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Sample records for hypertrophic rat heart

  1. Endothelin-1 contributes to the Frank-Starling response in hypertrophic rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Piuhola, Jarkko; Szokodi, István; Kinnunen, Pietari; Ilves, Mika; deChâtel, Rudolf; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Ruskoaho, Heikki

    2003-01-01

    Endothelin-1 is involved in mechanical load-induced cardiac growth processes; it also has effects on contractility. The interaction of endothelin-1 and the Frank-Starling response is unknown. The present study aimed to characterize the role of endothelin-1 in the regulation of the Frank-Starling response, one of the major mechanisms regulating cardiac contractile force, in both normal and hypertrophied hearts. Nontransgenic rat hearts and hypertrophic hearts of hypertensive double transgenic rats harboring human angiotensinogen and renin genes were studied in a Langendorff isolated heart setup with a liquid-filled balloon inside the left ventricle used to measure contractile parameters. The rats were studied at compensated phase, before showing any signs of heart failure. Compensated hypertrophy in double transgenic rat hearts resulted in improved contractility at a given level of preload when compared with nontransgenic rat hearts. Hearts of both rat lines showed preserved Frank-Starling responses, that is, increased contractile function in response to increased end-diastolic pressure. The mixed endothelin A/B receptor antagonist bosentan attenuated the Frank-Starling response by 53% (P<0.01) in the double transgenic hearts but not in nontransgenic hearts. The diastolic parameters remained unaffected. The left ventricles of the double transgenic rat hearts showed an 82% higher level of endothelin type A receptor mRNA and a 25% higher level of immunoreactive endothelin-1 compared with nontransgenic rat hearts. The type 1 angiotensin II receptor antagonist CV-11974 had no significant effect on contractile function in response to load in either strain. These results show that endogenous endothelin-1 contributes to the Frank-Starling response in hypertrophied rat hearts by affecting systolic performance.

  2. Recruitment of NADH Shuttling in Pressure Overloaded and Hypertrophic Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, E. Douglas; O'Donnell, J. Michael; Scholz, Thomas D.; Sorokina, Natalia; Buttrick, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in the heart requires oxidation of cytosolic NADH from glycolysis. This study examines shuttling reducing equivalents from the cytosol to the mitochondria via the activity and expression of the oxoglutarate-malate carrier (OMC), in rat hearts subjected to 2 (HYP2, n=6) and 10 weeks (HYP10, n=8) of pressure overload vs. that of sham-operated rats (SHAM2, n=6 and SHAM10, n=7). Moderate aortic banding produced increased atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) mRNA expression at 2 and 10 weeks, but only at 10 weeks did hearts develop compensatory hypertrophy (33% increase, P<0.05). Isolated hearts were perfused with the short chain fatty acid, [2,4-13C2] butyrate (2 mM) and glucose (5 mM) to enable dynamic-mode 13C NMR of intermediate exchange across OMC. OMC flux increased prior to development of hypertrophy: HYP2 = 9.6 ± 2.1 micromole/min/g dw vs. SHAM2 = 3.7 ± 1.2 providing an increased contribution of cytosolic NADH to energy synthesis in the mitochondria. With compensatory hypertrophy, OMC flux returned to normal: HYP10 = 3.9 ± 1.7 micromole/g/min vs. SHAM10 = 3.8 ± 1.2. Despite changes in activity, no differences in OMC expression occurred between HYP and SHAM. Elevated OMC flux represented augmented cytosolic NADH shuttling, coupled to increased nonoxidative glycolysis, in response to hypertrophic stimulus. However, development of compensatory hypertrophy moderated the pressure-induced elevation in OMC flux, which returned to control levels. The findings indicate that the challenge of pressure overload increases cytosolic redox state and its contribution to mitochondrial oxidation, but that hypertrophy, prior to decompensation, alleviates this stress response. PMID:17229809

  3. Disparate Effects of Stilbenoid Polyphenols on Hypertrophic Cardiomyocytes In Vitro vs. in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure Rat.

    PubMed

    Akinwumi, Bolanle C; Raj, Pema; Lee, Danielle I; Acosta, Crystal; Yu, Liping; Thomas, Samuel M; Nagabhushanam, Kalyanam; Majeed, Muhammed; Davies, Neal M; Netticadan, Thomas; Anderson, Hope D

    2017-02-01

    Stilbenoids are bioactive polyphenols, and resveratrol (trans-3,5,40-trihydroxystilbene) is a representative stilbenoid that reportedly exerts cardioprotective actions. As resveratrol exhibits low oral bioavailability, we turned our attention to other stilbenoid compounds with a history of medicinal use and/or improved bioavailability. We determined the effects of gnetol (trans-3,5,20,60-tetrahydroxystilbene) and pterostilbene (trans-3,5-dimethoxy-40-hydroxystilbene) on cardiac hypertrophy. In vitro, gnetol and pterostilbene prevented endothelin-1-induced indicators of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy including cell enlargement and protein synthesis. Gnetol and pterostilbene stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and inhibition of AMPK, using compound C or shRNA knockdown,abolished these anti-hypertrophiceffects. In contrast,resveratrol, gnetol, nor pterostilbene reduced blood pressure or hypertrophy in the spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rat. In fact, AMPK levels were similar between Sprague-Dawley and SHHF rats whether treated by stilbenoids or not. These data suggest that the anti-hypertrophic actions of resveratrol (and other stilbenoids?) do not extend to the SHHF rat, which models heart failure superimposed on hypertension. Notably, SHHF rat hearts exhibited prolonged isovolumic relaxationtime(an indicator of diastolicdys function),and this was improved by stilbenoid treatment.In conclusion, stilbenoid-based treatment as a viable strategy to prevent pathological cardiac hypertrophy,a major risk factor for heart failure,may be context-dependent and requires furtherstudy.

  4. Induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes in expression levels of Zn(2+)-transporters in hypertrophic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Olgar, Yusuf; Ozdemir, Semir; Turan, Belma

    2017-08-28

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown an association between intracellular free Zn(2+) ([Zn(2+)]i)-dyshomeostasis and cardiac dysfunction besides [Ca(2+)]i-dyshomeostasis. Since [Zn(2+)]i-homeostasis is regulated through Zn(2+)-transporters depending on their subcellular distributions, one can hypothesize that any imbalance in Zn(2+)-homeostasis via alteration in Zn(2+)-transporters may be associated with the induction of ER stress and apoptosis in hypertrophic heart. We used a transverse aortic constriction (TAC) model to induce hypertrophy in young male rat heart. We confirmed the development of hypertrophy with a high ratio of heart to body weight and cardiomyocyte capacitance. The expression levels of ER stress markers GRP78, CHOP/Gadd153, and calnexin are significantly high in TAC-group in comparison to those of controls (SHAM-group). Additionally, we detected high expression levels of apoptotic status marker proteins such as the serine kinase GSK-3β, Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio, and PUMA in TAC-group in comparison to SHAM-group. The ratios of phospho-Akt to Akt and phospho-NFκB to the NFκB are significantly higher in TAC-group than in SHAM-group. Furthermore, we observed markedly increased phospho-PKCα and PKCα levels in TAC-group. We, also for the first time, determined significantly increased ZIP7, ZIP14, and ZnT8 expressions along with decreased ZIP8 and ZnT7 levels in the heart tissue from TAC-group in comparison to SHAM-group. Furthermore, a roughly calculated total expression level of ZIPs responsible for Zn(2+)-influx into the cytosol (increased about twofold) can be also responsible for the markedly increased [Zn(2+)]i detected in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Taking into consideration the role of increased [Zn(2+)]i via decreased ER-[Zn(2+)] in the induction of ER stress in cardiomyocytes, our present data suggest that differential changes in the expression levels of Zn(2+)-transporters can underlie mechanical dysfunction, in part due to the

  5. Ultrastructural changes, increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and altered cardiac hypertrophic gene expressions in heart tissues of rats exposed to incense smoke.

    PubMed

    Al-Attas, Omar S; Hussain, Tajamul; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Al-Daghri, Nasser; Mohammed, Arif A; De Rosas, Edgard; Gambhir, Dikshit; Sumague, Terrance S

    2015-07-01

    Incense smoke exposure has recently been linked to cardiovascular disease risk, heart rate variability, and endothelial dysfunction. To test the possible underlying mechanisms, oxidative stress, and inflammatory markers, gene expressions of cardiac hypertrophic and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and ultrastructural changes were measured, respectively, using standard, ELISA-based, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscope procedures in heart tissues of Wistar rats after chronically exposing to Arabian incense. Malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis alpha (TNF)-α, and IL-4 levels were significantly increased, while catalase and glutathione levels were significantly declined in incense smoke-exposed rats. Incense smoke exposure also resulted in a significant increase in atrial natriuretic peptide, brain natriuretic peptide, β-myosin heavy chain, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Rats exposed to incense smoke displayed marked ultrastructural changes in heart muscle with distinct cardiac hypertrophy, which correlated with the augmented hypertrophic gene expression as well as markers of cardiac damage including creatine kinase-myocardial bound (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Increased oxidative stress, inflammation, altered cardiac hypertrophic gene expression, tissue damage, and architectural changes in the heart may collectively contribute to increased cardiovascular disease risk in individuals exposed to incense smoke. Increased gene expressions of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 may be instrumental in the incense smoke-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. Thus, incense smoke can be considered as a potential environmental pollutant and its long-term exposure may negatively impact human health.

  6. Sildenafil citrate increases myocardial cGMP content in rat heart, decreases its hypertrophic response to isoproterenol and decreases myocardial leak of creatine kinase and troponin T

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Madiha AH; Ketat, Amal F

    2005-01-01

    Background Cardiac hypertrophy is a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in a number of cardiovascular diseases. Consequently, the signaling pathways that inhibit cardiac hypertrophy are currently receiving much interest. Among them, nitric oxide (NO), signaling via cGMP and cGMP-dependent protein kinase I, has been recognized as a negative regulator of cardiac hypertrophy. The present study investigated the in-vivo effect of sildenafil as a phosphodiestrase-5A (PDE-5A) inhibitor on the hypertrophic response of rat heart to isoproterenol and the relation of this effect to the level of myocardial cGMP and integrity of the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) activity. Results The results showed that daily intraperitoneal administration of sildenafil per se for 10 days was without noticeable adverse effects on survival or myocardium. Conversely, daily subcutaneous administration of isoproterenol for 10 days caused significant myocardial hypertrophy, cell injury and decline in survival. When sildenafil was injected daily, one hour before isoproterenol, survival was significantly improved and the myocardium didn't show significant hypertrophy or cell injury. Interestingly, sildenafil was accompanied by significant rise in myocardial cGMP level, a parameter which was found in the present study to possess a significant negative correlation with cardiac hypertrophy and leak of cardiac troponin T into serum. At the same time, cGMP was found to possess a positive correlation with myocardial creatine kinase activity that reflects the efficiency of the energy utilization processes in the myocardium. However, in rats given Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) as a competitive inhibitor of cNOS, sildenafil failed to show any favorable effect on survival or the myocardial injury parameters used to assess isoproterenol-induced injury. Conclusion The present study suggests that increased cardiac cGMP level by sildenafil have a cardioprotective effect probably through acting

  7. Acute effects of sildenafil and dobutamine in the hypertrophic and failing right heart in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate whether acute intravenous administration of the phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor sildenafil in a single clinically relevant dose improves the in vivo function of the hypertrophic and failing right ventricle (RV). Wistar rats () were subjected to pulmonary trunk banding (PTB) causing RV hypertrophy and failure. Four weeks after surgery, they were randomized to receive an intravenous bolus dose of sildenafil (1 mg/kg; ), vehicle (), or dobutamine (10 μg/kg; ). Invasive RV pressures were recorded continuously, and transthoracic echocardiography was performed 1, 5, 15, 25, 35, 50, 70, and 90 minutes after injecting the bolus. Cardiac function was compared to baseline measurements to evaluate the in vivo effects of each specific treatment. The PTB procedure caused significant hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, and reduction in RV function evaluated by echocardiography (TAPSE) and invasive pressure measurements. Sildenafil did not improve the function of the hypertrophic failing right heart in vivo, measured by TAPSE, RV systolic pressure (RVsP), and dp/dtmax. Dobutamine improved RV function 1 minute after injection measured by TAPSE ( vs. cm; ), RVsP ( vs. mmHg; ), and dp/dtmax ( vs. mmHg/s; ). Acute administration of the PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil in a single clinically relevant dose did not modulate the in vivo function of the hypertrophic failing right heart of the rat measured by echocardiography and invasive hemodynamics. In the same model, dobutamine acutely improved RV function. PMID:24618544

  8. A New Animal Model for Investigation of Mechanical Unloading in Hypertrophic and Failing Hearts: Combination of Transverse Aortic Constriction and Heterotopic Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stenzig, Justus; Biermann, Daniel; Jelinek, Marisa; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Ehmke, Heimo; Schwoerer, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Previous small animal models for simulation of mechanical unloading are solely performed in healthy or infarcted hearts, not representing the pathophysiology of hypertrophic and dilated hearts emerging in heart failure patients. In this article, we present a new and economic small animal model to investigate mechanical unloading in hypertrophic and failing hearts: the combination of transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and heterotopic heart transplantation (hHTx) in rats. Methods To induce cardiac hypertrophy and failure in rat hearts, three-week old rats underwent TAC procedure. Three and six weeks after TAC, hHTx with hypertrophic and failing hearts in Lewis rats was performed to induce mechanical unloading. After 14 days of mechanical unloading animals were euthanatized and grafts were explanted for further investigations. Results 50 TAC procedures were performed with a survival of 92% (46/50). When compared to healthy rats left ventricular surface decreased to 5.8±1.0 mm² (vs. 9.6± 2.4 mm²) (p = 0.001) after three weeks with a fractional shortening (FS) of 23.7± 4.3% vs. 28.2± 1.5% (p = 0.01). Six weeks later, systolic function decreased to 17.1± 3.2% vs. 28.2± 1.5% (p = 0.0001) and left ventricular inner surface increased to 19.9±1.1 mm² (p = 0.0001). Intraoperative graft survival during hHTx was 80% with 46 performed procedures (37/46). All transplanted organs survived two weeks of mechanical unloading. Discussion Combination of TAC and hHTx in rats offers an economic and reproducible small animal model enabling serial examination of mechanical unloading in a truly hypertrophic and failing heart, representing the typical pressure overloaded and dilated LV, occurring in patients with moderate to severe heart failure. PMID:26841021

  9. Exercise heart rates in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong-Chang; Dimaano, Veronica L; Kembro, Jackelyn M; Hilser, Alex; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, David; Pozios, Iraklis; Tomas, Miguel S; Yalcin, Hulya; Dolores-Cerna, Ketty; Mormontoy, Wilfredo; Aon, Miguel A; Cameron, Duke; Bluemke, David A; Stewart, Kerry J; Russell, Stuart D; Cordova, Jorge G; Abraham, Theodore P; Abraham, M Roselle

    2015-04-15

    The exercise heart rate (HR) profile and its relation to cardiac function and arrhythmias were investigated in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Chronotropic response (CR) and heart rate recovery (HRR) were computed during and after treadmill exercise testing in 273 patients with HC and 95 age-matched healthy controls. Patients with HC had higher prevalence of chronotropic incompetence and lower HRR1-5min compared with controls. Exercise capacity, diastolic function (assessed by E/e') and left atrial volume index were associated with HRR1min and CR in HC. Septal myectomy was associated with reduction in chronotropic incompetence but did not affect HRR1min. In conclusion, impaired CR and HRR1min are associated with advanced disease and do not appear to be independent clinical markers indicating high-risk status in HC. Improving CR by titrating doses of negative chronotropic agents, myectomy, and atrial pacing may be useful to increase exercise capacity in patients with HC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Myocardial Hypertrophic Preconditioning Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Slows Progression to Heart Failure Through Upregulation of S100A8/A9

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xuan; Wu, Bing; Zhao, Jing; Zeng, Zhi; Xuan, Wanling; Cao, Shiping; Huang, Xiaobo; Asakura, Masanori; Xu, Dingli; Bin, Jianping; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Background— Transient preceding brief ischemia provides potent cardioprotection against subsequent long ischemia, termed ischemic preconditioning. Here, we hypothesized that transient short-term hypertrophic stimulation would induce the expression of hypertrophy regression genes and render the heart resistant to subsequent hypertrophic stress, and slow the progression to heart failure, as well. Methods and Results— Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was induced in mice by either transverse aortic constriction or an infusion of phenylephrine, and in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes by norepinephrine exposures. In the preconditioning groups, hypertrophic stimulation was provided for 1 to 7 days and then withdrawn for several days by either aortic debanding or discontinuing phenylephrine or norepinephrine treatment, followed by subsequent reexposure to the hypertrophic stimulus for the same period as in the control group. One or 6 weeks after transverse aortic constriction, the heart weight/body weight ratio was lower in the preconditioning group than in the control group, whereas the lung weight/body weight ratio was significantly decreased 6 weeks after transverse aortic constriction. Similar results were obtained in mice receiving phenylephrine infusion and neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes stimulated with norepinephrine. Both mRNA and protein expression of S100A8 and S100A9 showed significant upregulation after the removal of hypertrophic stimulation and persisted for 6 weeks in response to reimposition of transverse aortic constriction. The treatment with recombinant S100A8/A9 inhibited norepinephrine-induced myocyte hypertrophy and reduced the expression of calcineurin and NFATc3, but the silencing of S100A8/A9 prevented such changes. Conclusions— Preconditioning with prohypertrophic factors exerts an antihypertrophic effect and slows the progression of heart failure, indicating the existence of the phenomenon for hypertrophic preconditioning. PMID

  11. Primary amyloid heart disease presenting as hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, L.T.; Raybuck, B.D.; Robinowitz, M.; Brinker, J.A.; Oetgen, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the unusual presentation of a patient with primary cardiac amyloidosis. Initial clinical symptoms and hemodynamic studies, including Technetium-99m-pyrophosphate scintigraphy, suggested hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, but endomyocardial biopsy revealed diffuse amyloid infiltration. Only two other cases of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction due to cardiac amyloidosis have been reported. The false-negative technetium-99m-pyrophosphate scintigram in this patient argues for the use of endomyocardial biopsy to aid in the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  12. Transthoracic echocardiography in rats. Evalution of commonly used indices of left ventricular dimensions, contractile performance, and hypertrophy in a genetic model of hypertrophic heart failure (SHHF-Mcc-facp-Rats) in comparison with Wistar rats during aging.

    PubMed

    Reffelmann, Thorsten; Kloner, Robert A

    2003-09-01

    Two-weekly echocardiographic examinations were conducted in nine SHHF-Mc-fa(cp) rats in comparison with eight age-matched Wistar rats. In the SHHF-rats, characterized by progressive LV-dilation and decreasing contractile function between 77-87 weeks of age, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy was most sensitively demonstrated by increased LV-mass-index (p < 0.001). LV-areas and area-ejection fraction (EF) (2D-images) discriminated more sensitively in the early stages than M-mode-derived diameters and fractional shortening (FS); midwall shortening was the most sensitive parameter of reduced systolic function. Post-mortem measurements showed an excellent correlation with calculated LV-mass (r = 0.91). Post-mortem LV-volumes correlated significantly with diastolic LV-diameters, LV-areas, and calculated LV-volumes (r = 0.56-0.59). Mean within-subject standard deviations in controls were 0.5-0.6 mm (LV-diameters), 3.1-4.6 mm(2) (LV-areas), approximately 10% of the mean for FS, area-EF and midwall shortening, and approximately 20% for wall thickness and LV-mass. The data might be used to choose the most sensitive parameters, and to estimate sample size for echocardiographic investigations in rats.

  13. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a heart in need of an energy bar?

    PubMed Central

    Vakrou, Styliani; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has been recently recognized as the most common inherited cardiovascular disorder, affecting 1 in 500 adults worldwide. HCM is characterized by myocyte hypertrophy resulting in thickening of the ventricular wall, myocyte disarray, interstitial and/or replacement fibrosis, decreased ventricular cavity volume and diastolic dysfunction. HCM is also the most common cause of sudden death in the young. A large proportion of patients diagnosed with HCM have mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, it is unclear how these mutations lead to the cardiac phenotype, which is variable even in patients carrying the same causal mutation. Abnormalities in calcium cycling, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and energetic deficiency have been described constituting the basis of therapies in experimental models of HCM and HCM patients. This review focuses on evidence supporting the role of cellular metabolism and mitochondria in HCM. PMID:25191275

  14. Overexpression of mitofilin in the mouse heart promotes cardiac hypertrophy in response to hypertrophic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Xu, Jing; Luo, Yu-Xuan; An, Xi-Zhou; Zhang, Ran; Liu, Guang; Li, Hongliang; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-10-20

    Mitofilin was originally described as a heart muscle protein because of its abundance in the heart tissue; however, its function in the heart is still to be elucidated. Thus, this study aims at investigating the role of mitofilin in the heart in response to hypertrophic stimuli. In this study, a significant increase in mitofilin expression was observed in the hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Transgenic (TG) mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of mitofilin were generated, and cardiac hypertrophy was introduced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or chronic infusion of isoproterenol (ISO). In TG mice overexpressing mitofilin, the level of cardiac hypertrophy was significantly greater than that in wild-type (WT) mice after TAC and ISO stimulation. A detailed analysis showed that compared with WT mice, the level of reactive oxygen species was increased after TAC and ISO induction and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) activity in the TG hearts was lower. These alterations may contribute to the aggravated cardiac hypertrophy observed in response to TAC and ISO stimulation. Over-expression of mitofilin promotes cardiac hypertrophy under pathological conditions both in vivo and in vitro. Mitofilin, a mitochondria protein, is shown to be related to cardiac hypertrophy for the first time, which enhances our understanding of the role of mitochondria in cardiac hypertrophy.

  15. An autopsy report of acute myocardial infarction with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy-like heart.

    PubMed

    Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Okada, Hideshi; Morishita, Kentaro; Imai, Hajime; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Nawa, Takahide; Suzuki, Kodai; Ikeshoji, Haruka; Kato, Hisaaki; Yoshida, Takahiro; Yoshida, Shozo; Shirai, Kunihiro; Toyoda, Izumi; Hara, Akira; Ogura, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman, who was followed up as hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) in a local hospital, was transferred to our center because of anterior chest pain and diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction (MI). Coronary angiography showed total occlusion of the mid-left anterior descending, and flow was restored after endovascular thrombectomy. An autopsy was performed after she died on hospital day 6. At autopsy, there was no significant stenosis in this vessel and the absence of plaque rupture was confirmed. Likewise, it was unclear asymmetric hypertrophy at autopsy, it could not deny that a sigmoid deformity of the basal septum occurs in elderly patients and can mimic the asymmetric septal hypertrophy of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. MI was thought to be caused by coronary spasm or squeezing in HOCM-like heart. Therefore, it may be necessary antithrombosis therapy in HOCM-like patients with no history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

  16. Three-dimensional alignment of the aggregated myocytes in the normal and hypertrophic murine heart.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Boris; Fedarava, Katsiaryna; Falkenberg, Jan; Rothaus, Kai; Bodhey, Narendra K; Reischauer, Carolin; Kozerke, Sebastian; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Westermann, Dirk; Lunkenheimer, Paul P; Anderson, Robert H; Berger, Felix; Kuehne, Titus

    2009-09-01

    Several observations suggest that the transmission of myocardial forces is influenced in part by the spatial arrangement of the myocytes aggregated together within ventricular mass. Our aim was to assess, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI), any differences in the three-dimensional arrangement of these myocytes in the normal heart compared with the hypertrophic murine myocardium. We induced ventricular hypertrophy in seven mice by infusion of angiotensin II through a subcutaneous pump, with seven other mice serving as controls. DT-MRI of explanted hearts was performed at 3.0 Tesla. We used the primary eigenvector in each voxel to determine the three-dimensional orientation of aggregated myocytes in respect to their helical angles and their transmural courses (intruding angles). Compared with controls, the hypertrophic hearts showed significant increases in myocardial mass and the outer radius of the left ventricular chamber (P < 0.05). In both groups, a significant change was noted from positive intruding angles at the base to negative angles at the ventricular apex (P < 0.01). Compared with controls, the hypertrophied hearts had significantly larger intruding angles of the aggregated myocytes, notably in the apical and basal slices (P < 0.001). In both groups, the helical angles were greatest in midventricular sections, albeit with significantly smaller angles in the mice with hypertrophied myocardium (P < 0.01). The use of DT-MRI revealed significant differences in helix and intruding angles of the myocytes in the mice with hypertrophied myocardium.

  17. Homeostatic Left Heart integration and disintegration links atrio-ventricular covariation's dyshomeostasis in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Piras, Paolo; Torromeo, Concetta; Evangelista, Antonietta; Gabriele, Stefano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Madeo, Andrea; Schiariti, Michele; Varano, Valerio; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2017-07-24

    Left ventricle and left atrium are and have been practically always analyzed separately in common clinically and non-clinically oriented cardiovascular investigations. Both classic and speckle tracking echocardiographic data contributed to the knowledge about deformational impairments occurring in systo-diastolic differences. Recently new trajectory based approaches allowed a greater awareness about the entire left ventricle or left atrium revolution and on their deficiencies that take place in presence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, surprisingly, the concomitant function of the two left heart chambers has not been analyzed for their geometrical/mechanical relationship. For the first time we study here, by acquiring left ventricle and left atrial geometries on the same heartbeat, the trajectory attributes of the entire left heart treated as a whole shape and the shape covariation of its two subunits. We contrasted healthy subjects with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We found impaired left heart trajectory mainly in terms of orientation and size. More importantly, we found profound differences in the direction of morphological covariation of left ventricle and left atrium. These findings open to new perspectives in pathophysiological evaluation of different diseases by allowing the appreciation of concomitant functioning of both left heart whole geometry and of its two chambers.

  18. Combined effects of low-dose spironolactone and captopril therapy in a rat model of genetic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    de Resende, Micheline Monteiro; Kriegel, Alison Jessica; Greene, Andrew Seth

    2006-12-01

    For several years, the severe side effects associated with the use of high doses of the aldosterone antagonist, spironolactone, limited its clinical use. Studies have recently shown efficacy and minimal side effects of low-dose spironolactone combined with standard therapy in the treatment of heart failure and hypertensive patients. The authors evaluated the effects of low-dose spironolactone alone or in combination with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors on the progression of left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling in a congenic rat model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The congenic SS-16/Mcwi rats developed severe cardiac hypertrophy despite being normotensive even on high-salt diet. SS-16/Mcwi and SS/Mcwi rats were fed a low-salt (0.4% NaCl) diet and were treated with vehicle (CON), spironolactone (20 mg/kg/d subcutaneously), captopril (100 mg/kg/d drinking water), or both spironolactone and captopril for 4 weeks. Blood pressure, plasma peptides, cardiac fibrosis, and echocardiography measurements were evaluated. Spironolactone at a low dose had no effect on blood pressure, cardiac hypertrophy, and fibrosis in either strain. However, in combination with captopril, spironolactone decreased the cardiac hypertrophy more than captopril treatment alone. In the SS-16/Mcwi rats, the combined therapy significantly preserved the cardiac index when compared with control. These data indicate that the addition of low-dose spironolactone to captopril treatment was more effective in preventing the progression of heart hypertrophy and ventricular dysfunction in the SS-16/Mcwi than captopril alone. This study suggests that combined spironolactone and captopril therapy may be useful in the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  19. Compensatory role of the NBCn1 sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter on Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling in hypertrophic hearts.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Lorena A; Velasquez, Fernanda Carrizo; Alvarez, Bernardo V

    2017-03-01

    NBC Na(+)/HCO3(-) cotransporter (NBCn1) and NHE1 Na(+)/H(+) exchanger have been associated with cardiac disorders and recently located in coronary endothelial cells (CEC) and cardiomyocytes mitochondria, respectively. Mitochondrial NHE1 blockade delays permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening and reduces superoxide levels, two critical events exacerbated in cells of diseased hearts. Conversely, activation of NBCn1 prevented apoptosis in CEC subjected to ischemic stress. We characterized the role of the NHE1 and NBCn1 transporters in heart mitochondria from hypertrophic (SHR) and control (Wistar) rats. Expression of NHE1 was analyzed in left ventricular mitochondrial lysates (LVML), by immunoblots. NHE1 expression increased by ~40% in SHR compared to control (P < 0.05, n = 4). To examine NHE1-mediated Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity in cardiac hypertrophy, mitochondria were loaded with BCECF-AM dye and the maximal rate of pHm change measured after the addition of 50 mM NaCl. SHR mitochondria had greater changes in pHm compared to Wistar, 0.10 ± 0.01 vs. 0.06 ± 0.01, respectively (P < 0.05, n = 5). In addition, mitochondrial suspensions from SHR and control myocardium were exposed to 200 μM CaCl2 to induce MPTP opening (light-scattering decrease, LSD) and swelling. Surprisingly, SHR rats showed smaller LSD and a reduction in mitochondrial swelling, 67 ± 10% (n = 15), compared to control, 100 ± 8% (n = 13). NBC inhibition with S0859 (1 μM) significantly increased swelling in both control 139 ± 10% (n = 8) and SHR 115 ± 10% (n = 4). Finally, NBCn1 Na(+)/HCO3(-) cotransporter increased by twofold its expression in SHR LVML, compared to normal (P < 0.05, n = 5). We conclude that increased NBCn1 activity may play a compensatory role in hypertrophic hearts, protecting mitochondria from Ca(2+)-induced MPTP opening and swelling.

  20. [Mode of splitting of the second heart sound in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, N; Oki, T; Sakai, H; Asai, M; Ohshima, C; Kusaka, Y; Tominaga, T; Murao, A; Niki, T; Mori, H

    1983-06-01

    Mode of the splitting of the second heart sound ( IIs ) and left ventricular systolic time intervals (STIs) in patients (pts) with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were compared with those in hypertension (HT) with the global hypertrophy of the left ventricular wall. Forty-seven pts with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy [non-obstructive type (HCM, 30 pts), obstructive type (HOCM, 17 pts)] and 21 pts with HT were studied. The pts with HCM were classified as septal hypertrophic type (19 pts) and apical hypertrophic type (11 pts) on the basis of the echocardiographic findings. The pts with HOCM were classified as resting type (13 pts) and latent type (provoked by amyl nitrite: 4 pts) on the basis of the obstructive sign at rest. Mode of the splitting of the IIs : a) The pts with HCM showed a wide splitting of the IIs . The mean split interval during held expiration (IIA-IIP) was 41.0 +/- 9.9 msec. Twenty pts (67%) showed abnormal respiratory splitting. The mean IIA-IIP interval in septal hypertrophic type (45.3 +/- 9.0 msec) was significantly wider than that in apical hypertrophic type (33.6 +/- 6.7 msec) (p less than 0.05). There was a positive correlation between IIA-IIP interval and the thickness of the upper portion of the interventricular septum (r = 0.63). b) Nine out of 13 pts with resting type of HOCM showed a paradoxical (reversed) splitting with a mean IIA-IIP interval of -23.8 +/- 24.4 msec. On the other hand, pts with latent type showed a wide splitting similar to HCM with a mean IIA-IIP interval of 35.0 +/- 7.1 msec. c) The pts with HT showed a single IIs or physiological splitting. The mean IIA-IIP interval was 14.5 +/- 9.3 msec, which was significantly decreased than that of normals or the pts with HCM (p less than 0.01). Left ventricular systolic time intervals: a) The pts with an either type of HCM showed a short corrected left ventricular electromechanical systole [(Q-IIA)c] due to the shortening of the corrected left ventricular ejection time (LVETc). b) The

  1. Angiogenesis in ischaemic and hypertrophic hearts induced by long-term bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Brown, M D; Davies, M K; Hudlicka, O

    2005-01-01

    Angiogenesis and improved left ventricular function as a consequence of long-term bradycardia were first demonstrated in normal hearts, either electrically paced (rabbits, pigs) or treated with a selective sinus blocking drug alinidine (rats). Here we review the evidence that chronic heart rate reduction can have similar effects in the heart with compromised vascular supply, due to either hypertensive or haemodynamic overload hypertrophy (rats, rabbits) or ischaemic damage (rats, rabbits, pigs). Bradycardia induced over several weeks increased capillarity in all hypertrophied hearts, and in border and remote left ventricular myocardium of infarcted hearts. In some, but not all cases, coronary blood flow was improved by heart rate reduction, suggesting enlargement of the resistance vasculature in some circumstances. Cardiac or left ventricular function indices, which were depressed by hypertrophy or ischaemic damage, were preserved or even enhanced by chronic heart rate reduction. The expansion of the capillary bed in the vascularly compromised heart induced by bradycardia may be stimulated by mechanical stretch of the endothelium and/or VEGF activated by chamber dilation and myocyte stretch. The increased number of capillaries and more homogeneous distribution of capillary perfusion would support the better pump function, even in the absence of higher coronary flow. The beneficial impact of chronic heart rate reduction on myocardial angiogenesis and function in cardiac hypertrophy and infarction may be major factor in the success of beta-blockers in treatment of human heart failure.

  2. Clinical meaning of isolated increase of QRS voltages in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy versus athlete's heart.

    PubMed

    Calore, Chiara; Zorzi, Alessandro; Corrado, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Recent consensus documents have provided modern criteria for interpretation of the athlete's ECG, which are based on a better definition of physiological versus abnormal ECG changes. The aim of these modern criteria is to lower the traditionally high number of false positives and to reduce unnecessary and expensive investigations, maintaining the sensitivity for identification of cardiac diseases at risk of sudden cardiac death during sports such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This article reviews the published studies regarding the ECG changes associated with HCM ("pathologic hypertrophy") and athlete's heart ("physiologic hypertrophy"), with particular reference to the prevalence and clinical significance of the ECG pattern of isolated increase of QRS voltages. Taken together the results of the available studies show that ECG provides good accuracy for differentiating HCM from athlete's heart and allows to preserve the ECG power for detection of athletes with HCM. Patients with either completely normal ECGs or showing isolated QRS voltage criteria for LV hypertrophy have a less severe HCM phenotype, which is associated with a lower arrhythmic risk. These scientific data support the current recommendation that further cardiovascular tests including echocardiography are not systematically indicated in trained athletes showing an isolated increase of QRS voltages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Computational Modeling of Blood Flow and Valve Dynamics in Hearts with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xudong; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore; Pinheiro, Aurelio

    2010-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiovascular disease manifested by the thickening of the ventricular wall and often leads to a partial obstruction to the blood flow out of the left ventricle. HCM is recognized as one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in athletes. In a heart with HCM, the hypertrophy usually narrows the blood flow pathway to the aorta and produces a low pressure zone between the mitral valve and the hypertrophy during systole. This low pressure can suck the mitral valve leaflet back and completely block the blood flow into the aorta. In the current study, a sharp interface immersed boundary method flow solver is employed to study the hemodynamics and valve dynamics inside a heart with HCM. The three-dimensional motion and configuration of the left ventricle including mitral valve leaflets and aortic valves are reconstructed based on echo-cardio data sets. The mechanisms of aortic obstruction associated with HCM are investigated. The long term objective of this study is to develop a computational tool to aid in the assessment and surgical management of HCM.

  4. Metabolic crosstalk between the heart and liver impacts familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Magida, Jason A; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2014-04-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is largely caused by dominant mutations in genes encoding cardiac sarcomeric proteins, and it is etiologically distinct from secondary cardiomyopathies resulting from pressure/volume overload and neurohormonal or inflammatory stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that decreased left ventricular contractile function in male, but not female, HCM mice is associated with reduced fatty acid translocase (CD36) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. As a result, the levels of myocardial ATP and triglyceride (TG) content are reduced, while the levels of oleic acid and TG in circulating very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and liver are increased. With time, these metabolic changes culminate in enhanced glucose production in male HCM mice. Remarkably, restoration of ventricular TG and ATP deficits via AMPK agonism as well as inhibition of gluconeogenesis improves ventricular architecture and function. These data underscore the importance of the systemic effects of a primary genetic heart disease to other organs and provide insight into potentially novel therapeutic interventions for HCM.

  5. Functionally impaired, hypertrophic ECL cells accumulate vacuoles and lipofuscin bodies. An ultrastructural study of ECL cells isolated from hypergastrinemic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C M; Bakke, I; Tostrup-Skogaker, N; Waldum, H L; Håkanson, R; Chen, D

    2001-03-01

    ECL cells in the oxyntic mucosa of stomach control gastric acid secretion by mobilizing histamine in response to gastrin. They respond to gastrin also with hypertrophy and hyperplasia. ECL cells exhibit functional impairment upon long-term gastrin stimulation. The impairment is manifested in a gradual decline of the activity of the histamine-forming enzyme per individual ECL cell and in a failure of gastrin to mobilize histamine. The mechanism behind this impairment is unknown. In the present study, rats were treated with the proton pump inhibitor pantoprazole for 45 days to induce sustained hypergastrinemia. The ECL cells were isolated from normogastrinemic and hypergastrinemic rats and size-separated from other mucosal cells by the elutriation technique. The total ECL cell number was twofold higher in hypergastrinemic rats than in normogastrinemic rats, and most of the cells appeared in elutriation fractions where large cells predominate. The ECL cells of the different fractions were analyzed by quantitative electron microscopy. Normal-sized ECL cells from hypergastrinemic rats displayed a reduced number of secretory vesicles (probably because of degranulation) compared with normal-sized ECL cells from normogastrinemic rats. Hypertrophic ECL cells from hypergastrinemic rats had an unchanged number of secretory vesicles, supporting the view that such cells fail to respond to gastrin with degranulation. Although both normal-sized and hypertrophic ECL cells from hypergastrinemic rats contained vacuoles, those in the hypertrophic ECL cells were larger and more numerous. In addition, hypertrophic ECL cells were found to contain numerous, prominent lipofuscin bodies which are the presumed end product of crinophagia. Conceivably therefore, large vacuoles and lipofuscin bodies cause functional impairment of the hypertrophic ECL cells.

  6. Increased transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel expression in hypertrophic heart.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Schulz, Nico; Gergs, Ulrich; Neumann, Joachim; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Gollasch, Maik; Tepel, Martin

    2010-10-08

    The aim of this study was to compare the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels in hypertrophic hearts from transgenic mice showing overexpression of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein phosphatase 2A alpha (PP2Ac alpha) with wild-type mice and with TRPV1-/- mice. Transcripts of TRPV1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), discoidin domain receptor family, member 2 (DDR-2), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), GATA 4, and regulatory microRNA (miR-21) were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. Ventricle-to-body-weight-ratio was significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice and TRPV1-/- mice (8.6±1.3mg/g; 5.4±0.3mg/g; and 5.4±0.4mg/g; respectively; p<0.05 by Kruskal-Wallis test). TRPV1 transcripts were significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice (1.7±0.2 arbitrary units vs. 0.8±0.1 arbitrary units; p<0.05). TRPV1 protein expression was also significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice. A significant linear correlation was observed between TRPV1 transcripts and the ventricle-to-body-weight-ratio (Spearman r=0.78; p<0.05). The expression of DDR-2 was significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice and TRPV1 knockout mice. The expression of miR21 was significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared with TRPV1-/- mice (0.103±0.018 (PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice); 0.089±0.009 (wild-type mice); and 0.045±0.013 (TRPV1-/- mice), respectively; p<0.05). Masson Goldner staining revealed that PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice showed increased heart fibrosis compared with TRPV1 knockout mice. The study suggests an important role of TRPV1 in the pathogenesis of genetically associated heart hypertrophy.

  7. Differentiating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from athlete's heart: An electrocardiographic and echocardiographic approach.

    PubMed

    Grazioli, Gonzalo; Usín, Domingo; Trucco, Emilce; Sanz, Maria; Montserrat, Silvia; Vidal, Bàrbara; Gutierrez, Josep; Canal, Ramon; Brugada, Josep; Mont, Lluis; Sitges, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) vs athlete's heart is challenging in individuals with mild-moderate left-ventricular hypertrophy. This study aimed to assess ECG and echocardiographic parameters proposed for the differential diagnosis of HCM. The study included 75 men in three groups: control (n=30), "gray zone" athletes with interventricular septum (IVS) measuring 13-15mm (n=25) and HCM patients with IVS of 13-18mm (n=20). The most significant differences were found in relative septal thickness (RST), calculated as the ratio of 2 x IVS to left ventricle end-diastolic diameter (LV-EDD) (0.37, 0.51, 0.71, respectively; p<0.01) and in spatial QRS-T angle as visually estimated (9.8, 33.6, 66.2, respectively; p<0.01). The capacity for differential HCM diagnosis of each of the 5 criteria was assessed using the area under the curve (AUC), as follows: LV-EDD<54 (0.60), family history (0.61), T-wave inversion (TWI) (0.67), spatial QRS-T angle>45 (0.75) and RST>0.54 (0.92). Pearson correlation between spatial QRS-T angle>45 and TWI was 0.76 (p 0.01). The combination of spatial QRS-T angle>45 and RST>0.54 for diagnosis of HCM had an AUC of 0.79. The best diagnostic criteria for HCM was RST>0.54. The spatial QRS-T angle>45 did not add sensitivity if TWI was present. No additional improvement in differential diagnosis was obtained by combining parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Myosin Cross-Bridges Do Not Form Precise Rigor Bonds in Hypertrophic Heart Muscle Carrying Troponin T Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Midde, K.; Dumka, V.; Pinto, J.R.; Muthu, P.; Marandos, P.; Gryczynski, I.; Gryczynski, Z.; Potter, J.D.; Borejdo, J.

    2011-01-01

    Distribution of orientations of myosin was examined in ex-vivo myofibrils from hearts of transgenic (Tg) mice expressing Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (FHC) troponin T (TnT) mutations I79N, F110I and R278C. Humans are heterozygous for sarcomeric FHC mutations and so hypertrophic myocardium contains a mixture of the wild-type (WT) and mutated (MUT) TnT. If mutations are expressed at a low level there may not be a significant change in the global properties of heart muscle. In contrast, measurements from a few molecules avoid averaging inherent in the global measurements. It is thus important to examine the properties of only a few molecules of muscle. To this end, the lever arm of one out of every 60,000 myosin molecules was labeled with a fluorescent dye and a small volume within the A-band (~1 fL) was observed by confocal microscopy. This volume contained on average 5 fluorescent myosin molecules. The lever arm assumes different orientations reflecting different stages of acto-myosin enzymatic cycle. We measured the distribution of these orientations by recording polarization of fluorescent light emitted by myosin-bound fluorophore during rigor and contraction. The distribution of orientations of rigor WT and MUT myofibrils were significantly different. There was a large difference in the width and of skewness and kurtosis of rigor distributions. These findings suggest that the hypertrophic phenotype associated with the TnT mutations can be characterized by a significant increase in disorder of rigor cross-bridges. PMID:21683708

  9. Evidence suggesting that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock modulates responsiveness of the heart to hypertrophic stimuli in mice.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Tsai, Ju-Yun; Grenett, Maximiliano H; Pat, Betty M; Ratcliffe, William F; Villegas-Montoya, Carolina; Garvey, Merissa E; Nagendran, Jeevan; Dyck, Jason R B; Bray, Molly S; Gamble, Karen L; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Young, Martin E

    2011-04-01

    Circadian dyssynchrony of an organism (at the whole-body level) with its environment, either through light-dark (LD) cycle or genetic manipulation of clock genes, augments various cardiometabolic diseases. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been shown to influence multiple myocardial processes, ranging from transcriptional regulation and energy metabolism to contractile function. The authors, therefore, reasoned that chronic dyssychrony of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock with its environment would precipitate myocardial maladaptation to a circadian challenge (simulated shiftwork; SSW). To test this hypothesis, 2- and 20-month-old wild-type and CCM (Cardiomyocyte Clock Mutant; a model with genetic temporal suspension of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock at the active-to-sleep phase transition) mice were subjected to chronic (16-wks) biweekly 12-h phase shifts in the LD cycle (i.e., SSW). Assessment of adaptation/maladaptation at whole-body homeostatic, gravimetric, humoral, histological, transcriptional, and cardiac contractile function levels revealed essentially identical responses between wild-type and CCM littermates. However, CCM hearts exhibited increased biventricular weight, cardiomyocyte size, and molecular markers of hypertrophy (anf, mcip1), independent of aging and/or SSW. Similarly, a second genetic model of selective temporal suspension of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock (Cardiomyocyte-specific BMAL1 Knockout [CBK] mice) exhibits increased biventricular weight and mcip1 expression. Wild-type mice exhibit 5-fold greater cardiac hypertrophic growth (and 6-fold greater anf mRNA induction) when challenged with the hypertrophic agonist isoproterenol at the active-to-sleep phase transition, relative to isoproterenol administration at the sleep-to-active phase transition. This diurnal variation was absent in CCM mice. Collectively, these data suggest that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock likely influences responsiveness of the heart to

  10. Tricuspid annular motion velocity as a differentiation index of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shuji; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Nishio, Susumu; Hotchi, Junko; Bando, Mika; Takagawa, Yuriko; Saijo, Yoshihito; Hirata, Yukina; Sata, Masataka

    2015-06-01

    Hypertensive heart disease (HHD) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are the most frequently encountered entities presenting left ventricular hypertrophy in routine echocardiographic examination, and their differentiation is sometimes difficult. Abnormalities in right ventricular (RV) myocardium have been reported frequently in patients with HCM more than in those with HHD. We therefore hypothesized that tricuspid annular motion (TAM) velocity determined by pulsed tissue Doppler echocardiography can be used to detect RV dysfunction in HCM and discriminate these etiologies. TAM velocities were compared among clinically stable patients with 60 HCM and 60 HHD patients as well as 60 age-matched healthy controls. Peak systolic, early diastolic (TAM-e'), and atrial systolic velocities were measured. RV myocardial performance index was measured by tissue Doppler method. To more accurately differentiate HCM from HHD, electrocardiographic findings and brain natriuretic peptide levels, which can both be examined simply and noninvasively, were investigated in addition to echocardiography. RV wall thickness of the HCM group was greater than the HHD group (p=0.092), while there was no significant difference in RV myocardial performance index between the HCM and HHD groups (p=0.606). TAM-e' was significantly lower in the HCM group than in HHD and control groups (p=0.001). To differentiate HCM from HHD, TAM-e' was a powerful predictor as per multivariate logistic regression analysis (hazard ratio, 0.665; p<0.001) of parameters other than those of left ventricular parameters, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.686 and the best cut-off value was ≤8.0cm/s (62% sensitivity, 65% specificity). Multivariate logistic analysis revealed that electrocardiographic ST-T changes were the next most effective marker for differentiating HCM after TAM-e'. When TAM-e' and ST-T changes were combined, the AUC increased to 0.748. TAM-e' is a potentially

  11. Assessment of asynchronous relaxation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, S.; Tamaki, N.; Senda, M.; Yonekura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Nohara, R.; Tamaki, S.; Kambara, H.; Kawai, C.; Torizuka, K.

    1984-01-01

    This study is undertaken to assess cardiac performance in relation to left ventricular(LV) asynchronous wall motion. Multigated blood-pool study was performed in 67 cases, including 14 normals(N), 16 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy(HCM), and 37 with ischemic heart disease (IHD). IHD was further divided into 2 groups: IHD(I)(EF greater than or equal to 50%), and IHD(II)(EF < 50%). Regional (pixel-by-pixel) volume curve was simulated by second order harmonics of Fourier series. Then, functional images of the following indexes were made: EF, TES(time to end-systole), PER(Peak ejection rate), TPE(Time to PER), PFR(peak filling rate), and TPF(time to PFR). The left ventricular phase distribution histograms of TES, TPE, and TPF were made to calculate the standard deviation(SD) as an asynchronous parameter of each phase. TES(SD) was higher in IHD(II)(11.3 +- 5.2 deg) than N(4.8 +- 2.5 deg). TPF(SD) was higher in HCM(11.7 +- 9.7 deg) and IHD(15.1 +- 11.3 deg) than N(5.3 +- 3.7 deg), suggesting asynchronous relaxation. In the study of global LV performance, LVEF was not significantly different in HCM(64 +- 9%) and IHD(I)(58 +- 5%) from N(60 +- 6%). However, PFR was lower in IHD(I)(2.3 +- 0.6 EDV/sec) and IHD(II) (1.6 +- 0.5 EDV/sec) than N(3.3 + 1.0 EDV/sec). PFR/PER was lower in HCM(0.7 +- 0.2), IHD(I)(0.8 +- 0.2), and IHD(II)(0.7 +- 0.3) than N(1.0 +- 0.2). Besides, TPF(SD) was inversely correlated with LVEF(r=-0.43), PFR (r=-0.45), and PFR/PER(r=-0.51). Thus, asynchronous relaxation is often seen in HCM and IHD, and it may be related to the disturbance of LV filling.

  12. 1A.02: MICRORNA-208A AND ITS HOST GENE CARDIAC MYOSIN HEAVY CHAIN MYH6 ARE INVOLVED IN HYPERTROPHIC HEART DYSFUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Dóka, G; Radik, M; Krenek, P; Kyselovic, J; Klimas, J

    2015-06-01

    Circulating microRNAs may be markers of cardiac damage or dysfunction. miR-208a has heart-specific expression since its host gene - myosin heavy chain MYH6, dominant cardiac myosin motor is also heart-specific and its expression maintains proper cardiac output. Our aim was to evaluate miR-208a and MYH6 as key contributing factors involved in hypertrophic heart dysfunction. 18-20 weeks old male Wistar rats were treated for 8 days with isoproterenol (ISO; N=12; 5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle (CON; N=12). Relative expressions of cardiac myosin heavy chains (MYH6, MYH7, MYH7B), markers of cardiac damage (natriuretic peptides ANP, BNP) and heart-related microRNAs miR-1, miR-133a, miR-208a, miR-499 were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR in samples from left ventricle, microRNAs also in venous blood. Cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction was quantified with heart gravimetry and left heart catheterization, respectively. Treatment with isoproterenol induced cardiac hypertrophy (heart mass increased by +36% vs. CON (P<0.01) and 53% mortality associated with cardiovascular dysfunction characterized by a deteriorated peak left ventricular pressure and rate of isovolumetric pressure change during contraction (+dP/dt) compared to CON (-8% and -27% resp., P < 0.01). Gene expression of cardiac myosin heavy chain MYH6 in left ventricles was decreased by -61% indicating myosin switching in contractile apparatus. Cardiac dysfunction was further confirmed by 10-fold increase of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; P<0.01). Cardiac levels of microRNAs miR-1, miR-133a, miR-208a, miR-499 were strongly decreased (-71%, -65%, -59%, -75% resp., P < 0.01). Plasma levels of the same microRNAs were unchanged except for the cardio-specific miR-208a that showed a significant, 56-fold increase (P<0.01). ROC curve for detection of cardiac hypertrophy based on plasma miR-208a had a corresponding AUC = 98.8% (95% confidence interval, 85.3% - 100%). Cardiac hypertrophy was

  13. HEART RATE CONDITIONING IN THE RAT,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PULSE RATE, CONDITIONED RESPONSE), (*CONDITIONED RESPONSE, PULSE RATE), HEART , FEAR, ANXIETY, EMOTIONS, STIMULATION(PHYSIOLOGY), PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM, ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE, RATS

  14. Possible recruitment of osteoblastic precursor cells from hypertrophic chondrocytes during initial osteogenesis in cartilaginous limbs of young rats.

    PubMed

    Franzen, A; Oldberg, A; Solursh, M

    1989-08-01

    The appearance of the bone phenotype during rat embryogenesis was studied by in situ hybridization using a cDNA clone to osteopontin. Radiolabeled sense and antisense RNA probes were prepared from the osteopontin cDNA by in vitro transcription. The probes were used to hybridize paraffin sections of the cartilaginous diaphysis from embryonic rats at day 17 of gestation. The hybridization pattern was analyzed by autoradiography. Hybridization with the antisense probe gave patterns of silver grain labeling, indicating the presence of osteopontin mRNA among the hypertrophic chondrocytes. No silver grains could be detected in the corresponding region following hybridization of consecutive sections with the sense probe, showing the specificity of the technique being used. Whether these results indicate that the osteopontin gene is transiently expressed by hypertrophic chondrocytes or that osteopontin is an early marker for osteoblastic precursor cells will have to be explored further.

  15. Kinetics of a single cross-bridge in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy heart muscle measured by reverse Kretschmann fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettikolla, Prasad; Calander, Nils; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Borejdo, Julian

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a serious heart disease that often leads to a sudden cardiac death of young athletes. It is believed that the alteration of the kinetics of interaction between actin and myosin causes FHC by making the heart to pump blood inefficiently. We set out to check this hypothesis ex vivo. During contraction of heart muscle, a myosin cross-bridge imparts periodic force impulses to actin. The impulses are analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of fluorescently labeled actin. To minimize observation volume and background fluorescence, we carry out FCS measurements in surface plasmon coupled emission mode in a reverse Kretschmann configuration. Fluorescence is a result of near-field coupling of fluorophores excited in the vicinity of the metal-coated surface of a coverslip with the surface plasmons propagating in the metal. Surface plasmons decouple on opposite sides of the metal film and emit in a directional manner as far-field p-polarized radiation. We show that the rate of changes of orientation is significantly faster in contracting cardiac myofibrils of transgenic mice than wild type. These results are consistent with the fact that mutated heart muscle myosin translates actin faster in in vitro motility assays.

  16. CCN2 plays a key role in extracellular matrix gene expression in severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tsoutsman, Tatiana; Wang, Xiaoyu; Garchow, Kendra; Riser, Bruce; Twigg, Stephen; Semsarian, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited primary myocardial disorder. HCM is characterized by interstitial fibrosis and excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Fibrosis in HCM has been associated with impaired cardiac function and heart failure, and has been considered a key substrate for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. The molecular triggers underpinning ECM production are not well established. We have previously developed a double-mutant mouse model of HCM that recapitulates the phenotype seen in humans with multiple mutations, including earlier onset of the disease, progression to a dilated phenotype, severe heart failure and premature mortality. The present study investigated the expression of ECM-encoding genes in severe HCM and heart failure. Significant upregulation of structural Fn1, regulatory Mmp14, Timp1, Serpin3A, SerpinE1, SerpineE2, Tgfβ1, and Tgfβ2; and matricellular Ccn2, Postn, Spp1, Thbs1, Thbs4, and Tnc was evident from the early, pre-phenotype stage. Non-myocytes expressed ECM genes at higher levels than cardiomyocytes in normal and diseased hearts. Synchronous increase of secreted CCN2 and TIMP1 plasma levels and decrease of MMP3 levels were observed in end-stage disease. CCN2 protein expression was increased from early disease in double-mutant hearts and played an important role in ECM responses. It was a powerful modulator of ECM regulatory (Timp1 and SerpinE1) and matricellular protein-encoding (Spp1, Thbs1, Thbs4 and Tnc) gene expression in cardiomyocytes when added exogenously in vitro. Modulation of CCN2 (CTGF, connective tissue growth factor) and associated early ECM changes may represent a new therapeutic target in the treatment and prevention of heart failure in HCM.

  17. Regression of Copper-Deficient Heart Hypertrophy: Reduction in the Size of Hypertrophic Cardiomyocytes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dietary copper deficiency causes cardiac hypertrophy and its transition to heart failure in a mouse model. Copper repletion results in a rapid regression of cardiac hypertrophy and prevention of heart failure. The present study was undertaken to understand dynamic changes of cardiomyocytes in the hy...

  18. Misconceptions and Facts About Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Sherrid, Mark V; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common genetic heart disease. Once considered relentless, untreatable, and deadly, it has become a highly treatable disease with contemporary management. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is one of cardiology's "great masqueraders." Mistakes and delays in diagnosis abound. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy commonly "masquerades" as asthma, anxiety, mitral prolapse, and coronary artery disease. However, once properly diagnosed, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be effectively managed to improve both symptoms and survival. This review highlights some of the misconceptions about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Providers at all levels should have awareness of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to promptly diagnose and properly manage these individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. MicroRNAs in a hypertrophic heart: from foetal life to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Shahzad; Crowley, Tamsyn M; Charchar, Fadi J; Sanigorski, Andrew; Lewandowski, Paul A

    2017-08-01

    The heart is the first organ to form and undergoes adaptive remodelling with age. Ventricular hypertrophy is one such adaptation, which allows the heart to cope with an increase in cardiac demand. This adaptation is necessary as part of natural growth from foetal life to adulthood. It may also occur in response to resistance in blood flow due to various insults on the heart and vessels that accumulate with age. The heart can only compensate to this increase in workload to a certain extent without losing its functional architecture, ultimately resulting in heart failure. Many genes have been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy, however none have been shown conclusively to be responsible for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. MicroRNAs offer an alternative mechanism for cellular regulation by altering gene expression. Since 1993 when the function of a non-coding DNA sequence was first discovered in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, many microRNAs have been implicated in having a central role in numerous physiological and pathological cellular processes. The level of control these antisense oligonucleotides offer can often be exploited to manipulate the expression of target genes. Moreover, altered levels of microRNAs can serve as diagnostic biomarkers, with the prospect of diagnosing a disease process as early as during foetal life. Therefore, it is vital to ascertain and investigate the function of microRNAs that are involved in heart development and subsequent ventricular remodelling. Here we present an overview of the complicated network of microRNAs and their target genes that have previously been implicated in cardiogenesis and hypertrophy. It is interesting to note that microRNAs in both of these growth processes can be of possible remedial value to counter a similar disease pathophysiology. © 2016 The Authors. Biological Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  20. Phosphodiesterase 9A Controls Nitric-oxide Independent cGMP and Hypertrophic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong I.; Zhu, Guangshuo; Sasaki, Takashi; Cho, Gun-Sik; Hamdani, Nazha; Holewinski, Ronald; Jo, Su-Hyun; Danner, Thomas; Zhang, Manling; Rainer, Peter P.; Bedja, Djahida; Kirk, Jonathan A.; Ranek, Mark J.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Kwon, Chulan; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Paulus, Walter J.; Takimoto, Eiki; Kass, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a second messenger molecule that transduces nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptide (NP) coupled signaling, stimulating phosphorylation changes by protein kinase G (PKG). Enhancing cGMP synthesis or blocking its degradation by phosphodiesterase type 5A (PDE5A) protects against cardiovascular disease1,2. However, cGMP stimulation alone is limited by counter-adaptions including PDE upregulation3. Furthermore, though PDE5A regulates NO-generated cGMP4,5, NO-signaling is often depressed by heart disease6. PDEs controlling NP-coupled cGMP remain uncertain. Here we show that cGMP-selective PDE9A7,8 is expressed in mammalian heart including humans, and is upregulated by hypertrophy and cardiac failure. PDE9A regulates NP rather than NO-stimulated cGMP in heart myocytes and muscle, and its genetic or selective pharmacological inhibition protects against pathological responses to neuro-hormones, and sustained pressure-overload stress. PDE9A inhibition reverses pre-established heart disease independent of NO-synthase (NOS) activity, whereas PDE5A inhibition requires active NOS. Transcription factor activation and phospho-proteome analyses of myocytes with each PDE selectively inhibited reveals substantial differential targeting, with phosphorylation changes from PDE5A inhibition being more sensitive to NOS activation. Thus, unlike PDE5A, PDE9A can regulate cGMP signaling independent of the NO-pathway, and its role in stress-induced heart disease suggests potential as a therapeutic target. PMID:25799991

  1. Registration of dynamic multiview 2D ultrasound and late gadolinium enhanced images of the heart: Application to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterization.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Julián; Simon, Antoine; Halbert, Edgar; Tavard, François; Carré, François; Hernández, Alfredo; Donal, Erwan; Schnell, Frédéric; Garreau, Mireille

    2016-02-01

    Describing and analyzing heart multiphysics requires the acquisition and fusion of multisensor cardiac images. Multisensor image fusion enables a combined analysis of these heterogeneous modalities. We propose to register intra-patient multiview 2D+t ultrasound (US) images with multiview late gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images acquired during cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in order to fuse mechanical and tissue state information. The proposed procedure registers both US and LGE to cine MRI. The correction of slice misalignment and the rigid registration of multiview LGE and cine MRI are studied, to select the most appropriate similarity measure. It showed that mutual information performs the best for LGE slice misalignment correction and for LGE and cine registration. Concerning US registration, dynamic endocardial contours resulting from speckle tracking echocardiography were exploited in a geometry-based dynamic registration. We propose the use of an adapted dynamic time warping procedure to synchronize cardiac dynamics in multiview US and cine MRI. The registration of US and LGE MRI was evaluated on a dataset of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A visual assessment of 330 left ventricular regions from US images of 28 patients resulted in 92.7% of regions successfully aligned with cardiac structures in LGE. Successfully-aligned regions were then used to evaluate the abilities of strain indicators to predict the presence of fibrosis. Longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay of aligned left ventricular regions were computed from corresponding regional strain curves from US. The Mann-Withney test proved that the expected values of these indicators change between the populations of regions with and without fibrosis (p < 0.01). ROC curves otherwise proved that the presence of fibrosis is one factor amongst others which modifies longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay.

  2. Myocardial triglyceride content in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: comparison between hypertensive heart disease and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sai, Eiryu; Shimada, Kazunori; Yokoyama, Takayuki; Hiki, Makoto; Sato, Shuji; Hamasaki, Nozomi; Maruyama, Masaki; Morimoto, Ryoko; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Tamura, Yoshifumi; Aoki, Shigeki; Watada, Hirotaka; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) enables the assessment of myocardial triglyceride (TG) content, which is reported to be associated with cardiac dysfunction and morphology accompanied by metabolic disorder and cardiac hemodynamic status. The clinical usefulness of myocardial TG content measurements in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) has not been fully investigated. We examined whether myocardial TG content assessed by (1)H-MRS was useful for diagnosis in patients with LVH. To quantify myocardial TG content, we conducted (1)H-MRS in 35 subjects with LVH. Left ventricular function was measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were assigned to a hypertensive heart disease (HHD, n = 10) or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, n = 25) group based on the histology and/or late gadolinium enhancement pattern. The myocardial TG content was significantly higher in the HHD group than in the HCM group (2.14 ± 1.29 vs. 1.09 ± 0.72 %, P < 0.001). Myocardial TG content were significantly and negatively correlated with LV mass (r = -0.41, P < 0.04) and stroke volume (r = -0.64, P < 0.05) in the HCM group and HHD group, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, LV mass volume and diagnosis of HCM or HHD were independent factors of the myocardial TG content. The results suggest that myocardial metabolism may differ between HCM and HHD patients and that measurement of myocardial TG content by (1)H-MRS may be useful for evaluating the myocardial metabolic features of LVH.

  3. MicroRNA-1 downregulation increases connexin 43 displacement and induces ventricular tachyarrhythmias in rodent hypertrophic hearts.

    PubMed

    Curcio, Antonio; Torella, Daniele; Iaconetti, Claudio; Pasceri, Eugenia; Sabatino, Jolanda; Sorrentino, Sabato; Giampà, Salvatore; Micieli, Mariella; Polimeni, Alberto; Henning, Beverley J; Leone, Angelo; Catalucci, Daniele; Ellison, Georgina M; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Indolfi, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    Downregulation of the muscle-specific microRNA-1 (miR-1) mediates the induction of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. Dysfunction of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43), an established miR-1 target, during cardiac hypertrophy leads to ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT). However, it is still unknown whether miR-1 and Cx43 are interconnected in the pro-arrhythmic context of hypertrophy. Thus, in this study we investigated whether a reduction in the extent of cardiac hypertrophy could limit the pathological electrical remodeling of Cx43 and the onset of VT by modulating miR-1 levels. Wistar male rats underwent mechanical constriction of the ascending aorta to induce pathologic left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and afterwards were randomly assigned to receive 10mg/kg valsartan, VAL (LVH+VAL) delivered in the drinking water or placebo (LVH) for 12 weeks. Sham surgery was performed for control groups. Programmed ventricular stimulation reproducibly induced VT in LVH compared to LVH+VAL group. When compared to sham controls, rats from LVH group showed a significant decrease of miR-1 and an increase of Cx43 expression and its ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation, which displaces Cx43 from the gap junction. Interestingly, VAL administration to rats with aortic banding significantly reduced cardiac hypertrophy and prevented miR-1 down-regulation and Cx43 up-regulation and phosphorylation. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments in neonatal cardiomyocytes (NCMs) in vitro confirmed that Cx43 is a direct target of miR-1. Accordingly, in vitro angiotensin II stimulation reduced miR-1 levels and increased Cx43 expression and phosphorylation compared to un-stimulated NCMs. Finally, in vivo miR-1 cardiac overexpression by an adenoviral vector intra-myocardial injection reduced Cx43 expression and phosphorylation in mice with isoproterenol-induced LVH. In conclusion, miR-1 regulates Cx43 expression and activity in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of

  4. MicroRNA-1 Downregulation Increases Connexin 43 Displacement and Induces Ventricular Tachyarrhythmias in Rodent Hypertrophic Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, Antonio; Torella, Daniele; Iaconetti, Claudio; Pasceri, Eugenia; Sabatino, Jolanda; Sorrentino, Sabato; Giampà, Salvatore; Micieli, Mariella; Polimeni, Alberto; Henning, Beverley J.; Leone, Angelo; Catalucci, Daniele; Ellison, Georgina M.; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Indolfi, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    Downregulation of the muscle-specific microRNA-1 (miR-1) mediates the induction of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. Dysfunction of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43), an established miR-1 target, during cardiac hypertrophy leads to ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT). However, it is still unknown whether miR-1 and Cx43 are interconnected in the pro-arrhythmic context of hypertrophy. Thus, in this study we investigated whether a reduction in the extent of cardiac hypertrophy could limit the pathological electrical remodeling of Cx43 and the onset of VT by modulating miR-1 levels. Wistar male rats underwent mechanical constriction of the ascending aorta to induce pathologic left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and afterwards were randomly assigned to receive 10mg/kg valsartan, VAL (LVH+VAL) delivered in the drinking water or placebo (LVH) for 12 weeks. Sham surgery was performed for control groups. Programmed ventricular stimulation reproducibly induced VT in LVH compared to LVH+VAL group. When compared to sham controls, rats from LVH group showed a significant decrease of miR-1 and an increase of Cx43 expression and its ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation, which displaces Cx43 from the gap junction. Interestingly, VAL administration to rats with aortic banding significantly reduced cardiac hypertrophy and prevented miR-1 down-regulation and Cx43 up-regulation and phosphorylation. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments in neonatal cardiomyocytes (NCMs) in vitro confirmed that Cx43 is a direct target of miR-1. Accordingly, in vitro angiotensin II stimulation reduced miR-1 levels and increased Cx43 expression and phosphorylation compared to un-stimulated NCMs. Finally, in vivo miR-1 cardiac overexpression by an adenoviral vector intra-myocardial injection reduced Cx43 expression and phosphorylation in mice with isoproterenol-induced LVH. In conclusion, miR-1 regulates Cx43 expression and activity in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of

  5. Radiation-induced heart disease in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lauk, S.; Kiszel, Z.; Buschmann, J.; Trott, K.R.

    1985-04-01

    After local irradiation of the rat heart with X ray doses of over 10 Gy (single dose), animals developed symptoms of radiation-induced heart disease, which at higher doses would lead to fatal cardiac failure. The LD 50 at 1 year was between 15 Gy and 20 Gy. The pericardium and epicardium responded to irradiation with exudative pericarditis after 4 months. Focal myocardial damage was secondary to progressive capillary damage.

  6. Predictors of heart-focused anxiety in patients undergoing genetic investigation and counseling of long QT syndrome or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a one year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hamang, Anniken; Eide, Geir Egil; Rokne, Berit; Nordin, Karin; Bjorvatn, Cathrine; Øyen, Nina

    2012-02-01

    Since Long QT syndrome and Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are inherited cardiac disorders that may cause syncope, palpitations, serious arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death, at-risk individuals may experience heart-focused anxiety. In a prospective multi-site study, 126 Norwegian patients attending genetic counseling were followed 1 year with multiple administration of questionnaires, including the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, measuring three distinct symptoms of heart-focused anxiety- avoidance, attention, and fear-in mixed linear analyses. Overall, at 1-year follow-up, patients with clinical diagnosis as compared to patients at genetic risk had significantly higher scores of avoidance (p < .002), attention (p < .005), and fear (p < .007). Sudden cardiac death in close relatives, uncertainty whether other relatives previously had undergone genetic testing, patients' perceived general health, self-efficacy expectations and procedural satisfaction with genetic counseling were influential in predicting the different symptoms of heart-focused anxiety over time.

  7. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, Luis de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder with heterogeneity in mutations, forms of presentation, prognosis and treatment strategies. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is recognized as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death that occurs in young people, including athletes. The clinical diagnosis is complemented with the ecocardiographic study, in which an abnormal myocardial hypertrophy of the septum can be observed in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease (arterial systemic hypertension, aortic stenosis). The annual sudden mortality rate is 1% and, in selected populations, it ranges between 3 and 6%. The therapeutic strategies depend on the different subsets of patients according to the morbidity and mortality, sudden cardiac death, obstructive symptoms, heart failure or atrial fibrillation and stroke. High risk patients for sudden death may effectively be treated with the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

  8. Histological and Histometric Characterization of Myocardial Fibrosis in End-Stage Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Clinical-Pathological Study of 30 Explanted Hearts.

