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Sample records for hypertensive retinopathy microalbuminuria

  1. Hypertensive retinopathy in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Van Boxtel, Sherry A.

    2003-01-01

    A 12-year-old cat presented for sudden blindness was diagnosed with hypertensive retinopathy on the basis of ophthalmologic and ultrasonic examination. Renal failure due to a large intranephric cyst obstructing the right ureter and renal artery was the suggested cause of the systemic hypertension. The cat died 8 hours after unilateral nephrectomy. PMID:12650046

  2. Microalbuminuria in children with primary and white-coat hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Tomáš; Pohl, Michael; Palyzova, Daniela; John, Ulrike

    2012-03-01

    Microalbuminuria serves as an early marker of hypertension-related renal damage in adults. However, data on the prevalence of microalbuminuria in paediatric hypertensive patients in general and in children with white-coat hypertension (WCH) specifically are lacking. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of microalbuminuria in children with primary hypertension (PH) and WCH, respectively. This was a retrospective case review of children with PH and WCH treated at three paediatric nephrology centres. Untreated children with either form of hypertension for whom measurements of urinary albumin excretion (UAE) had been performed were enrolled in the study. The study cohort comprised 52 children (39 boys) with hypertension (26 children with PH, 26 with WCH). Microalbuminuria (>3.2 mg/mmol creatinine) was present in 20% of children with PH and none of the children with WCH (p < 0.01). Children with PH had a higher median UAE than those with WCH (1.27 ± 1.92 vs. 0.66 ± 0.46 mg/mmol creatinine, p < 0.05). Based on these results, we suggest that children with PH have an increased prevalence of microalbuminuria, while children with WCH show no signs of hypertension-related renal damage.

  3. Left ventricular systolic function in selected type 1 diabetic patients with or without diabetic retinopathy and microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Bućan, Kajo; Bojić, Lovro; Fabijanić, Damir; Galetović, Davor; Čapkun, Vesna; Utrobičić, Dobrila Karlica; Bućan, Ivona

    2014-12-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction is a basic etiologic factor for the development of late clinical complications in patients with diabetes mellitus type 1, such as diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy (which is characterized at the very beginning by microalbuminuria), and left ventricular cardiac dysfunction. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 and with or without diabetic retinopathy and microalbuminuria, and to correlate the duration of diabetes with the dynamics of diabetic retinopathy, microalbuminuria and asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction development in these patients. One-hundred and twenty selected patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 were examined by ophthalmologist and cardiologist. All patients underwent ergometric testing and two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiography with pulsed Doppler. Patients were divided into three groups according to their fundus findings and microalbuminuria: (1) patients without diabetic retinopathy and without microalbuminuria (n = 40); (2) patients with diabetic retinopathy without microalbuminuria (n = 40); and (3) patients with diabetic retinopathy and microalbuminuria (n = 40). All three groups of patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 (with low cardiovascular risk, regulated blood sugar, and without diabetic neuropathy) had echocardiographic values in the normal range. We found no statistically significant correlation between the duration of diabetes mellitus type 1 and echocardiographic values.

  4. More Impact of Microalbuminuria on Retinopathy Than Moderately Reduced GFR Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Harn-Shen; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The current study aimed to investigate whether microalbuminuria or moderately decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a better predictor for the development and progression of retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Type 2 diabetic patients without cardiovascular diseases, malignancy, pregnancy, and acute intercurrent illness were enrolled between 1 August 2001 and 31 December 2002. All participants provided their detailed medical history and underwent an eye fundus examination. They were followed up in outpatient clinics, and serum creatinine, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR), and retinal photographs were followed up annually until 31 December 2009. The primary outcomes were development and progression of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. The secondary outcomes were cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. RESULTS Among 487 participants, 81 subjects had normoalbuminuria and moderate renal impairment (baseline eGFR 30–59.9 mL/min/1.73 m2), and 106 subjects had microalbuminuria and baseline eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Patients with microalbuminuria and eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2 had a significantly greater risk for development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (HR 3.34 [95% CI 1.04–10.70]) compared with those with moderate renal impairment and normoalbuminuria after multivariate adjustment. Risks for renal outcome, cardiovascular events, and all-cause mortality were not significantly different between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Microalbuminuria has a greater impact on predicting the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy compared with moderate decline in GFR among type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:22338100

  5. Microalbuminuria and hypertension in pregnancy: role of aldosterone and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Ambrosini, Guido; Sabbadin, Chiara; Donà, Gabriella; Clari, Giulio; Bordin, Luciana

    2013-09-01

    Women with a history of hypertension in pregnancy are at increased risk of microalbuminuria later in life. Microalbuminuria is a marker of kidney dysfunction frequently related to an inflammatory event. Pregnancy is a dynamic process characterized by immune tolerance, angiogenesis, and hormonal regulation. Menstruation and pregnancy are associated with a physiological inflammation, which is altered in preeclampsia and probably in other hypertensive situations of pregnancy. An imbalance between pro-oxidant factors and the ability to scavenge these factors produces oxidative stress, which has been evaluated in many cells, but leukocytes are the main source of inflammatory cytokines and experimental and clinical evidence support a possible role of aldosterone as a mediator of placental and renal damage mediated by growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and cytokines. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and aldosterone receptor blockers are frequently effective in reducing the risk of progression of cardiovascular and renal disease.

  6. Prognostic value of microalbuminuria during antihypertensive treatment in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Jose Maria; Rodilla, Enrique; Costa, Jose Antonio; Garcia-Escrich, Miguel; Gonzalez, Carmen; Redon, Josep

    2014-12-01

    Whether changes over time of urinary albumin excretion have prognostic value is a matter of discussion. The objective was to assess the prognostic value of changes in urinary albumin excretion over time in cardiovascular risk during antihypertensive treatment. Follow-up study of 2835 hypertensives in the absence of previous cardiovascular disease (mean age 55 years, 47% men, BP 138/80 mm Hg, 19.1% diabetics, and calibrated systemic coronary risk estimation 5 or >10.6%). Usual-care of antihypertensive treatment was implemented to maintain blood pressure<140/90 mm Hg. Urinary albumin excretion was assessed yearly, and the values were expressed as the creatinine ratio. Incidence of cardiovascular events, fatal and nonfatal, was recorded during the follow-up. During a median follow-up of 4.7 years (17 028 patients-year), 294 fatal and first nonfatal cardiovascular events were recorded (1.73 CVD per 100 patients/year). Independently of blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, level of cardiovascular risk, and antihypertensive treatment, microalbuminuria at baseline and at any time during the follow-up resulted in higher risk for events, hazard ratio (HR) 1.35 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.79) and HR 1.49 (95% CI, 1.14-1.94), respectively. Likewise, development of microalbuminuria (HR 1.60; 95% CI, 1.04-2.46) or persistence from the beginning (1.53; 95% CI, 1.13-2.06) had a significantly higher rate of events than if remained normoalbuminuric (HR 1) or regress to normoalbuminuria (HR 1.37; 95% CI, 0.92-2.06) with an 18%, 18%, 8%, and 11% events, respectively, P<0.001. The study supports the value of urinary albumin excretion assessment as a prognostic factor for cardiovascular risk, but also opens the way to consider it as an intermediate objective in hypertension.

  7. Microalbuminuria - A better marker in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ruby P; Christy, Alap; Hegde, Anupama; Manjrekar, Poornima; Joseph, Maria

    2015-09-01

    To assess the role of microalbuminuria in pre-eclampsia (PE) as a diagnostic marker, we studied 40 PE cases and 40 normotensive controls at 24 ± 4 weeks of gestation in women 20-35 years of age. The patients with PE had significant microalbuminuria in comparison with the controls, in addition to deranged renal function tests. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that microalbuminuria had the highest sensitivity (100%) and good specificity (77.6%). Microalbuminuria had the highest area under the curve (0.869) for both diagnosis of PE and renal function assessment. Microalbuminuria also had a good correlation with systolic blood pressure in the cases with mild grades of renal dysfunction. Microalbuminuria is a specific marker in PE and it also helps to assess the renal function status. Therefore, microalbuminuria may be used in the early diagnosis and management of PE patients in order to reduce the immediate and long-term complications.

  8. Body Mass Index (BMI) Is Associated with Microalbuminuria in Chinese Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Yu; Chen, Youming; Li, Yongqiang; Shao, Xiaofei; Liang, Yan; Li, Bin; Holthöfer, Harry; Zhang, Guanjing; Zou, Hequn

    2015-01-01

    There is no general consensus on possible factors associated with microalbuminuria in hypertensive patients nor any reported study about this issue in Chinese patients. To examine this issues, 944 hypertensive patients were enrolled in a study based on a cross-sectional survey conducted in Southern China. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the factors related with the presence of microalbuminuria and urinary excretion of albumin. The prevalence of microalbuminuria in hypertensive and non-diabetic hypertensive patients were 17.16% and 15.25%, respectively. Body mass index (BMI), but not waist circumference (WC), were independently associated with microalbuminuria and the values of urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) based on multiple regression analyses, even after excluding diabetic patients and patients taking inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system from the analyses. Furthermore, patients with obesity (BMI ≥28) had higher levels of ACR, compared with those with normal weight (BMI <24 kg/m2) and overweight (24 kg/m2≤ BMI < 28). In conclusion, BMI, as a modifiable factor, is closely associated with microalbuminuria among Chinese hypertensive patients, which may provide a basis for future development of intervention approaches for these patients. PMID:25674785

  9. Epicardial Adiposity is Associated with Microalbuminuria in Patients with Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Mujgan Tek; Ebinç, Fatma Ayerden; Okyay, Gülay Ulusal; Kutlugün, Aysun Akbal

    2017-01-01

    Background Measurement of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is suggested as a novel cardiometabolic risk factor. Microalbuminuria is a marker of endothelial dysfunction and is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease in patients with systemic hypertension. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of echocardiographic epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness and microalbuminuria in hypertensive patients. Methods 75 essential hypertensive patients were included into the study. All subjects underwent transthoracic echocardiography to measure EAT thickness. Spot urine sample was collected for the assessment of microalbuminuria. Patients were divided into two groups according to their spot urine albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR); Group 1 included normoalbuminuria (0-30 μg/mg); and Group 2: included microalbuminuria (30-300 μg/mg). Thereafter, we evaluated patient characteristics including smoking status, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), antihypertensive treatment, statin therapy and serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglicerides, albumin, C-reactive protein (CRP), creatinine and hemoglobin. Results There was no difference in baseline characteristics between Group 1 and Group 2. Patients with microalbuminuria had significantly higher mean EAT thickness values compared to the normoalbuminuria group (7.1 ± 0.9 vs. 6.6 ± 0.9, p = 0.01). There were positive significant correlations between EAT and age (r = 0.267, p = 0.020), serum creatinine (r = 0.292, p = 0.01), UACR (r = 0.251, p = 0.03), left ventricular mass (r = 0.257, p = 0.03) and left ventricular mass index (r = 0.242, p = 0.04). UACR was independently associated with EAT (p = 0.01) after adjustments were made for age and BMI. Conclusions Epicardial Adipose Tissue (EAT) thickness could be associated with microalbuminuria in patients with essential hypertension. This association could support the recognition of EAT as a credible

  10. Cystatin C, CRP, log TG/HDLc and metabolic syndrome are associated with microalbuminuria in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Rafaela do Socorro Souza e Silva; Vasconcelos, Daniel França; Freitas, Eduardo; de Moura, Flavio José Dutra; Rosa, Tânia Torres; Veiga, Joel Paulo Russomano

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients with systemic hypertension, microalbuminuria is a marker of endothelial damage and is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Objective To determine the factors that may lead to the occurrence of microalbuminuria in hypertensive patients with serum creatinine lower than 1.5 mg/dL. Methods This cross-sectional study included 133 Brazilians with essential hypertension followed up at a hypertension outpatient clinic. Those with serum creatinine higher than 1.5 mg/dL, as well as those with diabetes mellitus, were excluded. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured, and body mass index (BMI) and GFR estimated by using the CKD-EPI formula were calculated. The serum levels of the following were assessed: CysC, creatinine, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP) and fasting glucose. Microalbuminuria was determined in 24-hour urine. Hypertensive patients were classified according to the presence of one or more criteria for metabolic syndrome. Results In a multiple regression analysis, the serum levels of CysC and CRP, the atherogenic index log TG/HDLc and the presence of three or more criteria for metabolic syndrome were positively correlated with microalbuminuria (r2: 0.277, p < 0.05). Conclusion CysC, CRP, log TG/HDLc, and the presence of three or more criteria for metabolic syndrome, regardless of serum creatinine, were associated with microalbuminuria, an early marker of kidney damage and cardiovascular risk in patients with essential hypertension. PMID:24162470

  11. Detection of Hypertension Retinopathy Using Deep Learning and Boltzmann Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triwijoyo, B. K.; Pradipto, Y. D.

    2017-01-01

    hypertensive retinopathy (HR) in the retina of the eye is disturbance caused by high blood pressure disease, where there is a systemic change of arterial in the blood vessels of the retina. Most heart attacks occur in patients caused by high blood pressure symptoms of undiagnosed. Hypertensive retinopathy Symptoms such as arteriolar narrowing, retinal haemorrhage and cotton wool spots. Based on this reasons, the early diagnosis of the symptoms of hypertensive retinopathy is very urgent to aim the prevention and treatment more accurate. This research aims to develop a system for early detection of hypertension retinopathy stage. The proposed method is to determine the combined features artery and vein diameter ratio (AVR) as well as changes position with Optic Disk (OD) in retinal images to review the classification of hypertensive retinopathy using Deep Neural Networks (DNN) and Boltzmann Machines approach. We choose this approach of because based on previous research DNN models were more accurate in the image pattern recognition, whereas Boltzmann machines selected because It requires speedy iteration in the process of learning neural network. The expected results from this research are designed a prototype system early detection of hypertensive retinopathy stage and analysed the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed methods.

  12. Hypertension in pregnancy is a risk factor for microalbuminuria later in life.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Andrea G; Asad, Reem; Scantlebury, Dawn C; Bailey, Kent R; Wiste, Heather J; Hunt, Steven C; Mosley, Thomas H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Turner, Stephen T; Garovic, Vesna D

    2013-09-01

    The authors aimed to compare renal function by estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria in 3 groups of women: nulliparous women, women with a history of normotensive pregnancies, and women with a history of at least one hypertensive pregnancy. Women who participated in the second Family Blood Pressure Program Study visit (2000-2004) and had serum creatinine and urine albumin measurements (n=3015) were categorized as having had no pregnancy lasting >6 months (n=341), having had only normotensive pregnancies (n=2199), or having had at least 1 pregnancy with hypertension (n=475) based on a standardized questionnaire. Women who reported having had at least one pregnancy with hypertension were significantly more likely to be hypertensive (75.6% vs 59.4%, P<.001), diabetic (34.2% vs 27.3%, P≤.001), and have higher body mass index (32.8 vs 30.5, P<.001) than those who reported normotensive pregnancies. There was a significantly greater risk of microalbuminuria (urine albumin-creatinine ratio >25 mg/g) in those who reported at least one pregnancy with hypertension (odds ratio, 1.37; confidence interval, 1.02-1.85; P=.04) than in those with normotensive pregnancies, after adjusting for risk factors for chronic kidney and cardiovascular disease. Hypertension in pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of future microalbuminuria.

  13. Microalbuminuria is associated with abnormal thoracic aortic mechanics in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tsioufis, C P; Lambrou, S G; Stefanadis, C I; Antoniadis, D I; Kallikazaros, I E; Pitsavos, C E; Toutouzas, P K

    2000-10-01

    In a population of 162 patients with currently untreated essential hypertension, those with microalbuminuria (n = 75) had significantly impaired elastic properties of the proximal ascending thoracic aorta compared with their normoalbuminuric counterparts (n = 87), whereas urinary albumin excretion was a significant predictor of aortic mechanics in the entire population. Impaired aortic mechanics in microalbuminuric hypertensives were not fully accounted for by clustering of classic risk factors for atherosclerosis, and constitute a finding that may entail additional long-term cardiovascular risk in this subgroup of patients.

  14. Microalbuminuria test

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes - microalbuminuria; Diabetic nephropathy - microalbuminuria; Kidney disease - microalbuminuria; Proteinuria - microalbuminuria ... to have a kidney problem, you can get treatment before the problem gets worse. People with severe ...

  15. Long-term impact of systolic blood pressure and glycemia on the development of microalbuminuria in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Jose Maria; Rodilla, Enrique; Gonzalez, Carmen; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Redon, Josep

    2005-06-01

    The objective was to assess the temporal impact of factors related to the development of microalbuminuria during the follow-up of young adult normoalbuminurics with high-normal blood pressure or at stage 1 of essential hypertension. Prospective follow-up was conducted on 245 normoalbuminuric hypertensive subjects (mean age 40.9 years; 134 men; blood pressure 139.7/88.6 mm Hg; body mass index 28.5 kg/m2) never treated previously with antihypertensive drugs, with yearly urinary albumin excretion measurements, until the development of microalbuminuria. After enrollment, patients were placed on usual care including nonpharmacological treatment or with an antihypertensive drug regime to achieve a blood pressure of <135/85 mm Hg. Thirty subjects (12.2%) developed microalbuminuria after a mean follow-up of 29.9 months (range 12 to 144 months), 2.5 per 100 patients per year. Baseline urinary albumin excretion (hazard ratio, 1.07; P=0.006) and systolic blood pressure during the follow-up (hazard ratio, 1.03; P=0.008) were independent factors related to the follow-up urinary albumin excretion in a Cox proportional hazard model. A significant increase in the risk of developing microalbuminuria for urinary albumin excretion at baseline >15 mg per 24-hour systolic blood pressure >139 mm Hg and a positive trend in fasting glucose were observed in the univariate analyses. However, in the multivariate analysis, only the baseline urinary albumin excretion and the trend of fasting glucose were independently related to the risk of developing microalbuminuria. In mild hypertensives, the development of microalbuminuria was linked to insufficient blood pressure control and to a progressive increment of glucose values.

  16. A Microalbuminuria Threshold to Predict the Risk for the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Guo, Kaifeng; Lu, Junxi; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Haoyong; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that a microalbuminuria (MA) threshold can help predict the risk for the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)_ patients. Design We conducted a cross-sectional study of 4739 subjects with T2DM and a prospective study of 297 subjects with T2DM in China respectively. Methods Clinical and laboratory data were collected and biologic risk factors associated with any DR were analysed. Results In the cross-sectional study, we found that MA was an independent risk factor for DR development; further, when the patients were divided into MA deciles, odds ratio (ORs) of DR for the patients in the sixth MA decile (10.7 mg/24 h) was 1.579-fold (1.161–2.147) compared to that for patients in the first MA decile. Furthermore, the OR of DR increased with a gradual increase in MA levels. Similarly, in the prospective study, during a mean follow-up of 4.5 years, we found that 51 patients (29.0%) of the 176 subjects with high MA level (10.7–30 mg/24 h) developed DR, while 17 patients (14.1%) of the 121 subjects with lower MA (<10.7 mg/24 h) developed DR, and the relative risk ratio of the development of DR is 2.13(95% CI, 1.58–3.62, P<0.001). Conclusion These data suggest that an MA threshold can predict the risk for the development of DR in type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is still within the traditionally established normal range. PMID:22590593

  17. Detection of hypertensive retinopathy using vessel measurements and textural features.

    PubMed

    Agurto, Carla; Joshi, Vinayak; Nemeth, Sheila; Soliz, Peter; Barriga, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Features that indicate hypertensive retinopathy have been well described in the medical literature. This paper presents a new system to automatically classify subjects with hypertensive retinopathy (HR) using digital color fundus images. Our method consists of the following steps: 1) normalization and enhancement of the image; 2) determination of regions of interest based on automatic location of the optic disc; 3) segmentation of the retinal vasculature and measurement of vessel width and tortuosity; 4) extraction of color features; 5) classification of vessel segments as arteries or veins; 6) calculation of artery-vein ratios using the six widest (major) vessels for each category; 7) calculation of mean red intensity and saturation values for all arteries; 8) calculation of amplitude-modulation frequency-modulation (AM-FM) features for entire image; and 9) classification of features into HR and non-HR using linear regression. This approach was tested on 74 digital color fundus photographs taken with TOPCON and CANON retinal cameras using leave-one out cross validation. An area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.84 was achieved with sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 67%, respectively.

  18. Microalbuminuria in HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hadigan, Colleen; Edwards, Elizabeth; Rosenberg, Alice; Purdy, Julia B.; Fleischman, Estee; Howard, Lilian; Mican, JoAnn M.; Sampath, Karmini; Oyalowo, Akinbowale; Johnson, Antoinette; Adler, Alexandra; Rehm, Catherine; Smith, Margo; Lai, Leon; Kopp, Jeffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Microalbuminuria is a marker for early kidney disease and cardiovascular risk. The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of microalbuminuria in an HIV-infected clinic population, to test the predictive value of a single urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) to identify persistent microalbuminuria and to examine covariates of microalbuminuria. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected subjects (n=182) without proteinuria (P/C ratio ≥0.5 g/g), elevated serum creatinine, diabetes, or chronic inflammatory conditions. Subjects completed three research visits within nine months. Microalbuminuria was defined as the geometric mean ACR of 25–355 mg/g for women and 17–250 mg/g for men. Results The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 14%. The negative predictive value of a single urine ACR determination was 98%, whereas the positive predictive value was only 74%. Microalbuminuria was similar among Black (15%) and non-Black (14%) subjects (p=0.8). Subjects with microalbuminuria were more likely to have hypertension (p=0.02) and metabolic syndrome (p=0.03). While duration of HIV infection and the level of HIV viremia were similar between groups, those with microalbuminuria were more likely to have a CD4 count <200 cells/μL (p=0.0003). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, the only significant independent predictors of microalbuminuria were low CD4 count (p=0.018) and current ritonavir exposure (p=0.04). Conclusion The prevalence of microalbuminuria in an HIV-infected clinic population was similar to earlier reports, and was associated with hypertension and impaired immune function. A single normal ACR determination effectively excludes microalbuminuria, whereas an elevated ACR requires confirmation. PMID:23615312

  19. Risk Factors for Retinopathy and DME in Type 2 Diabetes-Results from the German/Austrian DPV Database.

    PubMed

    Hammes, Hans-Peter; Welp, Reinhard; Kempe, Hans-Peter; Wagner, Christian; Siegel, Erhard; Holl, Reinhard W

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and risk factors for early and severe diabetic retinopathy and macular edema in a large cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes Retinopathy grading (any retinopathy, severe retinopathy, diabetic macular edema) and risk factors of 64784 were prospectively recorded between January 2000 and March 2013 and analyzed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and logistic regression. Retinopathy was present in 20.12% of subjects, maculopathy was found in 0.77%. HbA1c > 8%, microalbuminuria, hypertension, BMI > 35 kg/m2 and male sex were significantly associated with any retinopathy, while HbA1c and micro- and macroalbuminuria were the strongest risk predictors for severe retinopathy. Presence of macroalbuminuria increased the risk for DME by 177%. Retinopathy remains a significant clinical problem in patients with type 2 diabetes. Metabolic control and blood pressure are relevant factors amenable to treatment. Concomitant kidney disease identifies high risk patients and should be emphasized in interdisciplinary communication.

  20. Investigating kidney donation as a risk factor for hypertension and microalbuminuria: findings from the Swiss prospective follow-up of living kidney donors

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Gilbert T; Nolte, Christa; Tsinalis, Dimitrios; Steiger, Jürg; Bachmann, Lucas M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the role of nephrectomy as a risk factor for the development of hypertension and microalbuminuria. Design Prospective, long-term follow-up study. Setting Swiss Organ Living-Donor Health Registry. Participants All living kidney donors in Switzerland between 1993 and 2009. Interventions Data on health status and renal function before 1 year and biennially after donation were collected. Primary and secondary outcome measures Comparison of 1-year and 5-year occurrences of hypertension among normotensive donors with 1-year and 5-year estimates from the Framingham hypertension risk score. Multivariate random intercept models were used to investigate changes of albumin excretion after donation, correcting for repeated measurements and cofactors such as age, male gender and body mass index. Results A total of 1214 donors contributed 3918 data entries with a completed biennial follow-up rate of 74% during a 10-year period. Mean (SD) follow-up of donors was 31.6 months (34.4). Median age at donation was 50.5 years (IQR 42.2–58.8); 806 donors (66.4%) were women. Donation increased the risk of hypertension after 1 year by 3.64 (95% CI 3.52 to 3.76; p<0.001). Those participants remaining normotensive 1 year after donation return to a risk similar to that of the healthy Framingham population. Microalbuminuria before donation was dependent on donor age but not on the presence of hypertension. After nephrectomy, hypertension became the main driver for changes in albumin excretion (OR 1.19; 95% CI 0.13 to 2.25; p=0.03) and donor age had no effect. Conclusions Nephrectomy propagates hypertension and increases susceptibility for the development of hypertension-induced microalbuminuria. PMID:27006347

  1. Malignant Hypertensive Retinopathy in an Infant with Mid-Aortic Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Winlaw, David S.; Donaldson, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Case report describing an eight-month-old infant presenting with intermittent esotropia and irritability who was found to have malignant (grade 4) hypertensive retinopathy and mid-aortic syndrome. Methods. Visual acuity was 6/140 in the right eye and not recordable in the left eye. Blood pressure was as high as 230/120 mmHg. Fundoscopy revealed bilateral optic disc swelling, macular stars, and serous retinal detachment in the left eye, findings that are consistent with malignant (grade 4) hypertensive retinopathy. CT abdominal angiogram revealed a severe mid-aortic syndrome with occlusion of the abdominal aorta at T12. Results. The patient was treated with medical management of his hypertension, improving the subretinal exudate. Binocular visual acuity improved to 6/9.5 over 9 months. There was a persistent left relative afferent pupillary defect and moderate left esotropia. Conclusion. This is the first reported case of malignant hypertensive retinopathy in an infant with concomitant mid-aortic occlusion. The authors emphasize the need for an ophthalmological and pediatric examination in a child presenting with intermittent squint and irritability. The esotropia was found to be a false localizing sign of raised intracranial pressure secondary to the severe mid-aortic syndrome. PMID:27795862

  2. Hypertensive Retinopathy Associated With Use of the Ephedra-Free Weight-Loss Herbal Supplement Hydroxycut

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Scott L.; Moawad, Fouad J.; Hartzel, Joshua D.; Iglesias, Melissa; Jackson, William L.

    2006-01-01

    The use of performance-enhancing and weight-loss supplements is prevalent in the United States, and over the past decade, there has been growing concern with regard to the safety and efficacy of these products. It is well documented that ephedra-based products are associated with adverse reactions, including serious cardiovascular and neurologic injuries. With new restrictions placed on such products, companies are now marketing caffeine-based ephedra-free herbal supplements. Less is known about the potential side effects of these products. We present the case of a 42-year-old, previously healthy man who developed malignant hypertension and hypertensive retinopathy while taking Hydroxycut, a caffeine-based ephedra-free supplement. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of hypertensive retinopathy associated with the use of Hydroxycut. Given the lack of investigative studies in regard to their safety and efficacy, judicious care should be taken with the use of all herbal supplements, including those designated as ephedra-free. Readers are encouraged to respond to George Lundberg, MD, Editor of MedGenMed, for the editor's eye only or for possible publication via email: glundberg@medscape.net PMID:17406200

  3. Hypertensive Retinopathy as the First Manifestation of Advanced Renal Disease in a Young Patient: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Arriozola-Rodríguez, Karen Janeth; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Hernández, Virginia Alejandra; Rodríguez-Loaiza, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report the case of a 23-year-old patient suffering from bilateral acute visual loss who received the diagnosis of hypertensive retinopathy. After systemic evaluation, he was diagnosed with bilateral renal disease and chronic renal failure, requiring a kidney transplantation to manage the systemic illness, followed by gradual improvement of his visual acuity. PMID:26955342

  4. Effect of lercanidipine compared with ramipril on albumin excretion rate in hypertensive Type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria: DIAL study (diabete, ipertensione, albuminuria, lercanidipina).

    PubMed

    Dalla Vestra, M; Pozza, G; Mosca, A; Grazioli, V; Lapolla, A; Fioretto, P; Crepaldi, G

    2004-10-01

    Microalbuminuria and hypertension are risk factors for diabetic nephropathy in Type 2 diabetic patients. Recent data suggest that blockade of the renin-angiotensin system slows the progression of diabetic nephropathy; in contrast, the results on the renoprotective effect of calcium channel antagonists are conflicting. We evaluated the effectiveness of lercanidipine, in comparison with ramipril, on the reduction in albumin excretion rate (AER) and blood pressure in mild-to-moderate hypertensive patients with Type 2 diabetes and persistent microalbuminuria. A total of 277 patients were enrolled in a multicentric, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled, parallel-group trial; 180 were randomized to receive 10-20 mg/day of lercanidipine or 5-10 mg/day of ramipril and followed up for 9-12 months. The primary outcome was the change in AER from baseline. After 9-12 months of follow-up, a reduction in AER of -17.4+/-65 microg/min (p<0.05) and -19.7+/-52.5 (p<0.05) in the lercanidipine and ramipril group, respectively, was observed, without differences between the groups. A significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed in both the lercanidipine and ramipril-based treatment groups (p<0.0001 for both). This study demonstrated that treatment with lercanidipine 10-20 mg/day does not worsen albuminuria in microalbuminuric Type 2 diabetic patients with hypertension. Indeed, both lercanidipine and ramipril treatments resulted in a significant reduction in AER without a statistically significant difference between the two groups.

  5. Renal and cardiovascular risk predictive value of two different microalbuminuria screening methods in patients with hypertension with/without diabetes in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Polónia, J; Carvalho, D; Nazaré, J; Martins, L; da Silva, P M; Aguiar, C; Manso, M C; Carqueja, T

    2016-11-01

    MicRoAlbuminuria sCreening survEy (RACE) was a multicentre, observational, cross-sectional study conducted in primary health-care settings of Portugal. Here, we present a post-hoc analysis from the RACE study, assessing the renal and cardiovascular (CV) risk predictive value of two different microalbuminuria (MA) screening methods, nephelometry with 24-h urine (MA-24 h) and Micral test with occasional urine (MicralA) in patients with hypertension (HTN) with/without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Out of 3065 patients, 1173 (38.3%) were in the HTN group without T2DM (HTN) and 1892 (61.7%) in the HTN group with T2DM (HTN+T2DM). The overall prevalence of MA was 50.6% determined by MicralA and 22.1% with MA-24 h. Urinary albumin excretion data obtained by both techniques correlated significantly (rs=0.586; P<0.001). In all subjects, MicralA showed a sensitivity of 93%, specificity of 62% for detection of MA, with a positive predictive value of 41% and negative predictive value of 97%. With both methods, the presence of MA was independently associated with a higher risk (1.5- to 2.9-fold) of CV and renal organ damage in both HTN and HTN+T2DM groups. MicralA, due to its high sensitivity and negative predictive value, can be considered as a valid and reliable method for MA screening in patients with HTN with/without T2DM.

  6. Fenofibrate and Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Knickelbein, Jared E; Abbott, Akshar B; Chew, Emily Y

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common and sight-threatening microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is a leading cause of blindness among working-aged adults. Medical therapies including intensive control of hyperglycemia and hypertension have been shown to reduce the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. The association of dyslipidemia and treatment with statins with diabetic retinopathy is inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. However, two recent randomized clinical trials have demonstrated beneficial effects of systemic fenofibrate therapy in reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy independently of serum lipid levels. These findings suggest that fenofibrate may be an effective strategy for reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy, thus reducing the large and growing public health burden of treating the sight-threatening complications of diabetic retinopathy.

  7. Four-Year Incidence of Diabetic Retinopathy in a Spanish Cohort: The MADIABETES Study

    PubMed Central

    Salinero-Fort, Miguel Á.; San Andrés-Rebollo, Francisco Javier; de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen; Arrieta-Blanco, Francisco Jesús; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, to identify the risk factors associated with the incidence of retinopathy and to develop a risk table to predict four-year retinopathy risk stratification for clinical use, from a four-year cohort study. Design The MADIABETES Study is a prospective cohort study of 3,443 outpatients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, sampled from 56 primary health care centers (131 general practitioners) in Madrid (Spain). Results The cumulative incidence of retinopathy at four-year follow-up was 8.07% (95% CI = 7.04–9.22) and the incidence density was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.75–2.33) cases per 1000 patient-months or 2.43 (95% CI = 2.10–2.80) cases per 100 patient-years. The highest adjusted hazard ratios of associated risk factors for incidence of diabetic retinopathy were LDL-C >190 mg/dl (HR = 7.91; 95% CI = 3.39–18.47), duration of diabetes longer than 22 years (HR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.18–3.39), HbA1c>8% (HR = 1.90; 95% CI = 1.30–2.77), and aspirin use (HR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.22–2.24). Microalbuminuria (HR = 1.17; 95% CI = 0.75–1.82) and being female (HR = 1.12; 95% CI = 0.84–1.49) showed a non-significant increase of diabetic retinopathy. The greatest risk is observed in females who had diabetes for more than 22 years, with microalbuminuria, HbA1c>8%, hypertension, LDL-Cholesterol >190 mg/dl and aspirin use. Conclusions After a four-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of retinopathy was relatively low in comparison with other studies. Higher baseline HbA1c, aspirin use, higher LDL-Cholesterol levels, and longer duration of diabetes were the only statistically significant risk factors found for diabetic retinopathy incidence. This is the first study to demonstrate an association between aspirin use and diabetic retinopathy risk in a well-defined cohort of patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at low risk of

  8. [Microalbuminuria and urinary albumin excretion in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Tagle, Rodrigo; González, Fernando; Acevedo, Mónica

    2012-06-01

    Microalbuminuria is a new tool in the management of patients with diabetes mellitus or hypertension. Microalbuminuria is an easily measured biomarker in a urine sample. Urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in first morning urine sample correlates with 24 hours urinary albumin excretion, but it is easier to obtain, and can identify hypertensive or diabetic patients with high risk for cardiovascular events. Therapeutic interventions such as renin angiotensin system blockade have demonstrated their usefulness in reducing urinary albumin excretion in clinical studies. It would be advisable to incorporate urinary albumin to creatinine ratio to the routine clinical monitoring of patients with cardiovascular risk, such as those with hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  9. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetic Retinopathy What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Click for more information Can Cause Vision ... vision loss and even blindness can result. Other Diabetic Eye Diseases In addition to diabetic retinopathy, other ...

  10. Microalbuminuria: is it a valid predictor of cardiovascular risk?

    PubMed

    Tagle, Rodrigo; Acevedo, Monica; Vidt, Donald G

    2003-03-01

    Microalbuminuria strongly predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, clinical nephropathy, and progression of renal disease in high-risk populations. We recommend screening patients with type 2 diabetes, older patients with type 1 diabetes, and older patients with stage 2 hypertension or higher (ie, > or = 160/100 mm Hg).

  11. Diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Lozano, M; Salinas, P

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the importance of diabetic retinopathy in the loss of visual function. We exposed the most important risk factors, such as diabetes duration, poor metabolic control, pregnancy, puberty, hypertension, poor control of blood lipids, renal disease, and sleep apnea syndrome. We describe the pathogenesis of the disease, small retinal vessel microangiopathies which produce extravasation, edema and ischemia phenomena. We put special emphasis on the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its pathogenic importance. They are also described the main clinical symptoms as microaneurysms, intraretinal hemorrhages, hard and soft exudates, intraretinal microvascular abnormalities (IRMA), venous disorders, formation of new vessels and diabetic macular edema (the latter being the most common cause of vision loss). Finally we describe the latest diagnostic techniques and eye treatment, with special emphasis on obesity surgery importance as more important preventive factor to eliminate the predisposing and precipitating disease symptoms.

  12. Prevalence of microalbuminuria among middle-aged population of China: a multiple center cardiovascular epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guang; Wang, ZengWu; Zhang, Linfeng; Chen, Zuo; Wang, Xin; Guo, Min; Tian, Ye; Shao, Lan; Zhu, Manlu

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of microalbuminuria (MAU) and the relationships with other cardiovascular (CV) risk factors among a middle-aged Chinese population. Data from 10 313 participants were included in our cross-sectional survey. Microalbuminuria was defined as the urine albumin to creatinine ratio of 30:300 mg/g from a single-spot morning urine sample. Microalbuminuria was found to be common in males and females (15.04% vs 10.09%) aged 35 to 64 years in this Chinese general population, especially in those with obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. Multivariate analysis found that body mass index, triglyceride, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, alcohol consumption, hypertension, and diabetes were independently associated with MAU. Microalbuminuria may be a useful indicator for risk of CV disease in general populations.

  13. Occurrence of microalbuminuria among children and adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Al-Agha, Abdulmoein E; Ocheltree, Ali; Hakeem, Amr

    2013-11-01

    Microalbuminuria precedes the onset of diabetic nephropathy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) pediatric patients. Its prevention is among the most important challenges in managing IDDM. We attempted to determine the occurrence of microalbuminuria among IDDM Saudi children and adolescents and its associated risk factors. This is a retrospective cross-sectional study conducted on 409 IDDM children and adolescents attending the pediatric clinic at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital from 2006 to 2010. Their ages ranged from 1 to 18 years and the mean ± standard deviation (mean ± SD) was 12.3 ± 4.1 years. Twenty-four-hour urinary albumin excretion (on two separate occasions or more, 3 - 6 months apart each), HbA1c, duration of IDDM, Tanner staging and body mass index (BMI) were reviewed. Prevalence of microalbuminuria in our cohort was 11.3%. IDDM duration was ≥2 years in 55.8% of our patients; of them, 15.6% had microalbuminuria while 45.2% had IDDM duration <2 years (6% had microalbuminuria) (P <0.01). The prevalence of microalbuminuria was higher among the post-pubertal subjects (50%) than that among the pre-pubertal (8.7%) and pubertal (41.5%) subjects. Furthermore, microalbuminuria was present in 16.7% of those with elevated blood pressure, but only in 8.5% among those with normal blood pressure (P <0.05). The enrolled overweight and obese subjects showed a higher prevalence of microalbuminuria (14%) when compared with that among those with a normal BMI (6.6%) (P <0.05). In our cohort, duration of IDDM, pubertal status, hypertension and BMI affected the prevalence of microalbuminuria. Annual screening for microalbuminuria in IDDM children and adolescents is imperative.

  14. [Eclipse retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Simon; Høgsbro, Malou

    2014-11-10

    Eclipse retinopathy is a condition with macular damage resulting from viewing of a solar eclipse. This case report illustrates how eclipse retinopathy was diagnosed with a delay of more than 30 years. The report also summarises how solar eclipse can be observed without risk of retinal damage.

  15. Radiation retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Zamber, R W; Kinyoun, J L

    1992-01-01

    Radiation therapy is effective against many cancerous and noncancerous disease processes. As with other therapeutics, side effects must be anticipated, recognized, and managed appropriately. Radiation retinopathy is a vision-threatening complication of ocular, orbital, periorbital, facial, nasopharyngeal, and cranial irradiation. Factors that appear important in the pathogenesis of radiation retinopathy include total radiation dosage, fraction size, concomitant chemotherapy, and preexisting vascular disorders. Clinical manifestations of the disorder include macular edema and nonproliferative and proliferative retinopathy, similar to changes seen in diabetic retinopathy. Argon laser photocoagulation has proved efficacious for managing macular edema and fibrovascular proliferation in some of these patients. Ongoing basic laboratory and clinical research efforts have led to a better understanding of the pathogenesis, natural history, and treatment response of radiation retinopathy. The ultimate goal of this knowledge is to improve the prevention, recognition, and management of this vision-threatening complication. Images PMID:1441494

  16. Hydroxychloroquine retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, I H; Sharma, S; Luqmani, R; Downes, S M

    2017-03-10

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ; Plaquenil) is used increasingly in the management of a variety of autoimmune disorders, with well established roles in dermatology and rheumatology and emerging roles in oncology. Hydroxychloroquine has demonstrated a survival benefit in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus; some clinicians advocate its use in all such patients. However, Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine (CQ) have been associated with irreversible visual loss due to retinal toxicity. Hydroxychloroquine retinal toxicity is far more common than previously considered; an overall prevalence of 7.5% was identified in patients taking HCQ for greater than 5 years, rising to almost 20% after 20 years of treatment. This review aims to provide an update on HCQ/CQ retinopathy. We summarise emerging treatment indications and evidence of efficacy in systemic disease, risk factors for retinopathy, prevalence among HCQ users, diagnostic tests, and management of HCQ retinopathy. We highlight emerging risk factors such as tamoxifen use, and new guidance on safe dosing, reversing the previous recommendation to use ideal body weight, rather than actual body weight. We summarise uncertainties and the recommendations made by existing HCQ screening programmes. Asian patients with HCQ retinopathy may demonstrate an extramacular or pericentral pattern of disease; visual field testing and retinal imaging should include a wider field for screening in this group. HCQ is generally safe and effective for the treatment of systemic disease but because of the risk of HCQ retinal toxicity, modern screening methods and ideal dosing should be implemented. Guidelines regarding optimal dosing and screening regarding HCQ need to be more widely disseminated.Eye advance online publication, 10 March 2017; doi:10.1038/eye.2016.298.

  17. A Cost-Benefit and Accurate Method for Assessing Microalbuminuria: Single versus Frequent Urine Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Roholla; Gharipour, Mojgan; Khosravi, Alireza; Jozan, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to answer the question whether a single testing for microalbuminuria results in a reliable conclusion leading costs saving. Methods. This current cross-sectional study included a total of 126 consecutive persons. Microalbuminuria was assessed by collection of two fasting random urine specimens on arrival to the clinic as well as one week later in the morning. Results. In overall, 17 out of 126 participants suffered from microalbuminuria that, among them, 12 subjects were also diagnosed as microalbuminuria once assessing this factor with a sensitivity of 70.6%, a specificity of 100%, a PPV of 100%, a NPV of 95.6%, and an accuracy of 96.0%. The measured sensitivity, specificity, PVV, NPV, and accuracy in hypertensive patients were 73.3%, 100%, 100%, 94.8%, and 95.5%, respectively. Also, these rates in nonhypertensive groups were 50.0%, 100%, 100%, 97.3%, and 97.4%, respectively. According to the ROC curve analysis, a single measurement of UACR had a high value for discriminating defected from normal renal function state (c = 0.989). Urinary albumin concentration in a single measurement had also high discriminative value for diagnosis of damaged kidney (c = 0.995). Conclusion. The single testing of both UACR and urine albumin level rather frequent testing leads to high diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy as well as high predictive values in total population and also in hypertensive subgroups.

  18. Eclipse retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, S. P.; Gupta, A.; Jain, I. S.

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients (13 eyes) suffered from varying degrees of eclipse retinopathy during a solar eclipse on 16 February 1980. There was no correlation between severity of the fundus lesions and the visual acuity. In 8 of the 10 eyes available for follow-up 6/6 or better visual acuity was seen. Early fluorescein studies revealed microleaks in 3 eyes (2 patients) and masking of choroidal fluorescence in 1 eye; however, 1 to 3 weeks later these eyes showed only faint window defects. It is postulated that in mild to moderate lesions there is a transient retinal capillary spasm, producing oedema in anterior retinal layers. Fluorescein angiography in such patients reveals no abnormality or only masking of choroidal fluorescence. However, severe cases develop micropunctures in the tight junctions of the pigment epithelium, leading to microleaks, which are sealed within a short period. Images PMID:7448156

  19. Eclipse retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Dhir, S P; Gupta, A; Jain, I S

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients (13 eyes) suffered from varying degrees of eclipse retinopathy during a solar eclipse on 16 February 1980. There was no correlation between severity of the fundus lesions and the visual acuity. In 8 of the 10 eyes available for follow-up 6/6 or better visual acuity was seen. Early fluorescein studies revealed microleaks in 3 eyes (2 patients) and masking of choroidal fluorescence in 1 eye; however, 1 to 3 weeks later these eyes showed only faint window defects. It is postulated that in mild to moderate lesions there is a transient retinal capillary spasm, producing oedema in anterior retinal layers. Fluorescein angiography in such patients reveals no abnormality or only masking of choroidal fluorescence. However, severe cases develop micropunctures in the tight junctions of the pigment epithelium, leading to microleaks, which are sealed within a short period.

  20. [Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Mitsuru

    2014-04-01

    Hypertension is well known to one of the risk factors to reduce cognitive function, however, it is still unclear whether anti-hypertensive therapy is effective to prevent development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Epidemiological studies suggested antihypertensive therapy from the middle-age could reduce risk of dementia. The meta-analysis including HYVET also suggested blood pressure lowering from the elderly might be also effective to prevent development of dementia. The network meta-analysis and the cohort study using mega-data bank suggested ARB might be effective to prevent development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease compared to administration with other anti-hypertensive drugs. Although the further major clinical investigation is required, anti-hypertensive treatment might be useful to manage hypertensive patients with dementia.

  1. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Lepine, Todd

    2012-05-01

    Hypertension is responsible for roughly one-in-six adult deaths annually in the United States and is associated with five of the top nine causes of death.(1) Ten trillion dollars is the estimated annual cost worldwide of the direct and indirect effects of hypertension.(2,3) In the U.S. alone, costs estimated at almost $74 billion in 2009 placed a huge economic burden on the health care system.(4) The prevalence of hypertension increases with advancing age to the point where more than half of people 60 to 69 years of age and at least three-fourths of those 70 years of age and older are affected.(5) Most individuals with hypertension do not have it adequately controlled.(1,6) Medication noncompliance due to avoidance of side effects is suggested to be a primary factor.(6) The epidemic incidence of hypertension and its significant cost to society indicate that a well-tolerated, cost-effective approach to treatment is urgently needed.

  2. Retinopathy in old persons with and without diabetes mellitus: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility—Reykjavik Study (AGES-R)

    PubMed Central

    Gunnlaugsdottir, E.; Halldorsdottir, S.; Klein, R.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Klein, B. E.; Benediktsson, R.; Harris, T. B.; Launer, L. J.; Aspelund, T.; Gudnason, V.

    2012-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We aimed to describe the prevalence of retinopathy in an aged cohort of Icelanders with and without diabetes mellitus. Methods The study population consisted of 4,994 persons aged ≥67 years, who participated in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility—Reykjavik Study (AGES-R). Type 2 diabetes mellitus was defined as HbA1c ≥6.5% (>48 mmol/mol). Retinopathy was assessed by grading fundus photographs using the modified Airlie House adaptation of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study protocol. Associations between retinopathy and risk factors were estimated using odds ratios obtained from multivariate analyses. Results The overall prevalence of retinopathy in AGES-R was 12.4%. Diabetes mellitus was present in 516 persons (10.3%), for 512 of whom gradable fundus photos were available, including 138 persons (27.0%, 95% CI 23.2, 31.0) with any retinopathy. Five persons (1.0%, 95% CI 0.3, 2.3) had proliferative retinopathy. Clinically significant macular oedema was present in five persons (1.0%, 95% CI 0.3, 2.3). Independent risk factors for retinopathy in diabetic patients in a multivariate model included HbA1c, insulin use and use of oral hypoglycaemic agents, the last two being indicators of longer disease duration. In 4478 participants without diabetes mellitus, gradable fundus photos were available for 4,453 participants, with retinopathy present in 476 (10.7%, 95% CI 9.8, 11.6) and clinically significant macular oedema in three persons. Independent risk factors included increasing age and microalbuminuria. Conclusions/interpretation Over three-quarters (78%) of retinopathy cases were found in persons without diabetes and a strong association between microalbuminuria and non-diabetic retinopathy was found. These results may have implications for patient management of the aged. PMID:22134840

  3. Nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of retinopathy: evidences from preclinical and clinical researches.

    PubMed

    Opatrilova, Radka; Kubatka, Peter; Caprnda, Martin; Büsselberg, Dietrich; Krasnik, Vladimir; Vesely, Pavol; Saxena, Sandeep; Ruia, Surabhi; Mozos, Ioana; Rodrigo, Luis; Kruzliak, Peter; Dos Santos, Katia Goncalves

    2017-04-08

    Retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness and visual disability in working-aged people. The pathogenesis of retinopathy is an actual and still open query. Alterations contributing to oxidative and nitrosative stress, including elevated nitric oxide and superoxide production, changes in the expression of different isoforms of nitric oxide synthase or endogenous antioxidant system, have been implicated in the mechanisms how this ocular disease develops. In addition, it was documented that renin-angiotensin system has been implicated in the progression of retinopathy. Based on comprehensive preclinical and clinical researches in this area, the role of above-mentioned factors in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, hypertensive retinopathy and ischaemic proliferative retinopathy is reviewed in this study. Moreover, the genetic susceptibility factors involved in the development of the retinopathy and possible strategies that utilize antioxidants as additive therapy are also highlighted here.

  4. Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

  5. Retinopathy of Prematurity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinweg, Sue Byrd; Griffin, Harold C.; Griffin, Linda W.; Gingras, Happy

    2005-01-01

    The eyes of premature infants are especially vulnerable to injury after birth. A serious complication is called retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), which is abnormal growth of the blood vessels in an infant's eye. Retinopathy of prematurity develops when abnormal blood vessels grow and spread throughout the retina, which is the nerve tissue at the…

  6. Reduction of microalbuminuria in type-2 diabetes mellitus with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor alone and with cilnidipine.

    PubMed

    Singh, V K; Mishra, A; Gupta, K K; Misra, R; Patel, M L; Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the antiproteinuric effect of enalapril angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor) alone or in combination with cilnidipine in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. The study was conducted on 71 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus patients with hypertension and microalbuminuria. They were divided into two groups randomly as follows: Group I (enalaprilalone, n = 36) and Group II (enalapril with cilnidipine, n = 35). In both the groups, baseline 24 h urinary albumin was estimated and was repeated every 3 months upto 1-year. After 1-year follow-up, reduction in microalbuminuria was found to be greater in Group II. In Group I microalbuminuria came down by 25.68 ± 21.40 while in Group II it reduced by 54.88 ± 13.84 (P < 0.001). We conclude that in diabetic population, cilnidipine has an additive effect in microalbuminuria reduction over and above the well-proven effect of ACE inhibitors.

  7. Free triiodothyronine concentrations are inversely associated with microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yulin; Ye, Lei; Wang, Tiange; Hong, Jie; Bi, Yufang; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Baihui; Sun, Jichao; Huang, Xiaolin; Xu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid function and microalbuminuria are both associated with vascular disease and endothelial damage. However, whether thyroid function is associated with microalbuminuria is not well established. The objective was to explore the relationship between thyroid hormones and microalbuminuria in Chinese population. A community-based cross-sectional study was performed among 3,346 Chinese adults (aged ≥ 40 years). Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) were determined by chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. A single-void first morning urine sample was obtained for urinary albumin-creatinine ratio measurement. The prevalence of microalbuminuria decreased according to FT3 quartiles (13.2, 9.5, 8.6, and 8.2%, P for trend = 0.0005). A fully adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that high FT3 levels were associated with low prevalent microalbuminuria. The adjusted odds ratios for microalbuminuria were 0.61 (95% CI, 0.43-0.87, P = 0.007) when comparing the highest with the lowest quartile of FT3. The exclusion of participants with abnormal FT3 did not appreciably change the results (OR = 0.69, 95% CI, 0.49-0.98, P = 0.02). We concluded that serum FT3 levels, even within the normal range, were inversely associated with microalbuminuria in middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults. FT3 concentrations might play a role in the pathogenesis of microalbuminuria.

  8. Microalbuminuria and pegylated interferon in hepatitis-C patients.

    PubMed

    Elshahawi, Yasser; Sany, Dawlat; Abd Elmohsen, Walid Anwar; Tantawi, Tarek

    2015-11-01

    To determine the relation between hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 4 and microalbuminuria in relation to hepatic histology and viremia in the absence of cryoglobulinemia and to examine the effect of treatment on microalbuminuria, we studied 400 HCV genotype-4-infected patients who were tested for microalbuminuria, albumin creatinine ratio (ACR), urea, creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). The parameters were measured again in the HCV patients after six months of treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Microalbuminuria was detected in 56 (14%) HCV-positive patients. There was a highly significant reduction in the microalbuminuria levels among the HCV-positive individuals after six months of therapy (P <0.001). Microalbuminuria was significantly associated with older age [Odds Ratio (OR): 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0-1.2, P = 0.01], elevated creatinine (OR: 0.09, 95% CI: 0.01- 0.7, P = 0.02), high modified Histological Activity Index score (OR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5, P = 0.004) and increased viral load (OR: 2.8, 95% CI: 1.1-6.6, P = 0.01). Sustained virological response (SRV) was achieved in 272 (86%) patients. The individuals with SVR had lower microalbuminuria post-treatment (P = 0.56). We conclude that HCV infection can be associated with microalbuminuria, which can be reduced by the use of a combination therapy of pegylated interferon-ribavirin.

  9. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Alicia J; Joglekar, Mugdha V; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A; Keech, Anthony C; O'Neal, David N; Januszewski, Andrzej S

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  10. COPD and microalbuminuria: a 12-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Romundstad, Solfrid; Naustdal, Thor; Romundstad, Pål Richard; Sorger, Hanne; Langhammer, Arnulf

    2014-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), low lung function independent of diagnosis and markers of inflammation are all associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Microalbuminuria, reflecting endothelial dysfunction, could be a relevant inflammatory marker of potential systemic effects of COPD. We hypothesised that there was a positive association between microalbuminuria and mortality in individuals with COPD. We conducted a 12-year follow-up study of 3129 participants in the second survey of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), Norway. At baseline, albuminuria was analysed in three urine samples and spirometry was performed. Among the participants, 136 had COPD and microalbuminuria, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio between 2.5 and 30.0 mg·mmol(-1). The main outcome measures were hazard ratio of all-cause mortality according to microalbuminuria. Compared to those with COPD without microalbuminuria, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality in those with COPD and microalbuminuria was 1.54, 95% CI 1.16-2.04. This result was similar after excluding cardiovascular disease at baseline. Classifying COPD severity by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, there was a positive association trend with increasing severity stages. Microalbuminuria is associated with all-cause mortality in individuals with COPD and could be a relevant tool in identification of patients with poor prognosis.

  11. Visceral obesity is associated with microalbuminuria in nondiabetic Asians.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsuk; Kim, Hyo Jin; Shin, Nara; Han, Miyeon; Park, HyoEun; Kim, Minkyung; Kwon, Hyuktae; Choi, Su-Yeon; Heo, Nam Ju

    2014-07-01

    Microalbuminuria is an indicator of renal disease and is known to be related to obesity. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the cross-sectional area of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and the prevalence of microalbuminuria. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1154 subjects who underwent routine checkups, including computed tomography (CT) scans of abdominal adipose tissue. We used the lowest tertile as a reference of abdominal fat. The highest tertile of VAT was related to the highest prevalence of microalbuminuria (odds ratio (OR): 1.96; 95% CI: 1.12-3.43). Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) was not associated with microalbuminuria. In men, the highest tertile for VAT was associated with the highest prevalence of microalbuminuria (OR: 2.74; 95% CI: 1.44-5.22). In women, VAT or SAT was not associated with microalbuminuria. In nondiabetic subjects, the highest tertile for VAT was associated with the highest prevalence of microalbuminuria (OR: 2.23; 95% CI: 1.15-4.32). Among subjects without metabolic syndrome or with body mass index <25 kg m(-2), the highest tertile for VAT was associated with microalbuminuria in age- and sex-adjusted model, respectively (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.01-2.31; OR: 2.21; 95% CI: 1.05-4.65). The analysis of the association of VAT and insulin resistance (IR) indicated that a higher VAT was associated with a higher IR (highest tertile for VAT-OR: 2.91; 95% CI: 1.70-4.96). In conclusion, the highest VAT of the current study was significantly correlated with the highest prevalence of microalbuminuria, even in traditionally low-risk subjects without diabetes, and this association is potentially related with a higher IR.

  12. Zinc and Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xiao; Sun, Weixia; Miao, Lining; Fu, Yaowen; Wang, Yonggang; Su, Guanfang; Liu, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an important nutrient that is involved in various physiological metabolisms. Zn dyshomeostasis is often associated with various pathogeneses of chronic diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and related complications. Zn is present in ocular tissue in high concentrations, particularly in the retina and choroid. Zn deficiencies have been shown to affect ocular development, cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, and even diabetic retinopathy. However, the mechanism by which Zn deficiency increases the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy remains unclear. In addition, due to the negative effect of Zn deficiency on the eye, Zn supplementation should prevent diabetic retinopathy; however, limited available data do not always support this notion. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to summarize these pieces of available information regarding Zn prevention of diabetic retinopathy. Current theories and possible mechanisms underlying the role of Zn in the eye-related diseases are discussed. The possible factors that affect the preventive effect of Zn supplementation on diabetic retinopathy were also discussed. PMID:23671870

  13. [Systemic arterial hypertension in child and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Medina-Concebida, Luz Elena; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus where is the search for microalbuminuria justified.

  14. Arginase in Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, S. Priya; Rojas, Modesto; Suwanpradid, Jutamas; Toque, Haroldo A.; Caldwell, R. William; Caldwell, Ruth B.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic retinopathies, such as diabetic retinopathy (DR), retinopathy of prematurity and retinal vein occlusion are a major cause of blindness in developed nations worldwide. Each of these conditions is associated with early neurovascular dysfunction. However, conventional therapies target clinically significant macula edema or neovascularization, which occur much later. Intraocular injections of anti-VEGF show promise in reducing retinal edema, but the effects are usually transient and the need for repeated injections increases the risk of intraocular infection. Laser photocoagulation can control pathological neovascularization, but may impair vision and in some patients the retinopathy continues to progress. Moreover, neither treatment targets early stage disease or promotes repair. This review examines the potential role of the ureahydrolase enzyme arginase as a therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic retinopathy. Arginase metabolizes L-arginine to form proline, polyamines and glutamate. Excessive arginase activity reduces the L-arginine supply for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), causing it to become uncoupled and produce superoxide and less NO. Superoxide and NO react and form the toxic oxidant peroxynitrite. The catabolic products of polyamine oxidation and glutamate can induce more oxidative stress and DNA damage, both of which can cause cellular injury. Studies indicate that neurovascular injury during retinopathy is associated with increased arginase expression/activity, decreased NO, polyamine oxidation, formation of superoxide and peroxynitrite and dysfunction and injury of both vascular and neural cells. Furthermore, data indicate that the cytosolic isoform arginase I (AI) is involved in hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction and injury of vascular endothelial cells whereas the mitochondrial isoform arginase II (AII) is involved in neurovascular dysfunction and death following hyperoxia exposure. Thus, we postulate that activation of the arginase

  15. Arginase in retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, S Priya; Rojas, Modesto; Suwanpradid, Jutamas; Toque, Haroldo A; Caldwell, R William; Caldwell, Ruth B

    2013-09-01

    Ischemic retinopathies, such as diabetic retinopathy (DR), retinopathy of prematurity and retinal vein occlusion are a major cause of blindness in developed nations worldwide. Each of these conditions is associated with early neurovascular dysfunction. However, conventional therapies target clinically significant macula edema or neovascularization, which occur much later. Intra-ocular injections of anti-VEGF show promise in reducing retinal edema, but the effects are usually transient and the need for repeated injections increases the risk of intraocular infection. Laser photocoagulation can control pathological neovascularization, but may impair vision and in some patients the retinopathy continues to progress. Moreover, neither treatment targets early stage disease or promotes repair. This review examines the potential role of the ureahydrolase enzyme arginase as a therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic retinopathy. Arginase metabolizes l-arginine to form proline, polyamines and glutamate. Excessive arginase activity reduces the l-arginine supply for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), causing it to become uncoupled and produce superoxide and less NO. Superoxide and NO react and form the toxic oxidant peroxynitrite. The catabolic products of polyamine oxidation and glutamate can induce more oxidative stress and DNA damage, both of which can cause cellular injury. Studies indicate that neurovascular injury during retinopathy is associated with increased arginase expression/activity, decreased NO, polyamine oxidation, formation of superoxide and peroxynitrite and dysfunction and injury of both vascular and neural cells. Furthermore, data indicate that the cytosolic isoform arginase I (AI) is involved in hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction and injury of vascular endothelial cells whereas the mitochondrial isoform arginase II (AII) is involved in neurovascular dysfunction and death following hyperoxia exposure. Thus, we postulate that activation of the arginase

  16. Sickle cell retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Mason, G; Scherrer, F

    1991-12-01

    Sickle cell retinopathy was described as early as 1930 and research has been ongoing as to the pathophysiology of the disease, its effects on the eye and successful treatment. Disease stages have been identified and treatment modalities have been established for each stage. Research results and case reports have been published in medical journals available to physicians; however, there are no identifiable publications applicable to the nursing skills required to deal with this disease. Ophthalmic nurses should be knowledgeable of the sickle cell diseases and specifically the resultant retinopathy.

  17. 'Progressive diabetic nephropathy. How useful is microalbuminuria?: contra'.

    PubMed

    MacIsaac, Richard J; Ekinci, Elif I; Jerums, G

    2014-07-01

    The concept of microalbuminuria has been central to the development of clinical practice and research in the area of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). However, in recent times, the value of a paradigm of DKD based solely on microalbuminuria has been questioned. Although both the absolute level and rate of change of microalbuminuria are linked to the development and progression of DKD, microalbuminuria on its own lacks the necessary sensitivity or specificity to accurately predict kidney outcomes for people with diabetes. The development of microalbumiuria can no longer be viewed as a committed and irreversible stage of DKD, as spontaneous remission is now reported as a common occurrence. In addition, the absence of microalbuminuria or its progression to proteinuria does not signify that an individual patient is safe from a progressive decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Furthermore, although reductions in albuminuria within the microalbuminuric range can be linked to a slower GFR decline in observational studies, this relationship has not been robustly demonstrated in intervention studies. Conclusions regarding the kidney health of individuals with diabetes will continue to be flawed if an inappropriate emphasis is placed on the presence or absence of albuminuria or changes in albuminuria within the microalbuminuric range. This has important implications in terms of undermining the value of microalbuminuria as a surrogate renal end point for intervention trials. There is a need to develop broader models of progressive DKD that include novel pathways and risk markers apart from those related to the traditional 'albuminuric pathway' to renal impairment.

  18. Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trief, E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has increased due to a high incidence of premature, low birthweight infants. Stages of severity range from no visual damage to total blindness, and educational problems of ROP children parallel those of other visually impaired children, early intervention being crucial. Treatments are either pharmacological or…

  19. Diabetic retinopathy and systemic factors.

    PubMed

    Frank, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, an oculardisease, is governed by systemic as well as local ocular factors. These include primarily chronic levels of blood glucose. Individuals with chronically elevated blood glucose levels have substantially more, and more severe, retinopathy than those with lower blood glucose levels. The relationship of blood glucose to retinopathy is continuous, with no threshold although individuals with hemoglobin A1c levels (a measure of chronic glycemia) <6.5%, generally develop little or no retinopathy. Blood pressure levels have been claimed to influence retinopathy development and progression, but multiple controlled clinical trials of antihypertensive agents in diabetic subjects have produced only weak evidence of benefit from blood pressure lowering on the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Elevated blood lipids seem to play a role in the progression of retinopathy, and two trials of fenofibrate, a lipid-lowering agent that has not proved effective in preventing cardiovascular disease, have shown benefit in preventing retinopathy progression. The mechanism of this effect may not, however, be directly related to the reduction in blood lipids. Finally, there is strong, but only circumstantial, evidence for a genetic or epigenetic influence on the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Despite the power of large-scale epidemiologic studies and modern molecular biological and computational techniques, the gene or genes, which predispose or protect against the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy remain elusive.

