deng, Guangpu; Wu, Shengjie; Wang, Binyan; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Xiaobin; Fang, Pu; Wang, Hong; Xu, Xiping; Hou, Fanfan

    2015-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia (HHcy) is associated with microalbuminuria and glomerular injury in general and diabetic populations. However, HHcy’s role in hypertensive patients was not studied. We investigated whether HHcy is an independent risk factor for renal function decline and development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in hypertensive men and women. This was a community-based prospective cohort study of 2,387 hypertensive adults without CKD at baseline, with a mean follow-up of 4.4 years. Baseline and follow-up levels of plasma Hcy, folate, vitamin B12, blood pressure and other pertinent covariables were obtained. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/per 1.73 m2 and an eGFR decline rate >1 ml/min/per 1.73 m2/year. There was a graded association between Hcy tertiles and eGFR decline. Subjects in the 3rd tertile of Hcy levels had an accelerated rate of eGFR decline and an increased risk of incident CKD, as compared with those in the 1st tertile, after adjusting for age, gender, baseline diabetes, SBP, BMI, smoking, dyslipidemia, eGFR, folate and vitamin B12 levels. In conclusion, in this prospective cohort of Chinese hypertensive adults, elevated baseline plasma Hcy can serve as an independent biomarker to predict renal function decline and incident CKD. PMID:26553372

  14. [Hypertensive emergencies and urgencies].

    PubMed

    Phan, David Giang; Dreyfuss-Tubiana, Céline; Blacher, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disease, the most common chronic disease. Hypertensive emergency is much less frequent and only affects 1 to 2 % of all hypertensive patients. The true hypertensive emergency is characterized by the serious damage of one hypertensive target organ and requires an urgent intravenous treatment. Isolated blood pressure elevation should not be regarded as a hypertensive emergency if there is no target organ damage, even if the blood pressure is very high. These situations of "false hypertensive emergency", or hypertensive urgencies, often requires an immediate treatment, but oral. Signs of visceral pain of true hypertensive emergency often are a poor general condition, severe headache, decreased visual acuity, neurological deficit of ischemic or hemorrhagic cause, confusion, dyspnea with orthopnoea revealing heart failure, angina, chest pain revealing an aortic dissection, proteinuria, acute renal failure or eclampsia. True hypertensive emergencies include several entities, namely: severe hypertension, malignant hypertension and accelerated hypertension. If malignant hypertension is not treated, the prognosis is poor with 50 % death risk in the following year.

  15. GLP-1 agonist treatment: implications for diabetic retinopathy screening.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, Lakshminarayanan; Humphreys, Tracy; Hariman, Christian; Walker, Adrian B; Varughese, George I

    2011-12-01

    Rapid improvement in glycaemic control induced by GLP-1 agonist therapy could be yet another illustration of transient or permanent progression of diabetic retinopathy, similar to documented examples such as pregnancy and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Specific guidelines would be needed to monitor this paradoxical phenomenon during treatment with GLP-1 agonists. PMID:21906831

  16. Emerging trends in ocular telemedicine: the diabetic retinopathy model.

    PubMed

    Cavallerano, Jerry; Aiello, Lloyd M

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a leading cause of vision loss in industrialized countries. Diabetic retinopathy has features which make it ideal for disease management by telemedicine. The American Telemedicine Association (ATA) has recently established consensus recommendations for ocular telemedicine for diabetic retinopathy, in cooperation with the US National Institute of Standards and Technology. The guiding principle is that it would be inappropriate to use telemedicine to provide anything less than the accepted standard of clinical care. The ATA practice recommendations delineate performance standards for the clinical, technical and administrative elements of ocular telemedicine for diabetic retinopathy. Four clinical categories of assessment were identified. Category 4 validation, for example, indicates that a system matches or exceeds the ability of current photographs to identify lesions of diabetic retinopathy. To create the practice recommendations, workshops were held to address each of the three components: (1) clinical, (2) technical, and (3) operational and business. Ocular telemedicine programmes will need to demonstrate sustainability and cost-effectiveness, and respect a patient's right to privacy. Nevertheless, ocular telemedicine seems poised to become an integral part of eye health care, as long as programmes meet or exceed present clinical standards of care, and patient and provider expectations are clearly defined.

  17. The use of the Micral-Test strip to identify the presence of microalbuminuria in people with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) participating in the EUCLID study.

    PubMed

    Webb, D J; Newman, D J; Chaturvedi, N; Fuller, J H

    1996-03-01

    In IDDM, microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion rate (AER) of 20-200 micrograms/min) is a predictor of persistent proteinuria and diabetic nephropathy. Early intervention may prevent or reduce the rate of progression of renal complications. The Micral-Test strip can be used to establish a semi-quantitative estimate of AER. We assessed the field performance of the Micral-Test strip in detecting microalbuminuria in the EUCLID study, an European wide, 18 centre study of 530 IDDM participants, aged 20 to 59 years. People with macroalbuminuria were excluded. On entry, all participants had albumin concentrations from two overnight urine collections measured by a central laboratory, and the corresponding Micral-Test performed on the two collections locally. a cut off of > or = mg/l albumin from the first Micral-Test, to detect a centrally measured albumin concentration > or = 20 mg/l, yielded 29 (5.8%) false negative results and 58 (11.6%) false positive results (sensitivity 70%, specificity 87%). The mean AER, from two collections, was compared with the corresponding 'pooled' Micral-Test results (mean of the two readings). Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess if there was a suitable 'pooled' Micral-Test result for screening microalbuminuria. A 'pooled' Micral-Test result (> or = 15 mg/l) was used to detect mean AER > or = 20 micrograms/min (sensitivity 78%, specificity 77%). This 'pooled cut-off' had already been used for screening on to the study and led to an over-estimate (154 vs. 77) of the true number of microalbuminuric participants on the study. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the Micral-Test strip is not an effective screening tool for microalbuminuria, using the 'pooled' result from two measurements did not improve the sensitivity of the test.

  18. Hand vein responses to noradrenaline in normotensive patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and microalbuminuria: effects of alpha-adrenoceptor blockade with doxazosin.

    PubMed

    Bodmer, C W; Lake, D; Savage, M W; Williams, G

    1999-01-01

    Nephropathy commonly develops in patients with insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes. Administration of an antihypertensive agent to type 1 diabetes patients with microalbuminuria, the first clinically detectable stage of nephropathy, can help slow renal deterioration. It is postulated that the exaggerated vasoconstrictor response to noradrenaline seen in these patients may be relevant in the development of microalbuminuria. This open, non-comparative pilot study was designed to investigate the effects of the alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist doxazosin on noradrenaline-induced hand vein vasoconstriction and on albumin excretion in 14 normotensive type 1 diabetes patients with microalbuminuria. After a three-week placebo run-in period, patients received doxazosin (1, 2, and then 4 mg once-daily, at two-week intervals) for six weeks, followed by a two-week placebo washout period. Vasoconstrictor responses to noradrenaline were measured in dorsal hand veins at the end of each two-week period. Hand vein vasoconstrictor responses to noradrenaline decreased significantly, compared with placebo, at 4 mg/day doxazosin (p = 0.006). The mean albumin excretion rate was lower than baseline at all doses of doxazosin, but changes did not reach statistical significance. Doxazosin was generally well-tolerated; four patients (29%) reported mild-to-moderate treatment-related adverse events. This study indicates that alpha 1-adrenoceptor blockade can blunt the exaggerated vascular reactivity to noradrenaline in normotensive type 1 diabetes patients with microalbuminuria, and supports further research into a potential role for doxazosin in preventing the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Retinopathy of prematurity in port harcourt, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adio, Adedayo O; Ugwu, Rosemary O; Nwokocha, Chidi G; Eneh, Augusta U

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. With many preterm babies now surviving as a result of improvement in neonatal care in Nigeria, the incidence of visual impairment/blindness as a result of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) may rise. We describe our findings after screening starts for the first time in a 15-year-old special care baby unit so as to establish the incidence and risk factors for developing ROP. Methods. A prospective study carried out at the Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU) and Pediatric Outpatient Clinics of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital between January 1 and October 31, 2012. Fifty-three preterm babies (of 550 neonates admitted within the study period) delivered before 32 completed weeks and weighing less than 1500 g were included in the study following informed consent and the main outcome measure was the development of any stage of ROP. Results. Mean gestational age at birth was 28.98 ± 1.38 weeks. Mean birth weight was 1411 ± 128 g. Out of 550 babies admitted at SCBU, 87 of 100 preterms survived with 53 included in study. Twenty-five (47.2%) had different degrees of ROP with prevalence found to be 47.2%. Prevalence was higher (75%) in babies weighing <1300 g and those delivered before 30-week gestation (58%). Twenty-one (84%) had stage 1 no plus disease and 3 (12%) had stage 2 no plus disease. Only 1 (4%) had threshold disease in Zone 1. None had disease at stage 4 or 5 or AP-ROP. Receiving supplemental oxygen (χ (2) = 6.17; P = 0.01), presence of sepsis (χ (2) = 7.47; P = 0.006), multiple blood transfusions (χ (2) = 5.11; P = 0.02), and delivery by caesarian section (χ (2) = 4.22; P = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of ROP. There were no significant differences with gender, apneic spells, jaundice, or phototherapy. Conclusions and Relevance. All live infants with ROP were noted to regress spontaneously in this study. Though it may not be cost effective to acquire treatment facilities at the moment (the only child with

  20. Factors Associated With Serum Albumin in Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 With Microalbuminuria Using Non-Normal Mixed Models: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Khoundabi, Batoul; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Mansourian, Marjan; Faghihimani, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background: The globally increasing epidemic of diabetes will lead to serious problems including diabetic nephropathy and kidney diseases in near future. The first clinical diagnosable stage in a diabetic kidney disease is microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion of 30 - 300 g/24 hours). Objectives: This prospective cohort study investigated the risk factors of microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes who had been registered in endocrine and metabolism research center in Isfahan city, Iran. Patients and Methods: This prospective cohort study was performed on 90 diabetic type 2 patients with microalbuminuria, who were selected according to the consecutive sample selection method during 6 years. Data were collected through regular and systematic measurements of serum albumin as the response variable and body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, the duration of diabetes, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), fasting blood sugar (FBS), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) as the related factors. Non-normal mixed models were used to investigate the impact of effective factors on the amount of excreted serum albumin. Results: According to the deviance information criterion (DIC = 56.2), the non-normal mixed effects model with the skewed t distribution had a best fit and indicated that HbA1c, HDL and total cholesterol had a significant effect on the amount of albumin in urine (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Using nonnormal mixed models may lead to the best results as compared to common normality assumption. PMID:26889385

  1. Diabetic retinopathy. Screening and prevention of blindness. A doctoral thesis.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, J K

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic eye disease is a major cause of blindness in the Western World and remains one of the most serious complications of diabetes mellitus. Retinopathy is the ocular complication of diabetes that most often leads to impaired vision. In recent years laser treatment has been introduced that can significantly decrease the likelihood of blindness in diabetic patients, if the eyes are treated at the appropriate stage of the disease. It remains a public health problem to make sure that each patient is treated at the optimal time in the development of the eye disease. Several types of screening programs have been designed throughout the world to meet this problem. We now report on our active screening program for diabetic eye disease and describe the sight and eye condition of the diabetic patients who have been involved in this program. In 1980, regular eye screening for diabetic retinopathy was initiated at Department of Ophthalmology, Landakot Hospital. The number of diabetic patients seen regularly has increased considerably since then, with 70-80% of type 1 diabetic patients in the country participating in the program in 1990, increasing to over 90% in 1994. About a fifth of type 2 diabetics in the country participated in the program in 1990. The patients have undergone annual eye examinations and fundus photography. Laser treatment is administered for proliferative retinopathy and diabetic macular edema according to the Diabetic Retinopathy Study and Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study criteria. In 1990, we embarked on a cross-sectional study to evaluate the prevalence of retinopathy and visual impairment of the type 1 and type 2 patients participating in our program. At the time of study, 205 insulin-taking patients, with age at diagnosis of less than 30 years, participated in our screening program. Out of those, retinopathy was present in 106 (52%), patients proliferative retinopathy in 26 (13%) and macular edema in 19 (9%). Visual acuity of 196

  2. [Hypertension in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Handschin, Anja; Henny-Fullin, Katja; Buess, Daniel; Leuppi, Jörg; Dieterle, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Arterial hypertension remains the most important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal diseases. In view of an increasing prevalence with older age and an increasingly aging population, the treatment of elderly patients with arterial hypertension will become increasingly important in daily practice. Arterial hypertension in the elderly differs in many aspects from arterial hypertension in younger patients. For example, isolated systolic hypertension is the predominant form of arterial hypertension in the elderly. In comparison to younger patients, treatment of hypertension in the elderly is less well investigated. However, available data suggest that lowering of blood pressure in the elderly and very elderly reduces the risk of heart failure, stroke, and even mortality. The best evidence for the treatment of hypertension in the elderly exists for diuretics and calcium antagonists. However, the primary choice of antihypertensive therapy should be guided by the presence of existing cardiovascular and/or renal comorbidities.

  3. Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension Overview What is cirrhosis? In people who have ... lead to coma and death. What is portal hypertension? Normally, blood is carried to the liver by ...

  4. [Hypertensive urgency and emergency].

    PubMed

    Henny-Fullin, Katja; Buess, Daniel; Handschin, Anja; Leuppi, Jörg; Dieterle, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    European and North-American guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of arterial hypertension refer to hypertensive crisis as an acute and critical increase of blood pressure>180/120 mmHg. Presence of acute hypertensive target organ damage, such as stroke, myocardial infarction or heart failure, in this situation defines a “hypertensive emergency”. In these patients, immediate lowering of blood pressure (about 25% within one to two hours) in an intensive care setting is mandatory to prevent further progression of target organ damage. In contrast to hypertensive emergencies, hypertensive urgencies are characterized by an acute and critical increase in blood pressure without signs or symptoms of acute hypertensive target organ damage. In these patients, blood pressure should be lowered within 24 to 48 hours in order to avoid hypertensive target organ damage. In general, hospitalization is not required, and oral antihypertensive therapy usually is sufficient. However, further and continuing outpatient care has to be ensured.

  5. BR 08-3 MANAGEMENT OF DYSLIPIDEMIA IN HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, V V

    2016-09-01

    relaxation and increased permeability to lipoproteins. Hypertension is also associated with up regulation of lipid oxidation enzymes. Hypertension is clearly associated with vascular endothelium (prothrombotic and pro inflammatory). Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation are increased in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Reduction of both results in the reversal of vascular inflammation.LDL is a major cause of endothelial dysfunction. Microalbuminuria is identified in hypertensive patients and it is also associated with lipid abnormalities including high levels of LDL and TGL, low levels of HDL and elevated levels of LP(a). Today CVD prevention is focussed on treating hypertension with the lowering LDL (<100 mg%),increasing HDL (>40 mg in men) and lowering TGL(<150 mg%). In ALLHAT trial, 10,000 patients were given pravastatin 40 mg daily. At the end of 5 years, only 16.7% reduction in LDL was noted. In ASCOT-LLA trial, intensive therapy lipid lowering was recommended along with Antihypertensive therapy. ACEIs, ARBs, Aldosterone antagonists and Nebivolol improve endothelial function and reduce BP. Statin treatment happens to be as a first line drug therapy in the management of dyslipidemia. Fibrates are generally reserved for Hypertriglyceridemia. Bile sequestrants, Nicotinic acid and drug like Ezetimibe locally acting at the intestine level are also used for dyslipidemia. Single pill combination like Atorvastatin with RASS blocker/Amlodipine may be considered the coexisting hypertension and dyslipidemia. PMID:27643289

  6. BR 08-3 MANAGEMENT OF DYSLIPIDEMIA IN HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, V V

    2016-09-01

    relaxation and increased permeability to lipoproteins. Hypertension is also associated with up regulation of lipid oxidation enzymes. Hypertension is clearly associated with vascular endothelium (prothrombotic and pro inflammatory). Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation are increased in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Reduction of both results in the reversal of vascular inflammation.LDL is a major cause of endothelial dysfunction. Microalbuminuria is identified in hypertensive patients and it is also associated with lipid abnormalities including high levels of LDL and TGL, low levels of HDL and elevated levels of LP(a). Today CVD prevention is focussed on treating hypertension with the lowering LDL (<100 mg%),increasing HDL (>40 mg in men) and lowering TGL(<150 mg%). In ALLHAT trial, 10,000 patients were given pravastatin 40 mg daily. At the end of 5 years, only 16.7% reduction in LDL was noted. In ASCOT-LLA trial, intensive therapy lipid lowering was recommended along with Antihypertensive therapy. ACEIs, ARBs, Aldosterone antagonists and Nebivolol improve endothelial function and reduce BP. Statin treatment happens to be as a first line drug therapy in the management of dyslipidemia. Fibrates are generally reserved for Hypertriglyceridemia. Bile sequestrants, Nicotinic acid and drug like Ezetimibe locally acting at the intestine level are also used for dyslipidemia. Single pill combination like Atorvastatin with RASS blocker/Amlodipine may be considered the coexisting hypertension and dyslipidemia.

  7. Depression in hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V; Parikh, G J; Srinivasan, V

    1983-10-01

    168 patients attending hypertension clinic were randomly selected for the study. They were thoroughly investigated using E.C.G., X-ray chest, Urine analysis, Blood sugar, Blood urea, Serum cholesterol, Serum K, Serum Na, Scrum creatinine and Uric acid level. Detailed psychiatric case history and mental examination was carried out. Beck Rating Scale was used to measure the depression. 25% of hypertensive subjects exhibited depressive features and their mean score in Beck Rating scale is 21.76. The mean score of non-depressives is 4.46. All patients were receiving methyl dopa.25 mg. twice or thrice daily with thiazide diuretic. No significant difference in the incidence of depression with the duration of medication was observed.The hypertension was classified into mild, moderate and severe depending on the diastolic pressure. Depression was more frequent in severe hypertensives but not to the statistically significant level.Further hypertensives were classified into:1. Hypertension without organ involvement2. Hypertension with LVH only3. Hypertension with additional organ involvement4. Malignant hypertensionDepression was significantly more frequent in hypertensives with complications and also hypertensives in whom the B.P. remained uncontrolled. As all the patients were on the same drug, the drug effect is common to all; hence, the higher incidence of depression in hypertensives with complications is due to the limitation and distress caused by the illness. PMID:21847301

  8. Role of FAM18B in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vidhya R.; Chen, Judy J.; Lussier, Yves A.; Rehman, Jalees; Huang, Yong; Jager, Rama D.; Grassi, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Genome-wide association studies have suggested an association between a previously uncharacterized gene, FAM18B, and diabetic retinopathy. This study explores the role of FAM18B in diabetic retinopathy. An improved understanding of FAM18B could yield important insights into the pathogenesis of this sight-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Methods Postmortem human eyes were examined with immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence for the presence of FAM18B. Expression of FAM18B in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs) exposed to hyperglycemia, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or advanced glycation end products (AGEs) was determined with quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and/or western blot. The role of FAM18B in regulating human retinal microvascular endothelial cell viability, migration, and endothelial tube formation was determined following RNAi-mediated knockdown of FAM18B. The presence of FAM18B was determined with qRT-PCR in CD34+/VEGFR2+ mononuclear cells isolated from a cohort of 17 diabetic subjects with and without diabetic retinopathy. Results Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence demonstrated the presence of FAM18B in the human retina with prominent vascular staining. Hyperglycemia, VEGF, and AGEs downregulated the expression of FAM18B in HRMECs. RNAi-mediated knockdown of FAM18B in HRMECs contributed to enhanced migration and tube formation as well as exacerbating the hyperglycemia-induced decrease in HRMEC viability. The enhanced migration, tube formation, and decrease in the viability of HRMECs as a result of FAM18B downregulation was reversed with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), a specific nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor. CD34+/VEGFR2+ mononuclear cells from subjects with proliferative diabetic retinopathy demonstrated significantly reduced mRNA expression of FAM18B compared to diabetic subjects without retinopathy. Conclusions FAM18B is expressed in the retina

  9. [Ameliorative effects on retinal disorder in diabetic SHRSP (stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat)].

    PubMed

    Nagisa, Yasutaka; Shintani, Asae; Nakagawa, Shizue

    2002-10-01

    The results of the EUCLID highlighted the importance of the renin-angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of candesartan cilexetil(TCV-116), a potent angiotensin II receptor antagonist, in ameliorating retinal disorders in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats(SHRSP) with storeptozotocin(STZ)-induced diabetes. Retinal VEGF mRNA expression was significantly higher and the latencies of oscillatory potentials were significantly elongated in STZ-treated SHRSP compared with a non-treated SHRSP group matched for age. Treatment with TCV-116(3 mg/kg) significantly diminished retinal VEGF mRNA expression and the latencies of oscillatory potentials, but had no effect on plasma glucose concentrations. These results suggest that TCV-116 is effective in preventing the development of diabetic retinopathy already in the early stages.

  10. Screening intervals for diabetic retinopathy and incidence of visual loss: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Echouffo-Tcheugui, J B; Ali, M K; Roglic, G; Hayward, R A; Narayan, K M

    2013-11-01

    Screening for diabetic retinopathy can help to prevent this complication, but evidence regarding frequency of screening is uncertain. This paper systematically reviews the published literature on the relationship between screening intervals for diabetic retinopathy and the incidence of visual loss. The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched until December 2012. Twenty five studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria, as these assessed the incidence/prevalence of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in relation to screening frequency. The included studies comprised 15 evaluations of real-world screening programmes, three studies modelling the natural history of diabetic retinopathy and seven cost-effectiveness studies. In evaluations of diabetic retinopathy screening programmes, the appropriate screening interval ranged from one to four years, in people with no retinopathy at baseline. Despite study heterogeneity, the overall tendency observed in these programmes was that 2-year screening intervals among people with no diabetic retinopathy at diagnosis were not associated with high incidence of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. The modelling studies (non-economic and economic) assessed a range of screening intervals (1-5 years). The aggregated evidence from both the natural history and cost-effectiveness models favors a screening interval >1 year, but ≤2 years. Such an interval would be appropriate, safe and cost-effective for people with no diabetic retinopathy at diagnosis, while screening intervals ≤1 year would be preferable for people with pre-existing diabetic retinopathy. A 2-year screening interval for people with no sight threatening diabetic retinopathy at diagnosis may be safely adopted. For patients with pre-existing diabetic retinopathy, a shorter interval ≤1 year is warranted.

  11. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Not Associated with Diabetic Retinopathy or Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Uazman; Amjad, Yasar; Chan, Anges Wan Shan; Asghar, Omar; Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Experimental and clinical studies suggest a possible association between vitamin D deficiency and both diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy. Methods. We have performed a cross-sectional study in adults with types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. The relationship between the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was evaluated using logistic regression analyses in the presence of demographic and clinical covariates. Results. 657 adults with diabetes were stratified based on retinopathy grading: No Diabetic Retinopathy (39%), Background Diabetic Retinopathy (37%), Preproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy (21%), and Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy (3%), respectively. There were no differences in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (25(OH)D) between the groups (15.3 ± 9.0 versus 16.4 ± 10.5 versus 15.9 ± 10.4 versus 15.7 ± 8.5 ng/mL, P = NS). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between the severity of retinopathy and serum 25(OH)D. Furthermore, there was no difference in serum 25(OH)D between those with (n = 94, 14%) and those without (n = 563, 86%) Diabetic Maculopathy (16.2 ± 10.0 versus 15.8 ± 9.8, P = NS) and no relationship was demonstrated by logistic regression analyses between the two variables. Conclusions. This study has found no association between serum 25(OH)D and the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy or maculopathy. PMID:26885530

  12. [Retinopathy and angiopathy in diabetes of fifty to sixty years duration (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fischer, F

    1977-11-01

    A report is given on ten (seven female, three male) diabetis with uncommonly long duration of the disease. Diabetes had become manifest at an early age (mostly childhood) and, then, had continued for a period of fifty to sixty-one years. Eight patients suffer from retinopathy, two are free from it. Only three cases show nephropathy of moderate development and inconspicuous progression. Coronary sclerosis, peripheral sclerosis, and neuropathy recede with time. There is a surprising discrepancy of findings concerning retinopathy - on the one hand: simple retinopathy tending to spontaneous regression; on the other hand: malignant proliferating retinopathy. Uncommon also is the tarrying behaviour of nephropathy.

  13. Melanoma associated retinopathy: A new dimension using adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Dabir, Supriya; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Govindraj, Indu; Mallipatna, Ashwin; Battu, Rajani; Shetty, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    We report a 56-year-old male patient, complaining of metamorphopsia in his left eye nevertheless visual acuity, slit lamp, and fundus examinations were within normal limits. Microperimetry (MAIA, Centervue, Italy) revealed central field loss and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (Spectralis, Heidelberg, Germany) showed disrupted cone outer segment tip layer. The patient had a diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma in his foot for which an excision biopsy with lymph node dissection was performed 5 months earlier. Our clinical diagnosis was melanoma-associated retinopathy. Electrophysiology confirmed the diagnosis. Adaptive optics retinal imaging (Imagine eyes, Orsay) was performed to assess the cone mosaic integrity across the central retina. This is the first report on the investigation of autoimmune retinopathy using adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy. This case highlights the viability of innovative diagnostic modalities that aid early detection and subsequent management of vision threatening retinal.

  14. Current concepts regarding developmental mechanisms in diabetic retinopathy in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Yin; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Lin, Ying-Ju; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Chao-Jung; Lin, Wei-De; Liao, Wen-Lin; Chen, Yng-Tay; Lin, Wei-Yong; Liu, Yu-Huei; Yang, Jai-Sing; Sheu, Jinn-Chyuan; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the most feared complications of diabetes and is a leading cause of acquired blindness in working adults. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes in Taiwan is about 4%, and the annual incidence of T2D (Type 2 Diabetes) in Taiwan is 1.8% following the 1985 WHO criteria. Multiple mechanisms have been shown in T2DR with some signaling pathways, including the polyol pathway, PKC pathway, AGEs pathway, and MAPK pathway. However, the cause of vision loss in diabetic retinopathy is complex and remains incompletely understood. Herein, we try to fully understand the new concepts regarding hyperglycemia-induced biochemical pathways contributing to DR pathophysiology. Our work may be able to provide new strategies for the prevention and treatment of diabetic vascular complications. PMID:27154195

  15. A case of recurrent, self-inflicted handheld laser retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Simonett, Joseph M; Scarinci, Fabio; Labriola, Leanne T; Jampol, Lee M; Goldstein, Debra A; Fawzi, Amani A

    2016-04-01

    A 17-year-old young man presented with vision loss and discrete, bilateral foveal lesions. The patient returned 6 weeks later with worsening vision, prominent bilateral retinal lesions, and a full-thickness macular hole in the right eye consistent with recurrent self-inflicted handheld laser retinopathy. After instructing the family to remove the patient's access to laser pointers, follow-up examination revealed spontaneous closure of the macular hole but minimal vision improvement. Recurrent ocular exposure to handheld lasers can masquerade as an organic process in patients who withhold pertinent history. Clinicians should rely on the distinguishing features seen on examination and multimodal imaging to make the diagnosis of handheld laser retinopathy.

  16. Canine multifocal retinopathy in the Australian Shepherd: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Ingo; Guziewicz, Karina E.; Zangerl, Barbara; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Mardin, Christian Y.

    2013-01-01

    A 1-year-old Australian Shepherd (AS) was presented for a routine hereditary eye examination. During the examination multiple raised, brown to orange lesions were noted in the fundus, which could not be attributed to a known retinal disease in this breed. As they clinically most closely resembled canine multifocal retinopathy (cmr) and no indication of an acquired condition was found, genetic tests for BEST1 gene mutations were performed. These showed the dog to be homozygous for the cmr1 (C73T/R25X) gene defect. Furthermore, ultrasound (US), electroretinography (ERG), and optical coherence tomography were performed, confirming changes typical for cmr. Subsequently, the AS pedigree members were genetically and clinically tested, demonstrating autosomal recessive inheritance with no clinical symptoms in carrier animals, as was previously described for cmr. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canine multifocal retinopathy in the AS breed. Further investigations are under way. PMID:22432598

  17. First Reported Case of Proliferative Retinopathy in Hemoglobin SE Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Christopher; Fantin, Aldo; Darnley-Fisch, Deborah; Desai, Uday

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of proliferative sickle cell retinopathy in a patient with hemoglobin SE (Hb SE) disease. Only a few dozen cases of Hb SE disease have been reported previously, and none had evidence of proliferative retinopathy. A 56-year-old African American man presented to our clinic for routine examination and was found to have sea-fan peripheral neovascularization bilaterally without maculopathy. Hemoglobin analysis revealed Hb SE heterozygosity. Sector laser photocoagulation to areas of nonperfusion in both eyes resulted in regression of the peripheral neovascularization over a period of 6 months. Although Hb SE disease is rare, the incidence of Hb SE disease is postulated to rise in the future. Awareness of its potential ocular complications is needed to appropriately refer these patients for screening. PMID:25210638

  18. A case of recurrent, self-inflicted handheld laser retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Simonett, Joseph M; Scarinci, Fabio; Labriola, Leanne T; Jampol, Lee M; Goldstein, Debra A; Fawzi, Amani A

    2016-04-01

    A 17-year-old young man presented with vision loss and discrete, bilateral foveal lesions. The patient returned 6 weeks later with worsening vision, prominent bilateral retinal lesions, and a full-thickness macular hole in the right eye consistent with recurrent self-inflicted handheld laser retinopathy. After instructing the family to remove the patient's access to laser pointers, follow-up examination revealed spontaneous closure of the macular hole but minimal vision improvement. Recurrent ocular exposure to handheld lasers can masquerade as an organic process in patients who withhold pertinent history. Clinicians should rely on the distinguishing features seen on examination and multimodal imaging to make the diagnosis of handheld laser retinopathy. PMID:27012364

  19. Diabetic retinopathy: An epidemic at home and around the world

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rajiv; Gella, Laxmi; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Sharma, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of blindness due to diabetic retinopathy (DR) requires effective screening strategies, for which eye care providers need to know the magnitude of the burden and the risk factors pertinent in their geographical location. It is estimated that around 72 million of the global adult population (around 8.2%) has diabetes and about one-fifth of all adults with diabetes lives in the South-East Asia. In India, around 65 million people have diabetes. As the global prevalence of diabetes increases, so will the number of people with diabetes-related complications, such as DR; nearly one-third of them are likely to develop this complication. This article reviews the present status of diabetes and DR in India, the current situation of DR services and the projections on the load of morbidity associated with retinopathy. The article compiles the Indian studies elucidating the risk factors for DR. PMID:26953027

  20. Neodymium-YAG laser vitreolysis in sickle cell retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Hrisomalos, N.F.; Jampol, L.M.; Moriarty, B.J.; Serjeant, G.; Acheson, R.; Goldberg, M.F.

    1987-08-01

    Six patients with proliferative sickle cell retinopathy and vitreous bands were treated with the neodymium-YAG (Nd-YAG) laser to accomplish lysis of avascular traction bands or to clear the media in front of the macula. Transection of bands was possible in five of the six cases but in two of these the effect was only partial. Three cases were satisfactorily treated with the Nd-YAG laser application alone, two eventually required conventional vitreoretinal surgery, and one patient's condition stabilized despite failure of the treatment. Complications from the treatment occurred in three cases and included subretinal (choroidal) hemorrhage, preretinal hemorrhage, microperforation of a retinal vein, and focal areas of damage to the retinal pigment epithelium. Neodymium-YAG vitreolysis may be a useful modality in carefully selected patients with proliferative sickle cell retinopathy, but potentially sight-threatening complications may occur.

  1. Using a patient image archive to diagnose retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Abramoff, M.D.; Chaum, Edward; Giancardo, Luca; Govindaswamy, Priya; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Tennant, M; Swainson, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes has become an epidemic that is expected to impact 365 million people worldwide by 2025. Consequently, diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in the industrialized world today. If detected early, treatments can preserve vision and significantly reduce debilitating blindness. Through this research we are developing and testing a method for automating the diagnosis of retinopathy in a screening environment using a patient archive and digital fundus imagery. We present an overview of our content-based image retrieval (CBIR) approach and provide performance results for a dataset of 98 images from a study in Canada when compared to an archive of 1,355 patients from a study in the Netherlands. An aggregate performance of 89% correct diagnosis is achieved, demonstrating the potential of automated, web-based diagnosis for a broad range of imagery collected under different conditions and with different cameras.

  2. Imaging tamoxifen retinopathy using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Caramoy, Albert; Scholz, Paula; Fauser, Sascha; Kirchhof, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    A case of tamoxifen retinopathy examined with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is presented. The typical refractile deposits are located between ganglion cell layer and inner plexiform layer in SD-OCT. A defect on the outer retinal layer with disruption of the photoreceptor layer with sharp edges is seen. The still attached posterior hyaloids gives evidence of other pathomechanism involved in the outer retinal defect than that of macular hole, as suggested in the literature.

  3. Microvascular complications and diabetic retinopathy: recent advances and future implications.

    PubMed

    Barot, Megha; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Patel, Sulabh; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-03-01

    Retinal microvascular alterations have been observed during diabetic retinopathy (DR) due to the retinal susceptibility towards subtle pathological alterations. Therefore, retinal microvascular pathology is essential to understand the nature of retinal degenerations during DR. In this review, the role of retinal microvasculature complications during progression of DR, along with recent efforts to normalize such alterations for better therapeutic outcome, will be underlined. In addition, current therapeutics and future directions for advancement of standard treatment for DR patients will be discussed. PMID:23464520

  4. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists Therapy in Resistant Hypertension: Time to Implement Guidelines!

