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Sample records for hypertrophic stratified lake

  1. Nonlinear internal waves in shallow stratified lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkina, Oxana; Talipova, Tatiana; Kurkin, Andrey; Ruvinskaya, Ekaterina; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2015-04-01

    Weakly nonlinear model of internal waves based on the extended Korteweg-de Vries equation - Gardner equation is applied to analyze possible shapes in shallow stratified lake - Sankhar Lake, Russia. Series of temperature variation in space and time are collected and analyzed. The spectra of such variations can be fitted by power function of frequency with exponent minus one, minus two. It is shown that temperature variations influence on kinematic characteristics of internal waves, mainly on the coefficient of quadratic nonlinearity. The solitary wave (soliton) of the first mode is an elevation wave with amplitude less 3 m (total depth of 15 m). The solitons of the second mode can have any polarity. Also the breathers of second mode can be generated in such lake.

  2. Methane metabolism in a stratified boreal lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykänen, Hannu; Peura, Sari; Kankaala, Paula; Jones, Roger

    2013-04-01

    Stratified lakes, typical of the boreal zone, are naturally anoxic from their bottoms. In these lakes methanogenesis can account for up to half of organic matter degradation. However, a major part of the methane (CH4) is oxidized in the water column before reaching the atmosphere. Since methanotrophs use CH4 as their sole carbon and energy source, much CH4-derived carbon is incorporated into their biomass. Microbially produced CH4 has strongly negative δ13C compared to other carbon forms in ecosystems, making it possible to follow its route in food webs. However, only a few studies have estimated the amount of this microbial biomass or its carbon stable isotopic composition due to difficulties in separating it from other biomass or from other carbon forms in the water column. We estimated methanotrophic biomass from measured CH4 oxidation, and δ13C of the biomass from measured δ13C values of CH4, DIC, POM and DOC. An estimate of the fraction of methanotrophs in total microbial biomass is derived from bacterial community composition measurements. The study was made in, Alinen Mustajärvi, a small (area 0.75 ha, maximum depth 6.5 m, mean depth 4.2 m,), oligotrophic, mesohumic headwater lake located in boreal coniferous forest in southern Finland. CH4 and DIC concentrations and their δ13C were measured over the deepest point of the lake at 1 m intervals. 13C of DOM and POM were analyzed from composite samples from epi-, meta-, and hypolimnion. Evasion of CH4 and carbon dioxide from the lake surface to the atmosphere was estimated with boundary layer diffusion equations. CH4oxidation was estimated by comparing differences between observed concentrations and CH4potentially transported by turbulent diffusion between different vertical layers in the lake and also by actual methanotrophy measurements and from vertical differences in δ13C-CH4. The estimate of CH4 production was based on the sum of oxidized and released CH4. Molecular microbiology methods were used to

  3. Green River iaminites: does the playa-lake model really invalidate the stratified-lake model

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, B.W.

    1982-06-01

    Proponents of the playa-lake model have proposed deposition of most of the Green River Formation microlaminated carbonates (including oil shales) in lakes that were not perennially stratified (meromictic). However, there is a variety of evidence favoring a meromictic depositional environment: (1) close similarity of much of the lamination to varves in modern meromictic lakes, (2) evidence that hydrologic events favoring development of meromixis (chemical stratification) occurred prior to deposition of major accumulations of oil shale, (3) mutually exclusive distribution of fossil nekton (especially fish) and normal lacustrine benthos (including mollusks), and (4) analogy with a Quaternary playa that became a meromictic lake following increased inflow. The playa-lake model is untenable for the typical fish-bearing, kerogen-rich microlaminated sediments. These laminites were probably deposited in a large ectogenic meromictic lake - a chemically stratified lake that formed when increased fresh-water inflow ''drowned'' a saline playa complex.

  4. Green River laminites: Does the playa-lake model really invalidate the stratified-lake model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Bruce W.

    1982-06-01

    Proponents of the playa-lake model have proposed deposition of most of the Green River Formation microlaminated carbonates (including oil shales) in lakes that were not perennially stratified (meromictic). However, there is a variety of evidence favoring a meromictic depositional environment: (1) close similarity of much of the lamination to varves in modern meromictic lakes, (2) evidence that hydrologic events favoring development of meromixis (chemical stratification) occurred prior to deposition of major accumulations of oil shale, (3) mutually exclusive distribution of fossil nekton (especially fish) and normal lacustrine benthos (including mollusks), and (4) analogy with a Quaternary playa that became a meromictic lake following increased inflow. The playa-lake model is untenable for the typical fish-bearing, kerogen-rich microlaminated sediments. These laminites were probably deposited in a large ectogenic meromictic lake—a chemically stratified lake that formed when increased fresh-water inflow “drowned” a saline playa complex.

  5. Statistics of microstructure patchiness in a stratified lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planella Morato, J.; Roget, E.; Lozovatsky, I.

    2011-10-01

    Statistics of microstructure patches in a sheared, strongly stratified metalimnion of Lake Banyoles (Catalonia, Spain), which occupied ˜40% of the total lake depth of 12 m, are analyzed. Light winds (<3 m s-1) dominated the periods of observation in late June and early July of 2009. The patch sizes hp and the corresponding patch Thorpe scales LTp were identified using profiling measurements of temperature microstructure and small-scale shear. The distribution of hp was found to be lognormal with mean and median values of 0.69 m and 0.50 m respectively. The distribution of LTp within the patches was also fitted to a lognormal model and the mean and median values found to be close to 0.1 m. The probability distribution of the ratio LTp/hp was approximated by the Weibull probability model with a shape parameter cw ≈ 2, and also by beta probability distribution. For hp > 0.25 m, the ratio LTp/hp depends on the patch Richardson and mixing Reynolds numbers following the parameterization of Lozovatsky and Fernando (2002). Analysis of the dynamics of mixing reveals that averaged vertical diffusivities ranged between ˜1 × 10-4 m2 s-1 and ˜5 × 10-5 m2 s-1, depending on the phase of the internal waves. Episodic wind gusts (wind speed above 6 m s-1) transfer ˜1.6% of the wind energy to the metalimnion and ˜0.7% to the hypolimnion, generating large microstructure patches with hp of several meters.

  6. Lateral Solute Concentration Gradients in Stratified Eutrophic Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Robert E.

    1985-04-01

    Lateral concentration gradients in dissolved oxygen and phosphorus were studied in the metalimnion of Lake Mendota and the hypolimnion of Green Lake, Wisconsin. Oxygen concentrations were invariably lower (by up to 4.5 mg/L) in the 3-m interval overlying shelf sediments as compared to adjacent stations in deeper water. Conversely, phosphorus concentrations were up to 65 mg/m3 higher overlying the shelves. In Mendota, the "shelf shift," -ΔO/ΔP, was low as compared to expectations based on Redfield's equation for the aerobic oxidation of sedimenting phytoplankton; this difference indicates a net sediment release of P under aerobic conditions, corroborating laboratory studies. For Lake Mendota a phosphorus profile at the deep hole station underestimates total lake phosphorus by circa 3% in midsummer. Because of its elongated asymmetric basin and related factors, the deep hole sampling bias is larger (circa 15%) for Green Lake. Based on lateral oxygen gradients and flux-gradient computations, the lateral eddy diffusivity is 2 × 105 m2 day-1 in the metalimnion of Mendota and the hypolimnion of Green Lake.

  7. Effect of eddy diffusivity on wind-driven currents in a two-layer stratified lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, R. T.; Lick, W.; Molls, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    The steady state wind-driven circulation was numerically calculated in a rectangular stratified lake. The lake is composed of two layers having uniform but unequal densities and eddy diffusivities. The position in thermocline and the three-dimensional velocities in both layers calculated using shallow lake equations. The results show that, as the eddy diffusivity in the hypolimnion is increased, the thermocline tilt and hypolimnetic velocities increase. The effect of the other variables such as wind stress, density, basin length, and mean thermocline depth are also shown.

  8. Rising CO2 Levels Will Intensify Phytoplankton Blooms in Eutrophic and Hypertrophic Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Verspagen, Jolanda M. H.; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Finke, Jan F.; Visser, Petra M.; Van Donk, Ellen; Huisman, Jef

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms threaten the water quality of many eutrophic and hypertrophic lakes and cause severe ecological and economic damage worldwide. Dense blooms often deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration and raise pH. Yet, quantitative prediction of the feedbacks between phytoplankton growth, CO2 drawdown and the inorganic carbon chemistry of aquatic ecosystems has received surprisingly little attention. Here, we develop a mathematical model to predict dynamic changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), pH and alkalinity during phytoplankton bloom development. We tested the model in chemostat experiments with the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at different CO2 levels. The experiments showed that dense blooms sequestered large amounts of atmospheric CO2, not only by their own biomass production but also by inducing a high pH and alkalinity that enhanced the capacity for DIC storage in the system. We used the model to explore how phytoplankton blooms of eutrophic waters will respond to rising CO2 levels. The model predicts that (1) dense phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters can deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration to limiting levels and raise the pH over a relatively wide range of atmospheric CO2 conditions, (2) rising atmospheric CO2 levels will enhance phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters with high nutrient loads, and (3) above some threshold, rising atmospheric CO2 will alleviate phytoplankton blooms from carbon limitation, resulting in less intense CO2 depletion and a lesser increase in pH. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the model predictions were qualitatively robust. Quantitatively, the predictions were sensitive to variation in lake depth, DIC input and CO2 gas transfer across the air-water interface, but relatively robust to variation in the carbon uptake mechanisms of phytoplankton. In total, these findings warn that rising CO2 levels may result in a marked intensification of

  9. Community Shift from Phototrophic to Chemotrophic Sulfide Oxidation following Anoxic Holomixis in a Stratified Seawater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Korlević, Marino; Berg, Jasmine S.; Bura-Nakić, Elvira; Ciglenečki, Irena; Amann, Rudolf; Orlić, Sandi

    2014-01-01

    Most stratified sulfidic holomictic lakes become oxygenated after annual turnover. In contrast, Lake Rogoznica, on the eastern Adriatic coast, has been observed to undergo a period of water column anoxia after water layer mixing and establishment of holomictic conditions. Although Lake Rogoznica's chemistry and hydrography have been studied extensively, it is unclear how the microbial communities typically inhabiting the oxic epilimnion and a sulfidic hypolimnion respond to such a drastic shift in redox conditions. We investigated the impact of anoxic holomixis on microbial diversity and microbially mediated sulfur cycling in Lake Rogoznica with an array of culture-independent microbiological methods. Our data suggest a tight coupling between the lake's chemistry and occurring microorganisms. During stratification, anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria were dominant at the chemocline and in the hypolimnion. After an anoxic mixing event, the anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria entirely disappeared, and the homogeneous, anoxic water column was dominated by a bloom of gammaproteobacterial sulfur oxidizers related to the GSO/SUP05 clade. This study is the first report of a community shift from phototrophic to chemotrophic sulfide oxidizers as a response to anoxic holomictic conditions in a seasonally stratified seawater lake. PMID:25344237

  10. Diurnal sulfur isotope patterns in a stratified euxinic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilhooly, W., III; Werne, J. P.; O'Beirne, M.; Harris, J. H., IV; Fouskas, F.; Havig, J. R.; Hamilton, T. L.; McCormick, M.

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of sulfur isotopes in the environment is controlled by fractionations imparted during microbial sulfate reduction that commonly range between 19‰ and 66‰. In addition, microbial sulfide oxidation and subsequent disproportionation of intermediate phases of sulfur may contribute to the net isotopic offset observed between sulfate and sulfide. Thus, it has been proposed that the cycling of sulfur, comprising repeated cycles of reduction, oxidation, and disproportionation, is responsible for producing offsets up to 65‰ between the δ34S values of sulfate and sulfide. Such large fractionations are often observed in nature though disproportionation is not necessarily required to produce such large offsets. To address these questions, we report on initial results from inorganic sulfur cycling in the water column and pore waters of euxinic Fayetteville Green Lake (FGL), New York. Water column samples were collected during the day when phototrophic sulfide oxidation is likely active and during the night when chemolithotrophy is likely operative. The sulfur isotopic offsets between sulfate and sulfide at the sediment water interface (57‰) are strikingly similar to those reported for the bottom waters of FGL (55‰; Zerkle et al., GCA, 4953-4970, 2010). The offset increases to nearly 70‰ at 25 cm within the sediments, suggesting ongoing microbial sulfur cycling or possibly differential diffusion during sulfate reduction within the sediments. We will compare the day/night isotope patterns with those of the pore waters to focus on the net isotope effects of sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation.

  11. Biogeochemistry of natural gases in three alkaline, permanently stratified (meromictic) lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G. )

    1993-01-01

    Methane and associated light hydrocarbons are present as dissolved gases in the water columns of three alkaline, permanently stratified (meromictic) lakes: Big Soda Lake (Nevada), Mono Lake (California), and Soap Lake (Washington). Methane originates in the bottom sediments, but higher gaseous hydrocarbons (that is, gaseous hydrocarbons of higher molecular weight) have either microbial or thermal sources in the different lakes. Stable isotopic composition, hydrocarbon indices, radiocarbon dating, abundance-versus-depth profiles, and biological experiments indicate that methane is formed in the sediments by microbial processes. Methanogenesis and sulfate-reduction have much higher activity in the shallow littoral sediments than in the colder, more saline pelagic sediments of all three lakes. Methane-rich gas seeps are common in Mono Lake and emanate from a natural-gas deposit underlying the current lakebed. Seeps do not occur in either Big Soda Lake or Soap Lake. Ethane and higher alkanes are present in Big Soda Lake and Mono Lake, but are not present in significant quantities in Soap Lake. It is not clear if the presence of these higher alkanes is a consequence of biological activity, a result of mixing with thermogenic gases, or a combination of both factors. These results indicate the potential complexity and diversity encountered in studying light-hydrocarbon biogeochemistry in thermally and microbially active systems. Hence, in the case of methane, detailed multidisciplinary studies are often needed to determine its origin. For ethane and higher alkanes, there is currently a paucity of basic scientific information to allow for unequivocal identification of microbial and thermogenetic sources. 61 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Influence of wind and lake morphometry on the interaction between two rivers entering a stratified lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morillo, S.; Imberger, J.; Antenucci, J.P.; Woods, P.F.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of two rivers flowing into Coeur d'Alene Lake (United States) was investigated with a field experiment and three-dimensional numerical simulations. The focus was on the influence of basin morphology, wind speed, and wind direction on the fate and transport of the inflowing water. Data from the field campaign showed that intrusions from the two rivers propagated into the lake at different depths, with the trace element polluted Coeur d'Alene River flowing into the lake above the trace element poor and nutrient rich St. Joe River inflow. The inflows initially intruded horizontally into the lake at their level of neutral buoyancy and later mixed vertically. Model results revealed that, as the intrusions entered the main lake basin, a forced horizontal mode-two basin-scale internal wave interacted with the intrusions to frequently siphon them into the lake proper and where rapid vertical mixing followed. The results serve to show how detailed transport and mixing patterns in a lake can have important consequences for the plankton ecology in the lake. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  13. Modeling the Thickness of Perennial Ice Covers on Stratified Lakes of the Taylor Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obryk, M. K.; Doran, P. T.; Hicks, J. A.; McKay, C. P.; Priscu, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional ice cover model was developed to predict and constrain drivers of long term ice thickness trends in chemically stratified lakes of Taylor Valley, Antarctica. The model is driven by surface radiative heat fluxes and heat fluxes from the underlying water column. The model successfully reproduced 16 years (between 1996 and 2012) of ice thickness changes for west lobe of Lake Bonney (average ice thickness = 3.53 m; RMSE = 0.09 m, n = 118) and Lake Fryxell (average ice thickness = 4.22 m; RMSE = 0.21 m, n = 128). Long-term ice thickness trends require coupling with the thermal structure of the water column. The heat stored within the temperature maximum of lakes exceeding a liquid water column depth of 20 m can either impede or facilitate ice thickness change depending on the predominant climatic trend (temperature cooling or warming). As such, shallow (< 20 m deep water columns) perennially ice-covered lakes without deep temperature maxima are more sensitive indicators of climate change. The long-term ice thickness trends are a result of surface energy flux and heat flux from the deep temperature maximum in the water column, the latter of which results from absorbed solar radiation.

  14. Morphological characterization of viruses in the stratified water column of alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jennifer R; Steward, Grieg F

    2010-10-01

    Concentrations of viruses and prokaryotes in the alkaline, moderately hypersaline, seasonally stratified Mono Lake are among the highest reported for a natural aquatic environment. We used electron microscopy to test whether viral morphological characteristics differed among the epilimnion, metalimnion, and the anoxic hypolimnion of the lake and to determine how the properties of viruses in Mono Lake compare to other aquatic environments. Viral capsid size distributions were more similar in the metalimnion and hypolimnion of Mono Lake, while viral tail lengths were more similar in the epilimnion and metalimnion. The percentage of tailed viruses decreased with depth and the relative percentages of tailed phage families changed with depth. The presence of large (>125 nm capsid), untailed viruses in the metalimnion and hypolimnion suggests that eukaryotic viruses are produced in these suboxic and anoxic, hypersaline environments. Capsid diameters of viruses were larger on average in Mono Lake compared to other aquatic environments, and no lemon-shaped or filamentous viruses were found, in contrast to other high-salinity or high-altitude lakes and seas. Our data suggest that the physically and chemically distinct layers of Mono Lake harbor different viral assemblages, and that these assemblages are distinct from other aquatic environments that have been studied. Furthermore, we found that filtration of a sample through a 0.22-µm pore-size filter significantly altered the distribution of viral capsid diameters and tail lengths, resulting in a relative depletion of viruses having larger capsids and longer tails. This observation highlights the potential for bias in molecular surveys of viral diversity, which typically rely on filtration through 0.2- or 0.22-µm pore-size membrane filters to remove bacteria during sample preparation.

  15. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Kirsten; Milucka, Jana; Brand, Andreas; Littmann, Sten; Wehrli, Bernhard; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere. PMID:26193458

  16. Invasive alien species water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes as abode for macroinvertebrates in hypertrophic Ramsar Site, Lake Xochimilco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Ramirez, A; Robles-Valderrama, E; Ramirez-Flores, E

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents information on the density, diversity and functional feeding groups of macroinvertebrate assemblages associated with water hyacinth in Antiguo Canal Cuemanco, part of Lake Xochimilco in Mexico City. Rare (low frequency and density) and dominant (high frequency and density) taxa prevailed in the assemblages, with the most predominant being Hyalella azteca, Chironomus plumosus and Ischnura denticollis. Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling confirmed two climatic seasons: warm-rainy and cold-dry; the former with the highest diversity and density of taxa. Canonical Correspondence Analysis showed that conductivity, nitrates and turbidity explained the density variations of taxa. Antiguo Canal Cuemanco waters are spatially homogeneous with the characteristics of hypertrophic shallow lakes, inhabited by scrapers and gathering-collectors. The species found were tolerant to organic pollution.

  17. Instabilities in Non-Boussinesq Density Stratified Long and Narrow Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Anirban; Shete, Mihir

    2016-11-01

    We have discovered a new type of instability that can potentially occur in density stratified long and narrow lakes. The non-Boussinesq air-water interface plays a major role in this instability mechanism. A two layered lake driven by wind is considered; in such wind driven scenarios circulation sets up in each layer of the lake. The flow is assumed to be two dimensional, inviscid and incompressible. A surface gravity wave exists on the interface between air and water while an interfacial gravity wave exists on the interface between the two water layers (interface between warm and cold water). The resonant interactions between these two waves under a suitable doppler shift gives rise to normal mode growth rates leading to instability. We verify these claims analytically by piecewise linear velocity and density profiles. Furthermore we also use a realistic velocity and density profiles that are smooth and perform a linear stability analysis using a non-Boussinesq Taylor-Goldstein equation solver. We find that the normal mode instabilities are instigated by realistic wind velocities. Planetary Science and Exploration (PLANEX) Programme Grant No. PLANEX/PHY/2015239.

  18. Vertical stratification of bacteria and archaea in sediments of a boreal stratified humic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, Antti J.; Mpamah, Promise; Peura, Sari; Taipale, Sami; Biasi, Christina; Nykänen, Hannu

    2015-04-01

    Boreal stratified humic lakes, with steep redox gradients in the water column and in the sediment, are important sources of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. CH4 flux from these lakes is largely controlled by the balance between CH4-production (methanogenesis), which takes place in the organic rich sediment and in the deepest water layers, and CH4-consumption (methanotrophy), which takes place mainly in the water column. While there is already some published information on the activity, diversity and community structure of bacteria in the water columns of these lakes, such information on sediment microbial communities is very scarce. This study aims to characterize the vertical variation patterns in the diversity and the structure of microbial communities in sediment of a boreal stratified lake. Particular focus is on microbes with the potential to contribute to methanogenesis (fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea) and to methanotrophy (methanotrophic bacteria and archaea). Two sediment cores (26 cm deep), collected from the deepest point (~6 m) of a small boreal stratified lake during winter-stratification, were divided into depth sections of 1 to 2 cm for analyses. Communities were studied from DNA extracted from sediment samples by next-generation sequencing (Ion Torrent) of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - amplified bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The abundance of methanogenic archaea was also specifically studied by quantitative-PCR of methyl coenzyme-M reductase gene (mcrA) amplicons. Furthermore, the community structure and the abundance of bacteria were studied by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Dominant potential fermentative bacteria belonged to families Syntrophaceae, Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae. There were considerable differences in the vertical distribution among these groups. The relative abundance of Syntrophaceae started to increase from the sediment surface, peaked at depth layer from 5 to 10 cm (up

  19. Response in the trophic state of stratified lakes to changes in hydrology and water level: potential effects of climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, William J.

    2011-01-01

    To determine how climate-induced changes in hydrology and water level may affect the trophic state (productivity) of stratified lakes, two relatively pristine dimictic temperate lakes in Wisconsin, USA, were examined. Both are closed-basin lakes that experience changes in water level and degradation in water quality during periods of high water. One, a seepage lake with no inlets or outlets, has a small drainage basin and hydrology dominated by precipitation and groundwater exchange causing small changes in water and phosphorus (P) loading, which resulted in small changes in water level, P concentrations, and productivity. The other, a terminal lake with inlets but no outlets, has a large drainage basin and hydrology dominated by runoff causing large changes in water and P loading, which resulted in large changes in water level, P concentrations, and productivity. Eutrophication models accurately predicted the effects of changes in hydrology, P loading, and water level on their trophic state. If climate changes, larger changes in hydrology and water levels than previously observed could occur. If this causes increased water and P loading, stratified (dimictic and monomictic) lakes are expected to experience higher water levels and become more eutrophic, especially those with large developed drainage basins.

  20. The relationships between certain physical and chemical variables and the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton assemblages of two inlets of a shallow hypertrophic lake with different nutrient inputs.

    PubMed

    Celik, Kemal; Ongun, Tugba

    2007-01-01

    The relationships between water discharge, temperature, total dissolved solids (TDS) conductivity, turbidity, nitrate, ammonium, phosphate and the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton assemblages of two inlets of a shallow hypertrophic lake (Lake Manyas, Turkey) were studied between January 2003 and December 2004. The results showed that different levels of water discharge, turbidity, conductivity, TDS and nutrients could lead to the development of significantly different phytoplankton assemblages in inlets of shallow hypertrophic lakes. The multiple regression analysis identified water discharge, turbidity and water temperature as the driving factors behind the dynamics of phytoplankton biovolume in the studied inlets. The first two axes of Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) explained 78% of the total variance in dominant phytoplankton species at Siğirci Inlet and 88% at Kocaçay Inlet, respectively. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between water discharge, temperature, conductivity, turbidity, pH, TDS, nitrate, ammonium, phosphate and the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton assemblages of two inlets of the shallow hypertrophic Lake Manyas, Turkey by means of multivariate statistical analysis.

  1. Interference pattern of the sound field in the presence of an internal Kelvin wave in a stratified lake.

    PubMed

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lunkov, Andrey; Ostrovsky, Ilia

    2016-02-01

    Internal Kelvin waves (IKWs) initiated by rotation of the Earth are one of the main hydrodynamic phenomena in large stratified lakes where baroclinic Rossby radius of deformation is smaller than the horizontal scale of the lake. IKWs can be identified using the spectra of internal waves, where in the presence of IKWs, the inertial frequency is at maximum. IKWs play a rather important role in the lake's dynamics for different processes, both in the water layer and sediment, especially at the periphery of lake. Due to influence of internal waves on the sound propagation, acoustical methods can be used for estimation of behaviour of IKWs. In this paper, the spatiotemporal variability of the mid-frequency (∼1 kHz) sound field in the presence of IKWs in a deep stratified Lake Kinneret is studied using numerical simulations based on normal-mode theory. Due to the specific character of perturbation of the water layer, IKWs can cause specific variations of interference pattern, in particular, a significant shift of the sound interference pattern both in spatial and frequency domain. These shifts can be easily measured and used for reconstruction of IKW parameters.

  2. Controlling cyanobacterial blooms in hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China: will nitrogen reductions cause replacement of non-N2 fixing by N2 fixing taxa?

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Xu, Hai; Hall, Nathan S; Zhu, Guangwei; Qin, Boqiang; Wu, Yali; Rossignol, Karen L; Dong, Linghan; McCarthy, Mark J; Joyner, Alan R

    2014-01-01

    Excessive anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs have caused an alarming increase in harmful cyanobacterial blooms, threatening sustainability of lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China's third largest freshwater lake, typifies this predicament, with toxic blooms of the non-N2 fixing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. dominating from spring through fall. Previous studies indicate N and P reductions are needed to reduce bloom magnitude and duration. However, N reductions may encourage replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria. This potentially counterproductive scenario was evaluated using replicate, large (1000 L), in-lake mesocosms during summer bloom periods. N+P additions led to maximum phytoplankton production. Phosphorus enrichment, which promoted N limitation, resulted in increases in N2 fixing taxa (Anabaena spp.), but it did not lead to significant replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria, and N2 fixation rates remained ecologically insignificant. Furthermore, P enrichment failed to increase phytoplankton production relative to controls, indicating that N was the most limiting nutrient throughout this period. We propose that Microcystis spp. and other non-N2 fixing genera can maintain dominance in this shallow, highly turbid, nutrient-enriched lake by outcompeting N2 fixing taxa for existing sources of N and P stored and cycled in the lake. To bring Taihu and other hypertrophic systems below the bloom threshold, both N and P reductions will be needed until the legacy of high N and P loading and sediment nutrient storage in these systems is depleted. At that point, a more exclusive focus on P reductions may be feasible.

  3. Controlling Cyanobacterial Blooms in Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China: Will Nitrogen Reductions Cause Replacement of Non-N2 Fixing by N2 Fixing Taxa?

    PubMed Central

    Paerl, Hans W.; Xu, Hai; Hall, Nathan S.; Zhu, Guangwei; Qin, Boqiang; Wu, Yali; Rossignol, Karen L.; Dong, Linghan; McCarthy, Mark J.; Joyner, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs have caused an alarming increase in harmful cyanobacterial blooms, threatening sustainability of lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China’s third largest freshwater lake, typifies this predicament, with toxic blooms of the non-N2 fixing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. dominating from spring through fall. Previous studies indicate N and P reductions are needed to reduce bloom magnitude and duration. However, N reductions may encourage replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria. This potentially counterproductive scenario was evaluated using replicate, large (1000 L), in-lake mesocosms during summer bloom periods. N+P additions led to maximum phytoplankton production. Phosphorus enrichment, which promoted N limitation, resulted in increases in N2 fixing taxa (Anabaena spp.), but it did not lead to significant replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria, and N2 fixation rates remained ecologically insignificant. Furthermore, P enrichment failed to increase phytoplankton production relative to controls, indicating that N was the most limiting nutrient throughout this period. We propose that Microcystis spp. and other non-N2 fixing genera can maintain dominance in this shallow, highly turbid, nutrient-enriched lake by outcompeting N2 fixing taxa for existing sources of N and P stored and cycled in the lake. To bring Taihu and other hypertrophic systems below the bloom threshold, both N and P reductions will be needed until the legacy of high N and P loading and sediment nutrient storage in these systems is depleted. At that point, a more exclusive focus on P reductions may be feasible. PMID:25405474

  4. GDGT distribution in a stratified lake and implications for the application of TEX86 in paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Bradley, Raymond S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the relationship between distributions of GDGTs, GDGT-based proxies and environmental factors in a stratified lake in northwestern Norway. More than 90% of isoGDGTs were produced at the bottom of the oxycline, indicating a predominance of ammonia-oxidizing Group I.1a of Thaumarchaeota, supported by high crenarchaeol/caldarchaeol ratios. Dissolved oxygen content, rather than temperature, exercised a primary control on TEX86 values. In spite of low BIT value in surface sediment, the reconstructed lake surface temperature was “cold” biased. MBT values in streams and lake surface water were significantly smaller than those in the catchment soil, suggesting in situ production of brGDGTs in streams. A rapid transition of MBT vs. temperature/pH relationships occurring at the bottom of oxycline indicated the differential production of various brGDGTs with D.O. and depths. Only within the oxycline were CBT-based pH values close to in situ pH. Our results confirm earlier studies calling for caution in applying TEX86 as a surface temperature proxy, or MBT and/or CBT for reconstructing pH, in anoxic or euxinic lakes, estuaries and ocean basins. We propose that caldarchaeol/crenarchaeol ratio, an indicator of contributions from methanogenic archaea, together with the BIT and TEX86 proxies, can help reconstruct past levels of stratification.

  5. GDGT distribution in a stratified lake and implications for the application of TEX86 in paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Bradley, Raymond S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between distributions of GDGTs, GDGT-based proxies and environmental factors in a stratified lake in northwestern Norway. More than 90% of isoGDGTs were produced at the bottom of the oxycline, indicating a predominance of ammonia-oxidizing Group I.1a of Thaumarchaeota, supported by high crenarchaeol/caldarchaeol ratios. Dissolved oxygen content, rather than temperature, exercised a primary control on TEX86 values. In spite of low BIT value in surface sediment, the reconstructed lake surface temperature was “cold” biased. MBT values in streams and lake surface water were significantly smaller than those in the catchment soil, suggesting in situ production of brGDGTs in streams. A rapid transition of MBT vs. temperature/pH relationships occurring at the bottom of oxycline indicated the differential production of various brGDGTs with D.O. and depths. Only within the oxycline were CBT-based pH values close to in situ pH. Our results confirm earlier studies calling for caution in applying TEX86 as a surface temperature proxy, or MBT and/or CBT for reconstructing pH, in anoxic or euxinic lakes, estuaries and ocean basins. We propose that caldarchaeol/crenarchaeol ratio, an indicator of contributions from methanogenic archaea, together with the BIT and TEX86 proxies, can help reconstruct past levels of stratification. PMID:27694918

  6. Establishment of microbial eukaryotic enrichment cultures from a chemically stratified antarctic lake and assessment of carbon fixation potential.

    PubMed

    Dolhi, Jenna M; Ketchum, Nicholas; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2012-04-20

    Lake Bonney is one of numerous permanently ice-covered lakes located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The perennial ice cover maintains a chemically stratified water column and unlike other inland bodies of water, largely prevents external input of carbon and nutrients from streams. Biota are exposed to numerous environmental stresses, including year-round severe nutrient deficiency, low temperatures, extreme shade, hypersalinity, and 24-hour darkness during the winter (1). These extreme environmental conditions limit the biota in Lake Bonney almost exclusively to microorganisms (2). Single-celled microbial eukaryotes (called "protists") are important players in global biogeochemical cycling (3) and play important ecological roles in the cycling of carbon in the dry valley lakes, occupying both primary and tertiary roles in the aquatic food web. In the dry valley aquatic food web, protists that fix inorganic carbon (autotrophy) are the major producers of organic carbon for organotrophic organisms (4, 2). Phagotrophic or heterotrophic protists capable of ingesting bacteria and smaller protists act as the top predators in the food web (5). Last, an unknown proportion of the protist population is capable of combined mixotrophic metabolism (6, 7). Mixotrophy in protists involves the ability to combine photosynthetic capability with phagotrophic ingestion of prey microorganisms. This form of mixotrophy differs from mixotrophic metabolism in bacterial species, which generally involves uptake dissolved carbon molecules. There are currently very few protist isolates from permanently ice-capped polar lakes, and studies of protist diversity and ecology in this extreme environment have been limited (8, 4, 9, 10, 5). A better understanding of protist metabolic versatility in the simple dry valley lake food web will aid in the development of models for the role of protists in the global carbon cycle. We employed an enrichment culture approach to isolate potentially

  7. Quadruple sulfur isotope constraints on the origin and cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds in a stratified sulfidic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduro, Harry; Kamyshny, Alexey; Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Li, Yue; Farquhar, James

    2013-11-01

    We have quantified the major forms of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) distributed in the water column of stratified freshwater Fayetteville Green Lake (FGL), to evaluate the biogeochemical pathways involved in their production. The lake's anoxic deep waters contain high concentrations of sulfate (12-16 mmol L-1) and sulfide (0.12 μmol L-1 to 1.5 mmol L-1) with relatively low VOSC concentrations, ranging from 0.1 nmol L-1 to 2.8 μmol L-1. Sulfur isotope measurements of combined volatile organic sulfur compounds demonstrate that VOSC species are formed primarily from reduced sulfur (H2S/HS-) and zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), with little input from sulfate. Thedata support a role of a combination of biological and abiotic processes in formation of carbon-sulfur bonds between reactive sulfur species and methyl groups of lignin components. These processes are responsible for very fast turnover of VOSC species, maintaining their low levels in FGL. No dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) was detected by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) in the lake water column or in planktonic extracts. These observations indicate a pathway distinct from oceanic and coastal marine environments, where dimethylsulfide (DMS) and other VOSC species are principally produced via the breakdown of DMSP by plankton species.

  8. Stratified distribution of nutrients and extremophile biota within freshwater ice covering the surface of Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Nina A; Belykh, Olga I; Golobokova, Ludmila P; Artemyeva, Olga V; Logacheva, Natalia F; Tikhonova, Irina V; Lipko, Irina A; Kostornova, Tatyana Ya; Parfenova, Valentina V; Khodzher, Tamara V; Ahn, Tae-Seok; Zo, Young-Gun

    2012-02-01

    Biological entities and gradients of selected chemicals within the seemingly barren ice layers covering Lake Baikal were investigated. Ice cores 40-68 cm long were obtained from in shore and offshore sites of Southern Lake Baikal during the cold period of a year (March-April) in 2007 and 2008. In microscopic observations of the melted ice, both algae and bacteria were found in considerable numbers (>10(3) cells/L and >10(4) cells/ml, respectively). Among all organisms found, diatom was generally the most predominant taxon in the ice. Interestingly, both planktonic and benthic algae were present in considerable numbers (2-4×10(4) cells/L). Dominant phototrophic picoplankton were comprised of small green algae of various taxa and cyanobacteria of Synechococcus and Cyanobium. The bacterial community consisted mostly of short rod and cocci cells, either free-living or aggregated. Large numbers of yeast-like cells and actinomycete mycelium were also observed. Concentrations of silica, phosphorus, and nitrate were low by an order of magnitude where biota was abundant. The profile of the ice could be interpreted as vertical stratification of nutrients and biomass due to biological activities. Therefore, the organisms in the ice were regarded to maintain high activity while thriving under freezing conditions. Based on the results, it was concluded that the freshwater ice covering the surface of Lake Baikal is considerably populated by extremophilic microorganisms that actively metabolize and form a detritus food chain in the unique large freshwater ecosystem of Lake Baikal.

  9. Plasticity in habitat use determines metabolic response of fish to global warming in stratified lakes.

    PubMed

    Busch, Susan; Kirillin, Georgiy; Mehner, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    We used a coupled lake physics and bioenergetics-based foraging model to evaluate how the plasticity in habitat use modifies the seasonal metabolic response of two sympatric cold-water fishes (vendace and Fontane cisco, Coregonus spp.) under a global warming scenario for the year 2100. In different simulations, the vertically migrating species performed either a plastic strategy (behavioral thermoregulation) by shifting their population depth at night to maintain the temperatures occupied at current in-situ observations, or a fixed strategy (no thermoregulation) by keeping their occupied depths at night but facing modified temperatures. The lake physics model predicted higher temperatures above 20 m and lower temperatures below 20 m in response to warming. Using temperature-zooplankton relationships, the density of zooplankton prey was predicted to increase at the surface, but to decrease in hypolimnetic waters. Simulating the fixed strategy, growth was enhanced only for the deeper-living cisco due to the shift in thermal regime at about 20 m. In contrast, simulating the plastic strategy, individual growth of cisco and young vendace was predicted to increase compared to growth currently observed in the lake. Only growth rates of older vendace are reduced under future global warming scenarios irrespective of the behavioral strategy. However, performing behavioral thermoregulation would drive both species into the same depth layers, and hence will erode vertical microhabitat segregation and intensify inter-specific competition between the coexisting coregonids.

  10. Stratified tephra records from lake sediment archives: Holocene eruptions of the Virunga Volcanic Province, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Christine; Scholz, Christopher; Poppe, Sam; Schmid, Martin; Ross, Kelly Ann

    2016-04-01

    Lake sediments preserve rare stratified records of explosive volcanism, often with accompanying chronological controls or climatostratigraphic detail. In proximal areas where outcrop stratigraphies are complex, exposures isolated and sediments frequently eroded, the lacustrine archive provides a means to check the order of events and identify additional eruptions not preserved on land. The visible volcanic ash (tephra) record within lake sediments may be limited by eruption volume, distance from source and high sedimentation rates. A more complete eruption history can be detected through the study of non-visible tephra layers. Such "cryptotephra" records may be revealed through non-destructive core-scanning methods, such as XRF-scanning or magnetic susceptibility measurements, or by more thorough laboratory processes and microscopic analysis. Compositional analysis of tephra glass shards using WDS-EPMA and LA-ICP-MS provide a means to provenance eruptions, to cross-correlate between multiple sediment cores, and to establish connections between the lacustrine record and proximal outcrops. Here we present the results of such a "tephrostratigraphic" approach applied to the Holocene volcanic record of the Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP). More than 10 explosive volcanic eruptions, attributed to multiple volcanic centres, are evidenced over the last 12,000 years. This unique insight into the frequency of explosive eruptions from the VVP, demonstrates the potential of visible and cryptotephra investigations in lacustrine sediment archives as a means of studying past, present and future volcanic hazards.

  11. Remote sensing of the surface layer dynamics of a stratified lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steissberg, Todd Eugene

    Physical processes, such as upwelling, circulation, and small-scale eddies, affect aquatic ecosystem functioning, controlling nutrient and light availability and pollutant transport in inland and coastal waters. These processes can be characterized and tracked across time and space using a combination of thermal infrared and reflective-solar (visible light) satellite measurements. Thermal gradients, created and altered by physical processes, facilitate daytime and nighttime detection and tracking of upwelling fronts, surface jets, basin-scale gyres, and small-scale eddies. Similarly, sunglint patterns in reflective-solar satellite measurements are altered by internal waves, current shear, and rotation, improving delineation of fronts, jets, and eddies, and determination of transport direction or rotational characteristics. This study applied thermal infrared and reflective-solar satellite images and field measurements, collected across multiple spatial and temporal scales, to characterize upwelling, circulation, and eddies at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada. This included developing a novel technique to improve the quality of moderate-resolution satellite temperature data, creating filtered, calibrated Water Skin Temperature (WST) maps that clearly delineate thermal features, while preserving nearshore data and temperature accuracy. Time series of filtered WST maps acquired by two moderate-resolution satellite sensors were used to track up-welling fronts and jets, which can recur at moderate wind speeds when wind forcing is in phase with internal wave motion. High-resolution temperature and sunglint maps were used to characterize several, small-scale "spiral eddies" at Lake Tahoe. These features, although common in the ocean, have not been documented before in lakes. Satellite measurements showed spiral eddies form along thermal fronts and shear zones at Lake Tahoe, rotating predominantly cyclonically, as in the ocean, with sub-inertial periods longer than 21 hours

  12. Depth profiles of spectral and hydrological characteristics of water and their relation to abundances of green sulfur bacteria in the stratified lakes of the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Krasnova, Elena D.; Gorlenko, Vladimir M.; Lunina, Olga N.; Savvichev, Alexander S.; Voronov, Dmitry A.; Zhiltsova, Anna A.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the results received from two expeditions performed in August-September 2013, August-September 2014 and February 2015 in the Kandalaksha Bay of the White Sea. Depth profiles of hydrological characteristics and optical properties of water were recorded for five marine lakes being on different stages of isolation from the White Sea. Those relic lakes demonstrate a tendency to meromixis and are characterized by apparent stratification of the water bodies from the brackish top layer to the bottom salt water. Maximal concentrations of anoxygenic phototrophs (green sulfur bacteria) were found at depths close to the redox interface in all the studied lakes. To discriminate differently pigmented groups of microorganisms the fluorescence emission spectra of bacteriochlorophylls from the living cells were used. We puzzle out the data on light spectrum propagation through the water body in each lake using optical properties of water (attenuation spectra) in the UV, visible and NIR ranges, as well as direct measurements of the total irradiances at various depths. The changes in optical characteristics of water in the stratified reservoirs due to cromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and microbial pigments affect the light intensity and its spectral distribution at each water layer thus influencing the living conditions for differently pigmented phototrophic microorganisms and determining the composition of microbial community.

  13. New insights into the biogeochemistry of extremely acidic environments revealed by a combined cultivation-based and culture-independent study of two stratified pit lakes.

    PubMed

    Falagán, Carmen; Sánchez-España, Javier; Johnson, David Barrie

    2014-01-01

    The indigenous microbial communities of two extremely acidic, metal-rich stratified pit lakes, located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (Spain), were identified, and their roles in mediating transformations of carbon, iron, and sulfur were confirmed. A combined cultivation-based and culture-independent approach was used to elucidate microbial communities at different depths and to examine the physiologies of isolates, which included representatives of at least one novel genus and several species of acidophilic Bacteria. Phosphate availability correlated with redox transformations of iron, and this (rather than solar radiation) dictated where primary production was concentrated. Carbon fixed and released as organic compounds by acidophilic phototrophs acted as electron donors for acidophilic heterotrophic prokaryotes, many of which catalyzed the dissimilatory reduction in ferric iron; the ferrous iron generated was re-oxidized by chemolithotrophic acidophiles. Bacteria that catalyze redox transformations of sulfur were also identified, although these Bacteria appeared to be less abundant than the iron oxidizers/reducers. Primary production and microbial numbers were greatest, and biogeochemical transformation of carbon, iron, and sulfur, most intense, within a zone of c. 8-10 m depth, close to the chemocline, in both pit lakes. Archaea detected in sediments included two Thaumarchaeota clones, indicating that members of this recently described phylum can inhabit extremely acidic environments.

  14. Size and elemental distributions of nano- to micro-particulates in the geochemically-stratified Great Salt Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diaz, X.; Johnson, W.P.; Fernandez, D.; Naftz, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    The characterization of trace elements in terms of their apportionment among dissolved, macromolecular, nano- and micro-particulate phases in the water column of the Great Salt Lake carries implications for the potential entry of toxins into the food web of the lake. Samples from the anoxic deep and oxic shallow brine layers of the lake were fractionated using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). The associated trace elements were measured via online collision cell inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CC-ICP-MS). Results showed that of the total (dissolved + particulate) trace element mass, the percent associated with particulates varied from negligible (e.g. Sb), to greater than 50% (e.g. Al, Fe, Pb). Elements such as Cu, Zn, Mn, Co, Au, Hg, and U were associated with nanoparticles, as well as being present as dissolved species. Particulate-associated trace elements were predominantly associated with particulates larger than 450 nm in size. Among the smaller nanoparticulates (<450 nm), some trace elements (Ni, Zn, Au and Pb) showed higher percent mass (associated with nanoparticles) in the 0.9-7.5 nm size range relative to the 10-250 nm size range. The apparent nanoparticle size distributions were similar between the two brine layers; whereas, important differences in elemental associations to nanoparticles were discerned between the two layers. Elements such as Zn, Cu, Pb and Mo showed increasing signal intensities from oxic shallow to anoxic deep brine, suggesting the formation of sulfide nanoparticles, although this may also reflect association with dissolved organic matter. Aluminum and Fe showed greatly increased concentration with depth and equivalent size distributions that differed from those of Zn, Cu, Pb and Mo. Other elements (e.g. Mn, Ni, and Co) showed no significant change in signal intensity with depth. Arsenic was associated with <2 nm nanoparticles, and showed no increase in concentration with depth, possibly indicating

  15. Absorption and fluorescence of hydrophobic components of dissolved organic matter in several Karelian lakes with stratified structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khundzhua, Daria A.; Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Krasnova, Elena D.; Gorshkova, Olga M.; Chevel, Kira A.; Yuzhakov, Viktor I.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic components of cromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) extracted from water samples and sediments taken in several relic basins located on Karelian shoreline of the White Sea were analyzed using spectroscopic techniques. Those water reservoirs exist at various stages of isolation from the White Sea and represent complex stratified systems of fresh and marine water layers not completely mixing trough the year. Basins separating from the White Sea are the unique natural objects for investigations of properties CDOM, its transformation in the process of turning the marine ecosystem into freshwater environment. CDOM occurring in all types of natural water represents a significant reservoir of organic carbon and plays a key role in the carbon cycle on the Earth. However, aquatic CDOM and nonliving organic matter in sediments from relic separating basins still have not been studied. The target of this work was to study absorption and fluorescence spectra of hydrophobic components of aquatic CDOM from different water depth and sediments in several separated basins of the Kandalaksha Gulf of the White Sea located near the N.A. Pertsov White Sea Biological Station.