  20. Diabetic Retinopathy and Systemic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, an oculardisease, is governed by systemic as well as local ocular factors. These include primarily chronic levels of blood glucose. Individuals with chronically elevated blood glucose levels have substantially more, and more severe, retinopathy than those with lower blood glucose levels. The relationship of blood glucose to retinopathy is continuous, with no threshold although individuals with hemoglobin A1c levels (a measure of chronic glycemia) <6.5%, generally develop little or no retinopathy. Blood pressure levels have been claimed to influence retinopathy development and progression, but multiple controlled clinical trials of antihypertensive agents in diabetic subjects have produced only weak evidence of benefit from blood pressure lowering on the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Elevated blood lipids seem to play a role in the progression of retinopathy, and two trials of fenofibrate, a lipid-lowering agent that has not proved effective in preventing cardiovascular disease, have shown benefit in preventing retinopathy progression. The mechanism of this effect may not, however, be directly related to the reduction in blood lipids. Finally, there is strong, but only circumstantial, evidence for a genetic or epigenetic influence on the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Despite the power of large-scale epidemiologic studies and modern molecular biological and computational techniques, the gene or genes, which predispose or protect against the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy remain elusive. PMID:25949071

  1. Low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Halimi, Jean-Michel

    2013-07-27

    Nephrotic-range proteinuria has been known for years to be associated with poor renal outcome. Newer evidence indicates that early (1-3 months after transplantation) low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria (1) provide information on the graft in terms of donor characteristics and ischemia/reperfusion injury, (2) may occur before the development of donor-specific antibodies, (3) predict the development of diabetes and cardiovascular events, and (4) are associated with reduced long-term graft and patient survivals. Low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria are also predictive of diabetes, cardiovascular morbidity, and death in nontransplanted populations, which may help us to understand the pathophysiology of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria in renal transplantation. The impact of immunosuppressive medications, including mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, on graft survival is still discussed, and the effect on proteinuria is crucial to the debate. The fact that chronic allograft rejection may exist as early as 3 months after renal transplantation indicates that optimal management of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria should occur very early after transplantation to improve long-term renal function and the overall outcome of renal transplant recipients. The presence of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria early after transplantation must be taken into account to choose adequate immunosuppressive and antihypertensive medications. Limited information exists regarding the benefit of therapeutic interventions to reduce low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria. Whether renin angiotensin blockade results in optimal nephroprotection in patients with low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria is not proven, especially in the absence of chronic allograft nephropathy. Observational studies and randomized clinical trials yield conflicting results. Finally, randomized clinical trials are urgently needed.

  2. Association of Microalbuminuria with Metabolic Syndrome among Aged Population.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Shu-Hua; Guan, Li-Ying; Wang, Yi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of the various components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on chronic kidney disease has been conflicting. We aim to investigate the association between MetS and microalbuminuria and identify the major contributing components of MetS that result in microalbuminuria in the Chinese aged population. Methods. A total of 674 adults aged 55-98 years (males: 266; mean age: 66.5 ± 7.5 years) were studied. MetS was defined by the 2004 Chinese Diabetes Society criteria and microalbuminuria by urine albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) ≥3 mg/mmoL. Results. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was gradually increased with increasing number of MetS components (P < 0.05). In multivariate regression, after adjusting for age and sex, MetS was the strongest correlate of microalbuminuria (OR = 1.781, 95% CI = 1.226-2.587; P < 0.05) followed by the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (OR = 1.217, 95% CI = 1.044-1.092; P < 0.05), systolic blood pressure (SBP) (OR = 1.011, 95% CI = 1.107-1.338; P < 0.05), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (OR = 0.576, 95% CI = 0.348-0.953; P < 0.05). Conclusions. MetS is independently associated with microalbuminuria in the Chinese aged population. Elevated FPG is the most predominant component of metabolic syndrome associated with microalbuminuria followed by elevated SBP and reduced HDL-C.

  3. Blood pressure control for diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Do, Diana V; Wang, Xue; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; Marrone, Michael; Sleilati, Gina; Hawkins, Barbara S; Frank, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness. Research has established the importance of blood glucose control to prevent development and progression of the ocular complications of diabetes. Simultaneous blood pressure control has been advocated for the same purpose, but findings reported from individual studies have supported varying conclusions regarding the ocular benefit of interventions on blood pressure. Objectives The primary aim of this review was to summarize the existing evidence regarding the effect of interventions to control or reduce blood pressure levels among diabetics on incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy, preservation of visual acuity, adverse events, quality of life, and costs. A secondary aim was to compare classes of anti-hypertensive medications with respect to the same outcomes. Search methods We searched a number of electronic databases including CENTRAL as well as ongoing trial registries. We last searched the electronic databases on 25 April 2014. We also reviewed reference lists of review articles and trial reports selected for inclusion. In addition, we contacted investigators of trials with potentially pertinent data. Selection criteria We included in this review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which either type 1 or type 2 diabetic participants, with or without hypertension, were assigned randomly to intense versus less intense blood pressure control, to blood pressure control versus usual care or no intervention on blood pressure, or to different classes of anti-hypertensive agents versus placebo. Data collection and analysis Pairs of review authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts from electronic and manual searches and the full text of any document that appeared to be relevant. We assessed included trials independently for risk of bias with respect to outcomes reported in this review. We extracted data regarding trial

  4. Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Johnny; Kern, Timothy S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes causes a number of metabolic and physiologic abnormalities in the retina, but which of these abnormalities contribute to recognized features of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is less clear. Many of the molecular and physiologic abnormalities that have been found to develop in the retina in diabetes are consistent with inflammation. Moreover, a number of anti-inflammatory therapies have been found to significantly inhibit development of different aspects of DR in animal models. Herein, we review the inflammatory mediators and their relationship to early and late DR, and discuss the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches to inhibit development of different stages of the retinopathy. We focus primarily on information derived from in vivo studies, supplementing with information from in vitro studies were important. PMID:21635964

  5. The retinal renin-angiotensin system: implications for therapy in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sjølie, A K; Chaturvedi, N

    2002-08-01

    Retinopathy is the most common complication of diabetes, and a leading cause of blindness in people of working age. Optimal blood pressure and metabolic control can reduce the risk of diabetic retinopathy, but are difficult to achieve in clinical practice. In the EUCLID Study, the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor lisinopril reduced the risk of progression of retinopathy by approximately 50%, and also significantly reduced the risk of progression to proliferative retinopathy. These findings are consistent with extensive evidence that the renin-angiotensin system is expressed in the eye, and that adverse effects of angiotensin II on retinal angiogenesis and function can be inhibited by ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II-receptor blockers. However, in the EUCLID Study retinopathy was not a primary end-point and the study was not sufficiently powered for the eye-related outcomes. Hence, the Diabetic Retinopathy Candesartan Trials (DIRECT) programme has been established to determine whether AT(1)-receptor blockade with candesartan can prevent the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. This programme comprises three studies, involving a total of 4500 patients recruited from about 300 centres worldwide. The patients are normotensive or treated hypertensive individuals, and so the DIRECT programme should assess the potential of an AT(1)-receptor blocker to protect against the pathological changes in the eye following diabetes.

  6. Similarities and differences in early retinal phenotypes in hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Andrea; Cheung, Ning; Veglio, Franco; Wong, Tien Yin

    2011-09-01

    The use of retinal photography in clinical practice and research has substantially increased the knowledge about the epidemiology, natural history and significance of diabetic and hypertensive retinopathy. Early retinopathy signs, including retinal microaneurysms, blot hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots and hard exudates, are common vascular abnormalities found in middle-aged to older people with diabetes and hypertension. The presence of these early retinopathy signs is associated with an increased risk of systemic vascular diseases, such as stroke, cognitive impairment, coronary heart disease, heart failure and nephropathy. These retinopathy lesions may therefore be considered as biomarkers of systemic microvascular processes caused by diabetes and hypertension. Nevertheless, whereas the interest in retinopathy assessment continues to grow, a core concept remains undefined: what is the relative importance and contribution of diabetes and hypertension in the development of early retinopathy signs? The answer of this fundamental question holds the key to better understanding of the systemic associations of early hypertensive and diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we summarize the similarities and differences of early retinopathy signs seen in diabetes and hypertension, and discuss the conceptual relevance from epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical perspectives.

  7. Association of prediabetes-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms with microalbuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Wook; Moon, Shinje; Jang, Eun Jung; Lee, Chang Hwa; Park, Joon-Sung

    2017-01-01

    Increased glycemic exposure, even below the diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus, is crucial in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular complications represented by microalbuminuria. Nonetheless, there is limited evidence regarding which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with prediabetes and whether genetic predisposition to prediabetes is related to microalbuminuria, especially in the general population. Our objective was to answer these questions. We conducted a genomewide association study (GWAS) separately on two population-based cohorts, Ansung and Ansan, in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES). The initial GWAS was carried out on the Ansung cohort, followed by a replication study on the Ansan cohort. A total of 5682 native Korean participants without a significant medical illness were classified into either control group (n = 3153) or prediabetic group (n = 2529). In the GWAS, we identified two susceptibility loci associated with prediabetes, one at 17p15.3-p15.1 in the GCK gene and another at 7p15.1 in YKT6. When variations in GCK and YKT6 were used as a model of prediabetes, this genetically determined prediabetes increased microalbuminuria. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that fasting glucose concentration in plasma and SNP rs2908289 in GCK were associated with microalbuminuria, and adjustment for age, gender, smoking history, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and serum triglyceride levels did not attenuate this association. Our results suggest that prediabetes and the associated SNPs may predispose to microalbuminuria before the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Further studies are needed to explore the details of the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying this genetic association. PMID:28158221

  8. Association of prediabetes-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms with microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Wook; Moon, Shinje; Jang, Eun Jung; Lee, Chang Hwa; Park, Joon-Sung

    2017-01-01

    Increased glycemic exposure, even below the diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus, is crucial in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular complications represented by microalbuminuria. Nonetheless, there is limited evidence regarding which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with prediabetes and whether genetic predisposition to prediabetes is related to microalbuminuria, especially in the general population. Our objective was to answer these questions. We conducted a genomewide association study (GWAS) separately on two population-based cohorts, Ansung and Ansan, in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES). The initial GWAS was carried out on the Ansung cohort, followed by a replication study on the Ansan cohort. A total of 5682 native Korean participants without a significant medical illness were classified into either control group (n = 3153) or prediabetic group (n = 2529). In the GWAS, we identified two susceptibility loci associated with prediabetes, one at 17p15.3-p15.1 in the GCK gene and another at 7p15.1 in YKT6. When variations in GCK and YKT6 were used as a model of prediabetes, this genetically determined prediabetes increased microalbuminuria. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that fasting glucose concentration in plasma and SNP rs2908289 in GCK were associated with microalbuminuria, and adjustment for age, gender, smoking history, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and serum triglyceride levels did not attenuate this association. Our results suggest that prediabetes and the associated SNPs may predispose to microalbuminuria before the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Further studies are needed to explore the details of the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying this genetic association.

  9. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  10. Prevalence and determinants of microalbuminuria among diabetic patients in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maskari, Fatma; El-Sadig, Mohammed; Obineche, Enyioma

    2008-01-01

    Background Microalbuminuria (MA) represents the earliest clinical evidence of diabetic nephropathy and is a predictor of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of MA among diabetic patients in the Al-Ain district of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods The study was part of a general cross-sectional survey carried out to assess the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) complications in Al-Ain district, UAE and was the first to assess the prevalence of MA among diabetic patients. A sample of 513 diabetic patients with a mean age of 53 years (SD: ± 13) was randomly selected during 2003/2004. All patients completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire and underwent medical assessment. First morning urine collections were obtained and were tested for clinical proteinuria using urine dipsticks and for MA using the single Micral-Test II strips. Results MA was found in 61% (95% CI: 56.7–65.7) of the sample and the rate was significantly higher among males, positively related to body mass index (BMI), type 2 DM and presence of other DM complications such as diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy. Of the total sample population, 12.5% (95% CI: 8.1-14.1) had clinical proteinuria. Conclusion The prevalence rate of MA was considerably high ( 61%) among diabetic patients in the UAE. Therefore, regular screening for MA is recommended for all diabetic patients, as early treatment is critical for reducing cardiovascular risks and slowing the progression to late stages of diabetic nephropathy (overt proteinuria and end-stage renal disease). PMID:18230135

  11. Factors associated with remission and/or regression of microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ono, Tetsuichiro; Shikata, Kenichi; Obika, Mikako; Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Kodera, Ryo; Hirota, Daisyo; Wada, Jun; Kataoka, Hitomi; Ogawa, Daisuke; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the factors associated with the remission and/or regression of microalbuminuria in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 130 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with microalbuminuria for 2-6 years (3.39±1.31 years). Remission was defined as improving from microalbuminuria to normoalbuminuria using the albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), and regression of microalbuminuria was defined as a decrease in ACR of 50% or more from baseline. Progression of microalbuminuria was defined as progressing from microalbuminuria to overt proteinuria during the follow-up period. Among 130 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with microalbuminuria, 57 and 13 patients were defined as having remission and regression, respectively, while 26 patients progressed to overt proteinuria. Sex (female), higher HDL cholesterol and lower HbA1c were determinant factors associated with remission/regression of microalbuminuria by logistic regression analysis. Lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) was also correlated with remission/regression, but not at a significant level. These results suggest that proper control of blood glucose, BP and lipid profiles may be associated with remission and/or regression of type 2 diabetes mellitus with microalbuminuria in clinical practice.

  12. Hypertensive pregnancy disorders and future renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Steven; Craici, Iasmina

    2014-10-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders affect approximately 6 to 8 % of otherwise normal pregnancies. A growing body of evidence links these disorders with the future development of hypertension, coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease. Larger studies associating hypertensive pregnancy to future development of renal disease have been lacking until recently, with publication of several compelling studies in the last 5 years. In this review, we will focus on the recent evidence associating hypertensive pregnancy disorders with the future development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), as well as the development of microalbuminuria. We will also attempt to answer whether these renal risks are due to direct effects of hypertension during pregnancy, or whether they are due to shared environmental and genetic risk factors.

  13. Preventing radiation retinopathy with hyperfractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, Alan T.; Bhandare, Niranjan; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M. . E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with the development of radiation retinopathy in a large series of patients with head-and-neck cancer. In particular, we addressed whether the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy was effective in reducing the risk of retinopathy. Methods and materials: One hundred eighty-six patients received a significant dose to the retina as part of curative radiotherapy. Primary sites included: nasopharynx, 46; paranasal sinus, 64; nasal cavity, 69; and palate, 7. Prescription doses varied depending on primary site and histology. Hyperfractionated (twice-daily) radiation was delivered to 42% of the patients in this study, typically at 1.10 to 1.20 Gy per fraction. The remainder were treated once-daily. Retinal doses were determined from computerized dosimetry plans when available. For all other patients, retinal doses were retrospectively calculated using reconstructed off-axis dosimetry taken from contours through the center of the globes. Retinal dose was defined as the minimum dose received by at least 25% of the globe. The median retinal dose was 56.85 Gy. Patients were followed for a median of 7.6 years. Results: Thirty-one eyes in 30 patients developed radiation retinopathy, resulting in monocular blindness in 25, bilateral blindness in 1, and decreased visual acuity in 4. The median time to the diagnosis of retinopathy was 2.6 years (range, 11 months to 5.3 years). The actuarial incidence of developing radiation retinopathy was 20% at both 5 and 10 years. The incidence of developing ipsilateral blindness due to retinopathy was 16% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. Site-specific incidences varied considerably, with ethmoid sinus (9 of 25, 36%), nasal cavity (13 of 69, 19%), and maxillary sinus (6 of 35, 17%) being the most common sites associated with radiation retinopathy. Three of 72 patients (4%) receiving retinal doses less than 50 Gy developed retinopathy. Higher retinal doses resulted in a

  14. [Microalbuminuria as a marker of endothelial dysfunction in the long-term follow-up patients after surgical correction of aortic coarctation].

    PubMed

    Volkova, N I; Lazoryshynets, V V

    2013-06-01

    1170 patients after surgical correction of aortic coarctation during the period from 1988 to 2002 were studied. The median period of medical supervision after coarctation repair was 13,8 years, maximum age - 24 years. For diagnostics of the Microalbuminuria (MAU) it were used the special test-strings Microalbu PHAN (PLIVA-Lachema Diagnostica). MAU were discovered in 62.6% of and 34.9% of normotesive patients. Credible decrease of MAU of hypertensive patients with corrected coarctation of the aorta were defined after 3 months-long treatment by Losartan.

  15. Scanning laser edema index: a reliable tool to correlate with diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors?

    PubMed

    Peyman, Mohammadreza; Tajunisah, Iqbal; Loo, Angela; Chuah, Khai Choon; Subrayan, Visvaraja

    2012-01-01

    To correlate Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) derived macular edema (DME) index with severity of diabetic retinopathy and systemic factors. A total of 300 diabetic patients were recruited for the study for each of them a value for the macular edema index was obtained using the HRT II. Patients' age, gender, duration and type of diabetes mellitus, latest HbA1c result and presence or absence of co-morbid factors (hypertension, ischemic heart disease, nephropathy) were recorded together with the stage of diabetic retinopathy. These were correlated with DME. Out of 300 patients, HRT defined macula edema was seen in 68 patients (22.6%). There is a wider and higher range (95% percentile) of macula edema index in the severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) group. Independent samples t test showed significant difference between the severe NPDR group and no DR group (p<0.001), mild NPDR group (p<0.05) and moderate NPDR group (p<0.05). A higher macula edema index was also found to have a low degree of correlation with more advanced stages of retinopathy (r=0.310; p<0.001). Also nephropathy showed a strong and significant correlation with DME. Hypertension had moderately significant correlation with DME. This study found no correlation between ischemic heart disease and DME. HRT derived scanning laser edema index is a reliable objective tool to evaluate diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors.

  16. Prevalence of microalbuminuria in relation to glycemic control in type-2 diabetic patients in Mymensingh.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M J; Muqueet, A; Sharmeen, A; Hoque, M R

    2015-01-01

    Microalbuminuria is a renal marker of generalized vascular endothelial damage and early atherosclerosis. Patients with microalbuminuria are at increased risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes mellitus like myocardial infarction, stroke and nephropathy. Poor glycemic control increases the risk of microalbuminuria. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes and compare the frequency of microalbuminuria in poor and good glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. One Hundred and twenty two type 2 diabetic patients were included in the study. Data on age, gender, duration of diabetes, microalbuminuria and HbA1c were recorded. Urine and blood samples were collected and analyzed for microalbuminuria, blood glucose and HbA1c. All patients of both genders with type 2 diabetes for over 2 years were selected in this study. Patients with other causes of proteinuria were excluded. Out of 120 cases 93(77.5%) were male and 27(22.5%) were female. Mean age of patients was 57.8±14.7 years and average duration of diabetes was 9.2 years. Microalbuminuria was found 76.9% of male and 23.1% of female. Patients with poor glycemic control and good glycemic control have frequency of microalbuminuria of 55% and 54% respectively. Uncontrolled diabetes is strongly associated with prevalence of microalbuminuria. Screening for microalbuminuria and HbA1c test should be done both in newly and already diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients as an early marker of renal dysfunction and glycemic control.

  17. Insulin Pump Therapy Is Associated with Lower Rates of Retinopathy and Peripheral Nerve Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Zabeen, Bedowra; Craig, Maria E.; Virk, Sohaib A.; Pryke, Alison; Chan, Albert K. F.; Cho, Yoon Hi; Benitez-Aguirre, Paul Z.; Hing, Stephen; Donaghue, Kim C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of microvascular complications in adolescents with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) versus multiple daily injections (MDI). Research Design and Methods Prospective cohort of 989 patients (aged 12–20 years; diabetes duration >5 years) treated with CSII or MDI for >12 months. Microvascular complications were assessed from 2000–14: early retinopathy (seven-field fundal photography), peripheral nerve function (thermal and vibration threshold testing), autonomic nerve abnormality (heart rate variability analysis of electrocardiogram recordings) and albuminuria (albumin creatinine ratio/timed overnight albumin excretion). Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to examine the relationship between treatment and complications rates, adjusting for socio-economic status (SES) and known risk factors including HbA1c and diabetes duration. Results Comparing CSII with MDI: HbA1C was 8.6% [70mmol/mol] vs. 8.7% [72 mmol/mol]) (p = 0.7), retinopathy 17% vs. 22% (p = 0.06); microalbuminuria 1% vs. 4% (p = 0.07), peripheral nerve abnormality 27% vs. 33% (p = 0.108) and autonomic nerve abnormality 24% vs. 28% (p = 0.401). In multivariable GEE, CSII use was associated with lower rates of retinopathy (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.45–0.95, p = 0.029) and peripheral nerve abnormality (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42–0.95, p = 0.026), but not albuminuria (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.10–2.17, p = 0.33). SES was not associated with any of the complication outcomes. Conclusions In adolescents, CSII use is associated with lower rates of retinopathy and peripheral nerve abnormality, suggesting an apparent benefit of CSII over MDI independent of glycemic control or SES. PMID:27050468

  18. Pharmacologic vitreolysis in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    El-Asrar, Ahmed M Abu; Al-Mezain, Hani S

    2011-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy remains a major cause of worldwide preventable blindness. The vitreo-retinal interface plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. The term pharmacologic vitreolysis refers to the use of enzymes to liquefy the vitreous gel, and to induce posterior vitreous detachment (PVD). Intravitreal ovine hyaluronidase injection was effective in clearing vitreous hemorrhage. Several human case series demonstrated that intravitreal injection of autologous plasmin enzyme was a safe and effective adjunct to vitreous surgery for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Recently, it was shown that intravitreal injection of plasmin enzyme without the performance of vitrectomy induced complete PVD and reduced macular thickening due to refractory diabetic macular edema.

  19. Pharmacologic therapies for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Rechtman, Ehud; Harris, Alon; Garzozi, Hanna J; Ciulla, Thomas A

    2007-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are leading causes of blindness in the working-aged population of most developed countries. The increasing number of persons with diabetes worldwide suggests that DR/DME will continue to be major contributors to vision loss and associated functional impairment for years to come. Early detection of retinopathy in persons with diabetes is critical in preventing visual loss, but current methods of screening fail to identify a sizable number of high-risk patients. The control of diabetes-associated metabolic abnormalities (ie, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension) is also important in preserving visual function, as these conditions have been identified as risk factors for both the development and progression of DR/DME. The non-pharmacologic interventions for DR/DME, laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy, only target advanced stages of disease. Several biochemical mechanisms, including increased vascular endothelial growth factor production, protein kinase C beta activation, oxidative stress, and accumulation of intracellular sorbitol and advanced glycosylation end products, may contribute to the vascular disruptions that characterize DR/DME. The inhibition of these pathways holds the promise of the intervention for diabetic retinopathy with higher success rate and also at earlier, non-sight-threatening stages.

  20. Epigenetic modifications and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kowluru, Renu A; Santos, Julia M; Mishra, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy remains one of the most debilitating chronic complications, but despite extensive research in the field, the exact mechanism(s) responsible for how retina is damaged in diabetes remains ambiguous. Many metabolic pathways have been implicated in its development, and genes associated with these pathways are altered. Diabetic environment also facilitates epigenetics modifications, which can alter the gene expression without permanent changes in DNA sequence. The role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy is now an emerging area, and recent work has shown that genes encoding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are epigenetically modified, activates of epigenetic modification enzymes, histone lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1), and DNA methyltransferase are increased, and the micro RNAs responsible for regulating nuclear transcriptional factor and VEGF are upregulated. With the growing evidence of epigenetic modifications in diabetic retinopathy, better understanding of these modifications has potential to identify novel targets to inhibit this devastating disease. Fortunately, the inhibitors and mimics targeted towards histone modification, DNA methylation, and miRNAs are now being tried for cancer and other chronic diseases, and better understanding of the role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy will open the door for their possible use in combating this blinding disease.

  1. Hypoxic viscosity and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Rimmer, T; Fleming, J; Kohner, E M

    1990-01-01

    Diabetic and sickle retinopathy have features in common--for example, venous dilatation, microaneurysms, and capillary closure preceding neovascularisation. Bearing in mind that haemoglobin in poorly controlled diabetes is abnormal and that extremely low oxygen tensions (known to cause sickling) exist in the healthy cat retina, we wished to explore the possibility that diabetic blood, like that of sickle cell disease, may become more viscous when deoxygenated. To do this we measured whole blood viscosity, under oxygenated and deoxygenated conditions, of 23 normal persons, 23 diabetic patients without retinopathy, and 34 diabetic patients with retinopathy. The shear rate used was 230 s-1, which is similar to that thought to prevail in the major retinal veins. The viscosity of blood from normal persons, corrected for packed cell volume, did not change significantly on deoxygenation: mean 4.54 (SD 0.38) cps, versus, 4.57 (0.39) paired t test, p = 0.66. Similarly the blood from diabetics without retinopathy showed no change: 4.42 (0.45) versus 4.42 (0.30), p = 0.98; whereas the blood from patients with retinopathy changed from 4.82 (0.48) to 4.95 (0.63), p = 0.027. The hypoxic viscosity ratio (deoxygenated divided by oxygenated viscosity) correlated with total serum cholesterol (r = 0.44, p = 0.018) but not with HbA1, serum glucose, triglycerides, or age. A disproportionate increase in venous viscosity relative to arterial viscosity would lead to increased intraluminal and transmural pressure and therefore exacerbate leakage across capillary walls. PMID:2378855

  2. Hypertensive Target Organ Damage in Ghanaian Civil Servants with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Addo, Juliet; Smeeth, Liam; Leon, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Low levels of detection, treatment and control of hypertension have repeatedly been reported from sub Saharan Africa, potentially increasing the likelihood of target organ damage. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1015 urban civil servants aged≥25 years from seven central government ministries in Accra, Ghana. Participants diagnosed to have hypertension were examined for target organ involvement. Hypertensive target organ damage was defined as the detection of any of the following: left ventricular hypertrophy diagnosed by electrocardiogram, reduction in glomerular filtration rate, the presence of hypertensive retinopathy or a history of a stroke. Results Of the 219 hypertensive participants examined, 104 (47.5%) had evidence of target organ damage. The presence of target organ damage was associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The odds of developing hypertensive target organ damage was five to six times higher in participants with blood pressure (BP)≥180/110 mmHg compared to those with BP<140/90 mmHg, and there was a trend to higher odds of target organ damage with increasing BP (p = 0.001). Women had about lower odds of developing target organ damage compared to men. Conclusions The high prevalence of target organ damage in this working population associated with increasing blood pressure, emphasises the need for hypertension control programs aimed at improving the detection of hypertension, and importantly addressing the issues inhibiting the effective treatment and control of people with hypertension in the population. PMID:19701488

  3. The association between glycemic control and microalbuminuria in Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Showail, Anwar Ali; Ghoraba, Medhat

    2016-05-01

    Microalbuminuria is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and renal out- come in a patient with Type 2 diabetes. The evidence that intensive glycemic control reduces the microvascular complications of diabetes is based almost exclusively on prevention of micro- albuminuria. To evaluate the association between microalbuminuria and glycemic control and other factors in Type 2 diabetes, we studied retrospectively 551 patients with Type 2 diabetes. The patients were divided into two groups: 175 patients with microalbuminuria in the case group and 376 with normal urine albumin-creatinine ratio in the control group. Our data indicated that there was a significant association between the uncontrolled glycemia and development of microalbuminuria and that was more obvious if HbA1c level was >11%. Our data also indicate that there was a statistical significant association between male gender, age, the systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels, and the microalbuminuria in crude odds ratios (ORs). We conclude that there was a clear association between the glycemic control and microalbuminuria, and microalbuminuria was associated with older age, male gender, and systolic and DBP in crude ORs.

  4. Early Clinical Implications of Microalbuminuria in Patients with Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Stroke accounts for the second leading cause of death, about 11.13% of total deaths worldwide. Microalbuminuria is known to be associated with increased risk of mortality in ischaemic stroke patients. But there have been no studies to assess whether microalbuminuria affects the early clinical outcome of patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Aim This study aims to investigate whether microalbuminuria affects the early clinical outcome of patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Materials and Methods This is a prospective study of patients with ischaemic stroke (who presented within 24 hours of symptom onset) who were consecutively admitted in three tertiary care centres during the time period from November 2013 to June 2015. Early clinical outcomes in patients were assessed by investigating the presence of Early Neurological Deterioration (END) using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Urine albumin creatinine ratio was divided into two categories – Normal (less than 30mg/g of creatinine) or Urine Microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/g of creatinine). Results Total 42 out of 70 patients (60%) were found to have microalbuminuria. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, microalbuminuria was found to be independently associated with END in patients with acute ischaemic stroke (p=0.044). Conclusion In the early periods following acute ischaemic stroke, patients with microalbuminuria have worse clinical outcome. PMID:27790489

  5. Significance of microalbuminuria in relation to subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in asymptomatic nonhypertensive, nondiabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo Eun; Heo, Nam Ju; Kim, Minkyung; Choi, Su-Yeon

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the significance of microalbuminuria and its relationship with subclinical atherosclerosis in nonhypertensive and nondiabetic patients, by using coronary artery computed tomography (CT). A total of 1,318 nonhypertensive and nondiabetic subjects who had taken coronary artery CT and measured spot urine albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) were evaluated. The atherosclerotic changes of coronary arteries were greater in subjects with microalbuminuria, reflected by coronary artery calcium score (CACS) and significant coronary artery stenosis (CACS ≥ 100 in 15.3% vs 7.6% and stenosis ≥ 50% in 11.5% vs 4.9% of patients with vs without microalbuminuria, P = 0.008 and P = 0.011, respectively). Among various parameters that are known as a risk factor or possible biomarkers of coronary artery disease, presence of microalbuminuria, age and Framingham risk score were significantly related to coronary artery stenosis. Among them the presence of microalbuminuria showed stronger correlation than others to the coronary artery stenosis detected by CT, even after adjusting confounding factors (OR 3.397, 95% confidence interval 1.138 to 10.140, P = 0.028). The presence of microalbuminuria by UACR was significantly associated with presence of coronary artery stenosis ≥ 50% in asymptomatic, nonhypertensive and nondiabetic general population. Our study suggests that the presence of microalbuminuria may imply subclinical coronary artery disease, even in asymptomatic population.

  6. Prevalence and incidence of retinopathy in elderly diabetic patients receiving early diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIN; WANG, ZHAOYAN

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common and specific complications of diabetes. Thus, intervention is required to lower the incidence and prevalence of sight-threatening retinopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinopathy in elderly diabetic patients receiving early diagnosis and proper treatment and to explore risk factors for DR. From May 2005 to May 2011, fundus examination was performed for elderly diabetic patients during routine medical examinations. The presence of a microaneurysm or more severe presentations was used to diagnose DR, which was followed by fundus fluorescein angiography. Logistic regression analysis was employed to analyze the risk factors for DR development within 5 years. A total of 2,194 diabetic patients were recruited and followed-up for a mean of 5.8 years. The prevalence of DR was 15.38–16.20% and the incidence of DR was 8.38/1,000 person-years. Logistic multiple stepwise regression revealed that fasting plasma glucose (FPG), mean arterial pressure (MAP), duration of diabetes, body mass index (BMI) and microalbuminuria (MAU) were significantly associated with the occurrence of DR (all P<0.05). In the present study, the prevalence and incidence of DM were higher compared with those reported in the general population; however, the prevalence and incidence of DR were lower compared with those reported in similar studies. This suggests that favorable control of blood glucose, blood pressure and blood lipids effectively prevents the occurrence of DR in diabetic patients. PMID:23737887

  7. Association Between Retinopathy and Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort [CRIC] Study)

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Juan E.; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Pistilli, Maxwell; Daniel, Ebenezer; Alexander, Judith; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Chia-Mei Lo, Joan; Townsend, Raymond; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John Walter; Xie, Dawei; Coleman, Martha; Keane, Martin Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience co-morbid illneses including cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between retinopathy and self reported CVD in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this observational, ancillary investigation, 2605 CRIC participants were invited to participate in this study, and non-mydriatic fundus photographs in both eyes were obtained in 1936 subjects. Photographs were reviewed in a masked fashion at a central photograph reading center. Presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed using standard protocols by trained graders masked to information about study participants. History of self-reported cardiovascular disease was obtained using a medical history questionnaire. Kidney function measurements, traditional and non-traditional risk factors for CVD were obtained from the CRIC study. Greater severity of retinopathy was associated with higher prevalence of any cardiovascular disease and this association persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. Presence of vascular abnormalities usually associated with hypertension was also associated with increased prevalence of CVD. We found a direct relationship between CVD prevalence and mean venular caliber. In conclusion, presence of retinopathy was associated with CVD, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. This would make assessment of retinal morphology a valuable tool in chronic kidney disease studies of CVD outcomes. PMID:22516527

  8. Role of macular xanthophylls in prevention of common neovascular retinopathies: retinopathy of prematurity and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoming; Rubin, Lewis P

    2015-04-15

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are important causes of blindness among children and working-age adults, respectively. The development of both diseases involves retinal microvascular degeneration, vessel loss and consequent hypoxic and inflammatory pathologic retinal neovascularization. Mechanistic studies have shown that oxidative stress and subsequent derangement of cell signaling are important factors in disease progression. In eye and vision research, role of the dietary xanthophyll carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, has been more extensively studied in adult onset macular degeneration than these other retinopathies. These carotenoids also may decrease severity of ROP in preterm infants and of DR in working-age adults. A randomized controlled clinical trial of carotenoid supplementation in preterm infants indicated that lutein has functional effects in the neonatal eye and is anti-inflammatory. Three multicenter clinical trials all showed a trend of decreased ROP severity in the lutein supplemented group. Prospective studies on patients with non-proliferative DR indicate serum levels of lutein and zeaxanthin are significantly lower in these patients compared to normal subjects. The present review describes recent advances in lutein and zeaxanthin modulation of oxidative stress and inflammation related to ROP and DR and discusses potential roles of lutein/zeaxanthin in preventing or lessening the risks of disease initiation or progression.

  9. Corneal autofluorescence in presence of diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovati, Luigi; Docchio, Franco; Azzolini, Claudio; Van Best, Jaap A.

    1998-06-01

    Recently corneal autofluorescence has been proposed as an ocular diagnostic tool for diabetic retinopathy. The method is based on the sensible increase of the natural fluorescence of corneal tissue within specific wavelength in presence of early stage of diabetic retinopathy. The main advantages of this method are that the corneal autofluorescence has been demonstrated to be not age-related and that the cornea is readily accessible to be investigated. In this study 47 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 51 non-insulin- dependent diabetes mellitus patients aged 20 - 90 years have been considered. Patients were selected from the Eye Clinic of S. Raffaele Hospital. The modified Airlie House classification was used to grade the diabetic retinopathy. Corneal autofluorescence has been measured by using both a specifically designed instrument and the Fluorotron Master. Corneal autofluorescence mean value for each diabetic retinopathy measured by using both the instruments correlated with the retinopathy grade.

  10. Chlorpropamide alcohol flushing and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Leslie, R D; Barnett, A H; Pyke, D A

    1979-05-12

    "Mason-type" diabetics (mild diabetes which is dominantly inherited) are relatively free of retinopathy. Alcohol almost invariably causes facial flushing in these patients when they are given chlorpropamide (chlorpropamide alcohol flush, C.P.A.F.). 291 non-insulin-dependent diabetics were examined to see whether there was a difference in frequency of retinopathy between C.P.A.F. positive and negative cases who were of comparable age and duration of diabetes. Retinopathy was commoner and often severe in CPAF negative patients. Blindness from retinopathy was almost confined to C.P.A.F.-negative cases. Lens opacities, on the other hand, were equally common in both groups. Since C.P.A.F. is an inherited trait, retinopathy in non-insulin-dependent diabetics is to a considerable extent, although not entirely, determined by genetic factors.

  11. Hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Price, Raymond S; Kasner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    The definition of hypertension has continuously evolved over the last 50 years. Hypertension is currently defined as a blood pressure greater than 140/90mmHg. One in every four people in the US has been diagnosed with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension increases further with age, affecting 75% of people over the age of 70. Hypertension is by far the most common risk factor identified in stroke patients. Hypertension causes pathologic changes in the walls of small (diameter<300 microns) arteries and arterioles usually at short branches of major arteries, which may result in either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Reduction of blood pressure with diuretics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have all been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of stroke. Hypertensive emergency is defined as a blood pressure greater than 180/120mmHg with end organ dysfunction, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, encephalopathy, or focal neurologic deficits. Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by acute failure of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Hypertensive emergency is treated with intravenous antihypertensive agents to reduce blood pressure by 25% within the first hour. Selective inhibition of cerebrovascular blood vessel permeability for the treatment of hypertensive emergency is beginning early clinical trials.

  12. Outcome of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Gerd; Larsson, Eva

    2013-06-01

    In prematurely born children, various visual and ophthalmologic sequelae occur because of both retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and preterm birth per se. Several long-term follow-up studies have described the outcome of ROP. Visual impairment and blindness are well-known consequences, but the prevalence varies globally because of differing neonatal and ophthalmologic care. Improving treatment options and criteria for the treatment of ROP are continuously changing the ophthalmologic outcome. The anatomic outcome has improved with treatment, but good anatomic outcome in treated severe ROP does not always reflect the functional outcome. There is no consensus regarding long-term follow-up of prematurely born children.

  13. Retinopathy and Chronic Kidney Disease in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study (CRIC)

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Juan E.; Alexander, Judith; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker, Candace; McWilliams, Kathleen; Lo, Joan C.; Go, Alan; Townsend, Raymond; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Lash, James P.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W.; Xie, Dawei; Jaar, Bernard G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Retinal vascular and anatomic abnormalities caused by diabetes, hypertension, and other conditions can be observed directly in the ocular fundus and may reflect severity of chronic renal insufficiency. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between retinopathy and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods In this observational, cross-sectional study, 2605 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study, a multi-center study of CKD, were offered participation. Non-mydriatic fundus photographs of the disc and macula in both eyes were obtained in 1936 of these subjects. Photographs were reviewed in a masked fashion at a central photograph reading center using standard protocols. Presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed by trained graders and a retinal specialist using protocols developed for large epidemiologic studies. Kidney function measurements and information on traditional and non-traditional risk factors for decreased kidney function were obtained from the CRIC study. Results Greater severity of retinopathy was associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after adjustment for traditional and non-traditional risk factors. Presence of vascular abnormalities usually associated with hypertension was also associated with lower eGFR. We found no strong direct relationship between eGFR and average arteriolar or venular calibers. Conclusions Our findings show a strong association between severity of retinopathy and its features and level of kidney function after adjustment for traditional and non-traditional risk factors for CKD, suggesting that retinovascular pathology reflects renal disease. PMID:22965589

  14. Epidemiological Issues in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Peter H; Aldington, Stephen J; Stratton, Irene M

    2013-01-01

    There is currently an epidemic of diabetes in the world, principally type 2 diabetes that is linked to changing lifestyle, obesity, and increasing age of the population. Latest estimates from the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) forecasts a rise from 366 million people worldwide to 552 million by 2030. Type 1 diabetes is more common in the Northern hemisphere with the highest rates in Finland and there is evidence of a rise in some central European countries, particularly in the younger children under 5 years of age. Modifiable risk factors for progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) are blood glucose, blood pressure, serum lipids, and smoking. Nonmodifiable risk factors are duration, age, genetic predisposition, and ethnicity. Other risk factors are pregnancy, microaneurysm count in an eye, microaneurysm formation rate, and the presence of any DR in the second eye. DR, macular edema (ME), and proliferative DR (PDR) develop with increased duration of diabetes and the rates are dependent on the above risk factors. In one study of type 1 diabetes, the median individual risk for the development of early retinal changes was 9.1 years of diabetes duration. Another study reported the 25 year incidence of proliferative retinopathy among population-based cohort of type 1 patients with diabetes was 42.9%. In recent years, people with diabetes have lower rates of progression than historically to PDR and severe visual loss, which may reflect better control of glucose, blood pressure, and serum lipids, and earlier diagnosis. PMID:24339678

  15. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina; Bek, Toke; Grauslund, Jakob; Laugesen, Caroline Schmidt; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Andresen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database To monitor the development of diabetic eye disease in Denmark and to evaluate the accessibility and effectiveness of diabetic eye screening programs with focus on interregional variations. Target population The target population includes all patients diagnosed with diabetes. Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014–2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. Main variables The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase’s latest annual report (2014–2015) indicates that the prevalence of no diabetic retinopathy, nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy is 78%, 18%, and 4%, respectively. The percentage of patients without diabetic maculopathy is 97%. The proportion of patients with regression of diabetic retinopathy (20%) is greater than the proportion of patients with progression of diabetic retinopathy (10%). Conclusion The collection of data from diabetic eye screening is still expanding in Denmark. Analysis of the data collected during the period 2014–2015 reveals an overall decrease of diabetic retinopathy compared to the previous year, although the number of patients newly diagnosed with diabetes has been increasing in Denmark. DiaBase is a useful tool to observe the quality of screening

  16. Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Macular Edema.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven R; Gardner, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema result from chronic damage to the neurovascular structures of the retina. The pathophysiology of retinal damage remains uncertain but includes metabolic and neuroinflammatory insults. These mechanisms are addressed by intensive metabolic control of the systemic disease and by the use of ocular anti-inflammatory agents, including vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and corticosteroids. Improved understanding of the ocular and systemic mechanisms that underlie diabetic retinopathy will lead to improved means to diagnose and treat retinopathy and better maintain vision.

  17. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Howard-Williams, J; Patel, P; Jelfs, R; Carter, R D; Awdry, P; Bron, A; Mann, J I; Hockaday, T D

    1985-01-01

    One hundred and forty nine diabetic patients were ophthalmologically assessed seven years after randomisation to a low carbohydrate or modified fat diet (rich in linoleic acid). Glycaemic control, regardless of the type of diet, was a major determinant of the development of retinopathy. Poorly controlled patients (haemoglobin A1c greater than 8%) with low levels of linoleic acid in cholesterol ester had a significantly greater frequency of retinopathy than well controlled patients or patients with similarly unsatisfactory control but higher levels of linoleic acid. The findings support an earlier suggestion that linoleic acid might protect against diabetic retinopathy. PMID:3965024

  18. New-onset microalbuminuria following allogeneic myeloablative SCT is a sign of near-term decrease in renal function.

    PubMed

    Morito, T; Ando, M; Kobayashi, T; Kakihana, K; Ohashi, K; Akiyama, H; Tsuchiya, K; Nitta, K; Sakamaki, H

    2013-07-01

    The emergence of microalbuminuria following conditioning chemotherapy may predict the development of renal dysfunction. To confirm this, a 1-year retrospective cohort study was conducted in 31 myeloablative allogeneic SCT patients who received five consecutive measurements of albuminuria before conditioning therapy and on days 0, 7, 14 and 28 following SCT. The cohort had neither microalbuminuria nor renal dysfunction at baseline. Microalbuminuria was defined as an albumin-creatinine (Cr) ratio over 30 mg/g, and renal dysfunction was as an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Cumulative incidence of renal dysfunction over time was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to examine an association of de novo microalbuminuria with the incidence of renal dysfunction. In all, 16 patients (52%) developed microalbuminuria that was positive at least two times among the four measurements after SCT. The actuarial occurrence of chronic kidney disease was significantly higher in patients who developed microalbuminuria than in those who did not. Incidence of microalbuminuria had a significant risk of subsequent renal dysfunction (hazard ratio (95% confidence interval), 7.3 (1.2-140)). In conclusion, de novo microalbuminuria following conditioning therapy is a warning of near-term loss of renal function.

  19. Solar retinopathy without abnormal exposure: case report.

    PubMed

    Stock, Ricardo Alexandre; Savaris, Simone Louise; de Lima Filho, Erasmo Carlos Rodrigues; Bonamigo, Elcio Luiz

    2013-01-01

    Solar retinopathy is photochemical damage to the retina, usually caused, by direct or indirect solar observation resulting from the use of hallucinogenic drugs, mental disorders or during eclipses. There may be a loss of visual acuity. We report the case of a 38-year-old patient who presented with a clinical diagnosis of solar retinopathy in the left eye, no prior history of sun exposure, normal visual acuity and complaints of metamorphopsia. Optical coherence tomography showed a rupture of the retinal pigment epithelium, confirming class II solar retinopathy. Visual acuity tends to normalize after 3 to 9 months, but not always. Thus, there is a real need to educate people about using eye protection during sun exposure especially given that some people may be highly susceptible to retinal damage, which was presumably the case for this patient. Finally, we note the importance of optical coherence tomography in diagnosing solar retinopathy.

  20. [Proliferative diabetic retinopathy -- therapeutic approach (clinical case)].

    PubMed

    Burcea, M; Muşat, Ovidiu; Mahdi, Labib; Gheorghe, Andreea; Spulbar, F; Gobej, I

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 54 year old pacient diagnosed with neglected insulin dependent diabetes and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Surgery was recommended and we practiced posterior vitrectomy, endolaser and heavy silicone oil endotamponade. Post-operative evolution was favorable.

  1. [Pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity].

    PubMed

    Stahl, A; Lagrèze, W A; Agostini, H T

    2012-12-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a complex disease with a multifactorial pathogenetic cascade that is still only partially understood. Important pathogenetic factors are gestational age at birth and birth weight. Potent postnatal factors are exposure to supplemental oxygen, slow weight gain and expression of angiogenic growth factors. Some of these crucial aspects of ROP pathogenesis will be discussed in this article and put into clinical context. With the introduction of intravitreal anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) treatment into ROP therapy, the pathomechanistic role of VEGF in ROP deserves a special focus. Apart from VEGF, other factors will be discussed that may precede VEGF upregulation and thus may represent targets for an earlier and potentially protective intervention. Among these insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) appears to be most prominent. Finally, factors such as postnatal weight gain will be discussed in light of their potential role as screening parameters and their ability to predict ROP severity.

  2. Continued Reduction in the Prevalence of Retinopathy in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Downie, Elizabeth; Craig, Maria E.; Hing, Stephen; Cusumano, Janine; Chan, Albert K.F.; Donaghue, Kim C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine trends in microvascular complications in adolescents with type 1 diabetes between 1990 and 2009 in Sydney, Australia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used analysis of complications in 1,604 adolescents (54% female, aged 12–20 years, median duration 8.6 years), stratified by four time periods using Generalized Estimation Equations as follows: T1 (1990–1994), T2 (1995–1999), T3 (2000–2004), and T4 (2005–2009). Early retinopathy was detected using seven-field fundal photography, albumin excretion rate (AER) using timed overnight urine collections, and albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) and peripheral nerve function using thermal and vibration threshold. RESULTS Retinopathy declined (53, 38, 23, and 12%; P < 0.001), as did borderline elevation of AER/ACR (45, 30, 26, and 30%; P < 0.001) and microalbuminuria (8, 4, 3, and 3%; P = 0.006). Multiple daily injections (MDI)/continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) use increased (17, 54, 75, and 88%; P < 0.001), median HbA1c decreased (9.1, 8.9, 8.5, and 8.5%; P < 0.001), and severe hypoglycemia was unchanged (6, 8, 10, and 7%; P = 0.272). Retinopathy was associated with diabetes duration (odds ratio [OR] 1.12 [95% CI 1.08–1.17]), age (1.13 [1.06–1.20]), HbA1c (1.16 [1.08–1.25]), systolic blood pressure (BP) SDS (1.31 [1.16–1.48]), socioeconomic disadvantage (1.42 [1.04–1.95]), and 1 to 2 injections per day (vs. MDI/CSII; 1.35 [1.05–1.73]); borderline AER/ACR with male sex (1.32 [1.02–1.70]), age (1.19 [1.12–1.26]), HbA1c (1.18 [1.08–1.29]), weight SDS (1.31 [1.21–1.53]), insulin dose per kilograms (1.64 [1.13–2.39]), 1 to 2 injections per day (1.41 [1.08–1.84]), and socioeconomic disadvantage (1.68 [1.23–2.31]); and microalbuminuria with age (1.14 [1.01–1.29]), HbA1c (1.20 [1.05–1.37]), diastolic BP SDS (1.76 [1.26–2.46]), and 1 to 2 injections per day (1.95 [1.11–3.41]). CONCLUSIONS The decline in retinopathy supports contemporary guidelines that

  3. Automated static perimetry to evaluate diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Federman, J L; Lloyd, J

    1984-01-01

    The Octopus automated static perimeter was used to evaluate patients with early diabetic retinopathy. It showed islands of threshold sensitivity depression that were equal to areas of nonperfusion seen on fluorescein angiography. The geographic area of the fundus at risk of developing these field defects was found to be between 20 and 45 degrees, representing the central area of the midperiphery. This procedure has potential as an excellent screening test for early diabetic retinopathy. Images FIGURE 1 (Cont'd) C PMID:6549516

  4. Retinopathy and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study).

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Juan E; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker-Ostroff, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan C; Townsend, Raymond R; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W; Xie, Dawei

    2015-11-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience other diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether retinopathy predicts future CVD events in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this ancillary investigation, 2,605 participants of the CRIC study were invited to participate, and nonmydriatic fundus photographs were obtained in 1,936 subjects. Using standard protocols, presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive, or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed at a central photograph reading center by trained graders masked to study participant's information. Patients with a self-reported history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. Incident CVD events were adjudicated using medical records. Kidney function measurements, traditional and nontraditional risk factors, for CVD were obtained. Presence and severity of retinopathy were associated with increased risk of development of any CVD in this population of CKD patients, and these associations persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. We also found a direct relation between increased venular diameter and risk of development of CVD; however, the relation was not statistically significant after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In conclusion, the presence of retinopathy was associated with future CVD events, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. Assessment of retinal morphology may be valuable in assessing risk of CVD in patients with CKD, both clinically and in research settings.

  5. Prevalence and factors associated with diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients at Arbaminch General Hospital, Ethiopia: Cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chisha, Yilma; Terefe, Wondwossen; Assefa, Huruy; Lakew, Serawit

    2017-01-01

    Background Currently 93 million people are estimated as living with diabetic retinopathy worldwide. The prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in developed countries have been well documented; but in Ethiopia, data on prevalence and associated factors of diabetic retinopathy is lacking. Objective To determine prevalence and factors associated with development of diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients at Arbaminch General Hospital, Ethiopia. Method Cross-sectional study design with record review of 400 diabetic patients was conducted at Arbaminch General Hospital from November to January 2015. Among 400 diabetic patients, 270 patients with baseline information and without history of hypertension at baseline were included in this study. But patients with gestational diabetes and with retinopathy at baseline were excluded from the study. Consecutive sampling technique was applied to select study participants. Data of cohorts was extracted from medical record using pre tested structured extraction check list. Data cleaning, coding, categorizing, merging and analysis carried out by STATA version 12. Descriptive statistics was done and presented accordingly. Bivariate binary logistic regression analysis was done to select potential candidates for the full model at P-value cutoff point ≤ 0.25 and multivariable binary logistic regression analysis was made to estimate the independent effect of predictors on the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. Model diagnostic tests were done, final model fitness was checked using Hosmer and Lemeshow chi square test. Finally, statistical significance was tested at P-value <0.05. Result Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients at Arbaminch General Hospital was 13%. Adjusted analysis showed that the odds of diabetic retinopathy were statistically and significantly associated with baseline age (AOR = 6.06: 95%CI; 2.42, 15.21), baseline systolic blood pressure level (AOR = 4.38: 95%CI; 1.64, 11

  6. Secondary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Secondary hypertension Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Secondary hypertension (secondary high blood pressure) is high blood pressure that's caused by another medical condition. Secondary hypertension can be caused by conditions that affect your ...

  7. [Microalbuminuria and ultrasound characteristics of kidneys in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1].

    PubMed

    Hasanović, Evlijana; Tulumović, Denijal; Imamović, Goran; Trnacević, Senaid

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare ultrasound findings of kidneys in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1 (DMT1), establish the association with microalbuminuria, blood pressure values and metabolic control of the disease, and creatinine clearance. In 80 children and adolescents with DMT1, in whom illness occurred in period between 2 and 16 years of age, morphometry measurements with ultrasound were performed. Nephelometric method of three consecutive samples of urine determined microalbuminuria. In patients with microalbuminuria, creatinine clearance was also measured. Demographic data were obtained from the parents and from the patients medical records. In relation to the duration of the disease, all patients were divided into two groups: the first group of patients with illness lasting for less than 10 years, and the second were those whose illness had lasted more than 10 years. In patients with duration of DMT1 of more than 10 years, the frequency of pathological findings of the longitudinal diameter and volume of both kidneys in relation to age and anthropometric standards was statistically significantly greater. Also, the finding of microalbuminuria was more frequent. In the group of patients with DMT1 lasting for more than 10 years, the mean value of HBA1c was statistically significantly higher In patients with microalbuminuria the total mean value of creatinine clearance was within the bounds of the reference values and was statistically significantly higher in patients in whom the illness had lasted less than three years, which indicates hyperfiltration of the kidneys. Alongside microalbuminuria, monitoring of the dimension and volume of the kidneys may indicate the existence of the early phases of diabetic nephropathy and result in its prevention and prevention of illness progression.

  8. Prognostic Impact of Subclinical Microalbuminuria in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Miura, Masanobu; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Miyata, Satoshi; Nochioka, Kotaro; Takada, Tsuyoshi; Tadaki, Soichiro; Ushigome, Ryoichi; Yamauchi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Jun; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2014-10-30

    Background:Microalbuminuria, traditionally defined as urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) ≥30 mg/g, is a risk factor for mortality even in patients with preserved glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The prognostic impact of subclinical microalbuminuria, however, remains unknown in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF).Methods and Results:In the Chronic Heart Failure Analysis and Registry in the Tohoku District 2 Study, we enrolled 2,039 consecutive symptomatic CHF patients (median age, 67.4 years; 68.9% male) after excluding those on hemodialysis. On classification and regression tree analysis, UACR=10.2 mg/g and 27.4 mg/g were identified as the first and second discriminating points to stratify the risk for composite of death, acute myocardial infarction, HF admission and stroke, therefore subclinical microalbuminuria was defined as UACR ≥10.2 and <27.4 mg/g. There were 506 composite endpoints (24.8%) during the median follow-up of 2.69 years. On Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox modeling, subclinical microalbuminuria was significantly associated with increased composite endpoints with hazard ratios of 1.90 (P<0.001) and 2.29 (P<0.001) in patients with preserved (>60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2), n=1,129) or mildly reduced eGFR (30-59.9 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2), n=789), respectively. In patients with severely reduced GFR (eGFR <30 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2), n=121), >80% had microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria, and only 9.1% were free from any composite endpoints.Conclusions:Subclinical microalbuminuria was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events in CHF patients with mildly reduced or preserved renal function.

  9. Are We on the Path to Solve the Enigma of Resistant Hypertension: Renal Sympathetic Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Gerc, Vjekoslav; Buksa, Marko

    2013-01-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) opens new perspectives and possibilities not only in the treatment of resistant hypertension but also of other cardiometabolic diseases. In patients with hypertension, it has been demonstrated that activity of the sympathetic nervous system correlates with grade of hypertension. Decreasing sympathetic activity using RSD significantly reduces blood pressure in resistant hypertension. It is too early to say a definite opinion about appropriateness of this method in the treatment of resistant hypertension, because there are not great studies with huge number of the patients. After we get and evaluate these results through a longer span of time, only than we shall know what is the role of RSD in the treatment of resistant hypertension and other cardiometabolic conditions related to increased function of the sympathetic nervous system, such as heart failure, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, renal disease with microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria. PMID:25568521

  10. Are we on the path to solve the enigma of resistant hypertension: renal sympathetic denervation.

    PubMed

    Gerc, Vjekoslav; Buksa, Marko

    2013-12-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) opens new perspectives and possibilities not only in the treatment of resistant hypertension but also of other cardiometabolic diseases. In patients with hypertension, it has been demonstrated that activity of the sympathetic nervous system correlates with grade of hypertension. Decreasing sympathetic activity using RSD significantly reduces blood pressure in resistant hypertension. It is too early to say a definite opinion about appropriateness of this method in the treatment of resistant hypertension, because there are not great studies with huge number of the patients. After we get and evaluate these results through a longer span of time, only than we shall know what is the role of RSD in the treatment of resistant hypertension and other cardiometabolic conditions related to increased function of the sympathetic nervous system, such as heart failure, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, renal disease with microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria.

  11. Prevalence of microalbuminuria and its correlates among diabetic patients attending diabetic clinic at National Guard Hospital in Alhasa

    PubMed Central

    AlFehaid, Aneesah A.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common diseases encountered in clinical practice. Diabetic nephropathy is a common consequence of long-standing diabetes mellitus; microalbuminuria (MA) is considered an early stage of diabetic nephropathy. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of miciroalbuminuria in diabetic patients and factors associated with MA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the diabetic clinic of the primary health center of the National Guard Hospital. Diabetes type 2 patients between the ages of 20–60 years who attended the clinic in 2012 were included in this study. Data were collected by reviewing medical records for demographic and disease-related variables. MA was detected by measuring the albumin to creatinine ratio, and MA was diagnosed if this ratio was between 30 and 300 mg/g on two occasions. RESULTS: MA was found in 37.4% of the sample and the rate was significantly higher among females (P < 0.027). MA was positively related to body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.002), the presence of hypertension (P < 0.000), duration of diabetes (P < 0.000), glycated hemoglobin (P < 0.000), fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.000), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (P < 0.043). No statistically significant correlation was found between MA and age, creatinine level, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of MA in patients with diabetes in this study was high. The study suggests the need to screen for MA early, and the active management of modifiable risk factors, in particular, hyperglycemia, hypertension, LDL, and BMI, to reduce the burden of future end-stage renal disease. PMID:28163568

  12. Ambulatory and home blood pressure monitoring in children and adolescents: diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of target-organ damage.

    PubMed

    Karpettas, Nikos; Nasothimiou, Efthimia; Kollias, Anastasios; Vazeou, Adriani; Stergiou, George S

    2013-04-01

    The prevalence of elevated blood pressure in children and adolescents is more common than previously believed and often represents the early onset of essential hypertension, particularly in adolescents. The definition of hypertension in children is based on distribution criteria and normalcy tables that provide blood pressure percentiles for each measurement method (office, ambulatory and home) according to the individual's age, gender and body size. Owing to the white coat and masked hypertension phenomena, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is indispensable for the diagnosis of hypertension in children. Home blood pressure monitoring in children has been less well studied, and at present, treatment decisions should not be based solely on such measurements. Hypertension-induced preclinical target-organ damage (mainly echocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy) is not uncommon in children and should be evaluated in all hypertensive children. Other indices of target-organ damage, such as carotid intima-media thickness, pulse wave velocity and microalbuminuria, remain under investigation in pediatric hypertension.

  13. [Retinopathy due to 4-aminoquinolines in the prevention of malaria].

    PubMed

    Vedy, J; Graveline, J; Carrica, J; Rivaud, C; Chanut, G

    1979-01-01

    The authors give a study about retinopathy by 4-amino-quinoleine in malaria prevention. Twelve observations are known in patients after 12 to 20 years of treatment. The authors suggest systematic research of this retinopathy.

  14. Urinary albumin excretion in patients with renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Růzicka, M; Stríbrná, J; Englis, M; Lánská, V; Skibová, J; Peregrin, J

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-four hour urinary excretion of albumin (UEalb), IgG and beta-2 microglobulin was investigated at a 3 hour-interval in a control group (C) of healthy subjects, in 30 patients with renovascular hypertension (RVH), and in 16 patients with essential hypertension (EH). Mean UEalb in RVH was significantly higher than in C. A significant direct correlation was demonstrated between diastolic blood pressure and UEalb (p < 0.01). Microalbuminuria (MA) > or = 30 micrograms.min-1 was found in about 18% of RVH patients; it was higher than 16.7 micrograms.min-1 in approx. 31%. These results did not substantially differ from those obtained in patients with EH. The cause for increased UEalb in hypertensive patients may be functional, haemodynamic changes, or structural ones. In either case, MA indicates renal injury, and these patients should be given increased attention when monitoring their blood pressure and when selecting antihypertensive drugs.

  15. Association between retinopathy and cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort [CRIC] Study).

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Juan E; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Pistilli, Maxwell; Daniel, Ebenezer; Alexander, Judith; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan Chia-Mei; Townsend, Raymond; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John Walter; Xie, Dawei; Coleman, Martha; Keane, Martin Gerard

    2012-07-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease experience co-morbid illnesses, including cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of the present study was to assess the association between retinopathy and self-reported CVD in a subgroup of the participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study. For this observational, ancillary investigation, 2,605 Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort participants were invited to participate in the present study, and nonmydriatic fundus photographs in both eyes were obtained for 1,936 subjects. The photographs were reviewed in a masked fashion at a central photograph reading center. The presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive, or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed using standard protocols by trained graders who were masked to the information about the study participants. A history of self-reported CVD was obtained using a medical history questionnaire. Kidney function measurements and traditional and nontraditional risk factors for CVD were obtained from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study. A greater severity of retinopathy was associated with a greater prevalence of any CVD, and this association persisted after adjustment for the traditional risk factors for CVD. The presence of vascular abnormalities usually associated with hypertension was also associated with increased prevalence of CVD. We found a direct relation between CVD prevalence and mean venular caliber. In conclusion, the presence of retinopathy was associated with CVD, suggesting that retinovascular pathology might indicate macrovascular disease, even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. This would make the assessment of retinal morphology a valuable tool in CKD studies of CVD outcomes.

  16. Screening Diabetic Retinopathy Through Color Retinal Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Jin, Xue-Min; Gao, Quan-Xue; You, Jane; Bhattacharya, Prabir

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes that damages the eye's retina. Recognition DR as early as possible is very important to protect patients' vision. We propose a method for screening DR and distin-guishing Prolifetive Diabetic Retinopathy (PDR) from Non-Prolifetive Retino-pathy (NPDR) automatatically through color retinal images. This method evaluates the severity of DR by analyzing the appearnce of bright lesions and retinal vessel patterns. The bright lesions are extracted through morphlogical re-consturction. After that, the retinal vessels are automatically extracted using multiscale matched filters. Then the vessel patterns are analyzed by extracting the vessel net density. The experimental results domonstrate that it is a effective solution to screen DR and distinguish PDR from NPDR by only using color retinal images.

  17. [Diabetic retinopathy complications--12-year retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Ignat, Florica; Davidescu, Livia

    2002-01-01

    It is analyzed, on a retrospective study on 12 years, the incidence of diabetus melitus cases, hospitalized in the Ophthalmologic Clinic from Craiova with special mention to the frequency of the diabetic retinopathy, of it's complications and in an accordance to other general diseases, especially cardiovascular's, which contributes to the aggravation of the diabetic ocular in juries evolution. The study underlines the high incidence of the new founded cases with diabetus melitus in complicated diabetes retinopathy stage; the high frequency of ocular complications is explained, according to our statistic facts and through an insufficient treatment, sometimes incorrect and many other cases total neglected by the patients.

  18. Electro-Oculograms in the Early Diagnosis of Chloroquine Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Weinreb, Marvin S.

    1967-01-01

    Funduscopy, electro-oculography and electroretinography are all valuable in early detection of chloroquine retinopathy, which is reversible if detected early. Simplified instrumentation for electro-oculography was utilized in testing 12 normal controls, one patient with diabetic retinopathy and 15 patients with potential or actual cases of chloroquine retinopathy. Normal controls, and all but one of the patients without clinical evidence of retinopathy, had electro-oculographic ratios above 180. All patients having evidence of retinopathy had ratios below 180. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:6039185

  19. Advanced glycation end products and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Milne, Ross; Brownstein, Seymour

    2013-06-01

    Retinopathy is a serious microvascular complication of diabetes and a major cause of blindness in young adults, worldwide. Early diabetic retinopathy is characterized by a loss of pericytes from retinal capillaries, the appearance of acellular capillaries and microaneurysms, and a breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier. In later stages, this can evolve into the proliferative phase in which there is neovascularization of the retina, which greatly increases the probability of vision loss. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) which accumulate under hyperglycemic conditions are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. AGEs arise primarily by the modification of amine groups of proteins by reactive dicarbonyls such as methylglyoxal. Intracellular proteins including anti-oxidant enzymes, transcription factors and mitochondrial proteins are targets of dicarbonyl modification and this can modify their functional properties and thus compromise cellular physiology. Likewise, modification of extracellular proteins by dicarbonyls can impair cell adhesion and can generate ligands that can potentially bind to cell surface AGE receptors that activate pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. AGE inhibitors have been shown to provide protection in animal models of diabetic retinopathy and currently are being evaluated in clinical trials.