    PubMed Central

    Maiolino, Giuseppe; Azzolini, Matteo; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of anti-hypertensive medications with increasing efficacy up to 50% of hypertensive patients have blood pressure levels (BP) not at the goals set by international societies. Some of these patients are either not optimally treated or are non-adherent to the prescribed drugs. However, a proportion, despite adequate treatment, have resistant hypertension (RH), which represents an important problem in that it is associated to an excess risk of cardiovascular events. Notwithstanding a complex pathogenesis, an abundance of data suggests a key contribution for the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in RH, thus fostering a potential role for its antagonists in RH. Based on these premises randomized clinical trials aimed at testing the efficacy of MR antagonists (MRAs) in RH patients have been completed. Overall, they demonstrated the efficacy of MRAs in reducing BP and surrogate markers of target organ damage, such as microalbuminuria, either compared to placebo or to other drugs. In summary, owing to the key role of the MR in the pathogenesis of RH and on the proven efficacy of MRAs we advocate their inclusion as an essential component of therapy in patients with presumed RH. Conversely, we propose that RH should be diagnosed only in patients whose BP values show to be resistant to an up-titrated dose of these drugs. PMID:26664875

  5. Fully automated diabetic retinopathy screening using morphological component analysis.

    PubMed

    Imani, Elaheh; Pourreza, Hamid-Reza; Banaee, Touka

    2015-07-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the major cause of blindness in the world. It has been shown that early diagnosis can play a major role in prevention of visual loss and blindness. This diagnosis can be made through regular screening and timely treatment. Besides, automation of this process can significantly reduce the work of ophthalmologists and alleviate inter and intra observer variability. This paper provides a fully automated diabetic retinopathy screening system with the ability of retinal image quality assessment. The novelty of the proposed method lies in the use of Morphological Component Analysis (MCA) algorithm to discriminate between normal and pathological retinal structures. To this end, first a pre-screening algorithm is used to assess the quality of retinal images. If the quality of the image is not satisfactory, it is examined by an ophthalmologist and must be recaptured if necessary. Otherwise, the image is processed for diabetic retinopathy detection. In this stage, normal and pathological structures of the retinal image are separated by MCA algorithm. Finally, the normal and abnormal retinal images are distinguished by statistical features of the retinal lesions. Our proposed system achieved 92.01% sensitivity and 95.45% specificity on the Messidor dataset which is a remarkable result in comparison with previous work.

  6. Multispectral fundus imaging for early detection of diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, James M.; Tiedeman, James S.; Hopkins, Mark F.; Sabharwal, Yashvinder S.

    1999-04-01

    Functional imaging of the retina and associated structures may provide information for early assessment of risks of developing retinopathy in diabetic patients. Here we show results of retinal oximetry performed using multi-spectral reflectance imaging techniques to assess hemoglobin (Hb) oxygen saturation (OS) in blood vessels of the inner retina and oxygen utilization at the optic nerve in diabetic patients without retinopathy and early disease during experimental hyperglycemia. Retinal images were obtained through a fundus camera and simultaneously recorded at up to four wavelengths using image-splitting modules coupled to a digital camera. Changes in OS in large retinal vessels, in average OS in disk tissue, and in the reduced state of cytochrome oxidase (CO) at the disk were determined from changes in reflectance associated with the oxidation/reduction states of Hb and CO. Step to high sugar lowered venous oxygen saturation to a degree dependent on disease duration. Moderate increase in sugar produced higher levels of reduced CO in both the disk and surrounding tissue without a detectable change in average tissue OS. Results suggest that regulation of retinal blood supply and oxygen consumption are altered by hyperglycemia and that such functional changes are present before clinical signs of retinopathy.

  7. Revisiting the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Clifford B; D'Amore, Patricia A; Connor, Kip M

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina is a hallmark of many retinal diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and the wet form of age-related macular degeneration. In particular, ROP has been an important health concern for physicians since the advent of routine supplemental oxygen therapy for premature neonates more than 70 years ago. Since then, researchers have explored several animal models to better understand ROP and retinal vascular development. Of these models, the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) has become the most widely used, and has played a pivotal role in our understanding of retinal angiogenesis and ocular immunology, as well as in the development of groundbreaking therapeutics such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections for wet age-related macular degeneration. Numerous refinements to the model have been made since its inception in the 1950s, and technological advancements have expanded the use of the model across multiple scientific fields. In this review, we explore the historical developments that have led to the mouse OIR model utilized today, essential concepts of OIR, limitations of the model, and a representative selection of key findings from OIR, with particular emphasis on current research progress. PMID:27499653

  8. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with systemic follicular cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Kavita V; Hedges, Thomas; Thirkill, Charles E; Reichel, Elias

    2015-03-01

    The authors describe two rare cases of autoimmune retinopathy associated with follicular cell lymphoma, including a 54-year-old man who experienced nyctalopia for 1 year (patient 1) and a 59-year-old man who had bilateral loss of central vision for 6 months (patient 2). Visual field testing of patient 1 revealed nonspecific defects, and multifocal electroretinogram (ERG) testing showed mildly subnormal amplitudes more pronounced in the left than the right eye. Serologic testing detected antibodies against a 47-kD protein, presumed to be alpha-enolase. Goldmann perimetry of patient 2 showed dense central scotomas, and a full-field ERG revealed reduced amplitudes of bright scotopic responses. Serological testing yielded anti-bipolar cell antibodies. A variable presentation of autoimmune retinopathy can occur in the setting of follicular cell lymphoma. Disparate serum autoantibodies may have mediated the pathogenesis of retinal degeneration in these two patients and could explain the difference in course and severity of retinopathy. PMID:25835308

  9. Ophthalmoscopy versus fundus photographs for detecting and grading diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kinyoun, J L; Martin, D C; Fujimoto, W Y; Leonetti, D L

    1992-05-01

    Reported here is the agreement between three examination methods chosen to detect and grade diabetic retinopathy in 124 subjects with type II (noninsulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. These three examination methods include ophthalmoscopy (indirect and direct) by a retina specialist, seven standard field fundus photographs read by the same retina specialist, and the same photographs read by a trained photographic grader at the Fundus Photograph Reading Center. For the 59 subjects examined with all three methods, these results indicated fair to good (kappas, 0.69-0.84) agreement between the retina specialist's and trained grader's reading of photographs, fair to good (kappas, 0.58-0.79) agreement between the retina specialist's ophthalmoscopic findings and the specialist's reading of photographs, and fair (kappas, 0.49-0.62) agreement between the retina specialist's ophthalmoscopic findings and the trained grader's reading of fundus photographs. Analysis of the disagreements confirmed earlier reports that ophthalmoscopy misses approximately 50% of eyes with microaneurysms only. Other disagreements resulted from the trained grader's overreading photographs of eyes with lesions simulating diabetic retinopathy. Of the 393 total subjects (diabetic and nondiabetic) in this study, such lesions were seen with ophthalmoscopy in six eyes of six subjects (2.4% of diabetic patients and 1.1% of nondiabetic subjects). The authors believe at least one definite retinal microaneurysm should be present in one eye before establishing the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy in diabetic patients.

  10. [Modern view on the problem of retinopathy of preterm babies].

    PubMed

    Klimkin, A S; Medvedeva, M V

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a review of the data, which reflects the relevance and modern views on the problem of retinopathy of prematurity, including statistical and epidemiologic data on nosology. Various pathogenetic theories of onset and progression of this disease are discussed. A clear correlation depending on the degree of prematurity, body weight and physical condition of the newborn and the risk of disease is mentioned. The summation of etiology aspects, as well as pathogenesis, classification of clinical forms and the modern approach to the diagnostics is of a quite interest. The article also describes different treatment strategies which include various methods of conservative therapy and surgery, depending on the course and stage of disease. Rehabilitation activities for children who had come through some stage of retinopathy of prematurity and are at risk for the formation of different ophthalmopathology such as refractive errors and pathology of binocular vision in the future and require a subsequent long-term monitoring in the office catamnesis are itemized. The importance of interaction between ophthalmologists and neonatologists at all stages of neonatal screening for providing timely specialized care in order to minimize the occurrence of retinopathy and prevent progression to disabling stages, as well as to improve the quality of life of these patients is shown.

  11. EP300 Protects from Light-Induced Retinopathy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Reiko; Nishimura, Yuhei; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Okabe, Shiko; Kawaguchi, Koki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Moriyuki, Kazumi; Yamane, Shinsaku; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of rhodopsin to bright white light can induce photoreceptor cell damage and degeneration. However, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying light-induced retinopathy remains elusive. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis of three rodent models of light-induced retinopathy, and we identified 37 genes that are dysregulated in all three models. Gene ontology analysis revealed that this gene set is significantly associated with a cytokine signaling axis composed of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3 (STAT1/3), interleukin 6 signal transducer (IL6ST), and oncostatin M receptor (OSMR). Furthermore, the analysis suggested that the histone acetyltransferase EP300 may be a key upstream regulator of the STAT1/3–IL6ST/OSMR axis. To examine the role of EP300 directly, we developed a larval zebrafish model of light-induced retinopathy. Using this model, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of EP300 significantly increased retinal cell apoptosis, decreased photoreceptor cell outer segments, and increased proliferation of putative Müller cells upon exposure to intense light. These results suggest that EP300 may protect photoreceptor cells from light-induced damage and that activation of EP300 may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27242532

  12. SYSTEMIC INTERLEUKIN 1β INHIBITION IN PROLIFERATIVE DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Stahel, Marc; Becker, Matthias; Graf, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of systemic interleukin 1β inhibition using canakinumab (Ilaris) on retinal neovascularizations in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Methods: Patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy were enrolled in a prospective uncontrolled pilot study. Canakinumab (150 mg) was given 3 times subcutaneously. The primary end point was the change in the area of neovascularization from baseline to Week 24. Secondary end points were the change in retinal edema measured and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), as well as systemic safety evaluation, HbA1c, and systemic inflammatory parameters. Results: Systemic canakinumab treatment was well tolerated. None of the 8 eyes showed progression of neovascularizations within 24 weeks. Their mean size remained unchanged comparing 0.60 mm2 at baseline with 0.62 mm2 at Week 24 (P = 0.944). Median BCVA remained stable with 80 ETDRS letters at baseline and 82 ETDRS letters at Week 24. A not statistically significant reduction in retinal edema was detectable for the foveal central subfield thickness (mean, 313–295 μm). Mean HbA1c improved significantly from 7.92% to 7.30% within the 24 weeks (P = 0.046). Systemic inflammatory parameters remained overall unchanged. Conclusion: Systemic canakinumab showed no change in neovascularizations in diabetic retinopathy. Promising effects were seen on diabetic macular edema. PMID:26218500

  13. Epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, P I; MacCormick, I J C; Harding, S P; Bastawrous, A; Beare, N A V; Garner, P

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim To summarize findings from studies reporting the prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy in African countries in light of the rising prevalence of diabetes mellitus. Methods Using a predefined search strategy, we systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation index and Conference Proceedings Citation index, African Index Medicus and the grey literature database ‘OpenSIGLE’ for studies published between January 1990 and February 2011. Included studies reported prevalence or incidence of diabetic retinopathy or diabetic maculopathy of subjects with diabetes resident in African countries. Results Sixty-two studies from 21 countries were included: three population-based surveys; two cohort studies; five case–control studies; 32 diabetes clinic-based, nine eye clinic-based and 11 other hospital-based surveys. Included studies varied considerably in terms of patient selection, method of assessing the eye and retinopathy classification. In population-based studies, the reported prevalence range in patients with diabetes for diabetic retinopathy was 30.2 to 31.6%, proliferative diabetic retinopathy 0.9 to 1.3%, and any maculopathy 1.2 to 4.5%. In diabetes clinic-based surveys, the reported prevalence range for diabetic retinopathy was 7.0 to 62.4%, proliferative diabetic retinopathy 0 to 6.9%, and any maculopathy 1.2 to 31.1%. No obvious association between prevalence and income level of the country was detected. Conclusions Large, community-based cross-sectional and cohort studies are needed to investigate rates and determinants of prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, incidence and progression in Africa. Consensus is needed on the most appropriate methods of identification and classification of retinopathy for research and clinical practice. Estimates of prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy are comparable with recent European and American studies. PMID:22817387

  14. Risk of Radiation Retinopathy in Patients With Orbital and Ocular Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaushik, Megha; Pulido, Jose S.; Schild, Steven E.; Stafford, Scott

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation retinopathy is a potential long-term complication of radiation therapy to the orbit. The risk of developing this adverse effect is dose dependent; however, the threshold is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the risk of developing radiation retinopathy at increasing radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A 40-year retrospective review was performed of patients who received external beam radiation therapy for ocular/orbital non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Results: Sixty-seven patients who had at least one ophthalmic follow-up examination were included in this study. Most patients (52%) were diagnosed with NHL involving the orbit. Patients received external beam radiation therapy at doses between 1886 and 5400 cGy (mean, 3033 {+-} 782 cGy). Radiation retinopathy developed in 12% of patients, and the median time to diagnosis was 27 months (range, 15-241months). The mean prescribed radiation dose in patients with retinopathy was 3309 {+-} 585 cGy, and the estimated retinal dose (derived by reviewing the dosimetry) was 3087 {+-} 1030 cGy. The incidence of retinopathy increased with dose. The average prescribed daily fractionated dose was higher in patients who developed retinopathy than in patients who did not (mean, 202 cGy vs 180 cGy, respectively; P = .04). More patients with radiation retinopathy had comorbid diabetes mellitus type 2 than patients without retinopathy (P = .015). In our study, the mean visual acuity of the eyes that received radiation was worse than that of the eyes that did not (P = .027). Other postradiotherapy ocular findings included keratitis (6%), dry eyes (39%), and cataract (33%). Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy, a known complication of radiotherapy for orbital tumors, relates to vascular comorbidities and dose. Higher total doses and larger daily fractions (>180 cGy) appear to be related to higher rates of retinopathy. Future larger studies are required to identify a statistically significant threshold for the

  15. Spot urinary albumin-creatinine ratio predicts left ventricular hypertrophy in young hypertensive African-American men.

    PubMed

    Post, W S; Blumenthal, R S; Weiss, J L; Levine, D M; Thiemann, D R; Gerstenblith, G; Hill, M N

    2000-11-01

    Hypertensive patients with target organ damage are at increased cardiovascular risk, and should be treated most aggressively. The association between urinary albumin excretion and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in prior studies is inconsistent, and has not been described using a single, random spot urine specimen. Therefore, we evaluated the association between the urinary albumin creatinine ratio (ACR) and left ventricular (LV) mass and also tested the hypothesis that a simple random, single-void urine ACR would identify high risk young, hypertensive, African-American men. We measured echocardiographic LV mass and a random spot urinary ACR in 109 untreated, hypertensive, young, inner city, African-American men. The mean age was 41 +/- 6 years and the mean blood pressure (BP) was 157 +/- 19/107 +/- 13 mm Hg. Microalbuminuria (ACR 30 to 300 mg/g) was present in 22% of subjects. The ACR is higher in the men with LVH than in the men without LVH (P < .05). Increased ACR is a predictor of increased LV mass index (P < .003) using multiple linear regression. An ACR >30 mg/g has a sensitivity of 33% and a specificity of 82% for the diagnosis of echocardiographic LVH. In conclusion, elevated random spot ACR is a marker of increased LV mass, independent of BP, in young urban African-American men with hypertension, and may help to determine the aggressiveness of antihypertensive therapy in this high-risk group.

  16. Myocardial infarction worsens glomerular injury and microalbuminuria in rats with pre-existing renal impairment accompanied by the activation of ER stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhifeng; Wu, Penglong; Li, Yongguang; Shen, Yuan; Xin, Ping; Li, Shuai; Wang, Zhihua; Dai, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Wei; Wei, Meng

    2014-12-01

    Deterioration of renal function occurs after chronic heart failure in approximately one-third of patients, particularly in those with pre-existing renal impairment such as diabetic nephropathy. Impaired renal function in these patients is always associated with a worse prognosis. However, the mechanisms underlying such deterioration of renal function are still largely unknown. In three separate protocols, we compared 1) sham operation (Ctr, n = 10) with surgically induced myocardial infarction (MI, n = 10); 2) unilateral nephrectomy (UNX, n = 10) with UNX + MI (n = 10); and 3) STZ-induced type 1 diabetes (DB, n = 10) with DB + MI (n = 10). The differences between combined injury models (UNX + MI, DB + MI) and simple MI were also examined. Renal remodeling, function, ER stress (CHOP and GRP78) and inflammation (infiltration of inflammatory cells, NF-κB p65) were evaluated 12 weeks after MI. In common SD rats, MI activated less glomerular ER stress and inflammation, resulting in a minor change of glomerular remodeling and microalbuminuria. However, MI significantly increased the glomerular expression of GRP78 and CHOP in UNX and DB rats. In addition, it also promoted the infiltration of CD4+ T cells, particularly inflammatory cytokine (IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-4)-producing CD4+ T cells, and the expression of NF-κB p65 in the glomeruli. By contrast, significant glomerular fibrosis, glomerulosclerosis, podocyte injury and microalbuminuria were found in rats with UNX + MI and DB + MI. MI significantly increased chronic glomerular injury and microalbuminuria at 12 weeks in rats with pre-existing renal impairment, i.e., UNX and DB, but not common SD rats. These changes were accompanied by increased glomerular ER stress and immune-associated inflammation.

  17. Hyperuricemia and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Feig, Daniel I

    2012-11-01

    Over the past century, uric acid has been considered a possible risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. However, only in the past decade, animal models and clinical trials have supported a more mechanistic link. Results from animal models suggest a 2-phase mechanism for the development of hyperuricemic hypertension in which uric acid induces acute vasoconstriction by activation of renin-angiotensin system, followed by uric acid uptake into vascular smooth muscle cells leading to cellular proliferation and secondary arteriolosclerosis that impairs pressure natriuresis. This acute hypertension remains uric acid dependent and sodium independent, whereas the chronic hypertension becomes uric acid independent and sodium dependent. Small clinical trials, performed in adolescents with newly diagnosed essential hypertension, demonstrate that reduction of serum uric acid can reduce blood pressure. Although more research is clearly necessary, the available data suggest that uric acid is likely causative in some cases of early onset hypertension.

  18. Hypertension in young adults.

    PubMed

    De Venecia, Toni; Lu, Marvin; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension remains a major societal problem affecting 76 million, or approximately one third, of US adults. While more prevalent in the older population, an increasing incidence in the younger population, including athletes, is being observed. Active individuals, like the young and athletes, are viewed as free of diseases such as hypertension. However, the increased prevalence of traditional risk factors in the young, including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and renal disease, increase the risk of developing hypertension in younger adults. Psychosocial factors may also be contributing factors to the increasing incidence of hypertension in the younger population. Increased left ventricular wall thickness and mass are increasingly found in young adults on routine echocardiograms and predict future cardiovascular events. This increasing incidence of hypertension in the young calls for early surveillance and prompt treatment to prevent future cardiac events. In this review we present the current epidemiological data, potential mechanisms, clinical implications, and treatment of hypertension in young patients and athletes.

  19. Hypertensive crisis in children.

    PubMed

    Chandar, Jayanthi; Zilleruelo, Gastón

    2012-05-01

    Hypertensive crisis is rare in children and is usually secondary to an underlying disease. There is strong evidence that the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the genesis of hypertensive crisis. An important principle in the management of children with hypertensive crisis is to determine if severe hypertension is chronic, acute, or acute-on-chronic. When it is associated with signs of end-organ damage such as encephalopathy, congestive cardiac failure or renal failure, there is an emergent need to lower blood pressures to 25-30% of the original value and then accomplish a gradual reduction in blood pressure. Precipitous drops in blood pressure can result in impairment of perfusion of vital organs. Medications commonly used to treat hypertensive crisis in children are nicardipine, labetalol and sodium nitroprusside. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and recent developments in management of hypertensive crisis in children.

  20. Valproate Induced Hypertensive Urgency

    PubMed Central

    Sivananthan, Mauran

    2016-01-01

    Valproate is a medication used in the treatment of seizures, bipolar disorder, migraines, and behavioral problems. Here we present a case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with hypertensive urgency after initiation of valproate. Primary treatment of his hypertension was ineffective. Blood pressure stabilization was achieved following discontinuation of valproate. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of developing hypertensive urgency with administration of valproate. PMID:27403366

  1. Suggested mechanism for the selective excretion of glucosylated albumin. The effects of diabetes mellitus and aging on this process and the origins of diabetic microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Kowluru, A; Kowluru, R; Bitensky, M W; Corwin, E J; Solomon, S S; Johnson, J D

    1987-11-01

    In previous studies in the Sprague-Dawley rat, Williams and coworkers reported the phenomenon of selective urinary excretion of glucosylated albumin (editing, i.e., the percent glucosylation of urinary albumin is more than that of plasma albumin) by the mammalian kidney. Ghiggeri and coworkers subsequently found that the extent of editing is reduced in human diabetics. Moreover, the reduction in editing in diabetes correlates inversely with levels of microalbuminuria. We also find reduction in the extent of editing in diabetic humans. We find a striking inverse correlation not only with the magnitude of microalbuminuria but also with the extent of plasma albumin glucosylation. In contrast, we found little correlation between the reduction in editing and the duration of diabetes in human subjects. Stz induced diabetes in the Sprague-Dawley rat is associated with a striking and rapid reduction in editing which develops virtually with the same kinetics exhibited by the appearance of hyperglycemia. This loss of editing is rapidly reversed by daily administration of insulin but not by aldose reductase inhibitors. Mannitol infusion in anesthetized Wistar rats resulted in an increase in urine volume, GFR, and microalbuminuria, and was also accompanied by a marked reduction in editing. This reduction was rapidly reversed by a cessation of mannitol infusion. We propose here that glucosylated albumin (in contrast to unmodified albumin) is not reabsorbed by the proximal tubule, and thus, is preferentially excreted in the urine. We postulate that the increase in GFR which emerges as a consequence of increased plasma osmolality in diabetes mellitus delivers more albumin to the proximal tubule than can be reabsorbed. This results in a dilution of excreted glucosylated albumin molecules by excreted unmodified albumin, which appears as the early microscopic albuminuria of diabetes. Paradoxically, the fall in apparent editing is accompanied by an absolute increase in the total

  2. [Hungarian Hypertension Registry].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Kékes, Ede

    2014-05-11

    Today, hypertension is considered endemic throughout the world. The number of individuals with high blood pressure and the increasing risk, morbidity and mortality caused by hypertension despite modern therapy do not decrease sufficiently. Hypertension has become a public health issue. Prevention and effective care require integrated datasets about many features, clinical presentation and therapy of patients with hypertension. The lack of this database in Hungary prompted the development of the registry which could help to provide population-based data for analysis. Data collection and processing was initiated by the Hungarian Society of Hypertension in 2002. Data recording into the Hungarian Hypertension Registry was performed four times (2002, 2005, 2007, 2011) and the registry currently contains data obtained from 108,473 patients. Analysis of these data indicates that 80% of the patients belong to the high or very high cardiovascular risk group. The registry provides data on cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive populations and the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in Hungary. Based on international experience and preliminary analysis of data from the Hungarian Hypertension Registry, establishment of hypertension registry may support the effectiveness of public health programs. A further step would be needed for proper data management control and the application of professional principles of evidence-based guidelines in the everyday practice.

  3. [Hypertension and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Janka, H U

    1993-03-01

    Numerous surveys have shown that in industrial countries diabetic subjects develop hypertension more frequently than non-diabetic persons. In fact, three typical hypertension forms in these patients can be discerned: essential, renal, and isolated systolic hypertension. In type 2-diabetes (NIDDM) hypertension can be seen in close association with obesity, glucose intolerance, lipid changes, and insulin resistance within the framework of the metabolic syndrome. The increased incidence of hypertension in type 1-diabetes (IDDM) is a result of development of diabetic nephropathy. In the elderly type 2-diabetics particularly frequently isolated systolic hypertension is present which reflects increased arterial stiffness and loss of vascular distensibility. In hypertension progression of both macrovascular disease and microangiopathy is increased whereby interaction of hyperglycemia and hypertension seems to be the main risk factor. In most hypertensive diabetic patients drugs will be necessary to lower blood pressure in a therapeutical range. There are several effective substances available which should be prescribed individually according to the needs and accompanying conditions in these patients. PMID:8475640

  4. Digital photographic screening for diabetic retinopathy in the James Bay Cree.

    PubMed

    Maberley, David; Cruess, Alan F; Barile, Gae; Slakter, Jason

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluates a single, 45-degree fundus image from a non-mydriatic camera for the triage of subjects at risk for diabetic retinopathy. A complete retinal assessment by a retina specialist was the main comparator for the camera. Inter-observer agreements were calculated for the reading of digital images with different grades of retinopathy. Two hundred eyes of 100 consecutive subjects were evaluated as part of the James Bay diabetic retinopathy screening project; 62% of subjects had no retinopathy, 12% had microaneurysms only, 24% had non-proliferative retinopathy, 5% had clinically significant macular edema (CSME), and 2% had proliferative disease (PDR). The Kappa statistic for two independent observers was 0.85 (p < 0.001) for the identification of retinopathy from the digital images. The sensitivity of the digital camera for the evaluation of any retinopathy was 84.4%, for CSME and/or PDR it was over 90%. The use of a single digital retinal image for the evaluation of diabetic retinopathy was performed with a high degree of inter-observer concordance and a high degree of sensitivity.

  5. Effect of physical activity on mortality risk among Americans with retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Loprinzi, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous work demonstrates that retinopathy is associated with increased mortality risk, with physical activity inversely associated with retinopathy and all-cause mortality. However, no study has evaluated the effects of physical activity on mortality among those with existing retinopathy, which was this study’s purpose. Methods: Data from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were utilized, with follow-up through 2011. Retinopathy was objectively-measured using the Canon Non-Mydriatic Retinal Camera CR6-45NM. Physical activity was objectively-measured via up to 7 days of accelerometry assessment. Results: Six-hundred and seventy one adults (40-85 years) with complete data on the study variables constituted the analytic sample. During the follow-up period, 91 deaths occurred. In the sample, 35 886 person-months occurred with a mortality incidence rate of 2.5 deaths per1000 person-months. Among participants with mild retinopathy, those who met physical activity guidelines at baseline had a 63% reduced risk of all-cause mortality (HR adjusted = 0.37; 95% CI:0.18-0.75; P = 0.007). Notably, physical activity was not associated with mortality risk among those with moderate/severe retinopathy (HR adjusted = 0.371.72; 95% CI: 0.62-4.76; P = 0.27). Conclusion: Physical activity is associated with reduced mortality risk among those with mild retinopathy, but not among those with moderate/severe retinopathy. PMID:27579262

  6. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... To Look for the Underlying Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension PH has many causes, so many tests may ...

  7. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  8. Genetic susceptibility to retinopathy of prematurity: the evidence from clinical and experimental animal studies.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Gerd; van Wijngaarden, Peter; Coster, Douglas J; Williams, Keryn A

    2007-12-01

    Despite advances in management and treatment, retinopathy of prematurity remains a major cause of childhood blindness. Evidence for a genetic basis for susceptibility to retinopathy of prematurity is examined, including the influences of sex, ethnicity, and ocular pigmentation. The role of polymorphisms is explored in the genes for vascular endothelial growth factor and insulin-like growth factor-1, and of mutations in the Norrie disease gene. Insights into the genetic basis of retinopathy of prematurity provided by the animal model of oxygen induced retinopathy are examined. Evidence for a genetic component for susceptibility to retinopathy of prematurity is strong, although the molecular identity of the gene or genes involved remains uncertain. PMID:18024814

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene polymorphisms and vitreous proteome changes in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Kelli H; Silva, Paolo S; Sun, Jennifer K

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic retinal diseases, particularly diabetic retinopathy, continue to significantly impact vision and remain a leading cause of vision loss in working-aged adults. Identifying specific genetic risk factors for ischemic-driven pathways that increase susceptibility to developing diabetic retinopathy is a priority to allow development of accurate risk assessment algorithms, employ earlier intervention, and design novel treatment strategies to reduce the associated visual complications. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the VEGF gene have been shown to influence the expression of the VEGF protein. Several studies suggest that SNPs in the VEGF gene mediate genetic predisposition to diabetic retinopathy. In addition, alterations in the vitreous proteome, including carbonic anhydrase mediated vascular permeability, have been found to be associated with sight-threatening proliferative diabetic retinopathy and macular edema. Inhibition of these factors could provide new therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy.

  10. Stress and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, S; O'Farrell, I; Erasi, M; Kochar, M S

    1998-12-01

    Stress can cause hypertension through repeated blood pressure elevations as well as by stimulation of the nervous system to produce large amounts of vasoconstricting hormones that increase blood pressure. Factors affecting blood pressure through stress include white coat hypertension, job strain, race, social environment, and emotional distress. Furthermore, when one risk factor is coupled with other stress producing factors, the effect on blood pressure is multiplied. Overall, studies show that stress does not directly cause hypertension, but can have an effect on its development. A variety of non-pharmacologic treatments to manage stress have been found effective in reducing blood pressure and development of hypertension, examples of which are meditation, acupressure, biofeedback and music therapy. Recent results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey indicate that 50 million American adults have hypertension (defined to be a systolic blood pressure of greater than 139 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure of greater than 89 mm Hg). In 95% of these cases, the cause of hypertension is unknown and they are categorized as "essential" hypertension. Although a single cause may not be identified, the general consensus is that various factors contribute to blood pressure elevation in essential hypertension. In these days of 70 hour work weeks, pagers, fax machines, and endless committee meetings, stress has become a prevalent part of people's lives; therefore the effect of stress on blood pressure is of increasing relevance and importance. Although stress may not directly cause hypertension, it can lead to repeated blood pressure elevations, which eventually may lead to hypertension. In this article we explore how stress can cause hypertension and what can be done about it.

  11. Retinal vascular changes in hypertensive patients in Ibadan, Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Oluleye, Sunday Tunji; Olusanya, Bolutife Ayokunu; Adeoye, Abiodun Moshood

    2016-01-01

    Background Earlier studies in Nigeria reported the rarity of retinal vascular changes in hypertensives. The aim of this study was to describe the various retinal vascular changes in the hypertensive patients of Nigeria. Patients and methods Nine hundred and three hypertensive patients were studied. This study was approved by the ethical and research committee of the University of Ibadan and University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were measured. Cardiac echocardiography was performed on 156 patients. All patients had dilated fundoscopy and fundus photography using the Kowa portable fundus camera and an Apple iPhone with 20 D lens. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (Version 21). Results The mean age of patients was 57 years with a male:female ratio of 1. No retinopathy was found in 556 (61.5%) patients. In all, 175 (19.4%) patients had features of hypertensive retinopathy. Retinal vascular occlusion was a significant finding in 121 patients (13.4%), of which branch retinal vein occlusion, 43 (4.7%), and central retinal vein occlusion, 30 (3.3%), were the most prominent ones in cases. Hemicentral retinal vein occlusion, 26 (2.9%), and central retinal artery occlusion, 17 (1.9%), were significant presentations. Other findings included nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in five (0.6%) patients, hypertensive choroidopathy in seven (0.8%) patients, and hemorrhagic choroidal detachment in five (0.6%) patients. Left ventricular (LV) geometry was abnormal in 85 (55.5%) patients. Concentric remodeling, eccentric hypertrophy, and concentric hypertrophy were observed in 43 (27.6%), 26 (17.2%), and 15 (9.7%) patients, respectively. LV hypertrophy was found in 42 (27%) patients, while 60 (39%) patients had increased relative wall thickness. In this study, bivariate analysis showed a correlation between LV relative wall thickness and severity of retinopathy in both eyes

  12. Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25755321

  13. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What is Pulmonary Hypertension? Updated:Aug 12,2014 Is pulmonary hypertension different ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  14. Hypertension after clonidine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; deCarvalho, J G; Batson, H M; Frohlich, E D

    1978-05-01

    Rebound hypertension occurred in two patients upon clonidine withdrawal. Treatment of the hypertensive crisis consists of both alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blockade, reserpine, or the reintroduction of clonidine. With effective control of pressure during the crisis, long-term antihypertensive therapy must be resumed.

  15. Regression of retinopathy by squalamine in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Rosemary D; Yan, Yun; Geng, Yixun; Zasloff, Michael; Williams, Jon I

    2004-07-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether an antiangiogenic agent, squalamine, given late during the evolution of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) in the mouse, could improve retinal neovascularization. OIR was induced in neonatal C57BL6 mice and the neonates were treated s.c. with squalamine doses begun at various times after OIR induction. A system of retinal whole mounts and assessment of neovascular nuclei extending beyond the inner limiting membrane from animals reared under room air or OIR conditions and killed periodically from d 12 to 21 were used to assess retinopathy in squalamine-treated and untreated animals. OIR evolved after 75% oxygen exposure in neonatal mice with florid retinal neovascularization developing by d 14. Squalamine (single dose, 25 mg/kg s.c.) given on d 15 or 16, but not d 17, substantially improved retinal neovascularization in the mouse model of OIR. There was improvement seen in the degree of blood vessel tuft formation, blood vessel tortuosity, and central vasoconstriction with squalamine treatment at d 15 or 16. Single-dose squalamine at d 12 was effective at reducing subsequent development of retinal neovascularization at doses as low as 1 mg/kg. Squalamine is a very active inhibitor of OIR in mouse neonates at doses as low as 1 mg/kg given once. Further, squalamine given late in the course of OIR improves retinopathy by inducing regression of retinal neovessels and abrogating invasion of new vessels beyond the inner-limiting membrane of the retina. PMID:15128931

  16. Hypertension in women.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    Hypertension is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality, and a highly prevalent condition in both men and women. However, the prevalence of hypertension is predicted to increase more among women than men. Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) can induce hypertension in a small group of women and, increase CV risk especially among those with hypertension. Both COC-related increased CV risk and blood pressure (BP) returns to pretreatment levels by 3 months of its discontinuation. The effects of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on BP are controversial, and COCs and HRT containing the new generation progestin drospirenone are preferred in women with established hypertension. Despite the high incidence of cancer in women, CV disease remains the major cause of death in women and comparable benefit of antihypertensive treatment have been demonstrated in both women and men.

  17. Epigenomics of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mingyu; Cowley, Allen W; Mattson, David L; Kotchen, Theodore A; Liu, Yong

    2013-07-01

    Multiple genes and pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Epigenomic studies of hypertension are beginning to emerge and hold great promise of providing novel insights into the mechanisms underlying hypertension. Epigenetic marks or mediators including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and noncoding RNA can be studied at a genome or near-genome scale using epigenomic approaches. At the single gene level, several studies have identified changes in epigenetic modifications in genes expressed in the kidney that correlate with the development of hypertension. Systematic analysis and integration of epigenetic marks at the genome-wide scale, demonstration of cellular and physiological roles of specific epigenetic modifications, and investigation of inheritance are among the major challenges and opportunities for future epigenomic and epigenetic studies of hypertension.

