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Sample records for hypertonically challenged imcd3

  1. Hypertonic saline challenge in an adult epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    Rabone, S J; Phoon, W O; Anderson, S D; Wan, K C; Seneviratne, M; Gutierrez, L; Brannan, J

    1996-06-01

    Bronchial provocation tests using pharmacological agents such as methacholine or histamine are used in epidemiological studies to identify asthma despite recognition of limitations in specificity, positive predictive value and availability of reagents. Hypertonic saline (4.5%) bronchial challenge (HSBC), although less sensitive than pharmacological challenges, is reportedly highly specific in diagnosing current asthma. Added advantages are that reagents are cheap, stable and recognized by participants. Thus, HSBC may offer benefits over pharmacological tests in epidemiological surveys. This paper reports on the second field survey using the test, a study of 99 adults from the timber industry in Western Australia. The test is described and critically appraised as a practical epidemiological tool for assessing asthma prevalence. At a cutoff point of 20% FEV, fall, HSBC was positive in 8% of subjects, appeared specific for asthma, was safe, well-accepted and easy to use in the field.

  2. Nucleoporin 88 (Nup88) is regulated by hypertonic stress in kidney cells to retain the transcription factor tonicity enhancer-binding protein (TonEBP) in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Andres-Hernando, Ana; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Rivard, Christopher J; Berl, Tomas

    2008-09-05

    Antibody microarray technology identified Nup88 (nucleoporin 88) as a highly up-regulated protein in response to osmotic stress in inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD3) cells. Changes in expression were verified by Western blot and quantitative PCR for protein and message expression. In mouse and human kidney, Nup88 expression was substantial in the papilla, whereas it was nearly absent in the cortex. Furthermore, the expression of Nup88 increased 410.4 +/- 22% in the papilla of mice after 36 h of thirsting. Nup88 protein expression in IMCD3 cells was significantly up-regulated in the first 8 h following exposure to acute osmotic stress, indicating that Nup88 is an early response protein. To define the function of Nup88 in the osmotic stress response, the transcription factor associated with hypertonicity, tonicity enhancer-binding protein (TonEBP), was cloned upstream of the green fluorescent protein. Employing this construct, we demonstrate that silencing Nup88 in IMCD3 cells acutely stressed to hypertonic conditions reduces nuclear retention of TonEBP, resulting in a substantial blunting in transcription of important osmotic stress response target genes and reduced cell viability. Finally, we show that in IMCD3 cells, nuclear export of TonEBP under isotonic conditions involves CRM-1 but under hypertonic stress is CRM1-independent. Our data, therefore, suggest that Nup88 is up-regulated in response to hypertonic stress and acts to retain TonEBP in the nucleus, activating transcription of critical osmoprotective genes.

  3. The voltage-dependent Cl− channel ClC-5 and plasma membrane Cl− conductances of mouse renal collecting duct cells (mIMCD-3)

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, J A; Stewart, G S; Boese, S H; Gray, M A; Pearce, S H S; Goodship, T H J; Simmons, N L

    2001-01-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that the voltage-dependent Cl− channel, ClC-5 functions as a plasma membrane Cl− conductance in renal inner medullary collecting duct cells. Full-length mouse kidney ClC-5 (mClC-5) was cloned and transiently expressed in CHO-K1 cells. Fast whole-cell patch-clamp recordings confirmed that mClC-5 expression produces a voltage-dependent, strongly outwardly rectifying Cl− conductance that was unaffected by external DIDS. Slow whole-cell recordings, using nystatin-perforated patches from transfected CHO-K1 cells, also produced voltage-dependent Cl− currents consistent with ClC-5 expression. However, under this recording configuration an endogenous DIDS-sensitive Ca2+-activated Cl− conductance was also evident, which appeared to be activated by green fluorescent protein (GFP) transfection. A mClC-5-GFP fusion protein was transiently expressed in CHO-K1 cells; confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed localization at the plasma membrane, consistent with patch-clamp experiments. Endogenous expression of mClC-5 was demonstrated in mouse renal collecting duct cells (mIMCD-3) by RT-PCR and by immunocytochemistry. Using slow whole-cell current recordings, mIMCD-3 cells displayed three biophysically distinct Cl−-selective currents, which were all inhibited by DIDS. However, no cells exhibited whole-cell currents that had mClC-5 characteristics. Transient transfection of mIMCD-3 cells with antisense mClC-5 had no effect on the endogenous Cl− conductances. Transient transfection with sense mClC-5 failed to induce the Cl− conductance seen in CHO-K1 cells but stimulated levels of the endogenous Ca2+-activated Cl− conductance 24 h post-transfection. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of mIMCD-3 cells transfected with mClC-5-GFP showed that the protein was absent from the plasma membrane and was instead localized to acidic endosomal compartments. These data discount a major role for ClC-5 as a plasma membrane Cl− conductance in

  4. Nucleoporin 88 (Nup88) Is Regulated by Hypertonic Stress in Kidney Cells to Retain the Transcription Factor Tonicity Enhancer-binding Protein (TonEBP) in the Nucleus*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Andres-Hernando, Ana; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Berl, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Antibody microarray technology identified Nup88 (nucleoporin 88) as a highly up-regulated protein in response to osmotic stress in inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD3) cells. Changes in expression were verified by Western blot and quantitative PCR for protein and message expression. In mouse and human kidney, Nup88 expression was substantial in the papilla, whereas it was nearly absent in the cortex. Furthermore, the expression of Nup88 increased 410.4 ± 22% in the papilla of mice after 36 h of thirsting. Nup88 protein expression in IMCD3 cells was significantly up-regulated in the first 8 h following exposure to acute osmotic stress, indicating that Nup88 is an early response protein. To define the function of Nup88 in the osmotic stress response, the transcription factor associated with hypertonicity, tonicity enhancer-binding protein (TonEBP), was cloned upstream of the green fluorescent protein. Employing this construct, we demonstrate that silencing Nup88 in IMCD3 cells acutely stressed to hypertonic conditions reduces nuclear retention of TonEBP, resulting in a substantial blunting in transcription of important osmotic stress response target genes and reduced cell viability. Finally, we show that in IMCD3 cells, nuclear export of TonEBP under isotonic conditions involves CRM-1 but under hypertonic stress is CRM1-independent. Our data, therefore, suggest that Nup88 is up-regulated in response to hypertonic stress and acts to retain TonEBP in the nucleus, activating transcription of critical osmoprotective genes. PMID:18606815

  5. Altered plasma and pituitary arginine vasotocin and hypothalamic provasotocin expression in flounder (Platichthys flesus) following hypertonic challenge and distribution of vasotocin receptors within the kidney.

    PubMed

    Warne, J M; Bond, H; Weybourne, E; Sahajpal, V; Lu, W; Balment, R J

    2005-12-01

    Plasma AVT concentration, pituitary AVT content, hypothalamic provasotocin mRNA expression and other osmoregulatory parameters were measured in euryhaline flounder 4, 8, and 24 h after the hypertonic challenge of transfer from fresh water (FW) to seawater (SW). Osmolality and the concentration of major plasma ions, sodium and chloride, were significantly higher in fish transferred to SW by comparison with time matched controls, an effect evident within 4 h. By comparison with time matched controls, pituitary store of AVT was lower while plasma AVT concentration was higher 8 and 24 h after transfer to SW. Higher provasotocin mRNA expression in the hypothalamus was also seen at 4 and 8 h in flounder transferred from FW to SW compared with time matched controls. The lower pituitary store and higher circulating levels imply substantial AVT secretion occurs in the early phase response to this hypertonic challenge. Changes in the regulation of AVT synthesis and secretion appeared quickly following movement to SW, consistent with the rapid osmoregulatory response, including reduced urine production that fish require to accommodate the dehydrative water losses and salt loading on exposure to the new hyperosmotic environment. qPCR measures of whole kidney vasotocin receptor mRNA expression indicated similar levels in SW and FW. Immunohistochemistry for the vasotocin receptor in flounder kidney showed localisation on the afferent and efferent arterioles of the glomerulus and on the capillary bed that extends from the efferent arteriole to the smooth muscle surrounding the collecting duct. Localisation of the vasotocin receptor was comparable in SW and FW fish.

  6. Effect of Atractylodes macrocephala on Hypertonic Stress-Induced Water Channel Protein Expression in Renal Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Pyo; Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, So Min; Yoon, Jung Joo; Kim, Hye Yoom; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-01-01

    Edema is a symptom that results from the abnormal accumulation of fluid in the body. The cause of edema is related to the level of aquaporin (AQP)2 protein expression, which regulates the reabsorption of water in the kidney. Edema is caused by overexpression of the AQP2 protein when the concentration of Na+ in the blood increases. The rhizome of Atractylodes macrocephala has been used in traditional oriental medicine as a diuretic drug; however, the mechanism responsible for the diuretic effect of the aqueous extract from A. macrocephala rhizomes (AAMs) has not yet been identified. We examined the effect of the AAM on the regulation of water channels in the mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD)-3 cells under hypertonic stress. Pretreatment of AAM attenuates a hypertonicity-induced increase in AQP2 expression as well as the trafficking of AQP2 to the apical plasma membrane. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is a transcription factor known to play a central role in cellular homeostasis by regulating the expression of some proteins, including AQP2. Western immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the protein and mRNA expression levels of TonEBP also decrease after AAM treatment. These results suggest that the AAM has a diuretic effect by suppressing water reabsorption via the downregulation of the TonEBP-AQP2 signaling pathway. PMID:23258995

  7. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1β Regulates Urinary Concentration and Response to Hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Aboudehen, Karam; Noureddine, Lama; Cobo-Stark, Patricia; Avdulov, Svetlana; Farahani, Shayan; Gearhart, Micah D; Bichet, Daniel G; Pontoglio, Marco; Patel, Vishal; Igarashi, Peter

    2017-10-01

    The transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF-1β) is essential for normal kidney development and function. Inactivation of HNF-1β in mouse kidney tubules leads to early-onset cyst formation and postnatal lethality. Here, we used Pkhd1/Cre mice to delete HNF-1β specifically in renal collecting ducts (CDs). CD-specific HNF-1β mutant mice survived long term and developed slowly progressive cystic kidney disease, renal fibrosis, and hydronephrosis. Compared with wild-type littermates, HNF-1β mutant mice exhibited polyuria and polydipsia. Before the development of significant renal structural abnormalities, mutant mice exhibited low urine osmolality at baseline and after water restriction and administration of desmopressin. However, mutant and wild-type mice had similar plasma vasopressin and solute excretion levels. HNF-1β mutant kidneys showed increased expression of aquaporin-2 mRNA but mislocalized expression of aquaporin-2 protein in the cytoplasm of CD cells. Mutant kidneys also had decreased expression of the UT-A urea transporter and collectrin, which is involved in apical membrane vesicle trafficking. Treatment of HNF-1β mutant mIMCD3 cells with hypertonic NaCl inhibited the induction of osmoregulated genes, including Nr1h4, which encodes the transcription factor FXR that is required for maximal urinary concentration. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing experiments revealed HNF-1β binding to the Nr1h4 promoter in wild-type kidneys, and immunoblot analysis revealed downregulated expression of FXR in HNF-1β mutant kidneys. These findings reveal a novel role of HNF-1β in osmoregulation and identify multiple mechanisms, whereby mutations of HNF-1β produce defects in urinary concentration. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  8. Tonicity-responsive microRNAs contribute to the maximal induction of osmoregulatory transcription factor OREBP in response to high-NaCl hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weifeng; Liu, Huili; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Tiantian; Kuang, Juntao; Luo, Yu; Chung, Stephen S M; Yuan, Li; Yang, James Y

    2011-01-01

    Osmotic response element binding protein (OREBP) is a Rel-like transcription factor critical for cellular osmoresponses. Previous studies suggest that hypertonicity-induced accumulation of OREBP protein might be mediated by transcription activation as well as posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization or increased translation. However, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely elucidated. Here, we report that microRNAs (miRNAs) play critical regulatory roles in hypertonicity-induced induction of OREBP. In renal medullary epithelial mIMCD3 cells, hypertonicity greatly stimulates the activity of the 3'-untranslated region of OREBP (OREBP-3'UTR). Furthermore, overexpression of OREBP-3'UTR or depletion of miRNAs by knocking-down Dicer greatly increases OREBP protein expression. On the other hand, significant alterations in miRNA expression occur rapidly in response to high NaCl exposure, with miR-200b and miR-717 being most significantly down-regulated. Moreover, increased miR-200b or miR-717 causes significant down-regulation of mRNA, protein and transcription activity of OREBP, whereas inhibition of miRNAs or disruption of the miRNA-3'UTR interactions abrogates the silencing effects. In vivo in mouse renal medulla, miR-200b and miR-717 are found to function to tune OREBP in response to renal tonicity alterations. Together, our results support the notion that miRNAs contribute to the maximal induction of OREBP to participate in cellular responses to osmotic stress in mammalian renal cells.

  9. Tonicity-responsive microRNAs contribute to the maximal induction of osmoregulatory transcription factor OREBP in response to high-NaCl hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weifeng; Liu, Huili; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Tiantian; Kuang, Juntao; Luo, Yu; Chung, Stephen S. M.; Yuan, Li; Yang, James Y.

    2011-01-01

    Osmotic response element binding protein (OREBP) is a Rel-like transcription factor critical for cellular osmoresponses. Previous studies suggest that hypertonicity-induced accumulation of OREBP protein might be mediated by transcription activation as well as posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization or increased translation. However, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely elucidated. Here, we report that microRNAs (miRNAs) play critical regulatory roles in hypertonicity-induced induction of OREBP. In renal medullary epithelial mIMCD3 cells, hypertonicity greatly stimulates the activity of the 3′-untranslated region of OREBP (OREBP-3′UTR). Furthermore, overexpression of OREBP-3′UTR or depletion of miRNAs by knocking-down Dicer greatly increases OREBP protein expression. On the other hand, significant alterations in miRNA expression occur rapidly in response to high NaCl exposure, with miR-200b and miR-717 being most significantly down-regulated. Moreover, increased miR-200b or miR-717 causes significant down-regulation of mRNA, protein and transcription activity of OREBP, whereas inhibition of miRNAs or disruption of the miRNA–3′UTR interactions abrogates the silencing effects. In vivo in mouse renal medulla, miR-200b and miR-717 are found to function to tune OREBP in response to renal tonicity alterations. Together, our results support the notion that miRNAs contribute to the maximal induction of OREBP to participate in cellular responses to osmotic stress in mammalian renal cells. PMID:20852262

  10. Hypertonicity: Pathophysiologic Concept and Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in tonicity (effective osmolarity) are the major clinical disorders affecting cell volume. Cell shrinking secondary to hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and even death. Quantitative management of hypertonic disorders is based on formulas computing the volume of hypotonic fluids required to correct a given level of hypertonicity. These formulas have limitations. The major limitation of the predictive formulas is that they represent closed system calculations and have been tested in anuric animals. Consequently, the formulas do not account for ongoing fluid losses during development or treatment of the hypertonic disorders. In addition, early comparisons of serum osmolality changes predicted by these formulas and observed in animals infused with hypertonic solutions clearly demonstrated that hypertonicity creates new intracellular solutes causing rises in serum osmolality higher than those predicted by the formulas. The mechanisms and types of intracellular solutes generated by hypertonicity and the effects of the solutes have been studied extensively in recent times. The solutes accumulated intracellularly in hypertonic states have potentially major adverse effects on the outcomes of treatment of these states. When hypertonicity was produced by the infusion of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, the predicted and observed changes in serum sodium concentration were equal. This finding justifies the use of the predictive formulas in the management of hypernatremic states. PMID:27382523

  11. Effects of hypertonic buffer composition on lymph node uptake and bioavailability of rituximab, after subcutaneous administration

    PubMed Central

    Fathallah, Anas M.; Turner, Michael R.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of biologics is highly desirable; however, incomplete bioavailability after sc administration remains a major challenge. In this work we investigated the effects of excipient dependent hyper-osmolarity on lymphatic uptake and plasma exposure of rituximab as a model protein. Using Swiss Webster (SW) mice as our animal model, we compared the effects of NaCl, mannitol and, O-Phospho-L-Serine (OPLS) on plasma concentration of rituximab over 5 days after sc administration. We observed an increase in plasma concentrations in animals administered rituximab in hypertonic buffer solutions, as compared to isotonic buffer. Bioavailability, as estimated by our pharmacokinetic model, increased from 29% in isotonic buffer to 54% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl, to almost complete bioavailability in hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS or mannitol. This improvement in plasma exposure is due to improved lymphatic trafficking as evident from the increase in the fraction of dose trafficked through the lymph node in the presence of hypertonic buffers. The fraction of the dose trafficked through the lymphatic, as estimated by the model, increased from 0.05 % in isotonic buffer to 13% in hyper-tonic buffer containing NaCl to about 30% for hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS and mannitol. Our data suggests that hypertonic solutions may be a viable option to improve sc bioavailability. PMID:25377184

  12. Effects of hypertonic buffer composition on lymph node uptake and bioavailability of rituximab, after subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, Anas M; Turner, Michael R; Mager, Donald E; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-03-01

    The subcutaneous administration of biologics is highly desirable; however, incomplete bioavailability after s.c. administration remains a major challenge. In this work we investigated the effects of excipient dependent hyperosmolarity on lymphatic uptake and plasma exposure of rituximab as a model protein. Using Swiss Webster (SW) mice as the animal model, we compared the effects of NaCl, mannitol and O-phospho-L-serine (OPLS) on the plasma concentration of rituximab over 5 days after s.c. administration. An increase was observed in plasma concentrations in animals administered rituximab in hypertonic buffer solutions, compared with isotonic buffer. Bioavailability, as estimated by our pharmacokinetic model, increased from 29% in isotonic buffer to 54% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl, to almost complete bioavailability in hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS or mannitol. This improvement in plasma exposure is due to the improved lymphatic trafficking as evident from the increase in the fraction of dose trafficked through the lymph nodes in the presence of hypertonic buffers. The fraction of the dose trafficked through the lymphatics, as estimated by the model, increased from 0.05% in isotonic buffer to 13% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl to about 30% for hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS and mannitol. The data suggest that hypertonic solutions may be a viable option for improving s.c. bioavailability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Diagnosis of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, V.; Doebroente, Z.; Hajnal, F.; Csernay, L.; Nemessanyi, Z.; Lang, J.; Narai, G.; Szabo, E.

    1983-11-01

    The diagnostic possibility of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dysfunction was evaluated in 100 cholecystectomized and 28 noncholecystectomized patients. An organic lesion interfering with free bile flow was ruled out in every case. The existence of the syndrome, i.e., the dysfunction of the Oddi's musculature, was verified using the morphine-choleretic test combined with either dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy or (in selected cases) percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia can be regarded as an independent clinical syndrome.

  14. Hypertonicity: Clinical entities, manifestations and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Argyropoulos, Christos; Ing, Todd S; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid J; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2017-01-01

    Hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and is associated with mortality and severe short-term and long-term neurological sequelae. The main clinical syndromes of hypertonicity are hypernatremia and hyperglycemia. Hypernatremia results from relative excess of body sodium over body water. Loss of water in excess of intake, gain of sodium salts in excess of losses or a combination of the two are the main mechanisms of hypernatremia. Hypernatremia can be hypervolemic, euvolemic or hypovolemic. The management of hypernatremia addresses both a quantitative replacement of water and, if present, sodium deficit, and correction of the underlying pathophysiologic process that led to hypernatremia. Hypertonicity in hyperglycemia has two components, solute gain secondary to glucose accumulation in the extracellular compartment and water loss through hyperglycemic osmotic diuresis in excess of the losses of sodium and potassium. Differentiating between these two components of hypertonicity has major therapeutic implications because the first component will be reversed simply by normalization of serum glucose concentration while the second component will require hypotonic fluid replacement. An estimate of the magnitude of the relative water deficit secondary to osmotic diuresis is obtained by the corrected sodium concentration, which represents a calculated value of the serum sodium concentration that would result from reduction of the serum glucose concentration to a normal level. PMID:28101446

  15. Early Response of Protein Quality Control in Gills Is Associated with Survival of Hypertonic Shock in Mozambique tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2013-01-01

    The protein quality control (PQC) mechanism is essential for cell function and viability. PQC with proper biological function depends on molecular chaperones and proteases. The hypertonicity-induced protein damage and responses of PQC mechanism in aquatic organisms, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we examine the short-term effects of different hypertonic shocks on the levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs, e.g., HSP70 and HSP90), ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and protein aggregation in gills of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Following transfer from fresh water (FW) to 20‰ hypertonicity, all examined individuals survived to the end of experiment. Moreover, the levels of branchial HSPs and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins significantly increased at 3 and 24 h post-transfer, respectively. Up-regulation of HSPs and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins was sufficient to prevent the accumulation of aggregated proteins. However, the survival rate of tilapia dramatically declined at 5 h and all fish died within 7 h after direct transfer to 30‰ hypertonicity. We presumed that this result was due to the failed activation of gill PQC system, which resulted in elevating the levels of aggregated proteins at 3 and 4 h. Furthermore, in aggregated protein fractions, the amounts of gill Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) remained relatively low when fish were transferred to 20‰ hypertonicity, whereas abundant NKA was found at 4 h post-transfer to 30‰ hypertonicity. This study demonstrated that the response of PQC in gills is earlier than observable changes in localization of ion-secreting transport proteins upon hypertonic challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the regulation of PQC mechanism in fish and characterize its important role in euryhaline teleost survival in response to hypertonic stress. PMID:23690986

  16. Hypertonic saline: a change of practice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elizabeth; von Fintel, Nichola

    2012-01-01

    This practice development review describes how the introduction of hypertonic saline in the treatment of raised intracranial pressure was brought about in one critical care unit. It considers the need for staff education and patient safety as an integral part of the change process. The aim was to review making a practice change, using Lewin's three step change model and describes possible pitfalls in the process and ways of overcoming or avoiding them. The inclusion criterion for critiqued literature was: Worldwide, English language studies from the last 26 years. Exclusion was articles from non-academically recognized sources. The search was limited to primary and empirical sources. This article uses Lewin's change model to describe driving and restraining forces, highlighting potential problems and suggesting ways in which they can be overcome when implementing a change in practice. Critical to the success of any change is the importance of evaluation, and suitable methods of evaluating the change are also suggested. Critical care and neurosurgical nurses need to be aware of the potentially serious side effects, actions and correct methods of administration of hypertonic saline to ensure its safe use and ensure patient safety. Effects and side effects of hypertonic saline are described, highlighting the need for care in introducing such agents into a clinical area. The methodology used was an electronic search. The change in practice relates to the introduction of hypertonic saline, but could be adapted for any change in clinical nursing practice. © 2012 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2012 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  17. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  18. Ionic imbalance, in addition to molecular crowding, abates cytoskeletal dynamics and vesicle motility during hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paula; Roth, Isabelle; Meda, Paolo; Féraille, Eric; Brown, Dennis; Hasler, Udo

    2015-06-16

    Cell volume homeostasis is vital for the maintenance of optimal protein density and cellular function. Numerous mammalian cell types are routinely exposed to acute hypertonic challenge and shrink. Molecular crowding modifies biochemical reaction rates and decreases macromolecule diffusion. Cell volume is restored rapidly by ion influx but at the expense of elevated intracellular sodium and chloride levels that persist long after challenge. Although recent studies have highlighted the role of molecular crowding on the effects of hypertonicity, the effects of ionic imbalance on cellular trafficking dynamics in living cells are largely unexplored. By tracking distinct fluorescently labeled endosome/vesicle populations by live-cell imaging, we show that vesicle motility is reduced dramatically in a variety of cell types at the onset of hypertonic challenge. Live-cell imaging of actin and tubulin revealed similar arrested microfilament motility upon challenge. Vesicle motility recovered long after cell volume, a process that required functional regulatory volume increase and was accelerated by a return of extracellular osmolality to isosmotic levels. This delay suggests that, although volume-induced molecular crowding contributes to trafficking defects, it alone cannot explain the observed effects. Using fluorescent indicators and FRET-based probes, we found that intracellular ATP abundance and mitochondrial potential were reduced by hypertonicity and recovered after longer periods of time. Similar to the effects of osmotic challenge, isovolumetric elevation of intracellular chloride concentration by ionophores transiently decreased ATP production by mitochondria and abated microfilament and vesicle motility. These data illustrate how perturbed ionic balance, in addition to molecular crowding, affects membrane trafficking.

  19. Ionic imbalance, in addition to molecular crowding, abates cytoskeletal dynamics and vesicle motility during hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula; Roth, Isabelle; Meda, Paolo; Féraille, Eric; Brown, Dennis; Hasler, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Cell volume homeostasis is vital for the maintenance of optimal protein density and cellular function. Numerous mammalian cell types are routinely exposed to acute hypertonic challenge and shrink. Molecular crowding modifies biochemical reaction rates and decreases macromolecule diffusion. Cell volume is restored rapidly by ion influx but at the expense of elevated intracellular sodium and chloride levels that persist long after challenge. Although recent studies have highlighted the role of molecular crowding on the effects of hypertonicity, the effects of ionic imbalance on cellular trafficking dynamics in living cells are largely unexplored. By tracking distinct fluorescently labeled endosome/vesicle populations by live-cell imaging, we show that vesicle motility is reduced dramatically in a variety of cell types at the onset of hypertonic challenge. Live-cell imaging of actin and tubulin revealed similar arrested microfilament motility upon challenge. Vesicle motility recovered long after cell volume, a process that required functional regulatory volume increase and was accelerated by a return of extracellular osmolality to isosmotic levels. This delay suggests that, although volume-induced molecular crowding contributes to trafficking defects, it alone cannot explain the observed effects. Using fluorescent indicators and FRET-based probes, we found that intracellular ATP abundance and mitochondrial potential were reduced by hypertonicity and recovered after longer periods of time. Similar to the effects of osmotic challenge, isovolumetric elevation of intracellular chloride concentration by ionophores transiently decreased ATP production by mitochondria and abated microfilament and vesicle motility. These data illustrate how perturbed ionic balance, in addition to molecular crowding, affects membrane trafficking. PMID:26045497

  20. Mannitol versus hypertonic saline: Safety and efficacy of mannitol and hypertonic saline in sputum induction and bronchial hyperreactivity assessment.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Puebla, M J; Olaguibel, J M; Almudevar, E; Echegoyen, A A; Vela, C; de Esteban, B

    2015-08-01

    Eosinophilic asthma phenotype predicts good response to corticosteroids and associates to asthmatic exacerbations. Sputum induction by hypertonic saline (HS) inhalation is technically demanding. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) to osmotic agents indirectly mirrors active airway inflammation. We compared the safety and ability of HS and mannitol to induce sputum and measure BHR. We evaluated the stability of inflammatory phenotypes. We studied 35 non-smoking asthmatics randomized to undergo HS and mannitol challenges on 2 days 1 week apart. Sputum was sampled for cell analysis and phenotyped as eosinophilic (≥3% eosinophils) and non-eosinophilic (<3%) asthma. Nineteen subjects had BHR to mannitol and nine of them also had BHR to HS. Drops in forced expiratory volume in 1 s were higher from HS challenge than from mannitol challenge. Adequate sputum samples were obtained from 80% subjects (68% mannitol and 71% HS). Eosinophils and macrophages from both challenges correlated. Neutrophils were higher in sputum from HS. Ninety percent samples were equally phenotyped with HS and mannitol. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide, sputum eosinophils and BHR correlated in both challenges. HS and mannitol showed similar capacity to produce valuable sputum samples. BHR to both osmotic stimuli partially resembled airway eosinophilic inflammation but mannitol was more sensitive than HS to assess BHR. Eosinophilic phenotype remained stable in most patients with both stimuli. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. 21 CFR 349.16 - Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. 349.16 Section 349.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. The active ingredient and its concentration in the product is as follows...

  2. 21 CFR 349.16 - Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. 349.16 Section 349.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. The active ingredient and its concentration in the product is as follows...

  3. A randomized, controlled trial of nebulized 5% hypertonic saline and mixed 5% hypertonic saline with epinephrine in bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Tinsa, Faten; Abdelkafi, Sana; Bel Haj, Imen; Hamouda, Samia; Brini, Ines; Zouari, Bechir; Boussetta, Khadija

    2014-11-01

    Bronchiolitis is a public health problem in the word and in Tunisia. Nebulized hypertonic saline seems to have some benefits in bronchiolitis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of nebulized 5% hypertonic saline alone or mixed with epinephrine in bronchiolitis as measured by improvement in clinical score, oxygen saturation or reduction in duration of hospitalization. This prospective, double blind, placebo controlled, randomized clinical trial was performed at Children's Hospital of Tunis from February 2012 to Mars 2012. A total of 94 patients less than 12 months of age with diagnosis of moderately severe bronchiolitis were enrolled and assigned to receive 5% nebulized hypertonic saline, mixed 5% hypertonic saline with standard epinephrine 0,1% or normal saline (placebo) at admission and every 4 hours during hospitalization. There were no significant difference between nebulized 5% hypertonic saline, mixed 5% hypertonic saline with epinephrine or normal saline at baseline, T30 min, T60 min, and T120 min after start study in Wang severity score, oxygen saturation in room air, rate respiratory and heart rate. There was no difference in duration of hospitalization. Nebulized 5% hypertonic saline or mixed 5% hypertonic saline with epinephrine are safety but does not appear effective in treating moderately ill infants with the first acute bronchiolitis.

  4. Modeling liver electrical conductivity during hypertonic injection.

    PubMed

    Castellví, Quim; Sánchez-Velázquez, Patricia; Moll, Xavier; Berjano, Enrique; Andaluz, Anna; Burdío, Fernando; Bijnens, Bart; Ivorra, Antoni

    2017-05-30

    Metastases in the liver frequently grow as scattered tumor nodules that neither can be removed by surgical resection nor focally ablated. Previously, we have proposed a novel technique based on irreversible electroporation that may be able to simultaneously treat all nodules in the liver while sparing healthy tissue. The proposed technique requires increasing the electrical conductivity of healthy liver by injecting a hypersaline solution through the portal vein. Aiming to assess the capability of increasing the global conductivity of the liver by means of hypersaline fluids, here, it is presented a mathematical model that estimates the NaCl distribution within the liver and the resulting conductivity change. The model fuses well-established compartmental pharmacokinetic models of the organ with saline injection models used for resuscitation treatments, and it considers changes in sinusoidal blood viscosity because of the hypertonicity of the solution. Here, it is also described a pilot experimental study in pigs in which different volumes of NaCl 20% (from 100 to 200 mL) were injected through the portal vein at different flow rates (from 53 to 171 mL/minute). The in vivo conductivity results fit those obtained by the model, both quantitatively and qualitatively, being able to predict the maximum conductivity with a 14.6% average relative error. The maximum conductivity value was 0.44 second/m, which corresponds to increasing 4 times the mean basal conductivity (0.11 second/m). The results suggest that the presented model is well suited for predicting on liver conductivity changes during hypertonic saline injection. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Fyn and p38 signaling are both required for maximal hypertonic activation of the osmotic response element-binding protein/tonicity-responsive enhancer-binding protein (OREBP/TonEBP).

    PubMed

    Ko, Ben C B; Lam, Amy K M; Kapus, Andras; Fan, Lingzhi; Chung, Sookja K; Chung, Stephen S M

    2002-11-29

    When cells are challenged by hyperosmotic stress, one of the crucial adaptive responses is the expression of osmoprotective genes that are responsible for raising the intracellular level of compatible osmolytes such as sorbitol, betaine, and myo-inositol. This is achieved by the activation of the transcription factor called OREBP (also known as TonEBP or NFAT5) that specifically binds to the osmotic response element (ORE) or tonicity-responsive enhancer that enhances the transcription of these genes. Here we show that p38, a subgroup of the mitogen-activated kinases activated by hypertonic stress, and Fyn, a shrinkage-activated tyrosine kinase, are both involved in the hypertonic activation of OREBP/TonEBP. Inhibition of p38 by SB203580 or by the dominant negative p38 mutant partially blocked the hypertonic induction of ORE reporter (reporter gene regulated by ORE). Similarly, hypertonic activation of ORE reporter was partially blocked by pharmacological inhibition of Fyn or by a dominant negative Fyn and was attenuated in Fyn-deficient cells. Importantly, inhibiting p38 in Fyn-deficient cells almost completely abolished the hypertonic induction of ORE reporter activity, indicating that p38 and Fyn are the major signaling pathways for the hypertonic activation of OREBP/TonEBP. Further we show that the transactivation domain of OREBP/TonEBP is the target of p38- and Fyn-mediated hypertonic activation. These results indicate a dual control in regulating the expression of the osmoprotective genes in mammalian cells.

  6. [Stiff baby syndrome is a rare cause of neonatal hypertonicity].

    PubMed

    Rønne, Maria Sode; Nielsen, Preben Berg; Mogensen, Christian Backer

    2014-02-24

    Stiff baby syndrome (hyperekplexia) is a rare genetic disorder. The condition can easily be misdiagnosed as epilepsy or severe sepsis because of hypertonicity and seizure-like episodes and has an increased risk of severe apnoea and sudden infant death. Tapping of the nasal bridge inducing a startle response is the clinical hallmark. We report cases of two sisters born with stiff baby syndrome with hypertonicity, exaggerated startle reaction and cyanosis. The syndrome has a good prognosis if treated with clonazepam and both cases were developmental normal after one year.

  7. Hypertonicity Compromises Renal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Signaling through Tis11b-Mediated Post-Transcriptional Control

    PubMed Central

    Viengchareun, Say; Lema, Ingrid; Lamribet, Khadija; Keo, Vixra; Blanchard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates the Na+-retaining action of aldosterone. MR is highly expressed in the distal nephron, which is submitted to intense variations in extracellular fluid tonicity generated by the corticopapillary gradient. We previously showed that post-transcriptional events control renal MR abundance. Here, we report that hypertonicity increases expression of the mRNA-destabilizing protein Tis11b, a member of the tristetraprolin/ZFP36 family, and thereby, decreases MR expression in renal KC3AC1 cells. The 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTRs) of human and mouse MR mRNA, containing several highly conserved adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs), were cloned downstream of a reporter gene. Luciferase activities of full-length or truncated MR Luc-3′-UTR mutants decreased drastically when cotransfected with Tis11b plasmid, correlating with an approximately 50% shorter half-life of ARE-containing transcripts. Using site-directed mutagenesis and RNA immunoprecipitation, we identified a crucial ARE motif within the MR 3′-UTR, to which Tis11b must bind for destabilizing activity. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggested that endogenous Tis11b physically interacts with MR mRNA in KC3AC1 cells, and Tis11b knockdown prevented hypertonicity-elicited repression of MR. Moreover, hypertonicity blunted aldosterone-stimulated expression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine-zipper protein and the α-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel, supporting impaired MR signaling. Challenging the renal osmotic gradient by submitting mice to water deprivation, diuretic administration, or high-Na+ diet increased renal Tis11b and decreased MR expression, particularly in the cortex, thus establishing a mechanistic pathway for osmotic regulation of MR expression in vivo. Altogether, we uncovered a mechanism by which renal MR expression is regulated through mRNA turnover, a post-transcriptional control that seems physiologically relevant. PMID:24700863

  8. Efflux of red cell water into buffered hypertonic solutions.

    PubMed

    OLMSTEAD, E G

    1960-03-01

    Buffered NaCl solutions hypertonic to rabbit serum were prepared and freezing point depressions of each determined after dilution with measured amounts of water. Freezing point depression of these dilutions was a linear function of the amount of water added. One ml. of rabbit red cells was added to each 4 ml. of the hypertonic solutions and after incubation at 38 degrees C. for 30 minutes the mixture was centrifuged and a freezing point depression determined on the supernatant fluid. The amount of water added to the hypertonic solutions by the red cells was calcuated from this freezing point depression. For each decrease in the freezing point of -0.093 degrees C. of the surrounding solution red cells gave up approximately 5 ml. of water per 100 ml. of red cells in the range of -0.560 to -0.930 degrees C. Beyond -0.930 degrees C. the amount of water given up by 100 ml. of red cells fits best a parabolic equation. The maximum of this equation occurred at a freezing point of the hypertonic solution of -2.001 degrees C. at which time the maximum amount of water leaving the red cells would be 39.9 ml. per 100 ml. of red cells. The data suggest that only about 43 per cent of the red cell water is available for exchange into solutions of increasing tonicity.

  9. Phosphoinositolphosphate (PIP) cascade induction by hypertonic stress of plant tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A.; Jacoby, B. )

    1989-04-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) was determined by competition with ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 3} for binding to an IP{sub 3} specific protein. A hypertonic mannitol, sorbitol or lactose shock induced an increase in the rate of K{sup +} uptake and raised the IP{sub 3} content of Beta vulgaris slices, excised Vigna mungo and Sorghum bicolor roots, as well as attached V. mungo roots. Increased K{sup +} uptake could also be induced by compounds that artificially induce the PIP cascade, or mimic it's products. A hypertonic shock, administered to intact B. vulgaris slices, further enhanced the phosphorylation of a 20 kD protein in the plasmalemma. Maximal IP{sub 3} content was found 10 min after hypertonic induction and maximal K{sup +} uptake was obtained 10 min later. The effect of a continuous hypertonic treatment on IP{sub 3} content, but not on K{sup +} uptake, was transient. Li{sup +} decreased the rate of IP{sub 3} metabolism.

  10. Hypertonic saline inhibits luminal sodium channels in respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hebestreit, Alexandra; Kersting, Ulrich; Hebestreit, Helge

    2007-05-01

    Physical exercise with increased ventilation leads to a considerable rise in water loss from the airways. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of transepithelial fluid transport necessary to compensate for these losses are unknown but may include changes in luminal ion channel conductance. The present study was designed to examine the effects of an increase in luminal chloride and sodium concentrations which may locally occur during hyperventilation on luminal ion conductance in the respiratory epithelium of healthy controls and patients diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (CF). Changes in luminal chloride and sodium conductance were inferred by recording nasal potential difference in eight healthy subjects and 10 patients with CF, using superfusing solutions based on isotonic saline (150 mM) on one occasion and solutions based on hypertonic saline (300 mM) on the other. Switching from isotonic to hypertonic saline superfusion decreased potential difference in controls and CF patients significantly. Amiloride induced a decrease of potential difference which was larger with isotonic than with hypertonic saline (controls 9.5 +/- 6.1 vs. 3.7 +/- 4.6 mV; CF 17.2 +/- 7.2 vs. 9.8 +/- 7.6 mV). Chloride conductance stimulated with solutions low in chloride and containing isoproterenol was not significantly changed by hypertonic saline solutions compared with isotonic solutions in both groups. The findings indicate a significant inhibition of luminal sodium conductance by high luminal sodium concentrations. This mechanism may be involved in the regulation of fluid transport across the respiratory epithelium during exercise and in the improvement of mucociliary clearance and lung functions with inhalation of hypertonic saline in CF.

  11. Urea-prostaglandin versus hypertonic saline for instillation abortion.

    PubMed

    Binkin, N J; Schulz, K F; Grimes, D A; Cates, W

    1983-08-15

    Authorities have suggested use of a combination of hyperosmolar urea and low-dose prostaglandin F2 alpha as a second-trimester intra-amniotic abortifacient to avoid the disadvantages of hypertonic saline solution. To examine the safety and efficacy of urea-prostaglandin compared with the instillation of saline solution, we analyzed data from a prospective multicenter study conducted in the United States between 1975 and 1978. Both agents were highly effective in producing an abortion. However, urea-prostaglandin had a significantly lower rate of serious complications when compared with saline solution (1.03 versus 2.18 per 100 abortions; p less than 0.001). Urea-prostaglandin also had a significantly shorter induction-to-abortion time (14.2 versus 25.6 hours; p less than 0.001). Urea-prostaglandin, therefore, appears to be superior to hypertonic saline solution as an abortifacient.

  12. Mechanism of antigen presentation after hypertonic loading of soluble antigens

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Georg A

    2002-01-01

    Hypertonic loading of proteins into cells has been used to introduce soluble proteins into the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway of antigen presentation followed by cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) induction. The precise mechanism for this pathway is not completely understood. The antigen is either processed and presented by/on the same cell or by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) after taking up the antigen from damaged or apoptotic cells. After loading labelled ovalbumin (OVA), it could be co-precipitated with the proteasome complex, supporting the role of this pathway for antigen processing. The processing speed however, appeared to be slow since intact OVA could be detected inside the cells even after 18 hr. This corresponded well with the processing of OVA by isolated proteasomes. On the other hand, enough peptides for recognition of target cells by CTLs were generated in this reaction. One reason for the low level of processing might be that hypertonic loading may damage the cells and inhibit direct processing. In fact, at least 50% of the cells became positive for Annexin V binding after hypertonic loading which indicates severe membrane alterations usually associated with the progress of apoptosis. Annexin V binds to phosphatidylserine residues which also serve as ligand for CD36 expressed on monocytes and some immature dendritic cells. This may direct the phagocytic pathway to hypertonically loaded cells and thus enable professional APCs to present OVA-peptides. Therefore, in addition to the direct processing of OVA, CTLs can be primed by professional APC after uptake of apoptotic, OVA-loaded cells. PMID:12153514

  13. Release of ATP induced by hypertonic solutions in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aleu, Jordi; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Navarro, Piedad; de Lara, Ivanna Pérez; Bahima, Laia; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-01-01

    ATP mediates intercellular communication. Mechanical stress and changes in cell volume induce ATP release from various cell types, both secretory and non-secretory. In the present study, we stressed Xenopus oocytes with a hypertonic solution enriched in mannitol (300 mm). We measured simultaneously ATP release and ionic currents from a single oocyte. A decrease in cell volume, the activation of an inward current and ATP release were coincident. We found two components of ATP release: the first was associated with granule or vesicle exocytosis, because it was inhibited by tetanus neurotoxin, and the second was related to the inward current. A single exponential described the correlation between ATP release and the hypertonic-activated current. Gadolinium ions, which block mechanically activated ionic channels, inhibited the ATP release and the inward current but did not affect the decrease in volume. Oocytes expressing CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator) released ATP under hypertonic shock, but ATP release was significantly inhibited in the first component: that related to granule exocytosis. Since the ATP measured is the balance between ATP release and ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes, we measured the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity of the oocyte surface during osmotic stress, as the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of ATP, which was inhibited by more than 50 % in hypertonic conditions. The best-characterized membrane protein showing NTPDase activity is CD39. Oocytes injected with an antisense oligonucleotide complementary to CD39 mRNA released less ATP and showed a lower amplitude in the inward current than those oocytes injected with water. PMID:12562935

  14. Treatment of hypertonicity in muscles of lip retraction.

    PubMed

    Hand, C R; Burns, M O; Ireland, E

    1979-06-01

    An EMG biofeedback program was developed for a 56-year-old Parkinsonism patient who exhibited pathological lip hypertonia and retraction. The program was designed to achieve the following goals: (1) to demonstrate a reduction in postural lip hypertonicity and (2) to demonstrate a reduction in lip hypertonicity during a series of increasingly complex speech activities. To achieve the first goal, contrastive tasks of full contraction and relaxation were utilized. Each posture was sustained while voltage measurements were made at specific intervals. Procedures to modify lip retraction during speech included five tasks in which the patient was to monitor the audio feedback signal. The tasks involved: prolongation of a neutral vowel, consonant-vowel combinations, monosyllabic words, sentences, and a paragraph-reading task. Data collected over six biofeedback sessions are presented. Trend analyses showed consistent muscular reduction within each task. The following explanations for the decrease in the patient's hypertonicity were discussed: (1) reduction of anisometric contraction, (2) reduction of isometric contraction, (3) relearning of agonistic-antagonistic muscle balance.

  15. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus.

    PubMed

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75-5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus

    PubMed Central

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75–5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF. PMID:25311799

  17. Oral hypertonic saline causes transient fall of vasopressin in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Seckl, J.R.; Williams, D.M.; Lightman, S.L.

    1986-08-01

    After dehydration, oral rehydration causes a fall in plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) that precedes changes in plasma osmolality. To investigate further the stimulus for this effect, its specificity, and association with thirst, six volunteers were deprived of water for 24 h and given a salt load on two separate occasions. On each study day they then drank rapidly 10 ml/kg of either tap water or hypertonic saline (360 mosmol/kg). There was a significant fall in plasma AVP from 2.0 +/- 0.3 to 1.2 +/- 0.4 pmol/l 5 min after drinking water and from 1.8 +/- 0.3 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 pmol/l after hypertonic saline. Plasma osmolality fell 30-60 min after water and was unchanged after saline. Plasma renin activity, oxytocin, and total protein all remained unchanged. All subjects reported diminished thirst after hypertonic saline. Gargling with water reduced thirst but did not affect plasma AVP. There appears to be a drinking-mediated neuroendocrine reflex that decreases plasma AVP irrespective of the osmolality of the liquid consumed. The sensation of thirst did not correlate with plasma osmolality and was not always related to plasma AVP concentration. AVP was measured by radioimmunoassay.

  18. Out-of-hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation After Traumatic Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Kerby, Jeffery D.; Emerson, Scott; Stiell, Ian G.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Brasel, Karen J.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Coimbra, Raul; Rizoli, Sandro; Minei, Joseph P.; Hata, J. Steven; Sopko, George; Evans, David C.; Hoyt, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids would improve survival after severe injury with hemorrhagic shock. Background Hypertonic fluids have potential benefit in the resuscitation of severely injured patients because of rapid restoration of tissue perfusion, with a smaller volume, and modulation of the inflammatory response, to reduce subsequent organ injury. Methods Multicenter, randomized, blinded clinical trial, May 2006 to August 2008, 114 emergency medical services agencies in North America within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. Inclusion criteria: injured patients, age ≥ 15 years with hypovolemic shock (systolic blood pressure ≤ 70 mm Hg or systolic blood pressure 71–90 mm Hg with heart rate ≥ 108 beats per minute). Initial resuscitation fluid, 250 mL of either 7.5% saline per 6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran, HSD), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline, HS), or 0.9% saline (normal saline, NS) administered by out-of-hospital providers. Primary outcome was 28-day survival. On the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, the study was stopped early (23% of proposed sample size) for futility and potential safety concern. Results A total of 853 treated patients were enrolled, among whom 62% were with blunt trauma, 38% with penetrating. There was no difference in 28-day survival—HSD: 74.5% (0.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], −7.5 to 7.8); HS: 73.0% (−1.4; 95% CI, −8.7–6.0); and NS: 74.4%, P = 0.91. There was a higher mortality for the postrandomization subgroup of patients who did not receive blood transfusions in the first 24 hours, who received hypertonic fluids compared to NS [28-day mortality—HSD: 10% (5.2; 95% CI, 0.4–10.1); HS: 12.2% (7.4; 95% CI, 2.5–12.2); and NS: 4.8%, P < 0.01]. Conclusion Among injured patients with hypovolemic shock, initial resuscitation fluid treatment with either HS or HSD compared with NS, did not result in superior 28-day survival. However

  19. Cap-independent protein synthesis is enhanced by betaine under hypertonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Carnicelli, Domenica; Arfilli, Valentina; Onofrillo, Carmine; Alfieri, Roberta R; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2017-02-12

    Protein synthesis is one of the main cellular functions inhibited during hypertonic challenge. The subsequent accumulation of the compatible osmolyte betaine during the later adaptive response allows not only recovery of translation but also its stimulation. In this paper, we show that betaine modulates translation by enhancing the formation of cap-independent 48 S pre-initiation complexes, leaving cap-dependent 48 S pre-initiation complexes basically unchanged. In the presence of betaine, CrPV IRES- and sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter-2 (SNAT2) 5'-UTR-driven translation is 2- and 1.5-fold stimulated in MCF7 cells, respectively. Thus, betaine could provide an advantage in translation of messengers coding for proteins implicated in the response of cells to different stressors, which are often recognized by ribosomal 40 S subunit through simplified cap-independent mechanisms.

  20. Membrane potential stabilization in amphibian skeletal muscle fibres in hypertonic solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ferenczi, Emily A; Fraser, James A; Chawla, Sangeeta; Skepper, Jeremy N; Schwiening, Christof J; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated membrane transport mechanisms influencing relative changes in cell volume (V) and resting membrane potential (Em) following osmotic challenge in amphibian skeletal muscle fibres. It demonstrated a stabilization of Em despite cell shrinkage, which was attributable to elevation of intracellular [Cl−] above electrochemical equilibrium through Na+–Cl− and Na+−K+−2Cl− cotransporter action following exposures to extracellular hypertonicity. Fibre volumes (V) determined by confocal microscope xz-scanning of cutaneous pectoris muscle fibres varied linearly with [1/extracellular osmolarity], showing insignificant volume corrections, in fibres studied in Cl−-free, normal and Na+-free Ringer solutions and in the presence of bumetanide, chlorothiazide and ouabain. The observed volume changes following increases in extracellular tonicity were compared with microelectrode measurements of steady-state resting potentials (Em). Fibres in isotonic Cl−-free, normal and Na+-free Ringer solutions showed similar Em values consistent with previously reported permeability ratios PNa/PK(0.03–0.05) and PCl/PK (∼2.0) and intracellular [Na+], [K+] and [Cl−]. Increased extracellular osmolarities produced hyperpolarizing shifts in Em in fibres studied in Cl−-free Ringer solution consistent with the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz (GHK) equation. In contrast, fibres exposed to hypertonic Ringer solutions of normal ionic composition showed no such Em shifts, suggesting a Cl−-dependent stabilization of membrane potential. This stabilization of Em was abolished by withdrawing extracellular Na+ or by the combined presence of the Na+–Cl− cotransporter (NCC) inhibitor chlorothiazide (10 μm) and the Na+−K+−2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC) inhibitor bumetanide (10 μm), or the Na+−K+-ATPase inhibitor ouabain (1 or 10 μm) during alterations in extracellular osmolarity. Application of such agents after such increases in tonicity only produced a

  1. Vasopressin responses to corticotropin-releasing factor and hypertonicity after truncal vagotomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Raff, H; Papanek, P E; Cowles, V E

    1996-01-01

    Infusion of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) augments the plasma vasopressin response to infusion of hypertonic saline in conscious dogs. Furthermore, afferent vagal nerve input from the abdomen is involved in the control of vasopressin release and may be altered by CRF. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effect of CRF on the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline and to determine if it is mediated by afferent input carried from the abdominal vagus. Conscious male dogs (n = 5) underwent infusion of isotonic saline (vehicle), CRF (10 or 20 ng.kg-1.min-1), hypertonic saline (0.2 mmol.kg-1.min-1), or the combination of CRF and hypertonic saline. Hypertonic saline increased plasma sodium from 147 +/- 1 to 153 +/- 1 meq/1 and plasma vasopressin from 2.5 +/- 0.1 to 5.8 +/- 0.4 pg/ml. CRF infusion alone had no effect on plasma vasopressin. The addition of 10 or 20 ng.kg-1.min-1 CRF augmented the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline to 7.7 +/- 1.7 and 6.9 +/- 0.3 pg/ml, respectively. Truncal vagotomy did not attenuate the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline with or without CRF infusion. We conclude that CRF augments the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline and that this effect is not mediated via afferents from the abdominal vagus.

  2. Epinephrine Improves the Efficacy of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline in Moderate Bronchiolitis: A Randomised Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Flores-González, J Carlos; Matamala-Morillo, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Campoy, Patricia; Pérez-Guerrero, Juan J; Serrano-Moyano, Belén; Comino-Vazquez, Paloma; Palma-Zambrano, Encarnación; Bulo-Concellón, Rocio; Santos-Sánchez, Vanessa; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso M

    2015-01-01

    There is no evidence that the epinephrine-3% hypertonic saline combination is more effective than 3% hypertonic saline alone for treating infants hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis. We evaluated the efficacy of nebulized epinephrine in 3% hypertonic saline. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 208 infants hospitalized with acute moderate bronchiolitis. Infants were randomly assigned to receive nebulized 3% hypertonic saline with either 3 mL of epinephrine or 3 mL of placebo, administered every four hours. The primary outcome measure was the length of hospital stay. A total of 185 infants were analyzed: 94 in the epinephrine plus 3% hypertonic saline group and 91 in the placebo plus 3% hypertonic saline group. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Length of hospital stay was significantly reduced in the epinephrine group as compared with the placebo group (3.94 ±1.88 days vs. 4.82 ±2.30 days, P = 0.011). Disease severity also decreased significantly earlier in the epinephrine group (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036 on days 3 and 5, respectively). In our setting, nebulized epinephrine in 3% hypertonic saline significantly shortens hospital stay in hospitalized infants with acute moderate bronchiolitis compared to 3% hypertonic saline alone, and improves the clinical scores of severity from the third day of treatment, but not before. EudraCT 2009-016042-57.

  3. Epinephrine Improves the Efficacy of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline in Moderate Bronchiolitis: A Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Comino-Vazquez, Paloma; Palma-Zambrano, Encarnación; Bulo-Concellón, Rocio; Santos-Sánchez, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims There is no evidence that the epinephrine-3% hypertonic saline combination is more effective than 3% hypertonic saline alone for treating infants hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis. We evaluated the efficacy of nebulized epinephrine in 3% hypertonic saline. Patients and Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 208 infants hospitalized with acute moderate bronchiolitis. Infants were randomly assigned to receive nebulized 3% hypertonic saline with either 3 mL of epinephrine or 3 mL of placebo, administered every four hours. The primary outcome measure was the length of hospital stay. Results A total of 185 infants were analyzed: 94 in the epinephrine plus 3% hypertonic saline group and 91 in the placebo plus 3% hypertonic saline group. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Length of hospital stay was significantly reduced in the epinephrine group as compared with the placebo group (3.94 ±1.88 days vs. 4.82 ±2.30 days, P = 0.011). Disease severity also decreased significantly earlier in the epinephrine group (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036 on days 3 and 5, respectively). Conclusions In our setting, nebulized epinephrine in 3% hypertonic saline significantly shortens hospital stay in hospitalized infants with acute moderate bronchiolitis compared to 3% hypertonic saline alone, and improves the clinical scores of severity from the third day of treatment, but not before. Trial Registration EudraCT 2009-016042-57 PMID:26575036

  4. The renal medullary interstitium: focus on osmotic hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, Janusz; Dobrowolski, Leszek

    2003-03-01

    1. There has been continued interest in the functional role of the renal medullary interstitium and intense research in this area has furnished new information regarding the extent, dynamics and mechanisms determining fluctuations in medullary osmotic hypertonicity. 2. Any change in the tonicity (interstitial solute concentration) indicates an imbalance of the rate of solute delivery to the interstitium (by tubular transport) and solute removal therefrom (by the microcirculation). It is often difficult to establish whether alteration of the delivery or removal triggered the change in medullary tissue tonicity. 3. Newer in vivo studies have confirmed earlier predictions and indirect evidence indicating that the rate of NaCl transport in the ascending limb of the loop of Henle is the major determinant of medullary ionic hypertonicity. 4. The hypothesis of a 'washout' of medullary solutes during increased medullary blood flow (MBF) has been re-evaluated. A novel experimental approach has provided direct evidence of a modest dissipation of medullary solutes with increasing MBF and a modest accumulation of solutes with decreasing MBF. 5. Increasing evidence is reviewed indicating that medullary tonicity is not only a regulated variable, but also that it may itself modulate the activity of multiple local endocrine and paracrine control systems and thereby affect local microcirculation and the function of medullary interstitial and tubular cells.

  5. Rationale for hypertonic saline therapy for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert; Donaldson, Scott; Boucher, Richard C

    2007-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by alterations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator ( CFTCR) gene. More than 1400 mutations in the CFTCR gene have been described, but the most common mutation (noted in 70% of CF chromosomes) is DeltaF508. Alterations in the CFTCR gene result in deranged sodium and chloride ion transport channels. This leads to failure of airway epithelia to hydrate their surfaces normally, particularly in response to infectious or toxic insults. Additional effects include mucus adhesion to airway surface, chronic inflammation, and infections. The concept that airway surface dehydration can cause CF-like lung disease is supported by in vitro data and in vivo animal models. Rehydrating airway surfaces may reduce or prevent lung injury and damage. Short- and longer term studies have shown that inhalation of hypertonic saline is well tolerated and improves lung function, reduces exacerbations, and improves quality of life in CF patients. This review discusses the importance of airway epithelial sodium and chloride channels in the pathogenesis of CF, and strategies (particularly the use of inhaled hypertonic saline) to reverse or minimize lung inflammation and injury in this disease.

  6. Effects of hypertonic saline on expression of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Thiel, M; Buessecker, F; Eberhardt, K; Chouker, A; Setzer, F; Kreimeier, U; Arfors, K E; Peter, K; Messmer, K

    2001-08-01

    Hypertonic saline prevents vascular adherence of neutrophils and ameliorates ischemic tissue injury. We hypothesized that hypertonic saline attenuates N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-stimulated expression of adhesion molecules on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs). fMLP-stimulated up-regulation of beta2-integrins was diminished by hypertonic saline but not by hypertonic choline chloride-, mannitol-, or sucrose-modified Hanks' buffered salt solution. Shedding of L-selectin was decreased by hypertonic saline and choline chloride but not by hypertonic mannitol or sucrose. When the effects of hypertonic sodium chloride- and choline chloride-modified media were compared, neither solution affected fMLP-receptor binding but both equally inhibited fMLP-stimulated increase in intracellular calcium, ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated numerical up-regulation of beta2-integrins. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases p38 and p44/42 for phosphorylation revealed that hypertonic solutions did not differ in preventing fMLP-stimulated increases in phospho-p38 and phospho-p44/42. Resting PMNLs shrunk by hypertonic saline increased their volume during incubation and further during chemotactic stimulation. Addition of amiloride further enhanced inhibition of up-regulation of beta2-integrins. No fMLP-stimulated volume changes occurred in PMNLs exposed to hypertonic choline chloride, resulting in significant cell shrinkage. Results suggest a sodium-specific inhibitory effect on up-regulation of beta2-integrins of fMLP-stimulated PMNLs, which is unlikely to be caused by alterations of fMLP receptor binding, decrease in cytosolic calcium, attenuation of calcium or protein kinase C-dependent pathways, suppression of p38- or p44/42 MAP kinase-dependent pathways, or cellular ability to increase or decrease volumes.

  7. Protein kinase Cmu plays an essential role in hypertonicity-induced heat shock protein 70 expression.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Sook; Lee, Jae Seon; Huang, Tai Qin; Seo, Jeong Sun

    2008-12-31

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), which evidences important functions as a molecular chaperone and anti-apoptotic molecule, is substantially induced in cells exposed to a variety of stresses, including hypertonic stress, heavy metals, heat shock, and oxidative stress, and prevents cellular damage under these conditions. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the induction of HSP70 in response to hypertonicity has been characterized to a far lesser extent. In this study, we have investigated the cellular signaling pathway of HSP70 induction under hypertonic conditions. Initially, we applied a variety of kinase inhibitors to NIH3T3 cells that had been exposed to hypertonicity. The induction of HSP70 was suppressed specifically by treatment with protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (Gö6976 and GF109203X). As hypertonicity dramatically increased the phosphorylation of PKCmu, we then evaluated the role of PKCmu in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression and cell viability. The depletion of PKCmu with siRNA or the inhibition of PKCmu activity with inhibitors resulted in a reduction in HSP70 induction and cell viability. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP), a transcription factor for hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression, was translocated rapidly into the nucleus and was modified gradually in the nucleus under hypertonic conditions. When we administered treatment with PKC inhibitors, the mobility shift of TonEBP was affected in the nucleus. However, PKCmu evidenced no subcellular co-localization with TonEBP during hypertonic exposure. From our results, we have concluded that PKCmu performs a critical function in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 induction, and finally cellular protection, via the indirect regulation of TonEBP modification.

  8. The presence of PHB granules in cytoplasm protects non-halophilic bacterial cells against the harmful impact of hypertonic environments.

    PubMed

    Obruca, Stanislav; Sedlacek, Petr; Mravec, Filip; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Nebesarova, Jana; Samek, Ota; Kucera, Dan; Benesova, Pavla; Hrubanova, Kamila; Milerova, Miluse; Marova, Ivana

    2017-10-25

    Numerous prokaryotes accumulate polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) intracellularly as a storage material. It has also been proposed that PHB accumulation improves bacterial stress resistance. Cupriavidus necator and its PHB non-accumulating mutant were employed to investigate the protective role of PHB under hypertonic conditions. The presence of PHB granules enhanced survival of the bacteria after exposure to hypertonic conditions. Surprisingly, when coping with such conditions, the bacteria did not utilize PHB to harvest carbon or energy, suggesting that, in the osmotic upshock of C. necator, the protective mechanism of PHB granules is not associated with their hydrolysis. The presence of PHB granules influenced the overall properties of the cells, since challenged PHB-free cells underwent massive plasmolysis accompanied by damage to the cell membrane and the leakage of cytoplasm content, while no such effects were observed in PHB containing bacteria. Moreover, PHB granules demonstrated "liquid-like" properties indicating that they can partially repair and stabilize cell membranes by plugging small gaps formed during plasmolysis. In addition, the level of dehydration and changes in intracellular pH in osmotically challenged cells were less pronounced for PHB-containing cultures, demonstrating the important role of PHB for bacterial survival under hyperosmotic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Isotonic and hypertonic crystalloid solutions in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michael; Kortgen, Andreas; Hartog, Christiane; Riedemann, Niels; Reinhart, Konrad

    2009-06-01

    Disorders of fluid and electrolyte balance in the critically ill are volume-related, compositional, or both. Targeting 'normal' values for plasma volume, osmolality and electrolytes might not be optimal in conditions as diverse as intracranial trauma/haemorrhage, hepatic encephalopathy, abdominal hypertension, or major surgery, because a hyperosmolar state seems to favourably affect tissue (brain and intestinal) oedema formation. However, adequately powered studies regarding the impact of hypertonic saline on outcome are lacking. Isotonic crystalloids are the cornerstone of resuscitation and must be balanced against natural or artificial colloids and vasopressors. Crystalloid resuscitation is superior to vasopressors in shock associated with blunt trauma, and is at least not inferior to colloids in septic shock. Traditional rules of thumb indicating the need for three to four times the amount of crystalloids for the plasma volume to be replaced are probably erroneous and might have contributed to association of overly aggressive crystalloid resuscitation with poor outcome.

  10. Intradermal microdialysis of hypertonic saline attenuates cutaneous vasodilatation in response to local heating.

    PubMed

    DuPont, Jennifer J; Farquhar, William B; Edwards, David G

    2011-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that microdialysis of hypertonic saline would attenuate the skin blood flow response to local heating. Seventeen healthy subjects (23 ± 1 years old) were studied. In one group (n = 9), four microdialysis fibres were placed in the forearm skin and infused with the following: (1) Ringer solution; (2) normal saline (0.9% NaCl); (3) hypertonic saline (3% NaCl); and (4) 10 mm l-NAME. A second group (n = 8) was infused with the following: (1) normal saline; (2) hypertonic saline; (3) normal saline + l-NAME; and (4) hypertonic saline + l-NAME. Red blood cell flux was measured via laser Doppler flowmetry during local heating to 42°C. Site-specific maximal vasodilatation was determined by infusing 28 mm sodium nitroprusside while the skin was heated to 43°C. Data were expressed as the percentage of maximal cutaneous vascular conductance (%CVC(max)). The local heating response at the Ringer solution and normal saline sites did not differ (n = 9; initial peak Ringer solution, 69 ± 6 versus normal saline, 66 ± 2%CVC(max); plateau Ringer solution, 89 ± 4 versus normal saline, 89 ± 5%CVC(max)). Hypertonic saline reduced the initial peak (n = 9; normal saline, 66 ± 2 versus hypertonic saline, 54 ± 4%CVC(max); P < 0.05) and plateau (normal saline, 89 ± 5 versus hypertonic saline, 78 ± 2%CVC(max); P < 0.05) compared with normal saline. Plateau %CVC(max) was attenuated to a similar value at the normal saline + l-NAME and hypertonic saline + l-NAME sites (n = 8; normal saline + l-NAME, 39 ± 6 and hypertonic saline + l-NAME, 39 ± 5%CVC(max)). The nitric oxide contribution (plateau %CVC(max) - l-NAME plateau %CVC(max)) was lower at the hypertonic saline site (normal saline, 55 ± 6 versus hypertonic saline, 35 ± 4; P < 0.01). These data suggest an effect of salt on the cutaneous response to local heating, which may be mediated through a decreased production and/or availability of nitric oxide.