  20. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Obesity to Liver Cancer Additional Content Medical News Portal Hypertension By Steven K. Herrine, MD, Thomas Jefferson ... Liver Hepatic Encephalopathy Jaundice in Adults Liver Failure Portal Hypertension (See also Overview of Liver Disease .) Portal ...

  1. Hypertension - overview

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    If left untreated, hypertension can lead to the thickening of arterial walls causing its lumen, or blood passage way, to narrow in diameter. ... the narrowed arterial openings. In addition, people with hypertension may be more susceptible to stroke.

  2. Soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) predicts microalbuminuria in patients at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Guthoff, Martina; Wagner, Robert; Randrianarisoa, Elko; Hatziagelaki, Erifili; Peter, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Heyne, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Early identification of patients at risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is essential. Elevated serum concentrations of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) associate with diabetes mellitus and predict onset and loss of renal function in chronic kidney disease. We hypothesize, that suPAR may be an early risk indicator for diabetic nephropathy, preceding microalbuminuria. The relationship of baseline suPAR and incident microalbuminuria was assessed in a prospective long-term cohort of subjects at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (TULIP, n = 258). Association with albuminuria at later stages of disease was studied in a cross-sectional cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes (ICEPHA, n = 266). A higher baseline suPAR was associated with an increased risk of new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at risk for type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio 5.3 (95% CI 1.1–25.2, p = 0.03) for the highest vs. lowest suPAR quartile). The proportion of subjects with prediabetes at the end of observation was higher in subjects with new-onset microalbuminuria. suPAR consistently correlated with albuminuria in a separate cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes. Elevated baseline suPAR concentrations independently associate with new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. suPAR may hence allow for earlier risk stratification than microalbuminuria. PMID:28091558

  3. Soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) predicts microalbuminuria in patients at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Guthoff, Martina; Wagner, Robert; Randrianarisoa, Elko; Hatziagelaki, Erifili; Peter, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Heyne, Nils

    2017-01-16

    Early identification of patients at risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is essential. Elevated serum concentrations of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) associate with diabetes mellitus and predict onset and loss of renal function in chronic kidney disease. We hypothesize, that suPAR may be an early risk indicator for diabetic nephropathy, preceding microalbuminuria. The relationship of baseline suPAR and incident microalbuminuria was assessed in a prospective long-term cohort of subjects at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (TULIP, n = 258). Association with albuminuria at later stages of disease was studied in a cross-sectional cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes (ICEPHA, n = 266). A higher baseline suPAR was associated with an increased risk of new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at risk for type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio 5.3 (95% CI 1.1-25.2, p = 0.03) for the highest vs. lowest suPAR quartile). The proportion of subjects with prediabetes at the end of observation was higher in subjects with new-onset microalbuminuria. suPAR consistently correlated with albuminuria in a separate cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes. Elevated baseline suPAR concentrations independently associate with new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. suPAR may hence allow for earlier risk stratification than microalbuminuria.

  4. Urinary MicroRNA Profiling Predicts the Development of Microalbuminuria in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Wang, Kai; Bernardo, Jose; Ellis, Demetrius; Orchard, Trevor; Galas, David; Johnson, John P

    2015-07-17

    Microalbuminuria provides the earliest clinical marker of diabetic nephropathy among patients with Type 1 diabetes, yet it lacks sensitivity and specificity for early histological manifestations of disease. In recent years microRNAs have emerged as potential mediators in the pathogenesis of diabetes complications, suggesting a possible role in the diagnosis of early stage disease. We used quantiative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to evaluate the expression profile of 723 unique microRNAs in the normoalbuminuric urine of patients who did not develop nephropathy (n = 10) relative to patients who subsequently developed microalbuminuria (n = 17). Eighteen microRNAs were strongly associated with the subsequent development of microalbuminuria, while 15 microRNAs exhibited gender-related differences in expression. The predicted targets of these microRNAs map to biological pathways known to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of diabetic renal disease. A microRNA signature (miR-105-3p, miR-1972, miR-28-3p, miR-30b-3p, miR-363-3p, miR-424-5p, miR-486-5p, miR-495, miR-548o-3p and for women miR-192-5p, miR-720) achieved high internal validity (cross-validated misclassification rate of 11.1%) for the future development of microalbuminuria in this dataset. Weighting microRNA measurements by their number of kidney-relevant targets improved the prognostic performance of the miRNA signature (cross-validated misclassification rate of 7.4%). Future studies are needed to corroborate these early observations in larger cohorts.

  5. Urinary MicroRNA Profiling Predicts the Development of Microalbuminuria in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Wang, Kai; Bernardo, Jose; Ellis, Demetrius; Orchard, Trevor; Galas, David; Johnson, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Microalbuminuria provides the earliest clinical marker of diabetic nephropathy among patients with Type 1 diabetes, yet it lacks sensitivity and specificity for early histological manifestations of disease. In recent years microRNAs have emerged as potential mediators in the pathogenesis of diabetes complications, suggesting a possible role in the diagnosis of early stage disease. We used quantiative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to evaluate the expression profile of 723 unique microRNAs in the normoalbuminuric urine of patients who did not develop nephropathy (n = 10) relative to patients who subsequently developed microalbuminuria (n = 17). Eighteen microRNAs were strongly associated with the subsequent development of microalbuminuria, while 15 microRNAs exhibited gender-related differences in expression. The predicted targets of these microRNAs map to biological pathways known to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of diabetic renal disease. A microRNA signature (miR-105-3p, miR-1972, miR-28-3p, miR-30b-3p, miR-363-3p, miR-424-5p, miR-486-5p, miR-495, miR-548o-3p and for women miR-192-5p, miR-720) achieved high internal validity (cross-validated misclassification rate of 11.1%) for the future development of microalbuminuria in this dataset. Weighting microRNA measurements by their number of kidney-relevant targets improved the prognostic performance of the miRNA signature (cross-validated misclassification rate of 7.4%). Future studies are needed to corroborate these early observations in larger cohorts. PMID:26239688

  6. [Albuminuria after acute oral administration of proteins in patients with renovascular hypertension].

    PubMed

    Stríbrná, J; Růzicka, M; Englis, M; Peregrín, J; Lánská, V

    1993-02-05

    In a group of 19 patients with renovascular hypertension the effect of a morning snack comprising meat (1 g protein per 1 kg body weight) on urinary albumin excretion was assessed. Concurrently the plasma creatinine concentration (Pcr) was examined which varied between normal and 260 mumol/l and the creatinine clearance (Ccr). After administration of an acute protein load the mean Ccr value increased by 23%. The albumin excretion, however, did not change substantially, as compared with the previous collection period (mean 17 and 18 micrograms/min). Microalbuminuria was recorded in 31% of the patients and its prevalence was directly related to the increasing Pcr value. The results revealed that an acute protein load did not increase albuminuria although the rise of Ccr was significant. The variability of albumin excretion in the course of the day is, however, influenced also by other factors and for assessment of microalbuminuria therefore examination of 24-hour urine samples should be preferred.

  7. Evaluation of Micro-Bumintest reagent tablets for screening of microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Tai, J; Tze, W J

    1990-01-01

    The presence of significant microalbuminuria is an important predictor of early diabetic nephropathy. Currently methods available to detect microalbuminuria are not suitable for routine screening. This study assessed the performance of Micro-Bumintest reagent tablets (Ames Laboratory) as a visual screening test for qualitative measurement of urinary albumin. 150 urine specimens from type 1 diabetic patients with a disease duration of less than 1-19 years were assayed over 15 runs using quantitative albumin (radioimmunoassay) and total protein assays. In parallel, 600 determinants were made with the tablets. Each sample was assessed by two readers using a color chart with patterns illustrating typical negative and positive color reactions with a grading from 1 to 7. Urinary protein was determined with an Ames Clinitek 10 urine chemistry analyzer and the Multistix 10 SG reagent strips. The results revealed that as the albumin concentration increased, the percentage of specimens detected visually as presumptive positive (grading = 3) reactions and positive reactions (grading greater than 3) increased. A positive Micro-Bumintest reaction was obtained with an albumin concentration of greater than 40 micrograms/ml. Presumptive positive reactions occur more than 50% of the time at protein concentrations greater than 14 mg/dl. The tablet test is more sensitive than the Clinitek 10/Multistix 10 SG strip system. These data show that the Micro-Bumintest reagent tablets are a sensitive and convenient screening test for detection of microalbuminuria.

  8. Retinopathy and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study [CRIC])

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Juan E.; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker-Ostroff, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan C.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W.; Xie, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience other diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether retinopathy predicts future CVD events in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this ancillary investigation, 2605 CRIC participants were invited to participate and non-mydriatic fundus photographs were obtained in 1936 subjects. Using standard protocols, presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed at a central photograph reading center by trained graders masked to study participant’s information. Patients with a self-reported history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. Incident CVD events were adjudicated using medical records. Kidney function measurements, traditional and non-traditional risk factors for CVD were obtained. Presence and severity of retinopathy were associated with increased risk of development of any CVD in this population of CKD patients, and these associations persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. We also found a direct relationship between increased venular diameter and risk of development of CVD; however, the relationship was not statistically significant after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In conclusion, presence of retinopathy was associated with future CVD events, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. Assessment of retinal morphology may be valuable in assessing risk of CVD in patients with CKD, both clinically and in research settings. PMID:26409637

  9. Severe diabetic retinopathy at presentation in a young man.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, G. C.; James, R. A.; Powell, R. G.; Jones, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    A 22 year old man presented with a severe ischaemic diabetic retinopathy and, in spite of photocoagulation therapy, was blind in one eye 16 months after diagnosis. Four similar cases of aggressive diabetic retinopathy are reviewed. There is increasing evidence that a small group of young men with insulin dependent diabetes (IDD) may develop severe diabetic retinopathy at, or soon after, diagnosis. Images Figure 1 PMID:1904157

  10. High-resolution adaptive optics findings in talc retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Mohamed K; Sarwar, Salman; Hanout, Mostafa; Sadiq, Mohammad A; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Gulati, Vikas; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Sepah, Yasir J

    2015-01-01

    Talc retinopathy is a recognized ocular condition characterized by the presence of small, yellow, glistening crystals found inside small retinal vessels and within different retinal layers. These crystals can be associated with retinal vascular occlusion and ischemia. Different diagnostic modalities have been used previously to characterize the retinal lesions in talc retinopathy. Adaptive optics, a high resolution imaging technique, is used to evaluate the location, appearance and distribution of talc crystals in a case of talc retinopathy.

  11. Argon laser photo-coagulation complications in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Pavljasević, Suzana; Pranjić, Nurka; Sarajlić, Dzevdet

    2004-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a disease based on vascular genesis that begins as microangiopathy and develops into macroangioapthy preceded by fibroproliferation changes. According to histo- pathological changes, diabetic retinopathy is divided into nonproliferative, pre-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Possibilities and needs for photo-coagulation in the earlier and later changes in retina reduce the meaning of conservative treatment. Laser photo-coagulation with therapeutical may cause unwanted and damaging effects, as well. Complications diagnosed in diabetic retinopathy, such as cataract, secondary glaucoma, central retinal vein thrombosis, haemophthalmus, are much more frequent in patients with laser photo-coagulation treatment.

  12. Autoimmune retinopathy: A case report from India

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Sudha K.; Ahmed, Arshee S.

    2017-01-01

    A first case report of autoimmune retinopathy (AIR) from India. A middle-aged female patient presented with subacute loss of vision in both eyes. Clinical examination revealed a near normal fundus in both the eyes. A presumed diagnosis of nonparaneoplastic AIR was made based on clinical features and suggestive investigations. Early detection and management with steroids or immunosuppression may be beneficial to patients with AIR. PMID:28298865

  13. Neurodegeneration and neuroprotection in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ola, Mohammad Shamsul; Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; Khan, Haseeb A; Alhomida, Abdullah S

    2013-01-28

    Diabetic retinopathy is widely considered to be a neurovascular disease. This is in contrast to its previous identity as solely a vascular disease. Early in the disease progression of diabetes, the major cells in the neuronal component of the retina consist of retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, both of which have been found to be compromised. A number of retinal function tests also indicated a functional deficit in diabetic retina, which further supports dysfunction of neuronal cells. As an endocrinological disorder, diabetes alters metabolism both systemically and locally in several body organs, including the retina. A growing body of evidences indicates increased levels of excitotoxic metabolites, including glutamate, branched chain amino acids and homocysteine in cases of diabetic retinopathy. Also present, early in the disease, are decreased levels of folic acid and vitamin-B12, which are potential metabolites capable of damaging neurons. These altered levels of metabolites are found to activate several metabolic pathways, leading to increases in oxidative stress and decreases in the level of neurotrophic factors. As a consequence, they may damage retinal neurons in diabetic patients. In this review, we have discussed those potential excitotoxic metabolites and their implications in neuronal damage. Possible therapeutic targets to protect neurons are also discussed. However, further research is needed to understand the exact molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration so that effective neuroprotection strategies can be developed. By protecting retinal neurons early in diabetic retinopathy cases, damage of retinal vessels can be protected, thereby helping to ameliorate the progression of diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness worldwide.

  14. The Impact of Blood Pressure Variability on Subclinical Ventricular, Renal and Vascular Dysfunction, in Patients with Hypertension and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    CIOBANU, Andrea O; GHERGHINESCU, Carmen Lucia; DULGHERU, Raluca; MAGDA, Stefania; DRAGOI GALRINHO, Ruxandra; FLORESCU, Maria; GUBERNA, Suzana; CINTEZA, Mircea; VINEREANU, Dragos

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Blood pressure variability (BPV) was proved as a cardiovascular risk factor. One of its mechanisms is related to arterial stiffness and ventriculo-arterial coupling; however its impact on subclinical cardiovascular dysfunction has not been evaluated yet. Objectives: To assess the relationship between BPV on 24 hours, and subclinical left ventricle (LV), renal, and vascular dysfunction in diabetic and hypertensive patients. Material and methods: We studied 56 patients (57±9 years, 29 men) with mild-to-moderate hypertension and type 2 diabetes, no cardiovascular disease, normal ejection fraction and normal renal function. 24 hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was used to assess BPV, daytime (d) and night time (n), by: 1. mean (M); 2. standard deviation of mean (SD); 3. variance (Vr); 4. coefficient of variation (CV); 5. day/night variation: reverse dippers, non-dippers, dippers and extreme dippers; conventional and 2D speckle tracking echo to assess LV function; myocardial deformation was measured as global longitudinal strain (GLS). Endothelial (flow mediated dilation, FMD) and arterial function (intima media-thickness, IMT; pulse wave velocity, PWV), microalbuminuria were tested. Outcomes: Daytime BPV correlates inversely with subclinical myocardial function evaluated through GLS. Daytime systolic BPV correlates positively with IMT (all rho > 0.30, all p < 0.05). Also, there is a significantly inverse correlation between mean BP and GLS. We found a direct correlation between mean BP, but not BPV, and microalbuminuria (all rho > - 0.30 and all p < 0.05). We found no correlation between BPV and FMD, PWV. There were no differences for GLS, microalbuminuria and FMD between dipper groups. Conclusions: In diabetic patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension, increased daytime blood pressure variability correlates with subclinical left ventricular dysfunction and arterial function (IMT), while microalbuminuria correlates with elevated

  15. Malignant hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2009:chap 89. Read More Acute kidney failure Alertness - decreased Angina Heart attack Preeclampsia Pulmonary edema Renovascular hypertension Seizures Stroke Review ...

  16. Mineralocorticoid hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 10 – 25% of the population and is an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. The renin-angiotensin system is frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension, be it primary or secondary. The prevalence of primary aldosteronism increases with the severity of hypertension, from 2% in patients with grade 1 hypertension to 20% among resistant hypertensives. Mineralcorticoid hypertension includes a spectrum of disorders ranging from renin-producing pathologies (renin-secreting tumors, malignant hypertension, coarctation of aorta), aldosterone-producing pathologies (primary aldosteronism – Conns syndrome, familial hyperaldosteronism 1, 2, and 3), non-aldosterone mineralocorticoid producing pathologies (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Liddle syndrome, deoxycorticosterone-secreting tumors, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormones (ACTH) syndrome, congenitalvadrenal hyperplasia), and drugs with mineraocorticoid activity (locorice, carbenoxole therapy) to glucocorticoid receptor resistance syndromes. Clinical presentation includes hypertension with varying severity, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. Ratio of plasma aldosterone concentraion to plasma renin activity remains the best screening tool. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling is the best diagnostic test coupled with a CT scan. Treatment is either surgical (adrenelectomy) for unilateral adrenal disease versus medical therapy for idiopathic, ambiguous, or bilateral disease. Medical therapy focuses on blood pressure control and correction of hypokalemia using a combination of anti-hypertensives (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers) and potassium-raising therapies (mineralcorticoid receptor antagonist or potassium sparing diuretics). Direct aldosterone synthetase antagonists represent a promising future therapy. PMID:22145132

  17. Impact of microalbuminuria on incident coronary heart disease, cardiovascular and all-cause mortality: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fang; Liu, Guanghua; Shi, Yifu; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the magnitude of relationship between microalbuminuria and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and mortality in the general population by conducting a meta-analysis. A comprehensive literature search in Pubmed and Embase database was performed prior to March 2014. Only prospective studies investigating the presence of microalbuminuria and incident CHD, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and mortality and were selected. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated by the presence of microalbuminuria versus without microalbuminuria. Finally, we identified 8 prospective studies involving 114,105 individuals. Participants with microalbuminuria were associated with 69% greater risk of CVD (RR=1.69; 95% CI 1.41-2.02) and 41% greater risk of CHD (RR=1.41; 95% CI 1.17-1.69). Participants with microalbuminuria were also associated with 57% greater risk of cardiovascular mortality (RR=1.57; 95% CI 1.20-2.06) and 65% greater risk of all-cause mortality (RR=1.65; 95% CI 1.45-1.88). Microalbuminuria is an independent predictor for CHD, CVD, and all-cause mortality in the general population. Early detection of microalbuminuria in the general population is likely to identify patients at increased risk of CVD and mortality.

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI-per-TEN-shun), or PH, is increased pressure in the pulmonary arteries. These arteries carry blood from your heart to your lungs to pick up oxygen. PH causes symptoms such as shortness of ...

  19. Successful treatment of cancer-associated retinopathy with alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Espandar, Ladan; O'Brien, Susan; Thirkill, Charles; Lubecki, Linda A; Esmaeli, Bita

    2007-07-01

    We herein report a patient with cancer-associated retinopathy who experienced multiple bouts of paraneoplastic retinopathy and optic neuropathy but responded to treatments with alemtuzumab and was able to maintain useful vision over the course of 8 years of follow-up.

  20. Retinopathy of prematurity: An update on screening and management

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, Ann L

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity is a proliferative disorder of the developing retinal blood vessels in preterm infants. The present practice point reviews new information regarding screening and management for retinopathy of prematurity, including the role of risk factors in screening, optimal scheduling for screening examinations, pain management, digital retinal photography and antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy. PMID:27095887

  1. A Review on Recent Developments for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the retinal micro vasculature which may be formed as a result of diabetes mellitus. Blindness may appear as a result of unchecked and severe cases of diabetic retinopathy. Manual inspection of fundus images to check morphological changes in microaneurysms, exudates, blood vessels, hemorrhages, and macula is a very time-consuming and tedious work. It can be made easily with the help of computer-aided system and intervariability for the observer. In this paper, several techniques for detecting microaneurysms, hemorrhages, and exudates are discussed for ultimate detection of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Blood vessels detection techniques are also discussed for the diagnosis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, the paper elaborates a discussion on the experiments accessed by authors for the detection of diabetic retinopathy. This work will be helpful for the researchers and technical persons who want to utilize the ongoing research in this area. PMID:27777811

  2. Maternal diabetes programs hypertension and kidney injury in offspring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chenier, Isabelle; Tran, Stella; Scotcher, Michael; Chang, Shiao-Ying; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2010-07-01

    We investigated whether maternal diabetes programs the offspring to develop hypertension and kidney injury in adulthood and examined potential underlying mechanisms. In a murine model we studied the offspring of three groups of dams (non-diabetic, diabetic, and diabetic treated with insulin). Mean systolic blood pressure in the offspring was monitored from 8 to 20 weeks. Body and kidney weights in the offspring of diabetic mothers were significantly lower than in offspring of non-diabetic mothers. Offspring of diabetic mothers developed hypertension, microalbuminuria, and glucose intolerance. Increased accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the glomeruli and marked upregulation of angiotensinogen, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme, transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta1), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression were evident in the renal cortex of hypertensive offspring of diabetic mothers. By contrast, angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) gene expression was lower in the hypertensive offspring of diabetic mothers than in that of non-diabetic mothers. These changes were prevented in the offspring of insulin-treated diabetic mothers. These data indicate that maternal diabetes induces perinatal programming of hypertension, renal injury, and glucose intolerance in the offspring and suggest a central role for the activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and TGF-beta1 gene expression in this process.

  3. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, G

    2001-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow, which in turn is the result of splanchnic vasodilatation. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is, in turn, secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This paper reviews the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  4. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2003-05-01

    Portal hypertension, the main complication of cirrhosis, is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which, in turn, is secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation, with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This review covers the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  5. Ultra widefield fundus imaging for diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Szilárd; Berenberg, Thomas L

    2014-08-01

    For decades, the standard method for screening and grading severity of diabetic retinal disease has relied upon a montage of photographs using normal angle fundus cameras. With the development of ultrawide field (UWF) fundus imaging, more of the retina can be imaged with fewer pictures, less dependence on photographer skill, and, often, greater ease on the patient. Recent studies have shown comparability between traditional and UWF imaging for standard grading of diabetic retinopathy. Moreover, UWF images can detect peripheral pathology not typically seen in standard photographs, which may enlighten our understanding of disease severity and suggest new indications for treatment.

  6. Growth Factors in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zia Ali

    2003-01-01

    Many growth factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Alteration of growth factors and their receptors in diabetes has been shown in both experimental and clinical studies. Sustained hyperglycemia resulting from long-standing diabetes leads to several biochemical abnormalities that consequently result in retinal hypoxia. Retinal oxygenation state regulates various growth factors that promote angiogenesis in order to meet the oxygen demands of the tissue. However, unregulated expression of these growth factors and induction of complex cascades leading to augmentation of other proangiogenic factors, which may not be regulated by tissue oxygenation, leads to uncontrolled retinal neovascularization and blindness in diabetic patients. PMID:14668050

  7. Medication adherence and quality of life among the elderly with diabetic retinopathy 1

    PubMed Central

    Jannuzzi, Fernanda Freire; Cintra, Fernanda Aparecida; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus; São-João, Thaís Moreira; Gallani, Maria Cecília Bueno Jayme

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to investigate the factors related to medication adherence and its relation to Health- Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in elderly people with diabetic retinopathy. METHOD: one hundred (n=100) elderly outpatients with diabetic retinopathy taking antihypertensives and/or oral antidiabetics/insulin were interviewed. Adherence was evaluated by the adherence proportion and its association with the care taken in administrating medications and by the Morisky Scale. The National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25) was used to evaluate HRQoL. RESULTS: most (58%) reported the use of 80% or more of the prescribed dose and care in utilizing the medication. The item "stopping the drug when experiencing an adverse event", from the Morisky Scale, explained 12.8% and 13.5% of the variability of adherence proportion to antihypertensives and oral antidiabetics/insulin, respectively. CONCLUSION: there was better HRQoL in the Color Vision, Driving and Social Functioning domains of the NEI VFQ-25. Individuals with lower scores on the NEI VFQ-25 and higher scores on the Morisky Scale presented greater chance to be nonadherent to the pharmacological treatment of diabetes and hypertension. PMID:25591084

  8. Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema: pathophysiology, screening, and novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, Thomas A; Amador, Armando G; Zinman, Bernard

    2003-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are leading causes of blindness in the working-age population of most developed countries. The increasing number of individuals with diabetes worldwide suggests that DR and DME will continue to be major contributors to vision loss and associated functional impairment for years to come. Early detection of retinopathy in individuals with diabetes is critical in preventing visual loss, but current methods of screening fail to identify a sizable number of high-risk patients. The control of diabetes-associated metabolic abnormalities (i.e., hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension) is also important in preserving visual function because these conditions have been identified as risk factors for both the development and progression of DR/DME. The currently available interventions for DR/DME, laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy, only target advanced stages of disease. Several biochemical mechanisms, including protein kinase C-beta activation, increased vascular endothelial growth factor production, oxidative stress, and accumulation of intracellular sorbitol and advanced glycosylation end products, may contribute to the vascular disruptions that characterize DR/DME. The inhibition of these pathways holds the promise of intervention for DR at earlier non-sight-threatening stages. To implement new therapies effectively, more individuals will need to be screened for DR/DME at earlier stages-a process requiring both improved technology and interdisciplinary cooperation among physicians caring for patients with diabetes.

  9. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  11. Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Chi-Juei; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chung-May; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Li

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of current study aims to investigate the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a nationwide population-based cohort in Taiwan. Newly diagnosed DN patients and age- and sex-matched controls were identified from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2010. We studied the effects of age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), and medications on the development of nonproliferative DR (NPDR), proliferative DR (PDR), and diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients with DN. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of the development of DR. Our results show that the adjusted HRs of NPDR and PDR were 5.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.68–5.37) and 9.7 (95% CI = 8.15–11.5), respectively, in patients with DN as compared with patients in the non-DN cohort. At 5-year follow-up, patients with DN showed an increased HR of NPDR progression to PDR (HR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.68–3.03), and the major comorbidities were hypertension (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.10–1.38 with NPDR; HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.02–1.72 with PDR) and DPN (HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.72–2.41 in NPDR; HR = 2.95, 95% CI = 2.16–4.03 in PDR). Dyslipidemia increased the HR of developing NPDR but not PDR or DME. Moreover, DN did not significantly affect DME development (HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 0.87–2.48) or progression (HR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.11–1.20). We concluded that DN was an independent risk factor for DR development and progression; however, DN did not markedly affect DME development in this study, and the potential association between these disorders requires further investigation. PMID:27564383

  12. Inflammation and pharmacological treatment in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaštelan, Snježana; Tomić, Martina; Gverović Antunica, Antonela; Salopek Rabatić, Jasminka; Ljubić, Spomenka

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is estimated to be the leading cause of new blindness in the working population of developed countries. Primary interventions such as intensive glycemic control, strict blood pressure regulation, and lipid-modifying therapy as well as local ocular treatment (laser photocoagulation and pars plana vitrectomy) can significantly reduce the risk of retinopathy occurrence and progression. Considering the limitations of current DR treatments development of new therapeutic strategies, it becomes necessary to focus on pharmacological treatment. Currently, there is increasing evidence that inflammatory processes have a considerable role in the pathogenesis of DR with multiple studies showing an association of various systemic as well as local (vitreous and aqueous fluid) inflammatory factors and the progression of DR. Since inflammation is identified as a relevant mechanism, significant effort has been directed to the development of new concepts for the prevention and treatment of DR acting on the inflammatory processes and the use of pharmacological agents with anti-inflammatory effect. Inhibiting the inflammatory pathway could be an appealing treatment option for DR in future practices, and as further prospective randomized clinical trials accumulate data, the role and guidelines of anti-inflammatory pharmacologic treatments will become clearer.

  13. Photocoagulation as treatment of diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, J.; Fernandez, L.; de Pedraza, Maria L.; Gamella, C.; Santervas, R.

    1992-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic disease that is revealed with a lot of alterations due to factors such as an absolute or relative reduction of the insulin. It is usually accompanied by generalized arteriosclerosis and prepares for certain microvasculares pathologies such as retinopathy, nefropathy, and neuropathy. The first effects of diabetes in the retina seem to act on the capillaries. The functional modifications of the retinal circulation appear before the structural ones. These consist of the blood flux damage and the obligation of the hematorretinal barrier with extravasacy as can be proved in the fluorophotometry of the vitreous humor. Nowadays, medical treatments are more effective and only vitrectomy and photocoagulation are used in diabetic retinopathy. For that, the argon laser and the xenon arch are used. The treatment is usually spread panretine, with coagulation in a grid pattern around the eye, avoiding the macula and other vital structures, and treating the neoformed blood vessels. The rate of grave visual loss in the studies carried out with there techniques was 12 in relation to 28 in the non-treated cases. The most important factors of risk found, were the discal neoformed blood vessels and the hemorrhage of the vitreous humor. Adverse effects were found such as the reduction of visual sharpness and the contrition of the visual field, these are greater in patients treated with the xenon arch than in those treated with the argon laser.

  14. Present-day conservative treatment retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Monika, Modrzejewska; Katarzyna, Kubasik-Kładna; Leszek, Kuprjanowicz

    2013-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity occurs in prematurely born babies. Etiology of disease is multifactorial and frequency of retinopathy of prematurity diagnosis increases. Retinopathy is one of causes for major loss of vision and amaurosis in newborns around the world. Low efficacy of treatment leads to necessity for looking for new solutions and modern therapy use in treatment of this disease. So far, therapies used are: laser and cryotherapy and cases of retina detachment, the course is combined with surgical procedures of sclera and vitrectomy. The aim of the paper was detailed observation of available literature concerning new methods of management in retinopathy of prematurity. Newest reviews on role of vascular endothelial growth factor secreted under the influence of hypoxia indicate that it takes part in angiogenesis and neovascularization. Thus, in retinopathy of prematurity management vitreous application of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors such as ranibizumab, bevacizumab are used as supplement or treatment combined with laser therapy or surgical procedures, however there are many controversies on this form of treatment. Recently there has been an interest in vitreous application of Triamcinolon and other experimental substances inhibiting fibro-vascular proliferations in mouse models of retinopathy of prematurity. Hopes connected with high efficacy of retinopathy of prematurity treatment are also related to use of gene therapy, beta-blockers, supplementation with Omega-3 acids, matrix metalloproteinase-2 inhibitors, gold nanoparticles-GNP and anthrax lethal toxin.

  15. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2002-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is in turn secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. Hepatic hydrothorax results from the passage of ascites across the diaphragm and into the pleural space. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency resulting in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain.

  16. Recent Developments in Laser Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Samuel H.; Adelman, Ron A.

    2015-01-01

    Laser photocoagulation has been the mainstay of diabetic retinopathy treatment since its development in mid-20th century. With the advent of antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy, the role of laser therapy appeared to be diminished, however many advances in laser technology have been developed since. This review will describe recent advances in laser treatment of diabetic retinopathy including pattern scan laser, short-pulse duration and a reduced fluence laser, and navigated laser system for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and macular edema. PMID:25949072

  17. Angiotensin II-related hypertension and eye diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marin Garcia, Pablo Jesus; Marin-Castaño, Maria Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Systemic vascular disease, especially hypertension, has been suspected as a risk factor for some eye diseases including, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Hypertension can contribute to chronic diseases by hemodynamic injury and/or cellular actions induced by hypertension-related hormones or growth factors. Among the most important is Angiotensin II (Ang II), which controls blood pressure and induces different cellular functions that may be dependent or independent of its effect on blood pressure. Importantly, as is true for heart, kidney and other organs, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is present in the eye. So, even in the absence of hypertension, local production of Ang II could be involved in eye diseases. The goal of this manuscript is to review the most relevant scientific evidence supporting the role of the RAS activation, in the development of age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, and highlight the importance of Ang II in the etiology of these diseases. PMID:25276298

  18. Incidence, risk factors, and morphology in operating microscope light retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Khwarg, S.G.; Linstone, F.A.; Daniels, S.A.; Isenberg, S.J.; Hanscom, T.A.; Geoghegan, M.; Straatsma, B.R.

    1987-03-15

    A review of 135 consecutive cataract operations identified ten cases (7.4%) of operating microscope light retinopathy. Ophthalmoscopically, these light retinopathy lesions appeared as a focal pigment epithelial change with varying degrees of pigment clumping in the center. Fluorescein angiography accentuated the lesion by demonstrating a sharply demarcated transmission defect, occasionally with multiple satellite lesions. The shape of the lesion matched the shape of the illuminating source of the particular operating microscope used during the surgery. The most significant risk factor associated with the production of these light retinopathy lesions was prolonged operating time. Mean total operating time for the ten patients with light retinopathy was 51 minutes longer than for those without (P less than .0001). Other significant associated factors were the presence of diabetes mellitus (P less than .03), younger age (P less than .05), and the use of hydrochlorothiazide (P less than .04).

  19. Evaluation of the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy A Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupfer, Carl

    1973-01-01

    Evaluated is the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (blindness due to ruptured vessels of the retina as a side effect of diabetes), and described is a research project comparing two types of photocoagulation treatment. (DB)

  20. Is medical treatment for diabetic retinopathy still an unreal dream?

    PubMed

    Giusti, C

    2002-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a highly specific vascular complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, estimated to be the most frequent cause of new cases of blindness in the working population of the Western world. The prevalence of retinopathy is strongly related to the duration of diabetes and glycemic control, even though a multifactorial pathogenesis should be probably considered in genetically susceptible subjects. Intensive diabetes management, with the goal of achieving near-normal glycemia, has been shown to prevent and/or delay the onset of diabetic retinopathy and laser photocoagulation has an established clinical efficacy in preventing visual loss. However, as laser scars always destroy the retinal anatomy permanently, a medical approach to nonproliferative retinopathy should be preferred if its clinical efficacy could be demonstrated. In this paper, recently published reports supporting this hypothesis are reviewed and their conclusions critically discussed.

  1. Visual complications in diabetes mellitus: beyond retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Khan, A; Petropoulos, I N; Ponirakis, G; Malik, R A

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss in people with diabetes mellitus; however, other causes of visual impairment/loss include other retinal and non-retinal visual problems, including glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy and cataracts. Additionally, when a person with diabetes complains of visual disturbance despite a visual acuity of 6/6, abnormalities in refraction, contrast sensitivity, straylight and amplitude of accommodation should be considered. We review and highlight these visual problems for physicians who manage people with diabetes to ensure timely referral and treatment to limit visual disability, which can have a significant impact on daily living, especially for those participating in sports and driving.

  2. Diabetic Retinopathy: Vascular and Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Semeraro, F.; Cancarini, A.; dell'Omo, R.; Rezzola, S.; Romano, M. R.; Costagliola, C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual impairment in the working-age population of the Western world. The pathogenesis of DR is complex and several vascular, inflammatory, and neuronal mechanisms are involved. Inflammation mediates structural and molecular alterations associated with DR. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways associated with DR are not completely characterized. Previous studies indicate that tissue hypoxia and dysregulation of immune responses associated with diabetes mellitus can induce increased expression of numerous vitreous mediators responsible for DR development. Thus, analysis of vitreous humor obtained from diabetic patients has made it possible to identify some of the mediators (cytokines, chemokines, and other factors) responsible for DR pathogenesis. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between inflammation and DR. Herein the main vitreous-related factors triggering the occurrence of retinal complication in diabetes are highlighted. PMID:26137497

  3. Acute eclipse retinopathy: a small case series.

    PubMed

    Khatib, Nur; Knyazer, Boris; Lifshitz, Tova; Levy, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    We present four young patients with acute severe solar retinopathy after observation of the total eclipse on January 4, 2011 without appropriate eye protection. Funduscopic findings were accompanied by optical coherence tomography (OCT) investigation of the macula. All our patients were young (range 14-29 years). In three of the four patients we have been able to repeat OCT evaluation revealing that the retinal changes were reversible, but delineating mild pathology in the retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors. Best-corrected visual acuity in the fourth case was 6/24. In addition, macular edema, which has been previously described in literature, could not be demonstrated by OCT. In the two cases we performed an early fluorescein angiogram, no pathology was seen.

  4. Managing hypertension in diabetic patients – focus on trandolapril/verapamil combination

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanjib Kumar; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Hypertensive diabetes individuals are at higher risk for cardiovascular events and progression to end stage renal disease. Several well conducted clinical trials indicate that aggressive treatment of hypertension in individual with diabetes reduces these complications. Combinations of two or more antihypertensive drugs are frequently required to reach the target blood pressure and to improve the cardiovascular and renal outcomes in these patients. There are physiological and clinical rationales for renin-angiotensin system blockade in hypertensive diabetics. Trandolapril/verapamil sustained released (SR) is a fixed-dose combination of trandolapril and a sustained release formulation of verapamil and indicated in treatment of hypertension in patients who require more than one drug to reach target blood pressure. The antihypertensive efficacy of trandolapril/verapamil SR has been evaluated extensively in large trials. In the INVEST trial, a verapamil SR-based treatment strategy that included trandolapril in most patients was effective in reducing the primary outcome in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease. The new onset of diabetes was also significantly lower in the verapamil SR/trandolapril treatment group in comparison with those on the atenolol/hydroclorothiazide treatment group. The BErgamo NEphrologic DIabetes Complications Trial (BENEDICT) documented that in hypertensive diabetes and normoalbuminuria, trandolapril plus verapamil or trandolapril alone delayed the onset of microalbuminuria independent of their blood pressure-reducing effect. Thus, trandolapril/verapamil is an effective option for treatment of hypertensive diabetes patients requiring more than one agent to achieve target blood pressure. PMID:17969376

  5. Retinopathy and Cognitive Impairment in Adults With CKD

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, Kristine; Ackerson, Lynn; Hoang, Tina D.; Go, Alan S.; Maguire, Maureen G.; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Daniel, Ebenezer; Bazzano, Lydia A.; Coleman, Martha; Cohen, Debbie L.; Kusek, John W.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Seliger, Stephen; Xie, Dawei; Grunwald, Juan E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Retinal microvascular abnormalities have been associated with cognitive impairment, possibly serving as a marker of cerebral small vessel disease. This relationship has not been evaluated among persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD), a condition associated with increased risk of both retinal pathology and cognitive impairment. Study Design Cross-sectional study Setting & Participants 588 participants ≥ 52 years old with CKD in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study Predictor Retinopathy graded using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study severity scale and diameters of retinal vessels. Outcomes Neuropsychological battery of six cognitive tests Measurements Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of retinopathy, individual retinopathy features, and retinal vessel diameters with cognitive impairment (≤1 SD from the mean), and linear regression models were used to compare cognitive test scores across levels of retinopathy adjusting for age, race, sex, education, and medical comorbidities. Results The mean age of the cohort was 65.3 +/− 5.6 (SD) years; 51.9% were non-White, and 52.6% were male. The prevalence of retinopathy was 30.1% and 14.3% for cognitive impairment. Compared to those without retinopathy, participants with retinopathy had increased likelihood of cognitive impairment on executive function (35.1% vs. 11.5%; OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.0-6.0), attention (26.7% vs. 7.3%; OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.8-4.9), and naming (26.0% vs. 10.0%; OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2-3.4) after multivariable adjustment. Increased level of retinopathy was also associated with lower cognitive performance on executive function and attention. Microaneurysms were associated with cognitive impairment on some domains, but there were no significant associations with other retinal measures after multivariable adjustment. Limitations Unknown temporal relationship between retinopathy and impairment. Conclusions In adults with CKD, retinopathy is

  6. Increment Threshold Functions in Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ronald M.; Moskowitz, Anne; Bush, Jennifer N.; Fulton, Anne B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess scotopic background adaptation in subjects with a history of preterm birth and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Retinopathy of prematurity is known to have long-term effects on rod photoreceptor and rod mediated postreceptor retinal function. Methods Rod-mediated thresholds for detection of 3° diameter, 50 ms stimuli presented 20° from fixation were measured using a spatial forced choice method in 36 subjects (aged 9–17 years) with a history of preterm birth and 11 age similar term-born subjects. Thresholds were measured first in the dark-adapted condition and then in the presence of 6 steady background lights (−2.8 to +2.0 log scot td). A model of the increment threshold function was fit to each subject's thresholds to estimate the dark-adapted threshold (TDA) and the Eigengrau (A0, the background that elevates threshold 0.3 log unit above TDA). Results In subjects with a history of severe ROP, both TDA and A0 were significantly elevated relative to those in former preterms who never had ROP and term-born control subjects. Subjects who had mild ROP had normal TDA but elevated A0. Neither TDA nor A0 differed significantly between former preterms who never had ROP and term-born controls. Conclusions The results suggest that in severe ROP, threshold is affected at a preadaptation site, possibly the rod outer segment. In mild ROP, changes in the Eigengrau may reflect increased intrinsic noise in the photoreceptor or postreceptor circuitry or both. PMID:27145476

  7. Early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Baez, Maria Valeria; Barcenas-Contreras, Rodolfo; Morales Montoya, Carlos; Espinosa-Garcia, Laura Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of a strategy for early detection of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2) in Quintana Roo, México. Methods: Study transversal, observational, prospective, analytical, eight primary care units from Mexican Social Security Institute in the northern delegation of the State of Quintana Roo, Mexico were included. A program for early detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in adult 376,169 was designed. Were diagnosed 683 cases of type 2 diabetes, in 105 patients randomized was conducted to direct ophthalmoscopy were subjected to a secondary hospital were assigned. Will determine the degree of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema was performed. Results: In population were 55.2% female, mean age 48+11.1 years, 23.8 % had some degree of DR, 28.0% with mild non- proliferative diabetic retinopathy 48.0 % moderate 16.0% and severe and 8.0% showed proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Those over age 30 are 2.8 times more risk of developing DR, OR= 2.8; 95%CI: 0.42-18.0, and OR= 1.7; 95%CI: 1.02-2.95 women. Conclusions: The implementation of programs aimed at the early detection of debilitating conditions such as diabetic retinopathy health impact beneficiaries, effective links between primary care systems and provide second level positive health outcomes for patient diseases. PMID:26019380

  8. Microalbuminuria--a marker of the risk of developing nephropathy in insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dryáková, M; Englis, M; Bartos, V; Rozprimová, L; Sidlová, A; Malý, J

    1989-01-01

    The authors present partial results of a prospective study conducted in 65 insulin-dependent diabetics with varying duration of disease in whom development of micro-angiopathic organ alterations is followed in relation to diabetes compensation and development of clinically manifest proteinuria or to albumin excretion (microalbuminuria). The results suggest that the increase in albumin excretion in recent-onset and non-recent-onset patients is in most cases only an expression of changes in renal function due to metabolism and therapy and apparently of little value in predicting the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy. The situation is not so unambiguous in patients with long duration of diabetes and, in case increased albumin excretion remains unchanged or further increases despite intensive insulin therapy, it may serve most likely as a marker of high risk of developing diabetic nephropathy.

  9. [Microalbuminuria--a risk indicator for the development of nephropathy in insulin-dependent diabetics].

    PubMed

    Dryáková, M; Englis, M; Bartos, V; Rozprimová, L; Sidlová, A; Malý, J

    1989-10-27

    The authors submit preliminary results of a prospective study in 65 insulin-dependent diabetics with a varying duration of the disease where they followed up the development of microangiopathic organ changes in relation to the compensation of diabetes and the development of clinically manifest proteinuria or albumin excretion (microalbuminuria). From the results ensues that in recent and postrecent patients the increased albumin excretion is as a rule only a manifestation of metabolically conditioned and treatable changes of renal function and is of minor importance for the prediction of the risk of development of diabetic nephropathy. In patients with prolonged duration of diabetes the position is not unequivocal and if the albumin excretion persists or increases despite intensive insulin treatment it is most probably an indicator of a high risk of development of diabetic nephropathy.

  10. Efficacy of captopril in postponing nephropathy in normotensive insulin dependent diabetic patients with microalbuminuria.

    PubMed Central

    Mathiesen, E R; Hommel, E; Giese, J; Parving, H H

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the effectiveness of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition in preventing the development of diabetic nephropathy (albuminuria greater than 300 mg/24h). DESIGN--Open randomised controlled study of four years' duration. SETTING--Outpatient diabetic clinic in tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--44 normotensive (mean blood pressure 127/78 (SD 12/10) mm Hg) insulin dependent diabetic patients with persistent microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/24h). INTERVENTIONS--The treatment group (n = 21) was initially given captopril (25 mg/24 h). The dose was increased to 100 mg/24 h during the first 16 months and thiazide was added after 30 months. The remaining 23 patients were left untreated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Albuminuria, kidney function, development of diabetic nephropathy (albuminuria greater than 300 mg/24 h), and arterial blood pressure. RESULTS--Clinical and laboratory variables were comparable at baseline. Urinary excretion of albumin was gradually reduced from 82 (66-106) to 57 (39-85) mg/24 h (geometric mean (95% confidence interval)) in the captopril treated group, whereas an increase from 105(77-153) to 166 (83-323) mg/24 h occurred in the control group (p less than 0.05). Seven of the untreated patients progressed to diabetic nephropathy, whereas none of the captopril treated patients developed clinical overt diabetic nephropathy (p less than 0.05). Systemic blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate, haemoglobin A1c concentration, and urinary excretion of sodium and urea remained practically unchanged in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS--The findings suggest that angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition postpones the development of clinical overt diabetic nephropathy in normotensive insulin dependent diabetic patients with persistent microalbuminuria. PMID:1860008

  11. Association between Urine Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio within the Normal Range and Incident Hypertension in Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Kang, Dae Ryong; Koh, Sang-Baek; Kim, Jang-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There have been few studies on gender difference in the impact of a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) within the normal range on the risk of hypertension. We evaluated whether the association between the UACR below the microalbuminuria range and the incident risk of hypertension is different between men and women. Materials and Methods A total of 1173 individuals (442 men and 731 women) aged 40 to 70 years without hypertension was examined at baseline (2005–2008) and followed (2008–2011). We defined the UACR as the amount of albumin (mg/dL) divided by creatinine (g/dL) in randomly voided urine. The subjects were classified according to UACR tertile. Results During an average of 2.6 years of follow-up, 57 men (12.9%) and 66 women (9.0%) developed hypertension. In multivariable-adjusted models, the odds ratio for new-onset hypertension comparing the highest and lowest tertiles of UACR was 1.83 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85–3.94] in men and 2.69 (95% CI 1.27–5.73) in women. In stratified analyses by menopausal status, higher tertiles of UACR were associated with an increased risk of incident hypertension in postmenopausal women. Conclusion Higher normal UACR levels were associated with an increased risk of incident hypertension in women. The UACR could have a clinical role in predicting the development of hypertension. PMID:27593874

  12. Does Insulin Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Deficiency Have a “Protective” Role in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in Thalassamia Major Patients?

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Incorvaia, Carlo; Soliman, Ashraf T; Candini, Giancarlo; Pepe, Alessia; Kattamis, Christos; Soliman, Nada A.; Elsedfy, Heba; Kholy, Mohamed El

    2015-01-01

    (32.2 %) had IGF-1 levels below the 2.5th percentile of the normal values for the Italian population. The mean serum IGF-1 concentrations were significantly lower in the diabetic versus the non-diabetic TM groups (p < 0.001). DR was present in 4 (21 %) of 19 TM patients with IDDM and was associated with the main classical risk factors, namely inefficient glycemic control and duration of the disease but not hypertension. Using the scale developed by the Global Diabetic Retinopathy Group, the DR in our patients was classified as non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). Only a few numbers of microaneurysms [1–3] were detected. Our data also confirm the strong association of IDDM in TM patients with other endocrine and non-endocrine complications. PMID:26075045

  13. The Association of a Genetic Variant in SCAF8-CNKSR3 with Diabetic Kidney Disease and Diabetic Retinopathy in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Li; Wang, Tao; Jiang, Song; Chen, Miao; Zhang, Rong; Hu, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Background. Genome-wide association studies found rs955333 located in 6q25.2 was associated with diabetic kidney disease in multiple ethnic populations, including European Americans, African Americans, and Mexican Americans. We aimed to investigate the association between the variant rs955333 in SCAF8-CNKSR3 and DKD susceptibility in Chinese type 2 diabetes patients. Methods. The variant rs955333 was genotyped in 1884 Chinese type 2 diabetes patients. Associations of the variant rs955333 with DKD and DR susceptibility and related quantitative traits were evaluated. Results. The variant rs955333 was not associated with DKD in our samples, while subjects with genotype GG were associated with DR (P = 0.047, OR = 0.5525 [0.308,0.9911]), and it also showed association with microalbuminuria (P = 0.024, beta = −0.1812 [−0.339, −0.024]). Conclusion. Our data suggests the variant rs955333 was not associated with DKD but showed association with diabetic retinopathy in Chinese type 2 diabetes patients.

  14. FT011, a Novel Cardiorenal Protective Drug, Reduces Inflammation, Gliosis and Vascular Injury in Rats with Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Deliyanti, Devy; Zhang, Yuan; Khong, Fay; Berka, David R.; Stapleton, David I.; Kelly, Darren J.; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy features inflammation as well as injury to glial cells and the microvasculature, which are influenced by hypertension and overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system. FT011 is an anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic agent that has been reported to attenuate organ damage in diabetic rats with cardiomyopathy and nephropathy. However, the potential therapeutic utility of FT011 for diabetic retinopathy has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that FT011 would attenuate retinopathy in diabetic Ren-2 rats, which exhibit hypertension due to an overactive extra-renal renin-angiotensin system. Diabetic rats were studied for 8 and 32 weeks and received intravitreal injections of FT011 (50 μM) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl). Comparisons were to age-matched controls. In the 8-week study, retinal inflammation was examined by quantitating vascular leukocyte adherence, microglial/macrophage density and the expression of inflammatory mediators. Macroglial Müller cells, which exhibit a pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic phenotype in diabetes, were evaluated in the 8-week study as well as in culture following exposure to hyperglycaemia and FT011 (10, 30, 100 μM) for 72 hours. In the 32-week study, severe retinal vasculopathy was examined by quantitating acellular capillaries and extracellular matrix proteins. In diabetic rats, FT011 reduced retinal leukostasis, microglial density and mRNA levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In Müller cells, FT011 reduced diabetes-induced gliosis and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunolabeling and the hyperglycaemic-induced increase in ICAM-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, CCL20, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, VEGF and IL-6. Late intervention with FT011 reduced acellular capillaries and the elevated mRNA levels of collagen IV and fibronectin in diabetic rats. In conclusion, the protective effects of FT011 in cardiorenal disease extend to key elements of diabetic retinopathy and

  15. Automated Early Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Russell, Stephen R.; Folk, James C.; Mahajan, Vinit B.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Quellec, Gwénolé

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the performance of automated diabetic retinopathy (DR) detection, using the algorithm that won the 2009 Retinopathy Online Challenge Competition in 2009, (‘Challenge2009’) against that of the one currently used in EyeCheck, a large computer-aided early DR detection project. Design Evaluation of diagnostic test or technology. Participants Fundus photographic sets, consisting of two fundus images from each eye, were evaluated from 16,670 patient visits of 16,670 people with diabetes who had not previously been diagnosed with DR. Methods The fundus photographic set from each visit was analyzed by a single retinal expert; 793 of the 16,770 sets were classified as containing more than minimal DR (threshold for referral). The outcomes of the two algorithmic detectors were applied separately to the dataset and compared by standard statistical measures. Main Outcome Measures The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (AUC), a measure of the sensitivity and specificity of DR detection. Results Agreement was high, and exams containing more than minimal DR were detected with an AUC of 0.839 by the ‘Eyecheck’ algorithm and an AUC of 0.821 for ‘Challenge2009’, a statistically non-significant difference (z-score 1.91). If either of the algorithms detected DR in combination, AUC for detection was 0.86, the same as the theoretically expected maximum. At 90% sensitivity, the specificity of the ‘EyeCheck’ algorithm was 47.7% and the ‘Challenge2009’ algorithm, 43.6%. Conclusions DR detection algorithms appear to be maturing, and further improvements in detection performance cannot be differentiated from best clinical practices, because the performance of competitive algorithm development has now reached the human intra-reader variability limit. Additional validation studies on larger, well-defined, but more diverse populations of patients with diabetes are urgently needed, anticipating cost-effective early detection of DR in

  16. The growing epidemic of hypertension among children and adolescents: a challenging road ahead.

    PubMed

    Assadi, Farahnak

    2012-10-01

    Currently, it is clear that primary hypertension begins in childhood and that it contributes to the early development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension also increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and that risk rises as blood pressure levels escalate. As among adult patients, overweight and obesity rates are on the rise among children and adolescents with primary hypertension and can develop target organ damage including left ventricular hypertrophy. An elevated level of C-reactive protein (CRP) and microalbuminuria are early manifestations of cardiovascular disease and CKD in hypertensive patients. Lifestyle interventions are recommended for all children with hypertension. Pharmacologic therapy should be added for symptomatic children, those with stage 2 hypertension, and children with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension who exhibit an insufficient response to lifestyle modifications. Although the recommendations for choice of drugs generally are similar for children and adults, dosages for children should be lower, based on weight, and adjusted very carefully. Medications that are effective and safe for children and adolescents include thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, and calcium channel-blockers. Hypertension is not being detected early enough for initiation of a treatment regimen to reduce death and disability. Initiatives should be undertaken to make health care providers and the general population more aware of the seriousness of hypertension in children and adolescents. This review focuses on the principles underlying the importance of a team approach for hypertension control, especially one that incorporates increased data sharing using enhanced health information technology for early detection and intervention.

  17. Homocysteine Serum Levels in Diabetic Patients with Non Proliferative, Proliferative and without Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gagliano, Caterina; Giordano, Maria; Vacante, Marco; Caraci, Filippo; Drago, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio; Motta, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine has been associated with extracellular matrix changes. The diabetic retinopathy is a neurovascular complication of diabetes mellitus and it is the leading cause of vision loss among working adults worldwide. In this study, we evaluate the role of homocysteine in diabetic retinopathy analyzing the plasma levels of homocysteine in 63 diabetic type 2 patients with nonproliferative retinopathy (NPDR), 62 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), 50 healthy subjects used as control group, and 75 randomly selected patients. PMID:24877066

  18. Homocysteine serum levels in diabetic patients with non proliferative, proliferative and without retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Gagliano, Caterina; Giordano, Maria; Salomone, Salvatore; Vacante, Marco; Bucolo, Claudio; Caraci, Filippo; Reibaldi, Michele; Drago, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio; Motta, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine has been associated with extracellular matrix changes. The diabetic retinopathy is a neurovascular complication of diabetes mellitus and it is the leading cause of vision loss among working adults worldwide. In this study, we evaluate the role of homocysteine in diabetic retinopathy analyzing the plasma levels of homocysteine in 63 diabetic type 2 patients with nonproliferative retinopathy (NPDR), 62 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), 50 healthy subjects used as control group, and 75 randomly selected patients.

  19. Association of Salivary Osteopontin Levels with Glycaemic Status and Microalbuminuria - in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rajagambeeram, Reeta; Venkatkumar, Shruthi; Vijayan, Mohana Valli; Murugaiyan, Sathish Babu; Gopal, Shyam Prakash; Ramsamy, Sathiya; Alwar, Velayutharaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The monitoring of glycaemic status in patients with T2DM is mainly through blood tests (Fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c), which are invasive and involves painful pricks. This leads to poor patient compliance and soon could lead to various micro and macro vascular complications, which hamper the quality of life. There are no sensitive and specific markers to predict these complications at the earliest. Sialochemistry has recently gained attention for monitoring chronic diseases. Osteopontin is a phospho-glycoprotein molecule, elevated in many inflammatory conditions. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of serum and salivary osteopontin in Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Materials and Methods In this case-control study, we recruited 33 cases of T2DM and 31 age and gender matched healthy controls. Body Mass Index (BMI), Waist/Hip Ratio (WHR), Waist Circumference (WC) and blood pressure was recorded. Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG), salivary glucose, HbA1c, microalbuminuria, systolic BP, serum and salivary osteopontin levels were estimated. Results FPG, salivary glucose, HbA1c, microalbuminuria, systolic BP, BMI, waist / hip ratio serum and salivary osteopontin levels were significantly high in T2DM cases compared to control subjects. Serum and salivary osteopontin levels were significantly correlated with HbA1c and microalbuminuria in T2DM cases. Conclusion Serum and salivary osteopontin levels are significantly elevated in subjects with T2DM and are associated with glycaemic control and microalbuminuria. PMID:27656430

  20. The neural retina in retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ronald M; Moskowitz, Anne; Akula, James D; Fulton, Anne B

    2017-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a neurovascular disease that affects prematurely born infants and is known to have significant long term effects on vision. We conducted the studies described herein not only to learn more about vision but also about the pathogenesis of ROP. The coincidence of ROP onset and rapid developmental elongation of the rod photoreceptor outer segments motivated us to consider the role of the rods in this disease. We used noninvasive electroretinographic (ERG), psychophysical, and retinal imaging procedures to study the function and structure of the neurosensory retina. Rod photoreceptor and post-receptor responses are significantly altered years after the preterm days during which ROP is an active disease. The alterations include persistent rod dysfunction, and evidence of compensatory remodeling of the post-receptor retina is found in ERG responses to full-field stimuli and in psychophysical thresholds that probe small retinal regions. In the central retina, both Mild and Severe ROP delay maturation of parafoveal scotopic thresholds and are associated with attenuation of cone mediated multifocal ERG responses, significant thickening of post-receptor retinal laminae, and dysmorphic cone photoreceptors. These results have implications for vision and control of eye growth and refractive development and suggest future research directions. These results also lead to a proposal for noninvasive management using light that may add to the currently invasive therapeutic armamentarium against ROP.

  1. The neurovascular retina in retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Anne B; Hansen, Ronald M; Moskowitz, Anne; Akula, James D

    2009-11-01

    The continuing worldwide epidemic of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a leading cause of childhood visual impairment, strongly motivates further research into mechanisms of the disease. Although the hallmark of ROP is abnormal retinal vasculature, a growing body of evidence supports a critical role for the neural retina in the ROP disease process. The age of onset of ROP coincides with the rapid developmental increase in rod photoreceptor outer segment length and rhodopsin content of the retina with escalation of energy demands. Using a combination of non-invasive electroretinographic (ERG), psychophysical, and image analysis procedures, the neural retina and its vasculature have been studied in prematurely born human subjects, both with and without ROP, and in rats that model the key vascular and neural parameters found in human ROP subjects. These data are compared to comprehensive numeric summaries of the neural and vascular features in normally developing human and rat retina. In rats, biochemical, anatomical, and molecular biological investigations are paired with the non-invasive assessments. ROP, even if mild, primarily and persistently alters the structure and function of photoreceptors. Post-receptor neurons and retinal vasculature, which are intimately related, are also affected by ROP; conspicuous neurovascular abnormalities disappear, but subtle structural anomalies and functional deficits may persist years after clinical ROP resolves. The data from human subjects and rat models identify photoreceptor and post-receptor targets for interventions that promise improved outcomes for children at risk for ROP.

  2. Understanding retinopathy of prematurity: update on pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rivera, José Carlos; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Duhamel, François; Shao, Zhuo; Sitaras, Nicholas; Picard, Emilie; Zhou, Ellen; Lachapelle, Pierre; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), an ocular disease characterized by the onset of vascular abnormalities in the developing retina, is the major cause of visual impairment and blindness in premature neonates. ROP is a complex condition in which various factors participate at different stages of the disease leading to microvascular degeneration followed by neovascularization, which in turn predisposes to retinal detachment. Current ablative therapies (cryotherapy and laser photocoagulation) used in the clinic for the treatment of ROP have limitations and patients can still have long-term effects even after successful treatment. New treatment modalities are still emerging. The most promising are the therapies directed against VEGF; more recently the use of preventive dietary supplementation with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may also be promising. Other than pharmacologic and nutritional approaches, cell-based strategies for vascular repair are likely to arise from advances in regenerative medicine using stem cells. In addition to all of these, a greater understanding of other factors involved in regulating pathologic retinal angiogenesis continues to emerge, suggesting potential targets for therapeutic approaches. This review summarizes an update on the current state of knowledge on ROP from our and other laboratories, with particular focus on the role of nitro-oxidative stress and notably trans-arachidonic acids in microvascular degeneration, semaphorin 3 operating as vasorepulsive molecules in the avascular hypoxic retina and in turn impairing revascularization, succinate and its receptor GPR91 in neuron-mediated retinal neovascularization, and ω-3 lipids as modulators of preretinal neovascularization.

  3. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

    PubMed Central

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y.; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. PMID:26830491

  4. The Vitreomacular Interface in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Daniel; Gelman, Rachel; Prospero Ponce, Claudia; Stevenson, William; Christoforidis, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading health concern and a major cause of blindness. DR can be complicated by scar tissue formation, macular edema, and tractional retinal detachment. Optical coherence tomography has found that patients with DR often have diffuse retinal thickening, cystoid macular edema, posterior hyaloid traction, and tractional retinal detachment. Newer imaging techniques can even detect fine tangential folds and serous macular detachment. The interplay of the vitreous and the retina in the progression of DR involves multiple chemokine and other regulatory factors including VEGF. Understanding the cells infiltrating pathologic membranes at the vitreomacular interface has opened up the possibility of new targets for pharmacotherapy. Vitrectomies for DR remain a vital tool to help relieve tension on the macula by removing membranes, improving edema absorption, and eliminating the scaffold for new membrane formation. Newer treatments such as triamcinolone acetonide and VEGF inhibitors have become essential as a rapid way to control DR at the vitreomacular interface, improve macular edema, and reduce retinal neovascularization. These treatments alone, and in conjunction with PRP, help to prevent worsening of the VMI in patients with DR. PMID:26425349

  5. Retinopathy of prematurity: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parag K; Prabhu, Vishma; Karandikar, Smita S; Ranjan, Ratnesh; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Kalpana, Narendran

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vasoproliferative disorder of the retina occurring principally in new born preterm infants. It is an avoidable cause of childhood blindness. With the increase in the survival of preterm babies, ROP has become the leading cause of preventable childhood blindness throughout the world. A simple screening test done within a few weeks after birth by an ophthalmologist can avoid this preventable blindness. Although screening guidelines and protocols are strictly followed in the developed nations, it lacks in developing economies like India and China, which have the highest number of preterm deliveries in the world. The burden of this blindness in these countries is set to increase tremendously in the future, if corrective steps are not taken immediately. ROP first emerged in 1940s and 1950s, when it was called retrolental fibroplasia. Several epidemics of this disease were and are still occurring in different regions of the world and since then a lot of research has been done on this disease. However, till date very few comprehensive review articles covering all the aspects of ROP are published. This review highlights the past, present and future strategies in managing this disease. It would help the pediatricians to update their current knowledge on ROP. PMID:26862500

  6. Diaretinopathy database –A Gene database for diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vidhya, Gopalakrishnan; Anusha, Bhaskar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of adult blindness. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy is not well understood. Results from epidemiological studies of diabetic patients suggest that there are familial predispositions to diabetes and to diabetic retinopathy. Therefore the main purpose of this database is to help both scientists and doctors in studying the candidate genes responsible for causing diabetic retinopathy. For each candidate gene official symbol, chromosome map, number of exons, GT-AG introns, motif, polymorphic variation and 3D structure are given respectively. In addition to molecular class and function of these genes, this database also provides links to download the corresponding nucleotide and amino acid sequences in FASTA format which may be further used for computational approaches. Therefore this database will increase the understanding of the genetics underlying the development or progression of diabetic retinopathy and will have an impact on future diagnostic, prevention and intervention strategies. Availability The database is freely available at http: diaretinopathydatabase.com PMID:24966527

  7. Radiation retinopathy as an experimental model for ischemic proliferative retinopathy and rubeosis iridis

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, A.R.; Wood, I.S.