  18. Arterial hypertension and cancer.

    PubMed

    Milan, Alberto; Puglisi, Elisabetta; Ferrari, Laura; Bruno, Giulia; Losano, Isabel; Veglio, Franco

    2014-05-15

    Arterial hypertension and cancer are two of the most important causes of mortality in the world; correlations between these two clinical entities are complex and various. Cancer therapy using old (e.g., mitotic spindle poisons) as well as new (e.g., monoclonal antibody) drugs may cause arterial hypertension through different mechanisms; sometimes the increase of blood pressure levels may be responsible for chemotherapy withdrawal. Among newer cancer therapies, drugs interacting with the VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factors) pathways are the most frequently involved in hypertension development. However, many retrospective studies have suggested a relationship between antihypertensive treatment and risk of cancer, raising vast public concern. The purposes of this brief review have then been to analyse the role of chemotherapy in the pathogenesis of hypertension, to summarize the general rules of arterial hypertension management in this field and finally to evaluate the effects of antihypertensive therapy on cancer disease.

  19. Hypertension in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Extremera, Blas; Cía-Gómez, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Background. The incidence of hypertension in the Western countries is continuously increasing in the elderly population and remains the leading cause of cardiovascular and morbidity. Methods. we analysed some significant clinical trials in order to present the relevant findings on those hypertensive population. Results. Several studies (SYST-EUR, HYVET, CONVINCE, VALUE, etc.) have demonstrated the benefits of treatment (nitrendipine, hydrochrotiazyde, perindopril, indapamide, verapamil, or valsartan) in aged hypertensive patients not only concerning blood pressure values but also the other important risk factors. Conclusion. Hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disorder in the Western countries, and the relevance of receiving pharmacological treatment of hypertension in aged patients is crucial; in addition, the results suggest that combination therapy—nitrendipine plus enalapril—could have more benefits than those observed with the use of nitrendipine alone. PMID:21876789

  20. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lindheimer, Marshall D; Taler, Sandra J; Cunningham, F Gary

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension complicates 5% to 7% of all pregnancies. A subset of preeclampsia, characterized by new-onset hypertension, proteinuria, and multisystem involvement, is responsible for substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and is a marker for future cardiac and metabolic disease. This American Society of Hypertension (ASH) position paper summarizes the clinical spectrum of hypertension in pregnancy, focusing on preeclampsia. Recent research breakthroughs relating to etiology are briefly reviewed. Topics include classification of the different forms of hypertension during pregnancy, and status of the tests available to predict preeclampsia, and strategies to prevent preeclampsia and to manage this serious disease. The use of antihypertensive drugs in pregnancy, and the prevention and treatment of the convulsive phase of preeclampsia, eclampsia, with intravenous MgSO(4) is also highlighted. Of special note, this guideline article, specifically requested, reviewed, and accepted by ASH, includes solicited review advice from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

  1. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lindheimer, Marshall D; Taler, Sandra J; Cunningham, F Gary

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension complicates 5% to 7% of all pregnancies. A subset of preeclampsia, characterized by new-onset hypertension, proteinuria, and multisystem involvement, is responsible for substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and is a marker for future cardiac and metabolic disease. This American Society of Hypertension (ASH) position paper summarizes the clinical spectrum of hypertension in pregnancy, focusing on preeclampsia. Recent research breakthroughs relating to etiology are briefly reviewed. Topics include classification of the different forms of hypertension during pregnancy, and status of the tests available to predict preeclampsia, and strategies to prevent preeclampsia and to manage this serious disease. The use of antihypertensive drugs in pregnancy, and the prevention and treatment of the convulsive phase of preeclampsia, eclampsia, with intravenous MgSO(4) is also highlighted. Of special note, this guideline article, specifically requested, reviewed, and accepted by ASH, includes solicited review advice from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

  2. Truly resistant hypertension?

    PubMed

    Goodlad, Cate; Unwin, Robert; Reaich, David; Cross, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    A young man presented with severe hypertension with evidence of both neurological and cardiovascular end-organ damage. Investigation revealed a small right kidney and a left renal artery aneurysm. Significant hypertension persisted even after right nephrectomy. Despite extensive investigation, no evidence was found to implicate the aneurysm in the causation of his high blood pressure. No alternative cause for hypertension was found, yet blood pressure was high even during hospital admission and observed medication dosing with eight antihypertensive agents. Sustained hypertension resulted in worsening left ventricular hypertrophy and he died suddenly at a tragically young age several years after presentation. This gentleman had truly resistant hypertension, a clinical problem which can be very difficult to manage. PMID:23169928

  3. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vest, Amanda R; Cho, Leslie S

    2014-03-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy represent the second commonest cause of direct maternal death and complicate an estimated 5-10 % of pregnancies. Classification systems aim to separate hypertension similar to that seen outside pregnancy (chronic and gestational hypertension) from the potentially fatal pregnancy-specific conditions. Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and eclampsia represent increasing severities of this disease spectrum. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' 2013 guidelines no longer require proteinuria as a diagnostic criterion, because of its variable appearance in the disease spectrum. The cause involves inadequate cytotrophoblastic invasion of the myometrium, resulting in placental hypoperfusion and diffuse maternal endothelial dysfunction. Changes in angiogenic and antiangiogentic peptide profiles precede the onset of clinical preeclampsia. Women with preeclampsia should be closely monitored and receive magnesium sulfate intravenously if severe features, HELLP syndrome, or eclampsia occur. Definitive therapy is delivery of the fetus. Hypertension in pregnancy increases future maternal risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders.

  4. [Hypertension and arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a known risk factor for arteriosclerosis, and causes both atherosclero= sis of medium-large arteries and arteriolosclerosis of the arterioles. Elevated blood pressure causes damage to the endothelium and vascular wall through both mechanical and humoral factors. We and others have shown that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system at a 'critical period' during the development of hypertension results in a permanent suppression of hypertension in animal models. We have also reported that high-dose renin-angiotensin inhibition results in regression of hypertension, possibly by regression of renal arteriolar hypertrophy. These results suggest that understanding the process of arterial remodeling may play a key role in the development of new strategies for prevention and regression of hypertension and arteriosclerosis.

  5. The challenge of screening for retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Clare M; Ells, Anna L; Fielder, Alistair R

    2013-06-01

    Screening for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and the optimum treatment of sight-threatening disease requires detailed understanding of the infants at risk and timely identification. Despite a plethora of guidelines, not all populations and situations are adequately covered, so that what should be preventable visual disability still occurs. This article considers the design of screening guidelines and the possibility of a global guideline, although in certain parts of the world manpower for ROP screening is not available. Algorithms linked to the increase in weight of preterm infants over time may refine the number of babies needing to undergo treatment. PMID:23719308

  6. Telemedicine in Diabetic Retinopathy: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Das, Taraprasad; Raman, Rajiv; Ramasamy, Kim; Rani, Padmaja Kumari

    2015-01-01

    Telemedicine is exchange of medical data by electronic telecommunications technology that allows a patient's medical problems evaluated and monitored by a remotely located physician. Over the years, telemedicine and telescreening have become important components in health care, in both disease detection and treatment. Highly visual and image intensive ophthalmology is uniquely suited for telemedicine. Because of rising disease burden coupled with high opportunity cost in detection, diabetic retinopathy is an ideal ophthalmic disease for telescreening and decision-making. It fits to Wilson and Jungner's all 10 criteria of screening for chronic diseases and the American Telehealth Association's 4 screening categories. PMID:25949074

  7. Leucapheresis for management of retinopathy in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Muhajir; Oakley, Carmen; McEwen, Fiona; Connelley, Georgina

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterised by granulocytic hyperplasia in the bone marrow and the presence of a specific cytogenetic abnormality known as Philadelphia chromosome with fusion of breakpoint cluster region (BCR) and ableson (ABL) genes. Retinopathy is a rare sight-threatening complication of chronic myeloid leukaemia, which occurs due to leucostasis in retinal blood vessels. We report a case of a patient who presented with visual impairment due to leucostasis, who was successfully managed by leucapheresis along with BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. PMID:26628310

  8. Saturday Night Retinopathy: Characterization of a Rare Ophthalmic Condition.

    PubMed

    Peracha, Zuhair H; Ahmed, Shareef B; Desai, Ankit; Peracha-Riyaz, Manal; Kumar, Nitin; Desai, Uday R

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old, black female with a history of heroin and daily alcohol abuse presented to the emergency room in a lethargic state with severe right eye pain and vision loss. She had been unconscious for 10 hours prior to presentation. On exam she was found to have no light perception vision, severe retinal edema, and complete ophthalmoplegia of the right eye. Imaging and clinical course confirmed the diagnosis of Saturday Night Retinopathy--only the second documented case to be published. PMID:26731217

  9. Hypertension burden in Luxembourg

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Castell, Maria; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Kuemmerle, Andrea; Schritz, Anna; Barré, Jessica; Delagardelle, Charles; Krippler, Serge; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Stranges, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but it remains the main cause of death in Luxembourg. We aimed to estimate the current prevalence of hypertension, associated risk factors, and its geographic variation in Luxembourg. Cross-sectional, population-based data on 1497 randomly selected Luxembourg residents aged 25 to 64 years were collected as part of the European Health Examination Survey from 2013 to 2015. Hypertension was defined as systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg, self-report of a physician diagnosis or on antihypertensive medication. Standard and Bayesian regressions were used to examine associations between hypertension and covariates, and also geographic distribution of hypertension across the country. Nearly 31% of Luxembourg residents were hypertensive, and over 70% of those were either unaware of their condition or not adequately controlled. The likelihood of hypertension was lower in men more physically active (odds ratio [95% credible region] 0.6 [0.4, 0.9]) and consuming alcohol daily (0.3 [0.1, 0.8]), and higher in men with a poor health perception (1.6 [1.0, 2.7]) and in women experiencing depressive symptoms (1.8 [1.3, 2.7]). There were geographic variations in hypertension prevalence across cantons and municipalities. The highest odds ratio was observed in the most industrialized region (South-West) (1.2 [0.9, 1.6]) with a positive effect at 90% credible region. In Luxembourg, the vast majority of people with hypertension are either unaware of their condition or not adequately controlled, which constitutes a major, neglected public health challenge. There are geographic variations in hypertension prevalence in Luxembourg, hence the role of individual and regional risk factors along with public health initiatives to reduce disease burden should be considered. PMID:27603374

  10. Hypertension in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Naing, Cho; Yeoh, Peng Nam; Wai, Victor Nyunt; Win, Ni Ni; Kuan, Lai Pei; Aung, Kyan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine trends in prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension in Malaysia and to assess the relationship between socioeconomic determinants and prevalence of hypertension in Malaysia. The distribution of hypertension in Malaysia was assessed based on available data in 3 National Health and Morbidity Surveys (NHMSs) and 1 large scale non-NHMS during the period of 1996 to 2011. Summary statistics was used to characterize the included surveys. Differences in prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension between any 2 surveys were expressed as ratios. To assess the independent associations between the predictors and the outcome variables, regression analyses were employed with prevalence of hypertension as an outcome variable. Overall, there was a rising trend in the prevalence of hypertension in adults ≥30 years: 32.9% (30%–35.8%) in 1996, 42.6% (37.5%–43.5%) in 2006, and 43.5% (40.4%–46.6%) in 2011. There were significant increase of 32% from 1996 to 2011 (P < 0.001) and of 29% from 1996 to 2006 (P < 0.05), but only a small change of 1% from 2006 to 2011 (P = 0.6). For population ≥18 years, only a 1% increase in prevalence of hypertension occurred from the 2006 NHMS (32.2%) to the 2011 NHMS (32.7%) (P = 0.25). A relative increase of 13% occurred in those with primary education (P < 0.001) and a 15% increase was seen in those with secondary education (P < 0.001). The rate of increase in the prevalence of hypertension in the population with income level RM 3000–3999 was the highest (18%) during this period. In general, the older age group had higher prevalence of hypertension in the 2006 and 2011 NHMSs. The prevalence peaked at 74.1% among population aged 65 to 69 years in the 2011 NHMS. Both the proportion of awareness and the control of hypertension in Malaysia improved from 1996 to 2006. A change in the control of hypertension was 13% higher in women than in men. The findings suggest that

  11. Masked hypertension: A common but insidious presentation of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Donald W; Myers, Martin G; Bolli, Peter; Chockalingam, Arun

    2006-01-01

    A patient has masked hypertension when his office blood pressure is less than 140/90 mmHg but his ambulatory or home blood pressure readings are in the hypertensive range. Several recent studies have demonstrated that cardiovascular risk is similar between those with masked hypertension and those with sustained hypertension. The prevalence of masked hypertension in Canada is not known, but data from other countries suggest rates greater than 8%. Physicians need to use careful clinical judgment to identify and treat subjects with masked hypertension. The present review discusses masked hypertension, its importance to clinical practice and some aspects of patient management. PMID:16755318

  12. Treatment of diabetic retinopathy: Recent advances and unresolved challenges

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in industrialized countries. Remarkable advances in the diagnosis and treatment of DR have been made during the past 30 years, but several important management questions and treatment deficiencies remain unanswered. The global diabetes epidemic threatens to overwhelm resources and increase the incidence of blindness, necessitating the development of innovative programs to diagnose and treat patients. The introduction and rapid adoption of intravitreal pharmacologic agents, particularly drugs that block the actions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and corticosteroids, have changed the goal of DR treatment from stabilization of vision to improvement. Anti-VEGF injections improve visual acuity in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) from 8-12 letters and improvements with corticosteroids are only slightly less. Unfortunately, a third of patients have an incomplete response to anti-VEGF therapy, but the best second-line therapy remains unknown. Current first-line therapy requires monthly visits and injections; longer acting therapies are needed to free up healthcare resources and improve patient compliance. VEGF suppression may be as effective as panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, but more studies are needed before PRP is abandoned. For over 30 years laser was the mainstay for the treatment of DME, but recent studies question its role in the pharmacologic era. Aggressive treatment improves vision in most patients, but many still do not achieve reading and driving vision. New drugs are needed to add to gains achieved with available therapies.

  13. Treatment of diabetic retinopathy: Recent advances and unresolved challenges.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael W

    2016-08-25

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in industrialized countries. Remarkable advances in the diagnosis and treatment of DR have been made during the past 30 years, but several important management questions and treatment deficiencies remain unanswered. The global diabetes epidemic threatens to overwhelm resources and increase the incidence of blindness, necessitating the development of innovative programs to diagnose and treat patients. The introduction and rapid adoption of intravitreal pharmacologic agents, particularly drugs that block the actions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and corticosteroids, have changed the goal of DR treatment from stabilization of vision to improvement. Anti-VEGF injections improve visual acuity in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) from 8-12 letters and improvements with corticosteroids are only slightly less. Unfortunately, a third of patients have an incomplete response to anti-VEGF therapy, but the best second-line therapy remains unknown. Current first-line therapy requires monthly visits and injections; longer acting therapies are needed to free up healthcare resources and improve patient compliance. VEGF suppression may be as effective as panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, but more studies are needed before PRP is abandoned. For over 30 years laser was the mainstay for the treatment of DME, but recent studies question its role in the pharmacologic era. Aggressive treatment improves vision in most patients, but many still do not achieve reading and driving vision. New drugs are needed to add to gains achieved with available therapies. PMID:27625747

  14. Quantitative Assessment of Retinopathy Using Multi-parameter Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghanian, Zahra; Staniszewski, Kevin; Jamali, Nasim; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Wang, Shoujian; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader; Ranji, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    A multi-parameter quantification method was implemented to quantify retinal vascular injuries in microscopic images of clinically relevant eye diseases. This method was applied to wholemount retinal trypsin digest images of diabetic Akita/+, and bcl-2 knocked out mice models. Five unique features of retinal vasculature were extracted to monitor early structural changes and retinopathy, as well as quantifying the disease progression. Our approach was validated through simulations of retinal images. Results showed fewer number of cells (P = 5.1205e-05), greater population ratios of endothelial cells to pericytes (PCs) (P = 5.1772e-04; an indicator of PC loss), higher fractal dimension (P = 8.2202e-05), smaller vessel coverage (P = 1.4214e-05), and greater number of acellular capillaries (P = 7.0414e-04) for diabetic retina as compared to normal retina. Quantification using the present method would be helpful in evaluating physiological and pathological retinopathy in a high-throughput and reproducible manner. PMID:27186534

  15. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Molina, J. M.; Anaya-Alaminos, R.; Uberos-Fernández, J.; Solans-Pérez de Larraya, A.; Chaves-Samaniego, M. J.; Salgado-Miranda, A.; Piñar-Molina, R.; Jerez-Calero, A.; García-Serrano, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The goals were to isolate and study the genetic susceptibility to retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), as well as the gene-environment interaction established in this disease. Methods. A retrospective study (2000–2014) was performed about the heritability of retinopathy of prematurity in 257 infants who were born at a gestational age of ≤32 weeks. The ROP was studied and treated by a single pediatric ophthalmologist. A binary logistic regression analysis was completed between the presence or absence of ROP and the predictor variables. Results. Data obtained from 38 monozygotic twins, 66 dizygotic twins, and 153 of simple birth were analyzed. The clinical features of the cohorts of monozygotic and dizygotic twins were not significantly different. Genetic factors represented 72.8% of the variability in the stage of ROP, environmental factors 23.08%, and random factors 4.12%. The environmental variables representing the highest risk of ROP were the number of days of tracheal intubation (p < 0.001), postnatal weight gain (p = 0.001), and development of sepsis (p = 0.0014). Conclusion. The heritability of ROP was found to be 0.73. The environmental factors regulate and modify the expression of the genetic code. PMID:26089603

  16. Automated microaneurysm detection in diabetic retinopathy using curvelet transform.

    PubMed

    Ali Shah, Syed Ayaz; Laude, Augustinus; Faye, Ibrahima; Tang, Tong Boon

    2016-10-01

    Microaneurysms (MAs) are known to be the early signs of diabetic retinopathy (DR). An automated MA detection system based on curvelet transform is proposed for color fundus image analysis. Candidates of MA were extracted in two parallel steps. In step one, blood vessels were removed from preprocessed green band image and preliminary MA candidates were selected by local thresholding technique. In step two, based on statistical features, the image background was estimated. The results from the two steps allowed us to identify preliminary MA candidates which were also present in the image foreground. A collection set of features was fed to a rule-based classifier to divide the candidates into MAs and non-MAs. The proposed system was tested with Retinopathy Online Challenge database. The automated system detected 162 MAs out of 336, thus achieved a sensitivity of 48.21% with 65 false positives per image. Counting MA is a means to measure the progression of DR. Hence, the proposed system may be deployed to monitor the progression of DR at early stage in population studies.

  17. Automatic detection of retinal anatomy to assist diabetic retinopathy screening.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Alan D; Goatman, Keith A; Philip, Sam; Olson, John A; Sharp, Peter F

    2007-01-21

    Screening programmes for diabetic retinopathy are being introduced in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. These require large numbers of retinal images to be manually graded for the presence of disease. Automation of image grading would have a number of benefits. However, an important prerequisite for automation is the accurate location of the main anatomical features in the image, notably the optic disc and the fovea. The locations of these features are necessary so that lesion significance, image field of view and image clarity can be assessed. This paper describes methods for the robust location of the optic disc and fovea. The elliptical form of the major retinal blood vessels is used to obtain approximate locations, which are refined based on the circular edge of the optic disc and the local darkening at the fovea. The methods have been tested on 1056 sequential images from a retinal screening programme. Positional accuracy was better than 0.5 of a disc diameter in 98.4% of cases for optic disc location, and in 96.5% of cases for fovea location. The methods are sufficiently accurate to form an important and effective component of an automated image grading system for diabetic retinopathy screening.

  18. Treatment of diabetic retinopathy: Recent advances and unresolved challenges

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in industrialized countries. Remarkable advances in the diagnosis and treatment of DR have been made during the past 30 years, but several important management questions and treatment deficiencies remain unanswered. The global diabetes epidemic threatens to overwhelm resources and increase the incidence of blindness, necessitating the development of innovative programs to diagnose and treat patients. The introduction and rapid adoption of intravitreal pharmacologic agents, particularly drugs that block the actions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and corticosteroids, have changed the goal of DR treatment from stabilization of vision to improvement. Anti-VEGF injections improve visual acuity in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) from 8-12 letters and improvements with corticosteroids are only slightly less. Unfortunately, a third of patients have an incomplete response to anti-VEGF therapy, but the best second-line therapy remains unknown. Current first-line therapy requires monthly visits and injections; longer acting therapies are needed to free up healthcare resources and improve patient compliance. VEGF suppression may be as effective as panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, but more studies are needed before PRP is abandoned. For over 30 years laser was the mainstay for the treatment of DME, but recent studies question its role in the pharmacologic era. Aggressive treatment improves vision in most patients, but many still do not achieve reading and driving vision. New drugs are needed to add to gains achieved with available therapies. PMID:27625747

  19. Intravitreal Bevacizumab (Avastin) for Diabetic Retinopathy: The 2010 GLADAOF Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, J. Fernando; Sanchez, Juan G.; Lasave, Andres F.; Wu, Lihteh; Maia, Mauricio; Bonafonte, Sergio; Brito, Miguel; Alezzandrini, Arturo A.; Restrepo, Natalia; Berrocal, Maria H.; Saravia, Mario; Farah, Michel Eid; Fromow-Guerra, Jans; Morales-Canton, Virgilio

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates multiple benefits of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) on diabetic retinopathy (DR) including diabetic macular edema (DME) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) at 24 months of followup. This is a retrospective multicenter interventional comparative case series of intravitreal injections of 1.25 or 2.5 mg of bevacizumab for DME, PDR without tractional retinal detachment (TRD), and patients who experienced the development or progression of TRD after an intravitreal injection of 1.25 or 2.5 mg of bevacizumab before vitrectomy for the management of PDR. The results indicate that IVB injections may have a beneficial effect on macular thickness and visual acuity (VA) in diffuse DME. Therefore, in the future this new therapy could complement focal/grid laser photocoagulation in DME. In PDR, this new option could be an adjuvant agent to panretina photocoagulation so that more selective therapy may be applied. Finally, TRD in PDR may occur or progress after IVB used as an adjuvant to vitrectomy. Surgery should be performed 4 days after IVB. Most patients had poorly controlled diabetes mellitus associated with elevated HbA1c, insulin administration, PDR refractory to panretinal photocoagulation, and longer time between IVB and vitrectomy. PMID:21584260

  20. Evaluation of internet websites about retinopathy of prematurity patient education

    PubMed Central

    Martins, E N; Morse, L S

    2005-01-01

    Background/aims: The success of the treatment in patients with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is mainly associated with timely diagnosis and appropriate management. Information dissemination is crucial for the outcome of ROP. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of the information about ROP available for patients on the internet. Methods: Cross sectional study. In March 2004 the ROP information available on the internet was evaluated using two search engines (MetaCrawler and MSN) and four key terms (“retinopathy of prematurity,” “premature eye,” “premature retina,” and “ROP”). The quality of each website was evaluated using a score system. The sites were classified as academic, organisational, or commercial. Readability, general quality of the website (based on ownership, purpose, authorship, author qualification, attribution, interactivity, and currency), and quality of the content specific to ROP (definition, causes, epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, classification, treatment, and prognosis) were analysed. Results: Of 114 websites evaluated, 40 were included. 10 sites (25.0%) were academic, eight (20.0%) organisational, and 22 (55.0%) commercial. In the majority of the sites (62.5%) the ROP information was fair or poor. Conclusions: A large amount of information about ROP is available on the internet. However, most websites were considered incomplete. PMID:15834086

  1. Solar retinopathy. A study from Nepal and from Germany.

    PubMed

    Rai, N; Thuladar, L; Brandt, F; Arden, G B; Berninger, T A

    1998-01-01

    319 patients with a solar retinopathy were seen in an eye clinic in Nepal within 20 months. All patients had either a positive history of sun-gazing or typical circumscribed scars in the foveal area. In more than 80% of the patients the visual acuity was 6/12 or better and did not deteriorate over time. 126 (40%) patients had a history of gazing at the sun during an eclipse, 33 (10%) were sun worshipers and 4 (1%) were in both categories. Three years later 29 patients were re-examined in a follow-up study. Only 16 had had visual disturbances directly after they had gazed into the sun. No colour vision defects were seen in any of the 44 affected eyes, when tested with Panel D 15, while four patients (6 eyes) had some uncertainty with the tritan plates of the Ishihara test charts. Metamorphopsia were recorded in 11 eyes. Five German patients with solar retinopathy were examined in more detail. Colour contrast sensitivity (CCS) was tested for the central and the peripheral visual field. CCS for tritan axis was raised in all patients for the central visual field, while it was normal for the peripheral visual field. PMID:10431794

  2. Solar retinopathy. A study from Nepal and from Germany.

    PubMed

    Rai, N; Thuladar, L; Brandt, F; Arden, G B; Berninger, T A

    1998-01-01

    319 patients with a solar retinopathy were seen in an eye clinic in Nepal within 20 months. All patients had either a positive history of sun-gazing or typical circumscribed scars in the foveal area. In more than 80% of the patients the visual acuity was 6/12 or better and did not deteriorate over time. 126 (40%) patients had a history of gazing at the sun during an eclipse, 33 (10%) were sun worshipers and 4 (1%) were in both categories. Three years later 29 patients were re-examined in a follow-up study. Only 16 had had visual disturbances directly after they had gazed into the sun. No colour vision defects were seen in any of the 44 affected eyes, when tested with Panel D 15, while four patients (6 eyes) had some uncertainty with the tritan plates of the Ishihara test charts. Metamorphopsia were recorded in 11 eyes. Five German patients with solar retinopathy were examined in more detail. Colour contrast sensitivity (CCS) was tested for the central and the peripheral visual field. CCS for tritan axis was raised in all patients for the central visual field, while it was normal for the peripheral visual field.

  3. [Modern trends in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Freyler, H

    1977-02-10

    Adequate control of diabetic patients may not only delay the appearance of diabetic retinopathy, but may, moreover, effect the regression of fundus changes at the pre-retinopathic stage and in cases of commencing non-proliferative retinopathy. Medical treatment is based on the achievement of a decrease in vascular permeability and a lowering of the blood lipid level; a diet enriched with phosphates may influence retinal hypoxia by increasing the 2,3 diphosphoglycerate level in the erythrocytes, thereby leading to an improved free oxygen supply to the tissue. Complete medical and dietetic compensation of hyper-permeability of the retinal capillaries, of the intraretinal exudation of lipoproteins, and of retinal hypoxia belong still today to utopia; hence, conservative treatment is only of auxiliary character. Hypophysectomy has largely been abandoned in view of the mutilation involved and the poor results of this procedure. The most effective active treatment is photocoagulation. The best results are obtained by a combination of generalized unselective coagulation of the peripheral retina by means of a xenon coagulator and the selective elimination of progressive vascular changes seen in the fluorescein angiogram with argon laser.

  4. Colour Doppler ultrasound evaluation of orbital vessels in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Baydar, S; Adapinar, B; Kebapci, N; Bal, C; Topbas, S

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of colour Doppler imaging in the retrobulbar vascular circulation in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Maximum (V(max)), end-diastolic (V(min)) and average (V(mean)) velocities of blood flows and pulsatility index and resistivity index (RI) in central retinal artery (CRA), short branches of posterior ciliary artery (PCA) and ophthalmic artery of the 65 diabetic and 22 control eyes were measured. The CRA V(max) level in the control group was significantly higher than in DR groups. The CRA V(mean) level was also significantly higher in the control group than in the mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) and the moderate NPDR groups. The CRA RI value was significantly higher in the control group than in the nonretinopathy group. The CRA V(min) and the ophthalmic artery RI values were found significantly higher in the nonretinopathy group than in the moderate NPDR group. There were significant decreases in the some CRA and PCA values as glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels increase in diabetic group. There was a positive correlation between the duration of diabetes and HbA1c levels. This study showed the presence of some dynamic circulatory alterations in the nonretinopathy group with diabetes and DR groups. It was also shown that there is a negative correlation between HbA1c and some orbital vascular velocities.

  5. The protective effect of Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Fang in salt-sensitive hypertension rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiang; He, Yanming; Wang, Wenjian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is considered as a chronic and complex disease relating to multiple systemic systems. Apart from lowering blood pressure, the final purpose of the treatment lies in reducing the variability of blood pressure and other risk factors. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a long history of treating hypertension. This study was designed to determine the effect of Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Fang (L-W-D-H-F), a compound used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine, to treat salt-sensitive hypertension (SSHT) induced by a high-salt and high-fat diet. L-W-D-H-F was prepared from six plant extracts. It was dissolved in 0.9% sodium chloride solution prior to use. Male Sprague-Dawley (6 weeks) rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal diet (CON); HSF (Without Drug Intervention); VAL (Valsartan 13.33 mg/kg/day); and LW (L-W-D-H-F 8.13 g/kg/day). Six weeks after blood pressure treatment, plasma biochemical analyses and histological and functional examination of the kidney were performed. L-W-D-H-F decreased the levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP), fasting blood glucose (FG), insulin (INS), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), homeostasis model assessment of basal insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and angiotensin II (Ang II) from plasma and Ang II and renin from kidney. It also promoted the excretion of urinary Na(+), reducing the loss of urinary K(+) and microalbuminuria (MAU), and improved the glomerular afferent arteriole, arterioles and each kidney unit. Together, these results suggest that L-W-D-H-F is capable of moderately reducing MAP in salt-sensitive hypertension and can work at different levels on multiple differential targets. PMID:24164386

  6. Influence of retinopathy on the achromatic and chromatic vision of patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Luminance contrast sensitivity and colour vision are considered to have great predictive value in the evaluation of type 2 diabetic retinopathy. However, these two visual characteristics have seldom been investigated in the same group of patients. In the present study we measured contrast sensitivity and colour vision in a group of patients with type 2 diabetes and correlated the results with estimates of common metabolic markers for the disease. A subgroup of the patients had no clinical signs of retinopathy. Methods The vision of 27 patients (n = 50 eyes) with type 2 diabetes, with retinopathy (n = 20 eyes), or without retinopathy (n = 30 eyes) were evaluated using two psychophysical tests, the Farnsworth–Munsell 100 hue test (FM 100), and measurements of the luminance contrast sensitivity at 11 spatial frequencies. The results were compared with measurements obtained from an age-matched control group (n = 32), and were correlated with the level of glycated haemoglobin, glycaemic level, and time of disease onset. Signs of retinopathy were identified during the ophthalmological examinations. Results Contrast sensitivity and colour vision impairments were present at different levels in diabetes patients. Eyes with retinopathy showed more severe vision loss than eyes without retinopathy. The FM 100 test was more sensitive for separation of patients from controls. Colour vision loss had no colour axes preference. The contrast sensitivity test appeared to have some advantage in differentiating patients with retinopathy from patients without retinopathy. Conclusions Both methods can be useful to follow the visual function of diabetic patients and should be used together to discriminate patients from controls, as well as to identify early signs of retinal damage. PMID:25174264

  7. [Influence of polymorphism's of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and polymorphism of NADPH oxidase gene on development of complications of arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, T Iu; Gavrilov, D V; Dudanov, I P; Makarevich, P I; Balatskiĭ, A V; Samokhodskaia, L M; Parfenova, E V

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of polymorphism Glu298Asp of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and C242T p22 phox polymorphism of NADPH oxidase gene in patients with arterial hypertension (AH) and their influence on AH complications. The study included 272 AH patients, average age 50,7 years. The following analyses were performed: clinical analysis of the blood, general analysis of the urine, lipid spectrum, plasma electrolytes, creatinine, glucose, electrocardiography, echocardioscopy, examination of eye vessels, ultrasound examination of the carotid arteries, determination of microalbuminuria. The polymorphism Glu298Asp of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and C242T p22 phox polymorphism of NADPH oxidase gene were detected with two methods: polymerase chain reaction and restrictase reaction. The control group for Glu298Asp polymorphism detection included 102 healthy Russian donors aged 18 to 50 years. Genotypes prevalence in AH patients was as follows: GG 58,8%, GA 32,3%, AA 8,9%, and CC 48,2%, CT 44,9%, TT 6.9%. In the control group: GG 53%, GA 36%, AA 11% and CC 42%, CT 54%, TT 4%. These polymorphisms did not affect the incidence of complications, such as obliterating atherosclerosis of the lower extremity vessels, ischemic heart disease, and acute insufficiency of cerebral circulation, chronic heart failure, left ventricular hypertrophy, microalbuminuria, carotid arteries atherosclerosis. PMID:18429753

  8. Serum Growth Hormone Levels and the Response of Diabetic Retinopathy to Pituitary Ablation*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A. D.; Kohner, E. M.; Oakley, N. W.; Hartog, M.; Joplin, G. F.; Fraser, T. Russell

    1969-01-01

    Serum growth hormone levels were measured during insulin tolerance tests in 36 patients after yttrium-90 pituitary implantation for diabetic retinopathy. The response of the new blood vessels was more clearly related to loss of growth hormone function than was the improvement of retinal haemorrhages and microaneurysms. The overall response of the retinopathy was greatest when growth hormone function was lost. Since the loss of growth hormone function was related to the loss of other aspects of anterior pituitary function, a unique role of growth hormone in the response of diabetic retinopathy to pituitary ablation could not be established. PMID:5768460

  9. Retinopathy and Uveitis Associated with Sofosbuvir Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chin-Loy, Katrina; Galaydh, Farah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We report a case of retinopathy and uveitis associated with sofosbuvir therapy for hepatitis C infection. Methods: Case report. Results: A 57-year-old-male developed ocular inflammation and retinopathy four weeks after the administration of sofosbuvir for a hepatitis C infection. Hearing loss, rheumatologic disease, and essential tremor were also noted. The ophthalmic findings resolved with discontinuation of the drug.    Conclusion:  The authors report a case of sofosbuvir induced retinopathy and uveitis, the first associated with this emerging therapy for hepatitis C. Ophthalmologists and other treating physicians should be aware of the ophthalmic side effects of this drug.  PMID:27335709

  10. Chronic inhibition of 11 β -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity decreases hypertension, insulin resistance, and hypertriglyceridemia in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Christine G; Costell, Melissa H; Krosky, Daniel J; Cui, Jianqi; Wu, Charlene W; Hong, Victor S; Harpel, Mark R; Willette, Robert N; Yue, Tian-Li

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and obesity that promote the development of cardiovascular disease. Metabolic syndrome has been associated with changes in the secretion or metabolism of glucocorticoids, which have important functions in adipose, liver, kidney, and vasculature. Tissue concentrations of the active glucocorticoid cortisol are controlled by the conversion of cortisone to cortisol by 11 β -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11 β -HSD1). Because of the various cardiovascular and metabolic activities of glucocorticoids, we tested the hypothesis that 11 β -HSD1 is a common mechanism in the hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. In obese and lean SHR/NDmcr-cp (SHR-cp), cardiovascular, metabolic, and renal functions were measured before and during four weeks of administration of vehicle or compound 11 (10 mg/kg/d), a selective inhibitor of 11 β -HSD1. Compound 11 significantly decreased 11 β -HSD1 activity in adipose tissue and liver of SHR-cp. In obese SHR-cp, compound 11 significantly decreased mean arterial pressure, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, and plasma renin activity with no effect on heart rate, body weight gain, or microalbuminuria. These results suggest that 11 β -HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue is a common mediator of hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome.