    PubMed

    Galati, Giuseppe; Leone, Ornella; Pasquale, Ferdinando; Olivotto, Iacopo; Biagini, Elena; Grigioni, Francesco; Pilato, Emanuele; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Corti, Barbara; Foà, Alberto; Agostini, Valentina; Cecchi, Franco; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    Although noninvasively detected myocardial fibrosis (MF) has clinical implications in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the extent, type, and distribution of ventricular MF have never been extensively pathologically characterized. We assessed the overall amount, apex-to-base, circumferential, epicardial-endocardial distribution, pattern, and type of MF in 30 transplanted hearts of end-stage, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Visual and morphometric histological analyses at basal, midventricular, and apical levels were performed. Overall MF ranged from 23.1% to 55.9% (mean=37.3±8.4%). Prevalent types of MF were as follows: replacement in 53.3%, interstitial-perimyocyte in 13.3%, and mixed in 33.3%. Considering left ventricular base-to-apex distribution, MF was 31.9%, 43%, and 46.2% at basal, midventricular, and apical level, respectively (P<0.001). Circumferential distributions (mean percentage of MF within the section) were as follows: anterior 11.9%, anterolateral 15.8%, inferolateral 7.0%, inferior 24.3%, anteroseptal 11%, midseptal 10.7%, and posteroseptal 11.4%; circumferential distributions for anterior and inferior right ventricular walls were 3.4% and 4.5%, respectively. Epicardial-endocardial distributions were as follows: trabecular 26.1% and subendocardial 20.2%, midwall 33.4%, and subepicardial 20.3%. Main patterns identified were as follows: midwall in 33.3% of the hearts, transmural in 23.3%, midwall-subepicardial in 23.3%, and midwall-subendocardial in 20%. In end-stage, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients undergoing transplantation, more than one-third of the left ventricular myocardium was replaced by fibrosis, mainly of replacement type. MF preferentially involved the left ventricular apex and the midwall. Inferior and anterior walls and septum were maximally involved, whereas inferolateral and right ventricular were usually spared. These observations reflect the complex pathophysiology of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and may provide clues for the timely

  9. Hypercholesterolemia downregulates autophagy in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Giricz, Zoltán; Koncsos, Gábor; Rajtík, Tomáš; Varga, Zoltán V; Baranyai, Tamás; Csonka, Csaba; Szobi, Adrián; Adameová, Adriana; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2017-03-23

    We have previously shown that efficiency of ischemic conditioning is diminished in hypercholesterolemia and that autophagy is necessary for cardioprotection. However, it is unknown whether isolated hypercholesterolemia disturbs autophagy or the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether isolated hypercholesterolemia modulates cardiac autophagy-related pathways or programmed cell death mechanisms such as apoptosis and necroptosis in rat heart. Male Wistar rats were fed either normal chow (NORM; n = 9) or with 2% cholesterol and 0.25% cholic acid-enriched diet (CHOL; n = 9) for 12 weeks. CHOL rats exhibited a 41% increase in plasma total cholesterol level over that of NORM rats (4.09 mmol/L vs. 2.89 mmol/L) at the end of diet period. Animals were sacrificed, hearts were excised and briefly washed out. Left ventricles were snap-frozen for determination of markers of autophagy, mTOR pathway, apoptosis, and necroptosis by Western blot. Isolated hypercholesterolemia was associated with a significant reduction in expression of cardiac autophagy markers such as LC3-II, Beclin-1, Rubicon and RAB7 as compared to controls. Phosphorylation of ribosomal S6, a surrogate marker for mTOR activity, was increased in CHOL samples. Cleaved caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis, increased in CHOL hearts, while no difference in the expression of necroptotic marker RIP1, RIP3 and MLKL was detected between treatments. This is the first comprehensive analysis of autophagy and programmed cell death pathways of apoptosis and necroptosis in hearts of hypercholesterolemic rats. Our data show that isolated hypercholesterolemia suppresses basal cardiac autophagy and that the decrease in autophagy may be a result of an activated mTOR pathway. Reduced autophagy was accompanied by increased apoptosis, while cardiac necroptosis was not modulated by isolated hypercholesterolemia. Decreased basal autophagy and elevated apoptosis may be responsible for the

  10. Stimulation of phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis, protein kinase C translocation, and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity by bradykinin in rat ventricular myocytes: dissociation from the hypertrophic response.

    PubMed Central

    Clerk, A; Gillespie-Brown, J; Fuller, S J; Sugden, P H

    1996-01-01

    In ventricular myocytes cultured from neonatal rat hearts, bradykinin (BK), kallidin or BK(1-8) [(Des-Arg9)BK] stimulated PtdinsP2 hydrolysis by 3-4-fold. EC50 values were 6 nM (BK), 2 nM (kallidin), and 14 microM [BK(1-8)]. BK or kallidin stimulated the rapid (less than 30 s) translocation of more than 80% of the novel protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms nPKC-delta and nPKC-epsilon from the soluble to the particulate fraction. EC50 values for nPKC-delta translocation by BK or kallidin were 10 and 2 nM respectively. EC50 values for nPKC-epsilon translocation by BK or kallidin were 2 and 0.6 nM respectively. EC50 values for the translocation of nPKC-delta and nPKC-epsilon by BK(1-8) were more than 5 microM. The classical PKC, cPKC-alpha, and the atypical PKC, nPKC-zeta, did not translocate. BK caused activation and phosphorylation of p42-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (maximal at 3-5 min, 30-35% of p42-MAPK phosphorylated). p44-MAPK was similarly activated. EC50 values for p42/p44-MAPK activation by BK were less than 1 nM whereas values for BK(1-8) were more than 10 microM. The order of potency [BK approximately equal to kallidin >> BK (1-8)] for the stimulation of PtdInsP2 hydrolysis, nPKC-delta and nPKC-epsilon translocation, and p42/p44-MAPK activities suggests involvement of the B2 BK receptor subtype. In addition, stimulation of all three processes by BK was inhibited by the B2BK receptor-selective antagonist HOE140 but not by the B1-selective antagonist Leu8BK(1-8). Exposure of cells to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate for 24 h inhibited subsequent activation of p42/p44-MAPK by BK suggesting participation of nPKC (and possibly cPKC) isoforms in the activation process. Thus, like hypertrophic agents such as endothelin-1 (ET-1) and phenylephrine (PE), BK activates PtdInsP2 hydrolysis, translocates nPKC-delta, and nPKC-epsilon, and activates p42/p44-MAPK. However, in comparison with ET-1 and PE, BK was only weakly hypertrophic as assessed by cell morphology

  11. Detection of catalase in rat heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Radi, R; Turrens, J F; Chang, L Y; Bush, K M; Crapo, J D; Freeman, B A

    1991-11-15

    The presence of heme-containing catalase in rat heart mitochondria (20 +/- 5 units/mg) was demonstrated by biochemical and immunocytochemical analysis. Intact rat heart mitochondria efficiently consumed exogenously added H2O2. The rate of H2O2 consumption was not influenced by succinate, glutamate/malate, or N-ethylmaleimide but was significantly inhibited by cyanide. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition by mitochondria yielded molecular oxygen in a 2:1 stoichiometry, consistent with a catalytic mechanism. Mitochondrial fractionation studies and quantitative electron microscopic immunocytochemistry revealed that most catalase was matrix-associated. Electrophoretic analysis and Western blotting of the mitochondrial matrix fraction indicated the presence of a protein with similar electrophoretic mobility to bovine and rat liver catalase and immunoreactive to anti-catalase antibody. Myocardial tissue has a lower catalase-specific activity and a greater mitochondrial H2O2 production/g of tissue than most organs. Thus catalase, representing 0.025% of heart mitochondrial protein, is important for detoxifying mitochondrial derived H2O2 and represents a key antioxidant defense mechanism for myocardial tissue.

  12. Post-immobilization eccentric training promotes greater hypertrophic and angiogenic responses than passive stretching in muscles of weanling rats.

    PubMed

    Benedini-Elias, Priscila Cação Oliveira; Morgan, Mariana Calvente; Cornachione, Anabelle Silva; Martinez, Edson Z; Mattiello-Sverzut, Ana Claudia

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated how different types of remobilization after hind limb immobilization, eccentric exercise and passive static stretching, influenced the adaptive responses of muscles with similar function and fascicle size, but differing in their contractile characteristics. Female Wistar weanling rats (21 days old) were divided into 8 groups: immobilized for 10 days, maintaining the ankle in maximum plantar flexion; immobilized and submitted to eccentric training for 10 or 21 days on a declining treadmill for 40min; immobilized and submitted to passive stretching for 10 or 21 days for 40min by maintaining the ankle in maximum dorsiflexion; control of immobilized; and control of 10 or 21 days. The soleus and plantaris muscles were analyzed using fiber distribution, lesser diameter, capillary/fiber ratio, and morphology. Results showed that the immobilization reduced the diameter of all fiber types, caused changes in fiber distribution and decreased the number of transverse capillaries in both muscles. The recovery period of the soleus muscle is longer than that of the plantaris after detraining. Moreover, eccentric training induced greater hypertrophic and angiogenic responses than passive stretching, especially after 21 days of rehabilitation. Both techniques demonstrated positive effects for muscle rehabilitation with the eccentric exercise being more effective.

  13. Contribution of ventricular remodeling to pathogenesis of heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Brower, G L; Janicki, J S

    2001-02-01

    We previously reported an approximately 50% incidence of rats with symptoms of congestive heart failure (CHF) at 8 wk postinfrarenal aorto-caval fistula. However, it was not clear whether compensatory ventricular remodeling could continue beyond 8 wk or whether the remaining animals would have developed CHF or died. Therefore, the intent of this study was to complete the characterization of this model of sustained volume overload by determining the morbidity and mortality and the temporal response of left ventricular (LV) remodeling and function beyond 8 wk. The findings demonstrate an upper limit to LV hypertrophy and substantial increases in LV volume and compliance, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and collagen volume fraction associated with the development of CHF. There was an 80% incidence of morbidity and mortality following 21 wk of chronic volume overload. These findings indicate that the development of CHF is triggered by marked ventricular dilatation and increased compliance occurring once the myocardial hypertrophic response is exhausted.

  14. Hypertensive heart disease versus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: multi-parametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance discriminators when end-diastolic wall thickness ≥ 15 mm.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C L; Rohan, Stephen; Ghosh Dastidar, Amardeep; Harries, Iwan; Lawton, Christopher B; Ratcliffe, Laura E; Burchell, Amy E; Hart, Emma C; Hamilton, Mark C K; Paton, Julian F R; Nightingale, Angus K; Manghat, Nathan E

    2017-03-01

    European guidelines state left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic wall thickness (EDWT) ≥15mm suggests hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but distinguishing from hypertensive heart disease (HHD) is challenging. We identify cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) predictors of HHD over HCM when EDWT ≥15mm. 2481 consecutive clinical CMRs between 2014 and 2015 were reviewed. 464 segments from 29 HCM subjects with EDWT ≥15mm but without other cardiac abnormality, hypertension or renal impairment were analyzed. 432 segments from 27 HHD subjects with EDWT ≥15mm but without concomitant cardiac pathology were analyzed. Magnitude and location of maximal EDWT, presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), LV asymmetry (>1.5-fold opposing segment) and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (SAM) were measured. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Significance was defined as p<0.05. HHD and HCM cohorts were age-/gender-matched. HHD had significantly increased indexed LV mass (110±27g/m(2) vs. 91±31g/m(2), p=0.016) but no difference in site or magnitude of maximal EDWT. Mid-wall LGE was significantly more prevalent in HCM. Elevated indexed LVM, mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM were significant multivariate predictors of HHD, but LV asymmetry was not. Increased indexed LV mass, absence of mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM are better CMR discriminators of HHD from HCM than EDWT ≥15mm. • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is often diagnosed with end-diastolic wall thickness ≥15mm. • Hypertensive heart disease (HHD) can be difficult to distinguish from HCM. • Retrospective case-control study showed that location and magnitude of EDWT are poor discriminators. • Increased left ventricular mass and midwall fibrosis are independent predictors of HHD. • Cardiovascular magnetic resonance parameters facilitate a better discrimination between HHD and HCM.

  15. The NO stimulator, Catestatin, improves the Frank-Starling response in normotensive and hypertensive rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Angelone, T; Quintieri, A M; Pasqua, T; Filice, E; Cantafio, P; Scavello, F; Rocca, C; Mahata, S K; Gattuso, A; Cerra, M C

    2015-08-01

    The myocardial response to mechanical stretch (Frank-Starling law) is an important physiological cardiac determinant. Modulated by many endogenous substances, it is impaired in the presence of cardiovascular pathologies and during senescence. Catestatin (CST:hCgA352-372), a 21-amino-acid derivate of Chromogranin A (CgA), displays hypotensive/vasodilatory properties and counteracts excessive systemic and/or intra-cardiac excitatory stimuli (e.g., catecholamines and endothelin-1). CST, produced also by the myocardium, affects the heart by modulating inotropy, lusitropy and the coronary tone through a Nitric Oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. This study evaluated the putative influence elicited by CST on the Frank-Starling response of normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and hypertensive (SHR) hearts by using isolated and Langendorff perfused cardiac preparations. Functional changes were evaluated on aged (18-month-old) WKY rats and SHR which mimic human chronic heart failure (HF). Comparison to WKY rats, SHR showed a reduced Frank-Starling response. In both rat strains, CST administration improved myocardial mechanical response to increased end-diastolic pressures. This effect was mediated by EE/IP3K/NOS/NO/cGMP/PKG, as revealed by specific inhibitors. CST-dependent positive Frank-Starling response is paralleled by an increment in protein S-Nitrosylation. Our data suggested CST as a NO-dependent physiological modulator of the stretch-induced intrinsic regulation of the heart. This may be of particular importance in the aged hypertrophic heart, whose function is impaired because of a reduced systolic performance accompanied by delayed relaxation and increased diastolic stiffness.

  16. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg; Fisher, Robyn L.; Vickers, Alison E.M.

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol

  17. Longitudinal Analysis of Osteogenic and Angiogenic Signaling Factors in Healing Models Mimicking Atrophic and Hypertrophic Non-Unions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Minkwitz, Susann; Faßbender, Mirja; Kronbach, Zienab; Wildemann, Britt

    2015-01-01

    Impaired bone healing can have devastating consequences for the patient. Clinically relevant animal models are necessary to understand the pathology of impaired bone healing. In this study, two impaired healing models, a hypertrophic and an atrophic non-union, were compared to physiological bone healing in rats. The aim was to provide detailed information about differences in gene expression, vascularization and histology during the healing process. The change from a closed fracture (healing control group) to an open osteotomy (hypertrophy group) led to prolonged healing with reduced mineralized bridging after 42 days. RT-PCR data revealed higher gene expression of most tested osteogenic and angiogenic factors in the hypertrophy group at day 14. After 42 days a significant reduction of gene expression was seen for Bmp4 and Bambi in this group. The inhibition of angiogenesis by Fumagillin (atrophy group) decreased the formation of new blood vessels and led to a non-healing situation with diminished chondrogenesis. RT-PCR results showed an attempt towards overcoming the early perturbance by significant up regulation of the angiogenic regulators Vegfa, Angiopoietin 2 and Fgf1 at day 7 and a further continuous increase of Fgf1, -2 and Angiopoietin 2 over time. However µCT angiograms showed incomplete recovery after 42 days. Furthermore, lower expression values were detected for the Bmps at day 14 and 21. The Bmp antagonists Dan and Twsg1 tended to be higher expressed in the atrophy group at day 42. In conclusion, the investigated animal models are suitable models to mimic human fracture healing complications and can be used for longitudinal studies. Analyzing osteogenic and angiogenic signaling patterns, clear changes in expression were identified between these three healing models, revealing the importance of a coordinated interplay of different factors to allow successful bone healing. PMID:25910190

  18. Prevention of anemia alleviates heart hypertrophy in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lure, M.D.; Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G. Univ. of Maryland, College Park Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC )

    1991-03-11

    The present investigation was designed to examine the role of anemia in the cardiomegaly and myocardial pathology of copper deficiency. Weanling rats were fed a copper deficient diet containing either starch (ST) or fructose (FRU) for five weeks. Six rats consuming the FRU diet were intraperitoneally injected once a week with 1.0 ml/100g bw of packed red blood cells (RBC) obtained from copper deficient rats fed ST. FRU rats injected with RBC did not develop anemia. Additionally, none of the injected rats exhibited heart hypertrophy or gross pathology and all survived. In contrast, non-injected FRU rats were anemic, exhibited severe signs of copper deficiency which include heart hypertrophy with gross pathology, and 44% died. Maintaining the hematocrit with RBC injections resulted in normal heart histology and prevented the mortality associated with the fructose x copper interaction. The finding suggest that the anemia associated with copper deficiency contributes to heart pathology.

  19. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... thickness, problems with blood flow, or leaky heart valves ( mitral valve regurgitation ) may include: Echocardiography ECG 24-hour Holter ... You may need surgery to repair the heart's mitral valve if it is leaking. Watch this video about: ...

  20. Treating a Structural Heart Disease Using a Non-structural Approach: Role of Cardiac Pacing in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Bernard Benjamin P.; Fadreguilan, Erdie C.; Chua, Jeffrey M.; Ho, James; Medrano, Ana Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiovascular disease characterized by a thickened non-dilated ventricle in the absence of another cardiac or systemic condition. Its most important hemodynamic consequence is left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction. The primary management strategy of this condition is surgical septal myectomy, but an acceptable alternative treatment in patients who are not suitable for (or who refuse) surgery is alcohol septal ablation (ASA). However, in patients with unfavorable coronary anatomy which precludes ASA (i.e. absence of major septal perforator branch of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery), another reasonable option is dual chamber pacemaker implantation to decrease LVOT outflow gradient. A 77-year-old female, known hypertensive, diabetic with a history of coronary artery disease, presented with 1-week history of worsening chest pain and shortness of breath. She was admitted as a case of acute coronary syndrome and pneumonia. On workup, 2DED revealed hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) with a demonstrated systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve with a peak instantaneous gradient of 194 mm Hg across the basal LV cavity. The patient refused surgical myectomy, and ASA was the preferred treatment option. On coronary angiography, there was an incidental finding of absent major septal perforator branch of the LAD coronary artery, rendering her unsuitable for septal ablation. She was referred to electrophysiology for evaluation. She underwent dual chamber pacemaker implantation and documented significant decrease in the peak instantaneous gradient from 194 to 37 mm Hg, with complete obliteration of SAM and improvement in overall wall motion. She remained stable and asymptomatic after pacemaker insertion until her recent outpatient follow-up (1 year after implantation). We present a case of HCM with congenitally absent major septal perforator branch coronary artery treated with

  1. The Scaffold Protein Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein β Orchestrates Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophic Signaling Required for the Development of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kritzer, Michael D.; Li, Jinliang; Passariello, Catherine L.; Gayanilo, Marjorie; Thakur, Hrishikesh; Dayan, Joseph; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac myocyte hypertrophy is regulated by an extensive intracellular signal transduction network. In vitro evidence suggests that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein β (mAKAPβ) serves as a nodal organizer of hypertrophic signaling. However, the relevance of mAKAPβ signalosomes to pathological remodeling and heart failure in vivo remains unknown. Methods and Results Using conditional, cardiac myocyte–specific gene deletion, we now demonstrate that mAKAPβ expression in mice is important for the cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload and catecholamine toxicity. mAKAPβ targeting prevented the development of heart failure associated with long-term transverse aortic constriction, conferring a survival benefit. In contrast to 29% of control mice (n=24), only 6% of mAKAPβ knockout mice (n=31) died in the 16 weeks of pressure overload (P=0.02). Accordingly, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited myocardial apoptosis and the development of interstitial fibrosis, left atrial hypertrophy, and pulmonary edema. This improvement in cardiac status correlated with the attenuated activation of signaling pathways coordinated by the mAKAPβ scaffold, including the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase D1 and histone deacetylase 4 that we reveal to participate in a new mAKAP signaling module. Furthermore, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited pathological gene expression directed by myocyte-enhancer factor-2 and nuclear factor of activated T-cell transcription factors that associate with the scaffold. Conclusions mAKAPβ orchestrates signaling that regulates pathological cardiac remodeling in mice. Targeting of the underlying physical architecture of signaling networks, including mAKAPβ signalosome formation, may constitute an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of pathological remodeling and heart failure. PMID:24812305

  2. Impact of Cryoballoon Ablation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-related Heart Failure due to Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation. A Comparative Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Maagh, Petra; Plehn, Gunnar; Christoph, Arnd; Oernek, Ahmet; Meissner, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a turning point in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Pulmonary Vein Isolation (PVI) with Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation (RFCA) is accepted to be successful in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) in HCM patients. The efficacy of cryoballoon (CB) therapy in HCM patients has not been studied so far. Methods: 166 patients with AF underwent PVI with CB technology in our single center between 1/2012 and 12/2015. To evaluate the efficacy of the CB therapy in HCM patients, we compared their clinical outcome with those in “Non-HCM” AF patients in a 3 and 6 months follow-up. Results: Out of 166 AF patients (65.7% paroxysmal AF, PAF), 4 patients had HCM and PAF (young males < 50 years). During the blanking period, 26 patients (15.8%) suffered from AF recurrence (11.0% PAF), including all HCM patients. The 6 months follow up of “Non-HCM” AF patients showed acceptable results (80% stable SR), whereas the HCM patients remained AF. In Conclusion: Even if the CB provides advantages, the single device cannot be recommended in HCM patients because of early AF recurrences. Anyway, because of the specific hemodynamic changes in HCM patients with AF, ablation should be sought in an early state of its occurrence, then, however, preferably with RFCA. PMID:27647995

  3. Hypertrophic Scar Formation on Application of Terpenoid Fraction of Tuberous Root of Mirabilis jalapa L. on Excision Wound Model in Wistar Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Jyotchna; Chattopadhayay, Pronobesh; Kumar Rai, Ashok; Veer, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the effects of hydromethanolic extract of tuberous root of M. jalapa and its terpenoid and flavonoid fractions on cutaneous wound healing in Wistar Albino rats. The hydromethanolic extract was subfractionated by sequential extraction in solvents (moderately nonpolar to polar). The extract and its (terpenoid and flavonoid) fractions were used for cutaneous wound healing studies by using excision wound model on rat. Their effects on wound contraction rate, biochemical and histological changes, and expression of growth factors such as collagen 3A, basic fibroblast growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor were investigated. The results indicated that flavonoid treated group showed significant decrease (P < 0.05) in antioxidant enzyme level as compared to control in wound healing process, whereas terpenoid fraction showed significant increase (P < 0.05) in expression of growth factor levels but regeneration and remodeling stages were delayed due to formation of thicker ulcus layer and also there were no hair follicle-like blood capillaries formation which ultimately may lead to formation of hypertrophic scar of wound. Therefore, from this study, it can be concluded that terpenoid fraction prolongs proliferation phase and hence may have tendency to convert the wound into hypertrophic wound. PMID:27379322

  4. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Julia E; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg; Fisher, Robyn L; Vickers, Alison E M

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices.

  5. Liguzinediol improved the heart function and inhibited myocardial cell apoptosis in rats with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Song, Ping; Zhu, Qing; Yin, Qiu-yi; Ji, Jia-wen; Li, Wei; Bian, Hui-min

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Liguzinediol is a novel derivative of ligustrazine isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Chuanxiong (Ligusticum wallichii Franch), and produces significant positive inotropic effect in isolated rat hearts. In this study we investigated the effects of liguzinediol on a rat model of heart failure. Methods: To induce heart failure, male SD rats were injected with doxorubicin (DOX, 2 mg/kg, ip) once a week for 4 weeks. Then the rats were administered with liguzinediol (5, 10, 20 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) for 2 weeks. Hemodynamic examination was conducted to evaluate heart function. Myocardial cell apoptosis was examined morphologically. The expression of related genes and proteins were analyzed using immunohistochemical staining and Western blot assays, respectively. Results: Oral administration of liguzinediol dose-dependently improved the heart function in DOX-treated rats. Electron microscopy revealed that liguzinediol (10 mg·kg−1·d−1) markedly attenuated DOX-induced injury of cardiomyocytes, and decreased the number of apoptotic bodies in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, liguzinediol significantly decreased Bax protein level, and increased Bcl-2 protein level in cardiomyocytes of DOX-treated rats, led to an increase in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax. Moreover, liguzinediol significantly decreased the expression of both cleaved caspase-3 and NF-κB in cardiomyocytes of DOX-treated rats. Administration of digitalis (0.0225 mg·kg−1·d−1) also markedly improved the heart function and the morphology of cardiomyocytes in DOX-treated rats. Conclusion: Liguzinediol improves the heart function and inhibits myocardial cell apoptosis in the rat model of heart failure, which is associated with regulating Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and NF-κB expression. PMID:25220638

  6. Altered carnitine transport in pressure-overload hypertrophied rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, B.; Foster, K.; Reibel, D.K.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously observed reduced carnitine levels in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction. In an attempt to determine the mechanism for reduced myocardial carnitine content, carnitine transport was examined in isolated perfused hearts. Hearts were excised from sham-operated and aortic-constricted rats 3 weeks following surgery and perfused at 60 mm Hg aortic pressure with buffer containing various concentrations of L-/sup 14/C-carnitine. Carnitine uptake by control and hypertrophied hearts was linear throughout 30 minutes of perfusion with 40 ..mu..M carnitine. Total carnitine uptake was significantly reduced by 25% in hypertrophied hearts at each time point examined. The reduction in uptake by hypertrophied hearts was also evident when hearts were perfused with 100 or 200 ..mu..M carnitine. When 0.05 mM mersalyl acid was included in the buffer to inhibit the carrier-mediated component of transport, no difference in carnitine uptake was observed indicating that the transport of carnitine by diffusion was unaltered in the hypertrophied myocardium. Carrier-mediated carnitine uptake (total uptake - uptake by diffusion) was significantly reduced by approximately 40% in hypertrophied hearts at all concentrations examined. Thus, the reduction in carnitine content in the pressure-overload hypertrophied rat heart appears to be due to a reduction in carrier-mediated carnitine uptake by the heart.

  7. Complete inhibition of creatine kinase in isolated perfused rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Fossel, E.T.; Hoefeler, H.

    1987-01-01

    Transient exposure of an isolated isovolumic perfused rat heart to low concentrations (0.5 mM) of perfusate-born iodoacetamide resulted in complete inhibition of creatine kinase and partial inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the heart. At low levels of developed pressure, hearts maintained mechanical function, ATP, and creatine phosphate levels at control values. However, iodoacetamide-inhibited hearts were unable to maintain control values of end diastolic pressure or peak systolic pressure as work load increased. Global ischemia resulted in loss of all ATP without loss of creatine phosphate, indicating lack of active creatine kinase. These results indicate that isovolumic perfused rat hearts are able to maintain normal function and normal levels of high-energy phosphates without active creatine kinase at low levels of developed pressure. /sup 31/P-NMR of the heart was carried out.

  8. [The origin of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Moiseev, V S

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the clinical cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMP). The development of obstructive CMP in a patient with hyperparathyroidism indicates a possible pathogenetic role of endocrine factors and calcium metabolism abnormalities. The familial character of the disease and its combination with hereditary diseases (familial microspherocytosis) point to the significance of genetic factors. In addition, marked hypertrophy of the myocardium (without dilatation) including hypertrophy with obstruction of the outflow tract of the left ventricle was observed in nonspecific protracted myocarditis, alcoholic injury to the heart, in athletes, in coronary heart disease (after survival of myocardial infarction). It is suggested that hypertrophic CMP (similarly to restrictive and congestive CMP) is most likely a syndrome of varying origin.

  9. Lack of JunD promotes pressure overload-induced apoptosis, hypertrophic growth, and angiogenesis in the heart.

    PubMed

    Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Hilfiker, Andres; Kaminski, Karol; Schaefer, Arnd; Park, Joon-Keun; Michel, Kim; Quint, Anja; Yaniv, Moshe; Weitzman, Jonathan B; Drexler, Helmut

    2005-09-06

    The Jun family of activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factors (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) is involved in fundamental biological processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, tumor angiogenesis, and hypertrophy. The role of individual AP-1 transcription factors in the stressed heart is not clear. In the present study we analyzed the role of JunD in survival, hypertrophy, and angiogenesis in the pressure-overloaded mouse heart after thoracic aortic constriction. Mice lacking JunD (knockout [KO]) showed increased mortality and enhanced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and fibrosis associated with increased levels of hypoxia-induced factor-1alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), p53, and Bax protein and reduced levels of Bcl-2 protein after 7 days of severe pressure overload compared with wild-type (WT) siblings. Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in surviving KO mice was enhanced compared with that in WT mice. Chronic moderate pressure overload for 12 weeks caused enhanced left ventricular hypertrophy in KO mice, and survival and interstitial fibrosis were comparable with WT mice. Cardiac function, 12 weeks after operation, was comparable among shams and pressure-overloaded mice of both genotypes. In addition, KO mice exposed to chronic pressure overload showed higher cardiac capillary density associated with increased protein levels of VEGF. Thus, JunD limits cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and protects the pressure-overloaded heart from cardiac apoptosis. These beneficial effects of JunD, however, are associated with antiangiogenic properties.

  10. Neural control of the endocrine rat heart.

    PubMed

    Jiao, J H; Baertschi, A J

    1993-08-15

    Although atrial stretch is the accepted stimulus for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), in vivo studies suggest a stretch-independent, neurally induced ANF release mechanism. Thus the hypothesis that cardiac nerves can stimulate ANF secretion was tested in the Langendorff-perfused, paced rat heart. Venom from the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus was used to activate neuronal sodium channels, veratridine was added to activate sodium channels (predominantly in myocytes), and electrical stimulation was applied to the right atrial appendage. The efficacy of nerve stimulation was verified by measurements of increased neuropeptide Y in the effluent. ANF levels in the effluent increased by 120% over baseline with 0.5 microM scorpion venom and by 88% with 0.5 microM veratridine (P < 0.01). Cardiac mechanics did not explain the large, concentration-dependent ANF response to the scorpion venom, since changes in the left ventricular developed pressure were small, opposite to those induced by veratridine, and unaffected by sympathectomy or adrenergic receptor blockade. Prior chemical sympathectomy and adrenergic receptor blockade almost abolished the ANF response to scorpion venom but hardly affected the ANF response to veratridine. Addition of 1 microM tetrodotoxin abolished all ANF responses. Electrical stimulation of the atrial appendage increased the ANF secretion by 60.2% (P < 0.02), in conjunction with neuropeptide Y, whereas control stimulations were ineffective. These studies unequivocally demonstrate that stimulation of cardiac sympathetic nerves potently stimulates ANF secretion.

  11. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... purchased, 10% will be donated to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. iGive.com - Online Shopping Joing iGive.com to ... 5% of the purchase price to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. Bookmark the link http://smile.amazon.com/ch/ ...

  12. Mechanisms for altered carnitine content in hypertrophied rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Reibel, D.K.; O'Rourke, B.; Foster, K.A.

    1987-03-01

    Carnitine levels are reduced in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction (banding) and evaluated in hypertrophied hearts of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In an attempt to determine the mechanisms for these alterations, L-(/sup 14/C)carnitine transport was examined in isolated perfused hearts. Total carnitine uptake was significantly reduced by approx.20% in hypertrophied hearts of banded rats at all perfusate carnitine concentrations employed. The reduction in total uptake was due to a 40% reduction in carrier-mediated carnitine uptake with no difference in uptake by diffusion. In contrast, carnitine uptake was not altered in isolated hypertrophied hearts of SHR. However, serum carnitine levels were elevated in SHR, which could result in increased myocardial carnitine uptake in vivo. The data suggest that altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of aortic-banded rats is due to an alteration in the carrier-mediated carnitine transport system in the myocardium. However, altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of SHR is not due to a change in the carnitine transport system per se but may rather be due to a change in serum carnitine levels.

  13. Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Veselka, Josef; Anavekar, Nandan S; Charron, Philippe

    2017-03-25

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is an inherited myocardial disease defined by cardiac hypertrophy (wall thickness ≥15 mm) that is not explained by abnormal loading conditions, and left ventricular obstruction greater than or equal to 30 mm Hg. Typical symptoms include dyspnoea, chest pain, palpitations, and syncope. The diagnosis is usually suspected on clinical examination and confirmed by imaging. Some patients are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Patients with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death undergo cardioverter-defibrillator implantation; in patients with severe symptoms related to ventricular obstruction, septal reduction therapy (myectomy or alcohol septal ablation) is recommended. Life-long anticoagulation is indicated after the first episode of atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Left atrial volume in children without heart disease and in those with ventricular septal defect or patent ductus arteriosus or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Taggart, Nathaniel W; Cetta, Frank; O'Leary, Patrick W; Seward, James B; Eidem, Benjamin W

    2010-11-15

    In adults, the left atrial (LA) volume has been shown to reflect diastolic function and is a powerful predictor of cardiac morbidity and mortality. Normative LA volume values in children and the effect of loading conditions on the LA volume in those with congenital heart disease are lacking. The purposes of the present study were to (1) establish normal LA volume values for children, (2) assess the effect of left ventricular volume loading conditions on LA volume, and (3) describe the effect of abnormal myocardial relaxation on the LA volume. We retrospectively reviewed the echocardiograms from 3 pediatric cohorts: group N (n = 522), children with normal echocardiographic findings; group VSD/PDA (n = 71), children with ventricular septal defect (VSD; n = 50) or patent ductus arteriosus (PDA; n = 21); and group HC (n = 63), children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). In group N, we identified the LA volume indexed to the body surface area (LA volume index) as a consistent measure of the LA volume in children 3 to 23 months old (mean 16 ± 3 ml/m(2)) and 2 to 17 years old (mean 22 ± 4 ml/m(2)). LA dilation was more common in group VSD/PDA than in group N (27% vs 2%, p <0.0001) and in children with moderate or large shunts than in those with smaller shunts (61% vs 5%, p <0.0001). In group HC, the LA volume index correlated with the mitral valve E/e' ratio (p <0.0001). In conclusion, this is the first study to establish normal pediatric LA volume values. The LA volume index is a reproducible measure of LA size in children ≥ 3 months old. The LA volume index reflects a chronically increased left ventricular volume load in children with VSD or PDA and chronically elevated left ventricular filling pressures in children with HC. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nuclear pore rearrangements and nuclear trafficking in cardiomyocytes from rat and human failing hearts

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Mirna N.; Mioulane, Maxime; Sikkel, Markus B.; O'Gara, Peter; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G.; Pierce, Grant N.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Földes, Gábor; Harding, Sian E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims During cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyocytes (CMs) increase in the size and expression of cytoskeletal proteins while reactivating a foetal gene programme. The process is proposed to be dependent on increased nuclear export and, since nuclear pore trafficking has limited capacity, a linked decrease in import. Our objective was to investigate the role of nuclear import and export in control of hypertrophy in rat and human heart failure (HF). Methods and results In myocardial tissue and isolated CMs from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, nuclear size was increased; Nucleoporin p62, cytoplasmic RanBP1, and nuclear translocation of importins (α and β) were decreased while Exportin-1 was increased. CM from a rat HF model 16 weeks after myocardial infarction (MI) reproduced these nuclear changes. Nuclear import, determined by the rate of uptake of nuclear localization sequence (NLS)-tagged fluorescent substrate, was also decreased and this change was observed from 4 weeks after MI, before HF has developed. Treatment of isolated rat CMs with phenylephrine (PE) for 48 h produced similar cell and nuclear size increases, nuclear import and export protein rearrangement, and NLS substrate uptake decrease through p38 MAPK and HDAC-dependent pathways. The change in NLS substrate uptake occurred within 15 min of PE exposure. Inhibition of nuclear export with leptomycin B reversed established nuclear changes in PE-treated rat CMs and decreased NLS substrate uptake and cell/nuclear size in human CMs. Conclusions Nuclear transport changes related to increased export and decreased import are an early event in hypertrophic development. Hypertrophy can be prevented, or even reversed, by targeting import/export, which may open new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25341891

  16. Cardiovascular differentiation of imatinib and bosutinib in the rat.

    PubMed

    Heyen, Jonathan R; Hu, Wenyue; Jamieson, Joseph; Thibault, Stephane; Batugo, Minerva; Loi, Cho-Ming; Burns-Naas, Leigh Ann; McHarg, Aileen D; Jessen, Bart

    2013-11-01

    Imatinib and bosutinib were administered to rats for up to 6 months at clinically relevant exposures to investigate the effects on the cardiovascular system. Imatinib treatment resulted in increased volume, wall thickness and mass suggesting a hypertrophic heart in male and female rats at one and fivefold clinical exposures, respectively. Bosutinib treatment resulted in milder cardiac hypertrophy in female rats only at fivefold clinical exposures. Analysis of excised hearts and cultured myocytes demonstrated increased expression of hypertrophic genes with imatinib or analogs, but not bosutinib or c-Abl RNAi treatment. The current dataset suggests that cardiovascular liability of imatinib and bosutinib are differentiated preclinically and c-Abl independent.

  17. Diastolic flow velocity pattern of the left anterior descending coronary artery in hypertrophied heart, with special reference to the difference between hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Nobuo; Fukuda, Yamato; Morishita, Satofumi; Sakabe, Koichi; Shinohara, Hisanori; Tamura, Yoshiyuki

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the characteristics of diastolic flow velocity pattern of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), and the difference in diastolic LAD flow velocity pattern between hypertensive LVH and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The flow velocity pattern was recorded at the mid-portion of the LAD by high-frequency transthoracic Doppler echocardiography in 22 patients with HCM, 10 hypertensive patients with LVH [LVH(+)HT], and 9 hypertensive patients without LVH [LVH(-)HT]. The diastolic flow pattern was analyzed. Standard two-dimensional echocardiogram and apexcardiogram (ACG) were also recorded. The interventricular septal thickness (IVST) and the sum of the IVST and LV posterior wall thickness (PWT) (IVST + PWT) were greater in HCM than in HT (p < 0.01) patients. Early diastolic upstroke time (D-UT) of the LAD flow velocity wave was longest in HCM, and was longer in LVH(+)HT than in LVH(-)HT (p < 0.01) patients. Direct correlation was found between D-UT and IVST, IVST + PWT in patients with LVH(+)HT and LVH(-)HT (r = 0.80, 0.79, respectively; p < 0.01), but no correlation was found between these parameters in HCM. Late-diastolic step (LDS) formation of the LAD flow velocity wave was observed in 68% of HCM, 20% of LVH(+)HT, but none of the LVH(-)HT patients. The A wave ratio of ACG was higher in patients with LDS than in those without (p < 0.01). The LDS occurred coincidently with the A wave of ACG. The diastolic LAD flow velocity pattern in hypertrophied heart is characterized by slow acceleration and LDS formation, reflecting impaired relaxation and increased stiffness of the LV, respectively. These abnormalities correlate with the degree of hypertrophy in hypertensive heart, but do not correlate with that in HCM.

  18. Usefulness of two-dimensional and speckle tracking echocardiography in "Gray Zone" left ventricular hypertrophy to differentiate professional football player's heart from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Mayank M; Lester, Steven J; Surapaneni, Phani; Sengupta, Partho P; Appleton, Christopher P; Ommen, Steven R; Ressler, Steven W; Hurst, R Todd

    2011-11-01

    Distinguishing the pathologic hypertrophy of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) from the physiologic hypertrophy of professional football players (PFP) can be challenging when septal wall thickness falls within a "gray zone" between 12 and 16 mm. It was hypothesized that 2-dimensional and speckle-tracking strain (ε) echocardiography could differentiate the hearts of PFPs from those of patients with HC with similar wall thicknesses. Sixty-six subjects, including 28 professional American football players and 21 patients with HC, with septal wall thicknesses of 12 to 16 mm, along with 17 normal controls, were studied using 2-dimensional echocardiography. Echocardiographic parameters, including modified relative wall thickness (RWT; septal wall thickness + posterior wall thickness/left ventricular end-diastolic diameter) and early diastolic annular tissue velocity (e'), were measured. Two-dimensional ε was analyzed by speckle tracking to measure endocardial and epicardial longitudinal ε and circumferential ε and radial cardiac ε. Septal wall thickness was higher in patients with HC than in PFPs (14.7 ± 1.1 vs 12.9 ± 0.9 mm, respectively, p <0.001), while posterior wall thickness showed no difference. RWT was larger in patients with HC than in PFPs (0.68 ± 0.10 vs 0.48 ± 0.06, p <0.001). Longitudinal endocardial ε and radial cardiac ε were significantly higher in PFPs than in patients with HC, while circumferential endocardial ε was no different. RWT was the parameter that most accurately differentiated PFPs from patients with HC. An RWT cut point of 0.6 differentiated PFPs from patients with HC, with an area under the curve of 0.97. In conclusion, a 2-dimensional echocardiographic measure of RWT (septal wall + posterior wall thickness/left ventricular end-diastolic dimension) accurately differentiated PFPs' hearts from those of patients with HC when septal wall thickness was in the gray zone of 12 to 16 mm. Two-dimensional strain analysis identifies

  19. Calcium transport mechanisms in muskrat and rat hearts.

    PubMed

    McKean, T A

    2001-11-01

    Mammalian hearts experience calcium overload during extreme and prolonged hypoxia and the calcium overload may lead to enzyme activation and cell death. Several calcium transport systems were examined in muskrat hearts and compared to those found in rat hearts to determine if there is a species difference that might be related to the muskrats' superior ability to survive hypoxia. Radiolabeled nitredendipine binding was determined in rat and muskrat hearts to estimate the density of voltage gated calcium channels in surface membranes. There were no species differences. Calcium release channel density in the sarcoplasmic reticulum was estimated by the determination of radiolabeled ryanodine binding in muskrat and rat heart SR membranes. No differences were revealed between species. The SR uptake of calcium was measured in SR membranes from the hearts of the two species. No differences were found in the B(max) values, however, the muskrat SR membranes did have a slightly lower K(m) value. There were large species differences in Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange in SL membranes with the muskrat heart having approximately 3.5 times the transport capacity of rat SL membranes. During hypoxic conditions in which there is extensive ATP depletion leading to [Na(+)](i) accumulation and discharge of cellular membrane potential, the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger may operate in the reverse mode and import calcium into the cell and accelerate hypoxic damage. Prior to reaching this state a robust Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange would facilitate the maintenance of normal diastolic calcium levels and calcium cycling. Muskrats hearts are hypoxia tolerant by virtue of their ability to reduce metabolic demand and generate ATP anaerobically thus, maintaining a favorable ATP balance. Therefore, the relative overexpression of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers in muskrat hearts may be beneficial in the preservation of contractile function and calcium homeostasis in this freshwater diving mammal.

  20. Rat heart: a site of oxytocin production and action.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M; Hajjar, F; Kawas, S A; Mukaddam-Daher, S; Hoffman, G; McCann, S M; Gutkowska, J

    1998-11-24

    We report here that the rat heart is a site of oxytocin (OT) synthesis and release. Oxytocin was detected in all four chambers of the heart. The highest OT concentration was in the right atrium (2128 +/- 114 pg/mg protein), which was 19-fold higher than in rat uterus but 3.3-fold lower than in the hypothalamus. OT concentrations were significantly greater in the right and left atria than in the corresponding ventricles. Furthermore, OT was released into the effluent of isolated, perfused rat heart (34.5 +/- 4.7 pg/min) and into the medium of cultured atrial myocytes. Reverse-phase HPLC purification of the heart extracts and heart perfusates revealed a main peak identical with the retention time of synthetic OT. Southern blots of reverse transcription-PCR products from rat heart revealed gene expression of specific OT mRNA. OT immunostaining likewise was found in atrial myocytes and fibroblasts, and the intensity of positive stains from OT receptors paralleled the atrial natriuretic peptide stores. Our findings suggest that heart OT is structurally identical, and therefore derived from, the same gene as the OT that is primarily found in the hypothalamus. Thus, the heart synthesizes and processes a biologically active form of OT. The presence of OT and OT receptor in all of the heart's chambers suggests an autocrine and/or paracrine role for the peptide. Our finding of abundant OT receptor in atrial myocytes supports our hypothesis that OT, directly and/or via atrial natriuretic peptide release, can regulate the force of cardiac contraction.

  1. Norepinephrine turnover in heart of the copper deficient rat

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, K.E.; Failla, M.L.; Rosebrough, R. )

    1989-02-01

    Weaned male SD rats were fed a modified AIN-76A diet containing 62% sucrose and either 7 ppm (+Cu) or 0.5 ppm (-Cu) copper for 5 weeks. Dietary copper deprivation resulted in lower concentrations of copper in liver and serum and enlarged hearts. Tissue levels of norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DPA) were quantified by HPLC using electrochemical detection. Cardiac concentration of NE and DPA and 26% lower and 63% higher, respectively, in -Cu rats than in +Cu controls. Altered cardiac levels of NE and DPA in -Cu rats were also evident after overnight fasting, a stress that depresses SNS activity. NE turnover was investigated after inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase by injection of {alpha}-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester (250 mg/kg). The fractional rate of NE turnover in the heart was 4.6%/hour for rats fed -Cu and +Cu diets. Calculated NE turnover was greater in heart of +Cu rats than -Cu rats (26 vs. 19 ng/g/hr). NE and DPA concentration in brain, pancreas, and spleen were not affected by dietary copper. These data suggest that synthesis of NE in cardiac nerve endings of the weaned rats sensitive to dietary copper deficiency.

  2. The changes of vaccinia related kinase 1 in grafted heart after rat heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Shiguo; Yang, Xuechao; Wu, Kunpeng; Lv, Qiangsheng; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Dai, Jiahong; Chen, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the expression and significance of vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1) after rat heart transplantation. Materials and methods Lewis and Wistar rats weighing 250 to 300 g were used as donors and recipients. Allografts were from Wistar transplanted into Lewis, and isografts were transplanted from Lewis into Lewis. Grafts were harvested at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after transplantation. We performed Western Blot of heart tissues after cardiac transplantation. To analyze VRK1 express between the isografts and allografts for immunohistochemical staining. At 5th day after heart transplantation use related cytokines VRK1 for immunohistochemical. We used double immunofluorescent staining on transverse cryosections of graft tissues by co-labeling with different markers, including those for VRK1, activate caspase-3, α-actinin, VCAM-1, CD4. Results Compared with rare expression in syngeneic Lewis rat hearts, VRK1 protein level in allogeneic hearts were detected at various survival times after heterotopic heart transplantation, which observably expressed on day 5 postoperative. In addition, we examined the expression of activate caspase-3 in allogeneic hearts, which has a similar expression with VRK1. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent method displayed that VRK1 was widely expressed in cytoplasm of cardiac tissue and activate caspase-3 was also expressed in cardiomyocytes. However, the VRK1 wasn’t express in inflammation. Conclusions The VRK1 expression has increased after heart transplantation in allograft and isograft, and VRK1 may play a significant role in myocardial apoptosis after heterotopic heart transplantation in rats. PMID:25589968

  3. Rat heart: A site of oxytocin production and action

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, Marek; Hajjar, Fadi; Kawas, Sausan Al; Mukaddam-Daher, Suhayla; Hoffman, Gloria; McCann, Samuel M.; Gutkowska, Jolanta

    1998-01-01

    We report here that the rat heart is a site of oxytocin (OT) synthesis and release. Oxytocin was detected in all four chambers of the heart. The highest OT concentration was in the right atrium (2128 ± 114 pg/mg protein), which was 19-fold higher than in rat uterus but 3.3-fold lower than in the hypothalamus. OT concentrations were significantly greater in the right and left atria than in the corresponding ventricles. Furthermore, OT was released into the effluent of isolated, perfused rat heart (34.5 ± 4.7 pg/min) and into the medium of cultured atrial myocytes. Reverse-phase HPLC purification of the heart extracts and heart perfusates revealed a main peak identical with the retention time of synthetic OT. Southern blots of reverse transcription–PCR products from rat heart revealed gene expression of specific OT mRNA. OT immunostaining likewise was found in atrial myocytes and fibroblasts, and the intensity of positive stains from OT receptors paralleled the atrial natriuretic peptide stores. Our findings suggest that heart OT is structurally identical, and therefore derived from, the same gene as the OT that is primarily found in the hypothalamus. Thus, the heart synthesizes and processes a biologically active form of OT. The presence of OT and OT receptor in all of the heart’s chambers suggests an autocrine and/or paracrine role for the peptide. Our finding of abundant OT receptor in atrial myocytes supports our hypothesis that OT, directly and/or via atrial natriuretic peptide release, can regulate the force of cardiac contraction. PMID:9826739

  4. Physiologic consequences of local heart irradiation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, B.J.; Lauk, S.; Bornhausen, M.; Trott, K.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Noninvasive methods have been used to study the long-term cardiovascular and pulmonary functional changes at rest and after exercise in adult rats following local heart irradiation with single x-ray doses of 15, 17.5 or 20 Gy, and in non-irradiated control animals. Rats that had undergone a chronic exercise program were compared with untrained cohorts. The earliest dysfunction detected was an increased respiratory rate (f) at 10 weeks after irradiation in the highest dose group. In contrast, both telemetric heart-rate (HR) and rhythm and indirect systolic blood pressure measurements performed at rest only revealed changes starting at 43 weeks after irradiation with 20 Gy, up to which point the rats showed no clinical signs of heart failure. However, the number of minutes required for the recovery of the HR to pre-exercise levels following the implementation of a standardized exercise challenge was elevated in untrained rats compared with their trained cohorts at 18 weeks after irradiation with 20 Gy. Increases in recovery times were required in the two lowest dose groups, starting at 26 weeks after irradiation. It was concluded that the reserve capacity of the cardiopulmonary system masks functional decrements at rest for many months following local heart irradiation, necessitating the use of techniques which reveal reductions in reserve capacities. Further, the influence of local irradiation to the heart and lungs deserves closer scrutiny due to mutual interactions.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Heart Rate Variability and Baroreflex Sensitivity in Rats with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Sharon Del Bem Velloso; da Silva, Luiz Eduardo Virgilio; Lataro, Renata Maria; Silva, Carlos Alberto Aguiar; de Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos; de Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira; Simões, Marcus Vinicius; da Silva Meirelles, Lindolfo; Fazan, Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure induced by myocardial infarct (MI) attenuates the heart rate variability (HRV) and baroreflex sensitivity, which are important risk factors for life-threatening cardiovascular events. Therapies with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown promising results after MI. However, the effects of MSCs on hemodynamic (heart rate and arterial pressure) variability and baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure (CHF) following MI have not been evaluated thus far. Male Wistar rats received MSCs or saline solution intravenously 1 week after ligation of the left coronary artery. Control (noninfarcted) rats were also evaluated. MI size was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography. Four weeks after MSC injection, the animals were anesthetized and instrumented for chronic ECG recording and catheters were implanted in the femoral artery to record arterial pressure. Arterial pressure and HRVs were determined in time and frequency domain (spectral analysis) while HRV was also examined using nonlinear methods: DFA (detrended fluctuation analysis) and sample entropy. The initial MI size was the same among all infarcted rats but was reduced by MSCs. CHF rats exhibited increased myocardial interstitial collagen and sample entropy combined with the attenuation of the following cardiocirculatory parameters: DFA indices, LVEF, baroreflex sensitivity, and HRV. Nevertheless, MSCs hampered all these alterations, except the LVEF reduction. Therefore, 4 weeks after MSC therapy was applied to CHF rats, MI size and myocardial interstitial fibrosis decreased, while baroreflex sensitivity and HRV improved. PMID:26059001

  6. The effect of Ligustrum delavayanum on isolated perfused rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Stankovičová, Tatiana; Frýdl, Miroslav; Kubicová, Mária; Baróniková, Slávka; Nagy, Milan; Grančai, Daniel; Švec, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extract of ligustrum leaves (Ligustrum delavayanum Hariot [Oleaceae]) is well known in traditional Chinese medicine. One of the active components, oleuropein, displays vasodilating and hypotensive effects. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of 0.008% lyophilized extract of ligustrum dissolved in 0.5% ethanol on heart function. ANIMALS AND METHODS: Experiments were done on isolated rat hearts perfused by the Langendorff method in control conditions and during ischemic-reperfusion injury. RESULTS: Application of ligustrum induced positive inotropic and vasodilating effects in spontaneously beating hearts. Pretreatment of the hearts with ligustrum reduced left ventricular diastolic pressure measured during reperfusion and improved left ventricular contraction compared with hearts without any pretreatment. Ligustrum significantly suppressed the incidence and duration of cardiac reperfusion arrhythmias, expressed as G-score, from 7.40±0.58 in nontreated rats to 1.97±0.50. DISCUSSION: Application of ligustrum or ethanol alone induced changes in coordination between atria and ventricles during ischemia-reperfusion injury. The ‘g-score’, a new parameter summing the incidence and duration of atrioventricular blocks, atrioventricular dissociation and cardiac arrest, is introduced. The g-scores with ligustrum pretreatment were higher during ischemia than during reperfusion. Ethanol significantly depressed myocardial contractility and coronary flow, and nonsignificantly decreased heart rate of isolated rat hearts. Electrical changes observed during coronary reperfusion in the presence of ethanol were accompanied by deterioration of contractile function. CONCLUSIONS: Ligustrum had a significant protective effect on rat myocardium against ischemic-reperfusion injury. Ethanol partially attenuated the protective effect of ligustrum. PMID:20428448

  7. Fatty acid utilization in pressure-overload hypertrophied rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Reibel, D.K.; O'Rourke, B.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously shown that the levels of total tissue coenzyme A and carnitine are reduced in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction. It was therefore of interest to determine if these changes were associated with alterations in fatty acid oxidation by the hypertrophied myocardium. Hearts were excised from sham-operated and aortic-constricted rats and perfused at 10 cm H/sub 2/O left atrial filling pressure with a ventricular afterload of 80 cm of H/sub 2/O with buffer containing 1.2 mM /sup 14/C-linoleate. Heart rate and peak systolic pressure were not different in control and hypertrophied hearts. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production was linear in both groups of hearts between 10 and 30 minutes of perfusion. The rate of fatty acid oxidation determined by /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production during this time was 0.728 +/- 0.06 ..mu..moles/min/g dry in control hearts and 0.710 +/- 0.02 ..mu..moles/min/g dry in hypertrophied hearts. Comparable rates of fatty acid oxidation were associated with comparable rates of O/sub 2/ consumption in the two groups of hearts (39.06 +/- 3.50 and 36.78 +/- 2.39 ..mu..moles/g dry/min for control and hypertrophied hearts, respectively). The data indicate that the ability of the hypertrophied heart to oxidize fatty acids under these perfusion conditions is not impaired in spite of significant reductions in tissue levels of coenzyme A and carnitine.

  8. Carvedilol protected diabetic rat hearts via reducing oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Shan, Jiang; Pan, Xiao-hong; Wang, Hui-ping; Qian, Ling-bo

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a dominant role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Bcl-2 gene has close connection with antioxidant stress destruction in many diseases including diabetes. Carvedilol, an adrenoceptor blocker, also has antioxidant properties. To study the effect of carvedilol on the antioxidant status in diabetic hearts, we investigated carvedilol-administrated healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. After small and large dosage carvedilol-administered for 5 weeks, hemodynamic parameters, the levels of malondialdehyde, activities of antioxidant enzymes and expression of Bcl-2 mRNA in the cardiac tissues were measured. The diabetic rats not only had cardiac disfunction, weaker activities of antioxidant enzymes, but also showed lower expression of Bcl-2. Carvedilol treatment increased activities of antioxidant enzymes and expression of Bcl-2 in healthy rats as well as diabetic rats. These results indicated that carvedilol partly improves cardiac function via its antioxidant properties in diabetic rats. PMID:16909474

  9. Teneligliptin Prevents Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy, Fibrosis, and Development of Hypertensive Heart Failure in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Ishizu, Tomoko; Seo, Yoshihiro; Suto, Yoshimi; Sai, Seika; Xu, Dongzhu; Murakoshi, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Taizo; Kawakami, Yasushi; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2017-09-06

    We investigated the effects of the DPP4 inhibitor, teneligliptin, on cardiac function and hemodynamics during heart failure in hypertensive model rats. Fifty-five male Dahl salt-sensitive rats were divided into four groups: control group (0.3% NaCl chow, n=13), hypertension (HT) group (8% NaCl chow, n=20), HT-early TNL group (8% NaCl chow and teneligliptin from 6 weeks, n=10), and HT-late TNL group (8% NaCl chow and teneligliptin from 10 weeks, n=12). Hemodynamic measurement and tissue analyses were performed at 18 weeks. In the all HT groups, systolic blood pressures and similarly elevated (p=0.66) and heart weight similarly increased (p=0.36) with or without TNL administration. LV end-diastolic dimension was significantly enlarged only in the HT-early TNL groups compared with control group (p=0.025). Histological analysis showed less fibrosis (p=0.008) and cardiomyocyte widths (p=0.009) in the HT-early TNL group compare with HT group. On hemodynamic analysis, only HT group showed significant LV end-diastolic pressure elevation (p=0.049) and lung congestion (p<0.001) compare with control group. These results suggest teneligliptin prevents concentric LV hypertrophy, fibrosis, and development of congestive heart failure in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Teneligliptin may inhibit pressure-overload hypertrophic adaption and result in LV eccentric hypertrophy with reduced LV ejection fraction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Manganese depresses rat heart muscle respiration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has previously been reported that moderately high dietary manganese (Mn) in combination with marginal magnesium (Mg) resulted in ultrastructural damage to heart mitochondria. Manganese may replace Mg in biological functions, including the role of enzyme cofactor. Manganese may accumulate and subs...

  11. A systems genetics approach identifies Trp53inp2 as a link between cardiomyocyte glucose utilization and hypertrophic response.

    PubMed

    Seldin, Marcus M; Kim, Eric D; Romay, Milagros C; Li, Shen; Rau, Christoph D; Wang, Jessica J; Krishnan, Karthickeyan Chella; Wang, Yibin; Deb, Arjun; Lusis, Aldons J

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac failure has been widely associated with an increase in glucose utilization. The aim of our study was to identify factors that mechanistically bridge this link between hyperglycemia and heart failure. Here, we screened the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP) for substrate-specific cardiomyocyte candidates based on heart transcriptional profile and circulating nutrients. Next, we utilized an in vitro model of rat cardiomyocytes to demonstrate that the gene expression changes were in direct response to substrate abundance. After overlaying candidates of interest with a separate HMDP study evaluating isoproterenol-induced heart failure, we chose to focus on the gene Trp53inp2 as a cardiomyocyte glucose utilization-specific factor. Trp53inp2 gene knockdown in rat cardiomyocytes reduced expression and protein abundance of key glycolytic enzymes. This resulted in reduction of both glucose uptake and glycogen content in cardiomyocytes stimulated with isoproterenol. Furthermore, this reduction effectively blunted the capacity of glucose and isoprotereonol to synergistically induce hypertrophic gene expression and cell size expansion. We conclude that Trp53inp2 serves as regulator of cardiomyocyte glycolytic activity and can consequently regulate hypertrophic response in the context of elevated glucose content.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Here, we apply a novel method for screening transcripts based on a substrate-specific expression pattern to identify Trp53inp2 as an induced cardiomyocyte glucose utilization factor. We further show that reducing expression of the gene could effectively blunt hypertrophic response in the context of elevated glucose content. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Arrhythmogenic effect of androgens on the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Argenziano, Mariana; Tiscornia, Gisela; Moretta, Rosalia; Casal, Leonardo; Potilinski, Constanza; Amorena, Carlos; Gras, Eduardo Garcia

    2017-01-01

    In most species androgens shorten the cardiac action potential and reduce the risk of afterdepolarizations. Despite the central role of the rat model in physiological studies, the effects of androgens on the rat heart are still inconclusive. We therefore performed electrophysiological studies on the perfused rat right ventricular free wall. We found a correlation between androgenic activity and a propensity to generate ventricular ectopic action potentials. We also found that the testosterone treatment increased action potential duration at 90 % of repolarization (APD90), while androgenic inhibition increased the time to peak and decreased APD90. We observed that the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv4.3 and the bi-directional membrane ion transporter NCX in the rat myocardium were regulated by androgenic hormones. One possible explanation for these findings is that due to the expression of specific ion channels in the rat myocardium, the action potential response to its hormonal background is different from those described in other experimental models. Our results indicate that androgenic control of NCX expression plays a key role in determining arrhythmogenicity in the rat heart.

  13. Stage-specific differential activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in hypertrophied and failing rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, W; Kihara, Y; Yasaka, A; Inagaki, K; Iwanaga, Y; Sasayama, S

    2001-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in the early development of cardiac hypertrophy, but their roles in chronic left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) are unclear. We studied the angiotensin (Ang) II-induced cardiac MAPK activation of the hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats in the subacute developing LVH stage, the chronic compensated LVH stage, and the congestive heart failure (CHF) stage. In the isolated, coronary-perfused heart preparation, Ang II infusion (1x10(-6)mol/l) activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38-MAPK in the LV myocardium. No substantial differences were observed in the Ang II-induced ERK activation between the normotensive control DS rats and the hypertensive DS rats in either stage. In contrast, the Ang II-induced activation of JNK and p38-MAPK was augmented in the subacute LVH stage of the hypertensive DS rats, but then progressively attenuated in the chronic LVH and CHF stages. Chronic treatment with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, temocapril (20 mg/kg/day), ameliorated the responsiveness of the JNK/p38-MAPK activation, suggesting that the decreased JNK/p38-MAPK activation is a consequence of negative feedback regulation for the activated cardiac renin-angiotensin system in chronic LVH and CHF. Thus, the Ang II-induced activation of multiple cardiac MAPK pathways are differentially regulated, depending on the stages of chronic hypertrophic process. The JNK and p38-MAPK activation may be involved in the early development of adaptive LVH. However, the responsiveness of the cardiac JNK/p38-MAPK pathways progressively decreased in chronic LVH and CHF under the chronic activation of tissue renin-angiotensin system.

  14. Melatonin protects against ischemic heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Şehirli, Ahmet Özer; Koyun, Derya; Tetik, Şermin; Özsavcı, Derya; Yiğiner, Ömer; Çetinel, Şule; Tok, Olgu Enis; Kaya, Zehra; Akkiprik, Mustafa; Kılıç, Ertugrul; Şener, Göksel

    2013-09-01

    Ischemic injury, which occurs as a result of sympathetic hyperactivity, plays an important role in heart failure. Melatonin is thought to have antiatherogenic, antioxidant, and vasodilatory effects. In this study, we investigated whether melatonin protects against ischemic heart failure (HF). In Wistar albino rats, HF was induced by left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation and rats were treated with either vehicle or melatonin (10 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. At the end of this period, echocardiographic measurements were recorded and the rats were decapitated to obtain plasma and cardiac tissue samples. Lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lysosomal enzymes (β-D-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase, β-D-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, acid phosphatase, and cathepsin-D) were studied in plasma samples, while malondialdehyde and glutathione levels and Na+, K+-ATPase, caspase-3 and myeloperoxidase activities were determined in the cardiac samples. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) and caveolin-3 levels in cardiac tissues were evaluated using Western blot analyses. Furthermore, caveolin-3 levels were also determined by histological analyses. In the vehicle-treated HF group, cardiotoxicity resulted in decreased cardiac Na+, K+-ATPase and SERCA activities, GSH contents and caveolin-3 levels, while plasma LDH, CK, and lysosomal enzyme activities and cardiac MDA and Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were found to be increased. On the other hand, melatonin treatment reversed all the functional and biochemical changes. The present results demonstrate that Mel ameliorates ischemic heart failure in rats. These observations highlight that melatonin is a promising supplement for improving defense mechanisms in the heart against oxidative stress caused by heart failure.

  15. Effects of caffeine on heart mitochondria in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Wink, C S; Rossowska, M J; Joseph, F; Yazdani, M; Nakamoto, T

    1999-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, in the present study, litters of rats were combined upon birth, and 8 pups were randomly assigned to each dam. Dams with pups were divided into 2 groups: group 1 received a 20% protein diet as a control, and group 2 received the 20% protein diet supplemented with caffeine (4 mg/100 g body weight). Pups from both groups were killed on days 11 and 15. Transmission electron microscopy revealed swollen, disrupted, degenerating mitochondria and intracellular edema in the hearts of rats in the caffeine groups when compared with those of the controls. Plasma Cu concentration was significantly decreased. These results indicate that early exposure to caffeine through maternal milk adversely affects cardiac mitochondria of rat pups and may be associated with decreased plasma Cu levels. It is unclear whether these results apply to the human infant. Interspecies extrapolation from rat to human must be made with caution.

  16. Post-infarct treatment with [Pyr1]apelin-13 exerts anti-remodelling and anti-apoptotic effects in rats' hearts.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Yaser; Imani, Alireza; Fanaei, Hamed; Khamse, Safoura; Parvizi, Mohammad Reza; Faghihi, Mahdieh

    2017-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the main cause of mortality in the world. After myocardial infarction (MI) cardiomyocytes apoptosis and ventricular remodelling have occurred. Apelin is a peptide that has been shown to exert cardioprotective effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-apoptotic and anti-remodelling effects of [Pyr¹]apelin-13 in the rat model of post-MI. Thirty-six male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: (1) sham, (2) MI, and (3) MI treated with [Pyr¹] apelin-13 (MI+Apel). MI animals were subjected to 30-min ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and 14 days of reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after LAD ligation, [Pyr¹]apelin-13 (10 nmol/kg/day, i.p.) was administered for five consecutive days. Hypertrophic parameters, left ventricular (LV) remodelling, and gene expression of Apel, apelin receptor (Apelr), Bax, caspase-3 (Casp-3), and Bcl-2 by real-time polymerase chain reaction and cardiomyocytes apoptosis by TUNEL immunostaining were assessed on day 14 post-MI. Post-infarct treatment with [Pyr¹]apelin-13 improved myocardial hypertrophic and LV remodelling parameters and led to a significant increase in the expression of Apel, Apelr, and Bcl-2, and a decrease in the expression of Bax and Casp-3. Furthermore, treatment with [Pyr¹]apelin-13 decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis. [Pyr¹]apelin-13 has anti-hypertrophic, anti-remodelling, and anti-apoptotic effects via overexpression of Apel, Apelr, and Bcl-2 and reduces gene expression of Bax and Casp-3 in the infarcted myocardium, which can in turn lead to repair myocardium.

  17. Skeletal muscle electrical stimulation improves baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability in heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto Rucatti, Ananda; Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Rossato, Douglas Dalcin; Bonetto, Jéssica Hellen Poletto; Ferreira, Janaína; Xavier, Leder Leal; Sonza, Anelise; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on the arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and cardiovascular autonomic control in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF). Male Wistar rats were designated to one of four groups: placebo sham (P-Sham, n=9), ES sham (ES-Sham, n=9), placebo CHF (P-CHF, n=9) or ES CHF (ES-CHF, n=9). The ES was adjusted at a low frequency (30 Hz), duration of 250 μs, with hold and rest time of 8s (4 weeks, 30 min/day, 5 times/week). It was applied on the gastrocnemius muscle with intensity to produce a visible muscle contraction. The rats assigned to the placebo groups performed the same procedures with the equipment turned off. The two-way ANOVA and the post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls tests (P<0.05) were used to data comparison. The BRS was higher in ES-Sham group compared to the P-Sham group and the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF group. ES was able to decrease heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation and peripheral sympathetic modulation in ES-CHF compared to P-CHF group. Interestingly, heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation was similar between ES-CHF and P-Sham groups. Thus, ES enhances heart rate parasympathetic modulation on heart failure (ES-CHF) compared to placebo (P-CHF), with consequent decrease of sympatho-vagal balance in the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF. The results show that a 4 week ES protocol in CHF rats enhances arterial BRS and cardiovascular autonomic control.