  11. Dose Response Effects of Hypertonic Saline and Dextran on Cardiovascular Responses in Sheep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    137-144, 1995 DOSE RESPONSE EFFECTS OF HYPERTONIC SALINE AND DEXTRAN ON CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES AND PLASMA VOLUME EXPANSION IN SHEEP Michael A...addressed the dose - response effects of HS or D-70 solutions or their possible synergistic combinations to evaluate optimal concentrations of the HS and D...205-217, 1989. 13. Halvorsen L, Günther RA, Dubick MA, Holcroft JW: Dose response characteristics of hypertonic saline dextran solution. J Trauma

  12. What are the effects of hypertonic saline plus furosemide in acute heart failure?

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Patricio; Rain, Carmen; Sepúlveda, Paola

    2015-08-27

    In search of new therapies to solve diuretic resistance in acute heart failure, the addition of hypertonic saline has been proposed. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified two systematic reviews including nine pertinent randomized controlled trials. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded hypertonic saline associated with furosemide probably decrease mortality, length of hospital stay and hospital readmission in patients with acute decompensated heart failure.

  13. Comparison of Normal Saline, Hypertonic Saline Albumin and Terlipressin plus Hypertonic Saline Albumin in an Infant Animal Model of Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In series of cases and animal models suffering hemorrhagic shock, the use of vasopressors has shown potential benefits regarding hemodynamics and tissue perfusion. Terlipressin is an analogue of vasopressin with a longer half-life that can be administered by bolus injection. We have previously observed that hypertonic albumin improves resuscitation following controlled hemorrhage in piglets. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether the treatment with the combination of terlipressin and hypertonic albumin can produce better hemodynamic and tissular perfusion parameters than normal saline or hypertonic albumin alone at early stages of hemorrhagic shock in an infant animal model. Methods Experimental, randomized animal study including 39 2-to-3-month-old piglets. Thirty minutes after controlled 30 ml/kg bleed, pigs were randomized to receive either normal saline (NS) 30 ml/kg (n = 13), 5% albumin plus 3% hypertonic saline (AHS) 15 ml/kg (n = 13) or single bolus of terlipressin 15 μg/kg i.v. plus 5% albumin plus 3% hypertonic saline 15 ml/kg (TAHS) (n = 13) over 30 minutes. Global hemodynamic and tissular perfusion parameters were compared. Results After controlled bleed a significant decrease of blood pressure, cardiac index, central venous saturation, carotid and peripheral blood flow, brain saturation and an increase of heart rate, gastric PCO2 and lactate was observed. After treatment no significant differences in most hemodynamic (cardiac index, mean arterial pressure) and perfusion parameters (lactate, gastric PCO2, brain saturation, cutaneous blood flow) were observed between the three therapeutic groups. AHS and TAHS produced higher increase in stroke volume index and carotid blood flow than NS. Conclusions In this pediatric animal model of hypovolemic shock, albumin plus hypertonic saline with or without terlipressin achieved similar hemodynamics and perfusion parameters than twice the volume of NS. Addition of terlipressin did not

  14. Comparison of the in vitro effects of saline, hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch, hypertonic saline, and two forms of hydroxyethyl starch on whole blood coagulation and platelet function in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wurlod, Virginie A; Howard, Judith; Francey, Thierry; Schweighauser, Ariane; Adamik, Katja N

    2015-01-01

    To compare the in vitro effects of hypertonic solutions and colloids to saline on coagulation in dogs. In vitro experimental study. Veterinary teaching hospital. Twenty-one adult dogs. Blood samples were diluted with saline, 7.2% hypertonic saline solution with 6% hydroxyethylstarch with an average molecular weight of 200 kDa and a molar substitution of 0.4 (HH), 7.2% hypertonic saline (HTS), hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 or hydroxyethyl starch 600/0.75 at ratios of 1:22 and 1:9, and with saline and HES at a ratio of 1:3. Whole blood coagulation was analyzed using rotational thromboelastometry (extrinsic thromboelastometry-cloting time (ExTEM-CT), maximal clot firmness (MCF) and clot formation time (CFT) and fibrinogen function TEM-CT (FibTEM-CT) and MCF) and platelet function was analyzed using a platelet function analyzer (closure time, CTPFA ). All parameters measured were impaired by saline dilution. The CTPFA was prolonged by 7.2% hypertonic saline solution with 6% hydroxyethylstarch with an average molecular weight of 200 kDa and a molar substitution of 0.4 (HH) and HTS but not by HES solutions. At clinical dilutions equivalent to those generally administered for shock (saline 1:3, HES 1:9, and hypertonic solutions 1:22), CTPFA was more prolonged by HH and HTS than other solutions but more by saline than HES. No difference was found between the HES solutions or the hypertonic solutions. ExTEM-CFT and MCF were impaired by HH and HTS but only mildly by HES solutions. At clinically relevant dilutions, no difference was found in ExTEM-CFT between HTS and saline or in ExTEM-MCF between HH and saline. No consistent difference was found between the 2 HES solutions but HH impaired ExTEM-CFT and MCF more than HTS. At high dilutions, FibTEM-CT and -MCF and ExTEM-CT were impaired by HES. Hypertonic solutions affect platelet function and whole blood coagulation to a greater extent than saline and HES. At clinically relevant dilutions, only CTPFA was markedly more

  15. Effects of hypertonic perfusion on the ultrastructure of frog cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Hatae, J; Kawata, H

    1978-11-01

    The ultrastructural changes induced by hypertonic perfusion were investigated using the ventricular muscle of the bullfrog. It was demonstrated that the fixative tonicity critically affects the ultrastructure. Effects of sucrose-, NaCl- and urea-hypertonicities were investigated and compared. In both sucrose- and NaCl-hypertonic media, although the cardiac muscle strongly shrank and the extracellular spaces markedly increased according to increasing tonicity the width of the intercalated disc cleft remained unchanged and the cleft was never separated even in 3 times hypertonicity. The sucrose-hypertonicity made the feature of the fine structure extremely obscure and the electron densities in both the Z-line and the intercalated disc region markedly decreased. When both the perfusate and fixative were made hypertonic by urea, which is known to easily penetrate the cell membrane, a shrinkage of the myocardial cells was observed but to a lesser extent as compared with sucrose or NaCl. The striation pattern was disordered in this condition though the intercalated discs were never affected.

  16. Creatine as a compatible osmolyte in muscle cells exposed to hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Alfieri, Roberta R; Bonelli, Mara A; Cavazzoni, Andrea; Brigotti, Maurizio; Fumarola, Claudia; Sestili, Piero; Mozzoni, Paola; De Palma, Giuseppe; Mutti, Antonio; Carnicelli, Domenica; Vacondio, Federica; Silva, Claudia; Borghetti, Angelo F; Wheeler, Kenneth P; Petronini, Pier Giorgio

    2006-01-01

    Exposure of C2C12 muscle cells to hypertonic stress induced an increase in cell content of creatine transporter mRNA and of creatine transport activity, which peaked after about 24 h incubation at 0.45 osmol (kg H2O)−1. This induction of transport activity was prevented by addition of either cycloheximide, to inhibit protein synthesis, or of actinomycin D, to inhibit RNA synthesis. Creatine uptake by these cells is largely Na+ dependent and kinetic analysis revealed that its increase under hypertonic conditions resulted from an increase in Vmax of the Na+-dependent component, with no significant change in the Km value of about 75 μmol l−1. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed a more than threefold increase in the expression of creatine transporter mRNA in cells exposed to hypertonicity. Creatine supplementation significantly enhanced survival of C2C12 cells incubated under hypertonic conditions and its effect was similar to that obtained with the well known compatible osmolytes, betaine, taurine and myo-inositol. This effect seemed not to be linked to the energy status of the C2C12 cells because hypertonic incubation caused a decrease in their ATP content, with or without the addition of creatine at 20 mmol l−1 to the medium. This induction of creatine transport activity by hypertonicity is not confined to muscle cells: a similar induction was shown in porcine endothelial cells. PMID:16873409

  17. Hypertonicity enhances GABA uptake by cultured rat retinal capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Tohru; Tachikawa, Masanori; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2010-01-01

    We have reported previously that taurine transporter (TauT) mediates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as a substrate in a conditionally immortalized rat retinal capillary endothelial cell line (TR-iBRB2 cells). This study investigates how TauT-mediated GABA transport is regulated in TR-iBRB2 cells under hypertonic conditions. [³H]GABA uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells exposed to 12 h- to 24 h-hypertonic culture medium was significantly greater than that of isotonic culture medium. [³H]GABA uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells was Na(+)-, Cl(-)-, and concentration-dependent with a Michaelis-Menten (K(m)) constant of 3.5 mM under isotonic conditions and K(m) of 0.324 and 5.48 mM under hypertonic conditions. Under hypertonic conditions, [³H]GABA uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells was more potently inhibited by substrates of TauT, such as taurine and β-alanine, than those of GABA transporters such as GABA, nipecotic acid, and betaine. These results suggest that an unknown high-affinity GABA transport process and TauT-mediated GABA transport are enhanced under hypertonic conditions. In conclusion, hypertonicity enhances GABA uptake by cultured rat retinal capillary endothelial cells.

  18. Hypertonic saline up-regulates A3 adenosine receptors expression of activated neutrophils and increases acute lung injury after sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshiaki; Chen, Yu; Pauzenberger, Reinhard; Mark, Hirsh I.; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Hypertonic saline resuscitation reduces tissue damage by inhibiting polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Hypertonic saline triggers polymorphonuclear neutrophils to release adenosine triphosphate that is converted to adenosine, inhibiting polymorphonuclear neutrophils through A2a adenosine receptors. polymorphonuclear neutrophils also express A3 adenosine receptors that enhance polymorphonuclear neutrophils functions. Here we investigated whether A3 receptors may diminish the efficacy of hypertonic saline in a mouse model of acute lung injury. Design Randomized animal study and laboratory investigation. Setting University research laboratory. Interventions The effect of A3 receptors on the efficacy of hypertonic saline resuscitation was assessed in A3 receptor knockout and wild-type mice. Animals were treated with hypertonic saline (7.5% NaCl, 4 mL/kg) before or after cecal ligation and puncture, and acute lung injury and mortality were determined. The effect of timing of hypertonic saline exposure on A3 receptor expression and degranulation was studied in vitro with isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Measurements and main results Treatment of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with hypertonic saline before stimulation with formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine inhibited A3 receptor expression and degranulation, whereas hypertonic saline-treatment after formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulation augmented A3 receptor expression and degranulation. Acute lung injury in wild-type mice treated with hypertonic saline after cecal ligation and puncture was significantly greater than in wild-type mice pretreated with hypertonic saline. This aggravating effect of delayed hypertonic saline-treatment was absent in A3 receptor knockout mice. Similarly, mortality in wild-type mice with delayed hypertonic saline-treatment was significantly higher (88%) than in animals treated with hypertonic saline before cecal ligation and puncture (50%). Mortality in A3

  19. [Effectiveness of inhaled hypertonic saline in children with bronchiolitis].

    PubMed

    Li, Guangpu; Zhao, Jing

    2014-08-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of inhaled nebulized hypertonic saline (HS) solution in infants with acute bronchiolitis. Totally 129 patients with acute bronchiolitis (clinical severity score ≥ 4, aged 2-18 months) admitted to the Capital Institute of Pediatrics from November 2012 to January 2013 were enrolled. All the subjects were assigned to receive 1.5 ml compound ipratropium bromide solution for inhalation and 1 ml budesonide firstly, twice a day. Then, the subjects were randomized to receive 2 ml doses of nebulized 5% HS (Group A), 3% HS (Group B) or 0.9% NS (Group C), twice a day. The treatment lasted for 3 days. Clinical severity scores before treatment and 24, 48, 72 h after treatment were documented. Bronchospasm, nausea and emesis were recorded to assess safety. A total of 124 patients completed this research.Group A included 40 cases, Group B included 42 cases, Group C included 42 cases. Demographic characteristics, pre-treatment duration and clinical severity score before treatment were similar among the 3 group.Seventy-two hours after treatment, the clinical severity score of Group A, B, and C were 3.5 (1.0) , 4.0 (1.0) and 5.0 (0) . At 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment, the clinical severity score were significantly different among the three groups (χ(2) = 36.000, 51.200, 50.800, P < 0.05) .One patient in Group A got paroxysmal cough everytime as soon as he received 5% HS (6 times).Other 3 patients in Group A got paroxysmal cough once. The incidence of adverse effect of Group A was 3.75% (9/240); no adverse event occurred in other group. The incidence of adverse effect among this three group was significantly different (χ(2) = 19.13, P < 0.01). Inhalation of nebulized 5% and 3% hypertonic saline could decrease clinical symptoms of patient with acute bronchiolitis; 5% HS was superior to 3% HS. But 2 ml dose of 5% HS may induce paroxysmal cough.

  20. The Effect of Hypertonic Media on Water Permeability of Frog Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ripoche, P.; Bourguet, J.; Parisi, M.

    1973-01-01

    The frog urinary bladder undergoes, in some conditions, a marked increase of its water permeability when incubated in hypertonic media. This increase was observed with various nonpermeant solutes. It seems to result from the shrinkage of an osmo-sensitive compartment of the tissue, probably the epithelial cells. Many similarities were found between this effect and the physiological increase in water permeability (hydrosmotic response) elicited by antidiuretic hormone (ADH): both were dependent on the physiological state of the animals, and although the response was slower after hyperosmolar than after hormonal challenge, the patterns of response were similar, and in both cases markedly dependent on bathing solution temperature. Norepinephrine and prostaglandin E1, which in this tissue reduce the hydrosmotic action of ADH, presumably by inhibiting the adenyl cylase also reduced the effect of hyperosmolarity. Conversely this effect was potentiated by incubation in the presence of oxytocin, exogenous cyclic AMP, and theophylline, conditions in which the intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP is increased. These data demonstrate that the response to hyperosmolarity is elicited, at least partly, by mechanisms also involved in the physiological hydrosmotic response to ADH. PMID:4345637

  1. Out-of-Hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Newgard, Craig; Slutsky, Arthur; Coimbra, Raul; Emerson, Scott; Minei, Joseph P.; Bardarson, Berit; Kudenchuk, Peter; Baker, Andrew; Christenson, Jim; Idris, Ahamed; Davis, Daniel; Fabian, Timothy C.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Callaway, Clifton; Williams, Carolyn; Banek, Jane; Vaillancourt, Christian; van Heest, Rardi; Sopko, George; Hata, J. Steven; Hoyt, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Context Hypertonic fluids restore cerebral perfusion with reduced cerebral edema and modulate inflammatory response to reduce subsequent neuronal injury and thus have potential benefit in resuscitation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids improves neurologic outcome following severe TBI. Design, Setting, and Participants Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 114 North American emergency medical services agencies within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, conducted between May 2006 and May 2009 among patients 15 years or older with blunt trauma and a prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less who did not meet criteria for hypovolemic shock. Planned enrollment was 2122 patients. Intervention A single 250-mL bolus of 7.5% saline/6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline), or 0.9% saline (normal saline) initiated in the out-of-hospital setting. Main Outcome Measure Six-month neurologic outcome based on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) (dichotomized as >4 or ≤4). Results The study was terminated by the data and safety monitoring board after randomization of 1331 patients, having met prespecified futility criteria. Among the 1282 patients enrolled, 6-month outcomes data were available for 1087 (85%). Baseline characteristics of the groups were equivalent. There was no difference in 6-month neurologic outcome among groups with regard to proportions of patients with severe TBI (GOSE ≤4) (hypertonic saline/dextran vs normal saline: 53.7% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.2% [95% CI, −4.5% to 9.0%]; hypertonic saline vs normal saline: 54.3% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, −4.0% to 9.7%]; P=.67). There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of GOSE category or Disability Rating Score by treatment group. Survival at 28 days was 74.3% with hypertonic saline

  2. Out-of-hospital hypertonic resuscitation following severe traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bulger, Eileen M; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J; Schreiber, Martin; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Tisherman, Samuel A; Newgard, Craig; Slutsky, Arthur; Coimbra, Raul; Emerson, Scott; Minei, Joseph P; Bardarson, Berit; Kudenchuk, Peter; Baker, Andrew; Christenson, Jim; Idris, Ahamed; Davis, Daniel; Fabian, Timothy C; Aufderheide, Tom P; Callaway, Clifton; Williams, Carolyn; Banek, Jane; Vaillancourt, Christian; van Heest, Rardi; Sopko, George; Hata, J Steven; Hoyt, David B

    2010-10-06

    Hypertonic fluids restore cerebral perfusion with reduced cerebral edema and modulate inflammatory response to reduce subsequent neuronal injury and thus have potential benefit in resuscitation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids improves neurologic outcome following severe TBI. Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 114 North American emergency medical services agencies within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, conducted between May 2006 and May 2009 among patients 15 years or older with blunt trauma and a prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less who did not meet criteria for hypovolemic shock. Planned enrollment was 2122 patients. A single 250-mL bolus of 7.5% saline/6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline), or 0.9% saline (normal saline) initiated in the out-of-hospital setting. Six-month neurologic outcome based on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) (dichotomized as >4 or ≤4). The study was terminated by the data and safety monitoring board after randomization of 1331 patients, having met prespecified futility criteria. Among the 1282 patients enrolled, 6-month outcomes data were available for 1087 (85%). Baseline characteristics of the groups were equivalent. There was no difference in 6-month neurologic outcome among groups with regard to proportions of patients with severe TBI (GOSE ≤4) (hypertonic saline/dextran vs normal saline: 53.7% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.2% [95% CI, -4.5% to 9.0%]; hypertonic saline vs normal saline: 54.3% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, -4.0% to 9.7%]; P = .67). There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of GOSE category or Disability Rating Score by treatment group. Survival at 28 days was 74.3% with hypertonic saline/dextran, 75.7% with hypertonic saline, and 75.1% with normal saline (P = .88). Among patients with severe

  3. Immunomodulatory effect of hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Motaharinia, Javad; Etezadi, Farhad; Moghaddas, Azadeh; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-10-05

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and nosocomial infection following trauma-hemorrhage are among the most important causes of mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients. Dysregulation of the immune system plays a central role in MODS and a fluid having an immunomodulatory effect could be advantageous in hemorrhagic shock resuscitation. Hypertonic saline (HS) is widely used as a resuscitation fluid in trauma-hemorrhagic patients. Besides having beneficial effects on the hemodynamic parameters, HS has modulatory effects on various functions of immune cells such as degranulation, adhesion molecules and cytokines expression, as well as reactive oxygen species production. This article reviews clinical evidence for decreased organ failure and mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients resuscitated with HS. Despite promising results in animal models, results from pre-hospital and emergency department administration in human studies did not show improvement in survival, organ failure, or a reduction in nosocomial infection by HS resuscitation. Further post hoc analysis showed some benefit from HS resuscitation for severely-injured patients, those who received more than ten units of blood by transfusion, patients who underwent surgery, and victims of traumatic brain injury. Several reasons are suggested to explain the differences between clinical and animal models.

  4. Biofilm formation by Escherichia coli in hypertonic sucrose media.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Taketo; Furukawa, Soichi; Narisawa, Naoki; Hagiwara, Chisato; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari

    2009-06-01

    High osmotic environments produced by NaCl or sucrose have been used as reliable and traditional methods of food preservation. We tested, Escherichia coli as an indicator of food-contaminating bacterium, to determine if it can form biofilm in a hyperosmotic environment. E. coli K-12 IAM1264 did not form biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M NaCl. However, the bacterium formed biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M sucrose, although the planktonic growth was greatly suppressed. The biofilm, formed on solid surfaces, such as titer-plate well walls and glass slides, solely around the air-liquid interface. Both biofilm forming cells and planktonic cells in the hypertonic medium adopted a characteristic, fat and filamentous morphology with no FtsZ rings, which are a prerequisite for septum formation. Biofilm forming cells were found to be alive based on propidium iodide staining. The presence of 1 M sucrose in the food environment is not sufficient to prevent biofilm formation by E. coli.

  5. [The effect of hypertonic saline solution on the rheology after burn-blast combined injury].

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Zhu, P; Wang, Z; Liu, D; Wu, Z; Song, G; Long, M

    1997-12-01

    To study the effect of hypertonic saline solution on the rheology and putative mechanism, we investigated the changes of plasma viscosity, blood viscosity and reduced viscosity in dogs treated with hypertonic saline solution after burn-blast combined injury and observed the effect of hypertonic saline solution therapy on the viscoelastic property of erythrocyte membranes measured by micropippette aspiration technique in rats with burn. The results showed that the blood viscosity and reduced viscosity increased significantly in dogs after injury, and plasma viscosity also increased significantly at 24 h after injury. Elastic moduli and viscous coefficients of erythrocyte membranes increased obviously in rats after burn. The hypertonic saline solution therapy could significantly improve blood viscosity and reduced viscosity, but it did not significantly improve elastic moduli and viscous coefficients of erythrocyte membranes. These suggested that the hardness of erythrocyte membranes increased, the deform property of erythrocyte membranes decreased, and the blood rheology became worse after burn blast combined injury. Hypertonic saline solution therapy could significantly improve the blood rheology. The effect did not bear a significant relationship with the change of single biomechanics property of erythrocyte membranes. It might be related with other factors.

  6. The effect of tonicity and hypertonic solutions on microvascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Victorino, Gregory P; Newton, Christopher R; Curran, Brian

    2002-05-15

    The effect of hypertonic saline (HS) on microvascular permeability is unclear. We hypothesized that varying degrees of tonicity and HS solutions alter microvascular fluid flux across the endothelium. Hydraulic permeability (L(p)) is a measure of water flow across the endothelial barrier. L(p) was measured in cannulated rat mesenteric venules using the modified Landis micro-occlusion technique. The effect of tonicity was tested by measuring L(p) after successive perfusions with Ringers' solutions of varying sodium chloride (NaCl) concentrations (85, 135, 185, and 235 mM) (n = 6). Additional venules were perfused with control Ringers' ([NaCl] = 135 mM) and measures of L(p) were obtained after subsequent perfusions with 7% NaCl followed by 7% NaCl with 6% dextran (n = 6). Tonicity had a significant dose-dependent effect on L(p) (P < 0.0001). Perfusion with 7% NaCl significantly increased L(p) (P < 0.0001). The addition of 6% dextran to 7% NaCl significantly decreased L(p) compared with perfusion with 7% NaCl alone (P = 0.002). We conclude that (1) tonicity influences microvascular permeability, (2) HS increases microvascular permeability, and (3) the addition of dextran to HS greatly attenuates this response. These findings suggest an important role for tonicity and a possible deleterious effect of HS in modulating microvascular permeability as well as the benefit of dextran with HS for maintaining intravascular volume. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  7. Cell and molecular biology of organic osmolyte accumulation in hypertonic renal cells.

    PubMed

    Handler, J S; Kwon, H M

    2001-02-01

    When the renal medulla becomes hypertonic in association with the formation of concentrated urine, the cells of the medulla avoid the stress of high intracellular salts by accumulating small non-perturbing organic osmolytes. The response has been studied in most detail in cultured kidney-derived cells, and confirmed in studies of the intact kidney. The non-perturbing osmolytes, myo-inositol, betaine, and sorbitol, are accumulated because of stimulation of the transcription of the genes for the proteins that catalyze their accumulation by transport or synthesis. The genes involved have all been cloned and sequenced and contain tonicity responsive regulatory elements (TonEs) in their 5' region. During hypertonicity, the elements are occupied by TonE-binding protein, a transacting factor that has been cloned and characterized. Current efforts focus on identifying the mechanism by which cells sense hypertonicity and how that leads to activation of TonE-binding protein. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Challenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle "Challenger" in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy. (Contains 4 figures and 2 footnotes.)

  9. Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas R.

    1975-01-01

    Domestic and international challenges facing the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness are discussed; and U.S. and Russian programs in testing and correcting children's vision, developing eye safety programs in agriculture and industry, and disseminating information concerning the detection and treatment of cataracts are compared. (SB)

  10. Challenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle "Challenger" in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy. (Contains 4 figures and 2 footnotes.)

  11. Dornase alpha compared to hypertonic saline for lung atelectasis in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Youness, Houssein A; Mathews, Kathryn; Elya, Marwan K; Kinasewitz, Gary T; Keddissi, Jean I

    2012-12-01

    Despite the lack of randomized trials, nebulized Dornase alpha and hypertonic saline are used empirically to treat atelectasis in mechanically ventilated patients. Our objective was to determine the clinical and radiological efficacy of these medications as an adjunct to standard therapy in critically ill patients. Mechanically ventilated patients with new onset (<48 h) lobar or multilobar atelectasis were randomized into three groups: nebulized Dornase alpha, hypertonic (7%) saline or normal saline every 12 h. All patients received standard therapy, including chest percussion therapy, kinetic therapy, and bronchodilators. The primary endpoint was the change in the daily chest X-ray atelectasis score. A total of 33 patients met the inclusion criteria and were randomized equally into the three groups. Patients in the Dornase alpha group showed a reduction of 2.18±1.33 points in the CXR score from baseline to day 7, whereas patients in the normal saline group had a reduction of 1.00±1.79 points, and patients in the hypertonic saline group showed a score reduction of 1.09±1.51 points. Pairwise comparison of the mean change of the CXR score showed no statistical difference between hypertonic saline, normal saline, and dornase alpha. Airway pressures as well as oxygenation, expressed as PaO(2)/F(I)O(2) and time to extubation also were similar among groups. During the study period the rate of extubation was 54% (6/11), 45% (5/11), and 63% (7/11) in the normal saline, hypertonic saline, and Dornase alpha groups, respectively (p=0.09). No treatment related complications were observed. There was no significant improvement in the chest X-ray atelectasis score in mechanically ventilated patients with new onset atelectasis who were nebulized with Dornase alpha twice a day. Hypertonic saline was no more effective than normal saline in this population. Larger randomized control trials are needed to confirm our results.

  12. Inhibition by hypertonic solutions of Ca-dependent electrogenesis in single crab muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Kurtz, G; Sorenson, A L

    1977-10-01

    This study describes the effect of hypertonic solutions on isolated muscle fibers of Callinectes danae. Solutions of twice normal tonicity (2.0 T) inhibit both the normal graded membrane responses and the spikes induced by procaine, tetraethylammonium, or barium. The inhibition is maintained throughout exposure to hypertonic solutions prepared by addition of impermeant solutes such as NaCl, sucrose, or Tris-propionate, but is reversible on their withdrawal. In the presence of permeant solutes such as glycerol or acetamide, the inhibition is transient. In both cases the onset of inhibition of the depolarizing Ca electrogenesis is correlated with shrinkage of the fiber. In the case of permeant solutes, the time course of recovery of the graded responses or the spikes follows the recovery of the fiber volume. Changes in the passive electrical characteristics of the fibers due to hypertonic solutions were unrelated to the blockade of membrane Ca activation. The current-voltage relationship in hypertonic sollution revealed no increase in depolarizing K activation. Inhibition of the graded membrane responses and spikes appears to be associated with depression of Ca conductance. Hypertonic solutions might affect the activation of Ca conductance through reduction of the electric field generated by fixed negative surface charges and/or morphological changes in the T tubules. Membrane depolarization elicited little or no tension in 2.0 T solutions while caffeine contracture (10 mM) with an ampliture of 76% of the maximal contractile ability could still be elicited. This indicates that direct effects of hypertonic solutions on the contractile apparatus were not responsible for loss of tension. The latter is attributed to the inhibition of the transmembrane Ca currents.

  13. [Isolation of monocytes from peripheral blood by gradient centrifugation on Lymphoprep in a hypertonic medium].

    PubMed

    Májský, A

    1989-12-08

    The author describes a new method of isolation of monocytes from peripheral blood, involving hypertonization of the blood and isolation of monocytes by centrifuging above a gradient of hypertonic Lymphoprep. The method makes it possible to obtain a monocyte suspension with at least 85% cells; there are no B lymphocytes in the suspension and the monocytes are not damaged. The quality of the thus obtained monocytes was tested by examination with monocytic sera and with HLA-DR antibodies, whereby the test was concurrently made with monocytes obtained by adherence and with B lymphocytes.

  14. Hypertonic Saline Dextran Ameliorates Organ Damage in Beagle Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    You, Guo-xing; Wang, Ying; Chen, Gan; Wang, Quan; Zhang, Xi-gang; Zhao, Lian; Zhou, Hong; He, Yue-zhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of hypertonic saline with 6% Dextran-70 (HSD) resuscitation on organ damage and the resuscitation efficiency of the combination of HSD and lactated ringers (LR) in a model of hemorrhage shock in dogs. Methods Beagles were bled to hold their mean arterial pressure (MAP) at 50±5 mmHg for 1 h. After hemorrhage, beagles were divided into three groups (n = 7) to receive pre-hospital resuscitation for 1 h (R1): HSD (4 ml/kg), LR (40 ml/kg), and HSD+LR (a combination of 4 ml/kg HSD and 40 ml/kg LR). Next, LR was transfused into all groups as in-hospital resuscitation (R2). After two hours of observation (R3), autologous blood was transfused. Hemodynamic responses and systemic oxygenation were measured at predetermined phases. Three days after resuscitation, the animals were sacrificed and tissues including kidney, lung, liver and intestinal were obtained for pathological analysis. Results Although the initial resuscitation with HSD was shown to be faster than LR with regard to an ascending MAP, the HSD group showed a similar hemodynamic performance compared to the LR group throughout the experiment. Compared with the LR group, the systemic oxygenation performance in the HSD group was similar but showed a lower venous-to-arterial CO2 gradient (Pv-aCO2) at R3 (p < 0.05). Additionally, the histology score of the kidneys, lungs and liver were significantly lower in the HSD group than in the LR group (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a superior hemodynamic response but higher extravascular lung water (EVLW) and lower arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) than the other groups (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a marginally improved systemic oxygenation performance and lower histology score than other groups. Conclusions Resuscitation after hemorrhagic shock with a bolus of HSD showed a similar hemodynamic response compared with LR at ten times the volume of HSD, but HSD showed superior efficacy in organ protection

  15. Hypertonic Saline Dextran Ameliorates Organ Damage in Beagle Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-xiang; Wang, Bo; You, Guo-xing; Wang, Ying; Chen, Gan; Wang, Quan; Zhang, Xi-gang; Zhao, Lian; Zhou, Hong; He, Yue-zhong

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of hypertonic saline with 6% Dextran-70 (HSD) resuscitation on organ damage and the resuscitation efficiency of the combination of HSD and lactated ringers (LR) in a model of hemorrhage shock in dogs. Beagles were bled to hold their mean arterial pressure (MAP) at 50 ± 5 mmHg for 1 h. After hemorrhage, beagles were divided into three groups (n = 7) to receive pre-hospital resuscitation for 1 h (R1): HSD (4 ml/kg), LR (40 ml/kg), and HSD+LR (a combination of 4 ml/kg HSD and 40 ml/kg LR). Next, LR was transfused into all groups as in-hospital resuscitation (R2). After two hours of observation (R3), autologous blood was transfused. Hemodynamic responses and systemic oxygenation were measured at predetermined phases. Three days after resuscitation, the animals were sacrificed and tissues including kidney, lung, liver and intestinal were obtained for pathological analysis. Although the initial resuscitation with HSD was shown to be faster than LR with regard to an ascending MAP, the HSD group showed a similar hemodynamic performance compared to the LR group throughout the experiment. Compared with the LR group, the systemic oxygenation performance in the HSD group was similar but showed a lower venous-to-arterial CO2 gradient (Pv-aCO2) at R3 (p < 0.05). Additionally, the histology score of the kidneys, lungs and liver were significantly lower in the HSD group than in the LR group (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a superior hemodynamic response but higher extravascular lung water (EVLW) and lower arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) than the other groups (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a marginally improved systemic oxygenation performance and lower histology score than other groups. Resuscitation after hemorrhagic shock with a bolus of HSD showed a similar hemodynamic response compared with LR at ten times the volume of HSD, but HSD showed superior efficacy in organ protection. Our findings suggest that

  16. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. III. Hypertonic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H. L.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that treatment in anisotonic medium modifies rejoining of radiation-induced breaks in interphase chromosomes. In previous work, we have demonstrated that formation of exchanges in human lymphocytes has a slow component (half-time of 1-2 h), but a fraction of exchanges are also observed in samples assayed soon after exposure. In this paper we studied the effect of hypertonic treatment on rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced breaks using fluorescence in situ hybridization of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with 7 Gy gamma rays, fused to mitotic hamster cells and incubated in hypertonic solution (0.5 M NaCl) for the period normally allowed for interphase chromosome condensation to occur. The data from hypertonic treatment experiments indicate the presence of a class of interphase chromosome breaks that rejoin and misrejoin very quickly (half-time of 5-6 min). The fast misrejoining of these lesions is considered to be responsible for the initial level of exchanges which we reported previously. No significant effect of hypertonic treatment on the yield of chromosome aberrations scored at the first postirradiation mitosis was detected.

  17. Chemical castration with intratesticular injection of 20% hypertonic saline: a minimally invasive method.

    PubMed

    Emir, Levent; Dadali, Mümtaz; Sunay, Melih; Erol, Demokan; Caydere, Muzaffer; Ustün, Hüseyin

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to ablate testicular tissue by hypertonic saline solution in a rat model, thereby to discover a minimally invasive alternative method to medical and surgical castration in patients with metastatic prostate carcinoma. A total of 40 male Wistar rats were divided into orchiectomy (n = 20) and experimental groups. In the experimental group, 20% (n = 20) hypertonic saline solution was injected into the rat testes. Blood was taken prior to, 1 day, and 30 days after the intervention for testosterone determination. All testicles were surgically removed for pathologic examination. Skin infection, necrosis, and testicular abscess were not detected in any rat. Pathologic examination revealed necrosis in almost all areas of the testicle. The comparison of 0, day 1, and day 30 measurements of total testosterone did not reveal a statistically significant difference between the control and hypertonic saline groups at each of the three time points (Mann-Whitney U-test, P > 0.05). Intratesticular hypertonic saline injection seems to be an alternative method in the future to its rivals such as orchiectomy and medical castration. This new approach offers a minimally invasive and less expensive method aside from preserving body image in metastatic prostatic carcinoma. However, our conclusions should be supported with more experimental studies before a clinical study is taken into account.

  18. The hypertonic environment differentially regulates wild-type CFTR and TNR-CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Lassance-Soares, Roberta M; Cheng, Jie; Krasnov, Kristina; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Cutting, Garry R; Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Morales, Marcelo M; Guggino, William B

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that the hypertonic environment of the renal medulla regulates the expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) and its natural splice variant, TNR-CFTR. To accomplish this, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) stable cell lines expressing TNR-CFTR or CFTR were used. The cells were treated with hypertonic medium made with either NaCl or urea or sucrose (480 mOsm/kg or 560 mOsm/kg) to mimic the tonicity of the renal medulla environment. Western blot data showed that CFTR and TNR-CFTR total cell protein is increased by hypertonic medium, but using the surface biotinylation technique, only CFTR was found to be increased in cell plasma membrane. Confocal microscopy showed TNR-CFTR localization primarily at the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane. In conclusion, CFTR and TNR-CFTR have different patterns of distribution in MDCK cells and they are modulated by a hypertonic environment, suggesting their physiological importance in renal medulla.

  19. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. III. Hypertonic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H. L.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that treatment in anisotonic medium modifies rejoining of radiation-induced breaks in interphase chromosomes. In previous work, we have demonstrated that formation of exchanges in human lymphocytes has a slow component (half-time of 1-2 h), but a fraction of exchanges are also observed in samples assayed soon after exposure. In this paper we studied the effect of hypertonic treatment on rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced breaks using fluorescence in situ hybridization of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with 7 Gy gamma rays, fused to mitotic hamster cells and incubated in hypertonic solution (0.5 M NaCl) for the period normally allowed for interphase chromosome condensation to occur. The data from hypertonic treatment experiments indicate the presence of a class of interphase chromosome breaks that rejoin and misrejoin very quickly (half-time of 5-6 min). The fast misrejoining of these lesions is considered to be responsible for the initial level of exchanges which we reported previously. No significant effect of hypertonic treatment on the yield of chromosome aberrations scored at the first postirradiation mitosis was detected.

  20. Dose Effect of HSD (Hypertonic Saline/Dextran) Survival Following Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    injured patients. Ann Surg 1987;206:279-288. 6. Kramer GC, Perron PR, Lindsey C , et al. Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline dextran...No.3:297-298. 12. Greenfield RH, Bessen HA, Henneman PL. Effect of crystalloid infusion on hematocrit and intravascular volume in healthy, nonbleeding

  1. Hypertonic saline attenuates TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activation in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nydam, Trevor L; Moore, Ernest E; McIntyre, Robert C; Wright, Franklin L; Gamboni-Robertson, Fabia; Eckels, Phillip C; Banerjee, Anirban

    2009-05-01

    Resuscitation with hypertonic saline (HTS) attenuates acute lung injury (ALI) and modulates postinjury hyperinflammation. TNF-alpha-stimulated pulmonary epithelium is a major contributor to hemorrhage-induced ALI. We hypothesized that HTS would inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB proinflammatory signaling in pulmonary epithelial cells. Therefore, we pretreated human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) with hypertonic medium (180 mM NaCl) for 30 min, followed by TNF-alpha stimulation (10 ng/mL). Key regulatory steps and protein concentrations in this pathway were assessed for significant alterations. Hypertonic saline significantly reduced TNF-alpha-induced intercellular adhesion molecule 1 levels and NF-kappaB nuclear localization. The mechanism is attenuated phosphorylation and delayed degradation of IkappaB alpha. Hypertonic saline did not alter TNF-alpha-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation or constitutive vascular endothelial growth factor expression, suggesting that the observed inhibition is not a generalized suppression of protein phosphorylation or cellular function. These results show that HTS inhibits TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activation in the pulmonary epithelium and, further, our understanding of its beneficial effects in hemorrhage-induced ALI.

  2. Cerebral regulation of renal sodium excretion in sheep infused intravenously with hypertonic NaCl.

    PubMed Central

    Chodobski, A; McKinley, M J

    1989-01-01

    1. The natriuretic response to intravenous infusion of 2 M-NaCl was investigated in six conscious sheep. This hypertonic NaCl load resulted in relatively small, physiological (2-3 mmol l-1) increases in plasma Na+ concentration and was followed by a natriuresis with a maximum mean urinary sodium excretion 5 times higher than pre-infusion values. 2. Intravenous infusion of isotonic NaCl, delivering the same Na+ load as hypertonic NaCl infusion, did not induce natriuresis. This suggested, therefore, that with the hypertonic sodium load administered in the present study, the rise in plasma Na+ and/or tonicity rather than increase in blood volume is important in evoking the natriuretic response. 3. Intracerebroventricular infusion of low-Na+ artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reduced CSF Na+ concentration, decreased plasma vasopressin (AVP) levels and caused a copious water diuresis. This was associated with excessive loss of water and large increases in plasma Na+ concentration and osmolality. 4. The natriuresis induced by intravenous hypertonic NaCl load could be blocked by lowering CSF Na+ concentration in situations where water diuresis was either prevented or reduced by intravenous infusion of AVP or by delayed intracerebroventricular infusion of low-Na+ CSF, respectively. 5. The results of the present study provide further evidence that renal sodium excretion can be controlled by the central nervous system. PMID:2621619

  3. Hypertonic Saline Resuscitation Restores Inflammatory Cytokine Balance in Post-Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    hypertonic saline with 6% dextran-70 (HSD) has been shown in experimental studies to reduce shock/resuscitation-induced inflammatory reactions and...hemodynamics and reestablishing inflammatory equilibrium [12]. Various immunoinflammatory alterations have been described in clinical and experimental ...ultimately causing greater morbidity and mortality [4]. Moreover, convincing experimental evidence indicates that conventional large-volume fluid

  4. Hypertonic Saline Resuscitation Restores Inflammatory Cytokine Balance in Post-Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    immunocompetant cells experience bidirectional communication with hormones and cytokines [35,40]. Thus, despite compelling experimental findings, HSD has not...hypertonic saline with 6% dextran-70 (HSD) has been shown in experimental studies to reduce shock/resuscitation-induced inflammatory reactions and...alterations have been described in clinical and experimental investigations of post-traumatic hemorrhagic shock [13]. The initial immunological

  5. Abnormal Osmotic Avoidance Behavior in C. elegans Is Associated with Increased Hypertonic Stress Resistance and Improved Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elaine C.; Kim, Heejung; Ditano, Jennifer; Manion, Dacie; King, Benjamin L.; Strange, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Protein function is controlled by the cellular proteostasis network. Proteostasis is energetically costly and those costs must be balanced with the energy needs of other physiological functions. Hypertonic stress causes widespread protein damage in C. elegans. Suppression and management of protein damage is essential for optimal survival under hypertonic conditions. ASH chemosensory neurons allow C. elegans to detect and avoid strongly hypertonic environments. We demonstrate that mutations in osm-9 and osm-12 that disrupt ASH mediated hypertonic avoidance behavior or genetic ablation of ASH neurons are associated with enhanced survival during hypertonic stress. Improved survival is not due to altered systemic volume homeostasis or organic osmolyte accumulation. Instead, we find that osm-9(ok1677) mutant and osm-9(RNAi) worms exhibit reductions in hypertonicity induced protein damage in non-neuronal cells suggesting that enhanced proteostasis capacity may account for improved hypertonic stress resistance in worms with defects in osmotic avoidance behavior. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes that play roles in managing protein damage are upregulated in osm-9(ok1677) worms. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work demonstrating that intercellular communication between neuronal and non-neuronal cells plays a critical role in integrating cellular stress resistance with other organismal physiological demands and associated energy costs. PMID:27111894

  6. Trigeminal pathways for hypertonic saline and light-evoked corneal reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mostafeezur; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Thompson, Randall; Bereiter, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Cornea-evoked eyeblinks maintain tear film integrity on the ocular surface in response to dryness and protect the eye from real or potential damage. Eyelid movement following electrical stimulation has been well studied in humans and animals; however, the central neural pathways that mediate protective eyeblinks following natural nociceptive signals are less certain. The aim of this study was to assess the role of the trigeminal subnucleus interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition and subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical cord (Vc/C1) junction regions on orbicularis oculi electromyographic (OOemg) activity evoked by ocular surface application of hypertonic saline or exposure to bright light in urethane anesthetized male rats. The Vi/Vc and Vc/C1 regions are the main sites of termination for trigeminal afferent nerves that supply the ocular surface, while hypertonic saline (saline = 0.15-5M) and bright light (light = 5-20k lux) selectively activate ocular surface and intraocular trigeminal nerves, respectively, and excite second-order neurons at the Vi/Vc and Vc/C1 regions. Integrated OOemg activity, ipsilateral to the applied stimulus, increased with greater stimulus intensities for both modalities. Lidocaine applied to the ocular surface inhibited OOemg responses to hypertonic saline, but did not alter the response to light. Lidocaine injected into the trigeminal ganglion blocked completely the OOemg responses to hypertonic saline and light indicating a trigeminal afferent origin. Synaptic blockade by cobalt chloride of the Vi/Vc or Vc/C1 region greatly reduced OOemg responses to hypertonic saline and bright light. These data indicate that OOemg activity evoked by natural stimuli known to cause irritation or discomfort in humans depends on a relay in both the Vi/Vc transition and Vc/C1 junction regions. PMID:25086311

  7. Trigeminal pathways for hypertonic saline- and light-evoked corneal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M; Okamoto, K; Thompson, R; Bereiter, D A

    2014-09-26

    Cornea-evoked eyeblinks maintain tear film integrity on the ocular surface in response to dryness and protect the eye from real or potential damage. Eyelid movement following electrical stimulation has been well studied in humans and animals; however, the central neural pathways that mediate protective eyeblinks following natural nociceptive signals are less certain. The aim of this study was to assess the role of the trigeminal subnucleus interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition and subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical cord (Vc/C1) junction regions on orbicularis oculi electromyographic (OOemg) activity evoked by ocular surface application of hypertonic saline or exposure to bright light in urethane anesthetized male rats. The Vi/Vc and Vc/C1 regions are the main sites of termination for trigeminal afferent nerves that supply the ocular surface, while hypertonic saline (saline=0.15-5M) and bright light (light=5k-20klux) selectively activate ocular surface and intraocular trigeminal nerves, respectively, and excite second-order neurons at the Vi/Vc and Vc/C1 regions. Integrated OOemg activity, ipsilateral to the applied stimulus, increased with greater stimulus intensities for both modalities. Lidocaine applied to the ocular surface inhibited OOemg responses to hypertonic saline, but did not alter the response to light. Lidocaine injected into the trigeminal ganglion blocked completely the OOemg responses to hypertonic saline and light indicating a trigeminal afferent origin. Synaptic blockade by cobalt chloride of the Vi/Vc or Vc/C1 region greatly reduced OOemg responses to hypertonic saline and bright light. These data indicate that OOemg activity evoked by natural stimuli known to cause irritation or discomfort in humans depends on a relay in both the Vi/Vc transition and Vc/C1 junction regions. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Peritoneal equilibrium test with hypertonic exchange: practical application in a peritoneal dialysis program].

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A; Marrón, B; Berlanga, J R; Reyero, A; Gazapo, R

    2001-01-01

    Peritoneal equilibration test (PET) employing a 2.27%/2.5% glucose exchange is the most widely used method of to evaluating peritoneal function and small solute transport. Hypertonic (3.86%/4.25% glucose) PET has been recently recommended for the evaluation of ultrafiltration and to study certain causes of ultrafiltration failure, such as aquaporin dysfunction, through the analysis of dialysate sodium. However, there is not enough information on the optimal way to express the changes in dialysate sodium concentration, the normal range of values for this parameter, and possible adverse effects of hypertonic PET in the general population of peritoneal dialysis patients. A hypertonic PET was performed in 22 patients. Ultrafiltration failure (ultrafiltration < 0.4 L) was present in seven patients. Patients with ultrafiltration failure had higher small solute peritoneal transport and dialysate sodium concentration and had been treated with peritoneal dialysis for longer periods of time. Dialysate sodium concentration at 60 and 240 minutes was directly correlated with small solute peritoneal transport calculated as D/PCr240 (r = 0.74, p = 0.0008 y r = 0.84, p < 0.0001) and inversely correlated with ultrafiltration (r = 0.64, p = 0.0016 y r = 0.72, p = 0.0002). An absence of a dip in dialysis sodium, suggestive of aquaporin dysfunction, was only observed in one patient with a high-average small solute peritoneal transport. Dialysate sodium concentration at 60 minutes is a better discriminator between ultrafiltration failure patients than parameters such as D/PNa or the absolute dip in dialysate sodium with respect to time zero. We observed the following adverse effects: symptomatic hypotension in 2 patients with preserved ultrafiltration. In conclusion, hypertonic PET allows to confirm the diagnosis of ultrafiltration failure, but monitoring dialysate sodium concentration offers additional information only in patients with severe aquaporin dysfunction. Hypertonic PET may

  9. Oxytocinergic and serotonergic systems involvement in sodium intake regulation: satiety or hypertonicity markers?

    PubMed

    Godino, Andrea; De Luca, Laurival Antonio; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Vivas, Laura

    2007-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the inhibitory participation of serotonergic (5-HT) and oxytocinergic (OT) neurons on sodium appetite induced by peritoneal dialysis (PD) in rats. The activity of 5-HT neurons increases after PD-induced 2% NaCl intake and decreases after sodium depletion; however, the activity of the OT neurons appears only after PD-induced 2% NaCl intake. To discriminate whether the differential activations of the 5-HT and OT neurons in this model are a consequence of the sodium satiation process or are the result of stimulation caused by the entry to the body of a hypertonic sodium solution during sodium access, we analyzed the number of Fos-5-HT- and Fos-OT-immunoreactive neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus-supraoptic nucleus, respectively, after isotonic vs. hypertonic NaCl intake induced by PD. We also studied the OT plasma levels after PD-induced isotonic or hypertonic NaCl intake. Sodium intake induced by PD significantly increased the number of Fos-5-HT cells, independently of the concentration of NaCl consumed. In contrast, the number of Fos-OT neurons increased after hypertonic NaCl intake, in both depleted and non-depleted animals. The OT plasma levels significantly increased only in the PD-induced 2% NaCl intake group in relation to others, showing a synergic effect of both factors. In summary, 5-HT neurons were activated after body sodium status was reestablished, suggesting that this system is activated under conditions of satiety. In terms of the OT system, both OT neural activity and OT plasma levels were increased by the entry of hypertonic NaCl solution during sodium consumption, suggesting that this system is involved in the processing of hyperosmotic signals.

  10. The cardioprotective effect of hypertonic saline is associated with inhibitory effect on macrophage migration inhibitory factor in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Li; Lam, Kwok-Keung; Cheng, Pao-Yun; Kung, Ching-Wen; Chen, Shu-Ying; Chao, Chun-Chih; Hwang, Hwong-Ru; Chung, Ming-Ting; Lee, Yen-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis can cause myocardial dysfunction, which contributes to the high mortality of sepsis. Hypertonic saline (HS) has been reported to increase myocardial contractility in sepsis. In the present study, mechanisms of action of HS resuscitation (4 mL of 7.5% NaCl per kilogram) on cardiac function have been evaluated in septic rats. HS was administered 1 h after LPS (10 mg/kg, i.v.) challenge. The mean arterial blood pressure significantly decreased 4 h after LPS challenge, and septic shock was observed at the end of experiment (6 h). Posttreatment with HS prevented hypotension caused by LPS and significantly improved cardiac function, evidenced by increases in left ventricular developed pressure, mean +dP/dt and -dP/dt. The amplitude of electrical-stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) transient in isolated single cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced after 6 h LPS insult, which was recovered by HS. In addition, LPS resulted in significant increases in neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and NF-κB phospho-p65 protein levels in myocardium at 6 h, which were significantly attenuated by HS. In conclusion, HS improved myocardial contractility and prevented circulatory failure induced by endotoxemia, which may attribute to improvement of intracellular calcium handling process and inhibitory effects on neutrophil infiltration and MIF production in hearts.

  11. Hypertonic saline is more effective than normal saline in seasonal allergic rhinitis in children.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, P; Varricchio, A; Baggi, E; Bianchini, S; Capasso, M E; Torretta, S; Capaccio, P; Gasparini, C; Patria, F; Esposito, S; Principi, N

    2012-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a very common childhood disease that is associated with a significant reduction in the patients' quality of life. Its treatment combines educating the patients and their parents, immunotherapy and drug administration. However, even the best approach does not relieve the symptoms of a number of patients. Alternative therapies are particularly needed for children because the fear of adverse events frequently reduces parental compliance to the prescribed drugs, and immunotherapy is less easy to administer than in adults. In this prospective investigator-blinded study we evaluated whether children, with a documented history of seasonal grass pollen-related AR, benefit from nasal irrigation by assessing the effects on nasal signs and symptoms, on middle ear effusion and on adenoidal hypertrophy. We randomized children aged 5 to 9 years (median age 82 months) to normal saline or hypertonic saline (a 2.7% sodium chloride solution), administered twice-daily using a disposable 20 ml syringe, or no treatment. Nasal symptoms (rhinorrhea, itching, sneezing, nasal obstruction), swelling of turbinates, adenoid hypertrophy or middle ear effusion were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment. Two hundred and twenty children (normal saline: 80; hypertonic saline: 80; no treatment: 60) completed the study. After four weeks, all the considered items were significantly reduced in the group receiving hypertonic saline (P < 0.0001), whereas in the group receiving normal saline only rhinorrhea (P = 0.0002) and sneezing (P = 0.002) were significantly reduced. There was no significant change in any of the items in the control group. The duration of oral antihistamines was significantly lower in the children receiving hypertonic saline than in those treated with normal saline or in controls. No adverse events were reported and parental satisfaction and compliance with the procedure were globally very good, regardless of the solution used. Using our

  12. Small volume resuscitation with hypertonic sodium chloride solution in cattle undergoing surgical correction of abomasal volvulus.

    PubMed

    Sickinger, M; Doll, K; Roloff, N C; Halekoh, U

    2014-09-01

    A randomized clinical trial was conducted to compare the efficacy of rapid intravenous (IV) infusion of a 7.2% hypertonic saline solution with that of continuous application of an isotonic solution in stabilizing the circulation of cows with abomasal volvulus. Cattle treated with hypertonic saline had a significantly greater reduction in volume deficit within the first 10 min of therapy than cows treated with isotonic saline (from 5.9 ± 4.8 to 2.1 ± 4.4 L/100 kg vs. 7.0 ± 4.5 to 4.9 ± 3.8 L/100 kg, respectively). The central venous pressure (CVP) of the cows given the hypertonic saline rose within the first 10 min of therapy from 7.3 ± 3.5 to 10.8 ± 3.4 cm H2O, while the CVP of the cattle treated with isotonic saline did not increase significantly during this time. Sixty minutes after the start of the infusion, the CVP of the isotonic group was still significantly lower than that of the hypertonic group (9.5 ± 2.1 vs. 10.3 ± 3.3 cm H2O, respectively). Within the first 60 min, the base excess decreased from 5.5 ± 6.9 to 4.7 ± 6.2 mmol/L in the hypertonic group whereas it increased from 5.6 ± 5.7 to 6.8 ± 5.4 mmol/L in the isotonic group. These results suggest that for cows with abomasal volvulus, IV therapy with hypertonic saline may improve the haemodynamic and circulatory situation considerably faster and more effectively than continuous infusion with isotonic saline. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Superiority of Hypertonic Saline/Dextran Over Hypertonic Saline during the First 30 Minutes of Resuscitation Following Hemorrhagic Hypotension in Conscious Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Comole:ion. :mediately after nerorrhage, zne swine were aarnin stereo nyoer:cn c sal ine/dextran or hyper~onc saline at 4 mi/kg, and 4finCtiona; variac as... C , Ho HS, Gunther RA, Boyle WA, Holcroft JW. Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline dextran solution. Surg 1986;100(No. 2):239-246. 2...concept. J Trauma 1985;25:65-70. 11. Border JR, Lewis FR, Aprahamian C , Haller JA, Jacobs LM, Luterman A. Prehospital trauma care--stabilize or scoop and

  14. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Antagonism Inhibits Bronchoconstriction in Respose to Hypertonic Saline Inhalation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kazani, Shamsah; Sadeh, Jonathan; Bunga, Sreedhar; Wechsler, Michael E; Israel, Elliot

    2010-01-01

    Background In asthma, cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) play varying roles in the bronchomotor response to multiple provocative stimuli. The contribution of CysLTs on the airway's response to hypertonic saline (HS) inhalation in asthma is unknown. Whether polymorphisms in the leukotriene biosynthetic pathway affect the contribution of CysLTs to this response is also unknown. Methods In a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study, mild and moderate asymptomatic asthmatics underwent inhaled 3% HS challenge by doubling the duration of nebulization (0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 min) two hours after one dose of montelukast (a CysLT receptor 1 [CysLTR1] antagonist) or placebo, and after three week courses. We examined the effect of the leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S) polymorphism (A-444C) on the efficacy of montelukast against HS inhalation in an exploratory manner. Results In 37 subjects, two hours after administration of montelukast, the mean provocative dose of HS required to cause a 20% drop in FEV1 (HS-PD20) increased by 59% (9.17 after placebo vs. 14.55 ml after montelukast, p = 0.0154). Three weeks of cysLTR1 antagonism increased the HS-PD20 by 84% (10.97 vs. 20.21 ml, p = 0.0002). Three weeks of CysLTR1 antagonism appeared to produce greater effects on blocking bronchial hyper responsiveness (two hour vs. three week HS-PD20 values 14.55 vs. 20.21 ml respectively, p = 0.0898). We did not observe an effect of the LTC4S polymorphism on the response to CysLTR1 antagonism in this cohort. Conclusions A significant proportion of HS-induced bronchoconstriction is mediated by release of leukotrienes as evidenced by substantial acute inhibition with a CysLTR1 antagonist. There was a trend toward greater inhibition of bronchial responsiveness with three weeks of therapy as opposed to acute CysLTR1 antagonism. PMID:21169002

  15. Effect of hypertonic saline treatment on the inflammatory response after hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Holms, Carla Augusto; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Kahvegian, Marcia; Massoco, Cristina Oliveira; Fantoni, Denise Tabacchi; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Junior, Jose Otavio Costa Auler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypertonic saline has been proposed to modulate the inflammatory cascade in certain experimental conditions, including pulmonary inflammation caused by inhaled gastric contents. The present study aimed to assess the potential anti-inflammatory effects of administering a single intravenous dose of 7.5% hypertonic saline in an experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hydrochloric acid. METHODS: Thirty-two pigs were anesthetized and randomly allocated into the following four groups: Sham, which received anesthesia and were observed; HS, which received intravenous 7.5% hypertonic saline solution (4 ml/kg); acute lung injury, which were subjected to acute lung injury with intratracheal hydrochloric acid; and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline, which were subjected to acute lung injury with hydrochloric acid and treated with hypertonic saline. Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters were recorded over four hours. Subsequently, bronchoalveolar lavage samples were collected at the end of the observation period to measure cytokine levels using an oxidative burst analysis, and lung tissue was collected for a histological analysis. RESULTS: Hydrochloric acid instillation caused marked changes in respiratory mechanics as well as blood gas and lung parenchyma parameters. Despite the absence of a significant difference between the acute lung injury and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline groups, the acute lung injury animals presented higher neutrophil and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage analysis. The histopathological analysis revealed pulmonary edema, congestion and alveolar collapse in both groups; however, the differences between groups were not significant. Despite the lower cytokine and neutrophil levels observed in the acute lung injury + hypertonic saline group, significant differences were not observed among the treated and non-treated groups. CONCLUSIONS: Hypertonic saline

  16. Effect of hypertonic saline treatment on the inflammatory response after hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in pigs.

    PubMed

    Holms, Carla Augusto; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Kahvegian, Marcia; Massoco, Cristina Oliveira; Fantoni, Denise Tabacchi; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Auler Junior, Jose Otavio Costa

    2015-08-01

    Hypertonic saline has been proposed to modulate the inflammatory cascade in certain experimental conditions, including pulmonary inflammation caused by inhaled gastric contents. The present study aimed to assess the potential anti-inflammatory effects of administering a single intravenous dose of 7.5% hypertonic saline in an experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hydrochloric acid. Thirty-two pigs were anesthetized and randomly allocated into the following four groups: Sham, which received anesthesia and were observed; HS, which received intravenous 7.5% hypertonic saline solution (4 ml/kg); acute lung injury, which were subjected to acute lung injury with intratracheal hydrochloric acid; and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline, which were subjected to acute lung injury with hydrochloric acid and treated with hypertonic saline. Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters were recorded over four hours. Subsequently, bronchoalveolar lavage samples were collected at the end of the observation period to measure cytokine levels using an oxidative burst analysis, and lung tissue was collected for a histological analysis. Hydrochloric acid instillation caused marked changes in respiratory mechanics as well as blood gas and lung parenchyma parameters. Despite the absence of a significant difference between the acute lung injury and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline groups, the acute lung injury animals presented higher neutrophil and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage analysis. The histopathological analysis revealed pulmonary edema, congestion and alveolar collapse in both groups; however, the differences between groups were not significant. Despite the lower cytokine and neutrophil levels observed in the acute lung injury + hypertonic saline group, significant differences were not observed among the treated and non-treated groups. Hypertonic saline infusion after intratracheal hydrochloric

  17. Can empirical hypertonic saline or sodium bicarbonate treatment prevent the development of cardiotoxicity during serious amitriptyline poisoning? Experimental research.

    PubMed

    Paksu, Muhammet Sukru; Zengin, Halit; Ilkaya, Fatih; Paksu, Sule; Guzel, Hasan; Ucar, Durmus; Uzun, Adem; Alacam, Hasan; Duran, Latif; Murat, Naci; Guzel, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate whether hypertonic saline or sodium bicarbonate administration prevented the development of cardiotoxicity in rats that received toxic doses of amitriptyline. Thirty-six Sprague Dawley rats were used in the study. The animals were divided into six groups. Group 1 received toxic doses of i.p. amitriptyline. Groups 2 and 3 toxic doses of i.p. amitriptyline, plus i.v. sodium bicarbonate and i.v. hypertonic saline, respectively. Group 4 received only i.v. sodium bicarbonate, group 5 received only i.v. hypertonic saline, and group 6 was the control. Electrocardiography was recorded in all rats for a maximum of 60 minutes. Blood samples were obtained to measure the serum levels of sodium and ionised calcium. The survival time was shorter in group 1. In this group, the animals' heart rates also decreased over time, and their QRS and QTc intervals were significantly prolonged. Groups 2 and 3 showed less severe changes in their ECGs and the rats survived for a longer period. The effects of sodium bicarbonate or hypertonic saline treatments on reducing the development of cardiotoxicity were similar. The serum sodium levels decreased in all the amitriptyline-applied groups. Reduction of serum sodium level was most pronounced in group 1. Empirical treatment with sodium bicarbonate or hypertonic saline can reduce the development of cardiotoxicity during amitriptyline intoxication. As hypertonic saline has no adverse effects on drug elimination, it should be considered as an alternative to sodium bicarbonate therapy.

  18. TonEBP stimulates multiple cellular pathways for adaptation to hypertonic stress: organic osmolyte-dependent and -independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Do; Choi, Soo Youn; Lim, Sun Woo; Lamitina, S. Todd; Ho, Steffan N.; Go, William Y.

    2011-01-01

    TonEBP (tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein) is a transcription factor that promotes cellular accumulation of organic osmolytes in the hypertonic renal medulla by stimulating expression of its target genes. Genetically modified animals with deficient TonEBP activity in the kidney suffer from severe medullary atrophy in association with cell death, demonstrating that TonEBP is essential for the survival of the renal medullary cells. Using both TonEBP knockout cells and RNA interference of TonEBP, we found that TonEBP promoted cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress. Microarray analyses revealed that the genetic response to hypertonicity was dominated by TonEBP in that expression of totally different sets of genes was increased by hypertonicity in those cells with TonEBP vs. those without TonEBP activity. Of over 100 potentially new TonEBP-regulated genes, we selected seven for further analyses and found that their expressions were all dependent on TonEBP. RNA interference experiments showed that some of these genes, asporin, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 and -7, and an extracellular lysophospholipase D, plus heat shock protein 70, a known TonEBP target gene, contributed to the adaptation to hypertonicity without promoting organic osmolyte accumulation. We conclude that TonEBP stimulates multiple cellular pathways for adaptation to hypertonic stress in addition to organic osmolyte accumulation. PMID:21209002

  19. TonEBP stimulates multiple cellular pathways for adaptation to hypertonic stress: organic osmolyte-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Do; Choi, Soo Youn; Lim, Sun Woo; Lamitina, S Todd; Ho, Steffan N; Go, William Y; Kwon, H Moo

    2011-03-01

    TonEBP (tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein) is a transcription factor that promotes cellular accumulation of organic osmolytes in the hypertonic renal medulla by stimulating expression of its target genes. Genetically modified animals with deficient TonEBP activity in the kidney suffer from severe medullary atrophy in association with cell death, demonstrating that TonEBP is essential for the survival of the renal medullary cells. Using both TonEBP knockout cells and RNA interference of TonEBP, we found that TonEBP promoted cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress. Microarray analyses revealed that the genetic response to hypertonicity was dominated by TonEBP in that expression of totally different sets of genes was increased by hypertonicity in those cells with TonEBP vs. those without TonEBP activity. Of over 100 potentially new TonEBP-regulated genes, we selected seven for further analyses and found that their expressions were all dependent on TonEBP. RNA interference experiments showed that some of these genes, asporin, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 and -7, and an extracellular lysophospholipase D, plus heat shock protein 70, a known TonEBP target gene, contributed to the adaptation to hypertonicity without promoting organic osmolyte accumulation. We conclude that TonEBP stimulates multiple cellular pathways for adaptation to hypertonic stress in addition to organic osmolyte accumulation.