    1987-06-15

    We produced radiation retinopathy in capuchin monkeys and studied them with fluorescein angiography and light and electron microscopy. The animals were followed up from ten days to 3 1/2 years after radiation in order to determine whether this could provide an experimental model for other chronic ischemic-proliferative retinopathies, such as diabetes. The first change detected after radiation was the focal loss of capillary endothelial cells and pericytes. As the areas of acellular capillaries became confluent, cotton-wool spots became visible ophthalmoscopically. These increased in number and then faded away, leaving large areas of retinal capillary perfusion. Histologic studies showed occlusion first of the deeper, smaller retinal vessels and then gradually of the larger vessels. Intraretinal neovascularization as well as apparent recanalization then developed, but no new vessels extended through the internal limiting lamina into the vitreous. Rubeosis iridis with neovascular glaucoma developed 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 years postirradiation, and vitreous aspirate demonstrated a high level of angiogenic factor.

  8. Retinopathy in youth with type 2 diabetes participating in the TODAY clinical trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of retinopathy in 517 youth with type 2 diabetes of 2–8 years duration enrolled in the TODAY study. Retinal photographs were graded centrally for retinopathy using established standards. Retinopathy was identified in 13.7% of subjects. Prev...

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, John S.; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of PAH therapies. Data Extraction Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Data Synthesis Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with PAH have been applied for the benefit of children with PAH. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no PAH medications approved for children in the US by the FDA. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with PAH are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for PAH in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with PAH. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of PAH as infusions (intravenous and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and is commonly used in the treatment of PAH in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with PAH. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators are the first drug class to be FDA approved for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions Literature and data supporting the

  10. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  11. Pulmonary Hypertension in Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION IN SCLERODERMA PULMONARY HYPERTENSION Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the blood vessels ... with scleroderma are at increased risk for developing PH from several mechanisms. Frequently patients with scleroderma have ...

  12. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) into five groups. These groups are organized based ... lungs. Group 2 Pulmonary Hypertension Group 2 includes PH with left heart disease. Conditions that affect the ...

  13. Comparative microRNA profiling in relation to urinary albumin excretion in newly diagnosed hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Parthenakis, F I; Marketou, M E; Kontaraki, J E; Maragoudakis, F; Maragkoudakis, S; Nakou, H; Roufas, K; Patrianakos, A; Chlouverakis, G; Malliaraki, N; Vardas, P E

    2016-11-01

    Microalbuminuria is an established early marker of endothelial dysfunction and damage. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as essential modulators of cardiovascular physiology and disease. In the present study, we sought an association between the differential expression of related miRNAs in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of untreated patients with newly diagnosed essential hypertension and the levels of urinary albumin excretion. We assessed the expression of the miRNAs miRNA-1, miRNA-133a, miRNA-26b, miRNA-208b, miRNA-499 and miRNA-21 in consecutive subjects with untreated newly diagnosed essential hypertension (aged 62.5±9.7 years) and with no indications of other organic heart disease. MiRNA expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were quantified by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 9.8%. miRNA-208b and miRNA-133a were independently correlated with 24-h urinary albumin excretion. More specifically, a strong association was found between the gene expression levels of miRNA-208b in our patients' peripheral blood cells and urinary albumin (r=0.72, P<0.001). A similar association was found for miRNA-133a (r=0.372, P<0.001). In conclusion, miRNA-208b and miRNA-133a show distinct profiling in peripheral blood cells isolated from untreated patients with recently diagnosed essential hypertension. Their gene expression levels reveal a strong correlation with urinary albumin excretion levels. Our findings provide new perspectives on the development of a new generation of biomarkers for the better monitoring of end-organ damage in hypertension.

  14. Cancer associated retinopathy (CAR): An autoimmune-mediated paraneoplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nadia; Huang, John J; Foster, C Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Cancer associated retinopathy (CAR) is an uncommon paraneoplastic retinopathy in which antibodies are directed against retinal antigens. Vision loss is associated with abnormal ERG findings. Few case reports and lack of controlled clinical trials make management of this syndrome especially challenging for the clinician. Herein, we describe the clinical, histopathologic and electrophysiologic features of CAR, along with a summary of previously employed management options. Cancer associated retinopathy syndrome has been recognized as a paraneoplastic disorder, most commonly associated with small cell lung cancer, in which cross-reacting autoantibodies against retinal antigen cause retinal dysfunction. Bilateral vision loss as a result of both rod and cone dysfunction in CAR may occur over a period of months, and visual symptoms may precede diagnosis of the systemic malignancy. The heterogeneity in antigens that have been identified as targets of antibody-mediated retinal damage perhaps help to explain the complexity of symptoms and the treatment challenges posed by patients with CAR.

  15. Canthaxanthin Retinopathy with Visual Loss: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Robert A.; Warwar, Ronald E.; Buerk, Bruce M.

    2013-01-01

    Canthaxanthin is a naturally occurring chemical, which is most commonly utilized as a colorant for food and dyes or a skin bronzing agent. Its most prevalent impact on human health is canthaxanthin retinopathy, which appears as birefringent, yellow to red crystals surrounding the macula. This occurs with increasing, dose-dependent exposure. Generally, patients remain asymptomatic and findings may only be evident on funduscopic examination. Cessation of canthaxanthin ingestion appears to reverse the retinopathy, but the time until crystal disappearance is variable. Despite a usually favorable outcome, long-standing visual changes may occur. We report a case of an 84-year-old woman with significant visual loss secondary to canthaxanthin retinopathy that ultimately improved upon cessation of the drug. PMID:24288637

  16. Ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Rubens Camargo; Kaiser Junior, Roberto Luiz; Ruiz, Lilian Piron; Ruiz, Milton Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a patient with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease. Case report This report presents a case of a 28-year-old female patient with Crohn’s disease and sudden decrease of visual acuity in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal electroretinography confirmed the clinical features of ischemic retinopathy. After systemic corticosteroid treatment, the patient developed epiretinal membrane without significant improvement in visual acuity. Discussion The patient presented with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease with deficiency of central visual acuity. Periodic examination by a retina specialist is recommended for patients being treated for Crohn’s disease. PMID:27524921

  17. Treating Hypertension in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schlembach, Dietmar; Homuth, Volker; Dechend, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension is present in about 10 % of all pregnancies. The frequency of chronic hypertension and that of gestational hypertension is increasing. The management of pregnant women with hypertension remains a significant, but controversial, public health problem. Although treatment of hypertension in pregnancy has shown to reduce maternal target organ damage, considerable debate remains concerning treatment. We review current evidence regarding treatment goals, the ideal treatment starting time, and which drugs are available for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy.

  18. Color Doppler imaging of the retrobulbar vessels in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Pauk-Domańska, Magdalena; Walasik-Szemplińska, Dorota

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by elevated blood glucose level due to impaired insulin secretion and activity. Chronic hyperglycemia leads to functional disorders of numerous organs and to their damage. Vascular lesions belong to the most common late complications of diabetes. Microangiopathic lesions can be found in the eyeball, kidneys and nervous system. Macroangiopathy is associated with coronary and peripheral vessels. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common microangiopathic complication characterized by closure of slight retinal blood vessels and their permeability. Despite intensive research, the pathomechanism that leads to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is not fully understood. The examinations used in assessing diabetic retinopathy usually involve imaging of the vessels in the eyeball and the retina. Therefore, the examinations include: fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography of the retina, B-mode ultrasound imaging, perimetry and digital retinal photography. There are many papers that discuss the correlations between retrobulbar circulation alterations and progression of diabetic retinopathy based on Doppler sonography. Color Doppler imaging is a non-invasive method enabling measurements of blood flow velocities in small vessels of the eyeball. The most frequently assessed vessels include: the ophthalmic artery, which is the first branch of the internal carotid artery, as well as the central retinal vein and artery, and the posterior ciliary arteries. The analysis of hemodynamic alterations in the retrobulbar vessels may deliver important information concerning circulation in diabetes and help to answer the question whether there is a relation between the progression of diabetic retinopathy and the changes observed in blood flow in the vessels of the eyeball. This paper presents the overview of literature regarding studies on blood flow in the vessels of the eyeball in patients with diabetic

  19. Management of diabetes mellitus and hypertension at UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Yusef, J I

    2000-01-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at all UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon Field, to assess the quality of care of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The study reviewed 2202 records of diabetic and hypertensive patients. Both diseases were present at an early age (< 40 years), with family history, obesity and sedentary lifestyle being the main risk factors. The major complication was cardiovascular disease followed by retinopathy. Action-oriented measures to improve the organization and management of the health care services were identified.

  20. Vessel discoloration detection in malarial retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Barriga, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Harding, S.; Lewallen, S.; Joshi, V.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening clinical syndrome associated with malarial infection. It affects approximately 200 million people, mostly sub-Saharan African children under five years of age. Malarial retinopathy (MR) is a condition in which lesions such as whitening and vessel discoloration that are highly specific to CM appear in the retina. Other unrelated diseases can present with symptoms similar to CM, therefore the exact nature of the clinical symptoms must be ascertained in order to avoid misdiagnosis, which can lead to inappropriate treatment and, potentially, death. In this paper we outline the first system to detect the presence of discolored vessels associated with MR as a means to improve the CM diagnosis. We modified and improved our previous vessel segmentation algorithm by incorporating the `a' channel of the CIELab color space and noise reduction. We then divided the segmented vasculature into vessel segments and extracted features at the wall and in the centerline of the segment. Finally, we used a regression classifier to sort the segments into discolored and not-discolored vessel classes. By counting the abnormal vessel segments in each image, we were able to divide the analyzed images into two groups: normal and presence of vessel discoloration due to MR. We achieved an accuracy of 85% with sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 67%. In clinical practice, this algorithm would be combined with other MR retinal pathology detection algorithms. Therefore, a high specificity can be achieved. By choosing a different operating point in the ROC curve, our system achieved sensitivity of 67% with specificity of 100%.

  1. Genetic susceptibility to retinopathy of prematurity: the evidence from clinical and experimental animal studies.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Gerd; van Wijngaarden, Peter; Coster, Douglas J; Williams, Keryn A

    2007-12-01

    Despite advances in management and treatment, retinopathy of prematurity remains a major cause of childhood blindness. Evidence for a genetic basis for susceptibility to retinopathy of prematurity is examined, including the influences of sex, ethnicity, and ocular pigmentation. The role of polymorphisms is explored in the genes for vascular endothelial growth factor and insulin-like growth factor-1, and of mutations in the Norrie disease gene. Insights into the genetic basis of retinopathy of prematurity provided by the animal model of oxygen induced retinopathy are examined. Evidence for a genetic component for susceptibility to retinopathy of prematurity is strong, although the molecular identity of the gene or genes involved remains uncertain.

  2. The Effect of Resting Heart Rate on the New Onset of Microalbuminuria in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Subanalysis of the ROADMAP Study.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Bramlage, Peter; Haller, Hermann; Ruilope, Luis M; Böhm, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The association between resting heart rate and new-onset microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes is not clear. The objective of the current analysis was to assess the relationship between heart rate and incidence of microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes. Data from the Randomised Olmesartan and Diabetes Microalbuminuria Prevention (ROADMAP) study were retrospectively analyzed. New-onset microalbuminuria was documented and related to heart rate as recorded at baseline and last assessment, and the mean of the measurements taken during the double-blind part of the ROADMAP trial. Patients (n = 4299) had a mean age of 57.8 ± 8.7 years and 46.3% were male. Characteristics were not different between the olmesartan and the placebo groups, except for a higher systolic blood pressure (136.7 vs 135.7 mm Hg; P = 0.04) and albumin creatinine ratio (5.9 vs 5.5; P = 0.03). Increased risk of microalbuminuria was found with increasing heart rate, independent of whether baseline [highest vs lowest quartile odds ratio (OR) 1.39; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03-1.87; P = 0.032], last assessment (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.26-2.31; P = 0.001), or mean heart rate was considered (OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.30-2.41; P = 0.0003). The greater risk of new-onset microalbuminuria with a high baseline heart rate was also found when data were adjusted for mean systolic blood pressure (OR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.00-1.82; P = 0.0496; interaction P < 0.0001). Although there was no risk increase with baseline heart rate in the placebo group (P = 0.8253 for trend), microalbuminuria was less frequent in patients receiving olmesartan in the low heart rate quartiles (P = 0.002 for trend). A low heart rate reduces the risk of patients with type 2 diabetes developing microalbuminuria, independent of blood pressure. The data demonstrate potential benefits of reducing the heart rate of type 2 diabetes patients, and indicate that olmesartan could, in

  3. Essential Hypertension vs. Secondary Hypertension Among Children

    PubMed Central

    Banker, Ashish; Shete, Sanjay; Hashmi, Syed Sharukh; Tyson, John E.; Barratt, Michelle S.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Milewicz, Diane M.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to determine the proportions and correlates of essential hypertension among children in a tertiary pediatric hypertension clinic. METHODS We evaluated 423 consecutive children and collected demographic and clinical history by retrospective chart review. RESULTS We identified 275 (65%) hypertensive children (blood pressure >95th percentile per the “Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents”) from 423 children referred to the clinic for history of elevated blood pressure. The remainder of the patients had normotension (11%), white coat hypertension (11%), prehypertension (10%), and pending diagnosis (3%). Among the 275 hypertensive children, 43% (n = 119; boys = 56%; median age = 12 years; range = 3–17 years) had essential hypertension and 57% (n = 156; boys = 66%; median age = 9 years; range = 0.08–19 years) had secondary hypertension. When compared with those with secondary hypertension, those with essential hypertension had a significantly older age at diagnosis (P = 0.0002), stronger family history of hypertension (94% vs. 68%; P < 0.0001), and lower prevalence of preterm birth (20% vs. 46%; P < 0.001). There was a bimodal distribution of age of diagnosis in those with secondary hypertension. CONCLUSIONS The phenotype of essential hypertension can present as early as 3 years of age and is the predominant form of hypertension in children after age of 6 years. Among children with hypertension, those with essential hypertension present at an older age, have a stronger family history of hypertension, and have lower prevalence of preterm birth. PMID:24842390

  4. Prevalence and Cardiovascular Associations of Diabetic Retinopathy and Maculopathy: Results from the Gutenberg Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Raum, Philipp; Lamparter, Julia; Ponto, Katharina A.; Peto, Tunde; Hoehn, René; Schulz, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Wild, Philipp S.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mirshahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in people of working age. The purpose of this paper is to report the prevalence and cardiovascular associations of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy (DMac) in Germany. Research Design and Methods The Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) is a population-based study with 15,010 participants aged between 35 at 74 years from the city of Mainz and the district of Mainz-Bingen. We determined the weighted prevalence of DR and DMac by assessing fundus photographs of persons with diabetes from the GHS data base. Diabetes was defined as HbA1c ≥ 6.5%, known diagnosis diabetes mellitus or known diabetes medication. Furthermore, we analysed the association between DR and cardiovascular risk factors and diseases. Results Overall, 7.5% (1,124/15,010) of the GHS cohort had diabetes. Of these, 27.7% were unaware of their disease and thus were newly diagnosed by their participation in the GHS. The prevalence of DR and DMac was 21.7% and 2.3%, respectively among patients with diabetes. Vision-threatening disease was present in 5% of the diabetic cohort. In the multivariable analysis DR (all types) was associated with age (Odds Ratio [95% confidence interval]: 0.97 [0.955–0.992]; p = 0.006) arterial hypertension (1.90 [1.190–3.044]; p = 0.0072) and vision-threatening DR with obesity (3.29 [1.504–7.206]; p = 0.0029). DR (all stages) and vision-threatening DR were associated with duration of diabetes (1.09 [1.068–1.114]; p<0.0001 and 1.18 [1.137–1.222]; p<0.0001, respectively). Conclusions Our calculations suggest that more than a quarter-million persons have vision-threatening diabetic retinal disease in Germany. Prevalence of DR was lower in the GHS compared to East-Asian studies. Associations were found with age, arterial hypertension, obesity, and duration of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26075604

  5. Hypertensive Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Olson-Chen, Courtney; Seligman, Neil S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is increasing. The etiology and pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain poorly understood. Hypertensive disorders are a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of hypertension decreases the incidence of severe hypertension, but it does not impact rates of preeclampsia or other pregnancy complications. Several antihypertensive medications are commonly used in pregnancy, although there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Severe hypertension should be treated immediately to prevent maternal end-organ damage. Appropriate antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum management is important in caring for patients with hypertensive disorders.

  6. Implementation of a clinical practice guideline for identification of microalbuminuria in the pediatric patient with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Kathleen A; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Baluarte, H Jorge; Murphy, Kathryn M; Willi, Steven; Lipman, Terri H

    2013-06-01

    Evidence-based practice is a shift in the health care culture from basing decisions on consensus opinion, past practice, and precedent toward the use of rigorous analysis of scientific evidence using outcomes research and clinical evidence to guide clinical decision making. The development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPG) is critical to guide the assessment and management of children with diabetes. This article provides an overview of the infrastructure and processes that are crucial to providing evidence-based care in a large urban pediatric diabetes center. Development of a CPG to identify microalbuminuria in children with type 1 diabetes is discussed.

  7. [Hypertensive crisis: urgency and hypertensive emergency].

    PubMed

    Sobrino Martínez, Javier; Doménech Feria-Carot, Mónica; Morales Salinas, Alberto; Coca Payeras, Antonia

    2016-11-18

    Hypertensive crises lumped several clinical situations with different seriousness and prognosis. The differences between hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergency depends on if this situation involves a vital risk for the patient. This risk is defined more by the severity of the organ damage than for the higher values of blood pressure. The hypertensive urgency not involves an immediately risk for the patient, for these reason, the treatment can be completed after discharged. Otherwise, the hypertensive emergency is a critical clinical condition that requires hospital assistance. Faced with a patient, with severe hypertension, asymptomatic or with unspecific symptoms we must be careful. First, we need to confirm the values of blood pressure, with several measures of blood pressure and investigate and treat factors, which triggered this situation. The objective of medical treatment for hypertensive urgency is to reduce blood pressure values (at least 20% of baseline values) but to avoid sudden reduction of these values. In hypertensive urgencies rapid acting drug should not be used because of the risk of ischemic stroke and use drugs with longer half-life. The cardiovascular risk of these patients is higher than that do not suffer hypertensive crisis. The treatment must be personalized in each hypertensive emergency and intravenous it’s the best route to treat these patients.

  8. Evaluation of microalbuminuria in relation to asymptomatic bacteruria in Nigerian patients with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Iwalokun, B A; Iwalokun, S O; Hodonu, S O; Aina, O A; Agomo, P U

    2012-11-01

    Studies have identified microalbuminuria (MA) and asymptomatic bacteruria (ASB) as co-morbid factors in sickle cell anemia (SCA). However, the relationship between these comorbid factors remains unclear and data are lacking for Nigerian patients. This study determined the prevalence of MA and ASB in a cohort of patients with SCA in a steady state, in Lagos, Nigeria. Early morning mid-stream urine samples were collected in sterile bottles from 103 patients comprising 48 males and 55 females with a mean age of 10.4 years. Aerobic culture and colony count of organisms was done using conventional methods. Serum creatinine and hematological indices, including irreversibly sickled cells (ISC), were also assayed. Of the 103 urine samples screened, 23 (22.3%) had albuminuria (ALB), and consisted of nine males and 14 females (P > 0.05); 16.5% of the cases had MA (P <0.05). Age at onset of MA was seven years, and children accounted for 23.5% of all cases with ALB (P >0.05). The prevalence of confirmed ASB was 14.6%, with females accounting for 14 of 19 probable ASB cases (P <0.05). Univariate regression analysis demonstrated a significant (P <0.05) association between age at onset of MA, hemoglobin level, reticulocyte count, ISC and occurrence of ASB, but with only ISC evolving as an independent predictor. Twenty-eight bacterial isolates predominated by Escherichia coli (39.3%; P <0.05), of whom 89.3% were multi-drug resistant, were recovered from the ASB urine samples. In conclusion, both MA and ASB are common in Nigerian SCA patients, with the former occurring from the first decade of life.

  9. A multi-marker approach to predict incident CKD and microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Fox, Caroline S; Gona, Philimon; Larson, Martin G; Selhub, Jacob; Tofler, Geoffrey; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Meigs, James B; Levy, Daniel; Wang, Thomas J; Jacques, Paul F; Benjamin, Emelia J; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2010-12-01

    Traditional risk factors do not adequately identify individuals at risk for CKD. We related a multi-marker panel consisting of the following seven circulating biomarkers to the incidence of CKD and microalbuminuria (MA) in 2345 participants who attended the sixth Framingham Offspring Study examination (1995 to 1998): C-reactive protein, aldosterone, renin, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), plasminogen-activator inhibitor type 1, fibrinogen, and homocysteine. We defined CKD at follow-up (2005 to 2008) as estimated GFR (eGFR) <60 ml/min per 1.73 m²; we defined MA as urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥25 (women) or 17 (men) mg/g on spot urine samples. We identified a parsimonious set of markers related to outcomes adjusting for standard risk factors and baseline renal function, and we assessed their incremental predictive utility. During a mean 9.5-year follow-up, 213 participants developed CKD and 186 developed MA. In multivariable logistic regression models, the multi-marker panel was associated with incident CKD (P < 0.001) and MA (P = 0.003). Serum homocysteine and aldosterone both were significantly associated with CKD incidence, and log-transformed aldosterone, BNP, and homocysteine were significantly associated with incident MA. Biomarkers improved risk prediction as measured by improvements in the c-statistics for both CKD and MA and by a 7% increase in net risk reclassification. In conclusion, circulating homocysteine, aldosterone, and BNP provide incremental information regarding risk for incident CKD and MA beyond traditional risk factors.

  10. Resistant hypertension and the Birmingham Hypertension Square.

    PubMed

    Felmeden, D C; Lip, G Y

    2001-06-01

    Recent guidelines for the treatment of hypertension place great emphasis on tighter blood pressure control, especially in the presence of hypertensive target organ damage and diabetes. In order to achieve these treatment targets, more patients will require a combination of antihypertensive medications. However, resistant hypertension may have many possible underlying causes, and clinicians should appreciate how to detect and tackle these potential problems. Effective and synergistic combinations are therefore of vital importance, especially in patients with resistant hypertension. The choice of rational first- and second-line drugs that act in synergy could lead to better blood pressure management as well as significant financial savings for health care resources. The use of the Birmingham Hypertension Square for the optimum choice of add-in drugs for the treatment of resistant hypertension may aid management.

  11. Retinopathy and Progression of CKD: The CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Daniel, Ebenezer; Maguire, Maureen G.; Xie, Dawei; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker Ostroff, Candace; Lo, Joan C.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Lash, James P.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold I.; Kusek, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Retinal abnormalities may be associated with changes in the renal vasculature. This study assessed the association between retinopathy and progression of kidney disease in participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a prospective study in which patients with CKD enrolled in CRIC had nonmydriatic fundus photographs of both eyes. All CRIC participants in six clinical sites in which fundus cameras were deployed were offered participation. Photographs were reviewed at a reading center. The presence and severity of retinopathy and vessel calibers were assessed using standard protocols by graders masked to clinical information. The associations of retinal features with changes in eGFR and the need for RRT (ESRD) were assessed. Results Retinal images and renal progression outcomes were obtained from 1852 of the 2605 participants (71.1%) approached. During follow-up (median 2.3 years), 152 participants (8.2%) developed ESRD. Presence and severity of retinopathy at baseline were strongly associated with the risk of subsequent progression to ESRD and reductions in eGFR in unadjusted analyses. For example, participants with retinopathy were 4.4 times (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.12 to 6.31) more likely to develop ESRD than those without retinopathy (P<0.001). However, this association was not statistically significant after adjustment for initial eGFR and 24-hour proteinuria. Venular and arteriolar diameter calibers were not associated with ESRD or eGFR decline. The results showed a nonlinear relationship between mean ratio of arteriole/vein calibers and the risk of progression to ESRD; participants within the fourth arteriole/vein ratio quartile were 3.11 times (95% CI, 1.51 to 6.40) more likely to develop ESRD than those in the first quartile (P<0.001). Conclusions The presence and severity of retinopathy were not associated with ESRD and decline in eGFR after

  12. [French as 2005-recommendations on the management of arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Chamontin, B; Halimi, J M

    2007-01-01

    Self blood pressure measurements (home BP) and/or ambulatory BP measurements are recommended in mild to moderate hypertension (140/90 - 179/109 mmHg) in order to confirm sustained hypertension and identify white coat and masked hypertension. The evaluation of target organ damages (TOD) has to be integrated in cardiovascular risk estimate and taken into account in the management of hypertensive patients. Beside echocardiography, there is a place for the screening of microalbuminuria in non diabetic hypertensive patients, but these investigations should not be performed systematically. Arterial stiffness evaluation and carotid intima-media thickness quantification are not yet recommended. Cardiovascular risk (CV risk) estimate plays a pivotal role in the therapeutic decision and strategy. The cardiovascular risk grade is based on [1] the list of cardiovascular risk factors (same list AFSSAPS recommendations on dyslipidemia), [2] the presence or absence of TOD and [3] cardiovascular complications: "low", "medium", and "high" CV risk. Lifestyle modifications are recommended in all hypertensive patients. Five antihypertensive drugs are recommended for first line therapy: beta-blockers, thiazide diuretics, ACEIs, ARA II and CCBs (and fixed low dose combinations with AFSSAPS agreement for first line). In order to initiate the treatment, Evidence-based therapy (according to clinical trials conducted in different clinical situations), certain comorbid conditions (compelling indications), efficacy and side-effects in a previous experience, and the cost are the determinants of the first choice. Most hypertensive patients require more than one agent to achieve target blood pressure and for second line therapy the recommended combinations are: betablockers-diuretics, ACEIs-diuretics, ARAII-diuretics, betablockers-CCBs (DHP), ACEIs-CCBs, ARA II-CCBs and CCBs-diuretics. The delay to establish a combination therapy depend on CV risk. The BP goals are those recommended by ESH

  13. Plasma Cardiotrophin-1 as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes-Induced Target Organ Damage and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Recio-Rodriguez, José I.; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Fernández-Martín, José L.; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B.; López-Novoa, José M.; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The search for biomarkers of hypertension and diabetes-induced damage to multiple target organs is a priority. We analyzed the correlation between plasma cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a chemokine that participates in cardiovascular remodeling and organ fibrosis, and a wide range of parameters currently used to diagnose morphological and functional progressive injury in left ventricle, arteries, and kidneys of diabetic and hypertensive patients, in order to validate plasma levels of CT-1 as clinical biomarker. This is an observational study with 93 type 2-diabetic patients, 209 hypertensive patients, and 82 healthy controls in which we assessed the following parameters: plasma CT-1, basal glycaemia, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH by electrocardiographic indexes), peripheral vascular disease (by pulse wave velocity—PWV, carotid intima-media thickness—C-IMT, and ankle-brachial index—ABI), and renal impairment (by microalbuminuria, albumin/creatinine urinary ratio, plasma creatinine concentrations, and glomerular filtration rate). Hypertensive or diabetic patients have higher plasma CT-1 than control patients. CT-1 positively correlates with basal glycaemia, SBP, DBP, PP, LVH, arterial damage (increased IMT, decreased ABI), and early renal damage (microalbuminuria, elevated albumin/creatinine ratio). CT-1 also correlates with increased 10-year cardiovascular risk. Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that CT-1 was associated with arterial injury assessed by PWV, IMT, ABI, and cardiac damage evaluated by Cornell voltage duration product. Increases in plasma CT-1 are strongly related to the intensity of several parameters associated to target organ damage supporting further investigation of its diagnostic capacity as single biomarker of cardiovascular injury and risk and, possibly, of subclinical renal damage. PMID:26222851

  14. [Pulse pressure as a prognostic indicator of organ damage in patients with essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Jołda-Mydłowska, Beata; Kobusiak-Prokopowicz, Małgorzata; Sławuta, Agnieszka; Witkowska, Maria

    2004-05-01

    Pulse pressure (PP), defined as systolic blood pressure minus diastolic blood pressure, plays an important role as a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Pulse pressure is pulsatile component of blood pressure. A widened pulse pressure reflects increased stiffness of the large arteries. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between pulse pressure and organ damage in essential hypertension. We examined 60 subjects, 34 women aged 59 +/- 13 years and 26 men aged 48 +/- 17 years with primary hypertension. In every subject we performed 24-hour automatic blood pressure measurement and echocardiography, abdominal ultrasonography, funduscopy, chest x-ray. We measured sodium potassium, creatinine level in serum and in urine, creatinine clearance and microalbuminuria. Pulse pressure is proportional to the stage of hypertension. A dimension of the aorta parallels with measures of blood pressure. The strong correlation between pulse pressure and damage in funduscopy can indicate, that complication in fundus of the eye are dependent more than the level of a pressure. The significantly higher sodium level in serum and the positive correlation between natremia, natriuresis and pulse pressure proves the role of natrium in pathophysiology of hypertension.

  15. Melanoma associated retinopathy: A new dimension using adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Dabir, Supriya; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Govindraj, Indu; Mallipatna, Ashwin; Battu, Rajani; Shetty, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    We report a 56-year-old male patient, complaining of metamorphopsia in his left eye nevertheless visual acuity, slit lamp, and fundus examinations were within normal limits. Microperimetry (MAIA, Centervue, Italy) revealed central field loss and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (Spectralis, Heidelberg, Germany) showed disrupted cone outer segment tip layer. The patient had a diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma in his foot for which an excision biopsy with lymph node dissection was performed 5 months earlier. Our clinical diagnosis was melanoma-associated retinopathy. Electrophysiology confirmed the diagnosis. Adaptive optics retinal imaging (Imagine eyes, Orsay) was performed to assess the cone mosaic integrity across the central retina. This is the first report on the investigation of autoimmune retinopathy using adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy. This case highlights the viability of innovative diagnostic modalities that aid early detection and subsequent management of vision threatening retinal.

  16. Canine multifocal retinopathy in the Australian Shepherd: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Ingo; Guziewicz, Karina E.; Zangerl, Barbara; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Mardin, Christian Y.

    2013-01-01

    A 1-year-old Australian Shepherd (AS) was presented for a routine hereditary eye examination. During the examination multiple raised, brown to orange lesions were noted in the fundus, which could not be attributed to a known retinal disease in this breed. As they clinically most closely resembled canine multifocal retinopathy (cmr) and no indication of an acquired condition was found, genetic tests for BEST1 gene mutations were performed. These showed the dog to be homozygous for the cmr1 (C73T/R25X) gene defect. Furthermore, ultrasound (US), electroretinography (ERG), and optical coherence tomography were performed, confirming changes typical for cmr. Subsequently, the AS pedigree members were genetically and clinically tested, demonstrating autosomal recessive inheritance with no clinical symptoms in carrier animals, as was previously described for cmr. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canine multifocal retinopathy in the AS breed. Further investigations are under way. PMID:22432598

  17. Neodymium-YAG laser vitreolysis in sickle cell retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Hrisomalos, N.F.; Jampol, L.M.; Moriarty, B.J.; Serjeant, G.; Acheson, R.; Goldberg, M.F.

    1987-08-01

    Six patients with proliferative sickle cell retinopathy and vitreous bands were treated with the neodymium-YAG (Nd-YAG) laser to accomplish lysis of avascular traction bands or to clear the media in front of the macula. Transection of bands was possible in five of the six cases but in two of these the effect was only partial. Three cases were satisfactorily treated with the Nd-YAG laser application alone, two eventually required conventional vitreoretinal surgery, and one patient's condition stabilized despite failure of the treatment. Complications from the treatment occurred in three cases and included subretinal (choroidal) hemorrhage, preretinal hemorrhage, microperforation of a retinal vein, and focal areas of damage to the retinal pigment epithelium. Neodymium-YAG vitreolysis may be a useful modality in carefully selected patients with proliferative sickle cell retinopathy, but potentially sight-threatening complications may occur.

  18. Using a patient image archive to diagnose retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Abramoff, M.D.; Chaum, Edward; Giancardo, Luca; Govindaswamy, Priya; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Tennant, M; Swainson, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes has become an epidemic that is expected to impact 365 million people worldwide by 2025. Consequently, diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in the industrialized world today. If detected early, treatments can preserve vision and significantly reduce debilitating blindness. Through this research we are developing and testing a method for automating the diagnosis of retinopathy in a screening environment using a patient archive and digital fundus imagery. We present an overview of our content-based image retrieval (CBIR) approach and provide performance results for a dataset of 98 images from a study in Canada when compared to an archive of 1,355 patients from a study in the Netherlands. An aggregate performance of 89% correct diagnosis is achieved, demonstrating the potential of automated, web-based diagnosis for a broad range of imagery collected under different conditions and with different cameras.

  19. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy and the Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zorena, Katarzyna; Raczyńska, Dorota; Raczyńska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    The main problem both in type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) diabetes is the development of chronic vascular complications encompassing micro- as well as macrocirculation. Chronic complications lower the quality of life, lead to disability, and are the cause of premature death in DM patients. One of the chronic vascular complications is a diabetic retinopathy (DR) which leads to a complete loss of sight in DM patients. Recent trials show that the primary cause of diabetic retinopathy is retinal neovascularization caused by disequilibrium between pro- and antiangiogenic factors. Gaining knowledge of the mechanisms of action of factors influencing retinal neovascularization as well as the search for new, effective treatment methods, especially in advanced stages of DR, puts special importance on research concentrating on the implementation of biological drugs in DR therapy. At present, it is antivascular endothelial growth factor and antitumor necrosis factor that gain particular significance. PMID:24311895

  20. A case of recurrent, self-inflicted handheld laser retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Simonett, Joseph M; Scarinci, Fabio; Labriola, Leanne T; Jampol, Lee M; Goldstein, Debra A; Fawzi, Amani A

    2016-04-01

    A 17-year-old young man presented with vision loss and discrete, bilateral foveal lesions. The patient returned 6 weeks later with worsening vision, prominent bilateral retinal lesions, and a full-thickness macular hole in the right eye consistent with recurrent self-inflicted handheld laser retinopathy. After instructing the family to remove the patient's access to laser pointers, follow-up examination revealed spontaneous closure of the macular hole but minimal vision improvement. Recurrent ocular exposure to handheld lasers can masquerade as an organic process in patients who withhold pertinent history. Clinicians should rely on the distinguishing features seen on examination and multimodal imaging to make the diagnosis of handheld laser retinopathy.

  1. Vitamin Status as a Determinant of Serum Homocysteine Concentration in Type 2 Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raptis, Athanasios; Apergis, George; Dimitriadis, George; Vergados, Ioannis; Theodossiadis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the association of serum homocysteine levels and vitamin status with type 2 diabetic retinopathy. This study included 65 patients with and 75 patients without diabetic retinopathy. Patients with diabetic retinopathy had significantly higher serum homocysteine levels (P < 0.001), higher prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia (P < 0.001), lower serum folic acid (P < 0.001), and vitamin B12 (P = 0.014) levels than those without diabetic retinopathy. Regression analysis revealed that homocysteine was an independent risk factor for diabetic retinopathy and there was a threshold in its serum level (13.7 μmol/L), above which the risk of diabetic retinopathy greatly increases (OR = 1.66, P = 0.001). Folic acid was associated with decreased odds for diabetic retinopathy (OR = 0.73, P < 0.001). There was a threshold in serum vitamin B12 level (248.4 pg/mL), below which serum homocysteine concentration significantly increases with decreasing serum vitamin B12 (P = 0.003). Our findings suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Decreased serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12, through raising serum homocysteine concentrations, may also affect the diabetic retinopathy risk. PMID:25006590

  2. Near-infrared fundus autoflorescence imaging in solar retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Czepita, Maciej; Machalińska, Anna; Czepita, Damian

    2017-01-01

    Solar retinopathy is a rare clinical entity caused by photochemical damage to the retinal pigment epithelium layer and photoreceptors of the fovea. Here we describe a case of a 33-year-old female patient diagnosed by near-infrared fundus autofluorescence imaging for signs of damage to the melanosomes of the retinal pigment epithelium of the fovea. The patient was advised to discontinue looking at the sun with the naked eye. PMID:28293534

  3. Pulmonary hypertension - at home

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PAH) is abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. With PAH, the right side ... Chin K, Channick RN. Pulmonary hypertension. In: Broaddus VC, Mason ... Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  4. EP300 Protects from Light-Induced Retinopathy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Reiko; Nishimura, Yuhei; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Okabe, Shiko; Kawaguchi, Koki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Moriyuki, Kazumi; Yamane, Shinsaku; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of rhodopsin to bright white light can induce photoreceptor cell damage and degeneration. However, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying light-induced retinopathy remains elusive. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis of three rodent models of light-induced retinopathy, and we identified 37 genes that are dysregulated in all three models. Gene ontology analysis revealed that this gene set is significantly associated with a cytokine signaling axis composed of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3 (STAT1/3), interleukin 6 signal transducer (IL6ST), and oncostatin M receptor (OSMR). Furthermore, the analysis suggested that the histone acetyltransferase EP300 may be a key upstream regulator of the STAT1/3–IL6ST/OSMR axis. To examine the role of EP300 directly, we developed a larval zebrafish model of light-induced retinopathy. Using this model, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of EP300 significantly increased retinal cell apoptosis, decreased photoreceptor cell outer segments, and increased proliferation of putative Müller cells upon exposure to intense light. These results suggest that EP300 may protect photoreceptor cells from light-induced damage and that activation of EP300 may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27242532

  5. Autoimmune destruction of pericytes as the cause of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Adams, Duncan D

    2008-06-01

    In diabetic retinopathy, collapse of the retinal vasculature is associated with loss of the pericytes. These are contractile cells that together with endothelial cells form the terminal arterioles of the retina. The cause of the loss of pericytes is not known. Recently, it has been discovered that type 1 diabetes is caused by forbidden clones of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which destroy the insulin-making cells with exquisite specificity. In the light of this, I postulate that an antigenically-related forbidden clone of cytotoxic T lymphocytes selectively destroys the pericytes and that this is the cause of the vascular collapse of diabetic retinopathy. If this is so, the therapeutic implications are immense, involving a switch from ineffectual tight glycemic control to immunotherapy. This is already used as immunosuppression to prevent organ transplant rejection, and as the immune ablation and autologous bone marrow cell reconstitution that has saved the lives of patients with lethally-severe scleroderma. Once the pericyte surface auto-antigen for the T lymphocytes has been isolated, selective destruction of the pathogenic T lymphocytes would be possible by manufacture and use of cytotoxic auto-antigen complexes, which arrests progression of the retinopathy.

  6. Revisiting the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Clifford B; D'Amore, Patricia A; Connor, Kip M

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina is a hallmark of many retinal diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and the wet form of age-related macular degeneration. In particular, ROP has been an important health concern for physicians since the advent of routine supplemental oxygen therapy for premature neonates more than 70 years ago. Since then, researchers have explored several animal models to better understand ROP and retinal vascular development. Of these models, the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) has become the most widely used, and has played a pivotal role in our understanding of retinal angiogenesis and ocular immunology, as well as in the development of groundbreaking therapeutics such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections for wet age-related macular degeneration. Numerous refinements to the model have been made since its inception in the 1950s, and technological advancements have expanded the use of the model across multiple scientific fields. In this review, we explore the historical developments that have led to the mouse OIR model utilized today, essential concepts of OIR, limitations of the model, and a representative selection of key findings from OIR, with particular emphasis on current research progress. PMID:27499653

  7. Multispectral fundus imaging for early detection of diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, James M.; Tiedeman, James S.; Hopkins, Mark F.; Sabharwal, Yashvinder S.

    1999-04-01

    Functional imaging of the retina and associated structures may provide information for early assessment of risks of developing retinopathy in diabetic patients. Here we show results of retinal oximetry performed using multi-spectral reflectance imaging techniques to assess hemoglobin (Hb) oxygen saturation (OS) in blood vessels of the inner retina and oxygen utilization at the optic nerve in diabetic patients without retinopathy and early disease during experimental hyperglycemia. Retinal images were obtained through a fundus camera and simultaneously recorded at up to four wavelengths using image-splitting modules coupled to a digital camera. Changes in OS in large retinal vessels, in average OS in disk tissue, and in the reduced state of cytochrome oxidase (CO) at the disk were determined from changes in reflectance associated with the oxidation/reduction states of Hb and CO. Step to high sugar lowered venous oxygen saturation to a degree dependent on disease duration. Moderate increase in sugar produced higher levels of reduced CO in both the disk and surrounding tissue without a detectable change in average tissue OS. Results suggest that regulation of retinal blood supply and oxygen consumption are altered by hyperglycemia and that such functional changes are present before clinical signs of retinopathy.

  8. [Ameliorative effects on retinal disorder in diabetic SHRSP (stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat)].

    PubMed

    Nagisa, Yasutaka; Shintani, Asae; Nakagawa, Shizue

    2002-10-01

    The results of the EUCLID highlighted the importance of the renin-angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of candesartan cilexetil(TCV-116), a potent angiotensin II receptor antagonist, in ameliorating retinal disorders in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats(SHRSP) with storeptozotocin(STZ)-induced diabetes. Retinal VEGF mRNA expression was significantly higher and the latencies of oscillatory potentials were significantly elongated in STZ-treated SHRSP compared with a non-treated SHRSP group matched for age. Treatment with TCV-116(3 mg/kg) significantly diminished retinal VEGF mRNA expression and the latencies of oscillatory potentials, but had no effect on plasma glucose concentrations. These results suggest that TCV-116 is effective in preventing the development of diabetic retinopathy already in the early stages.

  9. Hypertension in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Tibazarwa, Kemi B; Damasceno, Albertino A

    2014-05-01

    The past 2 decades have seen a considerable global increase in cardiovascular disease, with hypertension remaining by far the most common. More than one-third of adults in Africa are hypertensive; as in the urban populations of most developing countries. Being a condition that occurs with relatively few symptoms, hypertension remains underdetected in many countries; especially in developing countries where routine screening at any point of health care is grossly underutilized. Because hypertension is directly related to cardiovascular disease, this has led to hypertension being the leading cause of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, as a result of patients living, often unknowingly, with uncontrolled hypertension for prolonged periods of time. In Africa, hypertension is the leading cause of heart failure; whereas at global levels, hypertension is responsible for more than half of deaths from stroke, just less than half of deaths from coronary artery disease, and for more than one-tenth of all global deaths. In this review, we discuss the escalating occurrence of hypertension in developing countries, before exploring the strengths and weaknesses of different measures to control hypertension, and the challenges of adopting these measures in developing countries. On a broad level, these include steps to curb the ripple effect of urbanization on the health and disease profile of developing societies, and suggestions to improve loopholes in various aspects of health care delivery that affect surveillance and management of hypertension. Furthermore, we consider how the industrial sectors' contributions toward the burden of hypertension can also be the source of the solution.

  10. Economics of hypertension control. World Hypertension League.

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the key aspects of the problem of estimating the economic burden of hypertension and hypertension-related disease, the use of economic models, and the opportunities for containing the costs. More information is needed on the population-attributable risk of hypertension in various countries, which is indispensable to estimate the part of hypertension in the burden of stroke and heart disease. The population and high-risk approaches to hypertension control also have economic consequences, which may vary in different societies and must be assessed to ensure proper allocation of resources. Cost-containment can be achieved by more selective diagnostic investigations and by opting for cheaper drugs, though the choice of treatment is difficult owing to uncertainties in the quality-of-life estimates. PMID:7554012

  11. BR 08-3 MANAGEMENT OF DYSLIPIDEMIA IN HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, V V

    2016-09-01

    relaxation and increased permeability to lipoproteins. Hypertension is also associated with up regulation of lipid oxidation enzymes. Hypertension is clearly associated with vascular endothelium (prothrombotic and pro inflammatory). Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation are increased in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Reduction of both results in the reversal of vascular inflammation.LDL is a major cause of endothelial dysfunction. Microalbuminuria is identified in hypertensive patients and it is also associated with lipid abnormalities including high levels of LDL and TGL, low levels of HDL and elevated levels of LP(a). Today CVD prevention is focussed on treating hypertension with the lowering LDL (<100 mg%),increasing HDL (>40 mg in men) and lowering TGL(<150 mg%). In ALLHAT trial, 10,000 patients were given pravastatin 40 mg daily. At the end of 5 years, only 16.7% reduction in LDL was noted. In ASCOT-LLA trial, intensive therapy lipid lowering was recommended along with Antihypertensive therapy. ACEIs, ARBs, Aldosterone antagonists and Nebivolol improve endothelial function and reduce BP. Statin treatment happens to be as a first line drug therapy in the management of dyslipidemia. Fibrates are generally reserved for Hypertriglyceridemia. Bile sequestrants, Nicotinic acid and drug like Ezetimibe locally acting at the intestine level are also used for dyslipidemia. Single pill combination like Atorvastatin with RASS blocker/Amlodipine may be considered the coexisting hypertension and dyslipidemia.

  12. Risk of Radiation Retinopathy in Patients With Orbital and Ocular Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaushik, Megha; Pulido, Jose S.; Schild, Steven E.; Stafford, Scott

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation retinopathy is a potential long-term complication of radiation therapy to the orbit. The risk of developing this adverse effect is dose dependent; however, the threshold is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the risk of developing radiation retinopathy at increasing radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A 40-year retrospective review was performed of patients who received external beam radiation therapy for ocular/orbital non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Results: Sixty-seven patients who had at least one ophthalmic follow-up examination were included in this study. Most patients (52%) were diagnosed with NHL involving the orbit. Patients received external beam radiation therapy at doses between 1886 and 5400 cGy (mean, 3033 {+-} 782 cGy). Radiation retinopathy developed in 12% of patients, and the median time to diagnosis was 27 months (range, 15-241months). The mean prescribed radiation dose in patients with retinopathy was 3309 {+-} 585 cGy, and the estimated retinal dose (derived by reviewing the dosimetry) was 3087 {+-} 1030 cGy. The incidence of retinopathy increased with dose. The average prescribed daily fractionated dose was higher in patients who developed retinopathy than in patients who did not (mean, 202 cGy vs 180 cGy, respectively; P = .04). More patients with radiation retinopathy had comorbid diabetes mellitus type 2 than patients without retinopathy (P = .015). In our study, the mean visual acuity of the eyes that received radiation was worse than that of the eyes that did not (P = .027). Other postradiotherapy ocular findings included keratitis (6%), dry eyes (39%), and cataract (33%). Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy, a known complication of radiotherapy for orbital tumors, relates to vascular comorbidities and dose. Higher total doses and larger daily fractions (>180 cGy) appear to be related to higher rates of retinopathy. Future larger studies are required to identify a statistically significant threshold for the

  13. Epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, P I; MacCormick, I J C; Harding, S P; Bastawrous, A; Beare, N A V; Garner, P

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim To summarize findings from studies reporting the prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy in African countries in light of the rising prevalence of diabetes mellitus. Methods Using a predefined search strategy, we systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation index and Conference Proceedings Citation index, African Index Medicus and the grey literature database ‘OpenSIGLE’ for studies published between January 1990 and February 2011. Included studies reported prevalence or incidence of diabetic retinopathy or diabetic maculopathy of subjects with diabetes resident in African countries. Results Sixty-two studies from 21 countries were included: three population-based surveys; two cohort studies; five case–control studies; 32 diabetes clinic-based, nine eye clinic-based and 11 other hospital-based surveys. Included studies varied considerably in terms of patient selection, method of assessing the eye and retinopathy classification. In population-based studies, the reported prevalence range in patients with diabetes for diabetic retinopathy was 30.2 to 31.6%, proliferative diabetic retinopathy 0.9 to 1.3%, and any maculopathy 1.2 to 4.5%. In diabetes clinic-based surveys, the reported prevalence range for diabetic retinopathy was 7.0 to 62.4%, proliferative diabetic retinopathy 0 to 6.9%, and any maculopathy 1.2 to 31.1%. No obvious association between prevalence and income level of the country was detected. Conclusions Large, community-based cross-sectional and cohort studies are needed to investigate rates and determinants of prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, incidence and progression in Africa. Consensus is needed on the most appropriate methods of identification and classification of retinopathy for research and clinical practice. Estimates of prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy are comparable with recent European and American studies. PMID:22817387

  14. Proliferative retinopathy predicts nephropathy: a 25-year follow-up study of type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Charlotte; Falk, Christine; Green, Anders; Sjølie, Anne Katrin; Grauslund, Jakob

    2012-08-01

    We wanted to examine proliferative retinopathy as a marker of incident nephropathy in a 25-year follow-up study of a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients and to examine cross-sectional associations between nephropathy and retinopathy in long-term surviving patients of the same cohort. All type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark, were identified as of 1 July 1973. One hundred and eighty four patients were examined in 1981-1982 (baseline) and in 2007-2008 (follow-up). The level of retinopathy was graded by ophthalmoscopy at baseline and nine-field digital colour fundus photographs at follow-up. Single spot urine was used to evaluate nephropathy at both examinations. Proliferative retinopathy was present in 29 patients (15.8%) at baseline. At follow-up, these patients were more likely to macroalbuminuria (20.7% vs. 6.5%) than patients without proliferative retinopathy at baseline. In a multivariate logistic regression adjusted for baseline age, sex, duration of diabetes, smoking, HbA(1,) systolic and diastolic blood pressure, odds ratio of nephropathy (micro- and macroalbuminuria combined) was 2.98 (95% confidence interval 1.18-7.51, p = 0.02) for patients with proliferative retinopathy at baseline as compared to those without. At follow-up, there was a close relation between retinopathy and nephropathy. The level of macroalbuminuria was 4.3, 4.6 and 13.0% for patients with no or mild non-proliferative retinopathy, moderate non-proliferative retinopathy and proliferative retinopathy, respectively. In conclusion, proliferative retinopathy is an independent marker of long-term nephropathy in type 1 diabetes. Upcoming studies should examine whether these microvascular complications are also causally linked in type 1 diabetes.

  15. Spontaneous Closure of a Full-Thickness Macular Hole Associated with Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Persistent Vitreomacular Traction

    PubMed Central

    Reinherz, Benjamin J.; Rubin, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy worsens the prognosis of macular holes compared to those of idiopathic etiology. While spontaneous closure of idiopathic macular holes is a well-documented phenomenon, spontaneous closure of macular holes associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy is rare. We report a case of spontaneous closure of a macular hole associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and persistent vitreomacular traction. PMID:27099607

  16. Influence of age and hypertension treatment-time on ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Crespo, Juan J; Mojón, Artemio; Chayán, Luisa; Fontao, María J; Fernández, José R

    2013-03-01

    Some studies based on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) have reported a reduction in sleep-time relative BP decline towards a more non-dipping pattern in the elderly, but rarely have past studies included a proper comparison with younger subjects, and no previous report has evaluated the potential role of hypertension treatment time on nighttime BP regulation in the elderly. Accordingly, we evaluated the influence of age and time-of-day of hypertension treatment on the circadian BP pattern assessed by 48-h ABPM. This cross-sectional study involved 6147 hypertensive patients (3108 men/3039 women), 54.0 ± 13.7 (mean ± SD) yrs of age, with 2137 (978 men/1159 women) being ≥60 yrs of age. At the time of study, 1809 patients were newly diagnosed and untreated, and 4338 were treated with hypertension medications. Among the later, 2641 ingested all their prescribed BP-lowering medications upon awakening, whereas 1697 ingested the full daily dose of ≥1 hypertension medications at bedtime. Diagnosis of hypertension in untreated patients was based on ABPM criteria, specifically an awake systolic (SBP)/diastolic (DBP) BP mean ≥135/85 mm Hg and/or an asleep SBP/DBP mean ≥120/70 mm Hg. Collectively, older in comparison with younger patients were more likely to have diagnoses of microalbuminuria, chronic kidney disease, obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome, anemia, and/or obesity. In addition, the group of older vs. younger patients had higher glucose, creatinine, uric acid, triglycerides, and fibrinogen, but lower cholesterol, hemoglobin, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. In older compared with younger patients, ambulatory SBP was significantly higher and DBP significantly lower (p < .001), mainly during the hours of nighttime sleep and initial hours after morning awakening. The prevalence of non-dipping was significantly higher in older than younger patients (63.1% vs. 41.1%; p < .001). The largest difference between

  17. The impact of improved glycaemic control with GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy on diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, Lakshminarayanan; Humphreys, Tracy; Walker, Adrian B; Varughese, George I

    2014-03-01

    Rapid improvement in glycaemic control with GLP-1 receptor agonist (RA) therapy has been reported to be associated with significant progression of diabetic retinopathy. This deterioration is transient, and continuing GLP-1 RA treatment is associated with reversal of this phenomenon. Pre-existent maculopathy, higher grade of retinopathy and longer duration of diabetes may be risk factors for persistent deterioration.

  18. Is there any effect of bolus and/or infusion 5-fluorouracil treatment on microalbuminuria in immediate or long term?

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Ozgur

    2014-07-01

    5-Fluorouracil is a widely used cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment settings particularly in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. Various studies on the cardiac adverse effects of 5-fluorouracil, reported the likelihood of altered myocardial contractility and vascular endothelial damage caused by this agent. However, the mechanism underlying 5-fluorouracil-related cardiotoxicity is not clear. In certain experimental studies, thrombotic processes occurring in microvascular field were supposed to play a role in this condition. In the light of this knowledge, the administration of 5-fluorouracil may be considered to cause renal vascular endothelial damage that may result in the altered endothelial permeability. As a result of endothelial dysfunction, increased urinary albumin excretion may be in question and no study investigating this potential direct relationship has been available in medical literature. Based on this evidence, the hypothesis of that 5-fluorouracil might cause renal vascular dysfunction and microalbuminuria, was discussed in this article along with the basic knowledge.

  19. Scanning laser entoptic perimetry for the detection of visual defects associated with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    El‐Bradey, M; Plummer, D J; Uwe‐Bartsch, D; Freeman, W R

    2006-01-01

    Aim To determine the sensitivity and specificity of entoptic perimetry for diagnosing diabetic retinopathy at all levels of severity. Methods A prospective clinical study at the Shiley Eye Center, University of California, and San Diego. 30 patients with photographically documented diabetic retinopathy and 24 controls with a similar age distribution. Sensitivity and specificity of entoptic perimetry were computed for detecting clinically significant macular oedema within the central 120 degree radius of the fovea compared to fundus photographs. Results Entoptic perimetry can detect clinically significant diabetic retinopathy with a sensitivity of 0.88 and specificity of 1.00. Entoptic perimetry can detect the earliest stages of diabetic retinopathy with a sensitivity of 0.86. Conclusion Scanning laser entoptic perimetry is an effective tool for detecting visual function loss caused by diabetic retinopathy. PMID:16361659

  20. A prospective two-center study on the associations between microalbuminuria, coronary atherosclerosis and long-term clinical outcome in asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: evaluation by coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Jin; Hwang, Byung-Hee; Choi, Ik Jun; Choo, Eun-Ho; Lim, Sungmin; Koh, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Pum-Joon; Seung, Ki-Bae; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Hyung; Jung, Jung Im; Chang, Kiyuk

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the associations between microalbuminuria in asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes and the presence, extent, and severity of coronary atherosclerosis, as measured by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), and the long-term clinical outcomes. In total, the study enrolled 284 consecutive eligible asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes and without known coronary artery disease (CAD), who then underwent CCTA and 24 h urine albumin measurements. Microalbuminuria was defined as 30-300 mg/day urinary albumin excretion. Obstructive CAD, as measured by CCTA, was defined as maximum intra-luminal stenosis ≥50 %. Patients with and without microalbuminuria were compared in terms of obstructive CAD prevalence, and the extent and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. They were evaluated using the following data: coronary artery calcium score (CACS), atheroma burden obstructive score (ABOS), segment involvement score (SIS) and segment stenosis score (SSS). All-cause mortality within a follow-up period of 5 years was also compared. Compared to patients without microalbuminuria, patients with microalbuminuria were more likely to have obstructive CAD (p = 0.004). Microalbuminuria was associated with higher ABOS (p = 0.010), SIS (p = 0.029), and SSS (p = 0.011), except for CACS (p = 0.058). Multivariable analyses adjusted for conventional cardiovascular risk factors revealed that microalbuminuria was an independent predictor of obstructive CAD [odds ratio 2.255, confidence intervals (CI) 1.121-4.538, p = 0.023] and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 3.469, CI 1.319-9.121, p = 0.012). In asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes, microalbuminuria was associated with increased risk of CAD and poorer clinical outcomes.

  1. Peripheral Blood Mitochondrial DNA Damage as a Potential Noninvasive Biomarker of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Manish; Lillvis, John; Seyoum, Berhane; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the development of diabetic retinopathy, retinal mitochondria become dysfunctional, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is damaged. Because retinopathy is a progressive disease, and circulating glucose levels are high in diabetes, our aim was to investigate if peripheral blood mtDNA damage can serve as a potential biomarker of diabetic retinopathy. Methods Peripheral blood mtDNA damage was investigated by extended-length PCR in rats and mice, diabetic for 10 to 12 months (streptozotocin-induced, type 1 model), and in 12- and 40-week-old Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF, type 2). Mitochondrial copy number (in gDNA) and transcription (in cDNA) were quantified by qPCR. Similar parameters were measured in blood from diabetic patients with/without retinopathy. Results Peripheral blood from diabetic rodents had significantly increased mtDNA damage and decreased copy numbers and transcription. Lipoic acid administration in diabetic rats, or Sod2 overexpression or MMP-9 knockdown in mice, the therapies that prevent diabetic retinopathy, also ameliorated blood mtDNA damage and restored copy numbers and transcription. Although blood from 40-week-old ZDF rats had significant mtDNA damage, 12-week-old rats had normal mtDNA. Diabetic patients with retinopathy had increased blood mtDNA damage, and decreased transcription and copy numbers compared with diabetic patients without retinopathy and nondiabetic individuals. Conclusions Type 1 diabetic rodents with oxidative stress modulated by pharmacologic/genetic means, and type 2 animal model and patients with/without diabetic retinopathy, demonstrate a strong relation between peripheral blood mtDNA damage and diabetic retinopathy, and suggest the possibility of use of peripheral blood mtDNA as a noninvasive biomarker of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27494345

  2. Risk Factors for Retinopathy of Prematurity in Premature Born Children

    PubMed Central

    Alajbegovic-Halimic, Jasmina; Zvizdic, Denisa; Alimanovic-Halilovic, Emina; Dodik, Irena; Duvnjak, Sanela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) represent disease of the eye in premature born children which affects immature blood vessels of the retina during their development. The emergence of retinopathy of prematurity depends on the interaction of multiple factors, such as: gestational age, low birth weight, hypoxia, duration of oxygen supplementation, respiratory distress syndrome, twin pregnancy, anemia, blood transfusions, sepsis, intraventricular hemorrhage, hypotension, hypothermia, etc. If remain unrecognized and untreated it can cause severe visual impairment and blindness in children, but can also be prevented with timely screening. Goals: To establish the number of patients with development of retinopathy of prematurity active forms in the observed time period and examine which risk factors have most significant impact on its origin. Material and methods: In a clinical, retrospective study we observed a total of 80 premature born children in the period from January to May 2015 with regard to listed risk factors identified for eye examination. Results: From a total of 80 premature newborns sample included 48.8% male and 51.2% female children. The active form of ROP developed in 6.2% of cases, while in 93.8% of cases there was a spontaneous resolution. Patients who developed active form of ROP have significantly younger gestational age (26.4±1.5 weeks) and lower birth weight (874±181 grams), lower Apgar score in the first and fifth minute and were longer on oxygen therapy (20±3.4 days). Conclusion: Of the potential risk factors that could affect the development of ROP active form following factors have a statistically significant influence: early gestational age, low birth weight, lower Apgar score and prolonged oxygen therapy (p <0.05). PMID:26843736

  3. Asymmetric severity of diabetic retinopathy in Waardenburg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old female patient was referred to our institution due to vitreous hemorrhage. Best corrected visual acuity of her right and left eyes at her initial visit was 10/20 and 20/20, respectively. Although hypochromic iris was observed in the superior iris between the 10 and 2 o’clock positions in her right eye, her entire left eye exhibited hypochromic iris. Hypopigmentation of the fundus was seen in the superior part of her right eye. This eye also had a huge neovascularization on the optic disc that was 7 discs in diameter. Conversely, her left fundi showed hypopigmentation of the fundus in the entire region of the left eye, and dot hemorrhages were observed all over the left fundi, although no neovascularization could be seen microscopically. Fluorescein angiography showed a huge neovascularization in the right eye and a tiny neovascularization in the left eye. Gene analysis revealed the presence of the PAX3 gene homeobox domain mutation, which led to her being diagnosed as Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Magnetic resonance angiography showed there was no obstructive region at either of the internal carotid arteries and ophthalmic arteries. The severity of the diabetic retinopathy appeared to be correlated with the degree of hypopigmentation in the posterior fundus. We speculate that hypopigmentation of the fundus in Waardenburg syndrome may be responsible for the reduction in retinal metabolism, which led to a reduction in oxygen consumption and prevented further aggravation of the diabetic retinopathy. Only laser treatments using short wavelengths was effective in this case. While the extinction coefficient for hemoglobin when using green light is higher than when using yellow light, the differences between these wavelengths tend to disappear when oxygenated hemoglobin is present. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient with Waardenburg syndrome and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:22205830

  4. Disease Course of Patients with Unilateral Pigmentary Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Potsidis, Emorfily; Berson, Eliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the change in ocular function by eye in patients with unilateral pigmentary retinopathy. Methods. Longitudinal regression was used to estimate mean exponential rates of change in Goldmann visual field area (V4e white test light) and in full-field electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes to 0.5- and 30-Hz white flashes in 15 patients with unilateral pigmentary retinopathy. Snellen visual acuity was assessed case by case. Results. Mean annual rates of change for the affected eyes were −4.9% for visual field area, −4.7% for ERG amplitude to 0.5-Hz flashes, and −4.6% for ERG amplitude to 30-Hz flashes. All three rates were faster than the corresponding age-related rates of change for the fellow normal eyes (P = 0.0006, P = 0.003, P = 0.03, respectively). An initial cone ERG implicit time to 30-Hz flashes in affected eyes ≥40 ms predicted a faster mean rate of decline of visual field area and of ERG amplitude to 0.5- and 30-Hz flashes (P < 0.0001 for all three measures). The visual acuity of affected eyes was more likely to decrease in patients presenting at >35 years of age than in patients presenting at a younger age (P = 0.0004). Conclusions. The affected eye in unilateral pigmentary retinopathy shows a progressive loss of peripheral retinal function that cannot be attributed to aging alone and that is faster in eyes with a more prolonged initial cone ERG implicit time. Patients presenting at >35 years of age are at greater risk for losing visual acuity. PMID:21989720

  5. The omega-3 and retinopathy of prematurity relationship.

    PubMed

    Malamas, Angelakis; Chranioti, Angeliki; Tsakalidis, Christos; Dimitrakos, Stavros A; Mataftsi, Asimina

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the effect of omega-3 (ω-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) intake on retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) by reviewing the experimental and clinical trials conducted on animal models and infants. LCPUFAs demonstrate cytoprotective and cytotherapeutic actions contributing to a number of anti-angiogenic and neuroprotective mechanisms within the retina. Their intake appears to have a beneficial effect on ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular signaling mechanisms, influencing retinal cell gene expression and cellular differentiation. ω-3 LCPUFAs may modulate metabolic processes that activate molecules implicated in the pathogenesis of vasoproliferative and neurodegenerative retinal diseases such as ROP.

  6. Surgery for Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy: New Tips and Tricks

    PubMed Central

    Oellers, Patrick; Mahmoud, Tamer H.