  18. Role of transiently altered sarcolemmal membrane permeability and basic fibroblast growth factor release in the hypertrophic response of adult rat ventricular myocytes to increased mechanical activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, D; Pimental, D; Prasad, S; Mäki, T; Berger, H J; McNeil, P L; Smith, T W; Kelly, R A

    1996-01-01

    One of the trophic factors that has been implicated in initiating or facilitating growth in response to increased mechanical stress in several tissues and cell types is basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; FGF-2). Although mammalian cardiac muscle cells express bFGF, it is not known whether it plays a role in mediating cardiac adaptation to increased load, nor how release of the cytosolic 18-kD isoform of bFGF would be regulated in response to increased mechanical stress. To test the hypothesis that increased mechanical activity induces transient alterations in sarcolemmal permeability that allow cytosolic bFGF to be released and subsequently to act as an autocrine and paracrine growth stimulus, we examined primary isolates of adult rat ventricular myocytes maintained in serum-free, defined medium that were continually paced at 3 Hz for up to 5 d. Paced myocytes, but not nonpaced control cells, exhibited a "hypertrophic" response, which was characterized by increases in the rate of phenylalanine incorporation, total cellular protein content, and cell size. These changes could be mimicked in control cells by exogenous recombinant bFGF and could be blocked in continually paced cells by a specific neutralizing anti-bFGF antibody. In addition, medium conditioned by continually paced myocytes contained significantly more bFGF measured by ELISA and more mitogenic activity for 3T3 cells, activity that could be reduced by a neutralizing anti-bFGF antibody. The hypothesis that transient membrane disruptions sufficient to allow release of cytosolic bFGF occur in paced myocytes was examined by monitoring the rate of uptake into myocytes from the medium of 10-kD dextran linked to fluorescein. Paced myocytes exhibited a significantly higher rate of fluoresceinlabeled dextran uptake. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that nonlethal, transient alterations in sarcolemmal membrane permeability with release of cytosolic bFGF is one mechanism by which increased

  19. Resveratrol Improved Flow-Mediated Outward Arterial Remodeling in Ovariectomized Rats with Hypertrophic Effect at High Dose

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Marie; Guihot, Anne-Laure; Grimaud, Linda; Vessieres, Emilie; Toutain, Bertrand; Menet, Marie-Claude; Nivet-Antoine, Valérie; Arnal, Jean-François; Loufrani, Laurent; Procaccio, Vincent; Henrion, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic increases in blood flow in resistance arteries induce outward remodeling associated with increased wall thickness and endothelium-mediated dilatation. This remodeling is essential for collateral arteries growth following occlusion of a large artery. As estrogens have a major role in this remodeling, we hypothesized that resveratrol, described as possessing phytoestrogen properties, could improve remodeling in ovariectomized rats. Methods Blood flow was increased in vivo in mesenteric arteries after ligation of adjacent arteries in 3-month old ovariectomized rats treated with resveratrol (5 or 37.5 mg/kg per day: RESV5 or RESV37.5) or vehicle. After 2 weeks arterial structure and function were measured in vitro in high flow (HF) and normal flow (NF) arteries isolated from each rat. Results Arterial diameter was greater in HF than in NF arteries in ovariectomized rats treated with RESV5 or RESV37.5, not in vehicle-treated rats. In mice lacking estrogen receptor alpha diameter was equivalent in HF and NF arteries whereas in mice treated with RESV5 diameter was greater in HF than in NF vessels. A compensatory increase in wall thickness and a greater phenylephrine-mediated contraction were observed in HF arteries. This was more pronounced in HF arteries from RESV37.5-treated rats. ERK1/2 phosphorylation, involved in hypertrophy and contraction, were higher in RESV37.5-treated rats than in RESV5- and vehicle-treated rats. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was greater in HF than in NF arteries in RESV5-treated rats only. In HF arteries from RESV37.5-treated rats relaxation was increased by superoxide reduction and markers of oxidative stress (p67phox, GP91phox) were higher than in the 2 other groups. Conclusion Resveratrol improved flow-mediated outward remodeling in ovariectomized rats thus providing a potential therapeutic tool in menopause-associated ischemic disorders. This effect seems independent of the estrogen receptor alpha. Nevertheless

  20. Identification, purification, and localization of tissue kallikrein in rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, W; Chen, L M; Woodley-Miller, C; Simson, J A; Chao, J

    1990-01-01

    A tissue kallikrein has been isolated from rat heart extracts by DEAE-Sepharose and aprotinin-affinity column chromatography. The purified cardiac enzyme has both N-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester esterolytic and kinin-releasing activities, and displays parallelism with standard curves in a kallikrein radioimmunoassay, indicating it to have immunological identity with tissue kallikrein. The enzyme is inhibited by aprotinin, antipain, leupeptin and by high concentrations of soybean trypsin inhibitor, but stimulated by lima-bean or ovomucoid trypsin inhibitor and low concentrations of soybean trypsin inhibitor. By using a specific monoclonal antibody to tissue kallikrein in Western blot as well as active-site labelling with [14C]di-isopropyl fluorophosphate, the cardiac enzyme was identified as a protein of 38 kDa, a molecular mass identical with that of tissue kallikrein. Immunocytochemistry at the electron-microscopic level localized this enzyme to the sarcoplasmic reticulum and granules of rat atrial myocytes. Two cardiac kallikrein precursors, (38 and 40 kDa) were identified from the translation in vitro of heart mRNA by immunoprecipitation and electrophoresis of [35S]methionine-labelled cell-free translation products. Kallikrein mRNA in the rat heart was also demonstrated by dot-blot analysis using a tissue kallikrein cDNA probe. These results indicate that the tissue kallikrein gene is expressed in the rat heart and that the purified enzyme is indistinguishable from tissue kallikrein with respect to enzymic and immunological characteristics. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2140256

  1. Development of neuropeptide Y-mediated heart innervation in rats.

    PubMed

    Masliukov, Petr M; Moiseev, Konstantin; Emanuilov, Andrey I; Anikina, Tatyana A; Zverev, Alexey A; Nozdrachev, Alexandr D

    2016-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays a trophic role in the nervous and vascular systems and in cardiac hypertrophy. However, there is no report concerning the expression of NPY and its receptors in the heart during postnatal development. In the current study, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis was used to label NPY, and Y1R, Y2R, and Y5R receptors in the heart tissue and intramural cardiac ganglia from rats of different ages (newborn, 10 days old, 20 days old, 30 days old, 60 days old, 1 year old, and 2 years old).The obtained data suggest age-dependent changes of NPY-mediated heart innervation. The density of NPY-immunoreactive (IR) fibers was the least in newborn animals and increased in the first 20 days of life. In the atria of newborn and 10-day-old rats, NPY-IR fibers were more abundant compared with the ventricles. The vast majority of NPY-IR fibers also contained tyrosine hydroxylase, a key enzyme in catecholamine synthesis.The expression of Y1R increased between 10 and 20 days of life. Faint Y2R immunoreactivity was observed in the atria and ventricles of 20-day-old and older rats. In contrast, the highest level of the expression of Y5R was found in newborn pups comparing with more adult rats. All intramural ganglionic neurons were also Y1R-IR and Y5R-IR and Y2R-negative in all studied animals.Thus, the increasing of density of NPY-containing nerve fibers accompanies changes in relation of different subtypes of NPY receptors in the heart during development.

  2. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Gregory P.; Sepe, Joseph J.; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.; Diffee, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  3. The growth of the muscular and collagenous parts of the rat heart in various forms of cardiomegaly

    PubMed Central

    Bartošová, D.; Chvapil, M.; Korecký, B.; Poupa, O.; Rakušan, K.; Turek, Z.; Vízek, M.

    1969-01-01

    1. Cardiomegaly has been produced in rats by sideropenic anaemia, by isoprenaline or thyroxine or by the application of both drugs, by artificial increase in resistance to blood flow and by long-term adaptation to hypoxia and physical stress. The ratio of the growth of muscle to the growth of collagen in the heart has been studied. 2. All possible variations in the ratio occurred depending on the type of stimulus used for inducing cardiomegaly and on the dynamics of the development of cardiomegaly. In cardiomegaly induced by sideropenia and by thyroxine the growth of muscle was not accompanied by the growth of collagen. Exposure to hypoxia or isoprenaline administration increased only the growth of collagen in the hypertrophic heart. In all other forms of cardiomegaly muscle and collagen formation were stimulated to the same extent. 3. It is concluded that when certain organs hypertrophy during adult life several factors may determine the relative rapidity of growth of the muscular or parenchymal and the collagenous stromal components of the tissue. PMID:4236906

  4. Oxidative Damage in the Aging Heart: an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Gustavo Lenci; Neto, Francisco Filipak; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto de Oliveira; Liebel, Samuel; de Fraga, Rogério; Bueno, Ronaldo da Rocha Loures

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several theories have been proposed to explain the cause of ‘aging’; however, the factors that affect this complex process are still poorly understood. Of these theories, the accumulation of oxidative damage over time is among the most accepted. Particularly, the heart is one of the most affected organs by oxidative stress. The current study, therefore, aimed to investigate oxidative stress markers in myocardial tissue of rats at different ages. Methods: Seventy-two rats were distributed into 6 groups of 12 animals each and maintained for 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and the levels of non-protein thiols, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were determined. Results: Superoxide dismutase, catalase activity and lipid peroxidation were reduced in the older groups of animals, when compared with the younger group. However, protein carbonylation showed an increase in the 12-month group followed by a decrease in the older groups. In addition, the levels of non-protein thiols were increased in the 12-month group and not detected in the older groups. Conclusion: Our data showed that oxidative stress is not associated with aging in the heart. However, an increase in non-protein thiols may be an important factor that compensates for the decrease of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the oldest rats, to maintain appropriate antioxidant defenses against oxidative insults. PMID:27006709

  5. Detection of cardiac variability in the isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Autumn M; Zbilut, Joseph P; Webber, Charles L; Schwertz, Dorie W; Piano, Mariann R

    2006-07-01

    Cardiac variability can be assessed from two perspectives: beat-to-beat performance and continuous performance during the cardiac cycle. Linear analysis techniques assess cardiac variability by measuring the physical attributes of a signal, whereas nonlinear techniques evaluate signal dynamics. This study sought to determine if recurrence quantification analysis (RQA), a nonlinear technique, could detect pharmacologically induced autonomic changes in the continuous left ventricular pressure (LVP) and electrographic (EC) signals from an isolated rat heart-a model that theoretically contains no inherent variability. LVP and EC signal data were acquired simultaneously during Langendorff perfusion of isolated rat hearts before and after the addition of acetylcholine (n = 11), norepinephrine (n = 12), or no drug (n = 12). Two-minute segments of the continuous LVP and EC signal data were analyzed by RQA. Findings showed that%recurrence,%determinism, entropy, maxline, and trend from the continuous LVP signal significantly increased in the presence of both acetylcholine and norepinephrine, although systolic LVP significantly increased only with norepinephrine. In the continuous EC signal, the RQA trend variable significantly increased in the presence of norepinephrine. These results suggest that when either the sympathetic or parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system overwhelms the other, the dynamics underlying cardiac variability become stationary. This study also shows that information concerning inherent variability in the isolated rat heart can be gained via RQA of the continuous cardiac signal. Although speculative, RQA may be a tool for detecting alterations in cardiac variability and evaluating signal dynamics as a nonlinear indicator of cardiac pathology.

  6. Sodium alterations in isolated rat heart during cardioplegic arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Schepkin, V.D.; Choy, I.O.; Budinger, T.F.

    1996-12-01

    Triple-quantum-filtered (TQF) Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) without chemical shift reagent is used to investigate Na derangement in isolated crystalloid perfused rat hearts during St. Thomas cardioplegic (CP) arrest. The extracellular Na contribution to the NMR TQF signal of a rat heart is found to be 73 {+-} 5%, as determined by wash-out experiments at different moments of ischemia and reperfusion. With the use of this contribution factor, the estimated intracellular Na ([Na{sup +}]{sub i}) TQF signal is 222 {+-} 13% of preischemic level after 40 min of CP arrest and 30 min of reperfusion, and the heart rate pressure product recovery is 71 {+-} 8%. These parameters are significantly better than for stop-flow ischemia: 340 {+-} 20% and 6 {+-} 3%, respectively. At 37{degrees}C, the initial delay of 15 min in [Na{sup +}]{sub i} growth occurs during CP arrest along with reduced growth later ({approximately}4.0%/min) in comparison with stop-flow ischemia ({approximately}6.7%/min). The hypothermia (21{degrees}C, 40 min) for the stop-flow ischemia and CP dramatically decreases the [Na{sup +}]{sub i} gain with the highest heart recovery for CP ({approximately}100%). These studies confirm the enhanced sensitivity of TQF NMR to [Na{sup +}]{sub i} and demonstrate the potential of NMR without chemical shift reagent to monitor [Na{sup +}]{sub i} derangements. 48 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Myocardial Fibrosis as an Early Manifestation of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; López, Begoña; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R.; Lakdawala, Neal K.; Cirino, Allison L.; Jarolim, Petr; Kwong, Raymond; González, Arantxa; Colan, Steven D.; Seidman, J.G.; Díez, Javier; Seidman, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Myocardial fibrosis is a hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a proposed substrate for arrhythmias and heart failure. In animal models, profibrotic genetic pathways are activated early, before hypertrophic remodeling. Data showing early profibrotic responses to sarcomere-gene mutations in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are lacking. METHODS We used echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and serum biomarkers of collagen metabolism, hemodynamic stress, and myocardial injury to evaluate subjects with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a confirmed genotype. RESULTS The study involved 38 subjects with pathogenic sarcomere mutations and overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 39 subjects with mutations but no left ventricular hypertrophy, and 30 controls who did not have mutations. Levels of serum C-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) were significantly higher in mutation carriers without left ventricular hypertrophy and in subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy than in controls (31% and 69% higher, respectively; P<0.001). The ratio of PICP to C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen was increased only in subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, suggesting that collagen synthesis exceeds degradation. Cardiac MRI studies showed late gadolinium enhancement, indicating myocardial fibrosis, in 71% of subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy but in none of the mutation carriers without left ventricular hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS Elevated levels of serum PICP indicated increased myocardial collagen synthesis in sarcomere-mutation carriers without overt disease. This profibrotic state preceded the development of left ventricular hypertrophy or fibrosis visible on MRI. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:20818890

  8. Psychosocial impact of specialized cardiac genetic clinics for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Lind, Joanne M; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Semsarian, Christopher

    2008-02-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, an autosomal dominant chronic heart disease, can have significant implications, including increased risk of sudden death, exercise limitations, and risk of transmission to offspring. This study sought to describe the psychosocial factors associated with attending a specialty cardiac genetic clinic, and to determine whether these may be predictors of comorbid anxiety and depression in this population. Questionnaires were sent to 184 individuals attending the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic. Questionnaires were anonymous and comprised demographics, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Patient Experience Scales, and Patient Satisfaction Scales. Completed questionnaires were returned by 109 participants (59.2% response rate), of which 76.9% had a diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, while 23.1% were at-risk relatives attending for clinical screening. Patient satisfaction scores were generally high to very high across all groups, though only 24% of HCM patients showed good adjustment to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 10% had low worry about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy scores. Within the disease group, logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, gender, and education revealed adjustment to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and worry about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy scores to be significantly associated with anxiety, while adjustment scores and location of patient follow-up (i.e., Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy clinic or another cardiologist) to be significantly associated with depression scores. HCM patients who attend specialized cardiac genetic clinics are better adjusted and worry less, than those who do not attend. An integrated approach, including a genetic counselor, is important in the management of HCM families.

  9. Heart failure decreases passive tension generation of rat diaphragm fibers.

    PubMed

    van Hees, H W H; Ottenheijm, C A C; Granzier, H L; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Heunks, L M A

    2010-06-11

    Diaphragm dysfunction is well-known to limit quality of life and prognosis of patients with heart failure (HF), but its underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In an animal model for HF we recently showed that impaired diaphragm contractility arises at the single fiber level and is associated with sarcomeric injuries. For optimal muscle function and sarcomeric stability passive elastic structures, like titin, are indispensable. The current study aimed to investigate if impaired passive elasticity contributes to diaphragm dysfunction in rats with heart failure. Skinned muscle fibers were isolated from the diaphragm and soleus of rats with chronic HF, induced by left coronary artery ligation and of sham-operated rats. Passive tension-length relationships were determined by applying segmental extension tests. Immunofluorescence was performed on muscle cryosections using antibodies (T12) against a titin epitope near the Z-line. Titin content was determined by SDS-agarose-gel electrophoresis. Titin's mobility on gel was studied to detect changes in titin size. Passive tension generation upon stretch was significantly reduced (>35%) in HF diaphragm fibers compared to sham. Immunostaining intensities against titin were reduced in diaphragm cryosections of HF rats compared to sham. Soleus fibers from HF and sham rats did not display differences, neither in passive tension nor in immunostaining. No differences in titin's size were detected in HF and sham diaphragm. Titin content, however, was significantly reduced ( approximately 25%) in HF diaphragm. We conclude that in the diaphragm of HF rats, passive elasticity is impaired, mainly resulting from titin loss. Copyright (c) 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a Vascularized Heterotopic Neonatal Rat Heart Transplantation Model.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shogo; Del Nido, Pedro J; Friehs, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    Rodent adult-to-adult heterotopic heart transplantation is a well-established animal model, and the detailed surgical technique with several modifications has been previously described. In immature donor organ transplantation, however, the surgical technique needs to be revised given the smaller size and fragility of the donor graft. Here, we report our surgical technique for heterotopic abdominal (AHTx) and femoral (FHTx) neonatal rat heart transplantation based on an experience of over 300 cases. Heterotopic heart transplantation was conducted in syngeneic Lewis rats. Neonatal rats (postnatal day 2-4) served as donors. AHTx was performed by utilizing the conventional adult-to-adult transplant method with specific modifications for optimal aortotomy and venous anastomosis. In the FHTx, the donor heart was vascularized by connecting the donor's aorta and pulmonary artery to the recipient's right femoral artery and vein, respectively, in an end-to-end manner. A specifically fashioned butterfly-shaped rubber sheet was used to align the target vessels properly. The transplanted graft was visually assessed for its viability and was accepted as a technical success when the viability met specific criteria. Successfully transplanted grafts were subject to further postoperative evaluation. Forty cases (AHTx and FHTx; n = 20 each) were compared regarding perioperative parameters and outcomes. Both models were technically feasible (success rate: AHTx 75% vs. FHTx 70%) by refining the conventional heterotopic transplant technique. Injury to the fragile donor aorta and congestion of the graft due to suboptimal venous connection were predominant causes of failure, leading to refractory bleeding and poor graft viability. Although the FHTx required significantly longer operation time and graft ischemic time, the in situ graft viabilities were comparable. The FHTx provided better postoperative monitoring as it enabled daily graft palpation and better echocardiographic

  11. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy associated with Fallot's tetralogy—a case report

    PubMed Central

    George, B. Olu.; Mabayoje, J. Olu.

    1975-01-01

    A case of Fallot's tetralogy associated with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a young Nigerian female is described. The clinical spectrum of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is reviewed. The rarity of this syndrome is stressed. Some other aspects of the clinical manifestation of cyanotic congenital heart disease which may mimic the skeletal syndrome are mentioned. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:1197165

  12. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Novel CACNA1C-Mediated Cardiac Disorder Characterized by Prolonged QT Intervals With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Congenital Heart Defects, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Boczek, Nicole J; Ye, Dan; Jin, Fang; Tester, David J; Huseby, April; Bos, J Martijn; Johnson, Aaron J; Kanter, Ronald; Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    A portion of sudden cardiac deaths can be attributed to structural heart diseases, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) or cardiac channelopathies such as long-QT syndrome (LQTS); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are distinct. Here, we identify a novel CACNA1C missense mutation with mixed loss-of-function/gain-of-function responsible for a complex phenotype of LQTS, HCM, sudden cardiac death, and congenital heart defects. Whole exome sequencing in combination with Ingenuity variant analysis was completed on 3 affected individuals and 1 unaffected individual from a large pedigree with concomitant LQTS, HCM, and congenital heart defects and identified a novel CACNA1C mutation, p.Arg518Cys, as the most likely candidate mutation. Mutational analysis of exon 12 of CACNA1C was completed on 5 additional patients with a similar phenotype of LQTS plus a personal or family history of HCM-like phenotypes and identified 2 additional pedigrees with mutations at the same position, p.Arg518Cys/His. Whole cell patch clamp technique was used to assess the electrophysiological effects of the identified mutations in CaV1.2 and revealed a complex phenotype, including loss of current density and inactivation in combination with increased window and late current. Through whole exome sequencing and expanded cohort screening, we identified a novel genetic substrate p.Arg518Cys/His-CACNA1C, in patients with a complex phenotype including LQTS, HCM, and congenital heart defects annotated as cardiac-only Timothy syndrome. Our electrophysiological studies, identification of mutations at the same amino acid position in multiple pedigrees, and cosegregation with disease in these pedigrees provide evidence that p.Arg518Cys/His is the pathogenic substrate for the observed phenotype. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Toxic effects of palladium compounds on the isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Perić, Tanja; Jakovljević, Vladimir Lj; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Krkeljic, Jelena; Petrović, Zorica D; Simijonović, Dusica; Novokmet, Slobodan; Djuric, Dragan M; Janković, Slobodan M

    2012-01-01

    Taken into consideration limited data about effects of palladium on cardiovascular system, the aim of our study was to compare toxicity of inorganic and organic palladium compounds on the isolated rat heart. The hearts (total number n=30, 6 for each experimental group) excised from Wistar albino rats, male sex, age 8 weeks, and body mass 180-200 g, were retrogradely perfused according to the Langendorff technique at constant perfusion pressure (70 cm H2O). After the insertion of sensor in the left ventricle, the parameters of heart function: maximum rate of left ventricular pressure development (dP/dt max), systolic left ventricular pressure (SLVP), diastolic left ventricular pressure (DLVP), mean blood pressure (MBP) and heart rate (HR)), were continuously registered. The experiments were performed during control conditions, and in the presence of perfusion with incresing concentration of the following: (triethanolamine (TEA), triethanolamine acetate (TEAA), palladium(II)chloride (PdCl2), and trans-dichlorobis(triethanolamine-N)palladium(II) complex (trans-[PdCl2(TEA)2])) started every 30 minutes (30, 60, 90, 120 minute). dP/dt max was not affected significantly by either TEAA, TEA, PdCl2 or Pd complex. SLVP was, also, not affected significantly by either TEAA, TEA, PdCl2, or Pd complex. DLVP was significantly decreased by both TEAA and PdCl2, while TEA and Pd complex did not show significant effect. MBP was significantly decreased only by PdCl2, while TEAA, TEA and Pd complex did not show significant effect. HR was significantly decreased by all compounds- PdCl2, TEAA, TEA and Pd complex. In our study, inorganic palladium compound (PdCl2) induced clear depression of the isolated rat heart contractility, manifested as drop in diastolic and mean blood pressure , and as decrease of the heart rate. On the other hand, it seems that palladium, when bound in an organic compound (linked to TEA in Pd complex), does not contribute significantly to cardio-toxicity in our

  14. MLP accumulation and remodelling in the infarcted rat heart.

    PubMed

    Wilding, James R; Lygate, Craig A; Davies, Kay E; Neubauer, Stefan; Clarke, Kieran

    2006-06-01

    Mutation of cytoskeletal protein genes results in abnormal protein function and causes cardiomyopathy. We hypothesised that cardiac levels of cytoskeletal proteins, such as dystrophin, desmin and muscle LIM protein (MLP), would be altered during remodelling caused by myocardial infarction (MI). We measured left-ventricular morphology, function and cytoskeletal protein levels 10 weeks after coronary artery ligation or sham operation in male Wistar rats. Two-dimensional echocardiography revealed significant impairment of systolic function and decreased ejection fraction in infarcted hearts compared with sham (47+/-5% versus 73+/-4%), commensurate with the development of heart failure. Western blotting was used to measure levels of beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MyHC), a marker of hypertrophy, and levels of dystrophin, desmin, MLP, beta-tubulin, utrophin and syncoilin, using GAPDH for normalization. Relative to shams, beta-MyHC and MLP levels were increased 1.9-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively, in infarcted rat hearts, whereas the levels of other cytoskeletal proteins were unchanged. Both MLP and desmin protein levels correlated negatively with ejection fraction, with the strongest relation between MLP and ejection fraction (r=-0.95, n=13, p<0.0001). This work suggests that MLP may play an important compensatory role in cardiac remodelling following MI.

  15. Effects of Astragaloside IV on heart failure in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuanyou; Wang, Weiting; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Kerui; Han, Yingmei; Xu, Weiren; Tang, Lida

    2009-01-01

    Background Astragaloside IV (ASI) in Radix Astragali is believed to be the active component in treating heart failure. The present study aims to examine the effects of ASI on cardiovascular parameters in long-term heart failure in rats. Methods Using echocardiographic and haemodynamic measurements, we studied the effects of ASI on congestive heart failure (CHF) induced by ligation of the left coronary artery in rats. Results ASI (0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg/day) attenuated the decline of fractional shortening (FS). The peak derivatives of the left ventricle (LV) pressure (dp/dt) in ASI-treated groups significantly increased. Both LV internal diameters in diastole (LVIDd) and in systole (LVIDs) decreased significantly after ASI treatment (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg/day). ASI (1.0 mg/kg/day) attenuated the decrease of LV systolic pressure (LVSP). ASI treatment inhibited compensatory hypertrophy of myocardial cells and lowered the number of apoptotic myocytes. Conclusion ASI improved cardiac functions as measured by cardiovascular parameters. PMID:19338675

  16. Hypoxic preconditioning facilitates acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mrinalini; Shukla, Dhananjay; Thomas, Pauline; Saxena, Saurabh; Bansal, Anju

    2010-12-01

    Acute systemic hypoxia induces delayed cardioprotection against ischaemia-reperfusion injury in the heart. As cobalt chloride (CoCl₂) is known to elicit hypoxia-like responses, it was hypothesized that this chemical would mimic the preconditioning effect and facilitate acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia in rat heart. Male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with distilled water or cobalt chloride (12.5 mg Co/kg for 7 days) were exposed to simulated altitude at 7622 m for different time periods (1, 2, 3 and 5 days). Hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt appreciably attenuated hypobaric hypoxia-induced oxidative damage as observed by a decrease in free radical (reactive oxygen species) generation, oxidation of lipids and proteins. Interestingly, the observed effect was due to increased expression of the antioxidant proteins hemeoxygenase and metallothionein, as no significant change was observed in antioxidant enzyme activity. Hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt increased hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression as well as HIF-1 DNA binding activity, which further resulted in increased expression of HIF-1 regulated genes such as erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor and glucose transporter. A significant decrease was observed in lactate dehydrogenase activity and lactate levels in the heart of preconditioned animals compared with non-preconditioned animals exposed to hypoxia. The results showed that hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt induces acclimatization by up-regulation of hemeoxygenase 1 and metallothionein 1 via HIF-1 stabilization. © 2010 The Authors. JPP © 2010 Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.

  17. Reiki improves heart rate homeostasis in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Ann Linda; Wagers, Christina; Schwartz, Gary E

    2008-05-01

    To determine whether application of Reiki to noise-stressed rats can reduce their heart rates (HRs) and blood pressures. In a previous study, we showed that exposure of rats to 90 dB white noise for 15 minutes caused their HRs and blood pressures to significantly increase. Reiki has been shown to significantly decrease HR and blood pressure in a small group of healthy human subjects. However, use of humans in such studies has the disadvantage that experimental interpretations are encumbered by the variable of belief or skepticism regarding Reiki. For that reason, noise-stressed rats were used as an animal model to test the efficacy of Reiki in reducing elevated HR and blood pressure. Three unrestrained, male Sprague-Dawley rats implanted with radiotelemetric transducers were exposed daily for 8 days to a 15-minute white noise regimen (90 dB). For the last 5 days, the rats received 15 minutes of Reiki immediately before the noise and during the noise period. The experiment was repeated on the same animals but using sham Reiki. The animals were housed in a quiet room in University of Arizona Animal Facility. Mean HRs and blood pressure were determined before Reiki/sham Reiki, during Reiki/sham Reiki, and during the noise in each case. Reiki, but not sham Reiki, significantly reduced HR compared to initial values. With Reiki, there was a high correlation between change in HR and initial HR, suggesting a homeostatic effect. Reiki, but not sham Reiki, significantly reduced the rise in HR produced by exposure of the rats to loud noise. Neither Reiki nor sham Reiki significantly affected blood pressure. Reiki is effective in modulating HR in stressed and unstressed rats, supporting its use as a stress-reducer in humans.

  18. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry: The rationale and design of an international, observational study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christopher M; Appelbaum, Evan; Desai, Milind Y; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; DiMarco, John P; Friedrich, Matthias G; Geller, Nancy; Heckler, Sarahfaye; Ho, Carolyn Y; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ivey, Elizabeth A; Keleti, Julianna; Kim, Dong-Yun; Kolm, Paul; Kwong, Raymond Y; Maron, Martin S; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Piechnik, Stefan; Watkins, Hugh; Weintraub, William S; Wu, Pan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic heart disease with a frequency as high as 1 in 200. In many cases, HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding the different components of the sarcomere apparatus. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, myofibrillar disarray, and myocardial fibrosis. The phenotypic expression is quite variable. Although most patients with HCM are asymptomatic, serious consequences are experienced in a subset of affected individuals who present initially with sudden cardiac death or progress to refractory heart failure. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry study is a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored 2,750-patient, 44-site, international registry and natural history study designed to address limitations in extant evidence to improve prognostication in HCM (NCT01915615). In addition to the collection of standard demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic variables, patients will undergo state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance for assessment of left ventricular mass and volumes as well as replacement scarring and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, genetic and biomarker analyses will be performed. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry has the potential to change the paradigm of risk stratification in HCM, using novel markers to identify those at higher risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of suprachiasmatic lesions on diurnal heart rate rhythm in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleh, M. A.; Winget, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    Heart rate and locomotor activity of rats kept under 12L/12D illumination regimen were recorded every six minutes for ten days using implantable radio transmitters. Some of the rats then received bilateral RF lesions into the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Control sham operations were performed on the rest of the animals. After recovery from surgery, recording of heart rate and locomotor activity was continued for ten days. SCN-lesioned rats showed no significant diurnal fluctuation in heart rate, while normal and sham-operated rats showed the normal diurnal rhythm in that function. The arrhythmic diurnal heart-rate pattern of SCN rats appeared to be correlated with their sporadic activity pattern. The integrity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus is therefore necessary for the generation and/or expression of diurnal rhythmicity in heart rate in the rat.

  20. Energetic basis for reduced contractile reserve in isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Tian, R; Ingwall, J S

    1996-04-01

    To study the relationship between myocardial energetics and contractile reserve, we acutely and selectively inhibited creatine kinase (CK) activity in isolated perfused rat hearts, using increasing doses of iodoacetamide. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to measure intracellular pH and the concentrations of ATP, phosphocreatine, and inorganic phosphate. Contractile reserve was assessed as the increase of rate-pressure product (RPP) from baseline during high-calcium perfusion. Contractile reserve was reduced by 9, 35, and 72% in hearts with 26, 6, and 1% CK activity, respectively. An inverse linear relationship between RPP and the free energy release from ATP hydrolysis ([delta G approximately P[) was shown for all groups. Furthermore, the maximal RPPs of all hearts were achieved at the same level of [delta G approximately P[ (52-53 kJ/mol), which is equal to the free energy requirement of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ adenosine 5'-triphosphatase (ATPase). We suggest that inhibition of the CK reaction caused a decrease of [delta G approximately P[ which, in turn, limits the Ca(2+)-handling capacity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase. In this way, the ability of the heart to increase its contractile performance is restricted.

  1. Beta-adrenoceptor stimulation of alveolar fluid clearance is increased in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Maron, Michael B; Luther, Daniel J; Pilati, Charles F; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Li, Tianbo; Koshy, Shyny; Horne, Walter I; Meszaros, J Gary; Walro, Jon M; Folkesson, Hans G

    2009-09-01

    The alveolar epithelium plays a critical role in resolving pulmonary edema. We thus hypothesized that its function might be upregulated in rats with heart failure, a condition that severely challenges the lung's ability to maintain fluid balance. Heart failure was induced by left coronary artery ligation. Echocardiographic and cardiovascular hemodynamics confirmed its development at 16 wk postligation. At that time, alveolar fluid clearance was measured by an increase in protein concentration over 1 h of a 5% albumin solution instilled into the lungs. Baseline alveolar fluid clearance was similar in heart failure and age-matched control rats. Terbutaline was added to the instillate to determine whether heart failure rats responded to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. Alveolar fluid clearance in heart failure rats was increased by 194% after terbutaline stimulation compared with a 153% increase by terbutaline in control rats. To determine the mechanisms responsible for this accelerated alveolar fluid clearance, we measured ion transporter expression (ENaC, Na-K- ATPase, CFTR). No significant upregulation was observed for these ion transporters in the heart failure rats. Lung morphology showed significant alveolar epithelial type II cell hyperplasia in heart failure rats. Thus, alveolar epithelial type II cell hyperplasia is the likely explanation for the increased terbutaline-stimulated alveolar fluid clearance in heart failure rats. These data provide evidence for previously unrecognized mechanisms that can protect against or hasten resolution of alveolar edema in heart failure.

  2. Heart Alterations after Domoic Acid Administration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Andres C; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Bermúdez, Roberto; Ferreiro, Sara F; Castro, Albina Román; Botana, Luis M

    2016-03-10

    Domoic acid (DA) is one of the best known marine toxins, causative of important neurotoxic alterations. DA effects are documented both in wildlife and experimental assays, showing that this toxin causes severe injuries principally in the hippocampal area. In the present study we have addressed the long-term toxicological effects (30 days) of DA intraperitoneal administration in rats. Different histological techniques were employed in order to study DA toxicity in heart, an organ which has not been thoroughly studied after DA intoxication to date. The presence of DA was detected by immunohistochemical assays, and cellular alterations were observed both by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Although histological staining methods did not provide any observable tissue damage, transmission electron microscopy showed several injuries: a moderate lysis of myofibrils and loss of mitochondrial conformation. This is the first time the association between heart damage and the presence of the toxin has been observed.

  3. Heart Alterations after Domoic Acid Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Andres C.; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Bermúdez, Roberto; Ferreiro, Sara F.; Castro, Albina Román; Botana, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is one of the best known marine toxins, causative of important neurotoxic alterations. DA effects are documented both in wildlife and experimental assays, showing that this toxin causes severe injuries principally in the hippocampal area. In the present study we have addressed the long-term toxicological effects (30 days) of DA intraperitoneal administration in rats. Different histological techniques were employed in order to study DA toxicity in heart, an organ which has not been thoroughly studied after DA intoxication to date. The presence of DA was detected by immunohistochemical assays, and cellular alterations were observed both by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Although histological staining methods did not provide any observable tissue damage, transmission electron microscopy showed several injuries: a moderate lysis of myofibrils and loss of mitochondrial conformation. This is the first time the association between heart damage and the presence of the toxin has been observed. PMID:26978401

  4. Effects of gender on heart injury after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi; Xie, Qing; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced brain injury is less in female than in male rats, and estrogen can reduce such injury in males. Myocardial injury occurs after ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and the current study investigated the effects of gender on heart injury after ICH in rats. In the first part of the study, male and female rats had an intracerebral injection of 100 μL autologous blood, and sham-operated rats had a needle insertion. In the second part of the study, male rats were treated with 17β-estrodiol or vehicle 2 h after ICH. All rats were then killed after 3 days and heart samples collected for histology and Western blot analysis. ICH caused heart injury, including petechial hemorrhage in male and female rats. To quantify heart stress following ICH, heat shock proteins (HSP) 32 and 27 were measured by Western blot analysis. We found that heart HSP-32 levels were higher in female compared to male rats after ICH (p<0.01), but there was no effect of gender in sham-operated rats (p>0.05), nor were there gender differences in myocardial HSP27 levels. Treatment with 17β-estrodiol increased HSP-32 levels in male ICH rats (p<0.05). In conclusion, an ICH results in heart injury by an unknown mechanism. Gender and estrogen affect the heart response to ICH.

  5. NADPH oxidase hyperactivity induces plantaris atrophy in heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Luiz R G; Moreira, Jose B N; Jannig, Paulo R; Voltarelli, Vanessa A; Dourado, Paulo M; Vasconcelos, Andrea R; Scavone, Cristoforo; Ramires, Paulo R; Brum, Patricia C

    2014-08-20

    Skeletal muscle wasting is associated with poor prognosis and increased mortality in heart failure (HF) patients. Glycolytic muscles are more susceptible to catabolic wasting than oxidative ones. This is particularly important in HF since glycolytic muscle wasting is associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the main ROS sources involved in muscle redox imbalance in HF have not been characterized. Therefore, we hypothesized that NADPH oxidases would be hyperactivated in the plantaris muscle of infarcted rats, contributing to oxidative stress and hyperactivation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), ultimately leading to atrophy. Rats were submitted to myocardial infarction (MI) or Sham surgery. Four weeks after surgery, MI and Sham groups underwent eight weeks of treatment with apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, or placebo. NADPH oxidase activity, oxidative stress markers, NF-κB activity, p38 MAPK phosphorylation, mRNA and sarcolemmal protein levels of NADPH oxidase components, UPS activation and fiber cross-sectional area were assessed in the plantaris muscle. The plantaris of MI rats displayed atrophy associated with increased Nox2 mRNA and sarcolemmal protein levels, NADPH oxidase activity, ROS production, lipid hydroperoxides levels, NF-κB activity, p38 MAPK phosphorylation and UPS activation. NADPH oxidase inhibition by apocynin prevented MI-induced skeletal muscle atrophy by reducing ROS production, NF-κB hyperactivation, p38 MAPK phosphorylation and proteasomal hyperactivity. Our data provide evidence for NADPH oxidase hyperactivation as an important source of ROS production leading to plantaris atrophy in heart failure rats, suggesting that this enzyme complex plays key role in skeletal muscle wasting in HF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nifedipine represses ion channels, transporters and Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins in hearts of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zwadlo, Carolin; Borlak, Juergen . E-mail: borlak@item.fraunhofer.de

    2006-06-15

    The Ca{sup 2+} antagonists nifedipine has been used for more than three decades to treat hypertension, but its effects on the transcriptional regulation of cardiac genes are basically unknown. We therefore studied expression of genes coding for ion channels, ion transporters and associated partners as well as Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins in ventricular tissue of normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats after repeated intraperitoneally (i.p.) dosing of nifedipine. Notably, we observed significant (P < 0.05) repression in transcript levels of most of the genes investigated, including cardiac Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}-channels (L-type Ca{sup 2+}-channel, K{sub ir}3.4, K{sub ir}6.1, Na{sub v}1.5), ATP-driven ion exchangers (Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase, NCX-1, PMCA 2 and 4, SERCA 2a and 2b) and their associated partners (phospholamban, RyR-2) as well as cytoskeletal proteins ({alpha} and {beta}-MHC, {alpha} cardiac and {alpha} skeletal actin, troponin T and I). Repression in transcript levels was, however, only seen in ventricular tissue of hypertensive animals. This points to fundamental differences in the mode of action of nifedipine in diseased and healthy animals. Indeed, this preponderance of repressed genes will promote disturbed ion homeostasis to result in contractile dysfunction. It is of considerable importance that repressed gene expression was also seen in end-stage human heart failure [Borlak, J., Thum, T., 2003. Hallmarks of ion channel gene expression in end-stage heart failure. FASEB J. 17, 1592-1608]. We propose repression of cardiac-specific gene expression as a hallmark of nifedipine treatment in hypertrophic hearts.

  7. The Influence of a High Salt Diet on a Rat Model of Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4 weeks) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion exacerbated cardiomyopathy in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats. Others have shown...

  8. The Influence of a High Salt Diet on a Rat Model of Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4 weeks) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion exacerbated cardiomyopathy in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats. Others have shown...

  9. A RAT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE INDUCED BY ISOPROTERENOL AND A HIGH SALT DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4wk) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats caused cardiac injury with minimal hypertrophy. O...

  10. A RAT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE INDUCED BY ISOPROTERENOL AND A HIGH SALT DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4wk) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats caused cardiac injury with minimal hypertrophy. O...

  11. Mitochondrial respiration in hearts of copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, A.M.; Saari, J.T. USDA/ARS, Grand Forks, ND )

    1991-03-11

    Morphological observations indicate that dietary copper deficiency causes structural damage of cardiac mitochondria. The purpose of this study was to determine whether mitochondrial function is impaired as well. Male, weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets deficient or sufficient in copper for 4 wks. Copper deficiency was verified by measurement of plasma (ND (CuD) vs 0.46 {plus minus} 0.15 {mu}g/ml (CuS)) and kidney copper. Mitochondria were isolated and P/O ratio, state 3 and state 4 respiration rate and acceptor control index (ACI) were determined using succinate or pyruvate/malate as substrate. Determinations were made polarographically at 30C in a reaction medium consisting of 0.25 M sucrose, 0.1 mM EDTA, 200 mM MgCl and 200 mM sodium phosphate buffer. State 3 respiration rate in mitochondria from CuD hearts was 30% lower than in CuS mitochondria when succinate was used as substrate and 28% lower when pyruvate/malate was used. Copper deficiency reduced state 4 respiration rate by 31% when succinate was used and 16% when pyruvate/malate was used. P/O ratio and ACI were not significantly affected by copper deficiency. The observed decreases in respiration rates are consistent with decreased cytochrome c oxidase activity shown by others to occur in mitochondria isolated from hearts of copper-deficient rats.

  12. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a neonate associated with nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mir, Arshid; Lemler, Matthew; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Blalock, Shannon; Ikemba, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a congenital nonprogressive skeletal muscle disorder with a characteristic rod body formation in the skeletal muscle fibers. Cardiac involvement in nemaline myopathy is rare, although both dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have been reported. We describe an infant diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypotonia on the first day of life. Muscle biopsy confirmed nemaline myopathy at 3 weeks of age. The diagnosis of nemaline myopathy precluded consideration of heart transplantation, thus shifting the focus to comfort care. This is the earliest presentation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy reported in the literature in the setting of nemaline myopathy. The approach to determining an etiology for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an infant is reviewed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy simulating an infiltrative myocardial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, A; Loperfido, F; Pennestrì, F

    1985-01-01

    Congestive heart failure developed in a patient with low electrocardiographic QRS voltages, diffuse thickening of the septum and free cardiac wall, and a reduction in left ventricular internal diameter, which suggested an infiltrative heart muscle disease. Histological examination at necropsy showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with symmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy. Myocardial disarray of type 1A disorganisation was extensive and equally distributed in the ventricular septum and the left anterior and left posterior ventricular free walls. Severe fibrosis (40%) was also present and may have been a possible cause of the electrocardiographic abnormalities as well as of the lack of ventricular dilatation. Images PMID:4041302

  14. Screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cats.

    PubMed

    Häggström, Jens; Luis Fuentes, Virginia; Wess, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats, and it can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Cats are often screened for HCM because of the presence of a heart murmur, but screening for breeding purposes has also become common. These cats are usually purebred cats of breeding age, and generally do not present with severe disease or with any clinical signs. This type of screening is particularly challenging because mild disease may be difficult to differentiate from a normal phenotype, and the margin for error is small, with potentially major consequences for the breeder. This article reviews HCM screening methods, with particular emphasis on echocardiography.

  15. Comparison of right ventricular contractile abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy versus hypertensive heart disease using two dimensional strain imaging: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Luis; Briasoulis, Alex; Mahajan, Nitin; Kondur, Ashok; Siddiqui, Fayez; Siddiqui, Sabeeh; Alesh, Issa; Cardozo, Shaun; Kottam, Anupama

    2015-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) affects the right ventricle (RV) because of the anatomically hypertrophied septum and plausibly by extension of the myopathic process to the RV. We sought to investigate RV strain in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy secondary to either HCM or hypertension (H-LVH). Our cross-sectional study included 32 patients with HCM, 21 patients with H-LVH, and 11 healthy subjects, who were evaluated with transthoracic echocardiography. Using a dedicated software package, bi-dimensional acquisitions were analyzed to measure segmental longitudinal strain in apical views. Right ventricular global longitudinal strain (GLS) was calculated by averaging septal and right free wall strains. The HCM and H-LVH groups were comparable for age and demographic characteristics. Right ventricular tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion was not significantly different between HCM and H-LVH subjects. Moreover, RV GLS, septal and lateral RV myocardial strain were significantly impaired in patients with HCM (all p < 0.001). Regional and global RV strain parameters were not significantly impaired in H-LVH compared to healthy controls An RV GLS cut-off value of >14.9% differentiated HCM and H-LVH with a 90% sensitivity and a 95% specificity (p < 0.001). RV strain parameters are impaired in patients with HCM. Assessment of two-dimensional RV strain parameters could help differentiate between HCM and H-LVH.

  16. The efficiency coefficient of the rat heart and muscular system after physical training and hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alyukhin, Y. S.; Davydov, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of an isolated heart did not change after prolonged physical training of rats for an extreme load. The increase in oxygen consumption by the entire organism in 'uphill' running as compared to the resting level in the trained rats was 14% lower than in the control animals. Prolonged hypokinesia of the rats did not elicit a change in the efficiency of the isolated heart.

  17. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, B.J.; Tajik, A.J.; Ruttenberg, H.D.; Graham, T.P.; Atwood, G.F.; Victorica, B.E.; Lie, J.T.; Roberts, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure.

  18. Electrocardiographic changes announcing the rapid development of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an adult male.

    PubMed

    Freites, Alfonso; Canovas, Ester; Rubio, J

    2015-07-01

    We presented the case of an adult male without structural heart disease, who in the period of 3 years developed apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. ECG changes preceded the development of ventricular hypertrophy. We discussed the appearance of ventricular enlargement during adulthood, in some cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), and how the ECG abnormalities may precede the onset of ventricular hypertrophy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A luminance-based heart chip assay for assessing the efficacy of graft preservation solutions in heart transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Masashi; Kasahara, Naoya; Doi, Junshi; Iijima, Yuki; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Teratani, Takumi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    We developed a novel luciferase-based viability assay for assessing the viability of hearts preserved in different solutions. We examined whether this in vitro system could predict heart damage and survival after transplantation in rats. By our novel system, preserved heart viability evaluation and transplanted heart-graft functional research study. University basic science laboratory. Isolated Luciferase-transgenic Lewis (LEW) rat cardiac-tissue-chips were plated on 96-well tissue-culture plates and incubated in preservation solutions at 4°C. Viability was measured as photon intensity by using a bio-imaging system. Heart-grafts preserved in University of Wisconsin (UW), extracellular-trehalose-Kyoto (ETK), Euro-Collins (EC), histidin-tryptophan-ketoglutarat solution (HTK), lactated Ringer's (LR) or normal saline solution were transplanted cervically by using a cuff-technique or into the abdomens of syngeneic wild-type LEW rats by using conventional microsurgical suture techniques. Imaging an evaluation of preservation heart-graft and functional analysis. Cardiac-tissue-chips preserved with UW, HTK or ETK solution gave higher luminance than those preserved with EC, LR or normal saline (p<0.03). After 24 h of preservation of hearts in each solution at 4°C, the beating of the isolated hearts was evaluated. The success rate, evaluation of beating, of cervical heart transplants using UW and ETK solution exceeded 70%, but those using other preservation solutions were lower (UW: 100%, ETK: 75%, EC: 42.86%, HTK: 14.29%, normal saline: 0%). Histological analysis of cervical heart-grafts after 3 h preservation by myeloperoxidase (MPO), zona occludens-1(ZO-1), and caspase-3 immunostaining revealed different degrees of preservation damage in all grafts. Our novel assay system is simple and can test multiple solutions. It should therefore be a powerful tool for developing and improving new heart-graft preservation solutions.

  20. Reduced expression of adherens and gap junction proteins can have a fundamental role in the development of heart failure following cardiac hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daniele O; Blefari, Valdecir; Prado, Fernanda P; Silva, Carlos A; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C; Ramos, Simone G; Prado, Cibele M

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension causes cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac dysfunction and heart failure (HF). The mechanisms implicated in the transition from compensated to decompensated cardiac hypertrophy are not fully understood. This study was aimed to investigate whether alterations in the expression of intercalated disk proteins could contribute to the transition of compensated cardiac hypertrophy to dilated heart development that culminates in HF. Male rats were submitted to abdominal aortic constriction and at 90 days post surgery (dps), three groups were observed: sham-operated animals (controls), animals with hypertrophic hearts (HH) and animals with hypertrophic + dilated hearts (HD). Blood pressure was evaluated. The hearts were collected and Western blot and immunofluorescence were performed to desmoglein-2, desmocollin-2, N-cadherin, plakoglobin, Bcatenin, and connexin-43. Cardiac systolic function was evaluated using the Vevo 2100 ultrasound system. Data were considered significant when p b 0.05. Seventy percent of the animals presented with HH and 30% were HD at 90 dps. The blood pressure increased in both groups. The amount of desmoglein-2 and desmocollin-2 expression was increased in both groups and no difference was observed in either group. The expression of N-cadherin, plakoglobin and B-catenin increased in the HHgroup and decreased in the HDgroup; and connexin-43 decreased only in theHDgroup. Therewas no difference between the ejection fraction and fractional shortening at 30 and 60 dps; however, they were decreased in the HD group at 90 dps. We found that while some proteins have increased expression accompanied by the increase in the cell volume associated with preserved systolic cardiac function in theHHgroup, these same proteins had decreased expression evenwithout significant reduction in the cell volume associated with decreased systolic cardiac function in HD group. The increased expression of desmoglein-2 and desmocollin-2 in both the HH and HD groups could

  1. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive heart disease with mildly reduced or preserved ejection fraction: insight from altered mechanics and native T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Wu, L-M; An, D-A L; Yao, Q-Y; Ou, Y-R Z; Lu, Q; Jiang, M; Xu, J-R

    2017-10-01

    To explore the relationship between extracellular volume (ECV), native T1, and systolic strain in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (HTN LVH) with mildly reduced or preserved ejection fraction. T1 mapping was performed in 45 patients with late gadolinium enhancement positive (LGE+) HCM (mean age, 53±6 years), 11 patients with LGE- (LGE-) HCM (mean age, 56±5 years), and 20 patients with HTN LVH (mean age, 55±6 years) on at 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using the modified look-locker inversion-recovery (MOLLI) pulse sequence. Mean T1 value, ECV and circumferential strain parameters were determined for each patient. Overall, the HCM patients had higher native T1 values (1242.92±68.94) and ECV (0.31±0.05) in comparison to those of the HTN LVH patients (1197±46.80, 0.27±0.04; p<0.05). In the subgroup analysis, the HCM LGE+ patients had the highest native T1 values among the three groups. The HCM LGE+ patients had higher ECV than the LGE- patients. HCM LGE- patients had higher ECV than HTN LVH patients (p<0.05). Peak systolic circumferential strain and early diastolic strain rates were reduced in the HCM LGE+ patients in comparison to the HCM LGE- and HTN LVH patients (p<0.05). Reduced peak systolic and early diastolic circumferential strain rates were associated with increased levels of ECV and native T1 values among all the patients. HCM LGE+ patients had higher native T1 values, higher ECV, and an associated reduction in early diastolic strain rates and peak systolic circumferential strains when compared to the HCM LGE- and HTN LVH patients with mildly reduced or preserved ejection fraction. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcium Activation Profile In Electrically Stimulated Intact Rat Heart Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Hugo; Nuydens, Rony; Ver Donck, Luc; Nuyens, Roger; De Brabander, Marc; Borgers, Marcel

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in fluorescent probe technology and image processing equipment have made available the measurement of calcium in living systems on a real-time basis. We present the use of the calcium indicator Fura-2 in intact normally stimulated rat heart cells for the spatial and dynamic measurement of the calcium excitation profile. After electric stimulation (1 Hz), the activation proceeds from the center of the myocyte toward the periphery. Within two frame times (80 ms), the whole cell is activated. The activation is slightly faster in the center of the cell than in the periphery. The mean recovery time is 200-400 ms. There is no difference along the cell's long axis. The effect of a beta-agonist and of a calcium antagonist is described.

  3. A rare presentation of acute heart failure secondary to aggressive uterine leiomyosarcoma metastatic to the myocardium initially diagnosed as hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karass, Michael; Mondal, Pratik; Alkayem, Mohammad; Ojo, Amole; Puccio, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    Uterine sarcoma is the cause of 3–9% of all uterine malignant neoplasms and has a 2-fold higher incidence in black women as compared to white women. Cellular atypia and abundant mitoses (≥10 per 10 high power fields) as seen in this patient are associated with an increased risk for metastases. Metastases to the heart are infrequently reported with a handful of cases in the literature. We present a case of a 51-year-old woman with aggressively metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma causing acute heart failure 4 months after initial presentation. PMID:27826577

  4. Respiratory Muscle Training Improves Diaphragm Citrate Synthase Activity and Hemodynamic Function in Rats with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Bertagnolli, Mariane; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Lago, Pedro Dal

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced respiratory muscle strength in patients with heart failure positively alters the clinical trajectory of heart failure. In an experimental model, respiratory muscle training in rats with heart failure has been shown to improve cardiopulmonary function through mechanisms yet to be entirely elucidated. The present report aimed to evaluate the respiratory muscle training effects in diaphragm citrate synthase activity and hemodynamic function in rats with heart failure. Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: sedentary sham (Sed-Sham, n=8), trained sham (RMT-Sham, n=8), sedentary heart failure (Sed-HF, n=7) and trained heart failure (RMT-HF, n=7). The animals were submitted to a RMT protocol performed 30 minutes a day, 5 days/week, for 6 weeks. In rats with heart failure, respiratory muscle training decreased pulmonary congestion and right ventricular hypertrophy. Deleterious alterations in left ventricular pressures, as well as left ventricular contractility and relaxation, were assuaged by respiratory muscle training in heart failure rats. Citrate synthase activity, which was significantly reduced in heart failure rats, was preserved by respiratory muscle training. Additionally, a negative correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular end diastolic pressure and positive correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular systolic pressure. Respiratory muscle training produces beneficial adaptations in the diaphragmatic musculature, which is linked to improvements in left ventricular hemodynamics and blood pressure in heart failure rats. The RMT-induced improvements in cardiac architecture and the oxidative capacity of the diaphragm may improve the clinical trajectory of patients with heart failure.

  5. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Novel CACNA1C-Mediated Cardiac Disorder Characterized by Prolonged QT Intervals with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Congenital Heart Defects, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Boczek, Nicole J.; Ye, Dan; Jin, Fang; Tester, David J.; Huseby, April; Bos, J. Martijn; Johnson, Aaron J.; Kanter, Ronald; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background A portion of sudden cardiac deaths (SCD) can be attributed to structural heart diseases such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) or cardiac channelopathies such as long QT syndrome (LQTS); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are quite distinct. Here, we identify a novel CACNA1C missense mutation with mixed loss-of-function/gain-of-function responsible for a complex phenotype of LQTS, HCM, SCD, and congenital heart defects (CHDs). Methods and Results Whole exome sequencing (WES) in combination with Ingenuity Variant Analysis was completed on three affected individuals and one unaffected individual from a large pedigree with concomitant LQTS, HCM, and CHDs and identified a novel CACNA1C mutation, p.Arg518Cys, as the most likely candidate mutation. Mutational analysis of exon 12 of CACNA1C was completed on 5 additional patients with a similar phenotype of LQTS plus a personal or family history of HCM-like phenotypes, and identified two additional pedigrees with mutations at the same position, p.Arg518Cys/His. Whole cell patch clamp technique was used to assess the electrophysiological effects of the identified mutations in CaV1.2, and revealed a complex phenotype, including loss of current density and inactivation in combination with increased window and late current. Conclusions Through WES and expanded cohort screening, we identified a novel genetic substrate p.Arg518Cys/His-CACNA1C, in patients with a complex phenotype including LQTS, HCM, and CHDs annotated as cardiac-only Timothy syndrome. Our electrophysiological studies, identification of mutations at the same amino acid position in multiple pedigrees, and co-segregation with disease in these pedigrees provides evidence that p.Arg518Cys/His is the pathogenic substrate for the observed phenotype. PMID:26253506

  6. Zinc antagonizes homocysteine-induced fetal heart defects in rats.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyu; Hong, Xinru; Zeng, Fang; Kang, Fenhong; Li, Li; Sun, Qinghua

    2009-09-01

    It has been suggested that zinc may have a protective role against heart defects during fetal development. We investigated the effects of zinc on the development of fetal cardiac malformations induced by homocysteine. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into one of five groups: control (C), homocysteine (H), homocysteine + zinc (Z), homocysteine + folic acid (F), or homocysteine + zinc + folic acid (ZF) (each n = 8). Homocysteine (8 nmol/day) was administered intraperitoneally in the H, Z, F, and ZF groups on gestation days (GD) 8, 9, and 10. Zinc (30 mg/kg day), folic acid (30 mg/kg day), or both (30 mg/kg day each) were administered intragastrically daily in the Z, F, and ZF groups, respectively, throughout the pregnancy. In each group, two fetuses were removed on GD 13, 15, 17, and 19 and examined for cardiac malformations; maternal copper/zinc-containing-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) activity and metallothionein type I (MT-1) mRNA expression were measured simultaneously. The prevalence of cardiac malformations was significantly higher in group H than in group C, and significantly lower in group Z than in group H at the studied time points. Cu/Zn-SOD activity and MT-1 mRNA levels were significantly lower in group H than in group C, and significantly higher in group Z than in group H. Our data suggest that zinc antagonizes homocysteine-induced teratogenic effects on the fetal heart, possibly via the inhibition of excessive peroxidation.

  7. Respiratory control and substrate effects in the working rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, F M; Malloy, C R

    1992-01-01

    31P n.m.r. spectroscopy was used to measure the concentration of phosphates commonly proposed to control oxidative phosphorylation. The effect of loading conditions, beta-adrenergic stimulation and different substrates (acetate, pyruvate or glucose) was examined under steady-state conditions in the isolated working rat heart. Oxygen consumption and haemodynamic variables were monitored continuously. In response to a 2-fold increase in afterload, there were no significant changes in [ADP], [ATP]/[ADP], or [ATP]/[ADP][Pi]. In the presence of isoprenaline, these variables also tended not to change from afterload. However, isoprenaline, at identical perfusion pressures, consistently decreased the phosphorylation potential and [ATP]/[ADP], but had little effect on [ADP]. Substrates altered the phosphate metabolites in a manner independent of oxygen consumption, and had only minor effects on the relationship between phosphates and work, in contrast with other studies. Thus, metabolites of ATP synthesis are not normally involved in respiratory control. The 31P n.m.r. spectrum can vary greatly, but does not predict oxygen consumption in this preparation. Substrates have no effect on the mechanism of respiratory control. Thus the normal control of respiration in the heart at steady state cannot occur at the level of its substrates. Rather, there must be concerted regulation of the numerous pathways, involving allostery and covalent modification. The attention of future research should be shifted away from the metabolites of ATP and towards identifying the effectors of such regulation. PMID:1417763

  8. Contractile force measured in unskinned isolated adult rat heart fibres.

    PubMed

    Brady, A J; Tan, S T; Ricchiuti, N V

    1979-12-13

    A number of investigators have succeeded in preparing isolated cardiac cells by enzymatic digestion which tolerate external [Ca2+] in the millimolar range. However, a persistent problem with these preparations is that, unlike in situ adult ventricular fibres, the isolated fibres usually beat spontaneously. This spontaneity suggests persistent ionic leakage not present in situ. A preferable preparation for mechanical and electrical studies would be one which is quiescent but excitable in response to electrical stimulation and which does not undergo contracture with repeated stimulation. We report here a modified method of cardiac fibre isolation and perfusion which leaves the fibre membrane electrically excitable and moderately resistant to mechanical stress so that the attachment of suction micropipettes to the fibre is possible for force measurement and length control. Force generation in single isolated adult rat heart fibres is consistent with in situ contractile force. The negative staircase effect (treppe) characteristic of adult not heart tissue is present with increased frequency of stimulation. Isometric developed tension increases with fibre length as in in situ ventricular tissue.

  9. Synergistic regulation of ANF in isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Jiao, J H; Baertschi, A J

    1995-04-01

    The interaction between cardiac sympathetic stimulation of atrial natriuretic factors (ANF) release and left atrial stretch was examined in groups (n = 5 or 6) of isolated, perfused (10 ml/min), paced rat hearts. Left atrial stretch, produced by an increase in atrial pressure of 1.1 +/- 0.2 mmHg over 8 min, transiently (4 min) increased ANF release by 46 +/- 4% over baseline (220 pg/ml buffer; P < 0.05). Infusion of 1 microM norepinephrine (NE) over 28 min caused a sustained increase in ANF release of 76 +/- 10% (P < 0.05). Atrial stretch plus NE caused additive effects on ANF release during stretch but 2.4 times the additive effects after stretch (P < 0.05). To examine whether resting tension modulates the ANF response to sympathetic stimulation, the left atrium was stretched throughout the experiment by increasing the atrial pressure by 1-1.5 mmHg. Infusion of 1 microM NE over 28 min increased ANF release by 216 +/- 46% (P < 0.01) in the prestretched heart, compared with a calculated summed increase of 85% due to NE alone plus prestretch alone. Infusion of 0.5 microM veratridine, known to stimulate ANF via mechanical effects on the heart, increased ANF release by 88 +/- 3% (P < 0.01). Scorpion venom, known to dose dependently stimulate ANF secretion via activation of neuronal sodium channels, elicits a negligible increase in ANF release at the threshold concentration of 0.1 microM. The combined infusion of 0.5 microM veratridine plus 0.1 microM venom increased ANF release by 239 +/- 53% (n = 6, P < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Behavioral and Biological Effects of Housing Conditions and Stress in Male Rats - Relevance to Heart Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    morphology). Seventy-two Sprague-Dawley rats were raised in enriched environments ( social or social and physical enrichment) or non-enriched environments...consumption compared with non-stressed and non-enriched rats, (4) rats in the stress with social enrichment conditions had heart dimensions that...differed from rats in the other stress conditions without social enrichment. Social enrichment appeared to attenuate some effects of stress on the

  11. Effects of thyroid state on respiration of perfused rat and guinea pig hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Read, L.C.; Wallace, P.G.; Berry, M.N. )

    1987-09-01

    The effects of thyroid state on the respiration of the isolated heart were investigated using retrograde perfused rat and guinea pig hearts. In both species, hypothyroidism caused a marked depression in circulating thyroid hormone concentrations and in the respiration of the isolated, retrograde perfused heart. Hypothyroidism was caused by injecting animals with Na{sup 131}I. The effects on myocardial respiration could be attributed to changes in the contraction frequency and in the oxygen consumption per beat, with little contribution from basal respiration. Treatment of animals with thyroxine elevated plasma thyroid hormones to a similar extent in rats and guinea pigs. In the latter, thyroxine treatment was associated with substantial increases in the contraction frequency and the oxygen consumption per beat of the isolated heart. In contrast, only small changes were apparent in the retrograde perfused rat heart, observations that were confirmed in rat hearts perfused at near physiological work loads. It was concluded that rat hearts isolated from normal animals function at near maximal thyroid state, in contrast to the guinea pig heart, which requires higher circulating concentrations of thyroid hormones to attain maximal responses.

  12. Symbolic dynamics for arrhythmia identification from heart variability of rats with cardiac failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letellier, C.; Roulin, E.; Loriot, S.; Morin, J.-P.; Dionnet, F.

    2004-12-01

    Heart rate variability of rats is investigated using concepts from the nonlinear dynamical system theory. Among the important techniques offered, symbolic dynamics is very appealing by its power to investigate patterns which can be repeated in a time series. The present analysis was performed in six control rats and six chronic cardiac insufficient rats (myocardial infarction due to left descendent coronary artery ligation). Rats are left in clean atmosphere or exposed to atmosphere containing diluted engine emission pollutants. The evolution of the heart rate variability is then investigated with a three element symbolic dynamics which allows to distinguish extrasystoles from tachycardia or bradycardia using the symbol sequences.

  13. Impaired cardiac hypertrophic response in Calcineurin Aβ-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Orlando F.; Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Tymitz, Kevin M.; Glascock, Betty J.; Kimball, Thomas F.; Lorenz, John N.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2002-01-01

    Calcineurin is a calcium–calmodulin-regulated, serine–threonine phosphatase that functions as a key inducer of stress responsive gene expression in multiple cell types through a direct activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells and myocyte enhancer factor 2 transcription factors. In cardiomyocytes, calcineurin signaling has been implicated in the regulation of the hypertrophic response caused by pressure overload or neuroendocrine stimulation. Three separate genes encode the catalytic subunit of calcineurin in mammalian cells, CnAα, CnAβ, and CnAγ. To evaluate the necessary function of calcineurin as a hypertrophic regulatory factor, the CnAβ gene was disrupted in the mouse. CnAβ-deficient mice were viable, fertile, and overtly normal well into adulthood, but displayed a 80% decrease in calcineurin enzymatic activity in the heart that was associated with a 12% reduction in basal heart size. CnAβ-deficient mice were dramatically impaired in their ability to mount a productive hypertrophic response induced by pressure overload, angiotensin II infusion, or isoproterenol infusion. Analysis of marker genes associated with the hypertrophic response revealed a partial defect in the molecular program of hypertrophy. Collectively, these data solidify the hypothesis that calcineurin functions as a central regulator of the cardiac hypertrophic growth response in vivo. PMID:11904392

  14. A Novel Technique for Image-Guided Local Heart Irradiation in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G.; Boerma, Marjan; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Han, Eun Young; Clarkson, Richard; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Corry, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    In radiotherapy treatment of thoracic, breast and chest wall tumors, the heart may be included (partially or fully) in the radiation field. As a result, patients may develop radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) several years after exposure to radiation. There are few methods available to prevent or reverse RIHD and the biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. In order to further study the effects of radiation on the heart, we developed a model of local heart irradiation in rats using an image-guided small animal conformal radiation therapy device (SACRTD) developed at our institution. First, Monte Carlo based simulations were used to design an appropriate collimator. EBT-2 films were used to measure relative dosimetry, and the absolute dose rate at the isocenter was measured using the AAPM protocol TG-61. The hearts of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with a total dose of 21 Gy. For this purpose, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and placed in a custom-made vertical rat holder. Each heart was irradiated with a 3-beam technique (one AP field and 2 lateral fields), with each beam delivering 7 Gy. For each field, the heart was visualized with a digital flat panel X-ray imager and placed at the isocenter of the 1.8 cm diameter beam. In biological analysis of radiation exposure, immunohistochemistry showed γH2Ax foci and nitrotyrosine throughout the irradiated hearts but not in the lungs. Long-term follow-up of animals revealed histopathological manifestations of RIHD, including myocardial degeneration and fibrosis. The results demonstrate that the rat heart irradiation technique using the SACRTD was successful and that surrounding untargeted tissues were spared, making this approach a powerful tool for in vivo radiobiological studies of RIHD. Functional and structural changes in the rat heart after local irradiation are ongoing. PMID:24000983

  15. A novel technique for image-guided local heart irradiation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G; Boerma, Marjan; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Han, Eun Young; Clarkson, Richard; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Corry, Peter M

    2014-12-01

    In radiotherapy treatment of thoracic, breast and chest wall tumors, the heart may be included (partially or fully) in the radiation field. As a result, patients may develop radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) several years after exposure to radiation. There are few methods available to prevent or reverse RIHD and the biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. In order to further study the effects of radiation on the heart, we developed a model of local heart irradiation in rats using an image-guided small animal conformal radiation therapy device (SACRTD) developed at our institution. First, Monte Carlo based simulations were used to design an appropriate collimator. EBT-2 films were used to measure relative dosimetry, and the absolute dose rate at the isocenter was measured using the AAPM protocol TG-61. The hearts of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with a total dose of 21 Gy. For this purpose, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and placed in a custom-made vertical rat holder. Each heart was irradiated with a 3-beam technique (one AP field and 2 lateral fields), with each beam delivering 7 Gy. For each field, the heart was visualized with a digital flat panel X-ray imager and placed at the isocenter of the 1.8 cm diameter beam. In biological analysis of radiation exposure, immunohistochemistry showed γH2Ax foci and nitrotyrosine throughout the irradiated hearts but not in the lungs. Long-term follow-up of animals revealed histopathological manifestations of RIHD, including myocardial degeneration and fibrosis. The results demonstrate that the rat heart irradiation technique using the SACRTD was successful and that surrounding untargeted tissues were spared, making this approach a powerful tool for in vivo radiobiological studies of RIHD. Functional and structural changes in the rat heart after local irradiation are ongoing.

  16. Digitoxin improves cardiovascular autonomic control in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fardin, Núbia Mantovan; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Montemor, Jairo Augusto Silva; da Veiga, Glaucia Luciano; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Campos, Ruy R

    2016-06-01

    The effects of chronic treatment with digitoxin on arterial baroreceptor sensitivity for heart rate (HR) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (rSNA) control, cardiopulmonary reflex, and autonomic HR control in an animal model of heart failure (HF) were evaluated. Wistar rats were treated with digitoxin, which was administered in their daily feed (1 mg/kg per day) for 60 days. The following 3 experimental groups were evaluated: sham, HF, and HF treated with digitoxin (HF + DIG). We observed an increase in rSNA in the HF group (190 ± 29 pps, n = 5) compared with the sham group (98 ± 14 pps, n = 5). Digitoxin treatment prevented an increase in rSNA (98 ± 14 pps, n = 7). Therefore, arterial baroreceptor sensitivity was decreased in the HF group (-1.24 ± 0.07 bpm/mm Hg, n = 8) compared with the sham group (-2.27 ± 0.23 bpm/mm Hg, n = 6). Digitoxin did not alter arterial baroreceptor sensitivity in the HF + DIG group. Finally, the HF group showed an increased low frequency band (LFb: 23 ± 5 ms(2), n = 8) and a decreased high frequency band (HFb: 77 ± 5 ms(2), n = 8) compared with the sham group (LFb: 14 ± 3 ms(2); HFb: 86 ± 3 ms(2), n = 9); the HF+DIG group exhibited normalized parameters (LFb: 15 ± 3 ms(2); HFb: 85 ± 3 ms(2), n = 9). In conclusion, the benefits of decreasing rSNA are not directly related to improvements in peripheral cardiovascular reflexes; such occurrences are due in part to changes in the central nuclei of the brain responsible for autonomic cardiovascular control.

  17. [Complex study of the rat heart at isoproterenol damage].

    PubMed

    Kapel'ko, V I; Lakomkin, V L; Lukoshkova, E V; Gramovich, V V; Vyborov, O N; Abramov, V S; Undrovinas, N A; Ermishkin, V V; Lakomkin, S V; Veselova, S P; Zhdanov, V S; Shirinskiĭ, V P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of isoproterenol (an agonist of beta-adrenoreceptors) to rats is one of the widespread experimental models of cardiac failure. It is caused by damage of cardiomyocytes with the subsequent development of substitutive fibrosis. The purpose of the given work was the complex characteristic of cardiac function by means of invasive and noninvasive (echocardiography and impedansometry) methods of research. Isoproterenol was injected twice with a daily interval in dozes 85, 120, 150 or 180 mg/kg. Echocardiographic study of the heart in 2 weeks revealed obvious attributes of cardiac failure (left ventricular dilatation, lowered ejection fraction) in the groups which have received high cumulative dozes of isoproterenol (300-360 mg/kg). The catheterization of the left ventricle in these groups has shown raised enddiastolic pressure, decreased maximal rate of pressure development and fall, and also lowered indices of myocardial contractility and relaxability. In the groups which have received smaller isoproterenol dozes, apparent decrease in relaxability parameters (constants of isovolumic and auxovolumic relaxation) has been revealed at only slightly changed parameters of contractility. A strong correlation between echocardiographic and invasive parameters of myocardial contractility has been found. The phase analysis of the cardiac cycle has shown a lengthening of isometric phases of contraction and relaxation, as well as duration of ejection due to shortening duration of filling of both ventricles. Cardiomyocytes isolated from hearts with obvious cardiac failure responded to electrostimulation by arrhythmic contractions and also by much slowed and incomplete removal of free Ca++ from the myoplasm. Results allow to conclude that relatively smaller extent of myocardial damage is accompanied by decreased relaxability at slightly changed contractility, while at greater degree of damage both processes fail, but delay of relaxation still prevails.