  11. Chronic Inhibition of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Activity Decreases Hypertension, Insulin Resistance, and Hypertriglyceridemia in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schnackenberg, Christine G.; Costell, Melissa H.; Krosky, Daniel J.; Cui, Jianqi; Wu, Charlene W.; Hong, Victor S.; Harpel, Mark R.; Willette, Robert N.; Yue, Tian-Li

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and obesity that promote the development of cardiovascular disease. Metabolic syndrome has been associated with changes in the secretion or metabolism of glucocorticoids, which have important functions in adipose, liver, kidney, and vasculature. Tissue concentrations of the active glucocorticoid cortisol are controlled by the conversion of cortisone to cortisol by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1). Because of the various cardiovascular and metabolic activities of glucocorticoids, we tested the hypothesis that 11β-HSD1 is a common mechanism in the hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. In obese and lean SHR/NDmcr-cp (SHR-cp), cardiovascular, metabolic, and renal functions were measured before and during four weeks of administration of vehicle or compound 11 (10 mg/kg/d), a selective inhibitor of 11β-HSD1. Compound 11 significantly decreased 11β-HSD1 activity in adipose tissue and liver of SHR-cp. In obese SHR-cp, compound 11 significantly decreased mean arterial pressure, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, and plasma renin activity with no effect on heart rate, body weight gain, or microalbuminuria. These results suggest that 11β-HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue is a common mediator of hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. PMID:23586038

  12. Clinical Manifestations of Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busafi, Said A.; McNabb-Baltar, Julia; Farag, Amanda; Hilzenrat, Nir

    2012-01-01

    The portal hypertension is responsible for many of the manifestations of liver cirrhosis. Some of these complications are the direct consequences of portal hypertension, such as gastrointestinal bleeding from ruptured gastroesophageal varices and from portal hypertensive gastropathy and colopathy, ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, and hypersplenism. In other complications, portal hypertension plays a key role, although it is not the only pathophysiological factor in their development. These include spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatic encephalopathy, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and portopulmonary hypertension. PMID:23024865

  13. Hypertensive heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... failure: pathophysiology and diagnosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Victor RG. Arterial hypertension. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  14. White-coat hypertension.

    PubMed

    Martin, Catherine A; McGrath, Barry P

    2014-01-01

    1. Numerous studies have examined whether white-coat hypertension (WCHT) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, but with definitions of WCHT that were not sufficiently robust, results have been inconsistent. The aim of the present review was to standardize the evidence by only including studies that used a definition of WCHT consistent with international guidelines. 2. Published studies were reviewed for data on vascular dysfunction, target organ damage, risk of future sustained hypertension and cardiovascular events. 3. White-coat hypertension has a population prevalence of approximately 15% and is associated with non-smoking and slightly elevated clinic blood pressure. Compared with normotensives, subjects with WCHT are at increased cardiovascular risk due to a higher prevalence of glucose dysregulation, increased left ventricular mass index and increased risk of future diabetes and hypertension. 4. In conclusion, management of a patient with WCHT should focus on cardiovascular risk factors, particularly glucose intolerance, not blood pressure alone.

  15. Secondary hypertension in adults

    PubMed Central

    Puar, Troy Hai Kiat; Mok, Yingjuan; Debajyoti, Roy; Khoo, Joan; How, Choon How; Ng, Alvin Kok Heong

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hypertension occurs in a significant proportion of adult patients (~10%). In young patients, renal causes (glomerulonephritis) and coarctation of the aorta should be considered. In older patients, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnoea and renal artery stenosis are more prevalent than previously thought. Primary aldosteronism can be screened by taking morning aldosterone and renin levels, and should be considered in patients with severe, resistant or hypokalaemia-associated hypertension. Symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea should be sought. Worsening of renal function after starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor suggests the possibility of renal artery stenosis. Recognition, diagnosis and treatment of secondary causes of hypertension lead to good clinical outcomes and the possible reversal of end-organ damage, in addition to blood pressure control. As most patients with hypertension are managed at the primary care level, it is important for primary care physicians to recognise these conditions and refer patients appropriately. PMID:27211205

  16. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure to live. Without it, blood can't flow through our bodies and carry oxygen to our vital organs. But when blood pressure gets too high — a condition called hypertension — it can lead to ...

  17. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  18. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure with the development of a practical method to measure it. Physicians began to note associations between hypertension and risk of heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure. Although scientists had yet to prove that lowering blood pressure ...

  19. Masked hypertension and hidden uncontrolled hypertension after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Paripovic, Dusan; Kostic, Mirjana; Spasojevic, Brankica; Kruscic, Divna; Peco-Antic, Amira

    2010-09-01

    Arterial hypertension is a risk factor affecting graft function in pediatric kidney transplants. Recent pediatric studies reported a high prevalence of hypertension, especially nocturnal hypertension in this population. Data regarding the prevalence of masked hypertension in pediatric patients with kidney transplants are still scarce. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of masked and hidden uncontrolled hypertension after renal transplantation. A total of 41 patients (25 males) with stable functioning renal graft were included in the study. Their median age was 14.5 years with the median interval since transplantation of 2.5 years (range 0.3 to 20.6). Spacelabs 90207 was used to measure ambulatory blood pressure (BP) during a 24-h period. Ambulatory hypertension was defined as mean systolic and/or diastolic BP index at day-time or nighttime >or=1. Masked hypertension was defined as normal office BP but daytime ambulatory hypertension in patients without antihypertensive medications. Hidden uncontrolled hypertension was defined as daytime ambulatory hypertension undetected by office BP measurements in treated patients. Antihypertensive medications were prescribed to 58%. Prevalence of nocturnal hypertension was 68%. On the basis of combination of office and ABPM masked hypertension and hidden uncontrolled hypertension was detected in 24% and 21% of the study population, respectively. Regular use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in transplanted patients enables detection of masked and hidden uncontrolled hypertension. PMID:20467790

  20. Management of Renovascular Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron; Gaba, Ron C; Bui, James T; Minocha, Jeet

    2016-09-01

    Renal artery stenosis is a potentially reversible cause of hypertension, and transcatheter techniques are essential to its treatment. Angioplasty remains a first-line treatment for stenosis secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia. Renal artery stenting is commonly used in atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, although recent trials have cast doubts upon its efficacy. Renal denervation is a promising procedure for the treatment of resistant hypertension, and in the future, its indications may expand. PMID:27641455

  1. Scotoma analysis of 10-2 visual field testing with a white target in screening for hydroxychloroquine retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Browning, David J; Lee, Chong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the variability of scotomas detected by 10-2 visual field (VF) testing in patients taking hydroxychloroquine without and with retinopathy. Design Retrospective review of clinical charts and visual fields. Subjects Twenty-one patients taking hydroxychloroquine without retinopathy, and nine patients taking hydroxychloroquine and one patient taking chloroquine with retinopathy. Methods Retinopathy was defined by annular scotomas on 10-2 VF testing with corroborative spectral domain optical coherence tomographic outer retinal changes and multifocal electroretinographic changes leading to cessation of hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine. Location and depth of scotoma points on 10-2 VF testing were recorded and their fates followed in serial, reliable 10-2 VFs performed with a white target over time. Main outcome measures Number of scotoma points and locations, percentage of persistent scotoma points, size of scotomas, location of scotomas, and percentage of scotomas deepening. Results A median of five, interquartile range (IQR) 3–8 scotoma points per VF occurred in patients without retinopathy. A median of 86%, IQR 63%–100% of these points resolve on the subsequent field. For patients with retinopathy, a median of 22%, IQR 10%–59% resolve. The median percentage of scotoma points in the zone 2–8 degrees from fixation in eyes with retinopathy was 79%, IQR 68%–85% compared to 60%, IQR 54%–75% in eyes without retinopathy (P=0.0094). Single-point scotomas were more common in eyes without than with retinopathy. Scotomas consisting of more than four contiguous scotoma points were generally indicative of retinopathy. Conclusion Point scotomas are common and variable in 10-2 VF testing with a white target for hydroxychloroquine retinopathy in subjects without retinopathy. The annular zone 2 to 8 degrees from fixation was useful for distinguishing the significance of scotoma points. Scotomas with more contiguous scotoma points were more often

  2. Anterior Diabetic Retinopathy Studied by Ultra-widefield Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kunho; Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Tae Hyup; Cho, Ga Eun; Ahn, Jeeyun; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prevalence of anterior type diabetic retinopathy (DR) using ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography and to identify the factors associated with anterior type DR incidence. Methods A retrospective case review was used in this study. Patients with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) underwent examination by ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography, and were classified into anterior, posterior, or diffuse DR groups. Anterior DR was defined if diabetic retinal changes were noted only at the location anterior to the imaginary circle bordered by the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study seven-standard fields. Correlations between demographic data, as well as systemic and ocular factors, and the incidence of NPDR types were evaluated. Results Among the 234 eyes of 234 patients with NPDR, 25 eyes (10.7%) demonstrated anterior DR. Anterior DR was observed in 10 eyes (30.3%) of patients having mild NPDR, three eyes (4.8%) of moderate NPDR patients, and in 12 eyes (7.1%) of severe NPDR patients (p < 0.001). The incidence of anterior DR positively correlated with lower hemoglobin A1c levels and with greater high-density lipoprotein levels following multiple logistic regression analysis (p < 0.001). The mean hemoglobin A1c level was 7.03 ± 0.99% in anterior DR, 7.99 ± 1.74% in posterior DR, and 7.94 ± 1.39% in diffuse DR patients (p = 0.003). The mean high-density lipoprotein level was 51.2 ± 12.5 mg/dL in anterior, 49.7 ± 15.2 mg/dL in posterior, and 45.2 ± 13.1 mg/dL in diffuse DR patients (p = 0.010). Conclusions Diabetic retinal changes confined to an anterior location were more frequently noted in earlier stages of NPDR. The incidence of DR sparing posterior retinal involvement was related to favorable blood sugar and lipid profiles. PMID:27729754

  3. Rapid Grading of Fundus Photographs for Diabetic Retinopathy Using Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Villanti, Andrea C; Pearson, Jennifer L; Kirchner, Thomas R; Gupta, Omesh P; Shah, Chirag P

    2014-01-01

    Background Screening for diabetic retinopathy is both effective and cost-effective, but rates of screening compliance remain suboptimal. As screening improves, new methods to deal with screening data may help reduce the human resource needs. Crowdsourcing has been used in many contexts to harness distributed human intelligence for the completion of small tasks including image categorization. Objective Our goal was to develop and validate a novel method for fundus photograph grading. Methods An interface for fundus photo classification was developed for the Amazon Mechanical Turk crowdsourcing platform. We posted 19 expert-graded images for grading by Turkers, with 10 repetitions per photo for an initial proof-of-concept (Phase I). Turkers were paid US $0.10 per image. In Phase II, one prototypical image from each of the four grading categories received 500 unique Turker interpretations. Fifty draws of 1-50 Turkers were then used to estimate the variance in accuracy derived from randomly drawn samples of increasing crowd size to determine the minimum number of Turkers needed to produce valid results. In Phase III, the interface was modified to attempt to improve Turker grading. Results Across 230 grading instances in the normal versus abnormal arm of Phase I, 187 images (81.3%) were correctly classified by Turkers. Average time to grade each image was 25 seconds, including time to review training images. With the addition of grading categories, time to grade each image increased and percentage of images graded correctly decreased. In Phase II, area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) indicated that sensitivity and specificity were maximized after 7 graders for ratings of normal versus abnormal (AUC=0.98) but was significantly reduced (AUC=0.63) when Turkers were asked to specify the level of severity. With improvements to the interface in Phase III, correctly classified images by the mean Turker grade in four-category grading

  4. Evaluation of geometric features as biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy for characterizing the retinal vascular changes during the progression of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leontidis, Georgios; Al-Diri, Bashir; Wigdahl, Jeffrey; Hunter, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) has been widely studied and characterized. However, until now, it is unclear how different features, extracted from the retinal vasculature, can be associated with the progression of diabetes and therefore become biomarkers of DR. In this study, a comprehensive analysis is presented, in which four groups were created, using eighty fundus images from twenty patients, who have progressed to DR and they had no history of any other diseases (e.g. hypertension or glaucoma). The significance of the following features was evaluated: widths, angles, branching coefficient (BC), angle-to-BC ratio, standard deviations, means and medians of widths and angles, fractal dimension (FD), lacunarity and FD-to-lacunarity ratio, using a mixed model analysis of variance (ANOVA) design. All the features were measured from the same junctions of each patient, using an automated tool. The discriminative power of these features was evaluated, using decision trees and random forests classifiers. Cross validation and out-of-bag error were used to evaluate the classifiers' performance, calculating the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and the classification error. Widths, FD and FD-to-Lacunarity ratio were found to differ significantly. Random forests had a superior performance of 0.768 and 0.737 in the AUC for the two cases of classification, namely three-years-pre-DR/post-DR and two-years-pre-DR/post-DR respectively.

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A: a multifunctional molecular player in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyuan; Bao, Shisan; Hambly, Brett D; Gillies, Mark C

    2009-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), first described as "vascular permeability factor", is a critical molecule in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy at several levels. Previous studies have outlined the importance of VEGF-A in mediating vascular pathology in both experimental models and clinical diabetic retinopathy, which are characterized by retinal vascular leakage, preretinal neovascularisation and neuronal degeneration. Paradoxically, recent reports have emphasized the potential neurotrophic effects of VEGF-A on the quiescent vasculature, as well as its direct and indirect protective effects on retinal neurons. VEGF-A has also been identified as an important signalling regulator in the normal central nervous system. Consequently, anti-VEGF therapy for diabetic retinopathy has become a controversal issue. This review outlines recently developed concepts relating to the role of VEGF-A in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, with particular emphasis on its implications for clinical practice. PMID:19646547

  6. [Influence of lasting diabetes and non-adjustable glycosylated haemoglobin on occurrence of retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Alajbegović, Salem; Alajbegović, Azra; Omerović, Jasmina; Musanović, Adnan; Lacić, Elmedin

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the duration of diabetes and glycemia on the development of diabetic retinopathy in diabetes types 1 and 2 and the prevalence of retinopathy by sex. It examined 278 diabetics in 1999 and 2004, a questionnaire was used to collect data and results of fasting glucose, HbA1c, glycosuria and ketonurie were recorded. Retinopathy was noted in 80 (28.78%) and 187 (67.27%) patients during 1999 and 2004, respectively (p < 0.001). The number of patients with the nonproliferative and preproliferative (p < 0.001) as well as with proliferative retinopathy (p < 0.01) was significantly higher in 2004 in the comparision with 1999. The average HbA1c in 1999 was 13.02%, whereas in 2004 it was 10.57%. Poor control of diabetes was present during both investigations. PMID:21263395

  7. Purtscher-like retinopathy in acute alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nema, Nitin; Ishrat, Saba; Verma, Abha; Kela, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old man with a history of alcoholism presented with vomiting, fever, and sharp epigastric pain radiating to the back and flanks. He was diagnosed as a case of acute alcoholic pancreatitis on the basis of clinical findings and investigations. On the next day of presentation, he developed sudden bilateral visual loss. His best-corrected visual acuity was finger counting at one-foot distance in both eyes. He had diffuse whitening in the circumpapillary area, haloes around the retinal vessels (Purtscher flecken) and intra-retinal hemorrhages on ophthalmoscopic examination. Optical coherence tomography revealed bilateral macular edema. These findings were characteristic of Purtscher-like retinopathy. The patient showed systemic and visual improvement at 8 weeks follow-up after receiving the conventional treatment for acute alcoholic pancreatitis. This case emphasizes the importance of fundus examination by an ophthalmologist in the diagnosis of this rare under-diagnosed entity. PMID:27433040

  8. Vitrectomy for Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Associated with Klinefelter Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tajiri, Kensuke; Otsuki, Kohei; Sato, Takaki; Kimura, Daisaku; Kobayashi, Takatoshi; Kida, Teruyo; Sugasawa, Jun; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We encountered a patient with Klinefelter syndrome (KS) who experienced poor outcomes after vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Case A 44-year-old male with poorly controlled diabetes was diagnosed with KS by chromosome analysis. Ocular findings revealed severe PDR complicated with extensive preretinal hemorrhages and traction retinal detachment in his left eye, and pars plana vitrectomy was subsequently performed for treatment. Results A clotting hemorrhage developed during surgery and proved difficult to control. Due to postoperative bleeding and redetachment, the vitrectomy was repeated. At the second operation, we performed a silicone oil tamponade; however, the retina was redetached under the silicone oil, and the light perception vision ultimately disappeared. Conclusion The patient, despite showing increased blood coagulability due to diabetes, presented severe coagulopathy, likely related to KS. In patients with KS and severe PDR, the potential difficulty of vitrectomy should always be kept in mind. PMID:26955343

  9. Cost-effectiveness of Different Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Modalities.

    PubMed

    Pasquel, Francisco J; Hendrick, Andrew M; Ryan, Martha; Cason, Emily; Ali, Mohammed K; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2016-03-01

    Current screening strategies aimed at detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR) historically have poor compliance, but advancements in technology can enable improved access to care. Nearly 80% of all persons with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), highlighting the importance of a cost effective screening program. Establishing mechanisms to reach populations with geographic and financial barriers to access is essential to prevent visual disability. Teleretinal programs leverage technology to improve access and reduce cost. The quality of currently employed screening modalities depends on many variables including the instrument used, use of pupillary mydriasis, number of photographic fields, and the qualifications of the photographer and image interpreter. Recent telemedicine and newer technological approaches have been introduced, but data for these technologies is yet limited. We present results of a systematic review of studies evaluating cost-effectiveness of DR screening, and discuss potential relevance for LMICs. PMID:26719134

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Elshaer, Sally L.; Eldahshan, Wael S.; Mysona, Barbara A.; El-Remessy, Azza B.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in United States. Research indicates an association between oxidative stress and the development of diabetes complications. However, clinical trials with general antioxidants have failed to prove effective in diabetic patients. Mounting evidence from experimental studies that continue to elucidate the damaging effects of oxidative stress and inflammation in both vascular and neural retina suggest its critical role in the pathogenesis of DR. This review will outline the current management of DR as well as present potential experimental therapeutic interventions, focusing on molecules that link oxidative stress to inflammation to provide potential therapeutic targets for treatment or prevention of DR. Understanding the biochemical changes and the molecular events under diabetic conditions could provide new effective therapeutic tools to combat the disease. PMID:25949069

  11. Non-invasive Respiratory Support and Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Rahul; Fisher, Marilyn; Cerone, Jennifer; Barry, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe two premature infants who developed stage 3, zone I retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) with plus disease in both eyes, despite limited exposure to supra-ambient oxygen. Both infants received noninvasive respiratory support for several weeks. Both cases are notable because the ROP was more posterior and aggressive than is typical for the gestational ages or birth weights. These cases are insufficient to make definitive conclusions regarding the factors that cause ROP. Further investigation is required to determine if there is an association between the use of non-invasive respiratory support, even in the absence of supra-ambient oxygen, and severe ROP development. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53:e47-e50.]. PMID:27537495

  12. Diabetic retinopathy: recent advances towards understanding neurodegeneration and vision loss.

    PubMed

    Barber, Alistair J

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common retinal diseases world-wide. It has a complex pathology that involves the vasculature of the inner retina and breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier. Extensive research has determined that DR is not only a vascular disease but also has a neurodegenerative component and that essentially all types of cells in the retina are affected, leading to chronic loss of visual function. A great deal of work using animal models of DR has established the loss of neurons and pathology of other cell types, including supporting glial cells. There has also been an increased emphasis on measuring retinal function in the models, as well as further validation and extension of the animal studies by clinical and translational research. This article will attempt to summarize the more recent developments in research towards understanding the complexities of retinal neurodegeneration and functional vision loss in DR.

  13. Retinopathy of prematurity: New developments bring concern and hope.

    PubMed

    Darlow, Brian A

    2015-08-01

    Blindness from retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in Australian and New Zealand is an uncommon event although 3% of <31 weeks gestation infants receive treatment for the disease. New world-wide estimates of the incidence of blindness from ROP are much higher than previously at 20 000 children annually. The impact of severe ROP can be reduced through good evidence-based care of very preterm infants and careful organisation of eye examinations and follow-up services. Recent oxygen saturation targeting trial results might mean the adoption of higher targets than formerly in very preterm infants and will require vigilance to ensure all eligible infants are examined appropriately. A true screening examination for acute ROP might involve non-opthalmologists obtaining photographic retinal images and remote reading of these. Although treatment with laser gives good outcomes, there is interest in intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial factor agents, but issues concerning the systemic safety and retinal results of such treatment are unresolved.

  14. Purtscher-like retinopathy in acute alcoholic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nema, Nitin; Ishrat, Saba; Verma, Abha; Kela, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old man with a history of alcoholism presented with vomiting, fever, and sharp epigastric pain radiating to the back and flanks. He was diagnosed as a case of acute alcoholic pancreatitis on the basis of clinical findings and investigations. On the next day of presentation, he developed sudden bilateral visual loss. His best-corrected visual acuity was finger counting at one-foot distance in both eyes. He had diffuse whitening in the circumpapillary area, haloes around the retinal vessels (Purtscher flecken) and intra-retinal hemorrhages on ophthalmoscopic examination. Optical coherence tomography revealed bilateral macular edema. These findings were characteristic of Purtscher-like retinopathy. The patient showed systemic and visual improvement at 8 weeks follow-up after receiving the conventional treatment for acute alcoholic pancreatitis. This case emphasizes the importance of fundus examination by an ophthalmologist in the diagnosis of this rare under-diagnosed entity. PMID:27433040

  15. Bietti's tapetoretinal degeneration with marginal corneal dystrophy crystalline retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, R B

    1977-01-01

    In 1937 Bietti reported a tapetoretinal degeneration with associated corneal deposits at the limbus. The hallmark of the disease was the crystalline characteristics of the retinal spots as well as those at the corneal limbus. Bagolini and Ioli-Spade in 1968 presented a 30 year follow-up on Bietti's cases and presented six additional cases. The present report delas with this entity in Orientals, a Chinese woman and a Japanese man. Corneal and conjunctival biopsy from the female patient revelaed a lipid deposition in both fibroblasts and epithelium. The term "crystalline retinopathy" has been added to the description of this entity since it defines the most characteristic feature of the syndrome. Images FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 2 C FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 6 C FIGURE 8 PMID:306693

  16. Telemedicine in diabetic retinopathy: Access to rural India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Taraprasad; Pappuru, Rajeev Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a growing concern in India. The first step in management of DR is timely screening. With 10% prevalence in rural India, 11 million people are likely to have DR by the year 2030. With limited resources and skilled manpower, it will not be possible to have routine eye examination to identify and treat these patients on a regular basis. Telemedicine is a possible answer in these situations where patients could be remotely screened and appropriately advised. With the advent of several technological advances such as low cost hand-held nonmydriatic camera, increased capabilities of the smartphones to take external eye and retinal photographs coupled with improving broadband connectivity; teleophthalmology in the management of DR could be a reality in the not too distant future. PMID:26953029

  17. Glycaemic threshold for diabetes-specific retinopathy among individuals from Saudi Arabia, Algeria and Portugal.

    PubMed

    Almdal, T P; Handlos, L N; Valerius, M; Juul, E; Nielsen, K E; Vistisen, D; Nielsen, L B; Sheikh, A; Belhadj, M; Nadir, D; Zinai, S; Raposo, J; Lund-Andersen, H; Witte, D R

    2014-03-01

    We studied the glycaemic threshold and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in screen-detected diabetes in Saudi Arabia, Algeria and Portugal. The prevalence of diabetes-specific retinopathy started to increase at an HbA1c level of 6-6.4% (42-47 mmol/mol) and in individuals with HbA(1c) >7.0% the prevalence was 6.0%.

  18. Long-Term Effects of Irbesartan Treatment and Smoking on Nucleic Acid Oxidation in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Broedbaek, Kasper; Henriksen, Trine; Weimann, Allan; Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Jon T.; Afzal, Shoaib; Jimenez-Solem, Espen; Persson, Frederik; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Rossing, Peter; Poulsen, Henrik E.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested whether long-term treatment with the angiotensin II receptor antagonist irbesartan reduces nucleic acid oxidation in patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Irbesartan in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria (IRMA 2) study was a 2-year multicenter randomized double-blind trial comparing irbesartan (150 and 300 mg once daily) with placebo. We studied a subgroup of 50 patients where urine samples were available for analysis of albumin and the oxidatively modified guanine nucleosides 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo). RESULTS During the 2-year trial, no significant differences in 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo excretions between placebo and irbesartan treatment were seen. 8-oxodG and albumin excretion decreased with time (P = 0.0004 and P < 0.0001, respectively), whereas treatment-related differences were shown for albumin excretion (P = 0.0008) only, as previously reported. Important secondary findings were significant associations between changes in 8-oxodG excretion and changes in albumin excretion and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). During the study period, 8-oxodG excretion decreased by 3 and 26% in smokers and nonsmokers, respectively (P = 0.015), and urinary albumin excretion decreased 22% in smokers and 58% in nonsmokers (P = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS Irbesartan treatment was not significantly more effective than placebo in reducing nucleic acid oxidation. The results indicate that DNA oxidation in diabetes patients is reduced by various components in the treatment of diabetes where glycemic control seems to be important and addition of angiotensin II receptor antagonists does not lead to any substantial additional reduction. Furthermore, the reductions in DNA oxidation and albumin excretion seem to be counteracted by smoking. PMID:21454798

  19. Angiogenic factors in human proliferative sickle cell retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, J.; Mathews, M. K.; McLeod, D; Merges, C.; Hjelmeland, L.; Lutty, G.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Preretinal neovascular formations called sea fans develop at the border of non-perfused peripheral retina in sickle cell retinopathy. Angiogenic factors which could contribute to their development, however, have not been examined previously. The objective of this study was to determine immunohistochemically if vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were associated with sea fan formations.
METHODS—Immunohistochemistry on cryosections was used to localise bFGF, VEGF, heparan sulphate proteoglycan, human serum albumin, collagens IV and II, and von Willebrand factor in tissue from five sickle cell and one control subject.
RESULTS—The greatest immunoreactivity for VEGF and bFGF was in the feeder and preretinal vessels of sea fans (p<0.01). The most prominent reaction product was localised to vascular endothelial cells. In retinal vessels, VEGF and bFGF immunoreactivities were greater in sickle cell subjects (both proliferative and non-proliferative) than in the control subject (p<0.01 and p<0.02 respectively). In the sickle cell retina, no angiogenic factor immunoreactivity was detected in non-perfused periphery and there was no significant difference in bFGF or VEGF immunoreactivity between perfused retina and the border of perfused and non-perfused areas.
CONCLUSION—Our results demonstrate for the first time that VEGF and bFGF are associated with sea fan formations in sickle cell retinopathy. Both factors may function in an autocrine manner because immunoreactivity for these factors was greater within the neovascularisation than in adjacent retina.

 PMID:10381672

  20. Laser photocoagulation stops diabetic retinopathy by controlling lactic acid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbarsht, Myron L.

    1994-08-01

    Many different types of proliferative retinopathy induced by various types of initial disorders have a common pathology in their mid and terminal stages. Thus, proper therapy is devoted toward elimination of the initial cause as well as alleviation of the proliferative processes. Vasodilatation, which is an initial symptom of diabetes, is itself destructive to the retinal capillary bed and appears to be a constant feature in all stages of diabetic retinopathy. In the mid and late stages, the vasodilatation seems very dependent upon capillary dropout, whereas the initial vasodilatation may derive from quite different causes. The efficacy of photocoagulation as a therapy for all stages seems to derive from decreasing the metabolism in the photoreceptor layer sufficiently to result in vasoconstriction of the retinal vessels. A model is proposed to show how diabetes, by altering the metabolism in the photoreceptor layer to produce excess lactic acid, causes the initial vasodilatation. The lactic acid also induces free radical (superoxide) formation; both act together to destroy the retinal capillary bed followed by vasoproliferation. Photocoagulation, thus, is even more appropriate for this particular syndrome than previously had been thought, as it not only reduces potentially destructive vasodilatation but also removes the metabolic cause of the free radical induced destruction of the capillary endothelium which is the initial step in capillary drop-out. A review of the present data indicates that the best type of pan- retinal photocoagulation is a very light type affecting the photoreceptors only with a minimal amount of damage to other parts of retina and the vessels in the choroid. The possible use of photochemical types of destruction of the photoreceptor as a therapeutic modality is attractive, but it is certainly too speculative to use until more detailed investigations have been completed. However, the basic therapeutic approach of choice may be to prevent the

  1. Automated detection of retinal whitening in malarial retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V.; Agurto, C.; Barriga, S.; Nemeth, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Lewallen, S.; Harding, S.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe neurological complication associated with malarial infection. Malaria affects approximately 200 million people worldwide, and claims 600,000 lives annually, 75% of whom are African children under five years of age. Because most of these mortalities are caused by the high incidence of CM misdiagnosis, there is a need for an accurate diagnostic to confirm the presence of CM. The retinal lesions associated with malarial retinopathy (MR) such as retinal whitening, vessel discoloration, and hemorrhages, are highly specific to CM, and their detection can improve the accuracy of CM diagnosis. This paper will focus on development of an automated method for the detection of retinal whitening which is a unique sign of MR that manifests due to retinal ischemia resulting from CM. We propose to detect the whitening region in retinal color images based on multiple color and textural features. First, we preprocess the image using color and textural features of the CMYK and CIE-XYZ color spaces to minimize camera reflex. Next, we utilize color features of the HSL, CMYK, and CIE-XYZ channels, along with the structural features of difference of Gaussians. A watershed segmentation algorithm is used to assign each image region a probability of being inside the whitening, based on extracted features. The algorithm was applied to a dataset of 54 images (40 with whitening and 14 controls) that resulted in an image-based (binary) classification with an AUC of 0.80. This provides 88% sensitivity at a specificity of 65%. For a clinical application that requires a high specificity setting, the algorithm can be tuned to a specificity of 89% at a sensitivity of 82%. This is the first published method for retinal whitening detection and combining it with the detection methods for vessel discoloration and hemorrhages can further improve the detection accuracy for malarial retinopathy.

  2. Protective Effects of Fufang Xueshuantong on Diabetic Retinopathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Huihui; Huang, Jianmei; Li, Wei; Tang, Minke

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of Fufang Xueshuantong (FXT) on diabetic retinopathy in rats induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Diabetes was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by a single injection of 60 mg/kg STZ. One week after STZ, FXT 0.525 g/kg or 1.05 g/kg was administrated to the rats by intragastric gavage (ig) once daily consecutively for 24 weeks. The control rats and untreated STZ rats received vehicle the same way. At the end of the experiment, the erythrocyte aggregation and blood viscosity were assayed. The retina vessel morphology was observed in retinal digestive preparations. Expression of occludin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in retina was measured by western blotting. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) in retina was detected by immunohistochemistry. The activity of aldose reductase in retina was investigated with a NADPH oxidation method. The results showed that, in STZ rats, there were distinct lesions in retinal vessel, including decrease of pericytes and increase of acellular capillaries, together with dilatation of retinal veins. The expression of VEGF and ICAM-1 increased, while the expression of PEDF and occludin decreased. The activity of aldose reductase elevated, and the whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, and erythrocyte aggregation also increased after STZ stimulation. FXT 0.525 g/kg and 1.05 g/kg demonstrated significant protective effects against STZ induced microvessel lesion in the retina with increased pericytes and reduced acellular capillaries. FXT also reduced the expression of VEGF and ICAM-1 and enhanced the expression of PEDF and occludin in STZ insulted rats. The activity of aldose reductase, the whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, and erythrocyte aggregation also decreased after FXT treatment. The results demonstrated that FXT has protective effect on STZ induced diabetic retinopathy in rats. PMID

  3. Language barrier and its relationship to diabetes and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Language barrier is an important determinant of health care access and health. We examined the associations of English proficiency with type-2 diabetes (T2DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Asian Indians living in Singapore, an urban city where English is the predominant language of communication. Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional study. T2DM was defined as HbA1c ≥6.5%, use of diabetic medication or a physician diagnosis of diabetes. Retinal photographs were graded for the severity of DR including vision-threatening DR (VTDR). Presenting visual impairment (VI) was defined as LogMAR visual acuity > 0.30 in the better-seeing eye. English proficiency at the time of interview was assessed. Results The analyses included 2,289 (72.1%) English-speaking and 885 (27.9%) Tamil- speaking Indians. Tamil-speaking Indians had significantly higher prevalence of T2DM (46.2 vs. 34.7%, p < 0.001) and, among those with diabetes, higher prevalence of DR (36.0 vs. 30.6%, p < 0.001), VTDR (11.0 vs. 6.5%, p < 0.001), and VI (32.4 vs. 14.6%) than English speaking Indians. Oaxaca decomposition analyses showed that the language-related discrepancies (defined as the difference in prevalence between persons speaking different languages) in T2DM, DR, and VTDR could not be fully explained by socioeconomic measures. Conclusions In an English dominant society, Tamil-speaking Indians are more likely to have T2DM and diabetic retinopathy. Social policies and health interventions that address language-related health disparities may help reduce the public health impact of T2DM in societies with heterogeneous populations. PMID:22974298

  4. Macular circulation in patients with diabetes mellitus with and without arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arend, O; Ruffer, M; Remky, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Previous fluorescein angiographic studies have shown alterations in the macular microcirculation in patients with diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension. In both diseases capillary blood velocity was reduced and capillary density decreased. These changes were more pronounced in diabetic patients. We have examined the influence of arterial hypertension in combination with diabetes mellitus.
METHODS—62 patients with diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension (group 1) were matched with patients with diabetes mellitus but without arterial hypertension (group 2, match criteria: ETDRS stage of retinopathy). In all subjects fluorescein angiograms were performed with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Macular capillary blood velocity (CBV), perifoveal intercapillary area (PIA), the coefficient of variation of both parameters, the area of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ), and the arteriovenous passage time (AVP) were assessed by digital image analysis.
RESULTS—Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly increased in the patients with arterial hypertension (systolic p=0.0008; diastolic p=0.03). Neither dynamic measures (AVP: 1.64 (0.49) seconds (group 1), 1.72 (0.58) seconds (group 2); CBV: 1.98 (0.39) mm/s (group 1), 2.09 (0.43) mm/s (group 2)) nor morphological measures (PIA: 7985 (3137) µm2 (group 1), 8338 (3376) µm2 (group 2); FAZ: 0.319 (0.206) mm2 (group 1), 0.363 (0.237) mm2 (group 2)) were significantly different between the two groups of diabetic patients.
CONCLUSION—Arterial hypertension did not result in more severe macular capillary dropout than diabetes without hypertension. This might be explained by the fact that most of the patients were being treated with antihypertensive drugs.