    2016-01-01

    Over the recent years, retina specialists have enjoyed significant improvements in the surgical management of proliferative diabetic retinopathy including improved preoperative planning, vitreoretinal instrumentation and new surgical maneuvers. In this review, we present new tips and tricks such as preoperative pharmacotherapy approaches including pegaptanib injection and biodegradable dexamethasone implantation, bimanual vitrectomy techniques and the concept of mixing small gauges as well as valved cannulas and intraoperative optical coherence tomography. With advanced surgical planning and sophisticated operative maneuvers tailored to the individual patient, excellent outcomes can be achieved even in severe cases of diabetic tractional detachment. PMID:27195092

  7. Clinical and electrophysiological observations in patients with low pressure retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R W; Ikeda, H

    1986-01-01

    The clinical, angiographic, and electrophysiological features of seven patients with transient visual loss and low-pressure retinopathy are presented. Six of the patients also had symptoms of cerebral ischaemia. The commonest provoking feature was bright light. Angiography showed multiple extracranial occlusions involving both internal and external carotid arteries in addition to occlusion or stenosis on the contralateral side. Electroretinography showed delay in the recovery of the b wave in the affected eye after exposure to bright light. This appears to be a valuable test for the detection of minor degrees of ischaemic damage to the retina caused by insufficiency of the retinal and choroidal circulation. Images PMID:3756120

  8. The omega-3 and retinopathy of prematurity relationship

    PubMed Central

    Malamas, Angelakis; Chranioti, Angeliki; Tsakalidis, Christos; Dimitrakos, Stavros A; Mataftsi, Asimina

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the effect of omega-3 (ω-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) intake on retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) by reviewing the experimental and clinical trials conducted on animal models and infants. LCPUFAs demonstrate cytoprotective and cytotherapeutic actions contributing to a number of anti-angiogenic and neuroprotective mechanisms within the retina. Their intake appears to have a beneficial effect on ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular signaling mechanisms, influencing retinal cell gene expression and cellular differentiation. ω-3 LCPUFAs may modulate metabolic processes that activate molecules implicated in the pathogenesis of vasoproliferative and neurodegenerative retinal diseases such as ROP. PMID:28251092

  9. [Hypertension in women].

    PubMed

    Tagle, Rodrigo; Tagle V, Rodrigo; Acevedo, Mónica; Valdés, Gloria

    2013-02-01

    The present review examines the types of hypertension that women may suffer throughout life, their physiopathological characteristics and management. In early life, the currently used low-dose oral contraceptives seldom cause hypertension. Pregnancy provokes preeclampsia, its main medical complication, secondary to inadequate transformation of the spiral arteries and the subsequent multisystem endothelial damage caused by deportation of placental factors and microparticles. Hypertension in preeclampsia is an epiphenomenon which needs to be controlled at levels that reduce maternal risk without impairing placental perfusion. The hemodynamic changes of pregnancy may unmask a hypertensive phenotype, may exacerbate a chronic hypertension, or may complicate hypertension secondary to lupus, renovascular lesions, and pheochromocytoma. On the other hand a primary aldosteronism may benefit from the effect of progesterone and present as a postpartum hypertension. A hypertensive pregnancy, especially preeclampsia, represents a risk for cardiac, vascular and renal disease in later life. Menopause may mimic a pheochromocytoma, and is associated to endothelial dysfunction and salt-sensitivity. Among women, non-pharmacological treatment should be forcefully advocated, except for sodium restriction during pregnancy. The blockade of the renin-angiotensin system should be avoided in women at risk of pregnancy; betablockers could be used with precautions during pregnancy; diuretics, ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor antagonists should not be used during breast feeding. Collateral effects of antihypertensives, such as hyponatremia, cough and edema are more common in women. Thus, hypertension in women should be managed according to the different life stages.

  10. [Hungarian Hypertension Registry].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Kékes, Ede

    2014-05-11

    Today, hypertension is considered endemic throughout the world. The number of individuals with high blood pressure and the increasing risk, morbidity and mortality caused by hypertension despite modern therapy do not decrease sufficiently. Hypertension has become a public health issue. Prevention and effective care require integrated datasets about many features, clinical presentation and therapy of patients with hypertension. The lack of this database in Hungary prompted the development of the registry which could help to provide population-based data for analysis. Data collection and processing was initiated by the Hungarian Society of Hypertension in 2002. Data recording into the Hungarian Hypertension Registry was performed four times (2002, 2005, 2007, 2011) and the registry currently contains data obtained from 108,473 patients. Analysis of these data indicates that 80% of the patients belong to the high or very high cardiovascular risk group. The registry provides data on cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive populations and the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in Hungary. Based on international experience and preliminary analysis of data from the Hungarian Hypertension Registry, establishment of hypertension registry may support the effectiveness of public health programs. A further step would be needed for proper data management control and the application of professional principles of evidence-based guidelines in the everyday practice.

  11. Pulmonary Hypertension in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Robert P; Engel, Peter J; Nathan, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complication of sarcoidosis leading to dyspnea and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH) can be due to several factors, including vascular involvement by the granulomatous inflammation, compression of the pulmonary arteries by adenopathy, fibrotic changes within the lung, and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Several case series have suggested that some patients with SAPH benefit from specific therapy for pulmonary hypertension. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial found 16 weeks' bosentan therapy to be associated with significant improvement in pulmonary artery pressure. Future studies may better define who would respond to treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  12. [Melatonin production in hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Rapoport, S I; Shatalova, A M; Malinovskaia, N K; Vettenberg, L

    2000-01-01

    Hypertensive subjects were examined for production of melatonin. In severe hypertension night levels of melatonin diminished, the day production is as in the controls. The role of melatonin in pathogenesis of essential hypertension is discussed.

  13. Intravitreal Bevacizumab (Avastin) for Diabetic Retinopathy: The 2010 GLADAOF Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, J. Fernando; Sanchez, Juan G.; Lasave, Andres F.; Wu, Lihteh; Maia, Mauricio; Bonafonte, Sergio; Brito, Miguel; Alezzandrini, Arturo A.; Restrepo, Natalia; Berrocal, Maria H.; Saravia, Mario; Farah, Michel Eid; Fromow-Guerra, Jans; Morales-Canton, Virgilio

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates multiple benefits of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) on diabetic retinopathy (DR) including diabetic macular edema (DME) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) at 24 months of followup. This is a retrospective multicenter interventional comparative case series of intravitreal injections of 1.25 or 2.5 mg of bevacizumab for DME, PDR without tractional retinal detachment (TRD), and patients who experienced the development or progression of TRD after an intravitreal injection of 1.25 or 2.5 mg of bevacizumab before vitrectomy for the management of PDR. The results indicate that IVB injections may have a beneficial effect on macular thickness and visual acuity (VA) in diffuse DME. Therefore, in the future this new therapy could complement focal/grid laser photocoagulation in DME. In PDR, this new option could be an adjuvant agent to panretina photocoagulation so that more selective therapy may be applied. Finally, TRD in PDR may occur or progress after IVB used as an adjuvant to vitrectomy. Surgery should be performed 4 days after IVB. Most patients had poorly controlled diabetes mellitus associated with elevated HbA1c, insulin administration, PDR refractory to panretinal photocoagulation, and longer time between IVB and vitrectomy. PMID:21584260

  14. Solar retinopathy. A study from Nepal and from Germany.

    PubMed

    Rai, N; Thuladar, L; Brandt, F; Arden, G B; Berninger, T A

    1998-01-01

    319 patients with a solar retinopathy were seen in an eye clinic in Nepal within 20 months. All patients had either a positive history of sun-gazing or typical circumscribed scars in the foveal area. In more than 80% of the patients the visual acuity was 6/12 or better and did not deteriorate over time. 126 (40%) patients had a history of gazing at the sun during an eclipse, 33 (10%) were sun worshipers and 4 (1%) were in both categories. Three years later 29 patients were re-examined in a follow-up study. Only 16 had had visual disturbances directly after they had gazed into the sun. No colour vision defects were seen in any of the 44 affected eyes, when tested with Panel D 15, while four patients (6 eyes) had some uncertainty with the tritan plates of the Ishihara test charts. Metamorphopsia were recorded in 11 eyes. Five German patients with solar retinopathy were examined in more detail. Colour contrast sensitivity (CCS) was tested for the central and the peripheral visual field. CCS for tritan axis was raised in all patients for the central visual field, while it was normal for the peripheral visual field.

  15. Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Practice Guidelines: Customized for Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Safi, Sare; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Azarmina, Mohsen; Moradian, Siamak; Entezari, Morteza; Nourinia, Ramin; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Shirvani, Armin; Shahraz, Saeid; Ramezani, Alireza; Dehghan, Mohammad Hossein; Shahsavari, Mohsen; Soheilian, Masoud; Nikkhah, Homayoun; Ziaei, Hossein; Behboudi, Hasan; Farrahi, Fereydoun; Falavarjani, Khalil Ghasemi; Parvaresh, Mohammad Mehdi; Fesharaki, Hamid; Abrishami, Majid; Shoeibi, Nasser; Rahimi, Mansour; Javadzadeh, Alireza; Karkhaneh, Reza; Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Manaviat, Masoud Reza; Maleki, Alireza; Kheiri, Bahareh; Golbafian, Faegheh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To customize clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for management of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in the Iranian population. Methods: Three DR CPGs (The Royal College of Ophthalmologists 2013, American Academy of Ophthalmology [Preferred Practice Pattern 2012], and Australian Diabetes Society 2008) were selected from the literature using the AGREE tool. Clinical questions were designed and summarized into four tables by the customization team. The components of the clinical questions along with pertinent recommendations extracted from the above-mentioned CPGs; details of the supporting articles and their levels of evidence; clinical recommendations considering clinical benefits, cost and side effects; and revised recommendations based on customization capability (applicability, acceptability, external validity) were recorded in 4 tables, respectively. Customized recommendations were sent to the faculty members of all universities across the country to score the recommendations from 1 to 9. Results: Agreed recommendations were accepted as the final recommendations while the non-agreed ones were approved after revision. Eventually, 29 customized recommendations under three major categories consisting of screening, diagnosis and treatment of DR were developed along with their sources and levels of evidence. Conclusion: This customized CPGs for management of DR can be used to standardize the referral pathway, diagnosis and treatment of patients with diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27994809

  16. Automated microaneurysm detection in diabetic retinopathy using curvelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Shah, Syed Ayaz; Laude, Augustinus; Faye, Ibrahima; Tang, Tong Boon

    2016-10-01

    Microaneurysms (MAs) are known to be the early signs of diabetic retinopathy (DR). An automated MA detection system based on curvelet transform is proposed for color fundus image analysis. Candidates of MA were extracted in two parallel steps. In step one, blood vessels were removed from preprocessed green band image and preliminary MA candidates were selected by local thresholding technique. In step two, based on statistical features, the image background was estimated. The results from the two steps allowed us to identify preliminary MA candidates which were also present in the image foreground. A collection set of features was fed to a rule-based classifier to divide the candidates into MAs and non-MAs. The proposed system was tested with Retinopathy Online Challenge database. The automated system detected 162 MAs out of 336, thus achieved a sensitivity of 48.21% with 65 false positives per image. Counting MA is a means to measure the progression of DR. Hence, the proposed system may be deployed to monitor the progression of DR at early stage in population studies.

  17. Quantitative Assessment of Retinopathy Using Multi-parameter Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghanian, Zahra; Staniszewski, Kevin; Jamali, Nasim; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Wang, Shoujian; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader; Ranji, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    A multi-parameter quantification method was implemented to quantify retinal vascular injuries in microscopic images of clinically relevant eye diseases. This method was applied to wholemount retinal trypsin digest images of diabetic Akita/+, and bcl-2 knocked out mice models. Five unique features of retinal vasculature were extracted to monitor early structural changes and retinopathy, as well as quantifying the disease progression. Our approach was validated through simulations of retinal images. Results showed fewer number of cells (P = 5.1205e-05), greater population ratios of endothelial cells to pericytes (PCs) (P = 5.1772e-04; an indicator of PC loss), higher fractal dimension (P = 8.2202e-05), smaller vessel coverage (P = 1.4214e-05), and greater number of acellular capillaries (P = 7.0414e-04) for diabetic retina as compared to normal retina. Quantification using the present method would be helpful in evaluating physiological and pathological retinopathy in a high-throughput and reproducible manner. PMID:27186534

  18. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Molina, J. M.; Anaya-Alaminos, R.; Uberos-Fernández, J.; Solans-Pérez de Larraya, A.; Chaves-Samaniego, M. J.; Salgado-Miranda, A.; Piñar-Molina, R.; Jerez-Calero, A.; García-Serrano, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The goals were to isolate and study the genetic susceptibility to retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), as well as the gene-environment interaction established in this disease. Methods. A retrospective study (2000–2014) was performed about the heritability of retinopathy of prematurity in 257 infants who were born at a gestational age of ≤32 weeks. The ROP was studied and treated by a single pediatric ophthalmologist. A binary logistic regression analysis was completed between the presence or absence of ROP and the predictor variables. Results. Data obtained from 38 monozygotic twins, 66 dizygotic twins, and 153 of simple birth were analyzed. The clinical features of the cohorts of monozygotic and dizygotic twins were not significantly different. Genetic factors represented 72.8% of the variability in the stage of ROP, environmental factors 23.08%, and random factors 4.12%. The environmental variables representing the highest risk of ROP were the number of days of tracheal intubation (p < 0.001), postnatal weight gain (p = 0.001), and development of sepsis (p = 0.0014). Conclusion. The heritability of ROP was found to be 0.73. The environmental factors regulate and modify the expression of the genetic code. PMID:26089603

  19. Raman spectroscopy of human vitreous collagen in diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebag, Jerry; Nie, Shuming; Reiser, Karen M.; Yu, Nai-Teng

    1992-08-01

    In diabetes nonenzymatic glycation alters collagen throughout the body resulting in the histopathology that underlies diabetic disease in several organs. In the eye such changes in vitreous collagen could contribute to vitreous degeneration and the progression of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Previous studies have demonstrated early glycation and advanced endproducts in the vitreous of humans with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Near-infrared Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy was performed on vitreous obtained at surgery from diabetic patients and from non-diabetic control subjects. The findings were compared to measurements obtained in untreated and glycated (in vitro) rat-tail tendon collagen. The results demonstrated substantial changes in diabetic vitreous collagen resulting from glycation, most likely advanced glycation endproducts. This approach appears to be useful as a means of characterizing the molecular changes induced by diabetes. Furthermore, this technique could be developed as a way of quantifying these changes in vivo in several tissues, so as to gauge the severity of non-enzymatic glycation and monitor the response to therapy.

  20. Pattern Visual Evoked Potential Changes in Diabetic Patients without Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sungur, Gulten; Yakin, Mehmet; Unlu, Nurten; Balta, Oyku Bezen; Ornek, Firdevs

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the different check sizes of pattern visual evoked potential (PVEP) in diabetic patients without retinopathy according to HbA1c levels and diabetes duration. Methods. Fifty-eight eligible patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Only the right eye of each patient was analyzed. All of the patients underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination, and the PVEPs were recorded. Results. There was a statistically significant difference in P100 latency in 1-degree check size and in N135 latency in 2-degree check size between controls and patient groups which have different HbA1c levels. There were statistically significant, positive, and weak correlations with diabetes duration and P100 latency in 7-minute and 15-minute check sizes and N135 latency in 15-minute check size. Conclusions. It was showed that there were prolongations in P100 latency only in 1-degree check size and in N135 only in 2-degree check size in diabetic patients without retinopathy. There was statistically significant correlation between diabetes duration and P100 and N135 latencies in different check sizes. PMID:28392940

  1. Treatment of diabetic retinopathy: Recent advances and unresolved challenges.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael W

    2016-08-25

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in industrialized countries. Remarkable advances in the diagnosis and treatment of DR have been made during the past 30 years, but several important management questions and treatment deficiencies remain unanswered. The global diabetes epidemic threatens to overwhelm resources and increase the incidence of blindness, necessitating the development of innovative programs to diagnose and treat patients. The introduction and rapid adoption of intravitreal pharmacologic agents, particularly drugs that block the actions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and corticosteroids, have changed the goal of DR treatment from stabilization of vision to improvement. Anti-VEGF injections improve visual acuity in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) from 8-12 letters and improvements with corticosteroids are only slightly less. Unfortunately, a third of patients have an incomplete response to anti-VEGF therapy, but the best second-line therapy remains unknown. Current first-line therapy requires monthly visits and injections; longer acting therapies are needed to free up healthcare resources and improve patient compliance. VEGF suppression may be as effective as panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, but more studies are needed before PRP is abandoned. For over 30 years laser was the mainstay for the treatment of DME, but recent studies question its role in the pharmacologic era. Aggressive treatment improves vision in most patients, but many still do not achieve reading and driving vision. New drugs are needed to add to gains achieved with available therapies.

  2. Treatment of diabetic retinopathy: Recent advances and unresolved challenges

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in industrialized countries. Remarkable advances in the diagnosis and treatment of DR have been made during the past 30 years, but several important management questions and treatment deficiencies remain unanswered. The global diabetes epidemic threatens to overwhelm resources and increase the incidence of blindness, necessitating the development of innovative programs to diagnose and treat patients. The introduction and rapid adoption of intravitreal pharmacologic agents, particularly drugs that block the actions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and corticosteroids, have changed the goal of DR treatment from stabilization of vision to improvement. Anti-VEGF injections improve visual acuity in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) from 8-12 letters and improvements with corticosteroids are only slightly less. Unfortunately, a third of patients have an incomplete response to anti-VEGF therapy, but the best second-line therapy remains unknown. Current first-line therapy requires monthly visits and injections; longer acting therapies are needed to free up healthcare resources and improve patient compliance. VEGF suppression may be as effective as panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, but more studies are needed before PRP is abandoned. For over 30 years laser was the mainstay for the treatment of DME, but recent studies question its role in the pharmacologic era. Aggressive treatment improves vision in most patients, but many still do not achieve reading and driving vision. New drugs are needed to add to gains achieved with available therapies. PMID:27625747

  3. Incidence and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy During 17 Years of a Population-Based Screening Program in England

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Colin D.; Greenwood, Richard H.; Misra, Aseema; Bachmann, Max O.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the incidence of diabetic retinopathy in relation to retinopathy grade at first examination and other prognostic characteristics. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a dynamic cohort study of 20,686 people with type 2 diabetes who had annual retinal photography up to 14 times between 1990 and 2006. Cumulative and annual incidence rates were estimated using life tables, and risk factors for progression were identified using Cox regression analysis. RESULTS Of 20,686 patients without proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) or sight-threatening maculopathy at their first retinal examination (baseline), 16,444 (79%) did not have retinopathy, 3,632 (18%) had nonproliferative retinopathy, and 610 (2.9%) had preproliferative retinopathy. After 5 years, few patients without retinopathy at baseline developed preproliferative retinopathy (cumulative incidence 4.0%), sight-threatening maculopathy (0.59%), or PDR (0.68%); after 10 years, the respective cumulative incidences were 16.4, 1.2, and 1.5%. Among those with nonproliferative (background) retinopathy at baseline, after 1 year 23% developed preproliferative retinopathy, 5.2% developed maculopathy, and 6.1% developed PDR; after 10 years, the respective cumulative incidences were 53, 9.6, and 11%. Patients with nonproliferative retinopathy at baseline were five times more likely to develop preproliferative, PDR, or maculopathy than those without retinopathy at baseline (adjusted hazard ratio 5.0 [95% CI 4.4–5.6]). CONCLUSIONS Few patients without diabetic retinopathy at the initial screening examination developed preproliferative retinopathy, PDR, or sight-threatening maculopathy after 5–10 years of follow-up. Screening intervals longer than a year may be appropriate for such patients. PMID:22279031

  4. [Incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy in low income population of Mexico City].

    PubMed

    González-Villalpando, C; González-Villalpando, M E; Rivera Martínez, D; Stern, M P

    1999-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of preventable blindness in working age population. Diabetes mellitus and this microvascular complication affects frequently Mexican population and presents itself in severe clinical forms. There are no incidence studies of diabetic retinopathy in Mexico. The four year incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy were investigated in low income diabetic patients of Mexico City. In the follow up phase we studied 164 patients, 76.6% of the patients studied at baseline, 63 were men and 101 women. All participants had a complete ophthalmological exam and seven field stereo photographs. All photographs were graded using internationally accepted criteria in the reading center of our institution. The four year incidence of any level of retinopathy was 22.5%. Worsening of retinopathy occurred in 20.6% and the proliferative diabetic retinopathy stage was reached in 4.5%. Incidence of diabetic retinopathy was associated to age at diagnosis of diabetes mellitus of less than 45 years and progression was associated to duration of disease of more than ten years. The four year incidence of macular edema was 8.8%. These data are important to plan strategies for prevention of blindness and the implementation of optimal care of diabetic patients in our country.

  5. Role of lipid-lowering agents in the management of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Estelle; Tseriotis, Vasilis-Spyridon; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy affects a substantial proportion of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and is the leading cause of blindness in working-aged adults. Even though the incidence of diabetic retinopathy has declined in the last decades, its prevalence increased and is expected to rise further as a result of the increasing incidence of type 2 DM (T2DM) and the longer life expectancy of patients with DM. The pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy is multifactorial. Some observational studies suggested an association between dyslipidemia and the development and progression of retinopathy in patients with DM but others did not confirm this association. Regarding lipid-lowering agents, studies that evaluated the role of statins in the management of these patients are mostly small and yielded discrepant results. Large randomized studies with statins in patients with T2DM showed no benefit of these agents on diabetic retinopathy but were not designed to address this effect. In contrast, both preclinical data and two large randomized controlled studies, the FIELD and the ACCORD trial, showed that fenofibrate delays the progression of diabetic retinopathy. Even though the mechanisms underpinning this favorable effect are not entirely clear, these findings suggest that fenofibrate might represent a useful tool for the management of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:28138358

  6. Ocular and cardiovascular autonomic function in diabetic patients with varying severity of retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Shivaji; Biswas, N R; Saxena, Rohit; Deepak, K K; Menon, Vimla; Garg, S P; Tandon, Radhika

    2005-04-01

    The study was conducted to assess the ocular and cardiovascular autonomic function in diabetic patients with varying severity of diabetic retinopathy. Ocular and cardiovascular autonomic function tests were performed in 30 patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (10 in each group of proliferative retinopathy, non-proliferative retinopathy and no retinopathy) of more than 5 years duration and 10 normal controls. Ocular autonomic function tests were done by measuring pupil cycle time and denervation hypersensitivity with 0.125% pilocarpine and 0.5% phenylephrine. Cardiovascular autonomic function was measured by a battery of standard tests. Denervation hypersensitivity to 0.125% pilocarpine and to 0.5% phenylephrine and pupil cycle time showed statistically significant differences (P value < 0.001) between controls and patients with proliferative retinopathy (PDR) and also between no retinopathy and PDR (P < 0.001). Systemic autonomic function tests namely expiration--inspiration ratio, difference in heart rate, 30th beat and 15th beat ratio in head up tilt and difference in diastolic blood pressure in head up tilt test also showed significant difference (P < 0.01) between controls and all 3 groups of diabetics. There was statistically significant difference found in para-sympathetic ocular autonomic dysfunction between NPDR and controls. Ocular and systemic autonomic dysfunctions are related to the severity of diabetic retinopathy.

  7. The use of the Micral-Test strip to identify the presence of microalbuminuria in people with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) participating in the EUCLID study.

    PubMed

    Webb, D J; Newman, D J; Chaturvedi, N; Fuller, J H

    1996-03-01

    In IDDM, microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion rate (AER) of 20-200 micrograms/min) is a predictor of persistent proteinuria and diabetic nephropathy. Early intervention may prevent or reduce the rate of progression of renal complications. The Micral-Test strip can be used to establish a semi-quantitative estimate of AER. We assessed the field performance of the Micral-Test strip in detecting microalbuminuria in the EUCLID study, an European wide, 18 centre study of 530 IDDM participants, aged 20 to 59 years. People with macroalbuminuria were excluded. On entry, all participants had albumin concentrations from two overnight urine collections measured by a central laboratory, and the corresponding Micral-Test performed on the two collections locally. a cut off of > or = mg/l albumin from the first Micral-Test, to detect a centrally measured albumin concentration > or = 20 mg/l, yielded 29 (5.8%) false negative results and 58 (11.6%) false positive results (sensitivity 70%, specificity 87%). The mean AER, from two collections, was compared with the corresponding 'pooled' Micral-Test results (mean of the two readings). Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess if there was a suitable 'pooled' Micral-Test result for screening microalbuminuria. A 'pooled' Micral-Test result (> or = 15 mg/l) was used to detect mean AER > or = 20 micrograms/min (sensitivity 78%, specificity 77%). This 'pooled cut-off' had already been used for screening on to the study and led to an over-estimate (154 vs. 77) of the true number of microalbuminuric participants on the study. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the Micral-Test strip is not an effective screening tool for microalbuminuria, using the 'pooled' result from two measurements did not improve the sensitivity of the test.

  8. Diabetic retinopathy in sub-Saharan Africa: meeting the challenges of an emerging epidemic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sub-Saharan Africa faces an epidemic of diabetes. Diabetes causes significant morbidity including visual loss from diabetic retinopathy, which is largely preventable. In this resource-poor setting, health systems are poorly organized to deliver chronic care with multiple system involvement. The specific skills and resources needed to manage diabetic retinopathy are scarce. The costs of inaction for individuals, communities and countries are likely to be high. Discussion Screening for and treatment of diabetic retinopathy have been shown to be effective, and cost-effective, in resource-rich settings. In sub-Saharan Africa, clinical services for diabetes need to be expanded with the provision of effective, integrated care, including case-finding and management of diabetic retinopathy. This should be underpinned by a high quality evidence base accounting for differences in diabetes types, resources, patients and society in Africa. Research must address the epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy in Africa, strategies for disease detection and management with laser treatment, and include health economic analyses. Models of care tailored to the local geographic and social context are most likely to be cost effective, and should draw on experience and expertise from other continents. Research into diabetic retinopathy in Africa can drive the political agenda for service development and enable informed prioritization of available health funding at a national level. Effective interventions need to be implemented in the near future to avert a large burden of visual loss from diabetic retinopathy in the continent. Summary An increase in visual loss from diabetic retinopathy is inevitable as the diabetes epidemic emerges in sub-Saharan Africa. This could be minimized by the provision of case-finding and laser treatment, but how to do this most effectively in the regional context is not known. Research into the epidemiology, case-finding and laser treatment of diabetic

  9. Factors Associated With Serum Albumin in Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 With Microalbuminuria Using Non-Normal Mixed Models: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Khoundabi, Batoul; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Mansourian, Marjan; Faghihimani, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background: The globally increasing epidemic of diabetes will lead to serious problems including diabetic nephropathy and kidney diseases in near future. The first clinical diagnosable stage in a diabetic kidney disease is microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion of 30 - 300 g/24 hours). Objectives: This prospective cohort study investigated the risk factors of microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes who had been registered in endocrine and metabolism research center in Isfahan city, Iran. Patients and Methods: This prospective cohort study was performed on 90 diabetic type 2 patients with microalbuminuria, who were selected according to the consecutive sample selection method during 6 years. Data were collected through regular and systematic measurements of serum albumin as the response variable and body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, the duration of diabetes, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), fasting blood sugar (FBS), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) as the related factors. Non-normal mixed models were used to investigate the impact of effective factors on the amount of excreted serum albumin. Results: According to the deviance information criterion (DIC = 56.2), the non-normal mixed effects model with the skewed t distribution had a best fit and indicated that HbA1c, HDL and total cholesterol had a significant effect on the amount of albumin in urine (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Using nonnormal mixed models may lead to the best results as compared to common normality assumption. PMID:26889385

  10. Changing Clinical Presentation, Current Knowledge-Attitude-Practice, and Current Vision Related Quality of Life in Self-Reported Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Retinopathy in Eastern India: The LVPEI Eye and Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Wallang, Batriti; Semwal, Preeti; Basu, Soumyava; Padhi, Tapas R.; Ali, Mohd Hasnat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To document the changing clinical presentation of diabetic retinopathy (DR) over a decade, the current knowledge-attitude-practice (KAP) of known type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, and the current vision related quality of life (VR-QOL) of patients with DR in a tertiary eye care center in Eastern India. Methods. Two hundred and forty patients with known type-2 DM were evaluated. The evaluation included status of DR (n = 240), KAP (n = 232), and VR-QOL (n = 75). International classification of DR was used in the study. The DR status was compared with another cohort (n = 472) examined a decade earlier, in year 2001. The KAP-25 questions were designed after literature review. The National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ; including optional items) was validated by Rasch analysis. Both KAP and VR-QOL were analyzed according to degree of DR, duration of known DM, and educational qualification. Results. Average age of the current cohort (n = 240) was 57.16 ± 9.03 years; there were 205 (85.4%) male patients and 143 (59.6%) patients had received less than graduate qualification. The mean duration of DM since diagnosis was 10 ± 7.8 months (range 8 months to 30 years); 118 (49.16%) patients had DR. In a decade time, 2001 to 2011, there was a change of retinopathy status at presentation (more often nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, NPDR). One-third of NPDR patients had poor vision and half of them were hypertensive. KAP was better in patients with higher education and those having DR. VFQ score was higher in better seeing patients. Conclusion. Patients currently presenting at earlier stage of retinopathy are probably related to poor vision. Early detection and treatment of DR is likely to preserve and/or improve vision. PMID:27843643

  11. Hypertension after clonidine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; deCarvalho, J G; Batson, H M; Frohlich, E D

    1978-05-01

    Rebound hypertension occurred in two patients upon clonidine withdrawal. Treatment of the hypertensive crisis consists of both alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blockade, reserpine, or the reintroduction of clonidine. With effective control of pressure during the crisis, long-term antihypertensive therapy must be resumed.

  12. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-09-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension.

  13. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) A ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  14. [Hypertension and arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a known risk factor for arteriosclerosis, and causes both atherosclero= sis of medium-large arteries and arteriolosclerosis of the arterioles. Elevated blood pressure causes damage to the endothelium and vascular wall through both mechanical and humoral factors. We and others have shown that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system at a 'critical period' during the development of hypertension results in a permanent suppression of hypertension in animal models. We have also reported that high-dose renin-angiotensin inhibition results in regression of hypertension, possibly by regression of renal arteriolar hypertrophy. These results suggest that understanding the process of arterial remodeling may play a key role in the development of new strategies for prevention and regression of hypertension and arteriosclerosis.

  15. Epigenomics of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mingyu; Cowley, Allen W; Mattson, David L; Kotchen, Theodore A; Liu, Yong

    2013-07-01

    Multiple genes and pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Epigenomic studies of hypertension are beginning to emerge and hold great promise of providing novel insights into the mechanisms underlying hypertension. Epigenetic marks or mediators including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and noncoding RNA can be studied at a genome or near-genome scale using epigenomic approaches. At the single gene level, several studies have identified changes in epigenetic modifications in genes expressed in the kidney that correlate with the development of hypertension. Systematic analysis and integration of epigenetic marks at the genome-wide scale, demonstration of cellular and physiological roles of specific epigenetic modifications, and investigation of inheritance are among the major challenges and opportunities for future epigenomic and epigenetic studies of hypertension.

  16. Hypertension in women.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    Hypertension is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality, and a highly prevalent condition in both men and women. However, the prevalence of hypertension is predicted to increase more among women than men. Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) can induce hypertension in a small group of women and, increase CV risk especially among those with hypertension. Both COC-related increased CV risk and blood pressure (BP) returns to pretreatment levels by 3 months of its discontinuation. The effects of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on BP are controversial, and COCs and HRT containing the new generation progestin drospirenone are preferred in women with established hypertension. Despite the high incidence of cancer in women, CV disease remains the major cause of death in women and comparable benefit of antihypertensive treatment have been demonstrated in both women and men.

  17. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vest, Amanda R; Cho, Leslie S

    2014-03-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy represent the second commonest cause of direct maternal death and complicate an estimated 5-10 % of pregnancies. Classification systems aim to separate hypertension similar to that seen outside pregnancy (chronic and gestational hypertension) from the potentially fatal pregnancy-specific conditions. Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and eclampsia represent increasing severities of this disease spectrum. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' 2013 guidelines no longer require proteinuria as a diagnostic criterion, because of its variable appearance in the disease spectrum. The cause involves inadequate cytotrophoblastic invasion of the myometrium, resulting in placental hypoperfusion and diffuse maternal endothelial dysfunction. Changes in angiogenic and antiangiogentic peptide profiles precede the onset of clinical preeclampsia. Women with preeclampsia should be closely monitored and receive magnesium sulfate intravenously if severe features, HELLP syndrome, or eclampsia occur. Definitive therapy is delivery of the fetus. Hypertension in pregnancy increases future maternal risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders.

  18. Hypertension in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Extremera, Blas; Cía-Gómez, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Background. The incidence of hypertension in the Western countries is continuously increasing in the elderly population and remains the leading cause of cardiovascular and morbidity. Methods. we analysed some significant clinical trials in order to present the relevant findings on those hypertensive population. Results. Several studies (SYST-EUR, HYVET, CONVINCE, VALUE, etc.) have demonstrated the benefits of treatment (nitrendipine, hydrochrotiazyde, perindopril, indapamide, verapamil, or valsartan) in aged hypertensive patients not only concerning blood pressure values but also the other important risk factors. Conclusion. Hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disorder in the Western countries, and the relevance of receiving pharmacological treatment of hypertension in aged patients is crucial; in addition, the results suggest that combination therapy—nitrendipine plus enalapril—could have more benefits than those observed with the use of nitrendipine alone. PMID:21876789

  19. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  20. Hypertension burden in Luxembourg

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Castell, Maria; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Kuemmerle, Andrea; Schritz, Anna; Barré, Jessica; Delagardelle, Charles; Krippler, Serge; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Stranges, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but it remains the main cause of death in Luxembourg. We aimed to estimate the current prevalence of hypertension, associated risk factors, and its geographic variation in Luxembourg. Cross-sectional, population-based data on 1497 randomly selected Luxembourg residents aged 25 to 64 years were collected as part of the European Health Examination Survey from 2013 to 2015. Hypertension was defined as systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg, self-report of a physician diagnosis or on antihypertensive medication. Standard and Bayesian regressions were used to examine associations between hypertension and covariates, and also geographic distribution of hypertension across the country. Nearly 31% of Luxembourg residents were hypertensive, and over 70% of those were either unaware of their condition or not adequately controlled. The likelihood of hypertension was lower in men more physically active (odds ratio [95% credible region] 0.6 [0.4, 0.9]) and consuming alcohol daily (0.3 [0.1, 0.8]), and higher in men with a poor health perception (1.6 [1.0, 2.7]) and in women experiencing depressive symptoms (1.8 [1.3, 2.7]). There were geographic variations in hypertension prevalence across cantons and municipalities. The highest odds ratio was observed in the most industrialized region (South-West) (1.2 [0.9, 1.6]) with a positive effect at 90% credible region. In Luxembourg, the vast majority of people with hypertension are either unaware of their condition or not adequately controlled, which constitutes a major, neglected public health challenge. There are geographic variations in hypertension prevalence in Luxembourg, hence the role of individual and regional risk factors along with public health initiatives to reduce disease burden should be considered. PMID:27603374

  1. Association of obesity with diabetic retinopathy: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SN-DREAMS Report no. 8).

    PubMed

    Raman, Rajiv; Rani, Padmaja Kumari; Gnanamoorthy, Perumal; Sudhir, R R; Kumaramanikavel, Govindasamy; Sharma, Tarun

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study was to report the prevalence of obesity indices in individuals with diabetes and find out their association with diabetic retinopathy in the urban Indian population. Subjects (n = 1,414) were recruited from Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology And Molecular Genetics Study (SN-DREAMS-I), a cross-sectional study between 2003 and 2006. Anthropometric measurements were carried out, and all patients' fundi were photographed using 45 degrees four-field stereoscopic digital photography. The diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy was based on the modified Klein classification. Generalized obesity and abdominal obesity were defined using WHO Asia Pacific guidelines with the BMI (body mass index) cutoff as > or =23 kg/m(2), WC (waist circumference) cutoffs as > or =90 cm in men and > or =80 cm in women and WHO guidelines using WHR (waist-to-hip ratio) cutoffs as > or =0.90 for men and > or =0.85 for women. Prevalence of obesity defined by BMI and WC was more in women compared to men, and that defined by WHR was more in men compared to women (P < 0.001). The prevalence of isolated generalized obesity, isolated abdominal obesity and combined obesity were 5.4, 10.1 and 58% in men and 4.5, 10.8 and 74.4% in women, respectively. The prevalence of any diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy was more in the isolated abdominal obesity group (26.35 and 6.08%, respectively) than in other subgroups. On logistic regression analysis, isolated abdominal obesity (OR 2.02, 95% CI: 1.06-3.86) and increased WHR in women (OR 1.48 95% CI: 1.10-2.38) were associated with diabetic retinopathy; BMI > or = 23 (OR 0.66, 95% CI: 0.48-0.90) and combined obesity (OR 0.72, 95% CI: 0.53-0.99) had a protective role for any diabetic retinopathy in the overall group. In the urban south Indian population, isolated abdominal obesity and higher WHR in women were associated with diabetic retinopathy, but not with the severity of diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Anterior Diabetic Retinopathy Studied by Ultra-widefield Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kunho; Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Tae Hyup; Cho, Ga Eun; Ahn, Jeeyun; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prevalence of anterior type diabetic retinopathy (DR) using ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography and to identify the factors associated with anterior type DR incidence. Methods A retrospective case review was used in this study. Patients with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) underwent examination by ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography, and were classified into anterior, posterior, or diffuse DR groups. Anterior DR was defined if diabetic retinal changes were noted only at the location anterior to the imaginary circle bordered by the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study seven-standard fields. Correlations between demographic data, as well as systemic and ocular factors, and the incidence of NPDR types were evaluated. Results Among the 234 eyes of 234 patients with NPDR, 25 eyes (10.7%) demonstrated anterior DR. Anterior DR was observed in 10 eyes (30.3%) of patients having mild NPDR, three eyes (4.8%) of moderate NPDR patients, and in 12 eyes (7.1%) of severe NPDR patients (p < 0.001). The incidence of anterior DR positively correlated with lower hemoglobin A1c levels and with greater high-density lipoprotein levels following multiple logistic regression analysis (p < 0.001). The mean hemoglobin A1c level was 7.03 ± 0.99% in anterior DR, 7.99 ± 1.74% in posterior DR, and 7.94 ± 1.39% in diffuse DR patients (p = 0.003). The mean high-density lipoprotein level was 51.2 ± 12.5 mg/dL in anterior, 49.7 ± 15.2 mg/dL in posterior, and 45.2 ± 13.1 mg/dL in diffuse DR patients (p = 0.010). Conclusions Diabetic retinal changes confined to an anterior location were more frequently noted in earlier stages of NPDR. The incidence of DR sparing posterior retinal involvement was related to favorable blood sugar and lipid profiles. PMID:27729754

  3. [The hypertensive type II diabetic patient treated with captopril in free general practice (Austrian Safety Study). An indications study].

    PubMed

    Stanek, B; Basalka, E; Seitl, K; Fiser, I

    1997-01-01

    In 826 hypertensive patients including 396 with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus safety and efficacy of captopril 50 mg per day was evaluated throughout three months. In all patients blood pressure was significantly reduced. Moreover, in part of the patients with microalbuminuria, these tests turned negative with treatment. In addition, in patients with diabetes fasting and postprandial plasma glucose levels as well as HBA1C levels decreased. Only in 6.8% side effects occurred. In all patients quality of life as evaluated by a 10 item rating scale questionnaire improved. Taken together the results of this observational study confirm improvement of blood pressure levels, kidney function and metabolic derangements in diabetic patients treated with the ACE-inhibitor captopril. Effectiveness of these actions of captopril in respect to longterm prognosis in diabetics, however, remains to be established.

  4. [Influence of lasting diabetes and non-adjustable glycosylated haemoglobin on occurrence of retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Alajbegović, Salem; Alajbegović, Azra; Omerović, Jasmina; Musanović, Adnan; Lacić, Elmedin

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the duration of diabetes and glycemia on the development of diabetic retinopathy in diabetes types 1 and 2 and the prevalence of retinopathy by sex. It examined 278 diabetics in 1999 and 2004, a questionnaire was used to collect data and results of fasting glucose, HbA1c, glycosuria and ketonurie were recorded. Retinopathy was noted in 80 (28.78%) and 187 (67.27%) patients during 1999 and 2004, respectively (p < 0.001). The number of patients with the nonproliferative and preproliferative (p < 0.001) as well as with proliferative retinopathy (p < 0.01) was significantly higher in 2004 in the comparision with 1999. The average HbA1c in 1999 was 13.02%, whereas in 2004 it was 10.57%. Poor control of diabetes was present during both investigations.

  5. Physical inactivity as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy? A review.

    PubMed

    Dirani, Mohamed; Crowston, Jonathan G; van Wijngaarden, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour have been identified as modifiable risk factors for diabetes. However, little is known of the associations between physical activity, sedentary behaviour and diabetic retinopathy. The development of diabetic retinopathy is associated with longer duration of diabetes, elevated blood pressure and poor glycaemic control. However these factors only explain a proportion of the risk of retinopathy in individuals with diabetes. Several studies have suggested a protective role for physical activity in diabetic retinopathy. Other work has shown that the time spent watching television is independently associated with abnormal retinal vascular signs. Limitations of the existing studies, such as the absence of objective measures of physical activity, a lack of sedentary behaviour measures, the inclusion of only those with type 1 diabetes and a lack of longitudinal data, make it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the strength of these associations.

  6. Current and Next Generation Portable Screening Devices for Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, J. Morgan; Hendrick, Andrew M.; Khan, Farah N.; Ziemer, David C.; Pasquel, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of legal blindness in the United States, and with the growing epidemic of diabetes, a global increase in the incidence of DR is inevitable, so it is of utmost importance to identify the most cost-effective tools for DR screening. Emerging technology may provide advancements to offset the burden of care, simplify the process, and provide financially responsible methods to safely and effectively optimize care for patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). We review here currently available technology, both in production and under development, for DR screening. Preliminary results of smartphone-based devices, “all-in-one” devices, and alternative technologies are encouraging, but are largely pending verification of utility when used by nonophthalmic personnel. Further research comparing these devices to current nonportable telemedicine strategies and clinical fundus examination is necessary to validate these techniques and to potentially overcome the poor compliance around the globe of current strategies for DR screening. PMID:26888973

  7. Retinopathy of prematurity: New developments bring concern and hope.

    PubMed

    Darlow, Brian A

    2015-08-01

    Blindness from retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in Australian and New Zealand is an uncommon event although 3% of <31 weeks gestation infants receive treatment for the disease. New world-wide estimates of the incidence of blindness from ROP are much higher than previously at 20 000 children annually. The impact of severe ROP can be reduced through good evidence-based care of very preterm infants and careful organisation of eye examinations and follow-up services. Recent oxygen saturation targeting trial results might mean the adoption of higher targets than formerly in very preterm infants and will require vigilance to ensure all eligible infants are examined appropriately. A true screening examination for acute ROP might involve non-opthalmologists obtaining photographic retinal images and remote reading of these. Although treatment with laser gives good outcomes, there is interest in intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial factor agents, but issues concerning the systemic safety and retinal results of such treatment are unresolved.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Elshaer, Sally L.; Eldahshan, Wael S.; Mysona, Barbara A.; El-Remessy, Azza B.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in United States. Research indicates an association between oxidative stress and the development of diabetes complications. However, clinical trials with general antioxidants have failed to prove effective in diabetic patients. Mounting evidence from experimental studies that continue to elucidate the damaging effects of oxidative stress and inflammation in both vascular and neural retina suggest its critical role in the pathogenesis of DR. This review will outline the current management of DR as well as present potential experimental therapeutic interventions, focusing on molecules that link oxidative stress to inflammation to provide potential therapeutic targets for treatment or prevention of DR. Understanding the biochemical changes and the molecular events under diabetic conditions could provide new effective therapeutic tools to combat the disease. PMID:25949069

  9. Automatic Tortuosity-Based Retinopathy of Prematurity Screening System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukkaew, Lassada; Uyyanonvara, Bunyarit; Makhanov, Stanislav S.; Barman, Sarah; Pangputhipong, Pannet

    Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) is an infant disease characterized by increased dilation and tortuosity of the retinal blood vessels. Automatic tortuosity evaluation from retinal digital images is very useful to facilitate an ophthalmologist in the ROP screening and to prevent childhood blindness. This paper proposes a method to automatically classify the image into tortuous and non-tortuous. The process imitates expert ophthalmologists' screening by searching for clearly tortuous vessel segments. First, a skeleton of the retinal blood vessels is extracted from the original infant retinal image using a series of morphological operators. Next, we propose to partition the blood vessels recursively using an adaptive linear interpolation scheme. Finally, the tortuosity is calculated based on the curvature of the resulting vessel segments. The retinal images are then classified into two classes using segments characterized by the highest tortuosity. For an optimal set of training parameters the prediction is as high as 100%.

  10. Effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation in severe diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhov, Yuri S.; Shadrichev, Fedor Y.; Lisochkina, Alla B.

    1999-02-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is one of the most severe complications of diabetes mellitus. In 1994, in St. Petersburg, a new system of ophthalmologic care for diabetic patients was set up. For Russia, this system represents an example of adequate care for subjects with DM, including screening strategies, documentation and education of patients and general ophthalmologists. According to our data, about one half of examined patients had DR, and about 20% of patients were in need of laser treatment. The aim of present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) in cases of severe DR, including advanced nonproliferative DR (preproliferative DR) and proliferative DR. Data concerning 1073 diabetics are included in this study. PRP was performed in 736 cases (1163 eyes). DR stabilization was estimated after one year follow-up PRP enabled preventing severe visual loss in patients with preproliferative DR and proliferative DR. Our system of specialized ophthalmic care for diabetic patients proved to be effective.

  11. Neovascular glaucoma after vitrectomy in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jin-woo; Jee, Donghyun; La, Tae Yoon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of neovascular glaucoma (NVG) after vitrectomy in patients with vitreous hemorrhage associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). This retrospective, noncomparative, observational study included 127 eyes of 127 patients with PDR who received vitrectomy with a follow-up period of at least 6 months. The prevalence of NVG and associated risk factors were assessed including sex, age, previous panretinal photocoagulation, baseline intraocular pressure, combined phacovitrectomy, and pretreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) before vitrectomy for the treatment of vitreous hemorrhage. NVG developed in 15 (11.8%) of 127 patients. Of the 15 eyes with NVG, 11 cases (73.3%) postoperatively developed NVG within 6 months. Postoperative NVG was associated with preoperative IVB treatment (odds ratio, 4.43; P = 0.019). The prevalence of NVG after vitrectomy was 11.8%, and an associated risk factor for NVG was preoperative IVB for the treatment of vitreous hemorrhage. PMID:28272234

  12. Cost-effectiveness of Different Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Modalities.

    PubMed

    Pasquel, Francisco J; Hendrick, Andrew M; Ryan, Martha; Cason, Emily; Ali, Mohammed K; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2015-12-29

    Current screening strategies aimed at detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR) historically have poor compliance, but advancements in technology can enable improved access to care. Nearly 80% of all persons with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), highlighting the importance of a cost effective screening program. Establishing mechanisms to reach populations with geographic and financial barriers to access is essential to prevent visual disability. Teleretinal programs leverage technology to improve access and reduce cost. The quality of currently employed screening modalities depends on many variables including the instrument used, use of pupillary mydriasis, number of photographic fields, and the qualifications of the photographer and image interpreter. Recent telemedicine and newer technological approaches have been introduced, but data for these technologies is yet limited. We present results of a systematic review of studies evaluating cost-effectiveness of DR screening, and discuss potential relevance for LMICs.

  13. Bietti's tapetoretinal degeneration with marginal corneal dystrophy crystalline retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, R B

    1977-01-01

    In 1937 Bietti reported a tapetoretinal degeneration with associated corneal deposits at the limbus. The hallmark of the disease was the crystalline characteristics of the retinal spots as well as those at the corneal limbus. Bagolini and Ioli-Spade in 1968 presented a 30 year follow-up on Bietti's cases and presented six additional cases. The present report delas with this entity in Orientals, a Chinese woman and a Japanese man. Corneal and conjunctival biopsy from the female patient revelaed a lipid deposition in both fibroblasts and epithelium. The term "crystalline retinopathy" has been added to the description of this entity since it defines the most characteristic feature of the syndrome. Images FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 2 C FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 6 C FIGURE 8 PMID:306693

  14. Telemedicine in diabetic retinopathy: Access to rural India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Taraprasad; Pappuru, Rajeev Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a growing concern in India. The first step in management of DR is timely screening. With 10% prevalence in rural India, 11 million people are likely to have DR by the year 2030. With limited resources and skilled manpower, it will not be possible to have routine eye examination to identify and treat these patients on a regular basis. Telemedicine is a possible answer in these situations where patients could be remotely screened and appropriately advised. With the advent of several technological advances such as low cost hand-held nonmydriatic camera, increased capabilities of the smartphones to take external eye and retinal photographs coupled with improving broadband connectivity; teleophthalmology in the management of DR could be a reality in the not too distant future. PMID:26953029

  15. [Hypertension and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Rosas, Martín; Lomelí, Catalina; Mendoza-González, Celso; Lorenzo, José Antonio; Méndez, Arturo; Férez Santander, Sergio Mario; Attie, Fause

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that hypertension in pregnancy is an under recognized risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Compared with women who have had normotensive pregnancies, those who are hypertensive during pregnancy are at greater risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and have a less favorable overall risk profile for CVD years after the affected pregnancies. One factor that might underlie this relationship is that hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (pre-eclampsia, in particular) and CVD share several common risk factors (e.g. obesity, diabetes mellitus and renal disease). Alternatively, hypertension in pregnancy could induce long-term metabolic and vascular abnormalities that might increase the overall risk of CVD later in life. In both cases, evidence regarding risk-reduction interventions specific to women who have had hypertensive pregnancies is lacking. While awaiting results of large-scale studies, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy should be screened for during assessment of a woman's overall risk profile for CVD. Women at high risk must be monitored closely for conventional risk factors that are common to both CVD and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and treated according to current evidence-based national guidelines.

  16. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hansson, L

    1996-10-01

    TREATMENT OF ELDERLY HYPERTENSIVES: Treatment of hypertension in the elderly is nowadays an accepted and highly effective medical intervention following the positive reports on the benefits of lowering elevated arterial pressure in elderly patients. Most of the intervention studies an antihypertensive treatment in elderly patients have used diuretics or beta-blockers or the two in combination as the therapy by which blood pressure was lowered. However, from a theoretical point of view, novel therapies such as calcium antagonists could offer advantages that would translate into an even greater reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than has been obtained with the traditional antihypertensive therapies used so far. DATA ON CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS IN THE ELDERLY: Some of the studies in elderly hypertensives that are currently in progress are using calcium antagonists as one of the main therapies, e.g. the Swedish Trial in Old patients with hypertension (STOP-Hypertension)-2 study and the Systolic hypertension in Europe (Syst-Eur) study. Another source of information is a large database on nicardipine, a dihydropyridine-derived calcium antagonist, used in the treatment of elderly hypertensives.

  17. Stress and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R S; Frohlich, E D

    1990-09-01

    The relationships between stress and hypertension have been evaluated extensively. Acutely, stress has been shown to increase blood pressure by increasing cardiac output and the heart rate without affecting total peripheral resistance. Acute stress has been found to increase levels of catecholamines, cortisol, vasopressin, endorphins and aldosterone, which may in part explain the increase in blood pressure. However, a primary role for the activation of the sympathetic nervous system has recently been suggested in several studies. Studies in the rat are beginning to determine specific central nervous system pathways which transform stressful stimuli into signals triggering a cardiovascular response without direct cortical participation. Furthermore, acute stress reduces renal sodium excretion, which contributes to an increase in blood pressure. Several studies suggest that prolonged stress may predispose people and animals to prolonged hypertension and certain populations are at risk for the development of stress-induced hypertension. It is likely that prolonged stress-induced hypertension is the result of neurohormonal trophic factors which cause vascular hypertrophy or atherosclerosis. Because stress can affect measurement of blood pressure due to the phenomenon of 'white-coat hypertension', ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is emerging as an important feature in the evaluation of patients with hypertension. Finally, relaxation techniques are being used increasingly in the treatment of patients with hypertension.

  18. The Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy Among Known Diabetic Population in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S K; Pant, B P; Subedi, P

    2016-01-01

    Background The worldwide prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) was found to be 34.6%. WHO estimates that DR is responsible for 4.8% of the 37 million cases of blindness throughout the world. In a study undertaken in urban population in Nepal, M.D. Bhattarai found the prevalence of diabetes among people aged 20 years and above to be 14.6% and the prevalence among people aged 40 years and above to be 19%. Studies on DR, to our knowledge, have mostly been hospital based in Nepal. Little information is available about prevalence of DR at the community level in Nepal. Objective To investigate the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors among known diabetic population of Nepal. Method A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted among individuals aged 30 and more using cluster sampling method. The study sites were Kathmandu metropolitan city and Birgunj sub-metropolitan city. A sample size of 5400 was calculated assuming 5% prevalence rate with 95% confidence level, 5% worst acceptable level and 1.5 cluster sampling design effect. Study participants were interviewed, anthropometric measurements and fundus photograph was taken from participants with diabetes. Fundus photographs were used to grade retinopathy. Result Around 12% of the respondents were diabetic, mean age 55.43±11.86 years, of which slightly more than half were females (50.2%). Among these diabetic respondents 9.9% had some forms of diabetic retinopathy, mean age 54.08±10.34 years, 56.7% were male. When severe grade of retinopathy in any eye was considered as overall grade of retinopathy for the individual, prevalence of Non-proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy, Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and complete vision loss was found to be 9.1%, 0.5% and 0.3%. Prevalence of Diabetic Macular Edema was 5.5%. Duration of diabetes, family history of diabetes and blood pressure at the day of survey was found to be associated with having any retinopathy. Conclusion Diabetic retinopathy

  19. The effects of pleiotrophin in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuemei; Bai, Yujing; Yu, Wenzhen; Pan, Chungting; Jin, Enzhong; Song, Dan; Xu, Qiong; Yao, Yuou; Huang, Lvzhen; Tao, Yong; Li, Xiaoxin; Zhao, Mingwei

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN), a secreted, multifunctional cytokine, is involved in angiogenic, fibrotic and neurodegenerative diseases. However, little is known about its effects on diabetic retinopathy, a neurovascular disease. To investigate the role of PTN in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), PTN concentration in the vitreous was evaluated in PDR patients and non-diabetic controls. PTN expression was observed in epiretinal membranes from patients. PTN knockdown was performed using small interfering (si)RNA, and the effects on retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and human umbilical vascular endothelia cells (HUVECs) were observed in vitro under hyperglycemic and hypoxic conditions. Cell attachment, proliferation, migration, tube formation, cell cycle, apoptosis, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) phosphorylation, and VEGF levels were studied. The vitreous PTN concentration in PDR patients was higher than that in non-diabetic controls, and PTN was highly expressed in the fibrovascular membranes of PDR patients. Under hyperglycemic and hypoxic conditions, PTN knockdown reduced cell attachment, proliferation, migration, and tube formation and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro. Mechanically, PTN depletion decreased ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. Recombinant PTN up regulated the concentration of VEGF in vitro, which can be attenuated by the ERK 1/2 inhibitor. Taken together, our results implied that elevated PTN in PDR patients might participate in the critical processes of the development of PDR, most likely playing roles in angiogenesis and proliferation, possibly by activating the ERK 1/2 pathway and regulating VEGF secretion. These findings provide new insight into the roles of PTN in PDR and suggest that PTN may become a new target for therapeutic intervention in PDR.

  20. Automated detection of retinal whitening in malarial retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V.; Agurto, C.; Barriga, S.; Nemeth, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Lewallen, S.; Harding, S.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe neurological complication associated with malarial infection. Malaria affects approximately 200 million people worldwide, and claims 600,000 lives annually, 75% of whom are African children under five years of age. Because most of these mortalities are caused by the high incidence of CM misdiagnosis, there is a need for an accurate diagnostic to confirm the presence of CM. The retinal lesions associated with malarial retinopathy (MR) such as retinal whitening, vessel discoloration, and hemorrhages, are highly specific to CM, and their detection can improve the accuracy of CM diagnosis. This paper will focus on development of an automated method for the detection of retinal whitening which is a unique sign of MR that manifests due to retinal ischemia resulting from CM. We propose to detect the whitening region in retinal color images based on multiple color and textural features. First, we preprocess the image using color and textural features of the CMYK and CIE-XYZ color spaces to minimize camera reflex. Next, we utilize color features of the HSL, CMYK, and CIE-XYZ channels, along with the structural features of difference of Gaussians. A watershed segmentation algorithm is used to assign each image region a probability of being inside the whitening, based on extracted features. The algorithm was applied to a dataset of 54 images (40 with whitening and 14 controls) that resulted in an image-based (binary) classification with an AUC of 0.80. This provides 88% sensitivity at a specificity of 65%. For a clinical application that requires a high specificity setting, the algorithm can be tuned to a specificity of 89% at a sensitivity of 82%. This is the first published method for retinal whitening detection and combining it with the detection methods for vessel discoloration and hemorrhages can further improve the detection accuracy for malarial retinopathy.

  1. Language barrier and its relationship to diabetes and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Language barrier is an important determinant of health care access and health. We examined the associations of English proficiency with type-2 diabetes (T2DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Asian Indians living in Singapore, an urban city where English is the predominant language of communication. Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional study. T2DM was defined as HbA1c ≥6.5%, use of diabetic medication or a physician diagnosis of diabetes. Retinal photographs were graded for the severity of DR including vision-threatening DR (VTDR). Presenting visual impairment (VI) was defined as LogMAR visual acuity > 0.30 in the better-seeing eye. English proficiency at the time of interview was assessed. Results The analyses included 2,289 (72.1%) English-speaking and 885 (27.9%) Tamil- speaking Indians. Tamil-speaking Indians had significantly higher prevalence of T2DM (46.2 vs. 34.7%, p < 0.001) and, among those with diabetes, higher prevalence of DR (36.0 vs. 30.6%, p < 0.001), VTDR (11.0 vs. 6.5%, p < 0.001), and VI (32.4 vs. 14.6%) than English speaking Indians. Oaxaca decomposition analyses showed that the language-related discrepancies (defined as the difference in prevalence between persons speaking different languages) in T2DM, DR, and VTDR could not be fully explained by socioeconomic measures. Conclusions In an English dominant society, Tamil-speaking Indians are more likely to have T2DM and diabetic retinopathy. Social policies and health interventions that address language-related health disparities may help reduce the public health impact of T2DM in societies with heterogeneous populations. PMID:22974298

  2. Protective Effects of Fufang Xueshuantong on Diabetic Retinopathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Huihui; Huang, Jianmei; Li, Wei; Tang, Minke

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of Fufang Xueshuantong (FXT) on diabetic retinopathy in rats induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Diabetes was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by a single injection of 60 mg/kg STZ. One week after STZ, FXT 0.525 g/kg or 1.05 g/kg was administrated to the rats by intragastric gavage (ig) once daily consecutively for 24 weeks. The control rats and untreated STZ rats received vehicle the same way. At the end of the experiment, the erythrocyte aggregation and blood viscosity were assayed. The retina vessel morphology was observed in retinal digestive preparations. Expression of occludin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in retina was measured by western blotting. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) in retina was detected by immunohistochemistry. The activity of aldose reductase in retina was investigated with a NADPH oxidation method. The results showed that, in STZ rats, there were distinct lesions in retinal vessel, including decrease of pericytes and increase of acellular capillaries, together with dilatation of retinal veins. The expression of VEGF and ICAM-1 increased, while the expression of PEDF and occludin decreased. The activity of aldose reductase elevated, and the whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, and erythrocyte aggregation also increased after STZ stimulation. FXT 0.525 g/kg and 1.05 g/kg demonstrated significant protective effects against STZ induced microvessel lesion in the retina with increased pericytes and reduced acellular capillaries. FXT also reduced the expression of VEGF and ICAM-1 and enhanced the expression of PEDF and occludin in STZ insulted rats. The activity of aldose reductase, the whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, and erythrocyte aggregation also decreased after FXT treatment. The results demonstrated that FXT has protective effect on STZ induced diabetic retinopathy in rats. PMID

  3. Mitochondrial Haplogroups Affect Severity But Not Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bregman, Jana A.; Herren, David J.; Estopinal, Christopher B.; Chocron, Isaac M.; Harlow, Paula A.; Warden, Cassandra; Brantley, Milam A.; Samuels, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We previously reported European mitochondrial haplogroup H to be a risk factor for and haplogroup UK to be protective against proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) among Caucasian patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR). The purpose of this study was to determine whether these haplogroups are also associated with the risk of having DR among Caucasian patients with diabetes. Methods Deidentified medical records for 637 Caucasian patients with diabetes (223 with DR) were obtained from BioVU, Vanderbilt University's electronic, deidentified DNA databank. An additional 197 Caucasian patients with diabetes (98 with DR) were enrolled from the Vanderbilt Eye Institute (VEI). We tested for an association between European mitochondrial haplogroups and DR status. Results The percentage of diabetes patients with DR did not differ across the haplogroups (P = 0.32). The percentage of patients with nonproliferative DR (NPDR; P = 0.0084) and with PDR (P = 0.027) significantly differed across the haplogroups. In logistic regressions adjusting for sex, age, diabetes type, duration of diabetes, and hemoglobin A1c, neither haplogroup H nor haplogroup UK had a significant effect on DR compared with diabetic controls. Haplogroup UK was a significant risk factor (OR = 1.72 [1.13–2.59], P = 0.010) for NPDR compared with diabetic controls in the unadjusted analysis, but not in the adjusted analysis (OR = 1.29 [0.79–2.10], P = 0.20). Conclusions Mitochondrial haplogroups H and UK were associated with severity, but not presence, of DR. These data argue that the effect of these haplogroups is related to ischemia and neovascularization, the defining features of PDR. PMID:28245487

  4. Laser photocoagulation stops diabetic retinopathy by controlling lactic acid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbarsht, Myron L.

    1994-08-01

    Many different types of proliferative retinopathy induced by various types of initial disorders have a common pathology in their mid and terminal stages. Thus, proper therapy is devoted toward elimination of the initial cause as well as alleviation of the proliferative processes. Vasodilatation, which is an initial symptom of diabetes, is itself destructive to the retinal capillary bed and appears to be a constant feature in all stages of diabetic retinopathy. In the mid and late stages, the vasodilatation seems very dependent upon capillary dropout, whereas the initial vasodilatation may derive from quite different causes. The efficacy of photocoagulation as a therapy for all stages seems to derive from decreasing the metabolism in the photoreceptor layer sufficiently to result in vasoconstriction of the retinal vessels. A model is proposed to show how diabetes, by altering the metabolism in the photoreceptor layer to produce excess lactic acid, causes the initial vasodilatation. The lactic acid also induces free radical (superoxide) formation; both act together to destroy the retinal capillary bed followed by vasoproliferation. Photocoagulation, thus, is even more appropriate for this particular syndrome than previously had been thought, as it not only reduces potentially destructive vasodilatation but also removes the metabolic cause of the free radical induced destruction of the capillary endothelium which is the initial step in capillary drop-out. A review of the present data indicates that the best type of pan- retinal photocoagulation is a very light type affecting the photoreceptors only with a minimal amount of damage to other parts of retina and the vessels in the choroid. The possible use of photochemical types of destruction of the photoreceptor as a therapeutic modality is attractive, but it is certainly too speculative to use until more detailed investigations have been completed. However, the basic therapeutic approach of choice may be to prevent the

  5. Unilateral retinopathy secondary to occult primary intraocular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Barile, Gaetano R.; Hood, Donald C.; Marr, Brian; Hussein, Shafinaz; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study is to report the clinical case of a 53-year-old woman whose presenting manifestation of primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL) was unilateral retinal degeneration. Method A case report was created with review of clinical, imaging, electrophysiologic, and pathological investigations. Results A 53-year-old woman with a distant history of ocular herpes simplex developed progressive central visual loss and intermittent photopsia over 4 years in her right eye. Ophthalmic examination revealed reduced visual acuity OD, central scotoma, and minimal ocular findings. Autofluorescence and infrared imaging revealed mild reflectance changes in the temporal macula, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography identified mild disruptions of inner segment/outer segment junctions in the subfoveal region of the right eye. A mild window defect was seen on fluorescein angiography. Electrophysiology with multifocal electroretinogram (ERG) revealed evidence of unilateral macular dysfunction. Full-field ERGs revealed progressive global retinal dysfunction over 6 months, with unilateral decreases in amplitude and implicit time shifts, as seen in cases of autoimmune retinopathies. The eye eventually exhibited mild vitreous cellular infiltration on ophthalmoscopic examination, and vitrectomy diagnosed B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Further evaluation revealed no evidence of central nervous system or systemic disease, consistent with occult PIOL. Conclusions This case illustrates an atypical presentation of PIOL characterized by unilateral retinal disease presenting with symptoms and signs of macular dysfunction. Clinical and ERG features evolved into an acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR)-like phenotype. PIOL should be considered in atypical cases of AZOOR with vitreal reactions, and some cases of AZOOR may be related to B cell lymphocyte disorders. PMID:24081663

  6. Neuroendocrine-immune disorder in type 2 diabetic patients with retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Obulkasim, Mutallip; Turdi, Ablikim; Amat, Nurmuhammat; Haxim, Muhtar; Eziz, Rena; Haji, Hurxide; Li, Linlin; Chen, Xueyi; Upur, Halmurat; Ren, Jun

    2011-04-01

    1. Diabetes mellitus is usually accompanied by hyperactivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most devastating complications in diabetes although little is known with regards to the HPA activity in type 2 diabetic patients (T2DM) with diabetic retinopathy. The present study was designed to evaluate the HPA axis activity in type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic retinopathy. 2. Diabetic retinopathy was examined by fluorescein fundus angiography (FFA) in 174 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients. Levels of / were measured using flow cytometry. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and cortisone were measured by radioimmunoassay. Plasma levels of monoamines norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) were assessed using high performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a fluorescence detection. Patients were grouped into the non-diabetic retinopathy (NDR), non-proliferating diabetic retinopathy (NPR) and proliferating diabetic retinopathy (PDR) categories. 3. Patients with PDR showed significantly less than those with NDR and NPR (P<0.05). No significant correlation was found in / and NK or severity of retinopathy among the three patient groups. There was no significant difference in serum IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels among the different patient groups (P>0.05). The serum concentrations of ACTH and cortisone were lower in PDR patients than other groups. There was no significant difference in plasma concentrations of DA and NE among all three groups (P>0.05). 4. Our data suggest that HPA and immune dysfunction might play a role in the development and/or progression of PDR.