  18. Dietary sodium restriction specifically potentiates left ventricular ACE inhibition by zofenopril, and is associated with attenuated hypertrophic response in rats with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Westendorp, Bart; Schoemaker, Regien G; Buikema, Hendrik; de Zeeuw, Dick; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; van Gilst, Wiek H

    2004-03-01

    In patients with myocardial infarction (MI)-induced heart failure, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are proven effective therapy in inhibiting the progression towards overt heart failure. However, the prognosis in these patients is still very poor, and optimisation of therapy is warranted. The antihypertensive and renoprotective effects of ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is) can be substantially enhanced by dietary sodium restriction. In line with the latter, the aim of the present study was to explore whether dietary sodium restriction enhances the efficacy of ACE-I after MI. Rats with MI-induced left ventricular (LV) dysfunction received ACE-I therapy with zofenopril (5.5 mg/kg/day orally), with or without dietary sodium restriction. ACE activity was measured in non-infarcted LV tissue, kidneys and plasma. Effects on cardiac hypertrophy were examined by means of organ weight/body weight ratios. After blood pressure (BP) measurements, functional consequences of therapy were evaluated as LV pressure development in isolated perfused hearts. Dietary sodium restriction alone had no effect on any of the measured parameters, whereas zofenopril alone significantly reduced plasma and kidney ACE activity, but not LV ACE activity, nor LV weight/body weight ratio. However, only when ACE-I therapy was combined with dietary sodium restriction was LV ACE activity significantly reduced. This effect was paralleled by inhibition of LV hypertrophy. BP was reduced after infarction, and further reduced by zofenopril, but not affected by dietary sodium. Neither treatment was associated with effects on the MI-induced reduction of LV function in vitro. Effects of ACE inhibition with zofenopril can be potentiated by additional dietary sodium restriction. However, these effects were tissue-specific, since LV, but not kidney or plasma, ACE activity was affected by the additional dietary sodium restriction. Effects on LV ACE activity were paralleled by reduced LV hypertrophy. Since the

  19. Effects of increased heart work on glycolysis and adenine nucleotides in the perfused heart of normal and diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Opie, L. H.; Mansford, K. R. L.; Owen, Patricia

    1971-01-01

    1. In the isolated perfused rat heart, the contractile activity and the oxygen uptake were varied by altering the aortic perfusion pressure, or by the atrial perfusion technique (`working heart'). 2. The maximum increase in the contractile activity brought about an eightfold increase in the oxygen uptake. The rate of glycolytic flux rose, while tissue contents of hexose monophosphates, citrate, ATP and creatine phosphate decreased, and contents of ADP and AMP rose. 3. The changes in tissue contents of adenine nucleotides during increased heart work were time-dependent. The ATP content fell temporarily (30s and 2min) after the start of left-atrial perfusion; at 5 and 10min values were normal; and at 30 and 60min values were decreased. ADP and AMP values were increased in the first 15min, but were at control values 30 or 60min after the onset of increased heart work. 4. During increased heart work changes in the tissue contents of adenine nucleotide and of citrate appeared to play a role in altered regulation of glycolysis at the level of phosphofructokinase activity. 5. In recirculation experiments increased heart work for 30min was associated with increased entry of [14C]glucose (11.1mm) and glycogen into glycolysis and a comparable increase in formation of products of glycolysis (lactate, pyruvate and 14CO2). There was no major accumulation of intermediates. Glycogen was not a major fuel for respiration. 6. Increased glycolytic flux in Langendorff perfused and working hearts was obtained by the addition of insulin to the perfusion medium. The concomitant increases in the tissue values of hexose phosphates and of citrate contrasted with the decreased values of hexose monophosphates and of citrate during increased glycolytic flux obtained by increased heart work. 7. Decreased glycolytic flux in Langendorff perfused hearts was obtained by using acute alloxan-diabetic and chronic streptozotocin-diabetic rats; in the latter condition there were decreased tissue

  20. Lipofuscin-like pigments in the rat heart during early postnatal development: effect of selenium supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ošťádalová, I; Charvátová, Z; Wilhelm, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize a) the lipofuscin-like pigment (LFP) accumulation (an indicator of ROS production) in the rat heart during early postnatal period and b) possible antioxidative role of selenium. Experimental animals received Na(2)SeO(3) in drinking water during gravidity and up to day 15 post partum. Two fluorophores of LFP in the hearts of 1-, 4-, 7- and 15-day-old rats were evaluated by fluorescent analysis. The highest level of heart/body weight ratio in control rats was observed on day 4, in the Se-supplemented rats on day 7. Cardiac LFP content in controls increased from postnatal day 4, in the hearts of Se-supplemented rats the LFP content increased already from day 1. As compared with the Se-supplemented group the LFP content of control hearts was significantly higher on day 1 but significantly lower on day 4. LFP concentration in control hearts decreased from postnatal day 1 to 4; this decrease was followed by significant increase until day 7 and decrease to day 15. LFP concentration in the Se-supplemented hearts was the highest on postnatal day 7; it differed from controls on day 1 and 4. Significant changes of LFP suggest an important role of ROS during critical ontogenetic period.

  1. Moderate exercise training attenuates aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Po-Hsiang; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Padma, V. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the most important risk factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading causes of death worldwide and the second major cause of death in Taiwan. The major factor in heart failure during aging is heart remodeling, including long-term stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Exercise is good for aging heart health, but the impact of exercise training on aging is not defined. This study used 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats and randomly divided each age group into no exercise training control groups (C3, A12 and A18) and moderate gentle swimming exercise training groups (E3, AE12 and AE18). The protocol of exercise training was swimming five times weekly with gradual increases from the first week from 20 to 60 min for 12 weeks. Analyses of protein from rat heart tissues and sections revealed cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis pathway increases in aged rat groups (A12 and A18), which were improved in exercise training groups (AE12 and AE18). There were no heart injuries in young rat hearts in exercise group E3. These data suggest that moderate swimming exercise training attenuated aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts. PMID:26496028

  2. Moderate exercise training attenuates aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Liao, Po-Hsiang; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Padma, V Vijaya; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-11-03

    Aging is the most important risk factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading causes of death worldwide and the second major cause of death in Taiwan. The major factor in heart failure during aging is heart remodeling, including long-term stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Exercise is good for aging heart health, but the impact of exercise training on aging is not defined. This study used 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats and randomly divided each age group into no exercise training control groups (C3, A12 and A18) and moderate gentle swimming exercise training groups (E3, AE12 and AE18). The protocol of exercise training was swimming five times weekly with gradual increases from the first week from 20 to 60 min for 12 weeks. Analyses of protein from rat heart tissues and sections revealed cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis pathway increases in aged rat groups (A12 and A18), which were improved in exercise training groups (AE12 and AE18). There were no heart injuries in young rat hearts in exercise group E3. These data suggest that moderate swimming exercise training attenuated aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts.

  3. Whole-body heat shock protects the ischemic rat heart by stimulating mitochondria respiration.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Tom L

    2006-01-01

    Whole-body heat shock (HS) leads to an enhancement of postischemic mechanical function and an improvement in glucose use by the rat heart. Here, we examine the effect of HS on isolated mitochondrial metabolism during reperfusion in the working rat heart. Rats were anesthetized, and their body temperature was raised to 41-42 degrees C for 15 min. Control rats were treated the same way but were not exposed to hyperthermia. Twenty-four hours after HS or sham treatment, rats were reanesthetized and the hearts were removed for perfusion with Krebs-Henseleit buffer, containing 11 mmol glucose/L and 1.2 mmol palmitate/L prebound to 3% albumin. Hearts were subjected to 25 min of global ischemia followed by 30 min of reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, heart mitochondria were isolated using differential centrifugation and respiration measured in the presence of pyruvate, glutamate, or palmitoylcarnitine. Hearts subjected to HS showed an enhanced recovery of function, expressed as aortic flow, during the reperfusion period, compared with sham hearts. This improved functional status was associated with a significant increase in state 3 respiration in the presence of pyruvate, glutamate, or palmitoylcarnitine. These results show that HS offers protection against ischemic damage, and that a possible mechanism might be the enhanced myocardial metabolism of fuels.

  4. Diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, Annina S; Perez-Tome, Maria Carrillo; Castelletti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is complex and includes a variety of phenotypes, which leads to different types of manifestations. Although most of the patients are asymptomatic, a significant proportion of them will develop symptoms or risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Therefore, the objectives of HCM diagnosis and management are to relieve the patients' symptoms (chest pain, heart failure, syncope, palpitations, etc.), prevent disease progression and major cardiovascular complications and SCD. The heterogeneity of HCM patterns, their symptoms and assessment is a challenge for the cardiologist. PMID:26693331

  5. Impaired alpha1-adrenergic responses in aged rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Olivier; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Guenoun, Thierry; Laplace, Monique; Crozatier, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    To determine age-related changes in the cardiac effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, both cardiomyocyte Ca2+-transient and cardiac protein kinase C (PKC) activity were measured in 3-month- (3MO) and 24-month- (24MO) old Wistar rats. Ca2+ transients obtained under 1 Hz pacing by microfluorimetry of cardiomyocyte loaded with indo-1 (405/480 nm fluorescence ratio) were compared in control conditions (Kreb's solution alone) and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation (phenylephrine or cirazoline, an alpha1-specific agonist). PKC activity and PKC translocation index (particulate/total activity) were also assayed before and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In 3MO, cirazoline induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient for a 10(-9) M concentration which returned to control values for larger concentrations. In contrast, in 24MO, we observed a constant negative effect of cirazoline on the Ca2+ transient with a significant decrease at 10(-6) M compared with both baseline and Kreb's solution. Preliminary experiments showed that, in a dose-response curve to phenylephrine, the response of Ca2+ transient was maximal at 10(-7) M. This concentration induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient in 3MO and a significant decrease in 24MO. The same concentration was chosen to perform PKC activity measurements under alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In the basal state, PKC particulate activity was higher in 24MO than that in 3MO but was not different in cytosolic fractions; so that the translocation index was higher in 24MO (P < 0.01). After phenylephrine, a translocation of PKC toward the particulate fraction was observed in 3MO but not in 24MO. In conclusion, cardiac alpha1-adrenoceptor response was found to be impaired in aged hearts. The negative effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation on Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes obtained from old rats can be related to an absence of alpha1-adrenergic-induced PKC translocation.

  6. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 Reduces Hypothalamic Excitation in Rats with Adriamycin-Induced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zang, Wei-Jin; Bao, Cui-Yu; Qin, Da-Nian

    2012-01-01

    Background The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus plays an important role in the progression of heart failure (HF). We investigated whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition in the PVN attenuates the activities of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. Methodology/Principal Finding Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin over a period of 2 weeks (cumulative dose of 15 mg/kg). On day 19, rats received intragastric administration daily with either COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (CLB) or normal saline. Treatment with CLB reduced mortality and attenuated both myocardial atrophy and pulmonary congestion in HF rats. Compared with the HF rats, ventricle to body weight (VW/BW) and lung to body weight (LW/BW) ratios, heart rate (HR), left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), left ventricular peak systolic pressure (LVPSP) and maximum rate of change in left ventricular pressure (LV±dp/dtmax) were improved in HF+CLB rats. Angiotensin II (ANG II), norepinephrine (NE), COX-2 and glutamate (Glu) in the PVN were increased in HF rats. HF rats had higher levels of ANG II and NE in plasma, higher level of ANG II in myocardium, and lower levels of ANP in plasma and myocardium. Treatment with CLB attenuated these HF-induced changes. HF rats had more COX-2-positive neurons and more corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) positive neurons in the PVN than did control rats. Treatment with CLB decreased COX-2-positive neurons and CRH positive neurons in the PVN of HF rats. Conclusions These results suggest that PVN COX-2 may be an intermediary step for PVN neuronal activation and excitatory neurotransmitter release, which further contributes to sympathoexcitation and RAS activation in adriamycin-induced heart failure. Treatment with COX-2 inhibitor attenuates sympathoexcitation and RAS activation in adriamycin-induced heart failure. PMID:23152801

  7. The effect of prefixation on the quality of vascular corrosion casts of rat heart.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P A; Douglas, J E; Schulte, M; Hossler, F E

    1995-01-01

    To help define the optimal conditions for the preparation of vascular corrosion casts of rat heart, we examined the effect of prefixation with aldehyde fixatives on the perfusion rates of rat heart and on the quality of vascular casts. For these studies, beating hearts were removed from rats, cannulated via the aortic stump, arrested with KCl, perfused retrograde with buffered saline or fixative, and infused with resin to prepare corrosion casts. Fixatives used were 2.5% glutaraldehyde or 2% paraformaldehyde, and the casting resin consisted of a Mercox-methylmethacrylate mixture (4:1). All perfusion pressures were monitored at 80 to 100 mm Hg using a mercury manometer. The perfusion rate of control hearts was 13 to 14 mL/min. Prefixation with glutaraldehyde and paraformaldehyde reduced perfusion to 8.5 and 8.1 mL/min, respectively. Cast quality was observed grossly and with the scanning electron microscope. Control hearts yielded high quality, complete casts with 2570 capillaries/mm(2+). Casts from prefixed hearts exhibited areas of incomplete vessel filling and resisted complete tissue maceration, leaving tissue remnants adhering to the vessel replicas. Casts from glutaraldehyde-fixed hearts were of very poor quality. Our results indicate that prefixation is an unnecessary step in the preparation of vascular casts of rat heart and is inconsistent with cast quality.

  8. Engineered heart tissue graft derived from somatic cell nuclear transferred embryonic stem cells improve myocardial performance in infarcted rat heart.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shuanghong; Li, Ying; Gao, Shaorong; Liu, Sheng; Wang, Haibin; He, Wenjun; Zhou, Jin; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Ye; Lin, Qiuxia; Duan, Cumi; Yang, Xiangzhong Jerry; Wang, Changyong

    2010-12-01

    The concept of regenerating diseased myocardium by implanting engineered heart tissue (EHT) is intriguing. Yet it was limited by immune rejection and difficulties to be generated at a size with contractile properties. Somatic cell nuclear transfer is proposed as a practical strategy for generating autologous histocompatible stem (nuclear transferred embryonic stem [NT-ES]) cells to treat diseases. Nevertheless, it is controversial as NT-ES cells may pose risks in their therapeutic application. EHT from NT-ES cell-derived cardiomyocytes was generated through a series of improved techniques in a self-made mould to keep the EHTs from contraction and provide static stretch simultaneously. After 7 days of static and mechanical stretching, respectively, the EHTs were implanted to the infarcted rat heart. Four weeks after transplantation, the suitability of EHT in heart muscle repair after myocardial infarction was evaluated by histological examination, echocardiography and multielectrode array measurement. The results showed that large (thickness/diameter, 2-4 mm/10 mm) spontaneously contracting EHTs was generated successfully. The EHTs, which were derived from NT-ES cells, inte grated and electrically coupled to host myocardium and exerted beneficial effects on the left ventricular function of infarcted rat heart. No teratoma formation was observed in the rat heart implanted with EHTs for 4 weeks. NT-ES cells can be used as a source of seeding cells for cardiac tissue engineering. Large contractile EHT grafts can be constructed in vitro with the ability to survive after implantation and improve myocardial performance of infarcted rat hearts.

  9. Activity of cholinesterases of blood and heart in rats of different sex and age during muscular loads and hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanova, V. D.; Antonova, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The activity of acetylcholinesterase (Ache) and butyrilcholinesterase (Bche) in the blood and the heart of 3 and 13 month old control male rats is considerably lower than in female rats. In 25 month old rats, no sex differences in the Ache and Bche were revealed in the heart. In 3 and 13 month old male and female rats, under conditions of muscular exercises, the Ache and Bche activity is lower, and in hypokinetic male rats -- higher than that in respective control animals. In all the rats, irrespective of sex, age, and motor conditions, Ache and Bche activity tended to decrease from the sinoatrial node to the heart apex.

  10. Effects of Long-term Blockade of Vasopressin Receptor Types 1a and 2 on Cardiac and Renal Damage in a Rat Model of Hypertensive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tomoyuki; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, Heitaro; Morooka, Hanako; Akahoshi, Yasumitsu; Fujiki, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2015-11-01

    The effects of chronic blockade of vasopressin type 1a receptors (V1aR) and the additive effects of a type 2 receptor (V2R) antagonist on the treatment of hypertension-induced heart failure and renal injury remain to be unknown. In this study, Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats were chronically treated with a vehicle (CONT), a V1aR antagonist (OPC21268; OPC), a V2R antagonist (tolvaptan; TOLV), or a combination of OPC21268 and tolvaptan (OPC/TOLV) from the pre-hypertrophic stage (6 weeks). No treatment altered blood pressure during the study. Significant improvements were seen in median survival for the OPC and TOLV, and the OPC/TOLV showed a further improvement in Kaplan-Meier analysis. Echocardiography showed suppressed left ventricular hypertrophy in the OPC and OPC/TOLV at 11 weeks with improved function in all treatment groups by 17 weeks. In all treatment groups, improvements were seen in the following: myocardial histological changes, creatinine clearance, urinary albumin excretion, and renal histopathologic damage. Also, key mRNA levels were suppressed (eg, endothelin-1 and collagen). In conclusion, chronic V1aR blockade ameliorated disease progression in this rat model, with additive benefits from the combination of V1aR and V2R antagonists. It was associated with protection of both myocardial and renal damage, independent of blood pressure.

  11. Influence of microwaves on the beating rate of isolated rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, K.C.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that microwave exposure can decrease the beating rate of isolated rat hearts. These experiments were conducted at room temperature and with the hearts exposed to air. We observed arrhythmia frequently at room temperature, and the variation of heart beat was so large that it makes the results difficult to reproduce. Therefore, we employed a double-circulating system to provide perfusion through the coronary artery and around the outside of the heart to maintain the rat hearts at 37.7 degrees C. No arrhythmias were observed in our experiments, and the hearts were beating for at least 1 h. The effects of 16-Hz modulated 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (10 microseconds, 100 pps) on the beating rate of 50 isolated rat hearts were studied. Results showed no statistically significant changes of heart rate in exposed groups at SARs of 2 and 10 W/kg compared with the control group. The effect seen at 200 W/kg was shown to be similar to that resulting from heating the heart.

  12. Myocardial kinetics of carbon-11-epinephrine in the isolated working rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, N.T.B.; DeGrado, T.R.; Chakraborty, P.

    1997-05-01

    The kinetics of EPI were studied in the isolated rat heart model to evaluate {sup 11}C-epinephrine (EPI) as a radiotracer for the assessment of sympathetic neuronal function in the heart. Isolated rat hearts were perfused in a working mode. Carbon-11-EPI was added to the perfusate during wash-in period of 20 min, followed by a washout period of 40 min. Radioactivity in the heart was externally monitored and time-activity curves were recorded as a function of time. Effluent samples were collected throughout each study to determine the fraction of {sup 11}C radioactivity as intact tracer. Time-activity curves of control hearts showed that {sup 11}C-EPI is taken up and retained by the myocardium. Desipramine inhibition (DMI) of uptake-1 resulted in a significant decrease in myocardial uptake and retention of {sup 11}C-EPI by 91% compared to controls. Addition of DMI to the perfusion medium during washout did not affect kinetics of {sup 11}C-EPI compared to control hearts. Reserpine pretreated rat hearts also showed significant decrease in tracer retention of 95% compared to controls. The metabolic data showed that, in control conditions, about 61% of {sup 11}C-EPI taken up by the rat heart is rapidly metabolized and released. Carbon-11-EPI traces sympathetic nerve terminals in the isolated rat heart. Uptake blockade by DMI and reserpine suggest that uptake and storage of {sup 11}C-EPI appear to be similar to that of norepinephrine. However, the prominent metabolic pathway warrants further consideration. These results suggest that {sup 11}C-EPI may be a suitable radiolabeled tracer for the evaluation of sympathetic vesicular function of the heart by PET. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Endotoxin pretreatment increases endogenous myocardial catalase activity and decreases ischemia-reperfusion injury of isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J M; Grosso, M A; Terada, L S; Whitman, G J; Banerjee, A; White, C W; Harken, A H; Repine, J E

    1989-01-01

    Hearts isolated from rats pretreated 24 hr before with endotoxin had increased myocardial catalase activity, but the same superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, as hearts from untreated rats. Hearts isolated from rats pretreated with endotoxin 24 hr before also had increased myocardial function (decreased injury) after ischemia and reperfusion (Langendorff apparatus, 37 degrees C), as assessed by measurement of ventricular developed pressure, contractility (+dP/dt), and relaxation rate (-dP/dt), compared to control hearts. In contrast, hearts isolated from rats pretreated with endotoxin 1 hr before isolation or hearts perfused with endotoxin did not have increased catalase activity or decreased injury following ischemia and reperfusion. Aminotriazole pretreatment prevented increases in myocardial catalase activity and myocardial function after ischemia-reperfusion in hearts from endotoxin-pretreated rats. The results suggest that endotoxin pretreatment decreases cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury and that increases in endogenous myocardial catalase activity contribute to protection. PMID:2648406

  14. Prolongation of rat heart allografts by donor-specific blood transfusion treated with ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Iga, C.; Lau, H.; Hardy, M.A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of donor-specific blood transfusion was compared to that of UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion on heart allograft survival in inbred rats with major histocompatibility differences. In one series ACI rats received heterotopic heart grafts from Lewis rats and 1 mL transfusion of donor-type blood at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to the transplantation. Fifty percent of the grafts were permanently accepted (survival greater than 200 days). Following UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion, 55% of the grafts survived indefinitely. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction ACI lymphocytes are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes. In another series, Lewis rats received ACI hearts. Donor-specific transfusions at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to transplantation did not significantly alter the survival of heart allografts. Lewis lymphocytes react strongly to ACI stimulator cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. However, when the donor blood was UVB-irradiated prior to transfusion, the ACI allograft survival was significantly prolonged in this ACI-to-Lewis strain combination. When Lewis rats received W/F hearts following either donor-specific or UVB-irradiated donor-specific transfusions, the hearts' survival was similarly and significantly prolonged, but did not become permanent. Mixed lymphocyte reaction reveals that the stimulation index of Lewis lymphocytes against W/F lymphocytes is greater than that of ACI versus Lewis, but is less than that between Lewis responder cells against ACI stimulators.

  15. Effect of autonomic blockers on the heart rate of intact rats and animals with artificial hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kapitola, J; Kölbel, F; Schüllerová, M; Schreiberová, O; Vilimovská, D

    1976-01-01

    The effect of various autonomic blockers on the heart rate (from the ECG recording) of intact rats and of animals with experimental hyperthyroidism induced by the administration of dried thyroid was studied. In intact rats, the heart rate fell significantly (by 22%) during the first week after the peroral administration of propranolol (0.05% in food), but trimepranol (0.02%), reserpine (0.001%) and guanethidine (0.1%) had no effect (in a suplementary experment, a small, but statistically significant decrease was also found after trimepranol). In experimental hyperthyroidism, using the same blocker doses, the heart rate fell significantly after propranolol (by 23%), trimepranol (22%), reserpine (16%) and, in a preliminary experiment, guanethidine (19%). On injecting 0.05 mg propranolol intravenously, the maximum drop in the heart rate in intact rats was 22%, while in hyperthyroidism it was hardly more than half this value (at all the intervals from 2 to 30 minutes the decrease was statistically significant). Practolol, in a dose of 0.3 mg i.v., was less effective -- in intact rats the heart rate fell by not more than 12% (at all the intervals from 2 to 30 minutes the decrease was significant), but in hyperthyroidism the drop was slower and statistically non-significant. The results do not furnish an unequivocal answer to the question of the role of adrenergic regulation of the heart rate under physiological conditions and in experimental hyperthyroidism in rats.

  16. Increased ANF secretion after volume expansion is preserved in rats with heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Young Wei; Barbee, R.W.; MacPhee, A.L.; Frohlich, E.D.; Trippodo, N.C. )

    1988-02-01

    To examine whether the failing heart has reached a maximal capacity to increase plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) concentration, the change in plasma immunoreactive ANF, measured by radioimmunoassay level due to acute blood volume expansion was determined in conscious rats with chronic heart failure. Varying degrees of myocardial infarction and thus heart failure were induced by coronary artery ligation 3 wk before study. Compared with controls, infarcted rats had decreases in mean arterial pressure cardiac index, renal blood flow, and peak left ventricle-developed pressure after aortic occlusion, and increases in central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, total peripheral resistance, plasma ANF level. Plasma ANF was correlated with infarct size, cardiac filling pressures, and left ventricle pressure-generating ability. At 5 min after 25% blood volume expansion, plasma ANF in rats with heart failure increased by 2,281 {plus minus} 345 pg/ml; the magnitude of the changes in circulating ANF and hemodynamic measurements was similar in controls. The results suggest that plasma ANF level can be used as a reliable index of the severity of heart failure, and that the capacity to increase plasma ANF concentration after acute volume expansion is preserved in rats with heart failure. There was no evidence of a relative deficiency of circulating ANF in this model of heart failure.

  17. Early life permethrin insecticide treatment leads to heart damage in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Vadhana, M S Dhivya; Carloni, Manuel; Nasuti, Cinzia; Fedeli, Donatella; Gabbianelli, Rosita

    2011-09-01

    Early life environmental exposure to xenobiotics could represent a critical period for the onset of permanent alterations in the structure and function of different organs. Cardiovascular diseases can be related to various factors including environmental toxicants. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of early life permethrin treatment (1/50 LD(50), from 6th to 21st day of life) on heart of adult rats. Increased DNA damage, decreased heart cell membrane fluidity, increased cholesterol content, protein and lipid oxidation were measured in heart cells from adult rats treated with permethrin during the neonatal period with respect to control rats. Moreover, the same group showed higher levels of cholesterol, IL-1β, IL-2, IFN-γ, rat-Rantes and IL-10 cytokines and decreased albumin content in plasma. Lower cholesterol levels and perturbation in the phospholipid lateral diffusion together with decreased GSH levels and increased GPx activity were measured in heart mitochondria of the treated group. Our findings support the evidence that the neonatal period has a critical role in the development of heart disease in adulthood. We hypothesize that the alterations observed in adult rats could depend on epigenetic changes that occurred during this period which influence gene expression throughout the rat's life, leading to alterations of certain parameters related to cardiac function.

  18. Effect of ethanol of heart rate and blood pressure in nonstressed and stressed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sparrow, M.G.; Roggendorf, H.; Vogel, W.H.

    1987-06-29

    The effect of ethanol on the cardiovascular system (ECG, heart rate, blood pressure) was studied in anesthetized, nonstressed or stressed rats. In anesthetized rats, ethanol showed no effect on heart rate or ECG. In nonstressed rats, ethanol sedated the animals but increased heart rate significantly. This ethanol induced tachycardia seemed the result of a direct stimulation of the sympathetic nerves to the heart. Blood pressure was not significantly affected by ethanol in these nonstressed rats. In stressed rats, marked behavioral excitation and significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure were noted. Ethanol pretreatment calmed the animals considerably during restraint. Ethanol did reduce slightly the stress-induced tachycardia but markedly reduced or antagonized stress-induced blood pressure increases. No major changes in the ECG were noted during these studies with the exception of a few individual animals which showed pathologic ECG responses to ethanol. These data show that ethanol affects cardiovascular functions differently in anesthetized, non stressed or stressed rats, and that ethanol can significantly reduce or antagonize stress-induced behavioral excitation, tachycardia and hypertension. 32 references, 4 tables.

  19. Parasympathetic activation by pyridostigmine on chemoreflex sensitivity in heart-failure rats.

    PubMed

    Sabino, João Paulo J; da Silva, Carlos Alberto Aguiar; Giusti, Humberto; Glass, Mogens Lesner; Salgado, Helio C; Fazan, Rubens

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated the effects of parasympathetic activation by pyridostigmine (PYR) on chemoreflex sensitivity in a rat model of heart failure (HF rats). HF rats demonstrated higher pulmonary ventilation (PV), which was not affected by PYR. When HF and control rats treated or untreated with PYR were exposed to 15% O2, all groups exhibited prompt increases in respiratory frequency (RF), tidal volume (TV) and PV. When HF rats were exposed to 10% O2 they showed greater PV response which was prevented by PYR. The hypercapnia triggered by either 5% CO2 or 10% CO2 promoted greater RF and PV responses in HF rats. PYR blunted the RF response in HF rats but did not affect the PV response. In conclusion, PYR prevented increased peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity, partially blunted central chemoreflex sensitivity and did not affect basal PV in HF rats. © 2013.

  20. Perinatal hypothyroidism modulates antioxidant defence status in the developing rat liver and heart.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Dong, Yan; Su, Qing

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant defence status in perinatal hypothyroid rat liver and heart. We found that the proteincarbonyl content did not differ significantly between the three groups both in the pup liver and in the heart. The OH˙ level was significantly decreased in the hypothyroid heart but not in the liver compared with controls. A slight but not significant decrease in SOD activity was observed in both perinatal hypothyroid liver and heart. A significantly increased activity of CAT was observed in the liver but not in the heart of hypothyroid pups. The GPx activity was considerably increased compared with controls in the perinatal hypothyroid heart and was unaltered in the liver of hypothyroid pups. We also found that vitamin E levels in the liver decreased significantly in hypothyroidism and were unaltered in the heart of perinatal hypothyroid rats. The GSH content was elevated significantly in both hypothyroid liver and heart. The total antioxidant capacity was higher in the liver of the hypothyroid group but not in the hypothyroid heart. Thyroxine replacement could not repair the above changes to normal. In conclusion, perinatal hypothyroidism modulates the oxidative stress status of the perinatal liver and heart.

  1. Static magnetic field influence on rat brain function detected by heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Veliks, Viktors; Ceihnere, Edīte; Svikis, Igors; Aivars, Juris

    2004-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of a static magnetic field (SMF) on rat brain structures that control autonomic functions, specifically heart rate and heart rhythmicity. The experiments were carried out on 44 male Wistar rats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. SMF was induced using samarium-cobalt fused magnets (20 x 20 x 10 mm in size) placed bitemporally. Magnetic induction intensity was 100 mT on the surface of the head. Duration of magnetic field application was 15 min. An electrocardiogram was recorded from limb lead II, and both heart rate (average duration of cardiac cycles) and heart rhythmicity were analyzed before and after SMF application. SMF evoked changes in both heart rate and rhythm in 80% of the animals; the predominant effects were bradycardia and disappearance of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. However, the effectiveness of SMF in large measure depends on both functional peculiarities and functional activities of brain autonomic centers.

  2. Long-term physiological T3 supplementation in hypertensive heart disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Weltman, Nathan Y; Pol, Christine J; Zhang, Youhua; Wang, Yibo; Koder, Adrienne; Raza, Sarah; Zucchi, Riccardo; Saba, Alessandro; Colligiani, Daria; Gerdes, A Martin

    2015-09-15

    Animal studies suggest that hypertension leads to cardiac tissue hypothyroidism, a condition that can by itself lead to heart failure. We have previously shown that short-term thyroid hormone treatment in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats near heart failure is beneficial. This study tested the hypothesis that therapeutic, long-term T3 treatment in SHHF rats can prevent or attenuate cardiac dysfunction. Female SHHF rats were treated orally with a physiological T3 dose (0.04 μg/ml) from 12 to 24 mo of age. Age-matched female SHHF and Wistar-Kyoto rats served as hypertensive and normotensive controls, respectively. SHHF rats had reduced serum free thyroid hormone levels and cardiac tissue T3 levels, LV dysfunction, and elevated LV collagen content compared with normotensive controls. Restoration of serum and cardiac tissue thyroid hormone levels in T3-treated rats was associated with no change in heart rate, but strong trends for improvement in LV systolic function and collagen levels. For instance, end-systolic diameter, fractional shortening, systolic wall stress, and LV collagen levels were no longer significantly different from controls. In conclusion, longstanding hypertension in rats led to chronic low serum and cardiac tissue thyroid hormone levels. Long-term treatment with low-dose T3 was safe. While cardiac dysfunction could not be completely prevented in the absence of antihypertensive treatment, T3 may offer additional benefits as an adjunct therapy with possible improvement in diastolic function.

  3. Enhanced arrhythmogenicity of Freon 113 by hypoxia in the perfused rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, T.; Takano, T.; Araki, R. )

    1990-05-01

    The interaction of Freon 113 (1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane) and hypoxia on the heart conduction system was studied using electrocardiogram monitoring of isolated perfused rat hearts. Freon 113 (0.2 mM) alone elicited significant atrioventricular conduction delay (p less than 0.05) and heart rate decrease (p less than 0.01), which were significantly enhanced by hypoxia (75% oxygen decrease), for instance, resulting in 2:1 AV block. The data suggest that arrhythmogenicity of Freon 113 on the heart conduction system may be enhanced synergistically by hypoxia.

  4. Natriuretic Peptides as Cardiovascular Safety Biomarkers in Rats: Comparison With Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, and Heart Weight.

    PubMed

    Engle, Steven K; Watson, David E

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) toxicity is an important cause of failure during drug development. Blood-based biomarkers can be used to detect CV toxicity during preclinical development and prioritize compounds at lower risk of causing such toxicities. Evidence of myocardial degeneration can be detected by measuring concentrations of biomarkers such as cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase in blood; however, detection of functional changes in the CV system, such as blood pressure, generally requires studies in animals with surgically implanted pressure transducers. This is a significant limitation because sustained changes in blood pressure are often accompanied by changes in heart rate and together can lead to cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial degeneration in animals, and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in humans. Increased concentrations of NPs in blood correlate with higher risk of cardiac mortality, all-cause mortality, and MACE in humans. Their utility as biomarkers of CV function and toxicity in rodents was investigated by exploring the relationships between plasma concentrations of NTproANP and NTproBNP, blood pressure, heart rate, and heart weight in Sprague Dawley rats administered compounds that caused hypotension or hypertension, including nifedipine, fluprostenol, minoxidil, L-NAME, L-thyroxine, or sunitinib for 1-2 weeks. Changes in NTproANP and/or NTproBNP concentrations were inversely correlated with changes in blood pressure. NTproANP and NTproBNP concentrations were inconsistently correlated with relative heart weights. In addition, increased heart rate was associated with increased heart weights. These studies support the use of natriuretic peptides and heart rate to detect changes in blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy in short-duration rat studies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Metabonomic analysis of rats with acute heart rejection.

    PubMed

    Tao, M; Xiu, D R

    2013-03-01

    Organs transplantation is an effective treatment for end-stage organ failure. Despite the use of modern immunosuppressants to decrease its incidence, acute rejection episodes (ARE), still present a problem for diagnosis, resolution, and prediction of long-term outcomes due to the absence of sufficiently robust biomarkers. Using an heterotopic heart transplantation model using Dark Agouti to Lewis rats, and sirolimus (rapamycin, Rapa) treatment by gavage, we divided recipients into four groups: controls, ARE, Rapa-14, and Rapa-7. We evaluated recipients by hematoxylin and eosin staining of grafts and reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions. Levels of plasma metabolites were quantified using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Data were evaluated employing partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves with negative predictive values (NPV) and positive predictive values (PPV). The graft survival was prolonged by Rapa. Plasma levels of 10 metabolites differed significantly between the ARE and the Rapa-14 groups as illustrated by the total ion current. According to PLS-DA, proline, glycine, serine, phenylalanine, and isocitrate showed the greatest effects with areas under the curve of 0.944, 0.917, 1.0, 0.861, and 0.944 respectively. The NPV values were 85.7%, 85.7%, 100%, 83.3%, and 85.7% and PPV values, 100%, 100%, 100%, 83.3%, and 100% respectively. Therefore, these metabolites may be used to predict the occurrence and progression of ARE. The trend of changes suggested that plasma metabolites correlated with the immune state of recipients. Therefore, metabonomics may provide new biomarkers for graft injury in the early phases of ARE. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prenatal zinc deficiency: influence on heart morphology and distribution of key heart proteins in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Veronica; Keen, Carl L; Lanoue, Louise

    2008-06-01

    The etiology of congenital heart disease is multifactorial, with genetics and nutritional deficiencies recognized as causative agents. Maternal zinc (Zn) deficiency is associated with an increased risk for fetal heart malformations; however, the contributing mechanisms have yet to be identified. In this study, we fed pregnant rats a Zn-adequate diet (ZnA), a Zn-deficient (ZnD), or a restricted amount of Zn adequate diet (RF) beginning on gestation day (GD) 4.5, to examine whether increased cell death and changes in cardiac neural crest cells (NCC) play a role in Zn deficiency-induced heart defects. Fetuses were collected on GD 13.5, 15.5, and 18.5 and processed for GATA-4, FOG-2, connexin-43 (Cx43), HNK-1, smooth muscle alpha-actin (SMA) and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression. Fetuses from ZnA-fed dams showed normal heart development, whereas fetuses from dams fed with the ZnD diet exhibited a variety of heart anomalies, particularly in the region of the outflow tract. HNK-1 expression was lower than normal in the hearts of GD13.5 and 15.5 ZnD fetuses, particularly in the right atrium and in the distal tip of the interventricular septum. Conversely, Cx43 immunoreactivity was increased throughout the heart in fetuses from ZnD dams compared to fetuses from control dams. The distribution and intensity of expression of SMA, GATA-4, FOG-2, and markers of apoptosis were similar among the three groups. We propose that Zn deficiency induced alterations in the distribution of Cx43 and HNK-1 in fetal hearts contribute to the occurrence of the developmental heart anomalies.

  7. Hypertrophic stimuli augment expression of cMG1/ERF-1, a putative zinc-finger motif transcription factor, in rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Manabe, T; Fukuda, K; Pan, J; Nagasaki, K; Yamaguchi, K; Ogawa, S

    1999-12-10

    We isolated the gene for cMG1/ERF-1, a known putative zinc-finger transcription factor, by differential display of mRNA extracted from cardiomyocytes with and without leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) stimulation. LIF induced cMG1/ERF-1 mRNA at 15 min, and levels peaked at 10-fold initial levels at 30 min. cMG1/ERF-1 expression was inhibited by AG490 (JAK2 inhibitor) and genistein, but was unaffected by PD98059 or wortmannin. Phenylephrine, angiotensin II and endothelin-1 also induced cMG1/ERF-1 expression. Mechanical stretch in vitro and acute pressure overload in vivo increased cMG1/ERF-1 expression. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the cMG1/ERF-1 gene can be induced by various hypertrophic stimuli, and that Janus kinase 2 is involved in this process.

  8. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Magri, Damiano; Santolamazza, Caterina

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the functional limitation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the most common inherited heart disease, is challenging. Beside the occurrence of disease-related complications, several factors are potential determinants of exercise limitation, including left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial fiber disarray, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, microvascular ischemia, and interstitial fibrosis. Furthermore, drugs commonly used in the daily management of these patients may interfere with exercise capacity, especially those with a negative chronotropic effect. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing can safely and objectively evaluate the functional capacity of these patients and help the physician in understanding the mechanisms that underlie this limitation. Features that reduce exercise capacity may predict progression to heart failure in these patients and even the risk of sudden cardiac death.

  9. Combined effects of hypertension and chronic running program on rat heart.

    PubMed

    Schaible, T; Malhotra, A; Ciambrone, G; Buttrick, P; Scheuer, J

    1987-07-01

    Previous studies in hearts of female rats have demonstrated that ventricular hypertrophy due to systolic overload, when combined with hypertrophy induced by a chronic swimming program, results in increased cardiac performance and enhanced contractile protein activity compared with the effects of hypertension alone. To explore how a chronic running program affects the function of hypertensive hearts, renal hypertension was created in female rats, and the animals were subjected to a program of chronic treadmill running. Running alone caused enhanced cardiac function, an increase in myosin adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity, and an increase in the percent of the V1 myosin isoenzyme. Hypertension alone caused cardiac hypertrophy with a depression in myosin ATPase activity and a decrease in the percent of the V1 isoenzyme. Running improved cardiac function in hearts of normotensive rats but had no effect in hearts of hypertensive rats. Despite the diminished myosin ATPase activity in hearts of hypertensive runners and the decrease in percent of the V1 isoenzyme, cardiac function was well maintained. The results demonstrate that a chronic running program in hypertensive rats, in contrast to a chronic swimming program, had virtually no effect on cardiac performance or contractile proteins. The dissociation between myocardial performance and the contractile proteins implicates other biochemical mechanisms in the adaptations observed.

  10. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation Retards the Natural Senescence of Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingyu; Liu, Di; Li, Shuang; Chang, Lingling; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Ruixue; Sun, Fei; Duan, Wenqi; Du, Weijie; Wu, Yanping; Zhao, Tianyang; Xu, Chaoqian

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown to offer a wide variety of cellular functions including the protective effects on damaged hearts. Here we investigated the antiaging properties of BMSCs and the underlying mechanism in a cellular model of cardiomyocyte senescence and a rat model of aging hearts. Neonatal rat ventricular cells (NRVCs) and BMSCs were cocultured in the same dish with a semipermeable membrane to separate the two populations. Monocultured NRVCs displayed the senescence-associated phenotypes, characterized by an increase in the number of β-galactosidase-positive cells and decreases in the degradation and disappearance of cellular organelles in a time-dependent manner. The levels of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde were elevated, whereas the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were decreased, along with upregulation of p53, p21Cip1/Waf1, and p16INK4a in the aging cardiomyocytes. These deleterious alterations were abrogated in aging NRVCs cocultured with BMSCs. Qualitatively, the same senescent phenotypes were consistently observed in aging rat hearts. Notably, BMSC transplantation significantly prevented these detrimental alterations and improved the impaired cardiac function in the aging rats. In summary, BMSCs possess strong antisenescence action on the aging NRVCs and hearts and can improve cardiac function after transplantation in aging rats. The present study, therefore, provides an alternative approach for the treatment of heart failure in the elderly population. PMID:25855590

  11. The treatment with pyridostigmine improves the cardiocirculatory function in rats with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sabino, João Paulo J; da Silva, Carlos Alberto Aguiar; de Melo, Rubens Fernando; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C

    2013-01-01

    Sympathetic hyperactivity and its outcome in heart failure have been thoroughly investigated to determine the focus of pharmacologic approaches targeting the sympathetic nervous system in the treatment of this pathophysiological condition. On the other hand, therapeutic approaches aiming to protect the reduced cardiac parasympathetic function have not received much attention. The present study evaluated rats with chronic heart failure (six to seven weeks after coronary artery ligation) and the effects of an increased parasympathetic function by pyridostigmine (an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) on the following aspects: arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), baroreceptor and Bezold-Jarisch reflex, pulse interval (PI) and AP variability, cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic tonus, intrinsic heart rate (i-HR) and cardiac function. Conscious rats with heart failure exhibited no change in HR, Bezold-Jarisch reflex, PI variability and cardiac sympathetic tonus. On the other hand, these animals presented hypotension and reduced baroreflex sensitivity, power in the low frequency (LF) band of the systolic AP spectrum, cardiac parasympathetic tonus and i-HR, while anesthetized rats exhibited reduced cardiac performance. Pyridostigmine prevented the attenuation of all the parameters examined, except basal AP and cardiac performance. In conclusion, the blockade of acetylcholinesterase with pyridostigmine was revealed to be an important pharmacological approach, which could be used to increase parasympathetic function and to improve a number of cardiocirculatory parameters in rats with heart failure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Brain and heart sodium channel subtype mRNA expression in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Yarowsky, P J; Krueger, B K; Olson, C E; Clevinger, E C; Koos, R D

    1991-01-01

    The expression of mRNAs coding for the alpha subunit of rat brain and rat heart sodium channels has been studied in adult and neonatal rat cerebral cortex using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Rat brain sodium channel subtype I, II, IIA, and III sequences were simultaneously amplified in the same PCR using a single oligonucleotide primer pair matched to all four subtype sequences. Identification of each subtype-specific product was inferred from the appearance of unique fragments when the product was digested with specific restriction enzymes. By using this RT-PCR method, products arising from mRNAs for all four brain sodium channel subtypes were identified in RNA extracted from adult rat cerebral cortex. The predominant component was type IIA with lesser levels of types I, II, and III. In contrast, the type II and IIA sequences were the predominant RT-PCR products in neonatal rat cortex, with slightly lower levels of type III and undetectable levels of type I. Thus, from neonate to adult, type II mRNA levels decrease relative to type IIA levels. Using a similar approach, we detected mRNA coding for the rat heart sodium channel in neonatal and adult rat cerebral cortex and in adult rat heart. These results reveal that mRNAs coding for the heart sodium channel and all four previously sequenced rat brain sodium channel subtypes are expressed in cerebral cortex and that type II and IIA channels may be differentially regulated during development. Images PMID:1658783

  13. Age-related changes in dopamine D2 receptors in rat heart and coronary vessels.

    PubMed

    Cavallotti, Carlo; Nuti, Federica; Bruzzone, Paolo; Mancone, Massimo

    2002-01-01

    1. The distribution of dopamine D2 receptors in rat heart and coronary vessels and the possible age-related changes in D2 receptor density were studied. The pharmacological characteristics and the anatomical location of dopamine D2-like receptor sites in rat heart and coronary vessels were investigated using combined binding techniques and light microscopy autoradiography. 2. Samples of heart and coronary vessels were harvested from young and old rats. On frozen slices, dopaminergic D2 receptors were labelled by means of a selective D2 ligand, namely [3H]-spiroperidol (spiperone). Inhibition studies were performed using unlabelled agonists and/or labelled and unlabelled antagonists to define pharmacological specificity of the binding. Physiological experiments were performed to demonstrate the selective antagonism between D2 receptors and many dopaminergic drugs. 3. [3H]-Spiroperidol was bound to sections of rat heart and coronary artery (in a manner consistent with the labelling of dopamine D2-like receptors) with an equilibrium dissociation constant of approximately 2.4 +/- 0.7 nmol/L and a maximum capacity of binding sites of 65.8 +/- 4.5 fmol/mg protein. Experiments performed on sections of coronary veins did not allow the evaluation of specific binding. Autoradiography, observed with light microscopy, showed the development of specific silver grains within the whole wall of rat heart and coronary artery. The greater sensitivity to displacement by amisulpride, bromocriptine, domperidone, haloperidol, raclopride and L-sulpiride than to displacement by N-propyl-norapomorphine, quinpirole and clozapine suggests that the binding sites observed in these experiments are likely to belong to the dopamine D2 receptor subtype. 4. Comparing results in young and old rats, we observed numerous significant age-related changes, including a decrease in D2 receptors localized in rat heart and coronary artery wall. These D2 receptors show a specific location, in close

  14. Effects of chronic caloric restriction on mitochondrial respiration in the ischemic reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Tom L; Belke, Terry; Driedzic, William R

    2002-04-01

    Dietary restriction increases life span and delays the development of age-related diseases in rodents. We have recently demonstrated that chronic dietary restriction is beneficial on recovery of heart function following ischemia. We studied whether the metabolic basis of this benefit is associated with alterations in mitochondrial respiration. Male Wistar rats were assigned to an ad libitum-fed (AL) group and a food restricted (FR) group, in which food intake was reduced to 55% of the amount consumed by the AL group. Following an 8-month period of restricted caloric intake, isolated working hearts perfused with glucose and high levels of fatty acids were subjected to global ischemia followed by reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, total heart mitochondria respiration was assessed in the presence of pyruvate, tricarboxylic acid intermediates, and palmitoylcarnitine. Recovery of heart function following ischemia was greater in FR hearts compared to AL hearts. Paralleling these changes in heart function was an increase in state 3 respiration with pyruvate. The respiratory control ratios in the presence of pyruvate and tricarboxylic acid intermediates were higher in FR hearts compared to AL hearts, indicating well-coupled mitochondria. Overall energy production, expressed as the ADP:O ratio and the oxidative phosphorylation rate, was also improved in FR hearts. Our results indicate that the beneficial effect of FR on recovery of heart function following ischemia is associated with changes in mitochondrial respiration.

  15. Increased Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger Expression/Activity Constitutes a Point of Inflection in the Progression to Heart Failure of Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jesica S.; Velez Rueda, J. Omar; Salas, Margarita; Becerra, Romina; Di Carlo, Mariano N.; Said, Matilde; Vittone, Leticia; Rinaldi, Gustavo; Portiansky, Enrique L.; Mundiña-Weilenmann, Cecilia; Palomeque, Julieta; Mattiazzi, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) constitutes a genetic model widely used to study the natural evolution of hypertensive heart disease. Ca2+-handling alterations are known to occur in SHR. However, the putative modifications of Ca2+-handling proteins during the progression to heart failure (HF) are not well established. Moreover, the role of apoptosis in SHR is controversial. We investigated intracellular Ca2+, Ca2+-handling proteins and apoptosis in SHR vs. control Wistar rats (W) from 3 to 15 months (mo). Changes associated with the transition to HF (i.e. lung edema and decrease in midwall fractional shortening), occurred at 15 mo in 38% of SHR (SHRF). In SHRF, twitch and caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients, significantly decreased relative to 6/9 mo and 15 mo without HF signs. This decrease occurred in association with a decrease in the time constant of caffeine-Ca2+ transient decay and an increase in Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) abundance (p<0.05) with no changes in SERCA2a expression/activity. An increased Ca2+-calmodulin-kinase II activity, associated with an enhancement of apoptosis (TUNEL and Bax/Bcl2) was observed in SHR relative to W from 3 to 15 mo. Conclusions: 1. Apoptosis is an early and persistent event that may contribute to hypertrophic remodeling but would not participate in the contractile impairment of SHRF. 2. The increase in NCX expression/activity, associated with an increase in Ca2+ efflux from the cell, constitutes a primary alteration of Ca2+-handling proteins in the evolution to HF. 3. No changes in SERCA2a expression/activity are observed when HF signs become evident. PMID:24781001

  16. The effect of endotoxin on heart rate dynamics in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Meamar, Morvarid; Dehpour, Tara; Mazloom, Roham; Sharifi, Fatemeh; Raoufy, Mohammad R; Dehpour, Ahmad R; Mani, Ali R

    2015-05-01

    The effect of endotoxin on heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed in diabetic and controls rats using a telemetric system. Endotoxin induced a reduction in sample entropy of cardiac rhythm in control animals. However, this effect was significantly blunted in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Since uncoupling of cardiac pacemaker from cholinergic control is linked to reduced HRV in endotoxemia, chronotropic responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation was assessed in isolated atria. Endotoxemia was associated with impaired responsiveness to carbacholine in control rats. However, endotoxemia did not impair cholinergic responsiveness in diabetic atria. These findings corroborates with development of endotoxin tolerance in diabetic rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Aortic banding in rat as a model to investigate malnutrition associated with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Héliès-Toussaint, Cécile; Moinard, Christophe; Rasmusen, Carole; Tabbi-Anneni, Imène; Cynober, Luc; Grynberg, Alain

    2005-05-01

    Heart failure is a severe pathology, which has displayed a dramatic increase in the occurrence of patients with chronic heart disease in developed countries, as a result of increases in the population's average age and in survival time. This pathology is associated with severe malnutrition, which worsens the prognosis. Although the cachexia associated with chronic heart failure is a well-known complication, there is no reference animal model of malnutrition related to heart failure. This study was designed to evaluate the nutritional status of rats in a model of loss of cardiac function obtained by ascending aortic banding. Cardiac overload led to the development of cardiac hypertrophy, which decompensates to heart failure, with increased brain natriuretic peptide levels. The rats displayed hepatic dysfunction and an associated renal hypotrophy and renal failure, evidenced by the alteration in renal function markers such as citrullinemia, creatininemia, and uremia. Malnutrition has been evidenced by the alteration of protein and amino acid metabolism. A muscular atrophy with decreased protein content and increased amino acid concentrations in both plasma and muscle was observed. These rats with heart failure displayed a multiorgan failure and malnutrition, which reflected the clinical situation of human chronic heart failure.

  18. PPAR ligands improve impaired metabolic pathways in fetal hearts of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Melisa; Capobianco, Evangelina; Martinez, Nora; Roberti, Sabrina Lorena; Arany, Edith; Jawerbaum, Alicia

    2014-10-01

    In maternal diabetes, the fetal heart can be structurally and functionally affected. Maternal diets enriched in certain unsaturated fatty acids can activate the nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and regulate metabolic and anti-inflammatory pathways during development. Our aim was to investigate whether PPARα expression, lipid metabolism, lipoperoxidation, and nitric oxide (NO) production are altered in the fetal hearts of diabetic rats, and to analyze the putative effects of in vivo PPAR activation on these parameters. We found decreased PPARα expression in the hearts of male but not female fetuses of diabetic rats when compared with controls. Fetal treatments with the PPARα ligand leukotriene B4 upregulated the expression of PPARα and target genes involved in fatty acid oxidation in the fetal hearts. Increased concentrations of triglycerides, cholesterol, and phospholipids were found in the hearts of fetuses of diabetic rats. Maternal treatments with diets supplemented with 6% olive oil or 6% safflower oil, enriched in unsaturated fatty acids that can activate PPARs, led to few changes in lipid concentrations, but up-regulated PPARα expression in fetal hearts. NO production, which was increased in the hearts of male and female fetuses in the diabetic group, and lipoperoxidation, which was increased in the hearts of male fetuses in the diabetic group, was reduced by the maternal treatments supplemented with safflower oil. In conclusion, impaired PPARα expression, altered lipid metabolism, and increased oxidative and nitridergic pathways were evidenced in hearts of fetuses of diabetic rats and were regulated in a gender-dependent manner by treatments enriched with PPAR ligands.

  19. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  20. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Farina Júnior, Jayme Adriano

    2014-08-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin.

  1. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 muM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt{sub max} of 105 +- 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 +- 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 +- 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 +- 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 +- 1 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 +- 3 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  2. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 microM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt(max) of 105+/-8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49+/-7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; p<0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0+/-0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2+/-0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; p<0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24+/-1 microM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14+/-3 microM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; p<0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Down Syndrome with Complete Atrioventricular Septal Defect, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, and Pulmonary Vein Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mahadevaiah, Guruprasad; Gupta, Manoj; Ashwath, Ravi

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease in infants with Down syndrome is 40%, compared with 0.3% in children who have normal chromosomes. Atrioventricular and ventricular septal defects are often associated with chromosomal aberrations, such as in trisomy 21, whereas hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is chiefly thought to be secondary to specific gene mutations. We found only one reported case of congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and atrioventricular septal defect in an infant with Down syndrome. Here, we report atrioventricular septal defect, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and pulmonary vein stenosis in a neonate with Down syndrome-an apparently unique combination. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature.

  4. An Unusual Type of Localized Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy With Wolf Parkinson White Syndrome Presenting With Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Vatan, Mehmet Bulent; Gunduz, Huseyin; Gurel, Safiye; Kocayigit, Ibrahim; Vural, Ahmet; Demirtas, Saadet; Cakar, Mehmet Akif; Gunduz, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant heart disease that is the most common genetic cardiac disorder. The disease is characterized by excessive thickening of the left ventricular myocardium. The anterior portion of the interventricular ventricular septum is often involved. Asymmetric hypertrophy of apical site, left ventricular free wall, and right ventricle are less common in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that occur in 1% cases. We report a case of a patient with an unusual type of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Wolf Parkinson White (WPW) presenting with pulmonary edema.

  5. Heart Rates of Male and Female Sprague–Dawley and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Housed Singly or in Groups

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Toni; Sharp, Jody; Lawson, David

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to confirm our previous reports that group housing lowered basal heart rate and various evoked heart-rate responses in Sprague–Dawley male and female rats and to extend these observations to spontaneously hypertensive rats. Heart rate data were collected by using radiotelemetry. Initially, group- and single-housed rats were evaluated in the same animal room at the same time. Under these conditions, group-housing did not decrease heart rate in undisturbed male and female rats of either strain compared with single-housed rats. Separate studies then were conducted to examine single-housed rats living in the room with only single-housed rats. When group-housed rats were compared with these single-housed rats, undisturbed heart rates were reduced significantly, confirming our previous reports for Sprague–Dawley rats. However, evoked heart rate responses to acute procedures were not reduced universally in group-housed rats compared with either condition of single housing. Responses to some procedures were reduced, but others were not affected or were significantly enhanced by group housing compared with one or both of the single-housing conditions. This difference may have been due, in part, to different sensory stimuli being evoked by the various procedures. In addition, the variables of sex and strain interacted with housing condition. Additional studies are needed to resolve the mechanisms by which evoked cardiovascular responses are affected by housing, sex, and strain. PMID:21439210

  6. Improved preservation of the rat heart with celsior solution supplemented with cariporide plus glyceryl trinitrate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling; Hicks, Mark; MacDonald, Peter S

    2005-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether the addition of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a source of nitric oxide, and/or cariporide, a Na/H exchange inhibitor, to a commercial preservation solution (Celsior) improved and extended cardiac preservation. After baseline indices of cardiac function (aortic flow, coronary flow, heart rate, cardiac output) were measured in an isolated working rat heart model, hearts were arrested and stored at 2-3 degrees C for 6 or 10 h in Celsior solution alone, Celsior supplemented with either 0.1 mg/mL GTN or 10 microM cariporide or both. After storage, functional measurements were repeated and recovery of each parameter was expressed as a percentage of its pre-storage baseline. After 6 h storage, recovery of cardiac function was significantly better in hearts stored in GTN- or cariporide-supplemented Celsior solution compared with Celsior solution alone. The beneficial effect of GTN was significantly abrogated in hearts perfused with glibenclamide prior to storage. Significant recovery of cardiac function after 10 h storage was only observed in hearts stored in Celsior solution supplemented with both GTN and cariporide. Combined supplementation with GTN and cariporide extends the safe period of storage of the rat heart and may be a useful approach to enhancing preservation of the donor heart.

  7. Heart failure alters matrix metalloproteinase gene expression and activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Dariolli, Rafael; Justulin Junior, Luis Antonio; Sugizaki, Mário Mateus; Politi Okoshi, Marina; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis; Dal Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2006-12-01

    Heart failure is associated with a skeletal muscle myopathy with cellular and extracellular alterations. The hypothesis of this investigation is that extracellular changes may be associated with enhanced mRNA expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). We examined MMP mRNA expression and MMP activity in Soleus (SOL), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and diaphragm (DIA) muscles of young Wistar rat with monocrotaline-induced heart failure. Rats injected with saline served as age-matched controls. MMP2 and MMP9 mRNA contents were determined by RT-PCR and MMP activity by electrophoresis in gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels in the presence of SDS under non-reducing conditions. Heart failure increased MMP9 mRNA expression and activity in SOL, EDL and DIA and MMP2 mRNA expression in DIA. These results suggest that MMP changes may contribute to the skeletal muscle myopathy during heart failure.

  8. Amygdala central nucleus lesions attenuate acoustic startle stimulus-evoked heart rate changes in rats.

    PubMed

    Young, B J; Leaton, R N

    1996-04-01

    Amygdala central nucleus (CNA) lesions were used to test the hypothesis that stimulus-evoked heart rate changes can reflect the development of fear during acoustic startle testing. A 120-dB white noise startle stimulus produced freezing as well as phasic heart rate accelerations and decelerations, and an abrupt decrease in tonic heart rate, in sham-operated rats. These responses were all significantly reduced in CNA-lesioned rats. In contrast, an 87-dB stimulus elicited only significant phasic decelerations that were similarly attenuated by the CNA lesions. In a follow-up experiment, the CNA lesions also attenuated phasic cardiac decelerations evoked by a conditioned stimulus-like, 85-dB pure tone. The results support the contention (B. J. Young & R.N. Leaton, 1994) that heart rate changes can reflect fear conditioned during acoustic startle testing and, in addition, suggest that the amygdala mediates responses to nonsignal acoustic stimuli.

  9. Treatment with alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone preserves calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Gualtiero; Sordi, Andrea; Lonati, Caterina; Carlin, Andrea; Turcatti, Flavia; Leonardi, Patrizia; Gatti, Stefano; Catania, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Prevention of graft dysfunction is a major objective in transplantation medicine. Previous research on experimental heart transplantation indicated that treatment with the immunomodulatory peptide alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) improves histopathology, prolongs allograft survival, and reduces expression of the main tissue injury mediators. Because calcium-handling is critical in heart graft function, we determined the effects of transplantation injury and influences of alpha-MSH treatment on representative calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart allografts. Hearts from Brown Norway rats were transplanted heterotopically into MHC incompatible Lewis rats. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), protein kinase C epsilon (PKC epsilon), sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase 2 (SERCA2a), arrestin-beta1 (Arrb1), cholinergic receptor M2 (Chrm2), and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 1 (InsP(3)R1) were examined in: (1) non-transplanted donor hearts; (2) allografts from saline-treated rats; and (3) allografts from rats treated with the synthetic alpha-MSH analog Nle4-DPhe7-alpha-MSH (NDP-alpha-MSH) (100 microg i.p. every 12h). Transplantation injury was associated with severe reduction in calcium regulatory protein transcription and expression level. NDP-alpha-MSH administration partly reversed inhibition of protein transcription and almost completely prevented protein loss. Finally, because certain effects of cyclic 3'-5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling on calcium handling in cardiac myocytes depend on activation of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), we determined Epac1 mRNA and protein expression in heart allografts. Transplantation injury markedly reduced Epac1. NDP-alpha-MSH treatment significantly preserved both Epac1 protein and mRNA in the allografts. Administration of alpha-MSH or related melanocortins could reduce transplantation-induced dysfunction through protection of heart calcium

  10. Effect of jaundiced sera and bile salts on cultured beating rat heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bogin, E.; Better, O.; Harary, I.

    1980-01-01

    Jaundiced serum, from common bile duct ligated rats, added to cultured heart cells decreased the beating rate and caused an early cessation of beating. Similarly it produced higher levels of lactate in the media. Deoxychloic acid but not cholic acid which are the main bile acids in jaundiced serum caused similar effects, thus suggesting that deoxychloic acid is the toxic substance responsible for heart function alterations seen in severe jaundiced patients.

  11. Sexual dimorphism in the expression of mitochondria-related genes in rat heart at different ages.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Vikrant; Han, Tao; Moland, Carrie L; Kwekel, Joshua C; Fuscoe, James C; Desai, Varsha G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Moreover, sex and age are considered major risk factors in the development of CVDs. Mitochondria are vital for normal cardiac function, and regulation of mitochondrial structure and function may impact susceptibility to CVD. To identify potential role of mitochondria in sex-related differences in susceptibility to CVD, we analyzed the basal expression levels of mitochondria-related genes in the hearts of male and female rats. Whole genome expression profiling was performed in the hearts of young (8-week), adult (21-week), and old (78-week) male and female Fischer 344 rats and the expression of 670 unique genes related to various mitochondrial functions was analyzed. A significant (p<0.05) sexual dimorphism in expression levels of 46, 114, and 41 genes was observed in young, adult and old rats, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis revealed the influence of sex on various biological pathways related to cardiac energy metabolism at different ages. The expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism was significantly different between the sexes in young and adult rat hearts. Adult male rats also showed higher expression of genes associated with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex compared to females. In young and adult hearts, sexual dimorphism was not noted in genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation. In old rats, however, a majority of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation had higher expression in females compared to males. Such basal differences between the sexes in cardiac expression of genes associated with energy metabolism may indicate a likely involvement of mitochondria in susceptibility to CVDs. In addition, female rats showed lower expression levels of apoptotic genes in hearts compared to males at all ages, which may have implications for better preservation of cardiac mass in females than in males.

  12. Sexual Dimorphism in the Expression of Mitochondria-Related Genes in Rat Heart at Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Vikrant; Han, Tao; Moland, Carrie L.; Kwekel, Joshua C.; Fuscoe, James C.; Desai, Varsha G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Moreover, sex and age are considered major risk factors in the development of CVDs. Mitochondria are vital for normal cardiac function, and regulation of mitochondrial structure and function may impact susceptibility to CVD. To identify potential role of mitochondria in sex-related differences in susceptibility to CVD, we analyzed the basal expression levels of mitochondria-related genes in the hearts of male and female rats. Whole genome expression profiling was performed in the hearts of young (8-week), adult (21-week), and old (78-week) male and female Fischer 344 rats and the expression of 670 unique genes related to various mitochondrial functions was analyzed. A significant (p<0.05) sexual dimorphism in expression levels of 46, 114, and 41 genes was observed in young, adult and old rats, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis revealed the influence of sex on various biological pathways related to cardiac energy metabolism at different ages. The expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism was significantly different between the sexes in young and adult rat hearts. Adult male rats also showed higher expression of genes associated with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex compared to females. In young and adult hearts, sexual dimorphism was not noted in genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation. In old rats, however, a majority of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation had higher expression in females compared to males. Such basal differences between the sexes in cardiac expression of genes associated with energy metabolism may indicate a likely involvement of mitochondria in susceptibility to CVDs. In addition, female rats showed lower expression levels of apoptotic genes in hearts compared to males at all ages, which may have implications for better preservation of cardiac mass in females than in males. PMID:25615628

  13. Tert-butylhydroquinone promotes angiogenesis and improves heart functions in rats after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan-Qian; Liu, Ning; Li, Peng; Ping, Song; Peng, Qi-Sheng; Shi, Wei-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is an increased risk of heart failure and acute myocardial infarction (MI). Tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), as an antioxidant, shows multiple cardioprotective actions including the reduction in blood pressure. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and how tBHQ improves heart functions in rats. The MI model was established in WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) by ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery. Akt phosphorylation was examined by western blot in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) or in rats. Angiogenesis was assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Heart function was determined by echocardiography. tBHQ increased Akt phosphorylation, promoted cell proliferations and migrations in HUVECs, which were abolished by Akt inhibitor wortmannin. In SHRs following MI, administration of tBHQ significantly increased Akt phosphorylation, promoted angiogenesis, reduced infarct size, and improved heart functions after 14 postoperative days. Importantly, these in vivo effects of tBHQ were ablated by wortmannin in SHRs. tBHQ via Akt activation promotes ischemia-induced angiogenesis and improves heart functions in hypertensive rats. In perspectives, the application of tBHQ should be considered in patients with ischemic diseases such as MI and stroke.

  14. Behavior of silica particles introduced into an isolated rat heart as potential drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Borak, B; Arkowski, J; Skrzypiec, M; Ziółkowski, P; Krajewska, B; Wawrzyńska, M; Grotthus, B; Gliniak, H; Szelag, A; Mazurek, W; Biały, D; Maruszewski, K

    2007-12-01

    Silica powders consisting of small spherical particles (50-200 nm) have been obtained by the sol-gel method. A suspension of such particles in the Krebs-Hanseleit solution has been introduced into the coronary circulation of a beating perfused rat heart. The influence of the suspension on the heart muscle and the coronary vessels in the rat body has been histopathologically examined. The particles have not left the lumen of the vessels and have not caused any side effects. These observations suggest the possibility of using such silica particles as a carrier for selected drugs.

  15. Age-related compensatory activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Régis; Heath, Shi-Hua D; Doneanu, Catalin E; Harris, Robert A; Hagen, Tory M

    2004-12-03

    Mitochondrial uptake and beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids are markedly impaired in the aging rat heart. While these alterations would be expected to adversely affect overall pyridine nucleotides, NADH levels do not change significantly with age. This conundrum suggests that specific compensatory mechanisms occur in the aging heart. The comparison of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) kinetics in 4- and 24- to 28-month-old F344 rats revealed a 60% significant increase in V(max) with no change in PDC expression, and a 1.6-fold decrease in the Michaelis constant (K(m)) in old compared to young rats. The observed kinetic adjustments were selective to PDC, as neither the V(max) nor K(m) of citrate synthase changed with age. PDC kinase-4 mRNA levels decreased by 57% in old vs young rat hearts and correlated with a 45% decrease in PDC phosphorylation. We conclude that PDC from old rat hearts catabolizes pyruvate more efficiently due to an adaptive change in phosphorylation.