 PMID:11090480

  5. Antiphospholipid antibodies and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rollino, C; Boero, R; Elia, F; Montaruli, B; Massara, C; Beltrame, G; Ferro, M; Quattrocchio, G; Quarello, F

    2004-01-01

    Hypertension is a common manifestation of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) have been described in patients with hypertension secondary to renal artery stenosis (RAS). Twenty-six patients with RAS and 25 patients with severe essential hypertension (diastolic blood pressure > 110 mmHg or > or = 3 hypertensive drugs) were studied and compared to 61 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Serum samples were tested for lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin (aCL) IgG and IgM, antiprothrombin (aPT) IgG and IgM, anti-beta2glycoprotein 1 (abeta2GP1) IgG and IgM. aPL were negative in all patients with RAS. Two patients with essential hypertension had positive aPL (8%) (LA in one patient confirmed in a second assay and abeta2GP1-IgG in the other patient confirmed one year later together with aCL IgG positivity). Among healthy subjects, one case (1.6%) was found to be positive for LA, aCL IgM, abeta2GP1 IgM, aPT IgG, aPT IgM. In conclusion, the association between RAS and aPL seems to be casual rather than an expression of an elective thrombotic localization ofAPS. The positive finding of aPL in 8% of patients with essential hypertension, a frequency higher than that of the control population, deserves further studies in larger series to better explore the relationship between aPL and hypertension. PMID:15540508

  6. Endocrine hypertension in small animals.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Claudia E; Schellenberg, Stefan; Wenger, Monique

    2010-03-01

    Hypertension is classified as idiopathic or secondary. In animals with idiopathic hypertension, persistently elevated blood pressure is not caused by an identifiable underlying or predisposing disease. Until recently, more than 95% of cases of hypertension in humans were diagnosed as idiopathic. New studies have shown, however, a much higher prevalence of secondary causes, such as primary hyperaldosteronism. In dogs and cats, secondary hypertension is the most prevalent form and is subclassified into renal and endocrine hypertension. This review focuses on the most common causes of endocrine hypertension in dogs and cats.

  7. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27656251

  8. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension.

  9. Serum Magnesium Concentration Is Inversely Associated with Albuminuria and Retinopathy among Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun; Gu, Yuying; Guo, Meixiang; Chen, Peihong; Wang, Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the association between serum magnesium levels and microvascular complications among patients with diabetes. Methods. Patients with diabetes were recruited between April 2012 and January 2015. All patients received an assay of serum magnesium concentration, were screened for 24 h albumin excretion rate, and underwent nonmydriatic fundus photography. Albuminuria and retinopathy were defined accordingly. A total of 3,100 patients with normal serum magnesium levels were included in this study. Results. Patients with albuminuria and/or retinopathy had lower levels of serum magnesium than patients without these complications (P < 0.001). The prevalence of isolated albuminuria, isolated retinopathy, and combined albuminuria and retinopathy decreased as the concentration of serum magnesium increased. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the odds ratio for isolated albuminuria, isolated retinopathy, and concomitant albuminuria and retinopathy decreased by approximately 20% for every 0.1 mmol/L increase in serum magnesium concentration. Conclusion. Serum magnesium levels were negatively associated with the risk of diabetic microvascular complications among patients with serum magnesium levels within the normal range. PMID:27547762

  10. Development of a screening tool for staging of diabetic retinopathy in fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Bency, Mayur Joseph; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Bansal, Reema; Gupta, Amod

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a condition of the eye of diabetic patients where the retina is damaged because of long-term diabetes. The condition deteriorates towards irreversible blindness in extreme cases of diabetic retinopathy. Hence, early detection of diabetic retinopathy is important to prevent blindness. Regular screening of fundus images of diabetic patients could be helpful in preventing blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, we propose techniques for staging of diabetic retinopathy in fundus images using several shape and texture features computed from detected microaneurysms, exudates, and hemorrhages. The classification accuracy is reported in terms of the area (Az) under the receiver operating characteristic curve using 200 fundus images from the MESSIDOR database. The value of Az for classifying normal images versus mild, moderate, and severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) is 0:9106. The value of Az for classification of mild NPDR versus moderate and severe NPDR is 0:8372. The Az value for classification of moderate NPDR and severe NPDR is 0:9750.

  11. Nonnarcotic analgesics and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gaziano, J Michael

    2006-05-01

    In 2004, individuals in the United States spent >$2.5 billion on over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and filled >100 million NSAID prescriptions. The most commonly used OTC analgesics include aspirin, acetaminophen, and nonaspirin NSAIDs. Nonnarcotic analgesics are generally considered safe when used as directed but do have the potential to increase blood pressure in patients with hypertension treated with antihypertensives. This is important because hypertension alone has been correlated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke. Small increases in blood pressure in patients with hypertension also have been shown to increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, when nonnarcotic analgesics are taken by patients with hypertension, there may be important implications. This review explores the potential connection among analgesic agents, blood pressure, and hypertension, and discusses possible mechanisms by which analgesics might cause increases in blood pressure. This is followed by a summary of data on the relation between analgesics and blood pressure from both observational and randomized trials.

  12. Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Negi, Neha; Aggarwal, Aakash; Bodh, Vijay; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage. Risks of variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation increase many fold during pregnancy. Optimal management revolves round managing the portal hypertension and its complications. Thus management of such cases requires multi-speciality approach involving obstetricians experienced in dealing with high risk cases, hepatologists, anesthetists and neonatologists. With advancement in medical field, pregnancy is not contra-indicated in these women, as was previously believed. This article focuses on the different aspects of pregnancy with portal hypertension with special emphasis on specific cause wise treatment options to decrease the variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation. Based on extensive review of literature, management from pre-conceptional period to postpartum is outlined in order to have optimal maternal and perinatal outcomes. PMID:25755552

  13. Sleep and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, David A; Harding, Susan M

    2010-08-01

    Ambulatory BP studies indicate that even small increases in BP, particularly nighttime BP levels, are associated with significant increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Accordingly, sleep-related diseases that induce increases in BP would be anticipated to substantially affect cardiovascular risk. Both sleep deprivation and insomnia have been linked to increases in incidence and prevalence of hypertension. Likewise, sleep disruption attributable to restless legs syndrome increases the likelihood of having hypertension. Observational studies demonstrate a strong correlation between the severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the risk and severity of hypertension, whereas prospective studies of patients with OSA demonstrate a positive relationship between OSA and risk of incident hypertension. Intervention trials with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) indicate a modest, but inconsistent effect on BP in patients with severe OSA and a greater likelihood of benefit in patients with most CPAP adherence. Additional prospective studies are needed to reconcile observational studies suggesting that OSA is a strong risk factor for hypertension with the modest antihypertensive effects of CPAP observed in intervention studies.

  14. GCAP1, Rab6, and HSP27: Novel Autoantibody Targets in Cancer-Associated Retinopathy and Autoimmune Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sufang; Dizhoor, Alexander; Wilson, David J.; Adamus, Grazyna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Autoantibodies (AAbs) with different retinal specificities were reported in cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) and autoimmune retinopathy (AR). The goal was to identify the small retinal proteins of apparent molecular mass of 23-kDa often recognized by patients' AAbs. Methods Sera specific for a 23-kDa retinal protein of 173 patients were investigated retrospectively by Western blotting and double immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. A proteomic analysis revealed new 23-kDa protein candidates, including guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs), heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), and Rab6A GTPase (Rab6A). Results Among the cohort of 173 patients, only 68 had anti-recoverin AAbs and the remaining 105 reacted with 4 unique proteins, which were identified as a Rab6A, HSP27, GCAP1, and GCAP2. Confocal images from a double labeling study confirmed the reactivity of AAbs with different types of cells in human retina, consistent with the target protein's respective cellular functions. Patients (62/173) had been diagnosed with various kinds of cancer, including 20% of patients who had anti-recoverin, 11% anti-Rab6A, and 5% anti-HSP27 AAbs. Only 50% of recoverin-seropositive patients had cancer and the individuals with anti-recoverin AAbs had a significantly higher likelihood to be diagnosed with cancer than patients with other anti-23-kDa AAbs. Conclusions The newly discovered retinal autoantigens may be involved in pathogenicity of CAR and AR. The recognition of AAbs against various retinal proteins associated with autoimmune retinal degeneration broadens the group of proteins related with these entities. Translational Relevance Patients with anti-recoverin, anti-GCAP1, anti-Rab6A, and anti-HSP27 AAbs represented diverse clinical phenotypes, so the presence of disease-associated AAbs provides important information for molecular diagnosis. PMID:27152249

  15. Scotoma analysis of 10–2 visual field testing with a red target in screening for hydroxychloroquine retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Browning, David J; Lee, Chong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the variability of scotomas detected by 10–2 visual field (VF) testing with a red target in patients taking hydroxychloroquine without and with retinopathy. Design Retrospective review of clinical charts and VFs. Methods Twenty-four patients taking hydroxychloroquine without retinopathy, and eight patients taking hydroxychloroquine with retinopathy were tested in this study. Retinopathy was defined by annular scotomas on 10–2 VF testing with corroborative spectral domain optical coherence tomographic outer retinal changes and multifocal electroretinographic changes leading to cessation of hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine. Location and depth of scotoma points on 10–2 VF testing were recorded and their fates followed in serial, reliable 10–2 VFs performed with a red target over time. The main outcome measures for this study were the number of scotoma points and locations, percentage of persistent scotoma points, size of scotomas, location of scotomas, and percentage of scotomas deepening. Results A median of 3, interquartile range (IQR) (2, 5), scotoma points per VF occurred in patients without retinopathy. A median of 86%, IQR (77, 100), of these resolved on the subsequent field. For patients with retinopathy, a median of 50%, IQR (46, 79), resolved, a difference compared to patients without retinopathy that was significant (P=0.0158). The median percentage of scotoma points in the zone from 2° to 8° from fixation in eyes with retinopathy was 72%, IQR (54, 100), compared to 49%, IQR (40, 54), in eyes without retinopathy (P=0.0069). The number of persistent scotoma locations at the last visit was higher in eyes with retinopathy: 3, IQR (1, 3), versus 0, IQR (0, 1), in patients without retinopathy, P=0.0156. Conclusion Point scotomas are common and variable in 10–2 VF testing with a red target for hydroxychloroquine retinopathy in subjects without retinopathy. Scotoma points in eyes with retinopathy are less variable. The annular

  16. Diabetic retinopathy: retina-specific methods for maintenance of diabetic rodents and evaluation of vascular histopathology and molecular abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Veenstra, Alexander; Liu, Haitao; Lee, Chieh Allen; Du, Yunpeng; Tang, Jie; Kern, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of visual impairment, which continues to increase in prevalence as more and more people develop diabetes. Despite the importance of vision, the retina is one of the smallest tissues in the body, and specialized techniques to study the retinopathy have been developed. This chapter will summarize several methods used to (i) induce diabetes, (ii) maintain the diabetic animals throughout the months required for the development of typical vascular histopathology, (iii) evaluate vascular histopathology of diabetic retinopathy, and (iv) quantitate abnormalities implicated in the development of the retinopathy. PMID:26331759

  17. [Cardiovascular complications of hypertensive crisis].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    It is inexorable that a proportion of patients with systemic arterial hypertension will develop a hypertensive crisis at some point in their lives. The hypertensive crises can be divided in hypertensive patients with emergency or hypertensive emergency, according to the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, aortic dissection and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises (those caused by cocaine use included). Each is presented in a unique way, although some patients with hypertensive emergency report non-specific symptoms. Treatment includes multiple medications for quick and effective action with security to reduce blood pressure, protect the function of organs remaining, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications and improve patient outcomes.

  18. Uric acid and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Feig, Daniel I

    2011-09-01

    A link between serum uric acid and the development of hypertension was first hypothesized in the 1870s. Although numerous epidemiologic studies in the 1980s and 1990s suggested an association, relatively little attention was paid to it until recently. Animal models have suggested a two-step pathogenesis by which uric acid initially activates the renin angiotensin system and suppresses nitric oxide, leading to uric acid-dependent increase in systemic vascular resistance, followed by a uric acid-mediated vasculopathy, involving renal afferent arterioles, resulting in a late sodium-sensitive hypertension. Initial clinical trials in young patients have supported these mechanisms in young patients but do not yet support pharmacologic reduction of serum uric acid as first-line therapy for hypertension.

  19. [Obesity and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Gábor; Kollár, Réka

    2013-11-01

    The frequency of hypertension and obesity is gradually growing in Hungary. At present 68.5% of men and 78% of women are obese. Hypertension and obesity are the most important risk factors of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. The relationship between increased sympathetic activity and hypertension is well known. Waist circumference and body fat mass correlate significantly with sympathetic activity, in which hyperlipidemia plays also a role. The increased activity of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system via its vascular and renal effects also contributes to an increase of blood pressure. Increased sympathetic activity with decreasing vagal tone accompanying the imbalance of the autonomous nervous system is independent and significant risk factor of cardiovascular events including sudden cardiac death.

  20. Malignant hypertension: a preventable emergency.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Walter; van der Merwe, Veronica

    2013-08-16

    The Waitemata Hypertension Clinic Database 2009-2012 (Auckland, New Zealand) was searched for patients meeting the definition of Malignant Hypertension. Eighteen of 565 patients met the criteria. All patients had essential hypertension which was either undiagnosed, untreated or undertreated. Most cases responded satisfactorily to standard drug therapy, but a number were left with significant chronic kidney disease. Malignant hypertension is a life-threatening disease which should be entirely preventable with regular blood pressure checks in primary care.

  1. Perspectives on research in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Y K

    2009-01-01

    This is a review of my published research on hypertension over 45 years on the three main racial groups residing in KwaZulu-Natal and its main city Durban. These three groups are blacks - mainly Zulu, whites and Indians. The research focused mainly on epidemiology, determinants of the aetiology of hypertension, clinical features, varying responses to hypotensive agents among the racial groups, complications that result from hypertension and the control of hypertension. PMID:19287815

  2. SSA 05-2 HYPERTENSION AND KIDNEY COMPLICATION IN AFRICA.

    PubMed

    Kadiri, Solomon

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension prevalence rates in most urbanized areas of Africa range from 20-30%, with a recent systematic review reporting 16.2% for sub-Saharan Africa. These rates are lower than those in the West but the age standardized rates are higher than in other regions of the world. The attendant morbidity and mortality are disproportionately high. For example, failure of nocturnal dipping and microalbuminuria, predictive of vascular disease, occur relatively early in the course of hypertension and predispose to early vascular disease. Multiple target organ damage occurs in a large proportion, up to 50%, of newly-diagnosed hypertensives and this is more marked when kidney disease is present.By most accounts, hypertension ranks second to glomerulonephritis as the commonest causes of ESRD in Africa, with diabetes rates rapidly increasing in the last 3 decades. The contribution of hypertension to the causation of ESRD is of the order of 25-35%, lower than in US Blacks, with the odds of developing ESRD increasing with increasing BP levels. Hypertension and renal disease often coexist, and nephrosclerosis can often be distinguished from primary renal disease by employing a set of parameters including age of onset of hypertension and renal disease, other clinical signs and level of proteinuria. In other cases, this could be difficult especially where investigative facilities are limited, a common situation in most parts of Africa. Indeed, up to 35% of cases of presumed nephrosclerosis may actually have primary renal disease, which can only be revealed after more extensive investigations.There is genetic heterogeneity in the susceptibility to kidney disease in hypertension associated with APOL 1 gene risk variants. In addition, environmental factors, including salt consumption, contribute to the propensity for elevated BP and vascular disease. The association with APOL 1 gene variants also raises the probability of an underlying glomerulopathy in kidneys which subsequently

  3. Association between pregnancy-related hypertension and severity of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moreira, L B; Gus, M; Nunes, G; Gonçalves, C B C; Martins, J; Wiehe, M; Fuchs, F D

    2009-06-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is an emerging sex-specific risk factor for cardiovascular disease and may lead to more severe hypertension after pregnancy. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of pregnancy-related hypertension among patients referred to a hypertension clinic and its association with the severity of hypertension and evidence of end-organ damage. In this cross-sectional study, women with hypertension were submitted to a systematic clinical evaluation. The occurrence of pregnancy-related hypertension was investigated by questionnaire. The association between pregnancy-related hypertension and severity of hypertension (stage 2 according to Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VII)) and end-organ damage was assessed in a logistic regression model. The mean age, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and body mass index (BMI) of the 768 women examined were 51.6+/-12.7 years, 158.2+/-26.6 mm Hg, 93.8+/-14.3 mm Hg and 29.4+/-5.6 kg/m(2), respectively. The proportion of women with pregnancy-related hypertension was 32.9%. It was significantly associated with hypertension at stage 2 (OR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.14-2.24; P=0.01) after controlling for confounders. The occurrence of a pregnancy-related hypertension was not associated with evidence of optic fundi abnormalities, left ventricular hypertrophy or abnormalities in kidney function. In conclusion, pregnancy-related hypertension is frequent in women referred to a hypertension clinic, and is associated with severe hypertension but not with evidence of end-organ damage. PMID:19020534

  4. The prevention of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tibblin, G; Eriksson, C G

    1977-01-01

    Our way to prevention is to find a list of traits known to be predictors of elevated blood pressure. This list of predictors offers means for the early identification of susceptibile persons. Years of experience in preventive work indicate that such identification is always useful for developing preventive programmes, since it gives a focus for action (5). Most of the predictors show possible ways in which action could be directed towards prevention of hypertension and reduction of elevated blood pressure. We will focus on salt, control of obesity, physical exercise, and meditation. We would like to discuss preventive aspects of hypertension and the possibility of treating with other methods than drugs.

  5. Neurological theory of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eggers, A E

    2003-06-01

    Review of the older literature on the relationship between migraine and hypertension, written in the era before either condition could be treated, discloses a high rate of co-morbidity. A neurological theory of essential hypertension is proposed in which the two diseases are brought together into one entity. It is hypothesized that abnormally functioning serotonergic pacemaker cells in the dorsal raphe nucleus, as part of a chronic stress response, inappropriately activate and inhibit parts of the central and autonomic nervous systems, so as to cause the two conditions. This theory builds on a previously published neural theory of migraine.

  6. Cerebral Malaria Retinopathy Predictors of Persisting Neurocognitive Outcomes in Malawian Children

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Michael J.; Vokhiwa, Maclean; Sikorskii, Alla; Magen, Jed G.; Beare, Nicholas A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuropsychological sequelae from pediatric cerebral malaria (CM) have been well documented. Although malaria-specific retinopathy during acute illness has become a defining criterion for CM, its relationship to neurocognitive sequelae has not been documented. This relationship is important if malaria-specific retinopathy reflects the possible brain neuropathogenesis leading to long-term neurocognitive deficits. Methods From 2008 to 2012, 49 Malawian children 4.5 to 12 yrs of age surviving retinopathy-positive cerebral malaria (CM-R) were tested 1 to 3 yrs following illness with the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, 2nd edition (KABC-II), the Tests of Variables of Attention (TOVA), and the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). In an observational study of a cohort of cerebral malaria survivors, these neurocognitive and behavioral outcomes were statistically related to types and severity of retinopathy measures, while controlling for age, sex, body mass index, socio-economic status, and time interval between illness and testing. Results Worse scores for hemorrhages, papilledema, optic disk hyperemia, retinal whitening of macula and foveal annulus were associated with poorer KABC-II mental processing index and global scale scores. Disk hyperemia was also predictive of TOVA D prime overall attention performance (inattention) and commission errors (impulsivity). Few associations were found between retinopathy scores and CBCL (emotional and behavioral) outcomes. Conclusions We are the first to report the relationship between severity of malaria-specific retinopathy during acute illness in CM survivors, and persisting neurocognitive problems. These findings support earlier studies documenting that severity of retinopathy during acute illness is medically prognostic in CM survivors. We extend these findings to include long-term neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:24763139

  7. Expression of parathyroid hypertensive factor in hypertensive primary hyperparathyroid patients.

    PubMed

    Lewanczuk, R Z; Pang, P K

    1993-03-01

    Hypertension is frequently associated with primary hyperparathyroidism, yet the mechanism of such hypertension is unknown. Parathyroid hypertensive factor (PHF) is a circulating hypertensive factor found in a proportion of human essential hypertensive patients as well as in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In the latter case, PHF has been shown to be secreted by the parathyroid gland. The purpose of this study was to determine if PHF expression might be responsible for the hypertension seen in primary hyperparathyroidism. Ten hypertensive and 10 normotensive primary hyperparathyroid patients underwent measurement of blood pressure and PHF pre- and post-parathyroidectomy. Cases reported are those of parathyroid adenomas. There were no significant differences between the hypertensive and normotensive groups preoperatively except that 9 out of 10 of the hypertensive group had significant PHF levels (mean 11 +/- 2 mm Hg vs 0.6 +/- 2 mm Hg, respectively, p = 0.003). Post-operative change in mean arterial pressure could be predicted by pre-operative PHF level, with all PHF-positive patients showing a fall in blood pressure (r = -0.73, p < 0.01). Post-operatively, PHF was undetectable in PHF-positive patients. These results suggest that the parathyroid gland can express PHF in humans and that such expression may be responsible for a proportion of the high reported incidence of hypertension in primary hyperparathyroidism.

  8. Oxidative stress and hypertension: Possibility of hypertension therapy with antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and aortic aneurysm, and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Hypertension is often associated with metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and the rate of these diseases is increasing nowadays. Recently it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress is a key player in the pathogenesis of hypertension. A reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity has been observed in newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive subjects, which are inversely correlated with blood pressure. Hydrogen peroxide production is also higher in hypertensive subjects. Furthermore, hypertensive patients have higher lipid hydroperoxide production. Oxidative stress is also markedly increased in hypertensive patients with renovascular disease. If oxidative stress is indeed a cause of hypertension, then, antioxidants should have beneficial effects on hypertension control and reduction of oxidative damage should result in a reduction in blood pressure. Although dietary antioxidants may have beneficial effects on hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors, however, antioxidant supplementation has not been shown consistently to be effective and improvement is not usually seen in blood pressure after treatment with single or combination antioxidant therapy in subjects thought to be at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This matter is the main focus of this paper. A list of medicinal plants that have been reported to be effective in hypertension is also presented. PMID:25097610

  9. Validation of Smartphone Based Retinal Photography for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, Ramachandran; Arulmalar, Subramanian; Usha, Manoharan; Prathiba, Vijayaraghavan; Kareemuddin, Khaji Syed; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of “fundus on phone’ (FOP) camera, a smartphone based retinal imaging system, as a screening tool for diabetic retinopathy (DR) detection and DR severity in comparison with 7-standard field digital retinal photography. Design Single-site, prospective, comparative, instrument validation study. Methods 301 patients (602 eyes) with type 2 diabetes underwent standard seven-field digital fundus photography with both Carl Zeiss fundus camera and indigenous FOP at a tertiary care diabetes centre in South India. Grading of DR was performed by two independent retina specialists using modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study grading system. Sight threatening DR (STDR) was defined by the presence of proliferative DR(PDR) or diabetic macular edema. The sensitivity, specificity and image quality were assessed. Results The mean age of the participants was 53.5 ±9.6 years and mean duration of diabetes 12.5±7.3 years. The Zeiss camera showed that 43.9% had non-proliferative DR(NPDR) and 15.3% had PDR while the FOP camera showed that 40.2% had NPDR and 15.3% had PDR. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting any DR by FOP was 92.7% (95%CI 87.8–96.1) and 98.4% (95%CI 94.3–99.8) respectively and the kappa (ĸ) agreement was 0.90 (95%CI-0.85–0.95 p<0.001) while for STDR, the sensitivity was 87.9% (95%CI 83.2–92.9), specificity 94.9% (95%CI 89.7–98.2) and ĸ agreement was 0.80 (95%CI 0.71–0.89 p<0.001), compared to conventional photography. Conclusion Retinal photography using FOP camera is effective for screening and diagnosis of DR and STDR with high sensitivity and specificity and has substantial agreement with conventional retinal photography. PMID:26401839

  10. In Vivo Angiography Quantifies Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy Vascular Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mezu-Ndubuisi, Olachi J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a potentially blinding vasoproliferative disease. There is no standardized way to quantify plus disease (tortuous and dilated retinal vessels) or characterize abnormal recovery during ROP monitoring. This study objectively studies vascular features in live mice during development using noninvasive retinal imaging. Methods Using fluorescein angiography (FA), retinal vascular features were quantified in live mice with oxygen induced retinopathy (OIR). A total of 105 wild-type mice were exposed to 77% oxygen from postnatal day 7 (P7) till P12 (OIR mice). Also, 105 age-matched pups were raised in room air (RA mice). In vivo FA was performed at early (P16 to P20), mid (P23 to P27), late (P30 to P34), and mature (P47) phases of retinal vascular development. Retinal vascular area, retinal vein width, and retinal artery tortuosity were quantified. Results Retinal artery tortuosity was higher in OIR than RA mice at early (p < 0.0001), mid (p < 0.0001), late (p < 0.0001), and mature (p < 0.0001) phases. Retinal vascular area in OIR mice increased from early to mid-phase (p < 0.0001), but remained unchanged from mid to late (p = 0.23), and from late to mature phase (p = 0.98). Retinal vein width was larger in OIR mice compared to RA mice during early phase only. Arteries in OIR mice were more tortuous from early to mid-phase (p < 0.0001), but tortuosity remained stable from mid through mature phase. RA mice had an increase in retinal vascular area from early to late phase, but maintained uniform retinal vein width and retinal artery tortuosity in all phases. Conclusions In vivo FA distinguished arterial and venous features, similar to plus disease, and revealed aberrant recovery of OIR mice (arterial tortuosity, reduced capillary density, and absent neovascular buds) that persisted into adulthood. Retinal artery tortuosity may be a reliable, objective marker of severity of ROP. Infants with abnormal retinal vascular

  11. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kim, Nick H; Delcroix, Marion; Jenkins, David P; Channick, Richard; Dartevelle, Philippe; Jansa, Pavel; Lang, Irene; Madani, Michael M; Ogino, Hitoshi; Pengo, Vittorio; Mayer, Eckhard

    2014-10-01

    Since the last World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in 2008, we have witnessed numerous and exciting developments in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Emerging clinical data and advances in technology have led to reinforcing and updated guidance on diagnostic approaches to pulmonary hypertension, guidelines that we hope will lead to better recognition and more timely diagnosis of CTEPH. We have new data on treatment practices across international boundaries as well as long-term outcomes for CTEPH patients treated with or without pulmonary endarterectomy. Furthermore, we have expanded data on alternative treatment options for select CTEPH patients, including data from multiple clinical trials of medical therapy, including 1 recent pivotal trial, and compelling case series of percutaneous pulmonary angioplasty. Lastly, we have garnered more experience, and on a larger international scale, with pulmonary endarterectomy, which is the treatment of choice for operable CTEPH. This report overviews and highlights these important interval developments as deliberated among our task force of CTEPH experts and presented at the 2013 World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in Nice, France. (J Am Coil Cardiol 2013;62:D92-9) ©2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  12. Project "Hypertension Alert."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailors, Emma Lou

    1983-01-01

    "Hypertension Alert," a 1979-80 blood pressure screening-awareness project of the Yonkers, New York Public Schools, is described. Data is analyzed in tables for ethnic composition, and range of blood pressure readings for the high school, junior high school, and elementary school students tested. (Author/JMK)

  13. Children and Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Denise

    1983-01-01

    Since children as young as seven years old can suffer from hypertension, all children should have blood pressure checked during physical examinations. Guidelines for testing children's blood pressure are presented along with suggestions about what schools and parents can do to help deal with the problem. (PP)

  14. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  15. Hypertension, a health economics perspective.