  7. HELLP Syndrome Complicated with Postpartum Subcapsular Ruptured Liver Hematoma and Purtscher-Like Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Cernea, Daniela; Dragoescu, Alice; Novac, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Purtscher's retinopathy is usually associated with trauma, acute pancreatitis, vasculitis, lupus, and bone fractures. It was rarely described postpartum in patients with preeclampsia as well as associated with HELLP syndrome. We present a case of a multiparous patient aged 44 with severe preeclampsia and postpartum HELLP syndrome complicated with Purtscher-like retinopathy and large ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma that required emergency abdominal surgery after premature delivery of a dead fetus. Postsurgical outcome was favorable regarding both liver function and visual acuity.

  8. Bilateral Ocular Decompression Retinopathy after Ahmed Valve Implantation for Uveitic Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Preciado, Javier; Ancona-Lezama, David Arturo; Valdés-Lara, Carlos Andrés; Díez-Cattini, Gian Franco; Coloma-González, Itziar

    2016-01-01

    Case Report We report the case of a 29-year-old man who underwent Ahmed valve implantation in both eyes as treatment for uveitic glaucoma, subsequently presenting with bilateral ocular decompression retinopathy in the postoperative period. Discussion Ocular decompression retinopathy is a rare complication of filtering surgery in patients with glaucoma; however, the course is benign in most cases, with spontaneous resolution of bleedings and improvement of visual acuity. PMID:27920718

  9. Thyroid malignancy presenting with visual loss: an unusual case of paraneoplastic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Emily; Moran, Sarah; Flitcroft, Ian; Logan, Patricia

    2016-10-19

    Paraneoplastic retinopathy is a rare cause of painless vision loss, associated with an underlying (and often occult) systemic malignancy. Ocular examination findings are subtle, and the diagnosis is often made on the basis of electrophysiology findings. This report describes the case of a 48-year-old Caucasian man with paraneoplastic retinopathy presenting as visual disturbance, central scotomata and abnormal electrophysiology. He was subsequently diagnosed with papillary thyroid malignancy.

  10. Anesthesia and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, Dana; Ivascu, Natalia; Heerdt, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia and surgery are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension due mainly to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, postoperative hypoxemia, and myocardial ischemia. Preoperative risk assessment and successful management of patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery involve an understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, screening of patients at-risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension, analysis of preoperative and operative risk factors, thorough multidisciplinary planning, careful intraoperative management, and early recognition and treatment of postoperative complications. This article will cover each of these aspects with particular focus on the anesthetic approach for non-cardiothoracic surgeries.

  11. Hypertension in special populations.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Shawna D

    2005-07-01

    Hypertension is a multifaceted disease that may present somewhat differently in various populations. It is clear that hypertensive treatment reduces cardiovascular, renal, and cerebrovascular outcomes for all patients, yet recent clinical trial data suggest that some groups may benefit more than others from specific drug intervention. Furthermore, these data justify specific approaches for some special populations. This article reviews important features of the presentation, rationale for treatment, and treatment recommendations for the treatment of hypertension in special populations. The special populations addressed include diabetic patients, the elderly, and women.

  12. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Caren G; Seely, Ellen W

    2011-12-01

    Hypertension is a common complication of pregnancy. Preeclampsia, in particular, is associated with substantial risk to both the mother and the fetus. Several risk factors have been recognized to predict risk for preeclampsia. However, at present no biomarkers have sufficient discriminatory ability to be useful in clinical practice, and no effective preventive strategies have yet been identified. Commonly used medications for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy include methyldopa and labetalol. Blood pressure thresholds for initiating antihypertensive therapy are higher than outside of pregnancy. Women with prior preeclampsia are at increased risk of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease.

  13. Update in Hypertension Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Leonard A

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is the leading cause of early mortality in the world, and reduction of blood pressure can help to reduce that burden. There is an enormous and ever-expanding body of literature on hypertension, with a 2016 Medline search for hypertension retrieving more than 113,000 publications. Recent guidelines from major societies have been published, and often present conflicting recommendations based on the same data. Using a question-and-answer format, this article reviews some of the recent developments and opinions on management of blood pressure and provides practical suggestions for management in the clinical arena.

  14. Management of Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Castillo, Leonardo; Gopinath, Shankar; Robertson, Claudia S.

    2008-01-01

    Effective management of intracranial hypertension involves meticulous avoidance of factors that precipitate or aggravate increased intracranial pressure. When intracranial pressure becomes elevated, it is important to rule out new mass lesions that should be surgically evacuated. Medical management of increased intracranial pressure should include sedation, drainage of cerebrospinal fluid, and osmotherapy with either mannitol or hypertonic saline. For intracranial hypertension refractory to initial medical management, barbiturate coma, hypothermia, or decompressive craniectomy should be considered. Steroids are not indicated and may be harmful in the treatment of intracranial hypertension resulting from traumatic brain injury. PMID:18514825

  15. Frequency and Clinical Characteristics of Hydroxychloroquine Retinopathy in Korean Patients with Rheumatologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the frequency and clinical characteristics of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) retinopathy in Korean patients with rheumatologic diseases. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 310 patients taking HCQ. Ophthalmic examinations included spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), automated visual field test, and fundus autofluorescence. The severity of retinopathy was categorized as early, moderate, or severe, and the location was categorized as parafoveal, pericentral, or mixed pattern. Among 310 patients, 9 patients (2.9%) were diagnosed as HCQ retinopathy. Among the patients with HCQ use ≥ 5 years (n = 174), the frequency was 5.2%. Only 1 (11.1%) of the 9 patients was symptomatic. The mean daily dose per kilogram of real body weight of the 9 patients was 5.6 mg, and only 3 had used 6.5 mg or more. Four of the 9 patients had severe HCQ retinopathy. Six of the 9 patients showed pericentral or mixed pattern of retinal damage. Consequently, the frequency of HCQ retinopathy in Korean patients was not low, especially when administered at a high cumulative dose and for a long duration. Screening of HCQ retinopathy by the recommended guidelines that include SD-OCT seems useful and should be done to detect retinal damage earlier in patients with chronic exposure to HCQ. PMID:28145658

  16. Development of a screening tool for staging of diabetic retinopathy in fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Bency, Mayur Joseph; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Bansal, Reema; Gupta, Amod

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a condition of the eye of diabetic patients where the retina is damaged because of long-term diabetes. The condition deteriorates towards irreversible blindness in extreme cases of diabetic retinopathy. Hence, early detection of diabetic retinopathy is important to prevent blindness. Regular screening of fundus images of diabetic patients could be helpful in preventing blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, we propose techniques for staging of diabetic retinopathy in fundus images using several shape and texture features computed from detected microaneurysms, exudates, and hemorrhages. The classification accuracy is reported in terms of the area (Az) under the receiver operating characteristic curve using 200 fundus images from the MESSIDOR database. The value of Az for classifying normal images versus mild, moderate, and severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) is 0:9106. The value of Az for classification of mild NPDR versus moderate and severe NPDR is 0:8372. The Az value for classification of moderate NPDR and severe NPDR is 0:9750.

  17. Larger and near-term baby retinopathy: a rare case series

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, T R; Rath, S; Jalali, S; Pradhan, L; Kesarwani, S; Nayak, M; Mishra, B; Panda, K G; Suttar, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report retinopathy in a series of four babies unusually beyond the screening standards reported so far in the literature. Methods During routine screening for retinopathy of prematurity, we detected retinopathy in four babies who were surprisingly bigger and older than the screening standards. The gestational age (GA), birth weight (BW), post menstrual age at first examination and significant perinatal events were noted. The retinopathy details imaged by the RetCam were classified as per ICROP revisited standards. Result The GA ranged from 36 to 39 weeks and BW from 2.4 to 3.0 kg. Three of them had retinopathy in zone III that regressed spontaneously and one had marked plus with vascular arcades and shunts in zone II that regressed after laser photocoagulation. All of them had fetal distress and multiple systemic comorbidities in the neonatal period. Conclusion This report makes one aware of the possibility of retinopathy in newborn of older GA and larger BW especially with fetal distress and stormy neonatal course. PMID:25359288

  18. Predominant cone photoreceptor dysfunction in a hyperglycaemic model of non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Yolanda; Chen, Kenneth; Reynolds, Alison L; Waghorne, Nora; O'Connor, John J; Kennedy, Breandán N

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 2.5 million people worldwide are clinically blind because of diabetic retinopathy. In the non-proliferative stage, the pathophysiology of this ocular manifestation of diabetes presents as morphological and functional disruption of the retinal vasculature, and dysfunction of retinal neurons. However, it is uncertain whether the vascular and neuronal changes are interdependent or independent events. In addition, the identity of the retinal neurons that are most susceptible to the hyperglycaemia associated with diabetes is unclear. Here, we characterise a novel model of non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy in adult zebrafish, in which the zebrafish were subjected to oscillating hyperglycaemia for 30 days. Visual function is diminished in hyperglycaemic fish. Significantly, hyperglycaemia disrupts cone photoreceptor neurons the most, as evidenced by prominent morphological degeneration and dysfunctional cone-mediated electroretinograms. Disturbances in the morphological integrity of the blood-retinal barrier were also evident. However, we demonstrate that these early vascular changes are not sufficient to induce cone photoreceptor dysfunction, suggesting that the vascular and neuronal complications in diabetic retinopathy can arise independently. Current treatments for diabetic retinopathy target the vascular complications. Our data suggest that cone photoreceptor dysfunction is a clinical hallmark of diabetic retinopathy and that the debilitating blindness associated with diabetic retinopathy may be halted by neuroprotection of cones.

  19. Folate status in type 2 diabetic patients with and without retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Gagliano, Caterina; Salomone, Salvatore; Giordano, Maria; Bucolo, Claudio; Pappalardo, Antonino; Drago, Filippo; Caraci, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio; Motta, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Background Folate deficiency is associated with cardiovascular disease, megaloblastic anemia, and with hyperhomocysteinemia. This study has been undertaken to investigate the role of folate status during the progression of the diabetic retinopathy. Methods We measured the plasma levels of homocysteine, folic acid, and red cell folate in 70 diabetic type 2 patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), 65 with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), 96 without diabetic retinopathy, and 80 healthy subjects used as a control group. Results We found higher plasma levels of homocysteine in the NPDR group compared to the control group (P<0.001) and in the PDR group compared to control group (P<0.001) and NPDR group (P<0.01). The severity of diabetic retinopathy was associated with lower folic acid and red cell folate levels, and a significant difference was observed between PDR and NPDR groups (P<0.05). Conclusion The folate status could play a role in the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26300625

  20. Impairment of Colour Vision in Diabetes with No Retinopathy: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SNDREAMS- II, Report 3)

    PubMed Central

    Gella, Laxmi; Raman, Rajiv; Kulothungan, Vaitheeswaran; Pal, Swakshyar Saumya; Ganesan, Suganeswari; Sharma, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess impairment of colour vision in type 2 diabetics with no diabetic retinopathy and elucidate associated risk factors in a population-based cross-sectional study. Methods This is part of Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular-genetics Study (SN-DREAMS II) which was conducted between 2007–2010. FM 100 hue-test was performed in 253 subjects with no clinical evidence of diabetic retinopathy. All subjects underwent detailed ophthalmic evaluation including cataract grading using LOCS III and 45° 4-field stereoscopic fundus photography. Various ocular and systemic risk factors for impairment of colour vision (ICV) were assessed in subjects with diabetes but no retinopathy. P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The mean age of the study sample was 57.08 ± 9.21 (range: 44–86 years). Gender adjusted prevalence of ICV among subjects with diabetes with no retinopathy was 39.5% (CI: 33.5–45.5). The mean total error score in the study sample was 197.77 ± 100 (range: 19–583). The risk factors for ICV in the study were women OR: 1.79 (1.00–3.18), increased resting heart rate OR: 1.04 (1.01–1.07) and increased intraocular pressure OR: 1.12 (1.00–1.24). Significant protective factor was serum high-density lipoprotein OR: 0.96 (0.93–0.99). Conclusions Acquired ICV is an early indicator of neurodegenerative changes in the retina. ICV found in diabetic subjects without retinopathy may be of non-vascular etiology. PMID:26053017

  1. Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... AGE Downloaded from http:// circ. ahajournals. org/ by guest on April 13, 2017 Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy ... e189 Downloaded from http:// circ. ahajournals. org/ by guest on April 13, 2017 TABLE 1. Types of ...

  2. Hypertension in aging patients.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alexander G

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension, especially isolated systolic hypertension, is commonly found in older (60-79 years of age) and elderly (≥80 years of age) people. Antihypertensive drug therapy should be considered in all aging hypertensive patients, as treatment greatly reduces cardiovascular events. Most classes of antihypertensive medications may be used as first-line treatment with the possible exception of α- and β-blockers. An initial blood pressure treatment goal is less than 140/90 mmHg in all older patients and less than 150/80 mmHg in the nonfrail elderly. The current paradigm of delaying therapeutic interventions until people are at moderate or high cardiovascular risk, a universal feature of hypertensive patients over 60 years of age, leads to vascular injury or disease that is only partially reversible with treatment. Future management will likely focus on intervening earlier to prevent accelerated vascular aging and irreversible arterial damage.

  3. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... already been diagnosed with high blood pressure. Try yoga and meditation. Yoga and meditation not only can strengthen your body ... Accessed Sept. 21, 2015. Hu B, et al. Effects of psychological stress on hypertension in middle-aged ...

  4. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Stroke Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome (HHNS) Gastroparesis Heart Disease Mental Health Pregnancy Related Conditions donate en -- Make Your Donation Count - ...

  5. Secondary hypertension in adults

    PubMed Central

    Puar, Troy Hai Kiat; Mok, Yingjuan; Debajyoti, Roy; Khoo, Joan; How, Choon How; Ng, Alvin Kok Heong

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hypertension occurs in a significant proportion of adult patients (~10%). In young patients, renal causes (glomerulonephritis) and coarctation of the aorta should be considered. In older patients, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnoea and renal artery stenosis are more prevalent than previously thought. Primary aldosteronism can be screened by taking morning aldosterone and renin levels, and should be considered in patients with severe, resistant or hypokalaemia-associated hypertension. Symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea should be sought. Worsening of renal function after starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor suggests the possibility of renal artery stenosis. Recognition, diagnosis and treatment of secondary causes of hypertension lead to good clinical outcomes and the possible reversal of end-organ damage, in addition to blood pressure control. As most patients with hypertension are managed at the primary care level, it is important for primary care physicians to recognise these conditions and refer patients appropriately. PMID:27211205

  6. Hypertension and adrenal disorders.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, J D

    1993-03-01

    Abnormalities of adrenal cortical and medullary function are important causes of hypertension in adults. Mineralocorticoid hypertension, characterized by spontaneous hypokalemia with excessive kaliuresis and low plasma renin activity, is most commonly caused by aldosterone-producing adenoma or, less frequently, by nonadenomatous adrenal hyperplasia. However, recent evidence indicates that this classification oversimplifies the pathophysiologic diversity of this syndrome. Advances in steroid biochemistry and molecular biology have improved our ability to identify patients with various forms of mineralocorticoid hypertension and also provide evidence that they are underdiagnosed. Pheochromocytomas are most commonly located in the adrenal medulla, where they may overproduce norepinephrine or epinephrine. Appropriate screening of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and their metabolites is essential because tumors that secrete epinephrine exclusively may not present with hypertension and, thus, can be overlooked. Extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas are more prevalent than previously considered and pose special problems because they may be multicentric, difficult to locate, and more likely to be malignant than are adrenal pheochromocytomas.

  7. Pregnancy-Induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kintiraki, Evangelia; Papakatsika, Sophia; Kotronis, George; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Kotsis, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) complicates 6-10% of pregnancies. It is defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) >90 mmHg. It is classified as mild (SBP 140-149 and DBP 90-99 mmHg), moderate (SBP 150-159 and DBP 100-109 mmHg) and severe (SBP ≥ 160 and DBP ≥ 110 mmHg). PIH refers to one of four conditions: a) pre-existing hypertension, b) gestational hypertension and preeclampsia (PE), c) pre-existing hypertension plus superimposed gestational hypertension with proteinuria and d) unclassifiable hypertension. PIH is a major cause of maternal, fetal and newborn morbidity and mortality. Women with PIH are at a greater risk of abruptio placentae, cerebrovascular events, organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Fetuses of these mothers are at greater risk of intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and intrauterine death. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over a period of 24 h seems to have a role in predicting deterioration from gestational hypertension to PE. Antiplatelet drugs have moderate benefits when used for prevention of PE. Treatment of PIH depends on blood pressure levels, gestational age, presence of symptoms and associated risk factors. Non-drug management is recommended when SBP ranges between 140-149 mmHg or DBP between 90-99 mmHg. Blood pressure thresholds for drug management in pregnancy vary between different health organizations. According to 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines, antihypertensive treatment is recommended in pregnancy when blood pressure levels are ≥ 150/95 mmHg. Initiation of antihypertensive treatment at values ≥ 140/90 mmHg is recommended in women with a) gestational hypertension, with or without proteinuria, b) pre-existing hypertension with the superimposition of gestational hypertension or c) hypertension with asymptomatic organ damage or symptoms at any time during pregnancy. Methyldopa is the drug of choice in pregnancy. Atenolol and metoprolol appear to be

  8. Diastolic function in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R A; Diamond, J A

    2001-11-01

    Diastolic dysfunction in patients with hypertension may present as asymptomatic findings on noninvasive testing, or as fulminant pulmonary edema, despite normal left ventricular systolic function. Up to 40% of hypertensive patients presenting with clinical signs of congestive heart failure have normal systolic left ventricular function. In this article we review the pathophysiologic factors affecting diastolic function in individuals with diastolic function, current and emerging tools for measuring diastolic function, and current concepts regarding the treatment of patients with diastolic congestive heart failure.

  9. Hypertensive emergencies of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, James M; Wilson, Karen L

    2013-03-01

    Hypertension is commonly encountered in pregnancy and has both maternal and fetal effects. Acute hypertensive crisis most commonly occurs in severe preeclampsia and is associated with maternal stroke, cardiopulmonary decompensation, fetal decompensation due to decreased uterine perfusion, abruption, and stillbirth. Immediate stabilization of the mother including the use of intervenous antihypertensives is required and often delivery is indicated. With appropriate management, maternal and fetal outcomes can be excellent.

  10. [Hypertension in old age].

    PubMed

    García-Palmieri, M

    1995-09-01

    Hypertension occurs in 50% of the elderly persons in industrialized societies. This disorder of the regulation of the arterial blood pressure has different manifestations in different age groups. The young hypertensive usually has an increase in cardiac output and a normal peripheral vascular resistance. The elderly patient with hypertension exhibits a decreased cardiac output and an increased peripheral vascular resistance. In the elderly hypertensive there is a progressive anteriolar narrowing and there is hardening of the largest arteries. The vascular disease that contributes to the hypertension in the elderly also causes hypoperfusion of the target organs. During the aging process there is a decrease in cardiac output, glomerular filtration rate, vital capacity, renal plasma flow and maximal cardiac rate. There are changes in the kidneys and the liver that influence the way different medications are handled by the body. The main findings of the Australian, EWPHE, Coope & Warrender, SHEP, STOP-HYP and MRC studies of hypertension in the elderly have been summarized. The intervention studies have proven that the treatment of hypertension in the elderly patient is efficacious and decreases the mortality and morbidity due to coronary and cerebrovascular events. The pharmacologic agents available for the treatment of hypertension in the elderly are the diuretics, beta blockers, vasodilators, calcium-channel blockers, adrenergic blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The morbidity and mortality benefits derived from antihypertensive trials are greater for the older than for the younger patients. The pharmacologic antihypertensive agents to be used in older patients will also depend upon the presence or not of associated illnesses in which some agents might be harmful or contraindicated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Hypertension and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Deak, Teresa M; Moskovitz, Joshua B

    2012-11-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is increasing in prevalence and incidence and its treatment becoming more commonplace. Associated complications of pregnancy, including end-organ damage, preeclampsia, eclampsia, and postpartum eclampsia, are leading sources of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, requiring an emergency physician to become proficient with their identification and treatment. This article reviews hypertension in pregnancy as it relates to outcomes, with special emphasis on preeclampsia, eclampsia, and postpartum eclampsia.

  12. Patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Amar, Jacques

    2007-06-01

    Hypertension remains uncontrolled in the majority of treated patients, especially those with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. This was demonstrated by a French study that showed that 70% of treated hypertensive patients are not controlled to the target level of 140/90 mmHg. This proportion reached 84% in hypertensive patients with diabetes (target level 130/85 mmHg). What are the reasons for this disappointing situation? Observational studies have shown that only a minority of patients with uncontrolled hypertension receive triple therapy including a diuretic. In this respect, self-measurement of blood pressure should improve the situation by allowing clinicians to base their decision to intensify hypertension treatment on more solid evidence than consultation blood pressure measurements alone. Patient-related factors may also contribute to this situation. Treated patients with uncontrolled hypertension often have multiple risk factors. This is associated with or is a source of poor treatment observance linked to patient psychological factors or a result of the increased consumption of medication. Finally, risk factors themselves may be responsible for problems with blood pressure control as a result of their detrimental effects on large arteries as well as the microvascular network. The early correction of such vascular anomalies is vital for medium and long-term blood pressure control.

  13. Resistant hypertension and chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-04-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient's history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of "non-dipper" hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures.

  14. Resistant Hypertension and Chronotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing’s syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient’s history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of “non-dipper” hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  15. Scotoma analysis of 10–2 visual field testing with a red target in screening for hydroxychloroquine retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Browning, David J; Lee, Chong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the variability of scotomas detected by 10–2 visual field (VF) testing with a red target in patients taking hydroxychloroquine without and with retinopathy. Design Retrospective review of clinical charts and VFs. Methods Twenty-four patients taking hydroxychloroquine without retinopathy, and eight patients taking hydroxychloroquine with retinopathy were tested in this study. Retinopathy was defined by annular scotomas on 10–2 VF testing with corroborative spectral domain optical coherence tomographic outer retinal changes and multifocal electroretinographic changes leading to cessation of hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine. Location and depth of scotoma points on 10–2 VF testing were recorded and their fates followed in serial, reliable 10–2 VFs performed with a red target over time. The main outcome measures for this study were the number of scotoma points and locations, percentage of persistent scotoma points, size of scotomas, location of scotomas, and percentage of scotomas deepening. Results A median of 3, interquartile range (IQR) (2, 5), scotoma points per VF occurred in patients without retinopathy. A median of 86%, IQR (77, 100), of these resolved on the subsequent field. For patients with retinopathy, a median of 50%, IQR (46, 79), resolved, a difference compared to patients without retinopathy that was significant (P=0.0158). The median percentage of scotoma points in the zone from 2° to 8° from fixation in eyes with retinopathy was 72%, IQR (54, 100), compared to 49%, IQR (40, 54), in eyes without retinopathy (P=0.0069). The number of persistent scotoma locations at the last visit was higher in eyes with retinopathy: 3, IQR (1, 3), versus 0, IQR (0, 1), in patients without retinopathy, P=0.0156. Conclusion Point scotomas are common and variable in 10–2 VF testing with a red target for hydroxychloroquine retinopathy in subjects without retinopathy. Scotoma points in eyes with retinopathy are less variable. The annular

  16. Diabetic retinopathy: retina-specific methods for maintenance of diabetic rodents and evaluation of vascular histopathology and molecular abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Veenstra, Alexander; Liu, Haitao; Lee, Chieh Allen; Du, Yunpeng; Tang, Jie; Kern, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of visual impairment, which continues to increase in prevalence as more and more people develop diabetes. Despite the importance of vision, the retina is one of the smallest tissues in the body, and specialized techniques to study the retinopathy have been developed. This chapter will summarize several methods used to (i) induce diabetes, (ii) maintain the diabetic animals throughout the months required for the development of typical vascular histopathology, (iii) evaluate vascular histopathology of diabetic retinopathy, and (iv) quantitate abnormalities implicated in the development of the retinopathy. PMID:26331759

  17. [Hypertension in children and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Lomelí, Catalina; Rosas, Martín; Mendoza-González, Celso; Méndez, Arturo; Lorenzo, José Antonio; Buendía, Alfonso; Férez-Santander, Sergio Mario; Attie, Fause

    2008-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus.

  18. Abnormal sleep patterns in subjects with type II diabetes mellitus and its effect on diabetic microangiopathies: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetic Study (SN-DREAMS, report 20).

    PubMed

    Raman, Rajiv; Gupta, Aditi; Venkatesh, Kadri; Kulothungan, Vaitheeswaran; Sharma, Tarun

    2012-08-01

    To study the prevalence of Abnormal Sleep Patterns (ASPs), gender-wise, in subjects with type II diabetes mellitus and its influence on diabetic microangiopathies. A population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1,414 patients having type II diabetes mellitus. Diabetic retinopathy was graded using stereoscopic digital fundus photography. Neuropathy was assessed by measuring vibration perception threshold using a sensitometer. Nephropathy was diagnosed by the presence of microalbuminuria in the first morning urine sample. ASPs were defined as either short (less than 5 h) or long (more than 9 h) duration of sleep with excessive daytime sleepiness. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score was assessed to note excessive daytime sleepiness; a score of more than 10 was considered as abnormal. The prevalence of ASPs was more in subjects with diabetes than with those without diabetes (14.8 vs. 6.6%) (P = 0.009), especially in women (15.7 vs. 5.6%) (P = 0.021). Likewise, the prevalence of short duration of sleep was higher in subjects with diabetes compared to those without diabetes (6.6 vs. 2.2%) (P = 0.040). The mean age of women subjects with diabetes, having ASPs, was higher than those without diabetes (56.4 ± 8.9 years vs. 47.2 ± 5.9 years, P = 0.033). Women subjects with ASPs had a higher risk of diabetic neuropathy on both univariate and multivariate analysis. ASPs are not only related to diabetes but can also influence the microvascular complications arising due to diabetes, particularly diabetic neuropathy. Diabetology and sleep medicine specialists need to work together to prevent the negative interactions between these two groups.

  19. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Changes in Preclinical Diabetic Retinopathy: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaofei; Nie, Chuang; Gong, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Jin, Xin; Wei, Shihui; Zhang, Maonian

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy is a microvascular neurodegenerative disorder in diabetic patients. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer changes have been described in patients with preclinical diabetic retinopathy, but study results have been inconsistent. Objective To assess changes in peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in diabetic patients with preclinical diabetic retinopathy. Methods A literature search was conducted through PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library. Case-control studies on RNFL thickness in preclinical diabetic retinopathy patients and healthy controls were retrieved. A meta-analysis of weighted mean difference and a sensitivity analysis were performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results Thirteen case-control studies containing 668 diabetic patients and 556 healthy controls were selected. Peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly reduced in patients with preclinical diabetic retinopathy compared to healthy controls in studies applying Optical Coherence Tomography (-2.88μm, 95%CI: -4.44 to -1.32, P = 0.0003) and in studies applying Scanning Laser Polarimeter (-4.21μm, 95%CI: -6.45 to -1.97, P = 0.0002). Reduction of RNFL thickness was significant in the superior quadrant (-3.79μm, 95%CI: -7.08 to -0.50, P = 0.02), the inferior quadrant (-2.99μm, 95%CI: -5.44 to -0.54, P = 0.02) and the nasal quadrant (-2.88μm, 95%CI: -4.93 to -0.82, P = 0.006), but was not significant in the temporal quadrant (-1.22μm, 95%CI: -3.21 to 0.76, P = 0.23), in diabetic patients. Conclusion Peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly decreased in preclinical diabetic retinopathy patients compared to healthy control. Neurodegenerative changes due to preclinical diabetic retinopathy need more attention. PMID:25965421

  20. Visual impairment and blindness in type 2 diabetics: Ife-Ijesa diabetic retinopathy study.

    PubMed

    Onakpoya, O H; Kolawole, B A; Adeoye, A O; Adegbehingbe, B O; Laoye, O

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes and blindness are important health issues globally; we determined the prevalence of blindness, diabetic retinopathy, and other eye diseases in Nigerian-type 2 diabetics. A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted on consenting type 2 diabetic patients who had scheduled comprehensive eye examination including dilated funduscopy with +78DS. Visual status was graded using the WHO criteria. Approval from Institutional Ethics Committee was obtained. Primary outcome measures were the prevalence and causes of blindness as well as prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. Secondary outcome measures were the presence of other eye diseases. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13. Two hundred and sixty-six eyes of 133 type 2 diabetic patients aged 22-89 years were studied; 69 (51.9 %) were males while 64 (48.1 %) were females. Five (3.8 %) patients were blind while 27 (20.3 %) were visually impaired. Cataract was the leading cause of blindness (60 %) and visual impairment was found in 59.3 %. Diabetic retinopathy was present in 37 (27.8 %) diabetic patients of which 5 (3.8 %) were proliferative. Diabetic macular edema was present in 31 (23.3 %) patients. Severe visual impairment and blindness were commoner in those with diabetic retinopathy. Refractive error 67 (25.2 %), cataract 63 (23.7 %), and chronic glaucoma 44 (16.5 %) were the most prevalent non-diabetic retinopathy eye diseases. High prevalence of blindness, diabetic retinopathy, and other diseases are seen in type 2 diabetics. Health education, early diagnosis as well as treatment of diabetic retinopathy and other diseases will largely alleviate these ocular morbidities.

  1. [Outcomes of surgical management of retinopathy of prematurity--an overview].

    PubMed

    Kuprjanowicz, Leszek; Kubasik-Kładna, Katarzyna; Modrzejewska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    According to the guidelines by the ETROP (Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity) study group, laser therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of retinopathy of prematurity. However, progression of the disease is seen in 12% of eyes despite the treatment. Since there is no causal treatment, new therapies of retinopathy of prematurity, are continually sought, such as anti-VEGF agents, beta-blockers, or insulin-like growth factor gene therapy. In cases with concomitant retinal detachment, surgery is performed. The standard therapy for retinopathy of prematurity stages 4-5 involves pars plicata vitrectomy and lensectomy (stage 5), ab externo surgery (scleral buckling) and lens-sparing vitrectomy (some cases of stage 4). Classic vitrectomy with lensectomy is reserved only for cases with advanced retinal tractions, retina-lens apposition or for cases of intraoperative lens damage during the lens-sparing vitrectomy. The ab externo surgery does not eliminate vitreous tractions, but it stabilises the neovascular membrane activity (transforming it into a scar). The indication for this type of operation is stage 4 retinopathy of prematurity with peripheral proliferations, except for the posterior--aggressive form of retinopathy of prematurity. Many papers have been published on combined therapy involving vitrectomy and conservative treatment. In conclusion, optimal timing of surgical intervention is difficult to determine in stages 4 and 5, because the anatomical and functional outcomes in stage 5 are unfavourable. Both, ab externo surgery and vitrectomy tend to produce poor macular vision in eyes with advanced retinopathy of prematurity, therefore surgical intervention at stage 4 just before the local macular retinal detachment provides better anatomical and functional outcomes.

  2. Increased serum level of homocysteine correlates with retinal nerve fiber layer thinning in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastav, Khushboo; Mahdi, Abbas A.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Meyer, Carsten H.; Akduman, Levent; Khanna, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the correlation between serum levels of vitamin B12, folic acid, and homocysteine and the severity of diabetic retinopathy and the correlation with retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods In a tertiary care center–based prospective cross-sectional study, 60 consecutive cases and 20 healthy controls in the age group of 40–65 years were included. The eyes of the cases were divided into three groups according to Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) classification: diabetes mellitus without retinopathy (n = 20), non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema (n = 20), and proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema (n = 20). The serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid were measured using a standard protocol. The serum homocysteine assay was performed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Average RNFL thickness was measured using SD-OCT. Statistical analysis was used to assess the correlations between the study variables. Results Increased severity of diabetic retinopathy was found to correlate with an increase in the serum levels of homocysteine (F = 53.79; p<0.001). The mean serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid were found to be within the normal reference range. A positive correlation was found between retinal nerve fiber layer thinning and serum levels of homocysteine (p<0.001). Conclusions This study, for the first time, demonstrated a correlation between increased homocysteine with a decrease in RNFL thickness and increased severity of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27994434

  3. Relationship between the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level and remission of diabetic nephropathy with microalbuminuria: a 3-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Seki, N; Matsumoto, T; Fukazawa, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level and progression or remission of diabetic nephropathy with microalbuminuria for 3 years. The subjects were 100 Japanese type 2 diabetes mellitus outpatients with microalbuminuria. Associations between metabolic parameters at baseline [HbA1c, systolic blood pressure (SBP), urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and BNP] and the progression or remission of diabetic nephropathy were examined for 3 years. A total of 83 patients were examined at the end of the 3-year period, including 17 with remission to normoalbuminuria, 47 with continuing microalbuminuria, and 19 with progression to macroalbuminuria. HbA1c, ACR, and BNP differed significantly among the 3 groups (p=0.024, p<0.001, p=0.002, respectively). Among baseline factors, HbA1c and BNP were significant predictors of the percentage increase in ACR for 3 years in multiple linear regression analysis (β=0.259, p=0.02; β=0.299, p=0.007, respectively). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, HbA1c and ACR were independently associated with progression of diabetic nephropathy (p=0.008, p=0.023, respectively), and ACR and BNP were independently associated with remission of diabetic nephropathy (p=0.029, p=0.012, respectively). ROC curve analysis gave a cutoff value for BNP of 14.9 pg/ml for prediction of remission of diabetic nephropathy (p=0.016). The BNP level has a relationship with diabetic nephropathy and a low BNP level predicts remission of diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, monitoring of BNP can play an important role in management of diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27656251

  5. In Vivo Angiography Quantifies Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy Vascular Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mezu-Ndubuisi, Olachi J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a potentially blinding vasoproliferative disease. There is no standardized way to quantify plus disease (tortuous and dilated retinal vessels) or characterize abnormal recovery during ROP monitoring. This study objectively studies vascular features in live mice during development using noninvasive retinal imaging. Methods Using fluorescein angiography (FA), retinal vascular features were quantified in live mice with oxygen induced retinopathy (OIR). A total of 105 wild-type mice were exposed to 77% oxygen from postnatal day 7 (P7) till P12 (OIR mice). Also, 105 age-matched pups were raised in room air (RA mice). In vivo FA was performed at early (P16 to P20), mid (P23 to P27), late (P30 to P34), and mature (P47) phases of retinal vascular development. Retinal vascular area, retinal vein width, and retinal artery tortuosity were quantified. Results Retinal artery tortuosity was higher in OIR than RA mice at early (p < 0.0001), mid (p < 0.0001), late (p < 0.0001), and mature (p < 0.0001) phases. Retinal vascular area in OIR mice increased from early to mid-phase (p < 0.0001), but remained unchanged from mid to late (p = 0.23), and from late to mature phase (p = 0.98). Retinal vein width was larger in OIR mice compared to RA mice during early phase only. Arteries in OIR mice were more tortuous from early to mid-phase (p < 0.0001), but tortuosity remained stable from mid through mature phase. RA mice had an increase in retinal vascular area from early to late phase, but maintained uniform retinal vein width and retinal artery tortuosity in all phases. Conclusions In vivo FA distinguished arterial and venous features, similar to plus disease, and revealed aberrant recovery of OIR mice (arterial tortuosity, reduced capillary density, and absent neovascular buds) that persisted into adulthood. Retinal artery tortuosity may be a reliable, objective marker of severity of ROP. Infants with abnormal retinal vascular

  6. Hypertension in postmenopausal women: how to approach hypertension in menopause.

    PubMed

    Modena, Maria Grazia

    2014-09-01

    During fertile life women are usually normo or hypotensive. Hypertension may appear during pregnancy and this represents a peculiar phenomenon increasing nowadays for delay time of pregnancy. Gestational hypertension appears partially similar to hypertension in the context of metabolic syndrome for a similar condition of increased waste circumference. Parity, for the same pathogenesis, has been reported to be associated to peri and postmenopausal hypertension, not confirmed by our study of parous women with transitional non persistent perimenopausal hypertension. Estrogen's deficiency inducing endothelial dysfunction and increased body mass index are the main cause for hypertension in this phase of life. For these reasons lifestyle modification, diet and endothelial active drugs represent the ideal treatment. Antioxidant agents may have a role in prevention and treatment of hypertension. In conclusion, hypertension in women represents a peculiar constellation of different biological and pathogenic factors, which need a specific gender related approach, independent from the male model.

  7. Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Negi, Neha; Aggarwal, Aakash; Bodh, Vijay; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage. Risks of variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation increase many fold during pregnancy. Optimal management revolves round managing the portal hypertension and its complications. Thus management of such cases requires multi-speciality approach involving obstetricians experienced in dealing with high risk cases, hepatologists, anesthetists and neonatologists. With advancement in medical field, pregnancy is not contra-indicated in these women, as was previously believed. This article focuses on the different aspects of pregnancy with portal hypertension with special emphasis on specific cause wise treatment options to decrease the variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation. Based on extensive review of literature, management from pre-conceptional period to postpartum is outlined in order to have optimal maternal and perinatal outcomes. PMID:25755552

  8. Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Lawrence; Dresang, Lee T; Fontaine, Patricia

    2016-01-15

    Elevated blood pressure in pregnancy may represent chronic hypertension (occurring before 20 weeks' gestation or persisting longer than 12 weeks after delivery), gestational hypertension (occurring after 20 weeks' gestation), preeclampsia, or preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension. Preeclampsia is defined as hypertension and either proteinuria or thrombocytopenia, renal insufficiency, impaired liver function, pulmonary edema, or cerebral or visual symptoms. Proteinuria is not essential for the diagnosis and does not correlate with outcomes. Severe features of preeclampsia include a systolic blood pressure of at least 160 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure of at least 110 mm Hg, platelet count less than 100 × 103 per µL, liver transaminase levels two times the upper limit of normal, a doubling of the serum creatinine level or level greater than 1.1 mg per dL, severe persistent right upper-quadrant pain, pulmonary edema, or new-onset cerebral or visual disturbances. Preeclampsia without severe features can be managed with twice-weekly blood pressure monitoring, antenatal testing for fetal well-being and disease progression, and delivery by 37 weeks' gestation. Preeclampsia with any severe feature requires immediate stabilization and inpatient treatment with magnesium sulfate, antihypertensive drugs, corticosteroids for fetal lung maturity if less than 34 weeks' gestation, and delivery plans. Preeclampsia can worsen or initially present after delivery. Women with hypertensive disorders should be monitored as inpatients or closely at home for 72 hours postpartum.

  9. Evaluation of VEGF gene polymorphisms and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria C; Garcia-Aguirre, Gerardo; Morales-Canton, Virgilio; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Soberon-Ventura, Vidal R; Gonzalez, Victoria; Lechuga, Rodrigo; Garcia-Solis, Pablo; Garcia-Gutierrez, David G; Garcia-Solis, Marco Vinicio; Saenz de Viteri, Manuel; Solis-S, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess if the included vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms rs3025035, rs3025021 and rs2010963 are associated to proliferative retinopathy in a Mexican population with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS A case-control study was conducted in adult individuals with T2DM associated to proliferative retinopathy or non-proliferative retinopathy from Oct. 2014 to Jun. 2015 from the Retina Department of the Asociation to Prevent Blindness in Mexico. The selected patients were adults with a diagnosis of T2DM ≥5y. All subjects had a comprehensive ocular examination and the classification of the retinopathy severity was made considering the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) standardization protocols. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole fresh blood. All samples were genotyped by qPCR for selected VEGF polymorphisms. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was calculated by comparing Chi-square values between the expected and the observed values for genotype counts. RESULTS In total 142 individuals were enrolled, 71 individuals with T2DM and associated proliferative retinopathy and 71 individuals with non-proliferative retinopathy. One-sided Fisher's exact test was performed for rs3025021 [OR (95% CI)=0.44(0.08-2.2); P=0.25] and rs2010963 [OR (95% CI)=0.63(0.25-1.6); P=0.23]. The minor allelic frequencies obtained were 26% for rs3025021, 10% for rs3025035 and 61% for rs2010963. The pairwise linkage disequilibrium between the three SNP was assessed, and was as follows: rs3025021 vs rs3025035: D'=1.0, r2=0.1043, P≤0.0001; rs3025021 vs rs2010963: D'=0.442, r2=0.0446, P=0.149; rs3025035 vs rs2010963: D'=0.505, r2=0.0214, P=0.142. CONCLUSION This is the first analysis involving VEGF polymorphisms and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in a Mexican population. A major finding of the present study is that none of the polymorphisms studied was significantly associated with proliferative retinopathy. Based on these results, we can infer that

  10. Circulating Biomarkers of Diabetic Retinopathy: An Overview Based on Physiopathology

    PubMed Central

    Simó-Servat, Olga; Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the main cause of working-age adult-onset blindness. The currently available treatments for DR are applicable only at advanced stages of the disease and are associated with significant adverse effects. In early stages of DR the only therapeutic strategy that physicians can offer is a tight control of the risk factors for DR. Therefore, new pharmacological treatments for these early stages of the disease are required. In order to develop therapeutic strategies for early stages of DR new diagnostic tools are urgently needed. In this regard, circulating biomarkers could be useful to detect early disease, to identify those diabetic patients most prone to progressive worsening who ought to be followed up more often and who could obtain the most benefit from these therapies, and to monitor the effectiveness of new drugs for DR before more advanced DR stages have been reached. Research of biomarkers for DR has been mainly based on the pathogenic mechanism involved in the development of DR (i.e., AGEs, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and proangiogenic factors). This review focuses on circulating biomarkers at both early and advanced stages that could be relevant for the prediction or detection of DR. PMID:27376090

  11. Erythrocyte aldose reductase activity and sorbitol levels in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, A.; Balakrishna, N.; Ayyagari, Radha; Padma, M.; Viswanath, K.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Activation of polyol pathway due to increased aldose reductase (ALR2) activity has been implicated in the development of diabetic complications including diabetic retinopathy (DR), a leading cause of blindness. However, the relationship between hyperglycemia-induced activation of polyol pathway in retina and DR is still uncertain. We investigated the relationship between ALR2 levels and human DR by measuring ALR2 activity and its product, sorbitol, in erythrocytes. Methods We enrolled 362 type 2 diabetic subjects (T2D) with and without DR and 66 normal subjects in this clinical case-control study. Clinical evaluation of DR in T2D patients was done by fundus examination. ALR2 activity and sorbitol levels along with glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels in erythrocytes were determined. Results T2D patients with DR showed significantly higher specific activity of ALR2 as compared to T2D patients without DR. Elevated levels of sorbitol in T2D patients with DR, as compared to T2D patients without DR, corroborated the increased ALR2 activity in erythrocytes of DR patients. However, the increased ALR2 activity was not significantly associated with diabetes duration, age, and HbA1C in both the DR group and total T2D subjects. Conclusions Levels of ALR2 activity as well as sorbitol in erythrocytes may have value as a quantitative trait to be included among other markers to establish a risk profile for development of DR. PMID:18385795

  12. Spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy detection in retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartczak, Piotr; Fält, Pauli; Penttinen, Niko; Ylitepsa, Pasi; Laaksonen, Lauri; Lensu, Lasse; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Uusitalo, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Retinal photography is a standard method for recording retinal diseases for subsequent analysis and diagnosis. However, the currently used white light or red-free retinal imaging does not necessarily provide the best possible visibility of different types of retinal lesions, important when developing diagnostic tools for handheld devices, such as smartphones. Using specifically designed illumination, the visibility and contrast of retinal lesions could be improved. In this study, spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy lesion visualization are implemented using a spectrally tunable light source based on digital micromirror device. The applicability of this method was tested in vivo by taking retinal monochrome images from the eyes of five diabetic volunteers and two non-diabetic control subjects. For comparison to existing methods, we evaluated the contrast of retinal images taken with our method and red-free illumination. The preliminary results show that the use of optimal illuminations improved the contrast of diabetic lesions in retinal images by 30-70%, compared to the traditional red-free illumination imaging.

  13. Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Using Telemedicine Tools: Pilot Study in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Eszes, Dóra J.; Szabó, Dóra J.; Russell, Greg; Kirby, Phil; Paulik, Edit; Nagymajtényi, László

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a sight-threatening complication of diabetes. Telemedicine tools can prevent blindness. We aimed to investigate the patients' satisfaction when using such tools (fundus camera examination) and the effect of demographic and socioeconomic factors on participation in screening. Methods. Pilot study involving fundus camera screening and self-administered questionnaire on participants' experience during fundus examination (comfort, reliability, and future interest in participation), as well as demographic and socioeconomic factors was performed on 89 patients with known diabetes in Csongrád County, a southeastern region of Hungary. Results. Thirty percent of the patients had never participated in any ophthalmological screening, while 25.7% had DR of some grade based upon a standard fundus camera examination and UK-based DR grading protocol (Spectra™ software). Large majority of the patients were satisfied with the screening and found it reliable and acceptable to undertake examination under pupil dilation; 67.3% were willing to undergo nonmydriatic fundus camera examination again. There was a statistically significant relationship between economic activity, education and marital status, and future interest in participation. Discussion. Participants found digital retinal screening to be reliable and satisfactory. Telemedicine can be a strong tool, supporting eye care professionals and allowing for faster and more comfortable DR screening. PMID:28078306

  14. Risk Factors and Prediction Models for Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Senthil, Mallika Prem; Salowi, Mohamad Aziz; Bujang, Mohamad Adam; Kueh, Adeline; Siew, Chong Min; Sumugam, Kala; Gaik, Chan Lee; Kah, Tan Aik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a simple prediction model for the pre-screening of Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) among preterm babies. Methods This was a prospective study. The test dataset (January 2007 until December 2010) was used to construct risk prediction models, and the validation dataset (January 2011 until March 2012) was used to validate the models developed from the test dataset. Two prediction models were produced using the test dataset based on logistic regression equations in which the development of ROP was used as the outcome. Results The sensitivity and specificity for model 1 [gestational age (GA), birth weight (BW), intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS)] was 82 % and 81.7%, respectively; for model 2, (GA and BW) the sensitivity and specificity were 80.5% and 80.3%, respectively. Conclusion Model 2 was preferable, as it only required two predictors (GA and BW). Our prediction model can be used for early detection of ROP to avoid poor outcomes. PMID:28239269

  15. Comprehensive Retinal Image Analysis for Aggressive Posterior Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Computer aided analysis plays a nontrivial role in assisting the diagnosis of various eye pathologies. In this paper, we propose a framework to help diagnose the presence of Aggressive Posterior Retinopathy Of Prematurity (APROP), a pathology that is characterised by rapid onset and increased tortuosity of blood vessels close to the optic disc (OD). We quantify vessel characteristics that are of clinical relevance to APROP such as tortuosity and the extent of branching i.e., vessel segment count in the defined diagnostic region. We have adapted three vessel segmentation techniques: matched filter response, scale space theory and morphology with local entropy based thresholding. The proposed feature set equips us to build a linear discriminant classifier to discriminate APROP images from clinically healthy images. We have studied 36 images from 21 APROP subjects against a control group of 15 clinically healthy age matched infants. All subjects are age matched ranging from 33−40 weeks of post menstrual age. Experimental results show that we attain 100% recall and 95.45% precision, when the vessel network obtained from morphology is used for feature extraction. PMID:27711231

  16. Bilateral Coats' Disease Combined with Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Gursoy, Huseyin; Erol, Nazmiye; Bilgec, Mustafa Deger; Basmak, Hikmet; Kutlay, Ozden; Aslan, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report a case of bilateral Coats' disease combined with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Case. Retinal vascularization was complete in the right eye, whereas zone III, stage 3 ROP and preplus disease were observed in the left eye at 43 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA) in a 31-week premature, 1200-g neonate. Intraretinal exudates developed and retinal hemorrhages increased in the left eye at 51 weeks of PMA. Diode laser photocoagulation (LP) was applied to the left eye. Exudates involved the macula, and telangiectatic changes developed one month following LP. Additional LP was applied to the left eye combined with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) injection at 55 weeks of PMA. Disease regressed one month after the additional therapy. At the 14-month examination of the baby, telangiectatic changes and intraretinal exudates were observed in the right eye. Diode LP was applied to the right eye combined with IVB injection. Exudates did not resolve completely, and cryotherapy was applied one month following LP. Retinal findings regressed three months following the cryotherapy. Conclusion. This is the first report of presumed bilateral Coats' disease combined with ROP. If Coats' disease could be diagnosed at early stages, it would be a disease associated with better prognosis. PMID:26413362

  17. Vector platforms for gene therapy of inherited retinopathies.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Ivana; Puppo, Agostina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IR) are common untreatable blinding conditions. Most of them are inherited as monogenic disorders, due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PR) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The retina's compatibility with gene transfer has made transduction of different retinal cell layers in small and large animal models via viral and non-viral vectors possible. The ongoing identification of novel viruses as well as modifications of existing ones based either on rational design or directed evolution have generated vector variants with improved transduction properties. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in IR animal models with both viral and non-viral vectors, and some of them have been relayed to clinical trials. To date, recombinant vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) represent the most promising tool for retinal gene therapy, given their ability to efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to both PR and RPE and their excellent safety and efficacy profiles in humans. However, AAVs' limited cargo capacity has prevented application of the viral vector to treatments requiring transfer of genes with a coding sequence larger than 5 kb. Vectors with larger capacity, i.e. nanoparticles, adenoviral and lentiviral vectors are being exploited for gene transfer to the retina in animal models and, more recently, in humans. This review focuses on the available platforms for retinal gene therapy to fight inherited blindness, highlights their main strengths and examines the efforts to overcome some of their limitations.

  18. Genetic contributions to the development of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Shakir; Schaa, Kendra; Cooper, Margaret E; Ahrens, Elise; Alvarado, Ana; Colaizy, Tarah; Marazita, Mary L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Dagle, John M

    2009-02-01

    There is growing support for the role of genetic factors in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a serious visual morbidity resulting from preterm birth. We used both candidate gene and data-mining approaches to investigate the role of genetic polymorphisms in the development of ROP. Our study population consisted of 330 infants, less than 32 wk gestation, and their parents. We initially studied 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 11 candidate genes. Using a family-based analysis strategy, we found an association between SNPs in the EPAS1 gene and the development of ROP (p = 0.007). Logistic regression analysis showed three SNPs associated with development of ROP, two in the CFH gene (p = 0.01) and one in the EPAS1 gene (p = 0.001). Extending this analysis to include genotyping data from a larger genetic study of prematurity (455 SNPs in 153 genes), we found SNPs in five genes associated with the development of ROP: IHH (p = 0.003), AGTR1 (p = 0.005), TBX5 (p = 0.003), CETP (p = 0.004), and GP1BA (p = 0.005). Our data suggest that genetic risk factors contribute to the development of ROP.

  19. The role of serum apelin in retinopathy of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Yasser F; El-Morshedy, Salah; Imam, Abdulbasit Abdulhalim; Abdelrahman, Nasser Ismai A; Elsayed, Riad M; Alkholy, Usama M; Abdalmonem, Nermin; Shehab, Mohammed M

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of serum apelin as a diagnostic tool in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) disease. Patients and methods Thirty-eight preterm infants (60% male) with gestational age ranging from 30 to 36 weeks admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, KJO Hospital, Saudi Arabia with proven diagnosis of ROP were included in the study. In addition, 27 preterm infants without ROP served as controls. All newborn infants in the study were subjected to adequate history taking, full clinical examination, and fundus examination by indirect ophthalmoscope (at 4–6 weeks) as well as determination of serum apelin at birth and at 4–6 weeks of age. Results The study revealed that oxygen therapy longer than 7 days’ duration, cesarean section (as a mode of delivery), sepsis, mechanical ventilation, blood transfusion, premature rupture of membranes, pneumothorax, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac problems, and neonatal jaundice were considered as risk factors related to development of ROP. Serum apelin levels were significantly lower in patients than controls (P<0.001) at time of diagnosis of the disease (4–6 weeks) while no significant differences were observed in levels at birth. Conclusion Serum apelin was found to be of significant diagnostic value in the occurrence of ROP. PMID:28260850

  20. Pupillary responses in non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jason C.; Chen, Yi-Fan; Blair, Norman P.; Chau, Felix Y.; Lim, Jennifer I.; Leiderman, Yannek I.; Shahidi, Mahnaz; McAnany, J. Jason

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the extent of rod-, cone-, and melanopsin-mediated pupillary light reflex (PLR) abnormalities in diabetic patients who have non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). Fifty diabetic subjects who have different stages of NPDR and 25 age-equivalent, non-diabetic controls participated. PLRs were measured in response to full-field, brief-flash stimuli under conditions that target the rod, cone, and intrinsically-photosensitive (melanopsin) retinal ganglion cell pathways. Pupil responses were compared among the subjects groups using age-corrected linear mixed models. Compared to control, the mean baseline pupil diameters were significantly smaller for all patient groups in the dark (all p < 0.001) and for the moderate-severe NPDR group in the light (p = 0.003). Pairwise comparisons indicated: (1) the mean melanopsin-mediated PLR was significantly reduced in the mild and moderate-severe groups (both p < 0.001); (2) the mean cone-mediated PLR was reduced significantly in the moderate-severe group (p = 0.008); (3) no significant differences in the mean rod-mediated responses. The data indicate abnormalities in NPDR patients under conditions that separately assess pupil function driven by different photoreceptor classes. The results provide evidence for compromised neural function in these patients and provide a promising approach for quantifying their neural abnormalities. PMID:28332564

  1. Scientometric Analysis and Mapping of Scientific Articles on Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    RAMIN, Shahrokh; GHAREBAGHI, Reza; HEIDARY, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the major cause of blindness among the working-age population globally. No systematic research has been previously performed to analyze the research published on DR, despite the need for it. This study aimed to analyze the scientific production on DR to draw overall roadmap of future research strategic planning in this field. A bibliometric method was used to obtain a view on the scientific production about DR by the data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). Articles about DR published in 1993–2013 were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic’s structure, history, and to document relationships. The trends in the most influential publications and authors were analyzed. Most highly cited articles addressed epidemiologic and translational research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker discovery and more molecular translational research. Areas such as gene therapy and micro-RNAs are also among the recent hot topics. Through analyzing the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production, we performed the first scientometric report on DR. Most influential articles have addressed epidemiology and translational research subjects in this field, which reflects that globally, the earlier diagnosis and treatment of this devastating disease still has the highest global priority. PMID:27350949

  2. Scientometric Analysis and Mapping of Scientific Articles on Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Gharebaghi, Reza; Heidary, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the major cause of blindness among the working-age population globally. No systematic research has been previously performed to analyze the research published on DR, despite the need for it. This study aimed to analyze the scientific production on DR to draw overall roadmap of future research strategic planning in this field. A bibliometric method was used to obtain a view on the scientific production about DR by the data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). Articles about DR published in 1993-2013 were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic's structure, history, and to document relationships. The trends in the most influential publications and authors were analyzed. Most highly cited articles addressed epidemiologic and translational research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker discovery and more molecular translational research. Areas such as gene therapy and micro-RNAs are also among the recent hot topics. Through analyzing the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production, we performed the first scientometric report on DR. Most influential articles have addressed epidemiology and translational research subjects in this field, which reflects that globally, the earlier diagnosis and treatment of this devastating disease still has the highest global priority.

  3. Beneficial Effect of Antioxidants in Retinopathies: A New Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Panfoli, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    The retina is the most oxygen consuming tissue of the body. Rod and cone photoreceptors efficiently carry out visual cascades, which are energetically costly processes. Data has recently been published that suggests that the metabolic support to phototransduction in the rod outer segment (OS) may originate directly in the OS, which is able to conduct aerobic metabolism. This oxygen-handling activity of the rod OS, which was never suspected before, appears to be a primary cause of the generation of reactive oxygen species directly inside the OS. Oxidative stress has been hypothesised to contribute to most of the neurodegenerative retinal pathologies, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and photoreceptor cell death after retinal detachment. Many natural antioxidant compounds are routinely used in experimental or human therapies for preventing or delaying photoreceptor degeneration in those pathologies. Here it is proposed that the ultimate reason for the beneficial actions of antioxidants in preventing or retarding the effect on the retinal degenerative pathologies can be found in their action on reactive oxygen species generated by the ectopic mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) coupled to FoF1-ATP synthase in rod OS disks. In fact, if not adequately coupled, the ETC generates reactive oxygen species that, in turn, can act on the polyunsaturated fatty acids which the rod OS is rich in. If correct, the mechanism put forward here would provide a potential for the molecular basis of therapies with antioxidants for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:24600629

  4. New insights in diagnosis and treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Cernichiaro-Espinosa, Linda A; Olguin-Manriquez, Francisco J; Henaine-Berra, Andree; Garcia-Aguirre, Gerardo; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Martinez-Castellanos, Maria A

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to review current perspectives on diagnosis and treatment of Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP). We performed a systematic review of how much has been produced in research published online and on print regarding ROP in different settings around the world. Early Treatment for ROP (ETROP) classification is the currently accepted classification of ROP. Fluorescein angiography and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) may eventually lead to changes in the definition of ROP, and as a consequence, they will serve as a guide for treatment. Intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy has proven to be more effective in terms of lowering recurrence, allowing growth of the peripheral retina, and diminishing the incidence of retinal detachment when proliferative ROP is diagnosed. Whether anti-VEGF plus laser are better than any of these therapies separately remains a subject of discussion. Telemedicine is evolving everyday to allow access to remote areas that do not count with a retina specialist for treatment. A management algorithm is proposed according to our reference center experience. ROP is an evolving subject, with a vulnerable population of study that, once treated with good results, leads to a reduction in visual disability and in consequence, in a lifetime improvement.

  5. Challenges in elucidating the genetics of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jane Z.; Wong, Tien Y.; Rotter, Jerome I.

    2014-01-01

    Importance In the past decade, significant progress in genomic medicine and technological advances have revolutionized our approach to common complex disorders in many areas of medicine, including ophthalmology. A major disorder that still needs major genetic progress is diabetic retinopathy (DR), one of the leading causes of blindness in adults. Objective To perform a literature review, present the current findings, and highlight some key challenges. Methods Thorough literature review of the genetic factors for DR, including heritability scores, twin studies, family studies, candidate gene studies, linkage studies, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Results While there is clear demonstration of a genetic contribution in the development and progression of DR, the identification of susceptibility loci through candidate gene approaches, linkage studies, and GWAS is still in its infancy. The greatest obstacles remain a lack of power due to small sample size of available studies and a lack of phenotype standardization. In this review, we also discuss novel technologies and novel approaches, such as intermediate phenotypes for biomarkers, proteomics, metabolomics, exome chips, and next-generation sequencing that may facilitate future studies of DR. Conclusions and Relevance The field of the genetics of DR is still in its infancy and is a challenge due to the complexity of the disease itself. This review outlines some strategies and lessons for future investigation to improve our understanding of this most complex of genetic disorders. PMID:24201651

  6. Diabetic retinopathy: variations in patient therapeutic outcomes and pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Soliman, Mohamed K; Sepah, Yasir J; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes and its microvascular complications in patients poses a significant challenge and constitutes a major health problem. When it comes to manifestations in the eye, each case of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is unique, in terms of the phenotype, genotype, and, more importantly, the therapeutic response. It is therefore important to identify factors that distinguish one patient from another. Personalized therapy in DR is a new trend aimed at achieving maximum therapeutic response in patients by identifying genotypic and phenotypic factors that may result in less than optimal response to conventional therapy, and consequently, lead to poorer outcome. With advances in the identification of these genetic markers, such as gene polymorphisms and human leucocyte antigen associations, as well as development of drugs that can target their effects, the future of personalized medicine in DR is promising. In this comprehensive review, data from various studies have been analyzed to present what has been achieved in the field of pharmacogenomics thus far. An insight into future research is also provided. PMID:25548526

  7. Neuroprotection as a Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a multifactorial progressive disease of the retina and a leading cause of vision loss. DR has long been regarded as a vascular disorder, although neuronal death and visual impairment appear before vascular lesions, suggesting an important role played by neurodegeneration in DR and the appropriateness of neuroprotective strategies. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the main target of current therapies, is likely to be one of the first responses to retinal hyperglycemic stress and VEGF may represent an important survival factor in early phases of DR. Of central importance for clinical trials is the detection of retinal neurodegeneration in the clinical setting, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography seems the most indicated technique. Many substances have been tested in animal studies for their neuroprotective properties and for possible use in humans. Perhaps, the most intriguing perspective is the use of endogenous neuroprotective substances or nutraceuticals. Together, the data point to the central role of neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of DR and indicate neuroprotection as an effective strategy for treating this disease. However, clinical trials to determine not only the effectiveness and safety but also the compliance of a noninvasive route of drug administration are needed. PMID:27123463

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy in Italy: Epidemiology Data and Telemedicine Screening Programs

    PubMed Central

    Midena, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    In Italy, the number of people living with diabetes is about 3.5 million (5.5% of the population), with an increase by about 60% in the last 20 years and with 1 person out of 3 older than 65 years. The Italian Health Service system estimates that 10 billion euros is spent annually on caring for patients with diabetes, a figure that increases yearly. No national data on prevalence and incidence of legal blindness in patients with diabetes and no national registry of patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR) are currently available. However, the available epidemiological data (in several locations throughout the country) are consistent with those reported in other European countries. The use of telemedicine for the screening of DR in Italy is confined to geographically limited locations. The available data in the literature on implementation and use of telematic screening proved to be successful from patient, caregiver, and authorities point of view. This review addresses the available epidemiological data on DR and telematic screening realities in Italy and thus may help in establishing a national screening program. PMID:27990441

  9. Perinatal Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome and Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Beena G.; Madan, Ashima; Saha, Shampa; Schendel, Diana; Thorsen, Poul; Skogstrand, Kristin; Hougaard, David; Shankaran, Seetha; Carlo, Wally

    2010-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal inflammation is associated with several morbidities of prematurity. Its relationship to retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has not been investigated. Our objective was to determine the relationship between cytokine levels and ROP in the first three postnatal weeks. Data for this study were derived from the NICHD Cytokine Study. Dried blood spots were obtained from infants <1000g on days 0-1, 3±1, 7±2, 14±3, and 21±3. Infants were classified into three groups – No, Mild, and Severe ROP. Multiplex Luminex assay was used to quantify 20 cytokines. Temporal profiles of cytokines were evaluated using mixed effects models after controlling for covariates. Of 1074 infants enrolled, 890 were examined for ROP and 877 included in the analysis. ROP was associated with several clinical characteristics on unadjusted analyses. Eight cytokines remained significantly different across ROP groups in adjusted analyses. IL-6 and IL-17 showed significant effects in early time periods (D0-3); TGF-β, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) in later time periods (D7-21) and IL-18, C-reactive protein (CRP) and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) in both early and later time periods. We conclude that perinatal inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of ROP. PMID:20032809

  10. Animal Models of Diabetic Retinopathy: Summary and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Amy C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication associated with chronic exposure to hyperglycemia and is a major cause of blindness worldwide. Although clinical assessment and retinal autopsy of diabetic patients provide information on the features and progression of DR, its underlying pathophysiological mechanism cannot be deduced. In order to have a better understanding of the development of DR at the molecular and cellular levels, a variety of animal models have been developed. They include pharmacological induction of hyperglycemia and spontaneous diabetic rodents as well as models of angiogenesis without diabetes (to compensate for the absence of proliferative DR symptoms). In this review, we summarize the existing protocols to induce diabetes using STZ. We also describe and compare the pathological presentations, in both morphological and functional aspects, of the currently available DR animal models. The advantages and disadvantages of using different animals, ranging from zebrafish, rodents to other higher-order mammals, are also discussed. Until now, there is no single model that displays all the clinical features of DR as seen in human. Yet, with the understanding of the pathological findings in these animal models, researchers can select the most suitable models for mechanistic studies or drug screening. PMID:24286086

  11. [Retinopathy of prematurity. Prevention, screening and treatment guidelines].