  16. Amyloid beta peptide 22-35 induces a negative inotropic effect on isolated rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Yousefirad, Neda; Kaygısız, Ziya; Aydın, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    Evidences indicate that deposition of amyloid beta peptides (Aβs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Aβs may influence cardiovascular system and ileum contractions. But the effect of amyloid beta peptide 22-35 (Aβ22-35) on cardiovascular functions and contractions of ileum has not been studied. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the possible effects of this peptide on isolated rat heart and ileum smooth muscle. Langendorff-perfused rat heart preparations were established. The hearts were perfused under constant pressure (60 mmHg) with modified Krebs-Henseleit solution. Aβ22-35 at doses of 1, 10 and 100 nM significantly decreased left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP; an index of cardiac contractility) and maximal rate of pressure development of left ventricle (+dP/dtmax; another index of cardiac contractility). This peptide at doses studied had no significant effect on heart rate, coronary flow, monophasic action potential amplitude (MAPamp), MAP duration at 90% repolarization (MAP90) and ileum contractions. We suggest that Aβ22-35 exerts a negative inotropism on isolated rat hearts with unchanged heart rate, coronary flow, MAPamp, MAP90 and smooth muscle contractility of ileum. PMID:28078053

  17. Impairment of energy metabolism in intact residual myocardium of rat hearts with chronic myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, S; Horn, M; Naumann, A; Tian, R; Hu, K; Laser, M; Friedrich, J; Gaudron, P; Schnackerz, K; Ingwall, J S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that energy metabolism is impaired in residual intact myocardium of chronically infarcted rat heart, contributing to contractile dysfunction. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced in rats by coronary artery ligation. Hearts were isolated 8 wk later and buffer-perfused isovolumically. MI hearts showed reduced left ventricular developed pressure, but oxygen consumption was unchanged. High-energy phosphate contents were measured chemically and by 31P-NMR spectroscopy. In residual intact left ventricular tissue, ATP was unchanged after MI, while creatine phosphate was reduced by 31%. Total creatine kinase (CK) activity was reduced by 17%, the fetal CK isoenzymes BB and MB increased, while the "adult" mitochondrial CK isoenzyme activity decreased by 44%. Total creatine content decreased by 35%. Phosphoryl exchange between ATP and creatine phosphate, measured by 31P-NMR magnetization transfer, fell by 50% in MI hearts. Thus, energy reserve is substantially impaired in residual intact myocardium of chronically infarcted rats. Because phosphoryl exchange was still five times higher than ATP synthesis rates calculated from oxygen consumption, phosphoryl transfer via CK may not limit baseline contractile performance 2 mo after MI. In contrast, when MI hearts were subjected to acute stress (hypoxia), mechanical recovery during reoxygenation was impaired, suggesting that reduced energy reserve contributes to increased susceptibility of MI hearts to acute metabolic stress. PMID:7883957

  18. Hydrogen-containing saline attenuates doxorubicin-induced heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shujing; Zhu, Liqun; Yang, Jing; Fan, Zhixin; Dong, Yanli; Luan, Rui; Cai, Jingjing; Fu, Lu

    2014-08-01

    Interactions between doxorubicin (DOX) and iron generate reactive oxygen species and contribute to DOX-induced heart failure. Hydrogen, as a selective antioxidant, is a promising potential therapeutic option for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Therefore, we investigated the preventive effects of hydrogen treatment on DOX-induced heart failure in rats. We found that cardiac function was significantly improved and that the plasma levels of oxidative-stress markers and myocardial autophagic activity were decreased in animals treated with hydrogen-containing saline. Therefore, we conclude that hydrogen-containing saline may have beneficial effects for doxorubicin-induced heart failure.

  19. Metabolic adaptations of skeletal muscle to voluntary wheel running exercise in hypertensive heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Schultz, R L; Kullman, E L; Waters, R P; Huang, H; Kirwan, J P; Gerdes, A M; Swallow, J G

    2013-01-01

    The Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rat mimics the human progression of hypertension from hypertrophy to heart failure. However, it is unknown whether SHHF animals can exercise at sufficient levels to observe beneficial biochemical adaptations in skeletal muscle. Thirty-seven female SHHF and Wistar-Furth (WF) rats were randomized to sedentary (SHHFsed and WFsed) and exercise groups (SHHFex and WFex). The exercise groups had access to running wheels from 6-22 months of age. Hindlimb muscles were obtained for metabolic measures that included mitochondrial enzyme function and expression, and glycogen utilization. The SHHFex rats ran a greater distance and duration as compared to the WFex rats (P<0.05), but the WFex rats ran at a faster speed (P<0.05). Skeletal muscle citrate synthase and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase enzyme activity was not altered in the SHHFex group, but was increased (P<0.05) in the WFex animals. Citrate synthase protein and gene expression were unchanged in SHHFex animals, but were increased in WFex rats (P<0.05). In the WFex animals muscle glycogen was significantly depleted after exercise (P<0.05), but not in the SHHFex group. We conclude that despite robust amounts of aerobic activity, voluntary wheel running exercise was not sufficiently intense to improve the oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult SHHF animals, indicating an inability to compensate for declining heart function by improving peripheral oxidative adaptations in the skeletal muscle.

  20. Effect of low thyroid function on cardiac structure and function in spontaneously hypertensive heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Kisso, Bassel; Patel, Ankit; Redetzke, Rebecca; Gerdes, A Martin

    2008-03-01

    Although low thyroid function is known to have detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system, including microvascular impairment, little is known about the pathophysiologic consequences of hypothyroidism in the background of hypertension. Hypothyroidism was induced in female spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats by treatment with propylthiouracil (PTU) for 6 months. Untreated SHHF and normotensive Wistar Furth (WF) rats served as controls. In terminal experiments, heart weight, echocardiographic measurements, hemodynamics, and arteriolar morphometry were performed. Left ventricular internal diameter in systole and diastole were increased and wall thickness, ejection fraction, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and +/-dP/dt were significantly decreased in the treatment group. Surprisingly, there were no observed differences in arteriolar density among the 3 groups. As expected, PTU treatment of SHHF rats led to systolic dysfunction and chamber dilation. However, PTU treatment did not lead to arteriolar loss as previously observed in normotensive rats treated with PTU. These finding suggest that induced hypothyroidism leads to detrimental changes in SHHF rats, but the overall effects were no worse than those previously observed in normotensive rats treated with PTU.

  1. Electroacupuncture improves cardiac function and remodeling by inhibition of sympathoexcitation in chronic heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Luyao; Cui, Baiping; Shao, Yongfeng; Ni, Buqing; Zhang, Weiran; Luo, Yonggang; Zhang, Shijiang

    2014-05-15

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, mainly as a result of neurohumoral activation. Acupuncture has been used to treat a wide range of diseases and conditions. In this study, we investigated the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on the sympathetic nerve activity, heart function, and remodeling in CHF rats after ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. CHF rats were randomly selected to EA and control groups for acute and chronic experiments. In the acute experiment, both the renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex elicited by epicardial application of capsaicin were recorded. In the chronic experiment, we performed EA for 30 min once a day for 1 wk to test the long-term EA effects on heart function, remodeling, as well as infarct size in CHF rats. The results show EA significantly decreased the renal sympathetic nerve activity effectively, inhibited cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex, and lowered the blood pressure of CHF rats. Treating CHF rats with EA for 1 wk dramatically increased left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular fraction shortening, reversed the enlargement of left ventricular end-systolic dimension and left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, and shrunk the infarct size. In this experiment, we demonstrated EA attenuates sympathetic overactivity. Additionally, long-term EA improves cardiac function and remodeling and reduces infarct size in CHF rats. EA is a novel and potentially useful therapy for treating CHF.

  2. [Effect of the sharply strengthened motor activity on heart pumping ability of rats and mechanisms of its regulation].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A S; Abzalov, R A; Abzalov, N I; Vafina, E Z

    2013-08-01

    The indicators of heart pumping ability of rats at a muscular loading of the maximum power and also in the conditions of transition from sharply strengthened motor activity regime on a strengthened motor activity regime at adrenergic influence stimulation and blockade were investigated. At rats of 100-daily age at the strengthened motor activity heart rate is less, and blood stroke volume is more, than in the rats, subject to muscular loading of the maximum power. The adrenergic influence on the heart's pumping ability of sharply strengthened motor activity rats is much more, than of unlimited motor activity rats. At the α1-adrenoreceptors blockade at 100-daily rats the decreasing in intensity of muscular loading causes increased in adrenergic influence on heart pumping ability.

  3. A Tension-Based Model Distinguishes Hypertrophic versus Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Davis, L Craig; Correll, Robert N; Makarewich, Catherine A; Schwanekamp, Jennifer A; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Wang, Dan; York, Allen J; Wu, Haodi; Houser, Steven R; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Regnier, Michael; Metzger, Joseph M; Wu, Joseph C; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-05-19

    The heart either hypertrophies or dilates in response to familial mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, which are responsible for contraction and pumping. These mutations typically alter calcium-dependent tension generation within the sarcomeres, but how this translates into the spectrum of hypertrophic versus dilated cardiomyopathy is unknown. By generating a series of cardiac-specific mouse models that permit the systematic tuning of sarcomeric tension generation and calcium fluxing, we identify a significant relationship between the magnitude of tension developed over time and heart growth. When formulated into a computational model, the integral of myofilament tension development predicts hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies in mice associated with essentially any sarcomeric gene mutations, but also accurately predicts human cardiac phenotypes from data generated in induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived myocytes from familial cardiomyopathy patients. This tension-based model also has the potential to inform pharmacologic treatment options in cardiomyopathy patients.

  4. Improvement of Heart Failure by Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Razavi Tousi, Seyed Mohammad Taghi; Faghihi, Mahdieh; Nobakht, Maliheh; Molazem, Mohammad; Kalantari, Elham; Darbandi Azar, Amir; Aboutaleb, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, stem cells have been considered for the treatment of heart diseases, but no marked improvement has been recorded. This is the first study to examine the functional and histological effects of the transplantation of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs) in rats with heart failure (HF). Methods: This study was conducted in the years 2014 and 2015. 35 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into 5 equal experimental groups (7 rats each) as 1- Control 2- Heart Failure (HF) 3- Sham 4- Culture media 5- Stem Cell Transplantation (SCT). Heart failure was induced using 170 mg/kg/d of isoproterenol subcutaneously injection in 4 consecutive days. The failure confirmed by the rat cardiac echocardiography on day 28. In SCT group, 3×106 cells in 150 µl of culture media were transplanted to the myocardium. At the end, echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters together with histological evaluation were done. Results: Echocardiography results showed that cardiac ejection fraction in HF group increased from 58/73 ± 9% to 81/25 ± 6/05% in SCT group (p value < 0.001). Fraction shortening in HF group was increased from 27/53 ± 8/58% into 45/55 ± 6/91% in SCT group (p value < 0.001). Furthermore, hAMSCs therapy significantly improved mean diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, rate pressure product, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure compared to those in the HF group, with the values reaching the normal levels in the control group. A marked reduction in fibrosis tissue was also found in the SCT group (p value < 0.001) compared with the animals in the HF group. Conclusion: The transplantation of hAMSCs in rats with heart failure not only decreased the level of fibrosis but also conferred significant improvement in heart performance in terms of echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters. PMID:27956912

  5. Effect of zinc supplements in the attenuated cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning in hyperlipidemic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Sunil Kumar; Jyoti, Uma; Sharma, Samridhi; Kaura, Arun; Deshmukh, Rahul; Goyal, Sandeep

    2015-06-01

    Hyperlipidemia is regarded as independent risk factor in the development of ischemic heart disease, and it can increase the myocardial susceptibility to ischemia-/reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury. Hyperlipidemia attenuates the cardioprotective response of ischemic preconditioning (IPC). The present study investigated the effect of zinc supplements in the attenuated cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning in hyperlipidemic rat hearts. Hyperlipidemia was induced in rat by feeding high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks then the serum lipid profile was observed. In experiment, the isolated Langendorff rat heart preparation was subjected to 4 cycles of ischemic preconditioning (IPC), then 30 min of ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Myocardial infarct size was elaborated morphologically by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and biochemically by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) release from coronary effluent and left ventricular collagen content. However, the effect of zinc supplement, i.e., zinc pyrithione (10 μM) perfused during reperfusion for 120 min, significantly abrogated the attenuated cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning in hyperlipidemic rat heart whereas administration of chelator of this zinc ionophore, i.e., N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylene diamine (TPEN; 10 μM), perfused during reperfusion 2 min before the perfusion of zinc pyrithione abrogated the cardioprotective effect of zinc supplement during experiment in hyperlipidemic rat heart. Thus, the administration of zinc supplements limits the infarct size, LDH, and CK-MB and enhanced the collagen level which suggests that the attenuated cardioprotective effect of IPC in hyperlipidemic rat is due to zinc loss during reperfusion caused by ischemia/reperfusion.

  6. [Changes of cholinergic nerves and tumor necrosis factor-α in doxorubicin-induced rat failing heart].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Zeng, Jurong; Yu, Xiaojiang; Mi, Man; Hou, Jin; Sun, Lei; Li, Dongling; Zang, Weijin

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the changes of cholinergic nerves in doxorubicin (DOX)-induced rat failing heart and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the heart tissue and serum. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into control (n=10) and DOX-induced chronic heart failure (CHF) groups (n=15), and in the latter group, the rats were given intraperitoneal injections of 2.5 mg/kg DOX once a week for 6 weeks, with a total cumulative dose of 15 mg/kg. The control rats were injected with normal saline (1 ml/week). Karnovsky-Roots histochemical staining combined with point counting was used to demonstrate the distribution of cholinergic nerves in the heart. The expression levels of TNF-α in the heart tissue and serum were determined with ELISA. Positively stained cholinergic nerves were found in all the rat hearts in the two groups, but in CHF group, the point counts of cholinergic nerves were significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0.01). Compared with the control rats, those with DOX-induced CHF showed elevated levels of TNF-α both in the heart tissue and in the serum (P<0.01). In rats with DOX-induced CHF, the parasympathetic nervous system is down-regulated in the failing heart, and the diminished cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway may play an important role in the progression of CHF.

  7. Cardiotoxic effects of the Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom fractions in the isolated perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Karabuva, Svjetlana; Brizić, Ivica; Latinović, Zorica; Leonardi, Adrijana; Križaj, Igor; Lukšić, Boris

    2016-10-01

    The nose-horned viper (Vipera ammodytes ammodytes) is the most venomous European snake. Its venom is known as haematotoxic, myotoxic and neurotoxic but it exerts also cardiotoxic effects. To further explore the cardiotoxicity of the venom we separated it into four fractions by gel filtration chromatography. Three fractions that contain polypeptides (A, B, and C) were tested for their effects on isolated rat heart. Heart rate (HR), incidence of arrhythmias (atrioventricular (AV) blocks, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and asystolia), coronary flow (CF), systolic, developed and diastolic left ventricular pressure (LVP) were measured before, during, and after the application of venom fractions in three different concentrations. Fraction A, containing proteins of 60-100 kDa, displayed no effect on the rat heart. Fractions B and C disturbed heart functioning in similar way, but with different potency that was higher by the latter. This was manifested by significant decrease of HR and CF, the increase of diastolic, and the decrease of systolic and developed LVPs. All hearts treated with fraction C in the final CF concentrations 22.5 and 37.5 μg/mL suffered rapid and irreversible asystolia without AV blockade. They underwent also ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. Fraction B affected hearts only at the highest dose inducing asystolia in all hearts, ventricular fibrillation in 80% and ventricular tachycardia in 70% of the hearts. Venom fraction C induced 71% of all recorded heart rhythm disturbances, significantly more than fraction B, which induced 29%. Most abundant proteins in fraction C were secreted phospholipases A2 among which the venom component acting on the heart is most probably to be looked for. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemical sympathectomy restores baroreceptor-heart rate reflex and heart rate variability in rats with chronic nitric oxide deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chaswal, M; Das, S; Prasad, J; Katyal, A; Fahim, M

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role not only in regulation of blood pressure but also in maintenance of cardiac autonomic tone and its deficiency induced hypertension is accompanied by cardiac autonomic dysfunction. However, underlying mechanisms are not clearly defined. We hypothesized that sympathetic activation mediates hemodynamic and cardiac autonomic changes consequent to deficient NO synthesis. We used chemical sympathectomy by 6-hydroxydopamine to examine the influence of sympathetic innervation on baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and heart rate variability (HRV) of chronic N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treated adult Wistar rats. BRS was determined from heart rate responses to changes in systolic arterial pressure achieved by intravenous administration of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Time and frequency domain measures of HRV were calculated from 5-min electrocardiogram recordings. Chronic L-NAME administration (50 mg/kg per day for 7 days orally through gavage) in control rats produced significant elevation of blood pressure, tachycardia, attenuation of BRS for bradycardia and tachycardia reflex and fall in time as well as frequency domain parameters of HRV. Sympathectomy completely abolished the pressor as well as tachycardic effect of chronic L-NAME. In addition, BRS and HRV improved after removal of sympathetic influence in chronic L-NAME treated rats. These results support the concept that an exaggerated sympathetic activity is the principal mechanism of chronic L-NAME hypertension and associated autonomic dysfunction.

  9. Disease-associated changes in the expression of ion channels, ion receptors, ion exchangers and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins in heart hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Zwadlo, Carolin; Borlak, Juergen . E-mail: borlak@item.fraunhofer.de

    2005-09-15

    The molecular pathology of cardiac hypertrophy is multifactorial with transcript regulation of ion channels, ion exchangers and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins being speculative. We therefore investigated disease-associated changes in gene expression of various ion channels and their receptors as well as ion exchangers, cytoskeletal proteins and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. We also compared experimental findings with results from hypertrophic human hearts, previously published (Borlak, J., and Thum, T., 2003. Hallmarks of ion channel gene expression in end-stage heart failure. FASEB J. 17, 1592-1608). We observed significant (P < 0.05) induction in transcript level of ATP-driven ion exchangers (Atp1A1, NCX-1, SERCA2a), ion channels (L-type Ca{sup 2+}-channel, K{sub ir}3.4, Na{sub v}1.5) and RyR-2 in hypertrophic hearts, while gene expression was repressed in diseased human hearts. Further, the genes coding for calreticulin and calmodulin, PMCA 1 and 4 as well as {alpha}-skeletal actin were significantly (P < 0.05) changed in hypertrophic human heart, but were unchanged in hypertrophic left ventricles of the rat heart. Notably, transcript level of {alpha}- and {beta}-MHC, calsequestrin, K{sub ir}6.1 (in the right ventricle only), phospholamban as well as troponin T were repressed in both diseased human and rat hearts. Our study enabled an identification of disease-associated candidate genes. Their regulation is likely to be the result of an imbalance between pressure load/stretch force and vascular tonus and the observed changes may provide a rational for the rhythm disturbances observed in patients with cardiac hypertrophy.

  10. Effects of excessive long-term exercise on cardiac function and myocyte remodeling in hypertensive heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Rebecca L; Swallow, John G; Waters, Robert P; Kuzman, James A; Redetzke, Rebecca A; Said, Suleman; de Escobar, Gabriella Morreale; Gerdes, Anthony M

    2007-08-01

    The long-term effects of exercise on cardiac function and myocyte remodeling in hypertension/progression of heart failure are poorly understood. We investigated whether exercise can attenuate pathological remodeling under hypertensive conditions. Fifteen female Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure rats and 10 control rats were housed with running wheels beginning at 6 months of age. At 22 months of age, heart function of the trained rats was compared with heart function of age-matched sedentary hypertensive and control rats. Heart function was measured using echocardiography and left ventricular catheterization. Cardiac myocytes were isolated to measure cellular dimensions. Fetal gene expression was determined using Western blots. Exercise did not significantly impact myocyte remodeling or ventricular function in control animals. Sedentary hypertensive rats had significant chamber dilatation and cardiac hypertrophy. In exercised hypertensive rats, however, exercise time was excessive and resulted in a 21% increase in left ventricular diastolic dimension (P<0.001), a 24% increase in heart to body weight ratio (P<0.05), a 27% increase in left ventricular myocyte volume (P<0.01), a 13% reduction in ejection fraction (P<0.001), and a 22% reduction in fractional shortening (P<0.01) compared with sedentary hypertensive rats. Exercise resulted in greater fibrosis and did not prevent activation of the fetal gene program in hypertensive rats. We conclude that excessive exercise, in the untreated hypertensive state can have deleterious effects on cardiac remodeling and may actually accelerate the progression to heart failure.

  11. Dynamics of the formation of rhythmic activity of the heart in fetuses and newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Timopheeva, O P; Vdovichenko, N D; Kuznetsov, S V

    2012-02-01

    The development of heart activity and its relationship with respiratory and motor activities were studied in rat fetuses with preserved placental circulation on gestation days 15-20 (E15-20) and in newborn rats (P0). During the studied period, the heart rate in fetuses increased from 175.93±6.10 bpm (E15) to 271.82±5.93 bpm (E20). After birth, the heart rate decreased to 220.94±8.73 bpm. Heart rate variability in the decasecond and near-minute ranges was detected. At E16 stage it is presented by slow regular oscillations lasting for 20-35 sec with an amplitude of 10-45 msec. Comparison of functional activities of the cardiac and somatic motor systems showed that at E16, fluctuations in heart rate are independent of the bouts of motor excitation. During growing, the degree of synchronization of heart rate variability with physical activity increased. E17-18 stage is characterized by short-term episodes of heart rate deceleration associated with motor activity; their duration and amplitude did not depend much on the force of movement. At E19-20, decelerations typical of early gestation terms were replaced by acceleration-type reactions typical for mature organism, which is related to maturation of coordination function of the nervous system. In the heart rhythm, respiratory arrhythmia appears during episodes of rhythmic breathing. Newborn rats demonstrated acceleration episodes; their parameters depend on the force of motor bouts; respiratory arrhythmia was not observed.

  12. Exercise intolerance in rats with hypertensive heart disease is associated with impaired diastolic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, M; Brenner, D A; Apstein, C S; Saupe, K W

    2001-02-01

    A decrease in functional capacity is one of the most important clinical manifestations of hypertensive heart disease, but its cause is poorly understood. Our purpose was to evaluate potential causes of hypertension-induced exercise intolerance, focusing on identifying the type(s) of cardiac dysfunction associated with the first signs of exercise intolerance during the course of hypertensive heart disease. Exercise capacity was measured weekly in Dahl salt-sensitive rats as they developed hypertension as well as in Dahl salt-resistant control rats. Exercise capacity was unchanged from baseline during the first 8 weeks of hypertension, suggesting that hypertension itself did not cause exercise intolerance. After 9 to 12 weeks of hypertension, exercise capacity decreased in salt-sensitive rats but not in control rats. After 10 weeks of hypertension, indices of diastolic function (early truncation of the E wave), as assessed by echocardiography at rest, were decreased in the salt-sensitive rats. When exercise capacity had decreased by approximately 25% in a rat, the heart was isolated, and left ventricular (LV) compliance and systolic function were measured. At that time point, LV hypertrophy was modest (an approximately 20% increase in LV mass), and systolic function was normal or supernormal, indicating that exercise intolerance began during "compensated" LV hypertrophy. Passive LV compliance remained normal in salt-sensitive rats. Thus, in this model of hypertensive heart disease, exercise intolerance develops during the compensated stage of LV hypertrophy and appears to be due to changes in diastolic rather than systolic function. However, studies in which LV function is assessed during exercise are needed to conclusively define the roles of systolic and diastolic dysfunction in causing exercise intolerance.

  13. Evidence for the Primo Vascular System above the Epicardia of Rat Hearts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Lee, Jeong Yim; Kang, Dae-In; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Inhyung; Park, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Lee, Byung-Cheon

    2013-01-01

    We for the first time reported evidence for the existence of a novel network, a PVS, abovethe epicardium of the rat heart. (1) We were consecutively able to visualize the PVs and the PNs above the epicardial spaces of five rats' hearts by using Cr-Hx spraying or injection. (2) Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and toluidine blue staining of the PVs and the PNs showed that they consisted of a basophilic matrix; specifically the PNs contained several mast cells, some of which were degranulating into pericardial space. Also, 4', 6-diamidino-2 phenylindole (DAPI) images of the PVs and the PNs showed that they contained various kinds of cells. (3) Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) longitudinal image of the PVs showed that the sinuses contained many granules with high-electron-density cores in parallel with putative endothelial cells. (4) TEM images of the PNs demonstrated that they consisted of lumen-containing cells surrounded by fibers and that they had mast cells that were degranulating toward the epicardium of the rat heart. The above data suggest that mast-cells-containing novel network exists above the epicardium of the rat heart.

  14. Evidence for the Primo Vascular System above the Epicardia of Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Lee, Jeong Yim; Kang, Dae-In; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Inhyung; Park, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Lee, Byung-Cheon

    2013-01-01

    We for the first time reported evidence for the existence of a novel network, a PVS, abovethe epicardium of the rat heart. (1) We were consecutively able to visualize the PVs and the PNs above the epicardial spaces of five rats' hearts by using Cr-Hx spraying or injection. (2) Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and toluidine blue staining of the PVs and the PNs showed that they consisted of a basophilic matrix; specifically the PNs contained several mast cells, some of which were degranulating into pericardial space. Also, 4′, 6-diamidino-2 phenylindole (DAPI) images of the PVs and the PNs showed that they contained various kinds of cells. (3) Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) longitudinal image of the PVs showed that the sinuses contained many granules with high-electron-density cores in parallel with putative endothelial cells. (4) TEM images of the PNs demonstrated that they consisted of lumen-containing cells surrounded by fibers and that they had mast cells that were degranulating toward the epicardium of the rat heart. The above data suggest that mast-cells-containing novel network exists above the epicardium of the rat heart. PMID:24023576

  15. Copper Transporter 2 Content Is Lower in Liver and Heart of Copper-Deficient Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bertinato, Jesse; Duval, Sébastien; L’Abbé, Mary R.

    2010-01-01

    Copper (Cu) transporter 2 (Ctr2) is a transmembrane protein that transports Cu across cell membranes and increases cytosolic Cu levels. Experiments using cell lines have suggested that Ctr2 expression is regulated by Cu status. The importance of changes in Ctr2 expression is underscored by recent studies demonstrating that lower Ctr2 content in cells increases the cellular uptake of platinum-containing cancer drugs and toxicity to the drugs. In this study, we examined whether Ctr2 expression is altered by a nutritional Cu deficiency in vivo. Ctr2 mRNA and protein in liver and heart from rats fed a normal (Cu-N), moderately deficient (Cu-M) or deficient (Cu-D) Cu diet was measured. Rats fed the Cu-deficient diets showed a dose-dependent decrease in liver Ctr2 protein compared to Cu-N rats. Ctr2 protein was 42% and 85% lower in Cu-M and Cu-D rats, respectively. Liver Ctr2 mRNA was 50% lower in Cu-D rats and unaffected in Cu-M rats. In heart, Ctr2 protein was only lower in Cu-D rats (46% lower). These data show that Cu deficiency decreases Ctr2 content in vivo. PMID:21151468

  16. Canola oil rich in oleic acid improves diastolic heart function in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Thandapilly, Sijo Joseph; Raj, Pema; Louis, Xavier Lieben; Perera, Danielle; Yamanagedara, Prasanga; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Netticadan, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. It directly affects heart structure and function and contributes to heart failure. Diet is a major factor involved in the development of obesity along with genetic factors. We examined the effects of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich oils on cardiac structure and function in the diet-induced rodent model of obesity (DIO). Obese prone (OP) rats were fed a high-fat diet (HF; 55% of kcal) for 12 weeks; Sprague-Dawley rats fed commercial chow served as control. Echocardiography was performed to assess the cardiac structure and function in all rats at 12 weeks. OP rats fed the HF diet showed significant impairment in diastolic function compared to control rats. The HF diet containing high oleic canola oil significantly improved diastolic function of OP rats compared to the HF diet with lard. In conclusion, canola oil rich in oleic acid, when incorporated into an HF diet, prevents the development of diastolic dysfunction in DIO rats.

  17. Nicotine-induced perturbations on heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity daily rhythms in rats.

    PubMed

    Pelissier, A L; Gantenbein, M; Bruguerolle, B

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of nicotine on the daily rhythms of heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity in unrestrained rats by use of implanted radiotelemetry transmitters. The study was divided into three seven-day periods: a control period, a treatment period and a recovery period. The control period was used for baseline measurement of heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity. During the treatment period three rats received nicotine (1 mg kg(-1), s.c.) at 0900 h. Three rats received saline under the same experimental conditions. Heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity were continuously monitored and plotted every 10 min. During the three periods a power spectrum analysis was used to determine the dominant period of rhythmicity. If daily rhythms of heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity were detected, the characteristics of these rhythms, i.e. the mesors, amplitudes and acrophases, were determined by cosinor analysis, expressed as means +/- s.e.m. and compared by analysis of variance. Nicotine did not suppress daily rhythmicity but induced decreases of amplitudes and phase-advances of acrophases for heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity. These perturbations might result from the effects of nicotine on the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the hypothalamic clock that co-ordinates biological rhythms.

  18. Characterization of spinal afferent neurons projecting to different chambers of the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Guić, Maja Marinović; Kosta, Vana; Aljinović, Jure; Sapunar, Damir; Grković, Ivica

    2010-01-29

    The pattern of distribution of spinal afferent neurons (among dorsal root ganglia-DRGs) that project to anatomically and functionally different chambers of the rat heart, as well as their morphological and neurochemical characteristics were investigated. Retrograde tracing using a patch loaded with Fast blue (FB) was applied to all four chambers of the rat heart and labeled cardiac spinal afferents were characterized by using three neurochemical markers. The majority of cardiac projecting neurons were found from T1 to T4 DRGs, whereas the peak was at T2 DRG. There was no difference in the total number of FB-labeled neurons located in ipsilateral and contralateral DRGs regardless of the chambers marked with the patch. However, significantly more FB-labeled neurons projected to the ventricles compared to the atria (859 vs. 715). The proportion of isolectin B(4) binding in FB-labeled neurons was equal among all neurons projecting to different heart chambers (2.4%). Neurofilament 200 positivity was found in greater proportions in DRG neurons projecting to the left side of the heart, whereas calretinin-immunoreactivity was mostly represented in neurons projecting to the left atrium. Spinal afferent neurons projecting to different chambers of the rat heart exhibit a variety of neurochemical phenotypes depending on binding capacity for isolectin B(4) and immunoreactivity for neurofilament 200 and calretinin, and thus represent important baseline data for future studies.

  19. Regulation of L-type inward calcium channel activity by captopril and angiotensin II via the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase pathway in cardiomyocytes from volume-overload hypertrophied rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Alvin, Zikiar; Laurence, Graham G.; Coleman, Bernell R; Zhao, Aiqiu; Hajj-Moussa, Majd; Haddad, Georges E.

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure can be caused by pro-hypertrophic humoral factors such as angiotensin II (Ang II), which regulates protein kinase activities. The intermingled responses of these kinases lead to the early compensated cardiac hypertrophy, but later to the uncompensated phase of heart failure. We have shown that although beneficial, cardiac hypertrophy is associated with modifications in ion channels that are mainly mediated through mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation. This study evaluates the control of L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L) by the Ang II/PI3K pathway in hypertrophied ventricular myocytes from volume-overload rats using the perforated patch-clamp technique. To assess activation of the ICa,L in cardiomyocytes, voltages of 350 ms in 10 mV increments from a holding potential of −85 mV were applied to cardiocytes, with a pre-pulse to −45 mV for 300 ms. Volume overload-induced hypertrophy reduces ICa,L, whereas addition of Ang II alleviates the hypertrophic-induced decrease in a PI3K-dependent manner. Acute administration of Ang II (10−6 mol/L) to normal adult cardiomyocytes had no effect; however, captopril reduced their basal ICa,L. In parallel, captopril regressed the hypertrophy and inverted the Ang II effect on ICa,L seemingly through a PI3K upstream effector. Thus, it seems that regression of cardiac hypertrophy by captopril improved ICa,L partly through PI3K. PMID:21423294

  20. Long-term effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus on heart rhythm in the Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Frank C; Jacobson, Michael; Shafiullah, Mohamed; Adeghate, Ernest

    2008-03-01

    In vivo biotelemetry studies have demonstrated a variety of heart rhythm disturbances in type 1 diabetes mellitus. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat, these disturbances have included reductions in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) and an electrocardiogram that displays prolonged QRS duration and Q-T interval. The aim of this study was to investigate the chronic effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus on heart rhythm in the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat. Transmitter devices were surgically implanted in the peritoneal cavity of young male GK and age-matched Wistar control rats. Electrodes from the transmitter were arranged in Einthoven bipolar lead II configuration. Electrocardiogram, physical activity and body temperature data were recorded in rats from age 2 to 15 months. Data were acquired for 2 weeks each month. Non-fasting blood glucose, glucose tolerance and body weight were measured periodically. In GK rats, growth rate and maximal attained body weight were significantly reduced and non-fasting blood glucose was progressively increased compared with age-matched Wistar control animals. Heart rate was significantly lower in GK compared with control rats at 2, 7 and 15 months of age. At 2 months of age, HR was 316 +/- 6 beats min(-1) in GK rats compared with 370 +/- 7 beats min(-1) in Wistar control animals. There was a progressive age-dependent decline in HRV in Wistar control rats; however, HRV in GK rats did not alter significantly with age. Heart rate variability was significantly reduced in GK compared with Wistar control rats at 2 and 7 months. At 2 months of age, HRV was 28 +/- 2 beats min(-1) in GK rats compared with 38 +/- 3 beats min(-1) in Wistar control rats. Reduced HR in GK rats may be an inherited characteristic. The absence of age-dependent reductions in HRV in GK rats may be a consequence of an underlying impairment of autonomic control which manifests at early age.

  1. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-07-01

    An 18-year-old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected.She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients.

  2. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: An 18-year old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected. She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients. PMID:23456048

  3. Dexamethasone Treatment of Newborn Rats Decreases Cardiomyocyte Endowment in the Developing Heart through Epigenetic Modifications.

    PubMed

    Gay, Maresha S; Li, Yong; Xiong, Fuxia; Lin, Thant; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    The potential adverse effect of synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone therapy on the developing heart remains unknown. The present study investigated the effects of dexamethasone on cardiomyocyte proliferation and binucleation in the developing heart of newborn rats and evaluated DNA methylation as a potential mechanism. Dexamethasone was administered intraperitoneally in a three day tapered dose on postnatal day 1 (P1), 2 and 3 to rat pups in the absence or presence of a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist Ru486, given 30 minutes prior to dexamethasone. Cardiomyocytes from P4, P7 or P14 animals were analyzed for proliferation, binucleation and cell number. Dexamethasone treatment significantly increased the percentage of binucleated cardiomyocytes in the hearts of P4 pups, decreased myocyte proliferation in P4 and P7 pups, reduced cardiomyocyte number and increased the heart to body weight ratio in P14 pups. Ru486 abrogated the effects of dexamethasone. In addition, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA) blocked the effects of dexamethasone on binucleation in P4 animals and proliferation at P7, leading to recovered cardiomyocyte number in P14 hearts. 5-AZA alone promoted cardiomyocyte proliferation at P7 and resulted in a higher number of cardiomyocytes in P14 hearts. Dexamethasone significantly decreased cyclin D2, but not p27 expression in P4 hearts. 5-AZA inhibited global DNA methylation and blocked dexamethasone-mediated down-regulation of cyclin D2 in the heart of P4 pups. The findings suggest that dexamethasone acting on glucocorticoid receptors inhibits proliferation and stimulates premature terminal differentiation of cardiomyocytes in the developing heart via increased DNA methylation in a gene specific manner.

  4. Arachidonic acid incorporation and turnover is decreased in sympathetically denervated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Casey B; McHowat, Jane; Rosenberger, Thad A; Rapoport, Stanley I; Murphy, Eric J

    2005-06-01

    Heart sympathetic denervation can accompany Parkinson's disease, but the effect of this denervation on cardiac lipid-mediated signaling is unknown. To address this issue, rats were sympathetically denervated with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 50 mg/kg ip) and infused with 170 muCi/kg of either [1-(14)C]palmitic acid ([1-(14)C]16:0) or [1-(14)C]arachidonic acid ([1-(14)C]20:4 n-6), and kinetic parameters were assessed using a steady-state radiotracer model. Heart norepinephrine and epinephrine levels were decreased 82 and 85%, respectively, in denervated rats, and this correlated with a 34% reduction in weight gain in treated rats. Fatty acid tracer uptake was not significantly different between groups for either tracer, although the dilution coefficient lambda was increased in [1-(14)C]20:4 n-6-infused rats, which indicates that less 20:4 n-6 was recycled in denervated rats. In [1-(14)C]16:0-infused rats, incorporation rate and turnover values of 16:0 in stable lipid compartments were unchanged, which is indicative of preservation of beta-oxidation. In [1-(14)C]20:4 n-6-infused rats, there were dramatic reductions in incorporation rate (60-84%) and turnover value (56-85%) in denervated rats that were dependent upon the lipid compartment. In addition, phospholipase A(2) activity was reduced 40% in treated rats, which is consistent with the reduction observed in 20:4 n-6 turnover. These results demonstrate marked reductions in 20:4 n-6 incorporation rate and turnover in sympathetic denervated rats and thereby suggest an effect on lipid-mediated signal transduction mediated by a reduction in phospholipase A(2) activity.

  5. Heart rate reactivity in HAD and LAD rats during Pavlovian fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Linda M; Finn, Peter R; Steinmetz, Joseph E

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we reported that High-Alcohol-Drinking (HAD) rats exhibited selective deficits in active avoidance learning under alcohol-naive conditions, and that administration of moderate doses of alcohol (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg) facilitated learning in these rats (Blankenship et al., 2000; Rorick et al., 2003b). We hypothesized that the deficits resulted from excessive fear in the aversive learning context and that the anxiolytic properties of alcohol may have contributed to the improved learning that was observed after alcohol administration. This hypothesis was supported by a recent study in which prolonged freezing in HAD rats was seen after a classical fear conditioning procedure (Rorick et al., 2003a). To provide additional evidence that HAD rats indeed exhibit behaviors consistent with the expression of increased fear in aversive learning contexts, we employed a Pavlovian fear conditioning task to measure heart rate in HAD and Low-Alcohol-Drinking (LAD) rats. In this study, HAD (HAD-1 and HAD-2) and LAD (LAD-1 and LAD-2) rats were assigned to one of three pre-exposure conditions: Context Only, Context/Tone, or Sequential (Context Only followed by Context/Tone) Pre-Exposure. Following pre-exposure, fear conditioning acquisition and extinction procedures were identical for all groups. Results indicated that although no baseline differences were observed between HAD and LAD rats, HAD rats receiving Context-Only pre-exposure exhibited excessive heart rate reactivity to the tone conditional stimulus during fear conditioning acquisition, compared to LAD rats receiving the same pre-exposure conditions. These findings support the hypothesis that HAD rats exhibit behaviors consistent with increased fear in aversive learning contexts, as measured by autonomic conditioning.

  6. Exercise training improves renal excretory responses to acute volume expansion in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Li, Yi-Fan; Zucker, Irving H; Patel, Kaushik P

    2006-12-01

    Experiments were performed to test the postulate that exercise training (ExT) improves the blunted renal excretory response to acute volume expansion (VE), in part, by normalizing the neural component of the volume reflex typically observed in chronic heart failure (HF). Diuretic and natriuretic responses to acute VE were examined in sedentary and ExT groups of rats with either HF or sham-operated controls. Experiments were performed in anesthetized (Inactin) rats 6 wk after coronary ligation surgery. Histological data indicated that there was a 34.9 +/- 3.0% outer and 42.5 +/- 3.2% inner infarct of the myocardium in the HF group. Sham rats had no observable damage to the myocardium. In sedentary rats with HF, VE produced a blunted diuresis (46% of sham) and natriuresis (35% of sham) compared with sham-operated control rats. However, acute VE-induced diuresis and natriuresis in ExT rats with HF were comparable to sham rats and significantly higher than sedentary HF rats. Renal denervation abolished the salutary effects of ExT on renal excretory response to acute VE in HF. Since glomerular filtration rates were not significantly different between the groups, renal hemodynamic changes may not account for the blunted renal responses in rats with HF. Additional experiments confirmed that renal sympathetic nerve activity responses to acute VE were blunted in sedentary HF rats; however, ExT normalized the renal sympathoinhibition in HF rats. These results confirm an impairment of neurally mediated excretory responses to acute VE in rats with HF. ExT restored the blunted excretory responses as well as the renal sympathoinhibitory response to acute VE in HF rats. Thus the beneficial effects of ExT on cardiovascular regulation in HF may be partly due to improvement of the neural component of volume reflex.

  7. Prenatal exposure to PFOS caused mitochondia-mediated apoptosis in heart of weaned rat.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huai-Cai; He, Qing-Zhi; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Cheng-Qiu; Wu, Yi-Mou; Xu, Shun-Qing

    2015-09-01

    Perfluorooctanyl sulfonate (PFOS), a cardiac toxicity compound, has been widely detected in the environment and in organisms. However, the toxic mechanism is not clear. Our previous study indicated that prenatal PFOS exposure led to swollen mitochondrial with vacuolar structure and loss of cristae in offsping's heart. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of PFOS on the apoptosis in developing heart and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to PFOS at doses of 0.1, 0.6, and 2.0 mg/kg-d and 0.05% Tween 80 as control by gavage from gestation day 2 (GD 2) to GD 21. Apoptosis, as well as expression of apoptosis related genes associated with mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis pathway, including p53, bcl-2, bax, cytochrome c, caspase-9, and caspase-3 were analyzed in heart tissues from weaned (postnatal day 21, PND 21) offspring. The results showed that prenatal PFOS exposure resulted in apoptosis in the offspring's heart. The mRNA and protein expression levels of p53, bax, cytochrome c, caspase-9, and caspase-3 in the offspring's heart were enhanced in various PFOS-treated groups, meanwhile, the bcl-2 expression levels were decreased. Our results indicated that prenatal PFOS exposure induced the apoptosis of weaned offspring rat heart tissue via mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Gene Expression in Rat Hearts Following Oral Administration of a Single Hepatotoxic Dose of Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Kil, Hong Ryang; Park, Kwangsik; Noh, Chung Il

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Toxicity caused by acetaminophen and its toxic mechanisms in the liver have been widely studied, including effects involving metabolism and oxidative stress. However, its adverse effects on heart have not been sufficiently investigated. This study evaluated the cardiac influence and molecular events occurring within the myocardium in rats treated with a dose of acetaminophen large enough to induce conventional liver damage. Materials and Methods Male rats were orally administered a single dose of acetaminophen at 1,000 mg/kg-body weight, and subsequently examined for conventional toxicological parameters and for gene expression alterations to both the heart and liver 24 hours after administration. Results Following treatment, serum biochemical parameters including aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase were elevated. Histopathological alterations of necrosis were observed in the liver, but not in the heart. However, alterations in gene expression were observed in both the liver and heart 24 hours after dosing. Transcriptional profiling revealed that acetaminophen changed the expression of genes implicated in oxidative stress, inflammatory processes, and apoptosis in the heart as well as in the liver. The numbers of up-regulated and down-regulated genes in the heart were 271 and 81, respectively, based on a two-fold criterion. Conclusion The induced expression of genes implicated in oxidative stress and inflammatory processes in the myocardium reflects molecular levels of injury caused by acetaminophen (APAP), which could not be identified by conventional histopathology. PMID:22187249

  9. Polyol pathway and modulation of ischemia-reperfusion injury in Type 2 diabetic BBZ rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Hwang, Yuying C; Ananthakrishnan, Radha; Oates, Peter J; Guberski, Dennis; Ramasamy, Ravichandran

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of polyol pathway enzymes aldose reductase (AR) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) in mediating injury due to ischemia-reperfusion (IR) in Type 2 diabetic BBZ rat hearts. Specifically, we investigated, (a) changes in glucose flux via cardiac AR and SDH as a function of diabetes duration, (b) ischemic injury and function after IR, (c) the effect of inhibition of AR or SDH on ischemic injury and function. Hearts isolated from BBZ rats, after 12 weeks or 48 weeks diabetes duration, and their non-diabetic littermates, were subjected to IR protocol. Myocardial function, substrate flux via AR and SDH, and tissue lactate:pyruvate (L/P) ratio (a measure of cytosolic NADH/NAD+), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release (a marker of IR injury) were measured. Zopolrestat, and CP-470,711 were used to inhibit AR and SDH, respectively. Myocardial sorbitol and fructose content, and associated changes in L/P ratios were significantly higher in BBZ rats compared to non-diabetics, and increased with disease duration. Induction of IR resulted in increased ischemic injury, reduced ATP levels, increases in L/P ratio, and poor cardiac function in BBZ rat hearts, while inhibition of AR or SDH attenuated these changes and protected hearts from IR injury. These data indicate that AR and SDH are key modulators of myocardial IR injury in BBZ rat hearts and that inhibition of polyol pathway could in principle be used as a therapeutic adjunct for protection of ischemic myocardium in Type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:18957123

  10. Transient downregulation of glomerular atrial natriuretic factor receptors in high output heart failure in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gauquelin, G; Bonhomme, M C; Garcia, R

    1995-03-01

    The renal response to exogenous atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is blunted in chronic heart failure. The aim of the present studies was to investigate whether renal ANF receptor regulation in chronic heart failure is a time related event. Glomerular ANF receptors were analysed in radioligand binding experiments at 0, 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h, as well as at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after the induction of an aortocaval shunt. Rats with aortocaval shunts had lower packed cell volume and body weight and higher relative heart weight than sham operated controls. Plasma ANF C and N terminal levels were increased in shunt rats as early as 5 min after establishment of the shunt. Right and left atrial ANF concentrations were decreased and ventricular ANF concentration was increased in shunt rats at 6 and 12 h respectively. Competitive inhibition of 125I-ANF binding showed that at 6 h the density (Bmax) of glomerular ANF receptors was significantly lower than in the controls [518(SEM 10) v 759(12) fmol.mg-1 protein] without differences in their affinity (Kd). The low Bmax in shunt animals persisted at 12, 24, and 48 h, even at 1 week [Bmax: 400(29) and 713(28) fmol.mg-1 protein; Kd: 80(2) and 70(4) pM, for AC rats and controls, respectively]. Bmax values were not significantly different at 2, 4, and 8 weeks. In 24 h animals, C-ANF displaced 65% of total binding, with both total and C ANF binding sites being 38% lower in shunt animals. Downregulation of glomerular ANF receptors is a transient event during the development of high output heart failure in the rat. Thus the blunted renal response to ANF during chronic heart failure is not likely to be due to a decrease in renal ANF receptor density or affinity.

  11. Platelet deposition in rat heart allografts and the effect of a thromboxane receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Foegh, M.L.; Khirabadi, B.S.; Ramwell, P.W.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of a thromboxane antagonist, L640,035 on platelet deposition in heart allografts was studied. Twenty Lewis rats received heterotopic allografts from Lewis x Brown-Norway F1 hybrid. All recipients received azathioprine (5 mg/kg/day). The rats were divided into three groups. Groups II and III were also treated daily with either the vehicle for L640,035 or L640,035 respectively. Syngeneic indium-111-labeled platelet deposition was determined in the allograft and the native heart at 6, 9, and 13 days after transplantation; group III was studied on the sixth and ninth day only. A rapidly increasing platelet deposition was seen in allografts from rats given azathioprine; whereas the thromboxane antagonist prevented the increase in platelet deposition on the ninth day.

  12. Ultrastructural changes associated with myocardial apoptosis, in failing rat hearts induced by volume overload.

    PubMed

    Treskatsch, S; Shakibaei, M; Feldheiser, A; Shaqura, M; Dehe, L; Roepke, T K; Spies, C; Schäfer, M; Mousa, S A

    2015-10-15

    Myocardial apoptosis has been discussed to play a pivotal role in the development and progression of congestive heart failure (CHF). However, recently there is doubt on the evidence of myocardial apoptosis in heart failure as information on ultrastructural changes by electron microscopy is still scarce. This project therefore aimed to detect direct morphological evidence of myocardial apoptosis in an experimental heart failure model. Following IRB approval, an aortocaval fistula (ACF) was induced in male Wistar rats using a 16G needle. 28±2days following ACF rats were examined by hemodynamic measurements, Western blot, immunofluorescence confocal and electron microscopic analysis. Within 28±2days of ACF heart (3.8±0.1 vs. 6.6±0.3mg/g) and lung (3.7±0.2 vs. 6.9±0.5mg/g) weight indices significantly increased in the ACF group accompanied by a restriction in systolic (LVEF: 72±2 vs. 39±3%) and diastolic (dP/dtmin.: -10,435±942 vs. -5982±745mmHg/s) function (p<0.01). Activated caspase-3 was significantly increased in failing hearts concomitant with mitochondrial leakage of cytochrome c into the cytosol. Finally, electron microscopy of the left ventricle (LV) of ACF rats revealed pronounced ultrastructural changes in >70% of examined cardiomyocytes, such as nuclear chromatin condensation, myofibril loss and disarray, contour irregularities and amorphous dense bodies, mitochondriosis and damaged cell-cell-contacts between cardiomyocytes. Volume overload induced heart failure is associated with activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In addition, electron microscopy of the LV revealed direct ultrastructural evidence of extended myocardial apoptosis in ACF rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Negative Chronotropic Effect in Rat Heart Stimulated by Ultrasonic Pulses: Role of Sex and Age.

    PubMed

    Coiado, Olivia C; O'Brien, William D

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the role of sex and age of the negative chronotropic effect after exposure of 3.5-MHz pulsed ultrasound (US) to the rat heart. Forty F344 rats were exposed transthoracically to ultrasonic pulses at a duty factor of approximately 1.0% at 2.0-MPa peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. The transthoracic ultrasonic bursts were delivered consecutively in five 10-s intervals, that is, 10 s of 6-Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF), 10 s of 5-Hz PRF, 10 s of 4-Hz PRF, 10 s of 5-Hz PRF, and 10 s of 6-Hz, for a 50-s total exposure duration. The rats were divided into 8 groups (n = 5 each): US young male, control young male, US young female, control young female, US old male, control old male, US old female, and control old female. Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures was used to compare heart rate, cardiac output, arterial pressure, and other hemodynamic values (baseline) before and after US stimulation. Sex versus age versus US interaction was detected for heart rate. Cardiac output showed an age effect, and ejection fraction showed age and US effects. The arterial pressure showed a sex effect. A negative chronotropic effect (∼30% decrease in heart rate) was observed for young female rats. An hypothesis is that the US effect is weight (menopause) dependent, because the young (premenopausal) female rats weighed approximately 40 to 60% less than other groups of rats. It is likely that the ovarian hormones are responsible for different US-induced cardiac bioeffects in different ages and sexes. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  14. Chronic administration of oral vasopressin type 2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan exerts both myocardial and renal protective effects in rats with hypertensive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Morooka, Hanako; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Tamaki, Yodo; Takase, Toru; Akahoshi, Yasumitsu; Nakano, Yoshimasa; Fujiki, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2012-07-01

    Although recent clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of the oral vasopressin (AVP) type 2 receptor (V2R) antagonist tolvaptan, its long-term effects on the myocardium and kidney in heart failure (HF) are not clear. We examined the chronic effects of tolvaptan administration on both the myocardium and kidney in a rat hypertensive HF model. Not only circulating AVP level but also myocardial AVP and V1a receptor (V1aR) expressions, renal V1aR, and V2R expressions were significantly upregulated during the transition to HF. The animals were chronically treated with low-dose or high-dose (HD) tolvaptan or vehicle from the left ventricular (LV) hypertrophic stage. Chronic tolvaptan treatment persistently increased urine volume but did not affect blood pressure. In the HD group, the animal survival significantly improved (log-rank test, P<0.01). At the HF stage, the progression of LV dysfunction was prevented and lung congestion was suppressed. Activation of atrial natriuretic peptide, endothelin-1, AVP, and V1aR mRNA levels were significantly suppressed in the LV myocardium. Meanwhile, renal histopathologic damage was ameliorated and renal function was improved in the HD group at the HF stage. Concomitantly, not only activation of aquaporin-2 but also those of V2R, V1aR, renin, and endothelin-1 in the kidney were significantly suppressed (all P<0.05). These results indicate that chronic tolvaptan treatment has beneficial effects by preventing not only the progression of LV dysfunction but also that of renal injury in hypertensive rats with HF. The underlying mechanism may be related to the suppression of myocardial and renal neurohumoral activation.

  15. Living with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Subasic, Kim

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an insider's account of what it is like to live with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic cardiovascular illness that carries the risk for sudden cardiac death. This study aims to reveal how HCM impacts the family and guides the decision whether or not to pursue genetic testing, how the physical limitations associated with HCM alter being-in-the-world, and how HCM alters social relationships. Fifteen adults with HCM were recruited for a longitudinal, phenomenological, qualitative study through purposive sampling and word of mouth. A total of 45 interviews were conducted by the researcher at a time and place designated by the participant between August 2011 and January 2012. The first interview with each participant was conducted in person. While efforts were made to conduct all interviews in person, a total of three interviews were conducted by telephone as requested by three participants due to scheduling conflicts. Through methods of interpretive phenomenology, three audio-recorded, semistructured interviews occurred over the course of 3 months. Detailed narratives were solicited and transcribed verbatim. Methodological and analytical documentation was supported with the identification of key phrases, similar experiences, themes, and documentation of the rationale for decisions throughout the research process. Participation in genetic testing carries a multitude of personal, familial, financial, and emotional implications. The results of a genetic test elicited an emotional response regardless of whether the results were negative, positive, or inconclusive. Living with a potentially life-threatening illness altered identity, disrupted social relationships, and generated chronic fear and uncertainty. A new normal was re-ordered or transformed by the demands and limitations posed by HCM, and by the person's concerns, priorities, and the meaning of the illness. Results from this study underscore the need for healthcare

  16. Severe Calorie Restriction Reduces Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Protects Rat Hearts from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Dirceu S.; Costa-Pereira, Liliane V.; Santos, Carina S.; Mendes, Bruno F.; Costa, Karine B.; Santos, Cynthia Fernandes F.; Rocha-Vieira, Etel; Magalhães, Flávio C.; Esteves, Elizabethe A.; Ferreira, Anderson J.; Guatimosim, Sílvia; Dias-Peixoto, Marco F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Recent studies have proposed that if a severe caloric restriction (SCR) is initiated at the earliest period of postnatal life, it can lead to beneficial cardiac adaptations later on. We investigated the effects of SCR in Wistar rats from birth to adult age on risk factors for cardiac diseases (CD), as well as cardiac function, redox status, and HSP72 content in response to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Methods and Results: From birth to the age of 3 months, CR50 rats were fed 50% of the food that the ad libitum group (AL) was fed. Food intake was assessed daily and body weight were assessed weekly. In the last week of the SCR protocol, systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured and the double product index was calculated. Also, oral glucose and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests were performed. Thereafter, rats were decapitated, visceral fat was weighed, and blood and hearts were harvested for biochemical, functional, tissue redox status, and western blot analyzes. Compared to AL, CR50 rats had reduced the main risk factors for CD. Moreover, the FR50 rats showed increased cardiac function both at baseline conditions (45% > AL rats) and during the post-ischemic period (60% > AL rats) which may be explained by a decreased cardiac oxidative stress and increased HSP72 content. Conclusion: SCR from birth to adult age reduced risk factors for CD, increased basal cardiac function and protected hearts from the I/R, possibly by a mechanism involving ROS. PMID:27092082

  17. Lysophosphatidic Acid Pretreatment Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in the Immature Hearts of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haibo; Liu, Si; Liu, Xuewen; Yang, Jinjing; Wang, Fang; Cong, Xiangfeng; Chen, Xi

    2017-01-01

    The cardioprotection of the immature heart during cardiac surgery remains controversial due to the differences between the adult heart and the newborn heart. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small bioactive molecule with diverse functions including cell proliferation and survival via its receptor: LPA1–LPA6. We previously reported that the expressions of LPA1 and LPA3 in rat hearts were much higher in immature hearts and then declined rapidly with age. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether LPA signaling plays a potential protective role in immature hearts which had experienced ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The results showed that in Langendorff-perfused immature rat hearts (2 weeks), compared to I/R group, LPA pretreatment significantly enhanced the cardiac function, attenuated myocardial infarct size and CK-MB release, decreased myocardial apoptosis and increased the expression of pro-survival signaling molecules. All these effects could be abolished by Ki16425, an antagonist to LPA1 and LPA3. Similarly, LPA pretreatment protected H9C2 from hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) induced apoptosis and necrosis in vitro. The mechanisms underlying the anti-apoptosis effects were related to activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinas B (AKT) signaling pathways as well as phosphorylation of the downstream effector of AKT, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), through LPA1 and/or LPA3. What's more, we found that LPA preconditioning increased glucose uptake of H9C2 subjected to H/R by the activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) but not the translocation of GLUT4. In conclusion, our study indicates that LPA is a potent survival factor for immature hearts against I/R injuries and has the potential therapeutic function as a cardioplegia additive for infantile cardiac surgery. PMID:28377726

  18. Is rate–pressure product of any use in the isolated rat heart? Assessing cardiac ‘effort’ and oxygen consumption in the Langendorff‐perfused heart

    PubMed Central

    Aksentijević, Dunja; Lewis, Hannah R.

    2016-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? Rate–pressure product (RPP) is commonly used as an index of cardiac ‘effort’. In canine and human hearts (which have a positive force–frequency relationship), RPP is linearly correlated with oxygen consumption and has therefore been widely adopted as a species‐independent index of cardiac work. However, given that isolated rodent hearts demonstrate a negative force–frequency relationship, its use in this model requires validation. What is the main finding and its importance? Despite its widespread use, RPP is not correlated with oxygen consumption (or cardiac ‘effort’) in the Langendorff‐perfused isolated rat heart. This lack of correlation was also evident when perfusions included a range of metabolic substrates, insulin or β‐adrenoceptor stimulation. Langendorff perfusion of hearts isolated from rats and mice has been used extensively for physiological, pharmacological and biochemical studies. The ability to phenotype these hearts reliably is, therefore, essential. One of the commonly used indices of function is rate–pressure product (RPP); a rather ill‐defined index of ‘work’ or, more correctly, ‘effort’. Rate–pressure product, as originally described in dog or human hearts, was shown to be correlated with myocardial oxygen consumption (MV˙O2). Despite its widespread use, the application of this index to rat or mouse hearts (which, unlike the dog or human, have a negative force–frequency relationship) has not been characterized. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between RPP and MV˙O2 in Langendorff‐perfused rat hearts. Paced hearts (300–750 beats min−1) were perfused either with Krebs–Henseleit (KH) buffer (11 mm glucose) or with buffer supplemented with metabolic substrates and insulin. The arteriovenous oxygen consumption (MV˙O2) was recorded. Metabolic status was assessed using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and lactate efflux

  19. Is rate-pressure product of any use in the isolated rat heart? Assessing cardiac 'effort' and oxygen consumption in the Langendorff-perfused heart.

    PubMed

    Aksentijević, Dunja; Lewis, Hannah R; Shattock, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Rate-pressure product (RPP) is commonly used as an index of cardiac 'effort'. In canine and human hearts (which have a positive force-frequency relationship), RPP is linearly correlated with oxygen consumption and has therefore been widely adopted as a species-independent index of cardiac work. However, given that isolated rodent hearts demonstrate a negative force-frequency relationship, its use in this model requires validation. What is the main finding and its importance? Despite its widespread use, RPP is not correlated with oxygen consumption (or cardiac 'effort') in the Langendorff-perfused isolated rat heart. This lack of correlation was also evident when perfusions included a range of metabolic substrates, insulin or β-adrenoceptor stimulation. Langendorff perfusion of hearts isolated from rats and mice has been used extensively for physiological, pharmacological and biochemical studies. The ability to phenotype these hearts reliably is, therefore, essential. One of the commonly used indices of function is rate-pressure product (RPP); a rather ill-defined index of 'work' or, more correctly, 'effort'. Rate-pressure product, as originally described in dog or human hearts, was shown to be correlated with myocardial oxygen consumption (MV̇O2). Despite its widespread use, the application of this index to rat or mouse hearts (which, unlike the dog or human, have a negative force-frequency relationship) has not been characterized. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between RPP and MV̇O2 in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Paced hearts (300-750 beats min(-1)) were perfused either with Krebs-Henseleit (KH) buffer (11 mm glucose) or with buffer supplemented with metabolic substrates and insulin. The arteriovenous oxygen consumption (MV̇O2) was recorded. Metabolic status was assessed using (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and lactate efflux. Experiments were repeated in the presence of

  20. Atrophy, hypertrophy, and hypoxemia induce transcriptional regulators of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Razeghi, Peter; Baskin, Kedryn K; Sharma, Saumya; Young, Martin E; Stepkowski, Stanislaw; Essop, M Faadiel; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2006-04-07

    In skeletal muscle, transcript levels of proteins regulating the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) increase with atrophy and decrease with hypertrophy. Whether the same is true for heart muscle is not known. We set out to characterize the transcriptional profile of regulators of the UPS during atrophy-, hypertrophy-, and hypoxia-induced remodeling of the heart. Cardiac atrophy was induced by heterotopic transplantation of the rat heart. Left ventricular hypertrophy was induced by banding of the ascending aorta in rats. To study the effects of hypoxemia on the left ventricle, rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia. Transcript levels of six known regulators of the UPS, ubiquitin B (UbB), the ubiquitin conjugating enzymes UbcH2 and E2-14kDa, the ubiquitin ligases Mafbx/Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, and the proteasomal subunit PSMB4 were measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Unloading-induced atrophy increased mRNA levels of UbB and decreased levels of both ubiquitin ligases. Transcript levels of all UPS genes investigated increased in the hypertrophied and hypoxic heart (with the exception of E2-14kDa). Cardiac atrophy, hypertrophy, and hypoxemia all increase myocardial UbB expression, suggesting that UbB is a transcriptional marker for load-induced and hypoxia-mediated cardiac remodeling.

  1. Cardioprotective properties of citicoline against hyperthyroidism-induced reperfusion damage in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Pavón, Natalia; Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; González-Pacheco, Héctor; Belmont, Javier; Chávez, Edmundo

    2015-06-01

    Hyperthyroidism represents an increased risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity, especially when the heart is subjected to an ischemia/reperfusion process. The aim of this study was to explore the possible protective effect of the nucleotide citicoline on the susceptibility of hyperthyroid rat hearts to undergo reperfusion-induced damage, which is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Hence, we analyzed the protective effect of citicoline on the electrical behavior and on the mitochondrial function in rat hearts. Hyperthyroidism was established after a daily i.p. injection of triiodothyronine (at 2 mg/kg of body weight) during 5 days. Thereafter, citicoline was administered i.p. (at 125 mg/kg of body weight) for 5 days. In hyperthyroid rat hearts, citicoline protected against reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias. Moreover, citicoline maintained the accumulation of mitochondrial Ca(2+), allowing mitochondria to reach a high transmembrane electric gradient that protected against the release of cytochrome c. It also preserved the activity of the enzyme aconitase that inhibited the release of cytokines. The protection also included the inhibition of oxidative stress-induced mDNA disruption. We conclude that citicoline protects against the reperfusion damage that is found in the hyperthyroid myocardium. This effect might be due to its inhibitory action on the permeability transition in mitochondria.

  2. Hydrogen sulfide post-conditioning preserves interfibrillar mitochondria of rat heart during ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Banu, Shakila A; Ravindran, Sriram; Kurian, Gino A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction is considered to be the main manifestation in the pathology of ischemia reperfusion injury, and by restoring its functional activity, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel endogenous gaseotransmitter renders cardioprotection. Given that interfibrillar (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria are the two main types in the heart, the present study investigates the specific H2S-mediated action on IFM and SSM during ischemic reperfusion in the Langendorff rat heart model. Rats were randomly divided into five groups, namely normal, ischemic control, reperfusion control (I/R), ischemic post-conditioning (POC), and H2S post-conditioning (POC_H2S). In reperfusion control, cardiac contractility decreased, and lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and infracted size increased compared to both normal and ischemic group. In hearts post-conditioned with H2S and the classical method improved cardiac mechanical function and decreased cardiac markers in the perfusate and infarct size significantly. Both POC and POC_H2S exerts its cardioprotective effect of preserving the IFM, as evident by significant improvement in electron transport chain enzyme activities and mitochondrial respiration. The in vitro action of H2S on IFM and SSM from normal and I/R rat heart supports H2S and mediates cardioprotection via IFM preservation. Our study indicates that IFM play an important role in POC_H2S mediated cardioprotection from reperfusion injury.

  3. Patterns of heart rate responses to hydralazine in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H

    1996-01-01

    Hydralazine (H) induces hypotension accompanied by cardiac stimulation due to activation of the arterial baroreflex. Both clinical and experimental observations suggest, however, that in certain conditions H hypotension can be accompanied by unchanged or even depressed cardiac performance. The present study determined whether varying patterns of heart rate responses could be detected in large populations of conscious normotensive (n = 61) and renal hypertensive (n = 59) rats receiving a single dose of H. These patterns were compared with those of normotensive pentobarbital-anesthetized rats (n = 43). In the three groups, hypotension was accompanied by either tachycardia, unchanged heart rate or bradycardia. Tachycardia was found in 52% of normotensive conscious rats, in 51% of hypertensives and in only 14% of anesthetized animals. Heart rate did not change in 26, 35 and 23%, while bradycardia was detected in 22, 14 and 63%, respectively. These results were explained by postulating the initiation by H of two reflexes with opposite effects on heart rate: the arterial baroreflex producing tachycardia and a cardiac mechanoreceptor reflex producing bradycardia. These reactions would compete with each other, with results depending on their relative sensitivity in a given animal.

  4. In vitro influence of ascorbate on lipid peroxidation in rat testis and heart microsomes.

    PubMed

    Melin, A M; Peuchant, E; Perromat, A; Clerc, M

    1997-04-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LPO) in rat testis and heart microsomes was compared using the ADP/Fe2+ as initiator with and without ascorbate at different concentrations. The extent of LPO was estimated by the levels of TBARS and PUFA. Without ascorbate, LPO was higher in heart than in testis despite elevated levels of catalase in heart. With increased ascorbate concentrations, a biphasic effect of LPO was observed. For a concentration < or = 0.2 mM, ascorbate acted as pro-oxidant and increased TBARS correlated with decreased PUFA were observed both in testis and heart. Above 0.2 mM, ascorbate acts as antioxidant but differences in the rate of LPO were observed. In heart decreased TBARS correlated with increased PUFA whereas in testis TBARS only decreased, PUFA were not significantly modified. These results suggest different mechanisms in LPO initiation in the two organs. Increasing concentrations of H2O2 produced directly elevated TBARS levels in testis while a lag phase was observed in heart before the increase, suggesting that H2O2 was the essential ROS produced by ascorbate-ADP/Fe2+. The effects of scavengers such as catalase and ethanol showed an inhibitory effect on TBARS production only in testis, suggesting the role of H2O2/OH. as an initiator of LPO. In heart, catalase produced a slight increase in TBARS levels whereas no modification was observed with ethanol, suggesting a possible direct activation by ADP/Fe2+ through a metal-oxo intermediate.

  5. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O; Orlikowski, D; Annane, D

    2008-07-21

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spinocerebellar degeneration. It is caused by a mutation that consists of an unstable expansion of GAA repeats in the first intron of the gene encoding frataxin on chromosome 9 (9q13). We reported a case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia in a twenty year old patient.

  6. The Protection of Salidroside of the Heart against Acute Exhaustive Injury and Molecular Mechanism in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunru; Xu, Peng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Haiyan; Zhou, Yuwen; Cao, Xuebin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the protection of salidroside of the heart against acute exhaustive injury and its mechanism of antioxidative stress and MAPKs signal transduction. Method. Adult male SD rats were divided into four groups randomly. Cardiomyocytes ultrastructure was observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The contents of CK, CK-MB, LDH, MDA, and SOD were determined by ELISA method, and the phosphorylation degrees of ERK and p38 MAPK were assayed by Western blotting. Cardiac function of isolated rat heart ischemia/reperfusion was detected by Langendorff technique. Results. Salidroside reduced the myocardium ultrastructure injury caused by exhaustive swimming, decreased the contents of CK, CK-MB, and LDH, improved the LVDP, ±LV dp/dt max under the basic condition, reduced the content of MDA and the phosphorylation degree of p38 MAPK, and increased the content of SOD and the phosphorylation degree of ERK in acute exhaustive rats. Conclusion. Salidroside has the protection of the heart against acute exhaustive injury. The cardioprotection is mainly mediated by antioxidative stress and MAPKs signal transduction through reducing the content of MDA, increasing the content of SOD, and increasing p-ERK and decreasing p-p38 protein expressions in rat myocardium, which might be the mechanisms of the cardioprotective effect of salidroside. PMID:24454984

  7. Effects of olmesartan therapy on the expression of lung adrenoceptors in rats with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Y F; Jiang, Z L; Cao, F F; Liu, F

    2015-03-01

    Adrenergic receptors (AR) play important roles in regulating lung function. However, there are few reports concerning AR expression and the protective effect of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) on the lung in chronic heart failure (CHF). In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of the ARB olmesartan on the lung in CHF. Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal control, sham-operated rats, rats with CHF induced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary arteries, and rats with CHF treated with olmesartan (1 mg/kg) once daily for 8 weeks. Heart function, plasma renin activity (PRA) and angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, lung microscopic structure inspection and mRNA and protein expressions of α1A-, β1- and β2-AR in lung were tested. Compared with the CHF group, PRA and Ang II levels were decreased while heart function and mRNA and protein expression of α1A-AR, β1-AR and β2-AR were up-regulated in the olmesartan group (p<0.05 or p<0.01). The inflammation and cell proliferation in CHF lung tissue were reduced in the olmesartan group. Olmesartan may play a beneficial role in protecting lung in CHF by up-regulating AR and decreasing levels of PRA and Ang II. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Effect of ghrelin on aldolase gene expression in the heart of chronic hypoxic rat.

    PubMed

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia causes apoptosis of cardiac myocytes, however, energy production by anaerobic glycolysis protects myocardium against hypoxia injuries. Aldolase A is a well-characterised key enzyme of the glycolysis pathway. Ghrelin, a 28-amino-acid peptide, synthesizes in the stomach and has protective roles in cardiovascular systems and also affects metabolic pathways. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on aldolase A gene expression after chronic hypoxia in the rat hearts. Twenty four adult male wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. Hypoxic rats with saline or ghrelin treatment were placed in a normobaric hypoxic chamber (O2 11 %), for two weeks. Controls remained in room air. Aldolase A gene expression was measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. the transcriptiom rate of Aldolase A in hypoxic animals did not change significantly compared to negative control ones. During chronic hypoxia, ghrelin treatment increased the amount of heart Aldolase A gene expression compared to negative controls (P = 0.029). Hypoxic animals that were treated with ghrelin were significantly more polycythemic than the controls and even hypoxic with saline treated rats (P < 0.001). It seems that ghrelin interferes in the cardiac metabolism through upregulation of glycolytic enzymes. In other words, it may protect heart from possible hypoxia induced damages.