  20. Roles of TauT and system A in cytoprotection of rat syncytiotrophoblast cell line exposed to hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, T; Sai, Y; Fujii, J; Muta, M; Iizasa, H; Tomi, M; Deureh, M; Kose, N; Nakashima, E

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the cytoprotective mechanism(s) induced in a conditionally immortalized syncytiotrophoblast cell line (TR-TBT 18d-1) exposed to hypertonic conditions. Hypertonicity-induced apoptosis of TR-TBT 18d-1 cells, but this was blocked by addition of 1 mM taurine to the culture medium. TauT-knockdown using siRNA revealed that TauT is a major contributor to taurine uptake by TR-TBT 18d-1 cells, at least under normal conditions. Cellular uptake of [(3)H]taurine and [(14)C]betaine by TR-TBT 18d-1 cells cultured under hypertonic conditions was increased compared to that under normal conditions. TauT, BGT-1, ATA2 and HSP70 mRNAs were upregulated by hypertonicity, while OCTN2, ENT1 and CNT1 mRNAs were downregulated. [(3)H]Taurine uptake was strongly inhibited by TauT inhibitors such as hypotaurine and β-alanine. MeAIB, a system A specific substrate, inhibited hypertonic stress-induced [(14)C]betaine uptake. These results suggest that TauT and system A play cytoprotective roles in syncytiotrophoblasts exposed to hypertonic stress. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypertonic Saline for the Treatment of Bronchiolitis in Infants and Young Children: A Critical Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiolitis, an infection of the lower respiratory tract, is the leading cause of infant and child hospitalization in the United States. Therapeutic options for management of bronchiolitis are limited. Hypertonic saline inhalation therapy has been studied in numerous clinical trials with mixed results. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published updated guidelines on the diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis, which include new recommendations on the use of hypertonic saline. We reviewed all published clinical trials mentioned in the 2014 AAP guidelines, as well as additional trials published since the guidelines, and critically evaluated each trial to determine efficacy, safety, and expectations of hypertonic saline inhalation therapy. A total of 2682 infants were studied over the course of 22 clinical trials. Nine trials were carried out in the outpatient/clinic/emergency department and 13 in the inpatient setting. We agree with the AAP guidelines regarding the recommendation to use nebulized hypertonic saline for infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis, with the expectation of reducing bronchiolitis scores and length of stay when it is expected to last more than 72 hours. However, we also believe there might be an advantage for hypertonic saline in reducing admission rates from the emergency department, based on close examination of the results of recent trials. This review also highlights important gaps in the available literature that need to be addressed in order to define the role of inhaled hypertonic saline therapy. PMID:26997926

  2. Chlorobenzylidene malononitrile tear gas exposure: Rinsing with amphoteric, hypertonic, and chelating solution.

    PubMed

    Brvar, M

    2016-02-01

    Chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS) is the tear gas used by the police. The aim was to evaluate an amphoteric, hypertonic, and chelating rinsing solution in CS exposure. The first (CS) group of six police officers was exposed to CS only. The second (preexposure) group of eight sprayed their faces with an aqueous, hypertonic, amphoteric, and chelating solution before CS exposure. The third (postexposure) group of eight sprayed their faces with an aqueous, hypertonic, amphoteric, and chelating solution after CS exposure. The time between exiting the CS cloud and arriving at the "ready for action" checkpoint was measured. Their facial pain both inside the CS cloud and at the checkpoint was assessed (0-10 points). The pain level inside the CS cloud was significantly lower in the preexposed group (5.6 ± 1.1; p = 0.01) than in the CS group (9.7 ± 0.5) and in the postexposure group (9.1 ± 0.4) where it was similar. The time interval between CS exposure and arrival at the checkpoint in the preexposure group (1:26 ± 0:44 min) was significantly shorter than both in the CS group (2:28 ± 0:25 min; p = 0.04) and postexposure group (2:30 ± 0:48 min; p = 0.02) where it was not different. The residual pain at the checkpoint in the preexposure (1.1 ± 0.4) and postexposure (1.4 ± 0.7) groups was similar with a significant lower pain level than in the CS group (2.3 ± 0.5; p = 0.02). CS decontamination with an aqueous, hypertonic, amphoteric, and chelating solution reduces facial pain, whereas prevention with it reduces pain and recovery time. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Effects of hypertonic saline infusion and water drinking on atrial peptide.

    PubMed

    Salazar, F J; Granger, J P; Joyce, M L; Burnett, J C; Bove, A A; Romero, J C

    1986-12-01

    This study was undertaken to define the changes in plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) induced by hypertonic saline infusion followed by spontaneous water drinking and to determine whether these changes in ANP are correlated with changes in right atrial pressure (RAP) and plasma levels of vasopressin (AVP). Conscious dogs (n = 5) were infused with hypertonic saline (6%) at a rate of 1.4 ml/min for 4 h. Water was withheld for the first 2 h and administered ad libitum for the final 2 h. Hypertonic saline infusion induced increases (P less than 0.05) in plasma osmolality (posM), pAVP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and RAP (1.9 +/- 0.6 to 3.1 +/- 0.7 mmHg). These changes were accompanied by an increase of pANP (68 +/- 14 to 120 +/- 33 pg/ml, P less than 0.05). Spontaneous water drinking (1,410 +/- 127 ml) returned posM and pAVP to control levels and produced a further and significant increment in RAP (150%) and pANP (100%). During the water-drinking phase MAP was not further altered, and hematocrit decreased by 11.1% (P less than 0.05). A positive linear correlation (P less than 0.001) was found between increases in RAP and pANP. The administration of an AVP vasopressor antagonist in a similar protocol, and before hypertonic saline infusion, inhibited the increase of MAP, but it did not alter the changes of posM, hematocrit, RAP, nor pANP. These results suggest that changes in the release of ANP during increases in posM and after spontaneous water drinking are predominantly controlled by changes in RAP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Emergency anesthesia for evacuating a traumatic acute subdural hemorrhage in a child overdosed with hypertonic saline

    PubMed Central

    Goonasekera, Chulananda; Bedford, James; Harpreet, Sodhi; Giombini, Mariangela; Sheikh, Asme

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 1-year-old child with a traumatic acute subdural hemorrhage received 10 times higher dose of hypertonic saline inadvertently immediately before surgery. This case report describes deviations in fluid management needed to alleviate salt toxicity and its adverse effects during surgery under anesthesia perioperatively. The child made an uneventful recovery with no evident residual damage at follow-up. PMID:28217157

  5. Combination of Hot-Hypertonic Saline and Pressure Dressing in the Management of Parotid Fistula.

    PubMed

    Aisha; Fatima, Saira; Memon, Aijaz Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Parotid fistula is a rare complication of surgical or non-surgical trauma on or in the vicinity of parotid gland. Many pharmacological agents and surgical methods are used to treat it with their own merits, demerits and patient preferences. Injection of hypertonic hot saline along with compression dressing is an economical, patient-preferred and almost complication-free method to deal parotid fistula with promising results.

  6. Elevation of ouabainlike compound levels with hypertonic sodium chloride load in rat plasma and tissues.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Goto, A; Nagoshi, H; Terano, Y; Omata, M

    1997-07-01

    A major biologically active endogenous digitalis-like factor in the mammalian body may be an isomer of ouabain (ouabainlike compound, OLC). However, the exact role of OLC in sodium homeostasis is still unclear, and acute isotonic volume expansion does not enhance the secretion of OLC. We tested the hypothesis that OLC may be more important in the response to acute hypertonic NaCl load rather than isotonic volume expansion. We injected intraperitoneally 2 mL of 20% NaCl solution into male Wistar rats (n=34) and measured OLC levels in plasma, hypothalamus, pituitary, and adrenal at baseline (n=10) and 1, 2, and 4 hours (n=8 for each). In response to hypertonic NaCl loading, plasma Na-K ratio was elevated at 2 and 4 hours (P<.01). OLC levels in pituitary increased (P<.01) at 1 hour. Thereafter, plasma OLC levels increased at 2 and 4 hours (P<.05; basal, 75+/-11 pmol/L [+/-SEM]; 1 hour, 55+/-11; 2 hours, 130+/-24; 4 hours, 156+/-20). Concomitantly, OLC levels in adrenal increased at 2 and 4 hours (P<.01; basal, 1.7+/-0.2 pmol/g; 1 hour, 4.5+/-0.9; 2 hours, 5.0+/-0.7; 4 hours, 6.8+/-2.2). A significant correlation was observed between OLC levels in plasma and adrenal (P<.05). Plasma Na-K ratio positively correlated with OLC levels in plasma (r=.51, P<.01) and adrenal (r=.48, P<.01). Similar injection of physiological saline solution or hypertonic sucrose solution in physiological saline did not increase OLC levels in plasma and tissues. These findings indicate the elevation of OLC levels in plasma, pituitary, and adrenal in response to acute hypertonic NaCl load in rats and suggest that OLC may be involved in the response to the hypernatremic state.

  7. Hypertonic sabouraud broth as a simple and powerful test for Candida dubliniensis screening.

    PubMed

    Alves, Sydney Hartz; Milan, Eveline Pipolo; de Laet Sant'Ana, Priscilla; Oliveira, Loiva O; Santurio, Janio M; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2002-05-01

    We developed a new screening test for C. dubliniensis based on its inability to grow on Sabouraud dextrose broth with 6.5% NaCl. A total of 266 clinical yeast isolates and 3 reference strains were tested, including 250 C. albicans and 19 C. dubliniensis strains. All C. albicans isolates tested exhibited significant growth on hypertonic Sabouraud broth up to 96 h, while, all C. dubliniensis isolates did not exhibit any visually detectable growth during the same period.

  8. Use of Moderately Hypertonic Sodium Chloride in the Resuscitation of Patients from Injury.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-08

    administered at the time of entry. Measurements Serum samples were collected for measurement of chemistry panels, blood counts and blood gases, which...chloride; moderately hypertonic solutions; trauma; fluid resuscitation;psystolic blood pressure; heart rate, urine output; PaO 2/FI0 2 ratio; fluid...administeredv-patients; survival; shock; trauma, isotonic solutions lactated Ringer’s; organ failure; 3% sodium chloride- blood replacement; pulmonary

  9. The Use of Hypertonic Solutions to Resuscitate Animals from Hypovolemic Shock.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-18

    protein was determined with Biuret assay on arterial blood samples taken every 30 min. Serum sodium and potassium were measured on a Nova I Na t /K...determine if a variable changed with respect to time after resuscitation [131. The paired Student t test was used to compare variable differences between...through the femoral onstrated, a two-tailed t test with the Bonfer- venous catheter. The hypertonic saline was roni correction for multiple comparisons

  10. Effects of SFO lesion or captopril on drinking induced by intragastric hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, E M; Fitts, D A

    1998-06-08

    This study examined the hypothesis that the subfornical organ (SFO), a circumventricular organ with both osmosensitive elements and dipsogenic receptors for circulating angiotensin (ANG) II, is important for the water drinking response that follows an intragastric (ig) load of hypertonic NaCl. A 2-ml saline load was administered ig at 300, 900, or 1200 mOsm/kg to rats with sham lesions or lesions of the SFO, and intake was measured periodically for 2 h. Hypertonic loads caused sham-lesioned rats, but not SFO-lesioned rats, to drink earlier in the test or to drink more water than did the isotonic load. Inhibition of ANG II synthesis in unoperated rats with 100 mg/kg of captopril reduced water intake only during the initial 15 min after a gavage of 1200 mOsm/kg saline. Loads of 900 and 1200 mOsm/kg both increased plasma osmolality and sodium concentration by 15 min after gavage without greatly affecting hematocrit or plasma protein concentration. Thus, the SFO is important for the osmotically-induced water drinking response after acute ig administration of hypertonic saline. With the possible exception of the first 15 min, this drinking response is independent of the peripheral synthesis of ANG II. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sphingomyelin metabolism is involved in the differentiation of MDCK cells induced by environmental hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Favale, Nicolás Octavio; Santacreu, Bruno Jaime; Pescio, Lucila Gisele; Marquez, Maria Gabriela; Sterin-Speziale, Norma Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are relevant lipid components of eukaryotic cells. Besides regulating various cellular processes, SLs provide the structural framework for plasma membrane organization. Particularly, SM is associated with detergent-resistant microdomains. We have previously shown that the adherens junction (AJ) complex, the relevant cell-cell adhesion structure involved in cell differentiation and tissue organization, is located in an SM-rich membrane lipid domain. We have also demonstrated that under hypertonic conditions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells acquire a differentiated phenotype with changes in SL metabolism. For these reasons, we decided to evaluate whether SM metabolism is involved in the acquisition of the differentiated phenotype of MDCK cells. We found that SM synthesis mediated by SM synthase 1 is involved in hypertonicity-induced formation of mature AJs, necessary for correct epithelial cell differentiation. Inhibition of SM synthesis impaired the acquisition of mature AJs, evoking a disintegration-like process reflected by the dissipation of E-cadherin and β- and α-catenins from the AJ complex. As a consequence, MDCK cells did not develop the hypertonicity-induced differentiated epithelial cell phenotype. PMID:25670801

  12. [Septic shock. Update of treatment using hypertonic saline and antidiuretic hormone-vasopressin].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Ramírez, J; Aguirre Sánchez-Covisa, M; Araujo, F; Gil Trujillo, S; Collar, L G; Bocharán, S

    2012-01-01

    Safety in the use of small volumes of hypertonic saline solution for hypovolaemic shock and in the treatment of intracranial hypertension has been demonstrated in studies in the field of resuscitation. There is little experience of this for septic shock in humans. Beneficial immunomodulatory effects have been detected in pre-clinical studies. Interactions with the pituitary-adrenal axis and with the secretion of anti-diuretic hormone are varied and suggestive, but are not sufficiently understood. On the other hand, vasopressin has cardiovascular, osmoregulatory, and coagulation effects, and also acts on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is a relative deficit of vasopressin in septic shock. Its use in these patients does not seem to have any advantages as regards mortality, but may be beneficial in patients at risk from acute renal failure, or those who receive corticosteroids. Terlipressin is a vasopressin analogue that has also been studied. The synergy between vasopressin and hypertonic saline is a hypothesis that is mainly supported in pre-clinical studies. The use of hypertonic saline solution in septic shock, although promising, is still experimental, and must be restricted to the field of controlled clinical trials.

  13. Early Implementation of THAM for ICP Control: Therapeutic Hypothermia Avoidance and Reduction in Hypertonics/Hyperosmotics.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, F A; Gillman, L M; Teitelbaum, J; West, M

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tromethamine (THAM) has been demonstrated to reduce intracranial pressure (ICP). Early consideration for THAM may reduce the need for other measures for ICP control. Objective. To describe 4 cases of early THAM therapy for ICP control and highlight the potential to avoid TH and paralytics and achieve reduction in sedation and hypertonic/hyperosmotic agent requirements. Methods. We reviewed the charts of 4 patients treated with early THAM for ICP control. Results. We identified 2 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and 2 with traumatic brain injury (TBI) receiving early THAM for ICP control. The mean time to initiation of THAM therapy was 1.8 days, with a mean duration of 5.3 days. In all patients, after 6 to 12 hours of THAM administration, ICP stability was achieved, with reduction in requirements for hypertonic saline and hyperosmotic agents. There was a relative reduction in mean hourly hypertonic saline requirements of 89.1%, 96.1%, 82.4%, and 97.0% for cases 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, comparing pre- to post-THAM administration. Mannitol, therapeutic hypothermia, and paralytics were avoided in all patients. Conclusions. Early administration of THAM for ICP control could potentially lead to the avoidance of other ICP directed therapies. Prospective studies of early THAM administration are warranted.

  14. Pre-exercise ingestion of pickle juice, hypertonic saline, or water and aerobic performance and thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Peikert, Jarett; Miller, Kevin C; Albrecht, Jay; Tucker, Jared; Deal, James

    2014-01-01

    Ingesting high-sodium drinks pre-exercise can improve thermoregulation and performance. Athletic trainers (19%) give athletes pickle juice (PJ) prophylactically for cramping. No data exist on whether this practice affects aerobic performance or thermoregulation. To determine if drinking 2 mL/kg body mass of PJ, hypertonic saline, or deionized water (DIW) pre-exercise affects aerobic performance or thermoregulation. Crossover study. Controlled laboratory study. Nine euhydrated men (age = 22 ± 3 years, height = 184.0 ± 8.2 cm, mass = 82.6 ± 16.0 kg) completed testing. Participants rested for 65 minutes. During this period, they ingested 2 mL/kg of PJ, hypertonic saline, or DIW. Next, they drank 5 mL/kg of DIW. Blood was collected before and after ingestion of all fluids. Participants were weighed and ran in the heat (temperature = 38.3°C ± 1°C, relative humidity = 21.1% ± 4.7%) at increasing increments of maximal heart rate (50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90%, 95%) until exhaustion or until rectal temperature exceeded 39.5°C. Participants were weighed postexercise so we could calculate sweat volume. Time to exhaustion, rectal temperature, changes in plasma volume, and sweat volume. Time to exhaustion did not differ among drinks (PJ = 77.4 ± 5.9 minutes, hypertonic saline = 77.4 ± 4.0 minutes, DIW = 75.7 ± 3.2 minutes; F2,16 = 1.1, P = .40). Core temperature of participants was similar among drinks (PJ = 38.7°C ± 0.3°C, hypertonic saline = 38.7°C ± 0.4°C, DIW = 38.8°C ± 0.4°C; P = .74) but increased from pre-exercise (36.7°C ± 0.2°C) to postexercise (38.7°C ± 0.4°C) (P < .05). No differences were observed for changes in plasma volume or sweat volume among drinks (P > .05). Ingesting small amounts of PJ or hypertonic saline with water did not affect performance or select thermoregulatory measures. Drinking larger volumes of PJ and water may be more effective at expanding the extracellular space.

  15. Pre-Exercise Ingestion of Pickle Juice, Hypertonic Saline, or Water and Aerobic Performance and Thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Peikert, Jarett; Miller, Kevin C.; Albrecht, Jay; Tucker, Jared; Deal, James

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ingesting high-sodium drinks pre-exercise can improve thermoregulation and performance. Athletic trainers (19%) give athletes pickle juice (PJ) prophylactically for cramping. No data exist on whether this practice affects aerobic performance or thermoregulation. Objective: To determine if drinking 2 mL/kg body mass of PJ, hypertonic saline, or deionized water (DIW) pre-exercise affects aerobic performance or thermoregulation. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Controlled laboratory study. Patients or Other Participants: Nine euhydrated men (age = 22 ± 3 years, height = 184.0 ± 8.2 cm, mass = 82.6 ± 16.0 kg) completed testing. Intervention(s): Participants rested for 65 minutes. During this period, they ingested 2 mL/kg of PJ, hypertonic saline, or DIW. Next, they drank 5 mL/kg of DIW. Blood was collected before and after ingestion of all fluids. Participants were weighed and ran in the heat (temperature = 38.3°C ± 1°C, relative humidity = 21.1% ± 4.7%) at increasing increments of maximal heart rate (50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90%, 95%) until exhaustion or until rectal temperature exceeded 39.5°C. Participants were weighed postexercise so we could calculate sweat volume. Main Outcome Measure(s): Time to exhaustion, rectal temperature, changes in plasma volume, and sweat volume. Results: Time to exhaustion did not differ among drinks (PJ = 77.4 ± 5.9 minutes, hypertonic saline = 77.4 ± 4.0 minutes, DIW = 75.7 ± 3.2 minutes; F2,16 = 1.1, P = .40). Core temperature of participants was similar among drinks (PJ = 38.7°C ± 0.3°C, hypertonic saline = 38.7°C ± 0.4°C, DIW = 38.8°C ± 0.4°C; P = .74) but increased from pre-exercise (36.7°C ± 0.2°C) to postexercise (38.7°C ± 0.4°C) (P < .05). No differences were observed for changes in plasma volume or sweat volume among drinks (P > .05). Conclusions: Ingesting small amounts of PJ or hypertonic saline with water did not affect performance or select thermoregulatory measures. Drinking larger volumes of

  16. PGE(2) EP(3) receptor downregulates COX-2 expression in the medullary thick ascending limb induced by hypertonic NaCl.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shoujin; Hernandez, Alejandra; Quiroz-Munoz, Mariana; Cespedes, Carlos; Vio, Carlos P; Ferreri, Nicholas R

    2014-09-15

    We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of EP3 receptors enhances cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in the thick ascending limb (TAL) induced by hypertonic stimuli. COX-2 protein expression in the outer medulla increased approximately twofold in mice given free access to 1% NaCl in the drinking water for 3 days. The increase was associated with an approximate threefold elevation in COX-2 mRNA accumulation and an increase in PGE2 production by isolated medullary (m)TAL tubules from 77.3 ± 8.4 to 165.7 ± 10.8 pg/mg protein. Moreover, administration of NS-398 abolished the increase in PGE2 production induced by 1% NaCl. EP3 receptor mRNA levels also increased approximately twofold in the outer medulla of mice that ingested 1% NaCl. The selective EP3 receptor antagonist L-798106 increased COX-2 mRNA by twofold in mTAL tubules, and the elevation in COX-2 protein induced by 1% NaCl increased an additional 50% in mice given L-798106. COX-2 mRNA in primary mTAL cells increased twofold in response to media made hypertonic by the addition of NaCl (400 mosmol/kg H2O). L-798106 increased COX-2 mRNA twofold in isotonic media and fourfold in cells exposed to 400 mosmol/kg H2O. PGE2 production by mTAL cells increased from 79.3 ± 4.6 to 286.7 ± 6.3 pg/mg protein after challenge with 400 mosmol/kg H2O and was inhibited in cells transiently transfected with a lentivirus short hairpin RNA construct targeting exon 5 of COX-2 to silence COX-2. Collectively, the data suggest that local hypertonicity in the mTAL is associated with an increase in COX-2 expression concomitant with elevated EP3 receptor expression, which limits COX-2 activity in this segment of the nephron. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Intratesticular injection of hypertonic saline : non-invasive alternative method for animal castration model.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Byung Kuk; Lee, Sung-Ho

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies, including our own, have demonstrated that the intratesticular injection of hypertonic saline (20%) decreased serum testosterone level which was similar to the surgical castration in the rat, showing the state of chemical castration. In the present study, we further verify the efficacy of this less invasive method as an alternative of surgical orchidectomy in the andevrepological field. Sterilized 20% saline was directly injected into the adult male rats (750 μl per testis). The tested rats were divided into 3 groups including intact group (intact), orchidectomy group (ORX) and saline injection group (SAL) after bilateral orchidectomy was performed at the same day of injection. All rats were sacrificed at 4 weeks after injection. The reproductive organs (testes, epididymis, seminal vesicles and prostates) were collected and used for DNA and protein pattern analyses. Also, patho-histological studies on the testes were performed. In contrast to the intact group, similar DNA damages of testis and seminal vesicle were appeared in ORX group and SAL group. The DNA degradations seemed to be the results of necrosis rather than apoptosis. In the protein pattern analysis, all the testing tissues exerted similar patterns in the ORX group and the SAL group compared to the those of intact group. Patho-histological studies revealed that severe degenerative changes in testicular seminiferous tubules and massive infiltration of immune cells in SAL group. The present study confirmed that direct injection of hypertonic saline into the testis caused the equivalent biochemical changes in the accessory sex organs as shown in the orchidectomized animals. These results suggest that hypertonic saline injection model could be a useful castration model which can substitute for surgical castration when its safety is secured through further study in the future.

  18. [Changes induced by hypertonic solutions in the transportation of calcium by the cardiac reticular sarcoplasma].

    PubMed

    Sierra, M; Holguín, J A

    1979-01-01

    In the sarcoplasmic reticulum of the myocardium, celular organell which function is to regulate the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium in contraction and relaxation, we have studied the effect of hypertonic solutions of sucrose between 1 and 6.96 times the normal tonicity in order to observe the behavior of the internal linked or free calcium of this structure, as well as to prove the hypothesis that hypertonic solutions encourage the calcium exit of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum with the resulting signs of contractures. The following results were obtained: 1. The ATP hydrolisis and calcium transport rate are 14% and 90% respectively of the maximum speeds of 10(-5) M in calcium, while for concentrations of 10(-7) M or ess of the said cation, the transport rates and the ATPase do not reach 5% of the maximum values. 2. Between 1 and 2.54 times of the normal tonicity the calcium uptake remains between 400 and 500 nmoles of calcium/mg protein/min, the transported amount of calcium varies between 14 and 16 nmoles/mg protein and the rate of the ATP hydrolysis increases a 37% to 0.4 M in sucrose. 3. Between 0.4 and 1.2 M in sucrose of 2.54 to 6.96 times the isotonicity, the calcium transport rate velocity as well as the ATP hydrolisis are strongly inhibited. The vesicles volume minimizes and the amount of linked calcium remains within the control values, proving that the capacity of linking this cathion is independent from sarcoplasmic reticulum volume. These results show that the sarcoplasmic reticulum is involved in the contractures induced by hypertonic solutions in intact cells, since the osmolarity increase produces changes of volume which results in a decrease of the calcium transportation velocity or in an increase of the exit of said cathion.

  19. SABRE: a multicentre randomised control trial of nebulised hypertonic saline in infants hospitalised with acute bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Everard, Mark L; Hind, Daniel; Ugonna, Kelechi; Freeman, Jennifer; Bradburn, Mike; Cooper, Cindy L; Cross, Elizabeth; Maguire, Chin; Cantrill, Hannah; Alexander, John; McNamara, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    Aim Acute bronchiolitis is the commonest cause for hospitalisation in infancy. Supportive care remains the cornerstone of current management and no other therapy has been shown to influence the course of the disease. It has been suggested that adding nebulised hypertonic saline to usual care may shorten the duration of hospitalisation. To determine whether hypertonic saline does have beneficial effects we undertook an open, multi-centre parallel-group, pragmatic RCT in ten UK hospitals. Methods Infants admitted to hospital with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchiolitis and requiring oxygen therapy were randomised to receive usual care alone or nebulised 3% hypertonic saline (HS) administered 6-hourly. Randomisation was within 4 h of admission. The primary outcome was time to being assessed as ‘fit’ for discharge with secondary outcomes including time to discharge, incidence of adverse events together with follow up to 28 days assessing patient centred health related outcomes. Results A total of 317 infants were recruited to the study. 158 infants were randomised to HS (141 analysed) and 159 to standard care (149 analysed). There was no difference between the two arms in time to being declared fit for discharge (hazard ratio: 0−95, 95% CI: 0.75−1.20) nor to actual discharge (hazard ratio: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.76−1.23). There was no difference in adverse events. One infant in the HS group developed bradycardia with desaturation. Conclusion This study does not support the use of nebulised HS in the treatment of acute bronchiolitis over usual care with minimal handlings. ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT01469845. PMID:25389139

  20. Modulation of jaw muscle spindle afferent activity following intramuscular injections with hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Ro, J Y; Capra, N F

    2001-05-01

    Transient noxious chemical stimulation of small diameter muscle afferents modulates jaw movement-related responses of caudal brainstem neurons. While it is likely that the effect is mediated from the spindle afferents in the mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) via the caudally projecting Probst's tract, the mechanisms of pain induced modulations of jaw muscle spindle afferents is not known. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that jaw muscle nociceptors gain access to muscle spindle afferents in the same muscle via central mechanisms and alter their sensitivity. Thirty-five neurons recorded from the Vmes were characterized as muscle spindle afferents based on their responses to passive jaw movements, muscle palpation, and electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve. Each cell was tested by injecting a small volume (250 microl) of either 5% hypertonic and/or isotonic saline into the receptor-bearing muscle. Twenty-nine units were tested with 5% hypertonic saline, of which 79% (23/29) showed significant modulation of mean firing rates (MFRs) during one or more phases of ramp-and-hold movements. Among the muscle spindle primary-like units (n = 12), MFRs of 4 units were facilitated, five reduced, two showed mixed responses and one unchanged. In secondary-like units (n = 17), MFRs of 9 were facilitated, three reduced and five unchanged. Thirteen units were tested with isotonic saline, of which 77% showed no significant changes of MFRs. Further analysis revealed that the hypertonic saline not only affected the overall output of muscle spindle afferents, but also increased the variability of firing and altered the relationship between afferent signal and muscle length. These results demonstrated that activation of muscle nociceptors significantly affects proprioceptive properties of jaw muscle spindles via central neural mechanisms. The changes can have deleterious effects on oral motor function as well as kinesthetic sensibility.

  1. The effect of cooling and hypertonic exposure on murine oocyte function, fertilization, and development.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J E; Fuller, B J; Bernard, A; Shaw, R W

    1995-08-01

    Several individual but related steps are involved in the cryopreservation process, including the addition of cryoprotectants at various temperatures, cooling to subzero temperatures, and long-term storage. The process is completed by rewarming and removal of cryoprotectants prior to a return to physiological conditions. In this series of experiments we have attempted to distinguish the effects of some of these procedures. Control, untreated ovulated mouse oocytes showed 95% in vitro fertilization (190/200) and 92% subsequent development to hatching blastocyst (184/200). Exposure of oocytes to either isotonic or hypertonic media at 37 degrees C did not significantly change the rate of fertilization (90%, 108/120; and 89%, 154/174, respectively) or subsequent embryonic development (85%, 102/120; and 82%, 143/174, respectively). Slow cooling in isotonic medium (-3 degrees C/min) to 0 degree C had no effect on the rate of fertilization (83%, 103/124), but rapid cooling (> 1000 degrees C/min) to 0 degree C resulted in a significant reduction in fertilization rate to 75% (151/202). When oocytes suspended in a hypertonic solution were cooled using slow or rapid rates, there were marked decreases in fertilization to 26% (61/231) and 56% (156/278), respectively. Subsequent embryonic growth was reduced to 15% (34/231) after slow cooling and 26% (72/278) after rapid cooling. Exposure of oocytes to glycerol at 37 degrees C and dimethyl sulfoxide at 0 degree C reduced the fertilization rate to 57% (67/118) and 73% (103/145), respectively, with a corresponding reduction in embryonic growth to 52% (61/118) and 65% (94/145), but there were no additional effects of cooling or hypertonic exposure after addition of cryoprotectants.

  2. Hypertonic/Hyperoncotic Resuscitation from Shock: Reduced Volume Requirement and Lower Intracranial Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    volume re- gs reference organs for measurement 3f organ blood suscitation with hypertonic saline dextran flow, using radioactive microspheres. All...oastllto Amaintained throyighout the 30 minute shoth Interval Blood was At ot; sir -o,;tnrn M,’.t was rvdured Iron 1111 tmean+SC r-ov~ed to reduce...a volume much smaller than the original shed blood volume (4-12). The addition of colloid, usually 6.0% low-molecular weight dextran , has been used

  3. Evaluation of the Maintained Effect of 3% Hypertonic Saline Solution in an Animal Model of Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Leonardo M.; de Andrade, Almir F.; Belon, Alessandro R.; Soares, Matheus S.; Amorim, Robson Luis; Otochi, Jose Pinhata; Teixeira, Manoel J.; Paiva, Wellingson S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current clinical treatment methods for refractory intracranial hypertension include elevation of the decubitus, ventilation adjustment, and use of hypertonic solutions such as hypertonic saline and mannitol solutions. Previous studies have shown that hypertonic solutions are particularly effective. Although several concentrations of saline solution have been proposed, a 3% solution is the most widely used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the maintained efficacy of a 3% hypertonic saline solution in an experimental model of intracranial hypertension. Material/Methods A porcine model of reversible intracranial hypertension was created by inserting a balloon catheter into the brain parenchyma, which was inflated and deflated to simulate intracranial hypertension and its surgical correction. The experiment included 3 groups of animals (A, B, and C) with different balloon inflation volumes. In group B, balloons were inflated 2 times to simulate reexpansion. A 20 mL/kg bolus of 3% saline solution was infused using a pump 90 minutes after the start of balloon inflation, and the effects of intracranial pressure were evaluated 60 minutes after infusion. Results No increases outside of the normal range were observed in mean serum sodium concentrations (p=0.09). In addition, we identified no differences within each group in serum sodium levels measured during hypertonic saline infusion (p=0.21). No significant reductions in intracranial pressure were observed in any of the 3 groups. Conclusions Bolus infusion of 3% hypertonic saline solution with the aid of a pump does not significantly reduce intracranial pressure in an animal model of intracranial hypertension. PMID:27777397

  4. Effect of different concentrations of hypertonic saline at different times on protoscoleces of hydatid cyst isolated from liver and lung.

    PubMed

    Tappeh, Khosrow Hazreti; Einshaei, Ali; Mahmudloo, Rahim; Mohammadzadeh, Habib; Tahermaram, Mansoor; Mousavi, Seyed Javad

    2011-01-01

    Most surgeons inject scoloidal materials into the cyst before or after its removal, since any contamination to normal sites will cause re-growth of the same cyst. The aim of this study was to determine the lethal effect of hypertonic saline at different doses and different times on protoscolexes of lung and liver. The livers and lungs of killed animals with hydatid cyst disease were gathered from Urmia Industrial Abattoirs. They were transferred to the university parasitological lab immediately. The hydatid cyst fluid was aspirated with a 10 mm syringe and poured into a 15 cc tubes. The movement of protoscoleces and staining with 0.1% eosin was the test to determine viability of protoscoleces. Those with color absorption were those which were not viable. Different concentrations of hypertonic saline were given at different time. The results showed that in 20% of hypertonic saline in the 4th minute, 80% of protoscoleces were alive while in the 5th minute 50% were alive, in the 7th minute 20% and 8th minute 5%, 9th minute all of them were dead. In the 10% concentration, at up to 9 minutes 50% were alive, in the 18th minute 20% and in 30 minutes 10% of protoscoleces were alive. In the 5% concentration at up to 10 minutes 90% were alive while in the 22nd minute 80% and in 30 minutes 70% of protoscoleces were alive. When we inject 20% hypertonic saline into the cyst cavity there is aprobability that the cyst contaminates the bile duct and liver through the small hole we made. This material may cause widespread necrosis of the liver. We should use 10% hypertonic saline minimally for 45 minute before surgery and after cyst removal, since the hypertonic saline itself may cause injury to the biliary system.

  5. Serotonin, glutamate and glycerol are released after the injection of hypertonic saline into human masseter muscles – a microdialysis study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic myalgia is associated with higher muscle levels of certain algesic biomarkers. The aim of this study was to investigate if hypertonic saline-induced jaw myalgia also leads to release of such biomarkers and if there were any sex differences in this respect. Methods Healthy participants, 15 men and 15 aged-matched women (25.7 ± 4.3 years) participated. Intramuscular microdialysis into masseter muscles was performed to sample serotonin (5-HT), glutamate, lactate, pyruvate, glucose and glycerol. After 2 hours 0.2 mL hypertonic saline (58.5 mg/mL) was injected into the masseter on one side and 0.2 mL isotonic saline (9 mg/mL) into the contralateral masseter close to the microdialysis catheter. Microdialysis continued for 1 hour after the injections. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and pain were assessed before and after injections. Results The median (IQR) peak pain intensity (0–100 visual analogue scale) after hypertonic saline was 52.5 (38.0) and after isotonic saline 7.5 (24.0) (p < 0.05). 5-HT, glutamate and glycerol increased after hypertonic saline injection (p < 0.05). Lactate, pyruvate and glucose showed no change. PPT after microdialysis was reduced on both sides (p < 0.05) but without side differences. Pain after hypertonic saline injection correlated positively to 5-HT (p < 0.05) and negatively to glycerol (p < 0.05). Conclusions 5-HT, glutamate and glycerol increased after a painful hypertonic saline injection into the masseter muscle, but without sex differences. Since increased levels of 5-HT and glutamate have been reported in chronic myalgia, this strengthens the validity of the pain model. Glycerol warrants further investigations. PMID:25519464

  6. Serotonin, glutamate and glycerol are released after the injection of hypertonic saline into human masseter muscles - a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Louca, Sofia; Christidis, Nikolaos; Ghafouri, Bijar; Gerdle, Björn; Svensson, Peter; List, Thomas; Ernberg, Malin

    2014-12-17

    Chronic myalgia is associated with higher muscle levels of certain algesic biomarkers. The aim of this study was to investigate if hypertonic saline-induced jaw myalgia also leads to release of such biomarkers and if there were any sex differences in this respect. Healthy participants, 15 men and 15 aged-matched women (25.7 ± 4.3 years) participated. Intramuscular microdialysis into masseter muscles was performed to sample serotonin (5-HT), glutamate, lactate, pyruvate, glucose and glycerol. After 2 hours 0.2 mL hypertonic saline (58.5 mg/mL) was injected into the masseter on one side and 0.2 mL isotonic saline (9 mg/mL) into the contralateral masseter close to the microdialysis catheter. Microdialysis continued for 1 hour after the injections. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and pain were assessed before and after injections. The median (IQR) peak pain intensity (0-100 visual analogue scale) after hypertonic saline was 52.5 (38.0) and after isotonic saline 7.5 (24.0) (p < 0.05). 5-HT, glutamate and glycerol increased after hypertonic saline injection (p < 0.05). Lactate, pyruvate and glucose showed no change. PPT after microdialysis was reduced on both sides (p < 0.05) but without side differences. Pain after hypertonic saline injection correlated positively to 5-HT (p < 0.05) and negatively to glycerol (p < 0.05). 5-HT, glutamate and glycerol increased after a painful hypertonic saline injection into the masseter muscle, but without sex differences. Since increased levels of 5-HT and glutamate have been reported in chronic myalgia, this strengthens the validity of the pain model. Glycerol warrants further investigations.

  7. Hypertonic conditions trigger transient plasmolysis, growth arrest and blockage of transporter endocytosis in Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bitsikas, Vassilis; Karachaliou, Mayia; Gournas, Christos; Diallinas, George

    2011-01-01

    By using Aspergillus nidulans strains expressing functional GFP-tagged transporters under hypertonic conditions, we noticed the rapid appearance of cortical, relatively static, fluorescent patches (0.5-2.3 μm). These patches do not correspond to transporter microdomains as they co-localize with other plasma membrane-associated molecules, such as the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and the SsoA t-Snare, or the lipophilic markers FM4-64 and filipin. In addition, they do not show characteristics of lipid rafts, MCCs or other membrane microdomains. Deconvoluted microscopic images showed that fluorescent patches correspond to plasma membrane invaginations. Transporters remain fully active during this phenomenon of localized plasmolysis. Plasmolysis was however associated with reduced growth rate and a dramatic blockage in transporter and FM4-64 endocytosis. These phenomena are transient and rapidly reversible upon wash-out of hypertonic media. Based on the observation that block in endocytosis by hypertonic treatment altered dramatically the cellular localization of tropomyosin (GFP-TpmA), although it did not affect the cortical appearance of upstream (SlaB-GFP) or downstream (AbpA-mRFP) endocytic components, we conclude that hypertonicity modifies actin dynamics and thus acts indirectly on endocytosis. This was further supported by the effect of latrunculin B, an actin depolymerization agent, on endocytosis. We show that the phenomena observed in A. nidulans also occur in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that they constitute basic homeostatic responses of ascomycetes to hypertonic shock. Finally, our work shows that hypertonic treatments can be used as physiological tools to study the endocytic down-regulation of transporters in A. nidulans, as non-conditional genetic blocks affecting endocytic internalization are lethal or severely debilitating.

  8. Resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients with hypertonic saline-without dextran-inhibits neutrophil and endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Junger, Wolfgang G; Rhind, Shawn G; Rizoli, Sandro B; Cuschieri, Joseph; Shiu, Maria Y; Baker, Andrew J; Li, Linglin; Shek, Pang N; Hoyt, David B; Bulger, Eileen M

    2012-10-01

    Posttraumatic inflammation and excessive neutrophil activation cause multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), a major cause of death among hemorrhagic shock patients. Traditional resuscitation strategies may exacerbate inflammation; thus, novel fluid treatments are needed to reduce such posttraumatic complications. Hypertonic resuscitation fluids inhibit inflammation and reduce MODS in animal models. Here we studied the anti-inflammatory efficacy of hypertonic fluids in a controlled clinical trial. Trauma patients in hypovolemic shock were resuscitated in a prehospital setting with 250 mL of either 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS; n = 9), 7.5% hypertonic saline + 6% dextran 70 (HSD; n = 8), or 0.9% normal saline (NS; n = 17). Blood samples were collected on hospital admission and 12 and 24 h after resuscitation. Multicolor flow cytometry was used to quantify neutrophil expression of cell-surface activation/adhesion (CD11b, CD62L, CD64) and degranulation (CD63, CD66b, CD35) markers as well as oxidative burst activity. Circulating concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVACM-1), P- and E-selectins, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) were assessed by immunoassay. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, leukocytosis, and mortality were lower in the HS and HSD groups than in the NS group. However, these differences were not statistically significant. Hypertonic saline prevented priming and activation and neutrophil oxidative burst and CD11b and CD66b expression. Hypertonic saline also reduced circulating markers of neutrophil degranulation (MPO and MMP-9) and endothelial cell activation (sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, soluble E-selectin, and soluble P-selectin). Hypertonic saline + 6% dextran 70 was less capable than HS of suppressing the upregulation of most of these activation markers. This study demonstrates that initial resuscitation with HS, but neither NS nor HSD, can attenuate

  9. INHALED HYPERTONIC SALINE IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN LESS THAN SIX YEARS OF AGE WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS: THE ISIS RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Ratjen, Felix; Brumback, Lyndia; Daniel, Stephen; Rowbotham, Ron; McNamara, Sharon; Johnson, Robin; Kronmal, Richard; Davis, Stephanie D

    2013-01-01

    Context Inhaled hypertonic saline is recommended as therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients 6 years of age and older, but its efficacy has never been evaluated in CF patients <6 years of age. Objective To determine if hypertonic saline reduces the rate of protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbations in CF patients <6 years of age. Design and Setting A multicenter, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted from April 2009 to October 2011 at 30 CF care centers in the United States and Canada. Participants Participants had an established diagnosis of CF and were 4 to 60 months of age. A total of 344 patients were assessed for eligibility; 321 participants were randomized; 29 (9%) withdrew prematurely. Intervention The active group (n=158) received 7% hypertonic saline and the control group (n=163) received 0.9% isotonic saline nebulized twice daily for 48 weeks. Both groups received albuterol or levalbuterol prior to each study drug dose. Main Outcome Measures the rate of protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbations during the 48 week treatment period treated with oral, inhaled or intravenous antibiotics. Results The mean pulmonary exacerbation rate (events/person-year) was 2.3 (95% CI, 2.0, 2.5) in the hypertonic saline group and 2.3 (95% CI, 2.1, 2.6) in the isotonic saline group; the rate ratio was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.84, 1.14)). Among participants with pulmonary exacerbations, the mean number of total antibiotic treatment days for a pulmonary exacerbation was 60 (95% CI 49, 70) in the hypertonic saline group and 52 (95% CI 43, 61) in the isotonic saline group. There was no significant difference in secondary endpoints including height, weight, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, cough or respiratory symptom scores. Infant pulmonary function testing performed as an exploratory outcome in a subgroup (N=73, with acceptable measurements at 2 visits in 45) did not demonstrate significant differences between groups except for the mean change in forced

  10. Intratesticular hypertonic sodium chloride solution treatment as a method of chemical castration in cattle.

    PubMed

    Neto, Olmiro Andrade; Gasperin, Bernardo G; Rovani, Monique T; Ilha, Gustavo F; Nóbrega, Janduí E; Mondadori, Rafael G; Gonçalves, Paulo B D; Antoniazzi, Alfredo Q

    2014-10-15

    Castration of male calves is necessary for trading to facilitate handling and prevent reproduction. However, some methods of castration are traumatic and lead to economic losses because of infection and myiasis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of intratesticular injection (ITI) of hypertonic sodium chloride (NaCl; 20%) solution in male calf castration during the first weeks of life. Forty male calves were allocated to one of the following experimental groups: negative control-surgically castrated immediately after birth; positive control -intact males; G1-ITI from 1- to 5-day old; G2-ITI from 15- to 20-day old; and G3-ITI from 25- to 30-day old. Intratesticular injection induced coagulative necrosis of Leydig cells and seminiferous tubules leading to extensive fibrosis. Testosterone secretion and testicular development were severely impaired in 12-month-old animals from G1 and G2 groups (P<0.05), in which no testicular structure and sperm cells were observed during breeding soundness evaluation. Rectal and scrotal temperatures were not affected by different procedures. In conclusion, ITI of hypertonic NaCl solution induces sterility and completely suppresses testosterone secretion when performed during the first 20 days of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Endocytic response of type I alveolar epithelial cells to hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohua; Singh, Raman Deep; Godin, Lindsay; Pagano, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    We present plasma membrane (PM) internalization responses of type I alveolar epithelial cells to a 50 mosmol/l increase in tonicity. Our research is motivated by interest in ATI repair, for which endocytic retrieval of PM appears to be critical. We validated pharmacological and molecular tools to dissect the endocytic machinery of these cells and used these tools to test the hypothesis that osmotic stress triggers a pathway-specific internalization of PM domains. Validation experiments confirmed the fluorescent analogs of lactosyl-ceramide, transferrin, and dextran as pathway-specific cargo of caveolar, clathrin, and fluid-phase uptake, respectively. Pulse-chase experiments indicate that hypertonic exposure causes a downregulation of clathrin and fluid-phase endocytosis while stimulating caveolar endocytosis. The tonicity-mediated increase in caveolar endocytosis was associated with the translocation of caveolin-1 from the PM and was absent in cells that had been transfected with dominant-negative dynamin constructs. In separate experiments we show that hypertonic exposure increases the probability of PM wound repair following micropuncture from 82 ± 4 to 94 ± 2% (P < 0.01) and that this effect depends on Src pathway activation-mediated caveolar endocytosis. The therapeutic and biological implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:21257731

  12. The effect of hypertonic saline dextran solutions on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in anaesthetised piglets.

    PubMed

    Bellezza, M; Kerbaul, F; Roussel, L; Imbert, M; Guidon, C

    2002-10-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is a regulatory mechanism by which blood is diverted from poorly ventilated to better ventilated areas of the lung. The aim of the present study was to assess the extent to which hypertonic saline dextran and dextran solutions modify the magnitude of HPV during isovolumic haemodilution in intact acutely instrumented piglets. Eighteen large white piglets were anesthetised and assigned to two groups. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and cardiac output (Q), systemic arterial pressure and left arterial pressure (LAP) were measured. A decrease in Q was obtained by reducing venous return. This enabled measurement of transpulmonary pressures (mean PAP minus LAP) at four levels of Q in hyperoxia (inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2)=0.4) then in hypoxia (Fi,O2=0.1) in the two groups before blood soustraction (10 mL x kg(-1)) and after loading with sodium chloride (NaCl) 7.5% and dextran 6% or with dextran 6% alone. Dextran alone led to a decrease in mean PAP-LAP/Q values, and NaCl with dextran was associated with a significant shift of mean PAP-LAP/Q plots to higher pressures in hypoxia. Hypertonic saline dextran solution, as replacement fluid in isovolaemic haemodilution increased the magnitude of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, whereas dextran solution reduced it.

  13. Trehalose metabolism genes of Aphelenchoides besseyi (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) in hypertonic osmotic pressure survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiaoli; Li, Danlei; Zhang, Ruizhi; Ling, Yaming

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some organisms can survive extreme desiccation caused by hypertonic osmotic pressure by entering a state of suspended animation known as osmobiosis. The free-living mycophagous nematode Aphelenchoides besseyi can be induced to enter osmobiosis by soaking in osmolytes. It is assumed that sugars (in particular trehalose) are instrumental for survival under environmental stress. In A. besseyi, two putative trehalose-6-phosphate synthase genes (TPS) encoding enzymes catalyzing trehalose synthesis, and a putative trehalase gene (TRE) encoding enzymes that catalyze hydrolysis of trehalose were identified and then characterized based on their transcriptome. RT-qPCR analyses showed that each of these genes is expressed as mRNA when A. besseyi is entering in, during and recovering from osmobiosis, but only for certain periods. The changes of TRE activity were consistent with the transcript level changes of the TRE gene, and the trehalose level declined at certain periods when the nematodes were in, as well as recovering from, osmobiosis; this suggested that the hydrolysis of threhalose is essential. The feeding method of RNA interference (RNAi) was used to temporarily knock down the expression of each of the TPS and TRE genes. No obviously different phenotype was observed from any of the genes silenced individually or simultaneously, but the survival under hypertonic osmotic pressure reduced significantly and the recovery was delayed. These results indicated that trehalose metabolism genes should play a role in osmobiosis regulation and function within a restricted time frame. PMID:28396490

  14. Granulocyte markers in hypertonic and isotonic saline-induced sputum of asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Cianchetti, S; Bacci, E; Ruocco, L; Bartoli, M L; Ricci, M; Pavia, T; Dente, F L; Di Franco, A; Vagaggini, B; Paggiaro, P L

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether hyperosmolarity affects granulocyte mediator levels in induced sputum of asthmatic subjects. A total of 32 mild-to-moderate asthmatics, who inhaled either hypertonic (HS; 4.5% NaCl) or isotonic (IS; 0.9% NaCl) solutions for 15 min, were studied. Selected sputum was used for analysis. Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil protein X (EPX), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and free neutrophil elastase (NE) were measured in sputum supernatant. Sample weight, total and differential cell counts, as well as viability and squamous cell percentage were no different after the two tests. No significant differences in ECP, EPX, MPO or NE levels were observed between HS- and IS-induced sputum. Repeatability of the two tests was good for macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, ECP, EPX and NE, but not for lymphocytes and MPO. In conclusion, hyperosmolarity does not affect sputum cell counts and the levels of most granulocyte degranulation markers examined in this study, confirming that both hypertonic and isotonic solutions can be reliably used to induce sputum in asthmatics.

  15. Symptomatic Abdominal Simple Cysts: Is Percutaneous Sclerotherapy with Hypertonic Saline and Bleomycin a Treatment Option?

    PubMed Central

    Souftas, V. D.; Kosmidou, M.; Karanikas, M.; Souftas, D.; Menexes, G.; Prassopoulos, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous sclerotherapy of symptomatic simple abdominal cysts, using hypertonic saline and bleomycin, as an alternative to surgery. Materials and Methods. This study involved fourteen consecutive patients (ten women, four men, mean age: 59.2 y) with nineteen symptomatic simple cysts (liver n = 14, kidney n = 3, and adrenal n = 2) treated percutaneously using a modified method. Initially CT-guided drainage was performed; the next day the integrity of the cyst/exclusion of extravasation or communications was evaluated under fluoroscopy, followed by two injections/reabsorptions of the same quantity of hypertonic NaCl 15% solution and three-time repetition of the same procedure with the addition of bleomycin. The catheter was then removed; the patients were hospitalized for 12 hours and underwent follow-ups on 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 12th months. Cyst's volumes and the reduction rate (%) were calculated in each evaluation. Results. No pain or complications were noted. A significant cyst's volume reduction was documented over time (P < 0.001). On the 12th month 17 cysts disappeared and two displayed a 98.7% and 68.9% reduction, respectively. Conclusion. This percutaneous approach constitutes a very promising nonsurgical alternative for patients with symptomatic simple cyst, without complications under proper precautions, leading to eliminating the majority of cysts. PMID:25878660

  16. Development of a novel method for decellularizing a nerve graft using a hypertonic sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasuhisa; Sakakibara, Shuhsuke; Terashi, Hiroto; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2014-11-01

    Acellular nerves are a reconstruction material and provide scaffolds for nerve regeneration. Numerous methods to develop acellular nerves have been described. However, these methods pose problems that can be attributed to incomplete acellular processing and destruction of the extracellular matrix (ECM); the former may lead to rejection response, while the latter may damage the scaffold. In order to overcome problems associated with the above-mentioned methods, we developed a novel method that employs a hypertonic sodium chloride solution to decellularize nerve graft material. Rat sciatic nerves were harvested, dipped in hypertonic sodium chloride solution (1 M), and shaken for 24 h. We then washed the nerves in phosphate-buffered saline for 7 days with shaking and evaluated the acellular nerves by hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) staining, immunostaining, and electron microscopy. We then transplanted the grafts to the sciatic nerve of another rat and evaluated the outcomes by H-E staining, immunostaining (anti-neurofilament antibody, anti-S-100 antibody), anterograde nerve tracing, and electron microscopy. We found that our method successfully decellularized the grafts, but was mild enough to leave the ECM intact. Two months after transplantation, immunostaining and anterograde nerve tracing confirmed that Schwann cells infiltrated the grafts and induced neurofilament extension. Our methodology preserves the ECM, is simple to develop, and does not involve substances that harm biogenic tissue. Acellular nerve tissue processed in this way could become a substitute material for bridging nerve gaps. Our method could also aid in the development of other acellular tissues.

  17. Desiccation and hypertonicity of the airway surface fluid and thermally induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Kotaru, Chakradhar; Hejal, Rana B; Finigan, J H; Coreno, Albert J; Skowronski, Mary E; Brianas, Lori; McFadden, E R

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether drying and hypertonicity of the airway surface fluid (ASF) are involved in thermally induced asthma, nine subjects performed isocapnic hyperventilation (HV) (minute ventilation 62.2 +/- 8.3 l/min) of frigid air (-8.9 +/- 3.3 degrees C) while periciliary fluid was collected endoscopically from the trachea. Osmolality was measured by freezing-point depression. The baseline 1-s forced expiratory volume was 73 +/- 4% of predicted and fell 26.4% 10 min postchallenge (P > 0.0001). The volume of ASF collected was 11.0 +/- 2.2 microl at rest and remained constant during and after HV as the airways narrowed (HV 10.6 +/- 1.9, recovery 6.5 +/- 1.7 microl; P = 0.18). The osmolality also remained stable throughout (rest 336 +/- 16, HV 339 +/- 16, and recovery 352 +/- 19 mosmol/kgH(2)O, P = 0.76). These data demonstrate that airway desiccation and hypertonicity of the ASF do not develop during hyperpnea in asthma; therefore, other mechanisms must cause exercise- and hyperventilation-induced airflow limitation.

  18. [Animal experimentation of reimplantation of hypertonic saline-induced devitalized bone].

    PubMed

    Peng, Chang-liang; Yang, Yi; Sun, Xin; Guo, Wei

    2012-12-18

    To observe the healing process and the change of biomechanical properties of hypertonic saline-induced devitalized bone segment, so as to provide fundamental theory for clinical treatment. A model of New Zealand rabbit ulnar segments devitalized by hypertonic saline was established and then reimplanted in situ. The ulnar specimens were taken for examination of X-rays, light microscope and three-point-bend test at the end of 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. The devitalized bone healed at the end of 12 weeks in the X-ray film. The histological examination showed that osteoblast multiplied and secreted osteoid gradually. The maximal breaking load of the devitalized bone continuously increased and reached the top at the end of 24 weeks [control group (206.25±16.64) N vs. devitalized group (196.88±8.24) N, P>0.05]. The devitalized bone healed through intramembranous and endochondral ossification, and the endochondral ossification predominated; the biomechanical strength of devitalized bone continually increased as time lasted.

  19. [Effect of 3% hypertonic saline as early fluid resuscitation in pediatric septic shock].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Ren, Xiaoxu; Gun, Linying; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Yiming

    2015-08-01

    The mainstay of therapy in patients with septic shock is early and aggressive intravenous fluid resuscitation. However the type of intravenous fluid that would be ideal for managing septic shock has been intensely debated. In this study, the authors observed the effects of 3% hypertonic saline solution compared with normal saline solution as early fluid resuscitation in children with septic shock. In this prospective study, 44 septic shock children seen in the intensive care unit (ICU) of the Children's Hospital Affiliated to Capital Institute of Pediatrics were enrolled from January 2012 to January 2014, of whom 33 were male and 11 were female. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: normal saline group (NS group, 24 patients) and 3% hypertonic saline group (HS group,20 patients). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups of patients in age, gender, pediatric critical illness score (PCIS), oxygenation index (OI = PaO2/FiO2), arterial lactate, initial hemodynamic parameters, serum sodium and treatment at time of admission. Patients in NS group received normal saline guided by standard therapy. Those in HS group received 6 ml/kg 3% hypertonic saline as a single bolus over 10 min to 15 min with a maximum of 2 boluses and other standard therapy. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), arterial lactate, oxygenation index, urine output, serum sodium, lactate clearance rate, PCIS, fluid infusion volume, vasoactive - inotropic score, mechanical ventilation time , as well as incidence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), and 28 days in - hospital mortality were recorded for all patients. (1) HR, MAP in both groups were significantly higher after infusion than those on admission. There were no significant difference in HR and MAP at 1h, 3h, 6h and 24h after infusion between NS group and HS group. (2) OI in HS group was significantly higher than that on admission at 3 hours after infusion [(321. 8 ± 50. 7) vs. (296. 5 ± 58. 2

  20. Hypertonic enhancement of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals: Ca2+ independence and role of integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A. H.; Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperosmotic solutions cause markedly enhanced spontaneous quantal release of neurotransmitter from many nerve terminals. The mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. We have investigated this phenomenon at the frog neuromuscular junction with the aim of determining the degree to which it resembles the modulation of release by stretch, which has been shown to be mediated by mechanical tension on integrins.The hypertonicity enhancement, like the stretch effect, does not require Ca2+ influx or release from internal stores, although internal release may contribute to the effect. The hypertonicity effect is sharply reduced (but not eliminated) by peptides containing the RGD sequence, which compete with native ligands for integrin bonds.There is co-variance in the magnitude of the stretch and osmotic effects; that is, individual terminals exhibiting a large stretch effect also show strong enhancement by hypertonicity, and vice versa. The stretch and osmotic enhancements also can partially occlude each other.There remain some clear-cut differences between osmotic and stretch forms of modulation: the larger range of enhancement by hypertonic solutions, the relative lack of effect of osmolarity on evoked release, and the reported higher temperature sensitivity of osmotic enhancement. Nevertheless, our data strongly implicate integrins in a significant fraction of the osmotic enhancement, possibly acting via the same mechanism as stretch modulation.

  1. Comparison of intranasal hypertonic dead sea saline spray and intranasal aqueous triamcinolone spray in seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Cordray, Scott; Harjo, Jim B; Miner, Linda

    2005-07-01

    Intranasal corticosteroids are well known to be efficacious in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Nasal irrigation with saline, including hypertonic saline, has long been recommended for the treatment of sinonasal disease, and it has been shown to have a positive effect on the physiology of the nasal mucosa. Until now, no study of the clinical efficacy of intranasal hypertonic Dead Sea saline as a monotherapy for seasonal allergic rhinitis has been reported. We conducted a prospective, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled comparison of intranasal hypertonic Dead Sea saline spray and intranasal aqueous triamcinolone spray in 15 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Results were based on a 7-day regimen. Based on Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire scores, clinically and statistically significant (p < 0.0001) improvements were seen in both active-treatment groups; as expected, the corticosteroid spray was the more effective of the two treatments. No significant improvement occurred in the control group. Our preliminary results not only confirm the efficacy of intranasal corticosteroid therapy in moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis, they also suggest that the Dead Sea saline solution can be an effective alternative in mild-to-moderate allergic rhinitis, particularly with respect to nasal and eye symptoms. The hypertonicity of the Dead Sea solution may have a positive effect on the physiology of the nasal mucosa by improving mucociliary clearance. In addition, the dominant cation in the Dead Sea solution--magnesium--probably exerts anti-inflammatory effects on the nasal mucosa and on the systemic immune response.

  2. Analysis of central opioid receptor subtype antagonism of hypotonic and hypertonic saline intake in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, R J; Glass, M J; Koch, J E

    1995-01-01

    Intake of either hypotonic or hypertonic saline solutions is modulated in part by the endogenous opioid system. Morphine and selective mu and delta opioid agonists increase saline intake, while general opioid antagonists reduce saline intake in rats. The present study evaluated whether intracerebroventricular administration of general (naltrexone) and selective mu (beta-funaltrexamine, 5-20 micrograms), mu, (naloxonazine, 50 micrograms), kappa (nor-binaltorphamine, 5-20 micrograms), delta (naltrindole, 20 micrograms), or delta 1 (DALCE, 40 micrograms) opioid receptor subtype antagonists altered water intake and either hypotonic (0.6%) or hypertonic (1.7%) saline intake in water-deprived (24 h) rats over a 3-h time course in a two-bottle choice test. Whereas peripheral naltrexone (0.5-2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced water intake and hypertonic saline intake, central naltrexone (1-50 micrograms) significantly reduced water intake and hypotonic saline intake. Water intake was significantly reduced following mu and kappa receptor antagonism, but not following mu 1, delta, or delta 1 receptor antagonism. In contrast, neither hypotonic nor hypertonic saline intake was significantly altered by any selective antagonist. These data are discussed in terms of opioid receptor subtype control over saline intake relative to the animal's hydrational state and the roles of palatability and/or salt appetite.

  3. Resuscitation with a Bolus of Hypertonic Saline/Dextran Improves Renal Function Following Hemorrhage in Conscious Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-28

    is well-known that infusions of hypertonic salt solutions induce a diuresis and a natriuresis - this occurred in both the control as well as the...pressure), neither pigs (18) nor humans (19-21) responded with an excessive diuresis which would exacerbate hypovolemia. Sondeen et al -- 9 Although it

  4. Effects of hypertonic saline solution associated to remote ischemic perconditioning in kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Brito, Marcus Vinicius Henriques; Yasojima, Edson Yuzur; Percário, Sandro; Ribeiro, Rubens Fernando Gonçalves; Cavalcante, Lainy Carollyne da Costa; Monteiro, Andrew Moraes; Couteiro, Rodrigo Paracampo; Rodrigues, Ivone Aline da Silva; Santos, Hellen Aparecida Geyer Dos

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of hypertonic saline solution associated to remote ischemic perconditioning in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. Twenty five male rats (Wistar) underwent right nephrectomy and were distributed into five groups: Sham group (S); Ischemia/Reperfusion group (I/R) with 30 minutes of renal ischemia; Remote ischemic perconditioning group (Per) with three cycles of 10 minutes of I/R performed during kidney ischemia; Hypertonic saline solution group (HSS) treated with hypertonic saline solution (4ml/kg); remote ischemic perconditioning + Hypertonic saline solution group (Per+HSS) with both treatments. After reperfusion, blood samples were collected for BUN and creatinine serum levels analyzes. TBARS were evaluated in plasma and renal tissue to assess oxidative stress. Kidney histopathological examination were performed. Per+HSS group showed a lower degree of renal dysfunction in relation to I/R group, whereas the technique of remote ischemic perconditioning isolated or associated with saline solution significantly reduced oxidative stress and histological damage. Remote ischemic perconditioning associated or not to saline solution promoted reduction of acute renal injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion.