    PubMed

    Castro Conde, J R; Echániz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Pallás Alonso, C R; Narbona, E; Sánchez Luna, M

    2009-12-01

    ROP screening is carried out at all the Spanish hospitals, but there is little agreement on the criteria used for its screening and other aspects related to its practice. Our aim is to report on recommendations for prevention, screening, treatment and follow-up of the retinopathy of prematurity in Spain. Prevention strategies and recommendations for screening, exploration and treatment of ROP, as well as of the organisation of the services to carry out it are reviewed. The most recent bibliography on the basis of the scientific evidence is considered, taking as reference, the guidelines published by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 2006 and the recommendations updated in 2007 in the United Kingdom. The recommended prevention strategies are based on the best neonatal practice. The standards, as far as the screening is concerned, are established by birth weight (< or =1,500 g), gestational age (< or =32 weeks) and unstable neonatal clinical course. Indirect ophthalmoscopy is the standard technique for exploration and laser therapy the treatment of choice.

  12. Multiple factors in the prediction of risk of proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Rand, L I; Krolewski, A S; Aiello, L M; Warram, J H; Baker, R S; Maki, T

    1985-12-05

    To identify risk factors for the development of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, we compared 111 patients with longstanding insulin-dependent diabetes who had proliferative retinopathy (cases) with 81 patients with diabetes of similar duration (an average of 26 years) who did not have proliferative diabetic retinopathy (controls). The cases had diabetes that was more difficult to manage, as evidenced by their more frequent blood sugar levels above 200 mg per deciliter (11 mmol per liter) on routine clinic visits (odds ratio, 1.6 for each increment of 10 per cent in the relative frequency), and they expended less effort in managing their diabetes, as indicated by their less frequent testing of urine for sugar (odds ratio, 0.3). Among those who did not have myopia, the cases also had an excess of the HLA-DR phenotypes 4/0, 3/0, or X/X (odds ratio, 10.0). Among those with myopia, these phenotypes did not carry an increased risk of proliferative retinopathy. These results support a multifactorial model for the development of proliferative diabetic retinopathy; however, the mechanisms of action of the identified factors remain unknown.

  13. Hypoxia-Induced Retinal Neovascularization in Zebrafish Embryos: A Potential Model of Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2–4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression. PMID:25978439

  14. Computer-Assisted Digital Image Analysis of Plus Disease in Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Pavlina S; VanderVeen, Deborah K

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review the current state and role of computer-assisted analysis in diagnosis of plus disease in retinopathy of prematurity. Diagnosis and documentation of retinopathy of prematurity are increasingly being supplemented by digital imaging. The incorporation of computer-aided techniques has the potential to add valuable information and standardization regarding the presence of plus disease, an important criterion in deciding the necessity of treatment of vision-threatening retinopathy of prematurity. A review of literature found that several techniques have been published examining the process and role of computer aided analysis of plus disease in retinopathy of prematurity. These techniques use semiautomated image analysis techniques to evaluate retinal vascular dilation and tortuosity, using calculated parameters to evaluate presence or absence of plus disease. These values are then compared with expert consensus. The study concludes that computer-aided image analysis has the potential to use quantitative and objective criteria to act as a supplemental tool in evaluating for plus disease in the setting of retinopathy of prematurity.

  15. Hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization in zebrafish embryos: a potential model of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chao-Yuan; Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2-4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression.

  16. Oral glucose for pain relief during examination for retinopathy of prematurity: a masked randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Marlene Coelho; Eckert, Gabriela Unchalo; Fortes, Bárbara Gastal Borges; Filho, João Borges Fortes; Silveira, Rita C.; Procianoy, Renato S

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity is a painful procedure. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have been proposed to reduce pain during eye examinations. This study aims to evaluate the analgesic effect of 25% glucose using a validated pain scale during the first eye examination for retinopathy of prematurity in preterm infants with birth weight ≤1,500 g and/or gestational age ≤32 weeks. METHODS: A masked, randomized clinical trial for one dose of 1 ml of oral 25% glucose solution 2 minutes before the first ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity was conducted between March 2008 and April 2010. The results were compared to those of a control group that did not receive oral glucose solution. Pain was evaluated using a Neonatal Infant Pain Scale immediately before and immediately after the ophthalmologic examination in both groups. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00648687 RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-four patients who were examined for the first time for retinopathy of prematurity were included. Seventy were included in the intervention group and 54 in the control group. The number of patients with pain immediately before the procedure was similar in both groups. The number of patients with pain after ophthalmologic examination was 15.7% in the intervention group and 68.5% in the control group (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: One ml of oral 25% glucose solution given 2 minutes before an ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity was an effective measure for pain relief. PMID:23525316

  17. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Hypoxia in a Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Imam; Evans, Stephanie M.; Craft, Jason R.; Capozzi, Megan E.; McCollum, Gary W.; Yang, Rong; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Penn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-induced hypoxia elicits retinal neovascularization and is a major component of several blinding retinopathies such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Currently, noninvasive imaging techniques capable of detecting and monitoring retinal hypoxia in living systems do not exist. Such techniques would greatly clarify the role of hypoxia in experimental and human retinal neovascular pathogenesis. In this study, we developed and characterized HYPOX-4, a fluorescence-imaging probe capable of detecting retinal-hypoxia in living animals. HYPOX-4 dependent in vivo and ex vivo imaging of hypoxia was tested in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Predicted patterns of retinal hypoxia were imaged by HYPOX-4 dependent fluorescence activity in this animal model. In retinal cells and mouse retinal tissue, pimonidazole-adduct immunostaining confirmed the hypoxia selectivity of HYPOX-4. HYPOX-4 had no effect on retinal cell proliferation as indicated by BrdU assay and exhibited no acute toxicity in retinal tissue as indicated by TUNEL assay and electroretinography (ERG) analysis. Therefore, HYPOX-4 could potentially serve as the basis for in vivo fluorescence-based hypoxia-imaging techniques, providing a tool for investigators to understand the pathogenesis of ischemic retinopathies and for physicians to address unmet clinical needs. PMID:27491345

  18. Retinopathy during interferon-β treatment for multiple sclerosis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, Lorenzo; Menduno, Paola S; Cometa, Francesco; Di Gregorio, Maria; Sarchielli, Paola; Cagini, Carlo; Calabresi, Paolo; Di Filippo, Massimiliano

    2016-03-01

    The onset of new visual symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis is often associated with a neuro-ophthalmologic manifestation of the disease. However, other possible differential diagnoses need to be ruled out, including drug-induced retinal side effects. Although uncommon, retinal side effects of interferon-beta formulations may occur, and need to be promptly recognized and treated by neurologists. In this manuscript, we report the case of a 37-year-old woman affected by multiple sclerosis diagnosed with interferon beta-associated retinopathy and we review the literature with regard to the epidemiology, clinical presentation, management and follow-up of interferon beta-associated retinopathy. Interferon-beta induced retinopathy seems to be an uncommon and a dose-related side effect in multiple sclerosis patients. Retinopathy tends to completely resolve after treatment discontinuation. Neurologists must be aware that immune-modulatory drugs, in particular interferon beta, have been reported to cause retinal side effects. In multiple sclerosis patients complaining of new visual symptoms during interferon-beta treatment, it is thus advisable to perform an ophthalmological assessment to rule out and properly manage retinopathy.

  19. Automatic screening and classification of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy using fuzzy image processing.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Sarni Suhaila; Palade, Vasile; Shuttleworth, James; Jayne, Chrisina

    2016-12-01

    Digital retinal imaging is a challenging screening method for which effective, robust and cost-effective approaches are still to be developed. Regular screening for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy diseases is necessary in order to identify the group at risk of visual impairment. This paper presents a novel automatic detection of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in eye fundus images by employing fuzzy image processing techniques. The paper first introduces the existing systems for diabetic retinopathy screening, with an emphasis on the maculopathy detection methods. The proposed medical decision support system consists of four parts, namely: image acquisition, image preprocessing including four retinal structures localisation, feature extraction and the classification of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy. A combination of fuzzy image processing techniques, the Circular Hough Transform and several feature extraction methods are implemented in the proposed system. The paper also presents a novel technique for the macula region localisation in order to detect the maculopathy. In addition to the proposed detection system, the paper highlights a novel online dataset and it presents the dataset collection, the expert diagnosis process and the advantages of our online database compared to other public eye fundus image databases for diabetic retinopathy purposes.

  20. [Cardiovascular complications of hypertensive crisis].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    It is inexorable that a proportion of patients with systemic arterial hypertension will develop a hypertensive crisis at some point in their lives. The hypertensive crises can be divided in hypertensive patients with emergency or hypertensive emergency, according to the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, aortic dissection and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises (those caused by cocaine use included). Each is presented in a unique way, although some patients with hypertensive emergency report non-specific symptoms. Treatment includes multiple medications for quick and effective action with security to reduce blood pressure, protect the function of organs remaining, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications and improve patient outcomes.

  1. Methamphetamine Use and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Methamphetamine Use Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have used methamphetamines you are at risk for Pulmonary Hypertension? www. ... are made every year. PH in Association with Methamphetamine Use My doctor recently told me that I ...

  2. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Liver Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have liver disease, you are at risk for pulmonary hypertension? ... tissue diseases (scleroderma and lupus for example), chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, or HIV infec- tion. ...

  3. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) based on your medical and family histories, a ... exam, and the results from tests and procedures. PH can develop slowly. In fact, you may have ...

  4. [Portopulmonar hypertension: Updated review].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Almendros, Nielzer; Toapanta-Yanchapaxi, Liz N; Aguirre Valadez, Jonathan; Espinola Zavaleta, Nilda; Muñoz-Martínez, Sergio G; García-Juárez, Ignacio

    2016-12-13

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a rare global entity, although epidemiological data are unknown in Mexico. However, chronic liver diseases are very prevalent in Mexico. The PPH is the 4th subtype in frequency in the group of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Its diagnosis is within 2 groups: patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension and candidates for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Both echocardiogram and a right cardiac catheterization are crucial for diagnosis in both scenarios. The PPH is a challenge for OLT since it can increase perioperative mortality significantly. The use of specific therapy is the cornerstone of this disease, as a measure to improve the outcome of those who become candidates for OLT with moderate to severe PPH. It is important to recognize that PPH can be a contraindication to OLT. So far the role of lung-liver transplantation or heart-lung-liver transplantation as a measure to heal pulmonary vascular disease in patients with PPH is uncertain.

  5. [Hypertension and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    The number of patients with high blood pressure and osteoporosis are increased year by year in our society. In hypertension patients, excess urinary calcium secretion induces secondary parathyroidism to increase serum calcium level by calcium release from bone, which may accelerate osteoporosis. In this aspect, there are several reports that anti-hypertensive drugs, especially thiazides, increase bone mineral density and decrease the incidence of bone fracture. In addition, we demonstrated that renin-angiotensin system can be involved in the process of osteoporosis. Angiotensin II significantly induced the expression of RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand) in osteoblasts, leading to the activation of osteoclasts, while these effects were completely blocked by an Ang II type 1 receptor blockade. Recently, it has been reported that angiotensin receptor blockade clinically decreased the incidence of bone fracture. Renin-angiotensin system might be common molecule to regulate both hypertension and osteoporosis.

  6. Diastolic dysfunction in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nazário Leão, R; Marques da Silva, P

    2017-03-03

    Hypertension and coronary heart disease, often coexisting, are the most common risk factors for heart failure. The progression of hypertensive heart disease involves myocardial fibrosis and alterations in the left ventricular geometry that precede the functional change, initially asymptomatic. The left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is part of this continuum being defined by the presence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction without signs or symptoms of heart failure or poor left ventricular systolic function. It is highly prevalent in hypertensive patients and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite its growing importance in clinical practice it remains poorly understood. This review aims to present the epidemiological fundamentals and the latest developments in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  7. Snakes and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward D

    2017-02-01

    Inhibition of Angiotensin Conversion in Experimental Renovascular Hypertension. By Miller ED Jr, Samuels A, Haber E, and Barger AC. Science 1972; 177:1108-9. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.Constriction of the renal artery and controlled reduction of renal perfusion pressure is followed by a prompt increase in systemic renin activity and a concomitant rise in blood pressure in trained, unanesthetized dogs. The elevated blood pressure induced by the renal artery stenosis can be prevented by prior treatment with the nonapeptide Pyr-Trp-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gln-Ile-Pro-Pro, which blocks conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II. Further, the nonapeptide can restore systemic pressure to normal in the early phase of renovascular hypertension. These results offer strong evidence that the renin- angiotensin system is responsible for the initiation of hypertension in the unilaterally nephrectomized dog with renal artery constriction.

  8. New drugs in hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    Clonidine, propranolol, bethanidine and debrisoquine effectively decrease blood pressure by suppressing renin secretion or interfering with function of the sympathetic nervous system. In man these compounds exert an antihypertensive effect within several hours or days and their duration of action is sufficient to permit administration twice or thrice daily. Clonidine and propranolol are especially useful if sexual dysfunction or postural hypotension is undesirable. Although bethanidine and debrisoquine may produce these adverse effects, they are beneficial in severe hypertension and produce fewer side effects than guanethidine. Clonidine frequently causes sedation, and rebound hypertension may occur with sudden cessation of therapy. Injudicious use of propranolol may provoke heart failure or asthma in susceptible individuals. The combination of a thiazide diuretic with propranolol and one of hydralazine, bethanidine and debrisoquine may be used to treat severe or complicated hypertension. PMID:343894

  9. [Obesity and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Gábor; Kollár, Réka

    2013-11-03

    The frequency of hypertension and obesity is gradually growing in Hungary. At present 68.5% of men and 78% of women are obese. Hypertension and obesity are the most important risk factors of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. The relationship between increased sympathetic activity and hypertension is well known. Waist circumference and body fat mass correlate significantly with sympathetic activity, in which hyperlipidemia plays also a role. The increased activity of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system via its vascular and renal effects also contributes to an increase of blood pressure. Increased sympathetic activity with decreasing vagal tone accompanying the imbalance of the autonomous nervous system is independent and significant risk factor of cardiovascular events including sudden cardiac death.

  10. Stress, salt and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Henry, J P

    1988-01-01

    Reasons are given why calcium, obesity and genetics cannot be considered primary factors in the etiology of essential hypertension. This leaves the major protagonists as salt and neuroendocrine responses to the emotions aroused by the social environment. Most essential hypertension is renin dependent and associated with the physiological changes induced by arousal of the defence response. The psychosocial stimulation associated with this arousal induces an increase in salt appetite. This makes the salt consumption of society a measure of the social stress to which it is exposed. Primitive people whose blood pressure remains normal throughout their lives may lack modern societies' physically protective achievements but their religiously prescribed social solidarity may protect them from psychosocial stress. Our chronic suppression of awareness of emotional arousal together with loss of the ritualized support of affiliative behavior may result in repressed emotional responses which find somatic expression in diseases such as essential hypertension. Hypertensiologist George Pickering proposed that the primitive's ritual and taboo (the equivalent in our society might be the Alcoholic's Anonymous belief in a 'Higher Power') protect them from much anger and despair. He gave this precedence over salt as the primary factor in essential hypertension. New evidence supports this. Despite a high salt diet the blood pressure of socially adjusted rodents remains normal throughout their lifespan. On the other hand, the hypertension that develops when they are psychosocially stimulated is not abated by a low salt diet. In humans, the blood pressure of cloistered, secluded Italian nuns on a high salt diet has remained normal for 20 years while that of nearby village women has risen at a startling 2 mmHg/annum during the same period. On the other hand, in rapidly changing Malawi mature adult, rural and urban blood pressures are rising fast despite a low salt intake. Thus the

  11. Oxidative stress and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David G; Gongora, Maria Carolina

    2009-05-01

    This review has summarized some of the data supporting a role of ROS and oxidant stress in the genesis of hypertension. There is evidence that hypertensive stimuli, such as high salt and angiotensin II, promote the production of ROS in the brain, the kidney, and the vasculature and that each of these sites contributes either to hypertension or to the untoward sequelae of this disease. Although the NADPH oxidase in these various organs is a predominant source, other enzymes likely contribute to ROS production and signaling in these tissues. A major clinical challenge is that the routinely used antioxidants are ineffective in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease and hypertension. This is likely because these drugs are either ineffective or act in a non-targeted fashion, such that they remove not only injurious ROS Fig. 5. Proposed role of T cells in the genesis of hypertension and the role of the NADPH oxidase in multiple cells/organs in modulating this effect. In this scenario, angiotensin II stimulates an NADPH oxidase in the CVOs of the brain, increasing sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic nerve terminals in lymph nodes activate T cells, and angiotensin II also directly activates T cells. These stimuli also activate expression of homing signals in the vessel and likely the kidney, which attract T cells to these organs. T cells release cytokines that stimulate the vessel and kidney NADPH oxidases, promoting vasoconstriction and sodium retention. SFO, subfornical organ. 630 Harrison & Gongora but also those involved in normal cell signaling. A potentially important and relatively new direction is the concept that inflammatory cells such as T cells contribute to hypertension. Future studies are needed to understand the interaction of T cells with the CNS, the kidney, and the vasculature and how this might be interrupted to provide therapeutic benefit.

  12. Perspectives on research in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Y K

    2009-01-01

    This is a review of my published research on hypertension over 45 years on the three main racial groups residing in KwaZulu-Natal and its main city Durban. These three groups are blacks - mainly Zulu, whites and Indians. The research focused mainly on epidemiology, determinants of the aetiology of hypertension, clinical features, varying responses to hypotensive agents among the racial groups, complications that result from hypertension and the control of hypertension.

  13. Severe zone III retinopathy of prematurity in an infant with a birth weight of more than 1,500 grams.

    PubMed

    Rutar, Tina; Schwartz, Daniel; Good, William

    2010-05-21

    The authors report zone III stage 3 retinopathy of prematurity requiring treatment in a former 1,692-g 30 6/7-week twin cared for in a modern intensive care nursery. This case highlights the need for identifying biomarkers that increase the risk of severe retinopathy of prematurity so that screening guidelines can be optimized.

  14. Dramatic regression of persistent tunica vasculosa lentis associated with retinopathy of prematurity following treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Darin R; Baumal, Caroline R

    2013-06-04

    The authors describe a preterm infant who developed advanced retinopathy of prematurity bilaterally with a prominent tunica vasculosa lentis. Treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab resulted in regression of the tunica vasculosa lentis and posterior manifestations of the retinopathy of prematurity. RetCam imaging (Clarity Medical Systems, Pleasanton, CA) of the anterior segment was used to document the dramatic tunica vasculosa lentis resolution.

  15. Hypertension in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Lima, Roberta; Wofford, Marion; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2012-06-01

    Blood pressure is typically lower in premenopausal women than in men. However, after menopause, the prevalence of hypertension in women is higher than it is in men. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in women and men, but cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women. Furthermore, there is evidence that blood pressure may not be as well-controlled in women as in men, despite the fact that most women adhere better to their therapeutic regimens and medications than do men, and have their blood pressures measured more frequently than do men. This review describes possible mechanisms by which blood pressure may be increased in postmenopausal women.

  16. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, J; Egger, K; Harloff, A

    2017-02-01

    This review describes the clinical findings as well as thes diagnostic and therapeutic options for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri). Furthermore, the pathophysiological concepts are discussed. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is characterized by signs and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure with no established pathogenesis. Common symptoms include headaches, visual loss and pulsatile tinnitus. Treatment has two major goals: the alleviation of headaches and the preservation of vision. Weight loss and acetazolamide are the cornerstones in the treatment of the disorder. Drainage of cerebrospinal fluid, optic nerve sheath fenestration and stent angioplasty of a sinus stenosis can be employed in severe cases.

  17. [Hypertensive emergency and urgence].

    PubMed

    Gegenhuber, Alfons; Lenz, Kurt

    2003-12-01

    DEFINITION, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, THERAPY: The hypertensive crisis is characterized by a massive, acute rise in blood pressure. Patients with underlying hypertensive disease usually have an increase in systolic blood pressure values > 220 mmHg and diastolic values > 120 mmHg. The severity of the condition, however, is not determined by the absolute blood pressure level but by the magnitude of the acute increase in blood pressure. Thus, in the presence of primarily normotensive baseline values (such as those in eclampsia), even a systolic blood pressure > 170 mmHg may lead to a life-threatening condition. The most important causes are non-compliance (reduction or interruption of therapy), inadequate therapy, endocrine disease, renal (vessel) disease, pregnancy and intoxication (drugs). The management of this condition greatly depends on whether the patient has a hypertensive crisis with organ manifestation (hypertensive emergency) or a crisis without organ manifestation (hypertensive urgency). By documenting the medical history, the medical status and by simple diagnostic procedures, the differential diagnosis can be established at the emergency site within a very short period of time. In the absence of organ manifestations (hypertensive urgency) the patient may have non-specific symptoms such as palpitations, headache, malaise and a general feeling of illness in addition to the increase in blood pressure. In a hypertensive urgency the patient's blood pressure should not be reduced within a few minutes but within a period of 24 to 48 hours. Such adjustment can be achieved on an out-patient basis, however, only if the patient can be followed up adequately for early detection of a renewed attack. In the absence of follow-up facilities, the patient's blood pressure should be reduced over a period of 4 to 6 hours, if necessary in an out-patient emergency service. While intravenous medication is given preference when a rapid effect is desired, oral medication may be used for

  18. Antialbuminuric advantage of cilnidipine compared with L-type calcium channel blockers in type 2 diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria and microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Shinya; Ishimura, Eiji; Motoyama, Koka; Morioka, Tomoaki; Kimoto, Eiji; Wakikawa, Ken; Shoji, Shigeichi; Koyama, Hidenori; Shoji, Tetsuo; Emoto, Masanori; Nishizawa, Yoshiki; Inaba, Masaaki

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the antialbuminuric advantage of cilnidipine, an N/L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB), compared with L-type CCBs in diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria and microalbuminuria. The study was a multicenter, non-randomized crossover trial. Participants were 90 type 2 diabetic patients exhibiting either normo- or microalbuminuria, and undergoing CCB treatment for ≥6 months prior to study entry. The CCB at the time of entry was continued for the first 6 months (Period 1). Treatment was subsequently switched from cilnidipine to an L-type CCB, or vice versa, for the second 6-month observation period (Period 2). During Period 1, the L-type CCB group showed a significant increase of urinary albumin excretion (UAE) over time, while the cilnidipine group showed no significant elevation. During Period 2, switching of the treatment from the L-type CCB to cilnidipine resulted in significant reduction of the UAE, whereas switching from cilnidipine to the L-type CCB resulted in no significant change in the UAE. This study demonstrated that the antialbuminuric effect of Cilnidipine, but not the L-type CCBs, was sustained even in patients treated for a long time. In addition, the antialbuminuric effect can be anticipated after switching from an L-type CCB to cilnidipine, but not vice versa.

  19. Retinopathy in chronic hepatitis C patients during interferon treatment with ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Jain, K; Lam, W; Waheeb, S; Thai, Q; Heathcote, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To assess the ocular effect of interferon alfa 2b prescribed with ribavirin in patients undergoing therapy for chronic hepatitis C.
METHODS—19 patients with chronic hepatitis C who satisfied the follow up criteria were assessed for ocular complications using slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy before, during, and after the treatment at regular intervals.
RESULTS—8/19 patients, while on treatment, developed an asymptomatic retinopathy. Among these 3/8 were relapsers and 5/9 were non-responders to interferon monotherapy. All retinal changes faded, often while the patients continued the therapy. There was no significant association in occurrence of retinopathy with haematological and/or biochemical changes.
CONCLUSION—Retinopathy was more common in interferon monotherapy non-responders than relapsers when treated with interferon alfa 2b with the addition of ribavirin. The changes were transient, disappearing while the patients were still being treated.

 PMID:11567959

  20. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography features of mild and severe acute solar retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Mohammad; Jabbarpoor Bonyadi, Mohammad Hossein; Bonyadi, Jabbarpour; Soheilian, Rasam; Soheilian, Masoud; Peyman, Gholam A

    2011-09-08

    Photochemical/thermal retinal damage that results from unprotected solar eclipse viewing has vague presentations and sometimes misleading diagnosis, especially in cases with unclear history. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique useful in differential diagnosis that can reveal characteristic foveal alterations in solar retinopathy to an unprecedented quasi histologic level. The authors present high-resolution SD-OCT findings correlated with clinical findings in three eyes of two cases with acute solar retinopathy. SD-OCT can precisely define the site and extent of damage in acute solar retinopathy. In mild forms, damage may be limited to the outer retina with inner segment/outer segment disruption. In severe forms, full thickness macular damage may be seen. Advances in retinal imaging have improved our ability to provide precise correlation with clinical presentation and prognosis.

  1. Moving Past Anti-VEGF: Novel Therapies for Treating Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bolinger, Mark T.; Antonetti, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in working age adults, and is projected to be a significant future health concern due to the rising incidence of diabetes. The recent advent of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibodies has revolutionized the treatment of diabetic retinopathy but a significant subset of patients fail to respond to treatment. Accumulating evidence indicates that inflammatory cytokines and chemokines other than VEGF may contribute to the disease process. The current review examines the presence of non-VEGF cytokines in the eyes of patients with diabetic retinopathy and highlights mechanistic pathways in relevant animal models. Finally, novel drug targets including components of the kinin–kallikrein system and emerging treatments such as anti-HPTP (human protein tyrosine phosphatase) β antibodies are discussed. Recognition of non-VEGF contributions to disease pathogenesis may lead to novel therapeutics to enhance existing treatments for patients who do not respond to anti-VEGF therapies. PMID:27618014

  2. Automated segmentation of retinal blood vessels and identification of proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Herbert F; Cree, Michael J; Leandro, Jorge J G; Soares, João V B; Cesar, Roberto M; Luckie, A

    2007-05-01

    Proliferative diabetic retinopathy can lead to blindness. However, early recognition allows appropriate, timely intervention. Fluorescein-labeled retinal blood vessels of 27 digital images were automatically segmented using the Gabor wavelet transform and classified using traditional features such as area, perimeter, and an additional five morphological features based on the derivatives-of-Gaussian wavelet-derived data. Discriminant analysis indicated that traditional features do not detect early proliferative retinopathy. The best single feature for discrimination was the wavelet curvature with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.76. Linear discriminant analysis with a selection of six features achieved an AUC of 0.90 (0.73-0.97, 95% confidence interval). The wavelet method was able to segment retinal blood vessels and classify the images according to the presence or absence of proliferative retinopathy.

  3. Oxidative stress and hypertension: Possibility of hypertension therapy with antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and aortic aneurysm, and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Hypertension is often associated with metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and the rate of these diseases is increasing nowadays. Recently it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress is a key player in the pathogenesis of hypertension. A reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity has been observed in newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive subjects, which are inversely correlated with blood pressure. Hydrogen peroxide production is also higher in hypertensive subjects. Furthermore, hypertensive patients have higher lipid hydroperoxide production. Oxidative stress is also markedly increased in hypertensive patients with renovascular disease. If oxidative stress is indeed a cause of hypertension, then, antioxidants should have beneficial effects on hypertension control and reduction of oxidative damage should result in a reduction in blood pressure. Although dietary antioxidants may have beneficial effects on hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors, however, antioxidant supplementation has not been shown consistently to be effective and improvement is not usually seen in blood pressure after treatment with single or combination antioxidant therapy in subjects thought to be at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This matter is the main focus of this paper. A list of medicinal plants that have been reported to be effective in hypertension is also presented. PMID:25097610

  4. Stronger relationship of serum apolipoprotein A-1 and B with diabetic retinopathy than traditional lipids

    PubMed Central

    Ankit, B. S.; Mathur, G.; Agrawal, R. P.; Mathur, K. C.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common preventable cause of blindness where early detection and treatment can be sight-saving. Search for biomarkers of the disease has been relentless. We aimed to determine whether lipoproteins apolipoproteins A1 and B1 (Apo-A1 and Apo-B1) have stronger associations with DR in contrast to conventionally measured low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Materials and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study and studied 117 patients. Serum lipid profile was assessed by autoanalyzer. Serum Apo-A1 and Apo-B were measured using immunoturbidimetric kit on an autoanalyzer. Apo-B/A1 ratio was calculated. Retinopathy was graded from the digital retinal photographs, taken with nonmydriatic auto fundus camera and classified according to International Clinical DR Disease Severity Scale. Results: Mean Apo-A1 for mild, moderate, severe retinopathy, and proliferative DR (PDR) shows a significant negative correlation (P = 0.001) with severity of retinopathy. Mean Apo-B for mild, moderate, severe, PDR displayed a significant positive correlation with severity of retinopathy (P = 0.001). Mean Apo-B/A1 for mild, moderate, severe, PDR showed highly significant positive correlation with severity of retinopathy (P < 0.001). In contrast, mean LDL for mild, moderate, severe, PDR showed insignificant association with severity of DR (P = 0.081). Conclusion: Apo-A1 and Apo-B have a stronger association with the development of DR than traditional lipids and can thus facilitate early detection and treatment of the disease. PMID:28217507

  5. Screening for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy in patients with diabetes: a nationwide survey in Korea.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sang-Ho; Ma, Seung Hyun; Jun, Jae Kwan; Jung, Kyu-Won; Park, Boyoung

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to identify factors associated with screening for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2007 and 2009 were analyzed. Of 24,871 participants, 1,288 patients diagnosed with diabetes at ≥30 years of age were included. 36.3% received screening for diabetic retinopathy, and 40.5% received screening for diabetic nephropathy during the previous year. Patients living in rural areas, those with less education, those who had not received education about diabetes care, and those who did not receive medical care for diabetes were screened less often for retinopathy or nephropathy. Patients with poorer self-reported health status were screened more often. Occupation, smoking status, and diabetes duration were associated with retinopathy screening. Lower family income was associated with decreased nephropathy screening. Receiving education about diabetes care and receiving medical care for diabetes were significant factors in patients with a shorter duration of diabetes (the significant odds ratio [OR] of not receiving education varied between 0.27 and 0.51, and that of not receiving medical care varied between 0.34 and 0.42). Sociodemographic factors and health-related factors as well as education and medical care influenced screening for diabetic complications among those with a longer duration of diabetes (for retinopathy and nephropathy, the significant OR of living in a rural area varied between 0.56 and 0.61; for retinopathy, the significant OR of current smokers was 0.55, and the p-trend of subjective health status was <0.001; for nephropathy, the significant OR of a monthly household income of <3000 dollars was 0.61 and the p-trends of education and subjective health status were 0.030 and 0.007, respectively). Efforts to decrease sociodemographic disparities should be combined with education about diabetes care to increase the screening, especially for those with a

  6. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  7. Decoding white coat hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Dennis A; Park, Alex

    2017-01-01

    There is arguably no less understood or more intriguing problem in hypertension that the “white coat” condition, the standard concept of which is significantly blood pressure reading obtained by medical personnel of authoritative standing than that obtained by more junior and less authoritative personnel and by the patients themselves. Using hospital-initiated ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, the while effect manifests as initial and ending pressure elevations, and, in treated patients, a low daytime profile. The effect is essentially systolic. Pure diastolic white coat hypertension appears to be exceedingly rare. On the basis of the studies, we believe that the white coat phenomenon is a common, periodic, neuro-endocrine reflex conditioned by anticipation of having the blood pressure taken and the fear of what this measurement may indicate concerning future illness. It does not change with time, or with prolonged association with the physician, particularly with advancing years, it may be superimposed upon essential hypertension, and in patients receiving hypertensive medication, blunting of the nighttime dip, which occurs in about half the patients, may be a compensatory mechanisms, rather than an indication of cardiovascular risk. Rather than the blunted dip, the morning surge or the widened pulse pressure, cardiovascular risk appears to be related to elevation of the average night time pressure. PMID:28352632

  8. Project "Hypertension Alert."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailors, Emma Lou

    1983-01-01

    "Hypertension Alert," a 1979-80 blood pressure screening-awareness project of the Yonkers, New York Public Schools, is described. Data is analyzed in tables for ethnic composition, and range of blood pressure readings for the high school, junior high school, and elementary school students tested. (Author/JMK)

  9. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a referral to a counselor. A support group for people living with pulmonary hypertension can be invaluable in learning how to cope with the illness. This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  10. [Hypertension In pregnancy: practical considerations].

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Jaafar; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Ditisheim, Agnès

    2014-09-10

    Hypertension is the most frequent medical disorder of pregnancy. Whether in the form of a chronic hypertension or a pregnancy induced-hypertension, or preeclampsia, it is associated with major maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Improvement of prenatal care allowed a reduction in the number of poor outcomes. However, our partial understanding of the origin of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia limits the establishment of robust prediction models and efficient preventive interventions. This review discusses actual considerations on the clinical approach to hypertension in pregnancy.

  11. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roberta L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in the perinatal period can present acutely (persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn) or chronically. Clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary hypertension is well accepted but there are no broadly validated criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension later in the clinical course, although there are significant populations of infants with lung disease at risk for this diagnosis. Contributing cardiovascular comorbidities are common in infants with pulmonary hypertension and lung disease. It is not clear who should be treated without confirmation of pulmonary vascular disease by cardiac catheterization, with concurrent evaluation of any contributing cardiovascular comorbidities.

  12. Evaluation of hypertension in children.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Gaurav; Baracco, Rossana

    2013-10-01

    Hypertension is an important public health problem, and increasingly children are being diagnosed with primary hypertension. As the list of secondary causes of hypertension is extensive, pediatric practitioners increasingly need to decide on investigations needed for evaluating children presenting with high blood pressure. The differentiation between primary and secondary hypertension is paramount to understanding this important health issue, since many forms of secondary hypertension require specific treatment. The review evaluates the current available guidelines and practice patterns for evaluating children with elevated blood pressure. The review also aims to provide a framework for cost-effective evaluation strategies for children with elevated blood pressure based on current recommendations and evidence.

  13. The course of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy following ECCE with posterior chamber IOL implantation.

    PubMed

    Raniel, Y; Teichner, Y; Friedman, Z

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study on the effect of ECCE + IOL implantation on the course of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in 59 eyes showed that in one to three years following surgery, progression of DR, including the development of newly formed one, occurred in 28.8% of the eyes. This was more marked in patient with IDDM (IDDM-46%, NIDDM-24%) as well as in eyes with pre-operative BDR (pre-operative BDR-62.5%, no pre-operative BDR-16.3%). Final visual acuity was better in eyes without pre-operative DR as well as in eyes that did not show progression of the retinopathy.

  14. Pigmentary retinopathy due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Luis Jesuino de Oliveira; Andrade, Rafael; França, Caroline Santos; Bittencourt, Alcina Vinhaes

    2009-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. This syndrome was first described by Laurence and Moon in 1866 and additional cases were described by Bardet and Biedl between 1920 and 1922. The main features are obesity, polydactyly, pigmentary retinopathy, learning disabilities, various degrees of intellectual impairment, hypogonadism, and renal abnormalities. Bardet-Biedl syndrome is both phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of 4 of the 5 cardinal features. The authors present a typical case of pigmentary retinopathy due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome and made a brief commentary about the disease's cardinal manifestations.

  15. HELLP Syndrome Complicated with Postpartum Subcapsular Ruptured Liver Hematoma and Purtscher-Like Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cernea, Daniela; Dragoescu, Alice; Novac, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Purtscher's retinopathy is usually associated with trauma, acute pancreatitis, vasculitis, lupus, and bone fractures. It was rarely described postpartum in patients with preeclampsia as well as associated with HELLP syndrome. We present a case of a multiparous patient aged 44 with severe preeclampsia and postpartum HELLP syndrome complicated with Purtscher-like retinopathy and large ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma that required emergency abdominal surgery after premature delivery of a dead fetus. Postsurgical outcome was favorable regarding both liver function and visual acuity. PMID:22852104

  16. [Effects of complex therapy with emoxipin on the course of diabetic retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, S A; Khyshiktuev, B S; Logunov, N A

    2003-01-01

    The efficacy of 1% emoxipin solution (eye drops) in the nonproliferative stage of diabetic retinopathy was studied. The inhibition of lipid peroxidation and an enhancement of antioxidizing guard were observed both after the therapy by the above preparation and 3 months later. It was concluded that emoxipin was effective for leveling the biochemical violations in the "lipid peroxidation--antioxidants" system of lachrymal fluid in patients with the nonproliferative stage of diabetic retinopathy. The prescription of emoxipin eye drops can enhance the efficacy of therapy at the early stages of the disease.

  17. A Case of Proliferative Retinopathy Complicated with Tuberous Sclerosis Treated by Vitreous Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Emika; Morishita, Seita; Akashi, Mari; Kohmoto, Ryohsuke; Fukumoto, Masanori; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Takatoshi; Kida, Teruyo; Sugasawa, Jun; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of proliferative retinopathy complicated with retinal hamartoma in a tuberous sclerosis patient. This study involved a 16-year-old female patient who was diagnosed as having tuberous sclerosis at birth. Ophthalmic examination revealed retinal hamartoma surrounding the optic disc in both eyes. Vitreous surgery involving a vitrectomy and resection of the proliferative membranes was performed for proliferative retinopathy in her right eye. Postoperative fundus findings showed improvement and decreased exudative changes. The proliferative and exudative changes appeared to be due to the retinal hamartoma, and vitreous surgery proved effective in this case. PMID:28101046

  18. The DPP4 Inhibitor Linagliptin Protects from Experimental Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Nadine; Kolibabka, Matthias; Busch, Stephanie; Bugert, Petra; Kaiser, Ulrike; Lin, Jihong; Fleming, Thomas; Morcos, Michael; Klein, Thomas; Schlotterer, Andrea; Hammes, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetes, however, their influence on the retinal neurovascular unit remains unclear. Methods Vasculo- and neuroprotective effects were assessed in experimental diabetic retinopathy and high glucose-cultivated C. elegans, respectively. In STZ-diabetic Wistar rats (diabetes duration of 24 weeks), DPP4 activity (fluorometric assay), GLP-1 (ELISA), methylglyoxal (LC-MS/MS), acellular capillaries and pericytes (quantitative retinal morphometry), SDF-1a and heme oxygenase-1 (ELISA), HMGB-1, Iba1 and Thy1.1 (immunohistochemistry), nuclei in the ganglion cell layer, GFAP (western blot), and IL-1beta, Icam1, Cxcr4, catalase and beta-actin (quantitative RT-PCR) were determined. In C. elegans, neuronal function was determined using worm tracking software. Results Linagliptin decreased DPP4 activity by 77% and resulted in an 11.5-fold increase in active GLP-1. Blood glucose and HbA1c were reduced by 13% and 14% and retinal methylglyoxal by 66%. The increase in acellular capillaries was diminished by 70% and linagliptin prevented the loss of pericytes and retinal ganglion cells. The rise in Iba-1 positive microglia was reduced by 73% with linagliptin. In addition, the increase in retinal Il1b expression was decreased by 65%. As a functional correlate, impairment of motility (body bending frequency) was significantly prevented in C. elegans. Conclusion Our data suggest that linagliptin has a protective effect on the microvasculature of the diabetic retina, most likely due to a combination of neuroprotective and antioxidative effects of linagliptin on the neurovascular unit. PMID:27942008

  19. A Comparison of Strategies for Retinopathy of Prematurity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Lisa A.; Wade, Kelly C.; Repka, Michael X.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Baumritter, Agnieshka; Quinn, Graham E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Delayed detection of type 1 retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) can lead to permanent visual impairment. Providing ROP examinations is challenging because of the limited ophthalmology workforce. This study compares digital imaging–based ROP detection strategies versus serial ROP examinations. METHODS: We conducted an individual-level microsimulation studyof a hypothetical cohort of 650 infants with gestational age from 23 to 30 weeks. Infants were evaluated by using strategies based on indirect ophthalmoscopy or digital imaging beginning at 32 weeks’ postmenstrual age (PMA) and continuing to discharge, transfer, or 40 weeks’ PMA. ROP status and the accuracy of digital imaging were based on the e-ROP (Telemedicine Approaches to Evaluating Acute-Phase ROP) study, which enrolled high-risk infants. RESULTS: Within the hypothetical NICU, the strategy of ROP examinations identified an average of 45.8 cases of type 1 ROP by discharge, transfer, or 40 weeks’ PMA, and another 1.9 cases were included in the group of infants recommended to have later follow-up. Digital imaging with an ROP examination at discharge identified all 47.7 cases of type 1 ROP. On average, the ROP examination–only strategy required 1745.7 ROP examinations, whereas digital imaging with a discharge examination required 1065.5 ROP examinations and 1786.2 digital imaging sessions. CONCLUSIONS: Although digital imaging decreased the number of ROP examinations per infant, there was an increase in the total number of interventions (ie, ROP examinations and imaging sessions). Providing an ROP examination at the time of NICU discharge can significantly reduce the number of infants who require follow-up. PMID:26672022

  20. Dopamine-resistant hypotension and severe retinopathy of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Melissa; Miyagi, Shogo; Wickremasinghe, Andrea C.; Lucas, Sarah Scarpace; de Alba Campomanes, Alejandra G.; Good, William V.; Clyman, Ronald I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between the cause or severity of hypotension and the development of severe retinopathy of prematurity (sROP) (≥ stage 3 or stage 2 with plus disease in Zone I or II).. Study design Infants (<28 weeks’ gestation, n=242) were observed for hypotension and treated with a standardized hypotension-treatment protocol. Hypotension was classified as resulting from one of the following causes: (a) culture-positive infection and/or necrotizing enterocolitis, (b) PDA ligation, or (c) “idiopathic” (no cause identified other than prematurity), and as being either dopamine-responsive or dopamine-resistant. Cortisol levels were measured for infants with dopamine-resistant hypotension. Eye examinations were performed until the ROP resolved or the vasculature matured. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship between the cause/severity of hypotension and sROP. Results Overall, 66% of infants developed hypotension (41% were dopamine-responsive and 25% were dopamine-resistant). sROP developed in 19% of infants. “Idiopathic” dopamine-resistant hypotension was the only cause significantly related to sROP. 66% of infants with dopamine-resistant hypotension had low serum cortisol (≤10 μg/dL). Low cortisol, in the presence of dopamine-resistant hypotension, was significantly associated with sROP and accounted for the relationship between “idiopathic” hypotension and sROP. When low cortisol was included in statistical models, other known risk factors, such as immature gestation, were no longer significantly related to sROP. Conclusion Low cortisol, in the presence of dopamine-resistant hypotension, has the greatest magnitude of association with sROP. PMID:23465406

  1. Ultrasonographic findings in eyes with retinopathy of prematurity in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lee, K F; Abdul Rahim, A; Raja Azmi, M N; Wan Hazabbah, W H; Embong, Z; Noramazlan, R; Zulkifli, A G; Alagaratnam, J V; Jamalia, R; Sunder, R; I, Shatriah

    2013-01-01

    RetCam is an excellent screening tool for the detection of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). However, affordability is a barrier when adopting the use of RetCam in developing countries. We aimed to describe different stages of ROP using ultrasonographic B-scan and to evaluate the association between funduscopic examinations and ultrasonographic B-scan findings in premature neonates with ROP in Malaysia. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in 90 eyes of 47 premature neonates with different stages of ROP in three tertiary hospitals in Malaysia. Experienced ophthalmologists performed detailed funduscopic examinations using binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy (BIO). A masked examiner performed a 10 MHz ultrasonographic B-scan evaluation with 12 meridian position images within 48 hours of clinical diagnosis. Data from the clinical examination and ultrasonographic findings were collected and analysed. We recruited 37 eyes (41.1%) with stage 1 ROP, 29 eyes (32.3%) with stage 2, 18 eyes (20.0%) with stage 3, and 3 eyes (3.3%) with stages 4 and 5 based on the clinical assessment. Ultrasonography correctly identified 3 (8.1%) stage 1 eyes, 17 (58.6%) stage 2 eyes, 13 (72.2%) stage 3 eyes, and 3 each (100%) of the stage 4 and 5 eyes. There was a significant association between the funduscopic signs and the ultrasound findings for stage 2 ROP and above (Fisher's exact test, p <0.001). In conclusion, all stages of ROP were detected and described with a 10 MHz ultrasonic B-scan system. A significant association was observed between funduscopic signs and ultrasonographic findings in premature Malaysian neonates with stage 2 ROP and above.

  2. Characteristic clinical features associated with aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Y J; Hong, K E; Yum, H R; Lee, J H; Kim, K S; Youn, Y A; Park, S H

    2017-02-24

    PurposeTo identify the risk factors for, and clinical features and treatment outcomes of aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (APROP) in Korean infants.MethodsAmong 770 premature infants who underwent screening, 105 infants (198 eyes, 13.63%) received treatment for ROP. A total of 24 infants (48 eyes, 3.12%) developed APROP while 81 infants (150 eyes, 10.52%) developed non-APROP treatment-requiring type. The medical records of ROP-treated infants were reviewed retrospectively. The associated systemic and maternal risk factors were analyzed and anatomical outcomes were compared according to the severity of ROP and treatment modalities.ResultsThe mean gestational age and birth weight at birth in the APROP group were significantly lower than those in the non-APROP group (P=0.019, P<0.001, respectively). Infants who were born small for their GA developed APROP more frequently than non-APROP patients (P<0.001). Chorioamnionitis-positive infants also showed higher incidence rate of APROP (APROP vs non-APROP; P<0.001 and zone I APROP vs posterior zone II APROP; P=0.036, respectively). Infants with APROP required heavier laser treatment with a higher retreatment rate compared to infants with non-APROP. Favorable anatomical outcomes were achieved in 95.3% from treatment-requiring non-APROP group, 85.7% from zone I APROP and 84.6% from posterior zone II APROP group.ConclusionIntrauterine growth restriction and chorioamnionitis were associated with development of APROP. These findings suggest that perinatal maternal environment inhibiting normal retinal vascular growth in utero may contribute to increasing the risk of APROP in premature infants.Eye advance online publication, 24 February 2017; doi:10.1038/eye.2017.18.

  3. Intravitreal bevacizumab for persistent macular edema with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Gulkilik, Gokhan; Taskapili, Muhittin; Kocabora, Selim; Muftuoglu, Gulipek; Demirci, Goktug

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an intravitreal bevacizumab injection on retinal neovascularization and diabetic macular edema (DME) refractory to laser photocoagulation therapy. Thirty-four eyes of 22 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and DME refractory to laser photocoagulation therapy received an intravitreal injection of 1.25 mg/0.05 ml of bevazicumab. Changes in mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central macular thickness (CMT), regression of neovascularization over time, and correlation between BCVA and CMT were evaluated. Follow-up visits were at weeks 1, 2 and 4 and months 3 and 6. Mean BCVA was significantly better than baseline only at week 2 (P = 0.036). Mean CMT decreased significantly from baseline at weeks 1, 2, and 4 (P = 0.001). At months 3 and 6, mean CMT increased, albeit insignificantly (P = 0.804 and P = 1.0). The decrease in fluorescein leakage was moderate in all eyes at the end of week 1. At week 2, there was total resolution of fluorescein leakage in 24 (70.5%) eyes and moderate resolution in 10 (29.5%) eyes. At the end of month 3, the fluorescein leakage was fully resolved in 5 (14.7%) eyes, moderately resolved in 24 (70.5%) eyes, and was similar to baseline in 5 (14.7%) eyes. At month 6, the fluorescein leakage was fully resolved in 3 (8.8%) eyes, moderately resolved in 20 (58.8%) eyes, and was similar to baseline in 11 (32.4%) eyes. A moderate but insignificant negative correlation was found between visual acuity and CMT (P > 0.05). Persistence or recurrence of neovascular tissue after panretinal photocoagulation may be attributed to the production of vascular endothelial growth factor by the residual ischemic retina, which also results in persistent or recurrent DME despite macular grid photocoagulation.

  4. Pharmacologic Management of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Misurac, Jason; Nichols, Kristen R; Wilson, Amy C

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension in children is common, and the prevalence of primary hypertension is increasing with the obesity epidemic and changing dietary choices. Careful measurement of blood pressure is important to correctly diagnose hypertension, as many factors can lead to inaccurate blood pressure measurement. Hypertension is diagnosed based on comparison of age-, sex-, and height-based norms with the average systolic and diastolic blood pressures on three separate occasions. In the absence of hypertensive target organ damage (TOD), stage I hypertension is managed first by diet and exercise, with the addition of drug therapy if this fails. First-line treatment of stage I hypertension with TOD and stage II hypertension includes both lifestyle changes and medications. First-line agents include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, thiazide diuretics, and calcium-channel blockers. Hypertensive emergency with end-organ effects requires immediate modest blood pressure reduction to alleviate symptoms. This is usually accomplished with IV medications. Long-term reduction in blood pressure to normal levels is accomplished gradually. Specific medication choice for outpatient hypertension management is determined by the underlying cause of hypertension and the comparative adverse effect profiles, along with practical considerations such as cost and frequency of administration. Antihypertensive medication is initiated at a starting dose and can be gradually increased to effect. If ineffective at the recommended maximum dose, an additional medication with a complementary mechanism of action can be added.

  5. Masked hypertension: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bobrie, Guillaume; Clerson, Pierre; Ménard, Joël; Postel-Vinay, Nicolas; Chatellier, Gilles; Plouin, Pierre-François

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to review the literature on masked hypertension. Studies, reviews and editorials on masked hypertension were identified by PubMed, Pascal BioMed and Cochrane literature systematic searches. Then, we carried out a meta-analysis of the six cohort studies reporting quantitative data for masked hypertension prognosis. There is still no clear consensus definition of masked hypertension and the reproducibility of the phenomenon is unknown. Nevertheless, the prevalence of masked hypertension seems to lie between 8 and 20%, and can be up to 50% in treated hypertensive patients. Subjects with masked hypertension have a higher risk of cardiovascular accidents [hazard ratios: 1.92 (1.51-2.44)] than normotensive subjects. This is due to a possible failure to recognize and appropriately manage this particular form of hypertension, the frequent association with other risk factors and coexisting target organ damage. The remaining unresolved questions are as follows: is masked hypertension a clinical entity that requires identification and characterization or a statistical phenomenon linked to the variability of blood pressure measurements?; because screening of the entire population is not feasible, how to identify individuals with masked hypertension?; and, in the absence of randomized trial, how to treat masked hypertension?

  6. Hypertension: issues in control and resistance.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; Minor, Deborah S

    2009-10-01

    Hypertension remains uncontrolled in more than 50% of treated patients. Barriers to hypertension control include those that are patient-related, physician-related, and related to the health system. Identification of uncontrolled hypertension, pseudoresistant hyper-tension, and resistant hypertension require thoughtful attention to accurate blood pressure measurement, lifestyle factors, evaluation for secondary causes of hypertension, and proper treatment. Recent guidelines emphasize the importance of aggressive treatment and referral to hypertension specialists for patients with resistant hypertension, defined as blood pressure that remains above goal despite the use of three appropriate anti-hypertensive agents.

  7. Hypertension in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Roberta; Wofford, Marion; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure is typically lower in premenopausal women than in men. However, after menopause, the prevalence of hypertension in women is higher than it is in men. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in women and men. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women. Furthermore, there is evidence that blood pressure may not be as well-controlled in women as in men, despite the fact that most women adhere better to their therapeutic regimens and medications than do men, and have their blood pressures measured more frequently than do men. This review describes possible mechanisms by which blood pressure may be increased in postmenopausal women. PMID:22427070

  8. Hypertension and dementia.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier; Seux, Marie Laure; Lenoir, Hermine; Rigaud, Anne Sophie; Forette, Françoise

    2003-11-01

    Hypertension is one of the principal risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases. Several epidemiologic studies have also indicated a positive correlation between cognitive decline or dementia and blood pressure level. Indeed, the results of most longitudinal studies show that cognitive functioning is often inversely proportional to blood pressure values measured 15 or 20 years previously. Cerebral infarcts, lacunae, and white matter changes are implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular dementia, but may also favor the development of Alzheimer's disease. Microcirculation disorders and endothelial dysfunctions are also advanced to explain the deterioration in cognitive functions in hypertensive subjects. Data from recent therapeutic trials open the way to the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) by antihypertensive treatments and must be confirmed by other studies.

  9. The role of diabetic retinopathy in blindness and poor sight in Split-Dalmatia County 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Galetović, Davor; Olujić, Ivana; Znaor, Ljubo; Bućan, Kajo; Karlica, Dobrila; Lesin, Mladen; Susac, Tihomir

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the fifth leading cause of blindness in the world. The aim of this study was to determine the number of blind persons in the Split-Dalmatia County in the 2000-2010 period and how many of them are blind due to diabetic retinopathy. Records of 160 members of the Association of the Blind in the Split-Dalmatia County, enrolled from 2000 to 2010, were retrospectively analyzed. The leading causes of blindness were diabetic retinopathy (25.6%), glaucoma (13.1%), retinal dystrophy (16.2%), and age related macular degeneration (11.8%). The annual incidence of blindness was 8.4/100,000 inhabitants. The largest number of the blind were found in the 70-80 (21.2%) to > 80 (24.3%) age group. Diabetic retinopathy was the cause of blindness in 24 (15%) men and 17 (10.6%) women. The annual incidence of diabetic retinopathy was 2.16 per 100,000. No case of blindness due to diabetic retinopathy was diagnosed in patients younger than 30 years of age, while the highest prevalence was found in the 70-80 age group (34%). Proliferative diabetic retinopathy was the cause of blindness in 92.7% and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy in 7.3% of cases. Study results show that diabetic retinopathy remains the leading cause of blindness. Early identification of high-risk patients is the key factor in prevention and timely detection of ophthalmoscopic changes, thus enabling effective and duly treatment.

  10. Diabetic retinopathy and blockade of the renin-angiotensin system: new data from the DIRECT study programme.

    PubMed

    Wright, A D; Dodson, P M

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis and medical management of diabetic retinopathy is reviewed. The importance of good control of blood glucose and blood pressure remain key elements in the prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, and a number of specific metabolic pathways have been identified that may be useful additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Trial data, however, aimed specifically to answer the questions of optimum medical management are limited, so the DIRECT study of renin-angiotensin blockade using oral candesartan 32 mg daily is a welcome addition to our knowledge. This arose from the promising improvement of retinopathy outcomes in the EUCLID study of lisinopril in type I diabetes. In DIRECT, 5 years of candesartan treatment in type I diabetes reduced the incidence of retinopathy by two or more steps (EDTRS) in severity by 18% (P=0.0508) and, in a post hoc analysis, reduced the incidence of retinopathy by three-step progression by 35% (P=0.034). In type I diabetes patients there was no effect on progression of established retinopathy. In contrast, in type II diabetes, 5 years of candesartan treatment resulted in 34% regression of retinopathy (P=0.009). Importantly, an overall significant change towards less-severe retinopathy was noted in both type I and II diabetes (Pretinopathy, to prevent the problem in type I diabetes and to treat the early stages in type II diabetes.

  11. The Association of Elevated HDL Levels With Carotid Atherosclerosis in Middle-Aged Women With Untreated Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllidi, Helen; Pavlidis, George; Trivilou, Paraskevi; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Tzortzis, Stavros; Xenogiannis, Iosif; Schoinas, Antonios; Lekakis, John

    2015-11-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), a negative risk factor, is positively associated with a decreased risk of coronary heart disease. We investigated the association between high HDL-C levels and target organ damage (TOD) in never treated women with hypertension. We measured HDL-C levels in 117 women followed by estimation of TODs, that is, pulse wave velocity, microalbuminuria, left ventricular mass index, coronary flow reserve, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Women were divided into 2 groups (HDLH and HDLL), regarding HDL-C quartiles (upper quartile vs the first 3 lower quartiles). In HDLH group : HDL ≥70 mg/dL), cIMT was nonindependently, negatively related to HDL-C (ρ = -.42, P < .05). Using receiver -operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis in the HDLH group, we concluded that the cutoff value of HDL ≥76.5 mg/dL moderately predicted the absence of carotid atherosclerosis (area under the curve: 0.77, P = .02; confidence interval: 0.57-0.97; sensitivity 73% and specificity 67%). Increased HDL-C may predict the absence of carotid atherosclerosis in middle-age women with untreated essential hypertension and consequently contribute to total cardiovascular risk estimation and treatment planning.

  12. Urine albumin excretion, within normal range, reflects increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vyssoulis, Gregory; Karpanou, Eva; Spanos, Pangiotis; Kyvelou, Stella-Maria; Adamopoulos, Dionysios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2010-08-01

    Microalbuminuria is a prognostic marker of cardiovascular disease and is related to metabolic syndrome (MetS). For this purpose, the authors examined the relationship of low grade albuminuria to MetS, using 4 current definitions and a MetS score. They studied 6650 consecutive, nondiabetic, hypertensive patients with normal microalbumin excretion. MetS was defined by Adult Treatment Panel III, American Heart Association, World Heart Organization, International Diabetes Federation criteria, and MetS Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Streptochinasi nell'Infarcto Miocardico (GISSI) score. Urine microalbumin concentration was measured after a 24-hour urine collection by immunonephelometry. By all definitions, hypertensive patients with MetS had higher microalbumin levels. Significantly higher microalbumin levels were observed as the number of metabolic components rose. After adjustment for systolic blood pressure, the strength of this association was reduced to a nonsignificant level. Microalbumin levels, within normal range, are increased in patients with MetS, irrespective of the definition criteria.

  13. OCT Angiography Identification of Choroidal Neovascularization Secondary to Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Levison, Ashleigh L; Baynes, Kimberly; Lowder, Careen Y; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute zonal occult outer retinopathy presented with a new lesion suspicious for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in her right eye. Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) confirmed the presence of CNV. OCTA is a new imaging technique that may help guide diagnosis and management of choroidal neovascular membranes in uveitic diseases.

  14. Diabetic retinopathy: Proteomic approaches to help the differential diagnosis and to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Csősz, Éva; Deák, Eszter; Kalló, Gergő; Csutak, Adrienne; Tőzsér, József

    2017-01-06

    Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness among patients with diabetes. The appearance and the severity of the symptoms correlate with the duration of diabetes and poor blood glucose level management. Diabetic retinopathy is also categorized as a chronic low-level inflammatory disease; the high blood glucose level promotes the accumulation of the advanced glycation end products and leads to the stimulation of monocytes and macrophages. Examination of protein level alterations in tears using state-of the art proteomics techniques have identified several proteins as possible biomarkers for the different stages of the diabetic retinopathy. Some of the differentially expressed tear proteins have a role in the barrier function of tears linking the diabetic retinopathy with another eye complication of diabetes, namely the diabetic keratopathy resulting in impaired wound healing. Understanding the molecular events leading to the eye complications caused by hyperglycemia may help the identification of novel biomarkers as well as therapeutic targets in order to improve quality of life of diabetic patients.

  15. The biology of retinopathy of prematurity: how knowledge of pathogenesis guides treatment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lois E; Hard, Anna-Lena; Hellström, Ann

    2013-06-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity occurs because the retina of a preterm infant at birth is incompletely vascularized, and if the postnatal environment does not match the in utero environment that supported retinal development, the vessels and neural retina will not grow normally. Risk factors determined from many clinical studies and animal studies fall into 2 categories: prenatal factors and postnatal factors.

  16. Palmitoylethanolamide, a Natural Retinoprotectant: Its Putative Relevance for the Treatment of Glaucoma and Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M.; Costagliola, Ciro; Fakhry, Josiane; Kopsky, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy is a threat to the eyesight, and glaucoma and diabetes are the main causes for the damage of retinal cells. Recent insights pointed out a common pathogenetic pathway for both disorders, based on chronic inflammation. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous cell protective lipid. Since its discovery in 1957 as a biologically active component in foods and in many living organisms, around 500 scientific papers have been published on PEA's anti-inflammatory and neuron-protective properties. PEA has been evaluated for glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and uveitis, pathological states based on chronic inflammation, respiratory disorders, and various pain syndromes in a number of clinical trials since the 70s of 20th century. PEA is available as a food supplement (PeaPure) and as diet food for medical purposes in Italy (Normast, PeaVera, and Visimast). These products are notified in Italy for the nutritional support in glaucoma and neuroinflammation. PEA has been tested in at least 9 double blind placebo controlled studies, among which two studies were in glaucoma, and found to be safe and effective up to 1.8 g/day, with excellent tolerability. PEA therefore holds a promise in the treatment of a number of retinopathies. We discuss PEA as a putative anti-inflammatory and retinoprotectant compound in the treatment of retinopathies, especially related to glaucoma and diabetes. PMID:26664738

  17. Investigating Factors Associated with Depression of Type 2 Diabetic Retinopathy Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Duo; Dong, Qing; Gu, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives To assess the depression status of type 2 diabetic retinopathy patients in Nantong China and to identify factors associated with depression. Methods Two hundred and ninety-four patients with type 2 diabetic retinopathy were recruited from the Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University. The severity of DR was measured in the worse eye. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D); the quality of life was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36). The logistic regression analyses were used to identify the independent factors of depression. Results The mean age of the study subjects was 57.77 years (SD: 9.64). Approximately 35.7% of subjects reported depressive symptoms (n = 105).Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that female gender (p = 0.014), low monthly income (p = 0.01), poor vision in the better eye (P = 0.002), laser treatment history (p = 0.01) were significant risk factors for depression. The quality of life of individuals with CES-D score<16 was significantly better compared with individuals with CES-D score≥16. Conclusion The reported depressive symptoms among type 2 diabetic retinopathy population is higher in Nantong China. Gender, salary, vision acuity and treatment history were important risk factors linked to this disorder in the Chinese type 2 diabetic retinopathy population from Nantong. More attention by medical care personnel needs to be paid to the psychological health of this population. PMID:26151365

  18. Retinal expression of small non-coding RNAs in a murine model of proliferative retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Wang, Zhongxiao; Sun, Ye; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Ocular neovascularization is a leading cause of blindness in proliferative retinopathy. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) play critical roles in both vascular and neuronal development of the retina through post-transcriptional regulation of target gene expression. To identify the function and therapeutic potential of sncRNAs in retinopathy, we assessed the expression profile of retinal sncRNAs in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) with pathologic proliferation of neovessels. Approximately 2% of all analyzed sncRNAs were significantly altered in OIR retinas compared with normoxic controls. Twenty three microRNAs with substantial up- or down-regulation were identified, including miR-351, -762, -210, 145, -155, -129-5p, -150, -203, and -375, which were further analyzed for their potential target genes in angiogenic, hypoxic, and immune response-related pathways. In addition, nineteen small nucleolar RNAs also revealed differential expression in OIR retinas compared with control retinas. A decrease of overall microRNA expression in OIR retinas was consistent with reduced microRNA processing enzyme Dicer, and increased expression of Alu element in OIR. Together, our findings elucidated a group of differentially expressed sncRNAs in a murine model of proliferative retinopathy. These sncRNAs may exert critical post-transcriptional regulatory roles in regulating pathological neovascularization in eye diseases. PMID:27653551

  19. The Prize Is Healthy Eyes: Using Games to Educate about Diabetic Retinopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stastny, Sherri N.; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a program for prevention of diabetic retinopathy (DR) that was designed for Extension in collaboration with optometrists. The program was created to increase knowledge and awareness about risk factors for DR and included a game and take-home materials. Participants were asked to play a game similar to Wheel of Fortune. A…

  20. Protection from retinopathy and other complications in patients with type 1 diabetes of extreme duration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We performed a cross-sectional, observational study of 351 U.S. residents with at least 50 years of insulin-dependent diabetes. Longitudinal data on retinopathy progression was obtained via chart review in patients followed at the Joslin Diabetes Center eye clinic (Boston, MA). HbA1c was determined ...