    PubMed

    Alcocer, Luis; Cueto, Liliana

    2008-06-01

    The economic aspects of hypertension are critical to modern medicine. The medical, economic, and human costs of untreated and inadequately controlled hypertension are enormous. Hypertension is distributed unequally and with iniquity in different countries and regions of the world. Treatment of hypertension requires an investment over many years to prolong disease-free quality years of life. The high prevalence and high cost of the disease impacts on the microeconomics and macroeconomics of countries and regions. The criteria used for inclusion in clinical guidelines for hypertension impact on the cost and cost/utility of diagnosis or treatment. PMID:19124418

  16. Pharmacologic Management of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Misurac, Jason; Nichols, Kristen R; Wilson, Amy C

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension in children is common, and the prevalence of primary hypertension is increasing with the obesity epidemic and changing dietary choices. Careful measurement of blood pressure is important to correctly diagnose hypertension, as many factors can lead to inaccurate blood pressure measurement. Hypertension is diagnosed based on comparison of age-, sex-, and height-based norms with the average systolic and diastolic blood pressures on three separate occasions. In the absence of hypertensive target organ damage (TOD), stage I hypertension is managed first by diet and exercise, with the addition of drug therapy if this fails. First-line treatment of stage I hypertension with TOD and stage II hypertension includes both lifestyle changes and medications. First-line agents include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, thiazide diuretics, and calcium-channel blockers. Hypertensive emergency with end-organ effects requires immediate modest blood pressure reduction to alleviate symptoms. This is usually accomplished with IV medications. Long-term reduction in blood pressure to normal levels is accomplished gradually. Specific medication choice for outpatient hypertension management is determined by the underlying cause of hypertension and the comparative adverse effect profiles, along with practical considerations such as cost and frequency of administration. Antihypertensive medication is initiated at a starting dose and can be gradually increased to effect. If ineffective at the recommended maximum dose, an additional medication with a complementary mechanism of action can be added. PMID:26597490

  17. Contemporary management of refractory hypertension.

    PubMed

    Alper, A B; Calhoun, D A

    1999-10-01

    Refractory or resistant hypertension is conventionally defined as systolic or diastolic blood pressure that remains uncontrolled despite sustained therapy with at least three different classes of antihypertensive agents. Refractory hypertension is estimated to affect less than 5% of the general population with hypertension; however, its prevalence increases with increasing severity of blood pressure. Patients presenting with refractory hypertension usually have progressed from mild, to moderate, to severe hypertension because of lack of or inadequate treatment. Other common contributing factors include obesity, medical nonadherence, suboptimal medical regimens, excessive dietary salt ingestion, secondary forms of hypertension, sleep apnea, and ingestion of substances that interfere with treatment. Combination therapy that includes appropriate doses of a diuretic is recommended for treatment of refractory hypertension. Use of fixed-dose combinations enhances compliance through cost savings, more convenient dosing, and reduced pill burdens. PMID:10981097

  18. Diabetic Retinopathy in Pregnancy: A Population-Based Study of Women with Pregestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Aoife M.; McVicker, Lyle; Heerey, Adrienne; Carmody, Louise; Harney, Fiona; Dunne, Fidelma P.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this observational study was to evaluate screening and progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with pregestational diabetes attending five antenatal centres along the Irish Atlantic seaboard. An adequate frequency of screening was defined as at least two retinal evaluations in separate trimesters. Progression was defined as at least one stage of deterioration of diabetic retinopathy and/or development of diabetic macular edema on at least one eye. Women with pregestational diabetes who delivered after 22 gestational weeks (n = 307) were included. In total, 185 (60.3%) had an adequate number of retinal examinations. Attendance at prepregnancy care was associated with receiving adequate screening (odds ratio 6.23; CI 3.39–11.46 (P < 0.001)). Among those who received adequate evaluations (n = 185), 48 (25.9%) had retinopathy progression. Increasing booking systolic blood pressure (OR 1.03, CI 1.01–1.06, P = 0.02) and greater drop in HbA1c between first and third trimesters of pregnancy (OR 2.05, CI 1.09–3.87, P = 0.03) significantly increased the odds of progression. A significant proportion of women continue to demonstrate retinopathy progression during pregnancy. This study highlights the role of prepregnancy care and the importance of close monitoring during pregnancy and identifies those patients at the highest risk for retinopathy progression. PMID:25945354

  19. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Hypoxia in a Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Imam; Evans, Stephanie M.; Craft, Jason R.; Capozzi, Megan E.; McCollum, Gary W.; Yang, Rong; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Penn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-induced hypoxia elicits retinal neovascularization and is a major component of several blinding retinopathies such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Currently, noninvasive imaging techniques capable of detecting and monitoring retinal hypoxia in living systems do not exist. Such techniques would greatly clarify the role of hypoxia in experimental and human retinal neovascular pathogenesis. In this study, we developed and characterized HYPOX-4, a fluorescence-imaging probe capable of detecting retinal-hypoxia in living animals. HYPOX-4 dependent in vivo and ex vivo imaging of hypoxia was tested in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Predicted patterns of retinal hypoxia were imaged by HYPOX-4 dependent fluorescence activity in this animal model. In retinal cells and mouse retinal tissue, pimonidazole-adduct immunostaining confirmed the hypoxia selectivity of HYPOX-4. HYPOX-4 had no effect on retinal cell proliferation as indicated by BrdU assay and exhibited no acute toxicity in retinal tissue as indicated by TUNEL assay and electroretinography (ERG) analysis. Therefore, HYPOX-4 could potentially serve as the basis for in vivo fluorescence-based hypoxia-imaging techniques, providing a tool for investigators to understand the pathogenesis of ischemic retinopathies and for physicians to address unmet clinical needs. PMID:27491345

  20. Oral glucose for pain relief during examination for retinopathy of prematurity: a masked randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Marlene Coelho; Eckert, Gabriela Unchalo; Fortes, Bárbara Gastal Borges; Filho, João Borges Fortes; Silveira, Rita C.; Procianoy, Renato S

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity is a painful procedure. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have been proposed to reduce pain during eye examinations. This study aims to evaluate the analgesic effect of 25% glucose using a validated pain scale during the first eye examination for retinopathy of prematurity in preterm infants with birth weight ≤1,500 g and/or gestational age ≤32 weeks. METHODS: A masked, randomized clinical trial for one dose of 1 ml of oral 25% glucose solution 2 minutes before the first ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity was conducted between March 2008 and April 2010. The results were compared to those of a control group that did not receive oral glucose solution. Pain was evaluated using a Neonatal Infant Pain Scale immediately before and immediately after the ophthalmologic examination in both groups. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00648687 RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-four patients who were examined for the first time for retinopathy of prematurity were included. Seventy were included in the intervention group and 54 in the control group. The number of patients with pain immediately before the procedure was similar in both groups. The number of patients with pain after ophthalmologic examination was 15.7% in the intervention group and 68.5% in the control group (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: One ml of oral 25% glucose solution given 2 minutes before an ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity was an effective measure for pain relief. PMID:23525316

  1. Hypoxia-Induced Retinal Neovascularization in Zebrafish Embryos: A Potential Model of Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2–4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression. PMID:25978439

  2. Detecting and treating retinopathy in patients with type I diabetes mellitus. A health policy model.

    PubMed

    Javitt, J C; Canner, J K; Frank, R G; Steinwachs, D M; Sommer, A

    1990-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the major cause of new cases of blindness among working-age Americans. The authors analyzed the medical and economic implications of alternative screening strategies for detecting retinopathy in a diabetic population. The approaches compared included dilated fundus examination at 6-, 12-, and 24-month intervals with and without fundus photography. Potential savings from screening and treatment are based on amounts paid by the federal government for blindness-related disability. Screening for and treating retinopathy in patients with type I diabetes mellitus was cost-effective using all screening strategies. Between 71,474 and 85,315 person years of sight and 76,886 and 94,705 person years of reading vision can be saved for each annual cohort of patients with type I diabetes mellitus when proper laser photocoagulation is administered. This results in a cost savings of $62.1 to $108.6 million. Annual examination of all diabetic patients and semi-annual examination of those with retinopathy was more effective than annual examination with fundus photography. This screening strategy is consistent with the Preferred Practice Pattern for Diabetic Retinopathy of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. PMID:2109299

  3. Autoantibody Targets and their Cancer Relationship in the Pathogenicity of Paraneoplastic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adamus, Grazyna

    2009-01-01

    Paraneoplastic retinopathies (PR), including cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) or the closely related melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR) occur in a small subset of patients with retinal degeneration and systemic cancer. This autoimmune syndrome is characterized by sudden, progressive loss of vision in association with circulating anti-retinal autoantibodies. The PR syndromes are heterogeneous, may produce a number of ocular symptoms, and may be associated with several different neoplasms, including lung, breast, prostate, gynecological, and colon cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. We examined the onset of retinopathy in correlation to the diagnosis of cancer and the presence of specific anti-retinal autoantibodies in PR patients. In some patients without diagnosed malignant tumors, the onset of ocular symptoms and the presence of autoantibodies preceded the diagnosis of cancer by months to years, including anti-recoverin, anti-transducin-α, and anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies. Although anti-retinal autoantibodies may not be a good predictor of a specific neoplasm, they can be used as biomarkers for different subtypes of retinopathy. Identification of autoantibodies involved in autoimmune-mediated PR will help elucidate the mechanisms underlying the PR syndromes and develop targeted therapies for these sight-threatening disorders. PMID:19168157

  4. The evolving definition of systemic arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ram, C Venkata S; Giles, Thomas D

    2010-05-01

    Systemic hypertension is an important risk factor for premature cardiovascular disease. Hypertension also contributes to excessive morbidity and mortality. Whereas excellent therapeutic options are available to treat hypertension, there is an unsettled issue about the very definition of hypertension. At what level of blood pressure should we treat hypertension? Does the definition of hypertension change in the presence of co-morbid conditions? This article covers in detail the evolving concepts in the diagnosis and management of hypertension.

  5. Treatment-time regimen of hypertension medications significantly affects ambulatory blood pressure and clinical characteristics of patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ríos, María T; Crespo, Juan J; Moyá, Ana; Domínguez-Sardiña, Manuel; Otero, Alfonso; Sánchez, Juan J; Mojón, Artemio; Fernández, José R; Ayala, Diana E

    2013-03-01

    Patients with resistant hypertension (RH) are at greater risk for stroke, renal insufficiency, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events than are those for whom blood pressure (BP) is responsive to and well controlled by therapeutic interventions. Although all chronotherapy trials have compared the effects on BP regulation of full daily doses of medications when ingested in the morning versus at bedtime, prescription of the same medications in divided doses twice daily (BID) is frequent. Here, we investigated the influence of hypertension treatment-time regimen on the circadian BP pattern, degree of BP control, and relevant clinical and laboratory medicine parameters of RH patients evaluated by 48-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). This cross-sectional study evaluated 2899 such patients (1701 men/1198 women), 64.2 ± 11.8 (mean ± SD) yrs of age, enrolled in the Hygia Project. Among the participants, 1084 were ingesting all hypertension medications upon awakening (upon-awakening regimen), 1436 patients were ingesting the full daily dose of ≥1 of them at bedtime (bedtime regimen), and 379 were ingesting split doses of ≥1 medications BID upon awakening and at bedtime (BID regimen). Patients of the bedtime regimen compared with the other two treatment-time regimens had lower likelihood of microalbuminuria and chronic kidney disease; significantly lower albumin/creatinine ratio, glucose, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; plus higher estimated glomerular filtration rate and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The bedtime regimen was also significantly associated with lower asleep systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP means than the upon-awakening and BID regimens. The sleep-time relative SBP and DBP decline was significantly attenuated by the upon-awakening and BID regimens (p < .001), resulting in significantly higher prevalence of non-dipping in these two treatment-time regimen groups (80.5% and 77.3%, respectively

  6. Neuroprotection as a Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a multifactorial progressive disease of the retina and a leading cause of vision loss. DR has long been regarded as a vascular disorder, although neuronal death and visual impairment appear before vascular lesions, suggesting an important role played by neurodegeneration in DR and the appropriateness of neuroprotective strategies. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the main target of current therapies, is likely to be one of the first responses to retinal hyperglycemic stress and VEGF may represent an important survival factor in early phases of DR. Of central importance for clinical trials is the detection of retinal neurodegeneration in the clinical setting, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography seems the most indicated technique. Many substances have been tested in animal studies for their neuroprotective properties and for possible use in humans. Perhaps, the most intriguing perspective is the use of endogenous neuroprotective substances or nutraceuticals. Together, the data point to the central role of neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of DR and indicate neuroprotection as an effective strategy for treating this disease. However, clinical trials to determine not only the effectiveness and safety but also the compliance of a noninvasive route of drug administration are needed. PMID:27123463

  7. Circulating Biomarkers of Diabetic Retinopathy: An Overview Based on Physiopathology.

    PubMed

    Simó-Servat, Olga; Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the main cause of working-age adult-onset blindness. The currently available treatments for DR are applicable only at advanced stages of the disease and are associated with significant adverse effects. In early stages of DR the only therapeutic strategy that physicians can offer is a tight control of the risk factors for DR. Therefore, new pharmacological treatments for these early stages of the disease are required. In order to develop therapeutic strategies for early stages of DR new diagnostic tools are urgently needed. In this regard, circulating biomarkers could be useful to detect early disease, to identify those diabetic patients most prone to progressive worsening who ought to be followed up more often and who could obtain the most benefit from these therapies, and to monitor the effectiveness of new drugs for DR before more advanced DR stages have been reached. Research of biomarkers for DR has been mainly based on the pathogenic mechanism involved in the development of DR (i.e., AGEs, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and proangiogenic factors). This review focuses on circulating biomarkers at both early and advanced stages that could be relevant for the prediction or detection of DR. PMID:27376090

  8. Scientometric Analysis and Mapping of Scientific Articles on Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    RAMIN, Shahrokh; GHAREBAGHI, Reza; HEIDARY, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the major cause of blindness among the working-age population globally. No systematic research has been previously performed to analyze the research published on DR, despite the need for it. This study aimed to analyze the scientific production on DR to draw overall roadmap of future research strategic planning in this field. A bibliometric method was used to obtain a view on the scientific production about DR by the data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). Articles about DR published in 1993–2013 were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic’s structure, history, and to document relationships. The trends in the most influential publications and authors were analyzed. Most highly cited articles addressed epidemiologic and translational research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker discovery and more molecular translational research. Areas such as gene therapy and micro-RNAs are also among the recent hot topics. Through analyzing the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production, we performed the first scientometric report on DR. Most influential articles have addressed epidemiology and translational research subjects in this field, which reflects that globally, the earlier diagnosis and treatment of this devastating disease still has the highest global priority. PMID:27350949

  9. Scientometric Analysis and Mapping of Scientific Articles on Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Gharebaghi, Reza; Heidary, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the major cause of blindness among the working-age population globally. No systematic research has been previously performed to analyze the research published on DR, despite the need for it. This study aimed to analyze the scientific production on DR to draw overall roadmap of future research strategic planning in this field. A bibliometric method was used to obtain a view on the scientific production about DR by the data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). Articles about DR published in 1993-2013 were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic's structure, history, and to document relationships. The trends in the most influential publications and authors were analyzed. Most highly cited articles addressed epidemiologic and translational research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker discovery and more molecular translational research. Areas such as gene therapy and micro-RNAs are also among the recent hot topics. Through analyzing the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production, we performed the first scientometric report on DR. Most influential articles have addressed epidemiology and translational research subjects in this field, which reflects that globally, the earlier diagnosis and treatment of this devastating disease still has the highest global priority. PMID:27350949

  10. Genetic Contributions to the Development of Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    MOHAMED, SHAKIR; SCHAA, KENDRA; COOPER, MARGARET E.; AHRENS, ELISE; ALVARADO, ANA; COLAIZY, TARAH; MARAZITA, MARY L.; MURRAY, JEFFREY C.; DAGLE, JOHN M.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing support for the role of genetic factors in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a serious visual morbidity resulting from preterm birth. We used both candidate gene and data-mining approaches to investigate the role of genetic polymorphisms in the development of ROP. Our study population consisted of 330 infants, less than 32 wk gestation, and their parents. We initially studied 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 11 candidate genes. Using a family-based analysis strategy, we found an association between SNPs in the EPAS1 gene and the development of ROP (p = 0.007). Logistic regression analysis showed three SNPs associated with development of ROP, two in the CFH gene (p = 0.01) and one in the EPAS1 gene (p = 0.001). Extending this analysis to include genotyping data from a larger genetic study of prematurity (455 SNPs in 153 genes), we found SNPs in five genes associated with the development of ROP: IHH (p = 0.003), AGTR1 (p = 0.005), TBX5 (p = 0.003), CETP (p = 0.004), and GP1BA (p = 0.005). Our data suggest that genetic risk factors contribute to the development of ROP. PMID:18787502

  11. Necrotising herpetic retinopathy in patients with advance HIV disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R F; Brink, N S; Cartledge, J; Sharvell, Y; Frith, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the presenting features, clinical and laboratory diagnosis, response to treatment, and outcome of necrotising herpetic retinopathy (NHR) in HIV infected patients. METHODS: Retrospective case records/laboratory data review of five HIV infected patients presenting to the specialist HIV/AIDS unit at UCL Hospitals, London from April 1994 to August 1996 with a clinical diagnosis of NHR. RESULTS: All patients had advanced HIV disease with a median CD4 count of 20.10(6)/1. Three patients had cutaneous varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection within the preceding 8 weeks. All had uniocular loss of visual acuity; one also had headache and another ocular pain. All had typical retinal appearances. VZV DNA was detected in cerebrospinal fluid of four patients (and in vitreous fluid of one of the four) and in vitreous fluid of one other. One patient refused therapy and rapidly became blind. Four patients received intravenous foscarnet with intravenous aciclovir for 6 weeks: three subsequently received oral famciclovir and one oral valaciclovir; two patients also had intravitreal injections of foscarnet. In none of the four did treatment bring about improvement in visual acuity, but in all four visual loss from retinitis was halted. CONCLUSIONS: NHR occurs in HIV infected patients with advanced HIV disease and is strongly associated with evidence of VZV infection. With aggressive use of antiviral drugs the outcome is not uniformly poor. Images PMID:9582461

  12. Ocular Decompression Retinopathy Following Canaloplasty for Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gai-yun; Alantaree, Samer; Wang, Jun-ming; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ocular decompression retinopathy (ODR), a rare postoperative complication following glaucoma surgery, is characterized by the transient appearance of scattered retinal hemorrhages. Here, we present a unique case of ODR in a patient with primary open angle glaucoma who underwent canaloplasty. A 31-year-old male patient presented with an intraocular pressure (IOP) of 60 mm Hg in the right eye. The IOP remained over 40 mm Hg, even when treated with maximum tolerated antiglaucoma medication. Canaloplasty drastically lowered IOP in the right eye from 40 to 7 mm Hg. However, fundus examination revealed ODR after surgery. The patient was treated with tobramycin and dexamethasone. Three months after canaloplasty, IOP remained in control at 16 mm Hg and all retinal hemorrhages had completely resolved. This case demonstrates that ODR can occur following canaloplasty and physicians should be aware of this potential complication in patients with severely elevated IOP. Sufficiently lowering IOP before surgery and gradually decreasing IOP during surgery may prevent ODR from occurring. PMID:26945386

  13. Plasma kallikrein-kinin system and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Feener, Edward P

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) occurs, to some extent, in most people with at least 20 years' duration of diabetes mellitus. The progression of DR to its sight-threatening stages is usually associated with the worsening of underlying retinal vascular dysfunction and disease. The plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is activated during vascular injury, where it mediates important functions in innate inflammation, blood flow, and coagulation. Recent findings from human vitreous proteomics and experimental studies on diabetic animal models have implicated the KKS in contributing to DR. Vitreous fluid from people with advanced stages of DR contains increased levels of plasma KKS components, including plasma kallikrein (PK), coagulation factor XII, and high-molecular-weight kininogen. Both bradykinin B1 and B2 receptor isoforms (B1R and B2R, respectively) are expressed in human retina, and retinal B1R levels are increased in diabetic rodents. The activation of the intraocular KKS induces retinal vascular permeability, vasodilation, and retinal thickening, and these responses are exacerbated in diabetic rats. Preclinical studies have shown that the administration of PK inhibitors and B1R antagonists to diabetic rats ameliorates retinal vascular hyperpermeability and inflammation. These findings suggest that components of plasma KKS are potential therapeutic targets for diabetic macular edema. PMID:23362193

  14. The kallikrein-kinin system in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Menakshi; Pouliot, Mylène; Couture, Réjean; Vaucher, Elvire

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major microvascular complication associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can lead to visual impairment and blindness. Current treatment strategies for DR are mostly limited to laser therapies, steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, which are often associated with unwanted side effects leading to further complications. Recent evidence suggests that kinins play a primary role in the development of DR through enhanced vascular permeability, leukocytes infiltration, and other inflammatory mechanisms. These deleterious effects are mediated by kinin B1 and B2 receptors, which are expressed in diabetic human and rodent retina. Importantly, kinin B1 receptor is virtually absent in sane tissue, yet it is induced and upregulated in diabetic retina. These peptides belong to the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS), which contains two separate and independent pathways of regulated serine proteases, namely plasma kallikrein (PK) and tissue kallikrein (TK) that are involved in the biosynthesis of bradykinin (BK) and kallidin (Lys-BK), respectively. Hence, ocular inhibition of kallikreins or antagonism of kinin receptors offers new therapeutic avenues in the treatment and management of DR. Herein, we present an overview of the principal features and known inflammatory mechanisms associated with DR along with the current therapeutic approaches and put special emphasis on the KKS as a new and promising therapeutic target due to its link with key pathways directly associated with the development of DR. PMID:25130041

  15. Comprehensive Retinal Image Analysis for Aggressive Posterior Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Computer aided analysis plays a nontrivial role in assisting the diagnosis of various eye pathologies. In this paper, we propose a framework to help diagnose the presence of Aggressive Posterior Retinopathy Of Prematurity (APROP), a pathology that is characterised by rapid onset and increased tortuosity of blood vessels close to the optic disc (OD). We quantify vessel characteristics that are of clinical relevance to APROP such as tortuosity and the extent of branching i.e., vessel segment count in the defined diagnostic region. We have adapted three vessel segmentation techniques: matched filter response, scale space theory and morphology with local entropy based thresholding. The proposed feature set equips us to build a linear discriminant classifier to discriminate APROP images from clinically healthy images. We have studied 36 images from 21 APROP subjects against a control group of 15 clinically healthy age matched infants. All subjects are age matched ranging from 33−40 weeks of post menstrual age. Experimental results show that we attain 100% recall and 95.45% precision, when the vessel network obtained from morphology is used for feature extraction. PMID:27711231

  16. Circulating Biomarkers of Diabetic Retinopathy: An Overview Based on Physiopathology

    PubMed Central

    Simó-Servat, Olga; Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the main cause of working-age adult-onset blindness. The currently available treatments for DR are applicable only at advanced stages of the disease and are associated with significant adverse effects. In early stages of DR the only therapeutic strategy that physicians can offer is a tight control of the risk factors for DR. Therefore, new pharmacological treatments for these early stages of the disease are required. In order to develop therapeutic strategies for early stages of DR new diagnostic tools are urgently needed. In this regard, circulating biomarkers could be useful to detect early disease, to identify those diabetic patients most prone to progressive worsening who ought to be followed up more often and who could obtain the most benefit from these therapies, and to monitor the effectiveness of new drugs for DR before more advanced DR stages have been reached. Research of biomarkers for DR has been mainly based on the pathogenic mechanism involved in the development of DR (i.e., AGEs, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and proangiogenic factors). This review focuses on circulating biomarkers at both early and advanced stages that could be relevant for the prediction or detection of DR. PMID:27376090

  17. Neurodegeneration is an early event in diabetic retinopathy: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) remains the leading cause of blindness among working-age individuals in developed countries. Current treatments for DR are indicated in advanced stages of the disease and are associated with significant adverse effects. Therefore, new pharmacological treatments for the early stages of DR are needed. DR has been classically considered to be a microcirculatory disease of the retina. However, there is growing evidence to suggest that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of DR, which participates in the microcirculatory abnormalities that occur in DR. Therefore, the study of the underlying mechanisms that lead to neurodegeneration will be essential for identifying new therapeutic targets. From the clinical point of view, the identification of those patients in whom retinal neurodegeneration appears will be crucial for implementing early treatment based on neuroprotective drugs. When the early stages of DR are the therapeutic target, it would be inconceivable to recommend an aggressive treatment such as intravitreous injections. By contrast, topical administration of neuroprotective drugs by using eye drops is a possible option. However, clinical trials to determine the safety and effectiveness of this non-invasive route, as well as a standardisation of the methods for monitoring neurodegeneration, are needed. PMID:22887976

  18. Metabolic memory: mechanisms and implications for diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Chen, Baihua; Tang, Luosheng

    2012-06-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia of diabetes leads to microvascular complications that severely impact quality of life. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) may be the most common of these and is a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness among working age adults in developed nations. Many large-scale type 1 and type 2 diabetes clinical trials have demonstrated that early intensive glycemic control can reduce the incidence and progression of micro and macrovascular complications. On the other hand, epidemiological and prospective data have revealed that the stressors of diabetic vasculature persist beyond the point when glycemic control has been achieved. These kinds of persistent adverse effects of hyperglycemia on the development and progression of complications has been defined as "metabolic memory", and oxidative stress, advanced glycation end products and epigenetic changes have been implicated in the process. Recent studies have indicated that such "hyperglycemic memory" may also influence DR, suggesting that manipulation of hyperglycemic memory may prove a beneficial approach to prevention and treatment. This review summarizes the evidence from DR-related clinical trials and mechanistic studies to investigate the significance of metabolic memory in DR and understand its potential as a target of molecular therapeutics aimed at reversing hyperglycemic memory. PMID:22209677

  19. Apelin in epiretinal membranes of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiang; Ma, Yan; Xu, Yong-sheng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Formation of epiretinal membranes (ERMs) in the posterior fundus results in visual impairment. ERMs have been associated with numerous clinical conditions, including proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), a neovascular disease. Apelin has been identified as a novel angiogenesis contributor. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between apelin and ERMs after PDR. Methods ERM samples were obtained by vitrectomy from 12 subjects with PDR (aged 57±6 years; duration of diabetes 16±7 years), and 12 subjects with idiopathic ERM (aged 68±5 years). The samples were processed for immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription–PCR (RT–PCR). We also analyzed samples from patients with PDR who received an intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (IVB) before vitrectomy. Results The mRNA expression of apelin was significantly higher in the PDR ERMs than in the idiopathic ERMs. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed strong expression of apelin in all eight PDR ERMs without IVB, and was double-labeled with glial fibrillary acidic protein antibody (GFAP), platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD31), cytokeratin (CK) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) but not with fibronectin. They were mainly located in the adventitia. In contrast, the expression of apelin was lower in the PDR ERMs after IVB and the idiopathic ERMs. Conclusions The results showed that apelin was involved in the formation of ERMs and promoted the formation of adventitia, including glial, endothelial, and RPE cells. Bevacizumab blocked the expression of apelin and regressed gliosis and angiogenesis. PMID:25324682

  20. Prevalence of retinopathy of prematurity in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, Juliana Zimmermann; Filho, João Borges Fortes; Tartarella, Marcia Beatriz; Zin, Andrea; Jornada, Ignozy Dorneles

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to review the studies published over the last 10 years concerning the prevalence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in Latin American countries, to determine if there was an improvement in ROP prevalence rates in that period, and to identify the inclusion criteria for patients at risk of developing ROP in the screening programs. A total of 33 studies from ten countries published between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. Prevalence of any ROP stage in the regions considered ranged from 6.6% to 82%; ROP severe enough to require treatment ranged from 1.2% to 23.8%. There was no routine screening for ROP, and there was a lack of services for treatment of the disease in many countries. Inclusion criteria for patients in the studies ranged between birth weight ≤1500 g and ≤2000 g and gestational age ≤32 and <37 weeks. Use of different inclusion criteria regarding birth weight and gestational age in several Latin American studies hindered comparative analysis of the published data. Highly restrictive selection criteria for ROP screening in relation to birth weight and gestational age should not be used throughout most Latin American countries because of their different social characteristics and variable neonatal care procedures. The studies included in this review failed to provide adequate information to determine if the prevalence of ROP has decreased in Latin America. PMID:22174577

  1. Diabetic retinopathy: variations in patient therapeutic outcomes and pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Soliman, Mohamed K; Sepah, Yasir J; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes and its microvascular complications in patients poses a significant challenge and constitutes a major health problem. When it comes to manifestations in the eye, each case of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is unique, in terms of the phenotype, genotype, and, more importantly, the therapeutic response. It is therefore important to identify factors that distinguish one patient from another. Personalized therapy in DR is a new trend aimed at achieving maximum therapeutic response in patients by identifying genotypic and phenotypic factors that may result in less than optimal response to conventional therapy, and consequently, lead to poorer outcome. With advances in the identification of these genetic markers, such as gene polymorphisms and human leucocyte antigen associations, as well as development of drugs that can target their effects, the future of personalized medicine in DR is promising. In this comprehensive review, data from various studies have been analyzed to present what has been achieved in the field of pharmacogenomics thus far. An insight into future research is also provided.

  2. Challenges in elucidating the genetics of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jane Z.; Wong, Tien Y.; Rotter, Jerome I.

    2014-01-01

    Importance In the past decade, significant progress in genomic medicine and technological advances have revolutionized our approach to common complex disorders in many areas of medicine, including ophthalmology. A major disorder that still needs major genetic progress is diabetic retinopathy (DR), one of the leading causes of blindness in adults. Objective To perform a literature review, present the current findings, and highlight some key challenges. Methods Thorough literature review of the genetic factors for DR, including heritability scores, twin studies, family studies, candidate gene studies, linkage studies, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Results While there is clear demonstration of a genetic contribution in the development and progression of DR, the identification of susceptibility loci through candidate gene approaches, linkage studies, and GWAS is still in its infancy. The greatest obstacles remain a lack of power due to small sample size of available studies and a lack of phenotype standardization. In this review, we also discuss novel technologies and novel approaches, such as intermediate phenotypes for biomarkers, proteomics, metabolomics, exome chips, and next-generation sequencing that may facilitate future studies of DR. Conclusions and Relevance The field of the genetics of DR is still in its infancy and is a challenge due to the complexity of the disease itself. This review outlines some strategies and lessons for future investigation to improve our understanding of this most complex of genetic disorders. PMID:24201651

  3. Diabetic retinopathy: variations in patient therapeutic outcomes and pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Soliman, Mohamed K; Sepah, Yasir J; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes and its microvascular complications in patients poses a significant challenge and constitutes a major health problem. When it comes to manifestations in the eye, each case of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is unique, in terms of the phenotype, genotype, and, more importantly, the therapeutic response. It is therefore important to identify factors that distinguish one patient from another. Personalized therapy in DR is a new trend aimed at achieving maximum therapeutic response in patients by identifying genotypic and phenotypic factors that may result in less than optimal response to conventional therapy, and consequently, lead to poorer outcome. With advances in the identification of these genetic markers, such as gene polymorphisms and human leucocyte antigen associations, as well as development of drugs that can target their effects, the future of personalized medicine in DR is promising. In this comprehensive review, data from various studies have been analyzed to present what has been achieved in the field of pharmacogenomics thus far. An insight into future research is also provided. PMID:25548526

  4. Vector platforms for gene therapy of inherited retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Puppo, Agostina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IR) are common untreatable blinding conditions. Most of them are inherited as monogenic disorders, due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PR) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The retina’s compatibility with gene transfer has made transduction of different retinal cell layers in small and large animal models via viral and non-viral vectors possible. The ongoing identification of novel viruses as well as modifications of existing ones based either on rational design or directed evolution have generated vector variants with improved transduction properties. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in IR animal models with both viral and non-viral vectors, and some of them have been relayed to clinical trials. To date, recombinant vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) represent the most promising tool for retinal gene therapy, given their ability to efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to both PR and RPE and their excellent safety and efficacy profiles in humans. However, AAVs’ limited cargo capacity has prevented application of the viral vector to treatments requiring transfer of genes with a coding sequence larger than 5 kb. Vectors with larger capacity, i.e. nanoparticles, adenoviral and lentiviral vectors are being exploited for gene transfer to the retina in animal models and, more recently, in humans. This review focuses on the available platforms for retinal gene therapy to fight inherited blindness, highlights their main strengths and examines the efforts to overcome some of their limitations. PMID:25124745

  5. The renin-angiotensin system and advanced glycation end-products in diabetic retinopathy: impacts and synergies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Antonia G; Zhu, Tong; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of vision impairment and blindness and represents a significant health burden throughout the world. There is considerable interest in developing new treatments that retard the progression of diabetic retinopathy from its early to proliferative stages. It could be argued that the absence of an ideal therapy for diabetic retinopathy comes from an incomplete understanding about the biochemical mechanisms that underlie this disease, and their precise impact on specific retinal cell populations. Findings from pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that both the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) influence various aspects of diabetic retinopathy. Of interest is growing evidence of cross-talk between the RAS and AGEs pathways. This review will discuss the role of both the RAS and AGEs in diabetic retinopathy, and how the identification of interactions between the two pathways may have implications for the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:23173957

  6. Moving Past Anti-VEGF: Novel Therapies for Treating Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Bolinger, Mark T; Antonetti, David A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in working age adults, and is projected to be a significant future health concern due to the rising incidence of diabetes. The recent advent of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibodies has revolutionized the treatment of diabetic retinopathy but a significant subset of patients fail to respond to treatment. Accumulating evidence indicates that inflammatory cytokines and chemokines other than VEGF may contribute to the disease process. The current review examines the presence of non-VEGF cytokines in the eyes of patients with diabetic retinopathy and highlights mechanistic pathways in relevant animal models. Finally, novel drug targets including components of the kinin-kallikrein system and emerging treatments such as anti-HPTP (human protein tyrosine phosphatase) β antibodies are discussed. Recognition of non-VEGF contributions to disease pathogenesis may lead to novel therapeutics to enhance existing treatments for patients who do not respond to anti-VEGF therapies. PMID:27618014

  7. New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches for Preventing the Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Gun; Roh, Young-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a severe sight-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Retinal laser photocoagulation, antivascular endothelial growth factors, steroid therapy, and pars plana vitrectomy are now used extensively to treat advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy. Currently, diagnostic devices like ultrawide field fundus fluorescein angiography and the improvement of optical coherence tomography have provided quicker and more precise diagnosis of early diabetic retinopathy. Thus, treatment protocols have been modified accordingly. Various types of lasers, including the subthreshold micropulse laser and RPE-targeting laser, and selective targeted photocoagulation may be future alternatives to conventional retinal photocoagulation, with fewer complications. The new developed intravitreal medications and implants have provided more therapeutic options, with promising results. PMID:26881240

  8. Retinopathy in chronic hepatitis C patients during interferon treatment with ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Jain, K; Lam, W; Waheeb, S; Thai, Q; Heathcote, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To assess the ocular effect of interferon alfa 2b prescribed with ribavirin in patients undergoing therapy for chronic hepatitis C.
METHODS—19 patients with chronic hepatitis C who satisfied the follow up criteria were assessed for ocular complications using slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy before, during, and after the treatment at regular intervals.
RESULTS—8/19 patients, while on treatment, developed an asymptomatic retinopathy. Among these 3/8 were relapsers and 5/9 were non-responders to interferon monotherapy. All retinal changes faded, often while the patients continued the therapy. There was no significant association in occurrence of retinopathy with haematological and/or biochemical changes.
CONCLUSION—Retinopathy was more common in interferon monotherapy non-responders than relapsers when treated with interferon alfa 2b with the addition of ribavirin. The changes were transient, disappearing while the patients were still being treated.

 PMID:11567959

  9. Moving Past Anti-VEGF: Novel Therapies for Treating Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bolinger, Mark T.; Antonetti, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in working age adults, and is projected to be a significant future health concern due to the rising incidence of diabetes. The recent advent of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibodies has revolutionized the treatment of diabetic retinopathy but a significant subset of patients fail to respond to treatment. Accumulating evidence indicates that inflammatory cytokines and chemokines other than VEGF may contribute to the disease process. The current review examines the presence of non-VEGF cytokines in the eyes of patients with diabetic retinopathy and highlights mechanistic pathways in relevant animal models. Finally, novel drug targets including components of the kinin–kallikrein system and emerging treatments such as anti-HPTP (human protein tyrosine phosphatase) β antibodies are discussed. Recognition of non-VEGF contributions to disease pathogenesis may lead to novel therapeutics to enhance existing treatments for patients who do not respond to anti-VEGF therapies. PMID:27618014

  10. Comparison of Manual Refraction Versus Autorefraction in 60 Diabetic Retinopathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shirzadi, Keyvan; Shahraki, Kourosh; Yahaghi, Emad; Makateb, Ali; Khosravifard, Keivan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the comparison of manual refraction versus autorefraction in diabetic retinopathy patients. Material and Methods: The study was conducted at the Be’sat Army Hospital from 2013-2015. In the present study differences between two common refractometry methods (manual refractometry and Auto refractometry) in diagnosis and follow up of retinopathy in patients affected with diabetes is investigated. Results: Our results showed that there is a significant difference in visual acuity score of patients between manual and auto refractometry. Despite this fact, spherical equivalent scores of two methods of refractometry did not show a significant statistical difference in the patients. Conclusion: Although use of manual refraction is comparable with autorefraction in evaluating spherical equivalent scores in diabetic patients affected with retinopathy, but in the case of visual acuity results from these two methods are not comparable. PMID:27703289

  11. An update on hypertensive emergencies and urgencies.

    PubMed

    Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Salvetti, Massimo; Amadoro, Valentina; di Somma, Salvatore; Perlini, Stefano; Semplicini, Andrea; Borghi, Claudio; Volpe, Massimo; Saba, Pier Sergio; Cameli, Matteo; Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Maiello, Maria; Modesti, Pietro Amedeo; Novo, Salvatore; Palmiero, Pasquale; Scicchitano, Pietro; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Pedrinelli, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Severe acute arterial hypertension is usually defined as 'hypertensive crisis', although 'hypertensive emergencies' or 'hypertensive urgencies', as suggested by the Joint National Committee and the European Society of Hypertension, have completely different diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.The prevalence and demographics of hypertensive emergencies and urgencies have changed over the last four decades, but hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are still associated with significant morbidity and mortality.Different scientific societies have repeatedly produced up-to-date guidelines; however, the treatment of hypertensive emergencies and urgencies is still inappropriate, with potential clinical implications.This review focuses on hypertensive emergencies and urgencies management and treatment, as suggested by recent data.