  16. Density-stratified flow events in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA: implications for mercury and salinity cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, David L.; Carling, Gregory T.; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Pazmiño, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Density stratification in saline and hypersaline water bodies from throughout the world can have large impacts on the internal cycling and loading of salinity, nutrients, and trace elements. High temporal resolution hydroacoustic and physical/chemical data were collected at two sites in Great Salt Lake (GSL), a saline lake in the western USA, to understand how density stratification may influence salinity and mercury (Hg) distributions. The first study site was in a causeway breach where saline water from GSL exchanges with less saline water from a flow restricted bay. Near-surface-specific conductance values measured in water at the breach displayed a good relationship with both flow and wind direction. No diurnal variations in the concentration of dissolved (total and MeHg loadings was observed during periods of elevated salinity. The second study site was located on the bottom of GSL where movement of a high-salinity water layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), is restricted to a naturally occurring 1.5-km-wide “spillway” structure. During selected time periods in April/May, 2012, wind-induced flow reversals in a railroad causeway breach, separating Gunnison and Gilbert Bays, were coupled with high-velocity flow pulses (up to 55 cm/s) in the DBL at the spillway site. These flow pulses were likely driven by a pressure response of highly saline water from Gunnison Bay flowing into the north basin of Gilbert Bay. Short-term flow reversal events measured at the railroad causeway breach have the ability to move measurable amounts of salt and Hg from Gunnison Bay into the DBL. Future disturbance to the steady state conditions currently imposed by the railroad causeway infrastructure could result in changes to the existing chemical balance between Gunnison and Gilbert Bays. Monitoring instruments were installed at six additional sites in the DBL during October 2012 to assess impacts from any future modifications to the railroad causeway.

  17. Hydraulic Jumps, Waves and Other Flow Features Found by Modeling Stably-Stratified Flows in the Salt Lake Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Ludwig, F.; Street, R.

    2003-12-01

    The Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) was used to simulate weak synoptic wind conditions with stable stratification and pronounced drainage flow at night in the vicinity of the Jordan Narrows at the south end of Salt Lake Valley. The simulations showed the flow to be quite complex with hydraulic jumps and internal waves that make it essential to use a complete treatment of the fluid dynamics. Six one-way nested grids were used to resolve the topography; they ranged from 20-km grid spacing, initialized by ETA 40-km operational analyses down to 250-m horizontal resolution and 200 vertically stretched levels to a height of 20 km, beginning with a 10-m cell at the surface. Most of the features of interest resulted from interactions with local terrain features, so that little was lost by using one-way nesting. Canyon, gap, and over-terrain flows have a large effect on mixing and vertical transport, especially in the regions where hydraulic jumps are likely. Our results also showed that the effect of spatial resolution on simulation performance is profound. The horizontal resolution must be such that the smallest features that are likely to have important impact on the flow are spanned by at least a few grid points. Thus, the 250 m minimum resolution of this study is appropriate for treating the effects of features of about 1 km or greater extent. To be consistent, the vertical cell dimension must resolve the same terrain features resolved by the horizontal grid. These simulations show that many of the interesting flow features produce observable wind and temperature gradients at or near the surface. Accordingly, some relatively simple field measurements might be made to confirm that the mixing phenomena that were simulated actually take place in the real atmosphere, which would be very valuable for planning large, expensive field campaigns. The work was supported by the Atmospheric Sciences Program, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, U

  18. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, Luis de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder with heterogeneity in mutations, forms of presentation, prognosis and treatment strategies. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is recognized as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death that occurs in young people, including athletes. The clinical diagnosis is complemented with the ecocardiographic study, in which an abnormal myocardial hypertrophy of the septum can be observed in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease (arterial systemic hypertension, aortic stenosis). The annual sudden mortality rate is 1% and, in selected populations, it ranges between 3 and 6%. The therapeutic strategies depend on the different subsets of patients according to the morbidity and mortality, sudden cardiac death, obstructive symptoms, heart failure or atrial fibrillation and stroke. High risk patients for sudden death may effectively be treated with the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

  19. A hydrodynamics-based approach to evaluating the risk of waterborne pathogens entering drinking water intakes in a large, stratified lake.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Andrea B; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Rueda, Francisco J

    2015-10-15

    Pathogen contamination of drinking water lakes and reservoirs is a severe threat to human health worldwide. A major source of pathogens in surface sources of drinking waters is from body-contact recreation in the water body. However, dispersion pathways of human waterborne pathogens from recreational beaches, where body-contact recreation is known to occur to drinking water intakes, and the associated risk of pathogens entering the drinking water supply remain largely undocumented. A high spatial resolution, three-dimensional hydrodynamic and particle tracking modeling approach has been developed to analyze the risk and mechanisms presented by pathogen dispersion. The pathogen model represents the processes of particle release, transport and survival. Here survival is a function of both water temperature and cumulative exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Pathogen transport is simulated using a novel and computationally efficient technique of tracking particle trajectories backwards, from a drinking water intake toward their source areas. The model has been applied to a large, alpine lake - Lake Tahoe, CA-NV (USA). The dispersion model results reveal that for this particular lake (1) the risk of human waterborne pathogens to enter drinking water intakes is low, but significant; (2) this risk is strongly related to the depth of the thermocline in relation to the depth of the intake; (3) the risk increases with the seasonal deepening of the surface mixed layer; and (4) the risk increases at night when the surface mixed layer deepens through convective mixing and inactivation by UV radiation is eliminated. While these risk factors will quantitatively vary in different lakes, these same mechanisms will govern the process of transport of pathogens.

  20. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  1. Geohydrology, water quality, and simulation of groundwater flow in the stratified-drift aquifer system in Virgil Creek and Dryden Lake Valleys, Town of Dryden, Tompkins County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Todd S.; Bugliosi, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tompkins County Planning Department and the Town of Dryden, New York, began a study of the stratified-drift aquifer system in the Virgil Creek and Dryden Lake Valleys in the Town of Dryden, Tompkins County. The study provided geohydrologic data needed by the town and county to develop a strategy to manage and protect their water resources. In this study area, three extensive confined sand and gravel aquifers (the upper, middle, and lower confined aquifers) compose the stratified-drift aquifer system. The Dryden Lake Valley is a glaciated valley oriented parallel to the direction of ice movement. Erosion by ice extensively widened and deepened the valley, truncated bedrock hillsides, and formed a nearly straight, U-shaped bedrock trough. The maximum thickness of the valley fill in the central part of the valley is about 400 feet (ft). The Virgil Creek Valley in the east part of the study area underwent less severe erosion by ice than the Dryden Lake Valley, and hence, it has a bedrock floor that is several hundred feet higher in altitude than that in the Dryden Lake Valley. The sources and amounts of recharge were difficult to identify in most areas because the confined aquifers are overlain by confining units. However, in the vicinity of the Virgil Creek Dam, the upper confined aquifer crops out at land surface in the floodplain of a gorge eroded by Virgil Creek, and this is where the aquifer receives large amounts of recharge from precipitation that directly falls over the aquifer and from seepage losses from Virgil Creek. The results of streamflow measurements made in Virgil Creek where it flows through the gorge indicated that the stream lost 1.2 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) or 0.78 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water in the reach extending from 220 ft downstream from the dam to 1,200 ft upstream from the dam. In the southern part of the study area, large amounts of recharge also replenish the

  2. Optical Measurements Reveal Interplay Between Surface and Bottom Processes Involving Phytoplankton, Organic Carbon, Iron, Light, and Oxygen in Two Stratified Mesotrophic Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, B. R.; Vaidya, A.; Wiles, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Water column distribution of phytoplankton, organic carbon, particulate and dissolved iron are described through detailed vertical optical measurements that include downwelling cosine irradiance, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence by CDOM, Chl-a, phycobilin pigments, and diffuse attenuation for several UV wavebands, plus pH, temperature, and specific conductance. These measurements were completed with a group of profiling instruments during summer in two mid-latitude small lakes. Special calibration allowed for correcting the impact of CDOM and turbidity on the pigment fluorescence signals. These in situ data were combined with laboratory analysis of discrete water column samples for methanol-extracted chlorophyll-a, spectral absorbance of particles, concentration of particulates (dry mass and ash-free mass), total particulate and "dissolved" iron, DOC and CDOM (the "dissolved fraction" passes through a GF/F filter). Surface processes revealed by these measurement include solar heating and photobleaching of CDOM (partly distributed by wind-driven mixing), and nonphotochemical quenching of phytoplankton chlorophyll-a fluorescence. Bottom processes revealed by these measurements include oxygen consumption by net heterotrophic metabolism, release of DOC, CDOM, and iron from anoxic bottom sediments, and the development of a biological community structured by the light and temperature gradients and absence or scarcity of dissolved oxygen near the bottom. The iron associated with CDOM and particles in the deep samples substantially increased the latter's DOC-specific absorption once there was an opportunity for oxidation. A model for mass-specific spectral absorption of particulates accounts for the contribution of organic matter and iron associated with the particles. A detailed hydrologic budget for one of the lakes will allow the water column processes to be explored further by accounting for inputs and outputs of water and organic carbon (via precipitation

  3. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  4. Settling and swimming in density stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardekani, Arezoo

    2016-11-01

    Many aquatic environments are stratified, characterized by regions of vertical variation in fluid density caused by gradients in temperature or salinity. In oceans and lakes, intense biological activity and accumulation of particles and organisms are associated with pycnoclines and the occurrence of important environmental and oceanographic processes is correlated with stratification. We explore the effects of stratification on the fundamental hydrodynamics of small organisms, settling particles, and rising drops. These results demonstrate an unexpected effect of buoyancy, potentially affecting a broad range of processes at pycnoclines in oceans and lakes. In particular, stratification has a major effect on the flow field, energy expenditure and nutrient uptake of small organisms. We show that elongation affects both the settling orientation and the settling rate of particles in stratified fluids, which will have direct consequences on the vertical flux of particulate matter and carbon flux in the ocean.

  5. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O; Orlikowski, D; Annane, D

    2008-07-21

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spinocerebellar degeneration. It is caused by a mutation that consists of an unstable expansion of GAA repeats in the first intron of the gene encoding frataxin on chromosome 9 (9q13). We reported a case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia in a twenty year old patient.

  6. [The origin of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Moiseev, V S

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the clinical cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMP). The development of obstructive CMP in a patient with hyperparathyroidism indicates a possible pathogenetic role of endocrine factors and calcium metabolism abnormalities. The familial character of the disease and its combination with hereditary diseases (familial microspherocytosis) point to the significance of genetic factors. In addition, marked hypertrophy of the myocardium (without dilatation) including hypertrophy with obstruction of the outflow tract of the left ventricle was observed in nonspecific protracted myocarditis, alcoholic injury to the heart, in athletes, in coronary heart disease (after survival of myocardial infarction). It is suggested that hypertrophic CMP (similarly to restrictive and congestive CMP) is most likely a syndrome of varying origin.

  7. Stratified vapor generator

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Hassani, Vahab

    2008-05-20

    A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

  8. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vijay K; Aggarwal, Kamal; Jain, Sarika; Singh, Sunita

    2009-07-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis occurring in previously sensitized individuals with a high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Various forms including plaque, ulcerative, hypertrophic, vegetative, papular, and nodular forms have been described. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a very large hypertrophic lupus vulgaris lesion over left side of chest since 22 years. Histopathological examination showed granulomatous infiltration without caseation necrosis. The Mantoux reaction was strongly positive. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris of such a giant size and that too at an unusual site is extremely rare and hence is being reported.

  9. Laser application for hypertrophic rhinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inouye, Tetsuzo; Tanabe, Tetsuya; Nakanoboh, Manabu; Ogura, Masami

    1995-05-01

    The CO2 and KTP/532 lasers have been used in the treatment of an allergic and hypertrophic rhinitis for the past several years. As we know, the laser enables a surgeon to perform the operation with minimum hemorrhage and minimized pain, during and after the procedure. Additionally many of these operations can be performed under local anesthesia instead of general anesthesia, on an outpatient basis. The laser is used to irradiate the mucous membranes of the inferior turbinates. Vaporization and cutting is easily done. Post operative management of the local operated area is easy. The advantages of laser surgery over regular surgical techniques are supreme for intranasal operations when performed under local anesthesia.

  10. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the early years.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2009-12-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) has four major features: (1) severe left ventricular hypertrophy, often most prominent in the basal interventricular septum; (2) frequent familial occurrence with autosomal dominant transmission; (3) occurrence of sudden cardiac death that is usually considered to be due to ventricular fibrillation; and (4) presence of hemodynamic evidence of labile intraventricular obstruction. The key papers describing the recognition of each of these features, as well as of various combinations of them, are reviewed in this paper. Particular attention is focused on the very frequent finding of marked lability of intraventricular obstruction. The recognition of this fourth and last major feature in 1959 makes 2009 the golden anniversary year marking completion of the description of the major features of HOCM.

  11. Genetics of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Felix W; Carrier, Lucie

    2012-10-01

    Cardiomyopathies are categorized as extrinsic, being caused by external factors, such as hypertension, ischemia, inflammation, valvular dysfunction, or as intrinsic, which correspond to myocardial diseases without identifiable external causes. These so called primary cardiomyopathies can be categorized in four main forms: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathies are diagnosed by clinical expression, echocardiography, electrocardiography, non-invasive imaging, and sometimes by cardiac catheterization to rule out external causes as ischemia. The two main forms of primary cardiomyopathies are the hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Most of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 20-50% of dilated cardiomyopathy are familial showing a wide genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. This review presents the current knowledge on the causative genes, molecular mechanisms and the genotype � phenotype relations of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies.

  12. Fluttering in Stratified Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Try; Vincent, Lionel; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    The descent motion of heavy objects under the influence of gravitational and aerodynamic forces is relevant to many branches of engineering and science. Examples range from estimating the behavior of re-entry space vehicles to studying the settlement of marine larvae and its influence on underwater ecology. The behavior of regularly shaped objects freely falling in homogeneous fluids is relatively well understood. For example, the complex interaction of a rigid coin with the surrounding fluid will cause it to either fall steadily, flutter, tumble, or be chaotic. Less is known about the effect of density stratification on the descent behavior. Here, we experimentally investigate the descent of discs in both pure water and in a linearly salt-stratified fluids where the density is varied from 1.0 to 1.14 of that of water where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is 1.7 rad/sec and the Froude number Fr < 1. We found that stratification enhances the radial dispersion of the disc at landing, and simultaneously, decrease the descent speed and the inclination (or nutation) angle while falling. We conclude by commenting on the relevance of these results to the use of unpowered vehicles and robots for space exploration and underwater missions.

  13. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tomoya; Nishijima, Haruo; Haga, Rie; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Ueno, Tatsuya; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2015-10-15

    We report a case of idiopathic cerebral hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. No other identifiable cause of pachymeningitis was detected. Corticosteroid therapy was effective for both diseases. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis is closely related to autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. This case supports the hypothesis that hypertrophic pachymeningitis can be a rare comorbidity of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

  14. Low deuterium content of Lake Vanda, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ragotzkie, R.A.; Friedman, I.

    1965-01-01

    Lake Vanda in Victoria Land, Antarctica, is permanently ice-covered and permanently stratified, with warm, salty water near the bottom. Deuterium analyses of lake water from several levels indicate that the lake has a low deuterium content, and that it is stratified with respect to this isotope. This low deuterium content supports the evidence from the lake's ionic content that the saline layer is not of marine origin, and it indicates that evaporation from the ice surface has taken place. The stratification of the lake with respect to deuterium suggests that the upper and lower layers of water were formed at different times from different sources of glacial melt water.

  15. Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Fernando; Ramos, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela C.; Fariñas, M. Carmen; de Berrazueta, José Ramón; Zarauza, Jesús; Pericás Pulido, Juan Manuel; Paré, Juan Carlos; de Alarcón, Arístides; Sousa, Dolores; Rodriguez Bailón, Isabel; Montejo-Baranda, Miguel; Noureddine, Mariam; García Vázquez, Elisa; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) complicating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a poorly known entity. Although current guidelines do not recommend IE antibiotic prophylaxis (IEAP) in HCM, controversy remains. This study sought to describe the clinical course of a large series of IE HCM and to compare IE in HCM patients with IE patients with and without an indication for IEAP. Data from the GAMES IE registry involving 27 Spanish hospitals were analyzed. From January 2008 to December 2013, 2000 consecutive IE patients were prospectively included in the registry. Eleven IE HCM additional cases from before 2008 were also studied. Clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic characteristics were analyzed in IE HCM patients (n = 34) and in IE HCM reported in literature (n = 84). Patients with nondevice IE (n = 1807) were classified into 3 groups: group 1, HCM with native-valve IE (n = 26); group 2, patients with IEAP indication (n = 696); group 3, patients with no IEAP indication (n = 1085). IE episode and 1-year follow-up data were gathered. One-year mortality in IE HCM was 42% in our study and 22% in the literature. IE was more frequent, although not exclusive, in obstructive HCM (59% and 74%, respectively). Group 1 exhibited more IE predisposing factors than groups 2 and 3 (62% vs 40% vs 50%, P < 0.01), and more previous dental procedures (23% vs 6% vs 8%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, Group 1 experienced a higher incidence of Streptococcus infections than Group 2 (39% vs 22%, P < 0.01) and similar to Group 3 (39% vs 30%, P = 0.34). Overall mortality was similar among groups (42% vs 36% vs 35%, P = 0.64). IE occurs in HCM patients with and without obstruction. Mortality of IE HCM is high but similar to patients with and without IEAP indication. Predisposing factors, previous dental procedures, and streptococcal infection are higher in IE HCM, suggesting that HCM patients could benefit from IEAP. PMID:27368014

  16. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  17. [Gastric adenomyoma clinically simulating hypertrophic pyloric stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sánchez García, S; Rubio Solís, D; Anes González, G; González Sánchez, S

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenomyomas are extremely uncommon benign tumors in children. On histologic examination, these tumors have an epithelial component similar to pancreatic ducts. We present a case of a pyloric adenomyoma that clinically simulated hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn girl. Imaging tests, fundamentally magnetic resonance imaging, were very important in the characterization and diagnosis of this entity.

  18. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  19. Scar contractures, hypertrophic scars, and keloids.

    PubMed

    Brissett, A E; Sherris, D A

    2001-11-01

    A scar contracture is the result of a contractile wound-healing process occurring in a scar that has already been reepithelialized and adequately healed. Keloids and hypertrophic scars (HTSs) are fibrous tissue outgrowths that result from a derailment in the normal wound-healing process. The exact incidence of keloids and HTSs remains unknown. Beyond the common belief that trauma is the initiating event of keloid and hypertrophic scar formation, the remainder of the process remains uncertain. A combination of biochemical factors, skin tension, endocrinologic factors, and genetic factors are the likely culprits. Treatment begins by educating the patient about the etiology of the scarring process. All treatment protocols are individualized, but the standard approach to keloids and HTSs begins with corticosteroid injection followed by surgical excision, pressure dressings, and long-term follow-up.

  20. Calcification of in vitro developed hypertrophic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Tacchetti, C.; Quarto, R.; Campanile, G.; Cancedda, R.

    1989-04-01

    We have recently reported that dedifferentiated cells derived from stage 28-30 chick embryo tibiae, when transferred in suspension culture in the presence of ascorbic acid, develop in a tissue closely resembling hypertrophic cartilage. Ultrastructural examination of this in vitro formed cartilage showed numerous matrix vesicles associated with the extracellular matrix. In the present article we report that the in vitro developed hypertrophic cartilage undergoes calcification. We indicate a correlation between the levels of alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition at different times of development. Following the transfer of cells into suspension culture and an initial lag phase, the level of alkaline phosphatase activity rapidly increased. In most experiments the maximum of activity was reached after 5 days of culture. When alkaline phosphatase activity and /sup 45/Ca deposition were measured in the same experiment, we observed that the increase in alkaline phosphatase preceded the deposition of nonwashable calcium deposits in the cartilage.

  1. An unusual ST-segment elevation: apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy shows the ace up its sleeve.

    PubMed

    de Santis, Francesco; Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Pero, Gaetano; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Minardi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is part of the broad clinical and morphologic spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report a patient with electrocardiographic abnormalities in whom acute coronary syndrome was excluded and apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was demonstrated by careful differential diagnosis.

  2. Inflammation and cutaneous nervous system involvement in hypertrophic scarring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-hua; Yang, Heng-lian; Xiao, Hu; Wang, Yi-bing; Wang, De-chang; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to use a mouse model of hypertrophic scarring by mechanical loading on the dorsum of mice to determine whether the nervous system of the skin and inflammation participates in hypertrophic scarring. Results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that inflammation contributed to the formation of a hypertrophic scar and increased the nerve density in scar tissue.Western blot assay verified that interleukin-13 expression was increased in scar tissue. These findings suggest that inflammation and the cutaneous nervous system play a role in hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:26692869

  3. Myocardial Fibrosis as an Early Manifestation of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; López, Begoña; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R.; Lakdawala, Neal K.; Cirino, Allison L.; Jarolim, Petr; Kwong, Raymond; González, Arantxa; Colan, Steven D.; Seidman, J.G.; Díez, Javier; Seidman, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Myocardial fibrosis is a hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a proposed substrate for arrhythmias and heart failure. In animal models, profibrotic genetic pathways are activated early, before hypertrophic remodeling. Data showing early profibrotic responses to sarcomere-gene mutations in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are lacking. METHODS We used echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and serum biomarkers of collagen metabolism, hemodynamic stress, and myocardial injury to evaluate subjects with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a confirmed genotype. RESULTS The study involved 38 subjects with pathogenic sarcomere mutations and overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 39 subjects with mutations but no left ventricular hypertrophy, and 30 controls who did not have mutations. Levels of serum C-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) were significantly higher in mutation carriers without left ventricular hypertrophy and in subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy than in controls (31% and 69% higher, respectively; P<0.001). The ratio of PICP to C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen was increased only in subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, suggesting that collagen synthesis exceeds degradation. Cardiac MRI studies showed late gadolinium enhancement, indicating myocardial fibrosis, in 71% of subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy but in none of the mutation carriers without left ventricular hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS Elevated levels of serum PICP indicated increased myocardial collagen synthesis in sarcomere-mutation carriers without overt disease. This profibrotic state preceded the development of left ventricular hypertrophy or fibrosis visible on MRI. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:20818890

  4. Periostin induces fibroblast proliferation and myofibroblast persistence in hypertrophic scarring.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Justin; Nygard, Karen; Gan, Bing Siang; O'Gorman, David Brian

    2015-02-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is characterized by the excessive development and persistence of myofibroblasts. These cells contract the surrounding extracellular matrix resulting in the increased tissue density characteristic of scar tissue. Periostin is a matricellular protein that is abnormally abundant in fibrotic dermis, however, its roles in hypertrophic scarring are largely unknown. In this report, we assessed the ability of matrix-associated periostin to promote the proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation of dermal fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of hypertrophic scars or healthy skin. Supplementation of a thin type-I collagen cell culture substrate with recombinant periostin induced a significant increase in the proliferation of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts but not normal dermal fibroblasts. Periostin induced significant increases in supermature focal adhesion formation, α smooth muscle actin levels and collagen contraction in fibroblasts cultured from hypertrophic scars under conditions of increased matrix tension in three-dimensional type-I collagen lattices. Inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase activity significantly attenuated the effects of matrix-associated periostin on hypertrophic scar fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Depletion of endogenous periostin expression in hypertrophic scar myofibroblasts resulted in a sustained decrease in α smooth muscle actin levels under conditions of reducing matrix tension, while matrix-associated periostin levels caused the cells to retain high levels of a smooth muscle actin under these conditions. These findings indicate that periostin promotes Rho-associated protein kinase-dependent proliferation and myofibroblast persistence of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts and implicate periostin as a potential therapeutic target to enhance the resolution of scars.

  5. Diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, Annina S; Perez-Tome, Maria Carrillo; Castelletti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is complex and includes a variety of phenotypes, which leads to different types of manifestations. Although most of the patients are asymptomatic, a significant proportion of them will develop symptoms or risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Therefore, the objectives of HCM diagnosis and management are to relieve the patients' symptoms (chest pain, heart failure, syncope, palpitations, etc.), prevent disease progression and major cardiovascular complications and SCD. The heterogeneity of HCM patterns, their symptoms and assessment is a challenge for the cardiologist. PMID:26693331

  6. Blepharoptosis and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Aysun Şanal; Acaroğlu, Gölge; Dikmetas, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old male patient presented to our hospital with a history of secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) associated with an abdominal neoplasia and blepharoptosis. He had finger clubbing, hyperhidrosis, and hypertrichosis. He also had a recent history of extensive abdominal surgery with a pathology report of myelolipoma. Routine blood work was unremarkable. Upper eyelid reconstruction with blepharoplasty, upper eyelid wedge resection, and brow suspension was performed to address his eyelid concerns. By this case report, we would like to attract notice that the eyelid involvement may be a part of HOA and to emphasize the importance of systemic and pathologic evaluation in failed blepharoptosis surgery. PMID:27221686

  7. Factors associated with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jedd, M B; Melton, L J; Griffin, M R; Kaufman, B; Hoffman, A D; Broughton, D; O'Brien, P C

    1988-03-01

    We examined perinatal factors in relation to the rise in incidence of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis among children in Olmsted County, Minnesota, during the period from 1950 through 1984. Primogeniture was associated with male infants but not female infants; some factor related to primogeniture, such as breast-feeding, may be etiologically important. Our data did not support a role for maternal disease, use of doxylamine succinate-pyridoxide hydrochloride (Bendectin), or an infectious process. Further study should be directed toward environmental factors associated with primogeniture.

  8. Screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cats.

    PubMed

    Häggström, Jens; Luis Fuentes, Virginia; Wess, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats, and it can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Cats are often screened for HCM because of the presence of a heart murmur, but screening for breeding purposes has also become common. These cats are usually purebred cats of breeding age, and generally do not present with severe disease or with any clinical signs. This type of screening is particularly challenging because mild disease may be difficult to differentiate from a normal phenotype, and the margin for error is small, with potentially major consequences for the breeder. This article reviews HCM screening methods, with particular emphasis on echocardiography.

  9. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy simulating an infiltrative myocardial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, A; Loperfido, F; Pennestrì, F

    1985-01-01

    Congestive heart failure developed in a patient with low electrocardiographic QRS voltages, diffuse thickening of the septum and free cardiac wall, and a reduction in left ventricular internal diameter, which suggested an infiltrative heart muscle disease. Histological examination at necropsy showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with symmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy. Myocardial disarray of type 1A disorganisation was extensive and equally distributed in the ventricular septum and the left anterior and left posterior ventricular free walls. Severe fibrosis (40%) was also present and may have been a possible cause of the electrocardiographic abnormalities as well as of the lack of ventricular dilatation. Images PMID:4041302

  10. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Owl Monkeys (Aotus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly. PMID:23759531

  11. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys (Aotus spp.).

    PubMed

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly.

  12. Stratified volume diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Diana Marie

    2000-11-01

    Gratings with high diffraction efficiency into a single order find use in applications ranging from optical interconnects to beam steering. Such gratings have been realized with volume holographic, blazed, and diffractive optical techniques. However, each of these methods has limitations that restrict the range of applications in which they can be used. In this work an alternate, novel approach and method for creating high efficiency gratings has been developed. These new gratings are named stratified volume diffractive optical elements (SVDOE's). In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. An SVDOE consists of binary gratings interleaved with homogeneous layers in a multi-layer, stratified grating structure. The ridges of the binary gratings form fringe planes analogous to those of a volume hologram. The modulation and diffraction of an incident beam, which occur concurrently in a volume grating, are achieved sequentially by the grating layers and the homogeneous layers, respectively. The layers in this type of structure must be fabricated individually, which introduces the capability to laterally shift the binary grating layers relative to one another to create a grating with slanted fringe planes. This allows an element to be designed with high diffraction efficiency into the first order for any arbitrary angle of incidence. A systematic design process has been developed for SVDOE's. Optimum modulation depth of the SVDOE is determined analytically and the number of grating layers along with the thickness of homogeneous layers is determined by numerical simulation. A rigorous electromagnetic simulation of the diffraction properties of multi-layer grating structures, based on the Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) algorithm, was developed and applied to SVDOE performance prediction. Fabrication of an SVDOE structure presents unique challenges. Microfabrication combined with

  13. Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a rare, but clinically significant variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Perens, Gregory; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare variant of HCM. Segmental HCM is seen in 12% of cases of HCM. Among the patterns of segmental HCM, posterolateral HCM is the least common type. Our case of an 18-year old male documents this unusual type of cardiomyopathy. In this form of HCM, left ventricular thickness and the extent of hypertrophy might be underestimated by 2-dimensional echocardiography. This case illustrates the echocardiographic and pathologic features of posterolateral HCM.

  14. PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION FROM STRATIFIED JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Yamada, Shoichi; Pe'er, Asaf; Mizuta, Akira; Harikae, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E{sub p}-L{sub p} relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  15. Idiopathic hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Park, S. H.; Whang, C. J.; Sohn, M.; Oh, Y. C.; Lee, C. H.; Whang, Y. J.

    2001-01-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis (IHP) is a rare, chronic nonspecific and granulomatous inflammatory disorder of the dura with unknown etiology. The diagnosis can be established by open biopsy and exclusion of all other specific granulomatous and infectious diseases. We report a typical case of spinal IHP occurring in a long segment of cervical and thoracic dura from C6 to T8. The patient was 56-yr-old female, who had been suffered from pain on her upper back and both arms for 3 months and recent onset motor weakness of both legs. During the 9 months of follow-up period, she experienced the improvement of her neurologic symptoms with combined therapy of partial excision and corticosteroid medication. Since early surgical intervention and subsequent pulse steroid therapy are mandatory for this disease to avoid irreversible damage of nervous system, the identification of this unique disease entity is essential on frozen diagnosis. A few cases have been reported in Korean literature. PMID:11641545

  16. [Hypertrophic miocardiopathy. An historical and anatomopathological review].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F; Ruíz-Siller, Teresita de Jesús; Méndez-Ramos, Rosario; Karabut, Erick; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Jiménez-Becerra, Silvia

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by the presence of an abnormal hypertrophy of the left ventricle (LV), without dilation, and in the absence of any condition or another cardiac or systemic disease capable of inducing such hypertrophy. This primary or idiopathic hypertrophy can occur with or without dynamic obstruction (induced by exercise) of the LV outflow tract, so in its natural history two fundamental aspects are highlighted: the production of symptoms by blocking the LV outflow tract and the occurrence of sudden cardiac death secondary to ventricular arrhythmias. This revision includes the work of different Iberoamerican investigators, who contributed in an important way to lay the groundwork of what we know nowadays as HCM. It also includes the main anatomopathological characteristics, from its initial description to the new perspective we have concerning the myofiber disarray as the main histopathologic feature.

  17. Hypertrophic gastropathy with transient sessile polyps.

    PubMed

    Pesce, F; Barabino, A; Dufour, C; Caffarena, P E; Callea, F; Gatti, R

    1992-04-01

    We report an 8-year-old boy with hypertrophic gastropathy (HG) associated with duodenal Giardia lamblia infestation. The follow-up was complicated by the development of gastric polyps at the site of previous biopsies that spontaneously disappeared within 15 months. Despite the histological similarity, the different course between Ménétrier's disease (MD) in adults (chronic, with frequent development of sessile or pedunculate polyps) and HG (uncomplicated and usually spontaneously resolving) suggests a different pathogenesis. Viral (cytomegalovirus) and bacterial (Helicobacter pylori) infections have been described in association with HG and they could play an important pathogenetic role. The term HG better defines the childhood disease in which a conservative management is recommended.

  18. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Magri, Damiano; Santolamazza, Caterina

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the functional limitation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the most common inherited heart disease, is challenging. Beside the occurrence of disease-related complications, several factors are potential determinants of exercise limitation, including left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial fiber disarray, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, microvascular ischemia, and interstitial fibrosis. Furthermore, drugs commonly used in the daily management of these patients may interfere with exercise capacity, especially those with a negative chronotropic effect. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing can safely and objectively evaluate the functional capacity of these patients and help the physician in understanding the mechanisms that underlie this limitation. Features that reduce exercise capacity may predict progression to heart failure in these patients and even the risk of sudden cardiac death.

  19. Epidermolysis Bullosa with Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in a Newborn.

    PubMed

    Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Ammar, Saloua; Louati, Hamdi; Zitouni, Hayet; Jallouli, Mohamed; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited blistering disorder characterized by the fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. Extracutaneous manifestations can be associated. We report a unique concomitant occurrence of EB and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn.

  20. Epidermolysis Bullosa with Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Ammar, Saloua; Louati, Hamdi; Zitouni, Hayet; Jallouli, Mohamed; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited blistering disorder characterized by the fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. Extracutaneous manifestations can be associated. We report a unique concomitant occurrence of EB and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn. PMID:26500857

  1. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    MedlinePlus

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hyperthyroidism: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Symons, C.; Richardson, P. J.; Feizi, O.

    1974-01-01

    Symons, C., Richardson, P. J., and Feizi, O. (1974).Thorax, 29, 713-719. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hyperthyroidism. The combination of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hyperthyroidism gives rise to a complex clinical picture as some of the symptoms and signs may be common to both conditions. The presentation and investigation of three patients are reported. In one patient there was evidence of progression from the hypertrophic obstructive phase to that associated with loss of outflow tract obstruction. The echocardiogram was especially useful in assessing the presence or absence of hypertrophic disease in the thyrotoxic subject. It is suggested that the long continued high-output circulatory state in clinically undetected hyperthyroidism may prove to be a stimulus for unrestrained cardiac muscle hypertrophy. Images PMID:4281112

  3. Mixing in confined stratified aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolster, Diogo; Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; LeBorgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Carrera, Jesus

    2011-03-01

    Spatial variability in a flow field leads to spreading of a tracer plume. The effect of microdispersion is to smooth concentration gradients that exist in the system. The combined effect of these two phenomena leads to an 'effective' enhanced mixing that can be asymptotically quantified by an effective dispersion coefficient (i.e. Taylor dispersion). Mixing plays a fundamental role in driving chemical reactions. However, at pre-asymptotic times it is considerably more difficult to accurately quantify these effects by an effective dispersion coefficient as spreading and mixing are not the same (but intricately related). In this work we use a volume averaging approach to calculate the concentration distribution of an inert solute release at pre-asymptotic times in a stratified formation. Mixing here is characterized by the scalar dissipation rate, which measures the destruction of concentration variance. As such it is an indicator for the degree of mixing of a system. We study pre-asymptotic solute mixing in terms of explicit analytical expressions for the scalar dissipation rate and numerical random walk simulations. In particular, we divide the concentration field into a mean and deviation component and use dominant balance arguments to write approximate governing equations for each, which we then solve analytically. This allows us to explicitly evaluate the separate contributions to mixing from the mean and the deviation behavior. We find an approximate, but accurate expression (when compared to numerical simulations) to evaluate mixing. Our results shed some new light on the mechanisms that lead to large scale mixing and allow for a distinction between solute spreading, represented by the mean concentration, and mixing, which comes from both the mean and deviation concentrations, at pre-asymptotic times.

  4. Management of scar contractures, hypertrophic scars, and keloids.

    PubMed

    Sherris, D A; Larrabee, W F; Murakami, C S

    1995-10-01

    Aberrant fibrous tissue formation after surgery or trauma still presents a challenge to surgeons. Current research hopes to identify the characteristics of the population of fibroblasts that lead to hypertrophic or keloid scar formation. Surgical procedures and laser therapy followed by intralesional steroid treatments still are the foundation of treatment; but new modalities are being applied. The pathogenesis and management of hypertrophic scars, keloids, and scar contractures are discussed in this article.

  5. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy associated with Fallot's tetralogy—a case report

    PubMed Central

    George, B. Olu.; Mabayoje, J. Olu.

    1975-01-01

    A case of Fallot's tetralogy associated with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a young Nigerian female is described. The clinical spectrum of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is reviewed. The rarity of this syndrome is stressed. Some other aspects of the clinical manifestation of cyanotic congenital heart disease which may mimic the skeletal syndrome are mentioned. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:1197165

  6. How stratified is mantle convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puster, Peter; Jordan, Thomas H.

    1997-04-01

    due to slabs alone. A stratification index, Sƒ≲0.2, is sufficient to exclude many stratified convection models still under active consideration, including most forms of chemical layering between the upper and lower mantle, as well as the more extreme versions of avalanching convection governed by a strong endothermic phase change.

  7. Dynamics of CFCs in northern temperate lakes and adjacent groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, J.F.; Saad, D.A.; Hunt, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    [1] Three dimictic lakes and one meromictic lake in and near the Trout Lake, Wisconsin, watershed were sampled to determine the variation of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) concentrations within the lakes. The lakes were sampled during stratified conditions, during fall turnover, and during ice cover. The results demonstrate a considerable variation in CFC concentrations and corresponding atmospheric mixing ratios in the lakes sampled, both with depth and season within a given lake, and across different lakes. CFC profiles and observed degradation were not related to the groundwater inflow rate and hence are likely the result of in-lake processes influenced by CFC degradation in the (lake) water column, CFC degradation in the lake-bed sediments, and gas exchange rates and the duration of turnover (turnover efficiency).

  8. Waves in Turbulent Stably Stratified Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobitz, F. G.; Rogers, M. M.; Ferziger, J. H.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Two approaches for the identification of internal gravity waves in sheared and unsheared homogeneous stratified turbulence are investigated. First, the phase angle between the vertical velocity and density fluctuations is considered. It was found, however, that a continuous distribution of the phase angle is present in weakly and strongly stratified flow. Second, a projection onto the solution of the linearized inviscid equations of motion of unsheared stratified flow is investigated. It was found that a solution of the fully nonlinear viscous Navier-Stokes equations can be represented by the linearized inviscid solution. The projection yields a decomposition into vertical wave modes and horizontal vortical modes.

  9. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    stability of the solution at infinite vertical wavelength (k(3) = 0): There is an oscillatory behavior for τ > 1+|K(2)/k(1)|, where τ = St is a dimensionless time and K(2) is the radial component of the wave vector at τ = 0. The model is suitable to describe instabilities leading to turbulence by the bypass mechanism that can be relevant for the analysis of magnetized stratified Keplerian disks with a purely azimuthal field. For initial isotropic conditions, the time evolution of the spectral density of total energy (kinetic + magnetic + potential) is considered. At k(3) = 0, the vertical motion is purely oscillatory, and the sum of the vertical (kinetic + magnetic) energy plus the potential energy does not evolve with time and remains equal to its initial value. The horizontal motion can induce a rapid transient growth provided K(2)/k(1)>1. This rapid growth is due to the aperiodic velocity vortex mode that behaves like K(h)/k(h) where k(h)(τ)=[k(1)(2) + (K(2) - k(1)τ)(2)](1/2) and K(h) =k(h)(0). After the leading phase (τ > K(2)/k(1)>1), the horizontal magnetic energy and the horizontal kinetic energy exhibit a similar (oscillatory) behavior yielding a high level of total energy. The contribution to energies coming from the modes k(1) = 0 and k(3) = 0 is addressed by investigating the one-dimensional spectra for an initial Gaussian dense spectrum. For a magnetized Keplerian disk with a purely vertical field, it is found that an important contribution to magnetic and kinetic energies comes from the region near k(1) = 0. The limit at k(1) = 0 of the streamwise one-dimensional spectra of energies, or equivalently, the streamwise two-dimensional (2D) energy, is then computed. The comparison of the ratios of these 2D quantities with their three-dimensional counterparts provided by previous direct numerical simulations shows a quantitative agreement.

  10. Turbulence Modeling in Stratified Flows over Topography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    Details of the basic LES model can be found in Armenio and Sarkar [1]. To avoid the need to resolve the very small turbulent motions near the lower... Armenio and S. Sarkar. An investigation of stably stratified turbulent channel flow using large-eddy simulation. J. Fluid Mech., 459:1–42, 2002. [2...276, 1994. [12] J. Taylor, S. Sarkar, and V. Armenio . An investigation of stably stratified turbulent channel flow using large-eddy simulation. Phys

  11. Radiative transfer in a plane stratified dielectric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, T. T., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A model is developed for calculating radiative transfer in a stratified dielectric. This model is used to show that the reflectivity of a stratified dielectric is primarily determined by gradients in the real part of the refractive index over distances on the order of 1/10 wavelength in the medium. The effective temperature of the medium is determined by the thermodynamic temperature profile over distances of the order delta T.

  12. Cardiac norepinephrine kinetics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, J.E. Jr.; Eisenhofer, G.; Garty, M.; Stull, R.; Maron, B.J.; Cannon, R.O. III; Panza, J.A.; Epstein, S.E.; Goldstein, D.S.

    1989-04-01

    We examined the uptake and release of norepinephrine in the cardiac circulation and other regional vascular beds in 11 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and in 10 control subjects during simultaneous infusion of tracer-labeled norepinephrine and isoproterenol. Cardiac neuronal uptake of norepinephrine was assessed by comparing regional removal of tracer-labeled norepinephrine with that of tracer-labeled isoproterenol (which is not a substrate for neuronal uptake) and by the relation between production of dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), an exclusively intraneuronal metabolite of norepinephrine, and regional spillover of norepinephrine. Cardiac extraction of norepinephrine averaged 59 +/- 17% in the patients with HCM, significantly less than in the control subjects (79 +/- 13%, p less than 0.05), whereas cardiac extraction of isoproterenol was similar in the two groups (13 +/- 23% versus 13 +/- 14%), indicating that neuronal uptake of norepinephrine was decreased in the patients with HCM. The cardiac arteriovenous difference in norepinephrine was significantly larger in the patients with HCM than in the control subjects (73 +/- 77 versus 13 +/- 50 pg/ml, p less than 0.05), as was the product of the arteriovenous difference in norepinephrine and coronary blood flow (7.3 +/- 7.3 versus 0.8 +/- 3.0 ng/min, p less than 0.05).

  13. Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in the third world.

    PubMed

    Saula, P W; Hadley, G P

    2011-10-01

    The relative rarity of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) in the developing world makes its diagnosis a challenge to many physicians. This study audits the management of HPS at a tertiary hospital in South Africa, with a view to defining its regional pattern. This is a retrospective review of records of all patients (n = 63) managed for HPS over an eight-year period (2002-2010). The mean age at presentation was 6.2 weeks and the male/female ratio was 6:1. The majority of patients presented with non-bilious vomiting. Abdominal ultrasound had a sensitivity of 65% and 81.3% when the criteria of pyloric muscle thickness >4 mm and pyloric channel length >16 mm were used, respectively. The overall complication rate was 14.3% and the mortality rate was 0%. Despite the rarity of HPS in the Third World, the outcome of its management is favourable. However, the sensitivity of abdominal ultrasound for diagnosing HPS is low.