  1. Mechanistically Distinct Mouse Models for CRX-Associated Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nicholas M.; Zhang, Alan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Huecker, Julie B.; Hennig, Anne K.; Chen, Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Cone-rod homeobox (CRX) protein is a “paired-like” homeodomain transcription factor that is essential for regulating rod and cone photoreceptor transcription. Mutations in human CRX are associated with the dominant retinopathies Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), Cone-Rod Dystrophy (CoRD) and Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), with variable severity. Heterozygous Crx Knock-Out (KO) mice (“+/−”) have normal vision as adults and fail to model the dominant human disease. To investigate how different mutant CRX proteins produce distinct disease pathologies, we generated two Crx Knock-IN (K-IN) mouse models: CrxE168d2 (“E168d2”) and CrxR90W (“R90W”). E168d2 mice carry a frameshift mutation in the CRX activation domain, Glu168del2, which is associated with severe dominant CoRD or LCA in humans. R90W mice carry a substitution mutation in the CRX homeodomain, Arg90Trp, which is associated with dominant mild late-onset CoRD and recessive LCA. As seen in human patients, heterozygous E168d2 (“E168d2/+”) but not R90W (“R90W/+”) mice show severely impaired retinal function, while mice homozygous for either mutation are blind and undergo rapid photoreceptor degeneration. E168d2/+ mice also display abnormal rod/cone morphology, greater impairment of CRX target gene expression than R90W/+ or +/− mice, and undergo progressive photoreceptor degeneration. Surprisingly, E168d2/+ mice express more mutant CRX protein than wild-type CRX. E168d2neo/+, a subline of E168d2 with reduced mutant allele expression, displays a much milder retinal phenotype, demonstrating the impact of Crx expression level on disease severity. Both CRX[E168d2] and CRX[R90W] proteins fail to activate transcription in vitro, but CRX[E168d2] interferes more strongly with the function of wild type (WT) CRX, supporting an antimorphic mechanism. E168d2 and R90W are mechanistically distinct mouse models for CRX-associated disease that will allow the elucidation of molecular mechanisms and testing of

  2. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation.

  3. Severe paroxysmal hypertension (pseudopheochromocytoma).

    PubMed

    Mann, Samuel J

    2008-02-01

    Paroxysmal hypertension always engenders a search for a catecholamine-secreting pheochromocytoma. Yet 98% of people with paroxysmal hypertension do not have this tumor. The cause and management of paroxysmal hypertension remain a mystery, and the subject of remarkably few papers. This review presents an approach to understanding and successfully treating this disorder. Patients experience symptomatic blood pressure surges likely linked to sympathetic nervous system stimulation. A specific personality profile associated with this disorder suggests a psychological basis, attributable to repressed emotion related to prior emotional trauma or a repressive (nonemotional) coping style. Based on this understanding, three forms of intervention, alone or in combination, appear successful: antihypertensive therapy with agents directed at the sympathetically mediated blood pressure elevation (eg, combined alpha- and beta-blockade or central alpha-agonists such as clonidine); psychopharmacologic interventions including anxiolytic and/or antidepressant agents; and psychological intervention, particularly reassurance and increased psychological awareness. An appropriately selected intervention can reduce or eliminate attacks in most patients.

  4. Hypertension in Chronic Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), which includes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proliferative forms of GN such as IgA nephropathy, increases the risk of hypertension. Hypertension in chronic GN is primarily volume dependent, and this increase in blood volume is not related to the deterioration of renal function. Patients with chronic GN become salt sensitive as renal damage including arteriolosclerosis progresses and the consequent renal ischemia causes the stimulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system(RAAS). Overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system also contributes to hypertension in chronic GN. According to the KDIGO guideline, the available evidence indicates that the target BP should be ≤140mmHg systolic and ≤90mmHg diastolic in chronic kidney disease patients without albuminuria. In most patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/24 h (i.e., those with both micro-and macroalbuminuria), a lower target of ≤130mmHg systolic and ≤80mmHg diastolic is suggested. The use of agents that block the RAAS system is recommended or suggested in all patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/ 24 h. The combination of a RAAS blockade with a calcium channel blocker and a diuretic may be effective in attaining the target BP, and in reducing the amount of urinary protein excretion in patients with chronic GN. PMID:26848302

  5. [Arterial hypertension in children].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F

    1993-07-01

    It is considered hypertension in children, the persistent increase of the blood pressure values above percentile 95 for age and sex, in no less than three determinations, with adequate register techniques. Blood pressure is maintained mainly by the regulation of metabolism of sodium and water in the intravascular space, through the adequate balance of intake, filtration, reabsorption and renal throughout. It is also regulated by hormonal factors. Weight gain control in teen-agers could be useful to prevent high blood pressure in adults. In children, it is generally secondary to renal, reno-vascular, endocrinological or tumoral diseases. Clinical manifestations and the recommended diagnostic procedures are analysed to detect the most frequent causes of hypertension at different ages. Most cases response with antihypertensive drugs in combination with hyposodic diet. For the hypertensive crisis, asa diuretics and powerful antihypertensive drugs may be employed. Patients with chronic renal insufficiency could also need dialytic treatments. Renovascular diseases require almost always invasive treatments. Better prognosis in children with severe high blood pressure is related with recent diagnostic procedures, surgical techniques and antihypertensive drugs improvements.

  6. Beta blockers in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thadani, U

    1983-11-10

    Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are effective in the management of patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension. Noncardioselective agents, cardioselective agents and beta blockers with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) are equally effective, provided they are used in equipotent doses. Beta blockers can be used as first-line therapy in the management of hypertension and can be safely combined with diuretics, vasodilators, or both, for a better control of blood pressure. The exact mechanism by which beta blockers decrease blood pressure remains speculative, but they all reduce cardiac output during long-term therapy; drugs with ISA lower cardiac output and heart rate less than do drugs without ISA. Pharmacokinetic properties of beta blockers differ widely; drugs metabolized by the liver have shorter plasma half-lives than drugs primarily excreted by the kidneys. Although many of the side effects of various beta blockers are similar, differences in water and lipid solubility account for a higher incidence of central nervous system side effects with lipid-soluble drugs (such as propranolol and metoprolol) than with hydrophilic drugs (such as atenolol and timolol). The incidence of cold extremities has been reported to be less with drugs with ISA, and the incidence of bronchospasm less with cardioselective drugs. In the management of uncomplicated mild-to-moderate hypertension, all beta blockers are equally effective and produce less troublesome side effects than alternative antihypertensive agents. For effective therapy beta blockers can be used in 2 divided daily doses or even once daily.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Treprostinil for pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Skoro-Sajer, Nika; Lang, Irene; Naeije, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Treprostinil is a stable, long-acting prostacyclin analogue which can be administered as a continuous subcutaneous infusion using a portable miniature delivery system. Subcutaneous treprostinil has been shown in a large multicenter randomized controlled trial to improve exercise capacity, clinical state, functional class, pulmonary hemodynamics, and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, an uncommon disease of poor prognosis. Side effects include facial flush, headache, jaw pain, abdominal cramping, and diarrhea, all typical of prostacyclin, and manageable by symptom-directed dose adjustments, and infusion site pain which may make further treatment impossible in 7%–10% of the patients. Long-term survival in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients treated with subcutaneous treprostinil is similar to that reported with intravenous epoprostenol. There are uncontrolled data suggesting efficacy of subcutaneous treprostinil in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Treprostinil can also be administered intravenously, although increased doses, up to 2–3 times those given subcutaneously, appear to be needed to obtain the same efficacy. Preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial of inhaled treprostinil on top of bosentan and sildenafil therapies have shown significance on the primary endpoint, which was exercise capacity as assessed by the distance walked in 6 minutes. Trials of oral formulations of treprostinil have been initiated. PMID:18827901

  8. Genetics of experimental hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dominiczak, A F; Clark, J S; Jeffs, B; Anderson, N H; Negrin, C D; Lee, W K; Brosnan, M J

    1998-12-01

    Experimental models of genetic hypertension are used to develop paradigms to study human essential hypertension while removing some of the complexity inherent in the study of human subjects. Since 1991 several quantitative trait loci responsible for blood pressure regulation have been identified in various rat crosses. More recently, a series of interesting quantitative trait loci influencing cardiac hypertrophy, stroke, metabolic syndrome and renal damage has also been described. It is recognized that the identification of large chromosomal regions containing a quantitative trait locus is only a first step towards gene identification. The next step is the production of congenic strains and substrains to confirm the existence of the quantitative trait locus and to narrow down the chromosomal region of interest. Several congenic strains have already been produced, with further refinement of the methodology currently in progress. The ultimate goal is to achieve positional cloning of the causal gene, a task which has so far been elusive. There are several areas of cross-fertilization between experimental and human genetics of hypertension, with a successful transfer of two loci directly from rats to humans and with new pharmacogenetic approaches which may be utilized in both experimental and clinical settings.

  9. Obesity and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Zhong; Lu, Wen; Zong, Xue-Feng; Ruan, Hong-Yun; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The imbalance between energy intake and expenditure is the main cause of excessive overweight and obesity. Technically, obesity is defined as the abnormal accumulation of ≥20% of body fat, over the individual's ideal body weight. The latter constitutes the maximal healthful value for an individual that is calculated based chiefly on the height, age, build and degree of muscular development. However, obesity is diagnosed by measuring the weight in relation to the height of an individual, thereby determining or calculating the body mass index. The National Institutes of Health have defined 30 kg/m2 as the limit over which an individual is qualified as obese. Accordingly, the prevalence of obesity in on the increase in children and adults worldwide, despite World Health Organization warnings. The growth of obesity and the scale of associated health issues induce serious consequences for individuals and governmental health systems. Excessive overweight remains among the most neglected public health issues worldwide, while obesity is associated with increasing risks of disability, illness and death. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of mortality worldwide, particularly hypertension and diabetes, are the main illnesses associated with obesity. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying obesity-associated hypertension or other associated metabolic diseases remains to be adequately investigated. In the present review, we addressed the association between obesity and cardiovascular disease, particularly the biological mechanisms linking obesity and hypertension. PMID:27703502

  10. Longitudinal Commercial Claims–Based Cost Analysis of Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Kathryn; Weisman, Thomas; Engel, Tyler; Turpcu, Adam; Blumen, Helen; Rajput, Yamina; Dave, Purav

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes. The screening of patients with diabetes to detect retinopathy is recommended by several professional guidelines but is an underutilized service. Objective To analyze the relationship between the frequency of retinopathy screening and the cost of care in adult patients with diabetes. Methods Truven Health MarketScan commercial databases (2000–2013) were used to identify the diabetic population aged 18 to 64 years for the performance of a 2001–2013 annual trend analysis of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes and a 10-year longitudinal analysis of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. In the trend analysis, the prevalence of diabetes, screening rate, and allowed cost per member per month (PMPM) were calculated. In the longitudinal analysis, data from 4 index years (2001–2004) of patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were combined, and the costs were adjusted to be comparable to the 2004 index year cohort, using the annual diabetes population cost trends calculated in the trend analysis. The longitudinal population was segmented into the number of years of diabetic retinopathy screening (ie, 0, 1–4, 5–7, and 8–10), and the relationship between the years of screening and the PMPM allowed costs was analyzed. The difference in mean incremental cost between years 1 and 10 in each of the 4 cohorts was compared after adjusting for explanatory variables. Results In the trend analysis, between 2001 and 2013, the prevalence of diabetes increased from 3.93% to 5.08%, retinal screening increased from 26.27% to 29.58%, and the average total unadjusted allowed cost of care for each patient with diabetes increased from $822 to $1395 PMPM. In the longitudinal analysis, the difference between the screening cohorts’ mean incremental cost increase was $185 between the 0- and 1–4–year cohorts (P <.003) and $202 between the 0- and 5–7–year cohorts (P <.023). The

  11. The combination of OLmesartan and a CAlcium channel blocker (azelnidipine) or candesartan and a calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) in type 2 diabetic hypertensive patients: the OLCA study.

    PubMed

    Daikuhara, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Fumi; Ishida, Toshihiko

    2012-10-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) are often co-administered with a calcium channel blocker (CCB) for treating hypertension. In this open-label randomised study, untreated diabetic hypertensive patients were randomised to receive either olmesartan 20 mg/day or candesartan 8 mg/day for 12 weeks. Patients with blood pressure exceeding 130/80 mm Hg received add-on 16 mg/day azelnidipine to ongoing olmesartan (OL group) or 5 mg/day amlodipine to ongoing candesartan (CA group) for 24 weeks. Home-measured and clinic-measured blood pressure decreased in both groups. Fasting blood glucose, haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and urinary albumin levels decreased significantly in the OL group but not in the CA group. In conclusion, this study revealed clinically relevant differences between two combinations of an ARB+CCB in diabetic hypertensive patients. Olmesartan and azelnidipine had a more persistent early morning antihypertensive effect and produced greater decreases in heart rate, fasting blood glucose and HbA1c (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program values) levels, and microalbuminuria than did candesartan and amlodipine.

  12. Calcium channel antagonists in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ambrosioni, E; Borghi, C

    1989-02-01

    The clinical usefulness of calcium entry-blockers for the treatment of high blood pressure is related to their capacity to act upon the primary hemodynamic derangement in hypertension: the increased peripheral vascular resistance. They can be used alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents for the treatment of various forms of hypertensive disease. The calcium entry-blockers appear to be the most useful agents for the treatment of hypertension in the elderly and for the treatment of hypertension associated with ischemic heart disease, pulmonary obstructive disease, peripheral vascular disease, and supraventricular arrhythmias. They are effective in reducing blood pressure in pregnancy-associated hypertension and must be considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of hypertensive crisis.

  13. Radiation retinopathy after external-beam irradiation: Analysis of time-dose factors

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, J.T.; Bova, F.J.; Mendenhall, W.M.

    1994-11-15

    To investigate the risk of radiation-induced retinopathy according to total radiation dose and fraction size, based on both retorspective and prospectively collected data. Between October 1964 and May 1989, 68 retinae in 64 patients received fractionated external-beam irradiation during the treatment of primary extracranial head and neck tumors. All patients had a minimum of 3 years of ophthalmologic follow-up (range, 3 to 26 years; mean, 9 years; median, 8 years). Twenty-seven eyes in 26 patients developed radiation retinopathy resulting in visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. The mean and median times to the onset of symptoms attributable to retinal ischemia were 2.8 and 2.5 years, respectively. Fourteen of the injured eyes developed rubeosis iridis and/or neovascular glaucoma. Radiation retinopathy was not observed at doses below 45 Gy, but increased steadily in incidence at doses {ge}45Gy. In the range of doses between 45 and 55 Gy, there was an increased risk of injury among patients who received doses per fraction of {ge}1.9Gy (p - .09). There was also a trend toward increased risk of injury among patients who received chemotherapy (two of two vs. four of ten in the 45-51 Gy range; p - .23). The lowest dose associated with retinopathy was 45 Gy delivered to a diabetic patient by twice-a-day fractionation. The data did not suggest an increased risk of radiation retinopathy with increasing age. The current study suggests the importance of total dose as well as dose per fraction, and adds support to a small body of literature suggesting that patients with diabetes mellitus or who receive chemotherapy are at increased risk of injury. A sigmoid dose-response curve is constructed from our current data and data from the literature. 36 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Lack of R-Ras Leads to Increased Vascular Permeability in Ischemic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vähätupa, Maria; Prince, Stuart; Vataja, Suvi; Mertimo, Teija; Kataja, Marko; Kinnunen, Kati; Marjomäki, Varpu; Uusitalo, Hannu; Komatsu, Masanobu; Järvinen, Tero A.H.; Uusitalo–Järvinen, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The role of R-Ras in retinal angiogenesis and vascular permeability was evaluated in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model using R-Ras knockout (KO) mice and in human diabetic neovascular membranes. Methods Mice deficient for R-Ras and their wild-type (WT) littermates were subjected to 75% oxygen from postnatal day 7 (P7) to P12 and then returned to room air. At P17 retinal vascularization was examined from whole mounts, and retinal vascular permeability was studied using Miles assay. Real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expression of R-Ras in retina during development or in the OIR model. The degree of pericyte coverage and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin expression on WT and R-Ras KO retinal blood vessels was quantified using confocal microscopy. The correlation of R-Ras with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and human serum albumin on human proliferative diabetic retinopathy membranes was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results In retina, R-Ras expression was mostly restricted to the vasculature. Retinal vessels in the R-Ras KO mice were significantly more permeable than WT controls in the OIR model. A significant reduction in the direct physical contact between pericytes and blood vessel endothelium as well as reduced VE-cadherin immunostaining was found in R-Ras–deficient mice. In human proliferative diabetic retinopathy neovascular membranes, R-Ras expression negatively correlated with increased vascular leakage and expression of VEGFR2, a marker of blood vessel immaturity. Conclusions Our results suggest that R-Ras has a role in controlling retinal vessel maturation and stabilization in ischemic retinopathy and provides a potential target for pharmacologic manipulation to treat diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27654416

  15. Pharmacy Staff Opinions Regarding Diabetic Retinopathy Screenings in the Community Setting: Findings from a Brief Survey

    PubMed Central

    Law, Miranda G.; Komura, Stephanie; Murchison, Ann P.; Pizzi, Laura T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy is a retinal vascular disorder that affects more than 4.1 million people in the United States. New methods of detecting and ensuring adequate follow-up of this life-altering disease are vital to improving patient outcomes. Wills Eye Hospital and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are conducting a collaborative study to initiate a novel diabetic retinopathy screening in the community setting. Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a more widespread, large-scale implementation of this novel model of care for diabetic retinopathy screening in the community setting. Methods A simple, self-administered survey was distributed to pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, student pharmacists, and Wills Eye Hospital interns. The survey consisted of open-ended questions and responders were given 1 week to respond. A total of 22 surveys were distributed and 16 were completed. The responses were culled and analyzed to assess the feasibility of implementing this novel screening model in the pharmacy. Results The response rate to this pilot survey was 72%. The majority of the responding pharmacy staff members indicated that diabetic retinopathy screening in community pharmacies would greatly benefit patients and could improve patient care. However, they also noted barriers to implementing the screening, such as concerns about the cost of carrying out the screenings, the cost of the equipment needed to be purchased, and the lack of time and shortage of pharmacy staff. Conclusion The potential exists for pharmacists to positively influence diabetes care by implementing retinopathy care through the early detection of the disease and reinforcement of the need for follow-up; however, real-world barriers must be addressed before widespread adoption of such a novel model of care becomes feasible. PMID:24991381

  16. The effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in the progression of bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Aldebasi, Yousef H; Rahmani, Arshad H; Khan, Amjad A; Aly, Salah Mesalhy

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy is a major public health and economical burden worldwide. Despite its high prevalence, the molecular mechanisms that induce or develop bladder carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy progression are poorly understood but it might be due to the disturbance in balance between angiogenic factors such as VEGF and antiangiogenic factors such as pigment epithelium derived growth factor. VEGF is one of the important survival factors for endothelial cells in the process of normal physiological and abnormal angiogenesis and induce the expression of antiapoptotic proteins in the endothelial cells. It is also the major initiator of angiogenesis in cancer and diabetic retinopathy, where it is up-regulated by oncogenic expression and different type of growth factors. The alteration in VEGF and VEGF receptors gene and overexpression, determines a diseases phenotype and ultimately the patient’s clinical outcome. However, expressional and molecular studies were made on VEGF to understand the exact mechanism of action in the genesis and progression of bladder carcinoma and diabetic retinopathy , but still how VEGF mechanism involve in such type of disease progression are not well defined. Some other factors also play a significant role in the process of activation of VEGF pathways. Therefore, further detailed analysis via molecular and therapeutic is needed to know the exact mechanisms of VEGF in the angiogenesis pathway. The detection of these types of diseases at an early stage, predict how it will behave and act in response to treatment through regulation of VEGF pathways. The present review aimed to summarize the mechanism of alteration of VEGF gene pathways, which play a vital role in the development and progression of bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:23641300

  17. Paradoxical hypertension with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Herzog, Eyal; Halpern, Dan G; Messerli, Franz H

    2012-10-01

    Subacute (medical) tamponade develops over a period of days or even weeks. Previous studies have shown that subacute tamponade is uncommonly associated with hypotension. On the contrary, many of those patients are indeed hypertensive at initial presentation. We sought to determine the prevalence and predictors of hypertensive cardiac tamponade and hemodynamic response to pericardial effusion drainage. We conducted a retrospective study of patients who underwent pericardial effusion drainage for subacute pericardial tamponade. Diagnosis of pericardial tamponade was established by the treating physician based on clinical data and supportive echocardiographic findings. Patients were defined as hypertensive if initial systolic blood pressure (BP) was ≥140 mm Hg. Thirty patients with subacute tamponade who underwent pericardial effusion drainage were included in the analysis. Eight patients (27%) were hypertensive with a mean systolic BP of 167 compared to 116 mm Hg in 22 nonhypertensive patients. Hypertensive patients with tamponade were more likely to have advanced renal disease (63% vs 14%, p <0.05) and pre-existing hypertension (88% vs 46, p <0.05) and less likely to have systemic malignancy (0 vs 41%, p <0.05). Systolic BP decreased significantly in patients with hypertensive tamponade after pericardial effusion drainage. Those results are consistent with previous studies with an estimated prevalence of hypertensive tamponade from 27% to 43%. In conclusion, a hypertensive response was observed in approximately 1/3 of patients with subacute pericardial tamponade. Relief of cardiac tamponade commonly resulted in a decrease in BP.

  18. Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Rachita S; Baracco, Rossana; Jain, Amrish; Mattoo, Tej K

    2016-04-01

    Prevalence of hypertension is increasing in children and adolescents. Uncontrolled hypertension in children not only causes end organ damage but also increases the risk of adult hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Clinical trials have proven efficacy of antihypertensive medications in children. These medications are well tolerated by children with acceptable safety profile. The choice of agent is usually driven by underlying etiology of hypertension, profile of its side effects, and clinician's preference. This article will review currently available pediatric data on mechanism of action, common adverse effects, pediatric indication, recent clinical trial, and newer drugs in the common classes of antihypertensive medications.

  19. Obesity: A Perspective from Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Susic, Dinko; Varagic, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity-related hypertension is high worldwide and has become a major health issue. The mechanisms by which obesity relates to hypertensive disease are still under intense research scrutiny, and include altered hemodynamics, impaired sodium homeostasis, renal dysfunction, autonomic nervous system imbalance, endocrine alterations, oxidative stress and inflammation, and vascular injury. Most of these contributing factors interact with each other at multiple levels. Thus, as a multifactorial and complex disease, obesity-related hypertension should be recognized as a distinctive form of hypertension, and specific considerations should apply in planning therapeutic approaches to treat obese individuals with high blood pressure.

  20. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Manuel de Sousa; Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Oliveira, Eduardo Infante de; Carvalho, Henrique Cyrne de

    2015-02-01

    There is a marked contrast between the high prevalence of hypertension and the low rates of adequate control. A subset of patients with suboptimal blood pressure control have drug-resistant hypertension, in the pathophysiology of which chronic sympathetic hyperactivation is significantly involved. Sympathetic renal denervation has recently emerged as a device-based treatment for resistant hypertension. In this review, the pathophysiological mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous system and cardiovascular disease are reviewed, focusing on resistant hypertension and the role of sympathetic renal denervation. An update on experimental and clinical results is provided, along with potential future indications for this device-based technique in other cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions pulmonary arterial hypertension pulmonary arterial hypertension Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disorder characterized by abnormally high ...

  2. Liquorice: a root cause of secondary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Calum N.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a patient presenting with hypertension and hypokalaemia who was ultimately diagnosed with liquorice- induced pseudohyperaldosteronism. This rare cause of secondary hypertension illustrates the importance of a methodical approach to the assessment of hypertension. PMID:28210494

  3. Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, Karen; Ojji, Dike; Bachelier, Katrin; Böhm, Michael; Damasceno, Albertino; Stewart, Simon

    2014-07-01

    Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease is one of the main contributors to a growing burden of non-communicable forms of cardiovascular disease around the globe. The recently published global burden of disease series showed a 33 % increase of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy in the past two decades with long-term consequences. Africans, particularly younger African women, appear to be bearing the brunt of this increasing public health problem. Hypertensive heart disease is particularly problematic in pregnancy and is an important contributor to maternal case-fatality. European physicians increasingly need to attend to patients from African decent and need to know about unique aspects of disease presentation and pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological care. Reductions in salt consumption, as well as timely detection and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease remain a priority for effective primary and secondary prevention of CVD (particularly stroke and CHF) in African women. This article reviews the pattern, potential causes and consequences and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women, identifying the key challenges for effective primary and secondary prevention in this regard.

  4. Drug induced hypertension--An unappreciated cause of secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Messerli, Franz H; Grossman, Ehud

    2015-09-15

    Most patients with hypertension have essential hypertension or well-known forms of secondary hypertension, such as renal disease, renal artery stenosis, or common endocrine diseases (hyperaldosteronism or pheochromocytoma). Physicians are less aware of drug induced hypertension. A variety of therapeutic agents or chemical substances may increase blood pressure. When a patient with well controlled hypertension is presented with acute blood pressure elevation, use of drug or chemical substance which increases blood pressure should be suspected. Drug-induced blood pressure increases are usually minor and short-lived, although rare hypertensive emergencies associated with use of certain drugs have been reported. Careful evaluation of prescription and non-prescription medications is crucial in the evaluation of the hypertensive individual and may obviate the need for expensive and unnecessary evaluations. Discontinuation of the offending agent will usually achieve adequate blood pressure control. When use of a chemical agent which increases blood pressure is mandatory, anti-hypertensive therapy may facilitate continued use of this agent. We summarize the therapeutic agents or chemical substances that elevate blood pressure and their mechanisms of action.

  5. [Chronotherapy in arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bendersky, M

    2015-01-01

    The blood pressure profile in most normo- and hypertensive subjects are currently known, as well as the impact their changes induced on the cardio- and cerebrovascular risk. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has contributed greatly to the knowledge of this parameter. It to correct the schedule of drug administration (chronotherapy) with changes in any component of the BP profile that have better correlation with risk. These include the nocturnal decrease and the morning BP surge. Investigations in this direction are still scarce, and multicenter studies need to be conducted that can answer the true preventive impact of such modifications.

  6. Management of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Essop, M R; Galie, N; Badesch, D B; Lalloo, U; Mahomed, A G; Naidoo, D P; Ntsekhe, M; Williams, P G

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a potentially lethal disease mainly affecting young females. Although the precise mechanism of PAH is unknown, the past decade has seen the advent of many new classes of drugs with improvement in the overall prognosis of the disease. Unfortunately the therapeutic options for PAH in South Africa are severely limited. The Working Group on PAH is a joint effort by the South African Heart Association and the South African Thoracic Society tasked with improving the recognition and management of patients with PAH. This article provides a brief summary of the disease and the recommendations of the first meeting of the Working Group.

  7. Comparisons of serum miRNA expression profiles in patients with diabetic retinopathy and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianping; Wang, Jufang; Liu, Yanfen; Wang, Changyi; Duan, Donghui; Lu, Nanjia; Wang, Kaiyue; Zhang, Lu; Gu, Kaibo; Chen, Sihan; Zhang, Tao; You, Dingyun; Han, Liyuan

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the expression levels of serum miRNAs in diabetic retinopathy and type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Serum miRNA expression profiles from diabetic retinopathy cases (type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with diabetic retinopathy) and type 2 diabetes mellitus controls (type 2 diabetes mellitus patients without diabetic retinopathy) were examined by miRNA-specific microarray analysis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to validate the significantly differentially expressed serum miRNAs from the microarray analysis of 45 diabetic retinopathy cases and 45 age-, sex-, body mass index- and duration-of-diabetes-matched type 2 diabetes mellitus controls. The relative changes in serum miRNA expression levels were analyzed using the 2-ΔΔCt method. RESULTS: A total of 5 diabetic retinopathy cases and 5 type 2 diabetes mellitus controls were included in the miRNA-specific microarray analysis. The serum levels of miR-3939 and miR-1910-3p differed significantly between the two groups in the screening stage; however, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction did not reveal significant differences in miRNA expression for 45 diabetic retinopathy cases and their matched type 2 diabetes mellitus controls. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that miR-3939 and miR-1910-3p may not play important roles in the development of diabetic retinopathy; however, studies with a larger sample size are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:28273235

  8. The Immune System in Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  9. Endocrine causes of secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2008-07-01

    Secondary hypertension is common in clinical practice if a broad definition is applied. Various patterns of hypertension exist in the patient with an endocrine source of their disease, including new-onset hypertension in a previously normotensive individual, a loss of blood pressure control in a patient with previously well-controlled blood pressure, and/or labile blood pressure in the setting of either of these 2 patterns. A thorough history and physical exam, which can rule out concomitant medications, alcohol intake, and over-the-counter medication use, is an important prerequisite to the workup for endocrine causes of hypertension. Endocrine forms of secondary hypertension, such as pheochromocytoma and Cushing's disease, are extremely uncommon. Conversely, primary aldosteronism now occurs with sufficient frequency so as to be considered "top of the list" for secondary endocrine causes in otherwise difficult-to-treat or resistant hypertension. Primary aldosteronism can be insidious in its presentation since a supposed hallmark finding, hypokalemia, may be variable in its presentation. It is important to identify secondary causes of hypertension that are endocrine in nature because surgical intervention may result in correction or substantial improvement of the hypertension.

  10. Insulin analogues may accelerate progression of diabetic retinopathy after impairment of inner blood-retinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Abdullah; Kar, Taner; Aksoy, Yakup; Özalper, Veysel; Başbuğ, Barbaros

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy regresses after spontaneous infarction or surgical ablation of pituitary gland. Growth hormone deficiency seems to be a protective factor for development of diabetic retinopathy in dwarfs. Despite the same glycemic control, development of diabetic retinopathy is significantly higher in pubertal subjects than pre-pubertal subjects. These evidences indicate a strong relationship between growth hormone and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is the most important mediator of effects of growth hormone (GH). It stimulates IGF-1 receptor. Insulin analogues also stimulate IGF-1 receptor. Therefore insulin analogues may show similar effects like growth hormone and deteriorate diabetic retinopathy. However we suggest that impairment degree of inner blood-retinal barrier should be considered for this claim. We hypothesize that insulin analogues have dual effects (beneficial and worsening) depending on stage of impairment of inner blood-retinal barrier. Insulin analogues protect pericytes and blood-retinal barrier by decreasing blood glucose level. Analogues may pass into the retinal tissue in very low amounts when inner blood-retinal barrier is intact. Therefore, insulin analogues may not deteriorate diabetic retinopathy but also have beneficial effect by protecting blood-retinal barrier at this stage. However, they may pass into the retinal tissue in much more amounts when inner blood-retinal barrier impairs. Analogues may deteriorate cellular composition of retina through stimulation of IGF-1 receptors. A number of different cell types, including glia, retinal pigment epithelial cells and fibroblast-like cells have been identified in diabetic epiretinal tissues. Insulin analogues may cause proliferation in these cells. A type of glial cell named Non-astrocytic Inner Retinal Glia-like (NIRG) cell was identified to be stimulated and proliferate by IGF-1. IGF has been reported to generate traction force in retinal

  11. Dapagliflozin reduces albuminuria in patients with diabetes and hypertension receiving renin‐angiotensin blockers

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, E.; Gause‐Nilsson, I.; Cain, V. A.; Sjöström, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To characterize the effect of dapagliflozin on albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and to determine whether effects on albuminuria were mediated through changes in glycated haemoblogin (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP), body weight or eGFR. Methods We conducted a post hoc analysis of data pooled from two phase III clinical trials in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) on stable angiotensin‐converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker therapy, randomly assigned to dapagliflozin 10 mg/day or matched placebo. This analysis included only patients with microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria at baseline. Results Patients were randomized to receive dapagliflozin 10 mg (n = 167) or placebo (n = 189). Dapagliflozin resulted in greater 12‐week reductions in albuminuria compared with placebo: −33.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) −45.4, −18.2]. The reduction in albuminuria was also present after adjusting for age, sex and changes in HbA1c, SBP, body weight and eGFR: −23.5% (95% CI −37.6, −6.3). There was a decrease in eGFR with dapagliflozin versus placebo that was readily reversed 1 week after last dose. No serious renal‐related adverse events were observed in any group. Conclusions Dapagliflozin was effective in lowering albuminuria in patients with T2DM and hypertension using renin‐angiotensin system blockade therapy. Reductions in albuminuria were still present after adjusting for changes in HbA1c, SBP, body weight and eGFR. Dapagliflozin‐induced improvements in glycaemic control and reductions in SBP, coupled with other potentially beneficial renal effects, may lead to a reduced long‐term renal and cardiovascular risk. PMID:26936519

  12. Hypertensive emergencies. Etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Meryem; Ram, Venkata C S

    2003-01-01

    Although systemic hypertension is a common clinical disorder, hypertensive emergencies are unusual in clinical practice. Situations that qualify as hypertensive emergencies include accelerated or malignant hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute left ventricular failure, acute aortic dissection, pheochromocytoma crisis, interaction between tyramine-containing foods or drugs and monoamine oxidase inhibitors, eclampsia, drug-induced hypertension and possibly intracranial hemorrhage. It is important to recognize these conditions since immediate lowering of systemic blood pressure is indicated. The diagnosis of hypertensive emergencies depends on the clinical manifestations rather than on the absolute level of the blood pressure. Depending on the target organ that is affected, the manifestations of hypertensive emergencies can be quite expressive, yet variable. Thus, the physician has to make the clinical diagnosis urgently in order to render appropriate therapy. Several parenteral drugs can quickly and effectively lower the blood pressure in hypertensive emergencies. Intravenous fenoldopam, a selective dopamine (DA1) receptor agonist, offers the advantage of improving renal blood flow and causing natriuresis. Intravenous nicardipine may be beneficial in reserving tissue perfusion in patients with ischemic disorders. Whereas trimethaphan camsilate is the drug of choice for managing acute aortic dissection, hydralazine remains the drug of choice for the treatment of eclampsia. The alpha-adrenoceptor, phentolamine, is useful in patients with pheochromocytoma crisis. Enalaprilat is the only ACE inhibitor available for parenteral use and may be particularly useful in treating hypertensive emergencies in patients with heart failure. However, ACE inhibitors may cause a precipitous fall in blood pressure in patients who are hypovolemic. Although useful as adjunctive therapy in hypertensive crises, diuretics should be used with caution in these patients because prior

  13. The evaluation of retinal circulation in advanced diabetic retinopathy before and after panretinal laser photocoagulation by scanning laser opthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Tadashi

    2005-07-01

    I investigated the effects of panretinal laser photocoagulation (PRP) on the velocity of retinal circulation in diabetic retinopathy. The retinal circulation was evaluated by means of rapid serial fluorescein angiography (FAG), employing scanning laser ophthalmoscope. FAG was conducted at the rate of 30 frames per seconds in video-tape. Disc-to-macula transit time (DMTT) was defined as the parameter to evaluate the retinal circulation. Diabetic 28 eyes with advanced diabetic retinopathy were examined to measure the DMTT before and after PRP. Normal 30 eyes used as control. Mean DMTT decreased from 9.8+/-1.5 seconds before PRP to 8.2+/-1.5 seconds after PRP in 28 diabetic eyes. The value with improvement after PRP was significantly shorter than the value before PRP ( p < 0.05 ). These values before and after PRP were significantly longer than that (3.7+/-0.7 seconds ) in normal 30 eyes ( p < 0.01 ). Retinal circulation is retarded in diabetic retinopathy. The retardation of retinal circulation in diabetic retinopathy improves after PRP, but the value after PRP can not recover until the control level. This study was performed to reveal therapeutic effect to panretinal laser photocoagulation (PRP) for the retardation of retinal circulation in diabetic retinopathy. I investigated the effects of PRP on the velocity of retinal circulation in patients with advanced diabetic retinopathy.

  14. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  15. Exercise, the Brain, and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Peri-Okonny, Poghni; Fu, Qi; Zhang, Rong; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-10-01

    Exercise training is the cornerstone in the prevention and management of hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, blood pressure (BP) response to exercise is exaggerated in hypertension often to the range that raises the safety concern, which may prohibit patients from regular exercise. This augmented pressor response is shown to be related to excessive sympathetic stimulation caused by overactive muscle reflex. Exaggerated sympathetic-mediated vasoconstriction further contributes to the rise in BP during exercise in hypertension. Exercise training has been shown to reduce both exercise pressor reflex and attenuate the abnormal vasoconstriction. Hypertension also contributes to cognitive impairment, and exercise training has been shown to improve cognitive function through both BP-dependent and BP-independent pathways. Additional studies are still needed to determine if newer modes of exercise training such as high-intensity interval training may offer advantages over traditional continuous moderate training in improving BP and brain health in hypertensive patients.

  16. Elevated Levels of Plasma IgA Autoantibodies against Oxidized LDL Found in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy but Not in Nonproliferative Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Savolainen, Markku J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. This study investigated the association of autoantibodies binding to oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Methods. Plasma from 229 types 1 and 2 patients with DR including diabetic macular edema (DME) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was analysed with ELISA-based assay to determine IgA, IgG, and IgM autoantibody levels binding to oxLDL. The controls were 106 diabetic patients without retinopathy (NoDR) and 139 nondiabetic controls (C). Results. PDR group had significantly higher IgA autoantibody levels than DME or NoDR: mean 94.9 (SD 54.7) for PDR, 75.5 (41.8) for DME (p = 0.001), and 76.1 (48.2) for NoDR (p = 0.008). There were no differences in IgG, IgM, or IgA that would be specific for DR or for DME. Type 2 diabetic patients had higher levels of IgA autoantibodies than type 1 diabetic patients (86.0 and 65.5, resp., p = 0.004) and the highest levels in IgA were found in type 2 diabetic patients with PDR (119.1, p > 0.001). Conclusions. IgA autoantibodies were increased in PDR, especially in type 2 diabetes. The high levels of IgA in PDR, and especially in type 2 PDR patients, reflect the inflammatory process and enlighten the role of oxLDL and its autoantibodies in PDR. PMID:28090539

  17. Pulmonary hypertension in polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Liu, Tao; Cai, Ying-ying; Luo, Lian; Wang, Meng; Yang, Mengmeng; Cai, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is relatively common in connective tissue diseases. However, few studies have focused on the pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with polymyositis (PM). Our aim is to investigate the prevalence of PH and determine the associated factors for PH in patients with PM. Multicenter study of 61 patients with PM underwent evaluation including general information, physical examination, laboratory indictors, thoracic high-resolution CT (HRCT) imaging, and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). TTE was performed to estimate the pulmonary arterial pressure. PH was defined as resting systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) ≥40 mmHg. PH was identified in ten patients (16.39 %) who had few cardiopulmonary symptoms. PM patients with PH had higher prevalence of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pericardial effusion (PE) compared with patients without PH (18 vs. 11.5 %, p = 0.005; 11.5 vs. 9.8 %, p = 0.004; respectively). After controlling for age, gender, and potential factors, ILD and PE were independently associated with PH in patients with PM in multivariate analysis (OR = 8.193, 95 % CI 1.241-54.084, p = 0.029; OR = 8.265, 95 % CI 1.298-52.084, p = 0.025; respectively). Depending on TTE, the possible prevalence of PH was 16.39 % in patients with PM. Both ILD and PE may contribute to the development of PH in PM.

  18. Evaluation and management of pediatric hypertensive crises: hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirali H; Romero, Sarah K; Kaelber, David C

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) in the pediatric population is estimated to have a world-wide prevalence of 2%–5%. As with adults, pediatric patients with HTN can present with hypertensive crises include hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies. However, pediatric blood pressure problems have a greater chance of being from secondary causes of HTN, as opposed to primary HTN, than in adults. Thorough evaluation of a child with a hypertensive emergency includes accurate blood pressure readings, complete and focused symptom history, and appropriate past medical, surgical, and family history. Physical exam should include height, weight, four-limb blood pressures, a general overall examination and especially detailed cardiovascular and neurological examinations, including fundoscopic examination. Initial work-up should typically include electrocardiography, chest X-ray, serum chemistries, complete blood count, and urinalysis. Initial management of hypertensive emergencies generally includes the use of intravenous or oral antihypertensive medications, as well as appropriate, typically outpatient, follow-up. Emergency department goals for hypertensive crises are to (1) safely lower blood pressure, and (2) treat/minimize acute end organ damage, while (3) identifying underlying etiology. Intravenous antihypertensive medications are the treatment modality of choice for hypertensive emergencies with the goal of reducing systolic blood pressure by 25% of the original value over an 8-hour period. PMID:27147865

  19. Masked Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Hansen, Tine W.; Boggia, José; Liu, Yanping; Asayama, Kei; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Filipovský, Jan; Imai, Yutaka; Wang, Jiguang; Ibsen, Hans; O’Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Although distinguishing features of masked hypertension in diabetics are well known, the significance of antihypertensive treatment on clinical practice decisions has not been fully explored. We analyzed 9691 subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. Prevalence of masked hypertension in untreated normotensive participants was higher (P<0.0001) among 229 diabetics (29.3%, n=67) than among 5486 nondiabetics (18.8%, n=1031). Over a median of 11.0 years of follow-up, the adjusted risk for a composite cardiovascular end point in untreated diabetic-masked hypertensives tended to be higher than in normotensives (hazard rate [HR], 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97–3.97; P=0.059), similar to untreated stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 1.07; CI, 0.58–1.98; P=0.82), but less than stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.53; CI, 0.29–0.99; P=0.048). In contrast, cardiovascular risk was not significantly different in antihypertensive-treated diabetic-masked hypertensives, as compared with the normotensive comparator group (HR, 1.13; CI, 0.54–2.35; P=0.75), stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 0.91; CI, 0.49–1.69; P=0.76), and stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.65; CI, 0.35–1.20; P=0.17). In the untreated diabetic-masked hypertensive population, mean conventional systolic/diastolic blood pressure was 129.2±8.0/76.0±7.3 mm Hg, and mean daytime systolic/diastolic blood pressure 141.5±9.1/83.7±6.5 mm Hg. In conclusion, masked hypertension occurred in 29% of untreated diabetics, had comparable cardiovascular risk as stage 1 hypertension, and would require considerable reduction in conventional blood pressure to reach daytime ambulatory treatment goal. Importantly, many hypertensive diabetics when receiving antihypertensive therapy can present with normalized conventional and elevated ambulatory blood pressure that mimics masked hypertension. PMID:23478096

  20. Comparative systems pharmacology of HIF stabilization in the prevention of retinopathy of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, George; Yoon, Suzy; Gopalan, Banu; Savage, Alexandria R.; Brown, Rebecca; Case, Kelsey; Vasanji, Amit; Chan, E. Ricky; Silver, Randi B.; Sears, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) causes 100,000 new cases of childhood blindness each year. ROP is initiated by oxygen supplementation necessary to prevent neonatal death. We used organ systems pharmacology to define the transcriptomes of mice that were cured of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR, ROP model) by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilization via HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibition using the isoquinolone Roxadustat or the 2-oxoglutarate analog dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG). Although both molecules conferred a protective phenotype, gene expression analysis by RNA sequencing found that Roxadustat can prevent OIR by two pathways: direct retinal HIF stabilization and induction of aerobic glycolysis or indirect hepatic HIF-1 stabilization and increased serum angiokines. As predicted by pathway analysis, Roxadustat rescued the hepatic HIF-1 knockout mouse from retinal oxygen toxicity, whereas DMOG could not. The simplicity of systemic treatment that targets both the liver and the eye provides a rationale for protecting the severely premature infant from oxygen toxicity. PMID:27091985

  1. Comparative systems pharmacology of HIF stabilization in the prevention of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, George; Yoon, Suzy; Gopalan, Banu; Savage, Alexandria R; Brown, Rebecca; Case, Kelsey; Vasanji, Amit; Chan, E Ricky; Silver, Randi B; Sears, Jonathan E

    2016-05-03

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) causes 100,000 new cases of childhood blindness each year. ROP is initiated by oxygen supplementation necessary to prevent neonatal death. We used organ systems pharmacology to define the transcriptomes of mice that were cured of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR, ROP model) by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilization via HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibition using the isoquinolone Roxadustat or the 2-oxoglutarate analog dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG). Although both molecules conferred a protective phenotype, gene expression analysis by RNA sequencing found that Roxadustat can prevent OIR by two pathways: direct retinal HIF stabilization and induction of aerobic glycolysis or indirect hepatic HIF-1 stabilization and increased serum angiokines. As predicted by pathway analysis, Roxadustat rescued the hepatic HIF-1 knockout mouse from retinal oxygen toxicity, whereas DMOG could not. The simplicity of systemic treatment that targets both the liver and the eye provides a rationale for protecting the severely premature infant from oxygen toxicity.

  2. Retrieving clinically relevant diabetic retinopathy images using a multi-class multiple-instance framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandakkar, Parag S.; Venkatesan, Ragav; Li, Baoxin

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a vision-threatening complication from diabetes mellitus, a medical condition that is rising globally. Unfortunately, many patients are unaware of this complication because of absence of symptoms. Regular screening of DR is necessary to detect the condition for timely treatment. Content-based image retrieval, using archived and diagnosed fundus (retinal) camera DR images can improve screening efficiency of DR. This content-based image retrieval study focuses on two DR clinical findings, microaneurysm and neovascularization, which are clinical signs of non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The authors propose a multi-class multiple-instance image retrieval framework which deploys a modified color correlogram and statistics of steerable Gaussian Filter responses, for retrieving clinically relevant images from a database of DR fundus image database.

  3. Automated detection of leakage in fluorescein angiography images with application to malarial retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yitian; MacCormick, Ian J C; Parry, David G; Leach, Sophie; Beare, Nicholas A V; Harding, Simon P; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-06-01

    The detection and assessment of leakage in retinal fluorescein angiogram images is important for the management of a wide range of retinal diseases. We have developed a framework that can automatically detect three types of leakage (large focal, punctate focal, and vessel segment leakage) and validated it on images from patients with malarial retinopathy. This framework comprises three steps: vessel segmentation, saliency feature generation and leakage detection. We tested the effectiveness of this framework by applying it to images from 20 patients with large focal leak, 10 patients with punctate focal leak, and 5,846 vessel segments from 10 patients with vessel leakage. The sensitivity in detecting large focal, punctate focal and vessel segment leakage are 95%, 82% and 81%, respectively, when compared to manual annotation by expert human observers. Our framework has the potential to become a powerful new tool for studying malarial retinopathy, and other conditions involving retinal leakage.

  4. Automated Detection of Leakage in Fluorescein Angiography Images with Application to Malarial Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yitian; J. C. MacCormick, Ian; G. Parry, David; Leach, Sophie; A. V. Beare, Nicholas; P. Harding, Simon; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    The detection and assessment of leakage in retinal fluorescein angiogram images is important for the management of a wide range of retinal diseases. We have developed a framework that can automatically detect three types of leakage (large focal, punctate focal, and vessel segment leakage) and validated it on images from patients with malarial retinopathy. This framework comprises three steps: vessel segmentation, saliency feature generation and leakage detection. We tested the effectiveness of this framework by applying it to images from 20 patients with large focal leak, 10 patients with punctate focal leak, and 5,846 vessel segments from 10 patients with vessel leakage. The sensitivity in detecting large focal, punctate focal and vessel segment leakage are 95%, 82% and 81%, respectively, when compared to manual annotation by expert human observers. Our framework has the potential to become a powerful new tool for studying malarial retinopathy, and other conditions involving retinal leakage. PMID:26030010

  5. [The origin of papillary neovascularization in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Sdobnikova, S V; Mazurina, N K

    2004-01-01

    The case study covers examinations of 63 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), type 1, and with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). According to the results of fluorescence angiography, the patients were shared between 3 groups: Group 1--early contrasting of papillary vascular neoplasms; Group 2--late contrasting; and Group 3--mixed contrasting. We explained the available differences by that the vascular neoplasms of the optic nerve disk (OND) originate from 2 main blood supply basins, i.e. choroidal and retinal ones. They reflect, with respect to the above stated, the hemodynamic properties of the choroidal mycocirculation, which is characterized by a higher hemodynamic load and a higher intravascular pressure, or the retinal hemomicrocirculation. The pathological signs of diabetic retinopathy in the choroidal system may fail to correlate with changes in the retinal vascular system itself. Therefore, the findings of fluorescence angiography do not always represent the genuine scope of pathological manifestations occurring in the hemomicrocirculation system in case of PDR.

  6. Use of digital retinal imaging in screening for retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Yogavijayan; Smith, Roger; Wright, Ian; Hartley, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of premature births is increasing world-wide. This factor, combined with improved survival and revised screening criteria, is resulting in an increased workload in screening for retinopathy of prematurity. Digital retinal imaging is emerging as an important alternative tool for diagnosing retinopathy of prematurity, and its use has even been extended to developing countries. Neonatal nurses and technicians can be trained to use digital imaging devices effectively. This is important in areas that do not have ready access to paediatric ophthalmologists. The ability to transfer images electronically makes it a valuable tool in telemedicine, while the ability to store and retrieve images is also advantageous from a medico-legal perspective. Image analysis software can further improve the accuracy of diagnosis. The main limitation of this technology is its high capital cost.

  7. Comparison of Efficacy and Side Effects of Multispot Lasers and Conventional Lasers for Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Çeliker, Hande; Erdağı Bulut, Azer; Şahin, Özlem

    2017-01-01

    Panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) is a standard treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Conventional laser (CL) therapy is performed in one or more sessions in single spot mode. Visual disabilities have been reported after treatment with CL, including central vision loss due to macular edema and peripheral visual field loss resulting from extensive inner retinal scarring. Multispot laser (MSL) photocoagulation has recently been introduced to clinical practice. Studies comparing PRP conducted with MSL and CL have reported that MSLs resulted in less retinal tissue damage and pain, and greater patient comfort compared to CL. The aim of this review was to compare the efficacy and side effects of MSLs and CLs for diabetic retinopathy treatment. PMID:28182169

  8. Downregulated Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Pathophysiology of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Behl, Tapan; Kotwani, Anita

    2017-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of neurotrophin growth factor family, physiologically mediates induction of neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation, promotes neuronal growth and survival and maintains synaptic plasticity and neuronal interconnections. Unlike the central nervous system, its secretion in the peripheral nervous system occurs in an activity-dependent manner. BDNF improves neuronal mortality, growth, differentiation and maintenance. It also provides neuroprotection against several noxious stimuli, thereby preventing neuronal damage during pathologic conditions. However, in diabetic retinopathy (a neuromicrovascular disorder involving immense neuronal degeneration), BDNF fails to provide enough neuroprotection against oxidative stress-induced retinal neuronal apoptosis. This review describes the prime reasons for the downregulation of BDNF-mediated neuroprotective actions during hyperglycemia, which renders retinal neurons vulnerable to damaging stimuli, leading to diabetic retinopathy.

  9. Weight control in the management of hypertension. World Hypertension League.

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    This article, which includes a brief description of the mechanisms and some epidemiological findings in obesity and high blood pressure, sums up present knowledge on a complex subject and provides guidance to medical practitioners on the management of obese hypertensive patients. Weight reduction, together with drug therapy in severe and moderate hypertension, and other non-pharmacological methods and continuing observation in mild hypertension are the essential measures to be applied. In addition to the lowering of blood pressure, weight loss offers several other metabolic and haemodynamic benefits. PMID:2670295

  10. Methylene blue prevents retinal damage in an experimental model of ischemic proliferative retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Rey-Funes, Manuel; Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Fernández, Juan C; Contartese, Daniela S; Rolón, Federico; Inserra, Pablo I F; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; López-Costa, Juan J; Dorfman, Verónica B; Martínez, Alfredo; Loidl, César F

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal asphyxia induces retinal lesions, generating ischemic proliferative retinopathy, which may result in blindness. Previously, we showed that the nitrergic system was involved in the physiopathology of perinatal asphyxia. Here we analyze the application of methylene blue, a well-known soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, as a therapeutic strategy to prevent retinopathy. Male rats (n = 28 per group) were treated in different ways: 1) control group comprised born-to-term animals; 2) methylene blue group comprised animals born from pregnant rats treated with methylene blue (2 mg/kg) 30 and 5 min before delivery; 3) perinatal asphyxia (PA) group comprised rats exposed to perinatal asphyxia (20 min at 37°C); and 4) methylene blue-PA group comprised animals born from pregnant rats treated with methylene blue (2 mg/kg) 30 and 5 min before delivery, and then the pups were subjected to PA as above. For molecular studies, mRNA was obtained at different times after asphyxia, and tissue was collected at 30 days for morphological and biochemical analysis. Perinatal asphyxia produced significant gliosis, angiogenesis, and thickening of the inner retina. Methylene blue treatment reduced these parameters. Perinatal asphyxia resulted in a significant elevation of the nitrergic system as shown by NO synthase (NOS) activity assays, Western blotting, and (immuno)histochemistry for the neuronal isoform of NOS and NADPH-diaphorase activity. All these parameters were also normalized by the treatment. In addition, methylene blue induced the upregulation of the anti-angiogenic peptide, pigment epithelium-derived factor. Application of methylene blue reduced morphological and biochemical parameters of retinopathy. This finding suggests the use of methylene blue as a new treatment to prevent or decrease retinal damage in the context of ischemic proliferative retinopathy.

  11. Inverse Association between Serum Bilirubin Levels and Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Raghuram; Thankappan, Lekha; Andavar, Raghuram; Devisundaram, Sundar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) and serum bilirubin has been shown to have antioxidant properties. Aim To investigate the association between serum bilirubin concentration and DR in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Materials and Methods This was a hospital based, cross- sectional study where in 86 patients with Type 2 DM and 30 controls were recruited. The study was conducted at a tertiary care centre in Southern India between January 2014 and December 2014. The presence and the severity of DR were determined by fundus examination and grading of colour fundus photographs using the international clinical disease severity scale for DR. Serum total, direct and indirect bilirubin levels were determined in all subjects and the association between bilirubin levels and severity of DR was studied. Results Among the 86 diabetics, 24 had no retinopathy and 62 had DR of varying grades. The mean total bilirubin level among diabetic subjects (0.52±0.17) and controls (0.51±0.19) were found to be similar. The mean total as well as direct bilirubin levels were found to be lower in patients with retinopathy as compared to no retinopathy group (p<0.001). The severity of DR was inversely proportional to the serum bilirubin levels (p=0.010). Serum total bilirubin was found to have a negative association with glycosylated haemoglobin and served as an independent determinant of DR even after adjusting for risk factors known to be associated with DR (p=0.001). Conclusion Low serum bilirubin levels are significantly associated with increased risk of DR independent of classic risk factors. Serum bilirubin can serve as a useful biomarker in identifying patients at risk for developing proliferative DR. PMID:28384901

  12. Molecular Markers of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Screening Tool of the Future?

    PubMed Central

    Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Learn-Han; Abdul Kadir, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is among the leading causes of new onset blindness in adults. Effective treatment may delay the onset and progression of this disease provided it is diagnosed early. At present retinopathy can only be diagnosed via formal examination of the eye by a trained specialist, which limits the population that can be effectively screened. An easily accessible, reliable screening biomarker of diabetic retinopathy would be of tremendous benefit in detecting the population in need of further assessment and treatment. This review highlights specific biomarkers that show promise as screening markers to detect early diabetic retinopathy or even to detect patients at increased risk of DR at the time of diagnosis of diabetes. The pathobiology of DR is complex and multifactorial giving rise to a wide array of potential biomarkers. This review provides an overview of these pathways and looks at older markers such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs), inflammatory markers, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as other newer proteins with a role in the pathogenesis of DR including neuroprotective factors such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor (PEDF); SA100A12, pentraxin 3, brain natriuretic peptide, apelin 3, and chemerin as well as various metabolites such as lipoprotein A, folate, and homocysteine. We also consider the possible role of proteins identified through proteomics work whose levels are altered in the sera of patients with DR as screening markers though their role in pathophysiology remains to be characterized. The role of microRNA as a promising new screening marker is also discussed. PMID:27313539

  13. Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity in an Infant with Adenoviral Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Gunay, Murat; Celik, Gokhan; Con, Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has been a major problematic disorder during childhood. Laser photocoagulation (LPC) has been proven to be effective in most of the ROP cases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis (AVC) is responsible for epidemics among adult and pediatric population. It has also been reported to be a cause of outbreaks in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) several times. We herein demonstrate a case with AVC who underwent LPC for ROP. And we discuss the treatment methodology in such cases. PMID:25874149

  14. Diabetic retinopathy equity profile in a multi-ethnic, deprived population in Northern England

    PubMed Central

    Kliner, M; Fell, G; Gibbons, C; Dhothar, M; Mookhtiar, M; Cassels-Brown, A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Equity profiles are an established public health tool used to systematically identify and address inequity within health and health services. Our aim was to conduct an equity profile to identify inequity in eye health across Leeds and Bradford. This paper presents results of findings for diabetic retinopathy in Bradford and Airedale. Methods A variety of routine health data were included and sub-analysed by measures of equity, including age, sex, ethnicity, and deprivation to identify inequity in eye health and healthcare. The Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient was used to determine the association between variables. Results The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in Bradford and Airedale district is 6.6% compared to 4.3% in nearby Leeds and 5.1% nationally. The age-standardised prevalence of diagnosed diabetic retinopathy within Bradford and Airedale is 2.21% (95% CI 1.54–2.26%), with a disproportionately high prevalence of disease in the Pakistani population and the most deprived parts of the population. There was a poorer uptake of diabetic retinopathy screening in more deprived parts of the district and the proportions with a higher rate of referral to ophthalmology following the screening in Black and Minority Ethnic populations compared with the white population (13.2% vs6.9%). Uptake of secondary care outpatient appointments is much lower in more deprived populations. Conclusion Inequalities are inherent in diabetic retinopathy prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment. The reasons for these inequities are multi-factorial and further investigation of reasons for poor uptake of services is required. Addressing the inequalities in eye health and healthcare requires cross-organisational collaboration. PMID:22302063

  15. Fulminant proliferative diabetic retinopathy in the non-photocoagulated eye following acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Jang, Liuna; Herbort, Carl P

    2016-12-01

    Management of diabetic retinopathy should follow more strict and aggressive rules in patients at risk for severe acute renal impairment. Such patients should be identified and possibly prophylactically laser treated to avoid the severe consequences demonstrated in this case report. A 34-year-old type 2 diabetes patient with a stabilized diabetic retinopathy developed acute and severe retinal decompensation within weeks after acute renal failure complicated his chronic stable renal impairment. Fluorescein angiographic and optical coherence tomographic illustrations of the rapid evolution of the retinal condition are presented. The patient had previously been treated with panretinal photocoagulation in his left eye. After 8 years of regular 6-monthly checked stability, he developed rapid-onset proliferative diabetic retinopathy and macular edema in his right eye within 3 months of his last ocular check-up. Fluorescein angiography showed neovessels and major ischemic areas. Emergency panretinal photocoagulation and a sub-Tenon's injection were necessary to achieve control of the situation with regression of neovessels and complete regression of macular edema. This case shows that it is imperative for nephrologists to be well informed about a patient's ocular situation in order to give timely information to the ophthalmologist who can intervene to protect the retina in case of renal failure. On the other hand, the ophthalmologist should be familiar with the renal function of his patient with renal impairment so that he can decide to perform prophylactic retinal panphotocoagulation that should be imperatively considered even without strict indications in patients with renal impairment at risk for further deterioration of renal function, in order to prevent such explosive ischemic and proliferative retinopathy putting vision at risk.

  16. Molecular Markers of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Screening Tool of the Future?

    PubMed

    Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Learn-Han; Abdul Kadir, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is among the leading causes of new onset blindness in adults. Effective treatment may delay the onset and progression of this disease provided it is diagnosed early. At present retinopathy can only be diagnosed via formal examination of the eye by a trained specialist, which limits the population that can be effectively screened. An easily accessible, reliable screening biomarker of diabetic retinopathy would be of tremendous benefit in detecting the population in need of further assessment and treatment. This review highlights specific biomarkers that show promise as screening markers to detect early diabetic retinopathy or even to detect patients at increased risk of DR at the time of diagnosis of diabetes. The pathobiology of DR is complex and multifactorial giving rise to a wide array of potential biomarkers. This review provides an overview of these pathways and looks at older markers such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs), inflammatory markers, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as other newer proteins with a role in the pathogenesis of DR including neuroprotective factors such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor (PEDF); SA100A12, pentraxin 3, brain natriuretic peptide, apelin 3, and chemerin as well as various metabolites such as lipoprotein A, folate, and homocysteine. We also consider the possible role of proteins identified through proteomics work whose levels are altered in the sera of patients with DR as screening markers though their role in pathophysiology remains to be characterized. The role of microRNA as a promising new screening marker is also discussed.

  17. Assessment of calcium dobesilate in diabetic retinopathy. A double-blind clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Salama Benarroch, I; Nano, H; Pérez, H; Elizalde, F; Bisceglia, H; Salama, A

    1977-01-01

    In this double-blind, randomized trial, which lasted for 2 years, the authors investigated the efficacy of calcium dobesilate on diabetic retinopathy. 68 patients (51 on the active substance, 17 on placebo) participated in the study. The statistical analysis of the results indicate that calcium dobesilate acts as a potent angioprotector, capable of preventing both intra and extraretinal hemorrhages. The drug also lowers the incidence of exudate formation and improves visual acuity.

  18. Targeting carbonic anhydrase to treat diabetic retinopathy: Emerging evidences and encouraging results

    SciTech Connect

    Weiwei, Zhang; Hu, Renming

    2009-12-18

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of vision loss among working-age populations in developed countries. Current treatment options are limited to tight glycemic, blood pressure control and destructive laser surgery. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a group of enzymes involving in the rapid conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Emerging evidences reveal CA inhibitors hold the promise for the treatment of DR. This article summarizes encouraging results from clinical and animal studies, and reviews the possible mechanisms.

  19. [Cancer associated retinopathy (CAR). Two clinical cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Matus, G; Dicato, M; Focan, C

    2007-03-01

    The cancer associated retinopathy (CAR) is a paraneoplasic retinopathy in which an antigen-antibody reaction, due to retinal antigens, also expressed in tumours, leads to degeneration of retinal photoreceptor cells. We observed in CHL-Luxembourg, 2 clinical cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with severe prognosis in whom we described the presence of anti-recoverin antibodies. The CAR is most frequently associated with small cell lung and ovarian carcinomas. Clinical symptoms (phosphenes, progressive loss of eyesight) sometimes, occur before the diagnostics of primary cancer. Retinal degeneration may be assessed by electroretinogram, visual field, fundus oculi. A crossed reactivity between tumour and retinal antigens may initiate an antigen-antibody reaction, that implicates optic lesions. Different antigenic proteins have been evidenced, the