  9. Effect of Ghrelin on Aldolase Gene Expression in the Heart of Chronic Hypoxic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic hypoxia causes apoptosis of cardiac myocytes, however, energy production by anaerobic glycolysis protects myocardium against hypoxia injuries. Aldolase A is a well-characterised key enzyme of the glycolysis pathway. Ghrelin, a 28-amino-acid peptide, synthesizes in the stomach and has protective roles in cardiovascular systems and also affects metabolic pathways. Objectives Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on aldolase A gene expression after chronic hypoxia in the rat hearts. Materials and Methods Twenty four adult male wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. Hypoxic rats with saline or ghrelin treatment were placed in a normobaric hypoxic chamber (O2 11 %), for two weeks. Controls remained in room air. Aldolase A gene expression was measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. Results the transcriptiom rate of Aldolase A in hypoxic animals did not change significantly compared to negative control ones. During chronic hypoxia, ghrelin treatment increased the amount of heart Aldolase A gene expression compared to negative controls (P = 0.029). Hypoxic animals that were treated with ghrelin were significantly more polycythemic than the controls and even hypoxic with saline treated rats (P < 0.001). Conclusions It seems that ghrelin interferes in the cardiac metabolism through upregulation of glycolytic enzymes. In other words, it may protect heart from possible hypoxia induced damages. PMID:23843819

  10. Abolition of reperfusion-induced arrhythmias in hearts from thiamine-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Fernando A; Guatimosim, Silvia; Castro, Carlos H; Galan, Diogo T; Lauton-Santos, Sandra; Ribeiro, Angela M; Almeida, Alvair P; Cruz, Jader S

    2007-07-01

    Extensive work has been done regarding the impact of thiamine deprivation on the nervous system. In cardiac tissue, chronic thiamine deficiency is described to cause changes in the myocardium that can be associated with arrhythmias. However, compared with the brain, very little is known about the effects of thiamine deficiency on the heart. Thus this study was undertaken to explore whether thiamine deprivation has a role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. We examined hearts isolated from thiamine-deprived and control rats. We measured heart rate, diastolic and systolic tension, and contraction and relaxation rates. Whole cell voltage clamp was performed in rat isolated cardiac myocytes to measure L-type Ca(2+) current. In addition, we investigated the global intracellular calcium transients by using confocal microscopy in the line-scan mode. The hearts from thiamine-deficient rats did not degenerate into ventricular fibrillation during 30 min of reperfusion after 15 min of coronary occlusion. The antiarrhythmogenic effects were characterized by the arrhythmia severity index. Our results suggest that hearts from thiamine-deficient rats did not experience irreversible arrhythmias. There was no change in L-type Ca(2+) current density. Inactivation kinetics of this current in Ca(2+)-buffered cells was retarded in thiamine-deficient cardiac myocytes. The global Ca(2+) release was significantly reduced in thiamine-deficient cardiac myocytes. The amplitude of caffeine-releasable Ca(2+) was lower in thiamine-deficient myocytes. In summary, we have found that thiamine deprivation attenuates the incidence and severity of postischemic arrhythmias, possibly through a mechanism involving a decrease in global Ca(2+) release.

  11. Angiotensin converting enzyme binding sites in human heart and lung: comparison with rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Vago, T.; Bevilacqua, M.; Conci, F.; Baldi, G.; Ongini, E.; Chebat, E.; Monopoli, A.; Norbiato, G.

    1992-01-01

    1. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase which catalyzes the final activation step in the formation of angiotensin II, was identified by radioligand studies in rat heart and lung. In this work we identified ACE binding sites in human left ventricle and lung by radioligand binding using the ACE inhibitor [3H]-ramiprilat in all tissues tested was saturable, temperature and zinc-dependent, and inhibited by EDTA. In human left ventricle homogenate we found a density of binding sites of 121 +/- 15 fmol mg-1 protein (n = 4) with an affinity (Kd) of 850 +/- 55 pM, whereas in rat left ventricle the same values were 23 +/- 4 fmol mg-1 protein and 315 +/- 30 pM, (n = 4), respectively. 3. [3H]-ramiprilat binding to rat (n = 4) and human lung (n = 4) showed a binding site density of 2132 +/- 155 and 1085 +/- 51 fmol mg-1 protein respectively with an affinity of 639 +/- 54 and 325 +/- 22 pM. The lung:heart ratio of ACE binding site density was about 9:1 in man and 100:1 in rat. 4. The binding affinities of 13 ACE inhibitors were evaluated on human heart and lung: the drugs tested showed a wide range of affinities for the ACE binding sites in both tissues, and the affinity for lung was significantly greater than for heart for most of the drugs. 5. The greater potency of some ACE inhibitors in displacing [3H]-ramiprilat in human lung compared with the heart indicates differences between ACE binding sites in these tissues and suggests the possibility of a selective organ-targeted therapeutic approach. PMID:1335341

  12. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of nuclear urotensin-II binding sites in rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Doan, ND; Nguyen, TTM; Létourneau, M; Turcotte, K; Fournier, A; Chatenet, D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE During the past decade, a few GPCRs have been characterized at the nuclear membrane where they exert complementary physiological functions. In this study, we investigated (1) the presence of a functional urotensin-II (U-II) receptor (UT) in rat heart nuclear extracts and (2) the propensity of U-II and U-II-related peptide (URP) to cross the plasma membrane in a receptor-independent manner. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Biochemical and pharmacological methods including competitive binding assays, photoaffinity labelling, immunoblotting as well as de novo RNA synthesis were used to characterize the presence of functional UT receptors in rat heart nuclei. In addition, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis were used to investigate the cellular uptake of fluorescent U-II and URP derivatives. KEY RESULTS The presence of specific U-II binding sites was demonstrated in rat heart nuclear extracts. Moreover, such subcellular localization was also observed in monkey heart extracts. In vitro transcription initiation assays on rat, freshly isolated, heart nuclei suggested that nuclear UT receptors are functional, and that U-II, but not URP, participates in nuclear UT-associated gene expression. Surprisingly, hU-II and URP efficiently crossed the plasma membrane in a receptor-independent mechanism involving endocytosis through caveolin-coated pits; this uptake of hU-II, but not that of URP, was dependent on extracellular pH. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that (1) U-II and URP can differentially modulate nuclear UT functions such as gene expression, and (2) both ligands can reach the internal cellular space through a receptor-independent mechanism. PMID:22044114

  13. Studies on Pentoxifylline and Tocopherol Combination for Radiation-Induced Heart Disease in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hui; Xiong Mai; Xia Yunfei; Cui Nianji; Lu Rubiao; Deng Ling; Lin Yuehao; Rong Tiehua

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the application of pentoxifylline (PTX) and tocopherol l (Vit. E) could modify the development of radiation-induced heart disease and downregulate the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}1mRNA in rats. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into four groups: control group, irradiated group, experimental group 1, and experiment group 2. Supplementation was started 3 days before irradiation; in experimental group 1, injection of PTX (15 mg/kg/d) and Vit. E (5.5 mg/kg/d) continued till the 12th week postirradiation, whereas in experimental group 2 it was continued until the 24th week postirradiation. All rats were administrated a single dose of 20 Gy irradiation to the heart except the control group. Histopathologic evaluation was performed at various time points (Days 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 and 24th week) up to 24 weeks after irradiation. Changes of levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were also investigated at the same time points using competitive polymerase chain reaction. Results: Compared with the irradiated group, levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA of the rat hearts were relatively low in the two experimental groups on the 12th week postirradiation. In experimental group 1, there was a rebound expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA on the 24th week postirradiation, whereas that of the experimental group 2 remained low (p < 0.05). The proportions of collagen fibers of the two experimental groups were lower than that of irradiated group (p < 0.05). A rebound could be observed in the experimental group 1. Conclusion: PTX and Vit. E downregulated the expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA. The irradiated rat hearts showed a marked pathologic response to the drugs. The withdrawal of drugs in the 12th week postirradiation could cause rebound effects of the development of fibrosis.

  14. [Testosterone therapy improves cardiac function of male rats with right heart failure].

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Bin; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ju-Xiang; Chen, Xun-Min; Jiang, Shi-Sen

    2009-11-01

    Clinical studies have shown decreased levels of sexual hormones, particularly testosterone deficiency, in men with chronic heart failure (CHF). The authors aimed to investigate the effect of testosterone on cardiac function and the possible mechanism of androgen protecting the heart in male rats. Forty-three male SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: right heart failure (RHF, n = 15), physiologic testosterone treatment (TT, n = 15) and control (n = 13). The RHF group was given intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline at 60 mg/kg to make RHF models; the TT group was injected with testosterone at 5 mg/kg 3 days after monocrotaline administration; and the control group received equal volume of saline. The CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood of each rat were counted by flow cytometry. The levels of serum testosterone and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The hearts, lungs and livers of all the surviving rats were excised at 6 weeks for pathological and immunohistochemical examinations. The level of serum testosterone was gradually decreased, while that of TNF-alpha obviously increased in the RHF group. After testosterone treatment, the TT group showed a remarkable improvement of cardiac performance and a significant decrease in the level of serum TNF-alpha as compared with the RHF group. Statistically significant differences were observed neither in the CD34+ cell count in the peripheral blood nor in the CD34+ expression of the myocardial cells between the TT and RHF groups. Physiological supplementation of testosterone can improve the cardiac function of RHF male rats, probably through its inhibition of TNF-alpha rather than by autologous mobilization of bone marrow stem cells.

  15. Enhanced phosphodiesteratic breakdown and turnover of phosphoinositides during reperfusion of ischemic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Otani, H; Prasad, M R; Engelman, R M; Otani, H; Cordis, G A; Das, D K

    1988-11-01

    In this study, we examined phosphoinositide metabolism during ischemia and reperfusion using an isolated and perfused rat heart. When myocardial phosphoinositides were prelabeled with [3H]inositol, reperfusion after 30 minutes of normothermic global ischemia resulted in significant accumulations of radiolabeled inositol phosphate, inositol bisphosphate, and inositol trisphosphate. Isotopic incorporation of [3H]inositol into phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate, and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate was increased significantly in the heart reperfused with [3H]inositol after 30 minutes of ischemia compared with that perfused with [3H]inositol after 30 minutes of nonischemic perfusion. However, isotopic incorporation of [3H]glycerol into diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, and all of the three phosphoinositides was diminished in the reperfused hearts. Reperfusion of the ischemic heart prelabeled with [14C]arachidonic acid resulted in significant increases in [14C]diacylglycerol and [14C]phosphatidic acid. The enhanced accumulations of [3H]inositol phosphates during reperfusion were not affected by treatment with prazosin plus atropine or indomethacin, but were inhibited by hypoxic reperfusion, reperfusion with Ca2+-free buffer, or by mepacrine. These results suggest that myocardial reperfusion stimulates phosphodiesteratic breakdown and turnover of phosphoinositides, and increased Ca2+ influx caused by reperfusion may be involved in the mechanism of stimulation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C activity in the rat heart.

  16. Insulin resistance improves metabolic and contractile efficiency in stressed rat heart.

    PubMed

    Harmancey, Romain; Lam, Truong N; Lubrano, Genna M; Guthrie, Patrick H; Vela, Deborah; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2012-08-01

    Insulin resistance is a prominent feature in heart failure, while hyperglycemia impairs cardiac contraction. We propose that decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake by the heart preserves cardiac function in response to metabolic and hemodynamic stress. To test this hypothesis, we fed rats a high-sucrose diet (HSD). Energy substrate metabolism and cardiac work were determined ex vivo in a sequential protocol simulating metabolic and hemodynamic stress. Compared to chow-fed, control rats, HSD impaired myocardial insulin responsiveness and induced profound metabolic changes in the heart, characterized by reduced rates of glucose uptake (7.91 ± 0.30 vs. 10.73 ± 0.67 μmol/min/g dry weight; P<0.001) but increased rates of glucose oxidation (2.38 ± 0.17 vs. 1.50 ± 0.15 μmol/min/g dry weight; P<0.001) and oleate oxidation (2.29 ± 0.11 vs. 1.96 ± 0.12 μmol/min/g dry weight; P<0.05). Tight coupling of glucose uptake and oxidation and improved cardiac efficiency were associated with a reduction in glucose 6-phosphate and oleoyl-CoA levels, as well as a reduction in the content of uncoupling protein 3. Our results suggest that insulin resistance lessens fuel toxicity in the stressed heart. This calls for a new exploration of the mechanisms regulating substrate uptake and oxidation in the insulin-resistant heart.

  17. Effects of dietary magnesium on sodium-potassium pump action in the heart of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.W.; Giroux, A.

    1987-12-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a basal AIN-76 diet containing 80, 200, 350, 500 or 650 mg of magnesium per kilogram of diet for 6 wk. Ventricular slices, as well as microsomal fractions, were prepared from the hearts and were used to determine sodium-potassium pump activity. Sodium-potassium pump activity was assessed in the microsomal membranes by determining the ouabain-inhibitable Na+, K+-ATPase activity and (/sup 3/H)ouabain binding, and in the ventricular slices, by determining ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake under K+-free conditions. The ATPase activity increased with increasing dietary magnesium, so that in the hearts of those animals that were fed 500 and 650 mg of magnesium/kg diet, it was significantly greater than the activity in the hearts of the animals fed 80 and 200 mg/kg diet. Similarly, /sup 86/Rb uptake by heart slices from rats fed 500 and 650 mg of magnesium/kg diet was significantly greater than the uptake by heart slices from animals fed 80 and 200 mg/kg diet. (/sup 3/H)Ouabain binding did not change with increasing dietary magnesium. Thus, magnesium deficiency appears to have no effect on the number of sodium-potassium pump sites, but does decrease the activity of the pump. It is suggested that this leads to an increase in intracellular Na+, resulting in a change in the membrane potential, and may contribute to the arrhythmias associated with magnesium deficiency.

  18. Accelerated triacylglycerol turnover kinetics in hearts of diabetic rats include evidence for compartmented lipid storage.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, J Michael; Zampino, Manuela; Alpert, Nathaniel M; Fasano, Matthew J; Geenen, David L; Lewandowski, E Douglas

    2006-03-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) storage and turnover rates in the intact, beating rat heart were determined for the first time using dynamic mode (13)C- NMR spectroscopy to elucidate profound differences between hearts from diabetic rats (DR, streptozotocin treatment) and normal rats (NR). The incorporation of [2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16-(13)C(8)]palmitate into the TAG pool was monitored in isolated hearts perfused with physiological (0.5 mM palmitate, 5 mM glucose) and elevated substrate levels (1.2 mM palmitate, 11 mM glucose) characteristic of the diabetic condition. Surprisingly, although the normal hearts were enriched at a near-linear profile for >or=2 h before exponential characterization, exponential enrichment of TAG in diabetic hearts reached steady state after only 45 min. Consequently, TAG turnover rate was determined by fitting an exponential model to enrichment data rather than conventional two-point linear analysis. In the high-substrate group, both turnover rate (DR 820+/- 330, NR 190 +/-150 nmol.min(-1).g(-1) dry wt; P< 0.001) and [TAG] content (DR 78 +/-10, NR 32+/- 4 micromol/g dry wt; P< 0.001) were greater in the diabetic group. At lower substrate concentrations, turnover was greater in diabetics (DR 530+/-300, NR 160+/- 30; P<0.05). However, this could not be explained by simple mass action, because [TAG] content was similar between groups [DR 34+/- 7, NR 39+/- 9 micromol/g dry wt; not significant (NS)]. Consistent with exponential enrichment data, (13)C fractional enrichment of TAG was lower in diabetics (low- substrate groups: DR 4+/-1%, NR 10+/- 4%, P<0.05; high-substrate groups: DR 8+/- 3%, NR 14+/- 9%, NS), thereby supporting earlier speculation that TAG is compartmentalized in the diabetic heart.

  19. Cardioprotection of stevioside on stunned rat hearts: A mechano-energetical study.

    PubMed

    Ragone, María I; Bonazzola, Patricia; Colareda, Germán A; Lazarte, María Lara; Bruno, Fiorella; Consolini, Alicia E

    2017-11-15

    The sweetener and hypoglycemic properties of stevioside (STV) are well known, as the main component of the plant Stevia rebaudiana. Given its extensive use in diabetic patients, it was of interest to evaluate its effects on the most frequent cardiovascular disease, the coronary insufficiency. To study whether STV could be cardioprotective against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) in a model of "stunning" in rat hearts. A preclinical study was performed in isolated hearts from rats in the following groups: non-treated rats whose hearts were perfused with STV 0.3 mg/ml and their controls (C) exposed to either moderate stunning (20 min I/45 min R) or severe stunning (30 min I/45 min R), and a group of rats orally treated with STV 25 mg/kg/day in the drink water during 1 week before the experiment of severe stunning in the isolated hearts were done. The mechano-calorimetrical performance of isolated beating hearts was recorded during stabilization period with control Krebs perfusion inside a calorimeter, with or without 0.3 mg/ml STV before the respective period of I/R. The left ventricular maximal developed pressure (P) and total heat rate (Ht) were continuously measured. Both, orally administered and perfused STV improved the post-ischemic contractile recovery (PICR, as % of initial control P) and the total muscle economy (P/Ht) after the severe stunning, but only improved P/Ht in moderate stunning. However, STV increased the diastolic pressure (LVEDP) during I/R in both stunning models. For studying the mechanism of action, ischemic hearts were reperfused with 10 mM caffeine-36 mM Na(+)-Krebs to induce a contracture dependent on sarcorreticular Ca(2+) content, whose relaxation mainly depends on mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. STV at 0.3 mg/ml increased the area-under-curve of the caffeine-dependent contracture (AUC-LVP). Moreover, at room temperature STV increased the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake measured by Rhod-2 fluorescence in rat cardiomyocytes, but prevented

  20. Neonatal hyperthyroidism on rat heart: interrelation with nitric oxide and sex.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, L; Detomaso, F; Braga, P; Prendes, M; Perosi, F; Cernadas, G; Balaszczuk, A; Fellet, A

    2015-06-01

    To clarify the mechanism mediating the effect of hyperthyroidism on cardiac function during the second month of life in rats. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to a control or to a triiodothyronine (T3)-treated group. Treatment of each group was started on the third day after birth. Control rats (Eut) received 0.9 NaCl [0.1 ml/100 g body weight (BW)] every second day during 60 days and T3-treated rats (Hyper) received subcutaneous (SC) T3 injections every second day during 60 days. Hyperthyroidism decreased left ventricle volume only in male rats. Female euthyroid rats presented higher atrial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity than male rats and hormonal treatment decreased this enzyme's activity in both sexes. Euthyroid male and female rats had similar atrial NOS protein levels, but females had higher caveolin (cav) 3 protein levels. T3 treatment increased this protein only in males. Female rats had lower ventricular NOS activity than male rats; hyperthyroidism increased NOS activity in both sexes but this effect was associated with lower cav 3 protein levels. Hyperthyroidism did not change cav 1 protein levels in both male and female rats. The results of this study demonstrating clinically relevant sex-related differences in the pathophysiology of the hyperthyroid heart have raised new questions regarding the mechanisms responsible for the observed differences. This study suggests that sex-related intrinsic factors such as nitric oxide may modulate the response to hyperthyroidism that leads to cardiovascular dysfunction.

  1. Berberine treatment prevents cardiac dysfunction and remodeling through activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in type 2 diabetic rats and in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Zhaojie; Yu, Yang; Yao, Fan; Hatch, Grant M; Chen, Li

    2015-12-15

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is the major cause of death in type 2 diabetic patients. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract from traditional chinese herbs and its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects make it a promising drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes. We examined if berberine improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in high fat diet and streptozotocin induced-type 2 diabetic rats in vivo and reduced expression of hypertrophy markers in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells in vitro. Treatment of diabetic animals with berberine partially improved cardiac function and restored fasting blood insulin, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels to that of control. In addition, berberine treatment of diabetic animals increased cardiac 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT) activation and reduced glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activation compared to control. Palmitate incubation of H9c2 cells resulted in cellular hypertrophy and decreased expression of alpha-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and increased expression of beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) compared to controls. Berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells reduced hypertrophy, increased α-MHC expression and decreased β-MHC expression. In addition, berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells increased AMPK and AKT activation and reduced GSK3β activation. The presence of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C attenuated the effects of berberine. The results strongly indicate that berberine treatment may be protective against the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  2. Toxic effect of the glycoalkaloids solanine and tomatine on cultured neonatal rat heart cells.

    PubMed

    Bergers, W W; Alink, G M

    1980-06-01

    The toxic effects of the glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and tomatine, were studied in beating heart cell cultures from 1--2-day-old rats. After addition of alpha-solanine (80 microgram/ml) and tomatine (40 microgram/ml) to the culture medium, the cells ceased beating within a few minutes. At a concentration of 40 microgram/ml alpha-solanine and 20 microgram/ml tomatine, both compounds caused a pronounced increase of the contraction frequency, lasting for at least 2h. K-strophantin, a reference heart glycoside, caused arrhythmic beating at 20 microgram/ml and complete cessation of contractions at 160 microgram/ml.

  3. Does Aldosterone Upregulate the Brain Renin-Angiotensin System in Rats with Heart Failure?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise; Weiss, Robert M; Felder, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    The brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to increased sympathetic drive in heart failure (HF). The factors upregulating the brain RAS in HF remain unknown. We hypothesized that aldosterone (ALDO), a downstream product of the systemic RAS that crosses the blood-brain barrier, signals the brain to increase RAS activity in HF. We examined the relationship between circulating and brain ALDO in normal intact rats, in adrenalectomized rats receiving subcutaneous infusions of ALDO, and in rats with ischemia-induced HF and sham-operated controls (SHAM). Brain ALDO levels were proportional to plasma ALDO levels across the spectrum of rats studied. Compared with SHAM rats, HF rats had higher plasma and hypothalamic tissue levels of ALDO. HF rats also had higher expression of mRNA and protein for angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT1-R) in hypothalamus, increased reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H) oxidase activity and superoxide generation in paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of hypothalamus, increased excitation of PVN neurons, and increased plasma norepinephrine (NE). HF rats treated for 4 weeks with intracerebroventricular RU28318 (1 μg/hr), a selective mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, had less hypothalamic ACE and AT1-R mRNA and protein, less NAD(P)H-induced superoxide in PVN, fewer excited PVN neurons, and lower plasma NE. RU28318 had no effect on plasma ALDO, or on ACE or AT1-R mRNA expression in brain cortex. The data demonstrate that ALDO of adrenal origin enters the hypothalamus in direct proportion to plasma levels, and suggest that ALDO contributes to the upregulation of hypothalamic RAS activity and sympathetic drive in heart failure. PMID:18227408

  4. Effect of age and methacholine on the rate and coronary flow of isolated hearts of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, X S; Tanz, R D; Chang, K S

    1989-08-01

    1. Isolated hearts perfused by the method of Langendorff from 6, 12 and 24 week streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats displayed a significant bradycardia following 60 min equilibration. The rate of hearts from 12-week diabetic rats (164 +/- 17) displayed the greatest bradycardia compared to age-matched controls (268 +/- 15; P less than 0.001), and diabetics treated with insulin (232 +/- 17; P less than 0.01), but by 52 weeks the heart rate of the 3 groups was similar. With advancing age the effect of STZ diabetes on the rate of rat isolated perfused hearts remained unchanged but the rate of the control and diabetic + insulin groups declined. 2. Hearts from 6-52 week STZ-treated rats were found to be more sensitive to the negative chronotropic effect of methacholine, the greatest difference occurring in hearts from the 12 week animals. Atropine (10(-7) M) did not affect the resting heart rate of age-matched controls or diabetics but blocked methacholine (2.6 x 10(-6) M)-induced bradycardia in both, suggesting that the site of action of diabetic bradycardia is not the muscarinic receptors. 3. At the end of equilibration there was a significant decrease in coronary flow in hearts from 12 week diabetic animals. In spontaneously beating diabetic rat hearts administration of methacholine (2.6 x 10(-6) M) produced a significantly greater decrease in coronary flow in the 12, 24 and 52 week diabetic hearts. When electrically paced (5 Hz) however, there was no difference in response to methacholine between the three groups except at 52 weeks between the age-matched control and diabetic groups. This suggests that the more pronounced reduction induced by methacholine on the coronary flow of diabetic hearts is secondary to its negative chronotropic effect. 4. In general, hearts from diabetic animals treated with insulin respond similarly to their agematched controls in the presence and absence of methacholine.

  5. The effects of increased heart work on the tricarboxylate cycle and its interactions with glycolysis in the perfused rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Neely, J. R.; Denton, R. M.; England, P. J.; Randle, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    1. The work of the perfused rat heart was acutely increased by raising the aortic pressure in the Langendorff preparation from 50 to 120mmHg; within 1 min in perfusions with media containing glucose or glucose+acetate, rates of oxygen consumption and tricarboxylate-cycle turnover increased 2.5-fold, glycolysis rate doubled and oxidation of triglyceride fatty acid was strikingly enhanced. 2. Increased cardiac work had no significant effects on the heart concentrations of creatine phosphate, ATP, ADP or 5′-AMP. The only significant changes in tricarboxylate-cycle intermediates were a decrease in malate in perfusions with glucose and decreases in acetyl-CoA and citrate and an increase in aspartate in perfusions with glucose+acetate. 3. Measurements of intracellular concentrations of hexose phosphates, glucose and glycogen indicated that work accelerated glycolysis by activation of phosphofructokinase and subsequently hexokinase; the activation could not be accounted for by changes in the known effectors of phosphofructokinase. 4. Acetate at either perfusion pressure increased heart concentrations of acetyl-CoA, citrate, glutamate and malate and decreased that of aspartate; acetate increased tricarboxylate-cycle turnover by 50–60% and inhibited glycolysis and pyruvate oxidation. 5. In view of the markedly different effects of acetate and of cardiac work on the concentrations of cycle intermediates the changes that accompany acetate utilization may be specifically concerned with the regulatory functions of the cycle in control of glycolysis and pyruvate oxidation and not with the associated increase in cycle turnover. It is suggested that the concentrations of key metabolites controlling the rate of cycle turnover may fluctuate with each heart beat and that this may explain why no significant changes (for example, in adenine nucleotide concentrations) have been detected with increased work in the present study. PMID:5085551

  6. Overtraining does not induce oxidative stress and inflammation in blood and heart of rats.

    PubMed

    Stanojevic, D; Jakovljevic, V; Barudzic, N; Zivkovic, V; Srejovic, I; Parezanovic Ilic, K; Cubrilo, D; Ahmetovic, Z; Peric, D; Rosic, M; Radovanovic, D; Djordjevic, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our research was to evaluate the changes in levels of cytokines and redox state parameters in blood and isolated heart of rats subjected to different swimming protocols. Rats were divided into 3 groups: 1) controls, 2) moderately trained rats that during all 12 weeks swam 1 h/day, 5 days/week, and 3) overtrained rats that in 10(th) week swam twice, 11(th) week 3 times, and in 12(th) week 4 times a day for 1 h. After sacrificing, blood from jugular vein was collected, and the heart excised and perfused on a Langendorff apparatus. Samples of the coronary effluent were collected during coronary autoregulation. Levels of superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), nitric oxide (NO) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were measured in plasma and coronary effluent, while reduced glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were measured in erythrocytes. Venous blood was also used for interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) determination. Moderate training protocol induced the decrease of TBARS in plasma, while both training protocols induced the decrease of O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2) in coronary effluent. There was no significant difference in levels of cytokines between groups. The results of study add evidence about beneficial effects of moderate-intensity training on blood and cardiac redox state of rats, and furthermore, shows that exercising frequently, if the intensity stays within moderate range, may not have detrimental effects.

  7. Effects of hypoxia on contents of essential elements in pika and rat heart.

    PubMed

    Suo, Yourui; Wang, Hanqing; Zhang, Baochen

    2005-02-01

    The effects of hypoxia on the levels of essential macroelements and trace elements (K, Na, Ca, Mg, Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mn) in the heart muscles of Wistar rats and plateau pikas (Ochotona curzoniae) were studied by atomic absorption spectrometry. Unlike the rat, the plateau pika is tolerant to hypoxia. The levels of K, Na, and the trace element Mn were not significantly changed in rat or pika hearts after exposure to hypoxia for 1, 10, or 25 d at simulated altitudes of 5000 and 7000 m. Other minerals (Ca, Mg, Cu, Zn, and Fe) were significantly affected by hypoxia and the levels followed different time-courses under different hypoxic regimes in these two animals. There were marked differences between the rat and pika in myocardial accumulation of essential elements such as Ca, which was increased to high levels in the rat but not affected in the pika. The results suggest that hypoxia affects animal physiological mechanisms by regulating the levels of essential elements.

  8. Monolayer co-culture of rat heart cells and bovine adrenal chromaffin paraneurons.

    PubMed

    Trifaró, J M; Tang, R; Novas, M L

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes a method for the preparation of co-cultures of rat heart cells and bovine adrenal chromaffin paraneurons. The most suitable condition for heart cell isolation was when a combination of trypsin-DNAse I in Locke's solution was used for digestion. The best co-culture conditions were obtained when 10(6) heart cells were plated on 7- to 8-d-old adrenal chromaffin paraneuron cultures containing 0.5 x 10(6) cells per 35-mm diameter culture dishes. Measurements of DNA (heart cells and chromaffin paraneurons), monitoring of beating frequency (heart cells), and catecholamine (chromaffin paraneurons) levels and release indicated that both cell types remain viable and functional for several weeks. Heart cells started their characteristic contractile activity 24 h earlier when plated either on viable or lysed chromaffin paraneurons, an effect apparently due to faster surface adhesion of heart cells. The beating frequency of heart cells increased after treatment of co-cultures with either noradrenaline or nicotine, with the latter agent acting indirectly through the release of chromaffin paraneuron catecholamines. Propranolol produced a dose-related inhibition of the responses to either noradrenaline or nicotine, thus suggesting that the increase in myocyte's beating activity was mediated through beta-receptors. Anti-myosin and anti-dopamine-beta-hydroxylase immunostaining was used for cell type identification and for the demonstration of body-to-body and process-to-process contacts between adrenal chromaffin paraneurons and heart cells. This co-culture system will serve as a starting point of further studies directed to understand a) the influence of a cell type on the development and on the phenotypic characteristics of a second cell type and b) the interaction of cells derived from different organs and species.

  9. Relationship between fibronectin expression during gastrulation and heart formation in the rat embryo.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H R; Solursh, M; Baldwin, H S

    1995-11-01

    By utilizing myosin immunostaining, we were able to identify early rat myocardium as a thin epithelial sheet and realized that its cohesive movement toward the midline leads to the straight heart tube formation. Localization study of fibronectin mRNA and protein was, therefore, carried out to investigate its tissue origin and possible roles in facilitating mesoderm migration and heart formation. Fibronectin mRNAs were first detected throughout the mesoderm during the early primitive streak stage, suggesting that the mesoderm is the source of fibronectin. By pre-head fold (pre-somite) and head fold (early somite) stages, the mesoderm became largely down-regulated for fibronectin mRNAs, while it was also at these stages when myosin-positive myocardium formed itself into the epithelium and was subsequently folding toward the midline. Thus, there appears to be little fibronectin synthesis during and directly relevant to early heart tube formation. Later, during the early straight heart tube stage (5 somite and older), endocardium became highly positive for fibronectin mRNAs, suggesting that the endocardium is the major source of fibronectin for the cardiac jelly. Based on the results, we present a map for the early mammalian heart in which the heart is a single crescentic band lying in front of the prechordal plate. We also suggest a process for heart tube formation based on the cohesive movement of the myocardial epithelium. During heart tube formation, fibronectin protein had been deposited previously by the mesoderm and was found uniformly in the ECM and not newly produced by any adjacent tissue. The data contradict the endodermal guidance of heart migration by fibronectin gradient and suggest, instead, a permissive role for the fibronectin substrate.

  10. Levosimendan improves calcium sensitivity of diaphragm muscle fibres from a rat model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    van Hees, H W H; Andrade Acuña, Gl; Linkels, M; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Heunks, L M A

    2011-02-01

    Diaphragm muscle weakness occurs in patients with heart failure (HF) and is associated with exercise intolerance and increased mortality. Reduced sensitivity of diaphragm fibres to calcium contributes to diaphragm weakness in HF. Here we have investigated the ability of the calcium sensitizer levosimendan to restore the reduced calcium sensitivity of diaphragm fibres from rats with HF. Coronary artery ligation in rats was used as an animal model for HF. Sham-operated rats served as controls. Fifteen weeks after induction of HF or sham operations animals were killed and muscle fibres were isolated from the diaphragm. Diaphragm fibres were skinned and activated with solutions containing incremental calcium concentrations and 10 µM levosimendan or vehicle (0.02% DMSO). Developed force was measured at each calcium concentration, and force-calcium concentration relationships were plotted. Calcium sensitivity of force generation was reduced in diaphragm muscle fibres from HF rats, compared with fibres from control rats (P < 0.01). Maximal force generation was ∼25% lower in HF diaphragm fibres than in control fibres (P < 0.05). Levosimendan significantly increased calcium sensitivity of force generation in diaphragm fibres from HF and control rats, without affecting maximal force generation. Levosimendan enhanced the force generating capacity of diaphragm fibres from HF rats by increasing the sensitivity of force generation to calcium concentration. These results provide strong support for testing the effect of calcium sensitizers on diaphragm muscle weakness in patients with HF. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Functional evaluation of rat hearts transplanted after preservation in a high-pressure gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide and oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Hatayama, Naoyuki; Inubushi, Masayuki; Naito, Munekazu; Hirai, Shuichi; Jin, Yong-Nan; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Seki, Kunihiro; Itoh, Masahiro; Saga, Tsuneo; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-01-01

    We recently succeeded in resuscitating an extracted rat heart following 24–48 hours of preservation in a high-pressure gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen (O2). This study aimed to examine the function of rat hearts transplanted after being preserved in the high-pressure CO and O2 gas mixture. The hearts of donor rats were preserved in a chamber filled with CO and O2 under high pressure for 24 h (CO24h) or 48 h at 4 °C. For the positive control (PC) group, hearts immediately extracted from donor rats were used for transplantation. The preserved hearts were transplanted into recipient rats by heterotopic cervical heart transplantation. CO toxicity does not affect the grafts or the recipients. Light microscopy and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed that there were no significant differences in the size of the myocardial infarction or apoptosis of myocardial cells in post-transplant hearts between the PC and CO24h groups. Furthermore, at 100 days after the transplantation, the heart rate, weight and histological staining of the post-transplanted hearts did not differ significantly between the PC and CO24h groups. These results indicate that the function of rat hearts is well preserved after 24 hours of high-pressure preservation in a CO and O2 gas mixture. Therefore, high-pressure preservation in a gas mixture can be a useful method for organ preservation. PMID:27562456

  12. Acute Effects of Vagotomy on Baroreflex Equilibrium Diagram in Rats with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Toru; Li, Meihua; Zheng, Can; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    The arterial baroreflex system can be divided into the neural arc, from pressure input to efferent sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), and the peripheral arc, from SNA to arterial pressure (AP). Plotting the neural and peripheral arcs on a pressure–SNA plane yields a baroreflex equilibrium diagram. We examined the effects of vagotomy on the open-loop static characteristics of the carotid sinus baroreflex in normal control rats (NC, n = 10) and rats with heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI, n = 10). In the NC group, vagotomy shifted the neural arc toward higher SNA and decreased the slope of the peripheral arc. Consequently, the operating-point SNA increased without a significant change in the operating-point AP on the baroreflex equilibrium diagram. These vagotomy-induced effects were not observed in the MI group, suggesting a loss of vagal modulation of the carotid sinus baroreflex function in heart failure. PMID:27594790

  13. Alagebrium chloride protects the heart against oxidative stress in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Lu, Miao; Qian, Jin; Cheng, Yun-lin

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the possible effects of alagebrium chloride (ALT-711) on oxidative stress (OS) process in aging hearts, we examined the role of ALT-711 in cardiac function and OS in the heart of aging rats. Increased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion as well as nearly a twofold increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulation were observed in aging heart, whereas only about 50% of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activities were seen. However, after treatment with ALT-711, preserved cardiac diastolic function accompanied with reduced mtDNA deletion and about 30% of AGEs decrease was observed in aging hearts. In addition, ALT-711 can increase SOD and GSH-PX activities in aging hearts as well as in cultured cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, our study suggests that AGEs accumulation and the abnormalities in the OS in aging hearts can be attenuated by ALT-711, and this might be a novel underlying mechanism for ALT-711 in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases that develop with aging.

  14. Innervating sympathetic neurons regulate heart size and the timing of cardiomyocyte cell cycle withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, R E; Birren, S J

    2015-12-01

    Sympathetic drive to the heart is a key modulator of cardiac function and interactions between heart tissue and innervating sympathetic fibres are established early in development. Significant innervation takes place during postnatal heart development, a period when cardiomyocytes undergo a rapid transition from proliferative to hypertrophic growth. The question of whether these innervating sympathetic fibres play a role in regulating the modes of cardiomyocyte growth was investigated using 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to abolish early sympathetic innervation of the heart. Postnatal chemical sympathectomy resulted in rats with smaller hearts, indicating that heart growth is regulated by innervating sympathetic fibres during the postnatal period. In vitro experiments showed that sympathetic interactions resulted in delays in markers of cardiomyocyte maturation, suggesting that changes in the timing of the transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes could underlie changes in heart size in the sympathectomized animals. There was also an increase in the expression of Meis1, which has been linked to cardiomyocyte cell cycle withdrawal, suggesting that sympathetic signalling suppresses cell cycle withdrawal. This signalling involves β-adrenergic activation, which was necessary for sympathetic regulation of cardiomyocyte proliferation and hypertrophy. The effect of β-adrenergic signalling on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy underwent a developmental transition. While young postnatal cardiomyocytes responded to isoproterenol (isoprenaline) with a decrease in cell size, mature cardiomyocytes showed an increase in cell size in response to the drug. Together, these results suggest that early sympathetic effects on proliferation modulate a key transition between proliferative and hypertrophic growth of the heart and contribute to the sympathetic regulation of adult heart size.

  15. Selective aldosterone blockade prevents angiotensin II/salt-induced vascular inflammation in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ricardo; Martin-Berger, Cynthia L; Yang, Pochang; Scherrer, Rachel; Delyani, John; McMahon, Ellen

    2002-12-01

    We studied the role of aldosterone (aldo) in myocardial injury in a model of angiotensin (Ang) II-hypertension. Wistar rats were given 1% NaCl (salt) to drink and randomized into one of the following groups (n = 10; treatment, 21 d): 1) vehicle control (VEH); 2) Ang II infusion (25 ng/min, sc); 3) Ang II infusion plus the selective aldo blocker, eplerenone (epl, 100 mg/kg.d, orally); 4) Ang II infusion in adrenalectomized (ADX) rats; and 5) Ang II infusion in ADX rats with aldo treatment (20 micro g/kg.d, sc). ADX rats received also dexamethasone (12 micro g/kg.d, sc). Systolic blood pressure increased with time in all treatment groups except the VEH group (VEH, 136 +/- 6; Ang II/NaCl, 203 +/- 12; Ang II/NaCl/epl, 196 +/- 10; Ang II/NaCl/ADX, 181 +/- 7; Ang II/NaCl/ADX/aldo, 236 +/- 8 mm Hg). Despite similar levels of hypertension, epl and ADX attenuated the increase in heart weight/body weight induced by Ang II. Histological examination of the hearts evidenced myocardial and vascular injury in the Ang II/salt (7 of 10 hearts with damage, P < 0.05 vs. VEH) and Ang II/salt/ADX/aldo groups (10 of 10 hearts with damage, P < 0.05). Injury included arterial fibrinoid necrosis, perivascular inflammation (primarily macrophages), and focal infarctions. Vascular lesions were associated with expression of the inflammatory mediators cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and osteopontin in the media of coronary arteries. Myocardial injury, COX-2, and osteopontin expression were markedly attenuated by epl treatment (1 of 10 hearts with damage, P < 0.05 vs. Ang II/salt) and adrenalectomy (2 of 10 hearts with damage, P < 0.05 vs. Ang II/salt). Our data indicate that aldo plays a major role in Ang II-induced vascular inflammation in the heart and implicate COX-2 and osteopontin as potential mediators of the damage.

  16. Effects of a complex housing environment on heart rate and blood pressure of rats at rest and after stressful challenges.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Jody; Azar, Toni; Lawson, David

    2014-01-01

    Housing enrichment for rodents continues to be a discussion topic within the animal care community. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which a complex housing environment affects heart rate, blood pressure, and activity of rats when undisturbed and after exposure to stressful challenges and whether autonomic controls of heart rate would be affected. Male and female Sprague-Dawley and Wistar rats with radiotelemetry transmitters were evaluated under nonenriched single-housing conditions and after acclimation to a complex environment of dim light and cohabitation with 3 conspecifics in large cages with hiding, food foraging, and nesting items. Telemetry data were collected when rats were undisturbed, after acute challenges (cage change, intraperitoneal injections, restraint), during a forced running protocol, and after cholinergic or adrenergic blockade. The complex environment reduced heart rate and increased activity in undisturbed rats but did not affect blood pressure. Heart rate responses to challenges were unaffected, decreased, or increased by complex housing, depending on the stock and sex of rats. Forced running was either unaffected or decreased, depending on the stock and sex of rats. Heart rate responses to cholinergic or β1-adrenergic blockade were not affected. We conclude that the complex housing did not reduce indices of stress (for example, heart rate) as compared with simpler housing. However, the possibility that some environmental elements interact negatively with each other must be considered in future studies.

  17. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-15

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  18. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography.

    PubMed

    Umetani, K; Fukushima, K

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  19. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  20. Estrogen attenuates chronic volume overload induced structural and functional remodeling in male rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jason D; Murray, David B; Voloshenyuk, Tetyana G; Brower, Gregory L; Bradley, Jessica M; Janicki, Joseph S

    2010-02-01

    We have previously reported gender differences in ventricular remodeling and development of heart failure using the aortocaval fistula model of chronic volume overload in rats. In contrast to males, female rats exhibited no adverse ventricular remodeling and less mortality in response to volume overload. This gender-specific cardioprotection was lost following ovariectomy and was partially restored using estrogen replacement. However, it is not known if estrogen treatment would be as effective in males. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the structural and functional effects of estrogen in male rats subjected to chronic volume overload. Four groups of male rats were studied at 3 days and 8 wk postsurgery as follows: fistula and sham-operated controls, with and without estrogen treatment. Biochemical and histological studies were performed at 3 days postsurgery, with chronic structural and functional effects studied at 8 wk. Measurement of systolic and diastolic pressure-volume relationships was obtained using a blood-perfused isolated heart preparation. Both fistula groups developed significant ventricular hypertrophy after 8 wk of volume overload. Untreated rats with fistula exhibited extensive ventricular dilatation, which was coupled with a loss of systolic function. Estrogen attenuated left ventricular dilatation and maintained function in treated rats. Estrogen treatment was also associated with a reduction in oxidative stress and circulating endothelin-1 levels, as well as prevention of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activation and breakdown of ventricular collagen in the early stage of remodeling. These data demonstrate that estrogen attenuates ventricular remodeling and disease progression in male rats subjected to chronic volume overload.

  1. Beneficial effects of exercise training in heart failure are lost in male diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Boudia, Dalila; Domergue, Valérie; Mateo, Phlippe; Fazal, Loubina; Prud'homme, Mathilde; Prigent, Heloise; Delcayre, Claude; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Garnier, Anne; Ventura-Clapier, Renee; Samuel, Jane-Lise

    2017-09-07

    Exercise training has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects in patients with heart failure (HF) or diabetes. However, it is unknown whether diabetic patients with HF will benefit from exercise training. Male Wistar rats were fed either a standard (Sham, n= 53) or high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet (D, n=66) for 6 months. After 2 months of diet, the rats were already diabetic. Rats were then randomly subjected to either myocardial infarction by coronary artery ligation (MI) or sham operation (Sham). Two months later, heart failure was documented by echocardiography and animals were randomly subjected to exercise training with treadmill for eight additional weeks or remained sedentary. At the end, rats were euthanized and tissues were assayed by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, spectrophotometry and immunohistology. MI induced a similar decrease in ejection fraction in diabetic and lean animals but a higher premature mortality in the diabetic group. Exercise for 8 weeks resulted in a higher working power developed by MI animals with diabetes, and improved glycaemia but not ejection fraction or pathological phenotype. In contrast exercise improved the ejection fraction and increased adaptive hypertrophy after MI in the lean group. Trained diabetic rats with MI were nevertheless able to develop cardiomyocyte hypertrophy but without angiogenic responses. Exercise improved stress markers and cardiac energy metabolism in lean- but not diabetic-MI rats. Hence, following HF, the benefits of exercise training on cardiac function are blunted in diabetic animals. In conclusion, exercise training only improved the myocardial profile of infarcted lean rats fed the standard diet. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  2. Hyaluronate degradation affects ventricular function of the early postlooped embryonic rat heart in situ.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, H S; Lloyd, T R; Solursh, M

    1994-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid is the major glycosaminoglycan of the early cardiac extracellular matrix or "cardiac jelly," yet little is known about its role in the ontogeny of early ventricular performance. To investigate the in situ effect of hyaluronate degradation on ventricular function, whole rat embryos were cultured in rat serum alone (control embryos) or rat serum plus 20 TRU/mL of Streptomyces hyaluronidase (treatment embryos) from gestational day 9.5 (before formation of the heart tube) through initial looping of the heart. Cardiac function was measured before looping (24 hours in culture) and immediately after looping (36 hours in culture) by video motion analysis of the external wall motion of the bulbus cordis and primitive ventricle. Degradation of hyaluronic acid in the treated embryos was confirmed by Alcian blue staining at pH 2.5. Significant increases in heart rate, circumferential shortening fraction, maximum velocity of circumferential contraction, and maximum velocity of circumferential relaxation were observed with looping in both control and treatment embryos. Although there was minimal difference in ventricular performance between control and treatment embryos before looping, there was a significant increase in all parameters of ventricular performance in the hyaluronidase-treated embryos immediately after looping of the heart. Endocardial cushions were absent in hyaluronidase-treated embryos, and an additional group of embryos cultured in the presence of Streptomyces hyaluronidase for 48 to 72 hours failed to develop endocardial cushions. These experiments are the first to (1) document a quantifiable increase in ventricular performance during early cardiac looping and (2) demonstrate that hyaluronate degradation results in abnormal endocardial cushion formation and altered ventricular performance of the postlooped heart.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Arrhythmogenic substrate in hearts of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, David; Stones, Rachel; Drinkhill, Mark; Bernus, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms associated with right ventricular (RV) hypertension and arrhythmias are less understood than those in the left ventricle (LV). The aim of our study was to investigate whether and by what mechanisms a proarrhythmic substrate exists in a rat model of RV hypertension and hypertrophy. Rats were injected with monocrotaline (MCT; 60 mg/kg) to induce pulmonary artery hypertension or with saline (CON). Myocardial levels of mRNA for genes expressing ion channels were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Monophasic action potential duration (MAPD) was recorded in isolated Langendorff-perfused hearts. MAPD restitution was measured, and arrhythmias were induced by burst stimulation. Twenty-two to twenty-six days after treatment, MCT animals had RV hypertension, hypertrophy, and decreased ejection fractions compared with CON. A greater proportion of MCT hearts developed sustained ventricular tachycardias/fibrillation (0.83 MCT vs. 0.14 CON). MAPD was prolonged in RV and less so in the LV of MCT hearts. There were decreased levels of mRNA for K+ channels. Restitution curves of MCT RV were steeper than CON RV or either LV. Dispersion of MAPD was greater in MCT hearts and was dependent on stimulation frequency. Computer simulations based on ion channel gene expression closely predicted experimental changes in MAPD and restitution. We have identified a proarrhythmic substrate in the hearts of MCT-treated rats. We conclude that steeper RV electrical restitution and rate-dependant RV-LV action potential duration dispersion may be contributing mechanisms and be implicated in the generation of arrhythmias associated with in RV hypertension and hypertrophy. PMID:21398591

  4. Enhanced Electrical Integration of Engineered Human Myocardium via Intramyocardial versus Epicardial Delivery in Infarcted Rat Hearts.

    PubMed

    Gerbin, Kaytlyn A; Yang, Xiulan; Murry, Charles E; Coulombe, Kareen L K

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising approach to provide large-scale tissues for transplantation to regenerate the heart after ischemic injury, however, integration with the host myocardium will be required to achieve electromechanical benefits. To test the ability of engineered heart tissues to electrically integrate with the host, 10 million human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived cardiomyocytes were used to form either scaffold-free tissue patches implanted on the epicardium or micro-tissue particles (~1000 cells/particle) delivered by intramyocardial injection into the left ventricular wall of the ischemia/reperfusion injured athymic rat heart. Results were compared to intramyocardial injection of 10 million dispersed hESC-cardiomyocytes. Graft size was not significantly different between treatment groups and correlated inversely with infarct size. After implantation on the epicardial surface, hESC-cardiac tissue patches were electromechanically active, but they beat slowly and were not electrically coupled to the host at 4 weeks based on ex vivo fluorescent imaging of their graft-autonomous GCaMP3 calcium reporter. Histologically, scar tissue physically separated the patch graft and host myocardium. In contrast, following intramyocardial injection of micro-tissue particles and suspended cardiomyocytes, 100% of the grafts detected by fluorescent GCaMP3 imaging were electrically coupled to the host heart at spontaneous rate and could follow host pacing up to a maximum of 300-390 beats per minute (5-6.5 Hz). Gap junctions between intramyocardial graft and host tissue were identified histologically. The extensive coupling and rapid response rate of the human myocardial grafts after intramyocardial delivery suggest electrophysiological adaptation of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes to the rat heart's pacemaking activity. These data support the use of the rat model for studying electromechanical integration of human cardiomyocytes, and they identify lack of

  5. Repeated exposure to methamphetamine induces sex-dependent hypersensitivity to ischemic injury in the adult rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Sarah L.; Stoops, Thorne S.; D’Souza, Manoranjan S.

    2017-01-01

    Background We previously reported that adult female, but not male rats that were prenatally exposed to methamphetamine exhibit myocardial hypersensitivity to ischemic injury. However, it is unknown whether hypersensitivity to ischemic injury develops when rats are exposed to methamphetamine during adulthood. The goal of this study was to determine whether methamphetamine exposure during adulthood sensitizes the heart to ischemic injury. Methods Adult male and female rats received daily injections of methamphetamine (5 mg/kg) or saline for 10 days. Their hearts were isolated on day 11 and subjected to a 20 min ischemic insult on a Langendorff isolated heart apparatus. Cardiac contractile function was measured by an intraventricular balloon, and infarct size was measured by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Results Hearts from methamphetamine-treated females exhibited significantly larger infarcts and suppressed postischemic recovery of contractile function compared to hearts from saline-treated females. In contrast, methamphetamine had no effect on infarct size or contractile recovery in male hearts. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that hypersensitivity to ischemic injury persisted in female hearts following a 1 month period of abstinence from methamphetamine. Myocardial protein kinase C-ε expression, Akt phosphorylation, and ERK phosphorylation were unaffected by adult exposure to methamphetamine. Conclusions Exposure of adult rats to methamphetamine sex-dependently increases the extent of myocardial injury following an ischemic insult. These data suggest that women who have a heart attack might be at risk of more extensive myocardial injury if they have a recent history of methamphetamine abuse. PMID:28575091

  6. Repeated exposure to methamphetamine induces sex-dependent hypersensitivity to ischemic injury in the adult rat heart.

    PubMed

    Rorabaugh, Boyd R; Seeley, Sarah L; Stoops, Thorne S; D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that adult female, but not male rats that were prenatally exposed to methamphetamine exhibit myocardial hypersensitivity to ischemic injury. However, it is unknown whether hypersensitivity to ischemic injury develops when rats are exposed to methamphetamine during adulthood. The goal of this study was to determine whether methamphetamine exposure during adulthood sensitizes the heart to ischemic injury. Adult male and female rats received daily injections of methamphetamine (5 mg/kg) or saline for 10 days. Their hearts were isolated on day 11 and subjected to a 20 min ischemic insult on a Langendorff isolated heart apparatus. Cardiac contractile function was measured by an intraventricular balloon, and infarct size was measured by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Hearts from methamphetamine-treated females exhibited significantly larger infarcts and suppressed postischemic recovery of contractile function compared to hearts from saline-treated females. In contrast, methamphetamine had no effect on infarct size or contractile recovery in male hearts. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that hypersensitivity to ischemic injury persisted in female hearts following a 1 month period of abstinence from methamphetamine. Myocardial protein kinase C-ε expression, Akt phosphorylation, and ERK phosphorylation were unaffected by adult exposure to methamphetamine. Exposure of adult rats to methamphetamine sex-dependently increases the extent of myocardial injury following an ischemic insult. These data suggest that women who have a heart attack might be at risk of more extensive myocardial injury if they have a recent history of methamphetamine abuse.

  7. Exercise training reduces fibrosis and matrix metalloproteinase dysregulation in the aging rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Kim, Jong-hee; Joshi, Kumar; Yeh, Alvin; Martinez, Daniel A.; Lawler, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Aging impairs function in the nonischemic heart and is associated with mechanical remodeling. This process includes accumulation of collagen (i.e., fibrosis) and dysregulation of active matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Exercise training (ET) improves cardiac function, but the pathways of protection remain poorly understood. Young (3 mo) and old (31 mo) FBNF1 rats were assigned into sedentary and exercise groups, with ET group rats training on a treadmill 45 min/d, 5 d/wk for 12 wk. Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM), histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and Western blot analyses were performed on the left ventricle and septum. NLOM, IHC, and histological imaging revealed that ET reduced age-associated elevation of collagen type I fibers. Active MMP-1, active MMP-2, and MMP-14 in the ECM fraction of the left ventricle were reduced by aging, an effect abrogated by ET. Tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP-1) was elevated with age but protected by ET. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), upstream regulator of TIMP-1, increased with age but was attenuated by ET. Therefore, exercise training could protect the aging heart against dysregulation of MMPs and fibrosis by suppressing elevation of TIMP-1 and TGF-β.—Kwak, H.-B., Kim, J.-H., Joshi, K., Yeh, A., Martinez, D. A., Lawler, J. M. Exercise training reduces fibrosis and matrix metalloproteinase dysregulation in the aging rat heart. PMID:21148111

  8. Protective role of grape seed proanthocyanidin antioxidant properties on heart of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Esrafil; Khorsandi, Layasadat; Abdollahzade Fard, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Grape seed proanthocyanidin (GSP) bears a very powerful antioxidant effects. Studies demonstrated that proanthocyanidins protect against free radicals mediated cardiovascular and renal disorders. The present study was designed to assess the effect of GSP on the heart of diabetic rats. Forty rats were divided into four groups of 10 animals each: Group I: control, Group II: control group were given GSP, Group III: diabetic group, Group IV: diabetic group treated with GSP. Diabetes was induced by a single dose of streptozotocin, and then GSP (200 mg kg-1 body weight) was administrated for four weeks. Blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and also the levels of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes were examined in the heart tissues of all groups. Oral administration of GSP to diabetic rats significantly reduced (p < 0.05) heart weight, blood glucose, HbA1c and lipid peroxidation level, but increased (p < 0.05) body weight and activities antioxidant enzymes when compared to diabetic group. The results indicated that GSP could be useful for prevention or early treatment of cardiac disorder caused by diabetes. PMID:26261706

  9. Calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from hearts of septic rats

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough, K.H.

    1988-08-01

    Myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) plays a critical role in the regulation of the cytosolic calcium fluctuations that occur during the cardiac cycle. One function of the SR is to lower the calcium concentration so that myocardial relaxation and thus ventricular filling can occur. The aim of the present study was to determine if hyperdynamic sepsis induced a decrease in the capacity of SR to take up calcium. This defect would result in decreased ventricular filling and thus decreased cardiac output, as has previously been shown in isolated perfused working hearts removed from septic rats. Therefore, rats were anesthetized with ether, and sepsis was induced by the injection of an aliquot of a fecal homogenate into the peritoneal cavity. Control animals either underwent surgery and received an aliquot of sterilized fecal inoculum (sham) or were untreated (no surgery). On day 2 after surgery, animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital, and hearts were removed, weighted, and SR isolated. The rate of uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ by SR from septic rats was not depressed compared to controls but in fact was elevated. Maximum /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ accumulated by the SR and Ca/sup 2 +/-stimulated ATPase activity were similar in SR from control and septic hearts. These results suggest that the contractile dysfunction noted in the myocardium in early sepsis is probably not due to inadequate SR removal of Ca/sup 2 +/ during diastole.

  10. Donor pretreatment with carbon monoxide prevents ischemia/reperfusion injury following heart transplantation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fujisaki, Noritomo; Kohama, Keisuke; Nishimura, Takeshi; Yamashita, Hayato; Ishikawa, Michiko; Kanematsu, Akihiro; Yamada, Taihei; Lee, Sungsoo; Yumoto, Tetsuya; Tsukahara, Kohei; Kotani, Joji; Nakao, Atsunori

    2016-01-01

    Because inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) provides potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects against ischemia reperfusion injury, we hypothesized that treatment of organ donors with inhaled CO would decrease graft injury after heart transplantation. Hearts were heterotopically transplanted into syngeneic Lewis rats after 8 hours of cold preservation in University of Wisconsin solution. Donor rats were exposed to CO at a concentration of 250 parts per million for 24 hours via a gas-exposure chamber. Severity of myocardial injury was determined by total serum creatine phosphokinase and troponin I levels at three hours after reperfusion. In addition, Affymetrix gene array analysis of mRNA transcripts was performed on the heart graft tissue prior to implantation. Recipients of grafts from CO-exposed donors had lower levels of serum troponin I and creatine phosphokinase; less upregulation of mRNA for interleukin-6, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and tumor necrosis factor-α; and fewer infiltrating cells. Although donor pretreatment with CO altered the expression of 49 genes expressly represented on the array, we could not obtain meaningful data to explain the mechanisms by which CO potentiated the protective effects. Pretreatment with CO gas before organ procurement effectively protected cardiac grafts from ischemia reperfusion-induced injury in a rat heterotopic cardiac transplant model. A clinical report review indicated that CO-poisoned organ donors may be comparable to non-poisoned donors. PMID:27867479

  11. Protective role of grape seed proanthocyanidin antioxidant properties on heart of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Esrafil; Khorsandi, Layasadat; Abdollahzade Fard, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Grape seed proanthocyanidin (GSP) bears a very powerful antioxidant effects. Studies demonstrated that proanthocyanidins protect against free radicals mediated cardiovascular and renal disorders. The present study was designed to assess the effect of GSP on the heart of diabetic rats. Forty rats were divided into four groups of 10 animals each: Group I: control, Group II: control group were given GSP, Group III: diabetic group, Group IV: diabetic group treated with GSP. Diabetes was induced by a single dose of streptozotocin, and then GSP (200 mg kg(-1) body weight) was administrated for four weeks. Blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and also the levels of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes were examined in the heart tissues of all groups. Oral administration of GSP to diabetic rats significantly reduced (p < 0.05) heart weight, blood glucose, HbA1c and lipid peroxidation level, but increased (p < 0.05) body weight and activities antioxidant enzymes when compared to diabetic group. The results indicated that GSP could be useful for prevention or early treatment of cardiac disorder caused by diabetes.

  12. Altered heart and kidney phospholipid fatty acid composition are associated with cardiac hypertrophy in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Oh Yoen; Jung, Young-Sang; Cho, Yoonsu; Chung, Ji Hyung; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2013-08-01

    We examined the association of cardiac hypertrophy or fibrosis with the phospholipid fatty acid (FA) composition of heart and kidney in hypertensive rats. Eight-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) (n=8) and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKYs, n=8) as a normotensive control, were fed ad libitum for 6 weeks with regular AIN-76 diet. Phospholipid FA compositions in the left ventricle and kidney were measured and histological analyses were performed. Compared with WKYs, SHRs had lower proportions of γ-linolenic acid, α-linolenic acid, eicosadienoic acid, eicosatrienoic acid, dihomo-γ-linoleic acid, docosadienoic acid and nervonic acid in heart, and stearic acid (SA), γ-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in kidney. After adjusting for food intake, SHRs still maintained higher proportions of SA, and total saturated FAs in the heart and a lower proportion of eicosapentaenoic acid in the kidney. Additionally, compared with WKYs, SHRs showed larger cardiomyocyte diameters in the left ventricles, indicating cardiac hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Cardiomyocyte diameters also positively correlated with cardiac SA (r=0.550, p<0.05) and negatively with kidney EPA (r=-0.575, p<0.05). Tissue FA compositions were associated with cardiac hypertrophy in a hypertensive setting, implicating the pathogenic role of tissue FAs in hypertension and related complications. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxidative Stress in the Heart of Rats Infected with Trypanosoma evansi

    PubMed Central

    Baldissera, Matheus D.; Souza, Carine de F.; Bertoncheli, Cláudia M.; da Silveira, Karine L.; Grando, Thirssa H.; Porto, Bianca C. Z.; Leal, Daniela B. R.; Silva, Aleksandro S. Da; Mendes, Ricardo E.; Stefani, Lenita M.; Monteiro, Silvia G.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of oxidative stress in the heart tissue of rats infected with Trypanosoma evansi. Rats were divided into 2 groups (A and B) with 12 animals each, and further subdivided into 4 subgroups (A1 and A2, 6 animals/each; and B1 and B2, 6 animals/each). Animals in the groups B1 and B2 were subcutaneously inoculated with T. evansi. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione S-transferase activity (GST), reduced glutathione activity (GSH), and non-protein thiols (NPSH) in the heart tissue were evaluated. At day 5 and 15 post-infection (PI), an increase in the TBARS levels and a decrease in the SOD activity (P<0.05) were observed. GSH and GST activities were decreased in infected animals at day 15 PI (P<0.05). Considering the proper functioning of the heart, it is possible that the changes in the activity of these enzymes involved in the oxidative stress may be related, at least in part, in the pathophysiology of rats infected with T. evansi. PMID:27417077

  14. Bi-ventricular finite element model of right ventricle overload in the healthy rat heart.

    PubMed

    Masithulela, Fulufhelo

    2016-11-25

    The recognition of RV overpressure is critical to human life, as this may signify morbidity and mortality. Right ventricle (RV) dysfunction is understood to have an impact on the performance of the left ventricle (LV), but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. It is understood that ventricular compliance has the ability to affect cardiac performance. In this study, a bi-ventricular model of the rat heart was used in preference to other, single-ventricle models. Finite element analysis (FEA) of the bi-ventricular model provides important information on the function of the healthy heart. The passive myocardium was modelled as a nearly incompressible, hyperelastic, transversely isotropic material using finite element (FE) methods. Bi-ventricular geometries of healthy rat hearts reconstructed from magnetic resonance images were imported in Abaqus©. In simulating the normal passive filling of the rat heart, pressures of 4.8 kPa and 0.0098 kPa were applied to the inner walls of the LV and RV respectively. In addition, to simulate the overpressure of the RV, pressures of 2.4 kPa and 4.8 kPa were applied to the endocardial walls of the LV and RV respectively. As boundary conditions, the circumferential and longitudinal displacements at the base were set to zero. The radial displacements at the base were left free. The results show that the average circumferential stress at the mid-wall in the overloaded model increased from 2.8 kPa to 18.2 kPa. The average longitudinal stress increased from 1.5 kPa to 9.7 kPa. Additionally, in the radial direction, the average stress increased from 0.1 kPa to 0.6 kPa in the mid-wall. The average circumferential strain was found to be 0.138 and 0.100 on the endocardium of the over pressured and healthy model respectively. The average circumferential stress at the epicardium, mid-wall and endocardium in the case of a normal heart is 10 times lower than in the overloaded heart model. The finite analysis method is able to provide

  15. [Pharmacologic effects of mansonine on arrhythmias induced in isolated rat heart].

    PubMed

    Ehile, E E; Mensah-Nyagan, A; Guédé, G F; Aka, K J

    1991-01-01

    The effect of 3 x 10(-13) M Mansonine (MSN) was observed on arrythmias induced on isolated rat heart, perfused with either hypopotassic solution, atropine solution, or MacEwen physiological saline at 18 degrees C. Generally the reversal of induced arrythmias was complete with the hypopotassic solution, and partial with the MacEwen solution at 18 degrees C. On the other hand, when atropine and MSN were combined, their effects induced heart arrest, probably due to an intracellular calcium accumulation. In this case, the heart recovery occurred by preventing the calcium influx, either through EDTA chelation, or blockade of calcium channels. It was concluded that MSN probably acts like most cardiac glycosides, by blocking the Na(+)-K+ ATPase. This may activate a calcium influx, which causes the subsequent positive inotropic effect, as well as a negative chronotropic effect due to an increase of the membrane activation set point.

  16. Exposure of rats to ozone: evidence of damage to heart and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, I.; Massaro, G.D.; Massaro, D. )

    1992-01-01

    Ozone is a strong oxidizing agent, and in many locations it is a major atmospheric pollutant. It is phytotoxic and an important cause of lung dysfunction in humans. Recently, a significant association has been established between total atmospheric oxidants, of which ozone is one, and daily cardiovascular mortality rates. In this article, we show that exposure of rats to ozone for 5 days, in a concentration found in major urban centers, results in an increased concentration of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material (an indicator of lipid peroxidation) in heart and brain tissue as well as elevated activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase (enzymic scavengers of peroxides) in these tissues. We examined the heart anatomically and found evidence of extracellular and intracellular edema. These findings indicate that the heart and brain are damaged by a concentration of ozone present in major urban centers; they may have important implications for chronic illness and degenerative processes in humans.

  17. Effects of horsefly (Tabanidae) salivary gland extracts on isolated perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Rajská, P; Knezl, V; Kazimírová, M; Takác, P; Roller, L; Vidlicka, L; Ciampor, F; Labuda, M; Weston-Davies, W; Nuttall, P A

    2007-12-01

    The speed with which horseflies (Diptera: Tabanidae) obtain a bloodmeal suggests they have potent vasodilators. We used isolated perfused rat heart to examine the vasoactivity of salivary gland extracts (SGEs) of three horsefly species, Hybomitra bimaculata Macquart, Tabanus bromius Linnaeus and Tabanus glaucopis Meigen. Administration of horsefly SGEs to the heart produced biphasic coronary responses: a decrease and subsequent increase in coronary flow (CF), characterized by initial vasoconstriction followed by prolonged vasodilation of coronary vessels. However, although SGEs of H. bimaculata induced a significant decrease in left ventricular pressure (LVP), the effect on changes in CF was not significant except at the highest dose tested. The ability to reduce LVP without significantly lowering CF, or affecting heart rate and rhythm, represents a unique set of properties that have considerable therapeutic potential if they can be reproduced by a single molecule.

  18. Pharmacology of Casimiroa edulis; Part I. Blood pressure and heart rate effects in the anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Magos, G A; Vidrio, H

    1991-02-01

    The effect of an alcoholic extract of seeds of Casimiroa edulis on blood pressure and heart rate was determined in rats anesthetized with pentobarbital and compared with that of histamine. The extract induced hypotension, accompanied at high doses by tachycardia. Hypotension after histamine was more transient and was not accompanied by changes in heart rate. Experiments with a variety of autonomic antagonists revealed that extract-induced hypotension was not mediated by histamine H2, muscarinic, or beta-adrenergic receptors, but involved an H1 mechanism. After H1 blockade, the depressor response was reversed to a pressor effect, mediated by alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation. The increase in heart rate was due in part to H1 and in part to beta-adrenergic receptor activation. It was suggested that imidazole derivatives could be responsible for the depressor effect observed. The pressor response could be caused by these or other components of the extract.

  19. Modulation of {beta}-adrenoceptor signaling in the hearts of 4-wk simulated weightlessness rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wen; Liu, Jin-Cheng; Fan, Rong; Sun, Xi-Qing; Ma, Jin; Feng, Na; Zhang, Quan Yu; Yin, Zhao; Zhang, Shu-Miao; Guo, Hai-Tao; Bi, Hui; Wang, Yue-Min; Sun, Xin; Cheng, Liang; Cui, Qin; Yu, Shi-Qiang; Yi, Ding-Hua; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2008-08-01

    The modulation of beta-adrenoceptor signaling in the hearts of hindlimb unweighting (HU) simulated weightlessness rats has not been reported. In the present study, we adopted the rat tail suspension for 4 wk to simulate weightlessness; then the effects of simulated microgravity on beta-adrenoceptor signaling were studied. Mean arterial blood pressure (ABP), left ventricular pressure (LVP), systolic function (+dP/dtmax), and diastolic function (-dP/dtmax) were monitored in the course of the in vivo experiment. Single rat ventricular myocyte was obtained by the enzymatic dissociation method. Hemodynamics, myocyte contraction, and cAMP production in response to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation with isoproterenol or adenylyl cyclase stimulation with forskolin were measured, and Gs protein was also determined. Compared with the control group, no significant changes were found in heart weight, body weight and ABP, while LVP and +/-dP/dtmax were significantly reduced. The ABP decrease, LVP increase, and +/-dP/dtmax in response to isoproterenol administration were significantly attenuated in the HU group. The effects of isoproterenol on electrically induced single-cell contraction and cAMP production in myocytes of ventricles in the HU rats were significantly attenuated. The biologically active isoform, Gsalpha (45 kDa) in the heart, was unchanged. Both the increased electrically induced contraction and cAMP production in response to forskolin were also significantly attenuated in the simulated weightlessness rats. Above results indicated that impaired function of adenylyl cyclase causes beta-adrenoceptor desensitization, which may be partly responsible for the depression of cardiac function.