  14. Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy in 30 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Withers, S. S.; Johnson, E. G.; Culp, W. T. N.; Rodriguez, C. O.; Skorupski, K. A.; Rebhun, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy (pHO) is known to occur in both canine and human cancer patients. While the pathology of pHO is well-described in the dog, very little information exists regarding the true clinical presentation of dogs affected with pHO. The primary objective of this study was to provide a more comprehensive clinical picture of pHO. To this end, we retrospectively identified 30 dogs and recorded data regarding presenting complaints and physical examination (PE) findings on the date of pHO diagnosis. As a secondary objective, any blood test results were also collected from the computerized records. The most common clinical signs included leg swelling, ocular discharge and/or episcleral injection, lameness, and lethargy. The most common haematological and serum biochemical abnormalities included anaemia, neutrophilia and elevated alkaline phosphatase. In addition to presenting a more detailed clinical description of pHO in the dog, these data support the previously described haematological, serum biochemical and PE abnormalities published in individual case reports. PMID:23489591

  15. Hypertrophic olivary degeneration secondary to pontine haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wein, Sara; Yan, Bernard; Gaillard, Frank

    2015-07-01

    We report a 58-year-old man who developed hyptertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) after haemorrhage of a cavernous malformation in the pons. Lesions of the triangle of Guillain and Mollaret (the dentatorubro-olivary pathway) may lead to HOD, a secondary transsynaptic degeneration of the inferior olivary nucleus. HOD is considered unique because the degenerating olive initially becomes hypertrophic rather than atrophic. The primary lesion causing pathway interruption is often haemorrhage, either due to hypertension, trauma, surgery or, as in our patient, a vascular malformation such as a cavernoma. Ischaemia and demyelination can also occasionally be the inciting events. The classic clinical presentation of HOD is palatal myoclonus, although not all patients with HOD develop this symptom. The imaging features of HOD evolve through characteristic phases. The clue to the diagnosis of HOD is recognition of the distinct imaging stages and identification of a remote primary lesion in the triangle of Guillain and Mollaret. Familiarity with the classic imaging findings of this rare phenomenon is necessary in order to avoid misdiagnosis and prevent unnecessary intervention.

  16. Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy in 30 dogs.

    PubMed

    Withers, S S; Johnson, E G; Culp, W T N; Rodriguez, C O; Skorupski, K A; Rebhun, R B

    2015-09-01

    Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy (pHO) is known to occur in both canine and human cancer patients. While the pathology of pHO is well-described in the dog, very little information exists regarding the true clinical presentation of dogs affected with pHO. The primary objective of this study was to provide a more comprehensive clinical picture of pHO. To this end, we retrospectively identified 30 dogs and recorded data regarding presenting complaints and physical examination (PE) findings on the date of pHO diagnosis. As a secondary objective, any blood test results were also collected from the computerized records. The most common clinical signs included leg swelling, ocular discharge and/or episcleral injection, lameness, and lethargy. The most common haematological and serum biochemical abnormalities included anaemia, neutrophilia and elevated alkaline phosphatase. In addition to presenting a more detailed clinical description of pHO in the dog, these data support the previously described haematological, serum biochemical and PE abnormalities published in individual case reports.

  17. Penile agenesis and congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis: an association or a random coexistence?

    PubMed

    Yagmurlu, Aydin; Vargun, Rahsan; Gollu, Gulnur; Gokcora, I Haluk

    2004-01-01

    A neonate with penile agenesis and congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is presented. The patterns of associated anomalies with penile agenesis, and those of congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis are discussed.

  18. Potential applications for transesophageal echocardiography in hypertrophic cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Widimsky, P; Ten Cate, F J; Vletter, W; van Herwerden, L

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential advantages of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in comparison with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in selected patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Ten patients with previously established or suspected diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were examined by TEE to solve specific clinical questions. TEE was well tolerated by all patients; no arrhythmias were seen during the procedure. The comparison of TTE and TEE showed the following: Advantages of TTE--better assessment of the left ventricle, myocardial thickness measurements available in all regions and sufficient for the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in nine out of 10 patients; advantages of TEE--precise assessment of mitral valve morphology and regurgitant jets, detailed evaluation of systolic anterior motion, and subaortic membrane (not seen by TTE) recognized in one patient. Clinically, in three patients TEE influenced the management (mitral leaflet perforation, subaortic membrane, and residual mitral regurgitation after valvuloplasty). Thus TEE enables more precise diagnosis in some patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and has the potential to influence their surgical management. However, for medical treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, TTE is sufficient.

  19. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Wang, Su-Juan; Chen, Jian-Yu; Xin, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing on medicinal plants which have been scientifically tested in vitro and/or in vivo and proved as potential agents for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Although the chemical components and mechanisms of action of medicinal plants with antihypertrophic scarring potential have been investigated, many others remain unknown. More investigations and clinical trials are necessary to make use of these medical plants reasonably and phytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach against hypertrophic scars. PMID:25861351

  20. Advances in medical treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mareomi; Ikeda, Shuntaro; Shigematsu, Yuji

    2014-07-01

    We reviewed the natural history of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The effect of medical treatments on natural history, left ventricular (LV) functions and LV remodeling was also evaluated. Sudden cardiac death and end-stage heart failure are the most serious complications of HCM. Age <30 years and a family history of sudden premature death are risk factors for sudden cardiac death in HCM patients. End-stage heart failure is not a specific additional phenomenon observed in patients with HCM, but is the natural course of the disease in most of those patients. After the occurrence of heart failure, the progression to cardiac death is very rapid. Young age at diagnosis, a family history of HCM, and greater wall thickness are associated with a greater likelihood of developing end-stage heart failure. Neither beta-blockers nor calcium antagonists can prevent this transition. The class Ia antiarrhythmic drugs, disopyramide and cibenzoline are useful for the reduction of LV pressure gradient. Unlike disopyramide, cibenzoline has little anticholinergic activity; therefore, this drug can be easily adapted to long-term use. In addition to the reduction in LV pressure gradient, cibenzoline can improve LV diastolic dysfunction, and induce regression of LV hypertrophy in patients with HCM. A decrease in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration through the activation of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger associated with cibenzoline therapy is likely to be closely related with the improvement in HCM-related disorders. It is possible that cibenzoline can prevent the progression from typical HCM to end-stage heart failure.

  1. Sediment Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms in Two Plateau Freshwater Lakes at Different Trophic States.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Zhang, Jingxu; Zhao, Qun; Zhou, Qiheng; Li, Ningning; Wang, Yilin; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) can contribute to ammonia biotransformation in freshwater lake ecosystems. However, the factors shaping the distribution of sediment AOA and AOB in plateau freshwater lake remains unclear. The present study investigated sediment AOA and AOB communities in two freshwater lakes (hypertrophic Dianchi Lake and mesotrophic Erhai Lake) on the Yunnan Plateau (China). A remarkable difference in the abundance, diversity, and composition of sediment AOA and AOB communities was observed between Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake. AOB usually outnumbered AOA in Dianchi Lake, but AOA showed the dominance in Erhai Lake. Organic matter (OM), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) might be the key determinants of AOB abundance, while AOA abundance was likely influenced by the ration of OM to TN (C/N). AOA or AOB community structure was found to be relatively similar in the same lake. TN and TP might play important roles in shaping sediment AOA and AOB compositions in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake. Moreover, Nitrososphaera-like AOA were detected in Dianchi Lake. Nitrosospira- and Nitrosomonas-like AOB were dominant in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake, respectively. Sediment AOA and AOB communities in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake were generally regulated by trophic state.

  2. Future volcanic lake research: revealing secrets from poorly studied lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, D.; Tassi, F.; Mora-Amador, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic lake research boosted after the 1986 Lake Nyos lethal gas burst, a limnic rather than volcanic event. This led to the formation of the IAVCEI-Commission on Volcanic Lakes, which grew out into a multi-disciplinary scientific community since the 1990's. At Lake Nyos, a degassing pipe is functional since 2001, and two additional pipes were added in 2011, aimed to prevent further limnic eruption events. There are between 150 and 200 volcanic lakes on Earth. Some acidic crater lakes topping active magmatic-hydrothermal systems are monitored continuously or discontinuously. Such detailed studies have shown their usefulness in volcanic surveillance (e.g. Ruapehu, Yugama-Kusatsu-Shiran, Poás). Others are "Nyos-type" lakes, with possible gas accumulation in bottom waters and thus potentially hazardous. "Nyos-type" lakes tend to remain stably stratified in tropical and sub-tropical climates (meromictic), leading to long-term gas build-up and thus higher potential risk. In temperate climates, such lakes tend to turn over in winter (monomictic), and thus liberating its gas charge yearly. We line out research strategies for the different types of lakes. We believe a complementary, multi-disciplinary approach (geochemistry, geophysics, limnology, biology, statistics, etc.) will lead to new insights and ideas, which can be the base for future following-up and monitoring. After 25 years of pioneering studies on rather few lakes, the scientific community should be challenged to study the many poorly studied volcanic lakes, in order to better constrain the related hazard, based on probabilistic approaches.

  3. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects in children

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, A.J.; Schiapachasse, V.; Guerrero, R.

    1982-05-01

    Three children with idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects are reported. The syndrome was recognized after birth and in the two oldest siblings, the cranial defects and subperiosteal bone formation resolved almost completely by age 4 and 6 years. The joint swelling and clubbing persisted and mild bone reabsorption of the distal phalanges became apparent at an older age. Two siblings and both parents had normal bone X-rays and no clubbing. This study confirms the association of cranial sutural defects and familial idopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  4. BEHAVIOR OF ARSENIC AND OTHER REDOX-SENSITIVE ELEMENTS IN CROWLEY LAKE, CA: A RESERVOIR IN THE LOS ANGELES AQUEDUCT SYSTEM. (R826202)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated arsenic concentrations in Crowley Lake derive from upstream geothermal inputs. We examined the water column of Crowley Lake under stratified and unstratified conditions, seeking evidence for algal uptake and transformation of arsenic and its deposition to and release fro...

  5. THE WESTERN LAKE SUPERIOR COMPARATIVE WATERSHED FRAMEWORK: A FIELD TEST OF GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEPENDENT VS. THRESHOLD-BASED GEOGRAPHICALLY-INDEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stratified random selection of watersheds allowed us to compare geographically-independent classification schemes based on watershed storage (wetland + lake area/watershed area) and forest fragmentation with a geographically-based classification scheme within the Northern Lakes a...

  6. Stratified charge rotary engine for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, R. E.; Parente, A. M.; Hady, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    A development history, a current development status assessment, and a design feature and performance capabilities account are given for stratified-charge rotary engines applicable to aircraft propulsion. Such engines are capable of operating on Jet-A fuel with substantial cost savings, improved altitude capability, and lower fuel consumption by comparison with gas turbine powerplants. Attention is given to the current development program of a 400-hp engine scheduled for initial operations in early 1990. Stratified charge rotary engines are also applicable to ground power units, airborne APUs, shipboard generators, and vehicular engines.

  7. Nitrate and pesticides in surficial aquifers and trophic state and phosphorus sources for selected lakes, eastern Otter Tail County, west-central Minnesota, 1993-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Phosphorus at depth in Little Pine and Big Pine Lakes was mostly orthophosphate. During the fall turnover of the lakes, this orthophosphate may have circulated to near the lake surface and became an available nutrient for phytoplankton during the following growing season. The internal phosphorus load to Little Pine Lake may have been important because about three-fourths of the lake probably became stratified and anoxic in the hypolimnion. The internal phosphorus load to Big Pine Lake may not have been important because only a small portion of the lake became stratified and anoxic at depth.

  8. Stratification of lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehrer, Bertram; Schultze, Martin

    2008-06-01

    Many lakes show vertical stratification of their water masses, at least for some extended time periods. Density differences in water bodies facilitate an evolution of chemical differences with many consequences for living organisms in lakes. Temperature and dissolved substances contribute to density differences in water. The atmosphere imposes a temperature signal on the lake surface. As a result, thermal stratification can be established during the warm season if a lake is sufficiently deep. On the contrary, during the cold period, surface cooling forces vertical circulation of water masses and removal of gradients of water properties. However, gradients of dissolved substances may be sustained for periods much longer than one annual cycle. Such lakes do not experience full overturns. Gradients may be a consequence of external inflows or groundwater seepage. In addition, photosynthesis at the lake surface and subsequent decomposition of organic material in the deeper layers of a lake can sustain a gradient of dissolved substances. Three more geochemical cycles, namely, calcite precipitation, iron cycle, and manganese cycle, are known for sustaining meromixis. A limited number of lakes do not experience a complete overturn because of pressure dependence of temperature of maximum density. Such lakes must be sufficiently deep and lie in the appropriate climate zone. Although these lakes are permanently stratified, deep waters are well ventilated, and chemical differences are small. Turbulent mixing and convective deep water renewal must be very effective. As a consequence, these lakes usually are not termed meromictic. Permanent stratification may also be created by episodic partial recharging of the deep water layer. This mechanism resembles the cycling of the ocean: horizontal gradients result from gradients at the surface, such as differential cooling or enhanced evaporation in adjacent shallow side bays. Dense water parcels can be formed which intrude the deep

  9. Oscillations in a Linearly Stratified Salt Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Our physics students like to watch a ball bouncing underwater. They do this by dropping a weighted plastic ball into a 1000-ml cylinder filled with a linearly stratified salt-water solution at room temperature. The ball oscillates and comes to rest at about mid-depth. Its motion is analogous to the damped vertical oscillations of a mass hanging…

  10. The Stratified Adaptive Computerized Ability Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    This report describes the stratified adaptive (stradaptive) test as a strategy for tailoring an ability test to individual differences in testee ability; administration of the test is controlled by a time-shared computer system. The rationale of this method is described as it derives from Binet's strategy of ability test administration and…

  11. Mixing efficiency of turbulent stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, B. L.; Scotti, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Small-scale mixing in the stratified interior of the ocean is a fundamental, but poorly characterized, controlling factor of the global Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC). The mixing efficiency in the ocean has typically been assumed to be 20%, which is used as a basis to estimate the required turbulent dissipation to support the ocean diapycnal buoyancy flux. In this talk, we use DNS datasets to calculate the mixing efficiency in different classes of stratified turbulent flows. In particular, we compare flows forced thermodynamically by production of Available Potential Energy (APE) at a boundary, such as horizontal convection (a simple model for an ocean forced by differential surface heating) and flows that are forced mechanically by surface stresses. The mixing efficiency is calculated based on the irreversible diapycnal flux of buoyancy (Winters and D'Asaro, 1996; Scotti et al., 2006) instead of the more customary turbulent buoyancy flux, thereby isolating mixing from reversible processes (e.g., internal waves). For mechanically-driven flows, profiles of mixing efficiency vs. buoyancy Reynolds number are in agreement with accepted values for stratified turbulent shear flows. However, for flows in which mixing is driven in part or fully by thermodynamic forcing and an excess of APE, DNS results show much higher values of the mixing efficiency, approaching unity for horizontal convection. Implications of these results for the energy budget of the MOC are discussed. Note: The DNS data sets of turbulent stratified channel flow are provided courtesy of M. Garcia-Villalba and J. C. del Alamo.

  12. Adult hypertrophic pyloric stenosis — a description in 1834?

    PubMed Central

    Stout, G.

    1983-01-01

    John Peacock MD was in practice in Darlington when he published his Practical Hints on the Treatment of Several Diseases in 1834. It is suggested that his cases described therein of `scirrhous pylorus' are adult hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. If authenticated, his work would predate the earliest description of this condition by the French pathologist, Professor Jean Cruveilhier in 1835. PMID:6350566

  13. A case of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a Belgian blue cow

    PubMed Central

    Guyot, Hugues; Sandersen, Charlotte; Rollin, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    A 12-year-old cow was presented with chronic respiratory disease and lameness. Chronic pleuritis, pneumonia, and bronchial carcinoma were found as well as periosteal proliferation on limb bones. Ancillary tests and necropsy confirmed a combined pathology of pulmonary inflammation and neoplasm, and hypertrophic pulmonary osteopathy. PMID:22654134

  14. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical Steps for Preventing Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare cause of death among athletes, with deaths occurring in young, apparently healthy people. Differentiating HCM from conditioning hypertrophy is challenging. Routine detection involves family history, physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Keys to differential diagnosis include…

  15. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, B.J.; Tajik, A.J.; Ruttenberg, H.D.; Graham, T.P.; Atwood, G.F.; Victorica, B.E.; Lie, J.T.; Roberts, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure.

  16. Basic limnology of fifty-one lakes in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Haberyan, Kurt A; Horn, Sally P; Umaña, Gerardo

    2003-03-01

    We visited 51 lakes in Costa Rica as part of a broad-based survey to document their physical and chemical characteristics and how these relate to the mode of formation and geographical distribution of the lakes. The four oxbow lakes were low in elevation and tended to be turbid, high in conductivity and CO2, but low in dissolved O2; one of these, L. Gandoca, had a hypolimnion essentially composed of sea water. These were similar to the four wetland lakes, but the latter instead had low conductivities and pH, and turbidity was often due to tannins rather than suspended sediments. The thirteen artificial lakes formed a very heterogenous group, whose features varied depending on local factors. The thirteen lakes dammed by landslides, lava flows, or lahars occurred in areas with steep slopes, and were more likely to be stratified than most other types of lakes. The eight lakes that occupy volcanic craters tended to be deep, stratified, clear, and cool; two of these, L. Hule and L. Río Cuarto, appeared to be oligomictic (tending toward meromictic). The nine glacial lakes, all located above 3440 m elevation near Cerro Chirripó, were clear, cold, dilute, and are probably polymictic. Cluster analysis resulted in three significant groups of lakes. Cluster 1 included four calcium-rich lakes (average 48 mg l-1), Cluster 2 included fourteen lakes with more Si than Ca+2 and higher Cl- than the other clusters, and Cluster 3 included the remaining thirty-three lakes that were generally less concentrated. Each cluster included lakes of various origins located in different geographical regions; these data indicate that, apart from the high-altitude glacial lakes and lakes in the Miravalles area, similarity in lake chemistry is independent of lake distribution.

  17. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4)…

  18. Multiscale equations for strongly stratified turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Greg; Rocha, Cesar; Julien, Keith; Caulfield, Colm-Cille

    2016-11-01

    Strongly stratified turbulent shear flows are of fundamental importance owing to their widespread occurrence and their impact on diabatic mixing, yet direct numerical simulations of such flows remain challenging. Here, a reduced, multiscale description of turbulent shear flows in the presence of strong stable density stratification is derived via asymptotic analysis of the governing Boussinesq equations. The analysis explicitly recognizes the occurrence of dynamics on disparate spatiotemoporal scales, and yields simplified partial differential equations governing the coupled evolution of slowly-evolving small aspect-ratio ('pancake') modes and isotropic, strongly non-hydrostatic stratified-shear (e.g. Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability modes. The reduced model is formally valid in the physically-relevant regime in which the aspect-ratio of the pancake structures tends to zero in direct proportion to the horizontal Froude number. Relative to the full Boussinesq equations, the model offers both computational and conceptual advantages.

  19. Low Mach Number Modeling of Stratified Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Nonaka, A.; Zingale, M.

    2015-06-01

    Low Mach number equation sets approximate the equations of motion of a compressible fluid by filtering out the sound waves, which allows the system to evolve on the advective rather than the acoustic time scale. Depending on the degree of approximation, low Mach number models retain some sub set of possible compressible effects. In this paper we give an overview of low Mach number methods for modeling stratified flows arising in astrophysics and atmospheric science as well as low Mach number reacting flows. We discuss how elements from the different fields are combined to form MAESTRO, a code for modeling low Mach number stratified flows with general equations of state, reactions and time-varying stratification.

  20. Nitrogen transformations in stratified aquatic microbial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Revsbech, Niels Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2006-11-01

    New analytical methods such as advanced molecular techniques and microsensors have resulted in new insights about how nitrogen transformations in stratified microbial systems such as sediments and biofilms are regulated at a microm-mm scale. A large and ever-expanding knowledge base about nitrogen fixation, nitrification, denitrification, and dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium, and about the microorganisms performing the processes, has been produced by use of these techniques. During the last decade the discovery of anammmox bacteria and migrating, nitrate accumulating bacteria performing dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium have given new dimensions to the understanding of nitrogen cycling in nature, and the occurrence of these organisms and processes in stratified microbial communities will be described in detail.

  1. Stably Stratified Flow in a Shallow Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrt, L.

    2017-01-01

    Stratified nocturnal flow above and within a small valley of approximately 12-m depth and a few hundred metres width is examined as a case study, based on a network of 20 sonic anemometers and a central 20-m tower with eight levels of sonic anemometers. Several regimes of stratified flow over gentle topography are conceptually defined for organizing the data analysis and comparing with the existing literature. In our case study, a marginal cold pool forms within the shallow valley in the early evening but yields to larger ambient wind speeds after a few hours, corresponding to stratified terrain-following flow where the flow outside the valley descends to the valley floor. The terrain-following flow lasts about 10 h and then undergoes transition to an intermittent marginal cold pool towards the end of the night when the larger-scale flow collapses. During this 10-h period, the stratified terrain-following flow is characterized by a three-layer structure, consisting of a thin surface boundary layer of a few metres depth on the valley floor, a deeper boundary layer corresponding to the larger-scale flow, and an intermediate transition layer with significant wind-directional shear and possible advection of lee turbulence that is generated even for the gentle topography of our study. The flow in the valley is often modulated by oscillations with a typical period of 10 min. Cold events with smaller turbulent intensity and duration of tens of minutes move through the observational domain throughout the terrain-following period. One of these events is examined in detail.

  2. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry (HCMR): The rationale and design of an international, observational study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.; Appelbaum, Evan; Desai, Milind Y.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; DiMarco, John P.; Friedrich, Matthias G.; Geller, Nancy; Heckler, Sarahfaye; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ivey, Elizabeth A.; Keleti, Julianna; Kim, Dong-Yun; Kolm, Paul; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Maron, Martin S.; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Piechnik, Stefan; Watkins, Hugh; Weintraub, William S.; Wu, Pan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic heart disease with a frequency as high as 1 in 200. In many cases, HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding the different components of the sarcomere apparatus. HCM is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), myofibrillar disarray, and myocardial fibrosis. The phenotypic expression is quite variable. While the majority of patients with HCM are asymptomatic, serious consequences are experienced in a subset of affected individuals who present initially with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or progress to refractory heart failure (HF). The HCMR study is a National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 2750 patient, 41 site, international registry and natural history study designed to address limitations in extant evidence to improve prognostication in HCM (NCT01915615). In addition to collection of standard demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic variables, patients will undergo state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for assessment of left ventricular (LV) mass and volumes as well as replacement scarring and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, genetic and biomarker analysis will be performed. HCMR has the potential to change the paradigm of risk stratification in HCM, using novel markers to identify those at higher risk. PMID:26299218

  3. Thermal mixing in a stratified environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Damian; Cotel, Aline

    1999-11-01

    Laboratory experiments of a thermal impinging on a stratified interface have been performed. The thermal was released from a cylindrical reservoir located at the bottom of a Lucite tank. The stratified interface was created by filling the tank with two different saline solutions. The density of the lower layer is greater than that of the upper layer and the thermal fluid, thereby creating a stable stratification. A pH indicator, phenolphthalein, is used to visualize and quantify the amount of mixing produced by the impingement of the thermal at the interface. The upper layer contains a mixture of water, salt and sodium hydroxide. The thermal fluid is composed of water, sulfuric acid and phenolphthalein. When the thermal entrains and mixes fluid from the upper layer, a chemical reaction takes place, and the resulting mixed fluid is now visible. The ratio of base to acid, called the equivalence ratio, was varied throughout the experiments, as well as the Richardson number. The Richardson number is the ratio of potential to kinetic energy, and is based on the thermal quantities at the interface. Results indicate that the amount of mixing produced is proportional to the Richardson number raised to the -3/2 power. Previous experiments (Zhang and Cotel 1999) revealed that the entrainment rate of a thermal in a stratified environment follows the same power law.

  4. Evolution of a forced stratified mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, J.; Fernando, H. J. S.; Kit, E.

    2007-06-01

    Laboratory measurements were carried out in a spatially developing stably stratified shear layer generated downstream of a splitter plate. The instabilities were controlled using a flapper spanning the entire shear layer, with the flapper forced at the fastest growing frequency of the primary [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability. The measurements were taken as the KH instabilities roll up, break down, and degenerate into stratified turbulence. Both stratified and homogeneous shear layers were considered, the latter acting as the "baseline" case. The measurements included the streamwise and vertical velocities (made using X-wire hot film probes), which allowed calculation of the mean and rms velocities, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation, and TKE production. The density and its gradients were measured using miniature conductivity probes. The measurements and flow visualization elicited interesting features of KH evolution, namely that KH billows may be turbulent from the onset, the TKE dissipation is largest at early stages of evolution, the production of TKE is a maximum at the breakdown of billows, the decay of turbulence to fossilized motions and concomitant formation of fine (layered) structure occur rapidly after the breakdown of billows, and episodic rebirth of (zombie) turbulence develops before a final permanently fossilized state is achieved.

  5. Corrections of stratified tropospheric delays in SAR interferometry: Validation with global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, Marie-Pierre; Lasserre, Cécile; Peltzer, Gilles; Cavalié, Olivier; Doubre, Cécile

    2010-05-01

    The main limiting factor on the accuracy of Interferometric SAR measurements (InSAR) comes from phase propagation delays through the troposphere. The delay can be divided into a stratified component, which correlates with the topography and often dominates the tropospheric signal, and a turbulent component. We use Global Atmospheric Models (GAM) to estimate the stratified phase delay and delay-elevation ratio at epochs of SAR acquisitions, and compare them to observed phase delay derived from SAR interferograms. Three test areas are selected with different geographic and climatic environments and with large SAR archive available. The Lake Mead, Nevada, USA is covered by 79 ERS1/2 and ENVISAT acquisitions, the Haiyuan Fault area, Gansu, China, by 24 ERS1/2 acquisitions, and the Afar region, Republic of Djibouti, by 91 Radarsat acquisitions. The hydrostatic and wet stratified delays are computed from GAM as a function of atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure e vertical profiles. The hydrostatic delay, which depends on ratio P/T, varies significantly at low elevation and cannot be neglected. The wet component of the delay depends mostly on the near surface specific humidity. GAM predicted delay-elevation ratios are in good agreement with the ratios derived from InSAR data away from deforming zones. Both estimations of the delay-elevation ratio can thus be used to perform a first order correction of the observed interferometric phase to retrieve a ground motion signal of low amplitude. We also demonstrate that aliasing of daily and seasonal variations in the stratified delay due to uneven sampling of SAR data significantly bias InSAR data stacks or time series produced after temporal smoothing. In all three test cases, the InSAR data stacks or smoothed time series present a residual stratified delay of the order of the expected deformation signal. In all cases, correcting interferograms from the stratified delay removes all these

  6. Corrections of stratified tropospheric delays in SAR interferometry: Validation with global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, M.-P.; Lasserre, C.; Peltzer, G.; Cavalié, O.; Doubre, C.

    2009-09-01

    The main limiting factor on the accuracy of Interferometric SAR measurements (InSAR) comes from phase propagation delays through the troposphere. The delay can be divided into a stratified component, which correlates with the topography and often dominates the tropospheric signal, and a turbulent component. We use Global Atmospheric Models (GAM) to estimate the stratified phase delay and delay-elevation ratio at epochs of SAR acquisitions, and compare them to observed phase delay derived from SAR interferograms. Three test areas are selected with different geographic and climatic environments and with large SAR archive available. The Lake Mead, Nevada, USA is covered by 79 ERS1/2 and ENVISAT acquisitions, the Haiyuan Fault area, Gansu, China, by 24 ERS1/2 acquisitions, and the Afar region, Republic of Djibouti, by 91 Radarsat acquisitions. The hydrostatic and wet stratified delays are computed from GAM as a function of atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure e vertical profiles. The hydrostatic delay, which depends on ratio P/ T, varies significantly at low elevation and cannot be neglected. The wet component of the delay depends mostly on the near surface specific humidity. GAM predicted delay-elevation ratios are in good agreement with the ratios derived from InSAR data away from deforming zones. Both estimations of the delay-elevation ratio can thus be used to perform a first order correction of the observed interferometric phase to retrieve a ground motion signal of low amplitude. We also demonstrate that aliasing of daily and seasonal variations in the stratified delay due to uneven sampling of SAR data significantly bias InSAR data stacks or time series produced after temporal smoothing. In all three test cases, the InSAR data stacks or smoothed time series present a residual stratified delay of the order of the expected deformation signal. In all cases, correcting interferograms from the stratified delay removes all these

  7. [Risk stratification of sudden death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 2016].

    PubMed

    Dubourg, Olivier; Charron, Philippe; Sirol, Marc; Siam-Tsieu, Valérie; Mansencal, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are at an increased risk of death from many causes and sudden cardiac death is one of them. The study of the sudden cardiac death of patients with HCM has allowed the identification of risk factors and among them major risk factor are: family history of sudden cardiac death, the occurrence of syncope/dizziness, the existence of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia an abnormal blood pressure response during stress test, presence of severe left ventricular hypertrophy≥30mm. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death is essential, for symptomatic or asymptomatic HCM patients. Two approaches are possible: the classical approach or risk stratification methods with major risk factors and the new approach using the risk-calculator recommended by the ESC. Both methods are not in opposition but complementary. The risk stratification in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy should be still improved to be sure that only the most high-risk patients receive an implantable cardiac defibrillator.

  8. Atrial Myxoma in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Mahmoud; Hayek, Salim; Williams, Byron R.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most common primary cardiac tumor. Patients with atrial myxoma typically present with obstructive, embolic, or systemic symptoms; asymptomatic presentation is very rare. To our knowledge, isolated association of atrial myxoma with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been reported only once in the English-language medical literature. We report the case of an asymptomatic 71-year-old woman with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in whom a left atrial mass was incidentally identified on cardiac magnetic resonance images. After surgical excision of the mass and partial excision of the left atrial septum, histopathologic analysis confirmed the diagnosis of atrial myxoma. The patient was placed on preventive implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy and remained asymptomatic. The management of asymptomatic cardiac myxoma is a topic of debate, because no reports definitively favor either conservative or surgical measures. PMID:24082380

  9. A Tension-Based Model Distinguishes Hypertrophic versus Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Davis, L Craig; Correll, Robert N; Makarewich, Catherine A; Schwanekamp, Jennifer A; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Wang, Dan; York, Allen J; Wu, Haodi; Houser, Steven R; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Regnier, Michael; Metzger, Joseph M; Wu, Joseph C; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-05-19

    The heart either hypertrophies or dilates in response to familial mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, which are responsible for contraction and pumping. These mutations typically alter calcium-dependent tension generation within the sarcomeres, but how this translates into the spectrum of hypertrophic versus dilated cardiomyopathy is unknown. By generating a series of cardiac-specific mouse models that permit the systematic tuning of sarcomeric tension generation and calcium fluxing, we identify a significant relationship between the magnitude of tension developed over time and heart growth. When formulated into a computational model, the integral of myofilament tension development predicts hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies in mice associated with essentially any sarcomeric gene mutations, but also accurately predicts human cardiac phenotypes from data generated in induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived myocytes from familial cardiomyopathy patients. This tension-based model also has the potential to inform pharmacologic treatment options in cardiomyopathy patients.

  10. Innovative Therapies in the Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Martha H.; Amini, Sadegh; Valins, Whitney

    2010-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are benign fibrous overgrowths of scar tissue, which results from an abnormal response to trauma. Several therapeutic modalities have been described for the treatment and prevention of these conditions, but the optimal management approach has not yet been defined. This article reviews the most recent, innovative, therapeutic strategies for the management of hypertrophic scars and keloids, including mitomycin-C, tamoxifen citrate, methotrexate, imidazolaquinolines, retinoids, calcineurin inhibitors, phenylakylamine calcium channel blockers, botulinum toxin, vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, interleukin-10, manosa-6-phosphate, transforming growth factor beta, antihistamines, and prostaglandin E2. No consensus in treatment regimens has been reached due to the limited evidence-based information found in the literature. Most therapeutic options have potential effectiveness as both monotherapy and as combination therapy. However, recent reports offer novel modalities that may approach scarring from different angles. PMID:20725565

  11. Atrial fibrillation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: mechanisms, embolic risk and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ajith G; Fischer, Avi G

    2006-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is associated with an increased incidence of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in HCM with a prevalence of 20% and an annual incidence of two percent per year. Increased left atrial size and volume along with impaired left atrial function confer an increased likelihood of AF. The onset of AF is often accompanied by a decrease in functional status in conjunction with an increased risk of stroke and overall mortality.

  12. Lakes and lake-like waters of the Hawaiian Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maciolek, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This summary of Hawaiian lacustrine limnology is based on 12 years of field and literature surveys of archipelagic inland waters. Lakes here are distinguished from other standing waters by limits on surface oceanic area (> 0.1 ha) and depth (> 2 m), and by the absence of flatural surface oceanic connection. A variety of extinct and existing water bodies, sometimes referred to as lakes, are noted. Six lakes are described. Five of them are in crater basins, 3 are freshwater, and 2 are elevated (highest = 3969 m). The scarcity of elevated lakes results from general permeability of the substrata. Among the 6 lakes, surface areas range from 0.22 to 88 ha and maximum depths from 3 to 248 m. Naturally occurring aquatic biota generally is low in species diversity except for phytoplankton; fishes and submersed vascular plants are absent. Two lowland lakes, freshwater Green (Wai a Pele) and saline Kauhak6, are described for the first time. Profundal Kauhak6, 248 m deep, has a surface area of only 0.35 ha, which results in an extraordinary relative depth of 370%. It is permanently stratified, a condition apparently due primarily to the unique morphometry of its basin. 

  13. Two Cases of Apical Ballooning Syndrome Masking Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ranjini Raina; Hakim, Fayaz A.; Hurst, R. Todd; Simper, David; Appleton, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Apical akinesis and dilation in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease is a typical feature of stress-induced (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy, whereas apical hypertrophy is seen in apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report the cases of 2 patients who presented with takotsubo cardiomyopathy and were subsequently found to have apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, after the apical ballooning from the takotsubo cardiomyopathy had resolved. The first patient, a 43-year-old woman with a history of alcohol abuse, presented with shortness of breath, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, and no significant coronary artery disease. An echocardiogram 2 weeks later revealed a normal left ventricular ejection fraction and newly apparent apical hypertrophy. The 2nd patient, a 70-year-old woman with pancreatitis, presented with chest pain, apical akinesis, and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.39, consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. One month later, her left ventricular ejection fraction was normal; however, hypertrophy of the left ventricular apex was newly noted. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases in which apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was masked by apical ballooning from stress-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:24808780

  14. A novel phylogenetic clade of picocyanobacteria from the Mazurian lakes (Poland) reflects the early ontogeny of glacial lakes.

    PubMed

    Jasser, Iwona; Królicka, Adriana; Karnkowska-Ishikawa, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The community of picocyanobacteria inhabiting the Great Mazurian Lakes system (comprising lakes ranging from mesotrophic to hypertrophic) is dominated by phycoerythrin-rich cells, which outnumber phycocyanin-rich cells, even in hypertrophic lakes. The genetic diversity and phylogeny of 43 strains of picocyanobacteria isolated from four Mazurian lakes were studied by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and cpcBA-IGS operon. Phylogenetic analyses assigned some of the strains to several previously described clusters (Groups A, B, C, E and I) and revealed the existence of a novel clade, Group M (Mazurian), which exhibited a low level of similarity to the other clusters. Both phycocyanin and phycoerythrin picocyanobacteria were assigned to this clade based on an analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. The cpcBA sequence analysis assigned only phycocyanin strains to Group M, whereas the phycoerythrin strains from the M ribogroup were assigned to Groups B and E. We hypothesize that Group M originally contained only phycocyanin picocyanobacteria. The phycoerythrin found in strains belonging to ribogroup M seems to have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer as an adaptation to the changing environment early in the ontogeny of these glacial lakes.

  15. Turbulence production in stratified Ekman flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhinini, Nadia; Dubos, Thomas; Drobinski, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Although a stable stratification should suppress vertical motions and turbulence, significant turbulence is observed in nocturnal or polar atmospheric boundary layers (ABLs), and often presents a high degree of instationarity or intermittency. In this work we use the Ekman flow as a prototype flow to explore possible dynamical mechanisms generating this turbulence. The linear instability of neutral and stratified Ekman flow has been studied theoretically and experimentally (Lilly, 1966 ; Brown, 1972). The fastest growing infinitesimal perturbations equilibrate nonlinearly in the form of longitudinal roll vortices which are close analogues of circulations found in neutral and weakly convective ABLs (Brown, 1970 ; Young, 2002). Therefore a secondary instability mechanism must be invoked for three-dimensional (3D) turbulence to be generated. Through such a mechanism, which is known to exist in the neutral case (Dubos et al., 2008), infinitesimal 3D perturbations to the equilibrated rolls grow and eventually lead to turbulence through nonlinear interactions. Vortices and stratified shear flows present various types of secondary instability (Godeferd et al., 2001 ; Peltier and Caulfield, 2003). We perform the secondary stability analysis of stratified Ekman boundary layer rolls for a few values of the Reynolds, Richardson and Prandtl numbers. For this, we first compute the equilibrated rolls and discuss their structure. Especially their exists a range of intermediate Richardson numbers for which locally unstable stratification is present in the vortex core. This feature provides a potential mechanism and energy source for the secondary instability. The energetics of the growth of three-dimensional perturbations are discussed for a few representative values of the control parameters.

  16. The fully nonlinear stratified geostrophic adjustment problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutino, Aaron; Stastna, Marek

    2017-01-01

    The study of the adjustment to equilibrium by a stratified fluid in a rotating reference frame is a classical problem in geophysical fluid dynamics. We consider the fully nonlinear, stratified adjustment problem from a numerical point of view. We present results of smoothed dam break simulations based on experiments in the published literature, with a focus on both the wave trains that propagate away from the nascent geostrophic state and the geostrophic state itself. We demonstrate that for Rossby numbers in excess of roughly 2 the wave train cannot be interpreted in terms of linear theory. This wave train consists of a leading solitary-like packet and a trailing tail of dispersive waves. However, it is found that the leading wave packet never completely separates from the trailing tail. Somewhat surprisingly, the inertial oscillations associated with the geostrophic state exhibit evidence of nonlinearity even when the Rossby number falls below 1. We vary the width of the initial disturbance and the rotation rate so as to keep the Rossby number fixed, and find that while the qualitative response remains consistent, the Froude number varies, and these variations are manifested in the form of the emanating wave train. For wider initial disturbances we find clear evidence of a wave train that initially propagates toward the near wall, reflects, and propagates away from the geostrophic state behind the leading wave train. We compare kinetic energy inside and outside of the geostrophic state, finding that for long times a Rossby number of around one-quarter yields an equal split between the two, with lower (higher) Rossby numbers yielding more energy in the geostrophic state (wave train). Finally we compare the energetics of the geostrophic state as the Rossby number varies, finding long-lived inertial oscillations in the majority of the cases and a general agreement with the past literature that employed either hydrostatic, shallow-water equation-based theory or

  17. White dwarf stars with chemically stratified atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muchmore, D.

    1982-01-01

    Recent observations and theory suggest that some white dwarfs may have chemically stratified atmospheres - thin layers of hydrogen lying above helium-rich envelopes. Models of such atmospheres show that a discontinuous temperature inversion can occur at the boundary between the layers. Model spectra for layered atmospheres at 30,000 K and 50,000 K tend to have smaller decrements at 912 A, 504 A, and 228 A than uniform atmospheres would have. On the basis of their continuous extreme ultraviolet spectra, it is possible to distinguish observationally between uniform and layered atmospheres for hot white dwarfs.

  18. Topological Structures in Rotating Stratified Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, J. M.; Carrillo, A.; Perez, E.

    2003-04-01

    Detailled 2D Particle traking and PIV visualizations performed on a series of large scale laboratory experiments at the Coriolis Platform of the SINTEF in Trondheim have revealed several resonances which scale on the Strouhal, the Rossby and the Richardson numbers. More than 100 experiments spanned a wide range of Rossby Deformation Radii and the topological structures (Parabolic /Eliptic /Hyperbolic) of the quasi-balanced stratified-rotating flows were studied when stirring (akin to coastal mixing) occured at a side of the tank. The strong asymetry favored by the total vorticity produces a wealth of mixing patterns.

  19. A Filtering Method For Gravitationally Stratified Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti-Bono, Caroline; Colella, Phillip

    2005-04-25

    Gravity waves arise in gravitationally stratified compressible flows at low Mach and Froude numbers. These waves can have a negligible influence on the overall dynamics of the fluid but, for numerical methods where the acoustic waves are treated implicitly, they impose a significant restriction on the time step. A way to alleviate this restriction is to filter out the modes corresponding to the fastest gravity waves so that a larger time step can be used. This paper presents a filtering strategy of the fully compressible equations based on normal mode analysis that is used throughout the simulation to compute the fast dynamics and that is able to damp only fast gravity modes.

  20. Deglacial and lake level fluctuation history recorded in cores, Beaver Lake, Upper Peninsula, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Whitman, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    Sediment cores collected from the littoral and pelagic zones of Beaver Lake, Michigan record fluctuations in the water level of Lake Superior. Beaver Lake is a small 300 ha lake in Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (PRNL) now separated from Lake Superior by a dune-capped barrier bar. Cores were collected using a vibracorer from a lake-ice platform in February 1997. A 2.85 m long core in 10 m of water contains well-sorted sand, rhythmites, peat, interbedded sand and gyttja, and is capped with 1 m of massive gyttja. A 9480 BP AMS age from the basal sand provides a minimum deglacial date for the area. Further analysis indicates a sand-dominated depositional environment from a low lake stand at approximately 8500 BP to present. An approximate 8800 BP red to gray sediment color transition records either the cessation of meltwater input from Lake Agassiz or receding ice, while a younger similarly colored transition, 6600 BP in age, likely records sediment reworking in the coastal zone. Four AMS ages on peat range from 8520 to 7340 BP and are indicative of the Houghton low phase. Burial of the peat by stratified sand and gyttja after 7340 BP indicates a rising lake level. Peat at a higher level in the lake basin, encountered in shallow littoral cores, ranges in age from 6800 to 6420 BP, which estimates a 0.91 m rise/century in lake level to the Nipissing level by 5000 BP.

  1. Lake Tahoe

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the Lake Tahoe watershed, EPA's protection efforts, water quality issues, effects of climate change, Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), EPA-sponsored projects, list of partner agencies.

  2. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, S. M.; Miles, T. N.; Seroka, G. N.; Xu, Y.; Forney, R. K.; Yu, F.; Roarty, H.; Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward. PMID:26953963

  3. Variance estimation for stratified propensity score estimators.

    PubMed

    Williamson, E J; Morley, R; Lucas, A; Carpenter, J R

    2012-07-10

    Propensity score methods are increasingly used to estimate the effect of a treatment or exposure on an outcome in non-randomised studies. We focus on one such method, stratification on the propensity score, comparing it with the method of inverse-probability weighting by the propensity score. The propensity score--the conditional probability of receiving the treatment given observed covariates--is usually an unknown probability estimated from the data. Estimators for the variance of treatment effect estimates typically used in practice, however, do not take into account that the propensity score itself has been estimated from the data. By deriving the asymptotic marginal variance of the stratified estimate of treatment effect, correctly taking into account the estimation of the propensity score, we show that routinely used variance estimators are likely to produce confidence intervals that are too conservative when the propensity score model includes variables that predict (cause) the outcome, but only weakly predict the treatment. In contrast, a comparison with the analogous marginal variance for the inverse probability weighted (IPW) estimator shows that routinely used variance estimators for the IPW estimator are likely to produce confidence intervals that are almost always too conservative. Because exact calculation of the asymptotic marginal variance is likely to be complex, particularly for the stratified estimator, we suggest that bootstrap estimates of variance should be used in practice.

  4. Analytical investigation of stratified isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vytovtov, Konstantin A.

    2005-04-01

    A rigorous analytical approach for investigating a stratified medium with an arbitrary finite number of homogeneous isotropic layers in a period is developed. The approach is based on the translation matrix method. It is well known that the translation matrix for a period must be found as the product of the layer matrices. It is proved that this matrix can be represented as a finite sum of trigonometric matrices, and thus the dispersion relation of a stratified medium is written in an analytical form. All final expressions are obtained in terms of the constitutive parameters. To this author's knowledge, this is the first time that the new sign function that allows us to develop the presented analytical results has been described. The condition of the existence of a wave with an arbitrary period divisible by a structure period is found in analytical form. It is proved that changing the layer arrangement within the period does not affect the structure of the transmission and absorption bands.