  12. ED 04-3 ASSESSMENT OF RENAL FUNCTION DURING FOLLOW UP OF HYPERTENSIVE SUBJECTS.

    PubMed

    Ito, Sadayoshi

    2016-09-01

    The presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a strong risk factor not only for end stage kidney disease (ESKD) but also cerebro-cardiovascular disease (CVD). CKD is defined as GFR < 60ml/min/1.73m and/or the evidence of renal damages for more than 3 months. Epidemiological studies have shown that albuminuria even as little as 10mg/gCr is a strong risk factor for CVD, especially stroke. The significance of albuminuria can be recognized when we think of the fact that the amount of albumin in 24 hour-GFR is as large as 6 kg (4.0g/dL × 150 L/day) in normal: why such a miniscule amount of albumin in urine (as little as 10 mg of 6 kg) can be so closely related to CVD even in the presence of normal GFR? We have pointed out that in vital organs such as brain, heart and kidney, there are unique circulatory system where microvessels are branched off directly from large high pressure arteries. We refer these vessel as Strain Vessel, and have shown that close linkage between microalbuminuria CVD is based on strain vessel injuries. In addition, we have recently shown that urine pH is associated with vascular and renal damages. In this lecture, I will discuss the meaning of measurement of urinary protein (albumin) and pH as well as renal function during follow up of hypertensive subjects. PMID:27643069

  13. [Economics of nephroprotection in arterial hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Belousov, Iu B; Shestakova, M V; Belousov, D Iu

    2008-01-01

    Based on results of large-scale controlled trials of irbesartan (I), valsartan (V) and amlodipine (A) (PRIME and MARVAL) we carried out the Markov s modeling of their pharmacoeconomic parameters in arterial hypertension (AH) combined with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2) and microalbuminuria (MAU) projected for 8-years perspective. Cost and efficacy was evaluated taking into account years of life gained and outcomes of concomitant diseases and complications. Indexes of cost/efficacy (C/E) were calculated for each drug. Among investigated drugs I appeared to be the most economic at the account of retardation of development of terminal nephropathy and cardiovascular diseases. The use of I compared with V could save 565300 rub/100 patients/year. C/E of I was 26.5 and 37.4% lower that those of V and A, respectively. Costs of year of life saved was 12716, 16432, and 18325 for I, V, and A, respectively. Comparative pharmacoeconomic modeling of 8-year economic perspectives of I, V and A demonstrated financial benefits of I. PMID:19076089

  14. [Pulmonary hypertension: current aspects].

    PubMed

    Tello de Meneses, R; Gómez Sánchez, M A; Delgado Jiménez, J; Gómez Pajuelo, C; Sáenz de la Calzada, C; Zarco Gutiérrez, P

    1996-08-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension, although less frequent than secondary forms, represents the true paradigm of this disease. The recent investigations on pulmonary vascular response mechanisms to different stimuli has increased our knowledge about the mechanism of high pulmonary pressure. Molecular biology of the endothelial cell has provided evidence that endothelial injury plus a genetic individual predisposition may be the pathogenic mainstream of this disease. The histologic findings of pulmonary hypertension are still a matter of controversy, although the clinical, epidemiological and prognostic features are better defined. Therapeutically, there has been important advances, specially with various vasodilators, like calciumantagonists, prostacyclin, adenosine and nitric oxide, as well as new routes of administration. In more advance stages of the disease, atrial septostomy (only paliative) and pulmonary or cardio-pulmonary transplantation, are other therapeutic options to consider, after an adequate selection of patients.

  15. [Hyperuricemia, diabetes and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Viazzi, Francesca; Bonino, Barbara; Ratto, Elena; Desideri, Giovambattista; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is frequently found in association with several condition predisposing to cardiovascular events such as arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. This has led researchers to investigate possible pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this association. Several experimental studies and some indirect clinical evidence support a causal link between mild hyperuricemia and the developement of hypertension as well as new onset diabetes. At the tissue level, chronic exposure to increased uric acid has been shown to promote vascular changes leading to renal ischemia as well as stimulation of the renin angiotensin system. Furthermore, uric acid has been shown to promote the development of insulin resistance, hypertrglyceridemia and haepatic steatosis through pro-oxidative mechanisms. These experimental pathophysiological changes may be partly preventable by hypouricemic treatments. Whether clinical implications of these findings are confirmed by solid clinical intervention trials, mild hyperuricemia may soon change its status from risk predictor to treatment target for patients at high cardiovascular and renal risk.

  16. [Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Middeke, Martin

    2016-09-01

    In pregnancy, both mother and fetus benefit from blood pressure in normal ranges. There is discrepancy in the normenclature and thresholds for classification of hypertension in pregnancy and for initiation of antihypertensive treatment in different international guidelines. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure values that are associated with normal outcome are notably lower than any recommended treatment threshold in pregnancy. Tight blood pressure control under 85 mmHg diastolic is save and significantly prevents severe maternal hypertension as could be demonstrated in CHIPS. Close blood pressure monitoring comprising modern methods and devices including telemonitoring allows early recognition of risk developments and optimal guidance of antihypertensive therapy starting early in pregnancy. Only a few pharmacological substances are suitable for antihypertensive treatment in pregnancy. PMID:27598915

  17. Hypertension in perspective

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, W.F.; Zijlstra, F.

    2005-01-01

    Decisions about the management of hypertensive patients should not be based on the level of blood pressure alone, but also on the presence of other risk factors, target organ damage and cardiovascular and renal disease. The results of echocardiography and carotid ultrasonography aids in the stratification of absolute cardiovascular risk as recently advocated by the guidelines of the European Society of Hypertension 2003. Therefore, the detection of target organ damage by ultrasound techniques allows an accurate identification of high-risk patients. Cardiovascular risk stratification only based on a simple routine work-up can often underestimate overall risk, thus leading to a potentially inadequate therapeutic management especially of low-medium risk patients. PMID:25696486

  18. Primary hypertension in childhood.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Barbara S; Ferrarini, Alessandra; Weber, Nico; Bullo, Marina; Bianchetti, Mario G; Simonetti, Giacomo D

    2013-10-01

    There is growing concern about elevated blood pressure in children and adolescents, because of its association with the obesity epidemic. Moreover, cardiovascular function and blood pressure level are determined in childhood and track into adulthood. Primary hypertension in childhood is defined by persistent blood pressure values ≥ the 95th percentile and without a secondary cause. Preventable risk factors for elevated blood pressure in childhood are overweight, dietary habits, salt intake, sedentary lifestyle, poor sleep quality and passive smoking, whereas non-preventable risk factors include race, gender, genetic background, low birth weight, prematurity, and socioeconomic inequalities. Several different pathways are implicated in the development of primary hypertension, including obesity, insulin resistance, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, alterations in sodium homeostasis, renin-angiotensin system and altered vascular function. Prevention of adult cardiovascular disease should begin in childhood by regularly screening for high blood pressure, counseling for healthy lifestyle and avoiding preventable risk factors.

  19. [Hypertension and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Araki, Shin-ichi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The goal of diabetes treatment is to maintain a quality of life. Hypertension is a common diabetes comorbidity and is a risk factor for mortality. Epidemiological studies show that blood pressure (BP) lowering is associated with improving prognosis in this population. However, recent clinical trials and meta-analyses report no benefit of an intensive BP lowering of < 130/80 mmHg on mortality and cardiovascular complications, except stroke. Furthermore, the excess BP lowering should be avoided not to increase the risk of adverse effects such as hypotension, especially in elderly patients or those with adverse vascular complications. In Japanese diabetes guidelines, a BP target of < 130/80 mmHg is still recommended in diabetic patients with hypertension because of the high incidence of stroke in Japanese.

  20. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  1. [Hypertension and stress tests].

    PubMed

    Mallion, J M; Siché, J P; de Gaudemaris, R

    1989-09-15

    Stress tests have been performed for a long time in patients with coronary disease. The study of blood pressure variations, under these circumstances, is also interesting in hypertension. Several types of stress tests, dynamic and static, may be performed. Dynamic tests on ergometric bicycles are the most frequently performed. The evolution of the BP during stress increases regularly and there is a linear correlation between the BP values and the level of work as well as the heart rate (HR). It is therefore possible to individualize a reference blood pressure profile, according to age and sex. The stress may find applications from a diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic standpoint. First of all, in borderline HT, the stress test enables to confirm the HT and better differentiate between hyperemotional and hyperkinetic patients. In severe hypertension, the stress test permits to better define the magnitude of the haemodynamic disorder. In true hypertensive patients, undergoing major physical stress (work, sports...) the stress test permits to evaluate the tolerance to stress and the faculties of myocardial adaptation. From a prognostic standpoint, the incidence of permanent hypertension is 2 to 3 times higher in patients presenting an abnormal blood pressure profile. There is a significant correlation between the BP at maximum stress and the left ventricular mass index at all stages of the HT. The stress test makes it possible to better define the mode of action of antihypertensive medications, prescribe a personalized treatment according to these patients reactivity to stress and guarantee the correction of blood pressure abnormalities, since normalisation at rest does not necessarily imply a normalisation during stress. PMID:2686518

  2. [Dietary modification in hypertensives].

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Kloock, B; König, D

    2006-11-23

    Successful treatment of hypertension requires a holistic approach. In this connection, focusing on a healthy lifestyle, eating, drinking and consumption behavior and, finally, the quality of foodstuffs and the exercise habits of the patient represents an essential supplement to the classical forms of pharmaceutical treatment. The major dietary-physiological factors have been shown to be weight reduction, the monitoring of salt consumption, appropriate intake of fiber, a preference for vegetables, and a reduction of immoderate alcohol consumption.

  3. Treatment Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Egan, Brent M

    2015-11-05

    Treatment resistant hypertension (TRH) is defined by office blood pressure (BP) uncontrolled on ≥ 3 or controlled on ≥ 4 antihypertensive medications, preferably at optimal doses and including a diuretic. Apparent (a)TRH is used when optimal therapy, adherence, and measurement artifacts are unknown. Among treated hypertensives, ~30% of uncontrolled and 10% of controlled individuals have aTRH, with a higher prevalence in Blacks than other race-ethnicity groups. In ≥ 50% of aTRH patients, BP measurement artifacts ('office' TRH), suboptimal regimens, or suboptimal adherence are present, ie, pseudo-resistance. While patients with 'office' TRH have fewer cardiovascular events than those with 'true' TRH, no evidence confirms that patients with suboptimal regimens or adherence are spared. Averaging several office BPs obtained with an automated monitor can reduce 'office' TRH. Home or ambulatory BP monitoring can identify office resistance. Prescribing ≥ 3 different antihypertensive medication classes, eg, thiazide-type diuretic, renin-angiotensin blocker and calcium antagonist at ≥ 50% of maximum recommended doses reasonably defines optimal therapy. Intensifying diuretic therapy, eg, adding an aldosterone antagonist, is effective for many TRH patients who are volume expanded. Clinical information, hemodynamic and renin-guided therapeutics can inform other treatment options. Attention to adverse effects, medication costs, and pill burden can improve adherence and control. Patients with aTRH and suspected secondary hypertension should be evaluated. Interfering substances or medications should be discontinued. These approaches will identify or correct the problem in ~80% of aTRH patients. Referral to a hypertension specialist and newer therapeutic approaches are options for TRH patients who cannot take or do not respond to optimal therapy.

  4. The Misdiagnosis of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Pickering, Thomas G.; Clemow, Lynn; Chaplin, William; Spruill, Tanya M.; Albanese, Gabrielle M.; Eguchi, Kazuo; Burg, Matthew; Gerin, William

    2016-01-01

    Background The white coat effect (defined as the difference between blood pressure [BP] measurements taken at the physician’s office and those taken outside the office) is an important determinant of misdiagnosis of hypertension, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. We tested the hypothesis that the white coat effect may be a conditioned response as opposed to a manifestation of general anxiety. Methods A total of 238 patients in a hypertension clinic wore ambulatory blood pressure monitors on 3 separate days 1 month apart. At each clinic visit, BP readings were manually triggered in the waiting area and the examination room (in the presence and absence of the physician) and were compared with the mercury sphygmomanometer readings taken by the physician in the examination room. Patients completed trait and state anxiety measures before and after each BP assessment. Results A total of 35% of the sample was normotensive, and 9%, 37%, and 19% had white coat, sustained, and masked hypertension, respectively. The diagnostic category was associated with the state anxiety measure (F3,237 = 6.4, P < .001) but not with the trait anxiety measure. Patients with white coat hypertension had significantly higher state anxiety scores (t = 2.67, P < .01), with the greatest difference reported during the physician measurement. The same pattern was observed for BP changes, which generally paralleled the changes in state anxiety (t = 4.86, P < .002 for systolic BP; t = 3.51, P < .002 for diastolic BP). Conclusions These findings support our hypothesis that the white coat effect is a conditioned response. The BP measurements taken by physicians appear to exacerbate the white coat effect more than other means. This problem could be addressed with uniform use of automated BP devices in office settings. PMID:19064830

  5. Definition and classification of hypertension: an update.

    PubMed

    Giles, Thomas D; Materson, Barry J; Cohn, Jay N; Kostis, John B

    2009-11-01

    Since the publication of a paper by the American Society of Hypertension, Inc. Writing Group in 2003, some refinements have occurred in the definition of hypertension. Blood pressure is now recognized as a biomarker for hypertension, and a distinction is made between the various stages of hypertension and global cardiovascular risk. This paper discusses the logic underlying the refinements in the definition of hypertension.

  6. Nonmydriatic Fundus Photography for Teleophthalmology Diabetic Retinopathy Screening in Rural and Urban Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Eric K.; Ventura, Bruna V.; See, Kai-Yin; Seibles, Joann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the relative diagnostic value of nonmydriatic fundus photography (nFP) among patients screened for diabetic retinopathy in remote rural medical clinics and an urban academic medical center for nonadherence to recommended annual dilated eye examination. Subjects and Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed among diabetic patients seen in primary outpatient clinics between 2006 and 2011 who were screened for diabetic retinopathy with nFP for history of nonadherence to recommended annual dilated eye examination. A single nonstereoscopic, 45°, 10-megapixel digital image of the disc and macula of both eyes was obtained locally and transmitted electronically to a retinal specialist for remote review. The results from remote rural Native American Indian reservations were compared with those from an urban academic family practice clinic. The proportion of subjects diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy and the quality of fundus images were compared. Results: Among 872 patients (1,744 eyes) screened from rural sites and 517 subjects (1,034 eyes) screened from an urban site, images were of good quality for evaluation in 82.4% and 85.7% of subjects, respectively. Diabetic retinopathy was noted in 12.6% of rural subjects and 29.6% of urban subjects (p<0.001). Conclusions: nFP can be a useful tool in both rural and urban settings to screen for diabetic retinopathy in patients who are nonadherent to the recommended dilated annual eye exam. In our study population, a surprisingly higher percentage of diabetic subjects screened from the urban clinic had retinopathy compared with subjects screened in rural clinics. PMID:24219153

  7. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Robles, Nicolas R; Macias, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Data collected over a 30-year period have demonstrated the increasing prevalence of hypertension with age. Aging is an inevitable part of life and brings along two inconvenient events: physiologic decline and disease state. High blood pressure (HBP) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. It is a significant and often asymptomatic chronic disease, which requires optimal control and persistent adherence to prescribed medication to reduce the risks of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal disease. Hypertension in the elderly patients represents a management dilemma to geriatric and cardiovascular specialists and other practitioners. Furthermore, with the wide adoption of multiple drug strategies targeting subgroups of hypertensive patients with specific risk conditions to lower blood pressure (BP), difficult questions arise about how aggressive treatment of elderly patients should be. The purpose of the following chapter article is to review the pathophysiology of aging as well as the epidemiology and the clinical assessment of high blood pressure (HBP) in older people.

  8. Obesity and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Zhong; Lu, Wen; Zong, Xue-Feng; Ruan, Hong-Yun; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The imbalance between energy intake and expenditure is the main cause of excessive overweight and obesity. Technically, obesity is defined as the abnormal accumulation of ≥20% of body fat, over the individual's ideal body weight. The latter constitutes the maximal healthful value for an individual that is calculated based chiefly on the height, age, build and degree of muscular development. However, obesity is diagnosed by measuring the weight in relation to the height of an individual, thereby determining or calculating the body mass index. The National Institutes of Health have defined 30 kg/m2 as the limit over which an individual is qualified as obese. Accordingly, the prevalence of obesity in on the increase in children and adults worldwide, despite World Health Organization warnings. The growth of obesity and the scale of associated health issues induce serious consequences for individuals and governmental health systems. Excessive overweight remains among the most neglected public health issues worldwide, while obesity is associated with increasing risks of disability, illness and death. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of mortality worldwide, particularly hypertension and diabetes, are the main illnesses associated with obesity. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying obesity-associated hypertension or other associated metabolic diseases remains to be adequately investigated. In the present review, we addressed the association between obesity and cardiovascular disease, particularly the biological mechanisms linking obesity and hypertension. PMID:27703502

  9. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation. PMID:14664293

  10. [Arterial hypertension in children].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F

    1993-07-01

    It is considered hypertension in children, the persistent increase of the blood pressure values above percentile 95 for age and sex, in no less than three determinations, with adequate register techniques. Blood pressure is maintained mainly by the regulation of metabolism of sodium and water in the intravascular space, through the adequate balance of intake, filtration, reabsorption and renal throughout. It is also regulated by hormonal factors. Weight gain control in teen-agers could be useful to prevent high blood pressure in adults. In children, it is generally secondary to renal, reno-vascular, endocrinological or tumoral diseases. Clinical manifestations and the recommended diagnostic procedures are analysed to detect the most frequent causes of hypertension at different ages. Most cases response with antihypertensive drugs in combination with hyposodic diet. For the hypertensive crisis, asa diuretics and powerful antihypertensive drugs may be employed. Patients with chronic renal insufficiency could also need dialytic treatments. Renovascular diseases require almost always invasive treatments. Better prognosis in children with severe high blood pressure is related with recent diagnostic procedures, surgical techniques and antihypertensive drugs improvements.

  11. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Coope, J

    1987-08-01

    Hypertension is a common finding in patients aged over 60 years, but the following questions need answering. How dangerous is it? Will lowering the blood pressure reduce the attendant risks? What is the 'cost' of such treatment in terms of side effects, drug-induced disease and health service finance? Two recently completed trials throw light on these problems: EWPHE (European Working Party on Hypertension in the Elderly), a European study based on hospital-clinic attenders, using a diuretic backed up with methyldopa; and HEP (randomized trial of treatment of Hypertension in Elderly Patients in Primary Care), based on general-practice screening in England and Wales using atenolol and bendrofluazide. The results of these trials were compared and the findings were broadly similar in the two studies. Some of the differences may be due to the different selection of patients. It is concluded that elderly patients with sustained blood pressures greater or equal to 170/90 mmHg would benefit from treatment by substantial reduction of stroke. Diuretics or beta-blockers, alone or together, are acceptable treatments in elderly subjects. PMID:3312529

  12. Hypertensive diseases of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    A meeting in Singapore of principal investigators from 7 countries in a WHO collaborative study on hypertensive disease of pregnancy, also called pre-eclampsia or eclampsia, pointed out women at risk, suggested management guidelines, and summarized operations research projects involving administration of aspirin or calcium supplements. Hypertensive disease of pregnancy may ultimately end in fatal seizures. It is often marked by warning signs of severe headaches and facial and peripheral edema. A survey in Jamaica found that 0.72% of a group of 10,000 pregnant women had eclamptic seizures. These were the cause of almost one-third of all obstetric deaths in the period 1981-1983. 10.4% of the pregnant women had hypertension, and half of these had proteinuria. Associated risk factors were primigravida, age 30, abnormal weight gain, edema, 1+ proteinuria. A phased program of management guidelines for identifying and treating affected women is being instituted in half of Jamaica's parishes. An operations research project involves administration of low-dose aspirin vs. placebo. Another controlled trial, in Peru, is testing calcium supplements. A third trial in Argentina will compare 2 drug regimens.

  13. Hypertension in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M Mohsen; Damasceno, Albertino

    2012-08-11

    Data from different national and regional surveys show that hypertension is common in developing countries, particularly in urban areas, and that rates of awareness, treatment, and control are low. Several hypertension risk factors seem to be more common in developing countries than in developed regions. Findings from serial surveys show an increasing prevalence of hypertension in developing countries, possibly caused by urbanisation, ageing of population, changes to dietary habits, and social stress. High illiteracy rates, poor access to health facilities, bad dietary habits, poverty, and high costs of drugs contribute to poor blood pressure control. The health system in many developing countries is inadequate because of low funds, poor infrastructure, and inexperience. Priority is given to acute disorders, child and maternal health care, and control of communicable diseases. Governments, together with medical societies and non-governmental organisations, should support and promote preventive programmes aiming to increase public awareness, educate physicians, and reduce salt intake. Regulations for the food industry and the production and availability of generic drugs should be reinforced. PMID:22883510

  14. Beyond HbA1c: Environmental Risk Factors for Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nwanyanwu, Kristen Harris; Newman-Casey, Paula-Anne; Gardner, Thomas W; Lim, Jennifer I

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy affects 4.2 million people in the United States and is the leading cause of blindness in working-aged people. As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, cost-effective interventions to decrease blindness from diabetic retinopathy will be paramount. While HbA1c and duration of disease are known risk factors, they account for only 11% of the risk of developing microvascular complications from the disease. The assessment of environmental risk factors for diabetic eye disease allows for the determination of modifiable population-level challenges that may be addressed to facilitate the end of blindness from diabetes. PMID:26973797

  15. [The management of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema; joint forces fight for sight].

    PubMed

    Chronopoulos, Argyrios; Roquelaure, Daniel; Jacquier, Paul; Souteyrand, Georges; Matter, Michel; Thumann, Gabriele

    2015-12-16

    Despite the considerable progress in prevention and treatement options since the first big epidemiologic studies in the 80's, diabetic retinopathy still represents the primary cause of blindness in the working age population. The intensified prevention efforts that took place recentyears did show hopeful results as the incidence of diabetic retinopathy seems to decline. However a still considerable number of patients does not meet metabolic or treatment recommandations. In the aftermath of an ongoing globalisation and growing urbanisation of the society, there is an even bigger need of understanding the disease as well as improving prevention and treatment guidelines. PMID:26852554

  16. [The management of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema; joint forces fight for sight].

    PubMed

    Chronopoulos, Argyrios; Roquelaure, Daniel; Jacquier, Paul; Souteyrand, Georges; Matter, Michel; Thumann, Gabriele

    2015-12-16

    Despite the considerable progress in prevention and treatement options since the first big epidemiologic studies in the 80's, diabetic retinopathy still represents the primary cause of blindness in the working age population. The intensified prevention efforts that took place recentyears did show hopeful results as the incidence of diabetic retinopathy seems to decline. However a still considerable number of patients does not meet metabolic or treatment recommandations. In the aftermath of an ongoing globalisation and growing urbanisation of the society, there is an even bigger need of understanding the disease as well as improving prevention and treatment guidelines.

  17. HELLP Syndrome Complicated with Postpartum Subcapsular Ruptured Liver Hematoma and Purtscher-Like Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cernea, Daniela; Dragoescu, Alice; Novac, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Purtscher's retinopathy is usually associated with trauma, acute pancreatitis, vasculitis, lupus, and bone fractures. It was rarely described postpartum in patients with preeclampsia as well as associated with HELLP syndrome. We present a case of a multiparous patient aged 44 with severe preeclampsia and postpartum HELLP syndrome complicated with Purtscher-like retinopathy and large ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma that required emergency abdominal surgery after premature delivery of a dead fetus. Postsurgical outcome was favorable regarding both liver function and visual acuity. PMID:22852104

  18. Physiological mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    MacIver, David H; Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, Iain R; Revell, Alistair; Zhang, Henggui

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is usually related to obstruction of pulmonary blood flow at the level of the pulmonary arteries (eg, pulmonary embolus), pulmonary arterioles (idiopathic pulmonary hypertension), pulmonary veins (pulmonary venoocclusive disease) or mitral valve (mitral stenosis and regurgitation). Pulmonary hypertension is also observed in heart failure due to left ventricle myocardial diseases regardless of the ejection fraction. Pulmonary hypertension is often regarded as a passive response to the obstruction to pulmonary flow. We review established fluid dynamics and physiology and discuss the mechanisms underlying pulmonary hypertension. The important role that the right ventricle plays in the development and maintenance of pulmonary hypertension is discussed. We use principles of thermodynamics and discuss a potential common mechanism for a number of disease states, including pulmonary edema, through adding pressure energy to the pulmonary circulation. PMID:27659877

  19. Neurotrophins and Neurotrophin Receptors in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M.; Mohammad, Ghulam; De Hertogh, Gert; Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; Van Den Eynde, Kathleen; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Struyf, Sofie; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Geboes, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) are emerging as important mediators of angiogenesis and fibrosis. We investigated the expression of the NTs nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and their receptors TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). As a comparison, we examined the expression of NTs and their receptors in the retinas of diabetic rats. Vitreous samples from 16 PDR and 15 nondiabetic patients were studied by Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Epiretinal membranes from 17 patients with PDR were studied by immunohistochemistry. Rats were made diabetic with a single high dose of streptozotocin and retinas of rats were examined by Western blot analysis. Western blot analysis revealed a significant increase in the expression of NT-3 and NT-4 and the shedding of receptors TrkA and TrkB in vitreous samples from PDR patients compared to nondiabetic controls, whereas NGF and BDNF and the receptor TrkC were not detected with the use of Western blot analysis and ELISA. In epiretinal membranes, vascular endothelial cells and myofibroblasts expressed NT-3 and the receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC in situ, whereas NT-4 was not detected. The expression levels of NT-3 and NT-4 and the receptors TrkA and TrkB, both in intact and solubilized forms, were upregulated in the retinas of diabetic rats, whereas the receptor TrkC was not detected. Co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed binding between NT-3 and the receptors TrkA and TrkB in the retinas of diabetic rats. Our findings in diabetic eyes from humans and rats suggest that the increased expression levels within the NT-3 and NT-4/Trk axis are associated with the progression of PDR. PMID:23762379

  20. Neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M; Mohammad, Ghulam; De Hertogh, Gert; Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; Van Den Eynde, Kathleen; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Struyf, Sofie; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Geboes, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) are emerging as important mediators of angiogenesis and fibrosis. We investigated the expression of the NTs nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and their receptors TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). As a comparison, we examined the expression of NTs and their receptors in the retinas of diabetic rats. Vitreous samples from 16 PDR and 15 nondiabetic patients were studied by Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Epiretinal membranes from 17 patients with PDR were studied by immunohistochemistry. Rats were made diabetic with a single high dose of streptozotocin and retinas of rats were examined by Western blot analysis. Western blot analysis revealed a significant increase in the expression of NT-3 and NT-4 and the shedding of receptors TrkA and TrkB in vitreous samples from PDR patients compared to nondiabetic controls, whereas NGF and BDNF and the receptor TrkC were not detected with the use of Western blot analysis and ELISA. In epiretinal membranes, vascular endothelial cells and myofibroblasts expressed NT-3 and the receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC in situ, whereas NT-4 was not detected. The expression levels of NT-3 and NT-4 and the receptors TrkA and TrkB, both in intact and solubilized forms, were upregulated in the retinas of diabetic rats, whereas the receptor TrkC was not detected. Co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed binding between NT-3 and the receptors TrkA and TrkB in the retinas of diabetic rats. Our findings in diabetic eyes from humans and rats suggest that the increased expression levels within the NT-3 and NT-4/Trk axis are associated with the progression of PDR. PMID:23762379

  1. Comparison Among Methods of Retinopathy Assessment (CAMRA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Martha E.; Rajalakshmi, Ramachandran; Prathiba, Vijayaraghavan; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Ranjani, Harish; Narayan, K.M. Venkat; Olsen, Timothy W.; Mohan, Viswanathan; Ward, Laura A.; Lynn, Michael J.; Hendrick, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared smartphone fundus photography, nonmydriatic fundus photography, and 7-field mydriatic fundus photography for their abilities to detect and grade diabetic retinopathy (DR). Design This was a prospective, comparative study of 3 photography modalities. Participants Diabetic patients (n = 300) were recruited at the ophthalmology clinic of a tertiary diabetes care center in Chennai, India. Methods Patients underwent photography by all 3 modalities, and photographs were evaluated by 2 retina specialists. Main Outcome Measures The sensitivity and specificity in the detection of DR for both smartphone and nonmydriatic photography were determined by comparison with the standard method, 7-field mydriatic fundus photography. Results The sensitivity and specificity of smartphone fundus photography, compared with 7-field mydriatic fundus photography, for the detection of any DR were 50% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43–56) and 94% (95% CI, 92–97), respectively, and of nonmydriatic fundus photography were 81% (95% CI, 75–86) and 94% (95% CI, 92–96%), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of smartphone fundus photography for the detection of vision-threatening DR were 59% (95% CI, 46–72) and 100% (95% CI, 99–100), respectively, and of nonmydriatic fundus photography were 54% (95% CI, 40–67) and 99% (95% CI, 98–100), respectively. Conclusions Smartphone and nonmydriatic fundus photography are each able to detect DR and sight-threatening disease. However, the nonmydriatic camera is more sensitive at detecting DR than the smartphone. At this time, the benefits of the smartphone (connectivity, portability, and reduced cost) are not offset by the lack of sufficient sensitivity for detection of DR in most clinical circumstances. PMID:26189190

  2. pEPito-driven PEDF Expression Ameliorates Diabetic Retinopathy Hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Calado, Sofia M; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco; Silva, Gabriela A

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus. It is characterized by retinal microvascular changes caused by chronic exposure to hyperglycemia, leading to low tissue oxygenation and ultimately to neovascularization. Laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy are the most efficient treatments for DR, but display severe side effects such as the destruction of the healthy retina. Another clinical approach uses antiangiogenic agents to prevent and delay progression of neovascularization, but these require recurrent local administrations that increase the possibility of retinal detachment, vitreous hemorrhage, and cataract formation. Studies in human diabetic retinas have revealed an imbalance between proangiogenic factors such as the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and antiangiogenic factors, such as pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF). This imbalance favors pathological angiogenesis contributing to DR, and can constitute a therapeutic target. Gene therapy was recently shown to be an adequate intervention for long-term treatment of several retinal pathologies. We have previously shown the newly engineered episomal vector pEPito to be able of sustained gene expression in the mouse retina. We here show that pEPito was able to overexpress PEDF for up to three months, both in in vitro cultures of human retinal pigment epithelial cells and in the retina of diabetic mice after a single subretinal injection. In vivo, in parallel with the increase in PEDF we observed a decrease in VEGF levels in injected compared with noninjected eyes and a significant effect on two hallmarks of DR: reduction of glucose transport (by glucose transporter GLUT1), and reduction of inflammation by decreased reactivity of microglia. Jointly, these results point to a significant therapeutic potential of gene therapy with pEPito-PEDF for the treatment of DR. PMID:26942449

  3. Screening for retinopathy of prematurity: a report from upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Mahmoud M.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To detect the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in a tertiary referral neonatal intensive care unit in upper Egypt and to describe the obstacles faced during implementing the screening protocol for the first time. METHODS Consecutive infants were enrolled at birth and screened for ROP. We used the UK ROP guideline (May 2008) for infant selection, follow up and treatment. Repeat examinations were performed until retinal vascularisation was complete. RESULTS Fifty-two infants were enrolled: 24 males and 28 females. Mean gestational age was 31.3wk (±2.8 SD) and mean birth weight was 1234.6 g (±221.1 SD). Incidence of ROP was 36.5% (stages 1, 2, 3 and 4a were 9.6%, 9.6%, 15.4% and 1.9% respectively), no stages 4b or 5 were found in this series. Six infants (11.5%) died during screening without ROP, 25 infants (48.1%) were discharged from screening with retinal vascularisation reaching zone III, 5 infants (9.6%) were treated with indirect diode with or without additional cryotherapy and 16 infants (30.8%) were lost to follow up. In this series gestational age rather than birth weight was found significantly correlated and predictive (P<0.05) with ROP stages. CONCLUSION ROP in a single site in Upper Egypt appears to have comparable incidence to other areas worldwide. The main screening obstacle was missing cases due to the absence of a national ROP screening protocol. PMID:26949647

  4. Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy Using Computer Vision and Physiological Markers

    PubMed Central

    Hann, Christopher E.; Revie, James A.; Hewett, Darren; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Shaw, Geoffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia and diabetes result in vascular complications, most notably diabetic retinopathy (DR). The prevalence of DR is growing and is a leading cause of blindness and/or visual impairment in developed countries. Current methods of detecting, screening, and monitoring DR are based on subjective human evaluation, which is also slow and time-consuming. As a result, initiation and progress monitoring of DR is clinically hard. Methods Computer vision methods are developed to isolate and detect two of the most common DR dysfunctions—dot hemorrhages (DH) and exudates. The algorithms use specific color channels and segmentation methods to separate these DR manifestations from physiological features in digital fundus images. The algorithms are tested on the first 100 images from a published database. The diagnostic outcome and the resulting positive and negative prediction values (PPV and NPV) are reported. The first 50 images are marked with specialist determined ground truth for each individual exudate and/or DH, which are also compared to algorithm identification. Results Exudate identification had 96.7% sensitivity and 94.9% specificity for diagnosis (PPV = 97%, NPV = 95%). Dot hemorrhage identification had 98.7% sensitivity and 100% specificity (PPV = 100%, NPV = 96%). Greater than 95% of ground truth identified exudates, and DHs were found by the algorithm in the marked first 50 images, with less than 0.5% false positives. Conclusions A direct computer vision approach enabled high-quality identification of exudates and DHs in an independent data set of fundus images. The methods are readily generalizable to other clinical manifestations of DR. The results justify a blinded clinical trial of the system to prove its capability to detect, diagnose, and, over the long term, monitor the state of DR in individuals with diabetes. PMID:20144333

  5. Thioredoxin Interacting Protein (TXNIP) and Pathogenesis of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Lalit P

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia (HG)-associated reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) stress and low grade inflammation are considered to play critical roles in the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Excess glucose metabolic flux through the aldose reductase/polyol pathway, advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation, elevated hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP), diacyl glycerol/PKC activation, and mitochondrial ROS generation are all implicated in DR. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum stress/unfolded protein response (er-UPR) and deregulation of mitochondrial quality control by autophagy/mitophagy are observed causing cellular bioenergetic deficiency and injury. Recently, a pro-oxidant and pro-apoptotic thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) was shown to be highly upregulated in DR and by HG in retinal cells in culture. TXNIP binds to thioredoxin (Trx) inhibiting its oxidant scavenging and thiolreducing capacity. Hence, prolonged overexpression of TXNIP causes ROS/RNS stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and premature cell death in DR. Initially, DR was considered as microvascular complications of endothelial dysfunction and pericyte loss characterized by capillary basement membrane thickening, pericyte ghost, blood retinal barrier leakage, acellular capillary and neovascularization. However, it is currently acknowledged that neuro-glia are also affected by HG in diabetes and that neuronal injury, glial activation, innate immunity/sterile inflammation, and ganglion apoptosis occur early in DR. In addition, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) becomes dysfunctional in DR. Since TXNIP is induced by HG in most cells, its effects are not restricted to a particular cell type in DR. However, depending on the metabolic activity and anti-oxidant capacity, some cells may be affected earlier by TXNIP than others. Identification of TXNIP sensitive cells and elucidating the underlying mechanism(s) will be critical for preventing pre-mature cell death and

  6. Survey on retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate the incidence and the relative risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and posterior-ROP (P-ROP): ROP in Zone I and posterior Zone II, as well as to analyze the occurrence of surgical treatment of ROP and to evaluate the short term outcome of the disease in Italy. Methods It is a prospective multicenter observational study; all infants with a birth weight (BW) ≤ 750 g and/or a gestational age (GA) ≤27 weeks born between January 1st 2008 and December 31st 2009 in 25 III level Italian neonatal intensive care units were eligible for the study. Results 421 infants were examined: 265 (62.9%) developed ROP and 102 (24.2%) P-ROP. Following the multivariate analysis erythropoietin-therapy (p < 0.0001) and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with ROP while gestational age ≤24 weeks (p = 0.011) and sepsis (p = 0.002) were associated with the onset of P-ROP. Eighty nine infants (34%) required surgical treatment; following the multivariate analysis P-ROP was an independent factor associated with the need of surgical treatment (p < 0.0001). A favorable outcome was reported in 251 (94.7%) newborns affected by ROP. Adverse outcome occurred in 14 patients: all of them underwent surgery and showed P-ROP. Conclusions P-ROP is the most aggressive type of ROP. It associates with lower GA and sepsis. Obstetricians and Neonatologists must focus on the reduction of severe preterm births and on the prevention of neonatal early and late onset sepsis in order to reduce the incidence of P-ROP. PMID:23837411

  7. Vascular Inflammatory Cells in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David G.; Marvar, Paul J.; Titze, Jens M.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disorder with uncertain etiology. In the last several years, it has become evident that components of both the innate and adaptive immune system play an essential role in hypertension. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the perivascular fat, the heart and the kidney of hypertensive patients, and in animals with experimental hypertension. Various immunosuppressive agents lower blood pressure and prevent end-organ damage. Mice lacking lymphocytes are protected against hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells in the animals restores their blood pressure response to stimuli such as angiotensin II or high salt. Recent studies have shown that mice lacking macrophages have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II and that genetic deletion of macrophages markedly reduces experimental hypertension. Dendritic cells have also been implicated in this disease. Many hypertensive stimuli have triggering effects on the central nervous system and signals arising from the circumventricular organ seem to promote inflammation. Studies have suggested that central signals activate macrophages and T cells, which home to the kidney and vasculature and release cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-17, which in turn cause renal and vascular dysfunction and lead to blood pressure elevation. These recent discoveries provide a new understanding of hypertension and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treatment of this serious disease. PMID:22586409

  8. The kidney and arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ruilope, L M; Campo, C; Lahera, V

    1993-01-01

    It has been known for some time that a relationship exists between the kidney and blood pressure. The renal origin of arterial hypertension has been demonstrated in different animal models resembling human hypertension, with data from humans seeming to confirm this hypothesis. On the other hand, the renal vasculature also suffers the consequences of arterial hypertension, and renal insufficiency can develop as a result of elevated blood pressure levels. Antihypertensive therapy can prevent the development of renal damage secondary to hypertension. For example, calcium antagonists possess specific renal effects that not only facilitate their antihypertensive capacity but also protect the kidney from the development of renal failure.