  5. Osmolyte and Na+ transport balances of rat hepatocytes as a function of hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Wehner, F; Tinel, H

    2000-11-01

    The initial event in the regulatory volume increase (RVI) of rat hepatocytes is an influx of Na+ that is then exchanged for K+ via stimulation of Na+/K+-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). In this study, we analysed the activation pattern of the Na+ transporters underlying RVI as a function of the degree of hypertonic stress. In confluent primary cultures, four hypertonic conditions were tested (changes from 300 to 327, 360, 400 or 450 mosmol/l) and the activities of Na+ conductance, Na+/H+ antiport, Na+-K+-2Cl- symport and Na+/K+-ATPase were quantified using intracellular microelectrodes, microfluorometry and time-dependent, furosemide- or ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake, respectively. Neither Na+ conductance nor Na+-K+-2Cl- symport responded to 327 mosmol/A. At 360, 400 and 450 mosmol/l, uptake via these transporters would lead to increases of cell Na+ by 33.0, 49.0 and 49.0 and by 4.5, 10.4 and 9.2 mmol/l per 10 min, respectively. In contrast, Na+/H+ antiport exhibited 65% of its maximal activation already at 327 mosmol/l. At the four osmolarities tested, this transporter would augment cell Na+ by 6.9, 8.9, 9.8 and 10.6 mmol/l per 10 min. The sums of Na+ import were consistent with the amounts of Na+ exported via Na+/K+-ATPase plus the actual increases of cell Na+ (21.2, 58.5, 63.6 and 68.3 mmol/l per 10 min and 2.2, 4.0, 6.3 and 8.2 mmol/l, respectively). In addition, these elevations of cell Na+ plus the increases of cell K+ (via Na+/K+-ATPase) that amounted to 5.0, 6.5, 17.5 and 18.4 mmol/l were consistent with the increases of intracellular osmotic (cationic) activity of 2.5, 11.5, 21.0 and 28.5 mmol/l, respectively, computed from RVI data. It is concluded that the principle of rat hepatocyte RVI, i.e. an initial uptake of Na+ that is then exchanged for K+ via Na+/K+-ATPase, is realized over the entire range of 9-50% hypertonicity tested. The set-point for the activation of RVI clearly lies below 327 mosmol/l. Na+/H+ antiport is the most sensitive Na+ importer

  6. Intracellular Hypertonicity Is Responsible for Water Flux Associated with Na+/Glucose Cotransport

    PubMed Central

    Charron, François M.; Blanchard, Maxime G.; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    Detection of a significant transmembrane water flux immediately after cotransporter stimulation is the experimental basis for the controversial hypothesis of secondary active water transport involving a proposed stoichiometry for the human Na+/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) of two Na+, one glucose, and 264 water molecules. Volumetric measurements of Xenopus laevis oocytes coexpressing human SGLT1 and aquaporin can be used to detect osmotic gradients with high sensitivity. Adding 2 mM of the substrate α-methyl-glucose (αMG) created mild extracellular hypertonicity and generated a large cotransport current with minimal cell volume changes. After 20, 40, and 60 s of cotransport, the return to sugar-free, isotonic conditions was accompanied by measurable cell swelling averaging 0.051, 0.061, and 0.077 nl/s, respectively. These water fluxes are consistent with internal hypertonicities of 1.5, 1.7, and 2.2 mOsm for these cotransport periods. In the absence of aquaporin, the measured hypertonicites were 4.6, 5.0, and 5.3 mOsm for the same cotransport periods Cotransport-dependent water fluxes, previously assumed to be water cotransport, could be largely explained by hypertonicities of such amplitudes. Using intracellular Na+ injection and Na+-selective electrode, the intracellular diffusion coefficient for Na+ was estimated at 0.29 ± 0.03 × 10−5 cm2 s−1. Using the effect of intracellular αMG injection on the SGLT1-mediated outward current, the intracellular diffusion coefficient of αMG was estimated at 0.15 ± 0.01 × 10−5 cm2 s−1. Although these intracellular diffusion coefficients are much lower than in free aqueous solution, a diffusion model for a single solute in an oocyte would require a diffusion coefficient three times lower than estimated to explain the local osmolyte accumulation that was experimentally detected. This suggests that either the diffusion coefficients were overestimated, possibly due to the presence of convection, or the diffusion in

  7. Our experience in the treatment of burn shock by hypertonic lactated saline solution.

    PubMed

    Belba, M

    2005-06-30

    Hypertonic salt solutions have for many years been known to be effective in the treatment of burn shock. Rapid infusion of a high concentration of sodium (250 mEq/l) produces positive effects by reducing fluid shifts, decreasing tissue oedema, and causing fewer attendant complications. This study presents data on 20 patients with severe burns who were resuscitated with hypertonic lactated saline (HLS) solution. The resuscitation regime used was that proposed in the USA and subsequently also in Europe. The fluid formula is based only on calculating fluid requirements for the first hour of therapy. Further adjustments of fluid requirements are based mainly on urine output. During the first hour of fluid therapy the amount of HLS given (ml) is 0.5 x percentage TBSA x kg body weight. This regime is recommended for resuscitation both of children, taking into consideration that urine output should be 1 ml/kg body weight/h, and of adults and the elderly, in whom an amount of 35 ml of urine per h is considered optimal and reflects sufficient vital organ perfusion. In order to control the administration of fluid volumes, we calculated fluid and sodium balances. Fluid load was 2.3 ml/kg/%; sodium load, 0.6 mEq/kg/%; net fluid accumulation, 20-30 ml/kg; and sodium retention, 56 %, associated with high natriuresis. We observed a high volume load in the first hour and in the first four hours of therapy, which regressed after lower fluid loads. During resuscitation the clinical and laboratory criteria were maintained within acceptable limits. Our clinical experience indicates that during burn shock resuscitation with HLS solution, the amount of fluid can be reduced, compared to conventional formula. Early administration of high sodium and fluid loads in the first four hours may decrease the total fluid load in the first 24 hours post-burn. A hypertonic regime requires careful observation and calculations. Resuscitation with HLS solution is a valuable regime in the treatment of

  8. Elemental distribution in striated muscle and the effects of hypertonicity: Electron probe analysis of cryo sections

    PubMed Central

    Somlyo, AV; Shuman, H; Somlyo, AP

    1977-01-01

    A method of rapid freezing in supercooled Freon 22 (monochlorodifluoromethane) followed by cryoultramicrotomy is described and shown to yield ultrathin sections in which both the cellular ultrastructure and the distribution of diffusible ions across the cell membrane are preserved and intracellular compartmentalization of diffusabler ions can be quantitated. Quantitative electron probe analysis (Shuman, H., A.V. Somlyo, and A.P. Somlyo. 1976. Ultramicros. 1:317-339.) of freeze-dried ultrathin cryto sections was found to provide a valid measure of the composition of cells and cellular organelles and was used to determine the ionic composition of the in situ terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), the distribution of CI in skeletal muscle, and the effects of hypertonic solutions on the subcellular composition if striated muscle. There was no evidence of sequestered CI in the terminal cisternae of resting muscles, although calcium (66mmol/kg dry wt +/- 4.6 SE) was detected. The values of [C1](i) determined with small (50-100 nm) diameter probes over cytoplasm excluding organelles over nuclei or terminal cisternae were not significantly different. Mitochondria partially excluded C1, with a cytoplasmic/ mitochondrial Ci ratio of 2.4 +/- 0.88 SD. The elemental concentrations (mmol/kg dry wt +/- SD) of muscle fibers measured with 0.5-9-μm diameter electron probes in normal frog striated muscle were: P, 302 +/- 4.3; S, 189 +/- 2.9;C1, 24 +/- 1.1;K, 404 +/- 4.3, and Mg, 39 +/- 2.1. It is concluded that: (a) in normal muscle the "excess CI" measured with previous bulk chemical analyses and flux studies is not compartmentalized in the SR or in other cellular organelles, and (b) the cytoplasmic C1 in low [K](0) solutions exceeds that predicted by a passive electrochemical distribution. Hypertonic 2.2 X NaCl, 2.5 X sucrose, or 2.2 X Na isethionate produced: (a) swollen vacuoles, frequently paired, adjacent to the Z lines and containing significantly higher than

  9. Oral hypertonic electrolyte-glucose/mosapride complex solution for resuscitation of burn shock in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Quan; Chai, Jiake; Hu, Sen; Zhou, Guoyong; Sheng, Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of oral feeding of an electrolyte glucose mosapride solution for resuscitation in dogs with shock after a 35% TBSA full-thickness burn and the effect of mosapride on gastric emptying time. Eighteen male Beagle dogs were randomly divided into intravenous isotonic solution group, intragastric hypertonic solution group, and mosapride group after they were subjected to a 35% TBSA full-thickness flame injury. In intravenous isotonic solution group (I group), isotonic electrolyte glucose solution was given through vein with adoption of the Parkland formula. The resuscitation fluid in intragastric hypertonic solution group (H group) and mosapride group (M group) consisted of 1.8% NaCl and 5% glucose, the total fluid volume was one half of that for I group, and it was given in divided amount every 2 hours. Mosapride was added to the resuscitation fluid in mosapride group. Fluid replacement was begun 30 minutes after the injury in all the groups. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output index (CI), intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBI), blood volume (BV), serum sodium concentration, intestinal mucosal blood flow (IMBF), gastric emptying, and serum motilin levels were determined at different time points. The urinary output of all animals was measured immediately after burn upto 360 minutes postburn. CI, ITBI, BV, and IMBF were all decreased obviously after burn. In I group and M group, CI, ITBI, BV, and IMBF were increased gradually after resuscitation, and they were significantly higher than that of H group (P < .05). MAP in all three groups was lowered significantly and then gradually recovered, showing no significant difference among groups. The urinary output in M group was similar to that in I group (P > .05), and it was higher than that in H group (P < .05). Serum sodium level in H group and M group increased in varying degrees and were markedly higher compared with the I group (P < .05). Postburn gastric

  10. Hypertonic stress induces VEGF production in human colon cancer cell line Caco-2: inhibitory role of autocrine PGE₂.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luciana B; Piva, Bruno; Diaz, Bruno L

    2011-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is a major regulator of angiogenesis. VEGF expression is up regulated in response to micro-environmental cues related to poor blood supply such as hypoxia. However, regulation of VEGF expression in cancer cells is not limited to the stress response due to increased volume of the tumor mass. Lipid mediators in particular arachidonic acid-derived prostaglandin (PG)E₂ are regulators of VEGF expression and angiogenesis in colon cancer. In addition, increased osmolarity that is generated during colonic water absorption and feces consolidation seems to activate colon cancer cells and promote PGE₂ generation. Such physiological stimulation may provide signaling for cancer promotion. Here we investigated the effect of exposure to a hypertonic medium, to emulate colonic environment, on VEGF production by colon cancer cells. The role of concomitant PGE₂ generation and MAPK activation was addressed by specific pharmacological inhibition. Human colon cancer cell line Caco-2 exposed to a hypertonic environment responded with marked VEGF and PGE₂ production. VEGF production was inhibited by selective inhibitors of ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways. To address the regulatory role of PGE₂ on VEGF production, Caco-2 cells were treated with cPLA₂ (ATK) and COX-2 (NS-398) inhibitors, that completely block PGE₂ generation. The Caco-2 cells were also treated with a non selective PGE₂ receptor antagonist. Each treatment significantly increased the hypertonic stress-induced VEGF production. Moreover, addition of PGE₂ or selective EP₂ receptor agonist to activated Caco-2 cells inhibited VEGF production. The autocrine inhibitory role for PGE₂ appears to be selective to hypertonic environment since VEGF production induced by exposure to CoCl₂ was decreased by inhibition of concomitant PGE₂ generation. Our results indicated that hypertonicity stimulates VEGF production in colon cancer cell lines. Also PGE₂ plays an inhibitory

  11. TRPV1 Activation Is Required for Hypertonicity-Stimulated Inflammatory Cytokine Release in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Fan; Reinach, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether hypertonic stress promotes increases in inflammatory cytokine release through transient receptor potential vanilloid channel type 1 (TRPV1) signaling pathway activation in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). Methods. Hyperosmotic medium was prepared by supplementing isotonic Ringers solution with sucrose. Ca2+ signaling was measured in fura2-AM–loaded HCECs using a single-cell fluorescence imaging system. Western blot analysis evaluated the phosphorylation status of EGFR, ERK, p38 MAPK, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. ELISA assessed the effect of TRPV1 activation on the release of IL-6 and IL-8. Results. A 450 mOsm hypertonic stress elicited 2-fold Ca2+ transients that were suppressed by the TRPV1-selective antagonists capsazepine and JYL 1421. Such transients were enhanced by PGE2. Hypertonicity-induced EGF receptor (EGFR) transactivation was suppressed by preincubating HCECs with capsazepine, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) inhibitor TIMP-1, broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM 6001, heparin-bound (HB)-EGF inhibitor CRM 197, or EGFR inhibitor AG 1478. ERK and p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation after EGFR transactivation occurred in tonicity and in a time-dependent manner. Hypertonicity-induced increases in IL-6 and IL-8 releases were suppressed by exposure to capsazepine, AG 1478, ERK inhibitor PD 98059, p38 inhibitor SB 203580, or NF-κB inhibitor PDTC. Conclusions. Hypertonic stress–elicited TRPV1 channel stimulation mediates increases in a proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and a chemoattractant IL-8 by eliciting EGFR transactivation, MAPK, and NF-κB activation. Selective drug modulation of either TRPV1 activity or its signaling mediators may yield a novel approach to suppressing inflammatory responses occurring in dry eye syndrome. PMID:20739465

  12. Studies on the pathogenesis of the early dumping syndrome induced by intraduodenal instillation of hypertonic glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Snook, J A; Wells, A D; Prytherch, D R; Evans, D H; Bloom, S R; Colin-Jones, D G

    1989-01-01

    A reaction indistinguishable from the early dumping syndrome was induced in four of nine normal volunteers by intraduodenal instillation of a hypertonic glucose meal. Tachycardia and marked peripheral vasodilatation were demonstrated in 'dumpers' by Doppler ultrasound measurements of the arterial blood flow signal. The dumping reaction was not detectably altered by the addition of guar to the meal. Plasma VIP concentration rose and plasma volume fell to a similar degree in 'dumpers' and 'non-dumpers', suggesting that neither event is an integral component of the dumping mechanism. In contrast, the rates of rise of blood glucose and enteroglucagon concentration were markedly greater in 'dumpers'. The results are inconsistent with the conventional explanation that the early dumping syndrome is caused by a large osmotic fluid shift, but are compatible with a mechanism involving an initial period of intestinal hypermotility. PMID:2693232

  13. In Vitro impairment of whole blood coagulation and platelet function by hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch (HH) has been recommended for first line treatment of hemorrhagic shock. Its effects on coagulation are unclear. We studied in vitro effects of HH dilution on whole blood coagulation and platelet function. Furthermore 7.2% hypertonic saline, 6% hydroxyethylstarch (as ingredients of HH), and 0.9% saline solution (as control) were tested in comparable dilutions to estimate specific component effects of HH on coagulation. Methods The study was designed as experimental non-randomized comparative in vitro study. Following institutional review board approval and informed consent blood samples were taken from 10 healthy volunteers and diluted in vitro with either HH (HyperHaes®, Fresenius Kabi, Germany), hypertonic saline (HT, 7.2% NaCl), hydroxyethylstarch (HS, HAES6%, Fresenius Kabi, Germany) or NaCl 0.9% (ISO) in a proportion of 5%, 10%, 20% and 40%. Coagulation was studied in whole blood by rotation thrombelastometry (ROTEM) after thromboplastin activation without (ExTEM) and with inhibition of thrombocyte function by cytochalasin D (FibTEM), the latter was performed to determine fibrin polymerisation alone. Values are expressed as maximal clot firmness (MCF, [mm]) and clotting time (CT, [s]). Platelet aggregation was determined by impedance aggregrometry (Multiplate) after activation with thrombin receptor-activating peptide 6 (TRAP) and quantified by the area under the aggregation curve (AUC [aggregation units (AU)/min]). Scanning electron microscopy was performed to evaluate HyperHaes induced cell shape changes of thrombocytes. Statistics: 2-way ANOVA for repeated measurements, Bonferroni post hoc test, p < 0.01. Results Dilution impaired whole blood coagulation and thrombocyte aggregation in all dilutions in a dose dependent fashion. In contrast to dilution with ISO and HS, respectively, dilution with HH as well as HT almost abolished coagulation (MCFExTEM from 57.3 ± 4.9 mm (native) to 1.7 ± 2.2 mm (HH 40

  14. In vitro impairment of whole blood coagulation and platelet function by hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Alexander A; Maschler, Stephanie; Schöchl, Herbert; Flöricke, Felix; Görlinger, Klaus; Zanger, Klaus; Kienbaum, Peter

    2011-02-10

    Hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch (HH) has been recommended for first line treatment of hemorrhagic shock. Its effects on coagulation are unclear. We studied in vitro effects of HH dilution on whole blood coagulation and platelet function. Furthermore 7.2% hypertonic saline, 6% hydroxyethylstarch (as ingredients of HH), and 0.9% saline solution (as control) were tested in comparable dilutions to estimate specific component effects of HH on coagulation. The study was designed as experimental non-randomized comparative in vitro study. Following institutional review board approval and informed consent blood samples were taken from 10 healthy volunteers and diluted in vitro with either HH (HyperHaes, Fresenius Kabi, Germany), hypertonic saline (HT, 7.2% NaCl), hydroxyethylstarch (HS, HAES6%, Fresenius Kabi, Germany) or NaCl 0.9% (ISO) in a proportion of 5%, 10%, 20% and 40%. Coagulation was studied in whole blood by rotation thrombelastometry (ROTEM) after thromboplastin activation without (ExTEM) and with inhibition of thrombocyte function by cytochalasin D (FibTEM), the latter was performed to determine fibrin polymerisation alone. Values are expressed as maximal clot firmness (MCF, [mm]) and clotting time (CT, [s]). Platelet aggregation was determined by impedance aggregrometry (Multiplate) after activation with thrombin receptor-activating peptide 6 (TRAP) and quantified by the area under the aggregation curve (AUC [aggregation units (AU)/min]). Scanning electron microscopy was performed to evaluate HyperHaes induced cell shape changes of thrombocytes. 2-way ANOVA for repeated measurements, Bonferroni post hoc test, p < 0.01. Dilution impaired whole blood coagulation and thrombocyte aggregation in all dilutions in a dose dependent fashion. In contrast to dilution with ISO and HS, respectively, dilution with HH as well as HT almost abolished coagulation (MCFExTEM from 57.3 ± 4.9 mm (native) to 1.7 ± 2.2 mm (HH 40% dilution; p < 0.0001) and to 6.6 ± 3.4 mm (HT

  15. Isotonic and hypertonic saline droplet deposition in a human upper airway model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Kleinstreuer, Clement; Kim, Chong S

    2006-01-01

    The evaporative and hygroscopic effects and deposition of isotonic and hypertonic saline droplets have been simulated from the mouth to the first four generations of the tracheobronchial tree under laminar-transitional-turbulent inspiratory flow conditions. Specifically, the local water vapor transport, droplet evaporation rate, and deposition fractions are analyzed. The effects of inhalation flow rates, thermodynamic air properties and NaCl-droplet concentrations of interest are discussed as well. The validated computer simulation results indicate that the increase of NaCl-solute concentration, increase of inlet relative humidity, or decrease of inlet air temperature may reduce water evaporation and increase water condensation at saline droplet surfaces, resulting in higher droplet depositions due to the increasing particle diameter and density. However, solute concentrations below 10% may not have a very pronounced effect on droplet deposition in the human upper airways.

  16. Axial hypertonicity in Parkinson's disease: direct measurements of trunk and hip torque.

    PubMed

    Wright, W G; Gurfinkel, V S; Nutt, J; Horak, F B; Cordo, P J

    2007-11-01

    A cardinal feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is muscle hypertonicity, i.e. rigidity. Little is known about the axial tone in PD or the relation of hypertonia to functional impairment. We quantified axial rigidity to assess its relation to motor symptoms as measured by UPDRS and determine whether rigidity is affected by levodopa treatment. Axial rigidity was measured in 12 PD and 14 age-matched controls by directly measuring torsional resistance of the longitudinal axis to twisting (+/-10 degrees ). Feet were rotated relative to fixed hips (Hip Tone) or feet and hips were rotated relative to fixed shoulders (Trunk Tone). To assess tonic activity only, low constant velocity rotation (1 degrees /s) and low acceleration (<12 degrees /s(2)) were used to avoid eliciting phasic sensorimotor responses. Subjects stood during testing without changing body orientation relative to gravity. Body parts fixed against rotation could translate laterally within the boundaries of normal postural sway, but could not rotate. PD OFF-medication had higher axial rigidity (p<0.05) in hips (5.07 N m) and trunk (5.30 N m) than controls (3.51 N m and 4.46 N m, respectively), which did not change with levodopa (p>0.10). Hip-to-trunk torque ratio was greater in PD than controls (p<0.05) and unchanged by levodopa (p=0.28). UPDRS scores were significantly correlated with hip rigidity for PD OFF-medication (r values=0.73, p<0.05). Torsional resistance to clockwise versus counter-clockwise axial rotation was more asymmetrical in PD than controls (p<0.05), however, there was no correspondence between direction of axial asymmetry and side of disease onset. In conclusion, these findings concerning hypertonicity may underlie functional impairments of posture and locomotion in PD. The absence of a levodopa effect on axial tone suggests that axial and appendicular tones are controlled by separate neural circuits.

  17. The renal stanniocalcin-1 gene is differentially regulated by hypertonicity and hypovolemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Turner, Jeffrey; Xiang, Fu-Li; Feng, Qingping; Wagner, Graham F

    2011-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) is made by kidney collecting duct cells for autocrine and paracrine targeting of nephron cell mitochondria. Here, the ligand stimulates respiratory uncoupling and calcium uniport activity. However, the underlying purpose of these actions and how the renal gene is regulated are poorly understood. In a previous study, we described the time-dependent, stimulatory effects of water deprivation on renal STC-1 mRNA levels in both rats and mice. In cortical kidney, STC-1 mRNA levels were increased 8-fold by 72h of water deprivation, whereas the gene response in outer and inner medulla was less pronounced (2-4 fold). Gene induction occurred equally in males and females and was accompanied by increased mitochondrial STC-1 protein levels. As water deprivation increases extracellular fluid (ECF) tonicity and at the same time reduces ECF volume, the present study examined the individual effects of hypertonicity and hypovolemia on renal gene activity in rats. Hypertonicity, whether induced by mannitol, glucose or NaCl, uniquely stimulated the cortical gene, to the extent that transcript levels were positively correlated with serum osmolality. This was in contrast to high dietary sodium, which had no bearing on cortical or medullary transcript levels. The situation was reversed in the case of hypovolemia. Inner medullary gene expression was uniquely induced by hypovolemia (low sodium diet or polyethylene glycol) such that transcript levels were positively correlated with hematocrit, while cortical gene activity was unaffected or reduced. Hence, the cortical and medullary genes proved to be differentially regulated by changing ECF tonicity and volume, respectively. The findings are therefore indicative of cortical and medullary STC-1 having separate roles in the renal control of ECF balance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The transport systems of Ventricaria ventricosa: hypotonic and hypertonic turgor regulation.

    PubMed

    Bisson, M A; Beilby, M J

    2002-11-01

    The time course of hypertonic and hypotonic turgor regulation was studied in Ventricaria (Valonia) using pressure probe and I/V(current-voltage) analysis. Of 11 cells, 9 exhibited hypertonic turgor regulation, ranging from 100% regulation in 150 min to 14% regulation (14% recovery of the decrease in turgor) in 314 min. Some cells began regulating immediately, others took up to 90 min to begin. The resting PD (potential difference) became more positive in most cells. The I/V characteristics became more nonlinear with high resistance between -150 and -20 mV and negative conductance region near -70 mV. Prolonged (16 sec) voltage clamps to negative levels (-100 to -150 mV) showed progressively more rapid current turn-off, but subsequent I/V characteristics were not affected. Clamping to +150 mV, however, abolished the high conductance between -50 and +100 mV to yield a uniform high resistance I/V characteristic, similar to that in high [K+]o. Decreasing illumination from 2.02 micromol sec(-1) m(-2) to 0.5 micromol sec(-1)1 m(-2) had a similar effect. Two out of a total of three cells exhibited hypotonic turgor regulation. Both cells started regulating within minutes and achieved near 50% regulation within 50 min. The PD became more negative. The I/V curves exhibited high resistance between +50 and +150 mV. The characteristics were similar to those in cells exposed to low [K+]o. Prolonged voltage clamps to both negative and positive levels showed slow current increase. Decreased illumination increased the membrane resistance.

  19. Suppression of ciliary movements by a hypertonic stress in the newt olfactory receptor neuron.

    PubMed

    Wakazono, Yoshihiko; Sakurai, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2017-10-01

    Olfactory receptor neurons isolated from the newt maintain a high activity of the ciliary beat. A cilium of neuron is so unique that only little is known about regulatory factors for its beat frequency. We examined the olfactory receptor neuron immersed in various extracellular media under the video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscope. The activation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels by K(+) depolarization or by application of Ca(2+) to membrane-permeabilized olfactory cells did not affect the ciliary movement, suggesting that Ca(2+) influx through the cell membrane has no direct effect on the movement. However, when an extracellular medium contained NaCl or sucrose at concentrations only 30% higher than normal levels, ciliary movement was greatly and reversibly suppressed. In contrast, a hypotonic solution of such a solute did not change the ciliary movement. The hypertonic solutions had no effect when applied to permeabilized cells. Suction of the cell membrane with a patch pipette easily suppressed the ciliary movement in an isotonic medium. Application of positive pressure inside the cell through the same patch pipette eliminated the suppressive effect. From these findings, we concluded that the hypertonic stress suppressed the ciliary movement not by disabling the motor proteins, microtubules, or their associates in the cilia, but rather by modifying the chemical environment for the motor proteins. The ciliary motility of the olfactory receptor cell is directly sensitive to the external environment, namely, the air or water on the nasal epithelium, depending on lifestyle of the animal. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Centrally administered vasopressin cross-sensitizes rats to amphetamine and drinking hypertonic NaCl.

    PubMed

    McBride, Shawna M; Flynn, Francis W

    2007-09-01

    Prior sodium restriction cross-sensitizes rats to the psychomotor effects of amphetamines and vice versa. Repeated central injections of vasopressin (VP) induce a psychomotor sensitization similar to amphetamine sensitization and repeated sodium deficiency. Thus brain VP signaling may be a common mechanism involved in mediating these two motivational systems. In experiment 1, we tested the hypothesis that rats previously sensitized to central VP would show enhanced psychomotor responses to amphetamine. Rats were administered saline, VP (50 ng), or amphetamine (1 mg/kg or 3 mg/kg) on days 1 and 2, and given saline or amphetamine on day 3. Amphetamine produced psychomotor arousal in all groups. However, amphetamine on day 3 elicited a significantly greater psychomotor response in rats that had prior injections of amphetamine or VP than in rats previously treated with saline. In experiment 2, the hypothesis that prior experience with central VP would cross-sensitize rats to drinking hypertonic sodium (NaCl) solutions was tested. Rats were administered VP (50 ng) or saline for 3 days. On the fourth day, nondeprived rats were given access to 0.3 M NaCl and water for 1 h. Control and saline-treated rats only drank 1 ml of 0.3 M NaCl, but rats previously exposed to central VP drank significantly more hypertonic saline (4 ml). These results show that prior experience with central VP cross-sensitizes rats to the psychomotor stimulant effects of amphetamine and the ingestion of concentrated NaCl solutions. This pattern of cross-sensitization links central VP signaling, amphetamine, and sodium deficiency, and therefore it may play a role in the cross-sensitization between sodium appetite and amphetamines.

  1. Ultramicroscopic and biochemical changes in ram spermatozoa cryopreserved with trehalose-based hypertonic extenders.

    PubMed

    Aisen, E; Quintana, M; Medina, V; Morello, H; Venturino, A

    2005-06-01

    The ability of a range of extenders to cryopreserve ram spermatozoa was tested. The extenders were modified by the inclusion of citrate, Tris buffer, trehalose, and EDTA. Ejaculates from three Pampinta rams were evaluated and pooled at 30 degrees C. The semen was diluted to contain 1 x 10(9) cells/mL, cooled to 5 degrees C, loaded into 0.25-mL straws, frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen. Evaluation was based on the hypoosmotic swelling test (HOS test), electron microscopy, and biochemical parameters such as lipid peroxidation and reduced and total glutathione levels, all measured after thawing. The HOS test indicated that the percentage of intact plasma membranes after freezing and thawing was significantly higher for the hypertonic extender containing trehalose (T), compared with an extender containing trehalose+EDTA (TE) or an isotonic Tris extender (B) (p < 0.05). Membrane evaluation by ultramicroscopy also indicated better sperm cryopreservation in extender T compared with the others, and there was a significant reduction in the number of damaged membranes (27%, p < 0.0002). The level of reduced glutathione was significantly higher after sperm cryopreservation in either hypertonic diluent (T and TE) with respect to the isotonic extender B, immediately after thawing (12%) and after a 3-h post-thawing thermotolerance test at 37 degrees C (17%, p = 0.007). Total glutathione levels did not show statistical differences among the extenders. After 3h post-thawing incubation at 37 degrees C, lipid peroxide levels in spermatozoa were statistically lower for T than TE (35%) or isotonic extender B (44%) (p = 0.002). Taken together these results indicate a reduction in the oxidative stress provoked by freezing and thawing when semen is cryopreserved in extender T. The antioxidant properties of extender T may be related to its effectiveness in membrane cryopreservation.

  2. Axial hypertonicity in Parkinson’s disease: Direct measurements of trunk and hip torque

    PubMed Central

    Wright, W.G.; Gurfinkel, V.S.; Nutt, J.; Horak, F.B.; Cordo, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    A cardinal feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is muscle hypertonicity, i.e. rigidity. Little is known about the axial tone in PD or the relation of hypertonia to functional impairment. We quantified axial rigidity to assess its relation to motor symptoms as measured by UPDRS and determine whether rigidity is affected by levodopa treatment. Axial rigidity was measured in 12 PD and 14 age-matched controls by directly measuring torsional resistance of the longitudinal axis to twisting (±10°). Feet were rotated relative to fixed hips (Hip Tone) or feet and hips were rotated relative to fixed shoulders (Trunk Tone). To assess tonic activity only, low constant velocity rotation (1°/s) and low acceleration (<12°/s2) were used to avoid eliciting phasic sensorimotor responses. Subjects stood during testing without changing body orientation relative to gravity. Body parts fixed against rotation could translate laterally within the boundaries of normal postural sway, but could not rotate. PD OFF-medication had higher axial rigidity (p<0.05) in hips (5.07 Nm) and trunk (5.30 Nm) than controls (3.51 Nm and 4.46 Nm, respectively), which didn’t change with levodopa (p>0.10). Hip-to-trunk torque ratio was greater in PD than controls (p<0.05) and unchanged by levodopa (p=0.28). UPDRS scores were significantly correlated with hip rigidity for PD OFF-medication (r=0.73, p<0.05). Torsional resistance to clockwise versus counter-clockwise axial rotation was more asymmetrical in PD than controls (p<0.05), however, there was no correspondence between direction of axial asymmetry and side of disease onset. In conclusion, these findings concerning hypertonicity may underlie functional impairments of posture and locomotion in PD. The absence of a levodopa effect on axial tone suggests axial and appendicular tone are controlled by separate neural circuits. PMID:17692315

  3. Small volume resuscitation with 7.5% hypertonic saline, hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 solution and hypertonic sodium chloride hydroxyethyl starch 40 injection reduced lung injury in endotoxin shock rats: comparison with saline.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gaofeng; Chi, Xinjin; Hei, Ziqing; Shen, Ning; Chen, Jinghui; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Shangrong

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of small volume resuscitation with 7.5% hypertonic sodium chloride (HSS), hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 solution (HES), and hypertonic sodium chloride hydroxyethyl starch 40 injection (HSH) on endotoxin shock rat lung. Thirty Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided randomly into 5 groups ,Group C (negative control group), Group E (lipopolysaccharide, LPS +4 ml/kg saline), Group HSS (LPS +4 ml/kg HSS), Group HES (LPS +4 ml/kg HES) and Group HSH (LPS +4 ml/kg HSH). Endotoxin shock model of rat was produced by injection with LPS. Then small volume resuscitation with different fluids was implemented in each group, respectively. Compared to Group C(negative control group), lung injury in the other four groups was increased. Compared to Group E(LPS +4 ml/kg normal saline), lung injury of Group HSS(LPS +4 ml/kg HSS), HES(LPS +4 ml/kg HES), and HSH (LPS +4 ml/kg HSH)was lessened. Compared to Group C, oxygenation index in Groups E, HSS, HES, and HSH were decreased (P < 0.01). Compared to Group E, oxygenation indexes in Groups HSS, HES, and HSH were significantly increased (P < 0.01). Data of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α of lung tissue had similar results. However, protein concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) concentration indicated contrary results. Small volume resuscitation with 7.5% hypertonic sodium chloride, hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 solution, and hypertonic sodium chloride hydroxyethyl starch 40 injection could lessen lung injury caused by lipopolysaccharide. And this effect had relation to change of TNF-α and H(2)S. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [The influence of an isotonic solution containing benzalkonium chloride and a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium from the nasal cavity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Laberko, E L; Bogomil'sky, M R; Soldatsky, Yu L; Pogosova, I E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of an isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride and of a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium in the nasal cavity in vitro. To this effect, we investigated the cytological material obtained from 35 children presenting with adenoid tissue hypertrophy. The tissue samples were taken from the nasal cavity by the standard method. A cellular biopsy obtained from each patient was distributed between three tubes that contained isotonic saline solution supplemented by benzalconium chloride (0.1 mg/ml), a hypertonic seawater solution, and a standard physiological saline solution. It was shown that the number of the viable cells in both isotonic solutions was statistically comparable and significantly higher than in the hypertonic solution (p<0.05). The ciliary beat frequency of the cells embedded in the two isotonic solutions was not significantly different but considerably exceeded that in the hypertonic seawater solution (p<0.05). Thus, the present study has demonstrated the absence of the ciliotoxic influence of isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml and the strong ciliotoxic effect of the hypertonic seawater solution. This finding gives reason to recommend isotonic solutions for the regular application whereas hypertonic solutions can be prescribed only during infectious and/or inflammatory ENT diseases.

  5. The early systemic and gastrointestinal oxygenation effects of hemorrhagic shock resuscitation with hypertonic saline and hypertonic saline 6% dextran-70: a comparative study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Braz, José Reinaldo Cerqueira; do Nascimento, Paulo; Paiva Filho, Odilar; Braz, Leandro Gobbo; Vane, Luiz Antonio; Vianna, Pedro Thadeu Galvão; Rodrigues, Geraldo Rolim

    2004-08-01

    The smaller volemic state from hypertonic (7.5%) saline (HS) solution administration in hemorrhagic shock can determine lesser systemic oxygen delivery and tissue oxygenation than conventional plasma expanders. In a model of hemorrhagic shock in dogs, we studied the systemic and gastrointestinal oxygenation effects of HS and hyperoncotic (6%) dextran-70 in combination with HS (HSD) solutions in comparison with lactated Ringer's (LR) and (6%) hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions. Forty-eight mongrel dogs were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and subjected to splenectomy. A gastric air tonometer was placed in the stomach for intramucosal gastric CO(2) (Pgco(2)) determination and for the calculation of intramucosal pH (pHi): The dogs were hemorrhaged (42% of blood volume) to hold mean arterial blood pressure at 40-50 mm Hg over 30 min and were then resuscitated with LR (n = 12) in a 3:1 relation to removed blood volume; HS (n = 12), 6 mL/kg; HSD (n = 12), 6 mL/kg; and HES (mean molecular weight, 200 kDa; degree of substitution, 0.5) (n = 12) in a 1:1 relation to the removed blood volume. Hemodynamic, systemic, and gastric oxygenation variables were measured at baseline, after 30 min of hemorrhage, and 5, 60, and 120 min after intravascular fluid resuscitation. After fluid resuscitation, HS showed significantly lower arterial pH and mixed venous Po(2) and higher systemic oxygen uptake index and systemic oxygenation extraction than LR and HES (P < 0.05), whereas HSD showed significantly lower arterial pH than LR and HES (P < 0.05). Only HS and HSD did not return arterial pH and pHi to control levels (P < 0.05). In conclusion, all solutions improved systemic and gastrointestinal oxygenation after hemorrhagic shock in dogs. However, the HS solution showed the worst response in comparison to LR and HES solutions in relation to systemic oxygenation, whereas HSD showed intermediate values. HS and HSD solutions did not return regional oxygenation to control values.

  6. Sensory findings after stimulation of the thoracolumbar fascia with hypertonic saline suggest its contribution to low back pain.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Andreas; Hoheisel, Ulrich; Magerl, Walter; Benrath, Justus; Klein, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2014-02-01

    Injection of hypertonic saline into deep tissues of the back (subcutis, muscle, or the surrounding fascia) can induce acute low back pain (LBP). So far, no study has analyzed differences in temporal, qualitative, and spatial pain characteristics originating from these tissues. The current study aimed to investigate the role of the thoracolumbar fascia as a potential source of LBP. In separate sessions, 12 healthy subjects received ultrasound-guided bolus injections of isotonic saline (0.9%) or hypertonic saline (5.8%) into the erector spinae muscle, the thoracolumbar fascia (posterior layer), and the overlying subcutis. Subjects were asked to rate pain intensity, duration, quality, and spatial extent. Pressure pain thresholds were determined pre and post injection. Injections of hypertonic saline into the fascia resulted in significantly larger area under the curve of pain intensity over time than injections into subcutis (P<0.01) or muscle (P<0.001), primarily based on longer pain durations and, to a lesser extent, on higher peak pain ratings. Pressure hyperalgesia was only induced by injection of hypertonic saline into muscle, but not fascia or subcutis. Pain radiation and pain affect evoked by fascia injection exceeded those of the muscle (P<0.01) and the subcutis significantly (P<0.05). Pain descriptors after fascia injection (burning, throbbing, and stinging) suggested innervation by both A- and C-fiber nociceptors. These findings show that the thoracolumbar fascia is the deep tissue of the back that is most sensitive to chemical stimulation, making it a prime candidate to contribute to nonspecific LBP but not to localized pressure hyperalgesia.

  7. Inflammatory activity modulation by hypertonic saline and pentoxifylline in a rat model of strangulated closed loop small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Rasslan, Roberto; Utiyama, Edivaldo Massazo; Marques, Geraldo Magela Nogueira; Ferreira, Thiago Camargo; da Costa, Vitor Alves Pessoa; de Victo, Nathalia Cruz; Rasslan, Samir; Montero, Edna Frassonde Souza

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is an abdominal disease associated to mortality, especially if complicated with sepsis. Resuscitation increases survival, although controversies remain concerning to therapeutic strategy. To assess the effects of hypertonic saline and pentoxifylline on the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, Wistar rats underwent a laparotomy loop intestinal obstruction and ischemia. After 24 h, the intestinal segment was resected (IO) without any other treatment and resuscitation/pentoxifylline were administered according to the group: Ringer's lactate (RL); hypertonic saline (HS); pentoxifylline (PTX); Ringer's lactate with pentoxifylline (RL + PTX); hypertonic saline with pentoxifylline (HS + PTX) and the control group (CG) that was not submitted to ischemia and obstruction. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was recorded 4 times, and euthanasia was done 3 h after the resuscitation to obtain lung tissue, for malondialdehyde (MDA) by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) method, inflammatory cytokines were assessed using ELISA and NF-κΒ by Western blotting. The initial MAP levels were higher in the RL and HS groups than in the others; however, the last measurement was similar among all the groups. IL-1β, IL-6 and CINC-1 (Cytokine-Induced Neutrophil Chemoattractant-1) were lower in the HS, PTX and HS + PTX groups compared with the IO and RL groups. IL-10 was lower in the HS + PTX group than in the IO group. NF-κB in the HS, PTX and HS + PTX groups were lower than in the IO group; NF-κB in the HS + PTX group was lower than in the RL group. MDA in the lung was lower in the HS + PTX group compared with other groups. Hypertonic saline and pentoxifylline, both alone and in combination, attenuated oxidative stress and the activation of NF-κB, leading to a decrease in the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of hypertonic saline solution 7.2% on different hematological parameters in awake and anaesthetized ponies.

    PubMed

    Gasthuys, F; Messeman, C; De Moor, A

    1992-04-01

    The influence of hypertonic NaCl 7.2% infusion (4 ml/kg of body weight [BWT]) on plasma (PV) and blood (BV) volumes, sodium (Na), chloride (Cl), potassium (K) plasma concentrations, osmolality (Osm), total protein content (TP), packed cell volume (PCV) and red blood cell count (RBC) was studied in five standing and anaesthetized ponies (standard halothane anaesthesia). Arterial blood gases were followed in the anaesthetized ponies. Isotonic NaCl 0.9% (4 ml/kg of BWT) was used as a placebo in the standing ponies. Isotonic solution in the standing ponies induced few changes: only small decreases in K, TP, PCV and RBC were observed. Na, Cl and Osm increased significantly after the NaCl 7.2% infusions in the standing and anesthetized ponies. Significant decreases in PCV, RBC and TP after the administration of hypertonic solutions were determined and were in both groups clear indications of an occurring hemodilution although no significant increase in PV and BV could be demonstrated. An increase in diuresis characterized by numerous micturitions was observed in the standing ponies and during the recovery period after anaesthesia. Apparently, the occurring fluid shift towards the intravascular compartment was partly compensated by an increase in diuresis. The decreases in PCV, RBC and TP were less severe in the anaesthetized ponies compared to the changes observed in the standing ponies. Stress responses during anaesthesia might explain this finding. K increased abnormally at the end of anaesthesia, probably due to minimal muscle damage induced by the dorsal recumbent position. Arterial blood gases did not change after the administration of NaCl 7.2% solution during anaesthesia. No specific clinical side-effects related to the use of hypertonic solution could be observed in the standing and anaesthetized ponies. Further studies are necessary to investigate the effects of hypertonic NaCl solution in horses with a disturbed fluid balance (hypovolemia).

  9. Small-volume fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline prevents inflammation but not mortality in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Soheyl; Zimmermann, Klaus; Szelényi, Zoltán; Hamar, János; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Redl, Heinz; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2006-03-01

    Hemorrhage remains a primary cause of death in civilian and military trauma. Permissive hypotensive resuscitation is a possible approach to reduce bleeding in patients until they can be stabilized in an appropriate hospital setting. Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline (HS) is of particular interest because it allows one to modulate the inflammatory response to hemorrhage and trauma. Here, we tested the utility of permissive hypotensive resuscitation with hypertonic fluids in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock. Animals were subjected to massive hemorrhage [mean arterial pressure (MAP) = 30 - 35 mmHg for 2 h until decompensation] and partially resuscitated with a bolus dose of 4 mL/kg of 7.5% NaCl (HS), hypertonic hydroxyl ethyl starch (HHES; hydroxyl ethyl starch + 7.5% NaCl), or normal saline (NS) followed by additional infusion of Ringer solution to maintain MAP at 40 to 45 mmHg for 40 min (hypotensive state). Finally, animals were fully resuscitated with Ringer solution and the heparinized shed blood. Hypotensive resuscitation with NS caused a significant increase in plasma interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-2, interferon gamma (IFNgamma), IL-10, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). This increase was blocked by treatment with HS. HHES treatment significantly reduced the increase of IL-1beta and IL-2 but not that of the other cytokines studied. Despite the strong effects of HS and HHES on cytokine production, both treatments had little effect on plasma lactate, base excess (BE), white blood cell (WBC) count, myeloperoxidase (MPO) content, and the wet/dry weight ratio of the lungs. Moreover, on day 7 after shock, the survival rate in rats treated with HS was markedly, but not significantly, lower than that of NS-treated animals (47% vs. 63%, respectively). In summary, hypotensive resuscitation with hypertonic fluids reduces the inflammatory response but not lung tissue damage or mortality after severe hemorrhagic shock.

  10. Acute inhalation of hypertonic saline does not improve mucociliary clearance in all children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known of how mucociliary clearance (MCC) in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and normal pulmonary function compares with healthy adults, or how an acute inhalation of 7% hypertonic saline (HS) aerosol affects MCC in these same children. Methods We compared MCC in 12 children with CF and normal pulmonary function after an acute inhalation of 0.12% saline (placebo), or HS, admixed with the radioisotope 99 mtechnetium sulfur colloid in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over study. Mucociliary clearance on the placebo day in the children was also compared to MCC in 10 healthy, non-CF adults. Mucociliary clearance was quantified over a 90 min period, using gamma scintigraphy, and is reported as MCC at 60 min (MCC60) and 90 min (MCC90). Results Median [interquartile range] MCC60 and MCC90 in the children on the placebo visit were 15.4 [12.4-24.5]% and 19.3 [17.3-27.8%]%, respectively, which were similar to the adults with 17.8 [6.4-28.7]% and 29.6 [16.1-43.5]%, respectively. There was no significant improvement in MCC60 (2.2 [-6.2-11.8]%) or MCC90 (2.3 [-1.2-10.5]%) with HS, compared to placebo. In addition, 5/12 and 4/12 of the children showed a decrease in MCC60 and MCC90, respectively, after inhalation of HS. A post hoc subgroup analysis of the change in MCC90 after HS showed a significantly greater improvement in MCC in children with lower placebo MCC90 compared to those with higher placebo MCC90 (p = 0.045). Conclusions These data suggest that percent MCC varies significantly between children with CF lung disease and normal pulmonary functions, with some children demonstrating MCC values within the normal range and others showing MCC values that are below normal values. In addition, although MCC did not improve in all children after inhalation of HS, improvement did occur in children with relatively low MCC values after placebo. This finding suggests that acute inhalation of hypertonic saline may benefit a subset of children with low MCC

  11. Nebulized hypertonic saline and recombinant human DNase in the treatment of pulmonary atelectasis in newborns.

    PubMed

    Dilmen, Ugur; Karagol, Belma Saygili; Oguz, Serife Suna

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the efficacy of nebulized 3% hypertonic saline (HS) and recombinant human DNase (rhDNase) treatment for resolution of persistent atelectasis in newborns. Forty newborns (38 preterms) who did not respond to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive either nebulized 3% HS solution (n = 20) or rhDNase (n = 20) between September 2007 and March 2008. Clinical parameters, oxygen saturation and radiological response (chest X-ray scoring) were analyzed before and after administration of 3% HS or rhDNase. The patients of the nebulized 3% HS solution group improved better chest X-ray scores parameters than the patients of the rhDNase group: chest X-ray scores were 5.1 ± 1.9 vs 4.8 ± 1.7 before treatment and 1.0 ± 0.8 vs 2.1 ± 1.4 after treatment (P < 0.001). Resolution time of atelectasis did not differ between the two groups after whole treatment but the percentage of atelectasis resolution after 3 days treatment were 90% (18/20) in the 3% HS group and 70% (14/20) in the rhDNase group. The patients in the 3% HS group improved better also in clinical parameters in comparison to the rhDNase treatment. The difference of oxygen saturation before and after the treatment was 4.6 ± 0.8 in 3% HS group in comparison to 2.6 ± 0.1 in the rhDNase group (P < 0.05). All serum sodium levels were normal in two groups before and after the treatment modalities. This is the first study on the usefulness of nebulized 3% hypertonic saline solution in treating newborns with pulmonary atelectasis. In addition, 3% HS solution was a more effective therapeutic option on the basis of clinical and radiological improvement compared to rhDNase treatment in newborns with pulmonary atelectasis. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  12. Chondrogenic Effect of Intra-articular Hypertonic-Dextrose (Prolotherapy) in Severe Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Topol, Gastón Andrés; Podesta, Leandro Ariel; Reeves, Kenneth Dean; Giraldo, Marcia Mallma; Johnson, Lanny L; Grasso, Raul; Jamín, Alexis; Clark, Tom; Rabago, David

    2016-11-01

    Dextrose injection is reported to improve knee osteoarthritis (KOA)-related clinical outcomes, but its effect on articular cartilage is unknown. A chondrogenic effect of dextrose injection has been proposed. To assess biological and clinical effects of intra-articular hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) in painful KOA. Case series with blinded arthroscopic evaluation before and after treatment. Physical medicine and day surgery practice. Symptomatic KOA for at least 6 months, arthroscopy-confirmed medial compartment exposed subchondral bone, and temporary pain relief with intra-articular lidocaine injection. Four to 6 monthly 10-mL intra-articular injections with 12.5% dextrose. Visual cartilage growth assessment of 9 standardized medial condyle zones in each of 6 participants by 3 arthroscopy readers masked to pre-/postinjection status (total 54 zones evaluated per reader); biopsy of a cartilage growth area posttreatment, evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin and Safranin-O stains, quantitative polarized light microscopy, and immunohistologic cartilage typing; self-reported knee specific quality of life using the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, 0-100 points). Six participants (1 female and 5 male) with median age of 71 years, WOMAC composite score of 57.5 points, and a 9-year pain duration received a median of 6 dextrose injections and follow-up arthroscopy at 7.75 months (range 4.5-9.5 months). In 19 of 54 zone comparisons, all 3 readers agreed that the posttreatment zone showed cartilage growth compared with the pretreatment zone. Biopsy specimens showed metabolically active cartilage with variable cellular organization, fiber parallelism, and cartilage typing patterns consistent with fibro- and hyaline-like cartilage. Compared with baseline status, the median WOMAC score improved 13 points (P = .013). Self-limited soreness after methylene blue instillation was noted. Positive clinical and chondrogenic effects were seen

  13. Local thermal stimulation relaxes hypertonic anal sphincter: evidence of somatoanal reflex.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J K; Chiu, J H; Lin, J K

    1999-09-01

    Although it is generally believed that warm perineal baths reduce pain resulting from anal fissure, complicated hemorrhoids, or anal surgery, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Because hypertonicity of the internal anal sphincter contributes to increasing pain in these conditions, it has been postulated that warm perineal baths could help to relax the anal sphincter, hence reducing pain. It is our purpose to demonstrate response of the anal sphincter to local thermal stimulation via a somatoanal reflex. Continuous anorectal manometry tracings were obtained from 15 healthy volunteers, 22 patients with hemorrhoid, and 20 patients with anal fissure. Local thermal stimulation was achieved by applying a heat pad on the right infragluteal region (local area), and subsequently on the right first interphalangeal region (control area). Obvious response to local thermal stimulation was shown by 13.3 percent of volunteers, 36.4 percent of patients with hemorrhoid, and 60 percent of patients with fissure. Heat-sensitive patients who responded to local thermal stimulation were divided to two groups, those with ultraslow waves and those without ultraslow waves. In patients with ultraslow waves, the amplitude of ultraslow waves decreased significantly after local thermal stimulation, with amplitude before local thermal stimulation, (mean +/- standard deviation) 66.2 +/- 30.6 mmHg, and during local thermal stimulation, 43.2 +/- 22.3 mmHg, respectively, P = 0.003. By contrast, in patients without ultraslow waves, the tonic pressure measured before local thermal stimulation and during local thermal stimulation was 74.2 +/- 23.5 and 60.5 +/- 18.5 mmHg, respectively, P = 0.001. The response began at approximately three minutes after local thermal stimulation when the skin temperature was 42.1 +/- 0.3 degrees C. No anal response was observed when the heat pad was applied to the control area. The maximum resting pressure of the heat-sensitive patients was significantly higher than

  14. Slightly hypertonic saline and dextran-40 in resuscitation of methamphetamine burn patients.

    PubMed

    Juern, Jeremy; Peltier, George; Twomey, John

    2008-01-01

    The inherent danger of illegal manufacture of methamphetamine is explosion and fire with the "cookers" presenting to burn centers for treatment. Recent studies have shown that methamphetamine burn patients required resuscitation volumes two to three times that of the standard Parkland formula and experienced a higher mortality rate. The purpose of this study was to compare the fluid resuscitation requirements and other characteristics of our methamphetamine-positive burn patients with a control group of methamphetamine-negative burn patients. A retrospective study of burn patients with methamphetamine-positive urine toxicology screens was conducted from August 1996 to April 2005. The data collected were age, sex, %total body surface area (%TBSA) burn, urine toxicology screen result, length of stay (LOS), ventilator days, weight, urine output, and fluid requirement during the first 24 hours along with fluid type, survival, and hospital charges. Methamphetamine-positive patients were matched to controls for %TBSA, age, and sex. Eleven methamphetamine-positive burn patients were well matched with 11 methamphetamine-negative controls. There was no difference in intubation rate, ventilator days, LOS, and there were no deaths in either group. There was no statistical difference between the two groups for the ratio of the 24-hour fluid resuscitation requirement divided by the estimate from the Parkland formula. Hospital charges were similar for the two groups. The largest volume of fluid infused was lactated Ringers (LR) and the slightly hypertonic fluid combination of LR + 50 mEq sodium bicarbonate + 3.4 mmol potassium phosphate. Both groups also received a dextran-40 (Rheomacrodex) infusion. In contrast to previous studies, our experience with methamphetamine-positive burn patients shows that they did not have an increased initial fluid requirement, a longer LOS, more days on the ventilator, higher hospitalization charges nor an increased mortality rate. The only

  15. Generating chimeric mice from embryonic stem cells via vial coculturing or hypertonic microinjection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    The generation of a fertile embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived or F0 (100 % coat color chimerism) mice is the final criterion in proving that the ESC is truly pluripotent. Many methods have been developed to produce chimeric mice. To date, the most popular methods for generating chimeric embryos is well sandwich aggregation between zona pellucida (ZP) removed (denuded) 2.5-day post-coitum (dpc) embryos and ESC clumps, or direct microinjection of ESCs into the cavity (blastocoel) of 3.5-dpc blastocysts. However, due to systemic limitations and the disadvantages of conventional microinjection, aggregation, and coculturing, two novel methods (vial coculturing and hypertonic microinjection) were developed in recent years at my laboratory.Coculturing 2.5-dpc denuded embryos with ESCs in 1.7-mL vials for ~3 h generates chimeras that have significantly high levels of chimerism (including 100 % coat color chimerism) and germline transmission. This method has significantly fewer instrumental and technological limitations than existing methods, and is an efficient, simple, inexpensive, and reproducible method for "mass production" of chimeric embryos. For laboratories without a microinjection system, this is the method of choice for generating chimeric embryos. Microinjecting ESCs into a subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos can generate germline-transmitted chimeras including 100 % coat color chimerism. However, this method is adopted rarely due to the very small and tight space between ZP and blastomeres. Using a laser pulse or Piezo-driven instrument/device to help introduce ESCs into the subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos demonstrates the superior efficiency in generating ESC-derived (F0) chimeras. Unfortunately, due to the need for an expensive instrument/device and extra fine skill, not many studies have used either method. Recently, ESCs injected into the large subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos in an injection medium containing 0.2-0.3 M sucrose very efficiently generated

  16. Hypertonic Glucose Combined with Negative Pressure Wound Therapy to Prepare Wounds with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection for Skin Grafting: A Report of 3 Cases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Xian, Chun-Jing; Yu, Jia-Ao; Shi, Kai; Hong, Lei

    2015-06-01

    Soft tissue losses from acute or chronic trauma are a challenge for surgeons. To explore a method to expedite granulation tissue formation in preparation for a split-thickness skin graft (STSG), the medical records of 3 patients - 2 adult men with wounds related to trauma injury and 1 infant with necrotizing fasciitis, all infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa - were reviewed. All wounds were surgically debrided and managed by applying gauze soaked in 50% glucose followed by continuous negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) before definitive skin grafting. NPWT pressure was applied at -80 mm Hg for the 2 adult males (ages 39 and 25 years) and -50 mm Hg for the 7-month-old male infant. The dressings were changed every 2 to 3 days. No adverse events occurred, and wounds were successfully closed with a STSG after an average of 7 days. In 1 case, NPWT was able to help affix dressings in a difficult-to-dress area (genital region). The combination of hypertonic glucose and hand-made, gauze-based NPWT was found to be safe, well-tolerated, and effective in preparing the wound bed for grafting. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies are needed to compare the safety, effectiveness, and efficacy of this method to other treatment approaches for P. aeruginosa-infected wounds.

  17. TRPV4 mediates pain-related behavior induced by mild hypertonic stimuli in the presence of inflammatory mediator.

    PubMed

    Alessandri-Haber, Nicole; Joseph, Elizabeth; Dina, Olayinka A; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Levine, Jon D

    2005-11-01

    The ligand-gated ion channel, TRPV4, functions as a transducer of hypotonic stimuli in primary afferent nociceptive neurons and contributes to inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Hypertonic saline also stimulates primary afferent nociceptors and the injection of mild hypertonic saline (2-5%) is widely used as an experimental model of pain in humans. Therefore, we tested whether TRPV4 participates in the transduction of hypertonic stimuli. Intradermal injection of 2% (607 mOsm) or 10% (3,250 mOsm) saline solution in the hind paw of rats induced a concentration-dependent pain-related behavior, flinching. Sensitization with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) caused a 7-fold increase in the number of flinches induced by 2% saline but failed to increase those caused by 10% saline. Spinal administration of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to TRPV4 caused a 46% decrease in the number of flinches induced by 2% saline, but there was no change in flinching induced by 10% saline. Similarly, only the nociceptive behavior caused by 2% saline was reduced in TRPV4(-/-) knockout mice. The TRPV4-mediated nociceptive behaviors induced by hyper- and hypotonic stimuli were dependent on Src tyrosine kinase. We suggest TRPV4 is a transducer in primary afferents that mediates nociceptive behavior induced by small increases or decreases in osmolarity. Such changes in osmolarity might contribute to pain in inflammatory and neuropathic states.

  18. Resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients with hypertonic saline - without dextran - inhibits neutrophil and endothelial cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Junger, Wolfgang G.; Rhind, Shawn G.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Shiu, Maria Y.; Baker, Andrew J.; Li, Linglin; Shek, Pang N.; Hoyt, David B.; Bulger, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Post-traumatic inflammation and excessive neutrophil activation cause multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), a major cause of death among hemorrhagic shock patients. Traditional resuscitation strategies may exacerbate inflammation and thus novel fluid treatments are needed to reduce these post-traumatic complications. Hypertonic resuscitation fluids inhibit inflammation and reduce MODS in animal models. Here we studied the anti-inflammatory efficacy of hypertonic fluids in a controlled clinical trial. Methods Trauma patients in hypovolemic shock were resuscitated in a pre-hospital setting with 250 ml of either 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS; n=9), 7.5% hypertonic saline + 6% dextran-70 (HSD; n=8), or 0.9% normal saline (NS; n=17). Blood samples were collected on hospital admission and 12 and 24 h post-resuscitation. Multi-color flow cytometry was used to quantify neutrophil expression of cell-surface activation/adhesion (CD11b, CD62L, CD64) and degranulation (CD63, CD66b, CD35) markers as well as oxidative burst activity. Circulating concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM)-1, P-, E-selectins, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9 were assessed with immunoassays. Results MODS, leukocytosis, and mortality were lower in the HS and HSD groups than in the NS group. However, these differences were not statistically significant. HS prevented priming and activation and neutrophil oxidative burst and CD11b and CD66b expression. HS also reduced circulating markers of neutrophil degranulation (MPO and MMP-9) and endothelial cell activation (sICAM-1, cVCAM-1, sE-selectin, and sP-selectin). HSD was less capable than HS of suppressing the upregulation of most of these activation markers. Conclusions This study demonstrates that initial resuscitation with HS but neither NS nor HSD can attenuate post-traumatic neutrophil and endothelial cell activation in hemorrhagic shock

  19. Critical Evaluation of Hypertonic and Hypotonic Solutions to Resuscitate Severely Burned Children: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Fred T.; Bowser, Bonny H.

    1979-01-01

    Children with thermal burns covering 30% or more of the body surface area were alternately resuscitated with either hypertonic lactated saline (HLS) or lactated Ringer's solution (LRS). Parameters sequentially measured and calculated included: 1) serum and urine electrolyte concentrations, 2) serum and urine osmolalities, 3) arterial blood gases, 4) total and fractional serum proteins, 5) blood urea nitrogen, complete blood count and blood sugar concentration, 6) changes in body weight, 7) sodium, potassium and water balance. The water load received by the HLS group was significantly less through 48 hours postburn (49% at 8 hours, 44% at 24 hours and 38% at 48 hours postburn). Although the HLS group received significantly more sodium than the LRS group, there was no difference in sodium balance at 48 hours postburn. This is explained by the fact that the HLS group, at 48 hours postburn, retained significantly less of the administered sodium load (69% vs. 83%). Positive water balance was significantly greater in the LR group for the first 48 hours postburn. This study suggests that current hypotonic fluid regimens for burn resuscitation contain water in excess of that required for proper resuscitation. Severely burned children may be safely and efficiently resuscitated with conventional salt loads and one-third less than usual water loads. PMID:36048

  20. Mannitol or hypertonic saline in the setting of traumatic brain injury: What have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Myles Dustin; Oren-Grinberg, Achikam; Robinson, Timothy Matthew; Chen, Clark C.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intracranial hypertension, defined as an intracranial pressure (ICP) >20 mmHg for a period of more than 5 min, worsens neurologic outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI). While several mechanisms contribute to poor outcome, impaired cerebral perfusion appears to be a highly significant common denominator. Management guidelines from the Brain Trauma Foundation recommend measuring ICP to guide therapy. In particular, hyperosmolar therapy, which includes mannitol or hypertonic saline (HTS), is frequently administered to reduce ICP. Currently, mannitol (20%) is considered the gold standard hyperosmolar agent. However, HTS is increasingly used in this setting. This review sought to compare the efficacy of mannitol to HTS in severe TBI. Methods: The PubMed database was used to systematically search for articles comparing mannitol to HTS in severe TBI. The following medical subject headings were used: HTS, sodium lactate, mannitol, ICP, intracranial hypertension, and TBI. We included both prospective and retrospective randomized controlled studies of adult patients with intracranial hypertension as a result of severe TBI who received hyperosmolar therapy. Results: Out of 45 articles, seven articles were included in our review: 5 were prospective, randomized trials; one was a prospective, nonrandomized trial; and one was a retrospective, cohort study. Conclusions: While all seven studies found that both mannitol and HTS were effective in reducing ICP, there was heterogeneity with regard to which agent was most efficacious. PMID:26673517

  1. NFAT5 in cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress – regulations and functional significance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells-5 (NFAT5), also known as OREBP or TonEBP, is a member of the nuclear factors of the activated T cells family of transcription factors. It is also the only known tonicity-regulated transcription factor in mammals. NFAT5 was initially known for its role in the hypertonic kidney inner medulla for orchestrating a genetic program to restore the cellular homeostasis. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that NFAT5 might play a more diverse functional role, including a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation and the development of autoimmune diseases. Despite the growing significance of NFAT5 in physiology and diseases, our understanding of how its activity is regulated remains very limited. Furthermore, how changes in tonicities are converted into functional outputs via NFAT5 remains elusive. Therefore, this review aims to summarize our current knowledge on the functional roles of NFAT5 in osmotic stress adaptation and the signaling pathways that regulate its activity. PMID:23618372

  2. Repeated Dosing of 23.4% Hypertonic Saline for Refractory Intracranial Hypertension. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Alden K; Nau, Karen M; Miller, David A; Hanel, Ricardo A; Freeman, WD

    2008-01-01

    Background: Hypertonic saline (HTS) at a concentration of 23.4% is an emerging therapy for intracranial hypertension. Compared to mannitol which can be given as a single bolus or as repeated bolus dosing, little data exists regarding safety or efficacy of repeated dosing of 23.4% HTS. We report the first case of 16 doses of 23.4% HTS over a 5 day period in a patient with refractory intracranial hypertension. Case Report: A 43-year-old woman with Fisher 3 subarachnoid hemorrhage and hydrocephalus requiring an external ventricular drain developed global cerebral edema on computed tomography. Medically refractory intracranial hypertension ensued which required repeated dosing of 23.4% HTS. Reductions in intracranial pressure (ICP) occurred after each dose of 23.4% HTS. No central nervous system complications occurred. Anasarca was the only observed complication, which responded to furosemide diuresis. Conclusion: Repeated dosing of 23.4% HTS was effective in reducing ICP in a case of medically refractory intracranial hypertension without major systemic complications. Prospective studies should address the safety and efficacy of repeat dose 23.4% HTS on serum sodium, intracranial pressure, and complications. PMID:22518235

  3. The Role of Cell Swelling in Ischemic Renal Damage and the Protective Effect of Hypertonic Solute

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Jorge; DiBona, Donald R.; Beck, Clyde H.; Leaf, Alexander

    1972-01-01

    The failure of blood flow to return to the kidney following a transient period of ischemia has long been recognized. The cause of this “no-reflow” has been investigated in the rat after a transient period of total obstruction of the renal arteries. The vascular pattern of the kidneys as visualized with silicone rubber injection shows a diffuse patchy ischemia throughout the kidney, which persists after release of the obstructed renal artery. Electron microscopic studies of ischemic kidneys showed that all cellular elements were swollen and limiting the available vascular space. Functional studies revealed an increase in plasma urea nitrogen and creatinine after 1 hr or longer ischemic periods. The ischemia, cell swelling, “no-reflow,” and subsequent renal dysfunction occurring after obstruction to the renal arteries were corrected by the administration of hypertonic mannitol, but were unaffected by an equivalent expansion of the extracellular fluid volume either with isotonic saline or isotonic mannitol, showing that the osmotic effect was primary. The hypothesis is presented that ischemic swelling of cells may occlude small blood vessels so that recirculation does not resume even after the initial cause of the ischemia is no longer present; solutes which do not penetrate cell membranes are able to shrink swollen cells, increase the available vascular space and thus permit reflow of blood to the ischemic organ. Images PMID:5007042

  4. The role of cell swelling in ischemic renal damage and the protective effect of hypertonic solute.

    PubMed

    Flores, J; DiBona, D R; Beck, C H; Leaf, A

    1972-01-01

    The failure of blood flow to return to the kidney following a transient period of ischemia has long been recognized. The cause of this "no-reflow" has been investigated in the rat after a transient period of total obstruction of the renal arteries. The vascular pattern of the kidneys as visualized with silicone rubber injection shows a diffuse patchy ischemia throughout the kidney, which persists after release of the obstructed renal artery. Electron microscopic studies of ischemic kidneys showed that all cellular elements were swollen and limiting the available vascular space. Functional studies revealed an increase in plasma urea nitrogen and creatinine after 1 hr or longer ischemic periods. The ischemia, cell swelling, "no-reflow," and subsequent renal dysfunction occurring after obstruction to the renal arteries were corrected by the administration of hypertonic mannitol, but were unaffected by an equivalent expansion of the extracellular fluid volume either with isotonic saline or isotonic mannitol, showing that the osmotic effect was primary. The hypothesis is presented that ischemic swelling of cells may occlude small blood vessels so that recirculation does not resume even after the initial cause of the ischemia is no longer present; solutes which do not penetrate cell membranes are able to shrink swollen cells, increase the available vascular space and thus permit reflow of blood to the ischemic organ.