  5. Stratified and steady periodic water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Samuel

    This thesis considers two-dimensional stratified water waves propagating under the force of gravity over an impermeable at bed and with a free surface. In the absence of surface tension, it is proved that there exists of a global continuum of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. These waves, moreover, can exhibit large density variation, speed, and amplitude. When the motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid, it is shown that there exists global continua of such solutions. In both regimes, this is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from the laminar curve at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic argument in the spirit of Rabinowitz. We also provide an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer. Finally, we consider the question of symmetry for two-dimensional stably stratified steady periodic gravity water waves with surface profiles monotonic between crests and troughs. We provide sufficient conditions under which such waves are necessarily symmetric. We do this by first exploiting some elliptic structure in the governing equations to show that, in certain size regimes, a maximum principle holds. This then forms the basis for a method of moving planes argument.

  6. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, S. M.; Miles, T. N.; Seroka, G. N.; Xu, Y.; Forney, R. K.; Yu, F.; Roarty, H.; Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.

    2016-03-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward.

  7. Anomalous diffusion in rotating stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yoshi; Herring, Jackson

    2006-11-01

    Diffusion in rotating and stratified fluids is one of the central subjects in geophysical and astrophysical dynamics. In this paper, we report features of the dispersion of Lagrangian fluid particles in rotating stratified flows using the Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations. And for calculation of particle dispersion, we use the cubic spline interpolation method by Yeung and Pope. Our main concern is the picture different from the Taylor dispersion theory, i.e. ˜t^2 for ttB (ballistic mode) and ˜t for ttB(Brownian mode), where tB is the time after which the Lagrangian velocity auto-correlation function drops rapidly. The different features of diffusion from the standard Taylor picture is often called anomalous diffusion. Particle dispersion shows quite large anisotropy. In the vertical direction, particles stop migration after they pass the time interval of the ballistic mode when only stratification is active and rotation enhances this tendency (for decaying turbulence). In the horizontal direction, we observe that t^2 behavior is more evident not only for the initial ballistic mode but also at later times, and that there is a transition period between the two t^2 regimes. The duration and the starting time of the transition period are a function of the parameters of stratification and rotation. For a fixed value of stratification, the transition period shifts to earlier time with rotation. And with strong stratification, the transition period disappears.

  8. Effects of spatial allocation and parameter variability on lakewide estimates from surveys of Lake Superior, North America’s largest lake

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake Superior was sampled in 2011 using a Generalized Random Tessellation Stratified design (n=54 sites) to characterize biological and chemical properties of this huge aquatic resource, with statistical confidence. The lake was divided into two strata (inshore <100m and offsh...

  9. Histochemical evidences on the chronological alterations of the hypertrophic zone of mandibular condylar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Kazi Sazzad; Amizuka, Norio; Ikeda, Nobuyki; Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Suzuki, Akiko; Li, Minqi; Takeuchi, Kiichi; Aita, Megumi; Kawano, Yoshiro; Hoshino, Masaaki; Oda, Kimimitsu; Takagi, Ritsuo; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2005-08-15

    The hypertrophic chondrocytes lack the ability to proliferate, thus permitting matrix mineralization as well as vascular invasion from the bone in both the mandibular condyle and the epiphyseal cartilage. This study attempted to verify whether the histological appearance of the hypertrophic chondrocytes is in a steady state during postnatal development of the mouse mandibular condyle. Type X collagen immunohistochemistry apparently distinguished the fibrous layer described previously as the "articular zone," "articular layer," and "resting zone" from the hypertrophic zone. Interestingly, the ratio of the type X collagen-positive hypertrophic zone in the entire condyle seemed higher in the early stages but decreased in the later stages. Some apparently compacted cells in the hypertrophic zone showed proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunoreaction, indicating the potential for cell proliferation at the early stages. As the mice matured, in contrast, they further enlarged and assumed typical features of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Apoptotic cells were also discernible in the hypertrophic zone at the early but not later stages. Consistent with morphological configurations of hypertrophic chondrocytes, immunoreactions for alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and type I collagen were prominent at the later stage, but not the early stage. Cartilaginous matrices demonstrated scattered patches of mineralization at the early stage, but increased in their volume and connectivity at the later stage. Thus, the spatial and temporal occurrence of these immunoreactions as well as apoptosis likely reflect the prematurity of hypertrophying cells at the early stage, and imply a physiological relevance during the early development of the mandibular condyles.

  10. Clustering of floating particles in stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffetta, Guido; de Lillo, Filippo; Musacchio, Stefano; Sozza, Alessandro

    2016-11-01

    We study the dynamics of small floating particles transported by stratified turbulence in presence of a mean linear density profile as a simple model for the confinement and the accumulation of plankton in the ocean. By means of extensive direct numerical simulations we investigate the statistical distribution of floaters as a function of the two dimensionless parameters of the problem. We find that vertical confinement of particles is mainly ruled by the degree of stratification, with a weak dependency on the particle properties. Conversely, small scale fractal clustering, typical of non-neutral particles in turbulence, depends on the particle relaxation time and is only weakly dependent on the flow stratification. The implications of our findings for the formation of thin phytoplankton layers are discussed.

  11. Defining drug response for stratified medicine.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, Mike; Senn, Stephen J; McNamee, Christine; Daly, Ann K; Sutton, Robert; Hattersley, Andrew; Pearson, Ewan; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2017-01-01

    The premise for stratified medicine is that drug efficacy, drug safety, or both, vary between groups of patients, and biomarkers can be used to facilitate more targeted prescribing, with the aim of improving the benefit:risk ratio of treatment. However, many factors can contribute to the variability in response to drug treatment. Inadequate characterisation of the nature and degree of variability can lead to the identification of biomarkers that have limited utility in clinical settings. Here, we discuss the complexities associated with the investigation of variability in drug efficacy and drug safety, and how consideration of these issues a priori, together with standardisation of phenotypes, can increase both the efficiency of stratification procedures and identification of biomarkers with the potential for clinical impact.

  12. Domain Growth Kinetics in Stratifying Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Typical foam films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are μ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. We experimentally elucidate the influence of these different driving forces, and confinement on drainage kinetics of horizontal stratifying foam films. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. Quantitative characterization of domain growth visualized in a using Scheludko-type thin film cell and a theoretical model based on lubrication analysis, provide critical insights into hydrodynamics of thin foam films, and the strength and nature of surface forces, including supramolecular oscillatory structural forces.

  13. Laminar flame propagation in a stratified charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Youngchul

    The propagation of laminar flame from a rich or stoichiometric mixture to a lean mixture in a stratified methane-air charge was investigated experimentally and numerically. Emphasis was on the understanding of the flame behavior in the transition region; in particular, on the mechanism of burning velocity enhancement in this region. In the experimental setup, mixtures of two different equivalence ratios were separated by a soap bubble in a spherical constant volume combustion vessel. The richer mixture inside the bubble was ignited by a focused laser beam. The flame development was observed by Schlieren technique and flame speeds were measured by heat release analysis of the pressure data. An one-dimensional, time- dependant numerical simulation of the flame propagation in a charge with step-stratification was used to interpret the experimental results. Both the experimental and numerical studies showed that the instantaneous flame speed depended on the previous flame history. Thus a `strong' (with mixture equivalence ratio close to stoichiometric) flame can sustain propagation into finite regions of substantially lean equivalence ratio. Both thermal and chemical effects were crucial for explaining the mechanism of the flame speed enhancement in the transition period. Because of the presence of this `back- support' effect, the usual concept of specifying the burning velocity as a function of the end gas state is inadequate for a stratified charge. A simple correlation for instantaneous flame velocity based on the local burned gas temperature is developed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253- 1690.)

  14. Stratified charge rotary engine combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, H.; Hamady, F.; Somerton, C.; Stuecken, T.; Chouinard, E.; Rachal, T.; Kosterman, J.; Lambeth, M.; Olbrich, C.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of the combustion process in a stratified charge rotary engine (SCRE) continue to be the subject of active research in recent years. Specifically to meet the demand for more sophisticated products, a detailed understanding of the engine system of interest is warranted. With this in mind the objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the controlling factors that affect the SCRE combustion process so that an efficient power dense rotary engine can be designed. The influence of the induction-exhaust systems and the rotor geometry are believed to have a significant effect on combustion chamber flow characteristics. In this report, emphasis is centered on Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurements and on qualitative flow visualizations in the combustion chamber of the motored rotary engine assembly. This will provide a basic understanding of the flow process in the RCE and serve as a data base for verification of numerical simulations. Understanding fuel injection provisions is also important to the successful operation of the stratified charge rotary engine. Toward this end, flow visualizations depicting the development of high speed, high pressure fuel jets are described. Friction is an important consideration in an engine from the standpoint of lost work, durability and reliability. MSU Engine Research Laboratory efforts in accessing the frictional losses associated with the rotary engine are described. This includes work which describes losses in bearing, seal and auxillary components. Finally, a computer controlled mapping system under development is described. This system can be used to map shapes such as combustion chamber, intake manifolds or turbine blades accurately.

  15. Stratified Sampling Design Based on Data Mining

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeonkook J.; Oh, Yoonhwan; Park, Sunghoon; Cho, Sungzoon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To explore classification rules based on data mining methodologies which are to be used in defining strata in stratified sampling of healthcare providers with improved sampling efficiency. Methods We performed k-means clustering to group providers with similar characteristics, then, constructed decision trees on cluster labels to generate stratification rules. We assessed the variance explained by the stratification proposed in this study and by conventional stratification to evaluate the performance of the sampling design. We constructed a study database from health insurance claims data and providers' profile data made available to this study by the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service of South Korea, and population data from Statistics Korea. From our database, we used the data for single specialty clinics or hospitals in two specialties, general surgery and ophthalmology, for the year 2011 in this study. Results Data mining resulted in five strata in general surgery with two stratification variables, the number of inpatients per specialist and population density of provider location, and five strata in ophthalmology with two stratification variables, the number of inpatients per specialist and number of beds. The percentages of variance in annual changes in the productivity of specialists explained by the stratification in general surgery and ophthalmology were 22% and 8%, respectively, whereas conventional stratification by the type of provider location and number of beds explained 2% and 0.2% of variance, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated that data mining methods can be used in designing efficient stratified sampling with variables readily available to the insurer and government; it offers an alternative to the existing stratification method that is widely used in healthcare provider surveys in South Korea. PMID:24175117

  16. Stratified scaffold design for engineering composite tissues.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Christopher Z; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Lu, Helen H

    2015-08-01

    A significant challenge to orthopaedic soft tissue repair is the biological fixation of autologous or allogeneic grafts with bone, whereby the lack of functional integration between such grafts and host bone has limited the clinical success of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and other common soft tissue-based reconstructive grafts. The inability of current surgical reconstruction to restore the native fibrocartilaginous insertion between the ACL and the femur or tibia, which minimizes stress concentration and facilitates load transfer between the soft and hard tissues, compromises the long-term clinical functionality of these grafts. To enable integration, a stratified scaffold design that mimics the multiple tissue regions of the ACL interface (ligament-fibrocartilage-bone) represents a promising strategy for composite tissue formation. Moreover, distinct cellular organization and phase-specific matrix heterogeneity achieved through co- or tri-culture within the scaffold system can promote biomimetic multi-tissue regeneration. Here, we describe the methods for fabricating a tri-phasic scaffold intended for ligament-bone integration, as well as the tri-culture of fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts on the stratified scaffold for the formation of structurally contiguous and compositionally distinct regions of ligament, fibrocartilage and bone. The primary advantage of the tri-phasic scaffold is the recapitulation of the multi-tissue organization across the native interface through the layered design. Moreover, in addition to ease of fabrication, each scaffold phase is similar in polymer composition and therefore can be joined together by sintering, enabling the seamless integration of each region and avoiding delamination between scaffold layers.

  17. Structural differences in epiphyseal and physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Frederic; Flynn, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    We have observed that epiphyseal and physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes in BALB/c mice show considerable differences of light microscopic and ultrastructural appearance, even when the cells are at the same stage of differentiation. In addition, cell structure maintenance improved with tissue preparation controlled for osmolarity and for membrane stabilization using 0.5% ruthenium hexammine trichloride (RHT) for both light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM) or 0.5% lanthanum nitrate for LM. Physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes showed a gradual increase in size closer to the metaphysis and a change in shape as cells elongated along the long axis. The nucleus remained central, with uniformly dispersed chromatin, and the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) was randomly dispersed throughout cytoplasm with little to no presence against the cell membrane. Even the lowermost cells showed thin elongated or dilated cisternae of RER and intact cell membranes. Epiphyseal chondrocytes remained circular to oval with no elongation. Nucleus and RER were positioned as a complete transcellular central nucleocytoplasmic column or as an incomplete bud with RER of the column/bud always continuous with RER peripherally against the intact cell membrane. RER was densely packed with parallel cisternae with adjacent cytoplasm empty of organelles but often filled with circular deposits of moderately electron-dense material consistent with fat. Optimal technique for LM involved fixation using glutaraldehyde (GA) 1.3%, paraformaldehyde (PFA) 1% and RHT 0.5% (mOsm 606) embedded in JB-4 plastic and stained with 0.5% toluidine blue. Optimal technique for EM used fixation with GA 1.3%, PFA 1%, RHT 0.5% and cacodylate buffer 0.03 M (mOsm 511) and post-fixation including 1% osmium tetroxide. These observations lead to the possibility that the same basic cell, the hypertrophic chondrocyte, has differing functional mechanisms at different regions of the developing bone. PMID:25987982

  18. Assessing iron dynamics in the release from a stratified reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashby, S.L.; Faulkner, S.P.; Gambrell, R.P.; Smith, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to describe the fate of total, dissolved, and ferrous (Fe2.) iron in the release from a stratified reservoir with an anoxic hypolimnion. Concentrations of total iron in the tail water indicated a first order removal process during a low flow release (0.6 m3sec1), yet negligible loss was observed during a period of increased discharge (2.8 m 3 sec-1). Dissolved and ferrous iron concentrations in the tailwater were highly variable during both release regimes and did not follow responses based on theoretical predictions. Ferrous iron concentrations in unfiltered samples were consistently greater than concentrations observed in samples filtered separately through 0.4, 0.2, and 0.1 ??m filters. Total iron removal in laboratory studies followed first order kinetics, but was twice that rate (0.077 mg.L-1 .hr 1) observed during low flow discharge in the tailwater (0.036 mg. L1 .hr1). Dissolved and ferrous iron losses in laboratory studies were rapid (???75% in the first 15 minutes and 95% within 1 hour), followed theoretical predictions, and were much faster than observations in the tailwater (???30% within the first hour). The presence of particulate forms of ferrous iron in the field and differences in removal rates observed in field and laboratory studies indicate a need for improved field assessment techniques and consideration of complexation reactions when assessing the dynamics of iron in reservoir releases and downstream impacts as a result of operation regimes. ?? Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2004.

  19. Echocardiographic sign of right-sided hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Cardiel, E A; Alonso, M; Delcan, J L; Menarguez, L

    1978-01-01

    The echocardiographic and haemodynamic findings with a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) and dynamic subpulmonary stenosis, without left ventricular gradient, are described. The echocardiogram shows not only asymmetric septal hypertrophy, systolic anterior movement of the anterior mitral leaflet, and midsystolic collapse of the aortic valve, but also increase in the right ventricular wall echoes and systolic collapse of the pulmonary valve. We believe that in the absence of pulmonary hypertension these signs, particularly the systolic closing movement of the pulmonary valve cusp, may suggest right ventricular obstruction in HOCM. Images PMID:568930

  20. Effective Response of Methotrexate for Recurrent Idiopathic Hypertrophic Spinal Pachymeningitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Joon; Seo, Won Deok; Kim, Sang Young; Cho, Jae Hoon; Kim, Dae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (IHSP) is a chronic progressive and diffuse inflammatory fibrosis of the spinal dura mater. Though treatment of IHSP is surgical decompression with steroid therapy, treatment for recurrent IHSP is controversial. Our patient was diagnosed with IHSP based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and underwent laminectomy for decompression following steroid pulse therapy. Despite maintenance of steroid therapy, the patient experienced 3 recurrences. As an alternative immunosuppressant medication, methotrexate was introduced with low-dose steroid. Fortunately, the symptom was resolved, and a decrease of dura thickening was revealed on MRI. We present the case and suggest that methotrexate might be an effective treatment modality for recurrent IHSP. PMID:28127378

  1. Atrial fibrillation and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: who to anticoagulate?

    PubMed

    Frontera, Antonio; Wilson, D G; Sekhon, H; Duncan, E R; Thomas, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is one of the most common genetic cardiac conditions. Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been demonstrated to be the most frequent arrhythmia encountered in HCM patients. Research focusing on AF and embolic stroke in HCM patients has been sparse and the sample size of most studies is small. The prognostic significance of AF in HCM patients is still not well known. The aim of this article is to provide further understanding of the anti-coagulation requirement of HCM patients with AF.

  2. Ultrasonic "double track" sign in hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H L; Schechter, S; Mestel, A L; Eaton, D H; Haller, J O

    1987-03-01

    Ultrasound has been used in the diagnosis of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis since the first reports of its use with contact B mode scanners. Real-time imaging has allowed measurements of pyloric diameter, length, and muscle wall thickness. Wall thickness measurements taken with the pylorus in longitudinal (elongated) view improve diagnostic accuracy. Fluid aided real-time examination of 10 cases showed the ultrasound equivalent of the "double track" sign. This finding is the result of pyloric fluid compressed into smaller tracks as it is impinged upon circumferentially by the thickened circular muscle. This sign, previously seen in barium studies, although nonspecific, may prove to be a sensitive diagnostic criterion.

  3. Surgical Myectomy after Failed Ablation for Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bougioukas, Ioannis; Hoppe, Uta; Danner, Bernhard; Schoendube, Friedrich A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic disease of the myocardial sarcolemma characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy. When obstruction to the left ventricular outflow tract is present and symptoms are refractory to medication, surgical myectomy or alcohol septal ablation is indicated. Case Description We report a case of a patient presented for myectomy due to recurrence only 1 year after alcohol ablation. Interesting findings were a firm subaortic membrane and a direct insertion of the papillary muscle into the mitral valve. Conclusion After myectomy and extensive papillary muscle mobilization, a significant relief of obstruction was achieved. PMID:28018818

  4. Radiotherapy for extreme hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy associated with malignancy.

    PubMed

    Yeo, W; Leung, S F; Chan, A T; Chiu, K W

    1996-01-01

    A patient with florid hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPOA) associated with metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma is presented. Despite the presence of metastatic disease in the thorax and in bone, the patient's main symptom was severe pain from the HPOA, which was temporarily relieved by chemotherapy. Her disease subsequently progressed during chemotherapy and the pain became resistant to conventional treatment, including high dose morphine, non-steriodal anti-inflammatory agents and steriods. It was only with local radiation to the involved joints that the pain could be controlled. Our patient demonstrates that local radiotherapy is an option for the palliation of extreme HPOA.

  5. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a mixed breed cat family.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kiyoshi; Takemura, Naoyuki; Machida, Noboru; Kawamura, Masamichi; Amasaki, Hajime; Hirose, Hisashi

    2002-07-01

    A spayed female mixed cat (case 1) and its female offspring, the result of a pairing between case 1 and its male sibling, were diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). A pedigree survey revealed that the prevalence of HCM was at least 12.5% in the family, which was considered to be significantly higher than that in a hospital-based population (approximately 1.6%). Thus, this finding seems to support the suspected occurrence of familial HCM in this group of related cats.

  6. Percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    van der Lee, C.; Foley, D.P.; Vletter, W.B.; ten Cate, F.J.; Kofflard, M.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Background Percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) is a new interventional technique to treat patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods Small doses of ethanol 96% were injected into a targeted septal artery causing a chemical myocardial infarction. Three patients were evaluated, including a follow-up of three months. Results There were no complications during the procedure LVOT gradient was reduced from 120±140 mmHg. At follow-up, all three patients showed improvement in validity. Conclusion The method requires an echocardiographic contrast determination of the myocardium at risk for ethanol treatment, in addition to haemodynamic monitoring. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3A PMID:25696698

  7. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy hypertrophic obstructive.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Raimundo José Almeida de Oliveira; Santos, Adaílton Araújo dos; Azevedo, Mablo de Castro; Meira, Saulo Sacramento

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare clinical condition caused by a genetic change that results in the formation of structurally or functionally altered collagen. The clinical manifestations are varied, being the most obvious skin hypermotility and increased joint flexibility, although other systems - such as cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological - may also be affected. This paper presents the report of a patient who sought medical attention with complaints of atypical chest pain. Clinical evaluation enabled hypothetical diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Initial electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and 24 hours holter allowed the confirmation of the first hypothesis. A skin biopsy performed later associated clinical data and confirmed the second hypothesis.

  8. The genetic basis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cats and humans.

    PubMed

    Kittleson, Mark D; Meurs, Kathryn M; Harris, Samantha P

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in genes that encode for muscle sarcomeric proteins have been identified in humans and two breeds of domestic cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This article reviews the history, genetics, and pathogenesis of HCM in the two species in order to give veterinarians a perspective on the genetics of HCM. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in people is a genetic disease that has been called a disease of the sarcomere because the preponderance of mutations identified that cause HCM are in genes that encode for sarcomeric proteins (Maron and Maron, 2013). Sarcomeres are the basic contractile units of muscle and thus sarcomeric proteins are responsible for the strength, speed, and extent of muscle contraction. In people with HCM, the two most common genes affected by HCM mutations are the myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7), the gene that encodes for the motor protein β-myosin heavy chain (the sarcomeric protein that splits ATP to generate force), and the cardiac myosin binding protein-C gene (MYBPC3), a gene that encodes for the closely related structural and regulatory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C). To date, the two mutations linked to HCM in domestic cats (one each in Maine Coon and Ragdoll breeds) also occur in MYBPC3 (Meurs et al., 2005, 2007). This is a review of the genetics of HCM in both humans and domestic cats that focuses on the aspects of human genetics that are germane to veterinarians and on all aspects of feline HCM genetics.

  9. Subaortic and midventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with extreme segmental hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiadis, Georgios K; Giannakoulas, Georgios; Parcharidou, Despina G; Ziakas, Antonios G; Papadopoulos, Christodoulos E; Karoulas, Takis; Pliakos, Christodoulos; Parcharidis, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    Background Subaortic and midventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with extreme segmental hypertrophy exceeding the usual maximum wall thickness reported in the literature is a rare phenomenon. Case Presentation A 19-year-old man with recently diagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was referred for sudden death risk assessment. The patient had mild exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association functional class II), but without syncope or chest pain. There was no family history of HCM or sudden death. A two dimensional echocardiogram revealed an asymmetric type of LV hypertrophy; anterior ventricular septum = 49 mm; posterior ventricular septum = 20 mm; anterolateral free wall = 12 mm; and posterior free wall = 6 mm. The patient had 2 types of obstruction; a LV outflow obstruction due to systolic anterior motion of both mitral leaflets (Doppler-estimated 38 mm Hg gradient at rest); and a midventricular obstruction (Doppler-estimated 43 mm Hg gradient), but without apical aneurysm or dyskinesia. The patient had a normal blood pressure response on exercise test and no episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 24-h ECG recording. Cardiac MRI showed a gross late enhancement at the hypertrophied septum. Based on the extreme degree of LV hypertrophy and the myocardial hyperenhancement, an implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator was recommended prophylactically for primary prevention of sudden death. Conclusion Midventricular HCM is an infrequent phenotype, but may be associated with an apical aneurysm and progression to systolic dysfunction (end-stage HCM). PMID:17349063

  10. ANCA-Associated Systemic Vasculitis Presenting With Hypertrophic Spinal Pachymeningitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Zhao, Jiuliang; Wang, Qian; Fei, Yunyun; Zhao, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reports of hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) localized exclusively in the spine were quite rare. Two cases of ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV) presenting with hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (HSP) causing low back pain and numbness are described. Two patients showed prominent systemic and local inflammatory reactions manifested as fever, elevated levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, and markedly increased levels of total protein of cerebrospinal fluid. The gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan of spinal cord demonstrated diffuse spinal dura matter thickening. Additionally, simple microscopic hematuria was found in 1 case suggestive of renal involvement and the other 1 complicated with interstitial lung disease. Then, a diagnosis of HSP secondary to AASV was made. Combination therapy of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide produced a rapid improvement in the clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters. Followed up for 6 months, 1 case relapsed when the dosage of prednisone was tapered to 10 mg daily. Since the patient refused rituximab-based regimen, an immunosuppressive triple-therapy (corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and azathioprine) was initiated and brought control of the disease during the subsequent 6 months of follow-up. HSP is a relatively rare form of central nervous system involvement of AASV. Early recognition and intervention are of great significance since the pathogenesis of HSP starts with an inflammatory and fibrosing process. PMID:26579814

  11. Cranial and lumbosacral hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fei; Zhong, Ding-Rong; Hao, Hong-Lin; Kong, Wei-Ze; Zhu, Yi-Cheng; Guan, Hong-Zhi; Cui, Li-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP) is a chronic disease characterized by inflammatory hypertrophy and fibrosis of dura mater. It can be divided into cranial and spinal forms depending on the location of the lesion. HP involving 2 separate sites simultaneously is quite uncommon. Case summary: This study presents a case of a 49-year-old woman with pathologically confirmed cranial and lumbosacral hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which is a rare etiology of HP. She experienced persistent numbness and pain of the left lower limb, followed by headache and seizures. In laboratory tests, levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, and antinuclear antibodies and anti–double-strand deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) antibodies were detected. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed dural thickening with homogenous gadolinium enhancement both at lumbosacral level and over cerebral convexities. Histology suggested chronic inflammation in spinal dura mater with extensive fibrosis, dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, and focal vasculitis. Treatment with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide was started with significant clinical and radiological improvement. Conclusion: HP is etiologically heterogeneous. Despite its rarity, SLE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of HP. Early recognition and therapy may provide an optimal outcome. PMID:27684799

  12. Reversible transition from a hypertrophic to a dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spillmann, Frank; Kühl, Uwe; Van Linthout, Sophie; Dominguez, Fernando; Escher, Felicitas; Schultheiss, Heinz‐Peter; Pieske, Burkert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report the case of a 17‐year‐old female patient with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a Wolff‐Parkinson‐White syndrome. She came to our department for further evaluation of a new diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by an enlargement of the left ventricle and a fall in ejection fraction. Clinically, she complained about atypical chest pain, arrhythmic episodes with presyncopal events, and dyspnea (NYHA III) during the last 6 months. Non‐invasive and invasive examinations including magnetic resonance imaging, electrophysiological examinations, and angiography did not lead to a conclusive diagnosis. Therefore, endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) were taken to investigate whether a specific myocardial disease caused the impairment of the left ventricular function. EMB analysis resulted in the diagnosis of a virus‐negative, active myocarditis. Based on this diagnosis, an immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine was started, which led to an improvement of cardiac function and symptoms within 3 months after initiating therapy. In conclusion, we show that external stress triggered by myocarditis can induce a reversible transition from a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to a dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype. This case strongly underlines the need for a thorough and invasive examination of heart failure of unknown causes, including EMB investigations as recommend by the actual ESC position statement. PMID:27774273

  13. Anesthetic Practices for Laser Rehabilitation of Pediatric Hypertrophic Burn Scars.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brendan M; Keilman, Jeffrey; Zuccaro, Jennifer; Kelly, Charis; Maynes, Jason T; Fish, Joel S

    The use of ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser therapy and pulsed dye laser therapy has led to significant improvements in the rehabilitation of hypertrophic burn scars. However, laser procedures are associated with appreciable pain among pediatric patients. Clinical consensus suggests using general anesthesia for pediatric laser procedures; however, guidelines for perioperative care are lacking. The objective of this quality improvement study is to determine whether a difference exists in postoperative pain outcomes in pediatric patients who receive intraoperative opioid regimens compared with patients who receive opioid-sparing regimens for laser therapy of hypertrophic burn scars. A retrospective review of patients who received laser therapy at a pediatric burn center from April 2014 to May 2015 was performed. Overall, 88 of the 92 procedures reviewed were included. A statistically significant difference was not found between the likelihood of postoperative pain when intraoperative opioid regimens (n = 63) were given compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) X (1, n = 88) = 2.870, P = .0902. There was also no difference between short-acting (n = 48), long-acting (n = 9), or combination (n = 6) intraoperative opioids compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) in the likelihood of postoperative pain. Despite the small sample size, the low number of postoperative pain cases is encouraging. Ultimately, these data provide a foundation for developing anesthetic guidelines for pediatric laser procedures. Specifically, clinicians should consider the potential to deliver adequate perioperative care via an opioid-sparing regimen ± adjuvant.

  14. Influence of trophic status on PCB distribution in lake sediments and biota.

    PubMed

    Berglund, O; Larsson, P; Ewald, G; Okla, L

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between trophic status and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) distribution in 19 Swedish lakes. We analyzed PCB in water, phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish and sediment during two sampling periods, in spring and summer. The mass of sigma PCB in the lake sediments was positively related to lake trophy, i.e. more PCBs were accumulated and buried in the sediment of eutrophic lakes than in oligotrophic lakes. In the oligotrophic lakes a greater fraction of the total PCB load was dissolved in water. We conclude that this is a result of higher sedimentation rates in eutrophic lakes and relatively lower turnover of organic carbon in the water column of the shallow, eutrophic lakes. In the stratified lakes, the amount of PCB per cubic meter in the epilimnion decreased from spring to summer. We suggest that sedimentation of plankton beneath the thermocline during stratification act as a sink process of PCBs from the epilimnion.

  15. Z-Estimation and Stratified Samples

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, Norman E.; Hu, Jie; Wellner, Jon A.

    2015-01-01

    The infinite dimensional Z-estimation theorem offers a systematic approach to joint estimation of both Euclidean and non-Euclidean parameters in probabiity models for data. It is easily adapted for stratified sampling designs. This is important in applications to censored survival data because the inverse probability weights that modify the standard estimating equations often depend on the entire follow-up history. Since the weights are not predictable, they complicate the usual theory based on martingales. This paper considers joint estimation of regression coefficients and baseline hazard functions in the Cox proportional and Lin-Ying additive hazards models. Weighted likelihood equations are used for the former and weighted estimating equations for the latter. Regression coefficients and baseline hazards may be combined to estimate individual survival probabilities. Efficiency is improved by calibrating or estimating the weights using information available for all subjects. Although inefficient in comparison with likelihood inference for incomplete data, which is often difficult to implement, the approach provides consistent estimates of desired population parameters even under model misspecification. PMID:25588605

  16. Acoustic propagation under tidally driven, stratified flow.

    PubMed

    Finette, Steven; Oba, Roger; Shen, Colin; Evans, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Amplitude and phase variability in acoustic fields are simulated within a canonical shelf-break ocean environment using sound speed distributions computed from hydrodynamics. The submesoscale description of the space and time varying environment is physically consistent with tidal forcing of stratified flows over variable bathymetry and includes the generation, evolution and propagation of internal tides and solibores. For selected time periods, two-dimensional acoustic transmission examples are presented for which signal gain degradation is computed between 200 and 500 Hz on vertical arrays positioned both on the shelf and beyond the shelf break. Decorrelation of the field is dominated by the phase contribution and occurs over 2-3 min, with significant recorrelation often noted for selected frequency subbands. Detection range is also determined in this frequency band. Azimuth-time variations in the acoustic field are illustrated for 100 Hz sources by extending the acoustic simulations to three spatial dimensions. The azimuthal and temporal structure of both the depth-averaged transmission loss and temporal correlation of the acoustic fields under different environmental conditions are considered. Depth-averaged transmission loss varies up to 4 dB, depending on a combination of source depth, location relative to the slope and tidally induced volumetric changes in the sound speed distribution.

  17. Viscosity stratified fluids in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, Alfredo; Ahmadi, Somayeh; Roccon, Alessio; Zonta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is used to study the turbulent Poiseuille flow of two immiscible liquid layers inside a rectangular channel. A thin liquid layer (fluid 1) flows on top of a thick liquid layer (fluid 2), such that their thickness ratio is h1 /h2 = 1 / 9 . The two liquid layers have the same density but different viscosities (viscosity-stratified fluids). In particular, we consider three different values of the viscosity ratio λ =ν1 /ν2 : λ = 1 , λ = 0 . 875 and λ = 0 . 75 . Numerical Simulations are based on a Phase Field method to describe the interaction between the two liquid layers. Compared with the case of a single phase flow, the presence of a liquid-liquid interface produces a remarkable turbulence modulation inside the channel, since a significant proportion of the kinetic energy is subtracted from the mean flow and converted into work to deform the interface. This induces a strong turbulence reduction in the proximity of the interface and causes a substantial increase of the volume-flowrate. These effects become more pronounced with decreasing λ.

  18. Lake Constance

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... Swiss shores of Lake Constance at the town of Rorschach. Eutrophication, or the process of nutrient enrichment, is rapidly accelerated ... of the value of Lake Constance, efforts to mitigate eutrophication were initiated in the 1970's. MISR was built and is managed ...

  19. Cardiac sarcoid: a chameleon masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anushree; Sulemanjee, Nasir Z; Cheema, Omar; Downey, Francis X; Tajik, A Jamil

    2014-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology often seen in young adults, with cardiac involvement in more than one-quarter of sarcoid patients. The clinical presentation of cardiac sarcoid depends upon the location and extent of myocardium involved. Although cardiac sarcoid may produce asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, it is most commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypertrophic stage of cardiac sarcoid is rarely seen. We describe a case of cardiac sarcoid in a young patient wherein a distinctive appearance of the cardiac sarcoid spectrum from "hypertrophic" stage to thinned/scarred stage, masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy followed by dilated cardiomyopathy, is demonstrated.

  20. Down Syndrome with Complete Atrioventricular Septal Defect, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, and Pulmonary Vein Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mahadevaiah, Guruprasad; Gupta, Manoj; Ashwath, Ravi

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease in infants with Down syndrome is 40%, compared with 0.3% in children who have normal chromosomes. Atrioventricular and ventricular septal defects are often associated with chromosomal aberrations, such as in trisomy 21, whereas hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is chiefly thought to be secondary to specific gene mutations. We found only one reported case of congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and atrioventricular septal defect in an infant with Down syndrome. Here, we report atrioventricular septal defect, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and pulmonary vein stenosis in a neonate with Down syndrome-an apparently unique combination. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature.

  1. An Unusual Type of Localized Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy With Wolf Parkinson White Syndrome Presenting With Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Vatan, Mehmet Bulent; Gunduz, Huseyin; Gurel, Safiye; Kocayigit, Ibrahim; Vural, Ahmet; Demirtas, Saadet; Cakar, Mehmet Akif; Gunduz, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant heart disease that is the most common genetic cardiac disorder. The disease is characterized by excessive thickening of the left ventricular myocardium. The anterior portion of the interventricular ventricular septum is often involved. Asymmetric hypertrophy of apical site, left ventricular free wall, and right ventricle are less common in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that occur in 1% cases. We report a case of a patient with an unusual type of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Wolf Parkinson White (WPW) presenting with pulmonary edema.

  2. Hearing Profile in Patients with Dilated and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Zarea, Gehan Abd El-Rahman; Hassan, Yasser Elsayed Mohamed; Mahmoud, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy may cause disruptions in the micro-vascular system of the stria vascularis in the cochlea, and, subsequently, may result in cochlear degeneration. Degeneration in the stria vascularis affects the physical and chemical processes in the organ of Corti, thereby causing a possible hearing impairment. The objective of this study was to assess the hearing profiles of patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies to determine the relationship between the degree of hearing loss and the degree and duration of the disease and to compare the dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies as regards hearing profile. Methods In this case control study, we studied 21 patients (cases/study group/group 1) and 15 healthy individuals (controls/group 2). Six patients (group 1a) had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and 15 patients (group 1b) had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The data were analyzed using the t-test, chi-squared test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and the Multiple Mann-Whitney test. Results The results of this study showed that 80% of those patients with DCM (group 1b) had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), and 100% of the patients with HCM (group 1a) had mild to severe bilateral sloping SNHL. Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAEs) were present in 14% of the study group and in 100 % of the control group. The results of the measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) showed that 50% of the study group had abnormal latencies compared to the control group, and there was no correlation between the duration of the disease and the degree of hearing loss or DPOAE. Fifty percent of the patients with HCM and 35% of the patients with DCM had positive family histories of similar conditions, and 35% of those with HCM had a positive family history of sudden death. Conclusion The results of this study suggested that the link between heart disease and hearing loss and early identification of hearing loss in patients with

  3. STRATIFIED COMPOSITION EFFECTS ON PLANETARY NEUTRON FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    O. GASNAULT; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    All the bodies of the solar system that are directly irradiated by the galactic cosmic rays, emit enough neutrons to allow a measurement from space. These leakage neutron fluxes are indexes of the surface composition, depending on the energy of the neutrons [1]. Recent work propose geochemical interpretations of these fluxes: the thermal energy range is sensitive to iron, titanium, rare earth elements and thorium [2, 3], the epithermal energy range is sensitive to hydrogen, samarium and gadolinium [2] and the fast energy range is representative of the average soil atomic mass [4]. Nevertheless these studies make the hypothesis of a composition uniform within the footprint of the spectrometer and independent of depth. We show in this abstract that a stratified composition could change significantly the flux intensity and complicate the interpretation of the measurements. The neutron leakage flux is a competition between production effects (sensitive at high energy) and diffusion-capture effects (mostly sensitive at low energy). On one hand, it happens to be that the elements which produce the higher number of neutrons in typical lunar compositions are iron and titanium, which have also large cross section of absorption with the neutrons. On the other hand, the maximum of neutron intensity does not occur at the surface but at about 180 g cm{sup {minus}2} in depth. Therefore, if we have an iron- and/or titanium-rich soil (important production of neutrons) with a top layer having less iron and/or titanium (i.e. more transparent to the neutrons), we can expect an enhancement of the flux compared to a uniform composition.

  4. Stratified composition effects on planetary neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasnault, O.

    2001-01-01

    All the bodies of the solar system that are directly irradiated by the galactic cosmic rays, emit enough neutrons to allow a measurement from space. These leakage neutron fluxes are indexes of the surface composition, depending on the energy of the neutrons (1). Recent work propose geochemical interpretations of these fluxes: the thermal energy range is sensitive to iron, titanium, rare earth elements and thorium (2, 3), the epithermal energy range is sensitive to hydrogen, samarium and gadolinium (2) and the fast energy range is representative of the average soil atomic mass (4). Nevertheless these studies make the hypothesis of a composition uniform within the footprint of the spectrometer and independent of depth. We show in this abstract that a stratified composition could change significantly the flux intensity and complicate the interpretation of the measurements. The neutron leakage flux is a competition between production effects (sensitive at high energy) and diffusion-capture effects (mostly sensitive at low energy). On one hand, it happens to be that the elements which produce the higher number of neutrons in typical lunar compositions are iron and titanium, which have also large cross section of absorption with the neutrons. On the other hand, the maximum of neutron intensity does not occur at the surface but at about 180 g cm(sup (minus)2) in depth. Therefore, if we have an iron- and/or titanium-rich soil (important production of neutrons) with a top layer having less iron and/or titanium (i.e. more transparent to the neutrons), we can expect an enhancement of the flux compared to a uniform composition.

  5. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy in Patient with Crohn's Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sung-Min; Park, Ki Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Numerous causes of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) have been reported. Commonly, secondary osteoarthropathy accompanies pulmonary diseases such as carcinoma of the lung, pleural tumors, lung abscesses, and bronchiectasis. However, HOA in inflammatory bowel disease is a rare complication. There are only a few reports of secondary HOA with Crohn's disease. Our purpose was to report another case of HOA in Crohn's disease. We describe a case of a 27-year-old man with underlying Crohn's disease presenting with 2 years of pain in multiple joints. Radiographic findings suggested HOA in extremities. We performed a conservative treatment including medication and rehabilitations. The patient's symptoms were much improved at the latest follow-up. Although numerous studies on HOA have been published, the pathogenesis of HOA is still unclear. Various treatment modalities were recommended but further studies to uncover the pathogenesis of HOA with Crohn's disease and to establish a treatment modality are needed. PMID:25025001

  6. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy hypertrophic obstructive*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Raimundo José Almeida de Oliveira; dos Santos, Adaílton Araújo; Azevedo, Mablo de Castro; Meira, Saulo Sacramento

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare clinical condition caused by a genetic change that results in the formation of structurally or functionally altered collagen. The clinical manifestations are varied, being the most obvious skin hypermotility and increased joint flexibility, although other systems - such as cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological - may also be affected. This paper presents the report of a patient who sought medical attention with complaints of atypical chest pain. Clinical evaluation enabled hypothetical diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Initial electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and 24 hours holter allowed the confirmation of the first hypothesis. A skin biopsy performed later associated clinical data and confirmed the second hypothesis. PMID:26312722

  7. Fabry Disease Presenting with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Tricuspid Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang-Cheol; Yoo, Han-Wook; Lee, Jae Won; Jang, Jeong Yoon; Heo, Ran

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old female who was diagnosed with nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy since 1999 presented with dyspnea and severe edema on both legs. For the management of her symptom, cardiac surgery including tricuspid annuloplasty, Maze operation and right atrial reduction plasty was performed. During follow-up after cardiac surgery, a plasma α-galactosidase activity was checked for the screening of Fabry disease and the result was around lower normal limit. DNA analysis was implemented for confirmation and it revealed a heterozygote α-galactosidase mutation at exon 6 [c.901C>T (p.Arg301Ter)]. This case suggests that Fabry disease might be easily undetected, and clinical suspicion is critical. PMID:28090261

  8. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ultra-endurance running - two incompatible entities?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regular and prolonged exercise is associated with increased left ventricular wall thickness that can overlap with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Differentiating physiological from pathological hypertrophy has important implications, since HCM is the commonest cause of exercise-related sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Most deaths have been reported in intermittent 'start-stop' sports such as football (soccer) and basketball. The theory is that individuals with HCM are unable to augment stroke volume sufficiently to meet the demands of endurance sports and are accordingly 'selected-out' of participation in such events. We report the case of an ultra-endurance athlete with 25 years of > 50 km competitive running experience, with genetically confirmed HCM; thereby demonstrating that these can be two compatible entities. PMID:22122802

  9. [A case of localized hypertrophic neuropathy in the sciatic nerve].

    PubMed

    Izumi, T; Kusaka, H; Imai, T

    1995-01-01

    A 26-year-old male patient gradually developed muscular atrophy of the right lower leg over a two-year period. Neurological examination revealed absent Achilles tendon reflex and muscular atrophy of the right lower leg and right hamstring muscles. Conduction velocity of the F waves was delayed in the right posterior tibial nerve. A computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion along the proximal segment of the right sciatic nerve. Exploration revealed a fusiformly swollen sciatic nerve. Histological examination showed that a swollen segment of the sciatic nerve was filled with onion-bulb formations of perineurial cells, consistent with the diagnosis of localized hypertrophic neuropathy. This condition should be added to several etiologies of monomelic amyotrophy. Electrophysiological studies and neuroimaging techniques were useful in obtaining differential diagnosis.

  10. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a heart in need of an energy bar?