  9. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Manuel de Sousa; Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Oliveira, Eduardo Infante de; Carvalho, Henrique Cyrne de

    2015-02-01

    There is a marked contrast between the high prevalence of hypertension and the low rates of adequate control. A subset of patients with suboptimal blood pressure control have drug-resistant hypertension, in the pathophysiology of which chronic sympathetic hyperactivation is significantly involved. Sympathetic renal denervation has recently emerged as a device-based treatment for resistant hypertension. In this review, the pathophysiological mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous system and cardiovascular disease are reviewed, focusing on resistant hypertension and the role of sympathetic renal denervation. An update on experimental and clinical results is provided, along with potential future indications for this device-based technique in other cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Epidemiology and Genetics of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Taposh; Singh, Narinder Pal

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increasing in India as well as in the world. The average prevalence of hypertension in India is 25-30%. The median prevalence of total hypertension in 2009 was 37.6% in men and 40.1% in women in U.S. Hypertension is a major risk factor for majority of patients with cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal morbidity and mortality. Environmental factors as well as genetic factors account for regulation of blood pressure and its control. Understanding of genetic factor may not only help in recognising those at risk but also help in treatment. Discovering hypertension susceptibility genes would help recognizing those at risk for developing the disease before the expression of clinical symptoms. Genetic and epidemiological studies have suggested that essential hypertension is a polygenic and multifactorial disorder that results from genetic and/or environmental factors. In India awareness, treatment and control status of hypertension is low, with only half of the urban and a quarter of the rural hypertensive individuals being aware of its presence. In this review we have discussed epidemiology and genetics of hypertension, both the monogenic and polygenic forms. PMID:27608868

  11. [Masked hypertension: myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Mallion, Jean-Michel; Ormezzano, Olivier; Barone-Rochette, Gilles; Neuder, Yannick; Salvat, Muriel; Baguet, Jean-Philippe

    2008-06-01

    Masked hypertension is also referred as reverse white coat hypertension. Masked hypertension is diagnosed in subjects who have normal clinic blood pressure (BP) <140/90 mmHg and elevated ambulatory BP or home BP, with daytime systolic BP> or = 135 mmHg or daytime diastolic BP > or = 85 mmHg. Its prevalence varies between 10 to at least 47% and differs substantially according to the reference population and the specific criteria.Subjects with masked hypertension have been shown to have more extensive target organ damage, specifically, a higher prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis and of left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy. Longitudinal studies of patients with masked hypertension show higher levels of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than in reference populations. These studies show that ambulatory or home BP measurements predict risk much better than the usual clinical measurements and that those who are found to be hypertensive by ambulatory or home measurements have greater risks than those who are not. Who should be tested for masked hypertension? Our reference study shows that 3 characteristics are most likely to predict masked hypertension: male sex, age over 60 years, and office systolic BP of more than 130 mmHg. Masked hypertension is indeed a reality. Individual patients should be tested and treated, based on the physician's clinical judgment.

  12. Hyperuricemia and uncontrolled hypertension in treated hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jaelim; Kim, Changsoo; Kang, Dae Ryong; Park, Jeong Bae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous epidemiological studies have suggested that uric acid is an independent risk factor for incident hypertension, whereas few studies have evaluated the effect of hyperuricemia on blood pressure control in hypertensive patients. We investigated whether hyperuricemia predicts uncontrolled hypertension through a large-scale prospective cohort study with hypertensive patients treated with fimasartan in the Republic of Korea (the Kanarb–Metabolic Syndrome study). Of the 10,601 hypertensive patients who were recruited from 582 private clinics and 11 university hospitals at baseline, 7725 completed the follow-up after 3 months of fimasartan medication, and 6506 were included in the analysis after excluding those with missing values. We estimated the risk of uncontrolled hypertension after 3 months (≥130/80 mm Hg in those with diabetes or chronic renal failure and ≥140/90 mm Hg in the remaining patients) related with baseline hyperuricemia (serum uric acid ≥7 mg/dL in males ≥6 mg/dL in females) using multiple logistic regression models. Hyperuricemia increased the risk of uncontrolled hypertension after 3 months of fimasartan medication (odds ratio, 1.247; 95% confidence interval, 1.063–1.462). Males in the highest quartile of uric acid level were at a 1.322 (95% confidence interval, 1.053–1.660) times higher risk of uncontrolled hypertension in reference to the lowest quartile; the same analyses in females were not significant. Patients without metabolic syndrome had significantly higher odds of uncontrolled hypertension with hyperuricemia (odds ratio, 1.328; 95% confidence interval, 1.007–1.751). Hyperuricemia predicted uncontrolled hypertension even after 3 months of fimasartan treatment in hypertensive patients. PMID:27428212

  13. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary pulmonary hypertension 2 Primary pulmonary hypertension 3 Primary pulmonary hypertension 4 ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (4 links) ...

  14. Identification of Diabetic Retinopathy Genes through a Genome-Wide Association Study among Mexican-Americans from Starr County, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Hallman, D. Michael; Gonzalez, Victor H.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Cox, Nancy J.; Bell, Graeme I.; Hanis, Craig L.

    2010-01-01

    To identify genetic loci for severe diabetic retinopathy, 286 Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes from Starr County, Texas, completed physical examinations including fundus photography for diabetic retinopathy grading. Individuals with moderate-to-severe non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy were defined as cases. Direct genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set, and SNPs passing quality control criteria were used to impute markers available in HapMap Phase III Mexican population (MXL) in Los Angeles, California. Two directly genotyped markers were associated with severe diabetic retinopathy at a P-value less than .0001: SNP rs2300782 (P = 6.04 × 10−5) mapped to an intron region of CAMK4 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) on chromosome 5, and SNP rs10519765 (P = 6.21 × 10−5) on chromosomal 15q13 in the FMN1 (formin 1) gene. Using well-imputed markers based on the HapMap III Mexican population, we identified an additional 32 SNPs located in 11 chromosomal regions with nominal association with severe diabetic retinopathy at P-value less than .0001. None of these markers were located in traditional candidate genes for diabetic retinopathy or diabetes itself. However, these signals implicate genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and cell adhesion for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:20871662

  15. Identification of Diabetic Retinopathy Genes through a Genome-Wide Association Study among Mexican-Americans from Starr County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Hallman, D Michael; Gonzalez, Victor H; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Cox, Nancy J; Bell, Graeme I; Hanis, Craig L

    2010-01-01

    To identify genetic loci for severe diabetic retinopathy, 286 Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes from Starr County, Texas, completed physical examinations including fundus photography for diabetic retinopathy grading. Individuals with moderate-to-severe non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy were defined as cases. Direct genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set, and SNPs passing quality control criteria were used to impute markers available in HapMap Phase III Mexican population (MXL) in Los Angeles, California. Two directly genotyped markers were associated with severe diabetic retinopathy at a P-value less than .0001: SNP rs2300782 (P = 6.04 × 10(-5)) mapped to an intron region of CAMK4 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) on chromosome 5, and SNP rs10519765 (P = 6.21 × 10(-5)) on chromosomal 15q13 in the FMN1 (formin 1) gene. Using well-imputed markers based on the HapMap III Mexican population, we identified an additional 32 SNPs located in 11 chromosomal regions with nominal association with severe diabetic retinopathy at P-value less than .0001. None of these markers were located in traditional candidate genes for diabetic retinopathy or diabetes itself. However, these signals implicate genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and cell adhesion for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:20871662

  16. Pheochromocytoma induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Deborah

    2010-12-01

    Pheochromocytoma (Pheo) is a rare tumor that develops in the core of a chromaffin cell. This article will focus on pheochromocytoma and its affect on the heart. Because the signs and symptoms of a pheochromocytoma are those of the sympathetic nervous system, this tumor is hard to detect and might not be considered early on. In addition, there are many common deferential diagnoses that may lead to a delay of the correct diagnosis of a pheochromocytoma. Uncontrollable hypertension is one of the primary effects of pheochromocytoma. A severe increase in blood pressure (hypertensive crisis) may occur and this can be a life threatening condition that leads to stroke or arrhythmias. African-Americans are disproportionately affected by hypertension and they often go undiagnosed because of a lack of resources or access to care. This tumor is difficult to detect and its effects often mimic many other diagnoses, which often leads to this tumor being a late consideration. The long-term effects of a pheochromocytoma can lead to damage to the heart muscle, congestive heart failure (CHF), increased risk of diabetes, and even death. Nurses need to be aware of the key signs and symptoms of a pheochromocytoma, and to know when testing for this tumor what symptoms should be considered. Patients who suffer from a diagnosis of this tumor need a lot of emotional support and they must follow a strict diet and medication regimen. Nurses can play a vital role in raising awareness in our community about this tumor as well as being a patient advocate. PMID:21516925

  17. Diabetic retinopathy and blockade of the renin-angiotensin system: new data from the DIRECT study programme.

    PubMed

    Wright, A D; Dodson, P M

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis and medical management of diabetic retinopathy is reviewed. The importance of good control of blood glucose and blood pressure remain key elements in the prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, and a number of specific metabolic pathways have been identified that may be useful additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Trial data, however, aimed specifically to answer the questions of optimum medical management are limited, so the DIRECT study of renin-angiotensin blockade using oral candesartan 32 mg daily is a welcome addition to our knowledge. This arose from the promising improvement of retinopathy outcomes in the EUCLID study of lisinopril in type I diabetes. In DIRECT, 5 years of candesartan treatment in type I diabetes reduced the incidence of retinopathy by two or more steps (EDTRS) in severity by 18% (P=0.0508) and, in a post hoc analysis, reduced the incidence of retinopathy by three-step progression by 35% (P=0.034). In type I diabetes patients there was no effect on progression of established retinopathy. In contrast, in type II diabetes, 5 years of candesartan treatment resulted in 34% regression of retinopathy (P=0.009). Importantly, an overall significant change towards less-severe retinopathy was noted in both type I and II diabetes (Pretinopathy, to prevent the problem in type I diabetes and to treat the early stages in type II diabetes.

  18. The role of diabetic retinopathy in blindness and poor sight in Split-Dalmatia County 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Galetović, Davor; Olujić, Ivana; Znaor, Ljubo; Bućan, Kajo; Karlica, Dobrila; Lesin, Mladen; Susac, Tihomir

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the fifth leading cause of blindness in the world. The aim of this study was to determine the number of blind persons in the Split-Dalmatia County in the 2000-2010 period and how many of them are blind due to diabetic retinopathy. Records of 160 members of the Association of the Blind in the Split-Dalmatia County, enrolled from 2000 to 2010, were retrospectively analyzed. The leading causes of blindness were diabetic retinopathy (25.6%), glaucoma (13.1%), retinal dystrophy (16.2%), and age related macular degeneration (11.8%). The annual incidence of blindness was 8.4/100,000 inhabitants. The largest number of the blind were found in the 70-80 (21.2%) to > 80 (24.3%) age group. Diabetic retinopathy was the cause of blindness in 24 (15%) men and 17 (10.6%) women. The annual incidence of diabetic retinopathy was 2.16 per 100,000. No case of blindness due to diabetic retinopathy was diagnosed in patients younger than 30 years of age, while the highest prevalence was found in the 70-80 age group (34%). Proliferative diabetic retinopathy was the cause of blindness in 92.7% and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy in 7.3% of cases. Study results show that diabetic retinopathy remains the leading cause of blindness. Early identification of high-risk patients is the key factor in prevention and timely detection of ophthalmoscopic changes, thus enabling effective and duly treatment.

  19. Evidence that upregulation of serum IGF-1 concentration can trigger acceleration of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chantelau, E

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Acute reduction of chronic hyperglycaemia can accelerate early diabetic retinopathy. In adolescent patients with Mauriac's syndrome, this phenomenon is related to an upregulation of subnormal serum IGF-1 levels.
AIM—To obtain longitudinal data on serum IGF-1 and retinopathy status in poorly controlled adult insulin dependent (type 1) diabetic patients without Mauriac's syndrome, in whom hyperglycaemia is reduced by intensive insulin therapy.
METHODS—Four patients with chronic severe insulin deficiency and early microangiopathy were studied prospectively. Changes in plasma glucose, HbA1c, serum IGF-1 levels, proteinuria, retinopathy, and clinical status were followed up closely.
RESULTS—Reducing hyperglycaemia from >16 mmol/l (equivalent to HbA1c >11%) to <10 mmol/l (HbA1c <8%) within 5 months increased serum IGF-1 levels by 70-220%. While proteinuria and symptomatic neuropathy regressed, retinopathy progressed from the mild to the severe non-proliferative stage with maculopathy (n=4), and to the proliferative stage (n=1). Laser coagulation was commenced upon the appearance of sight threatening macular oedema (n=4).
CONCLUSION—Upregulation of serum IGF-1 preceding retinal deterioration in these patients suggests a cause-effect relation, consistent with earlier experimental and clinical data. 

 Keywords: diabetes mellitus; macular oedema; metabolic control; intensive therapy; glycated haemoglobin A1c; growth factors PMID:9924360

  20. Investigating Factors Associated with Depression of Type 2 Diabetic Retinopathy Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Duo; Dong, Qing; Gu, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives To assess the depression status of type 2 diabetic retinopathy patients in Nantong China and to identify factors associated with depression. Methods Two hundred and ninety-four patients with type 2 diabetic retinopathy were recruited from the Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University. The severity of DR was measured in the worse eye. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D); the quality of life was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36). The logistic regression analyses were used to identify the independent factors of depression. Results The mean age of the study subjects was 57.77 years (SD: 9.64). Approximately 35.7% of subjects reported depressive symptoms (n = 105).Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that female gender (p = 0.014), low monthly income (p = 0.01), poor vision in the better eye (P = 0.002), laser treatment history (p = 0.01) were significant risk factors for depression. The quality of life of individuals with CES-D score<16 was significantly better compared with individuals with CES-D score≥16. Conclusion The reported depressive symptoms among type 2 diabetic retinopathy population is higher in Nantong China. Gender, salary, vision acuity and treatment history were important risk factors linked to this disorder in the Chinese type 2 diabetic retinopathy population from Nantong. More attention by medical care personnel needs to be paid to the psychological health of this population. PMID:26151365

  1. OCT Angiography Identification of Choroidal Neovascularization Secondary to Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Levison, Ashleigh L; Baynes, Kimberly; Lowder, Careen Y; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute zonal occult outer retinopathy presented with a new lesion suspicious for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in her right eye. Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) confirmed the presence of CNV. OCTA is a new imaging technique that may help guide diagnosis and management of choroidal neovascular membranes in uveitic diseases.

  2. Palmitoylethanolamide, a Natural Retinoprotectant: Its Putative Relevance for the Treatment of Glaucoma and Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M.; Costagliola, Ciro; Fakhry, Josiane; Kopsky, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy is a threat to the eyesight, and glaucoma and diabetes are the main causes for the damage of retinal cells. Recent insights pointed out a common pathogenetic pathway for both disorders, based on chronic inflammation. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous cell protective lipid. Since its discovery in 1957 as a biologically active component in foods and in many living organisms, around 500 scientific papers have been published on PEA's anti-inflammatory and neuron-protective properties. PEA has been evaluated for glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and uveitis, pathological states based on chronic inflammation, respiratory disorders, and various pain syndromes in a number of clinical trials since the 70s of 20th century. PEA is available as a food supplement (PeaPure) and as diet food for medical purposes in Italy (Normast, PeaVera, and Visimast). These products are notified in Italy for the nutritional support in glaucoma and neuroinflammation. PEA has been tested in at least 9 double blind placebo controlled studies, among which two studies were in glaucoma, and found to be safe and effective up to 1.8 g/day, with excellent tolerability. PEA therefore holds a promise in the treatment of a number of retinopathies. We discuss PEA as a putative anti-inflammatory and retinoprotectant compound in the treatment of retinopathies, especially related to glaucoma and diabetes. PMID:26664738

  3. Coats-like retinopathy in a Young Indian Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Liu, David X; Gilbert, Margaret H; Wang, Xiaolei; Didier, Peter J; Shields, Carol L; Lackner, Andrew A

    2015-04-01

    A 1-year-old male Indian rhesus macaque presented with a bilateral blindness. Ocular examination, gross and histopathological evaluation, and immunohistochemistry were performed. The major findings were retinal telangiectasia, accumulation of exudate in the intraretinal and subretinal space, and retinal detachment. Coat-like retinopathy was diagnosed, and it has not been previously reported in veterinary medicine.

  4. Protection from retinopathy and other complications in patients with type 1 diabetes of extreme duration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We performed a cross-sectional, observational study of 351 U.S. residents with at least 50 years of insulin-dependent diabetes. Longitudinal data on retinopathy progression was obtained via chart review in patients followed at the Joslin Diabetes Center eye clinic (Boston, MA). HbA1c was determined ...

  5. Nrf2 as molecular target for polyphenols: A novel therapeutic strategy in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Barber, Alistair J; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Russo, Gian Luigi; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a microvascular complication of diabetes that is considered one of the leading causes of blindness among adults. More than 4.4 million people suffer from this disorder throughout the world. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a redox sensitive transcription factor, plays an essential protective role in regulating the physiological response to oxidative and electrophilic stress via regulation of multiple genes encoding antioxidant proteins and phase II detoxifying enzymes. Many studies suggest that dozens of natural compounds, including polyphenols, can supress oxidative stress and inflammation through targeting Nrf2 and consequently activating the antioxidant response element-related cytoprotective genes. Therefore, Nrf2 may provide a new therapeutic target for treatment of diabetic retinopathy. In the present article, we will focus on the role of Nrf2 in diabetic retinopathy and the ability of polyphenols to target Nrf2 as a therapeutic strategy.

  6. Wide-Field Megahertz OCT Imaging of Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reznicek, Lukas; Kolb, Jan P.; Klein, Thomas; Mohler, Kathrin J.; Wieser, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Kernt, Marcus; Märtz, Josef; Neubauer, Aljoscha S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of wide-field Megahertz (MHz) OCT imaging in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Methods. A consecutive series of 15 eyes of 15 patients with diagnosed diabetic retinopathy were included. All patients underwent Megahertz OCT imaging, a close clinical examination, slit lamp biomicroscopy, and funduscopic evaluation. To acquire densely sampled, wide-field volumetric datasets, an ophthalmic 1050 nm OCT prototype system based on a Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) laser source with 1.68 MHz A-scan rate was employed. Results. We were able to obtain OCT volume scans from all included 15 patients. Acquisition time was 1.8 seconds. Obtained volume datasets consisted of 2088 × 1044 A-scans of 60° of view. Thus, reconstructed en face images had a resolution of 34.8 pixels per degree in x-axis and 17.4 pixels per degree. Due to the densely sampled OCT volume dataset, postprocessed customized cross-sectional B-frames through pathologic changes such as an individual microaneurysm or a retinal neovascularization could be imaged. Conclusions. Wide-field Megahertz OCT is feasible to successfully image patients with diabetic retinopathy at high scanning rates and a wide angle of view, providing information in all three axes. The Megahertz OCT is a useful tool to screen diabetic patients for diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26273665

  7. The Prize Is Healthy Eyes: Using Games to Educate about Diabetic Retinopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stastny, Sherri N.; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a program for prevention of diabetic retinopathy (DR) that was designed for Extension in collaboration with optometrists. The program was created to increase knowledge and awareness about risk factors for DR and included a game and take-home materials. Participants were asked to play a game similar to Wheel of Fortune. A…

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 in the development of diabetic retinopathy and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Ghulam; Kowluru, Renu A

    2010-09-01

    In the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, retinal mitochondria become dysfunctional resulting in accelerated apoptosis of its capillary cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) is considered critical in cell integrity and cell survival, and diabetes activates MMP2 in the retina and its capillary cells. This study aims at elucidating the mechanism by which MMP2 contributes to the development of diabetic retinopathy. Using isolated bovine retinal endothelial cells, the effect of regulation of MMP2 (by its siRNA and pharmacological inhibitor) on superoxide accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction was evaluated. The effect of inhibiting diabetes-induced retinal superoxide accumulation on MMP2 and its regulators was investigated in diabetic mice overexpressing mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Inhibition of MMP2 ameliorated glucose-induced increase in mitochondrial superoxide and membrane permeability, prevented cytochrome c leakage from the mitochondria, and inhibited capillary cell apoptosis. Overexpression of MnSOD protected the retina from diabetes-induced increase in MMP2 and its membrane activator (MT1-MMP), and decrease in its tissue inhibitor (TIMP-2). These results implicate that, in diabetes, MMP2 activates apoptosis of retinal capillary cells by mitochondrial dysfunction increasing their membrane permeability. Understanding the role of MMP2 in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy should help lay ground for MMP2-targeted therapy to retard the development of retinopathy in diabetic patients.

  9. Florida Model Task Force on Diabetic Retinopathy: Development of an Interagency Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the development of a mechanism to organize a network in Florida for individuals who are at risk for diabetic retinopathy. The task force comprised representatives from governmental, academic, professional, and voluntary organizations. It worked to educate professionals, patients, and the public through brochures, resource…

  10. APOLIPOPROTEIN E GENE POLYMORPHISMS ARE NOT ASSOCIATED WITH DIABETIC RETINOPATHY: THE ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK IN COMMUNITIES STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PURPOSE: Polymorphism of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene has been associated with dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. This study examines the association of APOE polymorphisms and diabetic retinopathy. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. METHODS: We studied 1,398 people aged 49 to ...

  11. Sudden loss of vision following bilateral closed femoral nailing: a case of Purtscher's retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Saraswathivilasam S; Philips, George M; Balachandra, Canumalla

    2013-01-01

    Non-ocular causes of loss of vision following polytrauma have been rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of Purtscher's retinopathy in a 20-year-old male patient who had bilateral femur fracture. His vision became normal at 8 weeks follow-up without any intervention.

  12. Retinal expression of small non-coding RNAs in a murine model of proliferative retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Wang, Zhongxiao; Sun, Ye; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Ocular neovascularization is a leading cause of blindness in proliferative retinopathy. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) play critical roles in both vascular and neuronal development of the retina through post-transcriptional regulation of target gene expression. To identify the function and therapeutic potential of sncRNAs in retinopathy, we assessed the expression profile of retinal sncRNAs in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) with pathologic proliferation of neovessels. Approximately 2% of all analyzed sncRNAs were significantly altered in OIR retinas compared with normoxic controls. Twenty three microRNAs with substantial up- or down-regulation were identified, including miR-351, -762, -210, 145, -155, -129-5p, -150, -203, and -375, which were further analyzed for their potential target genes in angiogenic, hypoxic, and immune response-related pathways. In addition, nineteen small nucleolar RNAs also revealed differential expression in OIR retinas compared with control retinas. A decrease of overall microRNA expression in OIR retinas was consistent with reduced microRNA processing enzyme Dicer, and increased expression of Alu element in OIR. Together, our findings elucidated a group of differentially expressed sncRNAs in a murine model of proliferative retinopathy. These sncRNAs may exert critical post-transcriptional regulatory roles in regulating pathological neovascularization in eye diseases. PMID:27653551

  13. Coats-like retinopathy in a Young Indian Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, David X.; Gilbert, Margaret H.; Wang, Xiaolei; Didier, Peter J.; Shields, Carol L.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    A 1-year-old male Indian rhesus macaque presented with a bilateral blindness. Ocular examination, gross and histopathological evaluation, and immunohistochemistry were performed. The major findings were retinal telangiectasia, accumulation of exudate in the intraretinal and subretinal space, and retinal detachment. Coat-like retinopathy was diagnosed, and it has not been previously reported in veterinary medicine. PMID:25656754

  14. Exercise hypertension: an adverse prognosis?

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan G; Rubin, Stanley A; Ellestad, Myrvin H

    2009-01-01

    We sought to clarify the prognostic importance of an "exaggerated" or "hypertensive" systolic blood pressure response to exercise during an exercise test. Studies evaluating the prognosis for cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality in those with hypertension during exercise testing were systematically reviewed. Fourteen studies were identified. Six studies were of healthy volunteers or hypertensives. Eight studies were in subjects with known or suspected heart disease. Without established heart disease, exercise hypertension predicted cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death. However, two of the six studies included a multivariate analysis; both demonstrated no independent association. Studies in subjects with known or suspected heart disease demonstrated that exercise hypertension predicted fewer cardiac events and lesser mortality or, after multivariate adjustment, no associated risk. In a healthy population, a higher exercise blood pressure may indicate hypertension or prehypertension, instead of normal vascular function, and an associated long-term adverse prognosis. In a population with a high burden of heart disease, the highest risk subjects with the most extensive cardiac disease may not be capable of generating pressure or workload to allow the manifestation of exercise systolic hypertension. By comparison, therefore, those with exercise hypertension have a better prognosis. PMID:20409979

  15. Endocrine hypertension – Cushing's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yashpal; Kotwal, Narendra; Menon, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a major and frequent comorbid finding of Cushing's syndrome. This review discusses the etiology and pathophysiology of hypertension in Cushing's syndrome, while suggesting methods of management of this condition. It also provides an overview of diagnosis and management strategies in this disease. PMID:22145133

  16. The Immune System in Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  17. [Resistant hypertension: evaluation and treatment].

    PubMed

    Girerd, Xavier; Rosenbaum, David; Villeneuve, Frédéric

    2009-04-01

    Treatment resistant hypertension is defined as a blood pressure not achieving a goal blood pressure (< 140/90 mm Hg). The diagnosis of resistant hypertension requires use of good blood pressure technique to confirm persistently elevated blood pressure levels. Pseudoresistance, including lack of blood pressure control secondary to poor medication adherence or white coat hypertension, must be excluded. The evaluation of patients with resistant hypertension is focused on identifying contributing and secondary causes of hypertension which are guided by the clinical feature of hypertension: metabolic (obstructive sleep apnea, kidney disease), vascular (renal artery atheroma stenosis), endocrine (hyperaldosteronism), familial (renal artery fibrodyspalsia, adrenal causes). Treatment includes removal of contributing factors, appropriate management of secondary causes, and use of effective multidrug regimens. Three antihypertensive medications including ARB or ACEI in addition to calcium channel blocker and to thiazide diuretics is able to control 75% of hypertensive subjects when prescribed in effective doses. The addition of low dose spironolactone to this triple treatment induces significant BP reduction in most patients with resistant hypertension. PMID:19297124

  18. Automated classifiers for early detection and diagnosis of retinopathy in diabetic eyes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been used to classify eye diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy (DR) and glaucoma. DR is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in the developed world. The implementation of DR diagnostic routines could be feasibly improved by the integration of structural and optical property test measurements of the retinal structure that provide important and complementary information for reaching a diagnosis. In this study, we evaluate the capability of several structural and optical features (thickness, total reflectance and fractal dimension) of various intraretinal layers extracted from optical coherence tomography images to train a Bayesian ANN to discriminate between healthy and diabetic eyes with and with no mild retinopathy. Results When exploring the probability as to whether the subject’s eye was healthy (diagnostic condition, Test 1), we found that the structural and optical property features of the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and the complex formed by the ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers (GCL + IPL) provided the highest probability (positive predictive value (PPV) of 91% and 89%, respectively) for the proportion of patients with positive test results (healthy condition) who were correctly diagnosed (Test 1). The true negative, TP and PPV values remained stable despite the different sizes of training data sets (Test 2). The sensitivity, specificity and PPV were greater or close to 0.70 for the retinal nerve fiber layer’s features, photoreceptor outer segments and retinal pigment epithelium when 23 diabetic eyes with mild retinopathy were mixed with 38 diabetic eyes with no retinopathy (Test 3). Conclusions A Bayesian ANN trained on structural and optical features from optical coherence tomography data can successfully discriminate between healthy and diabetic eyes with and with no retinopathy. The fractal dimension of the OPL and the GCL + IPL complex predicted by the Bayesian radial

  19. Novel Diabetic Mouse Models as Tools for Investigating Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kador, Peter F.; Zhang, Peng; Makita, Jun; Zhang, Zifeng; Guo, Changmei; Randazzo, James; Kawada, Hiroyoshi; Haider, Neena; Blessing, Karen

    2012-01-01

    retinopathy. PMID:23251343

  20. Hypertension, Anti-Hypertensive Medication Use, and Risk of Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Li, Wen-Qing; Qureshi, Abrar A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Individuals with psoriasis are shown to have an elevated risk of hypertension, and anti-hypertensive medications, especially beta-blockers, have been linked to psoriasis development. However, the association of prior existing hypertension and anti-hypertensive medications with risk of incident psoriasis has not been accessed using prospective data. Objective To evaluate the association of hypertension and anti-hypertensive medications with risk of psoriasis based on data from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS). Design Prospective cohort study (1996–2008). Setting Nurses’ Health Study. Participants A total of 77,728 U.S. women who provided biennially updated data on hypertension and anti-hypertensive medications. Main Outcome and Measure Physician-diagnosed psoriasis. Results We documented a total of 843 incident psoriasis cases during 1,066,339 person-years of follow-up. Compared to normotensive women, women with hypertension duration more than 6 years were at a higher risk of developing psoriasis [HR=1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03–1.57]. In stratified analysis, the risk of psoriasis was higher among hypertensive women without medication [HR=1.49, 95% CI, 1.15–1.92] and among hypertensive women with current medication [HR=1.31, 95% CI, 1.10–1.55] when compared to normotensive participants without medication. Compared to women who never used beta-blockers, the multivariate HRs for psoriasis were 1.11 (95% CI, 0.82–1.51) for women who regularly used 1–2 years, 1.06 (95% CI, 0.79–1.40) for 3–5 years, and 1.39 (95% CI, 1.11–1.73) for 6 or more years (P for trend=0.009). There was no association between other individual anti-hypertensive drugs and risk of psoriasis. Conclusions Long-term hypertensive status is associated with an increased risk of psoriasis. Long-term regular use of beta-blockers may also increase the risk of psoriasis. PMID:24990147