  5. A3 adenosine receptor inhibition improves the efficacy of hypertonic saline resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Sumi, Yuka; Woehrle, Tobias; Chen, Yu; Hirsh, Mark I.; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2011-01-01

    We reported previously that hypertonic saline (HS) treatment can prevent or upregulate the function of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) via A2a adenosine receptors (A2aR) or A3 adenosine receptors (A3R), respectively. A3R translocate to the cell surface upon PMN stimulation and thus HS promotes PMN responses under conditions of delayed HS treatment. Here we investigated if inhibition of A3R improves the protective effects of HS resuscitation in a mouse sepsis model. We found that HS nearly triples extracellular adenosine concentrations in whole blood and that inhibition of A3R with the selective antagonist MRS-1191 dose-dependently improves the inhibitory effect of HS. MRS-1191 at a concentration of 1 nM enhanced the inhibitory effect of HS and reduced stimulatory effects of delayed HS treatment. Using a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis, we found that MRS-1191 reduces acute lung injury and PMN accumulation in lung tissue. While delayed HS treatment (4 ml/kg of 7.5 % NaCl) of mice 1 h after CLP aggravated PMN accumulation, lung tissue damage, and mortality 24 h after CLP, infusion of MRS-1191 (2 ng/kg body weight) combined with HS reduced these detrimental effects of delayed HS treatment. Our data thus show that A3 receptor antagonists can strengthen the beneficial effects of HS resuscitation by avoiding stimulatory side effects that result from delayed HS administration. PMID:20661181

  6. Cardiovascular effects of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions when injected into the liquor space of anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Feldberg, W; Wei, E

    1979-05-01

    1 In cats anaesthetized with chloralose, hyper- and hypotonic solutions were injected into the cisterna magna (in 0.5 ml) or into a lateral cerebral ventricle (in 0.2 to 0.3 ml), with aqueduct cannulated to prevent the injected solution from entering the subarachnoid space, and the effects on blood pressure and heart rate were examined. 2 Cisternal injections of hyper- and hypotonic solutions of NaCl (0.51 M and 0.05 M), glucose (1.03 M and 0.10 M), or sucrose (1.02 M and 0.10 M), as well as distilled water produced a rise in arterial blood pressure with tachycardias. Isotonic solutions of NaCl, glucose or sucrose were ineffective. 3 Ventricular injections of the hypertonic NaCl solution, also produced a pressor response with tachycardia effects when injected in this way. 4 The pressor responses and the tachycardias occurred after bilateral vagotomy and resulted from a sympathetic discharge which, on cisternal injection, originated from structures reached from the subarachnoid space, and on ventricular injection, from structures in the ventricular walls, probably in the hypothalamus. 5 The stimuli responsible for the discharge, were, on cisternal injection, the changes in osmolarity and on ventricular injection, the sodium ions.

  7. [Effect of sodium cromoglycate on airway vascular leakage caused by hypertonic saline in the rat trachea].

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, I; Tamaoki, J; Takeda, Y; Konno, K

    1996-09-01

    The action of the anti-asthmatic drug sodium cromoglycate (SCG) on airway inflammation remains uncertain. Using Evans blue dye as a maker of plasma leakage, we studied the effect of SCG on neurogenic vascular extravasation evoked by hypertonic saline (HTS) in the rat trachea. Inhalation of HTS (5-15%) caused a concentration-dependent increase in plasma leakage, but inhaled 0.9% NaCl had no effect. Inhalation of SCG did not affect the baseline level of vascular permeability, but it inhibited the effect of HTS in a dose-dependent manner: plasma extravasation induced by 10% NaCl was significantly reduced by 2 minutes of inhalation of SCG at concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/ml (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). SCG (10 mg/ml), also inhibited the changes in microvascular permeability caused by aerosols of substance P (10(-4) M), whereas it did not affect the responses to aerosols of platelet-activating factor (3 x 10(-4) M). A similar dose of SCG did not significantly alter microvascular leakage caused by 5% NaCl. However, phosphoramidon, a selective inhibitor of neutral endopeptidase, potentiated the response to 5% NaCl, an effect that was inhibited by SCG (p < 0.05). These results suggest that SCG inhibits HTS-induced airway vascular permeability, presumably through a tachykinin-antagonist-like property, and that this inhibition is exaggerated when the activity of endogenous neutral endopeptidase is low.

  8. Osmoregulation in water-deprived rats drinking hypertonic saline: effect of area postrema lesions.

    PubMed

    Stricker, E M; Craver, C F; Curtis, K S; Peacock-Kinzig, K A; Sved, A F; Smith, J C

    2001-03-01

    Rats drank rapidly when 0.3 M NaCl was the only drinking fluid available after overnight water deprivation, consuming approximately 200 ml/24 h. Although such large intakes of this hypertonic solution initially elevated plasma osmolality, excretion of comparable volumes of urine more concentrated than 300 meq Na(+)/l ultimately appears to restore plasma osmolality to normal levels. Rats drank approximately 100 ml of 0.5 M NaCl after overnight water deprivation, but urine Na(+) concentration (U(Na)) did not increase sufficiently to achieve osmoregulation. When an injected salt load exacerbated the initial dehydration caused by water deprivation, rats increased U(Na) to void the injected load and did not significantly alter 24-h intake of 0.3 or 0.5 M NaCl. Rats with lesions of area postrema had much higher saline intakes and lower U(Na) than did intact control rats; nonetheless, they appeared to osmoregulate well while drinking 0.3 M NaCl but not while drinking 0.5 M NaCl. Detailed analyses of drinking behavior by intact rats suggest that individual bouts were terminated by some rapid postabsorptive consequence of the ingested NaCl load that inhibited further NaCl intake, not by a fixed intake volume or number of licks that temporarily satiated thirst.

  9. [Tolerance of two inhaled hypertonic saline solutions in patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Máiz Carro, Luis; Lamas Ferreiro, Adelaida; Ruiz de Valbuena Maiz, Marta; Wagner Struwing, Carolin; Gabilondo Álvarez, Gustavo; Suárez Cortina, Lucrecia

    2012-02-04

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the tolerance of two inhaled hypertonic saline solutions (HS) in patients with cystic fibrosis. Eighty one cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (44 males; mean age 23.63 years) inhaled 5 ml of 7% inhaled HS solution and, in those patients who did not tolerate HS, we evaluated the tolerance of a 7% HS (at dose of 5 ml) added to 0.1% hyaluronic acid at least twenty-four hours later. Twenty one (26%) patients did not tolerate the HS solution immediately after its inhalation. Cough was the most common symptom. Patients over 18 years of age showed worse tolerance to HS than patients younger than 18 years of age. Those patients that did not tolerate HS had a worse lung function that the ones that showed good tolerance. Eighty-one percent of patients who did not tolerate the HS alone tolerated well the HS with hyaluronic acid. CF patients cannot tolerate inhaled HS immediately after nebulisation. Patients over 18 years and those with worse lung function tolerate HS worst. Hyaluronate acid added to 7% HS solution improves the tolerability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Muscular hypertonicity: a suspected contributor to rheumatological manifestations observed in ambulatory practice

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Kamat, Sona; Gajdosik, Richard; Ahmad, Naila; Aldag, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this retrospective study of non-inflammatory rheumatic disease patients was to investigate if the individuals clinically identified with muscular hypertonicity (MHT) had increased clinical manifestations compared with those of age- and gender-matched patients with the same disorders. Material and Methods The MHT status was clinically identified in the rheumatologist’s myofascial protocol examination as relatively increased passive resistance of relaxed muscle on a slow gentle stretch. Clinical and laboratory data were abstracted on a pre-coded form, including symptom and physical examination features, serum assays, and medications. Results The 19 MHT cases complained of greater subjective stiffness (p=0.010) and tiredness (p=0.018) at initial encounters and increased aching pain (p=0.049) and were prescribed more (p=0.003) mild narcotic analgesics than the 19 comparison patients. The cases had higher (p=0.027) serum creatine kinase levels, and patients with diffuse MHT had greater frequency of heavy (30+pack-years) cigarette smoking (p=0.002) than comparison subjects. Narcotic usage was also greater in cases with diffuse involvement. Conclusion Non-inflammatory rheumatic disease patients with MHT had an overall similar profile as that of comparison patients but had greater musculoskeletal complaints, and those with diffuse involvement had greater narcotic usage. Further research, including quantitative measurements of muscle stiffness, are required to determine whether MHT is a documented entity associated with increased rheumatological manifestations. PMID:27708929

  11. Some Effects of Hypertonic Solutions on Contraction and Excitation-Contraction Coupling in Frog Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, A. M.; Godt, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    In frog fast skeletal muscle, we find a decline of twitch, tetanus, and maximum K and caffeine contracture tensions as tonicity of the bathing solution is increased. The decline of tension independent of the method of producing contraction indicates that the major effect of hypertonicity is directly on contractile tension probably because of the increased internal ionic strength. However, there is some apparent disruption of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in solutions made three times the normal tonicity (3T solutions) since: (a) in 3T solutions tetanic and K contracture tensions decline to zero from a value near the average maximum caffeine contracture tension at this tonicity (10% of 1T tetanic tension). At this time, caffeine contractures of 10% of 1T tetanic tension can be elicited; (b) once the K contracture tension has declined, elevated [Ca++]o, 19.8 mM, restores K contracture tension to 13% of 1T tetanic tension. This probable disruption is not caused by changes in mechanical threshold since in 2T solutions the mechanical threshold is shifted by 12 mv in the hyperpolarizing direction. This is consistent with neutralization of fixed negative charges on the inside of the membrane. The repriming curve is also shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction in 2T solutions. Shifts of the repriming curve coupled with membrane depolarizations in 3T solutions (about 20 mv) may produce loss of repriming ability at the resting potential and disruption of E-C coupling. PMID:5415044

  12. Equiosmolar Solutions of Hypertonic Saline and Mannitol Do Not Impair Blood Coagulation During Elective Intracranial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Palazón, Joaquín; Fuentes-García, Diego; Doménech-Asensi, Paloma; Piqueras-Pérez, Claudio; Falcón-Araña, Luis; Burguillos-López, Sebastián

    2017-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of equiosmolar, equivolemic solutions of 3% hypertonic saline (HS) and 20% mannitol on blood coagulation assessed by rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and standard coagulation tests during elective craniotomy. In a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial, 40 patients undergoing elective craniotomy were randomized to receive 5 mL/kg of either 20% mannitol or 3% HS for intraoperative brain relaxation. Fibrinogen, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count were simultaneously measured intraoperatively with ROTEM for EXTEM, INTEM, and FIBTEM analysis. ROTEM parameters were: clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT), maximum clot firmness (MCF), and α-angle. No significant differences between groups were found in ROTEM variables CT, CFT, MCF, α-angle (EXTEM and INTEM), and MCF (FIBTEM) nor standard coagulation tests. ROTEM parameters did not show changes after administration of hyperosmolar solutions relating to basal values, except for an increase of CFT EXTEM (118±28 vs. 128±26 s) and decrease of CT INTEM (160±18 vs. 148±15 s) with values within normal range. Significant decreases from baseline levels were observed for hematocrit (-7%), platelet count (-10%), and fibrinogen (-13%) after HS infusion, and hematocrit (-9%), platelet count (-13%), and fibrinogen (-9%) after mannitol infusion, but remaining normal. The use of 5 mL/kg of equiosmolar solutions of 3% HS and 20% mannitol applied to reach a brain relaxation during elective craniotomy does not induce coagulation impairment as evidenced by ROTEM and standard coagulation tests.

  13. Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin 1-7 versus Hypertonic Sodium Chloride 7.5% Administration after Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) plays an important role in renal circulation. Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may cause kidney circulation disturbance, and this study was designed to investigate the renal blood flow (RBF) response to Ang1-7 after HS. Methods. 27 male Wistar rats were subjected to blood withdrawal to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 45 mmHg for 45 min. The animals were treated with saline (group 1), Ang1-7 (300 ng·kg−1 min−1), Ang1-7 in hypertonic sodium chloride 7.5% (group 3), and hypertonic solution alone (group 4). Results. MAP was increased in a time-related fashion (Ptime < 0.0001) in all groups; however, there was a tendency for the increase in MAP in response to hypertonic solution (P = 0.09). Ang1-7, hypertonic solution, or combination of both increased RBF in groups 2-4, and these were significantly different from saline group (P = 0.05); that is, Ang1-7 leads to a significant increase in RBF to 1.35 ± 0.25 mL/min compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mL/min in saline group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although Ang1-7 administration unlike hypertonic solution could not elevate MAP after HS, it potentially could increase RBF similar to hypertonic solution. This suggested that Ang1-7 recovers RBF after HS when therapeutic opportunities of hypertonic solution are limited. PMID:27073699

  14. Comparison of the effect of hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch and mannitol on the intraocular pressure in healthy normotensive dogs and the effect of hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch on the intraocular pressure in dogs with primary glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Volopich, Sabine; Mosing, Martina; Auer, Ulrike; Nell, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if intravenous hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch (7.5%/6%) (HES) could decrease the intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy normotensive dogs, and compare its effect with that of mannitol (20%) (experimental study). In addition, the potential IOP-lowering effect of hypertonic HES was evaluated in six dogs with primary glaucoma (clinical study). Experimental study: eight male ophthalmoscopically and clinically healthy Beagles were included in this study. The IOP of each dog was measured by applanation tonometry in both eyes to obtain control values at 10:00, 10:15, 10:30, 10:45, 11:00 a.m., and then every hour until 6:00 p.m. prior to the first treatment (control period). Each dog received, with at least 2-week intervals and in a random order, an intravenous (IV) infusion of 4 mL/kg hypertonic HES (1.2 g/kg NaCl; 0.96 g/kg HES) and 4 mL/kg mannitol 20% (1 g/kg) over a period of 15 min starting at 10:00 a.m. IOP was measured oculus uterque (OU) at the same time intervals as in the control study. The differences in IOP between the treatment groups and the baseline IOP (before the start of infusion), between oculus sinister (OS) and oculus dexter (OD) and between the same time points of all groups were determined with a Student's t-test for paired samples (P = 0.05). Clinical study: six dogs with primary glaucoma (representing seven eyes) received an IV infusion of 4 mL/kg hypertonic HES over a period of 15 min. IOP was measured before and 15 and 30 min after starting the infusion. Experimental study: no significant difference between IOP of both eyes was found. A significant decrease in IOP from baseline value was recorded at 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after the start of mannitol infusion (mean amplitude in IOP decrease 3.21 mmHg; P < 0.05) and at 15 and 30 min in dogs treated with HES (mean amplitude in IOP decrease 2.43 mmHg; P < 0.05). At 120 and 180 min there was a significantly higher IOP (P < 0.05) in HES treatment group

  15. Hypertonicity-induced transmitter release at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions is partly mediated by integrins and cAMP/protein kinase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Grinnell, Alan D.; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of quantal transmitter release increases upon application of hypertonic solutions. This effect bypasses the Ca(2+) triggering step, but requires the presence of key molecules involved in vesicle fusion, and hence could be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular process of vesicle fusion. We have examined the hypertonicity response at neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos in Ca(2+)-free saline. Relative to wild-type, the response induced by puff application of hypertonic solution was enhanced in a mutant, dunce, in which the cAMP level is elevated, or in wild-type embryos treated with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, while protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors decreased it. The response was also smaller in a mutant, DC0, which lacks the major subunit of PKA. Thus the cAMP/PKA cascade is involved in the hypertonicity response. Peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), which inhibit binding of integrins to natural ligands, reduced the response, whereas a peptide containing the non-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) did not. A reduced response persisted in a mutant, myospheroid, which expresses no integrins, and the response in DC0 was unaffected by RGD peptides. These data indicate that there are at lease two components in the hypertonicity response: one that is integrin mediated and involves the cAMP/PKA cascade, and another that is not integrin mediated and does not involve the cAMP/PKA cascade.

  16. K(+) channels of squid giant axons open by an osmotic stress in hypertonic solutions containing nonelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kukita, Fumio

    2011-08-01

    In hypertonic solutions made by adding nonelectrolytes, K(+) channels of squid giant axons opened at usual asymmetrical K(+) concentrations in two different time courses; an initial instantaneous activation (I (IN)) and a sigmoidal activation typical of a delayed rectifier K(+) channel (I (D)). The current-voltage relation curve for I (IN) was fitted well with Goldman equation described with a periaxonal K(+) concentration at the membrane potential above -10 mV. Using the activation-voltage curve obtained from tail currents, K(+) channels for I (IN) are confirmed to activate at the membrane potential that is lower by 50 mV than those for I (D). Both I (IN) and I (D) closed similarly at the holding potential below -100 mV. The logarithm of I (IN)/I (D) was linearly related with the osmolarity for various nonelectrolytes. Solute inaccessible volumes obtained from the slope increased with the nonelectrolyte size from 15 to 85 water molecules. K(+) channels representing I (D) were blocked by open channel blocker tetra-butyl ammonium (TBA) more efficiently than in the absence of I (IN), which was explained by the mechanism that K(+) channels for I (D) were first converted to those for I (IN) by the osmotic pressure and then blocked. So K(+) channels for I (IN) were suggested to be derived from the delayed rectifier K(+) channels. Therefore, the osmotic pressure is suggested to exert delayed-rectifier K(+) channels to open in shrinking rather hydrophilic flexible parts outside the pore than the pore itself, which is compatible with the recent structure of open K(+) channel pore.

  17. Median preoptic nucleus mediates the cardiovascular recovery induced by hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Nathalia Oda; Naves, Lara Marques; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos Luiz; Freiria-Oliveira, André Henrique; Colombari, Eduardo; Rosa, Daniel Alves; Reis, Angela Adamski da Silva; Ianzer, Danielle; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Changes in plasma osmolarity, through central and peripheral osmoreceptors, activate the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) that modulates autonomic and neuroendocrine adjustments. The present study sought to determine the participation of MnPO in the cardiovascular recovery induced by hypertonic saline infusion (HSI) in rats submitted to hemorrhagic shock. The recordings of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) were carried out on male Wistar rats (250-300 g). Hemorrhagic shock was induced by blood withdrawal over 20 min until the MAP values of approximately 60 mmHg were attained. The nanoinjection (100 nL) of GABAA agonist (Muscimol 4 mM; experimental group (EXP)) or isotonic saline (NaCl 150 mM; control (CONT)) into MnPO was performed 2 min prior to intravenous overload of sodium through HSI (3 M NaCl, 1.8 mL/kg, b.wt.). Hemorrhagic shock reduced the MAP in control (62 ± 1.1 mmHg) and EXP (61 ± 0.4 mmHg) equipotently. The inhibition of MnPO impaired MAP (CONT: 104 ± 4.2 versus EXP: 60 ± 6.2 mmHg) and RVC (CONT: 6.4 ± 11.4 versus EXP: -53.5 ± 10.0) recovery 10 min after HSI. The overall results in this study demonstrated, for the first time, that the MnPO plays an essential role in the HSI induced resuscitation during hypovolemic hemorrhagic shock.

  18. Advances toward the Elucidation of Hypertonic Saline Effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Michon, Anne-Laure; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Chiron, Raphaël; Lamy, Brigitte; Marchandin, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nebulized hypertonic saline (HTS) has beneficial effects including reducing pulmonary exacerbations in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. Several mechanisms may explain these effects but antimicrobial activity of NaCl remains largely unexplored. We aimed to measure the antimicrobial effect of NaCl on Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from the respiratory tract in CF patients. Methods NaCl minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined for strains characterized for mucoidy, antimicrobial resistance, and ability to form biofilm using 0,9% to 15% NaCl solutions. NaCl effects on biofilm formation, preformed biofilm, and mobility were evaluated. Kinetics of antimicrobial effects was studied. Results The growth of all isolates (n = 85) from 34 patients was inhibited by 6% NaCl solution. A 10% concentration had a bactericidal activity on 90% of the isolates. Mucoid and multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates displayed lower MICs compared to non-mucoid and to non-MDR isolates, respectively. Time-kill kinetics showed that NaCl exhibited a rapid, dose and growth phase dependent bactericidal effect. Three percent or more of NaCl inhibited biofilm formation for 69% of strongly adherent isolates. A dose-dependent decrease of preformed biofilm viability and an inhibitory activity on bacterial motility were observed. Conclusions NaCl inhibited the growth of all isolates and killed 38% of tested isolates within concentration range currently used in therapeutics. Our results suggest that anti-pseudomonal activity is another mechanism of action of HTS to add to those already established. Clinical trials are needed to compare diverse HTS conditions of use (rhythm, dose and mode of delivery) to obtain efficient and optimized anti-P. aeruginosa effects. More generally, NaCl effect on other opportunistic pathogens as well as on global microbiotae recovered during polymicrobial diseases warrants further investigations. PMID

  19. Synovitis induced by joint lavage with hypertonic saline solutions in healthy dairy calves

    PubMed Central

    Achard, Damien; Francoz, David; Desrochers, André; Girard, Christiane; Piché, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a single joint lavage with 7.2% or 15% hypertonic saline solutions (HSS) on the tarsocrural joints of healthy calves. The tarsi of 10 calves were randomly lavaged with 7.2% HSS, 15% HSS, or isotonic saline. Synovial fluid samples were collected aseptically on days 1 (before joint lavage), 2, 3, 4, and 8 for complete cytological analysis. Lameness, joint swelling, and pain were recorded daily. Calves were euthanized on day 8 for gross and histological analyses of synovial membranes and articular cartilage. Synovitis was evaluated using a scoring system reflecting inflammatory changes in synovial membranes. Joints irrigated with HSS were more distended and painful compared with isotonic control joints. Swelling decreased consistently in the joints lavaged with 7.2% HSS, whereas it remained unchanged in joints lavaged with 15% HSS. Slight to moderate lameness was observed in the joints lavaged with 15% HSS. In comparison to isotonic saline joints, total protein concentration was significantly increased on day 2 and 3 for the joints lavaged with 7.2% HSS (P ≤ 0.01) and on days 2, 3, and 4 in the joints lavaged with 15% HSS (P ≤ 0.0006). Gross and histological findings revealed that synovitis was more severe in the joints lavaged with 15% HSS but variable in the joints lavaged with 7.2% HSS. No significant differences were observed for the articular cartilage. Fifteen percent HSS is not recommended for joint lavage. Although irrigation with 7.2% HSS may induce a variable synovitis, it was found appropriate for joint lavage. Its effects on septic joints remain undetermined. PMID:23024450

  20. Salt Appetite Is Reduced by a Single Experience of Drinking Hypertonic Saline in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Michael P.; Greenwood, Mingkwan; Paton, Julian F. R.; Murphy, David

    2014-01-01

    Salt appetite, the primordial instinct to favorably ingest salty substances, represents a vital evolutionary important drive to successfully maintain body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. This innate instinct was shown here in Sprague-Dawley rats by increased ingestion of isotonic saline (IS) over water in fluid intake tests. However, this appetitive stimulus was fundamentally transformed into a powerfully aversive one by increasing the salt content of drinking fluid from IS to hypertonic saline (2% w/v NaCl, HS) in intake tests. Rats ingested HS similar to IS when given no choice in one-bottle tests and previous studies have indicated that this may modify salt appetite. We thus investigated if a single 24 h experience of ingesting IS or HS, dehydration (DH) or 4% high salt food (HSD) altered salt preference. Here we show that 24 h of ingesting IS and HS solutions, but not DH or HSD, robustly transformed salt appetite in rats when tested 7 days and 35 days later. Using two-bottle tests rats previously exposed to IS preferred neither IS or water, whereas rats exposed to HS showed aversion to IS. Responses to sweet solutions (1% sucrose) were not different in two-bottle tests with water, suggesting that salt was the primary aversive taste pathway recruited in this model. Inducing thirst by subcutaneous administration of angiotensin II did not overcome this salt aversion. We hypothesised that this behavior results from altered gene expression in brain structures important in thirst and salt appetite. Thus we also report here lasting changes in mRNAs for markers of neuronal activity, peptide hormones and neuronal plasticity in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus following rehydration after both DH and HS. These results indicate that a single experience of drinking HS is a memorable one, with long-term changes in gene expression accompanying this aversion to salty solutions. PMID:25111786

  1. Intracarotid hypertonic sodium chloride differentially modulates sympathetic nerve activity to the heart and kidney

    PubMed Central

    Frithiof, Robert; Xing, Tao; McKinley, Michael J.; May, Clive N.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertonic NaCl infused into the carotid arteries increases mean arterial pressure (MAP) and changes sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) via cerebral mechanisms. We hypothesized that elevated sodium levels in the blood supply to the brain would induce differential responses in renal and cardiac SNA via sensors located outside the blood-brain barrier. To investigate this hypothesis, we measured renal and cardiac SNA simultaneously in conscious sheep during intracarotid infusions of NaCl (1.2 M), sorbitol (2.4 M), or urea (2.4 M) at 1 ml/min for 4 min into each carotid. Intracarotid NaCl significantly increased MAP (91 ± 2 to 97 ± 3 mmHg, P < 0.05) without changing heart rate (HR). Intracarotid NaCl was associated with no change in cardiac SNA (11 ± 5.0%), but a significant inhibition of renal SNA (−32.5 ± 6.4%, P < 0.05). Neither intracarotid sorbitol nor urea changed MAP, HR, central venous pressure, cardiac SNA, and renal SNA. The changes in MAP and renal SNA were completely abolished by microinjection of the GABA agonist muscimol (5 mM, 500 nl each side) into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Infusion of intracarotid NaCl for 20 min stimulated a larger increase in water intake (1,100 ± 75 ml) than intracarotid sorbitol (683 ± 125 ml) or intracarotid urea (0 ml). These results demonstrate that acute increases in blood sodium levels cause a decrease in renal SNA, but no change in cardiac SNA in conscious sheep. These effects are mediated by cerebral sensors located outside the blood-brain barrier that are more responsive to changes in sodium concentration than osmolality. The renal sympathoinhibitory effects of sodium are mediated via a pathway that synapses in the PVN. PMID:24523342

  2. NEBULIZED HYPERTONIC SALINE ATTENUATES ACUTE LUNG INJURY FOLLOWING TRAUMA AND HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Wohlauer, M.; Moore, E.E.; Silliman, C.C.; Fragoso, M.; Gamboni, F.; Harr, J.; Accurso, F.; Wright, F.; Haenel, J.; Fullerton, D.; Banerjee, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that aerosolized inhaled HTS given at the onset of resuscitation will decrease acute lung injury (ALI) following hemorrhagic shock by inhibiting the release of epithelial derived pro-inflammatory mediators. Design Animal study Setting Animal care facility procedure room in a medical center. Subjects Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions Rats underwent hemorrhagic shock followed by 2 hrs of resuscitation and one hour of observation. In the study group, nebulized HTS was delivered at the end of the shock period and after 1 hr and 2 hr of resuscitation. Measurements and Main Results Shock provoked ALI, which was attenuated with inhaled HTS (1.56 ± 0.2 vs. 0.95 ± 0.3 mg protein/ml BALF, Shock vs. Shock +HTS, p<0.01). Nebulized HTS reduced inflammation (CINC-1 accumulation in BAL fluid 5999 ± 1267 vs. 3342 ± 859 pg/ml, Shock vs. Shock +HTS, p=0.006). Additionally, nebulized HTS inhibited MMP-13 accumulation in the BALF (1513 ± 337 pg/ml BALF vs. 230 ± 19 pg/ml, Shock vs. Shock + HTS, p=0.009) and pretreatment with an MMP-13 inhibitor was sufficient to attenuate postinjury ALI (1.42 ± 0.09 vs. 0.77 ± 0.23 mg/ml BAL protein, Shock vs. Shock + MMP-13 Inhibitor CL-82198, p=0.002). Conclusion Inhaled hypertonic saline attenuates postshock acute lung injury by exerting an anti-inflammatory effect on the pulmonary epithelium, suggesting a new clinical strategy to treat ALI/ARDS. PMID:22732292

  3. Chronic physiological increases in cortisol inhibit the vasopressin response to hypertonicity in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Papanek, P E; Raff, H

    1994-11-01

    Chronic increases in cortisol inhibit basal plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP). Acute pretreatment with cortisol inhibits the large increase in AVP during hypotension or hypoxia but does not inhibit the modest increase in AVP in response to hypertonic saline (HS). We evaluated the effect of a chronic increase in cortisol (physiological range) on the acute AVP response to HS. Five male dogs received a continuous infusion of either vehicle or cortisol (65 mg/day) for 7 days. The AVP response to HS (0.2 mmol.kg-1.min-1 for 30 min) was tested before infusion, on days 1, 4, and 7 of chronic infusion, and 2 days after the infusion was discontinued. Plasma cortisol increased significantly from 1.0 +/- 0.2 micrograms/dl to an average over the 7 days of infusion of 5.0 +/- 0.2 micrograms/dl, and basal plasma AVP was significantly decreased during cortisol infusion. The increase in plasma Na and osmolality during HS was unaffected by chronic infusion. HS resulted in an increase in AVP from 3.5 +/- 0.2 to 7.1 +/- 0.7 pg/ml before cortisol infusion. After 7 days of cortisol, the AVP response to HS (from 2.6 +/- 0.1 to 3.9 +/- 0.7 pg/ml) was significantly attenuated. Sustained, physiological increases in cortisol significantly inhibited osmotically stimulated AVP release. The decrease in AVP during hypercortisolism and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone in patients with adrenal insufficiency appear to be due to an inhibitory effect of cortisol on the osmotic sensitivity of the AVP control system.

  4. High flow therapy versus hypertonic saline in bronchiolitis: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bueno Campaña, Mercedes; Olivares Ortiz, Jorge; Notario Muñoz, Cristina; Rupérez Lucas, Marta; Fernández Rincón, Adelaida; Patiño Hernández, Olga; Calvo Rey, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    To demonstrate that heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) is superior to inhaled hypertonic saline solution (HSS) in improving respiratory distress in moderate bronchiolitis. In addition, it could improve comfort and reduce length of hospital stay (LOS) and admission to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Randomised Clinical Trial from 1 October 2010 to 31 December 2012. Two urban secondary (no PICU available) paediatric hospitalisation units. Hospitalised children aged up to 6 months with moderate acute bronchiolitis (Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument, RDAI ≥4). Patients were randomised to HHHFNC or HSS. All of them received epinephrine as bronchodilator. Primary outcome was difference in mean Respiratory Assessment Change Score (RACS) between both groups measured in six previously defined consecutive moments. Secondary outcomes were difference in mean comfort scores in this period, LOS and rate of PICU admission. Seventy-five previously healthy patients were enrolled. Mean age was 2.4 months (95% CI 2.04 to 2.76). 43 were allocated to HSS group and 32 in HHHFNC. Data of 1 patient were lost, and 8 changed group over the study period. Intention-to-treat principle was applied. There were no significant differences in mean RACS and mean comfort scores between groups at the evaluation points. Median LOS or PICU admission rate were similar in both groups. No adverse events were observed. HHHFNC was not superior to HSS in treatment of moderate acute bronchiolitis with respect to severity and comfort scores, LOS or PICU admission rate. NCT01873144. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Nebulized hypertonic saline for bronchiolitis in the emergency department: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Florin, Todd A; Shaw, Kathy N; Kittick, Marlena; Yakscoe, Stephen; Zorc, Joseph J

    2014-07-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is the most frequent lower respiratory tract infection in infants, yet there are no effective therapies available. Current evidence is unclear about the role of hypertonic saline (HS) for the acute treatment of bronchiolitis. To determine whether nebulized 3% HS compared with normal saline (NS) improves respiratory distress in infants with bronchiolitis not responding to standard treatments in the emergency department. A randomized clinical trial with blinding of investigators, health care providers, and parents was conducted at a single urban pediatric ED. The participants included children aged 2 to less than 24 months with their first episode of bronchiolitis and a Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument score of 4 to 15 after nasal suctioning and a trial of nebulized albuterol. Patients were randomized to receive either nebulized 3% HS (HS group) or NS (NS group). The primary outcome was change in respiratory distress at 1 hour after the intervention, as measured by the Respiratory Assessment Change Score (a decrease indicates improvement). Secondary outcomes included vital signs, oxygen saturation, hospitalization, physician clinical impression, parental assessment, and adverse events. The 31 patients enrolled in each treatment arm had similar baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. At 1 hour after the intervention, the HS group demonstrated significantly less improvement in the median Respiratory Assessment Change Score compared with the NS group (HS, -1 [interquartile range, -5 to 1] vs. NS, -5 [interquartile range, -6 to -2]; P = .01). There were no significant differences in heart rate, oxygen saturation, hospitalization rate, or other outcomes. There were no adverse events. Infants with bronchiolitis and persistent respiratory distress after standard treatment in the emergency department had less improvement after receiving 3% HS compared with those who received NS. Based on these results and the existing evidence

  6. Effect of hypertonic NaCl-starch-solution on oedema of different pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Koch, T; Neuhof, H; Kohler, P; Duncker, H P; Buse, A; van Ackern, K

    1994-02-01

    Small volumes of hypertonic NaCl-solutions have been proven to restore haemodynamics in hypovolemic shock patients. Topic of this study was to investigate whether bolus application of 7.5% NaCl-6.5% starch-solution (HSS) apart from its relevance in shock might be an effective therapy in oedema. Considering differential therapeutic aspects, the volume effects of 7.2 ml HSS were tested in three types of oedema: hydrostatic oedema induced by venous congestion (n = 6), oedema caused by bradykinin injection (n = 6), and proteinase-induced oedema (n = 6). The arterial, venous pressure and weight changes indicating volume shifts between intra- and extravascular space were continuously monitored in 36 isolated perfused rabbit hindlimbs. Oedema formation was induced corresponding to a weight gain of 18-20 g. Subsequently 7.2 ml HSS were injected into the extracorporeal circulation system containing 200 ml cell free, isoosmotic perfusate. Six experiments of each oedema group without HSS-application served as controls. 75-100% of oedema formation could be remobilised via bolus application of HSS within 5 min in all types of oedema. A persisting weight reduction was detectable in the hydrostatic and bradykinin oedema, whereas in the elastase oedema the initial weight loss was followed by a regain of weight up to 180% of initial oedema formation at 120 min after HSS-application. The results show that, due to the osmotic gradient induced by bolus application of HSS, the hydrostatic and bradykinin oedema can be permanently remobilised, whereas the therapeutic effect during proteinase oedema is only short-lasting due to an irreversible damage of barrier function.

  7. Comparison of 3% and 7.5% Hypertonic Saline in Resuscitation After Traumatic Hypovolemic Shock.

    PubMed

    Han, Juan; Ren, Hui-Qin; Zhao, Qing-Bo; Wu, You-Liang; Qiao, Zhuo-Yi

    2015-03-01

    Hypertonic saline solutions (HSSs) (7.5%) are useful in the resuscitation of patients with hypovolemic shock because they provide immediate intravascular volume expansion via the delivery of a small volume of fluid, improving cardiac function. However, the effects of using 3% HSS in hypovolemic shock resuscitation are not well known. This study was designed to compare the effects of and complications associated with 3% HSS, 7.5% HSS, and standard fluid in resuscitation. In total, 294 severe trauma patients were enrolled from December 2008 to February 2012 and subjected to a double-blind randomized clinical trial. Individual patients were treated with 3% HSS (250 mL), 7.5% HSS (250 mL), or lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) (250 mL). Mean arterial pressure, blood pressure, and heart rate were monitored and recorded before fluid infusion and at 10, 30, 45, and 60 min after infusion, and the incidence of complications and survival rate were analyzed. The results indicate that 3% and 7.5% HSSs rapidly restored mean arterial pressure and led to the requirement of an approximately 50% lower total fluid volume compared with the LRS group (P < 0.001). However, a single bolus of 7.5% HSS resulted in an increase in heart rate (mean of 127 beats/min) at 10 min after the start of resuscitation. Higher rates of arrhythmia and hypernatremia were noted in the 7.5% HSS group, whereas higher risks of renal failure (P< 0.001), coagulopathy (P < 0.001), and pulmonary edema (P < 0.001) were observed in the LRS group. Neither severe electrolyte disturbance nor anaphylaxis was observed in the HSS groups. It is notable that 3% HSS had similar effects on resuscitation because both the 7.5% HSS and LRS groups but resulted in a lower occurrence of complications. This study demonstrates the efficacy and safety of 3% HSS in the resuscitation of patients with hypovolemic shock.

  8. Duration of action of hypertonic saline on mucociliary clearance in the normal lung

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J.; Fuller, F.; Balcazar, J. R.; Zeman, K. L.; Duckworth, H.; Donn, K. H.; O'Riordan, T. G.; Boucher, R. C.; Donaldson, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation of hypertonic saline (HS) acutely enhances mucociliary clearance (MC) in both health and disease. In patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), repeated use of HS causes a sustained improvement in MC as well as clinical benefit. The pharmacodynamic duration of activity on MC may be an important determinant of its therapeutic potential in other airways diseases. Before moving toward testing the clinical benefits of HS for non-CF indications, we sought to assess the duration of pharmacodynamic effects of HS in healthy subjects by performing radiotracer clearance studies at baseline, 30-min post-HS administration, and 4-h post-HS administration. Indeed, acceleration of MC was observed when measured 30 min after HS inhalation. This acceleration was most pronounced in the first 30 min after inhaling the radiotracer in the central lung region (mean Ave30Clr = 15.5 vs. 8.6% for 30-min post-HS treatment vs. mean baseline, respectively, P < 0.005), suggesting that acute HS effects were greatest in the larger bronchial airways. In contrast, when MC was measured 4 h after HS administration, all indices of central lung region MC were slower than at baseline: Ave30Clr = 5.9% vs. 8.6% (P = 0.10); Ave90Clr = 12.4% vs. 16.8% (P < 0.05); clearance through 3 h = 29.4 vs. 43.7% (P < 0.002); and clearance through 6 h = 39.4 vs. 50.2% (P < 0.02). This apparent slowing of MC in healthy subjects 4-h post-HS administration may reflect depletion of airway mucus following acute HS administration. PMID:25911685

  9. Effects of hypertonic saline vs normal saline in lactate depuration after cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Atehortúa-López, Luis Horacio; Mendoza-Franco, Ray; Escobar-Serna, José Fernando; Urrego, Luis Alejandro; Alzate, Fernando; Jaimes, Fabian

    2017-03-11

    The postoperative care of patients exposed to cardiac surgery frequently require a thorough reanimation with intravenous fluids but crystalloid solutions like normal saline may increase the interstitial edema, and also it is well known that fluid overload increases mortality. To compare the effect of 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS) with 0.9% normal saline (NS) in the lactate depuration and the hemodynamic response of patients during the first day after on-pump cardiovascular surgery. Patients who were 18 years of age and older with coronary artery disease and/or heart valve disease, and who went to bypass surgery and/or cardiac valve replacement were included and randomly allocated to receive 4mL/kg of HS or NS intravenously for 30min once were admitted to the ICU. We measured lactate, arterial blood gases, HR, CVP and PWP on 0, 6, 12 and 24h after being admitted to the ICU. The analysis was carried out with an intention-to-treat principle. A total of 494 patients were evaluated and 102 were included and assigned to the HS groups (51 patients) or NS (51 patients). Participants' average age was 59±14 years and 59.8% were men. We did not observe any statistically significant difference between two groups in the lactate depuration or in any of the secondary outcomes. Our study failed to show better lactate depuration using a dose of HS, and did not evidence a higher incidence of adverse effects in the HS group. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. CNS sites activated by renal pelvic epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) in response to hypertonic saline in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Vanessa S; Terrill, Christopher; Hopewood, Ian; Loewy, Arthur D; Knuepfer, Mark M

    2017-05-01

    In some patients, renal nerve denervation has been reported to be an effective treatment for essential hypertension. Considerable evidence suggests that afferent renal nerves (ARN) and sodium balance play important roles in the development and maintenance of high blood pressure. ARN are sensitive to sodium concentrations in the renal pelvis. To better understand the role of ARN, we infused isotonic or hypertonic NaCl (308 or 500mOsm) into the left renal pelvis of conscious rats for two 2hours while recording arterial pressure and heart rate. Subsequently, brain tissue was analyzed for immunohistochemical detection of the protein Fos, a marker for neuronal activation. Fos-immunoreactive neurons were identified in numerous sites in the forebrain and brainstem. These areas included the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the lateral parabrachial nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON). The most effective stimulus was 500mOsm NaCl. Activation of these sites was attenuated or prevented by administration of benzamil (1μM) or amiloride (10μM) into the renal pelvis concomitantly with hypertonic saline. In anesthetized rats, infusion of hypertonic saline but not isotonic saline into the renal pelvis elevated ARN activity and this increase was attenuated by simultaneous infusion of benzamil or amiloride. We propose that renal pelvic epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) play a role in activation of ARN and, via central visceral afferent circuits, this system modulates fluid volume and peripheral blood pressure. These pathways may contribute to the development of hypertension.

  11. Furosemide continuous rate infusion diluted with 5% dextrose in water or hypertonic saline in normal adult dogs: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Adin, D; Atkins, C; Papich, M; DeFrancesco, T; Griffiths, E; Penteado, M; Kurtz, K; Klein, A

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the short-term safety and diuretic efficacy of furosemide constant rate infusion (CRI) diluted with 5% dextrose in water (D5W) compared to dilution with 2.4% hypertonic saline in healthy dogs. Six healthy dogs. Dogs were studied in a randomized, blinded, crossover manner. Furosemide 3.3mg/kg was diluted to 2.2mg/mL with either 1.5mL/kg D5W for the DEX method or with 1.0mL/kg D5W and 0.5mL/kg of 7.2% hypertonic saline for the H-SAL method. After a 0.66mg/kg furosemide IV bolus, the infusion rate was 0.3 mL/kg/hr for 5 h such that both methods delivered 0.66 mg/kg/hr (total 3.3mg/kg) furosemide in equal volume for the study duration. Urine output, water intake, central venous pressure (CVP), physical parameters, furosemide concentrations, blood and urine electrolytes, and urine aldosterone to creatinine ratio (UAldo:C) were evaluated. Measured variables were not different between methods but showed changes over time consistent with diuresis. Mean CVP decreased over time similarly for both methods. Plasma furosemide and urine concentrations were stable and not different between methods. Both furosemide CRI methods showed an increase in the UAldo:C, however, the rise was greater for DEX than for H-SAL. Diuresis was similar for both furosemide CRI methods; however, the H-SAL method induced less renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation than the DEX method. The absence of intravascular volume expansion based on CVP suggests that dilution of a furosemide CRI with 2.4% hypertonic saline may be well tolerated in heart failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Crystalloid vs. hypertonic crystalloid-colloid solutions for induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia after experimental cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Miclescu, Adriana; Sharma, Hari Shanker; Wiklund, Lars

    2013-02-01

    To compare cerebral and hemodynamic consequences of different volumes of cold acetated Ringer's solution or cold hypertonic saline dextran administered in order to achieve mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest (CA) in a pig model of experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Using an experimental pig model of 12 min CA (followed by 8 min CPR or no resuscitation) we compared four groups of piglets: a control group, a normothermic group and two groups with different solutions administered for induction of hypothermia. The control group of 5 piglets underwent 12 min CA without subsequent CPR, after which the brain of the animals was removed immediately. After restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) the resuscitated piglets were randomized into a normothermic group (NT group=10), and two hypothermic groups that received cold infusions of either 30 mL/kg acetated Ringer's solution (Much fluid group, M, n=10) or 3mL/kg hypertonic saline dextran solution (Less fluid group, L, n=10), respectively, administered during 30 min. Additional external cooling with ice packs was used in hypothermic groups. Sixty or 180min after ROSC the experiment was terminated. Immediately after arrest the brain was removed for histological analyses. The median time to reach the target core temperature of 34 °C after ROSC was 51.5±7.8 min in L group and 48.8±8.6 min in M group. Less cerebral tissue content of water (p<0.001), sodium (p<0.0001), potassium (p<0.0001) and less central venous pressure (CVP) at 5 and 15 min after ROSC were demonstrated in L group. Increased brain damage was demonstrated over time in NT group (p<0.001). Less neurologic damage and BBB disruptions (albumin leakage) was observed at 180min in M group in comparison with both NT and L groups (p<0.001). No statistical differences were observed between the hypothermic groups in the time to achieve mild hypothermia. Although inclusion of cold hypertonic crystalloid-colloidal solutions in the early resuscitation

  13. Inhaled hypertonic saline in infants and children younger than 6 years with cystic fibrosis: the ISIS randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Ratjen, Felix; Brumback, Lyndia; Daniel, Stephen; Rowbotham, Ron; McNamara, Sharon; Johnson, Robin; Kronmal, Richard; Davis, Stephanie D

    2012-06-06

    Inhaled hypertonic saline is recommended as therapy for patients 6 years or older with cystic fibrosis (CF), but its efficacy has never been evaluated in patients younger than 6 years with CF. To determine if hypertonic saline reduces the rate of protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbations in patients younger than 6 years with CF. The Infant Study of Inhaled Saline in Cystic Fibrosis (ISIS), a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted from April 2009 to October 2011 at 30 CF care centers in the United States and Canada. Participants were aged 4 to 60 months and had an established diagnosis of CF. A total of 344 patients were assessed for eligibility; 321 participants were randomized; 29 (9%) withdrew prematurely. The active treatment group (n = 158) received 7% hypertonic saline and the control group (n = 163) received 0.9% isotonic saline, nebulized twice daily for 48 weeks. Both groups received albuterol or levalbuterol prior to each study drug dose. Rate during the 48-week treatment period of protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbations treated with oral, inhaled, or intravenous antibiotics. The mean pulmonary exacerbation rate (events per person-year) was 2.3 (95% CI, 2.0-2.5) in the active treatment group and 2.3 (95% CI, 2.1-2.6) in the control group; the adjusted rate ratio was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.84-1.15). Among participants with pulmonary exacerbations, the mean number of total antibiotic treatment days for a pulmonary exacerbation was 60 (95% CI, 49-70) in the active treatment group and 52 (95% CI, 43-61) in the control group. There was no significant difference in secondary end points including height, weight, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, cough, or respiratory symptom scores. Infant pulmonary function testing performed as an exploratory outcome in a subgroup (n = 73, with acceptable measurements at 2 visits in 45 participants) did not demonstrate significant differences between groups except for the mean change in forced

  14. Induction of the high-affinity Na(+)-dependent glutamate transport system XAG- by hypertonic stress in the renal epithelial cell line NBL-1.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Martinez, A; Felipe, A; Nicholson, B; Casado, J; Pastor-Anglada, M; McGivan, J

    1995-01-01

    The high-affinity Na(+)-dependent glutamate transport system XAG- is induced (threefold increase in Vmax. with no change in Km) by hypertonicity in the renal epithelial cell line NBL-1. This effect is dependent on protein synthesis and glycosylation and is accompanied by an increase in EAAC1 mRNA levels. Other Na(+)-dependent transport systems in this cell line do not respond to hypertonic stress. In contrast to recent findings [Ruiz-Montasell, Gomez-Angelats, Casado, Felipe, McGivan and Pastor-Anglada (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91, 9569-9573] showing that increased system A activity after hyperosmotic shock results from induction of a regulatory protein, this is the first demonstration that hypertonicity may increase the expression of the gene for an amino acid transport protein itself. Images Figure 4 PMID:7654212

  15. Selective tonicity-induced expression of the neutral amino-acid transporter SNAT2 in oligodendrocytes in rat brain following systemic hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Maallem, S; Mutin, M; González-González, I M; Zafra, F; Tappaz, M L

    2008-04-22

    Sodium-coupled neutral amino-acid transporter member 2 (SNAT2) belongs to the family of neutral amino-acid transporters. SNAT2 is encoded by the gene Slc38a2, whose expression was reported to increase in vitro in fibroblasts, endothelial and renal cells exposed to a hypertonic medium. SNAT2 tonicity-induced expression brings about cellular accumulation of amino-acid, which contributes to osmoadaptation to hypertonicity. Since brain osmoadaptation is observed in relationship to neurological disorders resulting from pathological osmotic imbalances in blood plasma, we have investigated, through immunocytochemistry, SNAT2 expression in brain of rats subjected to systemic hypertonicity. Following prolonged systemic hypertonicity (24 h), small, strongly immunolabeled elements were observed that were not present in sham-treated animals. They were evenly distributed in the gray matter, with a lower density in the forebrain and a higher density in the brain stem. However the highest density by far was observed in white matter, where they were frequently aligned in chain-like rows. These observations suggested an oligodendrocyte location that was further established by double immunofluorescent labeling, using the oligodendrocyte phenotypic markers 2'-3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'phosphodiesterase and carbonic anhydrase II. SNAT2-positive elements were found associated with oligodendrocyte cell bodies, while oligodendrocyte processes were devoid of labeling. A quantitative analysis performed in the cerebral cortex indicated that virtually all SNAT2-positive elements were associated with oligodendrocyte cell bodies and conversely that the overwhelming majority of oligodendrocytes showed SNAT2 immunolabeling. The tonicity-induced expression of SNAT2 was not observed following acute systemic hypertonicity (6 h). Our results suggest that the osmoadaptation of brain oligodendrocytes to hypertonicity relies upon amino-acid accumulation through the tonicity-induced expression of SNAT2

  16. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are protected against acetic acid, but not hydrochloric acid, by hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Chapman, B; Ross, T

    2009-06-01

    Chapman et al. (B. Chapman, N. Jensen, T Ross, and M. B. Cole, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:5165-5172, 2006) demonstrated that an increased NaCl concentration prolongs survival of Escherichia coli O157 SERL 2 in a broth model simulating the aqueous phase of a food dressing or sauce containing acetic acid. We examined the responses of five other E. coli strains and four Salmonella enterica strains to increasing concentrations of NaCl under conditions of lethal acidity and observed that the average "lag" time prior to inactivation decreases in the presence of hydrochloric acid but not in the presence of acetic acid. For E. coli in the presence of acetic acid, the lag time increased with increasing NaCl concentrations up to 2 to 4% at pH 4.0, up to 4 to 6% at pH 3.8, and up to 4 to 7% (wt/wt of water) NaCl at pH 3.6. Salmonella was inactivated more rapidly by combined acetic acid and NaCl stresses than E. coli, but increasing NaCl concentrations still decreased the lag time prior to inactivation in the presence of acetic acid; at pH 4.0 up to 1 to 4% NaCl was protective, and at pH 3.8 up to 1 to 2% NaCl delayed the onset of inactivation. Sublethal injury kinetics suggest that this complex response is a balance between the lethal effects of acetic acid, against which NaCl is apparently protective, and the lethal effects of the NaCl itself. Compared against 3% NaCl, 10% (wt/wt of water) sucrose with 0.5% NaCl (which has similar osmotic potential) was found to be equally protective against adverse acetic acid conditions. We propose that hypertonicity may directly affect the rate of diffusion of acetic acid into cells and hence cell survival.

  17. Ad Libitum Fluid Intake and Plasma Responses After Pickle Juice, Hypertonic Saline, or Deionized Water Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Scott; Miller, Kevin C.; Albrecht, Jay; Garden-Robinson, Julie; Blodgett-Salafia, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Context: Adding sodium (Na+) to drinks improves rehydration and ad libitum fluid consumption. Clinicians (∼25%) use pickle juice (PJ) to treat cramping. Scientists warn against PJ ingestion, fearing it will cause rapid plasma volume restoration and thereby decrease thirst and delay rehydration. Advice about drinking PJ has been developed but never tested. Objective: To determine if drinking small volumes of PJ, hypertonic saline (HS), or deionized water (DIW) affects ad libitum DIW ingestion, plasma variables, or perceptual indicators. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen, euhydrated (urine specific gravity ≤ 1.01) men (age = 22 ± 2 years, height = 178 ± 6 cm, mass = 82.9 ± 8.4 kg). Intervention(s): Participants completed 3 testing days (≥72 hours between days). After a 30-minute rest, a blood sample was collected. Participants completed 60 minutes of hard exercise (temperature = 36 ± 2°C, relative humidity = 16 ± 1%). Postexercise, they rested for 30 minutes; had a blood sample collected; rated thirst, fullness, and nausea; and ingested 83 ± 8 mL of PJ, HS, or DIW. They rated drink palatability (100-mm visual analog scale) and were allowed to drink DIW ad libitum for 60 minutes. Blood samples and thirst, fullness, and nausea ratings (100-mm visual analog scales) were collected at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes posttreatment drink ingestion. Main Outcome Measure(s): Ad libitum DIW volume, percentage change in plasma volume, plasma osmolality (OSMp,) plasma sodium concentration ([Na+]p), and thirst, fullness, nausea, and palatability ratings. Results: Participants consumed more DIW ad libitum after HS (708.03 ± 371.03 mL) than after DIW (532.99 ± 337.14 mL, P < .05). Ad libitum DIW ingested after PJ (700.35 ± 366.15 mL) was similar to that after HS and DIW (P > .05). Plasma sodium concentration, OSMp, percentage change in plasma volume, thirst, fullness, and nausea did not differ among treatment drinks

  18. Thermogenesis induced by intravenous infusion of hypertonic solutions in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Akiko; Osaka, Toshimasa; Inoue, Shuji; Kimura, Shuichi

    2001-01-01

    Intravenous administration of 20-60 % glucose, 3.2-9.7 % NaCl or 20 % mannitol solutions (1.66 ml kg−1) for 5 min increased oxygen consumption in urethane-anaesthetized rats, whereas administration of physiological saline had no effect. Administration of 7.7-18.3 % urea slightly increased the oxygen consumption, but the increase was significantly smaller than that measured after the administration of other hypertonic solutions. The magnitude of the thermogenic effect correlated with the osmolality of the applied solutions. These results suggest that the thermogenesis was caused mainly by changes in osmolality rather than by a specific action of the different solute molecules. Neither pretreatment with the ganglion blocker hexamethonium (20 mg kg−1, i.p.) or the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol (10 mg kg−1, i.p.), nor bilateral cervical vagotomy or bilateral adrenalectomy had any effect on the osmotically induced thermogenesis. Therefore, the autonomic nervous system and the adrenal gland were not involved in this metabolic response. In response to osmotic stimulation, the temperature of the skeletal muscle increased significantly, whereas that of brown adipose tissue did not change and that of the colon and liver decreased. Accordingly, the site of osmotic thermogenesis is probably in the skeletal muscle, although osmotic stimulation was not accompanied by electromyographic activity and was not blocked by pretreatment with muscle relaxants such as dantrolene sodium or pancuronium bromide, or with the Na+-Cl− co-transport inhibitor bumetanide. The increases in plasma osmolality observed after the administration of 20 % (1.3 osmol kg−1) glucose and 4.1 % (1.3 osmol kg−1) NaCl were 4.50 ± 0.88 and 5.57 ± 0.71 mosmol kg−1, respectively. Since the slight increase in osmolality is well within the physiological range of changes that occur after food ingestion, diet-induced thermogenesis may have a component that is mediated by an increase in plasma

  19. Impact of hypertonic saline on postoperative complications for patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Siqi; Shang, Qingjuan; Geng, Qiankun; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yan; Guo, Chunbao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the impact of 3% hypertonic saline (HS) intragastric administration for patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal surgery. During the postoperative period, 3% HS has been suggested as a means to improve the intestinal edema and reduce gastrointestinal complications. The medical records of 111 patients with HS intragastric administration following upper gastrointestinal surgery and 268 patients, served as control, were reviewed retrospectively. Propensity score matching was performed to adjust for selected baseline variables. Clinical outcomes, including early gastrointestinal function recovery, postoperative complications, and length of hospital stay, were compared according to the HS intragastric administration or not. HS intragastric administration was associated with prompt postoperative gastrointestinal function recovery, including first flatus (risk ratio [RR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89–1.65; P = 0.048) and feeding within 3 postoperative days (RR (95% CI), 0.57 (0.49–0.77); P = 0.036). Early ileus occurred in 25 of 108 patients with HS treatment versus 36 of 108 patients without HS treatment (RR (95% CI), 1.43 (0.63–2.15); P = 0.065). The patients with HS experienced a lower overall postoperative complication (odds ratio [OD] 0.57; 95% CI, 0.33–1.09; P = 0.063), including trend toward a decrease for infectious complications (15[13.9] vs 23[21.3]; P = 0.11; OD, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.29–1.22). There was a decreased incidence of anastomotic leakage (1[0.9] vs 7[6.5]; P = 0.033) and postoperative ileuas (5[4.6%] vs 11[10.2%]; P = 0.096) in the HS administration patients. Our study demonstrated beneficial postoperative clinical effects of HS intragastric administration in patients who had undergone upper gastrointestinal surgery, such as prompt postoperative gastrointestinal function recovery and reduced overall postoperative complications, which may be attributed to a

  20. Ad libitum fluid intake and plasma responses after pickle juice, hypertonic saline, or deionized water ingestion.

    PubMed

    Allen, Scott; Miller, Kevin C; Albrecht, Jay; Garden-Robinson, Julie; Blodgett-Salafia, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Adding sodium (Na(+)) to drinks improves rehydration and ad libitum fluid consumption. Clinicians (∼25%) use pickle juice (PJ) to treat cramping. Scientists warn against PJ ingestion, fearing it will cause rapid plasma volume restoration and thereby decrease thirst and delay rehydration. Advice about drinking PJ has been developed but never tested. To determine if drinking small volumes of PJ, hypertonic saline (HS), or deionized water (DIW) affects ad libitum DIW ingestion, plasma variables, or perceptual indicators. Crossover study. Laboratory. Fifteen, euhydrated (urine specific gravity ≤ 1.01) men (age = 22 ± 2 years, height = 178 ± 6 cm, mass = 82.9 ± 8.4 kg). Participants completed 3 testing days (≥ 72 hours between days). After a 30-minute rest, a blood sample was collected. Participants completed 60 minutes of hard exercise (temperature = 36 ± 2°C, relative humidity = 16 ± 1%). Postexercise, they rested for 30 minutes; had a blood sample collected; rated thirst, fullness, and nausea; and ingested 83 ± 8 mL of PJ, HS, or DIW. They rated drink palatability (100-mm visual analog scale) and were allowed to drink DIW ad libitum for 60 minutes. Blood samples and thirst, fullness, and nausea ratings (100-mm visual analog scales) were collected at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes posttreatment drink ingestion. Ad libitum DIW volume, percentage change in plasma volume, plasma osmolality (OSMp,) plasma sodium concentration ([Na(+)]p), and thirst, fullness, nausea, and palatability ratings. Participants consumed more DIW ad libitum after HS (708.03 ± 371.03 mL) than after DIW (532.99 ± 337.14 mL, P < .05). Ad libitum DIW ingested after PJ (700.35 ± 366.15 mL) was similar to that after HS and DIW (P > .05). Plasma sodium concentration, OSMp, percentage change in plasma volume, thirst, fullness, and nausea did not differ among treatment drinks over time (P > .05). Deionized water (73 ± 14 mm) was more palatable than HS (17 ± 13 mm) or PJ (26 ± 16 mm, P

  1. The effect of an intravenous infusion of hypertonic saline on renal mechanisms and on electrolyte changes in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Potter, B. J.

    1966-01-01

    1. The ability of the sheep to tolerate excess sodium chloride has been investigated by subjecting sheep to an intravenous infusion of a 10% solution of sodium chloride. 2. Inulin and diodrast clearances failed to show any consistent changes in glomerular filtration rate but the effective renal plasma flow was slightly more. Plasma levels of sodium and chloride increased by 20-25% and potassium decreased by 30%. Urinary levels for sodium and chloride showed a corresponding increase and potassium excretion was reduced. 3. The rates of re-absorption of sodium and chloride from the renal tubules were found to be proportional to their rates of filtration at the glomerulus, but this ratio was reduced after the hypertonic saline infusion. No such correlation could be established for potassium. 4. Osmolar clearances indicated that continued re-absorption of osmotically free water from the kidney tubular fluid occurred during and after the hypertonic saline. Excretion of urine, hyperosmotic to plasma, was thus maintained and water conservation supported. 5. Possible renal mechanisms associated with these effects are discussed. PMID:5963734

  2. The immediate response to severe shock in a canine model with a combination of hypertonic-hyperoncotic solution with naloxone.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, David; Portilla-de Buen, Eliseo; Leal, Caridad; Santillán, Patricio; Muñiz, Jesús

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate the acute hemodynamic and acid-base balance effects of hypertonic-hyperoncotic solution (HHS) combined with naloxone in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock in 45 male splenectomized adult mongrel dogs, a severe controlled hemorrhagic shock (20 mmHg mean arterial pressure during 30 min) was established in the groups (n=6) no treatment, shed blood reinfusion, hypertonic-hyperoncotic (saline-dextran) solution alone, naloxone alone (NX), or combination. Interventions included propiopromazine-pentobarbital anesthesia and installation of Swan-Ganz, femoral arterial, and urethral catheters, and exsanguination at 20 mmHg mean arterial pressure during 30 min followed by treatment and observation for 160 min. Fifteen (33%) dogs died before completing the 30-min shock period. Another 33% from the no-treatment group died during the following 90 min. Shed blood improved the cardiac index, arterial pressure, and acid-base balance. NX restored the cardiac index to less than 60% of baseline and reduced vascular resistance. Additionally, NX produced no improvement in acidosis, with 1 dog dead at 95 min posttreatment. HHS restored the cardiac index for 45 min and increased vascular resistance and arterial pressure. Acidosis was not improved. Single-dose HHS combined with naloxone resulted in a high cardiac index, oxygen consumption, and urine output with low peripheral vascular resistance (and no acute mortality) compared with untreated or single-dose groups.