    PubMed Central

    Vakrou, Styliani; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has been recently recognized as the most common inherited cardiovascular disorder, affecting 1 in 500 adults worldwide. HCM is characterized by myocyte hypertrophy resulting in thickening of the ventricular wall, myocyte disarray, interstitial and/or replacement fibrosis, decreased ventricular cavity volume and diastolic dysfunction. HCM is also the most common cause of sudden death in the young. A large proportion of patients diagnosed with HCM have mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, it is unclear how these mutations lead to the cardiac phenotype, which is variable even in patients carrying the same causal mutation. Abnormalities in calcium cycling, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and energetic deficiency have been described constituting the basis of therapies in experimental models of HCM and HCM patients. This review focuses on evidence supporting the role of cellular metabolism and mitochondria in HCM. PMID:25191275

  11. [Cause and prevention of surgical site infection and hypertrophic scars].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Rei

    2012-03-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) occurs at the site of surgery within 1 month of an operation or within 1 year of an operation if a foreign body is implanted as part of the surgery. Most SSIs (about 70%) are superficial infections involving the skin and subcutaneous tissues only. The remaining infections are more serious and can involve tissues under the skin, organs, or implanted material. Hypertrophic scars( HSs) occur frequently on particular sites, including the anterior chest wall. The anterior chest wall is frequently subjected to skin stretching caused by the natural daily movements of the body. Most cases of SSIs and HSs can be prevented by (1) suture technique modification to prevent high stretching tension and ischemia, and (2) appropriate wound care after surgery. It would be useful to avoid subjecting wounded skin to sustained mechanical force, thereby permitting the wound to rest and heal normally.

  12. Surgery Management of Rare Hypertrophic Frenum in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Stroppa, Sheila de Carvalho; da Silva, Juliana Yassue Barbosa; Tavares, Maria Cristina Reis; Duda, João Gilberto; Losso, Estela Maris

    2014-01-01

    To report a rare case of a lateral frenum hypertrophy in an infant, this paper describes the case of a girl who came to a first dental appointment when she was 4 months old. A hypertrophic lateral frenum in the upper left canine region was detected. A great depression in the gingival rodet separated the anterior maxillary segment from the posterior one and also decreased the lip mobility in this region. A frenectomy was performed when the patient was 11 months old and the clinical follow-up was done up to the age of 30 months. There was normalization in the vestibular insertion of the lateral frenum, lip mobility, physiological development of the maxilla, and eruption of the upper incisors, canines, and first primary molars. Infants should go to a dental examination precociously in order to detect possible congenital and development alterations. PMID:25180104

  13. Surgery management of rare hypertrophic frenum in an infant.

    PubMed

    Stroppa, Sheila de Carvalho; da Silva, Juliana Yassue Barbosa; Tavares, Maria Cristina Reis; Duda, João Gilberto; Losso, Estela Maris

    2014-01-01

    To report a rare case of a lateral frenum hypertrophy in an infant, this paper describes the case of a girl who came to a first dental appointment when she was 4 months old. A hypertrophic lateral frenum in the upper left canine region was detected. A great depression in the gingival rodet separated the anterior maxillary segment from the posterior one and also decreased the lip mobility in this region. A frenectomy was performed when the patient was 11 months old and the clinical follow-up was done up to the age of 30 months. There was normalization in the vestibular insertion of the lateral frenum, lip mobility, physiological development of the maxilla, and eruption of the upper incisors, canines, and first primary molars. Infants should go to a dental examination precociously in order to detect possible congenital and development alterations.

  14. ICD Therapy for Primary Prevention in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common and heterogeneous disorder that increases an individual’s risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). This review article discusses the relevant factors that are involved in the challenge of preventing SCD in patients with HCM. The epidemiology of SCD in patients is reviewed as well as the structural and genetic basis behind ventricular arrhythmias in HCM. The primary prevention of SCD with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy is the cornerstone of modern treatment for individuals at high risk of SCD. The focus here is on the current and emerging predictors of SCD as well as risk stratification recommendations from both North American and European guidelines. Issues related to ICD implantation, such as programming, complications and inappropriate therapies, are discussed. The emerging role of the fully subcutaneous ICD and the data regarding its implantation are reviewed. PMID:28116084

  15. Lake Superior Phytoplankton Characterization from the 2006 Probability Based Survey

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a late summer probability based survey of Lake Superior in 2006 which consisted of 52 sites stratified across 3 depth zones. As part of this effort, we collected composite phytoplankton samples from the epilimnion and the fluorescence maxima (Fmax) at 29 of the site...

  16. A new era in clinical genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Matthew; Pavlovic, Aleksandra; DeGoma, Emil; Salisbury, Heidi; Brown, Colleen; Ashley, Euan A

    2009-12-01

    Building on seminal studies of the last 20 years, genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has become a clinical reality in the form of targeted exonic sequencing of known disease-causing genes. This has been driven primarily by the decreasing cost of sequencing, but the high profile of genome-wide association studies, the launch of direct-to-consumer genetic testing, and new legislative protection have also played important roles. In the clinical management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, genetic testing is primarily used for family screening. An increasing role is recognized, however, in diagnostic settings: in the differential diagnosis of HCM; in the differentiation of HCM from hypertensive or athlete's heart; and more rarely in preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Aside from diagnostic clarification and family screening, use of the genetic test for guiding therapy remains controversial, with data currently too limited to derive a reliable mutation risk prediction from within the phenotypic noise of different modifying genomes. Meanwhile, the power of genetic testing derives from the confidence with which a mutation can be called present or absent in a given individual. This confidence contrasts with our more limited ability to judge the significance of mutations for which co-segregation has not been demonstrated. These variants of "unknown" significance represent the greatest challenge to the wider adoption of genetic testing in HCM. Looking forward, next-generation sequencing technologies promise to revolutionize the current approach as whole genome sequencing will soon be available for the cost of today's targeted panel. In summary, our future will be characterized not by lack of genetic information but by our ability to effectively parse it.

  17. Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) suppression for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) recovery in Flathead Lake, Montana, North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.; Hansen, Barry S; Beauchamp, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-native lake trout Salvelinus namaycush displaced native bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Flathead Lake, Montana, USA, after 1984, when Mysis diluviana became abundant following its introduction in upstream lakes in 1968–1976. We developed a simulation model to determine the fishing mortality rate on lake trout that would enable bull trout recovery. Model simulations indicated that suppression of adult lake trout by 75% from current abundance would reduce predation on bull trout by 90%. Current removals of lake trout through incentivized fishing contests has not been sufficient to suppress lake trout abundance estimated by mark-recapture or indexed by stratified-random gill netting. In contrast, size structure, body condition, mortality, and maturity are changing consistent with a density-dependent reduction in lake trout abundance. Population modeling indicated total fishing effort would need to increase 3-fold to reduce adult lake trout population density by 75%. We conclude that increased fishing effort would suppress lake trout population density and predation on juvenile bull trout, and thereby enable higher abundance of adult bull trout in Flathead Lake and its tributaries.

  18. Determination of multidirectional myocardial deformations in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by using two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryohei; Mochizuki, Yohei; Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Teshima, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Koyama, Hidekazu

    2017-02-01

    Objectives Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a primary disorder of the myocardium, is the most common cardiac disease in cats. However, determination of myocardial deformation with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in cats with various stages of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has not yet been reported. This study was designed to measure quantitatively multidirectional myocardial deformations of cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods Thirty-two client-owned cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 14 healthy cats serving as controls were enrolled and underwent assessment of myocardial deformation (peak systolic strain and strain rate) in the longitudinal, radial and circumferential directions. Results Longitudinal and radial deformations were reduced in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, despite normal systolic function determined by conventional echocardiography. Cats with severely symptomatic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also had lower peak systolic circumferential strain, in addition to longitudinal and radial strain. Conclusions and relevance Longitudinal and radial deformation may be helpful in the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Additionally, the lower circumferential deformation in cats with severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may contribute to clinical findings of decompensation, and seems to be related to severe cardiac clinical signs. Indices of multidirectional myocardial deformations by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography may be useful markers and help to distinguish between cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and healthy cats. Additionally, they may provide more detailed assessment of contractile function in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  19. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    utility of in vitro assays for stratifying environmental contaminants based on a combination of human bioactivity and rodent toxicity. PMID:21339822

  20. Gas slug ascent through rheologically stratified conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capponi, Antonio; James, Mike R.; Lane, Steve J.

    2016-04-01

    Textural and petrological evidence has indicated the presence of viscous, degassed magma layers at the top of the conduit at Stromboli. This layer acts as a plug through which gas slugs burst and it is thought to have a role in controlling the eruptive dynamics. Here, we present the results of laboratory experiments which detail the range of slug flow configurations that can develop in a rheologically stratified conduit. A gas slug can burst (1) after being fully accommodated within the plug volume, (2) whilst its base is still in the underlying low-viscosity liquid or (3) within a low-viscosity layer dynamically emplaced above the plug during the slug ascent. We illustrate the relevance of the same flow configurations at volcanic-scale through a new experimentally-validated 1D model and 3D computational fluid dynamic simulations. Applied to Stromboli, our results show that gas volume, plug thickness, plug viscosity and conduit radius control the transition between each configuration; in contrast, the configuration distribution seems insensitive to the viscosity of magma beneath the plug, which acts mainly to deliver the slug into the plug. Each identified flow configuration encompasses a variety of processes including dynamic narrowing and widening of the conduit, generation of instabilities along the falling liquid film, transient blockages of the slug path and slug break-up. All these complexities, in turn, lead to variations in the slug overpressure, mirrored by changes in infrasonic signatures which are also associated to different eruptive styles. Acoustic amplitudes are strongly dependent on the flow configuration in which the slugs burst, with both acoustic peak amplitudes and waveform shapes reflecting different burst dynamics. When compared to infrasonic signals from Stromboli, the similarity between real signals and laboratory waveforms suggests that the burst of a slug through a plug may represent a viable first-order mechanism for the generation of

  1. Subarachnoid block and enlargement of the spinal canal in hypertrophic neuritis.

    PubMed

    De León, G A; Hodges, F J

    1976-06-01

    A case of Dejerine-Sottas hypertrophic neuritis is reported. The patient, a 45-year-old male, suffered from chronic hypertrophic polyneuropathy, abnormal pupils, fasciculations, tremor, back pain, impotence, sphincter disorders, cramps, and lightning pains in the lower extremities. Besides extensive subarachnoid block, there was X-ray evidence of enlargement of the bony spinal canal with scalloping of the lumbar vertebrae. Surgical exploration showed these abnormalities to be due to extreme hypertrophy of the cauda equina. Histologic findings in peripheral nerve and lumbar root biopsies were typical of hypertrophic neuropathy of the onion bulb type. Vertebral changes secondary to hypertrophied nerve roots appear not to have been described before in hypertrophic neuritis; however, knowledge of their possible occurrence may be of practical importance in the management of similar future cases. A simple way of visualizing enlarged peripheral nerves is briefly described.

  2. Activating types 1 and 2 angiotensin II receptors modulate the hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes☆

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Ichiro; Inoue, Shinji; Teramura, Takeshi; Takehara, Toshiyuki; Ohtani, Kazuhiro; Akagi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    A local tissue-specific renin–angiotensin system (local RAS) has been identified in many organs. However, no report has described the role of a local RAS in the hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. To examine the role of a local RAS in the hypertrophic differentiation, we activated angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) separately in the cell line ATDC5, which involves differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Activation of AT1R suppressed and activation of AT2R enhanced the expression of markers of hypertrophic differentiation, including type X collagen, matrix metalloproteinase 13 and runt-related transcription factor 2. PMID:23905010

  3. Pressure therapy in treatment of hypertrophic scar, burn contracture and keloid: the Kenyan experience.

    PubMed

    Haq, M A; Haq, A

    1990-11-01

    A preliminary report of the results of pressure therapy for hypertrophic scar, burn contracture and keloid is presented. Thirty four patients over a four year period were treated with four types of pressure therapy. Results showed over 50% improvement in 21 (61.8%) cases. This method obviated the need for repetitive surgery and no recurrence was noted. Pressure therapy is advocated as an adjunct measure for all cases of hypertrophic scarring, burn contracture and keloid.

  4. Successful treatment of hypertrophic herpes simplex genitalis in HIV-infected patient with topical imiquimod.

    PubMed

    Deza, Gustavo; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Curto-Barredo, Laia; Villar García, Judit; Pujol, Ramon M

    2015-12-01

    Hypertrophic herpes simplex genitalis is an atypical presentation of genital herpes described in the context of immunosuppression, particularly HIV-positive patients. This situation can become a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. For this reason, alternative therapies are currently being discussed in the literature. We report a case of hypertrophic genital herpes in a HIV-positive patient who was successfully treated with topical 5% imiquimod after treatment failures with oral and i.v. antivirals.

  5. Observation of an internal wave attractor in a confined, stably stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Leo R. M.; Benielli, Dominique; Sommeria, Joël; Lam, Frans-Peter A.

    1997-08-01

    When a container of water is vibrated, its response can be described in terms of large-scale standing waves-the eigenmodes of the system. The belief that enclosed continuous media always possess eigenmodes is deeply rooted. Internal gravity waves in uniformly stratified fluids, however, present a counterexample. Such waves propagate at a fixed angle to the vertical that is determined solely by the forcing frequency, and a sloping side wall of the container will therefore act as a lens, resulting in ray convergence or divergence. An important consequence of this geometric focusing is the prediction that, following multiple reflections, these waves will evolve onto specific paths-or attractors-whose locations are determined only by the frequency. Here we report the results of laboratory experiments that confirm that internal-wave attractors, rather than eigenmodes, determine the response of a confined, stably stratified fluid over a broad range of vibration frequencies. The existence of such attractors could be important for mixing processes in ocean basins and lakes, and may be useful for analysing oscillations of the Earth's liquid core and the stability of spinning, fluid-filled spacecraft.

  6. 3-D Eutrophication Modeling for Lake Simcoe, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Q.; Duckett, F.; Nairn, R.; Brunton, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Lake Simcoe Region Conservation Authority (LSRCA) and the Province of Ontario are undertaking a series of studies to facilitate management of the pressures of population growth in the Lake Simcoe watershed. With rapid population growth and urban development comes additional land clearing, storm water runoff and the discharge of treated sewage, all of which are sources of increased phosphorus loading to Lake Simcoe. Depressed oxygen levels were linked to phosphorous enrichment of the lake, with the resultant stimulation of algal growth in the sunlit upper waters of the lake, and its subsequent senescence and settling into the hypolimnion where bacterial decomposition consumes oxygen from the stratified waters. This poster describes a 3-D hydrodynamic, thermal and water quality model of Lake Simcoe developed using the Danish Hydraulics Institute (DHI) MIKE3 model. The hydrodynamic module includes wind-driven circulation, temperature variation, development of the thermocline and thermal stratification, and hydraulic forcing from inflowing tributaries. This is linked to the water quality module which simulates the eutrophication processes in the response of the lake to loadings of phosphorus, such as algal growth, the growth of aquatic plants and subsequent oxygen consumption. The model has been calibrated against Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler velocity data, plus measured temperature and water quality data at MOE stations in the lake and water intakes. The model is an important assessment tool for the management of the lake and its watersheds, allowing assessment of the impacts of the urban growth and land use change on the water quality in Lake Simcoe.

  7. A Non-Fickian Mixing Model for Stratified Turbulent Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. A Non-Fickian Mixing Model for Stratified Turbulent Flows...would be to improve the predictive skill of the Navy numerical models for submesoscale transport in the ocean. OBJECTIVES My main objective...COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Non-Fickian Mixing Model for Stratified Turbulent Flows 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  8. White Lake AOC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    White Lake is in Muskegon County along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. It was named an Area of Concern on the Great Lakes under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1987 and delisted in 2014.

  9. Seasonal habitat selection by lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in a small Canadian shield lake: Constraints imposed by winter conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchfield, P.J.; Tate, L.S.; Plumb, J.M.; Acolas, M.-L.; Beaty, K.G.

    2009-01-01

    The need for cold, well-oxygenated waters significantly reduces the habitat available for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) during stratification of small temperate lakes. We examined the spatial and pelagic distribution of lake trout over two consecutive summers and winters and tested whether winter increased habitat availability and access to littoral regions in a boreal shield lake in which pelagic prey fish are absent. In winter, lake trout had a narrowly defined pelagic distribution that was skewed to the upper 3 m of the water column and spatially situated in the central region of the lake. Individual core areas of use (50% Kernel utilization distributions) in winter were much reduced (75%) and spatially non-overlapping compared to summer areas, but activity levels were similar between seasons. Winter habitat selection is in contrast to observations from the stratified season, when lake trout were consistently located in much deeper waters (>6 m) and widely distributed throughout the lake. Winter distribution of lake trout appeared to be strongly influenced by ambient light levels; snow depth and day length accounted for up to 69% of the variation in daily median fish depth. More restricted habitat use during winter than summer was in contrast to our original prediction and illustrates that a different suite of factors influence lake trout distribution between these seasons. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  10. Community composition of nirS-type denitrifier in a shallow eutrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiang-Ke; Cheng, Zhan-Bing; Li, Jia; Miao, Li-Hong

    2013-11-01

    Denitrification is a major biological process to reduce nitrate to molecular nitrogen (N2). In shallow eutrophic lakes, this process can remove the largest portion of fixed nitrogen and plays an important role in self-purification of this ecosystem. To understand the structure of denitrifying communities in a shallow eutrophic lake, denitrifier communities in four sub-lakes of East Lake in Wuhan, China, were explored by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) analysis and sequencing of nirS gene clone libraries. nirS is a functional marker gene for denitrification encoding cytochrome cd 1-containing nitrite reductase, which catalyzes the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. Both RFLP fingerprints clustering analysis and phylogeny analysis based on the amino acid sequences of NirS revealed that NirS-type communities in East Lake sediment could be roughly divided into three clusters. Cluster I accounted for 74-82 % of clones from the moderately eutrophic sub-lakes Tuan, Tang Ling, and Guo Zheng. Cluster II accounted for 76 % of the communities in hypertrophic sub-lake Miao Lake and cluster III as a minor group (7 % of the total), mainly presented in Miao Lake. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that cluster I was related to the reference clones from a broad range of ecological environments, and clusters II and III were more phylogenetically related to the reference clones from entrophic environments. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that total nitrogen, total phosphate, total organic carbon, and NH4-N and NO2-N were important environmental factors affecting the dispersion of NirS-type denitrifier in the sediments. Cluster I showed a weak relationship with the nutrient content, while cluster II and III were positively related with the nutrient content. Principal coordinates analysis indicated that NirS-type communities from Tuan Lake, Tang Ling Lake, and Guo Zheng Lake sediments were divergent from those found in river, estuary sediment, and forest

  11. Overview of the limnology of crater lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Crater Lake occupies the collapsed caldera of volcanic Mount Mazama in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon. It is the deepest lake (589 m) in the United States and the 7th deepest lake in the world. The water column mixes to a depth of about 200 m in winter and spring from wind energy and cooling. The deep lake is mixed in winter and early spring each year when relatively cold water near the surface sinks and exchanges positions with water in the deep basins of the lake. The lake becomes thermally stratified in summer and early fall. The metalimnion extends to a depth of about 100 m; thus most of the water column is a cold hypolimnion. Secchi disk clarity measurements typically are in the upper-20-m range to the low-30-m range in summer and early fall. Concentrations of nutrients are low, although conductivity is relatively high owing to the inflow of hydrothermal fluids. Total chlorophyll is low in concentration, but typically maximal at a depth of 120 m during periods of thermal stratification. Primary production also is low, with the maximum levels occurring between the depth of 40 and 80 m. Phytoplankton taxa are spatially segregated from each other within the water column to a depth of 200 m in summer and early fall. The same generalization applies to the Zooplankton taxa. Water level, clarity, concentrations of total chlorophyll, primary production, and abundances of zooplankton and introduced kokanee salmon exhibit long-term fluctuations. Based primarily on a recent 10-year study of the lake, the lake is considered to be pristine, except for the consequences of fish introductions. ?? 1996 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  12. Overview of the limnology of Crater Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    Crater Lake occupies the collapsed caldera of volcanic Mount Mazama in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon. It is the deepest lake (589 m) in the United States and the 7th deepest lake in the world. The water column mixes to a depth of about 200 m in winter and spring from wind energy and cooling. The deep lake is mixed in winter and early spring each year when relatively cold water near the surface sinks and exchanges positions with water in the deep basins of the lake. The lake becomes thermally stratified in summer and early fall. The metalimnion extends to a depth of about 100 m; thus most of the water column is a cold hypolimnion. Secchi disk clarity measurements typically are in the upper-20-m range to the low-30-m range in summer and early fall. Concentrations of nutrients are low, although conductivity is relatively high owing to the inflow of hydrothermal fluids. Total chlorophyll is low in concentration, but typically maximal at a depth of 120 m during periods of thermal stratification. Primary production also is low, with the maximum levels occurring between the depth of 40 and 80 m. Phytoplankton taxa are spatially segregated from each other within the water column to a depth of 200 m in summer and early fall. The same generalization applies to the zooplankton taxa. Water level, clarity, concentrations of total chlorophyll, primary production, and abundances of zooplankton and introduced kokanee salmon exhibit long-term fluctuations. Based primarily on a recent 10-year study of the lake, the lake is considered to be pristine, except for the consequences of fish introductions.

  13. Shifts between ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in relation to nitrification potential across trophic gradients in two large Chinese lakes (Lake Taihu and Lake Chaohu).

    PubMed

    Hou, Jie; Song, Chunlei; Cao, Xiuyun; Zhou, Yiyong

    2013-05-01

    Ammonia oxidation plays a pivotal role in the cycling and removal of nitrogen in aquatic ecosystems. Recent findings have expanded the known ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes from Bacteria to Archaea. However, the relative importance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in nitrification is still debated. Here we showed that, in two large eutrophic lakes in China (Lake Taihu and Lake Chaohu), the abundance of AOA and AOB varied in opposite patterns according to the trophic state, although both AOA and AOB were abundant. In detail, from mesotrophic to eutrophic sites, the AOA abundance decreased, while the AOB increased in abundance and outnumbered the AOA at hypertrophic sites. In parallel, the nitrification rate increased along these trophic gradients and was significantly correlated with both the AOB abundance and the numerical ratio of AOB to AOA. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial amoA sequences showed that Nitrosomonas oligotropha- and Nitrosospira-affiliated AOB dominated in both lakes, while Nitrosomonas communis-related AOB were only detected at the eutrophic sites. The diversity of AOB increased from mesotrophic to eutrophic sites and was positively correlated with the nitrification rate. Overall, this study enhances our understanding of the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes by elucidating conditions that AOB may numerically predominated over AOA, and indicated that AOA may play a less important role than AOB in the nitrification process of eutrophic lakes.

  14. Involvement of impaired desmosome-related proteins in hypertrophic scar intraepidermal blister formation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianglin; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one of the unique fibrotic diseases in human. Intraepidermal blister is a common clinical symptom following the hypertrophic scar formation. However, little is known about the reason of blister creation. In this study, we selected three patients with hypertrophic scar as manifested by raised, erythematous, pruritic, blister and thickened appearance undergoing scar resection. The first scar sample was 6 months after burn from the neck of a 3 years old male patient with 10 score by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). The second scar sample was 12 months after burn from the dorsal foot of a 16 years old female patient with 13 score by VSS. The third one was 9 months after burn from the elbow of a 34 years old male patients with 13 score by VSS. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of blister formation, we screened the different protein expression between hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue by means of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology and high throughput 2D LC-MS/MS. There were 48 proteins found to be downregulated in hypertrophic scar. Among the downregulated ones, plakophilin1 (PKP1), plakophilin3 (PKP3) and desmoplakin (DSP) were the desmosome-related proteins which were validated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay. Transmission electron microscopy further showed the considerably reduced size and intensity of hemidesmosome and desmosome in hypertrophic scar tissue, compared to control normal skin. Our data indicted for the first time that downregulation of DSP, PKP1 and PKP3 in hypertrophic scar might be responsible for intraepidermal blister formation.

  15. Lake Powell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The white ring around Lake Powell tells the story. The surface is down 98 feet. This is critical, because Powell, Lake Mead, and other lakes along the Colorado River provide water for millions of people in five states. We are in the eighth year of a drought on the Colorado River. This year was the driest year ever reported in Southern California, and there is a severe drought in Northern California, down to less than 30-percent of snow pack. This ASTER image of part of Lake Powell was acquired in 2001. The gray area depicts the shrunken, reduced 2007 lake extent compared to the extended, larger black area in 2001.

    The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km, and is centered near 37.1 degrees north latitude, 111.3 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  16. Bioenergetic evaluation of diel vertical migration by bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in a thermally stratified reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckmann, Madeleine; Dunham, Jason; Connor, Edward J.; Welch, Carmen A.

    2016-01-01

    Many species living in deeper lentic ecosystems exhibit daily movements that cycle through the water column, generally referred to as diel vertical migration (DVM). In this study, we applied bioenergetics modelling to evaluate growth as a hypothesis to explain DVM by bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in a thermally stratified reservoir (Ross Lake, WA, USA) during the peak of thermal stratification in July and August. Bioenergetics model parameters were derived from observed vertical distributions of temperature, prey and bull trout. Field sampling confirmed that bull trout prey almost exclusively on recently introduced redside shiner (Richardsonius balteatus). Model predictions revealed that deeper (>25 m) DVMs commonly exhibited by bull trout during peak thermal stratification cannot be explained by maximising growth. Survival, another common explanation for DVM, may have influenced bull trout depth use, but observations suggest there may be additional drivers of DVM. We propose these deeper summertime excursions may be partly explained by an alternative hypothesis: the importance of colder water for gametogenesis. In Ross Lake, reliance of bull trout on warm water prey (redside shiner) for consumption and growth poses a potential trade-off with the need for colder water for gametogenesis.

  17. [Perioperative management for patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy undergoing noncardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Okuyama, A; Goda, Y; Kawahigashi, H; Takita, K; Okuyama, M; Kubota, M

    1992-01-01

    We had two patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy for noncardiac surgeries. Case 1: A 74-year-old man for right nephrectomy received epidural lidocaine and nitrous oxide combined with 0.2-0.6% isoflurane. During the operation, heart rate and blood pressure were relatively unstable, but he woke up promptly after the operation. Early on the morning of the 2nd post-operative day, he was found dead on his bed. Case 2: A 52-year-old man for gastrectomy was anesthetized with nitrous oxide and halothane with continuous propranolol infusion. Through the operative period, heart rate and blood pressure were stable and postoperative course was uneventful. In these two patients, preoperative Holter ECG showed ventricular tachycardia, which may increase the risk of a sudden death. These cases demonstrate that general anesthesia with nitrous oxide combined with halothane, can be administered with a low risk in patients with HCM for noncardiac surgery and that postoperative intensive care unit monitoring is necessary for these patients for several days to prevent a sudden death.

  18. Vps34 regulates myofibril proteostasis to prevent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hirotaka; Eguchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Junko; Kuba, Keiji; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Goto, Akiteru; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi; Imai, Yumiko; Suzuki, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common heart disease with a prevalence of 1 in 500 in the general population. Several mutations in genes encoding cardiac proteins have been found in HCM patients, but these changes do not predict occurrence or prognosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying HCM remain largely elusive. Here we show that cardiac expression of vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34) is reduced in a subset of HCM patients. In a mouse model, muscle-specific loss of Vps34 led to HCM-like manifestations and sudden death. Vps34-deficient hearts exhibited abnormal histopathologies, including myofibrillar disarray and aggregates containing αB-crystallin (CryAB). These features result from a block in the ESCRT-mediated proteolysis that normally degrades K63-polyubiquitinated CryAB. CryAB deposition was also found in myocardial specimens from a subset of HCM patients whose hearts showed decreased Vps34. Our results identify disruption of the previously unknown Vps34-CryAB axis as a potentially novel etiology of HCM. PMID:28097232

  19. Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis mimicking prolactinoma with recurrent vision loss.

    PubMed

    Lok, Julie Y C; Yip, Nelson K F; Chong, Kelvin K L; Li, C L; Young, Alvin L

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis is a rare inflammatory condition with diffuse thickening of the dura mater, which may cause a compressive effect or vascular compromise. We report on a 28-year-old Chinese woman with a history of granulomatous mastitis 7 years previously and oligomenorrhoea, headache, blurred vision, and raised prolactin level 2 years previously, that was diagnosed as prolactinoma and treated conservatively with bromocriptine. However, she had recurrent bilateral vision loss when the bromocriptine was stopped. Her symptoms were resolved by high-dose steroid injection but remained steroid-dependent. Serial magnetic resonance imaging scan showed progressive diffuse thickening of the pachymeningitis with disappearance of pituitary apoplexy. Lumbar puncture showed lymphocytosis with no organisms. Open biopsy of the meninges was performed and histology showed features of inflammatory infiltrates and vasculitis. This is an unusual presentation of a rare condition in this age-group, with co-existing granulomatous mastitis and chronic otitis media, and is a diagnostic challenge mimicking pituitary macroadenoma and meningioma in initial magnetic resonance imaging scans.

  20. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy--state of the art in 2007.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Silvia; Costa, Susana; Monteiro, Pedro; Gonçalves, Lino; Providência, Luís A

    2008-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary disease of the sarcomere, with considerable genetic heterogeneity and variability in phenotypic expression, whose main complication is sudden cardiac death (SCD). Genetic aspects of HCM, its molecular pathophysiology and genotype-phenotype relationships are the subject of this review, which is aimed at better understanding of practical management in this patient population. As HCM is a genetic disease whose initial manifestation can be sudden death, it is essential to establish the diagnosis at an early stage, to proceed with risk stratification and implementation of SCD prevention strategies, and to promote genetic counseling of patients and screening of their families. Detection of pathological mutations through progressive sequencing of the genes most commonly involved is the most efficient way to diagnose HCM, even in the absence of clinical evidence of the disease. Identification of individuals at high risk of SCD is a major challenge in the management of this population, since SCD can be prevented by use of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. The selection of patients for prophylactic implantation of these devices, particularly those who have only one major risk factor, is currently the subject of controversy.

  1. Diastolic filling in a physical model of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schovanec, Joseph; Samaee, Milad; Lai, Hong Kuan; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited heart disease that affects as much as one in 500 individuals, and is the most common cause of sudden death in young athletes. The myocardium becomes abnormally thick in HCM and deforms the internal geometry of the left ventricle (LV). Previous studies have shown that a vortex is formed during diastolic filling, and further that the dilated LV morphology seen in systolic heart failure results in altering the filling vortex from elliptical to spherical shape. We have also previously shown that increasing LV wall stiffness decreases the filling vortex circulation. However, alterations to intraventricular filling fluid dynamics due to an obstructive LV morphology and locally elevated wall stiffness (in the hypertrophied region) have not been previously examined from a mechanistic standpoint. We conducted an experimental study using an idealized HCM physical model and compared the intraventricular flow fields obtained from 2D PIV to a baseline LV physical model with lower wall stiffness and anatomical geometry. The obstruction in the HCM model leads to earlier breakdown of the filling vortex as compared to the anatomical LV. Intraventricular filling in both models under increased heart rates will be discussed.

  2. Hemolytic anemia in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Toru; Kitaoka, Hiroaki; Terauchi, Yasunobu; Tamura, Shinjiro; Okawa, Makoto; Yamasaki, Naohito; Yabe, Toshikazu; Doi, Yoshinori L

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman was referred for further evaluation and treatment of normocytic and normochromic anemia with hemoglobin level of 8.6 g/dL. A peripheral blood smear showed fragmented erythrocytes. The patient was then referred to the department of cardiology because of systolic murmur, ECG abnormality, and red cell fragmentation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with particularly increased interventricular septal thickness of 24 mm and a hyperkinetic wall motion, resulting in marked obstruction to left ventricular outflow tract (pressure gradient of 200 mmHg). Mitral regurgitation due to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflets was also seen. The cause of anemia was thought to be mechanical intravascular hemolysis due to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and mitral regurgitation. She was treated with atenolol and the class Ia antiarrhythmic drug cibenzoline to relieve the outflow tract obstruction, and the pressure gradient was reduced to 70 mmHg. After 3 months of treatment, her hemoglobin level had increased to 11.4 g/dL without additional treatment for anemia.

  3. The Ups and Downs of Genetic Diagnosis of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Juan; Reguero, Julián R; Coto, Eliecer

    2016-01-01

    Massive DNA sequencing, also known as next-generation sequencing, has revolutionized genetic diagnosis. This technology has reduced the effort and cost needed to analyze several genes simultaneously and has made genetic evaluation available to a larger number of patients. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, genetic analysis has increased from the 3 main genes implicated in the disease (MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2) to sequencing of more than 20 related genes. Despite the advantages of acquiring this additional information, many patients show variants of uncertain significance (mainly amino acid changes), which may also be present in at least 1 healthy control undergoing genome sequencing. This will be a dead-end situation unless the variant can be demonstrated to be associated with the disease in the patient's family. In the absence of clear evidence that these variants are truly pathogenic, they cannot be used for reliable genetic counselling in family members. Massive sequencing also enables identification of new candidate genes, but again, the problem of variants of uncertain significance limits the success of these assessments.

  4. Intravenous atropine treatment in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, H; Imura, K; Nishikawa, M; Yagi, M; Kubota, A

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To assess the efficacy of a new regimen of intravenous atropine treatment for infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) with special reference to regression of pyloric hypertrophy. Methods: Atropine was given intravenously at a dose of 0.01 mg/kg six times a day before feeding in 19 patients with IHPS diagnosed from radiographic and ultrasonographic findings. When vomiting ceased and the infants were able to ingest 150 ml/kg/day formula after stepwise increases in feeding volume, they were given 0.02 mg/kg atropine six times a day orally and the dose was decreased stepwise. Results: Of the 19 infants, 17 (89%) ceased projectile vomiting after treatment with intravenous (median seven days) and subsequent oral (median 44 days) atropine administration. The remaining two infants required surgery. No significant complications were encountered. Ultrasonography showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in pyloric muscle thickness, but no significant shortening of the pyloric canal after completion of the atropine treatment. The patients exhibited failure to thrive at presentation, but were thriving at 6 months of age (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This atropine therapy resulted in satisfactory clinical recovery. Pyloric muscle thickness was significantly reduced. PMID:12089130

  5. Hypertrophic Olivary Degeneration: A Neurosurgical Point of View.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Carlos Henrique; Kimmig, Hubert; Lopez, William Omar Contreras; Lange, Manfred; Oeckler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) is a rare form of transsynaptic degeneration characterized by hypertrophy of the inferior olivary nucleus situated in the olivary body, part of the medulla oblongata, representing a major source of input to the cerebellum. HOD typically results from focal lesions interrupting connections from the inferior olive within the dentato-rubro-olivary pathway, a region also known as the triangle of Guillain-Mollaret (TGM) (red nucleus, inferior olivary nucleus, and contralateral dentate nucleus). Clinically, HOD presents classically as palatal tremor and can include dentatorubral tremor and/or ocular myoclonus. The pathologic changes associated with HOD feature radiologic changes with the inferior olivary nucleus appearing larger and increasing its T2-weighted signal intensity on magnetic resonance images. HOD is commonly managed with pharmacotherapy but may require surgical intervention in extreme cases. HOD has been found to develop as a consequence of any injury that disrupts the TGM pathways (e.g., pontine cavernoma).These findings highlight the critical importance of a thorough knowledge of TGM anatomy to avoid secondary HOD. We present a patient who developed HOD secondary to resection of a tectal plate cavernous malformation and review the literature with an emphasis on the current knowledge of this disorder.

  6. The Signaling Pathways Involved in Chondrocyte Differentiation and Hypertrophic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes communicate with each other mainly via diffusible signals rather than direct cell-to-cell contact. The chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is well regulated by the interactions of varieties of growth factors, cytokines, and signaling molecules. A number of critical signaling molecules have been identified to regulate the differentiation of chondrocyte from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), SRY-related high-mobility group-box gene 9 (Sox9), parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (Ihh), fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), and β-catenin. Except for these molecules, other factors such as adenosine, O2 tension, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) also have a vital role in cartilage formation and chondrocyte maturation. Here, we outlined the complex transcriptional network and the function of key factors in this network that determine and regulate the genetic program of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:28074096

  7. Lake acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, J.E.; Peplies, R.W.; Rush, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    This paper examined a National Research Council (NRC) report called Acid Deposition: Long-Term Trends. The report has been the final word on acid deposition as the cause of acidification of lakes. The authors considered it important that the tentative nature of this report be kept in perspective so that the work of the NRC would promote rather than inhibit scientific inquiry on the lake acidification issue. In this spirit, this report proposed that degradation of storm damaged trees could increase the acidity of the forest humus and as a result the ground water which would fed local streams and lakes. They proposed that extensive forest blowdown could be a factor in acidification of surface waters.

  8. Stratified Vortex Rings: Visualization of the Density Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsthoorn, Jason; Dalziel, Stuart

    2016-11-01

    The study of vortex-ring induced stratified mixing has played a key role in understanding stratified turbulent mixing. In this study, we present an experimental investigation of the mechanical evolution and the stratification-modified three-dimensional instability of these vortex rings. Using a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup, we reconstruct a full, three-dimensional, time-resolved velocity field of the interaction of a vortex ring with a stratified interface. This reconstruction agrees with previous two-dimensional studies, while capturing the three-dimensional instabilities of the dynamical evolution. The stratified three-dimensional instability of a vortex ring is similar to the unstratified instability, but here the instability occurs much earlier. Through the use of numerical integration, we use the experimentally determined velocity field to simulate the kinematic evolution of the density stratification. This technique allows us to evaluate the vertical buoyancy flux throughout the vortex-ring interaction, providing a quantitative explanation for the interface sharpening observed within the experiments. Understanding the sharpening mechanism in the context of a vortex ring has direct relevance to understanding the layer formation found in stratified turbulence NSERC, EPSRC.

  9. An event-driven phytoplankton bloom in southern Lake Michigan observed by satellite.

    SciTech Connect

    Lesht, B. M.; Stroud, J. R.; McCormick, M. J.; Fahnenstiel, G. L.; Stein, M. L.; Welty, L. J.; Leshkevich, G. A.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Chicago; Great Lakes Research Lab.

    2002-04-15

    Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) images from June 1998 show a surprising early summer phytoplankton bloom in southern Lake Michigan that accounted for approximately 25% of the lake's annual gross offshore algal primary production. By combining the satellite imagery with in situ measurements of water temperature and wind velocity we show that the bloom was triggered by a brief wind event that was sufficient to cause substantial vertical mixing even though the lake was already stratified. We conclude that episodic events can have significant effects on the biological state of large lakes and should be included in biogeochemical process models.

  10. Unsteady Shear Disturbances Within a Two Dimensional Stratified Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.

    1992-01-01

    The origin and evolution of shear disturbances within a stratified, inviscid, incompressible flow are investigated numerically by a Clebsch/Weber decomposition based scheme. In contrast to homogeneous flows, within which vorticity can be redistributed but not generated, the presence of a density stratification can render an otherwise irrotational flow vortical. In this work, a kinematic decomposition of the unsteady Euler equations separates the unsteady velocity field into rotational and irrotational components. The subsequent evolution of these components is used to study the influence various velocity disturbances have on both stratified and homogeneous flows. In particular, the flow within a two-dimensional channel is used to investigate the evolution of rotational disturbances, generated or convected, downstream from an unsteady inflow condition. Contrasting simulations of both stratified and homogeneous flows are used to distinguish between redistributed inflow vorticity and that which is generated by a density stratification.

  11. Thermal Vibrational Convection in a Two-phase Stratified Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Qingming; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    2007-01-01

    The response of a two-phase stratified liquid system subject to a vibration parallel to an imposed temperature gradient is analyzed using a hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann method (HTLB). The vibrations considered correspond to sinusoidal translations of a rigid cavity at a fixed frequency. The layers are thermally and mechanically coupled. Interaction between gravity-induced and vibration-induced thermal convection is studied. The ability of applied vibration to enhance the flow, heat transfer and interface distortion is investigated. For the range of conditions investigated, the results reveal that the effect of vibrational Rayleigh number and vibrational frequency on a two-phase stratified fluid system is much different than that for a single-phase fluid system. Comparisons of the response of a two-phase stratified fluid system with a single-phase fluid system are discussed.

  12. SINDA/FLUINT Stratified Tank Modeling for Cryrogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A general purpose SINDA/FLUINT (S/F) stratified tank model was created to simulate self-pressurization and axial jet TVS; Stratified layers in the vapor and liquid are modeled using S/F lumps.; The stratified tank model was constructed to permit incorporating the following additional features:, Multiple or singular lumps in the liquid and vapor regions of the tank, Real gases (also mixtures) and compressible liquids, Venting, pressurizing, and draining, Condensation and evaporation/boiling, Wall heat transfer, Elliptical, cylindrical, and spherical tank geometries; Extensive user logic is used to allow detailed tailoring - Don't have to rebuilt everything from scratch!!; Most code input for a specific case is done through the Registers Data Block:, Lump volumes are determined through user input:; Geometric tank dimensions (height, width, etc); Liquid level could be input as either a volume percentage of fill level or actual liquid level height

  13. Lake Bonneville

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, Grove Karl

    1890-01-01

    This volume is a contribution to the later physical history of the Great Basin. As a geographic province the Great Basin is characterized by a dry climate, changes of drainage, volcanic eruption, and crustal displacement. Lake Bonneville, the special theme of the volume, was a phenomenon of climate and drainage, but its complete history includes an account of contemporaneous eruption and displacement.

  14. Insight into dissolved organic matter fractions in Lake Wivenhoe during and after a major flood.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Rupak; Grinham, Alistair; Beecham, Simon

    2016-03-01

    Dissolved organic matter is an important component of biogeochemical processes in aquatic environments. Dissolved organic matter may consist of a myriad of different fractions and resultant processing pathways. In early January 2011, heavy rainfall occurred across South East Queensland, Australia causing significant catchment inflow into Lake Wivenhoe, which is the largest water supply reservoir for the city of Brisbane, Australia. The horizontal and vertical distributions of dissolved organic matter fractions in the lake during the flood period were investigated and then compared with stratified conditions with no catchment inflows. The results clearly demonstrate a large variation in dissolved organic matter fractions associated with inflow conditions compared with stratified conditions. During inflows, dissolved organic matter concentrations in the reservoir were fivefold lower than during stratified conditions. Within the dissolved organic matter fractions during inflow, the hydrophobic and humic acid fractions were almost half those recorded during the stratified period whilst low molecular weight neutrals were higher during the flood period compared to during the stratified period. Information on dissolved organic matter and the spatial and vertical variations in its constituents' concentrations across the lake can be very useful for catchment and lake management and for selecting appropriate water treatment processes.

  15. Bimodal spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of hypertrophic skin tissue: pre-clinical experimentation, spectral data selection and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Honghui; Gisquet, Héloïse; Guillemin, F.; Blondel, Walter C. P. M.

    2011-07-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was two folds: firstly, we would like to investigate the efficiency of bimodal spectroscopic technique in characterization of hypertrophic scarring tissue deliberately created on a preclinical model (rabbit's ear); on the other hand, we evaluate the inhibition effect of an anti-inflammatory medication (tacrolimus) on hypertrophic formation in scar by using our bimodal spectroscopic system. Study design: This study was conducted on 20 New Zealand Rabbits receiving hypertrophic scarring treatment on their ears. Fluorescence and Diffuse Reflectance spectra were collected from each scar, amongst which some had received tacrolimus treatment. Features were extracted from corrected spectral data and analyzed to classify the scarring tissues into hypertrophic or non-hypertrophic. Diagnostic algorithms were developed with the use of k-NN classifier and validated by comparing to histological classification result with Leave-one- out cross validation. Results and discussion: The accuracy of our bimodal spectroscopy method for detecting hypertrophic scarring scar tissue was good (sensibility: 90.84%, specificity: 94.44%). The features used for classification were mainly extracted from the spectra exited at 360, 410 and 420 nm. This indicates that the difference between the spectra acquired from hypertrophic and non-hypertrophic tissue may be due to the different intensity distribution of several fluorophores (collagen,elastin and NADH) excited in this range, or to the change in proportion of tissue layers (epidermis and dermis) explored by the CEFS in use.

  16. Stratified flows and internal waves in the Central West Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, K. S.; Makarenko, N. I.; Morozov, E. G.; Tarakanov, R. Yu; Frey, D. I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study stratified flows and internal waves in the fracture zones of the Mid Atlantic Ridge. The results of measurements carried out in the 39th and 40th cruises of RV Akademik Sergey Vavilov in the autumn of 2014 and 2015 are presented. Hydrophysical properties of the near-bottom flows are studied experimentally on the basis of CTD- and LADCP profiling. Theoretical analysis involves mathematical formulation of stratified fluid flow which uses CTD-data obtained from field observation in the Vema Fracture Zone region. Spectral properties and kinematic characteristics of internal waves are calculated by finite element method.