  20. Ethyl acetate fraction of Allium hirtifolium improves functional parameters of isolated hearts of diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghi, Sara; Hesari, Mahvash; Godini, Aliashraf; Shackebaei, Dareuosh; Mostafaie, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Allium hirtifolium (Persian shallot) has a hypoglycemic effect on diabetic animals. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the ethyl acetate fraction of Allium hirtifolium on the function of isolated hearts of diabetic rats. Methods: The control and diabetic animals were randomly divided into four groups: saline- or extract-treated controls (n=10 and n=6, respectively) and saline- or extract-treated diabetic rats (n=8 and n=9, respectively), which received normal saline or extract for four weeks by daily gavage. The hearts were perfused according to the Langendorff method. Cardiac function parameters, including left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), heart rate (HR), rate pressure product (RPP; LVDP´HR), and dp/dt were measured. Results The findings of this study showed that in the extract-treated diabetic rats, LVDP (94.5±9.1 mm Hg, mean±SEM), HR (249±15 beats/min), RPP (22732±1246) and +dp/dt (2598±230) at the baseline were significantly higher than those in the saline-treated diabetic animals, (71.5±4.0), (189±6), (13923±984), and (1701±124), respectively. Furthermore, RPP and HR were also significantly higher than the corresponding values obtained in the saline-treated diabetic rats after ischemia. Conclusion Besides blood glucose lowering action, oral administration of the ethyl acetate fraction of Allium hirtifolium significantly improved the baseline and post-ischemic cardiac function parameters in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. PMID:28344215

  1. Cardiac sympathetic afferent denervation attenuates cardiac remodeling and improves cardiovascular dysfunction in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han-Jun; Wang, Wei; Cornish, Kurtis G; Rozanski, George J; Zucker, Irving H

    2014-10-01

    The enhanced cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) contributes to the exaggerated sympathoexcitation in chronic heart failure (CHF). Increased sympathoexcitation is positively related to mortality in patients with CHF. However, the potential beneficial effects of chronic CSAR deletion on cardiac and autonomic function in CHF have not been previously explored. Here, we determined the effects of chronic CSAR deletion on cardiac remodeling and autonomic dysfunction in CHF. To delete the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor-expressing CSAR afferents selectively, epicardial application of resiniferatoxin (50 μg/mL), an ultrapotent analog of capsaicin, was performed during myocardium infarction surgery in rats. This procedure largely abolished the enhanced CSAR, prevented the exaggerated renal and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and improved baroreflex sensitivity in CHF rats. Most importantly, we found that epicardial application of resiniferatoxin largely prevented the elevated left ventricle end-diastolic pressure, lung edema, and cardiac hypertrophy, partially reduced left ventricular dimensions in the failing heart, and increased cardiac contractile reserve in response to β-adrenergic receptor stimulation with isoproterenol in CHF rats. Molecular evidence showed that resiniferatoxin attenuated cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis and reduced expression of fibrotic markers and transforming growth factor-β receptor I in CHF rats. Pressure-volume loop analysis showed that resiniferatoxin reduced the end-diastolic pressure volume relationships in CHF rats, indicating improved cardiac compliance. In summary, cardiac sympathetic afferent deletion exhibits protective effects against deleterious cardiac remodeling and autonomic dysfunction in CHF. These data suggest a potential new paradigm and therapeutic potential in the management of CHF. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Decreased adrenoceptor stimulation in heart failure rats reduces NGF expression by cardiac parasympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Wohaib; Smith, Peter G

    2014-04-01

    Postganglionic cardiac parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves are physically proximate in atrial cardiac tissue allowing reciprocal inhibition of neurotransmitter release, depending on demands from central cardiovascular centers or reflex pathways. Parasympathetic cardiac ganglion (CG) neurons synthesize and release the sympathetic neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), which may serve to maintain these close connections. In this study we investigated whether NGF synthesis by CG neurons is altered in heart failure, and whether norepinephrine from sympathetic neurons promotes NGF synthesis. NGF and proNGF immunoreactivity in CG neurons in heart failure rats following chronic coronary artery ligation was investigated. NGF immunoreactivity was decreased significantly in heart failure rats compared to sham-operated animals, whereas proNGF expression was unchanged. Changes in neurochemistry of CG neurons included attenuated expression of the cholinergic marker vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and increased expression of the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. To further investigate norepinephrine's role in promoting NGF synthesis, we cultured CG neurons treated with adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists. An 82% increase in NGF mRNA levels was detected after 1h of isoproterenol (β-AR agonist) treatment, which increased an additional 22% at 24h. Antagonist treatment blocked isoproterenol-induced increases in NGF transcripts. In contrast, the α-AR agonist phenylephrine did not alter NGF mRNA expression. These results are consistent with β-AR mediated maintenance of NGF synthesis in CG neurons. In heart failure, a decrease in NGF synthesis by CG neurons may potentially contribute to reduced connections with adjacent sympathetic nerves.

  3. Effect of black grape juice against heart damage from acute gamma TBI in rats.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Robson Borba; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Rovani, Bruno Tomazele; Piana, Mariana; de Brum, Thiele Faccim; da Silva Jesus, Roberta; Rother, Fagner Chagas; Alves, Nelson Mendes; Teixeira da Rocha, João Batista; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Barrio, Juan Pablo; de Andrade, Edson Ramos; de Freitas Bauerman, Liliane

    2013-09-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential positive effect of black grape juice (BGJ) on lipid peroxidation considering Total Body Irradiation (TBI) in Wistar rats. As a potential feasible means of evaluation in situ, blood serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were evaluated as a marker for heart damage from acute radiation syndrome (ARS). Twenty rats were divided into four groups, two of them being irradiated by gamma-rays from a Co-60 source. Animals were treated by gavage with 2 mL per day of BGJ or placebo for one week before and 4 days after 6 Gy whole body gamma-irradiation, when they were euthanasiated. LDH on serum and lipid peroxidation on heart tissue were evaluated. High concentration of metabolites from lipid peroxidation in heart, and high LDH level on serum were found only in gamma-irradiated group given placebo, mainly at the first 24 h after radiation. Phytochemical analysis of BGJ was performed by determining total phenolics, flavonoids, and tannins followed by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC/DAD) analysis, which showed resveratrol as the major constituent. Results suggest that BGJ is a good protective candidate compound against heart damage from ARS and its effects suggest its use as a radiomodifier.

  4. Comparison of Carbon Dioxide and Argon Euthanasia: Effects on Behavior, Heart Rate, and Respiratory Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, Tanya H; Niel, Lee; Weed, James L; Brinster, Lauren R; Bacher, John D; Foltz, Charmaine J

    2010-01-01

    In this study we compared rat (n = 16) responses to euthanasia with either gradual-fill CO2 or rapid induction argon gas by evaluating the animals' heart rate via radiotelemetry, behavior, and vocalizations. We also evaluated the histologic effects of the gases. Rats were placed in an open test chamber 24 h before the start of the experiment. During baseline tests, rats were exposed to oxygen to evaluate the effects of the noise and movement of gas entering the chamber; 1 wk later, rats were euthanized by gas displacement with either 10%/min CO2 or 50%/min argon gas. Rats tended to have higher heart rats and were more active during the baseline test, but these parameters were normal before the euthanasia experiment, suggesting that the rats had acclimated to the equipment. Heart rate, behavior, and ultrasonic vocalizations were recorded for 2 min after gas introduction in both groups. All rats appeared conscious throughout the test interval. The heart rates of rats exposed to argon did not change, whereas those of rats exposed to CO2 declined significantly. Unlike those exposed to CO2, rats euthanized with argon gas gasped and demonstrated seizure-like activity. There were no differences in the pulmonary lesions resulting from death by either gas. Our results suggest that argon as a sole euthanasia agent is aversive to rats. CO2 using a 10%/min displacement may be less aversive than more rapid displacements. Future research investigating methods of euthanasia should allow sufficient time for the rats to acclimate to the test apparatus. PMID:20819391

  5. Comparison of carbon dioxide and argon euthanasia: effects on behavior, heart rate, and respiratory lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Tanya H; Niel, Lee; Weed, James L; Brinster, Lauren R; Bacher, John D; Foltz, Charmaine J

    2010-07-01

    In this study we compared rat (n = 16) responses to euthanasia with either gradual-fill CO(2) or rapid induction argon gas by evaluating the animals' heart rate via radiotelemetry, behavior, and vocalizations. We also evaluated the histologic effects of the gases. Rats were placed in an open test chamber 24 h before the start of the experiment. During baseline tests, rats were exposed to oxygen to evaluate the effects of the noise and movement of gas entering the chamber; 1 wk later, rats were euthanized by gas displacement with either 10%/min CO(2) or 50%/min argon gas. Rats tended to have higher heart rats and were more active during the baseline test, but these parameters were normal before the euthanasia experiment, suggesting that the rats had acclimated to the equipment. Heart rate, behavior, and ultrasonic vocalizations were recorded for 2 min after gas introduction in both groups. All rats appeared conscious throughout the test interval. The heart rates of rats exposed to argon did not change, whereas those of rats exposed to CO(2) declined significantly. Unlike those exposed to CO(2), rats euthanized with argon gas gasped and demonstrated seizure-like activity. There were no differences in the pulmonary lesions resulting from death by either gas. Our results suggest that argon as a sole euthanasia agent is aversive to rats. CO(2) using a 10%/min displacement may be less aversive than more rapid displacements. Future research investigating methods of euthanasia should allow sufficient time for the rats to acclimate to the test apparatus.

  6. Downregulation of L-type Ca2+ channel in rat mesenteric arteries leads to loss of smooth muscle contractile phenotype and inward hypertrophic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtseva, Olga; Herum, Kate Møller; Dam, Vibeke Secher; Straarup, Marthe Simonsen; Kamaev, Dmitry; Briggs Boedtkjer, Donna M; Matchkov, Vladimir V; Aalkjær, Christian

    2014-05-01

    L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) are important for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction, as well as VSMC differentiation, as indicated by loss of LTCCs during VSMC dedifferentiation. However, it is not clear whether loss of LTCCs is a primary event underlying phenotypic modulation or whether loss of LTCCs has significance for vascular structure. We used small interference RNA (siRNA) transfection in vivo to investigate the role of LTCCs in VSMC phenotypic expression and structure of rat mesenteric arteries. siRNA reduced LTCC mRNA and protein expression in rat mesenteric arteries 3 days after siRNA transfection to 12.7 ± 0.7% and 47.3 ± 13%, respectively: this was associated with an increased resting intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Despite the high [Ca(2+)]i, the contractility was reduced (tension development to norepinephrine was 3.5 ± 0.2 N/m and 0.8 ± 0.2 N/m for sham-transfected and downregulated arteries respectively; P < 0.05). Expression of contractile phenotype marker genes was reduced in arteries downregulated for LTCCs. Phenotypic changes were associated with a 45% increase in number of VSMCs and a consequent increase of media thickness and media area. Ten days after siRNA transfection arterial structure was again normalized. The contractile responses of LTCC-siRNA transfected arteries were elevated in comparison with matched controls 10 days after transfection. The study provides strong evidence for causal relationships between LTCC expression and VSMC contractile phenotype, as well as novel data addressing the complex relationship between VSMC contractility, phenotype, and vascular structure. These findings are relevant for understanding diseases, associated with phenotype changes of VSMC and vascular remodeling, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension.

  7. Effect of Angiotensin(1-7) on Heart Function in an Experimental Rat Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Katja; Schlegel, Franziska; Raasch, Walter; Bader, Michael; Dähnert, Ingo; Dhein, Stefan; Salameh, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Obesity is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Recently it was shown that overexpression of the Mas-receptor antagonist angiotensin(1-7) could prevent from diet-induced obesity. However, it remained unclear whether diet-induced obesity and angiotensin(1-7) overexpression might also have effects on the cardiovascular system in these rats. Methods:Twenty three male Sprague Dawley rats were fed with standard chow (SD+chow, n = 5) or a cafeteria diet (SD+CD, n = 6) for 5 months. To investigate the effect of angiotensin(1-7) transgenic rats, expressing an angiotensin(1-7)-producing fusion protein in testis were used. These transgenic rats also received a 5 month's feeding period with either chow (TGR+chow, n = 6) or cafeteria diet (TGR+CD, n = 6), respectively. Hemodynamic measurements (pressure-volume loops) were carried out to assess cardiac function and blood pressure. Subsequently, hearts were explanted and investigated according to the Langendorff technique. Furthermore, cardiac remodeling in these animals was investigated histologically. Results:After 5 months cafeteria diet feeding rats showed a significantly increased body weight, which could be prevented in transgenic rats. However, there was no effect on cardiac performance after cafeteria diet in non-transgenic and transgenic rats. Moreover, overexpression of angiotensin(1-7) deteriorated cardiac contractility as indicated by impaired dp/dt. Furthermore, histological analysis revealed that cafeteria diet led to myocardial fibrosis in both, control and transgenic rats and this was not inhibited by an overproduction of angiotensin(1-7). Conclusion:These results indicate that an overexpression of circulating angiotensin(1-7) prevents a cafeteria diet-induced increase in body weight, but does not affect cardiac performance in this experimental rat model of obesity. Furthermore, overexpression of angiotensin(1-7) alone resulted in an impairment of cardiac function. PMID:26733884

  8. [Dynamic detection of surface blood flow in rat heart and its application in real time identification of myocardial infarction model].

    PubMed

    Lei, Q; Chen, C; Wu, X L; Chen, W J; Yi, T; Ma, M D; He, Y; Shui, X R; Huang, S A; Chen, C; Lei, W

    2017-04-04

    Objective: To establish a method for monitoring the surface blood flow in the heart of rats, and to clarify the relationship between the degree of myocardial infarction and the blood perfusion on the surface of the heart, so as to provide a new indicator for the identification of rat myocardial infarction model. Methods: The rats were divided into control group (n=23) and model group (n=107), the rat hearts were scanned by the laser doppler perfusion imager before and after operation respectively, and the data was analyzed to acquire the rate of surface blood flow change of the heart. Myocardial infarction size of model group was detected by NBT. Model group were divided into three subgroups of mild myocardial infarction, moderate myocardial infarction and severe myocardial infarction according to the myocardial infarction size, and an analysis was made on the correlativity between rate of surface blood flow change of the heart and myocardial infarction size. Results: Myocardial infarction size was highly correlated to the rate of surface blood flow change of the heart in model group (r=0.849 6, P<0.000 1). There was no significant correlation between infarction size and heart blood flow in the mild myocardial infarction subgroup (r=-0.133 6, P>0.05), while the correlation in moderate myocardial infarction was significant (r=0.721 7, P<0.000 1), and the highest correlation was shown in severe myocardial infarction subgroup (r=0.910 2, P<0.000 1). Conclusion: The heart surface blood flow has a close relationship with the myocardial infarction size in rat, so the change of heart blood perfusion can beused as an effective reference to establish and identify rat myocardial infarction model.

  9. The Role of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor in Modulation of Heart Rate Dynamics in Endotoxemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mazloom, Roham; Eftekhari, Golnar; Rahimi, Maryam; Khori, Vahid; Hajizadeh, Sohrab; Dehpour, Ahmad R.; Mani, Ali R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that artificial stimulation of the vagus nerve reduces systemic inflammation in experimental models of sepsis. This phenomenon is a part of a broader cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway which activates the vagus nerve to modulate inflammation through activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nACHR). Heart rate variability represents the complex interplay between autonomic nervous system and cardiac pacemaker cells. Reduced heart rate variability and increased cardiac cycle regularity is a hallmark of clinical conditions that are associated with systemic inflammation (e.g. endotoxemia and sepsis). The present study was aimed to assess the role of α7nACHR in modulation of heart rate dynamics during systemic inflammation. Systemic inflammation was induced by injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) in rats. Electrocardiogram and body temperature were recorded in conscious animals using a telemetric system. Linear and non-linear indices of heart rate variability (e.g. sample entropy and fractal-like temporal structure) were assessed. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed that α7nACHR is expressed in rat atrium and is mainly localized at the endothelial layer. Systemic administration of an α7nACHR antagonist (methyllycaconitine) did not show a significant effect on body temperature or heart rate dynamics in naïve rats. However, α7nACHR blockade could further reduce heart rate variability and elicit a febrile response in endotoxemic rats. Pre-treatment of endotoxemic animals with an α7nACHR agonist (PHA-543613) was unable to modulate heart rate dynamics in endotoxemic rats but could prevent the effect of endotoxin on body temperature within 24 h experiment. Neither methyllycaconitine nor PHA-543613 could affect cardiac beating variability of isolated perfused hearts taken from control or endotoxemic rats. Based on our observations we suggest a tonic role for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in

  10. The effects of prenatal exposure to a 900-MHz electromagnetic field on the 21-day-old male rat heart.

    PubMed

    Türedi, Sibel; Hancı, Hatice; Topal, Zehra; Ünal, Deniz; Mercantepe, Tolga; Bozkurt, İlyas; Kaya, Haydar; Odacı, Ersan

    2015-01-01

    The growing spread of mobile phone use is raising concerns about the effect on human health of the electromagnetic field (EMF) these devices emit. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on rat pup heart tissue of prenatal exposure to a 900 megahertz (MHz) EMF. For this purpose, pregnant rats were divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group rats were exposed to a 900 MHz EMF (1 h/d) on days 13-21 of pregnancy. Measurements were performed with rats inside the exposure box in order to determine the distribution of EMF intensity. Our measurements showed that pregnant experimental group rats were exposed to a mean electrical field intensity of 13.77 V/m inside the box (0.50 W/m(2)). This study continued with male rat pups obtained from both groups. Pups were sacrificed on postnatal day 21, and the heart tissues were extracted. Malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and catalase values were significantly higher in the experimental group rats, while glutathione values were lower. Light microscopy revealed irregularities in heart muscle fibers and apoptotic changes in the experimental group. Electron microscopy revealed crista loss and swelling in the mitochondria, degeneration in myofibrils and structural impairments in Z bands. Our study results suggest that exposure to EMF in the prenatal period causes oxidative stress and histopathological changes in male rat pup heart tissue.

  11. Lipotoxic heart disease in obese rats: Implications for human obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan-Ting; Grayburn, Paul; Karim, Asad; Shimabukuro, Michio; Higa, Moritake; Baetens, Dany; Orci, Lelio; Unger, Roger H.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the mechanism of the cardiac dilatation and reduced contractility of obese Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats, myocardial triacylglycerol (TG) was assayed chemically and morphologically. TG was high because of underexpression of fatty acid oxidative enzymes and their transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α. Levels of ceramide, a mediator of apoptosis, were 2–3 times those of controls and inducible nitric oxide synthase levels were 4 times greater than normal. Myocardial DNA laddering, an index of apoptosis, reached 20 times the normal level. Troglitazone therapy lowered myocardial TG and ceramide and completely prevented DNA laddering and loss of cardiac function. In this paper, we conclude that cardiac dysfunction in obesity is caused by lipoapoptosis and is prevented by reducing cardiac lipids. PMID:10677535

  12. Voluntary exercise delays heart failure onset in rats with pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Natali, Antonio J; Fowler, Ewan D; Calaghan, Sarah C; White, Ed

    2015-08-01

    Increased physical activity is recommended for the general population and for patients with many diseases because of its health benefits but can be contraindicated if it is thought to be a risk for serious cardiovascular events. One such condition is pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). PAH and right ventricular failure was induced in rats by a single injection of monocrotaline (MCT). MCT rats with voluntary access to a running wheel ran on average 2 km/day. The time for half the animals to develop heart failure signs (median survival time) was 28 days (exercise failure group), significantly longer than sedentary animals (sedentary failure group, 23 days). The contractility of single failing myocytes in response to increasing demand (stimulation frequency) was significantly impaired compared with that in both sedentary control and exercising control myocytes. However, myocytes from exercising MCT rats, tested at 23 days (exercise + MCT group), showed responses intermediate to the control (sedentary control and exercising control) and failing (sedentary failure and exercise failure) groups. We conclude that voluntary exercise is beneficial to rats with heart failure induced by PAH, and this is evidence to support the consideration of appropriate exercise regimes for potentially vulnerable groups. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Effect of acute exposure to ozone on heart rate and blood pressure of the conscious rat

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, I.; Simomura, Y.; Yokoyama, E.

    1985-12-01

    Electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure in conscious and unrestrained rats of various ages were recorded during a 3-hr exposure to filtered air or 1 ppm ozone (O/sub 3/). In general, heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure of rats significantly decreased during exposure to O/sub 3/, whereas these functional parameters remained almost stable during exposure to filtered air. Heart rate usually reached a plateau during the exposure to O/sub 3/. Additionally, PR interval and QRS complex significantly increased and premature atrial contraction and incomplete A-V block were frequently observed during the exposure to O/sub 3/. These circulatory effects of O/sub 3/ were more markedly manifested by rats 11 weeks old than either those 8 or 4 weeks old. On the other hand, no significant difference in the circulatory responses was observed between male and female rats. These circulatory effects of O/sub 3/ may be significant from the viewpoint of health effects, although its mechanisms remain unsolved.

  14. Exercise training attenuates the pressor response evoked by peripheral chemoreflex in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Calegari, Leonardo; Mozzaquattro, Bruna B; Rossato, Douglas D; Quagliotto, Edson; Ferreira, Janaina B; Rasia-Filho, Alberto; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2016-09-01

    The effects of exercise training (ExT) on the pressor response elicited by potassium cyanide (KCN) in the rat model of ischemia-induced heart failure (HF) are unknown. We evaluated the effects of ExT on chemoreflex sensitivity and its interaction with baroreflex in rats with HF. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: trained HF (Tr-HF), sedentary HF (Sed-HF), trained sham (Tr-Sham), and sedentary sham (Sed-Sham). Trained animals underwent to a treadmill running protocol for 8 weeks (60 m/day, 5 days/week, 16 m/min). After ExT, arterial pressure (AP), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), peripheral chemoreflex (KCN: 100 μg/kg body mass), and cardiac function were evaluated. The results demonstrate that ExT induces an improvement in BRS and attenuates the pressor response to KCN relative to the Sed-HF group (P < 0.05). The improvement in BRS was associated with a reduction in the pressor response following ExT in HF rats (P < 0.05). Moreover, ExT induced a reduction in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and pulmonary congestion compared with the Sed-HF group (P < 0.05). The pressor response to KCN in the hypotensive state is decreased in sedentary HF rats. These results suggest that ExT improves cardiac function and BRS and attenuates the pressor response evoked by KCN in HF rats.

  15. Effect of apelin on the cardiac hemodynamics in hypertensive rats with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    PANG, HUI; HAN, BING; YU, TAO; ZONG, ZHENKUN

    2014-01-01

    It is known that apelin has definite protective effects on various cardiovascular diseases; however, the mechanism through which hypertension with heart failure (H-HF) is affected by pyroglutamylated apelin-13 (Pyr-AP13) remain unclear. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of apelin on the cardiac hemodynamics in rats with hypertension and heart failure. In our study, cardiac function, dimensions and histological determination of the fibrosis of rats with two-kidney, one-clip induced hypertension and sham-operated rats were assessed using an echocardiography system and Masson’s trichrome. The infusion of either 5% glucose injection (GS) alone or 5% GS containing Pyr-AP13 as a dose, time-matched design on the cardiac hemodynamics in H-HF rats and sham-operated rats was recorded. For the determination of the effects of potential related proteins on cardiac hemodynamics in the H-HF rats, the animals were divided into 5 groups: i) the sham-operated group (n=8); ii) H-HF (n=8); iii) H-HF with infusion of 0.1 μg dose of Pyr-AP13 (n=8) or 5% glucose (GS) (n=8); iv) H-HF with infusion of 1 μg dose of Pyr-AP13 (n=8) or 5% GS (n=8); and v) H-HF with infusion of 10 μg dose of Pyr-AP13 (n=8) or 5% GS (n=8). The concentration of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) was determined by ELISA. The expression of membrane and cytosolic proteins was evaluated by western blot analysis. Significant cardiac and perivascular fibrosis was observed in the H-HF rats. Following the infusion of Pyr-AP13, the systolic and diastolic function was significantly improved in the cardiac hemodynamic parameters in the H-HF rats treated with Pyr-AP13. The apelin receptor (APJ), which was activated by the exogenous infusion of Pyr-AP13, was partially recycled from the cytoplasm back to the plasma membrane; however, membrane APJ was eventually downregulated in the H-HF rats treated with Pyr-AP13 compared with the sham-operated group rats. Our findings suggested that a

  16. Echo planar imaging of isolated perfused rat hearts at 4.7 T: a comparison of Langendorff and working heart preparations.

    PubMed

    Blackband, S J; Chatham, J C; O'Dell, W; Day, S

    1990-08-01

    The implementation of echo planar imaging at 4.7 T is demonstrated using a homebuilt gradient and radiofrequency assembly. The application of such a technique to the study of the isolated perfused rat heart is demonstrated. Langendorff and working heart perfusion preparations are compared and changes in the left ventricular volume shown are to be much larger in the working heart preparation. Such a methodology is expected to provide a useful model for the study of cardiac function and dynamics in the normal and diseased states under controlled perfusion conditions.

  17. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells embedded in platelet-rich fibrin scaffolds promote angiogenesis, preserve heart function, and reduce left ventricular remodeling in rat acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Lung; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Tsai, Tzu-Hsien; Chang, Li-Teh; Leu, Steve; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Chua, Sarah; Yeh, Kuo-Ho; Lu, Hung-I; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Lee, Fan-Yen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the hypothesis that autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) embedded in platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) can significant promote myocardial regeneration and repair after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Summary background: With avoiding the needle-related complications, PRF-embedded autologous ADMSCs graft provides a new effective stem cell-based therapeutic strategy for myocardial repair. Methods: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided (n = 8 per group) into group 1 (sham-operated), group 2 (AMI by ligating left coronary artery), group 3 (AMI+ PRF), and group 4 (AMI+PRF-embedded autologous ADMSCs). RPF with or without ADMSCs was patched on infarct area 1h after AMI induction. All animals were sacrificed on day 42 after echocardiography. Results: Left ventricular (LV) dimension and infarct/fibrotic areas were lowest in group 1, highest in group 2, in group 3 higher than in group 4, whereas LV performance and wall thickness exhibited a reversed pattern in all groups (all p < 0.001). Protein expressions of inflammatory (MMP-9, IL-1β), oxidative, apoptotic (Bax, cleaved PARP), fibrotic (Smad 3, TFG-β), hypertrophic (β-MHC), and heart failure (BNP) biomarkers displayed an identical pattern in infarct/fibrotic areas, whereas the protein expressions of anti-inflammatory (IL-10), anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2), anti-fibrotic (Smad1/5, BMP-2) biomarkers and α-MHC showed an opposite pattern (all p < 0.01). Angiogenic activities (c-Kit+, Sca-1+, CD31+, SDF-1α+, CXCR4+ cells; protein expressions of SDF-1α, CXCR4, VEGF) were highest in group 4 and lowest in group 1 (all p < 0.001). Conclusion: ADMSCs embedded in PRF offered significant benefit in preserving LV function and limiting LV remodeling after AMI. PMID:26175843

  18. Essential fatty acids alter the activity of manganese-superoxide dismutase in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Phylactos, A C; Harbige, L S; Crawford, M A

    1994-02-01

    The effects of oil-derived dietary essential fatty acids on the activities of mitchondrial Mn-SOD (manganese-superoxide dismutase) and cytosolic cupric zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) were investigated in rat heart. A control group of rats was fed a stock diet for 29 d, and a second group was fed on a fat-free diet. Three other groups were fed fat-free diets that were supplemented with (i) borage oil, which is rich in linoleic (18:2n-6) and gamma-linolenic (18:3n-6) acids, (ii) fungal oil, which is rich in gamma-linolenic, but low in linoleic acid, or (iii) evening primrose oil, which is rich in linoleic acid and low in gamma-linolenic acid. An increase in the percentage composition of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) in both the choline and ethanolamine phospholipids, together with a decrease in linoleic acid in ethanolamine phospholipids, were found in heart membranes after feeding the rats with diets containing borage oil or fungal oil as compared to those fed the stock diet. The respective activities of Mn-SOD in rats fed the borage or fungal oil diets were also significantly higher than in rats fed the stock diet alone. No change in cytosolic Cn/Zn-SOD activity was observed. Dietary supply of linoleic acid-rich evening primrose oil resulted in an increased proportion of choline phospholipid linoleic acid without any changes in arachidonic acid content or in the activity of Mn-SOD. By contrast, a reduction in the activity of Mn-SOD was detected in rats fed a fat-free diet.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Mediate Upregulation of Hypothalamic AT1 Receptors in Heart Failure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Weiss, Robert M.; Felder, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    In heart failure (HF), angiotensin type-1 receptor (AT1-R) expression is upregulated in brain regions regulating sympathetic drive, blood pressure and body fluid homeostasis. However, the mechanism by which brain AT1-R are upregulated in HF remains unknown. The present study examined the hypothesis that the angiotensin II (ANG II)-triggered mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) p44/42, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) contribute to upregulation of the AT1-R in the hypothalamus of rats with HF. AT1-R protein, AT1-R mRNA and AT1-R immunoreactivity increased in the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN) and the subfornical organ (SFO) of rats with ischemia-induced HF, compared with sham-operated controls. Phosphorylated p44/42 MAPK, JNK, and p38 MAPK also increased in PVN and SFO. A 4-week intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of the AT1-R antagonist losartan decreased AT1-R protein and phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK, JNK and p38 MAPK in the HF rats. A 4-week ICV infusion of the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD98059 or the JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly decreased AT1-R protein and AT1-R immunoreactivity in the PVN and SFO, but the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Treatment with ICV losartan, PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on AT1-R expression by Western blot in sham-operated rats. In untreated HF rats 4 weeks after coronary ligation, a 3-hour ICV infusion of PD98059, SP600125 or losartan reduced AT1-R mRNA in PVN and SFO. These data indicate that MAPK plays an important role in the upregulation of AT1-R in the rat forebrain in heart failure, and suggest that ANG II upregulates its own receptor by this mechanism. PMID:18768402

  20. High-dose Radiation Induced Heart Damage in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Kiscsatári, Laura; Sárközy, Márta; Kővári, Bence; Varga, Zoltán; Gömöri, Kamilla; Morvay, Nikolett; Leprán, István; Hegyesi, Hargita; Fábián, Gabriella; Cserni, Bálint; Cserni, Gábor; Csont, Tamás; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a concern during radiotherapy. For its comprehensive study, an in vivo selective heart irradiation model was developed. Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 50 Gy and functional imaging, biochemical (circulating growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and morphological (picrosirius red staining of the heart) objectives were tested. Signs and symptoms of RIHD occurred >12 weeks after irradiation with tachypnea, systolic and diastolic dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy and body development retardation. Plasma GDF-15 was increased 3, 12 and 26, while plasma TGF-beta was increased 12 weeks after irradiation. At autopsy, extensive pleural fluid was found in the irradiated animals. Interstitial fibrosis could be reliably detected and quantified in irradiated hearts after a follow-up time of 19 weeks. The studied parameters could be used in future experiments for testing protective agents for prevention of radiation heart injury. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Exogenous reactive oxygen species deplete the isolated rat heart of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Vaage, J; Antonelli, M; Bufi, M; Irtun, O; DeBlasi, R A; Corbucci, G G; Gasparetto, A; Semb, A G

    1997-01-01

    The effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on myocardial antioxidants and on the activity of oxidative mitochondrial enzymes were investigated in the following groups of isolated, perfused rat hearts. I: After stabilization the hearts freeze clamped in liquid nitrogen (n = 7). II: Hearts frozen after stabilization and perfusion for 10 min with xanthine oxidase (XO) (25 U/l) and hypoxanthine (HX) (1 mM) as a ROS-producing system (n = 7). III: Like group II, but recovered for 30 min after perfusion with XO + HX (n = 9). IV: The hearts were perfused and freeze-clamped as in group III, but without XO + HX (n = 7). XO + HX reduced left ventricular developed pressure and coronary flow to approximately 50% of the baseline value. Myocardial content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) increased at the end of XO + HX perfusion, indicating that generation of ROS and lipid peroxidation occurred. Levels of H2O2 and MDA normalized during recovery. Superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione and alpha-tocopherol were all reduced after ROS-induced injury. ROS did not significantly influence the tissue content of coenzyme Q10 (neither total, oxidized, nor reduced), cytochrome c oxidase, and succinate cytochrome c reductase. The present findings indicate that the reduced contractile function was not correlated to reduced activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. ROS depleted the myocardium of antioxidants, leaving the heart more sensitive to the action of oxidative injury.

  2. Heart mass and blood pressure have separate genetic determinants in the New Zealand genetically hypertensive (GH) rat.

    PubMed

    Harris, E L; Phelan, E L; Thompson, C M; Millar, J A; Grigor, M R

    1995-04-01

    To determine associations between cardiovascular parameters and genotype in 205 F2 rats of both sexes and lineages from reciprocal crosses made between rats of the New Zealand genetically hypertensive (GH) and Brown Norway (BN) rat strains. Systolic tail blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, pulse rate, heart mass, body mass and relative heart mass were determined for each rat in the age range 17-19 weeks, and DNA polymorphisms were examined for the guanylyl cyclase A (GCA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and renin (REN) genes. The phenotypic data indicated the presence of genes on the X and Y chromosomes that affected blood pressure. The GH GCA allele, in males only, and the GH ACE allele, in females only, both cosegregated with increased blood pressure. The ACE effect was confined to rats of one lineage only, namely those with GH grandfathers. A cosegregation of the GH REN allele with decreased blood pressure was also detected in females with BN grandfathers. In contrast, the GH REN allele cosegregated with a smaller heart in males only, whereas the GH ACE allele cosegregated with a larger heart both in males and in females. In males this was the consequence of a decrease in body mass with no change in absolute heart mass, whereas in females there were changes in both of these parameters. The results show that cardiac hypertrophy and blood pressure have independent genetic determinants in the GH rat, and indicate the importance of sex in determining the phenotypic expression of genes underlying cardiovascular pathology.

  3. Persistent effects after trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation by mandibular extension on rat blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Lapi, D; Colantuoni, A; Del Seppia, C; Ghione, S; Tonlorenzi, D; Brunelli, M; Scuri, R

    2013-03-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex is a brainstem reflex known to lead to a decrement in heart rate and blood pressure, whereas few data have been collected about its effects on the cerebral hemodynamic. In this study we assess the in vivo effects of trigeminal nerve peripheral stimulation by mandibular extension on pial microcirculation and systemic arterial blood pressure in rats. Experiments were performed in male Wistar rats subjected to mandibular extension obtained inserting an ad hoc developed retractor between the dental arches. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate were recorded and the pial arterioles were visualized by fluorescence microscopy to measure the vessel diameters before (15 minutes) during (5-15 minutes) and after (80 minutes) mandibular extension. While in control rats (sham-operated rats) and in rats subjected to the dissection of the trigeminal peripheral branches mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation did not change during the whole observation period (110 minutes), in rats submitted to mandibular extension, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and arteriolar diameter significantly decreased during stimulation. Afterward mean arterial blood pressure remained reduced as well as heart rate, while arteriolar diameter significantly increased evidencing a vasodilatation persisting for the whole remaining observation time. Therefore, trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation appears to trigger specific mechanisms regulating systemic arterial blood pressure and pial microcirculation.

  4. Chronic exposure to zinc oxide nanoparticles increases ischemic-reperfusion injuries in isolated rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milivojević, Tamara; Drobne, Damjana; Romih, Tea; Mali, Lilijana Bizjak; Marin, Irena; Lunder, Mojca; Drevenšek, Gorazd

    2016-10-01

    The use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in numerous products is increasing, although possible negative implications of their long-term consumption are not known yet. Our aim was to evaluate the chronic, 6-week oral exposure to two different concentrations of ZnO NPs on isolated rat hearts exposed to ischemic-reperfusion injury and on small intestine morphology. Wistar rats of both sexes ( n = 18) were randomly divided into three groups: (1) 4 mg/kg ZnO NPs, (2) 40 mg/kg ZnO NPs, and (3) control. After 6 weeks of treatment, the hearts were isolated, the left ventricular pressure (LVP), the coronary flow (CF), the duration of arrhythmias and the lactate dehydrogenase release rate (LDH) were measured. A histological investigation of the small intestine was performed. Chronic exposure to ZnO NPs acted cardiotoxic dose-dependently. ZnO NPs in dosage 40 mg/kg maximally decreased LVP (3.3-fold) and CF (2.5-fold) and increased the duration of ventricular tachycardia (all P < 0.01) compared to control, whereas ZnO NPs in dosage 4 mg/kg acted less cardiotoxic. Goblet cells in the small intestine epithelium of rats, treated with 40 mg ZnO NPs/kg, were enlarged, swollen and numerous, the intestinal epithelium width was increased. Unexpectedly, ZnO NPs in both dosages significantly decreased LDH. A 6-week oral exposure to ZnO NPs dose-dependently increased heart injuries and caused irritation of the intestinal mucosa. A prolonged exposure to ZnO NPs might cause functional damage to the heart even with exposures to the recommended daily doses, which should be tested in future studies.

  5. [Effect of 2,3-butanedione monoxime on calcium paradox-induced heart injury in rats].

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling-Heng; Gu, Xiao-Ming; Su, Xing-Li; Sun, Na; Wei, Ming; Zhu, Juan-Xia; Chang, Pan; Zhou, Jing-Jun

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the Effect of 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) on calcium paradox-induced heart injury and its underlying mechanisms. Thirty-two adult male SD rats were randomized into 4 groups, namely the control group, BDM treatment control group, calcium paradox group, and BDM treatment group. Isolated Sprague Dawley male rat hearts underwent Langendorff perfusion and the left ventricular pressure (LVP) and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) were monitored. Left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) was calculated to evaluate the myocardial performance. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) content in the coronary flow was determined. Triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining was used to measure the infarct size, and myocardial cell apoptosis was tested with TUNEL method. Western blotting was used to determine the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cytochrome c. Compared with the control group, BDM at 20 mmol/L had no effect on cardiac performance, cell death, apoptotic index or the content of LDH, cleaved caspase-3 and cytochrome c at the end of perfusion under control conditions (P>0.05). Calcium paradox treatment significantly decreased the cardiac function and the level of LVDP and induced a larger infarct size (P<0.01), an increased myocardial apoptosis index (P<0.01), and up-regulated expressions of cleaved caspase-3 and cytochrome c (P<0.01). BDM (20 mmol/L) significantly attenuated these effects induced by calcium paradox, and markedly down-regulated the levels of LVEDP and LDH (P<0.01), lowered myocardial apoptosis index, decreased the content of cleaved caspase-3 and cytochrome c (P<0.01), increased LVDP, and reduced the infarct size (P<0.01). BDM suppresses cell apoptosis and contracture and improves heart function and cell survival in rat hearts exposed to calcium paradox, suggesting the value of BDM as an potential drug for myocardial ischemia reperfusion injur.

  6. Enhanced Electrical Integration of Engineered Human Myocardium via Intramyocardial versus Epicardial Delivery in Infarcted Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Gerbin, Kaytlyn A.; Yang, Xiulan; Murry, Charles E.; Coulombe, Kareen L. K.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising approach to provide large-scale tissues for transplantation to regenerate the heart after ischemic injury, however, integration with the host myocardium will be required to achieve electromechanical benefits. To test the ability of engineered heart tissues to electrically integrate with the host, 10 million human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived cardiomyocytes were used to form either scaffold-free tissue patches implanted on the epicardium or micro-tissue particles (~1000 cells/particle) delivered by intramyocardial injection into the left ventricular wall of the ischemia/reperfusion injured athymic rat heart. Results were compared to intramyocardial injection of 10 million dispersed hESC-cardiomyocytes. Graft size was not significantly different between treatment groups and correlated inversely with infarct size. After implantation on the epicardial surface, hESC-cardiac tissue patches were electromechanically active, but they beat slowly and were not electrically coupled to the host at 4 weeks based on ex vivo fluorescent imaging of their graft-autonomous GCaMP3 calcium reporter. Histologically, scar tissue physically separated the patch graft and host myocardium. In contrast, following intramyocardial injection of micro-tissue particles and suspended cardiomyocytes, 100% of the grafts detected by fluorescent GCaMP3 imaging were electrically coupled to the host heart at spontaneous rate and could follow host pacing up to a maximum of 300–390 beats per minute (5–6.5 Hz). Gap junctions between intramyocardial graft and host tissue were identified histologically. The extensive coupling and rapid response rate of the human myocardial grafts after intramyocardial delivery suggest electrophysiological adaptation of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes to the rat heart’s pacemaking activity. These data support the use of the rat model for studying electromechanical integration of human cardiomyocytes, and they identify lack of

  7. SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes are associated with cardiac hypertrophy in a genetic rat model of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Aanchal; Joe, Bina; de la Serna, Ivana L

    2013-12-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by a sustained increase in cardiomyocyte size and re-activation of the fetal cardiac gene program. Previous studies implicated SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes as regulators of the fetal cardiac gene program in surgical models of cardiac hypertrophy. Although hypertension is a common risk factor for developing cardiac hypertrophy, there has not yet been any investigation into the role of SWI/SNF enzymes in cardiac hypertrophy using genetic models of hypertension. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that components of the SWI/SNF complex are activated and recruited to promoters that regulate the fetal cardiac gene program in hearts that become hypertrophic as a result of salt induced hypertension. Utilizing the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat model, we found that the protein levels of several SWI/SNF subunits required for heart development, Brg1, Baf180, and Baf60c, are elevated in hypertrophic hearts from S rats fed a high salt diet compared with normotensive hearts from Dahl salt-resistant (R) rats fed the same diet. Furthermore, we detected significantly higher levels of SWI/SNF subunit enrichment as well as evidence of more accessible chromatin structure on two fetal cardiac gene promoters in hearts from S rats compared with R rats. Our data implicate SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes as regulators of gene expression in cardiac hypertrophy resulting from salt induced hypertension. Thus we provide novel insights into the epigenetic mechanisms by which salt induced hypertension leads to cardiac hypertrophy.

  8. Effect of oligomer procyanidins on reperfusion arrhythmias and lactate dehydrogenase release in the isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Al-Makdessi, Samar; Sweidan, Hicham; Jacob, Ruthard

    2006-01-01

    The antiarrhythmic effect of an oral 3-week-pretreatment with oligomer procyanidins derived from Vitis vinifera was investigated on the isolated perfused heart after global no-flow ischemia (procyanidin-treated group: n = 9, control group: n = 13). Hearts were perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution in which the K+ content was reduced to 3.0 mmol/l in order to lower the fibrillation threshold. Monophasic action potentials in addition to ECG were recorded. The durations of ischemia and reperfusion were 20 and 30 min, respectively. Arrhythmias including ventricular fibrillation (VF), ventricular tachycardia (VT), flutter (Fl) and bradycardia were evaluated. During the reperfusion, irreversible VF occurred in most of control hearts. The incidence of VF (percentage of the hearts in which VF occurred) was lowered by oligomer procyanidins from 84.6 to 55.6 %, and the duration of the episodes of VF (expressed as percentage relative to the total duration) was significantly shortened from 76.1 +/- 27.9 % to 36.6 +/- 40.6 % (p = 0.036). Simultaneously, the percentage of duration of normal sinus rhythm (NSR) increased from 19.5 +/- 30.3 % to 46.2 +/- 35.9 % (n.s.). VF occuring in the procyanidin-treated hearts could be reversed in two hearts within few minutes to a stage of "reversible arrhythmias" consisting of short episodes (1 to 60 s) of either Fl or VT or bradycardia or NSR alternating with each other. LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) release in the first drops appearing from the reperfused heart was significantly reduced in the procyanidin-treated rats (66.7 +/- 36.2 mU/min, n = 8) in comparison to controls (159.7 +/- 79.0 mU/min, n = 10; p = 0.010). These results demonstrate an antiarrhythmic and cytoprotective effect of oral pretreatment with oligomer procyanidins under the given experimental conditions.

  9. Cardiac arrhythmia mechanisms in rats with heart failure induced by pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, David; Stones, Rachel; Drinkhill, Mark J.; Benson, Alan P.; Yang, Zhaokang; Cassan, Cecile; Gilbert, Stephen H.; Saint, David A.; Cazorla, Olivier; Steele, Derek S.; Bernus, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension provokes right heart failure and arrhythmias. Better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these arrhythmias is needed to facilitate new therapeutic approaches for the hypertensive, failing right ventricle (RV). The aim of our study was to identify the mechanisms generating arrhythmias in a model of RV failure induced by pulmonary hypertension. Rats were injected with monocrotaline to induce either RV hypertrophy or failure or with saline (control). ECGs were measured in conscious, unrestrained animals by telemetry. In isolated hearts, electrical activity was measured by optical mapping and myofiber orientation by diffusion tensor-MRI. Sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ handling was studied in single myocytes. Compared with control animals, the T-wave of the ECG was prolonged and in three of seven heart failure animals, prominent T-wave alternans occurred. Discordant action potential (AP) alternans occurred in isolated failing hearts and Ca2+ transient alternans in failing myocytes. In failing hearts, AP duration and dispersion were increased; conduction velocity and AP restitution were steeper. The latter was intrinsic to failing single myocytes. Failing hearts had greater fiber angle disarray; this correlated with AP duration. Failing myocytes had reduced sarco(endo)plasmic reticular Ca2+-ATPase activity, increased sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+-release fraction, and increased Ca2+ spark leak. In hypertrophied hearts and myocytes, dysfunctional adaptation had begun, but alternans did not develop. We conclude that increased electrical and structural heterogeneity and dysfunctional sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ handling increased the probability of alternans, a proarrhythmic predictor of sudden cardiac death. These mechanisms are potential therapeutic targets for the correction of arrhythmias in hypertensive, failing RVs. PMID:22427523

  10. Propionate metabolism in the rat heart by 13C n.m.r. spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, A D; Malloy, C R; Roby, R E; Rajagopal, A; Jeffrey, F M

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution 13C n.m.r. spectroscopy has been used to examine propionate metabolism in the perfused rat heart. A number of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates are observable by 13C n.m.r. in hearts perfused with mixtures of pyruvate and propionate. When the enriched 13C-labelled nucleus originates with pyruvate, the resonances of the intermediates appear as multiplets due to formation of multiply-enriched 13C-labelled isotopomers, whereas when the 13C-labelled nucleus originates with propionate, these same intermediates appear as singlets in the 13C spectrum since entry of propionate into the TCA cycle occurs via succinyl-CoA. An analysis of the isotopomer populations in hearts perfused with [3-13C]pyruvate plus unlabelled propionate indicates that about 27% of the total pyruvate pool available to the heart is derived directly from unlabelled propionate. This was substantiated by perfusing a heart for 2 h with [3-13C]propionate as the only available exogenous substrate. Under these conditions, all of the propionate consumed by the heart, as measured by conventional chemical analysis, ultimately entered the oxidative pathway as [2-13C] or [3-13C]pyruvate. This is consistent with entry of propionate into the TCA cycle intermediate pools as succinyl-CoA and concomitant disposal of malate to pyruvate via the malic enzyme. 13C resonances arising from enriched methylmalonate and propionylcarnitine are also detected in hearts perfused with [3-13C] or [1-13C]propionate which suggests that 13C n.m.r. may be useful as a non-invasive probe in vivo of metabolic abnormalities involving the propionate pathway, such as methylmalonic aciduria or propionic acidaemia. PMID:3178775

  11. Sudden Death in Young People--Heart Problems Often Blamed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some specific causes of sudden cardiac death in young people include: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). In this usually inherited condition, the walls of the heart muscle thicken. The thickened muscle can disrupt the heart's ...

  12. Exogenous oxytocin reduces signs of sickness behavior and modifies heart rate fluctuations of endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Lagos, José Javier; Hadamitzky, Martin; Peña-Castillo, Miguel Ángel; Echeverría, Juan Carlos; Bösche, Katharina; Lückemann, Laura; Schedlowski, Manfred; Pacheco-López, Gustavo

    2016-10-15

    Besides the well-known roles of oxytocin on birth, maternal bonding, and lactation, recent evidence shows that this hypothalamic hormone possesses cardioprotective, anti-inflammatory and parasympathetic neuromodulation properties. In this study, we explore the heart rate fluctuations (HRF) in an endotoxemic rodent model that was accompanied by the administration of exogenous oxytocin. The assessment of HRF has been widely used as an indirect measure of the cardiac autonomic function. In this context, adult male Dark Agouti rats were equipped with a telemetric transmitter to continuously and remotely measure the electrocardiogram, temperature, and locomotion. In a between-subjects experimental design, rats received the following peripheral treatment: saline solution as a vehicle (V); lipopolysaccharide (LPS); oxytocin (Ox); lipopolysaccharide + oxytocin (LPS+Ox). Linear and non-linear parameters of HRF were estimated starting 3h before to 24h after treatments. Our results showed that exogenous oxytocin does not modify by itself the HRF of oxytocin-treated rats in comparison to vehicle-treated rats. However, in animals undergoing endotoxemia it: a) provokes a less anticorrelated pattern in HRF, b) decreased mean heart rate, c) moderated the magnitude and duration of the LPS-induced hyperthermia, and d) increased locomotion, up to 6h after the LPS injection. The less anticorrelated pattern in the HRF and decreased mean heart rate may reflect a cardiac pacemaker coupling with cholinergic influences mediated by oxytocin during LPS-induced endotoxemia. Finally, the anti-lethargic and long-term temperature moderating effects of the administration of oxytocin during endotoxemia could be a consequence of the systemic anti-inflammatory properties of oxytocin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling Hypertrophic IP3 Transients in the Cardiac Myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Cooling, Michael; Hunter, Peter; Crampin, Edmund J.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a known risk factor for heart disease, and at the cellular level is caused by a complex interaction of signal transduction pathways. The IP3-calcineurin pathway plays an important role in stimulating the transcription factor NFAT which binds to DNA cooperatively with other hypertrophic transcription factors. Using available kinetic data, we construct a mathematical model of the IP3 signal production system after stimulation by a hypertrophic α-adrenergic agonist (endothelin-1) in the mouse atrial cardiac myocyte. We use a global sensitivity analysis to identify key controlling parameters with respect to the resultant IP3 transient, including the phosphorylation of cell-membrane receptors, the ligand strength and binding kinetics to precoupled (with GαGDP) receptor, and the kinetics associated with precoupling the receptors. We show that the kinetics associated with the receptor system contribute to the behavior of the system to a great extent, with precoupled receptors driving the response to extracellular ligand. Finally, by reparameterizing for a second hypertrophic α-adrenergic agonist, angiotensin-II, we show that differences in key receptor kinetic and membrane density parameters are sufficient to explain different observed IP3 transients in essentially the same pathway. PMID:17693463

  14. Effects of Various Kynurenine Metabolites on Respiratory Parameters of Rat Brain, Liver and Heart Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Halina; Staniek, Katrin; Bertignol-Spörr, Melanie; Attam, Martin; Kronsteiner, Carina; Kepplinger, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the endogenous glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid dose-dependently and significantly affected rat heart mitochondria. Now we have investigated the effects of L-tryptophan, L-kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine and kynurenic, anthranilic, 3-hydroxyanthranilic, xanthurenic and quinolinic acids on respiratory parameters (ie, state 2, state 3), respiratory control index (RC) and ADP/oxygen ratio in brain, liver and heart mitochondria of adult rats. Mitochondria were incubated with glutamate/malate (5 mM) or succinate (10 mM) and in the presence of L-tryptophan metabolites (1 mM) or in the absence, as control. Kynurenic and anthranilic acids significantly reduced RC values of heart mitochondria in the presence of glutamate/malate. Xanthurenic acid significantly reduced RC values of brain mitochondria in the presence of glutamate/malate. Furthermore, 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid decreased RC values of brain, liver and heart mitochondria using glutamate/malate. In the presence of succinate, 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid affected RC values of brain mitochondria, whereas in liver and heart mitochondria only 3-hydroxykynurenine lowered RC values significantly. Furthermore, lowered ADP/oxygen ratios were observed in brain mitochondria in the presence of succinate with 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, and to a lesser extent with glutamate/malate. In addition, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid significantly lowered the ADP/oxygen ratio in heart mitochondria exposed to glutamate/malate, while in the liver mitochondria only a mild reduction was found. Tests of the influence of L-tryptophan and its metabolites on complex I in liver mitochondria showed that only 3-hydroxykynurenine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and L-kynurenine led to a significant acceleration of NADH-driven complex I activities. The data indicate that L-tryptophan metabolites had different effects on brain, liver and heart

  15. Enhanced functional preservation of cold-stored rat heart by a nucleoside transport inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Zhu, Q; Claydon, M A; Hicks, G L; Wang, T

    1994-07-15

    This study investigates the hypothesis that inhibition of nucleoside transport during hypothermic storage elevates tissue adenosine (ADO) content and improves the function of the isolated rat heart. The hearts, flushed with a cardioplegic solution containing varying concentrations (0-100 nM) of a nucleoside transport inhibitor, S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), were immersion-stored at 0 degrees C for 9 hr. Function was assessed after 30 min of working reperfusion. Function of unstored fresh hearts served as controls and poststorage recovery is reported as percentage of control function. Poststorage heart rate in all groups returned to control level after reperfusion. Recovery of other functional parameters in the no-NBTI group was as follows: aortic flow (AF), 56.2 +/- 4.6%; coronary flow (CF), 53.9 +/- 3.2%; cardiac output (CO), 55.5 +/- 4.0%; systolic pressure, 81.6 +/- 2.5%; work, 47.0 +/- 4.2%; and coronary vascular resistance (CVR), 157.1 +/- 7.8% of control. NBTI improved functional recovery in a dose-dependent fashion; the maximal improvement was seen at a dose of 5 nM, in which the recovery was: AF, 78.1 +/- 3.4%; CF, 73.5 +/- 4.4%; CO, 76.7 +/- 3.6%; work, 70.7 +/- 5.0%; and CVR, 127.5 +/- 4.5% of control (P < 0.05 vs. no-NBTI). The ADO A1-receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (0.1 microM) blocked the effects of 5 nM NBTI; the recovery of AF, CF, CO, work, and CVR decreased to 62.8 +/- 8.0%, 58.3 +/- 5.0%, 61.5 +/- 3.9%, 54.4 +/- 4.5%, and 163.8 +/- 12.7% of control, respectively (P < 0.05 vs. 5 nM NBTI). Tissue ADO content in 5 nM NBTI hearts at the end of storage was 0.075 +/- 0.025 mumol/g dry wt, which was significantly elevated from 0.016 +/- 0.004 mumol/g dry wt in no-NBTI hearts. Purine release during initial reperfusion was delayed in 5 nM NBTI hearts, indicating the inhibition of nucleoside transport by NBTI. But NBTI treatment did not improve end-storage or end-reperfusion myocardial ATP. In conclusion, the addition of

  16. Low vagally-mediated heart rate variability and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias in rats bred for high anxiety.

    PubMed

    Carnevali, Luca; Trombini, Mimosa; Graiani, Gallia; Madeddu, Denise; Quaini, Federico; Landgraf, Rainer; Neumann, Inga D; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Sgoifo, Andrea

    2014-04-10

    In humans, there is a documented association between anxiety disorders and cardiovascular disease. Putative underlying mechanisms may include an impairment of the autonomic nervous system control of cardiac function. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize cardiac autonomic modulation and susceptibility to arrhythmias in genetic lines of rats that differ largely in their anxiety level. To reach this goal, electrocardiographic recordings were performed in high-anxiety behavior (HAB, n=10) and low-anxiety behavior (LAB, n=10) rats at rest, during stressful stimuli and under autonomic pharmacological manipulations, and analyzed by means of time- and frequency-domain indexes of heart rate variability. During resting conditions, HAB rats displayed a reduced heart rate variability, mostly in terms of lower parasympathetic (vagal) modulation compared to LAB rats. In HAB rats, this relatively low cardiac vagal control was associated with smaller heart rate responsiveness to acute stressors compared to LAB counterparts. In addition, beta-adrenergic pharmacological stimulation induced a larger incidence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in HABs compared to LABs. At sacrifice, a moderate increase in heart-body weight ratio was observed in HAB rats. We conclude that high levels of anxiety-related behavior in rats are associated with signs of i) impaired autonomic modulation of heart rate (low vagally-mediated heart rate variability), ii) poor adaptive heart rate responsiveness to stressful stimuli, iii) increased arrhythmia susceptibility, and iv) cardiac hypertrophy. These results highlight the utility of the HAB/LAB model for investigating the mechanistic basis of the comorbidity between anxiety disorders and cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dietary linoleate preserves cardiolipin and attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction in the failing rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Christopher M.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Le, Catherine H.; De Mooy, Anthony B.; Routh, Melissa A.; Holmes, Michael G.; Hickson-Bick, Diane L.; Zarini, Simona; Murphy, Robert C.; Xu, Fred Y.; Hatch, Grant M.; McCune, Sylvia A.; Moore, Russell L.; Chicco, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Cardiolipin (CL) is a tetra-acyl phospholipid that provides structural and functional support to several proteins in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The majority of CL in the healthy mammalian heart contains four linoleic acid acyl chains (L4CL). A selective loss of L4CL is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and heart failure in humans and animal models. We examined whether supplementing the diet with linoleic acid would preserve cardiac L4CL and attenuate mitochondrial dysfunction and contractile failure in rats with hypertensive heart failure. Methods and results Male spontaneously hypertensive heart failure rats (21 months of age) were administered diets supplemented with high-linoleate safflower oil (HLSO) or lard (10% w/w; 28% kilocalorie fat) or without supplemental fat (control) for 4 weeks. HLSO preserved L4CL and total CL to 90% of non-failing levels (vs. 61–75% in control and lard groups), and attenuated 17–22% decreases in state 3 mitochondrial respiration observed in the control and lard groups (P < 0.05). Left ventricular fractional shortening was significantly higher in HLSO vs. control (33 ± 2 vs. 29 ± 2%, P < 0.05), while plasma insulin levels were lower (5.4 ± 1.1 vs. 9.1 ± 2.3 ng/mL; P < 0.05), with no significant effect of lard supplementation. HLSO also increased serum concentrations of several eicosanoid species compared with control and lard diets, but had no effect on plasma glucose or blood pressure. Conclusion Moderate consumption of HLSO preserves CL and mitochondrial function in the failing heart and may be a useful adjuvant therapy for this condition. PMID:22411972

  18. Pioglitazone Attenuates Acute Cocaine Toxicity in Rat Isolated Heart: Potential Protection by Metabolic Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Guy L.; Ripper, Richard; Bern, Sarah; Lin, Bocheng; Edelman, Lucas; DiGregorio, Guido; Piano, Mariann; Feinstein, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The authors test whether cocaine depresses mitochondrial acylcarnitine exchange and if a drug that enhances glucose metabolism could protect against cocaine-induced cardiac dysfunction. Methods Oxygen consumption with and without cocaine was compared in rat cardiac mitochondria using either octanoylcarnitine (lipid) or pyruvate (non-lipid) substrates. Isolated hearts from rats with or without pioglitazone-supplemented diet were exposed to cocaine. Results Cocaine 0.5mM inhibited respiration supported by octanoylcarnitine (82 +/− 10.4 and 45.7 +/− 4.24 ngatomO min −1 mg −1 protein +/− SEM, for control and cocaine treatment, respectively; p < 0.02) but not pyruvate-supported respiration (281 +/− 12.5 and 267 +/− 12.7 ngatomO min −1 mg −1 protein +/− SEM; p = 0.45). Cocaine altered contractility, lusitropy, coronary resistance and lactate production in isolated heart. These effects were each blunted in pioglitazone-treated hearts. Pioglitazone diet attenuated the drop in rate-pressure product (p = 0.002), cocaine-induced diastolic dysfunction (p = 0.04) and myocardial vascular resistance (p = 0.05) compared to controls. Lactate production was higher in pretreated hearts (p = 0.008) and in ventricular myocytes cultured with pioglitazone (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Cocaine inhibited octanoylcarnitine-supported mitochondrial respiration. Pioglitazone diet significantly attenuated the effects of cocaine on isolated heart. The authors postulate that inhibition of acylcarnitine exchange could contribute to cocaine-induced cardiac dysfunction and that metabolic modulation warrants further study a potential treatment for such toxicity. PMID:21487283

  19. Endurance training in early life results in long-term programming of heart mass in rats.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Glenn D; Laker, Rhianna C; McConell, Glenn K; Wlodek, Mary E

    2016-02-01

    Being born small for gestational age increases the risk of developing adult cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. This study aimed to examine if early-life exercise could increase heart mass in the adult hearts from growth restricted rats. Bilateral uterine vessel ligation to induce uteroplacental insufficiency and fetal growth restriction in the offspring (Restricted) or sham surgery (Control) was performed on day 18 of gestation in WKY rats. A separate group of sham litters had litter size reduced to five pups at birth (Reduced litter), which restricted postnatal growth. Male offspring remained sedentary or underwent treadmill running from 5 to 9 weeks (early exercise) or 20 to 24 weeks of age (later exercise). Remarkably, in Control, Restricted, and Reduced litter groups, early exercise increased (P < 0.05) absolute and relative (to body mass) heart mass in adulthood. This was despite the animals being sedentary for ~4 months after exercise. Later exercise also increased adult absolute and relative heart mass (P < 0.05). Blood pressure was not significantly altered between groups or by early or later exercise. Phosphorylation of Akt Ser(473) in adulthood was increased in the early exercise groups but not the later exercise groups. Microarray gene analysis and validation by real-time PCR did not reveal any long-term effects of early exercise on the expression of any individual genes. In summary, early exercise programs the heart for increased mass into adulthood, perhaps by an upregulation of protein synthesis based on greater phosphorylation of Akt Ser(473).

  20. Rat Heterotopic Heart Transplantation Model to Investigate Unloading-Induced Myocardial Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xuebin; Segiser, Adrian; Carrel, Thierry P.; Tevaearai Stahel, Hendrik T.; Most, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Unloading of the failing left ventricle in order to achieve myocardial reverse remodeling and improvement of contractile function has been developed as a strategy with the increasing frequency of implantation of left ventricular assist devices in clinical practice. But, reverse remodeling remains an elusive target, with high variability and exact mechanisms still largely unclear. The small animal model of heterotopic heart transplantation (hHTX) in rodents has been widely implemented to study the effects of complete and partial unloading on cardiac failing and non-failing tissue to better understand the structural and molecular changes that underlie myocardial recovery. We herein review the current knowledge on the effects of volume unloading the left ventricle via different methods of hHTX in rats, differentiating between changes that contribute to functional recovery and adverse effects observed in unloaded myocardium. We focus on methodological aspects of heterotopic transplantation, which increase the correlation between the animal model and the setting of the failing unloaded human heart. Last, but not least, we describe the late use of sophisticated techniques to acquire data, such as small animal MRI and catheterization, as well as ways to assess unloaded hearts under “reloaded” conditions. While giving regard to certain limitations, heterotopic rat heart transplantation certainly represents the crucial model to mimic unloading-induced changes in the heart and as such the intricacies and challenges deserve highest consideration. Careful translational research will further improve our knowledge of the reverse remodeling process and how to potentiate its effect in order to achieve recovery of contractile function in more patients. PMID:27807535

  1. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, R. E.; Schroedl, N. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Hartzell, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by nonmyocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA-designed High-Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment that allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells cultured in HARVs adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARVs using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar; however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissuelike organization of cardiac cells in vitro.

  2. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, R. E.; Schroedl, N. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Hartzell, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by nonmyocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA-designed High-Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment that allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells cultured in HARVs adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARVs using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar; however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissuelike organization of cardiac cells in vitro.

  3. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, Robert E.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.; Hartzell, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by non-myocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA designed High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment which allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells in cultured in HARV's adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARV's using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar, however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissue-like organizations of cardiac cells in simulated microgravity.

  4. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry (HCMR): The rationale and design of an international, observational study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.; Appelbaum, Evan; Desai, Milind Y.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; DiMarco, John P.; Friedrich, Matthias G.; Geller, Nancy; Heckler, Sarahfaye; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ivey, Elizabeth A.; Keleti, Julianna; Kim, Dong-Yun; Kolm, Paul; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Maron, Martin S.; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Piechnik, Stefan; Watkins, Hugh; Weintraub, William S.; Wu, Pan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic heart disease with a frequency as high as 1 in 200. In many cases, HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding the different components of the sarcomere apparatus. HCM is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), myofibrillar disarray, and myocardial fibrosis. The phenotypic expression is quite variable. While the majority of patients with HCM are asymptomatic, serious consequences are experienced in a subset of affected individuals who present initially with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or progress to refractory heart failure (HF). The HCMR study is a National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 2750 patient, 41 site, international registry and natural history study designed to address limitations in extant evidence to improve prognostication in HCM (NCT01915615). In addition to collection of standard demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic variables, patients will undergo state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for assessment of left ventricular (LV) mass and volumes as well as replacement scarring and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, genetic and biomarker analysis will be performed. HCMR has the potential to change the paradigm of risk stratification in HCM, using novel markers to identify those at higher risk. PMID:26299218

  5. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field Conditioning Protects against I/R Injury and Contractile Dysfunction in the Isolated Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Bialy, Dariusz; Wawrzynska, Magdalena; Bil-Lula, Iwona; Krzywonos-Zawadzka, Anna; Wozniak, Mieczyslaw; Cadete, Virgilio J J; Sawicki, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) decreases the formation of reactive oxygen species, which are key mediators of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Therefore, we hypothesized that the LF-EMF protects contractility of hearts subjected to I/R injury. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to 20 min of global no-flow ischemia, followed by 30 min reperfusion, in the presence or absence of LF-EMF. Coronary flow, heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), and rate pressure product (RPP) were determined for evaluation of heart mechanical function. The activity of cardiac matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and the contents of coronary effluent troponin I (TnI) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured as markers of heart injury. LF-EMF prevented decreased RPP in I/R hearts, while having no effect on coronary flow. In addition, hearts subjected to I/R exhibited significantly increased LVDP when subjected to LF-EMF. Although TnI and IL-6 levels were increased in I/R hearts, their levels returned to baseline aerobic levels in I/R hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The reduced activity of MMP-2 in I/R hearts was reversed in hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The data presented here indicate that acute exposure to LF-EMF protects mechanical function of I/R hearts and reduces I/R injury.