  3. The Effects of Hypertonic Dextrose Injection on Connective Tissue and Nerve Conduction through the Rabbit Carpal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Yoshii, Yuichi; Zhao, Chunfeng; Schmelzer, James D.; Low, Phillip A.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of hypertonic dextrose injection on the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) in a rabbit model. We hypothesized that dextrose injection would induce proliferation of the SSCT, hinder median nerve conduction, and alter SSCT mechanical properties similar to what is observed in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Design Randomized, controlled prospective study. Setting Not applicable. Participants New Zealand white rabbits (N=28) weighing 4.0 to 4.5kg. Intervention One fore paw was randomly injected with 0.1ml of 10% dextrose solution. The contralateral paw was injected with a similar amount of 0.9% saline solution as a control. Animals were sacrificed at 12 weeks after injection. Main Outcome Measures Animals were evaluated by electrophysiology (EP), mechanical testing, and histology. EP was evaluated by distal motor latency and amplitude. Shear force was evaluated when the middle digit flexor digitorum superficialis tendon was pulled out from the carpal tunnel. The ultimate tensile load and the energy absorption were also measured. Tissue for histology was evaluated qualitatively. Results EP demonstrated significant prolongation of distal motor latency. The energy absorption and stiffness were also significantly increased in the dextrose group. Histologically, the dextrose group showed thickening of the collagen bundles and vascular proliferation within the SSCT compared to the saline group. Conclusions These results are consistent with the findings in CTS patients and suggest that hypertonic dextrose injection has the potential to create a novel animal model in which to study the evolution of CTS. PMID:19236989

  4. Impact of Time on Fluid Resuscitation with Hypertonic Saline (NaCl 7.5%) in Rats with LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Petroni, Ricardo Costa; Biselli, Paolo Jose Cesare; Lima, Thais Martins de; Velasco, Irineu Tadeu; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common complication associated with septic shock that directly influences the prognosis of sepsis patients. Currently, one of the main supportive treatment modalities for septic shock is fluid resuscitation. The use of hypertonic saline (HS: 7.5% NaCl) for fluid resuscitation has been described as a promising therapy in experimental models of sepsis-induced ALI, but it has failed to produce similar results in clinical practice. Thus, we compared experimental timing versus clinical timing effectiveness (i.e., early vs. late fluid resuscitation) after the inflammatory scenario was established in a rat model of bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI. We found that late fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline (NaCl 7.5%) did not reduce the mortality rates of animals compared with the mortality late associated with early treatment. Late fluid resuscitation with both hypertonic and normal saline increased pulmonary inflammation, decreased pulmonary function, and induced pulmonary injury by elevating metalloproteinase-2 and metalloproteinase-9 activity and collagen deposition in the animals, unlike early treatment. The animals with lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI that received late resuscitation with any kind of fluids demonstrated aggravated pulmonary injury and respiratory function. Moreover, we showed that the therapeutic window for a beneficial effect of fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline is very narrow.

  5. Potassium depletion and hypertonic medium reduce "non-coated" and clathrin-coated pit formation, as well as endocytosis through these two gates.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, J L; Sawano, F; Geiger, D; Gorden, P; Perrelet, A; Orci, L

    1989-03-01

    Intracellular potassium depletion inhibits receptor-mediated endocytotic processes occurring through clathrin-coated pits. Besides the clathrin-coated pit route, flask-shaped invaginations that do not bear a typical clathrin coat have been recently implicated in receptor-mediated endocytosis of cholera toxin. These invaginations are called "non-coated" to distinguish them from the typical clathrin-coated pits. In the present study, we have investigated whether "non-coated" invaginations are sensitive, as are clathrin-coated pits, to potassium depletion and whether hypertonic medium, which inhibits receptor-mediated endocytosis, also affects "non-coated" invaginations. We found that 1) both potassium depletion and hypertonic medium reduce "non-coated" invaginations on the cell surface; 2) similar to potassium depletion, hypertonic medium markedly decreases the number of clathrin-coated pits; 3) these changes are accompanied by an inhibition of the internalization (measured morphologically) of cholera toxin-gold through "non-coated" invaginations, as well as of alpha 2-macroglobulin-gold taken up by clathrin-coated pits; and 4) in addition, both the hypertonic medium and potassium depletion inhibit the uptake of horseradish peroxidase, a marker of fluid-phase endocytosis.

  6. Transcription factor tonicity-responsive enhancer-binding protein (TonEBP) which transactivates osmoprotective genes is expressed and upregulated following acute systemic hypertonicity in neurons in brain.

    PubMed

    Loyher, M L; Mutin, M; Woo, S K; Kwon, H M; Tappaz, M L

    2004-01-01

    Tonicity-responsive enhancer-binding protein (TonEBP) was initially identified as a transcription factor involved in adaptation of renal cells to hypertonicity by activation of osmoprotective genes encoding proteins for accumulation of compatible osmolytes. Since brain osmoadaptation is observed in relationship to neurological disorders resulting from pathological osmotic disbalances of blood plasma we have investigated through immunocytochemistry TonEBP expression in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of normal rat and rats submitted to an acute systemic hypertonicity or to a prolonged systemic hypotonicity. TonEBP-expressing cells were identified using double immunofluorescence and appropriate cell type markers. Their relative proportion was determined by quantitative image analysis. In normal rats TonEBP expressed primarily in neurons where it was strictly located in the cell nucleus but heterogeneously distributed into a nucleoplasmic pool and a granular pool. In animals made acutely hypertonic TonEBP labeling increased dramatically exclusively in the nuclei of neurons and reached a maximum within 1 h. In hypertonic animals TonEBP labeling covered the whole cell nucleus of virtually all neurons, appeared finely punctuated but was no more granular. Optical density of the labeling as determined by image analysis correlated linearly with the increased plasma osmolality. In animals made hypotonic for several days no conspicuous decrease of TonEBP labeling was observed. In normal animals a very minor proportion of non-neuronal cells showed a faint TonEBP nuclear labeling. This proportion increased slightly in hypertonic animals. Nevertheless these non-neuronal TonEBP-positive nuclei which belonged to oligodendrocytes and to a small subpopulation of astrocytes remained always very weakly labeled when compared with neuron nuclei. Brain capillary endothelial cells as well as microglial cells showed no TonEBP-labeling even in hypertonic animals. Our data demonstrate that

  7. The influence of previous salt ingestion on the renal function of sheep subjected to intravenous hypertonic saline

    PubMed Central

    Potter, B. J.

    1968-01-01

    1. Sheep, which had access to a solution containing 1·3% sodium chloride as their sole source of drinking water for 6 months or more, were infused with a hypertonic solution (10%) of sodium chloride, and their ability to tolerate this salt load was compared with that of a similar group of sheep which drank only rain water. 2. The sheep which drank the rain water were often affected by the infusion and exhibited signs resembling potassium deficit. No such signs were apparent in the animals which consumed saline water. 3. Glomerular filtration rates were increased in all sheep by the hypertonic saline infusion, the increases being greater in the sheep which were maintained on the saline water. Effective renal plasma flow rates, though extremely variable, behaved in a similar manner. 4. Plasma values for sodium and chloride were increased in all sheep, but remained at a higher level for a longer period in the sheep which consumed rain water. The diuresis produced by hypertonic saline appeared to persist for a longer period in the sheep which drank rain water, while the excretion of sodium and chloride tended to be greater in the sheep maintained on saline water. 5. Plasma potassium was reduced in all sheep and urinary excretion of potassium increased. The latter response was more pronounced in the sheep which drank the rain water. 6. Filtered loads of sodium, chloride and potassium were greater in the sheep which were accustomed to drinking saline water. However, the amounts of potassium excreted were greater than those filtered in the rain water sheep and less than those filtered in the sheep which drank saline water. It therefore seems that secretion of potassium into the kidney tubules predominated in the former group and reabsorption prevailed in the latter. 7. Reabsorption of free water in excess of solute was greater in the kidney tubules of the sheep which drank saline water. 8. Increased blood volume and greater dilution of plasma proteins occurred in the

  8. Randomised clinical study comparing the effectiveness and physiological effects of hypertonic and isotonic polyethylene glycol solutions for bowel cleansing

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Hiro-o; Matsushita, Hiro-o; Yoshikawa, Kenjiro; Takagi, Ryo; Harada, Eiji; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Nakaoka, Michiko; Himori, Ryogo; Yoshida, Yuko; Satou, Kentarou; Imai, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Bowel cleansing is necessary before colonoscopy, but is a burden to patients because of the long cleansing time and large dose volume. A low-volume (2 L) hypertonic polyethylene glycol-ascorbic acid solution (PEG-Asc) has been introduced, but its possible dehydration effects have not been quantitatively studied. We compared the efficacy and safety including the dehydration risk between hypertonic PEG-Asc and isotonic PEG regimens. Design This was an observer-blinded randomised study. Participants (n=310) were allocated to receive 1 of 3 regimens on the day of colonoscopy: PEG-Asc (1.5 L) and water (0.75 L) dosed with 1 split (PEG-Asc-S) or 4 splits (PEG-Asc-M), or PEG-electrolyte solution (PEG-ES; 2.25 L) dosed with no split. Dehydration was analysed by measuring haematocrit (Ht). Results The cleansing time using the hypertonic PEG-Asc-S (3.33±0.48 hours) was significantly longer than that with isotonic PEG-ES (3.05±0.56 hours; p<0.001). PEG-Asc-M (3.00±0.53 hours) did not have this same disadvantage. Successful cleansing was achieved in more than 94% of participants using each of the 3 regimens. The percentage changes in Ht from baseline (before dosing) to the end of dosing with PEG-Asc-S (3.53±3.32%) and PEG-Asc-M (4.11±3.07%) were significantly greater than that with PEG-ES (1.31±3.01%). Conclusions These 3 lower volume regimens were efficacious and had no serious adverse effects. Even patients cleansed with isotonic PEG-ES showed significant physiological dehydration at the end of dosing. The four-split PEG-Asc-M regimen is recommended because of its shorter cleansing time without causing serious nausea. Trial registration number UMIN000013103; Results. PMID:27547443

  9. The role of tonicity responsive enhancer sites in the transcriptional regulation of human hsp70-2 in response to hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jee In; Lee, Mi Suk; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Jaebong; Park, Jae Bong; Lee, Jae Yong; Han, Jeong A; Kim, Jong Il

    2006-06-30

    The inducible 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70) in mice are encoded by two almost identical genes, hsp70.1 and hsp70.3. Studies have found that only hsp70.1 is induced by hypertonic stress while both hsp70.1 and hsp70.3 genes are expressed in response to heat shock stress. It is unclear if the human counterparts, hsp70-2 and hsp70-1, are differentially regulated by heat shock and osmotic stress. This study found that only hsp70-2 was induced by hypertonic stress in human embryonic kidney epithelial cells and fibroblasts, while heat shock stress induced both hsp70-1 and hsp70-2. The human hsp70-2 promoter region contains three TonE (tonicity-responsive enhancer) sites, which were reported to play an important role in the response to hypertonicity. When the reporter plasmids containing different parts of the 5' flanking region of hsp70-2 were transfected into human embryonic kidney epithelial cells or fibroblasts, one TonE site at -135 was found to play a key role in the response to hypertonicity. The inactivation of the TonE site using site-directed mutagenesis led to the complete loss of induction by hypertonicity, which demonstrates the essential role of the TonE site. This suggests that the TonE site and the TonEBP (TonE binding protein) are the major regulators for the cellular response against high osmolarity in human kidney tissue.

  10. Differential cellular distribution of tonicity-induced expression of transcription factor TonEBP in the rat brain following prolonged systemic hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Maallem, S; Mutin, M; Kwon, H M; Tappaz, M L

    2006-01-01

    In a previous work performed on cerebral cortex and hippocampus we reported that tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP), originally identified as a transactivator of osmoprotective genes involved in osmoadaptation of renal cells, was induced in neurons only, but to varying levels, following acute systemic hypertonicity. Whether or not this cellular specificity reflected a unique ability of neurons or a differential time course among brain cells for tonicity-induction of TonEBP was investigated throughout the brain in this study by subjecting the animals to prolonged systemic hypertonicity. In normal rats, TonEBP immunolabeling and TonEBP-mRNA in situ hybridization labeling showed a widespread, uneven and parallel distribution. TonEBP was expressed primarily in the cell nuclei of neurons, where it was heterogeneously distributed in a nucleoplasmic and a granular pool. In rats subjected to prolonged systemic hypertonicity, TonEBP labeling increased in the cell nuclei of neurons only. The tonicity-induced expression of TonEBP for a given cell group of neurons was rather uniform but varied greatly among neuronal cell groups and was positively correlated with the average size of the cell nuclei, as determined by quantitative analysis of digitized images. The detailed distribution of tonicity-induced expression of TonEBP is reported throughout the brain. In normal rats, a very minor proportion of non-neuronal cells, identified as a subset of astrocytes and possibly oligodendrocytes, showed faint nuclear immunolabeling, which however did not increase in hypertonic animals. Ependymocytes, capillary endothelial cells, and microglial cells showed no TonEBP labeling, even in hypertonic animals. Altogether our data indicate that neurons, albeit possibly to a varying extent, are the only brain cells able to use TonEBP-mediated processes for adaptation to a systemic hyperosmotic unbalance.

  11. Effects of preoperative administration of hypertonic saline or pentastarch solution on hematologic variables and long-term survival of surgically managed horses with colic.

    PubMed

    Dugdale, Alexandra H A; Barron, Kirsty E; Miller, Andrew J; Proudman, Christopher J

    2015-05-15

    To compare the effects of preoperatively administered pentastarch (10% concentration in isotonic saline [0.9% NaCl] solution) and hypertonic saline (7.2% NaCl) solutions on PCV and circulating total protein (TP) concentration in horses with colic undergoing emergency exploratory laparotomy and to assess survival rates of horses that received each treatment. Prospective, randomized study. 100 horses with signs of abdominal pain and PCV ≥ 0.46 L/L. Procedures-Horses received a 4 mL/kg (1.8 mL/lb) dose of pentastarch solution (n = 50) or hypertonic saline solution (50) over a 10- to 20-minute period before anesthetic induction. Blood samples were collected at the time of evaluation and ≤ 5 minutes after fluid resuscitation; changes in PCV and TP concentration were compared. Survival was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards analyses. Age, weight, sex, PCV, and heart rate on initial examination were similar between treatment groups. Hypertonic saline solution treatment resulted in a significantly greater reduction in PCV (median change, -0.14 L/L) than did pentastarch treatment (median change, -0.07 L/L). Reduction in TP concentration was also significantly greater after hypertonic saline solution treatment (median change, -16 g/L) than after pentastarch treatment (median change, -2 g/L). Long-term survival was not significantly different between groups. Despite a greater reduction in preanesthetic hemoconcentration following administration of hypertonic saline solution (4 mL/kg infusion, once), no difference in overall long-term survival was found between horses that received this treatment and those that received an equal volume of pentastarch solution. Findings suggested that, in a clinical setting, either of these fluids would be appropriate for preoperative fluid resuscitation in horses with colic.

  12. The association of hypernatremia and hypertonic saline irrigation in hepatic hydatid cysts: A case report and retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rujun; Wu, Renhua; Lv, Qingguo; Tong, Nanwei; Zhang, Yuwei

    2017-09-01

    Hypernatremia is a rare but fatal complication of hypertonic saline (HS) irrigation in hepatic hydatid disease. It needs careful monitoring and treatment. A 28-year-old woman with hepatic hydatid cysts who received operation treatment developed electrolyte disturbances. We also conducted a retrospective study about influence of HS application on electrolytes in patients with hepatic hydatid disease receiving surgery. Hypernatremia, developed after HS irrigation. Normal saline, 5% dextrose and other supportive treatment were administered. In the retrospective study, a comparison of electrolyte and glucose fluctuation was made among different HS application groups. The patient developed hypernatremia after irrigation with HS and died from severe complications. Although some cases of complications are found, no significant relationship between HS irrigation and hypernatremia was reported according to the retrospective study. Hypernatremia after HS irrigation remains rare but might cause severe complications. Monitoring and appropriate treatment are needed to improve prognosis.

  13. Antinociception by neutrophil-derived opioid peptides in noninflamed tissue--role of hypertonicity and the perineurium.

    PubMed

    Rittner, H L; Hackel, D; Yamdeu, R-S; Mousa, S A; Stein, C; Schäfer, M; Brack, A

    2009-05-01

    Inflammatory pain can be controlled by intraplantar opioid injection or by secretion of endogenous opioid peptides from leukocytes in inflamed rat paws. Antinociception requires binding of opioid peptides to opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerve terminals. In the absence of inflammation, hydrophilic opioid peptides do not penetrate the perineurial barrier and, thus, do not elicit antinociception. This study was designed to examine the conditions under which endogenous, neutrophil-derived hydrophilic opioid peptides (i.e. Met-Enkephalin and beta-endorphin) can raise nociceptive thresholds in noninflamed tissue in rats. Intraplantar injection of the chemokine CXCL2/3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-2) induced selective neutrophil recruitment without overt signs of inflammation or changes in mechanical nociceptive thresholds (paw pressure threshold). Following intraplantar injection of hypertonic saline, the perineurial barrier was permeable for hours and intraplantar injection of opioid peptides increased mechanical nociceptive thresholds. While formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) triggered opioid peptide release from neutrophils in vitro, nociceptive thresholds were unchanged in vivo. In vitro, hypertonicity interfered with fMLP-induced p38 mitogen activated kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and opioid peptide release from neutrophils. These inhibitory effects were fully reversible by washout. In vivo, return to normotonicity occurred within 30min while the perineurium remained permeable for hours. Under these conditions, fMLP triggered MAPK phosphorylation and induced opioid peptide-mediated increases in nociceptive thresholds in the noninflamed paw. Taken together, antinociception mediated by endogenous opioids in noninflamed tissue has two important requirements: (i) opening of the perineurial barrier for opioid peptide access and (ii) opioid peptide release from neutrophils involving p38 MAPK.

  14. Plasma volume and electrolyte changes following intravenous infusion of hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch versus mannitol in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Rebecca; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Wacek, Sabine; Nell, Barbara; Mosing, Martina

    2011-11-01

    In a prospective cross-over study, the duration and magnitude of effect on the electrolyte and plasma volume changes of intravenous (IV) hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch (hyperHES) (7.5%/6%) and mannitol (20%) were compared. Eight Beagle dogs received an IV infusion of 4mL/kg hyperHES (group H) and 4mL/kg mannitol 20% (group M) on separate occasions. Urine and blood samples were taken in the first (T(60)) and second (T(120)) hour after infusion. Significant increases in plasma volume at each time point in group H and M were noted when compared to baseline (start of infusion=T(0)) level. There was no significant difference between groups. Both fluids resulted in diuresis, although no significant difference between groups was noted. A significant increase in plasma sodium (Na) was demonstrated in group H between T(0) and T(60) with a significant increase in the Na and chloride (Cl) fractional excretion (FE) between T(0), T(60) and T(120). In group M no changes in plasma electrolyte concentrations were detected, although FE of Na, Cl and K was increased significantly between T(0) and T(60). In conclusion, hyperHES and mannitol appear to have a volume expanding effect lasting at least 120 min. The hypernatraemia induced by hyperHES was minimal compared to previous reports of hypertonic saline use, and no clinical side effects were noted. HyperHES showed comparable effects to mannitol in increasing plasma volume and diuresis and could be considered for these applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment of transtentorial herniation unresponsive to hyperventilation using hypertonic saline in dogs: effect on cerebral blood flow and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Wilson, David A; Traystman, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that transtentorial herniation (TTH) represents a state of cerebral ischemia that can be reversed by hypertonic saline. Because of the high mortality associated with TTH, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed for rapid and effective reversal of this process. We produced TTH (defined by acute dilatation of one or both pupils) by creating supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage with autologous blood injection in seven mongrel dogs anesthetized using intravenous pentobarbital and fentanyl. We measured serial rCBF (regional cerebral blood flow) using radiolabeled microspheres in regions around and distant to the hematoma. Cerebral oxygen extraction and oxygen consumption (CMRO2) were measured by serial sampling of cerebral venous blood from the sagittal sinus. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and intracranial pressure (ICP) were continuously monitored. TTH was successfully reversed over a mean period of 25.7 +/- 4.9 minutes after intravenous administration of 23.4% sodium chloride (1.4 mL/kg) in all animals. All measurements were recorded 15, 30, 60, and 90 minutes after administration of 23.4% sodium chloride. Compared to prehematoma ICP (14.1 +/- 1.7 mm Hg, mean +/- SE), elevation in ICP was observed during TTH (36.2 +/- 7.2 mm Hg) with no change in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) (80.4 +/- 4.7 vs. 76.7 +/- 10.1 mm Hg) because of concomitant elevation in mean arterial pressure. Compared to baseline values, there was a reduction in rCBF (mL/100 gm/min +/- SE) in brainstem (12.1 +/- 2.0 vs. 21.4 +/- 1.4), gray matter (18.2 +/- 2.1 vs. 31.4 +/- 1.8), and white matter (8.6 +/- 1.7 vs.18.7 +/- 0.9) in the hemisphere contralateral to the hematoma; and gray matter (12.9 +/- 2.9 vs. 27.9 +/- 2.2) and white matter (8.3 +/- 2.0 vs.19.9 +/- 1.0) in the ipsilateral hemisphere distant from the hematoma. Administration of 23.4% sodium chloride resulted in reduced ICP at 15 minutes (12.7 +/- 1.4) and 30 minutes (15.6 +/- 3.1) after administration

  16. Body water handling in response to hypertonic-saline induced diuresis in fasting northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wade, Charles E.; Ortiz, C. Leo

    2003-01-01

    During natural fasting conditions in postweaned northern elephant seal (NES) (Mirounga angustirostris) pups, urinary water loss is minimized and percent total body water (TBW) is maintained constant. However, following infusion of hypertonic saline, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine output increased in fasting pups. Therefore, we quantified the magnitude of the hypernatremia-induced diuresis relative to the animal's total body water (TBW) pool and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed. Following a 24 h control period, naturally fasting NES pups (n=7) were infused (4 ml min(-1)) with hypertonic saline (16.7%) at a dose of 3 mmol NaCl kg(-1) body mass. Total body water was estimated prior to infusion by tritium dilution, GFR was estimated by standard creatinine clearance, and urine output (V) was measured for 24 h during the control and post infusion periods. Percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was calculated as (1-(V/GFR))x100. Twenty-four hours following the infusion, GFR (control: 69+/-12 ml min(-1) and post-infusion: 118+/-19 ml min(-1); mean+/-S.E.) increased 77+/-28% above control and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was decreased 0.4+/-0.1%. The increase in urine output (control: 218+/-47 ml d(-1) and post-infusion: 883+/-92 ml d(-1)) accounted for 1.7+/-0.2% of the pups' TBW. The hypernatremia-induced diuresis was accompanied by the loss of body water indicating the lack of water retention. Although the 77% increase in GFR was only associated with a 0.4% decrease in the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed, this decrease was significant enough to result in a 4-fold increase in urine output. Despite the observed diuresis, fasting NES pups appear to possess an efficient water recycling mechanism requiring only a small percentage of body water to excrete an excess salt load. This water recycling mechanism may allow pups to avoid negative perturbations in body water as they initiate feeding in a marine environment following the

  17. NKCC2A and NFAT5 regulate renal TNF production induced by hypertonic NaCl intake.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shoujin; Bellner, Lars; Ferreri, Nicholas R

    2013-03-01

    Pathways that contribute to TNF production by the kidney are not well defined. Mice given 1% NaCl in the drinking water for 3 days exhibited a 2.5-fold increase in urinary, but not plasma, TNF levels compared with mice given tap water. Since furosemide attenuated the increase in TNF levels, we hypothesized that hypertonic NaCl intake increases renal TNF production by a pathway involving the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC2). A 2.5-fold increase in NKCC2A mRNA accumulation was observed in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) tubules from mice given 1% NaCl; a concomitant 2-fold increase in nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) mRNA and protein expression was observed in the outer medulla. Urinary TNF levels were reduced in mice given 1% NaCl after an intrarenal injection of a lentivirus construct designed to specifically knockdown NKCC2A (EGFP-N2A-ex4); plasma levels of TNF did not change after injection of EGFP-N2A-ex4. Intrarenal injection of EGFP-N2A-ex4 also inhibited the increase of NFAT5 mRNA abundance in the outer medulla of mice given 1% NaCl. TNF production by primary cultures of mTAL cells increased approximately sixfold in response to an increase in osmolality to 400 mosmol/kgH2O produced with NaCl and was inhibited in cells transiently transfected with a dnNFAT5 construct. Transduction of cells with EGFP-N2A-ex4 also prevented increases in TNF mRNA and protein production in response to high NaCl concentration and reduced transcriptional activity of a NFAT5 promoter construct. Since NKCC2A expression is restricted to the TAL, NKCC2A-dependent activation of NFAT5 is part of a pathway by which the TAL produces TNF in response to hypertonic NaCl intake.

  18. Effect of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Treatment in Emergency Departments on the Hospitalization Rate for Acute Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Angoulvant, François; Bellêttre, Xavier; Milcent, Karen; Teglas, Jean-Paul; Claudet, Isabelle; Le Guen, Christèle Gras; de Pontual, Loïc; Minodier, Philippe; Dubos, François; Brouard, Jacques; Soussan-Banini, Valérie; Degas-Bussiere, Vanessa; Gatin, Amélie; Schweitzer, Cyril; Epaud, Ralph; Ryckewaert, Amélie; Cros, Pierrick; Marot, Yves; Flahaut, Philippe; Saunier, Pascal; Babe, Philippe; Patteau, Géraldine; Delebarre, Mathilde; Titomanlio, Luigi; Vrignaud, Bénédicte; Trieu, Thanh-Van; Tahir, Abdelilah; Regnard, Delphine; Micheau, Pascale; Charara, Oussama; Henry, Simon; Ploin, Dominique; Panjo, Henri; Vabret, Astrid; Bouyer, Jean; Gajdos, Vincent

    2017-08-07

    Acute bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization among infants. Previous studies, underpowered to examine hospital admission, have found a limited benefit of nebulized hypertonic saline (HS) treatment in the pediatric emergency department (ED). To examine whether HS nebulization treatment would decrease the hospital admission rate among infants with a first episode of acute bronchiolitis. The Efficacy of 3% Hypertonic Saline in Acute Viral Bronchiolitis (GUERANDE) study was a multicenter, double-blind randomized clinical trial on 2 parallel groups conducted during 2 bronchiolitis seasons (October through March) from October 15, 2012, through April 15, 2014, at 24 French pediatric EDs. Among the 2445 infants (6 weeks to 12 months of age) assessed for inclusion, 777 with a first episode of acute bronchiolitis with respiratory distress and no chronic medical condition were included. Two 20-minute nebulization treatments of 4 mL of HS, 3%, or 4 mL of normal saline (NS), 0.9%, given 20 minutes apart. Hospital admission rate in the 24 hours after enrollment. Of the 777 infants included in the study (median age, 3 months; interquartile range, 2-5 months; 468 [60.2%] male), 385 (49.5%) were randomized to the HS group and 387 (49.8%) to the NS group (5 patients did not receive treatment). By 24 hours, 185 of 385 infants (48.1%) in the HS group were admitted compared with 202 of 387 infants (52.2%) in the NS group. The risk difference for hospitalizations was not significant according to the mixed-effects regression model (adjusted risk difference, -3.2%; 95% CI, -8.7% to 2.2%; P = .25). The mean (SD) Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument score improvement was greater in the HS group (-3.1 [3.2]) than in the NS group (-2.4 [3.3]) (adjusted difference, -0.7; 95% CI, -1.2 to -0.2; P = .006) and similarly for the Respiratory Assessment Change Score. Mild adverse events, such as worsening of cough, occurred more frequently among children in the HS group

  19. Body water handling in response to hypertonic-saline induced diuresis in fasting northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wade, Charles E.; Ortiz, C. Leo

    2003-01-01

    During natural fasting conditions in postweaned northern elephant seal (NES) (Mirounga angustirostris) pups, urinary water loss is minimized and percent total body water (TBW) is maintained constant. However, following infusion of hypertonic saline, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine output increased in fasting pups. Therefore, we quantified the magnitude of the hypernatremia-induced diuresis relative to the animal's total body water (TBW) pool and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed. Following a 24 h control period, naturally fasting NES pups (n=7) were infused (4 ml min(-1)) with hypertonic saline (16.7%) at a dose of 3 mmol NaCl kg(-1) body mass. Total body water was estimated prior to infusion by tritium dilution, GFR was estimated by standard creatinine clearance, and urine output (V) was measured for 24 h during the control and post infusion periods. Percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was calculated as (1-(V/GFR))x100. Twenty-four hours following the infusion, GFR (control: 69+/-12 ml min(-1) and post-infusion: 118+/-19 ml min(-1); mean+/-S.E.) increased 77+/-28% above control and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was decreased 0.4+/-0.1%. The increase in urine output (control: 218+/-47 ml d(-1) and post-infusion: 883+/-92 ml d(-1)) accounted for 1.7+/-0.2% of the pups' TBW. The hypernatremia-induced diuresis was accompanied by the loss of body water indicating the lack of water retention. Although the 77% increase in GFR was only associated with a 0.4% decrease in the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed, this decrease was significant enough to result in a 4-fold increase in urine output. Despite the observed diuresis, fasting NES pups appear to possess an efficient water recycling mechanism requiring only a small percentage of body water to excrete an excess salt load. This water recycling mechanism may allow pups to avoid negative perturbations in body water as they initiate feeding in a marine environment following the

  20. Requirement for the eIF4E binding proteins for the synergistic down-regulation of protein synthesis by hypertonic conditions and mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Michael J; Elia, Androulla; Morley, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the phosphorylation and activity of several proteins that have the potential to control translation, including p70S6 kinase and the eIF4E binding proteins 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2. In spite of this, in exponentially growing cells overall protein synthesis is often resistant to mTOR inhibitors. We report here that sensitivity of wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to mTOR inhibitors can be greatly increased when the cells are subjected to the physiological stress imposed by hypertonic conditions. In contrast, protein synthesis in MEFs with a double knockout of 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2 remains resistant to mTOR inhibitors under these conditions. Phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and protein kinase B (Akt) is blocked by the mTOR inhibitor Ku0063794 equally well in both wild-type and 4E-BP knockout cells, under both normal and hypertonic conditions. The response of protein synthesis to hypertonic stress itself does not require the 4E-BPs. These data suggest that under certain stress conditions: (i) translation has a greater requirement for mTOR activity and (ii) there is an absolute requirement for the 4E-BPs for regulation by mTOR. Importantly, dephosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and Akt is not sufficient to affect protein synthesis acutely.

  1. Effects of small-volume infusion of 7.5% hypertonic saline/6% dextran-70 on the cardiovascular function of traumatic-hemorrhagic shock rats at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Mei, J M; Hui, S C; Xiao, N; Chen, H H; Tian, K L; Wang, H T

    1995-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of small-volume infusion of 7.5% hypertonic saline/6% dextran-70 (HSD) on the cardiovascular function of traumatic-hemorrhagic shock rats at simulated high altitude. 32 rats were randomly divided into four groups: 1) normal saline (NS)-treated group, 2) .9% NaCl/6% dextran-70 (Dex)-treated group, 3) 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS)-treated group, and 4) 7.5% hypertonic saline/6% dextran-70 (HSD)-treated group. The rats were exposed to a simulated high altitude of 4,000 m in a hypobaric hypoxic chamber, and traumatic-hemorrhagic shock was inflicted through fracture of the shaft of the left femur and bleeding from femoral vein to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 6.00 +/- .67 kPa within 5 min. The MAP was kept at this level for 1 h, and then a bolus intravenous injection of 4 mL/kg NS, Dex, HS, or HSD were given to the rats, respectively. In the 5 h period after treatment, it was found that MAP, left ventricular systolic pressure, maximal rate of left ventricular pressure rise and drop (+/- dp/dtmax) were significantly higher in HSD group than in the NS, Dex and HS groups. It can be concluded that 1) HSD can improve the cardiovascular function and hemodynamics of traumatic-hemorrhagic shock rats at simulated high altitude and 2) HSD is more effective than HS.

  2. Impact of fluid resuscitation with hypertonic-hydroxyethyl starch versus lactated ringer on hemorheology and microcirculation in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Guerci, Philippe; Tran, Nguyen; Menu, Patrick; Losser, Marie-Reine; Meistelman, Claude; Longrois, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The choice of volume expander for fluid resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock is still debated. Changes in plasma viscosity (PV) are barely investigated while PV modulates functional capillary density, microcirculation and organ function. The present study evaluated the impact of 2 strategies of fluid resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock in pigs. Ten pigs were subjected to hemorrhagic shock and randomly assigned to a low viscosity fluid regimen (Lactated Ringer's, LR) group or a high viscosity regimen (hypertonic-hydroxyethyl starch, HES) for volume resuscitation. Sublingual microcirculatory flow and tissue oxygen tension were assessed together with macro- and microcirculatory, biochemical and rheological variables at baseline, 30 minutes after hemorrhagic shock, immediately after reaching resuscitation endpoints (R-0), and 60 minutes after resuscitation (R-60). PV decreased similarly in both groups following resuscitation (from 1.36 [1.32-1.38] to 1.21 [1.21-1.23] for LR, and from 1.32 [1.31-1.32] to 1.20 [1.17-1.21] mPa.s for HES). No differences were found between the groups for other rheological variables, microcirculatory flow or tissue oxygen tension at R-0 and R-60. Despite a 6-fold difference in the volumes required to achieve blood flow endpoints, commercially available volume expanders had similar effects on rheological and microcirculatory variables, irrespective of their viscosity. Our findings are consistent with the absence of clinically relevant differences between crystalloid and colloid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock.

  3. Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Regina WS; Chung, Vincent CH; Reeves, Kenneth D.; Rabago, David; Chan, Keith KW; Chan, Dicken CC; Wu, Xinyin; Ho, Robin ST; Wong, Samuel YS

    2016-01-01

    Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) is an emerging treatment for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) but its efficacy is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to synthesize clinical evidence on the effect of prolotherapy for knee OA. Fifteen electronic databases were searched from their inception to September 2015. The primary outcome of interest was score change on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of moderate risk of bias and one quasi–randomized trial were included, with data from a total of 258 patients. In the meta-analysis of two eligible studies, prolotherapy is superior to exercise alone by a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.18 to 1.45, p = 0.012), 0.78 (95% CI: 0.25 to 1.30, p = 0.001) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.04 to 1.20, p = 0.035) on the WOMAC composite scale; and WOMAC function and pain subscale scores respectively. Moderate heterogeneity exists in all cases. Overall, prolotherapy conferred a positive and significant beneficial effect in the treatment of knee OA. Adequately powered, longer-term trials with uniform end points are needed to better elucidate the efficacy of prolotherapy. PMID:27146849

  4. Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sit, Regina Ws; Chung, Vincent Ch; Reeves, Kenneth D; Rabago, David; Chan, Keith Kw; Chan, Dicken Cc; Wu, Xinyin; Ho, Robin St; Wong, Samuel Ys

    2016-05-05

    Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) is an emerging treatment for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) but its efficacy is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to synthesize clinical evidence on the effect of prolotherapy for knee OA. Fifteen electronic databases were searched from their inception to September 2015. The primary outcome of interest was score change on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of moderate risk of bias and one quasi-randomized trial were included, with data from a total of 258 patients. In the meta-analysis of two eligible studies, prolotherapy is superior to exercise alone by a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.18 to 1.45, p = 0.012), 0.78 (95% CI: 0.25 to 1.30, p = 0.001) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.04 to 1.20, p = 0.035) on the WOMAC composite scale; and WOMAC function and pain subscale scores respectively. Moderate heterogeneity exists in all cases. Overall, prolotherapy conferred a positive and significant beneficial effect in the treatment of knee OA. Adequately powered, longer-term trials with uniform end points are needed to better elucidate the efficacy of prolotherapy.

  5. Treatment of reticular and telangiectatic leg veins: double-blind, prospective comparative trial of polidocanol and hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer D; Goldman, Mitchel P; Weiss, Robert A; Duffy, David M; Fabi, Sabrina G; Weiss, Margaret A; Guiha, Isabella

    2012-08-01

    Sixty-three subjects' legs were randomized to receive treatment with polidocanol (POL) or hypertonic saline (HS) for telangiectasias and reticular leg veins. To compare the safety and efficacy of two sclerosing agents in three dermatologic surgery practices. After exclusion of saphenofemoral junction incompetence, each subject's veins were categorized (telangiectasias <1 mm and reticular veins 1-3 mm) and randomized. Telangiectasias were treated with POL 0.5% or 11.7% HS and reticular veins with POL 1% or 23.4% HS. An independent, blinded physician determined efficacy and adverse events. Subject satisfaction questionnaires were administered and global clinical improvement assessments performed. All patients completed four visits at 0, 1, 4, and 12 weeks. Patients reported significantly greater pain during treatment with HS (2.42) than POL (1.03) (p < .001). There were no significant differences in physician-assessed improvement of reticular leg veins or telangiectasias; subject- or physician-assessed overall improvement; or physician-assessed phlebitis, pigmentation, edema, or matting in either of the three practices or the entire cohort. Two subjects developed ulcerations with HS. No ulcerations or allergic reactions developed after POL injections. Both agents provided effective treatment, but HS caused 2.35 times as much pain during injections and resulted in two episodes of tissue necrosis. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Effect of hypertonic saline solution on the viscoelasticities of erythrocyte membrane in rats subjected to hemorrhagic shock].

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Hu, D; Liu, L; Wu, Z; Qin, J; Cai, S

    2001-12-01

    We have studied the effect of hypertonic saline solution on the viscoelasticities of erythrocyte membrane in hemorrhage-shocked rats using micropippette aspiration technique. Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups of 0.9% NaCl(NS), 7.5% NaCl (HS) and 5% NaCl-3.5% NaAc (HSA), respectively. The animals were bled to reach a mean arterial pressure of 5.3 kPa in 10 minutes and maintained in shock for 90 minutes. 4 ml/kg NS, HS and HSA was given intravenously and respectively in 5 minutes following hemorrhagic shock. The blood was collected to determine the viscoelasticities of erythrocyte membrane at baseline, shock and after treatment. The results showed that the elastic moduli and viscous coefficients of erythrocyte membrane were increased obviously following hemorrhagic shock. HS raised elastic moduli and reduced viscous coefficients significantly compared with NS after treatment. The elastic moduli and viscous coefficients of erythrocyte membrane were decreased remarkably in HSA group than in NS and HS group. These data suggested that HSA could improve the viscoelasticities of erythrocyte membrane significantly in rats subjected to hemorrhagic shock.

  7. G-CSF Administration after the Intraosseous Infusion of Hypertonic Hydroxyethyl Starches Accelerating Wound Healing Combined with Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong; Liu, Jiejie; Hao, Haojie; Tong, Chuan; Ti, Dongdong; Liu, Huiling; Song, Haijing; Jiang, Chaoguang; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of G-CSF administration after intraosseous (IO) resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock (HS) combined with cutaneous injury rats. Methods. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) HS with resuscitation (blank), (2) HS with resuscitation + G-CSF (G-CSF, 200 μg/kg body weight, subcutaneous injection), (3) HS with resuscitation + normal saline solution injection (normal saline), and (4) HS + G-CSF injection without resuscitation (Unres/G-CSF). To estimate the treatment effects, the vital signs of alteration were first evaluated, and then wound closure rates and homing of MSCs and EPCs to the wound skins and vasculogenesis were measured. Besides, inflammation and vasculogenesis related mRNA expressions were also examined. Results. IO infusion hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch (HHES) exhibited beneficial volume expansion roles and G-CSF administration accelerated wound healing 3 days ahead of other groups under hemorrhagic shock. Circulating and the homing of MSCs and EPCs at wound skins were significantly elevated at 6 h after G-CSF treatment. Inflammation was declined since 3 d while angiogenesis was more obvious in G-CSF treated group on day 9. Conclusions. These results suggested that the synergistical application of HHES and G-CSF has life-saving effects and is beneficial for improving wound healing in HS combined with cutaneous injury rats. PMID:26989687

  8. Regulation of the hypertonic stress response and other cellular functions by the Rel-like transcription factor NFAT5.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, José; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Estrada-Gelonch, Anaïs; Minguillón, Jordi; Morancho, Beatriz; Santiago, Verónica; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2006-11-30

    Stress, be it from environmental factors or intrinsic to the cell as result of growth and metabolism, can be harmful to cells. Mammalian cells have developed numerous mechanisms to respond to diverse forms of stress. These mechanisms combine signaling cascades and activation of gene expression programs to orchestrate an adaptive response that will allow the cell to survive and resume its normal functioning. In this review we will focus on the transcription factor NFAT5, a fundamental regulator of the response to osmotic stress in mammalian cells. Identified in 1999, NFAT5 is the latest addition to the Rel family, which comprises the NF-kappaB and NFATc proteins. Though in some of its structural and functional features NFAT5 is a hybrid between these two major groups of Rel proteins, it has unique characteristics that make it stand on its own as a third type of Rel transcription factor. Since its discovery, NFAT5 has been studied mostly in the context of the hypertonicity stress response. The advent of mouse models deficient in NFAT5 and other recent advances have confirmed a fundamental osmoprotective role for this factor in mammals, but also revealed features that suggest it may have a wider range of functions.

  9. ‘Indirect’ challenges from science to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sandra D.

    2016-01-01

    Indirect challenges act to provoke bronchoconstriction by causing the release of endogenous mediators and are used to identify airway hyper-responsiveness. This paper reviews the historical development of challenges, with exercise, eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH) of dry air, wet hypertonic saline, and with dry powder mannitol, that preceded their use in clinical practice. The first challenge developed for clinical use was exercise. Physicians were keen for a standardized test to identify exercise-induced asthma (EIA) and to assess the effect of drugs such as disodium cromoglycate. EVH with dry air became a surrogate for exercise to increase ventilation to very high levels. A simple test was developed with EVH and used to identify EIA in defence force recruits and later in elite athletes. The research findings with different conditions of inspired air led to the conclusion that loss of water by evaporation from the airway surface was the stimulus to EIA. The proposal that water loss caused a transient increase in osmolarity led to the development of the hypertonic saline challenge. The wet aerosol challenge with 4.5% saline, provided a known osmotic stimulus, to which most asthmatics were sensitive. To simplify the osmotic challenge, a dry powder of mannitol was specially prepared and encapsulated. The test pack with different doses and an inhaler provided a common operating procedure that could be used at the point of care. All these challenge tests have a high specificity to identify currently active asthma. All have been used to assess the benefit of treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. Over the 50 years, the methods for testing became safer, less complex, and less expensive and all used forced expiratory volume in 1 sec to measure the response. Thus, they became practical to use routinely and were recommended in guidelines for use in clinical practice. PMID:26908255

  10. Unilateral fluid absorption and effects on peak power after ingestion of commercially available hypotonic, isotonic, and hypertonic sports drinks.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, David S; Bonetti, Darrell L; Hopkins, Will G

    2011-12-01

    Isotonic sports drinks are often consumed to offset the effects of dehydration and improve endurance performance, but hypotonic drinks may be more advantageous. The purpose of the study was to compare absorption and effects on performance of a commercially available hypotonic sports drink (Mizone Rapid: 3.9% carbohydrate [CHO], 218 mOsmol/kg) with those of an isotonic drink (PowerAde: 7.6% CHO, 281 mOsmol/ kg), a hypertonic drink (Gatorade: 6% CHO, 327 mOsmol/kg), and a noncaloric placebo (8 mOsmol/kg). In a crossover, 11 cyclists consumed each drink on separate days at 250 ml/15 min during a 2-hr preload ride at 55% peak power followed by an incremental test to exhaustion. Small to moderate increases in deuterium oxide enrichment in the preload were observed with Mizone Rapid relative to PowerAde, Gatorade, and placebo (differences of 88, 45, and 42 parts per million, respectively; 90% confidence limits ±28). Serum osmolality was moderately lower with Mizone Rapid than with PowerAde and Gatorade (-1.9, -2.4; mOsmol/L; ±1.2 mOsmol/L) but not clearly different vs. placebo. Plasma volume reduction was small to moderate with Mizone Rapid, PowerAde, and Gatorade relative to placebo (-1.9%, -2.5%, -2.9%; ± 2.5%). Gut comfort was highest with Mizone Rapid but clearly different (8.4% ± 4.8%) only vs PowerAde. Peak power was highest with Mizone Rapid (380 W) vs. placebo and other drinks (1.2-3.0%; 99% confidence limits ±4.7%), but differences were inconclusive with reference to the smallest important effect (~1.2%). The outcomes are consistent with fastest fluid absorption with the hypotonic sports drink. Further research should determine whether the effect has a meaningful impact on performance.

  11. Effects of fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline dextrane or Ringer's acetate after nonhemorrhagic shock caused by pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Gryth, Dan; Rocksén, David; Drobin, Dan; Druid, Henrik; Weitzberg, Eddie; Bursell, Jenny; Olsson, Lars-Gunnar; Arborelius, Ulf P

    2010-10-01

    Injured lungs are sensitive to fluid resuscitation after trauma. Such treatment can increase lung water content and lead to desaturation. Hypertonic saline with dextran (HSD) has hyperosmotic properties that promote plasma volume expansion, thus potentially reducing these side effects. The aim of this study was to (1) evaluate whether fluid treatment counteracts hypotension and improves survival after nonhemorrhagic shock caused by lung contusion and (2) analyze whether resuscitation with HSD is more efficient than treatment with Ringer's acetate (RA) in terms of blood oxygenation, the amount of lung water, circulatory effects, and inflammatory response. Twenty-nine pigs, all wearing body armor, were shot with a 7.62-mm assault rifle to produce a standardized pulmonary contusion. These animals were allocated into three groups: HSD, RA, and an untreated shot control group. Exposed animals were compared with animals not treated with fluid and shot with blank ammunition. For 2 hours after the shot, the inflammatory response and physiologic parameters were monitored. The impact induced pulmonary contusion, desaturation, hypotension, increased heart rate, and led to an inflammatory response. No change in blood pressure was observed after fluid treatment. HSD treatment resulted in significantly less lung water (p < 0.05) and tended to give better Pao2 (p = 0.09) than RA treatment. Tumor necrosis factor-α release and heart rate were significantly lower in animals given fluids. Fluid treatment does not affect blood pressure or mortality in this model of nonhemorrhagic shock caused by lung contusion. However, our data indicate that HSD, when compared with RA, has advantages for the injured lung.

  12. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the LLSR leading to hypertonia. Approach. We modeled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable very-large-scale-integrated-circuit hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32 ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64 ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results. When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance. Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the LLSR is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia.

  13. The haemodynamic and metabolic effects of hypertonic-glucose and amino-acid-based peritoneal dialysis fluids.

    PubMed

    Selby, Nicholas M; Fialova, Jana; Burton, James O; McIntyre, Christopher W

    2007-03-01

    Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) may exert significant effects on systemic haemodynamics. We have previously demonstrated that hypertonic glucose solutions are associated with higher blood pressure (BP) due to a rise in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). However, the mechanisms underlying these changes have not been established. Ten non-diabetic CAPD patients entered a randomized crossover study (eight completed) to compare conventional glucose-based fluid, biocompatible pH-neutral glucose-based fluid and 1.1% amino acid solution (lactate-buffered but completely free of glucose degradation products). BP and haemodynamic variables were measured using continuous arterial pulse wave analysis, and serial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were collected. Left ventricular (LV) diameters were measured at the start and end of each dwell period using M-mode echocardiography. BP was similar during 1.36% glucose and 1.1% amino acid dwells, but was significantly higher during 3.86% glucose dwells with both conventional and biocompatible fluids (P < 0.001). This was associated with a significantly higher SV and CO (P < 0.001), although the haemodynamic response differed between conventional and biocompatible 3.86% solutions. Plasma glucose and insulin levels did not differ from baseline during 1.36% and amino acid dwells, but increased significantly during 3.86% glucose dwells. Despite a significantly higher ultrafiltration volume with 3.86% glucose, LV diameters were similar throughout. In conclusion, we have confirmed our previous findings demonstrating higher BP and adverse haemodynamics during 3.86% glucose dwells. These changes are associated with hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, but are not related to differences in cardiac filling.

  14. LL-37 complexation with glycosaminoglycans in cystic fibrosis lungs inhibits antimicrobial activity, which can be restored by hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Bergsson, Gudmundur; Reeves, Emer P; McNally, Paul; Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Greene, Catherine M; Greally, Peter; Murphy, Philip; O'Neill, Shane J; McElvaney, Noel G

    2009-07-01

    There is an abundance of antimicrobial peptides in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs. Despite this, individuals with CF are susceptible to microbial colonization and infection. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial response within the CF lung, focusing on the human cathelicidin LL-37. We demonstrate the presence of the LL-37 precursor, human cathelicidin precursor protein designated 18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein, in the CF lung along with evidence that it is processed to active LL-37 by proteinase-3. We demonstrate that despite supranormal levels of LL-37, the lung fluid from CF patients exhibits no demonstrable antimicrobial activity. Furthermore Pseudomonas killing by physiological concentrations of exogenous LL-37 is inhibited by CF bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid due to proteolytic degradation of LL-37 by neutrophil elastase and cathepsin D. The endogenous LL-37 in CF BAL fluid is protected from this proteolysis by interactions with glycosaminoglycans, but while this protects LL-37 from proteolysis it results in inactivation of LL-37 antimicrobial activity. By digesting glycosaminoglycans in CF BAL fluid, endogenous LL-37 is liberated and the antimicrobial properties of CF BAL fluid restored. High sodium concentrations also liberate LL-37 in CF BAL fluid in vitro. This is also seen in vivo in CF sputum where LL-37 is complexed to glycosaminoglycans but is liberated following nebulized hypertonic saline resulting in increased antimicrobial effect. These data suggest glycosaminoglycan-LL-37 complexes to be potential therapeutic targets. Factors that disrupt glycosaminoglycan-LL-37 aggregates promote the antimicrobial effects of LL-37 with the caveat that concomitant administration of antiproteases may be needed to protect the now liberated LL-37 from proteolytic cleavage.

  15. Effects of simulated weightlessness on intramuscular hypertonic saline induced muscle nociception and spinal Fos expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jing; Pertovaara, Antti; You, Hao-Jun

    2015-01-12

    We assessed the effects of simulated weightlessness, hindlimb unloading (HU) by 7 days of tail suspension, on noxious mechanically and heat evoked spinal withdrawal reflexes and spinal Fos expression during muscle nociception elicited by intramuscular (i.m.) injection of hypertonic (HT; 5.8%) saline into gastrocnemius muscle in rats. In HU rats, i.m. HT saline-induced secondary mechanical hyperalgesia was enhanced, and secondary heat hypoalgesia was significantly delayed. After 7 days of HU, basal Fos expression in spinal L4-6 segments was bilaterally enhanced only in superficial (I-II) but not middle and deep laminae (III-VI) of the spinal dorsal horn, which finding was not influenced by tail denervation. Unilateral i.m. HT saline injection increased spinal Fos expression bilaterally in both the control rats and 7 days of HU rats. The HT saline-induced bilateral increase of spinal Fos occurred within 0.5h and reached its peak within 1h, after which it gradually returned to the control levels within 8h. Spatial patterns of spinal Fos expression differed between the control group and 7 days of HU group. In superficial laminae, the HT saline-induced increases in Fos expression were higher and in the middle and deep laminae V-VI lower in the 7 days of HU than control rats. It is suggested that supraspinal mechanisms presumably underlie the effects of HU on spinally-organized nociception. Simulated weightlessness may enhance descending facilitation and weaken descending inhibition of nociception. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduction of Tendon Adhesions following Administration of Adaprev, a Hypertonic Solution of Mannose-6-Phosphate: Mechanism of Action Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason K. F.; Metcalfe, Anthony D.; Wong, Richard; Bush, Jim; Platt, Chris; Garcon, Arnaud; Goldspink, Nick; McGrouther, Duncan A.; Ferguson, Mark W. J.

    2014-01-01

    Repaired tendons may be complicated by progressive fibrosis, causing adhesion formation or tendon softening leading to tendon rupture and subsequent reduced range of motion. There are few therapies available which improve the gliding of damaged tendons in the hand. We investigate the role of Mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) in a 600 mM hypertonic solution (Adaprev) on tendon adhesion formation in vivo using a mouse model of severed tendon in conjunction with analysis of collagen synthesis, cellular proliferation and receptors involved in TGF beta signalling. Cytotoxicity was assessed by measuring tissue residency, mechanical strength and cell viability of tendons after treatment with Adaprev. To elicit potential modes of action, in vitro and ex vivo studies were performed investigating phosphorylation of p38, cell migration and proliferation. Adaprev treatment significantly (p<0.05) reduced the development of adhesions and improved collagen organisation without reducing overall collagen synthesis following tendon injury in vivo. The bioavailability of Adaprev saw a 40% reduction at the site of administration over 45 minutes and tendon fibroblasts tolerated up to 120 minutes of exposure without significant loss of cell viability or tensile strength. These favourable effects were independent of CI-MPR and TGF-β signalling and possibly highlight a novel mechanism of action related to cellular stress demonstrated by phosphorylation of p38. The effect of treatment reduced tendon fibroblast migration and transiently halted tendon fibroblast proliferation in vitro and ex vivo. Our studies demonstrate that the primary mode of action for Adaprev is potentially via a physical, non-chemical, hyperosmotic effect. PMID:25383548

  17. The Effects of Hypertonic Saline and Nicotinamide on Sensorimotor and Cognitive Function Following Cortical Contusion Injury in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Andrea; Tan, Arlene A.; Hoane, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertonic saline (HTS) is an accepted treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the behavioral and cognitive consequences following HTS administration have not thoroughly been examined. Recent preclinical evidence has suggested that nicotinamide (NAM) is beneficial for recovery of function following TBI. The current study compared the behavioral and cognitive consequences of HTS and NAM as competitive therapeutic agents for the treatment of TBI. Following controlled cortical impact (CCI), bolus administrations of NAM (500 mg/kg), 7.5% HTS, or 0.9% saline vehicle (1.0 mL/kg) were given at 2, 24, and 48 hrs post-CCI. Behavioral results revealed that animals treated with NAM and HTS showed significant improvements in beam walk and locomotor placing compared to the Vehicle group. The Morris water maze (MWM) retrograde amnesia test was conducted on day 12 post-CCI and showed that all groups had significant retention of memory compared to injured, Vehicle-treated animals. Working memory was also assessed on days 18-20 using the MWM. The NAM and Vehicle groups quickly acquired the task; however, HTS animals showed no acquisition of this task. Histological examinations revealed that the HTS-treated animals lost significantly more cortical tissue than either the NAM or Vehicle-treated animals. HTS-treated animals showed a greater loss of hippocampal tissue compared to the other groups. In general, NAM showed a faster rate of recovery than HTS without this associated tissue loss. The results of this study reiterate the strengths of NAM following injury and show concerns with bolus administrations of HTS due to the differential effects on cognitive performance and apparent tissue loss. PMID:19781534

  18. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and hypertonic glucose with 72% chromated glycerin in gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Elwakil, Reda; Montasser, Mohamed Fawzy; Abdelhakam, Sara M; Ibrahim, Wesam A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and a mixture of 72% chromated glycerin with hypertonic glucose solution in management of gastric varices. METHODS: Ninety patients with gastric varices presented to Endoscopy Unit of Ain Shams University Hospital were included. They were randomly allocated into three groups; each group included 30 patients treated with intravariceal sclerosant injections in biweekly sessions till complete obturation of gastric varices; Group I (n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Histoacryl®), Group II (iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Amcrylate®) and Group III (mixture of 72% chromated glycerin; Scleremo® with glucose solution 25%). All the procedures were performed electively without active bleeding. Recruited patients were followed up for 3 mo. RESULTS: 26% of Scleremo group had bleeding during puncture vs 3.3% in each of the other two groups with significant difference, (P < 0.05). None of Scleremo group had needle obstruction vs 13.3% in each of the other two groups with no significant difference, (P > 0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 13.3% of Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups vs 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. The in hospital mortality was 6.6% in both Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups, while it was 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. In the first and second sessions, the amount of Scleremo needed for obturation was significantly high, while the amount of Histoacryl was significantly low. Scleremo was the less costly of the two treatments. CONCLUSION: All used sclerosant substances showed efficacy and success in management of gastric varices with no significant differences except in total amount, cost and bleeding during puncture. PMID:25901221

  19. Seven percent hypertonic saline--0.1% hyaluronic acid in infants with mild-to-moderate bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Nenna, Raffaella; Papoff, Paola; Moretti, Corrado; De Angelis, Daniela; Battaglia, Massimo; Papasso, Stefano; Bernabucci, Mariangela; Cangiano, Giulia; Petrarca, Laura; Salvadei, Serena; Nicolai, Ambra; Ferrara, Marianna; Bonci, Enea; Midulla, Fabio

    2014-09-01

    Our study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of 7% hypertonic saline and 0.1% hyaluronic acid (7% HS-HA) given by inhalation, in infants hospitalized for mild-to-moderate bronchiolitis. In a double-blind controlled study, 39 infants (23 boys) <7 months of age (median age 2 months) were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either nebulized 7% HS-HA (7%NaCl + 0.1%HA) (n:21) or 0.9 normal saline (NS) (n:18) at a dose of 2.5 ml twice a day for 3 days. All infants were assigned a clinical severity score at admission and four times daily during hospitalization. Main outcome measures were number of days hospitalization, safety and daily reduction in the severity score. No difference was found between the two groups for clinical severity score at admission. One child in the study group and two in the NS group interrupted the study protocol; 19% of infants in the study group and 11% in the NS group had mild cough after the aerosol. The length of stay in the control group and treatment groups were 4.8 ± 1.5 versus 4.1 ± 1.9 days, respectively (P = 0.09). There was a trend for shortening the hospitalization days in the treatment group by 14.6%. The use of NS in the control group was identified as an independent risk factor for length of hospital stay using the multivariate logistic regression model (P = 0.04). No difference was observed between the two groups for the clinical score reduction during the first 3 days hospitalization. 7% HS-HA is a safe and effective therapy in treating infants hospitalized for mild-to-moderate bronchiolitis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Comparison of Melatonin, Hypertonic Saline, and Hydroxyethyl Starch for Resuscitation of Secondary Intra-Abdominal Hypertension in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lianyang

    2016-01-01

    A variety of agents may have a beneficial effect in reducing injury-induced intestinal edema of fluid, but studies confirming the efficacy and mechanisms of these agents in secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are lacking. This study was to compare the effectiveness of melatonin, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS), and hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) on the resuscitation of secondary IAH in a rat model. Female SD rats were divided into: sham group, shock group, lactated Ringer solution (LR) group, melatonin group, HS group, and HES group. Except for the sham group, all rats underwent a combination of inducing portal hypertension, hemorrhaging to a MAP of 40 mmHg for 2 hr, and using an abdominal restraint device. The collected blood was reinfused and the rats were treated with LR (30ml/h), melatonin (50 mg/kg) + LR, HS (6 ml/kg) + LR, and HES (30 ml/kg) + LR, respectively. The shock group received no fluids. LR was continuously infused for 6hr. The intestinal permeability, immunofluorescence of tight junction proteins, transmission electron microscopy, level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-a, IL-1β, IL-6) and of biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity, and glutathione peroxidase) were assessed. Expressions of the protein kinase B (Akt) and of tight junction proteins were detected by Western blot. Compared with LR, HS, and HES, melatonin was associated with less inflammatory and oxidative injury, less intestinal permeability and injury, and lower incidence of secondary IAH in this model. The salutary effect of melatonin in this model was associated with the upregulation of intestinal Akt phosphorylation. PMID:27560478

  1. Lower dose of hypertonic saline dextran reduces the risk of lethal rebleeding in uncontrolled hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Riddez, Louis; Drobin, Dan; Sjöstrand, Fredrik; Svensén, Christer; Hahn, Robert G

    2002-05-01

    To challenge whether the recommended dose of 4 mL/kg of 7.5% sodium chloride in 6% Dextran (HSD) is optimal for fluid resuscitation in uncontrolled hemorrhage, 30 anesthetized pigs were randomized to receive a 5-min intravenous infusion of either 1, 2, or 4 mL/kg of HSD beginning 10 min after inducing a 5-mm laceration in the infrarenal aorta. In addition to conventional hemodynamic monitoring, the blood loss was calculated as the difference in blood flow rates between flow probes placed proximal and distal to the injury. The results show that the bleeding stopped between 3 and 4 min after the injury and amounted to 338+/-92 mL (mean +/- SEM), which corresponds to 28.5%+/-6.6% of the estimated blood volume. After treatment with HSD was started, six rebleeding events occurred in the 1-mL group, 11 in the 2-mL group, and 16 in the 4-mL group. The amount of blood lost due to rebleeding increased significantly with the dose of HSD and was also associated with a fatal outcome. The total blood loss was 408 mL in the survivors and 630 mL in the nonsurvivors (median, P < 0.007). The mortality in the three groups was 20%, 50%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, infusing 4 mL/kg of HSD after uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage promoted rebleeding and increased the mortality, while a dose of 1 mL/kg appeared to be more suitable.

  2. Mutation of a single threonine in the cytoplasmic NH2 terminus disrupts trafficking of renal betaine-GABA transporter 1 during hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Schweikhard, Eva S; Kempson, Stephen A; Ziegler, Christine; Burckhardt, Birgitta C

    2014-07-01

    Betaine is an important osmolyte and is, compared with other organs, much more abundant in the kidneys, where it enters cells in the medulla by betaine-GABA transporter 1 (BGT1) to balance osmoregulation in the countercurrent system. In wild-type (wt-)BGT1-expressing oocytes, GABA-mediated currents were diminished by preincubation of oocytes with 100 nM PMA or 5 μM dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol, activators of PKC, whereas the application of staurosporine before the application of dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol restored the response to GABA. Four potential phosphorylation sites on BGT1 were mutated to alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutants (T235A, S428A, and S564A) evoked GABA currents comparable in magnitude to currents observed in wt-BGT1-expressing oocytes, whereas GABA currents in T40A were barely detectable. Uptake of [(3)H]GABA was also determined in human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged BGT1 with the same mutations. T235A, S428A, and S564A showed upregulation of GABA uptake after hypertonic stress and downregulation by PMA similar to EGFP-wt-BGT1. In contrast, T40A did not respond to either hypertonicity or PMA. Confocal microscopy of the EGFP-BGT1 mutants expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells revealed that T40A was present in the cytoplasm after 24 h of hypertonic stress. whereas the other mutants and EGFP-wt-BGT1 were in the plasma membrane. All mutants, including T40A, comigrated with wt-BGT1 on Western blots, suggesting that they are full-length proteins. T40A, however, cannot be phosphorylated, as revealed using a specific anti-phosphoantibody, and, therefore, T40 may be important for the trafficking and insertion of BGT1 in the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Infusion of hypertonic saline into the lung parenchyma during radiofrequency ablation of the lungs with multitined expandable electrodes: results using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Iishi, Tatsuhiko; Hiraki, Takao; Mimura, Hidefumi; Gobara, Hideo; Kurose, Taichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Sakurai, Jun; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Tadashi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-06-01

    The present study was performed to clarify the effect of hypertonic saline infusion into the lung parenchyma on radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the lungs. A total of 20 ablation zones were created in 3 pigs. The ablation zones were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 (n=6) consisted of ablation zones created by applying smaller radiofrequency (RF) power without saline infusion; group 2 (n=5) zones were created by applying greater RF power without saline infusion;and group 3 (n=9) zones were created by applying greater RF power with saline infusion. The techniques of saline infusion included administration of hypertonic saline 1 ml before RFA, followed by continuous administration at a rate of 1 ml/min during the first 2 min after the initiation of RFA. The ablation parameters and coagulation necrosis volumes were compared among the groups. Group 3 had a tendency toward smaller mean impedance than group 1 (p=0.059) and group 2 (p=0.053). Group 3 showed significantly longer RF application time than group 2 (p=0.004) and significantly greater maximum RF power than group 1 (p=0.001) and group 2 (p=0.004). Group 3 showed significantly larger coagulation necrosis volume (mean, 1,421mm3) than group 2 (mean, 858 mm3, p=0.039) and had a tendency toward larger necrosis volume than group 1 (mean, 878 mm3, p=0.077). Although this small study had limited statistical power, hypertonic saline infusion during RFA appeared to enlarge coagulation necrosis of the lung parenchyma.