  17. A spectral model of stably stratified surface-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalini, A.; Arnqvist, J.; Carlén, I.; Bergström, H.; Alfredsson, P. H.

    2015-06-01

    A new model to determine the spectral velocity tensor in a stably stratified flow is proposed. This model is complementary to the Mann model as it solves the stratified inviscid Rapid Distortion Theory equations analytically, allowing for the determination of the single and two-point velocity spectra as well as the temperature-velocity cross-spectra. The model has been here calibrated and validated against field measurements conducted over a forested area with measurements up to 140 m, therefore covering a region of interest for wind-energy applications.

  18. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy and Follicular Thyroid Cancer: A Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavarelli, Martina; Sarfati, Julie; De Gennes, Christian; Haroche, Julien; Buffet, Camille; Ghander, Cécile; Simon, Jean Marc; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a rare condition characterized by bone and joint pain and digital clubbing usually associated with bronchopulmonary diseases. Primary HOA is rare and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Objectives Cases of HOA as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with thyroid carcinoma are very rare – only 2 cases have been described in the literature. Results We present the first case of a 40-year-old patient affected by HOA associated with invasive differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma operated in 2 stages. Both operations were followed by radioiodine ablation, and then a rapid unresectable local recurrence developed requiring cervical radiotherapy (70 Gy). A second treatment with 100 mCi of 131I confirmed it was a refractory thyroid cancer. Further surgery confirmed a poorly differentiated follicular cancer and 12 cycles of chemotherapy by gemcitabine and oxaliplatin followed. During the 8 years of follow-up, cervical recurrence was stable, but severe episodes of hemoptysis occurred requiring iterative embolization of the bronchial and tracheal arteries. Other lung diseases were excluded. Digital clubbing appeared, which was associated with arthritis, bone pain and inflammatory syndrome. X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging found periosteal apposition in the long bones; bone scintigraphy confirmed the HOA diagnosis. Other causes of arthritis were eliminated. She was treated with colchicine, corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but only the combination of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine reduced the morphine requirements. Conclusion HOA is exceptionally associated with thyroid cancer and we raised the hypothesis of the secretion of a circulating factor in a patient with invasive and recurrent follicular thyroid cancer, refractory to radioiodine. PMID:26835431

  19. Genetics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy after 20 years: clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Maron, Martin S; Semsarian, Christopher

    2012-08-21

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common familial heart disease with vast genetic heterogeneity, demonstrated over the past 20 years. Mutations in 11 or more genes encoding proteins of the cardiac sarcomere (>1,400 variants) are responsible for (or associated with) HCM. Explosive progress achieved in understanding the rapidly evolving science underlying HCM genomics has resulted in fee-for-service testing, making genetic information widely available. The power of HCM mutational analysis, albeit a more limited role than initially envisioned, lies most prominently in screening family members at risk for developing disease and excluding unaffected relatives, which is information not achievable otherwise. Genetic testing also allows expansion of the broad HCM disease spectrum and diagnosis of HCM phenocopies with different natural history and treatment options, but is not a reliable strategy for predicting prognosis. Interfacing a heterogeneous disease such as HCM with the vast genetic variability of the human genome, and high frequency of novel mutations, has created unforeseen difficulties in translating complex science (and language) into the clinical arena. Indeed, proband diagnostic testing is often expressed on a probabilistic scale, which is frequently incompatible with clinical decision making. Major challenges rest with making reliable distinctions between pathogenic mutations and benign variants, and those judged to be of uncertain significance. Genotyping in HCM can be a powerful tool for family screening and diagnosis. However, wider adoption and future success of genetic testing in the practicing cardiovascular community depends on a standardized approach to mutation interpretation, and bridging the communication gap between basic scientists and clinicians.

  20. Altered patterns of cardiac intercellular junction distribution in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, R.; Severs, N. J.; Gourdie, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the distribution pattern of intercellular junctions (the mechanically coupling desmosomes and the electrically coupling gap junctions) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) hearts showing myofibre disarray. DESIGN: Samples from six necropsied hearts were studied, representing the interventricular septum and the free walls of the left and right ventricles. Immunohistochemical labelling of desmoplakin was used as a marker for desmosomes, and of connexin43 as a marker for gap junctions, in single and double stainings. The slides were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: Marked disorganisation of intercalated discs was observed in areas featuring myofibre disarray. Besides overall derangement, localised abnormalities in desmosome organisation were evident, which included: (1) the formation of abnormally enlarged megadiscs; (2) the presence of intersecting disc structures; and (3) aberrant side to side desmosomal connections. Gap junctional abnormalities included: (1) random distribution of gap junctions over the surface of myocytes, rather than localisation to intercalated discs; (2) abundant side to side gap junction connections between adjacent myocytes; and (3) formation of abnormally shaped gap junctions. Circles of myocytes continuously interconnected by gap junctions were also observed. Regions of the diseased hearts lacking myofibre disarray, and control hearts of normal patients and patients with other cardiac diseases, did not show these alterations. CONCLUSIONS: The disorganisation of the intercellular junctions associated with myofibre disarray in HCM may play an important role in the pathophysiological manifestations of the disease. The remodelling of gap junction distribution may underlie the formation of an arrhythmogenic substrate, thereby contributing to the generation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias associated with HCM. Images PMID:8944586

  1. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: interrater reliability and concurrent validity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    Research into the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertrophic scar (HSc) remains limited by the heterogeneity of scar and the imprecision with which its severity is measured. The objective of this study was to test the interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the Cutometer measurement of elasticity, the Mexameter measurement of erythema and pigmentation, and total thickness measure of the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar, and HSc. Three independent investigators evaluated 128 sites (severe HSc, moderate or mild HSc, donor site, and normal skin) on 32 burn survivors using all of the above measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient, which was used to measure interrater reliability, reflects the inherent amount of error in the measure and is considered acceptable when it is >0.75. Interrater reliability of the totals of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS fell below the acceptable limit ( congruent with0.50). The individual subscales of the mVSS fell well below the acceptable level (< or =0.3). The Cutometer reading of elasticity provided acceptable reliability (>0.89) for each study site with the exception of severe scar. Mexameter and DermaScan C reliability measurements were acceptable for all sites (>0.82). Concurrent validity correlations with the mVSS were significant except for the comparison of the mVSS pliability subscale and the Cutometer maximum deformation measure comparison in severe scar. In conclusion, the Mexameter and DermaScan C measurements of scar color and thickness of all sites, as well as the Cutometer measurement of elasticity in all but the most severe scars shows high interrater reliability. Their significant concurrent validity with the mVSS confirms that these tools are measuring the same traits as the mVSS, and in a more objective way.

  2. Hypertrophic lichen planus versus prurigo nodularis: a dermoscopic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ankad, Balachandra S.; Beergouder, Savitha L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic lichen planus (HLP) classically involves shin and ankles and is characterized by hyperkeratotic plaques and nodules. Prurigo nodularis (PN) is a chronic neurodermatitis that presents with intensely pruritic nodules. Histopathology of HLP and PN demonstrate epidermal hyperplasia, hypergranulosis, and compact hyperkeratosis. The dermis shows vertically arranged collagen fibers and an increased number of fibroblasts and capillaries in both conditions. Moreover, basal cell degeneration is confined to the tips of rete ridges, and band-like infiltration is conspicuously absent in HLP. Therefore, both conditions mimic each other clinically, which makes diagnosis difficult. Hence, there is a need for a diagnostic technique to differentiate both conditions. Objective: To evaluate dermoscopic patterns in HLP and PN and to study these patterns histopathologically. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at S. Nijalingappa Medical College in Bagalkot. It was an observational case series study. Ethical clearance and informed consent was obtained. A Dermlite 3 dermoscope (3Gen, San Juan Capistrano, CA, USA) attached to a Sony Cyber Shot camera DSC-W800 (Sony Electronics Inc., San Diego, California, USA) was employed. Histopathology was done to confirm the diagnosis. Results: There were 10 patients each with HLP and PN. HLP was seen in 8 males and 2 females. PN was observed in 7 females and 3 males. Dermoscopy of HLP demonstrated pearly white areas and peripheral striations (100%), gray-blue globules (60%), comedo-like openings (30%), red dots (40%), red globules (10%), brownish-black globules (30%), and yellowish structures (90%). In PN, red dots (70%), red globules (60%), and pearly white areas with peripheral striations (100%) were observed under dermoscopy. Conclusion: Both HLP and PN demonstrated specific dermoscopic patterns which can be demonstrated on histopathologic findings. The authors propose that these patterns are hallmarks of each

  3. Clinical significance of giant negative T waves in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso, F.; Nihoyannopoulos, P.; Stewart, J.; Dickie, S.; Lemery, R.; McKenna, W.J. )

    1990-04-01

    To assess the clinical significance of giant negative T waves in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from Western nations, clinical, echocardiographic, radionuclide and 48 h electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring findings were compared in 27 patients with and 56 patients without giant negative T waves. Patients with giant negative T waves were older at diagnosis (43 +/- 15 versus 32 +/- 14 years, p less than 0.005), had greater ECG voltage (SV1 + RV5 = 57 +/- 20 versus 37 +/- 18 mm, p less than 0.001) and had a more vertical frontal plane axis (38.4 +/- 34 versus 13.4 +/- 45 degrees, p less than 0.05). Left ventricular wall thickness on two-dimensional echocardiography was similar at the mitral valve level (mean 16.5 +/- 4 versus 16.6 +/- 3 cm), but was greater at the papillary muscle level (mean 20.7 +/- 5 versus 17.6 +/- 3 mm, p less than 0.01) and apex (mean 23.3 +/- 5 versus 17.3 +/- 3 mm, p less than 0.001) in patients with giant negative T waves. Fewer patients with giant negative T waves had asymmetric septal hypertrophy (12 (44%) of 27 versus 36 (64%) of 56, p = 0.08) or systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (4 (14%) of 27 versus 25 (45%) of 56, p less than 0.01), whereas left ventricular end-diastolic (44.1 +/- 6 versus 39.6 +/- 5 mm, p = 0.01) and end-systolic dimensions (27.8 +/- 4 versus 24 +/- 6 mm, p less than 0.05) were greater in this group. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia was seen on ECG monitoring in 21% of patients in both groups.

  4. Abnormal Mitral Valve Dimensions in Pediatric Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Daryl; Benson, Lee; Windram, Jonathan; Wong, Derek; Dragulescu, Andreea; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark; Al Nafisi, Bahiyah; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) show structural abnormalities other than isolated wall thickening. Recently, adult HCM patients have been found to have longer mitral valve leaflets than control subjects. The aim of the current study was to assess whether children and adolescents with HCM have similar measureable differences in mitral valve leaflet dimensions when compared to a healthy control group. Clinical and echocardiographic data from 46 children with myocardial hypertrophy and a phenotype and/or genotype consistent with sarcomeric HCM were reviewed. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies were evaluated. The anterior and posterior mitral valve leaflet lengths and myocardial structure were compared to 20 healthy controls. The anterior mitral valve was longer in the HCM group than in the control group (28.4 ± 4.9 vs. 25.2 ± 3.6 mm in control patients, p = 0.013) as was the posterior mitral valve leaflet (16.3 ± 3.0 vs. 13.1 ± 2.3 mm for controls <0.0001). There was no correlation between the resting left ventricular outflow tract gradient and anterior mitral valve leaflet length, nor was the anterior mitral valve leaflet longer in those with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve compared to those without (28.9 ± 6.1 vs. 28.1 ± 4.5 mm, p = 0.61). Children and adolescents with HCM have abnormally long mitral valve leaflets when compared with healthy control subjects. These abnormalities do not appear to result in, or be due to, obstruction to left ventricular outflow. The mechanism of this mitral valve elongation is not clear but appears to be independent of hemodynamic disturbances.

  5. Characteristics of hypertrophic pachymeningitis in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Ah; Lee, Mi Ji; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2017-02-20

    Hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP) is an important neurologic complication of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, formerly Wegener's granulomatosis). The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical features, radiological findings, and diagnostic pitfalls of GPA-related HP. A retrospective chart review was performed to screen patients diagnosed with GPA at Samsung Medical Center between 1997 and 2016. Neurologic manifestation, laboratory findings, neuroimaging data, and clinical course were evaluated in all patients. Characteristics of patients with HP were compared to those of patients without HP. Sixty-five patients with GPA were identified. Twenty-five of these patients had central nervous system involvement. HP (N = 9, 36%) was the second most common radiologic finding. Other neurologic findings included stroke (N = 7, 28%) and granulomatous disease (N = 10, 40%). Patients with HP had lower incidences of systemic manifestations (N = 2, 22.2% vs. N = 38, 67.9%, p = 0.013 in the lung and N = 1, 11.1% vs. N = 28, 50.0%, p = 0.030 in the kidney) than those without HP. Six patients with GPA-related HP were MPO-ANCA positive (66.7%) and two had PR3-ANCA (22.2%). Most of the patients with HP presented with headache (N = 8, 88.9%) at a rate that is similar to those of primary headache disorders (migraine, tension-type, and stabbing) and other secondary headache disorders (postural type and meningitis). Patients with HP rarely had neurologic deficits (N = 3, 37.5%). Different clinical or radiologic features may be observed in GPA-related HP. Early recognition and accurate diagnosis of GPA-related HP are needed in addition to neuroimaging findings.

  6. Successful management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei).

    PubMed

    Fredholm, Daniel V; Jones, Ashley E; Hall, Natalie H; Russell, Kathleen; Heard, Darryl J

    2015-03-01

    A 3-yr-old, intact male Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) was examined for a 1-wk history of intermittent lethargy and tachypnea. An echocardiogram revealed concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricular free wall and interventricular septum. These findings were compared to measurements from healthy Matschie's tree kangaroos, supporting a diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. At the time of publication, the patient has been managed for over 11.5 yr, using a combination of enalapril, furosemide, diltiazem, and diet modifications. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in tree kangaroos exhibiting signs of cardiovascular or respiratory distress. This case represents the first report of antemortem diagnosis and successful management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Matschie's tree kangaroo.

  7. The presence of lysylpyridinoline in the hypertrophic cartilage of newly hatched chicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, M. W.; Martinez, D. A.; Cook, M. E.; Vailas, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of lysylpyridinoline (LP) as a nonreducible cross-link in appreciable quantities has primarily been limited to the mineralized tissues, bone and dentin. However, the results reported here show that LP is not only present in the hypertrophic cartilage of the tibiotarsus isolated from newly hatched broiler chicks, but it is approx. 4-fold as concentrated as hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP). Bone and articular cartilage surrounding the hypertrophic cartilage do not contain measurable quantities of LP. Purified LP has a fluorescent scan similar to purified HP and literature values, confirming that we indeed were measuring LP. Also, the cartilage lesion produced by immature chondrocytes from birds with tibial dyschondroplasia had LP but the HP:LP ratio was > 1. Thus, the low HP:LP ratio could be a marker for hypertrophic cartilage in avians.

  8. Geohydrology and water quality of stratified-drift aquifers in the middle Connecticut River basin, west-central New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flanagan, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    A study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, Water Resources Division, to describe the geohydrology and water quality of stratified-drift aquifers in the Middle Connecticut River Basin, west-central New Hampshire Stratified-drift aquifers discontinuously underlie 123 mi2 (square miles) of the Middle Connecticut River Basin, which has a total drainage area of 987 mi 2. Saturated thicknesses of stratified drift in the study area are locally greater than 500 feet but generally are less than 100 feet. Aquifer transmissivity locally exceeds 4,000 ft2/d (feet squared per day) but is generally less than 1,000 ft2/d. In only 17.2 mi2 of the study area are the aquifers identified as having a transmissivity greater than 1,000 ft2/d. As of 1990, total groundwater withdrawals from stratified drift for municipal supply were about 1.5 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) in the study area. Many of the stratified-drift aquifers underlying the study area are not developed to their fullest potential. The geohydrologic investigation of the stratified-drift aquifers focused on aquifer properties, including aquifer boundaries; recharge, discharge, and direction of ground-water flow; saturated thickness and storage; and transmissivity. Surficial-geologic mapping assisted in the determination of aquifer boundaries. Data from more than 1,000 wells, test borings, and springs were used to prepare maps of water-table altitude, saturated thickness, and transmissivity of stratified drift. More than 11 miles of seismic-refraction profiling at 95 sites was used in the preparation of the water-table-altitude and saturated-thickness maps. Seismic-reflection data collected along 1.6 miles of Mascoma Lake also were used in preparation of the saturated-thickness maps. Four stratified-drift aquifers in the towns of Franconia, Haverhill, and Lisbon were analyzed to estimate the water availability on the basis of analytical

  9. Using a fast Fourier method to model sound propagation in a stratified atmosphere over a stratified porous-elastic ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooms, S.; Attenborough, K.

    1990-01-01

    Using a Fast Fourier integration method and a global matrix method for solution of the boundary condition equations at all interfaces simultaneously, a useful tool for predicting acoustic propagation in a stratified fluid over a stratified porous-elastic solid was developed. The model for the solid is a modified Biot-Stoll model incorporating four parameters describing the pore structure corresponding to the Rayleigh-Attenborough rigid-porous structure model. The method is also compared to another Fast Fourier code (CERL-FFP) which models the ground as an impedance surface under a horizontally stratified air. Agreement with the CERL FFP is good. The effects on sound propagation of a combination of ground elasticity, complex ground structure, and atmospheric conditions are demonstrated by theoretical results over a snow layer, and experimental results over a model ground surface.

  10. Modeling the carbon cycle in Lake Matano.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, L B; Laakso, T A; Schrag, D P; Crowe, S A

    2015-09-01

    Lake Matano, Indonesia, is a stratified anoxic lake with iron-rich waters that has been used as an analogue for the Archean and early Proterozoic oceans. Past studies of Lake Matano report large amounts of methane production, with as much as 80% of primary production degraded via methanogenesis. Low δ(13)C values of DIC in the lake are difficult to reconcile with this notion, as fractionation during methanogenesis produces isotopically heavy CO2. To help reconcile these observations, we develop a box model of the carbon cycle in ferruginous Lake Matano, Indonesia, that satisfies the constraints of CH4 and DIC isotopic profiles, sediment composition, and alkalinity. We estimate methane fluxes smaller than originally proposed, with about 9% of organic carbon export to the deep waters degraded via methanogenesis. In addition, despite the abundance of Fe within the waters, anoxic ferric iron respiration of organic matter degrades <3% of organic carbon export, leaving methanogenesis as the largest contributor to anaerobic organic matter remineralization, while indicating a relatively minor role for iron as an electron acceptor. As the majority of carbon exported is buried in the sediments, we suggest that the role of methane in the Archean and early Proterozoic oceans is less significant than presumed in other studies.

  11. The spectrum of soft tissue and skeletal abnormalities of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Pineda, C; Fonseca, C; Martinez-Lavin, M

    1990-05-01

    We review our radiographic experience with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Soft tissue abnormalities such as finger clubbing, "elephant feet" and cutis verticis gyrata are well appreciated by plain radiography. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is characterized by a bone remodeling process at the tip of the digits. In older patients it is manifested as tuftal hypertrophy whereas in younger individuals acroosteolysis takes place. Radiographic signs of inflammatory arthropathy are conspicuously absent. Periosteal proliferation is an orderly evolving process in 3 dimensions: in the number of affected bones, in the area of involvement of a given bone and in the shape of periostitis.

  12. In vitro mechanical compression induces apoptosis and regulates cytokines release in hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Renò, Filippo; Sabbatini, Maurizio; Lombardi, Francesca; Stella, Maurizio; Pezzuto, Carla; Magliacani, Gilberto; Cannas, Mario

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars resulting from severe burns are usually treated by continuous elastic compression. Although pressure therapy reaches success rates of 60-85% its mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. In this study, apoptosis induction and release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were evaluated in normal (n = 3) and hypertrophic (=7) scars from burns after in vitro mechanical compression. In the absence of compression (basal condition) apoptotic cells, scored using terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase assay, were present after 24 hours in the derma of both normal scar (23 +/- 0.4% of total cell) and hypertrophic scar (11.3 +/- 1.4%). Mechanical compression (constant pressure of 35 mmHg for 24 hours) increased apoptotic cell percentage both in normal scar (29.5 +/- 0.4%) and hypertrophic scar (29 +/- 1.7%). IL-1beta released in the medium was undetectable in normal scar under basal conditions while in hypertrophic scar the IL-1beta concentration was 3.48 +/- 0.2 ng/g. Compression in hypertrophic scar-induced secretion of IL-1beta twofold higher compared to basal condition. (7.72 +/- 0.2 ng/g). TNF-alpha basal concentration measured in normal scar medium was 8.52 +/- 4.01 ng/g and compression did not altered TNF-alpha release (12.86 +/- 7.84 ng/g). TNF-alpha basal release was significantly higher in hypertrophic scar (14.74 +/- 1.42 ng/g) compared to normal scar samples and TNF-alpha secretion was diminished (3.52 +/- 0.97 ng/g) after compression. In conclusion, in our in vitro model, mechanical compression resembling the clinical use of elastocompression was able to strongly increase apoptosis in the hypertrophic scar derma as observed during granulation tissue regression in normal wound healing. Moreover, the observed modulation of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha release by mechanical loading could play a key role in hypertrophy regression induced by elastocompression.

  13. Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in Postoperative Esophageal Atresia with Tracheoesophageal Fistula.

    PubMed

    R A A, Hassan; Y U, Choo; R, Noraida; I, Rosida

    2015-01-01

    Development of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis during postoperative period in EA with TEF is rare. Postoperative vomiting or feeding intolerance in EA is more common which is due to esophageal stricture, gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal dysmotility. A typical case of IHPS also presents with non-bilious projectile vomiting at around 3-4 weeks of life. The diagnosis of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in this subset is usually delayed because of its rarity. We report a case of IHPS in postoperative EA and emphasize on high index of suspicion to avoid any delay in diagnosis with its metabolic consequences.

  14. [The thickness/radius ratio (t/r) in patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Guadalajara, J F; Valenzuela, F; Martínez Sánchez, C; Huerta, D

    1990-01-01

    We studied 17 patients with cardiomyopathy (10 hypertrophic and 7 dilated). With two-dimensional echocardiography, we obtained a short axis view at the level of papillary muscle. We calculated the ratio between thickness (h), of ventricular wall and cavity's radius (r) in diastole and systole (h/r ratio). Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has a high h/r ratio in diastole (inappropriate hypertrophy), hypercontractility and low and systolic wall stress. Dilated cardiomyopathy has a low diastolic h/r ratio (inadequate hypertrophy) with low contractility and elevated end-systolic, wall stress. We discuss the mechanisms and consequences of different patterns of hypertrophy on the ventricular performance.

  15. FDTD scattered field formulation for scatterers in stratified dispersive media.

    PubMed

    Olkkonen, Juuso

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a simple scattered field (SF) technique that enables finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of light scattering from dispersive objects residing in stratified dispersive media. The introduced SF technique is verified against the total field scattered field (TFSF) technique. As an application example, we study surface plasmon polariton enhanced light transmission through a 100 nm wide slit in a silver film.

  16. Dual Spark Plugs For Stratified-Charge Rotary Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, John; Bracco, Frediano V.

    1996-01-01

    Fuel efficiency of stratified-charge, rotary, internal-combustion engine increased by improved design featuring dual spark plugs. Second spark plug ignites fuel on upstream side of main fuel injector; enabling faster burning and more nearly complete utilization of fuel.

  17. HYDRODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT MODELING STUDY IN A HIGHLY STRATIFIED ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the preliminary results of hydrodynamic and salinity predictions and the implications to an ongoing contaminated sediment transport and fate modeling effort in the Lower Duwamish Waterway (LDW), Seattle, Washington. The LDW is highly strati-fied when freshwate...

  18. Gravity-induced stresses in stratified rock masses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amadei, B.; Swolfs, H.S.; Savage, W.Z.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for the stress field induced by gravity in anisotropic and stratified rock masses. These rocks are assumed to be laterally restrained. The rock mass consists of finite mechanical units, each unit being modeled as a homogeneous, transversely isotropic or isotropic linearly elastic material. The following results are found. The nature of the gravity induced stress field in a stratified rock mass depends on the elastic properties of each rock unit and how these properties vary with depth. It is thermodynamically admissible for the induced horizontal stress component in a given stratified rock mass to exceed the vertical stress component in certain units and to be smaller in other units; this is not possible for the classical unstratified isotropic solution. Examples are presented to explore the nature of the gravity induced stress field in stratified rock masses. It is found that a decrease in rock mass anisotropy and a stiffening of rock masses with depth can generate stress distributions comparable to empirical hyperbolic distributions previously proposed in the literature. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Dynamics of a vortex filament in a stratified medium

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, P. V.; Romanov, A. S.; Chukbar, K. V.

    2009-03-15

    The behavior of a vortex filament in a perfectly conducting stratified medium is analyzed. It is shown that the equation describing oscillations of a straight filament is linear, but becomes substantially non-linear with increasing inclination angle. Effects related to the finite radius of the vortex core are considered, and dispersion relations for linear oscillations of a vortex column are derived.

  20. Numerical simulations of particle dispersion in stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brethouwer, G.; Lindborg, E.

    Several researchers have examined the vertical dispersion of fluid particles in stratified flows to obtain a better understanding of mixing in geophysical flows. Pearson et al. [5] used a Langevin model to predict that the mean square of vertical fluid particle displacements reaches a plateau with <δ z2rangle ˜ < w2rangle/N^2 at t ˜ N^{-1} in stationary stratified flows. Here, w is the vertical velocity fluctuation and N is the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. At long times, they predict that <δ z2rangle ˜ < w2 rangle t/N, when molecular diffusion alters the particle density. Venayagamoorthy and Stretch [6] examined the role of the changing particle density on vertical dispersion in DNS of decaying stratified turbulence and observed that after one eddy turnover time diabatic dispersion dominated. Van Aartrijk et al. [1] studied particle dispersion in DNS of stationary strat-ified turbulence and observed a plateau with <δ z2rangle ˜ < w2 rangle N^2 at t ˜ N^{-1}. However, some of the DNS showed that <δ z2rangle ˜ t at long times caused by density changes of fluid particles by molecular diffusion.

  1. Conditional Analysis of Dynamically Distinct Regions in Stratified Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portwood, Gavin; de Bruyn Kops, Stephen; Taylor, John; Salehipour, Hasem; Caulfield, Colm-Cille

    2016-11-01

    Stratified flows have been shown to exhibit broadly intermittent flow dynamics at large scales. In DNS of forced homogeneous stratified turbulence, we employ a conditional averaging technique to distinguish compositional flow regions which define the entire flow domain. Here, we condition on the vertical density gradient at inertial and buoyancy length scales to subdivide homogeneous stratified turbulence into three distinct regions that may be characterised by Gn ≡ ɛ / νN2 . We show that flows across the Fr-Re parameter space exhibit regions of (a) moderately 'quiescent' flow with few three-dimensional overturnings, (b) 'layered' turbulent regions which have constrained vertical length scales, and (c) three dimensional 'patches' of turbulence and that these regions may be characterised by Gn O (1) , Gn O (10) , and Gn O (100) , respectively. We conjecture that treating stratified turbulence as an instantaneous assemblage of these different regions in varying proportions may explain some of the apparently highly scattered flow dynamics and statistics previously reported in the literature. U.S. Office of Naval Research via Grant N00014-15-1-2248; U.K. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Grant EP/K034529/1; U.S. DoD HPCMP Frontier Project FP-CFD-FY14-007.

  2. A predictive model for rollover in stratified LNG tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, J.; Meader, J.W.; Shipman, C.W.

    1983-03-01

    The incubation period preceding ''rollover'' within a stratified LNG tank involves intensive heat and mass transfers between layers. Numerical integration of equations describing these processes leads to predicted time-history and boil-off characteristics which are in excellent agreement with Sarsten's (1972) documentation of the LaSpezia rollover incident.

  3. Nonlinear instability of elementary stratified flows at large Richardson number.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J.; Shefter, Michael G.

    2000-03-01

    Elementary stably stratified flows with linear instability at all large Richardson numbers have been introduced recently by the authors [J. Fluid Mech. 376, 319-350 (1998)]. These elementary stratified flows have spatially constant but time varying gradients for velocity and density. Here the nonlinear stability of such flows in two space dimensions is studied through a combination of numerical simulations and theory. The elementary flows that are linearly unstable at large Richardson numbers are purely vortical flows; here it is established that from random initial data, linearized instability spontaneously generates local shears on buoyancy time scales near a specific angle of inclination that nonlinearly saturates into localized regions of strong mixing with density overturning resembling Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. It is also established here that the phase of these unstable waves does not satisfy the dispersion relation of linear gravity waves. The vortical flows are one family of stably stratified flows with uniform shear layers at the other extreme and elementary stably stratified flows with a mixture of vorticity and strain exhibiting behavior between these two extremes. The concept of effective shear is introduced for these general elementary flows; for each large Richardson number there is a critical effective shear with strong nonlinear instability, density overturning, and mixing for elementary flows with effective shear below this critical value. The analysis is facilitated by rewriting the equations for nonlinear perturbations in vorticity-stream form in a mean Lagrangian reference frame. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Numerical analysis of internal waves in stratified wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, Philppe

    2014-05-01

    In laboratory investigations, increased attention has been given to internal waves generated by stationary placed oscillating sources and moving bodies in stratified fluids [1]. The main attention was paid to study flows past bodies of perfect shapes like sphere [2], cylinder [3] of thin strip [3] which are the best theoretical (analytical or numerical) studies. Due to simplicity of geometry, flow around a strip has a potential to investigate separately effects of a drag and lift forces on the body by changing the slope of the horizontally moving strip which can be placed vertically [1], horizontally [2], or be tilted under some angle to the direction of towing velocity [5]. Numeric modeling of a flow past vertical strip uniformly towing with permanent velocity in horizontal direction in a linearly stratified talk which was based on a finite differences solver adapted to the low Reynolds Navier-Stokes equation with transport equation for salinity (LES simulation [6] and RANS [7]) has demonstrated reasonable agreement with data of Schlieren visualization, density marker and probe measurements of internal wave fields. The chosen test cases allowed demonstrating the ability of selected numerical methods to represent stably stratified flows over horizontal strip [4] and hill type 2D obstacles [1, 3] with generation of internal waves. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research work was supported by the Region Provence Alpes Côte d'Azur - Modtercom project. The work was also supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 12-01-00128). REFERENCES [1] Chashechkin Yu.D., Mitkin V.V. Experimental study of a fine structure of 2D wakes and mixing past an obstacle in a continuously stratified fluid // Dynamics of Atmosphere and Oceans. 2001. V. 34. P. 165-187. [2] Chashechkin, Yu. D. Hydrodynamics of a sphere in a stratified fluid // Fluid Dyn. 1989. V.24(1) P. 1-7. [3] Mitkin V. V., Chashechkin Yu. D. Transformation of hanging discontinuities into vortex systems in a

  5. [Atrial fibrillation in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: clinical characteristics and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Cui, H; Wang, J J; Xiao, M H; Lu, J; Zheng, X X; Guo, Y; Wang, S Y; Huang, X H

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for atrial fibrillation(AF)in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy(OHCM). Methods: Patients with OHCM hospitalized in Fuwai Hospital from March 2011 to January 2016 were enrolled in the present study. Each patient underwent examinations including transthoracic echocardiography, body surface electrocardiograph or dynamic electrocardiogram (Holter). Cardiac troponin I (cTNI) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP)levels were tested and clinical profiles were collected.The subjects were divided into two groups (the AF group and non-AF group). Risk factors for AF in patients with OHCM were assessed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 309 patients were evaluated in the study. Among them, 17.5%( 54/309) patients were with AF.Age[(51.2±10.1)years vs (43.1 ± 14.4)years], New York Heart Association class(NYHA class)(2.8±0.5 vs 2.6±0.6), disease duration[6.0(4.0, 10.0)years vs 3.0(1.0, 6.0)years], left atrial (LA) dimension[(45.1±7.0)mm vs(42.6 ± 7.4)mm]and NT-pro-BNP levels[2 007(1 565, 3 199)pmol/L vs 1 509(729, 2 921)pmol/L]in the AF group were significantly higher than those in the non-AF group (all P<0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that advanced age(OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.08, P<0.01), higher NYHA class(OR=2.00, 95% CI 1.08-3.70, P<0.05)and longer disease duration(OR=1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.15, P<0.05)were independent risk factors for AF in patients with OHCM, in which advanced age(OR=1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.09, P<0.01), higher NYHA class(OR=3.39, 95% CI 1.53-7.54, P<0.01), LA dimension(OR=1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12, P<0.05)and longer clinical course(OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.04-1.20, P<0.01)were associated with AF in male patients, and advanced age (OR=1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.09, P<0.05)and longer disease duration(OR=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.28, P<0.01)were associated with AF in female patients when stratified by gender. Conclusion

  6. Left Atrial Mechanical Function and Global Strain in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Kim, Yong-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Zo, Joo-Hee; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia and is associated with adverse outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Although left atrial (LA) remodeling and dysfunction are known to associate with the development of atrial fibrillation in HCM, the changes of the LA in HCM patients remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the changes in LA size and mechanical function in HCM patients compared to control subjects and to determine the characteristics of HCM associated with LA remodeling and dysfunction. Methods Seventy-nine HCM patients (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men) were compared to 79 age- and sex-matched controls (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men) and 20 young healthy controls (mean age, 33 ± 5 years; 45% were men). The LA diameter, volume, and mechanical function, including global strain (ε), were evaluated by 2D-speckle tracking echocardiography. The phenotype of HCM, maximal left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, LV mass, and presence and extent of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) were evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Results HCM patients showed increased LA volume index, impaired reservoir function, and decreased LA ε compared to the control subjects. When we divided the HCM group according to a maximal LA volume index (LAVImax) of 38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε of 21%, no significant differences in the HCM phenotype and maximal LV wall thickness were observed for patients with LAVImax >38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε ≤21%. Conversely, the LV mass index was significantly higher both in patients with maximal LA volume index >38.7 ml/m2 and with LA ε ≤21% and was independently associated with LAVImax and LA ε. Although the LGE extent was increased in patients with LA ε ≤21%, it was not independently associated with either LAVImax or LA ε. Conclusions HCM patients showed progressed LA remodeling and dysfunction; the determinant of LA remodeling and dysfunction was LV mass index rather than LV myocardial fibrosis

  7. DDDR pacing for symptomatic patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Achterberg, H.J.; Scheffer, M.G.; van Mechelen, R.; Kofflard, M.J.M.; ten Cate, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a primary cardiac disorder with a heterogeneous expression. When medical therapy fails in patients with symptomatic HOCM, three additional therapeutic strategies exist: ventricular septal myectomy, alcohol-induced percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) of the first septal branch of the anterior descending artery and pacemaker implantation. In this paper we present the results of seven patients in whom a dual-chamber pacemaker was implanted to reduce the gradient in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) and to relieve their symptoms. Methods In patients with drug refractory symptomatic HOCM, not eligible for surgery, pacemaker therapy was recommended. Symptomatic HOCM was defined as symptoms of angina and dyspnoea, functional class NYHA 3-4 and a resting LVOT gradient during Doppler echocardiography of more than 2.75 m/s (30 mmHg). In these patients, a dual-chamber pacemaker was implanted with a right ventricular lead positioned in the right ventricular apex and an atrial lead positioned in the right atrial appendage. In all patients the AV setting was programmed between 50 and 100 ms, using Doppler echocardiography to determine the optimal filling and to ensure ventricular capture. Results A statistically significant reduction of the LVOT gradient was observed in all patients. The pre-implantation gradient in the LVOT measured by Doppler echocardiography varied from 3-5.8 m/s with a mean of 4.7±1.1 m/s. The post-implantation gradient varied from 1.4-2.6 m/s with a mean of 1.9±0.4 m/s (p<0.001). Symptomatic improvement was present in all patients. NYHA functional class went from 3-4 (mean 3.1±0.5) pre-implantation to 1-2 mean (1.3±0.4) after implantation (p<0.001). During a mean follow-up of 2.3±1.1 years, the improvement in functional class was maintained. Conclusion Our preliminary results demonstrate that dual-chamber pacing is an effective and safe treatment for

  8. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: intrarater reliability, sensitivity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    The comparison of scar evaluation over time requires measurement tools with acceptable intrarater reliability and the ability to discriminate skin characteristics of interest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the intrarater reliability and sensitivity and specificity of the Cutometer, the Mexameter, and the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar (donor sites), and hypertrophic scar (HSc). A single investigator evaluated four tissue types (severe HSc, less severe HSc, donor site, and normal skin) in 30 burn survivors with all four measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the Cutometer was acceptable (> or =0.75) for the maximum deformation measure for the donor site and normal skin (>0.78) but was below the acceptable range for the HSc sites and all other parameters. The ICC for the Mexameter erythema (>0.75) and melanin index (>0.89) and the DermaScan C total thickness measurement (>0.82) were acceptable for all sites. The ICC for the total of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS was acceptable (0.81) for normal scar but below the acceptable range for the scar sites. The DermaScan C was clearly able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin based on the total thickness measure. The Cutometer was less discriminating but was still able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin. The Mexameter erythema index was not a good discriminator of HSc and normal scar. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to establish the best cutoff point for the DermaScan C total thickness and the Cutometer maximum deformation, which were 2.034 and 0.387 mm, respectively. This study showed that although the Cutometer, the DermaScan C, and the Mexameter have measurement properties that make them attractive substitutes for the mVSS, caution must be used when interpreting results since the Cutometer has a ceiling effect when

  9. Past, present and future of volcanic lake monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, Dmitri; Tassi, Franco; Mora-Amador, Raúl; Sandri, Laura; Chiarini, Veronica

    2014-02-01

    Volcanic lake research boosted after lethal gas burst occurred at Lake Nyos (Cameroon) in 1986, a limnic rather than a volcanic event. This led to the foundation of the IAVCEI-Commission on Volcanic Lakes, which grew out into a multi-disciplinary scientific community since the 1990s. We here introduce the first data base of volcanic lakes VOLADA, containing 474 lakes, a number that, in our opinion, is surprisingly high. VOLADA could become an interactive, open-access working tool where our community can rely on in the future. Many of the compiled lakes were almost unknown, or at least unstudied to date, whereas there are acidic crater lakes topping active magmatic-hydrothermal systems that are continuously or discontinuously monitored, providing useful information for volcanic surveillance (e.g., Ruapehu, Yugama, Poás). Nyos-type lakes, i.e. those hosted in quiescent volcanoes and characterized by significant gas accumulation in bottom waters, are potentially hazardous. These lakes tend to remain stably stratified in tropical and sub-tropical climates (meromictic), leading to long-term build-up of gas, which can be released after a trigger. Some of the unstudied lakes are possibly in the latter situation. Acidic crater lakes are easily recognized as active, whereas Nyos-type lakes can only be recognized as potentially hazardous if bottom waters are investigated, a less obvious operation. In this review, research strategies are lined out, especially for the “active crater lakes”. We make suggestions for monitoring frequency based on the principle of the “residence time dependent monitoring time window”. A complementary, multi-disciplinary (geochemistry, geophysics, limnology, statistics) approach is considered to provide new ideas, which can be the bases for future volcanic lake monitoring. More profound deterministic knowledge (e.g., precursory signals for phreatic eruptions, or lake roll-over events) should not only serve to enhance conceptual models of

  10. MicroRNA 181b regulates decorin production by dermal fibroblasts and may be a potential therapy for hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Peter; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is a frequent fibroproliferative complication following deep dermal burns leading to impaired function and lifelong disfigurement. Decorin reduces fibrosis and induces regeneration in many tissues, and is significantly downregulated in hypertrophic scar and normal deep dermal fibroblasts. It was hypothesized that microRNAs in these fibroblasts downregulate decorin and blocking them would increase decorin and may prevent hypertrophic scarring. Lower decorin levels were found in hypertrophic scar as compared to normal skin, and in deep as compared to superficial dermis. A decorin 3' un-translated region reporter assay demonstrated microRNA decreased decorin in deep dermal fibroblasts, and microRNA screening predicted miR- 24, 181b, 421, 526b, or 543 as candidates. After finding increased levels of mir-181b in deep dermal fibroblasts, it was demonstrated that TGF-β1 stimulation decreased miR-24 but increased miR-181b and that hypertrophic scar and deep dermis contained increased levels of miR-181b. By blocking miR-181b with an antagomiR, it was possible to increase decorin protein expression in dermal fibroblasts. This suggests miR-181b is involved in the differential expression of decorin in skin and wound healing. Furthermore, blocking miR-181b reversed TGF-β1 induced decorin downregulation and myofibroblast differentiation in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts, suggesting a potential therapy for hypertrophic scar.

  11. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy with myelofibrosis and anemia: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheyu; Li, Qianrui; Wang, Qin; Chen, Decai; Li, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO) is a rare and usually benign disorder of bone and connective tissue growth. Here we present a 28-year-old male patient presenting to our hospital with PHO and symptomatic anemia. Bone marrow biopsy suggested myelofibrosis, a serious complication of PHO, which is often neglected upon admission, but may lead to life-threatening anemia. PMID:25785156

  12. Marked left ventricular hypertrophy mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with steroid therapy for congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Scirè, Giuseppe; D'Anella, Giorgio; Cristofori, Laura; Mazzuca, Valentina; Cianfarani, Stefano

    2007-06-01

    We describe a child treated with high-dose steroid therapy for congenital adrenal hyperplasia who showed marked left ventricular hypertrophy mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with steroid therapy for congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Cardiomyopathy reversed completely when an appropriate steroid therapeutic regimen was established.

  13. Dietary copper supplementation reverses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy induced by chronic pressure overload in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustained pressure overload causes cardiac hypertrophy and the transition to heart failure. We show here that dietary supplementation with physiologically relevant levels of copper (Cu) reverses pre-established hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the presence of pressure overload induced by ascending aor...

  14. [Molecular targets and novel pharmacological options to prevent myocardial hypertrophic remodeling].

    PubMed

    Coppini, Raffaele; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Poggesi, Corrado; Mugelli, Alessandro; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial hypertrophic remodeling is a pathophysiological feature of several cardiac conditions and is the hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common monogenic inherited disease of the heart. In recent years, preclinical and clinical studies investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms and intracellular signaling pathways involved in pathologic cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and highlighted a number of possible molecular targets of therapy aimed at preventing its development. Early prevention of myocardial hypertrophic remodeling is particularly sought after in HCM, as current therapeutic strategies are unable to remove the primary cause of disease, i.e. the disease-causing gene mutation. Studies on transgenic animal models or human myocardial samples from patients with HCM identified intracellular calcium overload as a central mechanism driving pathological hypertrophy. In this review, we analyze recent preclinical and clinical studies on animal models and patients with HCM aimed at preventing or modifying hypertrophic myocardial remodeling. Mounting evidence shows that prevention of pathological hypertrophy is a feasible strategy in HCM and will enter the clinical practice in the near future. Considering the close mechanistic similarities between HCM and secondary hypertrophy, these studies are also relevant for the common forms of cardiac hypertrophy, such as hypertensive or valvular heart disease.

  15. Galangin inhibits hypertrophic scar formation via ALK5/Smad2/3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifan; Shan, Shengzhou; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Xinyu; Yi, Bo; Zhou, Jia; Li, Qingfeng

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HS) is characterized by excessive fibrosis associated with aberrant function of fibroblasts. Currently, no satisfactory drug has been developed to treat the disease. Here we found that a flavonoid natural product, galangin, could significantly attenuate hypertrophic scar formation in a mechanical load-induced mouse model. Both in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that galangin remarkably inhibited collagen production, proliferation, and activation of fibroblasts. Besides, galangin suppressed the contractile ability of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts. Further Western blot analysis revealed that galangin dose-dependently down-regulated Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation. Such bioactivity of galangin resulted from its selective targeting to the activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) was demonstrated by ALK5 knockdown and over-expression experiments. Taken together, this compound could simultaneously inhibit both the accumulation of collagen and abnormal activation/proliferation of fibroblasts, which were the two pivotal factors for hypertrophic scar formation, thus suggesting that galangin serves as a potential agent for treatment of HS or other fibroproliferative disorders.

  16. [Apical hypertrophic myocardiopathy. Report of the first case identified on the American continent].