  6. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field Conditioning Protects against I/R Injury and Contractile Dysfunction in the Isolated Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Bialy, Dariusz; Wawrzynska, Magdalena; Bil-Lula, Iwona; Krzywonos-Zawadzka, Anna; Wozniak, Mieczyslaw; Cadete, Virgilio J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) decreases the formation of reactive oxygen species, which are key mediators of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Therefore, we hypothesized that the LF-EMF protects contractility of hearts subjected to I/R injury. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to 20 min of global no-flow ischemia, followed by 30 min reperfusion, in the presence or absence of LF-EMF. Coronary flow, heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), and rate pressure product (RPP) were determined for evaluation of heart mechanical function. The activity of cardiac matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and the contents of coronary effluent troponin I (TnI) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured as markers of heart injury. LF-EMF prevented decreased RPP in I/R hearts, while having no effect on coronary flow. In addition, hearts subjected to I/R exhibited significantly increased LVDP when subjected to LF-EMF. Although TnI and IL-6 levels were increased in I/R hearts, their levels returned to baseline aerobic levels in I/R hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The reduced activity of MMP-2 in I/R hearts was reversed in hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The data presented here indicate that acute exposure to LF-EMF protects mechanical function of I/R hearts and reduces I/R injury. PMID:25961016

  7. Heart-bound adiponectin, not serum adiponectin, inversely correlates with cardiac hypertrophy in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takao; Takemori, Kumiko; Mizuguchi, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Masatomo; Chikugo, Takaaki; Hagiyama, Man; Yoneshige, Azusa; Mori, Tatsufumi; Maenishi, Osamu; Kometani, Takashi; Itoh, Tatsuki; Satou, Takao; Ito, Akihiko

    2017-08-25

    What is the central question of this study? An inverse correlation between circulating adiponectin and many diseases has been reported, but some studies have found no correlation. To evaluate this controversy, we investigated the relationship between heart-bound adiponectin and hypertension or cardiac hypertrophy, compared with serum adiponectin. What is the main finding and its importance? Using hypertensive and normotensive rats, we found that heart-bound adiponectin was inversely correlated with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that heart-bound adiponectin has a more important function in preventing cardiac hypertrophy than circulating adiponectin. Our study provides new insights regarding the role of adiponectin in diseases. The inverse correlation between circulating adiponectin concentration and hypertension or cardiac hypertrophy is still controversial. In addition to circulating adiponectin, adiponectin is also bound to tissues such as the heart and skeletal muscle. In this study, we investigated the relationship of serum adiponectin and heart-bound adiponectin with hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Four types of hypertensive rats presenting different blood pressure levels were used at different ages, as follows: normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs); two sub-strains (strains C and B2, having low and high blood pressure, respectively) of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs); and stroke-prone SHRs (SHRSPs). Blood pressure, heart-to-body weight ratio, serum adiponectin and heart-bound adiponectin were determined. Histopathological analysis of the heart was carried out to evaluate the relationship with heart-bound adiponectin. Serum adiponectin concentration was not inversely correlated with blood pressure or heart-to-body weight ratio. In contrast, heart-bound adiponectin levels were significantly lower in SHRSPs than in other strains at respective ages. This resulted from a decrease in T-cadherin expression, which induced adiponectin binding to tissues

  8. Long term effects of fetal undernutrition on rat heart. Role of hypertension and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Pilar; López de Pablo, Angel L.; García-Prieto, Concha F.; Somoza, Beatriz; Quintana-Villamandos, Begoña; Gómez de Diego, José J.; Gutierrez-Arzapalo, Perla Y.; Ramiro-Cortijo, David; González, M. Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Fetal undernutrition is a risk factor for heart disease in both genders, despite the protection of women against hypertension development. Using a rat model of maternal undernutrition (MUN) we aimed to assess possible sex differences in the development of cardiac alterations and the implication of hypertension and cardiac oxidative stress. Methods Male and female offspring from rats fed ad libitum (control) or with 50% of the normal daily intake during the second half of gestation (MUN) were used. Heart weight/body weight ratio (HW/BW), hemodynamic parameters (anaesthetized rats) and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, ELISA) were assessed in 21-day, 6-month and 22-month old rats. Plasma testosterone (ELISA) and cardiac protein expression of enzymes related to reactive oxygen species synthesis (p22phox, xanthine-oxidase) and degradation (catalase, Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, Ec-SOD) were evaluated in 21-day and 6-month old rats (Western Blot). Heart structure and function was studied at the age of 22 months (echocardiography). Results At the age of 21 days MUN males exhibited significantly larger HW/BW and cardiac p22phox expression while females had reduced p22phox expression, compared to their respective sex-matched controls. At the age of 6-months, MUN males showed significantly larger blood pressure and cardiac xanthine-oxidase expression; MUN females were normotensive and had a lower cardiac expression of antioxidant enzymes, compared to their respective sex-matched controls. At the age of 22 months, both MUN males and females showed larger HW/BW and left ventricular mass and lower ejection fraction compared to sex-matched controls; only MUN males exhibited hypertension and a larger plasma BNP compared to aged male controls. Conclusions 1) During perinatal life females exposed to fetal undernutrition are protected from cardiac alterations, but in ageing they exhibit ventricular hypertrophy and functional loss, like MUN males; 2) cardiac oxidative

  9. Betaxolol improves the survival rate and changes natriuretic peptide expression in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Juan, Wen; Narasimman, Gurusamy; Ma, Meilei; Inoue, Mikio; Saito, Yuki; Wahed, Mir I I; Nakazawa, Mikio; Hasegawa, Go; Naito, Makoto; Tachikawa, Hitoshi; Tanabe, Naohito; Kodama, Makoto; Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Takahashi, Toshihiro

    2003-01-01

    The cardioprotective effects of betaxolol were studied in a rat model with heart failure induced by autoimmune myocarditis. Twenty-eight days after immunization, Lewis rats were divided into four groups; 0.1 mg/kg betaxolol per day (group 0.1), 1.0 mg/kg betaxolol per day (group 1), 10 mg/kg betaxolol per day (group 10), and vehicle (0.5% methylcellulose, group V) (all groups, n = 13). After oral administration for 1 month, the heart weight, the mRNA expression of atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide in the left ventricle, the plasma atrial natriuretic peptide concentration, the mean blood pressure, the heart rate, the central venous pressure, the peak left ventricular pressure, the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and its first derivative +/-dP/dt, and the area of myocardial fibrosis were measured. Betaxolol reduced the heart rate, the levels of atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA expression and the atrial natriuretic peptide concentration [group N (normal rats), 367 +/- 4 beats/min, 100%, 100% and 78 +/- 7 pg/ml, respectively; group V, 391 +/- 9 beats/min, 761 +/- 68% versus group N, 317 +/- 42% versus group N and 4374 +/- 312 pg/ml, respectively; group 0.1, 387 +/- 10 beats/min, 621 +/- 78%, 288 +/- 41% and 2875 +/- 331 pg/ml, respectively; group 1, 323 +/- 9 beats/min, 442 +/- 84%, 148 +/- 12% and 884 +/- 51 pg/ml, respectively; and group 10, 312 +/- 8 beats/min, 97 +/- 18%, 92 + 9% and 453 +/- 53 pg/ml, respectively], and increased survival (group V, 62%; group 0.1, 69%; groups N, 1 and 10, 100%). Betaxolol did not significantly alter the heart weight, the hemodynamic parameters or the area of fibrosis. These observations suggest that betaxolol may improve the survival rate by reducing sudden death and changing the atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA expression in patients with heart failure.

  10. Cardioprotective Effects of Astragalin against Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Isolated Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Daoxu; Ren, Huanhuan; Yang, Wenxiao; Zhang, Xinjie; Zheng, Qiusheng; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of astragalin against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in isolated rat heart. The cardioprotective effects of astragalin on myocardial I/R injury were investigated on Langendorff apparatus. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. The results showed that astragalin pretreatment improved myocardial function. Compared with I/R group, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities in coronary flow decreased in astragalin pretreatment groups, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio significantly increased. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) decreased in astragalin-treated groups. The infarct size (IS) and apoptosis rate in hearts from astragalin-treated groups were lower than those in hearts from the I/R group. Western blot analysis also revealed that astragalin preconditioning significantly reduced Bax level, whereas Bcl-2 was increased in the myocardium. Therefore, astragalin exhibited cardioprotective effects via its antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26788251

  11. Changes in expression of a functional G sub i protein in cultured rat heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, I.S.; Gaa, S.T.; Rogers, T.B. )

    1988-07-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic agonist, carbachol, and pertussis toxin were used to examine the functional status of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein that inhibits adenylate cyclase (G{sub i}) in cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes. The isoproterenol stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in myocyte membranes and adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in intact cells (4 days in culture) were insensitive to carbachol. However, in cells cultured for 11 days, carbachol inhibited isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation by 30%. Angiotensin II (ANG II) was also found to inhibit isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation in day 11 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin treatment reversed the inhibitory effects of both ANG II and carbachol, suggesting a role for G{sub i} in the process. Carbachol binding to membranes from day 4 cells was relatively insensitive to guanine nucleotides when compared with binding to membranes from day 11 or adult cells. Furthermore, pertussis toxin-mediated {sup 32}P incorporation into a 39- to 41-kDa substrate in day 11 membranes was increased 3.2-fold over that measured in day 4 membranes. These findings support the view that, although G{sub i} is expressed, it is nonfunctional in 4-day-old cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes and acquisition of functional G{sub i} is dependent on culture conditions. Furthermore, the ANG II receptor can couple to G{sub i} in heart.

  12. (-)-Terpinen-4-ol changes intracellular Ca(2+) handling and induces pacing disturbance in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Gondim, Antonio Nei Santana; Lara, Aline; Santos-Miranda, Artur; Roman-Campos, Danilo; Lauton-Santos, Sandra; Menezes-Filho, José Evaldo Rodrigues; de Vasconcelos, Carla Maria Lins; Conde-Garcia, Eduardo Antonio; Guatimosim, Silvia; Cruz, Jader S

    2017-07-15

    (-)-Terpinen-4-ol is a naturally occurring plant monoterpene and has been shown to have a plethora of biological activities. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of (-)-terpinen-4-ol on the rat heart, a key player in the control and maintenance of arterial blood pressure. The effects of (-)-terpinen-4-ol on the rat heart were investigated using isolated left atrium isometric force measurements, in vivo electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings, patch clamp technique, and confocal microscopy. It was observed that (-)-terpinen-4-ol reduced contraction force in an isolated left atrium at millimolar concentrations. Conversely, it induced a positive inotropic effect and extrasystoles at micromolar concentrations, suggesting that (-)-terpinen-4-ol may have arrhythmogenic activity on cardiac tissue. In anaesthetized animals, (-)-terpinen-4-ol also elicited rhythm disturbance, such as supraventricular tachycardia and atrioventricular block. To investigate the cellular mechanism underlying the dual effect of (-)-terpinen-4-ol on heart muscle, experiments were performed on isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes to determine the effect of (-)-terpinen-4-ol on L-type Ca(2+) currents, Ca(2+) sparks, and Ca(2+) transients. The arrhythmogenic activity of (-)-terpinen-4-ol in vitro and in vivo may be explained by its effect on intracellular Ca(2+) handling. Taken together, our data suggest that (-)-terpinen-4-ol has cardiac arrhythmogenic activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of histamine H3 receptors during ischemia/reperfusion in isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tamai, Isao; Takaoka, Masanori; Matsumura, Yasuo

    2004-03-01

    Histamine H3 receptors are involved in regulating the release of norepinephrine (NE), in both central and peripheral nervous systems. We investigated the effect of R-alpha-methylhistamine (R-HA), a selective H3 receptor agonist, and thioperamide (Thiop), a selective H3 receptor antagonist, on ischemia/reperfusion-induced changes in carrier-mediated NE release and cardiac function in isolated rat heart. Hearts were subjected to 40-minute ischemia followed by 30-minute reperfusion. Ischemia/reperfusion evoked massive NE release, which was markedly suppressed by the treatment with desipramine (DMI), a neuronal NE transporter blocker. Ischemia/reperfusion-induced cardiac dysfunction (decreases in left ventricular developed pressure, LVDP, and the first derivative of left ventricular pressure, dP/dt, and a rise in left ventricular end diastolic pressure, LVEDP) was also improved by the DMI treatment. The treatment with R-HA also significantly decreased the excessive NE release induced by the ischemia/reperfusion, improved the recovery of LVDP and dP/dt, and suppressed the rise in LVEDP. Thiop did not affect NE release and cardiac function after the reperfusion. When R-HA was administered concomitantly with Thiop, R-HA failed to attenuate ischemia/reperfusion-induced NE release and cardiac dysfunction. Thus, it seems likely that the ischemia/reperfusion-induced carrier-mediated NE release in rat hearts is negatively regulated by the activation of H3 receptors, probably located on cardiac noradrenergic nerve endings.

  14. Effect of postnatal lead exposure on the development of sympathetic innervation of the heart. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    To determine possible mechanisms for this Pb-induced cardiotoxicity, several neutrochemical parameters indicative of cardiac sympathetic innervation were measured in developing rats. Presynaptic indices of nerve terminal development which were studied included steady-state levels of norepinephrine, neuronal uptake and vesicular storage of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine. Analysis of postsynaptic development was accomplished by quantitating the density of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors and by measuring the activity of adenylate cyclase. Rat pups were exposed to Pb from birth to weaning (21 days) via the milk of dams whose drinking water contained 0.2% Pb acetate. This method and level of Pb treatment had no effect on body or heart weight development, however, it did result in a seven-fold increase in the blood Pb content (70-75 ..mu..g/dl) of the treated pups during the period of exposure. Pb exposure accelerated the development of sympathetic innervation of the heart as detected by significant increases in the vesicular uptake of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine and the steady-state concentration of norepinephrine measured at postnatal day 4. On the other hand, ontogeny of the neutronal uptake of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine in the heart and in the forebrain was not affected by Pb treatment. The apparent premature development of sympathetic innervation induced by Pb treatment was not reflected in significant alterations in either the density or the affinity of ..beta..-adrenergic receptor sites determined by the binding kinetics of /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol.

  15. Cardiac actions of phencyclidine in isolated guinea pig and rat heart: possible involvement of slow channels

    SciTech Connect

    Temma, K.; Akera, T.; Ng, Y.C.

    1985-03-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine were studied in isolated preparations of guinea pig and rat heart. In electrically paced left atrial muscle preparations, phencyclidine increased the force of contraction; rat heart muscle preparations were more sensitive than guinea pig heart muscle preparations. The positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine was not significantly reduced by a combination of phentolamine and nadolol; however, the effect was competitively blocked by verapamil in the presence of phentolamine and nadolol. Inhibition of the outward K+ current by tetraethylammonium chloride also produced a positive inotropic effect; however, the effect of tetraethylammonium was reduced by phentolamine and nadolol, and was almost insensitive to verapamil. The inotropic effect of phencyclidine was associated with a marked prolongation of the action potential duration and a decrease in maximal upstroke velocity of the action potential, with no change in the resting membrane potential. The specific (/sup 3/H)phencyclidine binding observed with membrane preparations from guinea pig ventricular muscle was saturable with a single class of high-affinity binding site. This binding was inhibited by verapamil, diltiazem, or nitrendipine, but not by ryanodine or tetrodotoxin. These results suggest that the positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine results from enhanced Ca/sup 2 +/ influx via slow channels, either by stimulation of the channels or secondary to inhibition of outward K/sup +/ currents.

  16. Tl(+) induces both cationic and transition pore permeability in the inner membrane of rat heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Nesterov, Vladimir P; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Furaev, Viktor V; Novozhilov, Artemy V

    2013-12-01

    Effects of Tl(+) were studied in experiments with isolated rat heart mitochondria (RHM) injected into 400 mOsm medium containing TlNO3 and a nitrate salt (KNO3 or NH4NO3) or TlNO3 and sucrose. Tl(+) increased permeability of the inner membrane of the RHM to K(+) and H(+). This manifested as an increase of the non-energized RHM swelling, in the order of sucrose < K(+) < NH4 (+), respectively. After succinate administration, the swollen RHM contracted. The Tl(+)-induced opening of the mitochondrial permeability pore (MPTP) in Ca(2+)-loaded rat heart mitochondria increased both the swelling and the inner membrane potential dissipation, as well as decreased basal state and 2,4-dinitrophenol-stimulated respiration. These effects of Tl(+) were suppressed by the MPTP inhibitors (cyclosporine A, ADP, bongkrekic acid, and n-ethylmaleimide), activated in the presence of the MPTP inducer (carboxyatractyloside) or mitoKATP inhibitor (5-hydroxydecanoate), but were not altered in the presence of mitoKATP agonists (diazoxide or pinacidil). We suggest that the greater sensitivity of heart and striated muscles, versus liver, to thallium salts in vivo can result in more vigorous Tl(+) effects on muscle cell mitochondria.

  17. Effects of ubiquinol with fluid resuscitation following haemorrhagic shock on rat lungs, diaphragm, heart and kidneys.

    PubMed

    Bennetts, Paul; Shen, Qiuhua; Thimmesch, Amanda R; Diaz, Francisco J; Clancy, Richard L; Pierce, Janet D

    2014-07-01

    Haemorrhagic shock (HS) and fluid resuscitation can lead to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), contributing to ischaemia-reperfusion injury and organ damage. Ubiquinol is a potent antioxidant that decreases ROS. This study examined the effects of ubiquinol administered with fluid resuscitation following controlled HS. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to treatment [ubiquinol, 1 mg (100 g body weight)(-1)] or control groups. Rats were subjected to 60 min of HS by removing 40% of the total blood volume to a mean arterial pressure ∼45-55 mmHg. The animals were resuscitated with blood and lactated Ringer solution, with or without ubiquinol, and monitored for 120 min. At the end of the experiments, the rats were killed and the lungs, diaphragm, heart and kidneys harvested. Leucocytes were analysed for mitochondrial superoxide at baseline, end of shock and 120 min following fluid resuscitation using MitoSOX Red. Diaphragms were examined for hydrogen peroxide using dihydrofluorescein diacetate and confocal microscopy. The apoptosis in lungs, diaphragm, heart and kidneys was measured using fluorescence microscopy with acridine orange and ethidium bromide. Leucocyte mitochondrial superoxide levels were significantly lower in rats that received ubiquinol than in the control animals. Production of hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis were significantly reduced in the organs of rats treated with ubiquinol. These findings suggest that ubiquinol, administered with fluid resuscitation after HS, attenuates ROS production and apoptosis. Thus, ubiquinol is a potent antioxidant that may be used as a potential treatment to reduce organ injury following haemorrhagic events. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  18. Enhanced activation of RVLM-projecting PVN neurons in rats with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Zheng, Hong; Patel, Kaushik P

    2012-04-15

    Previous studies have indicated that there is increased activation of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF); however, it is not clear if the preautonomic neurons within the PVN are specifically overactive. Also, it is not known if these neurons have altered responses to baroreceptor or osmotic challenges. Experiments were conducted in rats with CHF (6-8 wk after coronary artery ligation). Spontaneously active neurons were recorded in the PVN, of which 36% were antidromically activated from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). The baseline discharge rate in RVLM-projecting PVN (PVN-RVLM) neurons from CHF rats was significantly greater than in sham-operated (sham) rats (6.0 ± 0.6 vs. 2.6 ± 0.3 spikes/s, P < 0.05). Picoinjection of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid significantly decreased the basal discharge of PVN-RVLM neurons by 80% in CHF rats compared with 37% in sham rats. Fifty-two percent of spontaneously active PVN-RVLM neurons responded to changes in the mean arterial pressure (MAP). The changes in discharge rate in PVN-RVLM neurons after a reduction in MAP (+52 ± 7% vs. +184 ± 61%) or an increase in MAP (-42 ± 8% vs. -71 ± 6%) were significantly attenuated in rats with CHF compared with sham rats. Most PVN-RVLM neurons (63%), including all barosensitive PVN-RVLM neurons, were excited by an internal carotid artery injection of hypertonic NaCl (2.1 osmol/l), whereas a smaller number (7%) were inhibited. The increase in discharge rate in PVN-RVLM neurons to hypertonic stimulation was significantly enhanced in rats with CHF compared with sham rats (134 ± 15% vs. 92 ± 13%). Taken together, these data suggest that PVN-RVLM neurons are more active under basal conditions and this overactivation is mediated by an enhanced glutamatergic tone in rats with CHF. Furthermore, this enhanced activation of PVN-RVLM neurons may contribute to the altered responses to

  19. Recent progress in end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Yang, Kun-Qi; Jiang, Yong; Zhou, Xian-Liang

    2015-05-01

    Within the diverse spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a unique subgroup characterized by left ventricular enlargement and systolic dysfunction has emerged (defined as end-stage HCM [ES-HCM]). This underestimated entity provides challenging treatment strategies for extremely high risk of refractory heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Over the last 2 decades, the clinical features of ES-HCM have expanded and the underlying mechanisms gradually elucidated. Moreover, there is increasing evidence for early recognition of ES-HCM. New insights into early prevention and management will improve the clinical outcomes of this entity.

  20. Metformin prevents the development of chronic heart failure in the SHHF rat model.

    PubMed

    Cittadini, Antonio; Napoli, Raffaele; Monti, Maria Gaia; Rea, Domenica; Longobardi, Salvatore; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Walser, Marion; Samà, Mariateresa; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Isgaard, Jörgen; Saccà, Luigi

    2012-04-01

    Insulin resistance is a recently identified mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of chronic heart failure (CHF). We investigated the effects of two insulin-sensitizing drugs (metformin and rosiglitazone) in a genetic model of spontaneously hypertensive, insulin-resistant rats (SHHF). Thirty SHHF rats were randomized into three treatment groups as follows: 1) metformin (100 mg/kg per day), 2) rosiglitazone (2 mg/kg per day), and 3) no drug. Ten Sprague-Dawley rats served as normal controls. At the end of the treatment period (12 months), the cardiac phenotype was characterized by histology, echocardiography, and isolated perfused heart studies. Metformin attenuated left ventricular (LV) remodeling, as shown by reduced LV volumes, wall stress, perivascular fibrosis, and cardiac lipid accumulation. Metformin improved both systolic and diastolic indices as well as myocardial mechanical efficiency, as shown by improved ability to convert metabolic energy into mechanical work. Metformin induced a marked activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and vascular endothelial growth factor and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α expression and myocyte apoptosis. Rosiglitazone did not affect LV remodeling, increased perivascular fibrosis, and promoted further cardiac lipid accumulation. In conclusion, long-term treatment with metformin, but not with rosiglitazone, prevents the development of severe CHF in the SHHF model by a wide-spectrum interaction that involves molecular, structural, functional, and metabolic-energetic mechanisms.

  1. Antidepressant treatment decreases daily salt intake and prevents heart dysfunction following subchronic aortic regurgitation in rats.

    PubMed

    De Gobbi, Juliana Irani Fratucci; Omoto, Ana Carolina Mieko; Siqueira, Tamires Ferreira; Matsubara, Luiz Shigueto; Roscani, Meliza Goi; Matsubara, Beatriz Bojikian

    2015-05-15

    Depression is a predictor of poor prognosis in patients with heart failure. Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may improve these outcomes. Left ventricular volume overload induced hypertrophy that is associated with aortic regurgitation (AR) leads to ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of the SSRI paroxetine on cardiac function, as well as on fluid intake and excretion, in subchronic AR. Male Wistar rats (260 to 280g) received sham (SH) surgery or AR induced by retrograde puncture of the aortic valve leaflets. The presence of AR was confirmed by echocardiography (ECHO) exams. Four weeks after AR surgery, subcutaneous injections of paroxetine (PAR: 10mg/kg 3 times in a week) or saline were administered. The rats were randomly divided into the following 4 groups and treated for 4 weeks: AR-PAR, ARsaline, SH-PAR and SH-saline. At the end of the treatment period, fractional shortening was preserved in AR-PAR, compared to AR-saline (46.6±2.7% vs 38.3±2.2%, respectively). Daily 0.3 M NaCl intake was reduced in PAR-treated rats. Natriuresis was increased in weeks 2-3 after PAR treatment. Our results suggest that augmentation of central 5-HT neurotransmission has a beneficial effect on cardiovascular remodeling following volume overload. The mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown.

  2. The Impact of Heart Irradiation on Dose-Volume Effects in the Rat Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Luijk, Peter van Faber, Hette; Meertens, Harm; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Kampinga, Harm H.; Coppes, Robert P. Ph.D.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that heart irradiation increases the risk of a symptomatic radiation-induced loss of lung function (SRILF) and that this can be well-described as a modulation of the functional reserve of the lung. Methods and Materials: Rats were irradiated with 150-MeV protons. Dose-response curves were obtained for a significant increase in breathing frequency after irradiation of 100%, 75%, 50%, or 25% of the total lung volume, either including or excluding the heart from the irradiation field. A significant increase in the mean respiratory rate after 6-12 weeks compared with 0-4 weeks was defined as SRILF, based on biweekly measurements of the respiratory rate. The critical volume (CV) model was used to describe the risk of SRILF. Fits were done using a maximum likelihood method. Consistency between model and data was tested using a previously developed goodness-of-fit test. Results: The CV model could be fitted consistently to the data for lung irradiation only. However, this fitted model failed to predict the data that also included heart irradiation. Even refitting the model to all data resulted in a significant difference between model and data. These results imply that, although the CV model describes the risk of SRILF when the heart is spared, the model needs to be modified to account for the impact of dose to the heart on the risk of SRILF. Finally, a modified CV model is described that is consistent to all data. Conclusions: The detrimental effect of dose to the heart on the incidence of SRILF can be described by a dose dependent decrease in functional reserve of the lung.

  3. Total and high molecular weight adiponectin levels in the rat model of post-myocardial infarction heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kalisz, M; Baranowska, B; Wolinska-Witort, E; Maczewski, M; Mackiewicz, U; Tulacz, D; Gora, M; Martynska, L; Bik, W

    2015-10-01

    Adiponectin is a protein secreted primarily by adipose tissue. It has been suggested that adiponectin plays a protective role in the early phase following myocardial infarction. Our primary aim was to investigate the effects of post-myocardial infarction heart failure well-characterized by left ventricular hemodynamic parameters on the total and high molecular weight adiponectin concentrations in plasma, fat and cardiac tissue. Eight weeks after myocardial infarction or sham operation, total and high molecular weight adiponectin concentrations in plasma, fat, and cardiac tissues were assayed in rats. In addition, hemodynamic parameters and expression of the genes encoding atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide in left ventricle were evaluated. Atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA levels in left ventricle tissue were higher in rats with myocardial infarction-induced heart failure compared with the controls. Similarly, total adiponectin concentration was increased in left ventricle (but not in right ventricle) in rats with post-myocardial infarction heart failure. In contrast, adiponectin levels in plasma and cardiac adipose tissue in rats with post-myocardial infarction heart failure were lower than in sham-operated animals. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in levels of high molecular weight adiponectin in plasma, cardiac tissue or adipose tissue between these two groups. We conclude that in the rat model of post-myocardial infarction heart failure, adiponectin level is increased in left ventricle tissue. This is accompanied by decreased adiponectin levels in plasma and cardiac adipose tissue.

  4. Pycnogenol® and its fractions influence the function of isolated heart in rats with experimental diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kralova, Eva; Jankyova, Stanislava; Mucaji, Pavel; Gresakova, Eva; Stankovicova, Tatiana

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of Pycnogenol(®) (PYC) mixture and its three fractions (buthanolic, water, ethyl acetate) on heart function in rats with experimental diabetes mellitus (DM) and compare their effects to the diabetic group. Their antioxidant activity "in vitro" was also determined. DM rats (streptozotocin over 3 consecutive days at a dose of 25 mg/kg of body weight) had increased systolic blood pressure, thicker left ventriculi wall (LV) and weaker myocardial contraction, prolonged QT interval in comparison to controls rats. In comparison to the diabetic group, PYC (20 mg/kg b.w./day) suppressed the influence of DM on the LV, improved contraction, increased coronary flow and displayed negative effect on electrical activity of hearts. The most effective of PYC's fractions was the water fraction. It improved biometric parameters and hemodynamic function of the DM hearts, enhanced shortening the QT interval, reduced the amount of dysrhythmias of the DM hearts and had the strongest antioxidant activity. In conclusion, DM damaged isolated rat heart function. Only the water fraction improved the function of the diabetic heart. The different results of three fractions and PYC on myocardial function may be caused by a various lipo- and hydro-philic action of the PYC components.

  5. Ischemic preconditioning stimulates sodium and proton transport in isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, R; Liu, H; Anderson, S; Lundmark, J; Schaefer, S

    1995-01-01

    One or more brief periods of ischemia, termed preconditioning, dramatically limits infarct size and reduces intracellular acidosis during subsequent ischemia, potentially via enhanced sarcolemmal proton efflux mechanisms. To test the hypothesis that preconditioning increases the functional activity of sodium-dependent proton efflux pathways, isolated rat hearts were subjected to 30 min of global ischemia with or without preconditioning. Intracellular sodium (Nai) was assessed using 23Na magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the activity of the Na-H exchanger and Na-K-2Cl cotransporter was measured by transiently exposing the hearts to an acid load (NH4Cl washout). Creatine kinase release was reduced by greater than 60% in the preconditioned hearts (P < 0.05) and was associated with improved functional recovery on reperfusion. Preconditioning increased Nai by 6.24 +/- 2.04 U, resulting in a significantly higher level of Nai before ischemia than in the control hearts. Nai increased significantly at the onset of ischemia (8.48 +/- 1.21 vs. 2.57 +/- 0.81 U, preconditioned vs. control hearts; P < 0.01). Preconditioning did not reduce Nai accumulation during ischemia, but the decline in Nai during the first 5 min of reperfusion was significantly greater in the preconditioned than in the control hearts (13.48 +/- 1.73 vs. 2.54 +/- 0.41 U; P < 0.001). Exposure of preconditioned hearts to ethylisopropylamiloride or bumetanide in the last reperfusion period limited in the increase in Nai during ischemia and reduced the beneficial effects of preconditioning. After the NH4Cl prepulse, preconditioned hearts acidified significantly more than control hearts and had significantly more rapid recovery of pH (preconditioned, delta pH = 0.35 +/- 0.04 U over 5 min; control, delta pH = 0.15 +/- 0.02 U over 5 min). This rapid pH recovery was not affected by inhibition of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter but was abolished by inhibition of the Na-H exchanger. These results demonstrate that

  6. Physiological hypertrophic subaortic stenosis and subendocardial infarction in a patient with a pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Levister, E C; Taylor, J B

    1981-04-01

    This report describes the occurrence of a pheochromocytoma in a middle-aged, black female with a 12-year history of hypertension, and a strong family history of hypertension. In this case, the pheochromocytoma was associated with a subendocardial myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure which occurred in the presence of large, dilated coronary arteries without intraluminal obstructions. The patient also had the murmur and echocardiographic and ventriculographic signs typical of idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis, which resolved following removal of the tumor and return of the blood pressure to normal. The authors believe this to represent a form of transient physiological hypertrophic subaortic stenosis secondary to a hypercatecholamine state.

  7. Protective effects of benidipine on hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in rat isolated hearts.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kozo; Ina, Yasuhiro; Sonoda, Rie; Nagashima, Ken; Ohmori, Kenji; Ohno, Tetsuji

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effects of benidipine (hydrochloride), a calcium antagonist, on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced injury in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. The hearts were aerobically perfused at a constant flow and exposed to H(2)O(2) (600 micromol L(-1)) for 4 min, resulting in the oxidative stress-induced myocardial dysfunction (e.g., decrease in the left ventricular developed pressure) and myocardial cell injury (e.g., increase in the release of lactate dehydrogenase). Pretreatment of the hearts with benidipine or nifedipine was performed for 20 min until the start of H(2)O(2) exposure. Benidipine at 1 nmol L(-1) and nifedipine at 10 nmol L(-1) decreased the myocardial contractility and perfusion pressure to a similar degree in the hearts under normal conditions. Benidipine (1 nmol L(-1)) significantly reduced the H(2)O(2)-induced myocardial damage. Nifedipine (10 nmol L(-1)) also tended to exhibit similar effects. Benidipine inhibited the increase in tissue lipid peroxidation induced by H(2)O(2). The results suggest that, in addition to the calcium antagonism, benidipine possesses other actions responsible for the cardioprotective effects, to which the antioxidant activity of benidipine may partly contribute.

  8. Characteristic subcellular distribution, in brain, heart and lung, of biperiden, trihexyphenidyl, and (-)-quinuclidinyl benzylate in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, J; Yokogawa, K; Nakashima, E; Ohkuma, S; Ichimura, F

    1998-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of biperiden (BP), trihexyphenidyl (TP) and (-)-quinuclidinyl benzylate (QNB) in brain, heart and lung following high dose (3.2 mg/kg) i.v. administration was investigated in rats. The subcellular distribution of BP or TP used clinically conformed with that of QNB, a typical potent central muscarinic antagonist. The concentration-time courses of the brain subcellular fractions for these drugs were of two types which decreased slowly and in parallel to the plasma concentration. The subcellular distribution in the brain and heart was dependent on the protein amount of each fraction. The percent post-nuclear fraction (P2) of the total concentration in the lung was characteristically about 3-5 times larger than that in the heart. It was elucidated that the distribution in the lung differs from that in the brain and heart, with high affinity which is not dependent on the protein amount in the P2 fraction containing lysosomes. On the other hand, at a low dose (650 ng/kg) of 3H-QNB, each fraction as a percentage of the total concentration in the brain increased in synaptic membrane and synaptic vesicles and decreased in nuclei and cytosol as compared with the high dose. These results show that although the tissue concentration-time courses of anticholinergic drugs appear to decrease simply in parallel to plasma concentration, the subcellular distribution exhibits a variety of patterns among various tissues.

  9. Successful transplantation of rat hearts subjected to extended cold preservation with a novel preservation solution.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Kenji; Fukai, Moto; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Kimura, Taichi; Hirokata, Gentaro; Shibasaki, Susumu; Fukumori, Daisuke; Haga, Sanae; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Tomomi; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Michitaka; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Todo, Satoru

    2012-06-01

    Since prolonged cold preservation of the heart deteriorates the outcome of heart transplantation, a more protective preservation solution is required. We therefore developed a new solution, named Dsol, and examined whether Dsol, in comparison to UW, could better inhibit myocardial injury resulting from prolonged cold preservation. Syngeneic heterotopic heart transplantation in Lewis rats was performed after cold preservation with UW or Dsol for 24 or 36 h. In addition to graft survival, myocardial injury, ATP content, and Ca(2+) -dependent proteases activity were assessed in the 24-h preservation group. The cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration of H9c2 cardiomyocytes after 24-h cold preservation was assessed. Dsol significantly improved 7-day graft survival after 36-h preservation. After 24-h preservation, Dsol was associated with significantly faster recovery of ATP content and less activation of calpain and caspase-3 after reperfusion. Dsol diminished graft injury significantly, as revealed by the lower levels of infarction, apoptosis, serum LDH and AST release, and graft fibrosis at 7-day. Dsol significantly inhibited Ca(2+) overload during cold preservation. Dsol inhibited myocardial injury and improved graft survival by suppressing Ca(2+) overload during the preservation and the activation of Ca(2+) -dependent proteases. Dsol is therefore considered a better alternative to UW to ameliorate the outcome of heart transplantation.

  10. [L-propionylcarnitine taurine amide induces the metabolic recovery of the isolated postischemic rat heart].

    PubMed

    Lazzarino, G; Corsico, N; Tavazzi, B; di Pierro, D; Arrigoni-Martelli, E; Giardina, B

    1992-10-01

    The effect of reperfusion with L-propionyl-carnitine-taurinammide 1 mM was evaluated on the metabolic recovery of the isolated postischemic rat heart. Data referring to the tissue concentration of the high-energy phosphates, oxypurines, nucleosides, nicotinic coenzymes, lactate and pyruvate indicate that L-propionyl-carnitine-taurinammide significantly improves the metabolism of the reperfused myocardium. In particular, ATP, creatinphosphate, GTP, sum of adenine nucleotides and the energy charge resulted 1.80, 1.83, 3.47, 1.47 and 1.20 times higher respectively than the corresponding values recorded in control reperfused heart (p < 0.01 all). These data, out of supplying the necessary biochemical support to the beneficial effects of L-propionyl-carnitine-taurinammide on hemodynamics obtained in previous studies, suggest that L-propionyl-carnitine-taurinammide might represent a useful tool for the pharmacological treatment of myocardial infarction.

  11. Autoradiographic characterization of beta-adrenoceptors in rat heart valve leaflets

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, J.E.; Nazarali, A.J.; Torda, T.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    beta-Adrenoceptors were localized and characterized in valve leaflets of the rat heart. Sixteen micrometer-thick tissue sections containing the mitral and aortic valves were incubated with (-)3-(/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol followed by autoradiography with computerized microdensitometry and comparison with /sup 125/I-labeled standards. beta-Adrenoceptors were present in all the valves studied. The selective beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist CGP 20712 A (100 nM) displaced not more than 20% of the total binding sites, suggesting that most of the beta-adrenoceptors in the valve leaflets are of the beta 2-subtype. Forskolin-binding sites were detected in the mitral valve leaflet by incubation of adjacent tissue sections with (12-/sup 3/H)forskolin. Our results indicate that catecholamines could regulate the function of the heart valves through stimulation of beta 2-adrenoceptors.

  12. A microcomputer system for haemodynamic measurements in isolated, working rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Snoeckx, L H; Schrijen, J J; van Bilsen, M; Lammers, W J; van der Nagel, T; van der Vusse, G J; Reneman, R S

    1986-01-01

    This study describes the application of an Apple IIe microcomputer in combination with a pre-processor in the on-line calculation of haemodynamic variables of the isolated working rat heart and of relative rapid changes in these variables, induced by variations in left atrial filling pressure (preload) and end-diastolic aortic pressure (afterload). Variables such as heart rate, systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressure, the maximal positive and negative first derivative of the left ventricular pressure, systolic and diastolic aortic pressure and aortic flow were continuously calculated and printed at minimal intervals of 6 s. A newly designed procedure to detect the activation of the electrogram, which was necessary to start the detection of a new cardiac cycle, is described.

  13. High fat diet aggravates arsenic induced oxidative stress in rat heart and liver.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Mousumi; Ghosh, Debosree; Ghosh, Arnab Kumar; Bose, Gargi; Chattopadhyay, Aindrila; Rudra, Smita; Dey, Monalisa; Bandyopadhyay, Arkita; Pattari, Sanjib K; Mallick, Sanjaya; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic is a well known global groundwater contaminant. Exposure of human body to arsenic causes various hazardous effects via oxidative stress. Nutrition is an important susceptible factor which can affect arsenic toxicity by several plausible mechanisms. Development of modern civilization led to alteration in the lifestyle as well as food habits of the people both in urban and rural areas which led to increased use of junk food containing high level of fat. The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of high fat diet on heart and liver tissues of rats when they were co-treated with arsenic. This study was established by elucidating heart weight to body weight ratio as well as analysis of the various functional markers, oxidative stress biomarkers and also the activity of the antioxidant enzymes. Histological analysis confirmed the biochemical investigations. From this study it can be concluded that high fat diet increased arsenic induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor-Mediated Decline in Contractile Force in Rat Engineered Heart Tissue.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Fabian; Yonis, Amina Y; Cuello, Friederike; Luther, Pradeep; Schulze, Thomas; Eder, Alexandra; Streichert, Thomas; Mannhardt, Ingra; Hirt, Marc N; Schaaf, Sebastian; Stenzig, Justus; Force, Thomas; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Hansen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular dysfunction is a frequent and potentially severe side effect of many tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). The mode of toxicity is not identified, but may include impairment of mitochondrial or sarcomeric function, autophagy or angiogenesis, either as an on-target or off-target mechanism. We studied concentration-response curves and time courses for nine TKIs in three-dimensional, force generating engineered heart tissue (EHT) from neonatal rat heart cells. We detected a concentration- and time-dependent decline in contractile force for gefitinib, lapatinib, sunitinib, imatinib, sorafenib, vandetanib and lestaurtinib and no decline in contractile force for erlotinib and dasatinib after 96 hours of incubation. The decline in contractile force was associated with an impairment of autophagy (LC3 Western blot) and appearance of autophagolysosomes (transmission electron microscopy). This study demonstrates the feasibility to study TKI-mediated force effects in EHTs and identifies an association between a decline in contractility and inhibition of autophagic flux.

  15. EFFECT OF PERILLA FRUTESCENS EXTRACTS AND ROSMARINIC ACID ON RAT HEART MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTIONS.

    PubMed

    Raudone, Lina; Burdulis, Deividas; Raudonis, Raimondas; Janulis, Valdimaras; Jankauskiene, Laima; Viskelis, Pranas; Trumbeckaite, Sonata

    2016-01-01

    Perilla frutescens L. due to its aromatic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant traits has been traditionally used as medicinal plant in Eastern Asia. Alterations of mitochondria are interconnected with many chronic diseases. Bioactives of herbal extracts can modulate mitochondrial effects and be beneficial in prevention of mitochondrial related chronic diseases. Direct effects of the red-leaf form P. frutescens extract (PFE) and the green-leaf form P. frutescens var. crispa f. viridis extract (PCE) were evaluated investigating activities on the oxidative phosphorylation and antioxidant activity in the rat heart mitochondria in vitro. HPLC-MS analysis was applied for the identification of phenolic compounds. Cell with a Clark-type oxygen electrode was used for mitochondrial respiration measurement. The generation of reactive oxygen species was estimated in isolated rat heart mitochondria and determined fluorimetrically. State 3 respiration rate was not affected by lower concentrations, however, it was inhibited at higher concentrations by 22-70% for PFE and by 45-55% for PCE. PFE containing anthocyanins induced the concentration-dependent stimulation (by 23-76%) of the State 4 respiration rate after addition of cytochrome c due to reducing properties. Significant reduction of H₂O₂ pro- duction was observed with investigated concentrations of rosmarinic acid and both perilla extracts. Our results demonstrate that the effect of PFE and PCE extracts on rat heart mitochondria depend on the qualitative characteristics of complex of biologically active compounds. Selective effects on mitochondrial function could enable the regulation of apoptosis or another mechanisms occurring in cells.

  16. Rapid attenuation of circadian clock gene oscillations in the rat heart following ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Kung, Theodore A; Egbejimi, Oluwaseun; Cui, Jiajia; Ha, Ngan P; Durgan, David J; Essop, M Faadiel; Bray, Molly S; Shaw, Chad A; Hardin, Paul E; Stanley, William C; Young, Martin E

    2007-12-01

    The intracellular circadian clock consists of a series of transcriptional modulators that together allow the cell to perceive the time of day. Circadian clocks have been identified within various components of the cardiovascular system (e.g. cardiomyocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells) and possess the potential to regulate numerous aspects of cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. The present study tested the hypothesis that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R; 30 min occlusion of the rat left main coronary artery in vivo) alters the circadian clock within the ischemic, versus non-ischemic, region of the heart. Left ventricular anterior (ischemic) and posterior (non-ischemic) regions were isolated from I/R, sham-operated, and naïve rats over a 24-h period, after which mRNAs encoding for both circadian clock components and known clock-controlled genes were quantified. Circadian clock gene oscillations (i.e. peak-to-trough fold differences) were rapidly attenuated in the I/R, versus the non-ischemic, region. Consistent with decreased circadian clock output, we observe a rapid induction of E4BP4 in the ischemic region of the heart at both the mRNA and protein levels. In contrast with I/R, chronic (1 week) hypobaric chamber-induced hypoxia did not attenuate oscillations in circadian clock genes in either the left or right ventricle of the rat heart. In conclusion, these data show that in a rodent model of myocardial I/R, circadian clocks within the ischemic region become rapidly impaired, through a mechanism that appears to be independent of hypoxia.

  17. Cordyceps sinensis protects against liver and heart injuries in a rat model of chronic kidney disease: a metabolomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xia; Zhong, Fang; Tang, Xu-long; Lian, Fu-lin; Zhou, Qiao; Guo, Shan-mai; Liu, Jia-fu; Sun, Peng; Hao, Xu; Lu, Ying; Wang, Wei-ming; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Nai-xia

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis could improve the metabolic function of extrarenal organs to achieve its anti-chronic kidney disease (CKD) effects. Methods: Male SD rats were divided into CKD rats (with 5/6-nephrectomy), CKD rats treated with Cordyceps sinensis (4 mg•kg-1•d-1, po), and sham-operated rats. After an 8-week treatment, metabolites were extracted from the hearts and livers of the rats, and then subjected to 1H-NMR-based metabolomic analysis. Results: Oxidative stress, energy metabolism, amino acid and protein metabolism and choline metabolism were considered as links between CKD and extrarenal organ dysfunction. Within the experimental period of 8 weeks, the metabolic disorders in the liver were more pronounced than in the heart, suggesting that CKD-related extrarenal organ dysfunctions occurred sequentially rather than simultaneously. Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis exerted statistically significant rescue effects on the liver and heart by reversely regulating levels of those metabolites that are typically perturbed in CKD. Conclusion: Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis significantly attenuates the liver and heart injuries in CKD rats. The 1H NMR-based metabolomic approach has provided a systematic view for understanding of CKD and the drug treatment, which can also be used to elucidate the mechanisms of action of other traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:24632844

  18. Cordyceps sinensis protects against liver and heart injuries in a rat model of chronic kidney disease: a metabolomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Zhong, Fang; Tang, Xu-long; Lian, Fu-lin; Zhou, Qiao; Guo, Shan-mai; Liu, Jia-fu; Sun, Peng; Hao, Xu; Lu, Ying; Wang, Wei-ming; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Nai-xia

    2014-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis could improve the metabolic function of extrarenal organs to achieve its anti-chronic kidney disease (CKD) effects. Male SD rats were divided into CKD rats (with 5/6-nephrectomy), CKD rats treated with Cordyceps sinensis (4 mg•kg-1•d-1, po), and sham-operated rats. After an 8-week treatment, metabolites were extracted from the hearts and livers of the rats, and then subjected to (1)H-NMR-based metabolomic analysis. Oxidative stress, energy metabolism, amino acid and protein metabolism and choline metabolism were considered as links between CKD and extrarenal organ dysfunction. Within the experimental period of 8 weeks, the metabolic disorders in the liver were more pronounced than in the heart, suggesting that CKD-related extrarenal organ dysfunctions occurred sequentially rather than simultaneously. Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis exerted statistically significant rescue effects on the liver and heart by reversely regulating levels of those metabolites that are typically perturbed in CKD. Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis significantly attenuates the liver and heart injuries in CKD rats. The (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach has provided a systematic view for understanding of CKD and the drug treatment, which can also be used to elucidate the mechanisms of action of other traditional Chinese medicines.

  19. Nonobstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Out of the Shadows: Known from the Beginning but Largely Ignored … Until Now.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Rowin, Ethan J; Maron, Martin S; Braunwald, Eugene

    2017-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was first recognized as a disease of obstruction to left ventricular outflow, hence, its early names and acronyms such as idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic obstruction. The nonobstructive subset of patients, incapable of developing mechanical impedance to left ventricular outflow at rest or with physiologic exercise, was initially recognized by the Braunwald group at the National Institutes of Health >50 years ago in the preimaging era, and is now recognized as comprising about one-third of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients. Nevertheless, until recently, and for 25 years, this substantial patient subset has been largely ignored and incompletely understood in terms of its clinical significance and consequences. However, the newfound interest in nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with recent cohort data permits more robust clarity of this subset, as well as the overall disease spectrum. As a group, patients with nonobstructive disease experience a largely stable clinical course at relatively low risk for progressive heart failure symptoms to New York Heart Association class III/IV in (90%). On the other hand, there is a small but important subgroup of 10% at risk for developing drug-refractory advanced heart failure sufficient to justify consideration for heart transplant as the only definitive treatment option. This recognition closes a significant gap in understanding the natural history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, also underscoring that the disease is not uniformly grim but instead consistent with extended longevity, thereby providing many patients with a measure of reassurance.

  20. Coronary vasodilator effects of endogenous cannabinoids in vasopressin-preconstricted unpaced rat isolated hearts.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jens A; Abesser, Marco; Karcher, Jan; Laser, Martin; Kunos, George

    2005-09-01

    The mechanisms by which cannabinoids alter coronary vascular tone and cardiac performance are controversial. We investigated the effects of various cannabinoids in spontaneously beating Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Bolus injections of anandamide (0.1-1 micromol) caused no change in coronary flow (CF) or left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP). In hearts preperfused with vasopressin to induce vasoconstrictor tone, anandamide or the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA (1-100 nmol) dose-dependently increased CF by up to 267% and LVSP by 20 mm Hg. The metabolically stable endocannabinoid derivatives, R-methanandamide and noladin ether, displayed similar effects. In contrast, Delta-THC (10-100 nmol), the major psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, strongly decreased CF and LVSP. The CB2 receptor agonist JWH-133 (10-100 nmol) elicited vasodilator and positive inotropic effects only at higher doses. The CB1 antagonists SR141716A and AM-251 as well as the potassium channel inhibitors tetraethylammonium and iberiotoxin blocked the anandamide-induced increases in CF and LVSP, whereas the CB2 antagonist SR144528 and the putative "CB3 antagonist" O-1918 did not have an inhibitory effect. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of cardiac CB1 but no CB2 receptors. Anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol were detected in heart tissue. However, combined application of fatty acid amidohydrolase inhibitors and the transport inhibitor AM-404 to augment tissue levels of endocannabinoids was without effect on CF or LVSP. We conclude that in the rat isolated heart with reestablished vasoconstrictor tone, cannabinoids including anandamide elicit coronary vasodilation and a secondary increase in contractility via CB1 receptors and potassium channels.

  1. Cardiovascular effects of herbicides and formulated adjuvants on isolated rat aorta and heart.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yin-Ching; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Kang, Jaw-Jou; Wang, Shun-Cheng; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2007-06-01

    Various formulations of agricultural chemicals, including solutions, wettable powders, and emulsifiable concentrates, contain adjuvants of solvents and surfactants in addition to active ingredients. Among these formulations, herbicides are among the most commonly used pesticides globally. Some pesticides have been demonstrated to cause severe circulatory failure in poisoned humans. To clarify the potential risk of herbicides and their adjuvants influence on the cardiovascular system, four technical grade (TG) herbicides and their end products (EP), including paraquat, glyphosate, glufosinate, and atrazine, as well as their formulated adjuvants isopropylamine (IPA), polyoxyethylene alkylether sulfate (AES), ethyl acetate (EA), xylene, petrolium-170 (P-170), and solvesso-100 (S-100), were assessed to determine their effects on isolated rat aorta and heart. The results revealed that the vasorelaxation effects of the herbicide EPs exceeded those of TGs, and atrazine produced more significant vasorelaxation in rat aortas than the other herbicides tested. The formulated adjuvants of IPA did not affect the aorta; however, AES, EA, xylene, P-170 and S-100 caused significant vasorelaxation. Herbicide EPs-induced vasorelaxation was generally endothelium-dependent. Furthermore, the TG and EP of paraquat, and the TG of glufosinate and glyphosate were found to have no effect on the isolated heart. However, the normal twitch tensions of the isolated heart were significantly inhibited by EPs of glyphosate and glufosinate, and by TG and EP of atrazine. Although, the adjuvants of IPA appeared unaffected, however, AES, EA, xylene, P-170 and S-100 caused complete inhibition and contraction on the isolated hearts. These results indicated that the adjuvants of herbicides might enhance hypotension and contributed to cardiovascular disorders during intoxication.

  2. Melatonin Supplementation Ameliorates Energy Charge and Oxidative Stress Induced by Acute Exercise in Rat Heart Tissue.

    PubMed

    Cimen, Behzat; Uz, Ali; Cetin, Ihsan; Cimen, Leyla; Cetin, Aysun

    2017-09-01

    Regular physical exercises may help people to be more resistant to everyday problems; however, how acute and intense exercises affect the heart tissues functioning with maximum capacity and how melatonin changes the effect of acute and intense exercises are still not obvious. We aimed to comprehend whether melatonin intravenous injection supports the oxidative/antioxidative conditions and energy charge in heart tissues of rats exposed to acute swimming exercise. Thirty Wistar-albino male rats were categorized into 3 groups with equal number of subjects. Control group performed no application, and acute intensive swimming exercise group were subjected to acute intensive swimming exercise for 30 minutes, and melatonin group were applied 25 mg/kg single dose melatonin administration prior to 30 minutes acute intensive swimming exercise. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured by spectrophotometric method; and the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and energy charge were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography. Tissue MDA and 3-NT levels of the acute intensive exercise group were found to be higher than the control group. It was also found that the melatonin administration increased the energy charge and antioxidant activities, while decreased tissue MDA and 3-NT levels in heart tissues. Our results provide evidence for melatonin that can exert potent protective effects on oxidative stress and energy charge for heart tissues in acute swimming exercise. These findings suggest that the direct beneficial effects of melatonin could be potentially applied on prevention of oxidative stress and energy deficit.

  3. Chronic mercury exposure impairs the sympathovagal control of the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Simões, M R; Azevedo, B F; Fiorim, J; Jr Freire, D D; Covre, E P; Vassallo, D V; Dos Santos, L

    2016-11-01

    Mercury is known to cause harmful neural effects affecting the cardiovascular system. Here, we evaluated the chronic effects of low-dose mercury exposure on the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. Wistar rats were treated for 30 days with HgCl2 (1st dose 4.6 μg/kg followed by 0.07 μg/kg per day, intramuscular) or saline. The femoral artery and vein were then cannulated for evaluation of autonomic control of the hemodynamic function, which was evaluated in awake rats. The following tests were performed: baroreflex sensitivity, Von Bezold-Jarisch reflex, heart rate variability (HRV) and pharmacological blockade with methylatropine and atenolol to test the autonomic tone of the heart. Exposure to HgCl2 for 30 days slightly increased the mean arterial pressure and heart rate (HR). There was a significant reduction in the baroreflex gain of animals exposed to HgCl2 . Moreover, haemodynamic responses to the activation of the Von Bezold-Jarisch reflex were also reduced. The changes in the spectral analysis of HRV suggested a shift in the sympathovagal balance toward a sympathetic predominance after mercury exposure, which was confirmed by autonomic pharmacological blockade in the HgCl2 group. This group also exhibited reduced intrinsic HR after the double block suggesting that the pacemaker activity of the sinus node was also affected. These findings suggested that the autonomic modulation of the heart was significantly altered by chronic mercury exposure, thus reinforcing that even at low concentrations such exposure might be associated with increased cardiovascular risk. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Histopathological and immunohistochemical alterations in rat heart after thyroidectomy and the role of hemin and ketoconazole in treatment.

    PubMed

    Tousson, Ehab; Ali, Ehab M; Ibrahim, Wafaa; Ashraf, Rana M

    2012-12-01

    The heart is a major target organ for thyroid hormone action and marked changes occur in cardiac function in the case of hypo- or hyperthyroidism. Also, thyroid hormone has a significant regulatory effect on the rate of heme oxidation in the liver. Heme oxygenase (HO) is a heme-catabolizing enzyme that converts heme into biliverdin, iron and carbon monoxide. HO(-1) and its reaction products protect the heart and vasculature in pathological conditions. We studied the changes in the heart structure of thyroidectomized rat at the post-pubertal stage, in addition to the role of hemin as HO inducer and ketoconazole (KTZ) as HO inhibitor in treatment. 35 male Wistar rats were equally divided into seven groups; the first and second groups were the control and Sham-operated groups respectively while the 3rd and 4th groups were subjected to sham operation then treated with hemin (G(3)) and KTZ (G(4)). The 5th group (G(5)) was thyroidectomized group. The 6th and 7th groups were subjected to thyroidectomy then treated with hemin (G(5)) and KTZ (G(6)) respectively. Serum T(3) & TSH levels in thyroidectomized rats were significantly decreased and increased respectively when compared with the control group. Left ventricle section in the heart of thyroidectomized rats showed many of abnormalities as hydrophobic changes of myofibrillar structure with striations, myocardial atrophy and edema, focal haemorrhage when compared with that in control and sham groups. The iNOS label index was significantly decreased in thyroidectomized rat heart (grade 1) and their levels were significantly increased in treated thyroidectomized rats with hemin and KTZ (grades 3 & 2 respectively) when compared with control and sham rat groups (grade 4). Treatment of thyroidectomized rat with hemin improves the histopathological alternation and the intensity of iNOS immunoreactive cells demonstrating the recovery of some injury.

  5. The effects of interferon-alpha/beta in a model of rat heart transplantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, A. D.; Klein, J. B.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Ogden, L. L. 2nd; Gray, L. A. Jr

    1992-01-01

    Interferons have multiple immunologic effects. One such effect is the activation of expression of cell surface antigens. Interferon alpha/beta enhance expression of class I but not class II histocompatibility antigens. Contradictory information has been published regarding the effect of interferon-alpha/beta administration in patients with kidney transplantation. In a model of rat heart transplantation we demonstrated that administration of interferon-alpha/beta accelerated rejection in a dose-dependent fashion in the absence of maintenance cyclosporine. Animals treated with maintenance cyclosporine had evidence of increased rejection at 20 days that was resolved completely at 45 days with cyclosporine alone.

  6. In female rat heart mitochondria, oophorectomy results in loss of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pavón, Natalia; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Uribe-Alvarez, Cristina; Rivero-Segura, Nadia A; Vazquez-Martínez, Edgar Ricardo; Cerbón, Marco; Martínez-Abundis, Eduardo; Torres-Narvaez, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Memije, Raúl; Roldán-Gómez, Francisco-Javier; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador

    2017-02-01

    Oophorectomy in adult rats affected cardiac mitochondrial function. Progression of mitochondrial alterations was assessed at one, two and three months after surgery: at one month, very slight changes were observed, which increased at two and three months. Gradual effects included decrease in the rates of oxygen consumption and in respiratory uncoupling in the presence of complex I substrates, as well as compromised Ca(2+) buffering ability. Malondialdehyde concentration increased, whereas the ROS-detoxifying enzyme Mn(2+) superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and aconitase lost activity. In the mitochondrial respiratory chain, the concentration and activity of complex I and complex IV decreased. Among other mitochondrial enzymes and transporters, adenine nucleotide carrier and glutaminase decreased. 2-Oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase also decreased. Data strongly suggest that in the female rat heart, estrogen depletion leads to progressive, severe mitochondrial dysfunction. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. Novel Model of Pulmonary Artery Banding Leading to Right Heart Failure in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Masataka; Ousaka, Daiki; Arai, Sadahiko; Okuyama, Michihiro; Tarui, Suguru; Kobayashi, Junko; Kasahara, Shingo; Sano, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Background. Congenital heart diseases often involve chronic pressure overload of the right ventricle (RV) which is a major cause of RV dysfunction. Pulmonary artery (PA) banding has been used to produce animal models of RV dysfunction. We have devised a new and easier method of constricting the PA and compared it directly with the partial ligation method. Methods. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (240–260 g) were divided into three groups: sham operation, partial pulmonary artery ligation (PAL) procedure, and pulmonary artery half-closed clip (PAC) procedure. RV function and remodeling were determined by echocardiography and histomorphometry. Results. Surgical mortality was significantly lower in the PAC group while echocardiography revealed significantly more signs of RV dysfunction. At the 8th week after surgery RV fibrosis rate was significantly higher in the PAC group. Conclusions. This procedure of pulmonary artery banding in rats is easier and more efficient than partial ligation. PMID:26504827

  8. Endomorphins decrease heart rate and blood pressure possibly by activating vagal afferents in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Kwok, E H; Dun, N J

    1998-08-24

    Endomorphin 1 (10, 30, 100 nmol/kg) administered intravenously (i.v. ) to urethane-anesthetized rats consistently and dose-dependently lowered heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP); the decrease in blood pressure recovered faster as compared to the HR. The effects of endomorphin 2 were qualitatively similar. Naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.v.) completely antagonized the bradycardia and hypotension caused by endomorphin 1. Pretreatment of the rats with atropine methylnitrate, atropine sulfate (2 mg/kg, i.v.) or bilateral vagotomy nearly abolished the bradycardia and attenuated the hypotensive effect of endomorphin 1. Our studies suggest that the bradycardia effect following systemic administration of the new opioid peptide may be explained by activation of vagal afferents and the hypotensive effect may be secondary to a reduction of cardiac output and/or a direct vasodilation.

  9. Metabolic phenotyping of the diseased rat heart using 13C-substrates and ex vivo perfusion in the working mode.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Geneviève; Khairallah, Maya; Bouchard, Bertrand; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare energy substrate fluxes through metabolic pathways leading to mitochondrial citrate synthesis and release in normal and diseased rat hearts using 13C-substrates and mass isotopomer analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). This study was prompted by our previous finding of a modulated citrate release by perfused rat hearts and by the possibility that a dysregulated myocardial citrate release represents a specific chronic alteration of energy metabolism in cardiac patients. The 15-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) was chosen as our animal model of disease and the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat as its matched control. Ex vivo work-performing hearts were perfused with a semi-recirculating buffer containing physiological concentrations of unlabeled (glucose) and 13C-labeled ([U-13C3](lactate + pyruvate) and/or [1-(13)C]oleate) substrates. In parallel to the continuous monitoring of indices of the heart's functional and physiological status, the following metabolic parameters were documented: (i) citrate release rates and citric acid cycle intermediate tissue levels, (ii) the contribution of fatty acids as well as pyruvate decarboxylation and carboxylation to citrate synthesis, and (iii) lactate and pyruvate uptake and efflux rates. Working hearts from both rat species showed a similar percent contribution of carbohydrates for citrate synthesis through decarboxylation (70%) and carboxylation (10%). SHR hearts showed the following metabolic alterations: a higher citrate release rate, which was associated with a parallel increase in its tissue level, a lower contribution of oleate beta-oxidation to citrate synthesis, and an accelerated efflux rate of unlabeled lactate from glycolysis. These metabolic changes were not explained by differences in myocardial oxygen consumption, cardiac performance or efficiency, nor correlated with indices of tissue necrosis or ischemia. This study demonstrates how the

  10. Chronic heart failure modifies respiratory mechanics in rats: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Deise M.; Silveira, Viviane D.; Thomaz, Alex; Nunes, Ramiro B.; Elsner, Viviane R.; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze respiratory mechanics and hemodynamic alterations in an experimental model of chronic heart failure (CHF) following myocardial infarction. Method Twenty-seven male adult Wistar rats were randomized to CHF group (n=12) or Sham group (n=15). Ten weeks after coronary ligation or sham surgery, the animals were anesthetized and submitted to respiratory mechanics and hemodynamic measurements. Pulmonary edema as well as cardiac remodeling were measured. Results The CHF rats showed pulmonary edema 26% higher than the Sham group. The respiratory system compliance (Crs) and the total lung capacity (TLC) were lower (40% and 27%, respectively) in the CHF rats when compared to the Sham group (P<0.01). There was also an increase in tissue resistance (Gti) and elastance (Hti) (28% and 45%, respectively) in the CHF group. Moreover, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was higher (32 mmHg vs 4 mmHg, P<0.01), while the left ventricular systolic pressure was lower (118 mmHg vs 130 mmHg, P=0.02) in the CHF group when compared to the control. Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed a negative association between pulmonary edema and Crs (r=–0.70, P=0.0001) and between pulmonary edema and TLC (r=–0.67, P=0.0034). Pulmonary edema correlated positively with Gti (r=0.68, P=0.001) and Hti (r=0.68, P=0.001). Finally, there was a strong positive relationship between pulmonary edema and heart weight (r=0.80, P=0.001). Conclusion Rats with CHF present important changes in hemodynamic and respiratory mechanics, which may be associated with alterations in cardiopulmonary interactions. PMID:27556388

  11. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Left Ventricle and Plasma of Rats with Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Minamino, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics focusing on post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, is a useful strategy for discovering novel biomarkers. To apply this strategy effectively to cardiac hypertrophy and resultant heart failure, we aimed to characterize glycosylation profiles in the left ventricle and plasma of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats, a model of hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy, were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet starting at 6 weeks. As a result, they exhibited cardiac hypertrophy at 12 weeks and partially impaired cardiac function at 16 weeks compared with control rats fed a low-salt (0.3% NaCl) diet. Gene expression analysis revealed significant changes in the expression of genes encoding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Glycoproteome profiling using lectin microarrays indicated upregulation of mucin-type O-glycosylation, especially disialyl-T, and downregulation of core fucosylation on N-glycans, detected by specific interactions with Amaranthus caudatus and Aspergillus oryzae lectins, respectively. Upregulation of plasma α-l-fucosidase activity was identified as a biomarker candidate for cardiac hypertrophy, which is expected to support the existing marker, atrial natriuretic peptide and its related peptides. Proteomic analysis identified cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3, a master regulator of cardiac muscle function, as an O-glycosylated protein with altered glycosylation in the rats with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that alternations in O-glycosylation affect its oligomerization and function. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of significant changes in glycosylation pattern, specifically mucin-type O-glycosylation and core defucosylation, in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting that they are potential biomarkers for these diseases.

  12. Beneficial effect of prolonged heme oxygenase 1 activation in a rat model of chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Collino, Massimo; Pini, Alessandro; Mugelli, Niccolò; Mastroianni, Rosanna; Bani, Daniele; Fantozzi, Roberto; Papucci, Laura; Fazi, Marilena; Masini, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We and others have previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) induction by acute hemin administration exerts cardioprotective effects. Here, we developed a rat model of heart failure to investigate whether a long-term induction of HO-1 by chronic hemin administration exerted protective effects. Sprague Dawley rats that underwent permanent ligation of the left coronary artery were closely monitored for survival rate analysis and sacrificed on day 28 post-operation. Administration of hemin (4 mg/kg body weight) every other day for 4 weeks induced a massive increase in HO-1 expression and activity, as shown by the increased levels of the two main metabolic products of heme degradation, bilirubin and carbon monoxide (CO). These effects were associated with significant improvement in survival and reduced the extension of myocardial damage. The ischemic hearts of the hemin-treated animals displayed reduced oxidative stress and apoptosis in comparison with the non-treated rats, as shown by the decreased levels of lipid peroxidation, free-radical-induced DNA damage, caspase-3 activity and Bax expression. Besides, chronic HO-1 activation suppressed the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, interleukin 1β (IL-1β) production and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) production that were evoked by the ischemic injury, and increased the plasma level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Interestingly, HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX; 1 mg/kg) lowered bilirubin and CO concentrations to control values, thus abolishing all the cardioprotective effects of hemin. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that chronic HO-1 activation by prolonged administration of hemin improves survival and exerts protective effects in a rat model of myocardial ischemia by exerting a potent antioxidant activity and disrupting multiple levels of the apoptotic and inflammatory cascade. PMID:23592614

  13. Hypertrophy of neurons within cardiac ganglia in human, canine, and rat heart failure: the potential role of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S; Nee, Lisa M; Wurster, Robert D

    2013-08-19

    Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hypertrophied in human, canine, and rat heart failure and that nerve growth factor, which we hypothesize is elevated in the failing heart, contributes to this neuronal hypertrophy. Somal morphology of neurons from human (579.54±14.34 versus 327.45±9.17 μm(2); P<0.01) and canine hearts (767.80±18.37 versus 650.23±9.84 μm(2); P<0.01) failing secondary to ischemia and neurons from spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts (327.98±3.15 versus 271.29±2.79 μm(2); P<0.01) failing secondary to hypertension reveal significant hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia compared with controls. Western blot analysis shows that nerve growth factor levels in the explanted, failing human heart are 250% greater than levels in healthy donor hearts. Neurons from cardiac ganglia cultured with nerve growth factor are significantly larger and have greater dendritic arborization than neurons in control cultures. Hypertrophied neurons are significantly less excitable than smaller ones; thus, hypertrophy of vagal postganglionic neurons in cardiac ganglia would help to explain the parasympathetic withdrawal that accompanies heart failure. Furthermore, our observations suggest that nerve growth factor, which is elevated in the failing human heart, causes hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia.

  14. Angiotensin II and oxidative stress in Dahl Salt-sensitive rat with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Akihiro; Onozato, Maristela Lika; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Goto, Atsuo; Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2002-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species have an important pathogenic role in organ damage. We investigated the role of oxidative stress via nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase in the kidney of the Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats with heart failure (DSHF). Eleven-week-old DS rats fed an 8%-NaCl diet received either vehicle or imidapril (1 mg/kg per day) for 7 weeks. The renal expression of the NAD(P)H oxidase p47phox and endothelial NO synthase were evaluated. In DSHF rats, associated with increased renal angiotensin II, mRNA and protein expression of NAD(P)H oxidase p47phox were enhanced with an increase in renal lipid peroxidation production (0.33+/-0.03 versus 0.22+/-0.01 nmol/mg protein, P<0.05) and urinary excretion of hydrogen peroxide (26.9+/-6.6 versus 9.5+/-2.1 U/mg creatinine, P<0.01) compared with levels in Dahl salt-resistant rats. The endothelial NO synthase expression was decreased in the kidney. Treatment with imidapril reduced renal angiotensin II and NAD(P)H oxidase expression and the oxidative products (kidney lipid peroxidation product: 0.16+/-0.02, P<0.001; urinary hydrogen peroxide: 3.1+/-0.2, P<0.01 versus DSHF rats). Imidapril significantly decreased albuminuria and reduced glomerulosclerosis without changes in the blood pressure. In conclusion, DSHF rats showed increased oxidative stress in the kidney via NAD(P)H oxidase. Blockade of local angiotensin II with subpressor dose of imidapril inhibited NAD(P)H oxidase and prevented renal damage.

  15. Two subpopulations of mitochondria in the aging rat heart display heterogenous levels of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jung H; Heath, Shi-Hua; Hagen, Tory M

    2003-11-01

    Cardiac mitochondria are composed of two distinct subpopulations: one beneath the sarcolemma (subsarcolemmal mitochondria: SSM), and another along the myofilaments (interfibrillary mitochondria: IFM). Previous studies suggest a preferential loss of IFM function with age; however, the age-related changes in oxidative stress in these mitochondrial subpopulations have not been examined. To this end, the changes in mitochondrial antioxidant capacity, oxidant output, and oxidative damage to Complex IV in IFM and SSM from young and old rats were studied. Results show no apparent differences in any parameters examined between IFM and SSM from young rats. However, relative to young, only IFM from old rats had a significantly higher rate of oxidant production and a decline in mitochondrial ascorbate levels and GSH redox status. The age-related decline in mitochondrial antioxidant capacity in IFM was accompanied by a marked loss in glutaredoxin and GSSG reductase activities, suggesting a diminished reductive capacity in IFM with age. Moreover, the loss in Complex IV activity was limited to the IFM of old rats, which was accompanied by a 4-fold increase in 4-hydroxynonenal-modified Complex IV. Thus, mitochondrial decay is not uniform and further indicates that myofibrils may be uniquely under oxidative stress in the aging heart.

  16. Neonatal SSRI exposure improves mitochondrial function and antioxidant defense in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Braz, Glauber Ruda F; Freitas, Cristiane M; Nascimento, Luciana; Pedroza, Anderson A; da Silva, Aline Isabel; Lagranha, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Protein restriction during prenatal, postnatal, or in both periods has a close relationship with subsequent development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Elevated brain levels of serotonin and its metabolites have been found in malnourished states. The aim in the present study was to investigate whether treatment with fluoxetine (Fx), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, mimics the detrimental effect of low-protein diet during the perinatal period on the male rat heart. Our hypothesis is that increased circulating serotonin as a result of pharmacologic treatment with Fx leads to cardiac dysfunction similar to that observed in protein-restricted rats. Male Wistar rat pups received daily subcutaneous injection of Fx or vehicle from postnatal day 1 to postnatal day 21. Male rats were euthanized at 60 days of age and the following parameters were evaluated in the cardiac tissue: mitochondrial respiratory capacity, respiratory control ratio, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential, and biomarkers of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense. We found that Fx treatment increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity (123%) and membrane potential (212%) and decreased ROS production (55%). In addition we observed an increase in the antioxidant capacity (elevation in catalase activity (5-fold) and glutathione peroxidase (4.6-fold)). Taken together, our results suggest that Fx treatment in the developmental period positively affects the mitochondrial bioenergetics and antioxidant defense in the cardiac tissue.

  17. Lack of effect of thyroid hormone on diabetic rat heart function and biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Tahiliani, A G; McNeill, J H

    1984-06-01

    Cardiac functional abnormalities are frequently seen in diabetics and diabetes is also known to produce a state of mild hypothyroidism. To study the degree of involvement of diabetes-induced hypothyroidism on altered myocardial function, thyroid replacement therapy was carried out in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Triiodothyronine (T3) treatment was initiated 3 days after the rats were made diabetic and was carried out for 6 weeks thereafter. Isolated perfused hearts from diabetic rats exhibited a depression in left ventricular developed pressure and positive and negative dP/dt at higher filling pressures as compared with controls. The depression could not be prevented by thyroid treatment. Calcium uptake activity in the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was also depressed as a result of diabetes and this depression also was not prevented by thyroid treatment. Long chain acyl carnitine levels were found to be elevated i