  4. Early free access to hypertonic NaCl solution induces a long-term effect on drinking, brain cell activity and gene expression of adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Macchione, A F; Beas, C; Dadam, F M; Caeiro, X E; Godino, A; Ponce, L F; Amigone, J L; Vivas, L

    2015-07-09

    Exposure to an altered osmotic environment during a pre/postnatal period can differentially program the fluid intake and excretion pattern profile in a way that persists until adulthood. However, knowledge about the programming effects on the underlying brain neurochemical circuits of thirst and hydroelectrolyte balance, and its relation with behavioral outputs, is limited. We evaluated whether early voluntary intake of hypertonic NaCl solution may program adult offspring fluid balance, plasma vasopressin, neural activity, and brain vasopressin and angiotensinergic receptor type 1a (AT1a)-receptor gene expression. The manipulation (M) period covered dams from 1 week before conception until offspring turned 1-month-old. The experimental groups were (i) Free access to hypertonic NaCl solution (0.45 M NaCl), food (0.18% NaCl) and water [M-Na]; and (ii) Free access to food and water only [M-Ctrol]. Male offspring (2-month-old) were subjected to iv infusion (0.15 ml/min) of hypertonic (1.5M NaCl), isotonic (0.15M NaCl) or sham infusion during 20 min. Cumulative water intake (140 min) and drinking latency to the first lick were recorded from the start of the infusion. Our results indicate that, after systemic sodium overload, the M-Na group had increased water intake, and diminished neuronal activity (Fos-immunoreactivity) in the subfornical organ (SFO) and nucleus of the solitary tract. They also showed reduced relative vasopressin (AVP)-mRNA and AT1a-mRNA expression at the supraoptic nucleus and SFO, respectively. The data indicate that the availability of a rich source of sodium during the pre/postnatal period induces a long-term effect on drinking, neural activity, and brain gene expression implicated in the control of hydroelectrolyte balance.

  5. Complications Associated with Insertion of Intrauterine Pressure Catheters: An Unusual Case of Uterine Hypertonicity and Uterine Perforation Resulting in Fetal Distress after Insertion of an Intrauterine Pressure Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Rood, Kara M.

    2012-01-01

    Insertion of intrauterine pressure catheters is a routine procedure performed in labor and delivery departments, with few associated complications. There are several reports of maternal and neonatal morbidity associated with the use of intrauterine pressure catheters and their rare adverse outcomes. We report an unusual case of uterine hypertonicity resulting in fetal distress, immediately after the placement of an intrauterine pressure catheter. An emergent Cesarean section was performed for fetal distress and revealed a 5 cm vertical rent in the posterior lower uterine segment. The uterine perforation was repaired intraoperatively. Mother and infant did well and were discharged home on postoperative day four. PMID:22928133

  6. Complications associated with insertion of intrauterine pressure catheters: an unusual case of uterine hypertonicity and uterine perforation resulting in fetal distress after insertion of an intrauterine pressure catheter.

    PubMed

    Rood, Kara M

    2012-01-01

    Insertion of intrauterine pressure catheters is a routine procedure performed in labor and delivery departments, with few associated complications. There are several reports of maternal and neonatal morbidity associated with the use of intrauterine pressure catheters and their rare adverse outcomes. We report an unusual case of uterine hypertonicity resulting in fetal distress, immediately after the placement of an intrauterine pressure catheter. An emergent Cesarean section was performed for fetal distress and revealed a 5 cm vertical rent in the posterior lower uterine segment. The uterine perforation was repaired intraoperatively. Mother and infant did well and were discharged home on postoperative day four.

  7. Inhibition of gastric secretion by fat and hypertonic glucose in the dog: role of gastric inhibitory peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Creutzfeldt, W; Ebert, R; Finke, U; Konturek, S J; Kwiecień, N; Radecki, T

    1983-01-01

    intestinal perfusion with hypertonic glucose solutions. PMID:6864570

  8. Minocycline Prevents Muscular Pain Hypersensitivity and Cutaneous Allodynia Produced by Repeated Intramuscular Injections of Hypertonic Saline in Healthy Human Participants.

    PubMed

    Samour, Mohamad Samir; Nagi, Saad Saulat; Shortland, Peter John; Mahns, David Anthony

    2017-08-01

    Minocycline, a glial suppressor, prevents behavioral hypersensitivities in animal models of peripheral nerve injury. However, clinical trials of minocycline in human studies have produced mixed results. This study addressed 2 questions: can repeated injections of hypertonic saline (HS) in humans induce persistent hypersensitivity? Can pretreatment with minocycline, a tetracycline antibiotic with microglial inhibitory effects, prevent the onset of hypersensitivity? Twenty-seven healthy participants took part in this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, consisting of 6 test sessions across 2 weeks. At the beginning of every session, pressure-pain thresholds of the anterior muscle compartment of both legs were measured to determine the region distribution and intensity of muscle soreness. To measure changes in thermal sensitivity in the skin overlying the anterior muscle compartment of both legs, quantitative sensory testing was used to measure the cutaneous thermal thresholds (cold sensation, cold pain, warm sensation, and heat pain) and a mild cooling stimulus was applied to assess the presence of cold allodynia. To induce ongoing hypersensitivity, repeated injections of HS were administered into the right tibialis anterior muscle at 48-hour intervals. In the final 2 sessions (days 9 and 14), only sensory assessments were done to plot the recovery after cessation of HS administrations and drug washout. By day 9, nontreated participants experienced a significant bilateral increase in muscle soreness (P < .0001), accompanied by the emergence of bilateral cold allodynia in 44% of participants, thus confirming the effectiveness of the model. Placebo-treated participants experienced a bilateral 35% alleviation in muscle soreness (P < .0001), with no changes to the prevalence of cold allodynia. In contrast, minocycline-treated participants experienced a bilateral 70% alleviation in muscle soreness (P < .0001), additionally, only 10% of minocycline

  9. Continuous controlled-infusion of hypertonic saline solution in traumatic brain-injured patients: a 9-year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Description of a continuous hypertonic saline solution (HSS) infusion using a dose-adaptation of natremia in traumatic brain injured (TBI) patients with refractory intracranial hypertension (ICH). Methods We performed a single-center retrospective study in a surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital. Fifty consecutive TBI patients with refractory ICH treated with continuous HSS infusion adapted to a target of natremia. In brief, a physician set a target of natremia adapted to the evolution of intracranial pressure (ICP). Flow of NaCl 20% was a priori calculated according to natriuresis, and the current and target natremia that were assessed every 4 hours. Results The HSS infusion was initiated for a duration of 7 (5 to 10) (8 ± 4) days. ICP decreased from 29 (26 to 34) (31 ± 9) mm Hg at H0 to 20 (15 to 26) (21 ± 8) mm Hg at H1 (P < 0.05). Cerebral perfusion pressure increased from 61 (50 to 70) (61 ± 13) mm Hg at H0 up to 67 (60 to 79) (69 ± 12) mm Hg at H1 (P < 0.05). No rebound of ICH was reported after stopping continuous HSS infusion. Natremia increased from 140 (138 to 143) (140 ± 4) at H0 up to 144 (141 to 148) (144 ± 4) mmol/L at H4 (P < 0.05). Plasma osmolarity increased from 275 (268 to 281) (279 ± 17) mmol/L at H0 up to 290 (284 to 307) (297 ± 17) mmol/L at H24 (P < 0.05). The main side effect observed was an increase in chloremia from 111 (107 to 119) (113 ± 8) mmol/L at H0 up to 121 (117 to 124) (121 ± 6) mmol/L at H24 (P < 0.05). Neither acute kidney injury nor pontine myelinolysis was recorded. Conclusions Continuous HSS infusion adapted to close biologic monitoring enables long-lasting control of natremia in TBI patients along with a decreased ICP without any rebound on infusion discontinuation. PMID:22035596

  10. In vitro effects of 3% hypertonic saline and 20% mannitol on canine whole blood coagulation and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Adamik, Katja-Nicole; Butty, Emmanuelle; Howard, Judith

    2015-09-24

    Hyperosmolar therapy, using either mannitol or hypertonic saline (HTS), is considered the treatment of choice for intracranial hypertension. However, hyperosmolar agents may impair coagulation and platelet function, limiting their use in patients at risk for hemorrhage. Despite this, studies evaluating the effects of mannitol compared to other hyperosmolar agents in dogs are largely lacking. The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro effects on global hemostasis and platelet function of 20% mannitol and 3% HTS on canine blood. Citrated whole blood from 15 healthy dogs was diluted with 0.9% saline, 20% mannitol and 3% HTS in ratios of 1:16 and 1:8. Rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) was used to assess clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT) and maximal clot firmness (MCF) following extrinsic activation (Ex-tem) and after platelet inhibition (Fib-tem). A platelet function analyzer (PFA-100) was used to assess closure time (Ct(PFA)). No significant differences were observed between untreated whole blood and samples diluted with saline. Samples diluted with both mannitol and HTS were hypocoagulable compared to untreated whole blood samples. At a dilution of 1:16, no significant differences were found between any measured parameter in samples diluted with saline compared to mannitol or HTS. At a 1:8 dilution, Ct(PFA) was prolonged in samples diluted with mannitol and HTS compared to saline, and Ct(PFA) was prolonged more with mannitol than HTS. Ex-tem CT was increased at a 1:8 dilution with mannitol compared to HTS. Ex-tem CFT was prolonged at a 1:8 dilution with both agents compared to saline, and was prolonged more with mannitol than HTS. Ex-tem MCF was reduced at a 1:8 dilution with both agents compared to saline. Data in this study indicate that both mannitol and HTS affect canine platelet function and whole blood coagulation in vitro in a dose-dependent fashion. The most pronounced effects were observed after high dilutions with mannitol, which

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Continuous Micro-Pump Infusion of 3% Hypertonic Saline combined with Furosemide to Control Elevated Intracranial Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuqian; Li, Zhihong; Li, Min; Yang, Yanlong; Wang, Bao; Gao, Li; Zhang, Xingye; Cheng, Hongyu; Fang, Wei; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Boliang; Gao, Guodong; Li, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated intracranial pressure is one of the most common problems in patients with diverse intracranial disorders, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Effective management for increased intracranial pressure is based mainly on surgical and medical techniques with hyperosmolar therapy as one of the core medical treatments. The study aimed to explore the effects of continuous micro-pump infusions of 3% hypertonic saline combined with furosemide on intracranial pressure control. Material/Methods We analyzed data on 56 eligible participants with intracranial pressure >20 mmHg from March 2013 to July 2014. The target was to increase and maintain plasma sodium to a level between 145 and 155 mmol/L and osmolarity to a level of 310 to 320 mOsmol/kg. Results Plasma sodium levels significantly increased from 138±5 mmol/L at admission to 151±3 mmol/L at 24 h (P<0.01). Osmolarity increased from 282±11 mOsmol/kg at baseline to 311±8 mOsmol/kg at 24 h (P<0.01). Intracranial pressure significantly decreased from 32±7 mmHg to 15±6 mmHg at 24 h (P<0.01). There was a significant improvement in CPP (P<0.01). Moreover, central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, and Glasgow Coma Scale slightly increased. However, these changes were not statistically significant. Conclusions Continuous infusion of 3% hypertonic saline + furosemide is effective and safe for intracranial pressure control. PMID:26082293

  12. The effect of hypo- and hypertonic solutions on volume and ion distribution of smooth muscle of guinea-pig taenia coli.

    PubMed

    Brading, A F; Setekleiv, J

    1968-03-01

    1. The intra- and extracellular spaces and ionic content of the taenia coli of the guinea-pig have been measured in a series of bathing solutions in which the tonicity varied from 0.5 to 3 times the tonicity of the normal Krebs solution.2. Equilibrium of the tissue in the experimental solution is reached within about 30 min.3. The absolute values of the parameters measured have been shown to depend on the blotting technique used. These differences were eliminated by expressing the results as a percentage of the values found in the normal Krebs solution.4. In hypertonic solutions the cell behaves as a perfect osmometer, the cell volume changing in proportion to the tonicity of the bathing medium. Only a small amount of cations is lost from the cells. A considerable amount of chloride is lost, making the postulation of its replacement by some other anions necessary in order to maintain electroneutrality of the intracellular solution.5. In hypotonic solutions the cells do not behave as predicted for a perfect osmometer. In 0.5 hypotonic solution an actual decrease in cell volume was observed associated with an increase of the extracellular space probably due to penetration of [(14)C]sorbitol into the cell. The intracellular ionic concentration was decreased. These findings suggest damage of the cell membrane.6. The observed hyperpolarization of the membrane in hypertonic solution can be explained by the increased intracellular potassium concentration.

  13. Hypertonicity regulates the function of human neutrophils by modulating chemoattractant receptor signaling and activating mitogen-activated protein kinase p38.

    PubMed Central

    Junger, W G; Hoyt, D B; Davis, R E; Herdon-Remelius, C; Namiki, S; Junger, H; Loomis, W; Altman, A

    1998-01-01

    Excessive neutrophil activation causes posttraumatic complications, which may be reduced with hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation. We tested if this is because of modulated neutrophil function by HS. Clinically relevant hypertonicity (10-25 mM) suppressed degranulation and superoxide formation in response to fMLP and blocked the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK1/2 and p38, but did not affect Ca2+ mobilization. HS did not suppress oxidative burst in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). This indicates that HS suppresses neutrophil function by intercepting signal pathways upstream of or apart from PKC. HS activated p38 by itself and enhanced degranulation in response to PKC activation. This enhancement was reduced by inhibition of p38 with SB203580, suggesting that p38 up-regulation participates in HS-induced enhancements of degranulation. HS had similar effects on the degranulation of cells that were previously stimulated with fMLP, but had no effect on its own, suggesting that HS enhancement of degranulation requires another signal. We conclude that depending on other stimuli, HS can suppress neutrophil activation by intercepting multiple receptor signals or augment degranulation by enhancing p38 signaling. In patients HS resuscitation may reduce posttraumatic complications by preventing neutrophil activation via chemotactic factors released during reperfusion. PMID:9637711

  14. The effect of hypo- and hypertonic solutions on volume and ion distribution of smooth muscle of guinea-pig taenia coli

    PubMed Central

    Brading, Alison F.; Setekleiv, J.

    1968-01-01

    1. The intra- and extracellular spaces and ionic content of the taenia coli of the guinea-pig have been measured in a series of bathing solutions in which the tonicity varied from 0·5 to 3 times the tonicity of the normal Krebs solution. 2. Equilibrium of the tissue in the experimental solution is reached within about 30 min. 3. The absolute values of the parameters measured have been shown to depend on the blotting technique used. These differences were eliminated by expressing the results as a percentage of the values found in the normal Krebs solution. 4. In hypertonic solutions the cell behaves as a perfect osmometer, the cell volume changing in proportion to the tonicity of the bathing medium. Only a small amount of cations is lost from the cells. A considerable amount of chloride is lost, making the postulation of its replacement by some other anions necessary in order to maintain electroneutrality of the intracellular solution. 5. In hypotonic solutions the cells do not behave as predicted for a perfect osmometer. In 0·5 hypotonic solution an actual decrease in cell volume was observed associated with an increase of the extracellular space probably due to penetration of [14C]sorbitol into the cell. The intracellular ionic concentration was decreased. These findings suggest damage of the cell membrane. 6. The observed hyperpolarization of the membrane in hypertonic solution can be explained by the increased intracellular potassium concentration. PMID:5639794

  15. A Physiologically-Motivated Compartment-Based Model of the Effect of Inhaled Hypertonic Saline on Mucociliary Clearance and Liquid Transport in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Markovetz, Matthew R.; Corcoran, Timothy E.; Locke, Landon W.; Myerburg, Michael M.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Parker, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by liquid hyperabsorption, airway surface dehydration, and impaired mucociliary clearance (MCC). Herein, we present a compartment-based mathematical model of the airway that extends the resolution of functional imaging data. Methods Using functional imaging data to inform our model, we developed a system of mechanism-motivated ordinary differential equations to describe the mucociliary clearance and absorption of aerosolized radiolabeled particle and small molecules probes from human subjects with and without CF. We also utilized a novel imaging metric in vitro to gauge the fraction of airway epithelial cells that have functional ciliary activity. Results This model, and its incorporated kinetic rate parameters, captures the MCC and liquid dynamics of the hyperabsorptive state in CF airways and the mitigation of that state by hypertonic saline treatment. Conclusions We postulate, based on the model structure and its ability to capture clinical patient data, that patients with CF have regions of airway with diminished MCC function that can be recruited with hypertonic saline treatment. In so doing, this model structure not only makes a case for durable osmotic agents used in lung-region specific treatments, but also may provide a possible clinical endpoint, the fraction of functional ciliated airway. PMID:25383714

  16. [Preliminary establishment of cytological examination and the normal reference values for hypertonic saline solution-induced sputum of healthy children in Guangzhou].

    PubMed

    Chen, De-hui; Zhong, Guo-yu; Luo, Wei; Chen, Qiao-li; Chen, Ru-chong; Lin, Yu-neng; Pan, Xiao-an; Li, Jin-ying; Wu, Shang-zhi; Lai, Ke-fang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2012-07-01

    To establish the method of cytological examination and the normal reference values for hypertonic saline solution-induced sputum of healthy children (age range from 5 to 15 years) with physical examination in Guangzhou. A total of 352 children, 5 to 15 years old, were enrolled from primary school and middle school in Guangzhou from January to December, 2010. All subjects completed a standardized questionnaire on the presence of respiratory, allergic symptoms and family history, the medical history and the physical examination was performed by doctors, lung function (forced expiratory volume at 1 s in predicted normal, FEV(1)%) was determined. There were 266 healthy children (137 males, 129 females) who were selected and undergone hypertonic saline solution induction of sputum, and cytological examination was performed. Hypertonic saline (5%) was nebulized and inhaled for 15 - 30 min. No expectoration within 30 min was defined as failure, and the procedure was terminated. The part of opaque and higher density sputum samples was detected by cytology. The proportion of neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils, macrophages and monocytes was calculated. This study was approved by the institutional Ethics Review Committee of First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College. Informed consent was obtained from the legal guardians of all participants following a detailed description of the purpose and potential benefits of the study. There were 175 subjects' induced sputum specimens (175/266, 65.8%), non-qualified sputum samples were obtained from 16 of the subjects. The proportions of median (IQR) of lymphocytes were 0.012 (0.020), 95%CI were ranged from 0.015 to 0.022; neutrophils 0.207 (0.330), 95%CI 0.266 - 0.356 macrophages 0.761 (0.327), 95%CI 0.607 - 0.699; eosinophils 0.004 (0.019), 95%CI 0.013 - 0.022. There were no significant differences in proportions of cytological findings of female or male, different age groups and second-hand smoking or not (all P > 0

  17. The effect of continuous hypertonic saline infusion and hypernatremia on mortality in patients with severe traumatic brain injury: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sean K R; Kolmodin, Leif; Sekhon, Mypinder S; Qiao, Lu; Zou, Jie; Henderson, William R; Griesdale, Donald E G

    2016-06-01

    Hypertonic saline (HTS) is used to control intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, in prior studies, the resultant hypernatremia has been associated with increased mortality. We aimed to study the effect of HTS on ICP and mortality in patients with severe TBI. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 231 patients with severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] ≤ 8) admitted to two neurotrauma units from 2006-2012. We recorded daily HTS, ICP, and serum sodium (Na) concentration. We used Cox proportional regression modelling for hospital mortality and incorporated the following time-dependent variables: use of HTS, hypernatremia, and desmopressin administration. The mean [standard deviation (SD)] age of patients was 34 (17) and the median (interquartile range [IQR]) GCS was 6 [3-8]. Hypertonic saline was administered as a continuous infusion in 124 of 231 (54%) patients over 788 of 2,968 (27%) patient-days. Hypernatremia (Na > 145 mmol·L(-1)) developed in 151 of 231 (65%) patients over 717 of 2,968 (24%) patients-days. In patients who developed hypernatremia, the median [IQR] Na was 146 [142-147] mmol·L(-1). Overall hospital mortality was 26% (59 of 231 patients). After adjusting for baseline covariates, neither HTS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56 to 2.05; P = 0.84) nor hypernatremia (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.68 to 2.55; P = 0.42) was associated with hospital mortality. There was no effect modification by either HTS or hypernatremia on each another. Patients who received HTS observed a significant decrease in ICP during their ICU stay compared with those who did not receive HTS (4 mmHg; 95% CI, 2 to 6; P < 0.001 vs 2 mmHg; 95% CI, -1 to 5; P = 0.14). Hypertonic saline and hypernatremia are not associated with hospital mortality in patients with severe TBI.

  18. Efficacy of conivaptan and hypertonic (3%) saline in treating hyponatremia due to syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone in a tertiary Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sridhar Nagepalli Venkatarami; Rangappa, Pradeep; Jacob, Ipe; Janakiraman, Rajeswari; Rao, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hyponatremia is one of the most common electrolyte abnormalities encountered in clinical practice and has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The optimal management of hyponatremia is still evolving. Over the last decade, vaptans have been increasingly used in clinical practice with promising results. Materials and Methods: The study included eighty patients with symptomatic hyponatremia due to syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) admitted and treated in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with either conivaptan or hypertonic (3%) saline. They were compared for time taken to achieve normal serum sodium, length of ICU and hospital stay, and adverse effects. Results: The demographic data and serum sodium levels at admission were comparable between the two groups. After initiating correction, sodium levels at 6, 12, and 24 h were similar between the two groups. However, at 48 h, patients in the conivaptan group (Group C) had higher sodium levels (133.0 ± 3.8 mEq/L) as compared to hypertonic saline group (Group HS) (128.9 ± 2.6 mEq/L), which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The length of ICU stay was less in the Group C (3.35 ± 0.89 days) when compared with the Group HS (4.61 ± 0.91 days) (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in mortality between the two groups. Conclusion: In patients with symptomatic hyponatremia due to SIADH, conivaptan with its aquaresis property can achieve a significantly better sodium correction, resulting in reduced ICU and hospital stay with no significant adverse effects. PMID:28149029

  19. In rat hepatocytes, the hypertonic activation of Na(+) conductance and Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport--but not Na(+)-H(+) antiport--is mediated by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Heinzinger, H; van den Boom, F; Tinel, H; Wehner, F

    2001-11-01

    1. The initial event in the regulatory volume increase (RVI) of rat hepatocytes is an import of extracellular Na(+) via Na(+) conductance, Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport, and Na(+)-H(+) antiport. 2. Here, the protein kinase inhibitors staurosporine (100 nmol l(-1)) and bis-indolyl-maleimide I (400 nmol l(-1)) were used to test for a possible contribution of protein kinase C (PKC) to the hypertonic activation of these transporters in confluent primary cultures. 3. Stimulation of Na(+) conductance was monitored: (i) by use of a differential approach based on Na(+) fluxes, (ii) by means of cable analysis, and (iii) in experiments with low Na(+) pulses. All three experimental protocols in concert demonstrated a block of the activation of Na(+) conductance by staurosporine and bis-indolyl-maleimide I. 4. In addition, both compounds significantly reduced the hypertonic activation of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport (quantified on the basis of furosemide-sensitive (86)Rb(+) uptake) to approximately 30 %. 5. In contrast, neither staurosporine nor bis-indolyl-maleimide I had any detectable effect on the hypertonicity-induced alkalinization of cell pH via Na(+)-H(+) antiport (determined fluorometrically). 6. Staurosporine and bis-indolyl-maleimide I completely blocked the RVI of rat hepatocytes (quantified by means of confocal laser-scanning microscopy). The high efficiency of the block suggests an additional inhibitory effect of both compounds on the activity of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (determined as ouabain-sensitive (86)Rb(+) uptake). 7. It is concluded that the hypertonic activation of rat hepatocyte Na(+) conductance and Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport--but not Na(+)-H(+) antiport--is probably mediated by PKC.

  20. Hypertonic saline alleviates experimentally induced cerebral oedema through suppression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor VEGFR2 expression in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Linqiang; Cao, Wei; Deng, Yiyu; Zhu, Gaofeng; Han, Yongli; Zeng, Hongke

    2016-10-13

    Cerebral oedema is closely related to the permeability of blood-brain barrier, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) all of which are important blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability regulatory factors. Zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5 are also the key components of BBB. Hypertonic saline is widely used to alleviate cerebral oedema. This study aimed to explore the possible mechanisms underlying hypertonic saline that ameliorates cerebral oedema effectively. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and of oxygen-glucose deprivation model in primary astrocytes were used in this study. The brain water content (BWC) was used to assess the effect of 10 % HS on cerebral oedema. The assessment of Evans blue (EB) extravasation was performed to evaluate the protective effect of 10 % HS on blood-brain barrier. The quantification of VEGF, VEGFR2, ZO-1 and claudin-5 was used to illustrate the mechanism of 10 % HS ameliorating cerebral oedema. BWC was analysed by wet-to-dry ratios in the ischemic hemisphere of SD rats; it was significantly decreased after 10 % HS treatment (P < 0.05). We also investigated the blood-brain barrier protective effect by 10 % HS which reduced EB extravasation effectively in the peri-ischemic brain tissue. In parallel to the above notably at 24 h following MCAO, mRNA and protein expression of VEGF and VEGFR2 in the peri-ischemic brain tissue was down-regulated after 10 % HS treatment (P < 0.05). Along with this, in vitro studies showed increased VEGF and VEGFR2 mRNA and protein expression in primary astrocytes under hypoxic condition (P < 0.05), but it was suppressed after HS treatment (P < 0.05). In addition, HS inhibited the down-regulation of ZO-1, claudin-5 effectively. The results suggest that 10 % HS could alleviate cerebral oedema possibly through reducing the ischemia induced BBB permeability as a consequence of

  1. Clinical Challenge.

    PubMed

    2017-09-01

    Questions for this month's clinical challenge are based on articles in this issue. The clinical challenge is endorsed by the RACGP Quality Improvement and Continuing Professional Development (QI&CPD) program and has been allocated four Category 2 points (Activity ID: 109894). Answers to this clinical challenge are available immediately following successful completion online at http://gplearning.racgp.org.au. Clinical challenge quizzes may be completed at any time throughout the 2017-19 triennium; therefore, the previous months' answers are not published. Each of the questions or incomplete statements below is followed by four suggested answers or completions. Select the most appropriate statement as your answer.

  2. Clinical Challenge.

    PubMed

    2016-12-01

    Questions for this month's clinical challenge are based on articles in this issue. The clinical challenge is endorsed by the RACGP Quality Improvement and Continuing Professional Development (QI&CPD) program and has been allocated four Category 2 points (Activity ID: 69787). Answers to this clinical challenge are available immediately following successful completion online at http://gplearning.racgp.org.au. Clinical challenge quizzes may be completed at any time throughout the 2014-16 triennium; therefore, the previous months' answers are not published. Each of the questions or incomplete statements below is followed by four or five suggested answers or completions. Select the most appropriate statement as your answer.

  3. [Effect of incubation in sodium chloride hypertonic solutions on human blood lymphocyte DNA damage formation by long-wave UV-radiation].

    PubMed

    Smetanina, N M; Pustovalova, M V; Osipov, A N

    2013-01-01

    Effect of incubation in NaCl hypertonic solutions (0.2, 0.35 and 0.5 mol/L for 1 h at 4 degrees C) on the DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) and alkaline-labile site (ALS) yields induced by long-wave UV-radiation (365 +/- 10 nm) in human blood peripheral lymphocytes in vitro was investigated. It was shown that compared to the cells incubated in NaCl isotonic solution (0.14 mol/L) statistically significant increases in the yields of both spontaneous (-1.5-1.9 times) and UV-A radiation induced (-1.6-1.7 times) DNA damage was observed only at the NaCl concentration of 0.5 mol/L. It is assumed that at this concentration of NaCl, dissociation of the linker histone H1 occurs, the structure of chromatin is disrupted and the free radical-induced DNA damage output dramatically increases.

  4. Comparison of effects of equiosmolar doses of mannitol and hypertonic saline on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Cottenceau, Vincent; Masson, Francoise; Mahamid, Eugenia; Petit, Laurent; Shik, Venyamin; Sztark, Francois; Zaaroor, Menashe; Soustiel, Jean Francois

    2011-10-01

    The potential superiority of hypertonic saline (HTS) over mannitol (MTL) for control of intracranial pressure (ICP) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still debated. Forty-seven severe TBI patients with increased ICP were prospectively recruited in two university hospitals and randomly treated with equiosmolar infusions of either MTL 20% (4 mL/kg; n=25 patients) or HTS 7.5% (2 mL/kg; n=22 patients). Serum sodium, hematocrit, ICP, arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), shear rate, global indices of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism were measured before, and 30 and 120 min following each infusion during the course of illness. Outcome was assessed at 6 months. Both HTS and MTL effectively and equally reduced ICP levels with subsequent elevation of CPP and CBF, although this effect was significantly stronger and of longer duration after HTS and correlated with improved rheological blood properties induced by HTS. Further, effect of HTS on ICP appeared to be more robust in patients with diffuse brain injury. In contrast, oxygen and glucose metabolic rates were left equally unaffected by both solutions. Accordingly, there was no significant difference in neurological outcome between the two groups. In conclusion, MTL was as effective as HTS in decreasing ICP in TBI patients although both solutions failed to improved cerebral metabolism. HTS showed an additional and stronger effect on cerebral perfusion of potential benefit in the presence of cerebral ischemia. Treatment selection should therefore be individually based on sodium level and cerebral hemodynamics.

  5. Comparison of the protoscolocidal effectiveness of hypertonic saline, povidone-iodine and albendazole solutions in an experimental lung hydatid cyst model.

    PubMed

    Durgun Yetim, T; Basoglu, A; Taslak Sengul, A; Yetim, I; Serdar Bekdemir, O; Hokelek, M

    2011-01-01

    Secondary hydatidosis is an important problem encountered during the surgical treatment of hydatid cysts. This study describes an experimental model of secondary hydatidosis by cyst inoculation, used to explore whether simultaneous inoculation of protoscolocidal agents could prevent secondary hydatidosis. Fertile cyst fluid was injected into the pleural space of rabbits alone (group 1, n = 8), and in combination with 2% albendazole solution (group 2, n = 8), 20% hypertonic saline (group 3, n = 8) or 10% povidone-iodine (group 4, n = 8). Computed tomography imaging of the thorax, indirect haemagglutination (IHA) titres and eosinophil counts were used to determine cyst development. After 16 months, three control rabbits had pneumothorax, seven had cysts and four had parenchymal nodules. Histopathological investigation of nodules revealed 87.5% cyst formation. Pleural thickening was observed in rabbits from all groups. Cyst formation rates, IHA titres and eosinophilia counts were higher in group 1 than in groups 2-4. This study demonstrated the experimental formation of secondary hydatidosis and found that topical protoscolocidal agents were beneficial in preventing cyst recurrence.

  6. The role of the dorsal-most part of the lateral parabrachial nucleus in the processing of hypertonic NaCl using different conditioned flavor avoidance paradigms.

    PubMed

    De la Torre Vacas, María Lourdes; Agüero Zapata, Angeles

    2008-04-01

    The parabrachial nucleus (PBN) has been strongly associated with taste aversion learning (TAL) acquisition. Independent of its suggested associative functions, this brain stem centre plays a key role in the sensorial processing of both gustatory and visceral information. The sensory visceral functions have been attributed to the lateral area of the PBN (PBNl) but, recently, it has been proposed that within this area a form of anatomical and functional segregation may also exist, determined by factors such as, the learning paradigm used, the nature of aversive agent used, or the route chosen for the administration of this agent. This study used a lesion approach in rats to address the question of whether the dorsal most portion of the PBNl plays a key role in the acquisition of a conditioned avoidance to flavored stimuli induced by hypertonic sodium chloride (intra gastric), and whether this role is dependent on the flavor avoidance learning (FAL) paradigm used, concurrent (experiment 1) or delayed-sequential FAL (experiment 2). Results showed a clear disruptive effect of the PBNl electrolytic lesion on the acquisition of the concurrent FAL, but hardly any attenuation of the delayed-sequential FAL. This finding is discussed in the context of the hypothesis that two separate and apparently non-redundant routes exist for the processing of the visceral information.

  7. Early utilization of hypertonic peritoneal dialysate and subsequent risks of non-traumatic amputation among peritoneal dialysis patients: a nationwide retrospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The hemodialysis (HD) population has a particularly high incidence of amputation, which is likely associated with decreased tissue oxygenation during HD. However, information about the risk factors leading to amputation in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients is limited. Here, we have investigated the association between the use of hypertonic peritoneal dialysate (HPD) and subsequent amputation in PD patients. Methods Based on the data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance research database, this observational cohort study enrolled 203 PD patients who had received HPD early during treatment and had not undergone amputation and 296 PD controls who had not undergone amputation. Subjects were followed through until the end of 2009 and the event rates of new non-traumatic amputation were compared between groups. Results The incidence of amputation was 3 times higher for the HPD cohort than for the comparison cohort (23.68 vs. 8.01 per 1000 person-years). The hazard ratio (HR) for this group, estimated using a multivariable Cox model, was 2.48 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06–5.79). The HR for patients with both diabetes and early adoption of HPD increased to 44.34 (95% CI = 5.51-357.03), compared to non-HPD non-diabetic PD controls. Conclusion Early utilization of HPD in PD patients is associated with increasing risk of amputation; this risk considerably increases for those with concomitant diabetes. PMID:23786634

  8. Featherweight Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Ryan, Larry

    2012-01-01

    As science, technology education, and engineering programs suffer budget cuts, educators continue to seek cost-effective activities that engage students and reinforce standards. The featherweight challenge is a hands-on activity that challenges students to continually refine their design while not breaking the budget. This activity uses one of the…

  9. Featherweight Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Ryan, Larry

    2012-01-01

    As science, technology education, and engineering programs suffer budget cuts, educators continue to seek cost-effective activities that engage students and reinforce standards. The featherweight challenge is a hands-on activity that challenges students to continually refine their design while not breaking the budget. This activity uses one of the…

  10. Short-term hypertonic exposure enhances in vitro follicle growth and meiotic competence of enclosed oocytes while modestly affecting mRNA expression of aquaporin and steroidogenic genes in the domestic cat model.

    PubMed

    Songsasen, N; Thongkittidilok, C; Yamamizu, K; Wildt, D E; Comizzoli, P

    2017-03-01

    Using the domestic cat as a non-rodent, larger animal model, the objective was to determine the impact of a brief incubation in a hypertonic microenvironment on (1) ovarian follicle and oocyte growth in vitro, (2) developmental capacity of the resident oocyte, and (3) expression of aquaporin (AQP) genes in parallel with genes involved in regulation of folliculogenesis. In Study 1: Secondary or early antral follicles encapsulated in 0.5% alginate were allocated to one of three treatment groups: 1) culture in standard medium at 290 mOsm for 15 d (Control); 2) incubation in 350 mOsm medium for 1 h followed by culture in standard medium for 15 d (Hypertonic-1h); or 3) incubation in 350 mOsm medium for 24 h followed by incubation in standard medium for additional 14 d (Hypertonic-24h). After measuring follicle and oocyte diameters on Day 15, in vitro-grown oocytes were incubated for 24 h before assessing nuclear status. In Study 2: secondary or early antral follicles were subjected to one of the three treatments: 1) culture in standard medium at 290 mOsm for 48 h; 2) incubation in 350 mOsm medium for 1 h followed by culture in standard medium for additional 47 h; or 3) incubation in 350 mOsm medium for 24 h followed by culture in standard medium for additional 24 h. At the end of the culture period, all follicles were assessed for mRNA level of Cyp17a1, Cyp19a1, Star, Aqp1, 3, 5, 7 and 8 as well as Fshr using qPCR. Freshly collected follicles also were subjected to gene expression analysis and served as the 'Non-cultured control'. Hypertonic-24h follicles grew larger (P < 0.05) than the control, whereas those in Hypertonic-1h group exhibited intermediate growth, especially when the culture started at the early antral stage. Oocytes in the Hypertonic-24h group were larger and resumed meiosis at a higher rate than in the other treatments. In vitro culture affected (P < 0.05) mRNA expression of Cyp19a1, Star, Aqp1, and Aqp7 in both the secondary and early

  11. Cognitive Challenges

    MedlinePlus

    ... 60% of individuals with TSC develop cognitive challenges (intellectual disabilities), although the degree of intellectual dysfunction ranges from ... impairment. While most individuals with TSC who have intellectual disabilities also have epilepsy, many individuals with TSC who ...

  12. Centennial Challenges

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-26

    Doug Comstock, NASA's Director, Innovative Partnership Office, speaks during a ceremony for winners and participants of NASA’s 2009 Centennial Challenges, Friday, Feb. 26, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The year-long competition addresses a range of technical challenges that support NASA's missions in aeronautics and space with a goal of encouraging novel solutions from non-traditional sources. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  13. Centennial Challenges

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-26

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, right, and Doug Comstock, left, stand with David Masten, of Masten Space Systems, during a ceremony for winners and participants of NASA’s 2009 Centennial Challenges, Friday, Feb. 26, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The year-long competition addresses a range of technical challenges that support NASA's missions in aeronautics and space with a goal of encouraging novel solutions from non-traditional sources. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  14. Osmolality and respiratory regulation in humans: respiratory compensation for hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is absent after infusion of hypertonic saline in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Moen, Vibeke; Brudin, Lars; Rundgren, Mats; Irestedt, Lars

    2014-10-01

    Several animal studies show that changes in plasma osmolality may influence ventilation. Respiratory depression caused by increased plasma osmolality is interpreted as inhibition of water-dependent thermoregulation because conservation of body fluid predominates at the cost of increased core temperature. Respiratory alkalosis, on the other hand, is associated with a decrease in plasma osmolality and strong ion difference (SID) during human pregnancy. We investigated the hypothesis that osmolality would influence ventilation, so that increased osmolality will decrease ventilation and decreased osmolality will stimulate ventilation in both men and women. Our study participants were healthy volunteers of both sexes (ASA physical status I). Ten men (mean 28 years; range 20-40) and 9 women (mean 33 years; range 22-43) were included. All women participated in both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Hyperosmolality was induced by IV infusion of hypertonic saline 3%, and hypoosmolality by drinking tap water. Arterial blood samples were collected for analysis of electrolytes, osmolality, and blood gases. Sensitivity to CO2 was determined by rebreathing tests performed before and after the fluid-loading procedures. Infusion of hypertonic saline caused hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with decreased SID in all subjects. Analysis of pooled data showed absence of respiratory compensation. Baseline arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) mean (SD) 37.8 (2.9) mm Hg remained unaltered, with lowest PaCO2 37.8 (2.9) mm Hg after 100 minutes, P = 0.70, causing a decrease in pH from mean (SD) 7.42 (0.02) to 7.38 (0.02), P < 0.001. Metabolic acidosis was also observed during water loading. Pooled results show that PaCO2 decreased from 38.2 (3.3) mm Hg at baseline to 35.7 (2.8) mm Hg after 80 minutes of drinking water, P = 0.002, and pH remained unaltered: pH 7.43 (0.02) at baseline to pH 7.42 (0.02), P = 0.14, mean difference (confidence interval) = pH -0.007 (-0.017 to 0.003). Our

  15. Improvement of Neuroenergetics by Hypertonic Lactate Therapy in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury Is Dependent on Baseline Cerebral Lactate/Pyruvate Ratio.

    PubMed

    Quintard, Hervé; Patet, Camille; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Suys, Tamarah; Bouzat, Pierre; Pellerin, Luc; Meuli, Reto; Magistretti, Pierre J; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Energy dysfunction is associated with worse prognosis after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent data suggest that hypertonic sodium lactate infusion (HL) improves energy metabolism after TBI. Here, we specifically examined whether the efficacy of HL (3h infusion, 30-40 μmol/kg/min) in improving brain energetics (using cerebral microdialysis [CMD] glucose as a main therapeutic end-point) was dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state (assessed by CMD lactate/pyruvate ratio [LPR]) and cerebral blood flow (CBF, measured with perfusion computed tomography [PCT]). Using a prospective cohort of 24 severe TBI patients, we found CMD glucose increase during HL was significant only in the subgroup of patients with elevated CMD LPR >25 (n = 13; +0.13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.19] mmol/L, p < 0.001; vs. +0.04 [-0.05-0.13] in those with normal LPR, p = 0.33, mixed-effects model). In contrast, CMD glucose increase was independent from baseline CBF (coefficient +0.13 [0.04-0.21] mmol/L when global CBF was <32.5 mL/100 g/min vs. +0.09 [0.04-0.14] mmol/L at normal CBF, both p < 0.005) and systemic glucose. Our data suggest that improvement of brain energetics upon HL seems predominantly dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state and support the concept that CMD LPR - rather than CBF - could be used as a diagnostic indication for systemic lactate supplementation following TBI.

  16. Association of out-of-hospital advanced airway management with outcomes after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock in the ROC hypertonic saline trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Henry E; Brown, Siobhan P; MacDonald, Russell D; Dowling, Shawn K; Lin, Steve; Davis, Daniel; Schreiber, Martin A; Powell, Judy; van Heest, Rardi; Daya, Mohamud

    2014-03-01

    Prior studies suggest adverse associations between out-of-hospital advanced airway management (AAM) and patient outcomes after major trauma. This secondary analysis of data from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Hypertonic Saline Trial evaluated associations between out-of-hospital AAM and outcomes in patients suffering isolated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) or haemorrhagic shock. This multicentre study included adults with severe TBI (GCS ≤8) or haemorrhagic shock (SBP ≤70 mm Hg, or (SBP 71-90 mm Hg and heart rate ≥108 bpm)). We compared patients receiving out-of-hospital AAM with those receiving emergency department AAM. We evaluated the associations between airway strategy and patient outcomes (28-day mortality, and 6-month poor neurologic or functional outcome) and airway strategy, adjusting for confounders. Analysis was stratified by (1) patients with isolated severe TBI and (2) patients with haemorrhagic shock with or without severe TBI. Of 2135 patients, we studied 1116 TBI and 528 shock; excluding 491 who died in the field, did not receive AAM or had missing data. In the shock cohort, out-of-hospital AAM was associated with increased 28-day mortality (adjusted OR 5.14; 95% CI 2.42 to 10.90). In TBI, out-of-hospital AAM showed a tendency towards increased 28-day mortality (adjusted OR 1.57; 95% CI 0.93 to 2.64) and 6-month poor functional outcome (1.63; 1.00 to 2.68), but these differences were not statistically significant. Out-of-hospital AAM was associated with poorer 6-month TBI neurologic outcome (1.80; 1.09 to 2.96). Out-of-hospital AAM was associated with increased mortality after haemorrhagic shock. The adverse association between out-of-hospital AAM and injury outcome is most pronounced in patients with haemorrhagic shock.

  17. Comparing the efficacy of nebulizer recombinant human DNase and hypertonic saline as monotherapy and combined treatment in the treatment of persistent atelectasis in mechanically ventilated newborns.

    PubMed

    Altunhan, Hüseyin; Annagür, Ali; Pekcan, Sevgi; Ors, Rahmi; Koç, Hasan

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the cost-effectiveness and efficacy of nebulizer recombinant human DNase (rhDNase) and hypertonic saline (HS) as monotherapy and combined treatment in neonatal atelectasis. Eighty-seven newborns with persistent atelectasis who did not respond to traditional treatment were studied retrospectively. Group 1 did not receive nebulizer drugs; Group 2 received 7%HS; Group 3 received rhDNase; and Group 4 received both 7%HS and rhDNase. Subjects' chest X-ray scores, partial pressure of CO(2), respiratory rate, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO(2)) peak inspiratory pressure, atelectasis healing rate, median duration of nebulizer treatment and costs were compared. Percentages of improvement in atelectasis on Day 3 of treatment in Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and Group 4 were 27, 70, 81 and 95%, respectively, while median duration of treatment was 8.1, 3.3, 2.9 and 2.4 days, respectively. Comparison of chest X-ray scores, partial pressure of CO(2), respiratory rate, FiO(2) and peak inspiratory pressure values before and 48 h after treatment did not yield a significant difference for the control group (P > 0.05), while a marked improvement was observed in other groups for all parameters (P < 0.05). The most distinct improvement was in Group 4, followed by Group 3. Although both the combined treatment with HS and rhDNase and their monotherapies are effective in the treatment of persistent atelectasis in newborns receiving mechanical ventilation, their combined use produces higher efficacy. The efficacy of rhDNase is superior to monotherapy with HS. Use of these two treatments concomitantly reduces the cost. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to use HS alone or in combination with rhDNase in newborn patients. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. Hypertonic saline protects brain endothelial cells against hypoxia correlated to the levels of estimated glomerular filtration rate and interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng-Long; Deng, Yi-Yu; Wang, Qiao-Sheng; Han, Yong-Li; Jiang, Wen-Qiang; Fang, Ming; Hu, Bei; Wu, Zhi-Xin; Huang, Lin-Qiang; Zeng, Hong-Ke

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to verify the protective effect of hypertonic saline (HS) on brain endothelial cells under hypoxic conditions and the relevant underlying mechanism. Methods: bEnd.3 cells were treated with oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced injury. To measure HS performance, cell viability was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium salt assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase UTP nick-end labeling staining. RNA-seq was performed to assess the expression profiles and screen the candidate genes that participated in OGD-induced injury and the HS protective effect. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot analysis were used to confirm the expression of candidate genes, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the level of interleukin (IL)-1β. Overexpression analyses were performed to confirm the functions of the differentially expressed genes. Results: HS with a concentration of 40 mmol/L NaCl had an obvious protective effect on bEnd.3 cells after OGD-induced injury, resulting in increased cell viability and a smaller percentage of apoptotic cells. According to the RNA-seq results, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was chosen as the differentially expressed gene target in this study. The qPCR and western blot analyses further confirmed that the levels of EGFR/phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor and IL-1β were enhanced after OGD-induced injury, but attenuated after treatment with 40 mmol/L of NaCl HS. Overexpressed EGFR reversed the protective effect of HS that caused low viability and high rates of apoptosis in cells. Conclusion: HS can protect endothelial cells against OGD-induced injury, but is affected by the expression of EGFR/p-EGFR and IL-1β. PMID:28072729

  19. A comparison of equivolume, equiosmolar solutions of hypertonic saline and mannitol for brain relaxation in patients undergoing elective intracranial tumor surgery: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dostal, Pavel; Dostalova, Vlasta; Schreiberova, Jitka; Tyll, Tomas; Habalova, Jirina; Cerny, Vladimir; Rehak, Svatopluk; Cesak, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Hyperosmolar solutions have been used in neurosurgery to modify brain bulk and prevent neurological deterioration. The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of equivolume, equiosmolar solutions of mannitol and hypertonic saline (HTS) on brain relaxation and postoperative complications in patients undergoing elective intracranial tumor surgery. In this prospective, randomized study, patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I to III scheduled to undergo a craniotomy for intracranial tumors were enrolled. Patients received a 3.75 mL/kg intravenous infusion of either 3.2% HTS (group HTS, n=36) or 20% mannitol (group M, n=38). The surgeon assessed the condition of the brain using a 4-point scale after opening the dura. Recorded measures included duration of surgery, blood loss, urine output, volume and type of infused fluids, hemodynamic variables, electrolytes, glucose, creatinine, predefined postoperative complications, and length of intensive care unit and hospital stays. Brain relaxation conditions in group HTS (score 1/2/3/4, n=10/17/2/7) were better than those in group M (score 1/2/3/4, n=3/18/3/14, P=0.0281). Patients in group M had higher urine output, received more crystalloids during surgery, and displayed lower central venous pressure and lower natremia at the end of surgery than did patients in group HTS. No significant differences in postoperative complications or lengths of intensive care unit and hospital stays were observed between the groups. Our results suggest that HTS provides better brain relaxation than mannitol during elective intracranial tumor surgery.

  20. Timing of hypertonic saline and airway clearance techniques in adults with cystic fibrosis during pulmonary exacerbation: pilot data from a randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Katherine; Moran, Fidelma; Tunney, Michael M; Elborn, J Stuart; Bradbury, Ian; Downey, Damian G; Rendall, Jackie; Bradley, Judy M

    2017-01-01

    Background Streamlining the timing of treatments in cystic fibrosis (CF) is important to optimise adherence while ensuring efficacy. The optimal timing of treatment with hypertonic saline (HTS) and airway clearance techniques (ACT) is unknown. Objectives This study hypothesised that HTS before ACT would be more effective than HTS during ACT as measured by Lung Clearance Index (LCI). Methods Adults with CF providing written informed consent were randomised to a crossover trial of HTS before ACT or HTS during ACT on consecutive days. ACT treatment consisted of Acapella Duet. Patients completed LCI and spirometry at baseline and 90 min post treatment. Mean difference (MD) and 95% CIs were reported. Results 13 subjects completed the study (mean (SD) age 33 (12) years, forced expiratory volume in 1second % (FEV1%) predicted 51% (22), LCI (no. turnovers) 14 (4)). Comparing the two treatments (HTS before ACT vs HTS during ACT), the change from baseline to 90 min post treatment in LCI (MD (95% CI) −0.02 (−0.63 to 0.59)) and FEV1% predicted (MD (95% CI) −0.25 (−2.50 to 1.99)) was not significant. There was no difference in sputum weight (MD (95% CI) −3.0 (−14.9 to 8.9)), patient perceived ease of clearance (MD (95% CI) 0.4 (−0.6 to 1.3) or satisfaction (MD (95% CI) 0.4 (−0.6 to 1.5)). The time taken for HTS during ACT was significantly shorter (MD (95% CI) 14.7 (9.8 to 19.6)). Conclusions In this pilot study, HTS before ACT was no more effective than HTS during ACT as measured by LCI. Trial registration number NCT01753869; Pre-results. PMID:28123751

  1. Timing of hypertonic saline and airway clearance techniques in adults with cystic fibrosis during pulmonary exacerbation: pilot data from a randomised crossover study.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Katherine; Moran, Fidelma; Tunney, Michael M; Elborn, J Stuart; Bradbury, Ian; Downey, Damian G; Rendall, Jackie; Bradley, Judy M

    2017-01-01

    Streamlining the timing of treatments in cystic fibrosis (CF) is important to optimise adherence while ensuring efficacy. The optimal timing of treatment with hypertonic saline (HTS) and airway clearance techniques (ACT) is unknown. This study hypothesised that HTS before ACT would be more effective than HTS during ACT as measured by Lung Clearance Index (LCI). Adults with CF providing written informed consent were randomised to a crossover trial of HTS before ACT or HTS during ACT on consecutive days. ACT treatment consisted of Acapella Duet. Patients completed LCI and spirometry at baseline and 90 min post treatment. Mean difference (MD) and 95% CIs were reported. 13 subjects completed the study (mean (SD) age 33 (12) years, forced expiratory volume in 1second % (FEV1%) predicted 51% (22), LCI (no. turnovers) 14 (4)). Comparing the two treatments (HTS before ACT vs HTS during ACT), the change from baseline to 90 min post treatment in LCI (MD (95% CI) -0.02 (-0.63 to 0.59)) and FEV1% predicted (MD (95% CI) -0.25 (-2.50 to 1.99)) was not significant. There was no difference in sputum weight (MD (95% CI) -3.0 (-14.9 to 8.9)), patient perceived ease of clearance (MD (95% CI) 0.4 (-0.6 to 1.3) or satisfaction (MD (95% CI) 0.4 (-0.6 to 1.5)). The time taken for HTS during ACT was significantly shorter (MD (95% CI) 14.7 (9.8 to 19.6)). In this pilot study, HTS before ACT was no more effective than HTS during ACT as measured by LCI. NCT01753869; Pre-results.

  2. The influence of hypertonic mannitol on regional myocardial blood flow during acute and chronic myocardial ischemia in anesthetized and awake intact dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Willerson, J T; Watson, J T; Hutton, I; Fixler, D E; Curry, G C; Templeton, G H

    1975-01-01

    The influence of hypertonic mannitol on regional myocardial blood flow and ventricular performance was studied during acute myocardial ischemia in awake, unsedated and in anesthesized dogs and after myocardial infarction in awake unsedated dogs. Regional myocardial blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres. Generalized increases in regional myocardial blood flow occurred after mannitol in all of the different animal models studied. The increases in coronary blood flow after mannitol were just as impressive in the nonischemic regions as in the ischemic portion of the left ventricle in all of the different models that were examined in this study. Improvement in regional myocardial blood flow to the ischemic area of the left ventricle after mannitol was associated with a reduction in ST segment elevation during acute myocardial ischemia in anesthetized dogs. The increases in regional myocardial flow after mannitol were also associated with increases in contractility, but the increases in flow appeared to be more impressive than the changes in contractility. The data obtained demonstrate that mannitol increases regional coronary blood flow to both ischemic and nonischemic myocardium in both anesthetized and awake, unsedated, intact dogs with acute and chronic myocardial ischemia and that mannitol reduces ST segment elevation during acute myocardial ischemia in anesthetized dogs. Thus the results suggest that under these circumstances the increases in regional myocardial blood flow after mannitol are of physiological importance in reducing the extent of myocardial injury. Since coronary blood flow increased to nonischemic regions the increases in regional myocardial flow demonstrated in this study after mannitol cannot be entirely explained by the mechanism of reduction in ischemic cell swelling. PMID:1123427

  3. Immune-Inflammatory and Metabolic Effects of High Dose Furosemide plus Hypertonic Saline Solution (HSS) Treatment in Cirrhotic Subjects with Refractory Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Bellia, Chiara; Clemente, Giuseppe; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Maida, Carlo; Simonetta, Irene; Vassallo, Valerio; Di Bona, Danilo; Gulotta, Eliana; Ciaccio, Marcello; Pinto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with chronic liver diseases are usually thin as a result of hypermetabolism and malnutrition expressed by reduced levels of leptin and impairment of other adyponectins such as visfatin. Aims We evaluated the metabolic and inflammatory effects of intravenous high-dose furosemide plus hypertonic saline solutions (HSS) compared with repeated paracentesis and a standard oral diuretic schedule, in patients with cirrhosis and refractory ascites. Methods 59 consecutive cirrhotic patients with refractory ascites unresponsive to outpatient treatment. Enrolled subjects were randomized to treatment with intravenous infusion of furosemide (125–250mg⁄bid) plus small volumes of HSS from the first day after admission until 3 days before discharge (Group A, n:38), or repeated paracentesis from the first day after admission until 3 days before discharge (Group B, n: 21). Plasma levels of ANP, BNP, Leptin, visfatin, IL-1β, TNF-a, IL-6 were measured before and after the two type of treatment. Results Subjects in group A were observed to have a significant reduction of serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, ANP, BNP, and visfatin, thus regarding primary efficacy endpoints, in Group A vs. Group B we observed higher Δ-TNF-α, Δ-IL-1β, Δ-IL-6, Δ-ANP, Δ-BNP, Δ-visfatin, Δ-Leptin at discharge. Discussion Our findings underline the possible inflammatory and metabolic effect of saline overload correction in treatment of cirrhosis complications such as refractory ascites, suggesting a possible role of inflammatory and metabolic-nutritional variables as severity markers in these patients. PMID:27941973

  4. Does nebulized epinephrine improve the efficacy of hypertonic saline solution in the treatment of hospitalized moderate acute bronchiolitis? A double blind, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Flores-González, Jose Carlos; Dominguez-Coronel, Maria Teresa; Matamala Morillo, Miguel Angel; Aragón Ramírez, Miriam; García Ortega, Rosa María; Dávila Corrales, Francisco Javier; García Palacios, Maria Victoria; Perez Guerrero, Juan Jesus; García García, Laura; Lechuga Sancho, Alfonso María

    2016-04-01

    Nebulized 3% hypertonic saline solution (HSS 3%) has proven to reduce hospital stay in infants with acute bronchiolitis, as compared with nebulized physiological saline solutions. There are no studies assessing the effectiveness of nebulized epinephrine in patients treated with HSS 3%. The aim of this study was to compare the length of stay (LOS) in hospitalized patients treated with HSS 3% with placebo vs. HSS 3% with epinephrine. Secondarily we aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of both treatments. We performed a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study, including infants hospitalized for moderate acute bronchiolitis. Both groups received standard life support and were randomly treated with nebulized HSS 3% (7 mL) with either placebo 3 mL or epinephrine 3 mL. Nebulizations were initially administered every four hours and this interval was modified according to the patient's response. Sixty-four infants were included, 32 patients in each group. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups (P=0.948) in length of stay, disease severity, SatO2, respiratory rate or heart rate. On the third day of hospitalization, severity and respiratory rate in the HSS 3%+E presented a non statistically significant trend to an earlier improvement, (P=0.063 and P=0.096 repectively). No adverse events occurred. Four patients (two from each group) required transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit. With a third of the final estimated sample, we find a trend to an earlier clinical recovery in the epinephrine group, even though no statistical significant differences in LOS were found. The study needs to be continued until the total sample is recruited.

  5. Nebulized hypertonic saline treatment reduces both rate and duration of hospitalization for acute bronchiolitis in infants: an updated meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ju; Lee, Wen-Li; Wang, Chuang-Ming; Chou, Hsin-Hsu

    2014-12-01

    Nebulized hypertonic saline (HS) treatment reduced the length of hospitalization in infants with acute bronchiolitis in a previous meta-analysis. However, there was no reduction in the admission rate. We hypothesized that nebulized HS treatment might significantly decrease both the duration and the rate of hospitalization if more randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) without a language restriction. A meta-analysis was performed based on the efficacy of nebulized HS treatment in infants with acute bronchiolitis. We used weighted mean difference (WMD) and risk ratio as effect size metrics. Eleven studies were identified that enrolled 1070 infants. Nebulized HS treatment significantly decreased the duration and rate of hospitalization compared with nebulized normal saline (NS) [duration of hospitalization: WMD = -0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -1.38 to -0.54, p < 0.001; rate of hospitalization: risk ratio = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37-0.93, p = 0.02]. Furthermore, nebulized HS treatment had a beneficial effect in reducing the clinical severity (CS) score of acute bronchiolitis infants post-treatment (Day 1: WMD = -0.77, 95% CI = -1.30 to -0.24, p = 0.005; Day 2: WMD = -0.85, 95% CI = -1.30 to -0.39, p < 0.001; Day 3: WMD = -1.14, 95% CI = -1.69 to -0.58, p < 0.001). There was no decrease in the rate of readmission (risk ratio = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.68-1.73, p = 0.74). Nebulized HS treatment significantly decreased both the rate and the duration of hospitalization. Due to the efficacy and cost-effectiveness, HS should be considered for the treatment of acute bronchiolitis in infants. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Can hypertonic saline inhalation influence preformed chemokine and mediator release in induced sputum of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients? Comparison with isotonic saline.

    PubMed

    Cianchetti, S; Bacci, E; Bartoli, M L; Ruocco, L; Pavia, T; Dente, F L; Di Franco, A; Vagaggini, B; Paggiaro, P

    2007-12-01

    Hypertonic saline (HS) has been shown to modulate in vitro cell functions according to the state of cell activation; however, few studies have evaluated the effect of HS in vivo. Chronic airway inflammation, a major feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is associated with an activation of inflammatory and resident cells, which in turn makes them more prompt to respond to further stimuli. To evaluate whether HS might modulate, also in vivo, the release of preformed mediators and intracellular chemokines from airway cells of COPD patients. Sputum was induced by inhalation of either HS (4.5% w/v) or isotonic saline (IS 0.9% w/v) solution and processed by plug selection. We measured eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), neutrophil elastase (NE), IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in sputum samples obtained by either HS or IS inhalation in 24 COPD patients. No significant difference in mediators measured in sputum samples obtained by the two different inductions was observed; also, there was no significant difference in sputum sample volumes, cell viability, total and differential cell counts. Repeatability between the two tests was high for ECP, NE, macrophages, neutrophils and eosinophils, and satisfactory for IL-8 and MCP-1. Hyperosmolarity does not affect the levels of the inflammatory mediators and chemokines examined or the cell counts measured in induced sputum obtained from COPD patients. This study does not support the hypothesis that HS can stimulate chemokine and mediator release from airway cells of COPD patients. Therefore, HS and IS can be interchangeably used to measure inflammatory mediators in the sputum supernatant of COPD patients.

  7. In Situ Fluorescence Measurement of Tear Film [Na+], [K+], [Cl−], and pH in Mice Shows Marked Hypertonicity in Aquaporin-5 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ederra, Javier; Levin, Marc H.; Verkman, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Tear film composition depends on water and ion transport across ocular surface epithelia and on fluid secretion by lacrimal glands. The purpose of this study was to establish in situ fluorescence methods to measure tear film ionic concentrations and pH in mice and to determine whether tear film composition is sensitive to deficiency of the major ocular surface aquaporin water channels. Methods Tear film ionic concentrations and pH were measured in anesthetized mice by ratio imaging fluorescence microscopy after topical application of ion/pH-sensing, dual-wavelength fluorescent indicators. [Na+], [K+], and [Cl−] were measured with membrane-impermeant indicators developed by our laboratory, and pH was measured with bis(carboxyethyl)-carboxyfluorescein fluorescence-conjugated dextran. Measurements were performed on wild-type mice and on knockout mice lacking aquaporins AQP1, AQP3, and AQP5. Results In wild-type mice, tear film [Na+] was 139 ± 8 mM, [K+] was 48 ± 1 mM, [Cl−] was 127 ± 4 mM, and pH was 7.59 ± 0.2 (SE; n = 5–8). pH did not differ significantly in the AQP knockout mice. [Na+] was increased by approximately twofold in AQP5 null mice (230 ± 20 mM) and was greatly reduced after exposure of the ocular surface to a humidified atmosphere. [K+] was mildly reduced in AQP1 null mice. Conclusions These results establish an in situ optical methodology to measure tear film [Na+], [K+], [Cl−], and pH in living mice, without the need for fluid sampling. Tear film hypertonicity in AQP5 deficiency is likely caused by reduced transcorneal water secretion in response to evaporative water loss. PMID:19136711

  8. Comparison of 7.2% hypertonic saline - 6% hydroxyethyl starch solution and 6% hydroxyethyl starch solution after the induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing elective neurosurgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Liujiazi; Wang, Baoguo; Wang, Shuangyan; Mu, Feng; Gu, Ke

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The ideal solution for fluid management during neurosurgical procedures remains controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a 7.2% hypertonic saline - 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HS-HES) solution and a 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solution on clinical, hemodynamic and laboratory variables during elective neurosurgical procedures. METHODS: Forty patients scheduled for elective neurosurgical procedures were randomly assigned to the HS-HES group or the HES group. After the induction of anesthesia, patients in the HS-HES group received 250 mL of HS-HES (500 mL/h), whereas the patients in the HES group received 1,000 mL of HES (1000 mL/h). The monitored variables included clinical, hemodynamic and laboratory parameters. Chictr.org: ChiCTR-TRC-12002357 RESULTS: The patients who received the HS-HES solution had a significant decrease in the intraoperative total fluid input (p<0.01), the volume of Ringer's solution required (p<0.05), the fluid balance (p<0.01) and their dural tension scores (p<0.05). The total urine output, blood loss, bleeding severity scores, operation duration and hemodynamic variables were similar in both groups (p>0.05). Moreover, compared with the HES group, the HS-HES group had significantly higher plasma concentrations of sodium and chloride, increasing the osmolality (p<0.01). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that HS-HES reduced the volume of intraoperative fluid required to maintain the patients undergoing surgery and led to a decrease in the intraoperative fluid balance. Moreover, HS-HES improved the dural tension scores and provided satisfactory brain relaxation. Our results indicate that HS-HES may represent a new avenue for volume therapy during elective neurosurgical procedures. PMID:23644851

  9. Comparison of 7.2% hypertonic saline - 6% hydroxyethyl starch solution and 6% hydroxyethyl starch solution after the induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing elective neurosurgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Shao, Liujiazi; Wang, Baoguo; Wang, Shuangyan; Mu, Feng; Gu, Ke

    2013-01-01

    The ideal solution for fluid management during neurosurgical procedures remains controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a 7.2% hypertonic saline - 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HS-HES) solution and a 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solution on clinical, hemodynamic and laboratory variables during elective neurosurgical procedures. Forty patients scheduled for elective neurosurgical procedures were randomly assigned to the HS-HES group orthe HES group. Afterthe induction of anesthesia, patients in the HS-HES group received 250 mL of HS-HES (500 mL/h), whereas the patients in the HES group received 1,000 mL of HES (1000 mL/h). The monitored variables included clinical, hemodynamic and laboratory parameters. Chictr.org: ChiCTR-TRC-12002357 The patients who received the HS-HES solution had a significant decrease in the intraoperative total fluid input (p<0.01), the volume of Ringer's solution required (p<0.05), the fluid balance (p<0.01) and their dural tension scores (p<0.05). The total urine output, blood loss, bleeding severity scores, operation duration and hemodynamic variables were similar in both groups (p>0.05). Moreover, compared with the HES group, the HS-HES group had significantly higher plasma concentrations of sodium and chloride, increasing the osmolality (p<0.01). Our results suggest that HS-HES reduced the volume of intraoperative fluid required to maintain the patients undergoing surgery and led to a decrease in the intraoperative fluid balance. Moreover, HS-HES improved the dural tension scores and provided satisfactory brain relaxation. Our results indicate that HS-HES may represent a new avenue for volume therapy during elective neurosurgical procedures.