    PubMed

    Zanoniani, C; Guadalajara, J F; Gil, M; Medrano, G A; Vargas, J; Salazar, E

    1981-01-01

    What appears to be the first case of hypertrophic apical myocardiography described in the western hemisphere is presented in this report. The diagnosis was confirmed by angiocardiography and echocardiography. The electrocardiogram showed the characteristic giant T waves. It is of interest that the coronary radioangiography suggested alterations in the microcirculation which could explain the striking electrocardiographic pattern of subepicardial ischemia seen in these patients.

  17. [Right ventricular involvement in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A case report and brief review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Comella, Alessandro; Magnacca, Massimo; Gistri, Roberto; Lombardi, Massimo; Neglia, Danilo; Poddighe, Rosa; Pesola, Antonio

    2004-02-01

    A clinical case of non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with involvement of the right ventricle is reported. The patient was a 42-year-old male with symptoms suggesting an effort angina of recent onset. The diagnosis was established by echocardiography, which showed asymmetric hypertrophy of the interventricular septum (20 mm), hypertrophy of the right ventricular free wall, and severe hypertrophy of the septal papillary muscle of the tricuspid valve. The patient underwent a complete diagnostic evaluation, including exercise stress test, Holter monitoring, magnetic resonance, myocardial tomoscintigraphy and complete hemodynamic assessment. Medical treatment with atenolol 50 mg day was started; at 1-year follow-up the patient's clinical conditions are good, with decrease of anginal episodes. The literature review elicits the paucity of information about this condition, despite a frequent involvement of both ventricles in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. The case reported shows two atypical aspects: a) the involvement of the right ventricle in non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is anecdotal; b) this pattern of hypertrophy (right ventricular free wall/septal papillary muscle) has never been previously reported. Right ventricular involvement in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy must be carefully investigated, because it may be more frequent than conventionally deemed.

  18. Enhanced in Vivo Delivery of 5-Fluorouracil by Ethosomal Gels in Rabbit Ear Hypertrophic Scar Model

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Kan; Mao, Xiaohui; Su, Weijie; Li, Ke; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Applying Ethosomal Gels (EGs) in transdermal drug delivery systems has evoked considerable interest because of their good water-solubility and biocompatibility. However, there has not been an explicit description of applying EGs as a vehicle for hypertrophic scars treatment. Here, a novel transdermal EGs loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU EGs) was successfully prepared and characterized. The stability assay in vitro revealed that 5-FU EGs stored for a period of 30 days at 4 ± 1 °C had a better size stability than that at 25 ± 1 °C. Furthermore, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, EGs labeled with Rhodamine 6 G penetrated into the deep dermis of the hypertrophic scar within 24 h in the rabbit ear hypertrophic model suggested that the EGs were an optional delivery carrier through scar tissues. In addition, the value of the Scar Elevation Index (SEI) of 5-FU EGs group in the rabbit ear scar model was lower than that of 5-FU Phosphate Buffered Saline gel and Control groups. To conclude, these results suggest that EGs delivery system loaded 5-fluorouracil is a perfect candidate drug for hypertrophic scars therapy in future. PMID:25501333

  19. A numerical study of laminar flames propagating in stratified mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiacheng

    Numerical simulations are carried out to study the structure and speed of laminar flames propagating in compositionally and thermally stratified fuel-air mixtures. The study is motivated by the need to understand the physics of flame propagation in stratified-charge engines and model it. The specific question of interest in this work is: how does the structure and speed of the flame in the stratified mixture differ from that of the flame in a corresponding homogeneous mixture at the same equivalence ratio, temperature, and pressure? The studies are carried out in hydrogen-air, methane-air, and n-heptane-air mixtures. A 30-species 184-step skeletal mechanism is employed for methane oxidation, a 9-species 21-step mechanism for hydrogen oxidation, and a 37-species 56-step skeletal mechanism for n-heptane oxidation. Flame speed and structure are compared with corresponding values for homogeneous mixtures. For compositionally stratified mixtures, as shown in prior experimental work, the numerical results suggest that when the flame propagates from a richer mixture to a leaner mixture, the flame speed is faster than the corresponding speed in the homogeneous mixture. This is caused by enhanced diffusion of heat and species from the richer mixture to the leaner mixture. In fact, the effects become more pronounced in leaner mixtures. Not surprisingly, the stratification gradient influences the results with shallower gradients showing less effect. The controlling role that diffusion plays is further assessed and confirmed by studying the effect of a unity Lewis number assumption in the hydrogen/air mixtures. Furthermore, the effect of stratification becomes less important when using methane or n-heptane as fuel. The laminar flame speed in a thermally stratified mixture is similar to the laminar flame speed in homogeneous mixture at corresponding unburned temperature. Theoretical analysis is performed and the ratio of extra thermal diffusion rate to flame heat release rate

  20. Determination of water retention in stratified porous materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.

    1995-01-01

    Predicted and measured water-retention values, ??(??), were compared for repacked, stratified core samples consisting of either a sand with a stone-bearing layer or a sand with a clay loam layer in various spatial orientations. Stratified core samples were packed in submersible pressure outflow cells, then water-retention measurements were performed between matric potentials, ??, of 0 to -100 kPa. Predictions of ??(??) were based on a simple volume-averaging model using estimates of the relative fraction and ??(??) values of each textural component within a stratified sample. In general, predicted ??(??) curves resembled measured curves well, except at higher saturations in a sample consisting of a clay loam layer over a sand layer. In this case, the model averaged the air-entry of both materials, while the air-entry of the sample was controlled by the clay loam in contact with the cell's air-pressure inlet. In situ, avenues for air-entry generally exist around clay layers, so that the model should adequately predict air-entry for stratified formations regardless of spatial orientation of fine versus coarse layers. Agreement between measured and predicted volumetric water contents, ??, was variable though encouraging, with mean differences between measured and predicted ?? values in the range of 10%. Differences in ?? of this magnitude are expected due to variability in pore structure between samples, and do not indicate inherent problems with the volume averaging model. This suggets that explicit modeling of stratified formations through detailed characterization of the stratigraphy has the potential of yielding accurate ??(??) values. However, hydraulic-equilibration times were distinctly different for each variation in spatial orientation of textural layering, indicating that transient behavior during drainage in stratified formations is highly sensitive to the stratigraphic sequence of textural components, as well as the volume fraction of each textural

  1. Nutrient additions by waterfowl to lakes and reservoirs: predicting their effects on productivity and water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Johnson, W.C.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    Lakes and reservoirs provide water for human needs and habitat for aquatic birds. Managers of such waters may ask whether nutrients added by waterfowl degrade water quality. For lakes and reservoirs where primary productivity is limited by phosphorus (P), we developed a procedure that integrates annual P loads from waterfowl and other external sources, applies a nutrient load-response model, and determines whether waterfowl that used the lake or reservoir degraded water quality. Annual P loading by waterfowl can be derived from a figure in this report, using the days per year that each kind spent on any lake or reservoir. In our example, over 6500 Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and 4200 ducks (mostly mallards, Anas platyrhynchos) added 4462 kg of carbon (C), 280 kg of nitrogen (N), and 88 kg of P y-1 to Wintergreen Lake in southwestern Michigan, mostly during their migration. These amounts were 69% of all C, 27% of all N, and 70% of all P that entered the lake from external sources. Loads from all external sources totaled 840 mg P m-2 y-1. Application of a nutrient load-response model to this concentration, the hydraulic load (0.25 m y-1), and the water residence time (9.7 y) of Wintergreen Lake yielded an average annual concentration of total P in the lake of 818 mg m-3 that classified the lake as hypertrophic. This trophic classification agreed with independent measures of primary productivity, chlorophyll-a, total P, total N, and Secchi disk transparency made in Wintergreen Lake. Our procedure showed that waterfowl caused low water quality in Wintergreen Lake.

  2. Hydrological Controls on Ecosystem Dynamics in Lake Fryxell, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Rytel, Alexander L.; Lyons, W. Berry; McKnight, Diane M.; Jaros, Christopher; Gooseff, Michael N.; Priscu, John C.

    2016-01-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys constitute the largest ice free area of Antarctica. The area is a polar desert with an annual precipitation of ∼ 3 cm water equivalent, but contains several lakes fed by glacial melt water streams that flow from four to twelve weeks of the year. Over the past ∼20 years, data have been collected on the lakes located in Taylor Valley, Antarctica as part of the McMurdo Dry Valley Long-Term Ecological Research program (MCM-LTER). This work aims to understand the impact of climate variations on the biological processes in all the ecosystem types within Taylor Valley, including the lakes. These lakes are stratified, closed-basin systems and are perennially covered with ice. Each lake contains a variety of planktonic and benthic algae that require nutrients for photosynthesis and growth. The work presented here focuses on Lake Fryxell, one of the three main lakes of Taylor Valley; it is fed by thirteen melt-water streams. We use a functional regression approach to link the physical, chemical, and biological processes within the stream-lake system to evaluate the input of water and nutrients on the biological processes in the lakes. The technique has been shown previously to provide important insights into these Antarctic lacustrine systems where data acquisition is not temporally coherent. We use data on primary production (PPR) and chlorophyll-A (CHL)from Lake Fryxell as well as discharge observations from two streams flowing into the lake. Our findings show an association between both PPR, CHL and stream input. PMID:27441705

  3. Hydrological Controls on Ecosystem Dynamics in Lake Fryxell, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Herbei, Radu; Rytel, Alexander L; Lyons, W Berry; McKnight, Diane M; Jaros, Christopher; Gooseff, Michael N; Priscu, John C

    2016-01-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys constitute the largest ice free area of Antarctica. The area is a polar desert with an annual precipitation of ∼ 3 cm water equivalent, but contains several lakes fed by glacial melt water streams that flow from four to twelve weeks of the year. Over the past ∼20 years, data have been collected on the lakes located in Taylor Valley, Antarctica as part of the McMurdo Dry Valley Long-Term Ecological Research program (MCM-LTER). This work aims to understand the impact of climate variations on the biological processes in all the ecosystem types within Taylor Valley, including the lakes. These lakes are stratified, closed-basin systems and are perennially covered with ice. Each lake contains a variety of planktonic and benthic algae that require nutrients for photosynthesis and growth. The work presented here focuses on Lake Fryxell, one of the three main lakes of Taylor Valley; it is fed by thirteen melt-water streams. We use a functional regression approach to link the physical, chemical, and biological processes within the stream-lake system to evaluate the input of water and nutrients on the biological processes in the lakes. The technique has been shown previously to provide important insights into these Antarctic lacustrine systems where data acquisition is not temporally coherent. We use data on primary production (PPR) and chlorophyll-A (CHL)from Lake Fryxell as well as discharge observations from two streams flowing into the lake. Our findings show an association between both PPR, CHL and stream input.

  4. Classifying lakes to quantify relationships between epilimnetic chlorophyll a and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lester L; Pollard, Amina I

    2015-03-01

    Excess nutrient loading increases algal abundance which can cause hypoxia in many lakes and reservoirs. We used a divisive partitioning approach to analyze dissolved oxygen profile data collected across the continental United States to increase the precision of estimated relationships between chlorophyll a (chl a) concentrations and the extent of hypoxia in the water column. Chl a concentrations predicted the extent of hypoxia most accurately in lakes that were stratified at the time of sampling with a maximum temperature gradient of at least 1.2 °C/m. Lake elevation, Secchi depth, and lake geometry ratio further refined the specification of groups of lakes with different relationships between chl a and the extent of hypoxia. The statistical relationships between chl a and the extent of hypoxia that were estimated can be used directly for setting management thresholds for chl a in particular types of lakes.

  5. Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars Are the Result of Chronic Inflammation in the Reticular Dermis

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Rei

    2017-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are caused by cutaneous injury and irritation, including trauma, insect bite, burn, surgery, vaccination, skin piercing, acne, folliculitis, chicken pox, and herpes zoster infection. Notably, superficial injuries that do not reach the reticular dermis never cause keloidal and hypertrophic scarring. This suggests that these pathological scars are due to injury to this skin layer and the subsequent aberrant wound healing therein. The latter is characterized by continuous and histologically localized inflammation. As a result, the reticular layer of keloids and hypertrophic scars contains inflammatory cells, increased numbers of fibroblasts, newly formed blood vessels, and collagen deposits. Moreover, proinflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are upregulated in keloid tissues, which suggests that, in patients with keloids, proinflammatory genes in the skin are sensitive to trauma. This may promote chronic inflammation, which in turn may cause the invasive growth of keloids. In addition, the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in pathological scars suggests that, rather than being skin tumors, keloids and hypertrophic scars are inflammatory disorders of skin, specifically inflammatory disorders of the reticular dermis. Various external and internal post-wounding stimuli may promote reticular inflammation. The nature of these stimuli most likely shapes the characteristics, quantity, and course of keloids and hypertrophic scars. Specifically, it is likely that the intensity, frequency, and duration of these stimuli determine how quickly the scars appear, the direction and speed of growth, and the intensity of symptoms. These proinflammatory stimuli include a variety of local, systemic, and genetic factors. These observations together suggest that the clinical differences between keloids and hypertrophic scars merely reflect differences in the intensity, frequency, and duration of

  6. Hydrologic data and description of a hydrologic monitoring plan for Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Tiffany Rae; McFarland, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    A hydrologic reconnaissance of the Medicine Lake Volcano area was done to collect data needed for the design of a hydrologic monitoring plan. The reconnaissance was completed during two field trips made in June and September 1992, during which geothermal and hydrologic features of public interest in the Medicine Lake area were identified. Selected wells, springs, and geothermal features were located and documented, and initial water-level, discharge, temperature, and specific-conductance measurements were made. Lakes in the study area also were surveyed during the September field trip. Temperature, specific- conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH data were collected by using a multiparameter probe. The proposed monitoring plan includes measurement of water levels in wells, discharge from springs, and lake stage, as well as analysis of well-,spring-, and lake-water quality. In determining lake-water quality, data for both stratified and unstratified conditions would be considered. (Data for stratified conditions were collected during the reconnaissance phase of this project, but data for unstratified conditions were not.) In addition, lake stage also would be monitored. A geothermal feature near Medicine Lake is a "hot spot" from which hot gases discharge from two distinct vents. Gas chemistry and temperature would be monitored in one of these vents.

  7. A new 4D trajectory-based approach unveils abnormal LV revolution dynamics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Andrea; Piras, Paolo; Re, Federica; Gabriele, Stefano; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Torromeo, Concetta; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Giura, Geltrude; Evangelista, Antonietta; Dominici, Tania; Varano, Valerio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of left ventricular shape changes during cardiac revolution may be a new step in clinical cardiology to ease early diagnosis and treatment. To quantify these changes, only point registration was adopted and neither Generalized Procrustes Analysis nor Principal Component Analysis were applied as we did previously to study a group of healthy subjects. Here, we extend to patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the original approach and preliminarily include genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals to explore the potential that incumbent pathology might also be detected. Using 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, we recorded left ventricular shape of 48 healthy subjects, 24 patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 3 genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals. We then applied Generalized Procrustes Analysis and Principal Component Analysis and inter-individual differences were cleaned by Parallel Transport performed on the tangent space, along the horizontal geodesic, between the per-subject consensuses and the grand mean. Endocardial and epicardial layers were evaluated separately, different from many ecocardiographic applications. Under a common Principal Component Analysis, we then evaluated left ventricle morphological changes (at both layers) explained by first Principal Component scores. Trajectories' shape and orientation were investigated and contrasted. Logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to compare these morphometric indicators with traditional 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters. Geometric morphometrics indicators performed better than 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters in recognizing pathology both in systole and diastole. Genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals clustered with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during diastole, suggesting that incumbent pathology may indeed be foreseen by these methods. Left

  8. Anti-inflammatory cytokine TSG-6 inhibits hypertrophic scar formation in a rabbit ear model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Zhao; Li, Xiao-Jing; Ma, Li; Tang, Yue-Ling

    2015-03-15

    Hypertrophic scars are characterized by excessive fibrosis and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and can be functionally and cosmetically problematic; however, there are few satisfactory treatments for controlling hypertrophic scars. The inflammatory cells and cytokines involved in excessive inflammation during wound healing facilitate fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition, leading to pathologic scar formation. TSG-6 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity. This study examined the effect of recombinant TSG-6 on inflammation in hypertrophic scars using a rabbit ear model. Six 7-mm, full-thickness, circular wounds were made on the ears of 12 rabbits. TSG-6 and PBS were intradermally injected into the right and left ear wounds, respectively. The methods of TEM and TUNEL were used to detect fibroblast apoptosis. The expressions of inflammatory factors: IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, were detected by immunohistochemistry and real time polymerase chain reaction. Collagen I and III expression detected by immunohistochemistry and Masson׳s trichrome staining and SEI (scar elevation index) was used to evaluate the extent of scarring. TSG-6 injection mitigated the formation of a hypertrophic scar in the rabbit ear. TSG-6-treated wounds exhibited decreased inflammation compared with the control group, as evidenced by the lower levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and MPO. The SEI and the synthesis of collagens I and III were significantly decreased in the TSG-6-treated scars compared with control scars. The apoptosis rate was higher in the TSG-6-treated scars. TSG-6 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects during the wound healing process and cicatrization and significantly diminished hypertrophic scar formation in a rabbit ear model.

  9. Comparative effect and safety of verapamil in keloid and hypertrophic scar treatment: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhouna; Jin, Zhehu

    2016-01-01

    Background Keloids and hypertrophic scars are the most common types of pathological scarring. Traditionally, keloids have been considered as a result of aberrant wound healing, involving excessive fibroblast participation that is characterized by hyalinized collagen bundles. However, the usefulness of this characterization has been questioned. In recent years, studies have reported the appropriate use of verapamil for keloids and hypertrophic scars. Methods Searches were conducted on the databases Medline, Embase, Cochrane, PubMed, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure from 2006 to July 2016. State12.0 was used for literature review, data extraction, and meta-analysis. Treatment groups were divided into verapamil and nonverapamil group. Nonverapamil group includes steroids and intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy. Total effective rates include cure rate and effective rate. Cure: skin lesions were completely flattened, became soft and symptoms disappeared. Efficacy: skin lesions subsided, patient significantly reduced symptoms. Inefficient definition of skin was progression free or became worse. Random-effects model was used for the meta-analysis. Results Six studies that included 331 patients with keloids and hypertrophic scars were analyzed. Analysis of the total effective rate of skin healing was performed. The total effective rates in the two groups were 54.07% (verapamil) and 53.18% (nonverapamil), respectively. The meta-analysis showed that there was no difference between the two groups. We also compared the adverse reactions between the verapamil treatment group and the steroids treatment group in two studies, and the result indicated that the verapamil group showed less adverse reactions. Conclusion There were no differences between the application of verapamil and nonverapamil group in keloids and hypertrophic scars treatment. Verapamil could act as an effective alternative modality in the prevention and treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars. A

  10. Geochemical and biochemical evidence of lake overturn and fish kill at Lake Averno, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliro, S.; Chiodini, G.; Izzo, G.; Minopoli, C.; Signorini, A.; Avino, R.; Granieri, D.

    2008-12-01

    Lake Averno is situated in the homonymous crater in the northwestern sector of the Campi Flegrei active volcanic system in Campania region, Italy. In February 2005 a fish kill event was observed in the lake, prompting a geochemical survey to ascertain the possible cause. In February 2005 a geochemical survey revealed that the lake water was unstratified chemically and isotopically, presumably, as a result of lake overturn. This fish kill phenomenon was recorded at least two other times in the past. In contrast to the February 2005 results, data collected in October 2005, shows the Lake Averno to be stratified, with an oxic epilimnion (surface to 6 m) and an anoxic hypolimnion (6 m to lake bottom at about 33 m). Chemical and isotopic compositions of Lake Averno waters suggest an origin by mixing of shallow waters with a Na-Cl hydrothermal component coupled with an active evaporation process. The isotopic composition of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon, as well as the composition of the non-reactive dissolved gas species again supports the occurrence of this mixing process. Decreasing levels of SO 4 and increasing levels of H 2S and CH 4 contents in lake water with depth, strongly suggests anaerobic bacterial processes are occurring through decomposition of organic matter under anoxic conditions in the sediment and in the water column. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis processes coexist and play a pivotal role in the anaerobic environment of the Lake Averno. The sulfate reducing bacterial activity has been estimated in the range of 14-22 μmol m - 2 day - 1 . Total gas pressure of dissolved gases ranges between 800 and 1400 mbar, well below the hydrostatic pressure throughout the water column, excluding the possibility, at least at the survey time, of a limnic eruption. Vertical changes in the density of lake waters indicate that overturn may be triggered by cooling of epilimnetic waters below 7 °C. This is a possible phenomenon in winter periods if atmospheric

  11. Avoidance-preference testing in density stratified solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.H.; Logan, D.T.; Hansen, S.

    1994-12-31

    Toxicity testing is sometimes required where density stratifies test and reference solutions. Examples include freshwater effluents that float in estuarine and marine waters and desalinating plant effluents that sink. Standard avoidance-preference testing methods and apparatus are designed to test horizontal rather than vertical gradients and so are inappropriate for density stratified solutions. To overcome associated deficiencies, the authors modified testing chambers to take advantage of density stratification. Exposure levels for tests were selected based on NOELs from standard toxicity testing. Behavior of 10 striped bass was simultaneously observed using electronic surveillance. Measure of behavior include position in two axes and swimming speed. Avoidance-preference between several types of high density byproducts of salt water evaporation and lower density receiving water were tested. Results indicate that the modified test protocols allowed the authors to determine behavior responses to test materials.

  12. Falling bodies through sharply stratified fluids: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Richard; Camassa, Roberto; Falcon, Claudia; Harenberg, Steve; Mertens, Keith; Reis, Johnny; Schlieper, William; Watson, Bailey; White, Brian; UNC RTG Fluids Group Team

    2011-11-01

    The motion of bodies and fluids moving through a stratified background fluid arises naturally in the context of carbon (marine snow) settling in the ocean, as well as less naturally in the context of the DWH Gulf oil spill. The details of the settling rates may affect the ocean contribution to the earth's carbon cycle. We look at phenomena associated with many falling spheres in stratified fluids, as well as behavior of multiphase buoyant plumes penetrating strong stratification. We present careful measurements critical heights for fully miscible jets and companion analytical prediction. In turn, we examine cases involving clouds of sinking particulate and rising buoyant oil emulsions and associated plume trapping behaviors. NSF DMS RTG 0943851, NSF DMS 1009750, NSF CMG ARC-1025523, NSF RAPID CBET-1045653.

  13. Elementary stratified flows with stability at low Richardson number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Ricardo; Choi, Wooyoung

    2014-12-01

    We revisit the stability analysis for three classical configurations of multiple fluid layers proposed by Goldstein ["On the stability of superposed streams of fluids of different densities," Proc. R. Soc. A. 132, 524 (1931)], Taylor ["Effect of variation in density on the stability of superposed streams of fluid," Proc. R. Soc. A 132, 499 (1931)], and Holmboe ["On the behaviour of symmetric waves in stratified shear layers," Geophys. Publ. 24, 67 (1962)] as simple prototypes to understand stability characteristics of stratified shear flows with sharp density transitions. When such flows are confined in a finite domain, it is shown that a large shear across the layers that is often considered a source of instability plays a stabilizing role. Presented are simple analytical criteria for stability of these low Richardson number flows.

  14. The sensitivity of stratified flow stability to base flow modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kevin; Spedding, Geoffrey

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel theory that determines the sensitivity of linear stability to changes in the density or velocity of a base flow. The sensitivity is based on global direct and adjoint eigenmodes of the linearized Boussinesq equation, and is inspired by constant-density sensitivity analysis. The theory can be applied broadly to incompressible flows with small density variations, but it specifically provides new insight into the stability of density-stratified flows. Examples are given for the flows around a transverse thin plate at a Reynolds number of 30, a Prandtl number of 7.19, and Froude numbers of ∞ and 1. In the unstratified flow, the sensitivity is largest in the recirculation bubble; the stratified flow, however, exhibits high sensitivity in regions immediately upstream and downstream of the bluff body. Supported by the Viterbi Postdoctoral Fellowship, provided by the Viterbi School of Engineering at the University of Southern California.

  15. Stratified charge rotary aircraft engine technology enablement program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badgley, P. R.; Irion, C. E.; Myers, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The multifuel stratified charge rotary engine is discussed. A single rotor, 0.7L/40 cu in displacement, research rig engine was tested. The research rig engine was designed for operation at high speeds and pressures, combustion chamber peak pressure providing margin for speed and load excursions above the design requirement for a high is advanced aircraft engine. It is indicated that the single rotor research rig engine is capable of meeting the established design requirements of 120 kW, 8,000 RPM, 1,379 KPA BMEP. The research rig engine, when fully developed, will be a valuable tool for investigating, advanced and highly advanced technology components, and provide an understanding of the stratified charge rotary engine combustion process.

  16. Elementary stratified flows with stability at low Richardson number

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, Ricardo; Choi, Wooyoung

    2014-12-15

    We revisit the stability analysis for three classical configurations of multiple fluid layers proposed by Goldstein [“On the stability of superposed streams of fluids of different densities,” Proc. R. Soc. A. 132, 524 (1931)], Taylor [“Effect of variation in density on the stability of superposed streams of fluid,” Proc. R. Soc. A 132, 499 (1931)], and Holmboe [“On the behaviour of symmetric waves in stratified shear layers,” Geophys. Publ. 24, 67 (1962)] as simple prototypes to understand stability characteristics of stratified shear flows with sharp density transitions. When such flows are confined in a finite domain, it is shown that a large shear across the layers that is often considered a source of instability plays a stabilizing role. Presented are simple analytical criteria for stability of these low Richardson number flows.

  17. Buoyancy effects in an unstably stratified turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Luo, Kun; Fan, Jianren

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation has been performed to investigate the effect of buoyancy on an unstably stratified turbulent boundary layer with the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. The simulation results show that the mean values of the streamwise velocity and scalar fields are increased in the near-wall region but decreased in the outer layer under the effect of buoyancy, which leads to significant increases in the skin-friction drag and heat transfer. In addition, it is found that the unstable thermal stratification results in large increases in the intensities of the near-wall streamwise vortices and high- and low-speed streaks, and a reduction in the mean diameter of the vortical structures. Moreover, the turbulent coherent structures become less organized due to the stratification effect. With respect to the neutral boundary layer flow, the outer vortical structures tend to bias the direction of the principal extensional strain towards the vertical plane in the unstably stratified flow.

  18. Computation of mixing in large stably stratified enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haihua

    This dissertation presents a set of new numerical models for the mixing and heat transfer problems in large stably stratified enclosures. Basing on these models, a new computer code, BMIX++ (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++), was developed by Christensen (2001) and the author. Traditional lumped control volume methods and zone models cannot model the detailed information about the distributions of temperature, density, and pressure in enclosures and therefore can have significant errors. 2-D and 3-D CFD methods require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets, wall boundaries, yet such fine grid resolution is difficult or impossible to provide due to computational expense. Peterson's scaling (1994) showed that stratified mixing processes in large stably stratified enclosures can be described using one-dimensional differential equations, with the vertical transport by free and wall jets modeled using standard integral techniques. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to three-dimensional numerical modeling of turbulent mixing in large enclosures. The BMIX++ code was developed to implement the above ideas. The code uses a Lagrangian approach to solve 1-D transient governing equations for the ambient fluid and uses analytical models or 1-D integral models to compute substructures. 1-D transient conduction model for the solid boundaries, pressure computation and opening models are also included to make the code more versatile. The BMIX++ code was implemented in C++ and the Object-Oriented-Programming (OOP) technique was intensively used. The BMIX++ code was successfully applied to different types of mixing problems such as stratification in a water tank due to a heater inside, water tank exchange flow experiment simulation, early stage building fire analysis, stratification produced by multiple plumes, and simulations for the UCB large enclosure experiments. Most of these simulations gave satisfying

  19. A statistical mechanics approach to mixing in stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venaille, A.; Gostiaux, L.; Sommeria, J.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting how much mixing occurs when a given amount of energy is injected into a Boussinesq fluid is a longstanding problem in stratified turbulence. The huge number of degrees of freedom involved in those processes renders extremely difficult a deterministic approach to the problem. Here we present a statistical mechanics approach yielding prediction for a cumulative, global mixing efficiency as a function of a global Richardson number and the background buoyancy profile.

  20. SATURATED-SUBCOOLED STRATIFIED FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2010-08-01

    Advanced light water reactor systems are designed to use passive emergency core cooling systems with horizontal pipes that provide highly subcooled water from water storage tanks or passive heat exchangers to the reactor vessel core under accident conditions. Because passive systems are driven by density gradients, the horizontal pipes often do not flow full and thus have a free surface that is exposed to saturated steam and stratified flow is present.

  1. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in inclined channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A. Yu.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-08-01

    Linear stability of the stratified gas-liquid and liquid-liquid plane-parallel flows in the inclined channels is studied with respect to all wavenumber perturbations. The main objective is to predict the parameter regions in which the stable stratified configuration in inclined channels exists. Up to three distinct base states with different holdups exist in the inclined flows, so that the stability analysis has to be carried out for each branch separately. Special attention is paid to the multiple solution regions to reveal the feasibility of the non-unique stable stratified configurations in inclined channels. The stability boundaries of each branch of the steady state solutions are presented on the flow pattern map and are accompanied by the critical wavenumbers and the spatial profiles of the most unstable perturbations. Instabilities of different nature are visualized by the streamlines of the neutrally stable perturbed flows, consisting of the critical perturbation superimposed on the base flow. The present analysis confirms the existence of two stable stratified flow configurations in a region of low flow rates in the countercurrent liquid-liquid flows. These configurations become unstable with respect to the shear mode of instability. It was revealed that in slightly upward inclined flows the lower and middle solutions for the holdup are stable in the part of the triple solution region, while the upper solution is always unstable. In the case of downward flows, in the triple solution region, none of the solutions are stable with respect to the short-wave perturbations. These flows are stable only in the single solution region at low flow rates of the heavy phase, and the long-wave perturbations are the most unstable ones.

  2. Sea surface wind stress in stratified atmospheric flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D.; Slaattelid, O.H.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the wind shear stress on the sea surface as well as the velocity profile in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer flow over wind waves by using similarity theory. For a given geostrophic velocity, Coriolis parameter, spectral peak period and stratification parameter the sea surface shear stress is determined. Further, the direction of the sea surface shear stress and the velocity profile are given. Parameterizations of the results are also presented. Finally, the engineering relevance of the results is discussed.

  3. Human eccrine sweat gland cells can reconstitute a stratified epidermis.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Thomas; Pontiggia, Luca; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Tharakan, Sasha; Braziulis, Erik; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2010-08-01

    Eccrine sweat glands are generally considered to be a possible epidermal stem cell source. Here we compared the multilayered epithelia formed by epidermal keratinocytes and those formed by eccrine sweat gland cells. We demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo the capability of human eccrine sweat gland cells to form a stratified interfollicular epidermis substitute on collagen hydrogels. This is substantiated by the following findings: (1) a stratified epidermis consisting of 10-12 cell layers is formed by sweat gland cells; (2) a distinct stratum corneum develops and is maintained after transplantation onto immuno-incompetent rats; (3) proteins such as filaggrin, loricrin, involucrin, envoplakin, periplakin, and transglutaminases I and III match with the pattern of the normal human skin; (4) junctional complexes and hemidesmosomes are readily and regularly established; (5) cell proliferation in the basal layer reaches homeostatic levels; (6) the sweat gland-derived epidermis is anchored by hemidesmosomes within a well-developed basal lamina; and (7) palmo-plantar or mucosal markers are not expressed in the sweat gland-derived epidermis. These data suggest that human eccrine sweat glands are an additional source of keratinocytes that can generate a stratified epidermis. Our findings raise the question of the extent to which the human skin is repaired and/or permanently renewed by eccrine sweat gland cells.

  4. Background stratified Poisson regression analysis of cohort data.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Langholz, Bryan

    2012-03-01

    Background stratified Poisson regression is an approach that has been used in the analysis of data derived from a variety of epidemiologically important studies of radiation-exposed populations, including uranium miners, nuclear industry workers, and atomic bomb survivors. We describe a novel approach to fit Poisson regression models that adjust for a set of covariates through background stratification while directly estimating the radiation-disease association of primary interest. The approach makes use of an expression for the Poisson likelihood that treats the coefficients for stratum-specific indicator variables as 'nuisance' variables and avoids the need to explicitly estimate the coefficients for these stratum-specific parameters. Log-linear models, as well as other general relative rate models, are accommodated. This approach is illustrated using data from the Life Span Study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors and data from a study of underground uranium miners. The point estimate and confidence interval obtained from this 'conditional' regression approach are identical to the values obtained using unconditional Poisson regression with model terms for each background stratum. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed approach allows estimation of background stratified Poisson regression models of non-standard form, such as models that parameterize latency effects, as well as regression models in which the number of strata is large, thereby overcoming the limitations of previously available statistical software for fitting background stratified Poisson regression models.

  5. LES of a Stratified Boundary Layer under an Oscillating Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta; Sarkar, Sutanu; Taylor, John

    2008-11-01

    A numerical study based on large-eddy simulation (LES) is performed in the case of an oscillating tidal flow with a uniform ambient stratification. Here, the Reynolds number Reδ=U0δs/ν=1790 (U0= maximum amplitude of the outer flow, δs= √2 ν/φ is the Stokes layer thickness, ν is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid and φ the angular frequency of the oscillatory current), and N∞^2/2̂= 500 where N∞ is the buoyancy frequency of the overlying stratified layer. Turbulence appears at a tidal phase of approximately π/4 and is sustained throughout the deceleration phase (π/2<φtd<π, 3π/2<φtd<2π). Production of turbulence is confined to the the wall region and, for stratified flow, in the mixed layer between the wall and the thermocline. For both the stratified and unstratified cases, there is a log layer over a significant extent of the tidal cycle. Our unstratified flow results are verified against the numerical simulations of Salon et ; al (2007) %. JFM, 2007, vol 570, 253-296 and experimental data of Jensen et ; al. (1987). %JFM, 1987, vol 206, 256-297. In the presence of stratification, the boundary layer height decreases substantially and the wall shear stress increases slightly with respect to the unstratified case. Stratification effects on boundary layer turbulence and on the thermal field including the formation and collapse of the thermocline will be discussed.

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Weakly Stratified Turbulent Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redford, J. A.; Lund, T. S.; Coleman, Gary N.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to investigate a time-dependent turbulent wake evolving in a stably stratified background. A large initial Froude number is chosen to allow the wake to become fully turbulent and axisymmetric before stratification affects the spreading rate of the mean defect. The uncertainty introduced by the finite sample size associated with gathering statistics from a simulation of a time-dependent flow is reduced, compared to earlier simulations of this flow. The DNS reveals the buoyancy-induced changes to the turbulence structure, as well as to the mean-defect history and the terms in the mean-momentum and turbulence-kinetic-energy budgets, that characterize the various states of this flow - namely the three-dimensional (essentially unstratified), non-equilibrium (or 'wake-collapse') and quasi-two-dimensional (or 'two-component') regimes observed elsewhere for wakes embedded in both weakly and strongly stratified backgrounds. The wake-collapse regime is not accompanied by transfer (or 'reconversion') of the potential energy of the turbulence to the kinetic energy of the turbulence, implying that this is not an essential feature of stratified-wake dynamics. The dependence upon Reynolds number of the duration of the wake-collapse period is demonstrated, and the effect of the details of the initial/near-field conditions of the wake on its subsequent development is examined.

  7. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  8. Stratified gene expression analysis identifies major amyotrophic lateral sclerosis genes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ashley R; Troakes, Claire; King, Andrew; Sahni, Vibhu; De Jong, Simone; Bossers, Koen; Papouli, Efterpi; Mirza, Muddassar; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Shaw, Christopher E; Shaw, Pamela J; Kirby, Janine; Veldink, Jan H; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Powell, John F; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons resulting in progressive paralysis. Gene expression studies of ALS only rarely identify the same gene pathways as gene association studies. We hypothesized that analyzing tissues by matching on degree of disease severity would identify different patterns of gene expression from a traditional case-control comparison. We analyzed gene expression changes in 4 postmortem central nervous system regions, stratified by severity of motor neuron loss. An overall comparison of cases (n = 6) and controls (n = 3) identified known ALS gene, SOX5, as showing differential expression (log2 fold change = 0.09, p = 5.5 × 10(-5)). Analyses stratified by disease severity identified expression changes in C9orf72 (p = 2.77 × 10(-3)), MATR3 (p = 3.46 × 10(-3)), and VEGFA (p = 8.21 × 10(-4)), all implicated in ALS through genetic studies, and changes in other genes in pathways involving RNA processing and immune response. These findings suggest that analysis of gene expression stratified by disease severity can identify major ALS genes and may be more efficient than traditional case-control comparison.

  9. Continuous Dependence on the Density for Stratified Steady Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Walsh, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    There are two distinct regimes commonly used to model traveling waves in stratified water: continuous stratification, where the density is smooth throughout the fluid, and layer-wise continuous stratification, where the fluid consists of multiple immiscible strata. The former is the more physically accurate description, but the latter is frequently more amenable to analysis and computation. By the conservation of mass, the density is constant along the streamlines of the flow; the stratification can therefore be specified by prescribing the value of the density on each streamline. We call this the streamline density function. Our main result states that, for every smoothly stratified periodic traveling wave in a certain small-amplitude regime, there is an L ∞ neighborhood of its streamline density function such that, for any piecewise smooth streamline density function in that neighborhood, there is a corresponding traveling wave solution. Moreover, the mapping from streamline density function to wave is Lipschitz continuous in a certain function space framework. As this neighborhood includes piecewise smooth densities with arbitrarily many jump discontinues, this theorem provides a rigorous justification for the ubiquitous practice of approximating a smoothly stratified wave by a layered one. We also discuss some applications of this result to the study of the qualitative features of such waves.

  10. Turbulence comes in bursts in stably stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorai, C.; Mininni, P. D.; Pouquet, A.

    2014-04-01

    There is a clear distinction between simple laminar and complex turbulent fluids; however, in some cases, as for the nocturnal planetary boundary layer, a stable and well-ordered flow can develop intense and sporadic bursts of turbulent activity that disappear slowly in time. This phenomenon is ill understood and poorly modeled and yet it is central to our understanding of weather and climate dynamics. We present here data from direct numerical simulations of stratified turbulence on grids of 20483 points that display the somewhat paradoxical result of measurably stronger events for more stable flows, not only in the temperature and vertical velocity derivatives as commonplace in turbulence, but also in the amplitude of the fields themselves, contrary to what happens for homogenous isotropic turbulent flows. A flow visualization suggests that the extreme values take place in Kelvin-Helmoltz overturning events and fronts that develop in the field variables. These results are confirmed by the analysis of a simple model that we present. The model takes into consideration only the vertical velocity and temperature fluctuations and their vertical derivatives. It indicates that in stably stratified turbulence, the stronger bursts can occur when the flow is expected to be more stable. The bursts are generated by a rapid nonlinear amplification of energy stored in waves and are associated with energetic interchanges between vertical velocity and temperature (or density) fluctuations in a range of parameters corresponding to the well-known saturation regime of stratified turbulence.

  11. Between- and within-lake responses of macrophyte richness metrics to shoreline developmen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beck, Marcus W.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Hatch, Lorin K.

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic habitat in littoral environments can be affected by residential development of shoreline areas. We evaluated the relationship between macrophyte richness metrics and shoreline development to quantify indicator response at 2 spatial scales for Minnesota lakes. First, the response of total, submersed, and sensitive species to shoreline development was evaluated within lakes to quantify macrophyte response as a function of distance to the nearest dock. Within-lake analyses using generalized linear mixed models focused on 3 lakes of comparable size with a minimal influence of watershed land use. Survey points farther from docks had higher total species richness and presence of species sensitive to disturbance. Second, between-lake effects of shoreline development on total, submersed, emergent-floating, and sensitive species were evaluated for 1444 lakes. Generalized linear models were developed for all lakes and stratified subsets to control for lake depth and watershed land use. Between-lake analyses indicated a clear response of macrophyte richness metrics to increasing shoreline development, such that fewer emergent-floating and sensitive species were correlated with increasing density of docks. These trends were particularly evident for deeper lakes with lower watershed development. Our results provide further evidence that shoreline development is associated with degraded aquatic habitat, particularly by illustrating the response of macrophyte richness metrics across multiple lake types and different spatial scales.

  12. Seismic reflection study of recessional moraines beneath Lake Superior and their relationship to regional deglaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmesser, C.W.; Johnson, T.C.; Wold, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 8000 km of continuous seismic reflection profiles throughout Lake Superior were examined for evidence of recessional moraines and other ice-margin deposits associated with the retreat of late Wisconsin ice. These features are correlated with the record of glacial-lake evolution in western Lake Superior. An offlapping sequence of glacial and glacial-lacustrine dediments overlying bedrock is recognized in west-central Lake Superior that is progressively younger to the northeast. The sequence underlies more recent glaical-lacustrine and postglacial sediments. Four facies are recognized on the basis of geomorphologic and acoustic properties and are interpreted to represent a southwest-to-northeast assemblage of: proglacial stratified drift (facies A), drift in major end moraines (facies B), till deposited as glacial retreat resumed, or possibly late-stage ablation till (facies C), and basal till (facies D). The prominent moraines of facies B are unusually thick and are believed to mark the ice-margin shorelines of successive major proglacial lakes that formerly occupied parts of western Lake Superior. The moraines are tentatively correlated with Glacial Lake Duluth (unit 1), Glacial Lake Washburn (unit 2), and Glacial Lake Beaver Bay (unit 3), the most prominent of lakes drained via the progressively lower outlets via the Moose Lake/ Brule-St. Croix Rivers, the Huron Mountains, and the Au Train-Whitefish regions, respectively. ?? 1982.

  13. Spatial structure and persistence of methanogen populations in humic bog lakes.

    PubMed

    Milferstedt, Kim; Youngblut, Nicholas D; Whitaker, Rachel J

    2010-06-01

    Patterns of diversity within methanogenic archaea in humic bog lakes are quantified over time and space to determine the roles that spatial isolation and seasonal mixing play in structuring microbial populations. The protein encoding gene mcrA is used as a molecular marker for the detection of fine-scale differences between methanogens in four dimictic bog lakes in which the water column is mixed twice a year and one meromictic lake that is permanently stratified. Although similar sequences are observed in each bog lake, each lake has its own characteristic set of persisting sequence types, indicating that methanogen populations are delimited either by low migration between the anaerobic hypolimnia or by lake-specific selection. The meromictic lake is differentiated from all other lakes and contains sequences with a higher degree of microdiversity than the dimictic lakes. By relating the structure of diversity to the depth of each bog lake, we propose the hypothesis that the deeper parts of the water column favor microdiversification of methanogens, whereas the periodically disturbed water column of shallower dimictic lakes promote genetically more diverse methanogen communities.

  14. Biogeochemistry of manganese in Lake Matano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C.; Crowe, S. A.; Sturm, A.; Leslie, K. L.; Maclean, L. C. W.; Katsev, S.; Henny, C.; Fowle, D. A.; Canfield, D. E.

    2011-04-01

    This study explores Mn biogeochemistry in a stratified, ferruginous lake. Intense Mn cycling occurs in the chemocline where Mn is recycled at least 15 times before sedimentation. The kinetics of Mn oxidation in Lake Matano are similar to other studied environments, implying that Mn oxidation is relatively insensitive to environmental parameters and may be controlled by similar mechanisms in diverse settings. The product of biologically catalyzed Mn oxidation in Lake Matano is birnessite. Although there is evidence for abiotic Mn reduction with Fe(II), Mn reduction likely occurs through a variety of pathways. The flux of Fe(II) is insufficient to balance the reduction of Mn at 125 m depth in the water column, and Mn reduction could be a significant contributor to CH4 oxidation. By combining results from synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray spectroscopy, extractions of sinking particles, and reaction transport modeling, we find the kinetics of Mn reduction in the lake's reducing waters are sufficiently rapid to preclude the deposition of Mn oxides from the water column to the sediments underlying anoxic water. Rather, Mn is likely sequestered in these sediments as pseudo kutnahorite. This has strong implications for the interpretation of the sedimentary Mn record.