  10. Hypertonic Saline for Brain Relaxation and Intracranial Pressure in Patients Undergoing Neurosurgical Procedures: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Liujiazi; Hong, Fangxiao; Zou, Yi; Hao, Xiaofang; Hou, Haijun; Tian, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background A wealth of evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has indicated that hypertonic saline (HS) is at least as effective as, if not better than, mannitol in the treatment of increased intracranial pressure(ICP). However, there is little known about the effects of HS in patients during neurosurgery. Thus, this meta-analysis was performed to compare the intraoperative effects of HS with mannitol in patients undergoing craniotomy. Methods According to the research strategy, we searched PUBMED, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Other sources such as the internet-based clinical trial registries and conference proceedings were also searched. After literature searching, two investigators independently performed literature screening, quality assessment of the included trials and data extraction. The outcomes included intraoperative brain relaxation, intraoperative ICP, total volume of fluid required, diuresis, hemodynamic parameters, electrolyte level, mortality or dependence and adverse events. Results Seven RCTs with 468 participants were included. The quality of the included trials was acceptable. HS could significantly increase the odds of satisfactory intraoperative brain relaxation (OR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.32–3.81; P = 0.003) and decrease the mean difference (MD) of maximal ICP (MD: −2.51mmHg, 95% CI: −3.39—1.93mmHg; P<0.00001) in comparison with mannitol with no significant heterogeneity among the study results. Compared with HS, mannitol had a more prominent diuretic effect. And patients treated with HS had significantly higher serum sodium than mannitol-treated patients. Conclusions Considering that robust outcome measures are absent because brain relaxation and ICP can be influenced by several factors except for the hyperosmotic agents, the results of present meta-analysis should be interpreted with cautions. Well-designed RCTs in the future are needed to further test the present results, identify the impact of HS

  11. Hypertonic saline for brain relaxation and intracranial pressure in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Shao, Liujiazi; Hong, Fangxiao; Zou, Yi; Hao, Xiaofang; Hou, Haijun; Tian, Ming

    2015-01-01

    A wealth of evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has indicated that hypertonic saline (HS) is at least as effective as, if not better than, mannitol in the treatment of increased intracranial pressure(ICP). However, there is little known about the effects of HS in patients during neurosurgery. Thus, this meta-analysis was performed to compare the intraoperative effects of HS with mannitol in patients undergoing craniotomy. According to the research strategy, we searched PUBMED, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Other sources such as the internet-based clinical trial registries and conference proceedings were also searched. After literature searching, two investigators independently performed literature screening, quality assessment of the included trials and data extraction. The outcomes included intraoperative brain relaxation, intraoperative ICP, total volume of fluid required, diuresis, hemodynamic parameters, electrolyte level, mortality or dependence and adverse events. Seven RCTs with 468 participants were included. The quality of the included trials was acceptable. HS could significantly increase the odds of satisfactory intraoperative brain relaxation (OR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.32-3.81; P = 0.003) and decrease the mean difference (MD) of maximal ICP (MD: -2.51 mmHg, 95% CI: -3.39--1.93 mmHg; P<0.00001) in comparison with mannitol with no significant heterogeneity among the study results. Compared with HS, mannitol had a more prominent diuretic effect. And patients treated with HS had significantly higher serum sodium than mannitol-treated patients. Considering that robust outcome measures are absent because brain relaxation and ICP can be influenced by several factors except for the hyperosmotic agents, the results of present meta-analysis should be interpreted with cautions. Well-designed RCTs in the future are needed to further test the present results, identify the impact of HS on the clinically relevant outcomes and

  12. Pollen tube growth is coupled to the extracellular calcium ion flux and the intracellular calcium gradient: effect of BAPTA-type buffers and hypertonic media.

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, E S; Miller, D D; Callaham, D A; Shipley, A M; Rivers, B A; Cresti, M; Hepler, P K

    1994-01-01

    Lily pollen tubes possess a steep, tip-focused intracellular Ca2+ gradient and a tip-directed extracellular Ca2+ influx. Ratiometric ion imaging revealed that the gradient extends from above 3.0 microM at the apex to approximately 0.2 microM within 20 microns from the tip, while application of the Ca(2+)-specific vibrating electrode indicated that the extracellular influx measured between 1.4 and 14 pmol cm-2 sec-1. We examined the relationship between these phenomena and their role in tube growth by using different 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)-type buffers and hypertonic media. Injection of active BAPTA-type buffers or application of elevated levels of sucrose reversibly inhibited growth, destroyed tip zonation of organelles, and modified normal patterns of cytoplasmic streaming. Simultaneously, these treatments dissipated both the intracellular tip-focused gradient and the extracellular Ca2+ flux. Of the BAPTA-type buffers, 5,5'-dibromo-BAPTA (dissociation constant [Kd] is 1.5 microM) and 4,4'-difluoro-BAPTA (Kd of 1.7 microM) exhibited greater activity than those buffers with either a higher affinity (5,5'-dimethyl-BAPTA, Kd of 0.15 microM; BAPTA, Kd of 0.21 microM; 5,5'-difluoro-BAPTA, Kd of 0.25 microM) or lower affinity (5-methyl, 5'-nitro-BAPTA, Kd of 22 microM) for Ca2+. Our findings provide evidence that growing pollen tubes have open Ca2+ channels in their tip and that these channels become inactivated in nongrowing tubes. The studies with elevated sucrose support the view that stretching of the apical plasma membrane contributes to the maintenance of the Ca2+ signal. PMID:7866026

  13. An equiosmolar study on early intracranial physiology and long term outcome in severe traumatic brain injury comparing mannitol and hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Jagannatha, Aniruddha Tekkatte; Sriganesh, Kamath; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira; Rao, Ganne Sesha Umamaheswara

    2016-05-01

    The impact of hypertonic saline (HTS) on long term control of intracranial hypertension (ICH) is yet to be established. The current prospective randomized controlled study was carried out in 38 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Over 450 episodes of refractory ICH were treated with equiosmolar boluses of 20% mannitol in 20 patients and 3.0% HTS in 18 subjects. Intracranial pressure (ICP) was monitored for 6days. ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were comparable between the groups. The mannitol group had a progressive increase in the ICP over the study period (p=0.01). A similar increase was not seen in the HTS group (p=0.1). The percentage time for which the ICP remained below a threshold of 20 mmHg on day6 was higher in the HTS group (63% versus 49%; p=0.3). The duration of inotrope requirement in the HTS group was less compared to the mannitol group (p=0.06). The slope of fall in ICP in response to a bolus dose at a given baseline value of ICP was higher with HTS compared to mannitol (p=0.0001). In-hospital mortality tended to be lower in the HTS group (3 versus 10; p=0.07) while mortality at 6 months was not different between the groups (6 versus 10; p=0.41). Dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale scores at 6months were comparable between the groups (p=0.21). To conclude, immediate physiological advantages seen with HTS over mannitol did not translate into long term benefit on ICP/CPP control or mortality of patients with TBI.

  14. Regulation of expression of the stress response gene, Osp94: identification of the tonicity response element and intracellular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryoji; Randall, Jeffrey D; Ito, Eri; Manshio, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Yoshio; Gullans, Steven R

    2004-06-15

    Osp94 (osmotic stress protein of 94 kDa) is known to be up-regulated by hypertonic and heat-shock stresses in mouse renal inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD3) cells. To investigate the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the Osp94 gene under these stresses, we cloned and characterized the 5'-flanking region of the gene. Sequence analysis of the proximal 4 kb 5'-flanking region revealed a TATA-less G/C-rich promoter region containing a cluster of Sp1 sites. We also identified upstream sequence motifs similar to the consensus TonE/ORE (tonicity-response element/osmotic response element) as well as the consensus HSE (heat-shock element). Luciferase activities in cells transfected with reporter constructs containing a TonE/ORE-like element (Osp94-TonE; 5'-TGGAAAGGACCAG-3') and HSE enhanced reporter gene expression under hypertonic stress and heat-shock stress respectively. Electrophoretic gel mobility-shift assay showed a slowly migrating band binding to the Osp94-TonE probe, probably representing binding of TonEBP (TonE binding protein) to this enhancer element. Furthermore, treatment of mIMCD3 cells with MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) inhibitors (SB203580, PD98059, U0126 and SP600125) and a proteasome inhibitor (MG132) suppressed the increase in Osp94 gene expression caused by hypertonic NaCl. These results indicate that the 5'-flanking region of Osp94 gene contains a hypertonicity sensitive cis -acting element, Osp94-TonE, which is distinct from a functional HSE. Furthermore, the MAPK and proteasome systems appear to be, at least in part, involved in hypertonic-stressmediated regulation of Osp94 through Osp94-TonE.

  15. Challenging Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichle, Joe, Ed.; DePaepe, Paris, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The articles in this feature or theme issue describe successful approaches to positive, community-based management of severe challenging behavior. Programs include: a train-the-trainer strategy for inservice training used across the country; the use of student volunteers as community integration facilitators; a school-based intervention project…

  16. Quill Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2006-01-01

    Teaching high school students the "grammar" of art--the principles and elements of art and design--while also teaching them about creativity and concept can be difficult. This author has found that combining beginning lessons in line, shape, value, texture, form, and color with projects requiring innovation and inspiration, though challenging, is…

  17. Short-term effects of low-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline and hydroxyethylstarch in an experimental model of lung contusion and haemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Prunet, Bertrand; Cordier, Pierre-Yves; Prat, Nicolas; De Bourmont, Sophie; Couret, David; Lambert, Dominique; Michelet, Pierre

    2016-09-20

    This study aimed to assess the short-term respiratory tolerance and haemodynamic efficiency of low-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline and hydroxyethylstarch (HS/HES) in a pig model of lung contusion and controlled haemorrhagic shock. We hypothesised that a low-volume of HS/HES after haemorrhagic shock did not impact contused lungs in terms of extravascular lung water 3hours after trauma. A lung contusion resulting from blunt chest trauma was induced in 28 anaesthetised female pigs with five bolt-shots to the right thoracic cage, followed by haemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation. Pigs were randomly allocated into two groups: fluid resuscitation by 4ml/kg of HS/HES, or fluid resuscitation by 10ml/kg of normal saline (NS). Monitoring was based on transpulmonary thermodilution and a pulmonary artery catheter. After 3h, animals were euthanized to measure extravascular lung water (EVLW) by gravimetry. Blunt chest trauma was followed by a transient collapse and hypoxaemia in both groups. Post-mortem gravimetric assessment demonstrated a significant difference between EVLW in the NS-group (8.1±0.7ml/kg) and in the HS/HES-group (6.2±0.6ml/kg, P=0.038). Based on a pathological EVLW threshold of > 7ml/kg, results indicated that only the NS-group experienced moderate pulmonary oedema, contrary to the HS/HES-group. After haemorrhagic shock, HS/HES infusion enabled the restoration of effective mean arterial pressure and cardiac index. Intrapulmonary shunting increased transiently after fluid resuscitation but there was no significant impairment of oxygenation. In this pig model of lung contusion, the short-term assessment of fluid resuscitation after haemorrhagic shock with 4ml/kg of HS/HES showed that pulmonary oedema was avoided compared to fluid resuscitation with 10ml/kg of NS. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Effects of hypertonic sodium chloride hydroxyethyl starch 40 injection in treatment of acute intracranial hypertension complicated by hemorrhagic shock in dogs].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hua-ping; Gu, Miao-ning; Xiao, Jin-fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhao, Zhen-long

    2008-03-01

    To observe the effect of hypertonic sodium chloride hydroxyethyl starch 40 injection (HSH) in treatment of acute intracranial hypertension complicated by hemorrhagic shock in dogs, and explore the mechanism of the effects of HSH. Twenty dogs were randomized into 4 equal groups, namely the 7.5% NaCl (HS) group, Ringer-Lactates solution (RL) group, hydroxyethyl strarch (HES) group, and HSH group. Canine models of acute intracranial hypertension complicated by hemorrhagic shock were established by epidural balloon inflation with saline and rapid discharge of the arterial blood. One hour after the induced shock, the dogs were given HS (6 ml/kg), RL of 3-fold volume of blood loss, HES of equivalent volume of blood loss, and HSH 8 ml/kg in the 4 groups, respectively. During the shock and resuscitationperiod, the intracranial pressure (ICP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) of the dogs were monitored, and the serum sodium level and plasma osmolality were measured at 30 min, 1 h and 4 h after the resuscitation. All dogs had similar MAP, CPP, and ICP before resuscitation (P>0.05). After resuscitation, the MAP was significantly improved (P<0.01), but the dogs in HSH group exhibited the fastest response; with the exception of the dogs in HS group to have significantly decreased MAP 2 h after resuscitation (P<0.01), all the other dogs maintained the MAP for 4 h. The CPP was also significantly increased after resuscitation (P<0.01), and in HS group, CPP decreased significantly after 2 h (P<0.01), and HSH group maintained the high CPP after 4 h. The ICP was increased significantly in RL and HES groups after resuscitation (P<0.01), reaching the peak level at 1 and 3 h, respectively, but in HS and HSH groups, the ICP decreased significantly to the lowest level at 1 h (P<0.01) which was maintained for 4 h. After resuscitation, the plasma sodium and plasma osmolality were significantly increased in HSH and HS groups. In dogs with acute intracranial

  19. [Influence of enteral administration of hypertonic electrolyte glucose solution on the intestinal barrier and organ functions in dogs with severe burn].

    PubMed

    Hu, Quan; Hu, Sen; Chai, Jia-ke; Shen, Xiao-peng; Che, Jin-wei; Sheng, Zhi-yong

    2010-02-01

    To study the change in intestinal barrier and organ functions of burned dog after enteral administration of hypertonic electrolyte glucose solution (HEGS) in shock stage. Twenty-four Beagle dogs inflicted with 35% TBSA full-thickness burn were divided into no-fluid group (NF), intravenous infusion with isotonic electrolyte glucose solution (IEGS) group (II group), enteral infusion with IEGS group (EI), and enteral infusion with HEGS group (EH) according to the random number table, with 6 dogs in each group. Saline, containing 50 g/L glucose, was intravenously or enterally infused into dogs in II group and EI group respectively 0.5 hour post injury (PIH) for resuscitation. Total infusion volume within PIH 24 was 4 mL x kg(-1) x %TBSA(-1) (half of the total volume was infused in the first 8 hours in a constant speed, the other half volume was infused in the rest 16 hours in a constant speed). HEGS, containing 18 g/L NaCl and 50 g/L glucose, was enterally infused into dogs in EH group. Total infusion volume within PIH 24 was 2 mL x kg(-1) x %TBSA(-1), with the same infusion speed as that in II and EI groups. Liver and kidney function indexes [activity of ALT and CK-MB, expression levels of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in serum], activity of diamine oxidase (DAO), and activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in intestinal mucosa at PIH 24 were determined. ALT activity in each group was close to one another. Serum levels of creatinine and BUN in II, EI, and EH groups were significantly lower than those in NF group. CK-MB activity obviously increased at PIH 2 in every group. CK-MB activity in EH group at PIH 2 to 8 was respectively lower than that in NF and II groups. DAO activity in serum in II, EI, and EH groups decreased since PIH 4 or PIH 6, respectively from (3.9 + or - 0.6) U/L to (3.6 + or - 0.5) U/L, (4.8 + or - 0.4) U/L to (2.8 + or - 0.8) U/L, (6.4 + or - 1.8) U/L to (3.5 + or - 0.8) U/L, all were significantly lower than those in NF group [from (12.5 + or - 0

  20. National Drug IQ Challenge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug IQ Challenge 2016 National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge Print Get Started! Correct/Total Questions: Score: Other ... version of the 2016 National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge , [PDF, 637KB]. Download an accessible version of the ...

  1. Developing a Watershed Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a watershed challenge that gives students an opportunity to investigate the challenge of using a watershed area as a site for development, examining the many aspects of this multifaceted problem. This design challenge could work well in a team-based format, with students taking on specific aspects of the challenges and…

  2. Developing a Watershed Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a watershed challenge that gives students an opportunity to investigate the challenge of using a watershed area as a site for development, examining the many aspects of this multifaceted problem. This design challenge could work well in a team-based format, with students taking on specific aspects of the challenges and…

  3. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The CAFE Green Flight Challenge sponsored by Google will be held at the CAFE Foundation Flight Test Center at Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. The Green Flight Challeng...

  4. Challenges for the millennium.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, C M

    2000-01-01

    Health sciences librarians will face many new challenges in the new millennium. Some we can predict and some we cannot. The Hospital Information Services columns will explore some of these challenges in this and subsequent issues.

  5. Minority Innovation Challenges Institute

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Do you want to learn more about how to compete in NASA’s technical challenges for both prestige and significant cash prizes? NASA’s Minority Innovation Challenges Institute trains and mentors mino...

  6. The Backpack Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Something as simple as carrying books to school can be an interesting design challenge for students. It's an old problem that gets reinvented from time to time. In this article, the author discusses a backpack design challenge in which teachers work with students to design another way to carry books to school. The challenge started by trying to…

  7. Correlation of measured and calculated serum osmolality during mannitol or hypertonic saline infusion in patients after craniotomy: a study protocol and statistical analysis plan for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Xu, Ming; Zhou, Jian-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Brain oedema is a major complication after craniotomy. Hyperosmolar agents have been used as the medical treatment for this condition. Measurement and estimation of serum osmolality during hyperosmolar agent infusion is of clinical importance to evaluate clinical efficacy, adjust dosage and avoid side effects. However, several studies have shown that calculated serum osmolality may lead to a systematic bias compared with direct measurement. In the present study, mannitol or hypertonic saline (HS) will be used in patients after elective craniotomy. We aim to determine the accuracy of serum osmolality estimation during the application of hyperosmolar agent. Methods and analysis The study is a prospective, randomised, double-blinded, controlled, parallel-group design. Adult patients requiring the use of hyperosmolar agents for the prevention or treatment of postoperative brain oedema are enrolled and assigned randomly to one of the two treatment study groups, labelled as ‘M group’ and ‘HS group’. Patients in the M and HS groups receive intravenous infusion of 125 mL of either 20% mannitol or 3.1% sodium chloride solution, respectively. Data will be collected immediately before the infusion of study agents, 15, 30, 60, 120, 240 and 360 min after the start of infusion of experimental agents, which includes serum osmolality, concentration of serum sodium, potassium, urea and glucose. Serum osmolality will be measured by means of freezing point depression. Estimated serum osmolality will also be calculated by using four formulas published previously. Osmole gap is calculated as the difference between the measured and the estimated values. The primary endpoint is the correlation of measured and estimated serum osmolality during hyperosmolar agent infusion. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the International Review Board (IRB) of Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University. Study findings will be disseminated through peer

  8. NASA Centennial Challenges: After the Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    What's it like to participate in a NASA Centennial Challenge? In their own words: "We really had no idea what to expect when we got here. Being able to take all of this...now we have an idea for ne...

  9. Independence of extracellular tortuosity and volume fraction during osmotic challenge in rat neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Kume-Kick, June; Mazel, Tomáš; Voříšek, Ivan; Hrabětová, Sabina; Tao, Lian; Nicholson, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The structural properties of brain extracellular space (ECS) are summarised by the tortuosity (λ) and the volume fraction (α). To determine if these two parameters were independent, we varied the size of the ECS by changing the NaCl content to alter osmolality of bathing media for rat cortical slices. Values of λ and α were extracted from diffusion measurements using the real-time ionophoretic method with tetramethylammonium (TMA+). In normal medium (305 mosmol kg−1), the average value of λ was 1.69 and of α was 0.24. Reducing osmolality to 150 mosmol kg−1, increased λ to 1.86 and decreased α to 0.12. Increasing osmolality to 350 mosmol kg−1, reduced λ to about 1.67 where it remained unchanged even when osmolality increased further to 500 mosmol kg−1. In contrast, α increased steadily to 0.42 as osmolality increased. Comparison with previously published experiments employing 3000 Mr dextran to measure λ, showed the same behaviour as for TMA+, including the same constant λ in hypertonic media but with a steeper slope in the hypotonic solutions. These data show that λ and α behave differently as the ECS geometry varies. When α decreases, λ increases but when α increases, λ rapidly attains a constant value. A previous model allowing cellular shape to alter during osmotic challenge can account qualitatively for the plateau behaviour of λ. PMID:12122149

  10. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Team Aegis poses with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Lockheed Martin CEO, Marillyn Hewson. Team Aegis was one of the semi-finalists in the Exploration Design Challenge. The goal of the Exploration Design Challenge is for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation. The winner of the challenge was announced on April 25, 2014 at the USA Science and Engineering Festival at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  11. ELN implementation challenges.

    PubMed

    Drake, David J

    2007-08-01

    Electronic Laboratory Notebooks are becoming foundation platforms within many pharmaceutical companies because of the benefits that they offer to both the business and the scientists alike. Implementing an ELN within an established organisation presents challenges for the project team, both in terms of managing the impact on the scientists and the technical requirements for integration and data management. Implementation of a commercial ELN is not exempt from such challenges, and working with a third party supplier offers both advantages and additional challenges.

  12. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Team Lore poses with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Lockheed Martin CEO, Marillyn Hewson. Team Lore was one of the semi-finalists in the Exploration Design Challenge. The goal of the Exploration Design Challenge is for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation. The winner of the challenge was announced on April 25, 2014 at the USA Science and Engineering Festival at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  13. NASA Exploration Design Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From the International Space Station, astronaut Sunita Williams welcomes participants to the NASA Exploration Design Challenge and explains the uncertainties about the effects of space radiation on...

  14. College and University Challenge

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EPA's Green Power Partnership Challenge tracks and recognizes U.S. colleges and universities recognizes the largest single green power users within each participating collegiate athletic conferences.

  15. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Team Lore listens in the audience as NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks at the event to announce the winner of the Exploration Design Challenge. Team Lore was one of the semi-finalists in the challenge. The goal of the Exploration Design Challenge is for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation. The winner of the challenge was announced on April 25, 2014 at the USA Science and Engineering Festival at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  16. Science Challenge Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The…

  17. A Call to Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colleary, Shawn

    2004-01-01

    This article features the Challenge School, a magnet school in the CherryCreek School District in Colorado that focuses on academically advanced, motivated, and gifted students. The school was developed as an alternative to best meet the needs of these students. The Challenge School focuses on high student achievement and commensurate academic…

  18. The Intersection Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Street intersections are a source of accidents--for both automobiles and pedestrians. This article presents an intersection challenge that allows students to explore some possible ways to change the traditional intersection. In this challenge, teachers open up the boundaries and allow students to redesign their world. The first step is to help…

  19. Virtual Bridge Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    This design/problem-solving activity challenges students to design a replacement bridge for one that has been designated as either structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The Aycock MS Technology/STEM Magnet Program Virtual Bridge Design Challenge is an authentic introduction to the engineering design process. It is a socially relevant…

  20. Challenge and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehaffy, George L.

    2012-01-01

    In the past twenty years, various industries have been forever altered by technology: newspapers, book publishing, the photography business, and many more. Higher education too faces unprecedented challenges primarily driven by rapid changes in technology. To meet these challenges and adapt to these changes, new models are needed. Six challenges…

  1. Challenge College, Bradford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flecknoe, Mervyn

    2004-01-01

    What can you expect from a school in an area of high crime where 50 percent of the pupils take free school meals and which operates on a site that cannot be accessed from its main catchment area? In this article, the author shares his experience when he visited Challenge College. A low wall separates Challenge College from the area where most of…

  2. The Intersection Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Street intersections are a source of accidents--for both automobiles and pedestrians. This article presents an intersection challenge that allows students to explore some possible ways to change the traditional intersection. In this challenge, teachers open up the boundaries and allow students to redesign their world. The first step is to help…

  3. Challenge and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehaffy, George L.

    2012-01-01

    In the past twenty years, various industries have been forever altered by technology: newspapers, book publishing, the photography business, and many more. Higher education too faces unprecedented challenges primarily driven by rapid changes in technology. To meet these challenges and adapt to these changes, new models are needed. Six challenges…

  4. Virtual Bridge Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    This design/problem-solving activity challenges students to design a replacement bridge for one that has been designated as either structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The Aycock MS Technology/STEM Magnet Program Virtual Bridge Design Challenge is an authentic introduction to the engineering design process. It is a socially relevant…

  5. First Aid Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a challenge wherein students will be asked to design a portable first aid kit that is normally carried in a recreational vehicle (RV), but can also be hand-carried or backpacked off road for distances of approximately 1-2 miles. This can be a very practical challenge for the students because it touches everyone. Everybody…

  6. Dewey's Challenge to Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Stephen M.; McCarthy, Lucille

    2010-01-01

    Given the serious social problems confronting Americans and others worldwide, the authors propose that Dewey's 1932 challenge to teachers is worthy of reconsideration by educators at all levels. In times similar to our own, Dewey challenged teachers to cultivate students' capacities to identify their happiness with what they can do to improve the…

  7. Challenges Facing Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyen, Edward L., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 17 selected papers from recent issues of the journal, "Focus on Exceptional Children," concerning current and emerging challenges facing the field of special education. The book is organized in two parts. Part 1, "Contemporary Challenges," includes the following articles: "Transitions in Early Childhood Special Education: Issues…

  8. Dewey's Challenge to Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Stephen M.; McCarthy, Lucille

    2010-01-01

    Given the serious social problems confronting Americans and others worldwide, the authors propose that Dewey's 1932 challenge to teachers is worthy of reconsideration by educators at all levels. In times similar to our own, Dewey challenged teachers to cultivate students' capacities to identify their happiness with what they can do to improve the…

  9. Science Challenge Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The…

  10. Challenges to Financing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, R. Craig; Ruch, Robert W.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews court decisions involving challenges to state systems of financing education. The challenges have been based on Fourteenth Amendment rights to equal protection. To date 24 states have been involved with litigation. Systems that promote local control have been generally held to be constitutional. (42 references) (MD)

  11. The Multimedia Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Means, Barbara; Simkins, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Teachers implementing a local history project in Belmont, California, had help from a federally funded technology innovation challenge grant: the Challenge 2000 Multimedia Project. Sponsored by a Silicon Valley school-business partnership, the initiative illustrates how technology can transform classroom learning while supporting instructional…

  12. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  13. First Aid Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a challenge wherein students will be asked to design a portable first aid kit that is normally carried in a recreational vehicle (RV), but can also be hand-carried or backpacked off road for distances of approximately 1-2 miles. This can be a very practical challenge for the students because it touches everyone. Everybody…

  14. The Multimedia Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Means, Barbara; Simkins, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Teachers implementing a local history project in Belmont, California, had help from a federally funded technology innovation challenge grant: the Challenge 2000 Multimedia Project. Sponsored by a Silicon Valley school-business partnership, the initiative illustrates how technology can transform classroom learning while supporting instructional…

  15. Challenges Facing Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyen, Edward L., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 17 selected papers from recent issues of the journal, "Focus on Exceptional Children," concerning current and emerging challenges facing the field of special education. The book is organized in two parts. Part 1, "Contemporary Challenges," includes the following articles: "Transitions in Early Childhood Special Education: Issues…

  16. A Call to Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colleary, Shawn

    2004-01-01

    This article features the Challenge School, a magnet school in the CherryCreek School District in Colorado that focuses on academically advanced, motivated, and gifted students. The school was developed as an alternative to best meet the needs of these students. The Challenge School focuses on high student achievement and commensurate academic…

  17. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  18. Effect of a single dose of salmeterol on the increase in airway eosinophils induced by allergen challenge in asthmatic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dente, F.; Bancalari, L.; Bacci, E.; Bartoli, M.; Carnevali, S.; Cianchetti, S.; Di, F; Giannini, D.; Vagaggini, B.; Testi, R.; Paggiaro, P.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The long acting β2 agonist salmeterol is very effective in preventing asthmatic responses to specific stimuli, and this effect could theoretically be due to some anti-inflammatory property in addition to bronchodilator property.
METHODS—The protective effect of a single dose of salmeterol (50 µg) on allergen induced early and late responses and on the associated airway inflammation was investigated in a double blind, placebo controlled, crossover study in 11 atopic asthmatic subjects. Eosinophil percentages and concentrations of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in peripheral blood and in hypertonic saline induced sputum were measured 24 hours after allergen inhalation.
RESULTS—Salmeterol effectively inhibited both early and late asthmatic responses in comparison with placebo. Salmeterol also inhibited the increase in the percentage of eosinophils in the sputum 24hours after allergen inhalation (median (range) baseline 6% (1-36), after placebo 31% (5-75), after salmeterol 12% (1-63)). However, the increase in both sputum and serum ECP concentrations 24 hours after allergen challenge was not affected by pretreatment with salmeterol.
CONCLUSIONS—A single dose of salmeterol inhibits the allergen induced airway responses and the increase in sputum eosinophils after allergen challenge.

 PMID:10377209

  19. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Pictured are all Semi-finalist teams in the Exploration Design Challenge. NASA Administrator, Charles Bolden and Lockheed Martin CEO, Marillyn Hewson announced the winner of the Exploration Design Challenge at the USA Science and Engineering Festival on April 25, 2014. The goal of the challenge was for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation. The winning team's design will be built and flown aboard the Orion/EFT-1. The USA Science and Engineering Festival is taking place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  20. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Team Titan Shielding Systems poses with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Lockheed Martin CEO, Marillyn Hewson. Team Titan Shielding Systems was one of the semi-finalists in the Exploration Design Challenge. The goal of the Exploration Design Challenge is for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation. The winner of the challenge was announced on April 25, 2014 at the USA Science and Engineering Festival at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  1. Challenging behaviour: a challenge to change.

    PubMed

    van Berckelaer-Onnes, I A; van Loon, J; Peelen, A

    2002-09-01

    People with intellectual disability often exhibit severe behavioural problems. Treatment of these problems is frequently very difficult. In The Netherlands, parents, institutes, schools and others can request the services of an independent advisory team with a pool of professionals who have experience with individuals who exhibit challenging behaviour. In this article the methods of the team will be described using a 24-year-old man as an example. The process took almost 7 years. Finally, this man, who had been living full time in one room in total isolation from the rest of the world, fulfilled his heart's desire--visiting the UK by Hovercraft.

  2. 2017 TRI University Challenge

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Details about the 2017 TRI University Challenge, in which EPA is looking to academic institutions to help build a diverse portfolio of practical and replicable projects that benefit communities, the environment, academic institutions, and the TRI Program.

  3. Green Flight Challenge Highlights

    NASA Image and Video Library

    On Monday, October 3, 2011, NASA's Centennial Challenges program awarded the largest prize in aviation history, created to inspire the development of more fuel-efficient aircraft and spark the star...

  4. The Soviet Economic Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabe, Alexander M.

    1974-01-01

    The nature of the Soviet economic challenge to the world and to the United States is described in relation to standard of living, political influence, hegemony of Eastern Europe, and military power (Author/KM)

  5. Another challenge for scientists

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Laura M; Naqvi, Hassan R; Schmidt, Christian; Covarrubias, David; Mathur, Shawn

    2008-01-01

    By nature, scientists contribute to our understanding of nature and ourselves. As communities undergo significant changes, new challenges are presented. Here, we offer alternative views on recent changes in society. PMID:18637170

  6. Solving Aviation Challenges

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video highlights the challenges NASA aeronautics researchers are tackling to reduce aircraft noise, emissions, fuel consumption, and the innovative ways they're helping to debut NextGen, a rev...

  7. The 2061 Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hundt, Lin

    1999-01-01

    Presents an interview with George Nelson, former astronaut and director of Project 2061 at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Nelson discusses his interest in science and math education, and future challenges for educators. (WRM)

  8. Mars Balance Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Challenge is to develop ideas for how NASA can turn available entry, descent, and landing balance mass on a future Mars mission into a scientific or technological payload. Proposed concepts sho...

  9. A challenge to Goliath

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Megapublishers obligate librarians to buy hundreds of journals they do not need in order to access the journals their constituents actually read. The time has come to challenge this business model, which is unsustainable for the libraries. PMID:19398756

  10. The Electric Car Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Brian E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Electric Car Challenge during which students applied methods of construction to build lightweight, strong vehicles that were powered by electricity. The activity required problem solving, sheet metal work, electricity, design, and construction skills. (JOW)

  11. The Electric Car Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Brian E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Electric Car Challenge during which students applied methods of construction to build lightweight, strong vehicles that were powered by electricity. The activity required problem solving, sheet metal work, electricity, design, and construction skills. (JOW)

  12. International Space Apps Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    During the 2013 Space Apps Challenge, space enthusiasts with diverse backgrounds gathered April 20-21 for a collaborative, global problem-solving effort. Held at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Comple...

  13. The 2061 Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hundt, Lin

    1999-01-01

    Presents an interview with George Nelson, former astronaut and director of Project 2061 at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Nelson discusses his interest in science and math education, and future challenges for educators. (WRM)

  14. Better Buildings Challenge Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2011-06-01

    The Better Buildings Challenge is a national leadership initiative calling on corporate chief executive officers, university presidents, and state and local leaders to make a significant commitment to building energy efficiency.

  15. 2016 ROVER CHALLENGE EVENTS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-08

    2016 ROVER CHALLENGE EVENTS AT THE U.S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER IN HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA. NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE AND HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS COME TOGETHER TO TEST THEIR ENGINEERING SKILLS OVER A SIMULATED OUTER PLANET OBSTACLE COURSE.

  16. Challenger Little League.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Therrien, Victoria

    1992-01-01

    A parent describes her son's participation in Challenger Little League, a special division which allows children with disabilities to play competitive baseball. The division now has 560 leagues with an estimated 20,000 participants. (DB)

  17. Challenger Anniversary Resource Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This commemorative video marks the tenth anniversary, January 28, 1986, of the ninth Challenger flight and the seven astronauts onboard who died when the Challenger exploded 73 seconds into flight. The flight crew was comprised of Cmdr. Francis R. Scobee, Pilot Michael J. Smith, and Mission Specialists Judith A. Resnik, Ellison S. Onizuka, Ronald E. McNair, Gregory Jarvis (Hughes Aircraft representative), and S. Christie McAuliffe (teacher). The flight crew is shown performing preflight training, physiological tests, environmental tests, press conferences, prelaunch activities, and launch activities. The Challenger explosion is shown from both the launch site and from the control center. Various rescue operations, news coverage, and shots of the wreckage after salvage are also presented. President Ronald Reagan is shown giving a tribute at the memorial service for the flight crew. The video ends with a flyby salute and pictures of each of the members of the Challenger.

  18. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Sponsors of all of the semi-finalist teams in the Exploration Design Challenge pose for a group photo with the teams. Team ARES from the Governors School for Science and Technology in Hampton, Va. won the challenge with their radiation shield design, which will be built and flown aboard the Orion/EFT-1. The award was announced at the USA Science and Engineering Festival on April 25, 2014 at the Washington Convention Center. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  19. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    A hot air balloon passes over the campus of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    A hot air balloons pass over the campus of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Sid Siddiqi, seated, and other support personnel prepare noise level measuring equipment for the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Support personnel prepare noise level measuring equipment along the runway for the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The PhoEnix aircraft takes off during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The e-Genius aircraft crew wait as their aircraft is inspected during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, EcoEagle aircraft takes off during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. 2002 Controls Design Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.; Vetter, T. K.; Wells, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    This document is intended to provide the specifications and requirements for a flight control system design challenge. The response to the challenge will involve documenting whether the particular design has met the stated requirements through analysis and computer simulation. The response should be written in the general format of a technical publication with corresponding length limits, e.g., an approximate maximum length of 45 units, with each full-size figure and double-spaced typewritten page constituting one unit.

  7. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    NASA Administrator, Charles Bolden and Lockheed Martin CEO, Marillyn Hewson announce the winner of the Exploration Design Challenge at the USA Science and Engineering Festival on April 25, 2014. The goal of the Exploration Design Challenge was for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation.The USA Science and Engineering Festival is taking place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  8. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    NASA’s Administrator, Charles Bolden speaks with the winning high school team in the Exploration Design Challenge prior to the award ceremony. Team ARES from the Governors School for Science and Technology in Hampton, Va. won the challenge with their radiation shield design, which will be built and flown aboard the Orion/EFT-1. The award was announced at the USA Science and Engineering Festival on April 25, 2014 at the Washington Convention Center. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  9. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Sponsors of Team ARES pose for a group photo with the winning high school team in the Exploration Design Challenge. Team ARES from the Governors School for Science and Technology in Hampton, Va. won the challenge with their radiation shield design, which will be built and flown aboard the Orion/EFT-1. The award was announced at the USA Science and Engineering Festival on April 25, 2014 at the Washington Convention Center. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Team ARES poses with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Lockheed Martin CEO, Marillyn Hewson. Team ARES was the winner of the Exploration Design Challenge. The goal of the Exploration Design Challenge is for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation. The winning team was announced on April 25, 2014 at the USA Science and Engineering Festival at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  11. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    e-Genius Aircraft Pilot Eric Raymond poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn directs the EcoEagle aircraft to the start of the speed competition during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    e-Genius Aircraft Pilot Klaus Ohlmann poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    Various team members applaud as aircraft return from the speed competition during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the speed competition start flag for the EcoEagle aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The PhoEnix aircraft prepares to takeoff for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    PhoEnix Aircraft Co-Pilot Jeff Shingleton poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The e-Genius aircraft takes off during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    Pipistrel-USA Taurus G4 Aircraft Pilot David Morss poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the speed competition checkered flag for the e-Genius aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The e-Genius aircraft is pulled out to the runway for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    The PhoEnix aircraft takes off for the start of the speed competition during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    Media and ground crew look at aircraft as they participate in the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The campus of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, is seen in this aerial view at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Team members of the e-Genius aircraft prepare their plane prior to competition as part of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the speed competition checkered flag for the Taurus G4 aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The Pipistrel-USA, Taurus G4 aircraft takes off during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The e-Genius aircraft prepares to takeoff for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the speed competition checkered flag for the EcoEagle aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The Pipistrel-USA, Taurus G4 aircraft prepares to takeoff for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the speed competition checkered flag for the PhoEnix aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn directs the e-Genius aircraft to the start of the speed competition during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    Pipistrel-USA Taurus G4 Aircraft Pilot Robin Reid poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The EcoEagle, left, and the PhoEnix aircraft are seen on the campus of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    A Pipistrel-USA team member wipes down the Taurus G4 aircraft prior to competition as part of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    PhoEnix Aircraft Pilot Jim Lee poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    EcoEagle Aircraft Pilot Mikhael Ponso poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    The e-Genius aircraft takes off for the start of the speed competition during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The Pipistrel-USA team look up at aircraft as they participate in the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-03

    Pipistrel-USA Team Lead Jack Langelaan talks after his team won the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, on Monday, Oct. 3, 2011 at the NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, Calif. The all electric Taurus G4 aircraft achieved the equivalency of more than 400 miles per gallon. NASA and CAFE Foundation held the challenge to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, EcoEagle is seen as it passes a Grumman Albatross during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The e-Genius aircraft is pulled pulled out to the runway for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Challenges in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Palou, Andreu; Bonet, M Luisa

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is the main nutritional problem and one of the most important health problems in developed societies. Central to the challenge of obesity prevention and management is a thoroughly understanding of its determinants. Multiple socio-cultural, socio-economic, behavioural and biological factors--often interrelated and many of them still unknown or poorly understood--can contribute to the establishment and perpetuation of obese phenotypes. Here, we address current research challenges regarding basic aspects of obesity and emerging science for its control, including brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and browning of white fat as possible therapeutic targets for obesity, the influence of the microbioma, and genetics, epigenetics, nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics of obesity. We also highlight hot topics in relation to food and lifestyle as determinants of obesity, including the brain mechanisms underlying environmental motivation to eat, the biological control of spontaneous physical activity, the possible role of concrete foods and food components, and the importance of early life nutrition and environment. Challenges regarding the connections of obesity with other alterations and pathologies are also briefly addressed, as well as social and economical challenges in relation to healthy food production and lifestyle for the prevention of obesity, and technological challenges in obesity research and management. The objective is to give a panoramic of advances accomplished and still ahead relevant to the different stakeholders engaged in understanding and combating obesity.

  4. The challenge of sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses sustainability in a world that has changed rapidly. The author suggests that ecological assumptions embedded in communism and capitalism are badly flawed, but the flaws were not apparent when there were fewer than a billion people on earth living at low technology levels. Sustaining the earth's vital signs is a challenge to our perception of time, and the numbers - population, environmental damage, oil consumption, waste disposal - are too large to comprehend easily. There is a global debate about what sustainability means. In fact the challenge of sustainability is 6 different challenges: overcoming the tendency to deny inconvenient realities; establishing accurate indicators of human and ecological health; questions about the kinds of technology necessary to make the transition to sustainability; education; the need for an emotional bond between man and nature; rebuilding the existing democratic institutions. 16 refs.

  5. The LSST Data Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelrod, Tim S.; Becla, J.; Connolly, A.; Dossa, D.; Jagatheesan, A.; Kantor, J.; Levine, D.; Lupton, R.; Plante, R.; Smith, C.; Thakar, A.; Tyson, J. A.; LSST Data Management Team

    2007-12-01

    The development of the LSST Data Management System (DMS) includes a series of four Data Challenges that take place during the Design and Development phase of the project. The Data Challenges are partial prototypes of the full DMS, each validating different aspects of the system. DC1, which was executed in 2006, emphasized scalability of the overall processing and data flows. DC2, which was executed in 2007, prototyped the nightly processing pipelines and the middleware that supports them. DC3, planned for execution in 2008, will prototype the data release pipelines. DC4, the final Data Challenge before construction begins, will focus on data access by the astronomical community and the data processing that supports scientific use of the LSST data.

  6. Centennial Challenges Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Sam; Eberly, Eric

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Centennial Challenges Program was initiated in 2005 to directly engage the public in the process of advanced technology development. The program offers incentive prizes to generate revolutionary solutions to problems of interest to NASA and the nation. The program seeks innovations from diverse and nontraditional sources. Competitors are not supported by government funding and awards are only made to successful teams when the challenges are met. In keeping with the spirit of the Wright Brothers and other American innovators, the Centennial Challenge prizes are offered to independent inventors including small businesses, student groups, and individuals. These independent inventors are sought to generate innovative solutions for technical problems of interest to NASA and the nation and to provide them with the opportunity to stimulate or create new business ventures.

  7. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation safety volunteers Meg Hurt, left, and Gail Vann wait on the runway for the arrival of the next aircraft to take part in the speed competition during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    Pipistrel Taurus G4 Pilot David Morss, center, is is weighed-in as CAFE Foundation Weights Chief Wayne Cook, right, and Weight crew member Ron Stout look on during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Pipistrel-USA Pilot David Morss, left, CAFE Foundation Weights Chief Wayne Cook, 2nd from left, and Weight crew member Ron Stout look on as Pipistrel-USA Pilot Robin Reid is weighed-in during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Banff Challenge 2

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, Thomas R.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Experimental particle physics collaborations constantly seek newer and better ideas for improving the sensitivity of their searches for new particles and phenomena. Statistical techniques are the last step in interpreting the results of an experiment; they are used to make discoveries (hypothesis testing), and to measure parameters (point estimation). They are also used in the first step - experiment and analysis design. Banff Challenge 2 asks participants to test their methods of discovering hidden signals in simulated datasets and of measuring the properties of these signals. The Challenge problems are described, and the performances of the submitted entries is summarized, for datasets with and without simulated signals present.

  11. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    Pipistrel-USA Pilots Robin Reid, left, and David Morss, talk on their cell phones shortly after participating in the miles per gallon (MPG) flight in their Taurus G4 aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Mars - Destination and challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, Arnold D.

    1992-01-01

    A general evaluation is conducted of the challenges associated with prospective Mars exploration efforts. The technical challenge posed stems from the unforgiving physical environment of space travel, and such peculiarities of Mars as its great orbital eccentricity and 15-year cyclic variation in transfer energy. Additional considerations arise from the 'architecture' of NASA's Space Exploration Initiative, encompassing the determination of a Mars exploration effort's purpose, scope, and schedule. Finally, numerous unresolved issues arise from the definition of detailed scientific experimentation that is to be done for the sake of the greatest long-term benefit to an understanding of Mars, and the rallying of political support behind a major new exploration initiative.

  13. Mars - Destination and challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrich, Arnold D.

    A general evaluation is conducted of the challenges associated with prospective Mars exploration efforts. The technical challenge posed stems from the unforgiving physical environment of space travel, and such peculiarities of Mars as its great orbital eccentricity and 15-year cyclic variation in transfer energy. Additional considerations arise from the 'architecture' of NASA's Space Exploration Initiative, encompassing the determination of a Mars exploration effort's purpose, scope, and schedule. Finally, numerous unresolved issues arise from the definition of detailed scientific experimentation that is to be done for the sake of the greatest long-term benefit to an understanding of Mars, and the rallying of political support behind a major new exploration initiative.

  14. Challenges in Aeropropulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Donald C.

    1995-01-01

    Aeropropulsion technologies must progress to satisfy increasingly stringent global environmental requirements with economically viable air transportation systems. In this paper, key propulsion technologies to meet future needs are identified and the associated challenges are briefly discussed. Also discussed are NASA's vision, NASA's changing role in meeting today's challenge of a shrinking research budget, and propulsion technology impacts on the environment and air transport economics. Critical aeropropulsion technology drivers are identified and their impact evaluated. The aviation industry is critical to the nation's economy, job creation, and national security. NASA's advanced aeropropulsion technology programs and their relation to the aviation industry are discussed.

  15. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Brien A. Seeley M.D., President of Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation briefs pilots and ground crew prior to competition as part of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Brien A. Seeley M.D., President of Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation, right, briefs pilots and ground crew prior to competition as part of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Phoenix Air team members reattach the wings to their PhoEnix aircraft after pulling it out the weigh-in hanger as they start the day's 2011 Green Flight Challenge competition, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Challenges facing production grids

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

  19. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Astronaut Rex Walheim spoke at the USA Science and Engineering Festival on April 25, 2014. The event was held to announce the winner of the Exploration Design Challenge. The goal of the Exploration Design Challenge was for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation.The winning team's design will be built and flown aboard the Orion/EFT-1. The USA Science and Engineering Festival takes place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  20. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Lockheed Martin CEO Marillyn Hewson spoke at the Orion exhibit at the USA Science and Engineering Festival on April 25, 2014. The event was held to announce the winner of the Exploration Design Challenge. The goal of the Exploration Design Challenge was for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation.The USA Science and Engineering Festival is taking place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  1. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden spoke at the Orion exhibit at the USA Science and Engineering Festival on April 25, 2014. The event was held to announce the winner of the Exploration Design Challenge. The goal of the Exploration Design Challenge was for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation.The USA Science and Engineering Festival is taking place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  2. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    Mark Geyer, Orion Program Manager, spoke at the USA Science and Engineering Festival on April 25, 2014. The event was held to announce the winner of the Exploration Design Challenge. The goal of the Exploration Design Challenge was for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation.The winning team's design will be built and flown aboard the Orion/EFT-1. The USA Science and Engineering Festival takes place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  3. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    NASA’s Administrator, Charles Bolden (left), President/CEO of Lockheed Martin, Marillyn Hewson (right), and astronaut Rex Walheim (back row) pose for a group photo with the winning high school team in the Exploration Design Challenge. Team ARES from the Governors School for Science and Technology in Hampton, Va. won the challenge with their radiation shield design, which will be built and flown aboard the Orion/EFT-1. The award was announced at the USA Science and Engineering Festival on April 25, 2014 at the Washington Convention Center. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  4. Exploration Design Challenge 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-25

    After announcing that Team ARES won the Exploration Design Challenge, NASA Administrator, Charles Bolden and CEO, Marillyn Hewson invite the team up to the stage to receive their award. The goal of the Exploration Design Challenge was for students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation.Team ARES's design will be built and flown aboard the Orion/EFT-1. The USA Science and Engineering Festival is taking place at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC on April 26 and 27, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  5. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    CAFE Foundation Weights Chief Wayne Cook, left, talks with the e-Genius aircraft crew about their weigh-in during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    CAFE Foundation Weights crew member Ron Stout, left, and Weights Chief Wayne Cook, weigh-in the e-Genius aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the speed competition start flag for the Pipistrel-USA, Taurus G4 aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The checkered flag is waved as the PhoEnix aircraft crosses the finish line of the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The PhoEnix, lower left, EcoEagle, 2nd from left, Taurus G4, and e-Genius aircraft, top right, are seen on the campus of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the checkered flag as aircraft pass the finish line of the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The Pipistrel-USA, Taurus G4 aircraft is prepared to be rolled out of the weigh-in hanger during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The Pipistrel-USA Taurus G4 aircraft is pushed back to the weigh-in hanger as they start the day's 2011 Green Flight Challenge competition, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Team members of Pipistrel-USA prepare to have their Taurus G4 aircraft wings weighed using a scale built into the floor of the hanger during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, EcoEagle prepares to takeoff as an demonstration aircraft for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The e-Genius pilots talk with a fellow team member prior to their takeoff for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The Pipistrel-USA, Taurus G4 aircraft is seen as it participates in the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-03

    Team Lead Jack Langelaan poses for a photograph next to the Pipistrel-USA, Taurus G4, aircraft prior to winning the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, on Monday, Oct. 3, 2011 at the NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, Calif. The all electric Taurus G4 aircraft achieved the equivalency of more than 400 miles per gallon. NASA and CAFE held the challenge to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Wayne Cook, Weights Chief, inspects the Pipistrel-USA, Taurus G4 as it rest on a scale built into the floor of the hanger during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The e-Genius, left, Taurus G4, 2nd from left, EcoEagle, and PhoEnix aircraft, top right, are seen on the campus of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Challenges of Clinical Education.

    PubMed

    Brown, Darwin; Sivahop, Jacqueline N

    2017-10-01

    As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the physician assistant (PA) profession and specifically PA education, think of the tens of thousands of clinical preceptors who were or currently still are involved in the education of PA students. The clinical phase of PA programs has become the rate-limiting issue in PA education. For decades, developing clinical education sites was relatively easy. Over the last decade, rapid expansion in medical, nurse practitioner, and PA education programs has resulted in greater challenges in obtaining necessary clinical training sites. This article attempts to address several of the current challenges in PA clinical education.

  1. Robotics for challenging environments

    SciTech Connect

    Demsetz, L.A.

    1996-12-31

    This is the proceedings of the second specialty conference on Robotics for Challenging Environments (RCE-II), held in Albuquerque, NM, June 1-6, 1996. The conference was motivated by the recognition that the use of robotic, automated, and teleoperated equipment in hazardous, unstructured field operations poses challenges different from those faced in more controlled manufacturing environments. Papers were presented in areas including, path planning, operator interfaces, supervisory control, control of robots and manipulators, space applications, standards for space robots, infrastructure applications, robotic excavation, safety in nuclear facilities, mobile systems, and educational applications. Separate abstracts for some papers have been indexed into the energy database.

  2. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation volunteer Oliver Dyer-Bennet, left, CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn, center, and CAFE Foundation volunteer, Justin Dyer-Bennett scan the sky for aircraft during the speed competition portion of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, being held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The Pipistrel-USA, Taurus G4 aircraft approaches for landing as a Grumman Albatross plane is seen in the forground during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  5. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  6. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  7. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  8. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  9. The Moon Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Pat; Leddy, Diana; Johnson, Lindy; Biggam, Sue; Locke, Suzan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a first-grade research project that incorporates trade books and challenges misconceptions. Educators see the power of their students' wonder at work in their classrooms on a daily basis. This wonder must be nourished by students' own experiences--observing the moon on a crystal clear night--as well as by having…

  10. Symposium on Contemporary Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David A.; Graff, Gerald; Nelson, Cary

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss contemporary challenges. David Berry offers advice on teaching the humanities at a community college; Gerald Graff examines how the traditional organization of universities undermines student learning; and Cary Nelson considers the effects on the humanities of the increasing reliance on contingent faculty.

  11. Kayak Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Anson

    2011-01-01

    Living in the Adirondack Park and being an avid outdoorsman has often resulted in the author's love of the outdoors working its way into class projects. In 2010, the author gave a group of 25 students in grades 9-12 a challenge that required them to design and construct a prototype inexpensive, lightweight kayak for backpackers and fisherman. In…

  12. A Challenge to Watson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detterman, Douglas K.

    2011-01-01

    Watson's Jeopardy victory raises the question of the similarity of artificial intelligence and human intelligence. Those of us who study human intelligence issue a challenge to the artificial intelligence community. We will construct a unique battery of tests for any computer that would provide an actual IQ score for the computer. This is the same…

  13. The Best of Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    The articles on physical education and recreation for the mentally retarded have been compiled from the first five volumes of Challenge, a bi-monthly newsletter dealing with physical education, recreation, camping, outdoor education, and related activities for the retarded. Also included are a few entries from Outlook, a newsletter dealing with…

  14. The Store Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical and robotic technologies are merging to present a wonderful opportunity to develop artificial limbs and prosthetic devices for humans injured on the job, in the military, or due to disease. In this challenge, students will have the opportunity to design a store or online service that specifically dedicates itself to amputees. Described…

  15. Electric Vehicle Battery Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    A serious drawback to electric vehicles [batteries only] is the idle time needed to recharge their batteries. In this challenge, students can develop ideas and concepts for battery change-out at automotive service stations. Such a capability would extend the range of electric vehicles.

  16. The Dirty Water Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Mark; Kremer, Angelika; Schluter, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    "The Dirty Water Challenge" is a fun activity that teaches children about their environment in an engaging and practical way. Inquiry is embedded within the practical--students have to design, plan, and then build their own design of water filter. Students are exposed to important concepts from a variety of scientific disciplines, including how…

  17. Challenges for PISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleicher, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) provides a framework in which over 80 countries collaborate to build advanced global metrics to assess the knowledge, skills and character attributes of the students. The design of assessments poses major conceptual and technical challenges, as successful learning. Beyond a sound…

  18. The Better Boat Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomburg, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    "On your mark, get set, go!" Elementary students love to hear these words as they participate in the annual Third Grade Better Boat Challenge. This highly motivational project started a few years ago as the author was developing the third-grade science curriculum to include a study that revolved around models, design, and problem solving. It has…

  19. Leadership in Challenging Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    In spite of tough financial times, resourceful school leaders devise ways to overcome challenges and improve education. To do this, they make strategic use of the resources they have. And they also cultivate learning communities. In this article, Elizabeth A. City describes how school leaders can make more strategic use of three essential…

  20. The challenge of denitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groffman, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the nitrogen cycle at ecosystem, landscape, regional and global scales is a great current challenge in environmental science. Large amounts of "missing nitrogen" dominate nitrogen balances at all scales and have complicated efforts to address the effects of excess reactive nitrogen pollution on tropospheric ozone levels, coastal eutrophication and drinking water quality, and to determine "critical loads" for atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Uncertainty about nitrogen balances has led to increased interest in nitrogen gas fluxes as a fate of excess nitrogen. Denitrification, the conversion of reactive nitrogen oxides such as nitrate and nitrite into nitrogen gases, is a challenging process to study in terrestrial ecosystems. This process is difficult to quantify because of problematic measurement techniques, high spatial and temporal variability, and a lack of methods for scaling point measurements to larger areas. A particular challenge is that small areas (hotspots) and brief periods (hot moments) account for a high percentage of nitrogen gas flux activity. However, recent advances have yielded new methods capable of producing well constrained estimates of denitrification at the ecosystem scale, new ideas about the occurrence of hotspots and hot moments at ecosystem and landscape scales, and powerful new tools for extrapolation and validation. Progress on the challenges of denitrification suggest that we are poised for advances more generally across the genomes-to-ecosystems cascade.

  1. India's Higher Education Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2014-01-01

    India, with the world's second largest higher education system and a rapidly growing economy as one of the BRIC nations, faces significant challenges in building both capacity and excellence in higher education. India's higher education system is characterized by "islands of excellence in a sea of mediocrity." The mainstream universities…

  2. Rooftop Garden Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    A small commercial building in a nearby industrial park has decided to install a rooftop garden for its employees to enjoy. The garden will be about 100 feet long and 75 feet wide. This article presents a design challenge for technology and engineering students wherein they will assist in the initial conceptual design of the rooftop garden. The…

  3. Elementary Design Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Jonathan W.

    2010-01-01

    How many of our students come to the classroom with little background knowledge about the world around them and how things work? To help students develop conceptual understanding and explore the design process, the author brought the NASA "Engineering Design Challenges" program to his school district, redeveloped for elementary students. In this…

  4. A Cool Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The world of man-made design is all around, in everyday objects and appliances people use without a second thought. In this exercise, students have an opportunity to challenge the common refrigerator's design--and improve it. This approach can be used with many other appliances.

  5. Kayak Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Anson

    2011-01-01

    Living in the Adirondack Park and being an avid outdoorsman has often resulted in the author's love of the outdoors working its way into class projects. In 2010, the author gave a group of 25 students in grades 9-12 a challenge that required them to design and construct a prototype inexpensive, lightweight kayak for backpackers and fisherman. In…

  6. Curriculum Challenges in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Louise

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a longitudinal study that examined the extent and types of challenges to curriculum in California school districts. A survey of school districts conducted in 1990 yielded 421 usable responses. The second survey, sent in 1991, elicited 379 responses, a 37.5 percent response rate. Findings indicate that the number…

  7. The Ultimate PE Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerny, Eleanor; Wojehowski, Ken

    2005-01-01

    This article features the Ultimate PE Challenge. The idea had been born when the fifth-grade teachers complained that teaching physical geography was boring, and the technology instructor simultaneously noticed a climbing wall in the gym. "Could physical education simulate the geographic characteristics and obstacles of North America?"…

  8. Elementary Design Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Jonathan W.

    2010-01-01

    How many of our students come to the classroom with little background knowledge about the world around them and how things work? To help students develop conceptual understanding and explore the design process, the author brought the NASA "Engineering Design Challenges" program to his school district, redeveloped for elementary students. In this…

  9. A Cool Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The world of man-made design is all around, in everyday objects and appliances people use without a second thought. In this exercise, students have an opportunity to challenge the common refrigerator's design--and improve it. This approach can be used with many other appliances.

  10. The Dirty Water Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Mark; Kremer, Angelika; Schluter, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    "The Dirty Water Challenge" is a fun activity that teaches children about their environment in an engaging and practical way. Inquiry is embedded within the practical--students have to design, plan, and then build their own design of water filter. Students are exposed to important concepts from a variety of scientific disciplines, including how…

  11. The Better Boat Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomburg, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    "On your mark, get set, go!" Elementary students love to hear these words as they participate in the annual Third Grade Better Boat Challenge. This highly motivational project started a few years ago as the author was developing the third-grade science curriculum to include a study that revolved around models, design, and problem solving. It has…

  12. Rooftop Garden Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    A small commercial building in a nearby industrial park has decided to install a rooftop garden for its employees to enjoy. The garden will be about 100 feet long and 75 feet wide. This article presents a design challenge for technology and engineering students wherein they will assist in the initial conceptual design of the rooftop garden. The…

  13. The Clay Challenge Continues...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2007-01-01

    It was time for yet another challenge. Bright colored glazes were on hiatus; earth tones and mixed media took center stage. Inspiration was provided this time by the myriad Native American potters from the desert Southwest. The project: create a coil pot that demonstrates interesting form and good artistry and reflects, through symbolism or mixed…

  14. Communication Challenge Softball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Tom; Vance, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Communication Challenge Softball is a developmentally appropriate game for middle school students. The game allows them to develop new communication skills using American Sign Language (signing). Traditional softball has been a part of physical education for years, and remains a popular sport played by children in community leagues throughout the…

  15. Managing "Challenging" Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yariv, Eliezer; Coleman, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in which elementary school principals in Israel deal with teachers who are "challenging" in their behaviour, that is those who are perceived as under-performing. This is an important and under-researched area of educational management. Design/methodology/approach: Interviews…

  16. Toward Green Challenge Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karl E.

    1999-01-01

    Designing environmentally friendly challenge courses involves considering factors such as clearing, trees versus poles, soil erosion and compaction, toilet design, waste disposal, and carrying capacity. Strategies used in "green development" such as systems thinking, solution multipliers, and brainstorming with stakeholders could promote…

  17. The Clay Challenge Continues...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2007-01-01

    It was time for yet another challenge. Bright colored glazes were on hiatus; earth tones and mixed media took center stage. Inspiration was provided this time by the myriad Native American potters from the desert Southwest. The project: create a coil pot that demonstrates interesting form and good artistry and reflects, through symbolism or mixed…

  18. Challenges for Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James J.; Kielman, Joseph

    2009-09-23

    Visual analytics has seen unprecedented growth in its first five years of mainstream existence. Great progress has been made in a short time, yet great challenges must be met in the next decade to provide new technologies that will be widely accepted by societies throughout the world. This paper sets the stage for some of those challenges in an effort to provide the stimulus for the research, both basic and applied, to address and exceed the envisioned potential for visual analytics technologies. We start with a brief summary of the initial challenges, followed by a discussion of the initial driving domains and applications, as well as additional applications and domains that have been a part of recent rapid expansion of visual analytics usage. We look at the common characteristics of several tools illustrating emerging visual analytics technologies, and conclude with the top ten challenges for the field of study. We encourage feedback and collaborative participation by members of the research community, the wide array of user communities, and private industry.

  19. MALL: The Pedagogical Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burston, Jack

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the development of mobile-assisted language learning (MALL) over the past 20 years is reviewed with a particular focus on the pedagogical challenges facing its exploitation. Following a consideration of the definition of mobile learning, the paper describes the dominant mobile technologies upon which MALL applications have been…

  20. The Moon Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Pat; Leddy, Diana; Johnson, Lindy; Biggam, Sue; Locke, Suzan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a first-grade research project that incorporates trade books and challenges misconceptions. Educators see the power of their students' wonder at work in their classrooms on a daily basis. This wonder must be nourished by students' own experiences--observing the moon on a crystal clear night--as well as by having…