  15. Geohydrology and water quality of stratified-drift aquifers in the Contoocook River basin, south-central New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.; Johnson, William

    1995-01-01

    Stratified-drift aquifers discontinuously underlie 121 mi2 (square miles) of the Contoocook River Basin, which has a total drainage area of 776 mi2. Maps of these aquifers, showing water-table configurations, saturated thicknesses, and transmissivities were prepared from well and test-hole data and seismic-refraction profiles. The distribution of stratified-drift aquifers is largely controlled by the Pleistocene glaciation process and the formation of multiple glacial lakes along the main stem of the Contoocook River. Locally, saturated thickness of stratified drift within these aquifers are as great as 200 feet. Estimated transmissivities exceed 8,000 ft2/d (squared feet per day) at three locations and is as high as 22,800 ft2/d at one location. Stratified-drift aquifers that have the greatest potential to supply additional amounts of water include the aquifers at Greenfield-Otter Brook and Hancock-Norway Pond. Potential yields to hypothetical supply wells were estimated for the Greenfield-Otter Brook, Hillsborough-Contoocook River, and Andover- Blackwater River aquifers by use of a analytical ground-water-flow model. The model results predict that the potential yields are greatest from the Greenfield-Otter Brook aquifer, yielding up to 1.85 gallons per day during half-year periods of no recharge. The effective ground-water recharge to the entire basin, which includes recharge to the till, bedrock, and stratified drift, is 13.9 in./yr (inches per year) (521 million gallons per day) on the basis of hydrograph separation of streamflow. The quality of water obtained from 11 observation wells and 10 municipal supply wells is generally suitable for drinking and most other domestic purposes. Ground water in the region has low alkalinity, is slightly acidic, and has low concentrations of dissolved solids. Concentrations of dissolved constituents in ground-water samples were generally less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's primary and secondary maximum

  16. Sulfur transformations at the hydrogen sulfide/oxygen interface in stratified waters and in cyanobacterial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Stratified water bodies allow the development of several microbial plates along the water column. The microbial plates develop in relation to nutrient availability, light penetration, and the distribution of oxygen and sulfide. Sulfide is initially produced in the sediment by sulfate-reducing bacteria. It diffuses along the water column creating a zone of hydrogen sulfide/oxygen interface. In the chemocline of Solar Lake oxygen and sulfide coexist in a 0 to 10 cm layer that moves up and down during a diurnal cycle. The microbial plate at the chemocline is exposed to oxygen and hydrogen sulfide, alternating on a diurnal basis. The cyanobacteria occupying the interface switch from anoxygenic photosynthesis in the morning to oxygenic photosynthesis during the rest of the day which results in a temporal build up of elemental sulfur during the day and disappears at night due to both oxidation to thiosulfate and sulfate by thiobacilli, and reduction to hydrogen sulfide by Desulfuromonas sp. and anaerobically respiring cyanobacteria. Sulfate reduction was enhanced in the light at the surface of the cyanobacterial mats. Microsulfate reduction measurements showed enhanced activity of sulfate reduction even under high oxygen concentrations of 300 to 800 micrometer. Apparent aerobic SO sub 4 reduction activity is explained by the co-occurrence of H sub 2. The physiology of this apparent sulfate reduction activity is studied.

  17. Numerical simulation of 2D buoyant jets in ice-covered and temperature-stratified water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ruochuan

    A two-dimensional (2D) unsteady simulation model is applied to the problem of a submerged warm water discharge into a stratified lake or reservoir with an ice cover. Numerical simulations and analyses are conducted to gain insight into large-scale convective recirculation and flow processes in a cold waterbody induced by a buoyant jet. Jet behaviors under various discharge temperatures are captured by directly modeling flow and thermal fields. Flow structures and processes are described by the simulated spatial and temporal distributions of velocity and temperature in various regions: deflection, recirculation, attachment, and impingement. Some peculiar hydrothermal and dynamic features, e.g. reversal of buoyancy due to the dilution of a warm jet by entraining cold ambient water, are identified and examined. Simulation results show that buoyancy is the most important factor controlling jet behavior and mixing processes. The inflow boundary is treated as a liquid wall from which the jet is offset. Similarity and difference in effects of boundaries perpendicular and parallel to flow, and of buoyancy on jet attachment and impingement, are discussed. Symmetric flow configuration is used to de-emphasize the Coanda effect caused by offset.

  18. High resolution simulations of down-slope turbidity currents into stratified saline ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouillon, Raphael; Radhakrishnan, Senthil; Meiburg, Eckart; Sutherland, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    In this work we explore the properties of turbidity currents moving down a slope into a stratified saline ambient through highly resolved 3D Navier-Stokes simulations. Turbidity events are difficult to measure and to replicate experimentally for a wide range of parameters, but they play a key role in ocean, lake or river sediment transport. Our objectives are to improve on previous numerical studies, obtain quantitative data in a more controlled environment than current experimental set-ups, and combine results with analytical arguments to build physics-based scaling laws. We validate our results and propose a simple scaling law to predict the velocity of the front down a slope for any stratification. We also compute a time and space dependent entrainment of ambient fluid and highlight its strong variability. We then introduce a predictable scaling law for the intrusion depth that does not depend on an averaged entrainment and uses it as a verification tool instead. Finally, we show that the ratio of Stokes losses in the local flow around individual particles to dissipative losses of the large scale flow determines the ability of the flow to convert potential energy into kinetic energy. For different parameters, either mechanism can dominate the dynamics of the flow.

  19. Lake Volta, Ghana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Lake Volta in Ghana was acquired March 31, 2002 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Lake Volta is one of the world's largest artificially created lakes. Lake Volta is actually a reservoir formed from the damming of the Volta River, and extends 250 miles north of the Akosombo Dam. The lake covers an area of 8,482 square km. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  20. The combined use of cryosurgery and intralesional injections of suspensions of fluorinated adrenocorticosteroids for reducing keloids and hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Ceilley, R I; Babin, R W

    1979-01-01

    Freezing with liquid nitrogen in the conventional manner of cryosurgery followed immediately by injection of a suspension of a fluorinated adrenocorticosteroid is an effective way of treating keloids and hypertrophic scars. Details of the method are given.

  1. A-Stratified Computerized Adaptive Testing with Unequal Item Exposure across Strata.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Hui; Chang, Hua-Hua

    The purpose of this study was to compare a proposed revised a-stratified, or alpha-stratified, USTR method of test item selection with the original alpha-stratified multistage computerized adaptive testing approach (STR) and the use of maximum Fisher information (FSH) with respect to test efficiency and item pool usage using simulated computerized…

  2. Magnetic Field in the Gravitationally Stratified Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2015-03-01

    We study the effect of gravitational stratification on the estimation of magnetic fields in the coronal loops. By using the method of MHD seismology of kink waves for the estimation of magnetic field of coronal loops, we derive a new formula for the magnetic field considering the effect of gravitational stratification. The fast-kink wave is a potential diagnostic tool for the estimation of magnetic field in fluxtubes. We consider the eleven kink oscillation cases observed by TRACE between July 1998 and June 2001. We calculate magnetic field in the stratified loops ( B str) and compare them with the previously calculated absolute magnetic field ( B abs). The gravitational stratification efficiently affects the magnetic field estimation in the coronal loops as it affects also the properties of kink waves. We find ≈22% increment in the magnetic field for the smallest ( L = 72 Mm) while ≈ 42% increment in the absolute magnetic field for the longest ( L = 406 Mm) coronal loops. The magnetic fields B str and B abs also increase with the number density, if the loop length does not vary much. The increment in the magnetic field due to gravitational stratification is small at the lower number densities, however, it is large at the higher number densities. We find that damping time of kink waves due to phase-mixing is less in the case of gravitationally stratified loops compared to nonstratified ones. This indicates the more rapid damping of kink waves in the stratified loops. In conclusion, we find that the gravitational stratification efficiently affects the estimation of magnetic field and damping time estimation especially in the longer coronal loops.

  3. Sex Stratified Neuronal Cultures to Study Ischemic Cell Death Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saurabh; Traystman, Richard J.; Herson, Paco S.

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in neuronal susceptibility to ischemic injury and neurodegenerative disease have long been observed, but the signaling mechanisms responsible for those differences remain unclear. Primary disassociated embryonic neuronal culture provides a simplified experimental model with which to investigate the neuronal cell signaling involved in cell death as a result of ischemia or disease; however, most neuronal cultures used in research today are mixed sex. Researchers can and do test the effects of sex steroid treatment in mixed sex neuronal cultures in models of neuronal injury and disease, but accumulating evidence suggests that the female brain responds to androgens, estrogens, and progesterone differently than the male brain. Furthermore, neonate male and female rodents respond differently to ischemic injury, with males experiencing greater injury following cerebral ischemia than females. Thus, mixed sex neuronal cultures might obscure and confound the experimental results; important information might be missed. For this reason, the Herson Lab at the University of Colorado School of Medicine routinely prepares sex-stratified primary disassociated embryonic neuronal cultures from both hippocampus and cortex. Embryos are sexed before harvesting of brain tissue and male and female tissue are disassociated separately, plated separately, and maintained separately. Using this method, the Herson Lab has demonstrated a male-specific role for the ion channel TRPM2 in ischemic cell death. In this manuscript, we share and discuss our protocol for sexing embryonic mice and preparing sex-stratified hippocampal primary disassociated neuron cultures. This method can be adapted to prepare sex-stratified cortical cultures and the method for embryo sexing can be used in conjunction with other protocols for any study in which sex is thought to be an important determinant of outcome. PMID:24378980

  4. Stratified spin-up in a sliced, square cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, R. J.; Foster, M. R.

    2014-02-15

    We previously reported experimental and theoretical results on the linear spin-up of a linearly stratified, rotating fluid in a uniform-depth square cylinder [M. R. Foster and R. J. Munro, “The linear spin-up of a stratified, rotating fluid in a square cylinder,” J. Fluid Mech. 712, 7–40 (2012)]. Here we extend that analysis to a “sliced” square cylinder, which has a base-plane inclined at a shallow angle α. Asymptotic results are derived that show the spin-up phase is achieved by a combination of the Ekman-layer eruptions (from the perimeter region of the cylinder's lid and base) and cross-slope-propagating stratified Rossby waves. The final, steady state limit for this spin-up phase is identical to that found previously for the uniform depth cylinder, but is reached somewhat more rapidly on a time scale of order E{sup −1/2}Ω{sup −1}/log (α/E{sup 1/2}) (compared to E{sup −1/2}Ω{sup −1} for the uniform-depth cylinder), where Ω is the rotation rate and E the Ekman number. Experiments were performed for Burger numbers, S, between 0.4 and 16, and showed that for S≳O(1), the Rossby modes are severely damped, and it is only at small S, and during the early stages, that the presence of these wave modes was evident. These observations are supported by the theory, which shows the damping factors increase with S and are numerically large for S≳O(1)

  5. Recruitment of Hexagenia mayfly nymphs in western Lake Erie linked to environmental variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridgeman, Thomas B.; Schloesser, Don W.; Krause, Ann E.

    2006-01-01

    After a 40-year absence caused by pollution and eutrophication, burrowing mayflies (Hexagenia spp.) recolonized western Lake Erie in the mid 1990s as water quality improved. Mayflies are an important food resource for the economically valuable yellow perch fishery and are considered to be major indicator species of the ecological condition of the lake. Since their reappearance, however, mayfly populations have suffered occasional unexplained recruitment failures. In 2002, a failure of fall recruitment followed an unusually warm summer in which western Lake Erie became temporarily stratified, resulting in low dissolved oxygen levels near the lake floor. In the present study, we examined a possible link between Hexagenia recruitment and periods of intermittent stratification for the years 1997-2002. A simple model was developed using surface temperature, wind speed, and water column data from 2003 to predict stratification. The model was then used to detect episodes of stratification in past years for which water column data are unavailable. Low or undetectable mayfly recruitment occurred in 1997 and 2002, years in which there was frequent or extended stratification between June and September. Highest mayfly reproduction in 2000 corresponded to the fewest stratified periods. These results suggest that even relatively brief periods of stratification can result in loss of larval mayfly recruitment, probably through the effects of hypoxia. A trend toward increasing frequency of hot summers in the Great Lakes region could result in recurrent loss of mayfly larvae in western Lake Erie and other shallow areas in the Great Lakes.

  6. Egg freezing, stratified reproduction and the logic of not

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    This commentary examines social and political implications of social egg freezing in a market that is stratified, globalized, and part of a larger bioeconomy. John Robertson's article and public discourse prompted by Facebook and Apple's ‘corporate egg freezing’ benefits provide touchstones for interrogating social and industry practices that embrace making reproductive capacity marketable. Supply of the cells and bodies necessary for assisted reproductive technology use depends on market thinking and structural inequality. What the industry produces are carefully calibrated social-political distances between participants in egg freezing and banking, as well as ‘third party reproduction.’ PMID:27774187

  7. Harmonic Forcing on the Stratified Square Lid Driven Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalim, Jason; Welfert, Bruno; Lopez, Juan; Taylor, Stephanie

    2016-11-01

    Stratified fluids that are driven at an interface, such as oceans or seas, can be periodically driven by wind. As a canonical flow, the square lid driven cavity with a harmonic forcing and a linear temperature gradient serves as a idealized model. Resonances of the harmonic forcing with the internal modes of the system aide energy transfer from the surface to the bulk, leading to interesting dynamics. Using a numerical spectral collocation method, the internal waves of the system are investigated, including their possible interaction and annihilation.

  8. Energy Spectra of Strongly Stratified and Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalov, Alex; Nicolaenko, Basil; Zhou, Ye

    1998-01-01

    Turbulence under strong stratification and rotation is usually characterized as quasi-two dimensional turbulence. We develop a "quasi-two dimensional" energy spectrum which changes smoothly between the Kolmogorov -5/3 law (no stratification), the -2 scalings of Zhou for the case of strong rotation, as well as the -2 scalings for the case of strong rotation and stratification. For strongly stratified turbulence, the model may give the -2 scaling predicted by Herring; and the -5/3 scaling indicated by some mesoscale observations.

  9. Technology Development of Stratified Volume Diffractive Optics for Waveguide Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.

    2000-01-01

    Stratified Volume Diffractive Optical Elements (SVDOE) appear to be viable as high-efficiency waveguide couplers. Preliminary design studies were conducted under this task to provide initial device parameters for evaluation. However, these designs should be revisited prior to fabrication of a device for testing. The emphasis of this task has been development and implementation of fabrication procedures necessary for SVDOE'S, namely alignment of grating layers, Including offsets, to within required tolerances. Progress in this area Indicates that the alignment technique chosen is viable and tolerances have been reached that allow reasonable performance ranges. Approaches have been identified to improve alignment tolerances even further.

  10. Porous Sphere in Stratified Environments: Entrainment and Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camassa, Roberto; Falcon, Claudia; Khatri, Shilpa; McLaughlin, Richard; UNC Joint Fluids Lab Team

    2014-11-01

    A theoretical, experimental, and numerical study of porous spheres falling in stratified fluids will be presented. The systematic justification of asymptotic regimes resulting in asymptotic models with ``heat bath'' boundary conditions for salinity are derived in low Reynolds number regimes. Violation of these asymptotic scalings will be discussed in the context of experiments and mathematical modeling. In particular the presence of a salt depletion or enrichment wake left behind by the settling, ab/de-sorbing sphere, and its competition with entrainment, will be presented and highlighted. Experimental results with microporous spheres as well calibrated manufactured drilled spheres will be compared. Supported by: NSF CMG, NSF RTG, ONR.

  11. Fluid mixing in stratified gravity currents: the Prandtl mixing length.

    PubMed

    Odier, P; Chen, J; Rivera, M K; Ecke, R E

    2009-04-03

    Shear-induced vertical mixing in a stratified flow is a key ingredient of thermohaline circulation. We experimentally determine the vertical flux of momentum and density of a forced gravity current using high-resolution velocity and density measurements. A constant eddy-viscosity model provides a poor description of the physics of mixing, but a Prandtl mixing length model relating momentum and density fluxes to mean velocity and density gradients works well. For the average gradient Richardson number Ri(g) approximately 0.08 and a Taylor Reynolds number Re(lambda) approximately 100, the mixing lengths are fairly constant, about the same magnitude, comparable to the turbulent shear length.

  12. Measurement of photon-energy albedo from stratified shielding materials.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A K; Bhattacharjee, A

    1991-11-01

    In the conventional method of measuring photon-energy albedo using a scintillation detector coupled with a multichannel analyzer, tedious efficiency correction by the inverse matrix method was needed. The indigenously designed proportional-response photon counter, with its detection efficiency proportional to energy of incident photons, was used in the present investigation. Use of the proportional-response photon counter makes the measurement straightforward and more accurate. Measurements of energy albedo from stratified layers of aluminum, iron, lead, and concrete using 662-keV and 1250-keV photon energies are reported.

  13. Surfactant-laden drops rising in a stratified ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchette, Francois; Martin, David

    2015-11-01

    We present results of a numerical study of the dynamics of rising drops in the presence of both surfactants and stratification. Our simulations model oil drops rising in the oceans, where naturally occurring or man-made surfactants are present. We study surfactant covered drops in uniform and density-stratified ambients, as well as clean drops entering a dissolved surfactant layer. We quantify the effects of entrainment for various Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. We also report a brief acceleration followed by a significant deceleration as a clean drop enters a surfactant layer, and describe how the adsorption rate affects those dynamics.

  14. Secularly growing oscillations in a stratified rotating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Alan; Fedorovich, Evgeni

    2012-05-01

    A simple exact solution of the Boussinesq equations of motion, thermal energy, and mass conservation is obtained for an oscillatory flow regime in a stably stratified rotating fluid. The flow is unbounded and characterized by velocity gradients that vary with time but are spatially uniform—the basic state of Craik-Criminale flows. The solution describes an oscillatory convergent-divergent flow in which the linear (normal) strain rates are periodic. However, two of the shear strain rates are forced by the linear strain rates, and their amplitudes grow linearly with time.

  15. Dynamical theory of stratified Fresnel linear zone plates

    SciTech Connect

    Sammar, A.; Andre, J.M.

    1993-11-01

    A dynamical theory is given for calculating the performances of stratified Fresnel linear zone plates (SFLZP`s). The Born expansion extended to the Fresnel diffraction is used to prove a fundamental theorem giving the diffraction efficiency and the diffraction pattern of transmission or reflection SFLZP`s. The method is valuable as long as the wavelength is smaller than the characteristic parameter of the zone plate. It allows us to evaluate the performances of reflection multilayer SFLZPs, i.e., the so-called Bragg-Fresnel optics recently developed for x-ray optics. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Microvascular permeability changes might explain cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Hsiao, Ju-Feng; Chang, Jung-Jung; Chung, Chang-Min; Chang, Shih-Tai; Pan, Kuo-Li

    2014-04-01

    Various sequelae of alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy have been reported. Of note, some cases of cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation cannot be well explained. We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in whom cardiac tamponade developed one hour after alcohol septal ablation, probably unrelated to mechanical trauma. At that time, we noted a substantial difference in the red blood cell-to-white blood cell ratio between the pericardial effusion (1,957.4) and the peripheral blood (728.3). In addition to presenting the patient's case, we speculate that a possible mechanism for acute tamponade--alcohol-induced changes in microvascular permeability--is a reasonable explanation for cases of alcohol septal ablation that are complicated by otherwise-unexplainable massive pericardial effusions.

  17. Left Atrial trajectory impairment in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy disclosed by Geometric Morphometrics and Parallel Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piras, Paolo; Torromeo, Concetta; Re, Federica; Evangelista, Antonietta; Gabriele, Stefano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Madeo, Andrea; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Varano, Valerio; Uguccioni, Massimo; Puddu, Paolo E.

    2016-10-01

    The analysis of full Left Atrium (LA) deformation and whole LA deformational trajectory in time has been poorly investigated and, to the best of our knowledge, seldom discussed in patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Therefore, we considered 22 patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 46 healthy subjects, investigated them by three–dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, and studied the derived landmark clouds via Geometric Morphometrics with Parallel Transport. Trajectory shape and trajectory size were different in Controls versus HCM and their classification powers had high AUC (Area Under the Receiving Operator Characteristic Curve) and accuracy. The two trajectories were much different at the transition between LA conduit and booster pump functions. Full shape and deformation analyses with trajectory analysis enabled a straightforward perception of pathophysiological consequences of HCM condition on LA functioning. It might be worthwhile to apply these techniques to look for novel pathophysiological approaches that may better define atrio–ventricular interaction.

  18. A case of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome presenting with hypertrophic pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Wataru; Hayashi, Shintaro; Iwanaga, Yasutaka; Murai, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Akifumi; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-15

    A 43-year-old woman with a 3-year history of headache, fever, and swelling of the forehead, presented to our hospital. A general examination revealed palmar and plantar pustules. Blood analyses showed an elevated white blood cell count, C-reactive protein level, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Brain MRI revealed a partially thickened cranial bone with gadolinium enhancement, and also abnormally enhanced dura mater. Bone scintigraphy showed involvement of the cranial bone and bilateral sternoclavicular joints. Palmar skin biopsy indicated palmoplantar pustulosis. From these results, SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) syndrome with associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis was diagnosed. After corticosteroid therapy and tonsillectomy, the clinical symptoms and radiological abnormalities were improved. Clinicians should be aware of SAPHO as a potential unusual cause of hypertrophic pachymeningitis.

  19. The diagnosis of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Piva e Mattos, Beatriz; Torres, Marco Antonio Rodrigues; Rebelatto, Taiane Francieli; Loreto, Melina Silva de; Scolari, Fernando Luís

    2012-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a prevalent genetic disease characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy, presenting dynamic obstruction of outflow tract with subaortic gradient happening at rest in 30% of the cases. It is attributed to the intricate interaction between the anterior mitral leaflet, the interventricular septum and altered flow vectors generated in left ventricle along with changes in outflow tract geometry. Mitral regurgitation in varying degrees is found with or without association with structural deformities of the valve apparatus. The exercise echocardiogram evidences latent obstruction easily induced by exercise in 60 to 75% of non-obstructive forms. The determination of the gradient under this condition must be considered in routine investigation of patients with mild or no obstruction at rest. The evaluation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy incorporates methods based on the ultrasound image, which, along with MRI, allow recognizing ventricular obstruction generating mechanisms, thus facilitating the diagnosis and management of obstructive and latent obstructive forms.

  20. All That Glitters is not Gold: Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanadoss, Umashankar; Kulkarni, Abhishek; Balakrishnan, Shobana; Shree, Nidhi; Harjai, Kishore; Jagasia, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterized by the idiopathic hypertrophy of the left ventricle (and occasionally right ventricle). HCM is an autosomal dominant disease, with variable penetration. In Asian population, apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is relatively common (25%). However, this is relatively rare in Caucasian population (0.2%). Patients with HCM, often presents with typical exertional chest pain and shortness of breath. Apical HCM patients tend to have milder symptoms. However, the clinical presentation and electrocardiographic features of Apical HCM often mimic acute coronary syndrome and high index of suspicion is warranted in differentiating this condition. Patients with apical HCM have relatively better prognosis when compare to the other varieties. Here, we are presenting a patient who presented with typical exertional chest pain whose electrocardiographic changes are concerning for acute ischemic changes.

  1. Effects of prolonged hypertrophic resistance training on acute endocrine responses in young and older men.

    PubMed

    Walker, Simon; Santolamazza, Fabrizio; Kraemer, William; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated changes in acute serum hormone responses to a resistance exercise bout following a prolonged period of hypertrophic resistance training in young (YM) and older men (OM). Subjects performed a 5 × 10RM leg press exercise protocol before and after 20 weeks of hypertrophic resistance training. In YM, the acute responses in growth hormone were greater compared with before training (p < .05), and cortisol concentration did not increase after training. Endocrine responses in OM were similar before and after training. Greater acute growth hormone responses after training were associated with larger gains in lean mass in the entire subject group (r = .596, p = .019). These findings suggest that, in general, YM demonstrate greater adaptability within the endocrine system compared with OM. However, adaptability in growth hormone response was associated with larger training-induced gains independent of age.

  2. Effects of Prolonged Hypertrophic Resistance Training on Acute Endocrine Responses in Young and Older Men.

    PubMed

    Walker, Simon; Santolamazza, Fabrizio; Kraemer, William; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2014-05-02

    The present study investigated changes in acute serum hormone responses to a resistance exercise bout following a prolonged period of hypertrophic resistance training in young (YM) and older men (OM). Subjects performed a 5 × 10RM leg press exercise protocol before and after 20 weeks of hypertrophic resistance training. In YM, the acute responses in growth hormone were greater compared to before training (P < 0.05), and cortisol concentration did not increase after training. Endocrine responses in OM were similar before and after training. Greater acute growth hormone responses after training were associated with larger gains in lean mass in the entire subject group (r = 0.596, P = 0.019). These findings suggest that, in general, YM demonstrate greater adaptability within the endocrine system compared to OM. However, adaptability in growth hormone response was associated with larger training-induced gains independent of age.

  3. Pachydermoperiostosis (primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy): report of a case with evidence of endothelial and connective tissue involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Matucci-Cerinic, M; Cinti, S; Morroni, M; Lotti, T; Nuzzaci, G; Lucente, E; di Lollo, S; Ceruso, M; Cagnoni, M

    1989-01-01

    A case of pachydermoperiostosis characterised by the presence of finger clubbing, periostosis, sweating of hands and feet is described. Modifications of capillaroscopic pattern and of arteriovenous anastomoses are reported. The periungual border and finger tip tissue showed diffuse endothelial hyperplasia, hyalinosis, and sclerosis with packing of collagen fibres. Electron microscopy showed hypertrophic and activated endothelia (numerous and hypertrophic Golgi complexes, several Weibel-Palade bodies, vesicles of micropinocytosis, and glycogen particles), the basal membrane thickened and reduplicated, perivasal infiltrate in superficial derma, reticulation and segmentary reduplication of basal membrane in arteriovenous shunt. In the perineural connective tissue numerous Luse bodies (long spacing collagen) were evident. The data indicate that in the early phase of pachydermoperiostosis morphological endothelial and collagen fibre abnormalities are present, though there is a normal peripheral blood flow. Images PMID:2930280

  4. [Functional regulation of genome with peptide bioregulators by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (by patients and relatives)].

    PubMed

    Dzhokhadze, T A; Buadze, T Zh; Gaĭozishvili, M N; Rogava, M A; Lazhava, T A

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a comparative study of the functional genome indicators using lymphocyte cultures of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and their first relatives. Studies conducted both in intact cultures and cultures exposed to the influence of peptide - bioregulators Epithalon, Vilon and Livagen. Last (Livagen) tested at separate and joint application with cobalt chloride salt. As indicated according to the results of the analysis, the cells of the individuals with HCM and their first relatives were characterized by higher frequency of spontaneous quantitative - structural disorders in comparison with the cells of healthy individuals. The findings suggest a different effect of bioregulators. The most effective protective action in relation normalization of functional parameters of the genome shows Epithalon for lowering the level of chromosomal instability in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and relatives of patients with HCM. On the basis of identified protective action Epithalon concludes prospects of its application in the development of preventive measures for individuals at increased risk of morbidity HCM.

  5. An autopsy report of acute myocardial infarction with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy-like heart.

    PubMed

    Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Okada, Hideshi; Morishita, Kentaro; Imai, Hajime; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Nawa, Takahide; Suzuki, Kodai; Ikeshoji, Haruka; Kato, Hisaaki; Yoshida, Takahiro; Yoshida, Shozo; Shirai, Kunihiro; Toyoda, Izumi; Hara, Akira; Ogura, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman, who was followed up as hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) in a local hospital, was transferred to our center because of anterior chest pain and diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction (MI). Coronary angiography showed total occlusion of the mid-left anterior descending, and flow was restored after endovascular thrombectomy. An autopsy was performed after she died on hospital day 6. At autopsy, there was no significant stenosis in this vessel and the absence of plaque rupture was confirmed. Likewise, it was unclear asymmetric hypertrophy at autopsy, it could not deny that a sigmoid deformity of the basal septum occurs in elderly patients and can mimic the asymmetric septal hypertrophy of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. MI was thought to be caused by coronary spasm or squeezing in HOCM-like heart. Therefore, it may be necessary antithrombosis therapy in HOCM-like patients with no history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

  6. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Green, Eric M; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L; Evanchik, Marc J; Gorham, Joshua M; Harrison, Brooke C; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D; Rodriguez, Hector M; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A; Spudich, James A; McDowell, Robert S; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E

    2016-02-05

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM.

  7. Up-to-date approach to manage keloids and hypertrophic scars: A useful guide

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Anna I.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Barret, Juan P.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars occur anywhere from 30 to 90% of patients, and are characterized by pathologically excessive dermal fibrosis and aberrant wound healing. Both entities have different clinical and histochemical characteristics, and unfortunately still represent a great challenge for clinicians due to lack of efficacious treatments. Current advances in molecular biology and genetics reveal new preventive and therapeutical options which represent a hope to manage this highly prevalent, chronic and disabling problem, with long-term beneficial outcomes and improvement of quality of life. While we wait for these translational clinical products to be marketed, however, it is imperative to know the basics of the currently existing wide array of strategies to deal with excessive scars: from the classical corticotherapy, to the most recent botulinum toxin and lasers. The main aim of this review paper is to offer a useful up-to-date guideline to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars. PMID:24767715

  8. Myocardial stunning in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: recovery predicted by single photon emission computed tomographic thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, D.G.; Clements, I.P.; Callahan, M.J.

    1989-05-01

    A young woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization presented with chest pain and features of a large left ventricular aneurysm. The initial diagnosis was myocardial ischemia with either an evolving or an ancient myocardial infarction. Subsequently, verapamil therapy was associated with complete resolution of the extensive left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, normalization of left ventricular ejection fraction and a minimal myocardial infarction. Normal thallium uptake on single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy early in the hospital course predicted myocardial viability in the region of the aneurysm. Thus, orally administered verapamil may reverse spontaneous extensive myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and possibly limit the extent of myocardial infarction in such circumstances.

  9. [Chronic subdural hematoma with a markedly fibrous hypertrophic membrane. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Kuwana, N; Kojima, Y; Tanaka, N; Kitamura, H

    1990-01-01

    A 40-year-old female, who had taken low-dose oral contraceptives for 2 months before onset, developed transient dysarthria, left hemiparesis, and left hemihypesthesia. One month later, a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a uniformly enhanced, convex-shaped, hypertrophic membrane with a lobulated lumen in the subdural space of the right parietal region. A right parietal craniotomy was performed. The membrane, consisting of elastic-hard, hypertrophic granulation tissue and yellowish, sticky fluid in the lumen, was readily freed and totally extirpated. Subsequently, the patient recovered without persistent symptoms. Light microscopic examination detected the sinusoidal channel layer and the fibrous layer in an alternating configuration, along with intramembranous hemorrhagic foci. Such hypertrophy must have been caused by repeated intramembranous hemorrhages and reactive granulation. Such findings of hematoma membrane have never previously been reported. Thus, this is an interesting case, clearly distinguished from typical chronic subdural hematoma.

  10. Hypertrophic Scarring and Keloids: Pathomechanisms and Current and Emerging Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gauglitz, Gerd G; Korting, Hans C; Pavicic, Tatiana; Ruzicka, Thomas; Jeschke, Marc G

    2011-01-01

    Excessive scars form as a result of aberrations of physiologic wound healing and may arise following any insult to the deep dermis. By causing pain, pruritus and contractures, excessive scarring significantly affects the patient’s quality of life, both physically and psychologically. Multiple studies on hypertrophic scar and keloid formation have been conducted for decades and have led to a plethora of therapeutic strategies to prevent or attenuate excessive scar formation. However, most therapeutic approaches remain clinically unsatisfactory, most likely owing to poor understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying the processes of scarring and wound contraction. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying keloid and hypertrophic scar formation and discuss established treatments and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20927486

  11. Up-to-date approach to manage keloids and hypertrophic scars: a useful guide.

    PubMed

    Arno, Anna I; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Barret, Juan P; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-11-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars occur anywhere from 30 to 90% of patients, and are characterized by pathologically excessive dermal fibrosis and aberrant wound healing. Both entities have different clinical and histochemical characteristics, and unfortunately still represent a great challenge for clinicians due to lack of efficacious treatments. Current advances in molecular biology and genetics reveal new preventive and therapeutical options which represent a hope to manage this highly prevalent, chronic and disabling problem, with long-term beneficial outcomes and improvement of quality of life. While we wait for these translational clinical products to be marketed, however, it is imperative to know the basics of the currently existing wide array of strategies to deal with excessive scars: from the classical corticotherapy, to the most recent botulinum toxin and lasers. The main aim of this review paper is to offer a useful up-to-date guideline to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars.

  12. The myosin mesa and a possible unifying hypothesis for the molecular basis of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.

    2015-01-01

    No matter how many times one explores the structure of the myosin molecule, there is always something new to discover. Here, I describe the myosin mesa, a structural feature of the motor domain that has the characteristics of a binding domain for another protein, possibly myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C). Interestingly, many well-known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) mutations lie along this surface and may affect the putative interactions proposed here. A potential unifying hypothesis for the molecular basis of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is discussed here. It involves increased power output of the cardiac muscle as a result of HCM mutations causing the release of inhibition by myosin binding protein C. PMID:25619247

  13. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Green, Eric M.; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D.; Rodriguez, Hector M.; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Spudich, James A.; McDowell, Robert S.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  14. Left Atrial trajectory impairment in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy disclosed by Geometric Morphometrics and Parallel Transport.

    PubMed

    Piras, Paolo; Torromeo, Concetta; Re, Federica; Evangelista, Antonietta; Gabriele, Stefano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Madeo, Andrea; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Varano, Valerio; Uguccioni, Massimo; Puddu, Paolo E

    2016-10-07

    The analysis of full Left Atrium (LA) deformation and whole LA deformational trajectory in time has been poorly investigated and, to the best of our knowledge, seldom discussed in patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Therefore, we considered 22 patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 46 healthy subjects, investigated them by three-dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, and studied the derived landmark clouds via Geometric Morphometrics with Parallel Transport. Trajectory shape and trajectory size were different in Controls versus HCM and their classification powers had high AUC (Area Under the Receiving Operator Characteristic Curve) and accuracy. The two trajectories were much different at the transition between LA conduit and booster pump functions. Full shape and deformation analyses with trajectory analysis enabled a straightforward perception of pathophysiological consequences of HCM condition on LA functioning. It might be worthwhile to apply these techniques to look for novel pathophysiological approaches that may better define atrio-ventricular interaction.

  15. Left Atrial trajectory impairment in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy disclosed by Geometric Morphometrics and Parallel Transport

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Paolo; Torromeo, Concetta; Re, Federica; Evangelista, Antonietta; Gabriele, Stefano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Madeo, Andrea; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Varano, Valerio; Uguccioni, Massimo; Puddu, Paolo E.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of full Left Atrium (LA) deformation and whole LA deformational trajectory in time has been poorly investigated and, to the best of our knowledge, seldom discussed in patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Therefore, we considered 22 patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 46 healthy subjects, investigated them by three–dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, and studied the derived landmark clouds via Geometric Morphometrics with Parallel Transport. Trajectory shape and trajectory size were different in Controls versus HCM and their classification powers had high AUC (Area Under the Receiving Operator Characteristic Curve) and accuracy. The two trajectories were much different at the transition between LA conduit and booster pump functions. Full shape and deformation analyses with trajectory analysis enabled a straightforward perception of pathophysiological consequences of HCM condition on LA functioning. It might be worthwhile to apply these techniques to look for novel pathophysiological approaches that may better define atrio–ventricular interaction. PMID:27713503

  16. The Mitral Valve in Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Test in Context.

    PubMed

    Sherrid, Mark V; Balaram, Sandhya; Kim, Bette; Axel, Leon; Swistel, Daniel G

    2016-04-19

    Mitral valve abnormalities were not part of modern pathological and clinical descriptions of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the 1950s, which focused on left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and myocyte fiber disarray. Although systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve was discovered as the cause of LV outflow tract obstruction in the M-mode echocardiography era, in the 1990s structural abnormalities of the mitral valve became appreciated as contributing to SAM pathophysiology. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mitral malformations have been identified at all levels. They occur in the leaflets, usually elongating them, and also in the submitral apparatus, with a wide array of malformations of the papillary muscles and chordae, that can be detected by transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography and by cardiac magnetic resonance. Because they participate fundamentally in the predisposition to SAM, they have increasingly been repaired surgically. This review critically assesses imaging and measurement of mitral abnormalities and discusses their surgical relief.

  17. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM): How Flow Analysis May Drive Medical Management and Surgical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Theodore P.

    2011-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease and occurs in 1 in 500 persons worldwide regardless of race, age and gender. It is the most common cause of sudden death in the young and also causes heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias. The primary anatomic abnormality is thickening of certain walls, or sometimes global thickening of the left or right ventricle. The patterns of thickening along with increased ventricular stiffness lead to suboptimal ventricular filling and inefficient ejection of blood from the ventricle. Treatment for HCM can be medical or surgical. The choice of therapy is driven by the presence and severity of outflow obstruction. Flow analysis could provide sophisticated information about outflow and inflow ventricular dynamics. These flow dynamics features may enable better medical choices and provide information that would allow superior surgical planning. Associate Professor of Medicine & Director, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic

  18. Hydrology of Goat Lake watershed, Snohomish County, Washington, 1982-87

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, N.P.; Ebbert, J.C.; Poole, J.E.; Peck, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Goat Lake watershed functions as an experimental watershed for long-term studies to determine the effects of acidic precipitation on water resources. Data have been collected there by the US Geological Survey since 1982. The watershed is in a wilderness area of the Cascade Range and is downwind of an industrial and urban area that produces chemical compounds found in acidic precipitation. The lake is considered sensitive to acidic inputs from atmospheric deposition and streamflow. The mean annual discharge of the Goat Lake outflow is 35 cu ft/sec; precipitation on the watershed is calculated to be about 170 in/yr. The inflow to Goat Lake is sufficient to replace the entire contents of the lake basin on an average every 21.5 days, or 17 times/year. Water in Goat Lake, and that of the inlet and outlet, is of low ionic strength and of calcium-bicarbonate type. The lake, although considered oligotrophic, is sufficiently deep to stratify thermally, and summer dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the hypolimnion are depressed. Even though alkalinity and specific conductance at Goat Lake are in the range considered sensitive to acidic inputs, the pH of water in the lake has consistently ranged from 6.1 to 7.2, indicating that the lake is not acidified at this time. 36 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Hydrology of the Goat Lake watershed, Snohomish County, Washington, 1982-87

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dion, N.P.; Ebbert, J.C.; Poole, J.E.; Peck, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Goat Lake watershed in Snohomish County, Washington, functions as an ' experimental watershed ' for long-term studies to determine the effects of acidic precipitation on water resources. Data have been collected there by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1982. The watershed is in a wilderness area of the Cascade Range and is downwind of an industrial and urban area that produces chemical compounds found in acidic precipitation. The lake is considered sensitive to acidic inputs from atmospheric deposition and streamflow. The mean annual discharge of the Goat Lake outflow is 35 cu ft/sec; precipitation on the watershed is calculated to be about 170 in/yr. The inflow to Goat Lake is sufficient to replace the entire contents of the lake basin on an average every 21.5 days, or 17 times/year. Water in Goat Lake, and that of the inlet and outlet, is of low ionic strength and of calcium-bicarbonate type. The lake, although considered oligotrophic, is sufficiently deep to stratify thermally, and summer dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the hypolimnion are depressed. Even though alkalinity and specific conductance at Goat Lake are in the range considered sensitive to acidic inputs , the pH of water in the lake has consistently ranged from 6.1 to 7.2, indicating that the lake is not acidified at this time. (USGS)

  20. Stress cardiomyopathy in a patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and myocardial bridging

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Miguel; Vinardell, Juan M; Arenas, Ivan; Santana, Orlando

    2017-01-01

    Stress cardiomyopathy is an acquired cardiomyopathy of unknown aetiology. It usually occurs in women over the age of 70 who have experienced physical or emotional stress. It is most commonly characterised by a transient, left ventricular systolic dysfunction in the apical portion and hyperkinesia in the basal segments, without obstructive coronary artery disease. Its association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and myocardial bridging is rare. Herein, we present such a case. PMID:28228389

  1. Exposure to Varying Strain Magnitudes Influences the Conversion of Normal Skin Fibroblasts Into Hypertrophic Scar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ruixia; Wang, Zhiguo; Xu, Quanchen; Cai, Xia; Liu, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical strain is a key contributor in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scarring, whose optimal stretch magnitudes to initiate the differentiation of normal skin fibroblasts into aberrant fibroblasts phenotype remains largely unresolved. Influence of varying cyclic strain magnitudes on cultured human normal skin fibroblasts and its transformation into hypertrophic scar fibroblast-like phenotype is investigated in this study. Cultured fibroblasts isolated from hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue were subjected to cyclic mechanical stretching under individual 10%, 15%, and 20% strain magnitudes at a frequency of 0.1 Hz for 24 hours. Stretched normal skin fibroblasts demonstrated significantly increased rates of cell proliferation, and also apparently oriented away nearly perpendicular to the applied stretching direction. Interestingly, the applied 10% strains magnitude resulted in a markedly enhanced cell proliferative ability compared with that of 20% strain magnitude. Parameters involving the mechanotransduction signaling, such as integrin β1 and P130Cas, were significantly improved at both mRNA and protein levels in the stretched normal skin fibroblasts, which was demonstrated in a negative magnitude-dependent manner. In addition, 10% strains magnitude triggered the highest expression levels of growth factor TGF-β1 and collagen matrix in stretched normal skin fibroblasts. Collectively, these results indicate that the 10% stretching magnitude, of the 3 strain magnitudes studied, is most effective for triggering the optimal mechanotransduction effects and biological responses inside cultured skin fibroblasts. The demonstrable conversion of normal skin fibroblasts into hypertrophic scar fibroblasts was also observed when 10% stretching magnitude was applied to cultured fibroblasts in vitro.

  2. Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianyi; Liu, Xiaosun; Zhang, Qing; Hong, Yanyun; Song, Bin; Teng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Standard therapy has not been established for thyroid cancer when a thyroidectomy is contraindicated due to systemic disease. Herein, we reported a patient who had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by radiofrequency ablation because of inability to tolerate a thyroidectomy. Radiofrequency ablation can be used to treat thyroid cancer when surgery is not feasible, although the long-term outcome needs further observation. PMID:27390548

  3. Fatal infantile mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and optic atrophy associated with a homozygous OPA1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Ronen; Saada, Ann; Flannery, Padraig J; Burté, Florence; Soiferman, Devorah; Khayat, Morad; Eisner, Verónica; Vladovski, Eugene; Taylor, Robert W; Bindoff, Laurence A; Shaag, Avraham; Mandel, Hanna; Schuler-Furman, Ora; Shalev, Stavit A; Elpeleg, Orly; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Infantile-onset encephalopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defects are genetically heterogeneous with defects involving both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Objective To identify the causative genetic defect in two sisters presenting with lethal infantile encephalopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and optic atrophy. Methods We describe a comprehensive clinical, biochemical and molecular genetic investigation of two affected siblings from a consanguineous family. Molecular genetic analysis was done by a combined approach involving genome-wide autozygosity mapping and next-generation exome sequencing. Biochemical analysis was done by enzymatic analysis and Western blot. Evidence for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability was investigated using long-range and real-time PCR assays. Mitochondrial cristae morphology was assessed with transmission electron microscopy. Results Both affected sisters presented with a similar cluster of neurodevelopmental deficits marked by failure to thrive, generalised neuromuscular weakness and optic atrophy. The disease progression was ultimately fatal with severe encephalopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities were globally decreased in skeletal muscle biopsies. They were found to be homozygous for a novel c.1601T>G (p.Leu534Arg) mutation in the OPA1 gene, which resulted in a marked loss of steady-state levels of the native OPA1 protein. We observed severe mtDNA depletion in DNA extracted from the patients’ muscle biopsies. Mitochondrial morphology was consistent with abnormal mitochondrial membrane fusion. Conclusions We have established, for the first time, a causal link between a pathogenic homozygous OPA1 mutation and human disease. The fatal multisystemic manifestations observed further extend the complex phenotype associated with pathogenic OPA1 mutations, in particular the previously unreported association

  4. Treatment of hypertrophic scars using a long-pulsed dye laser with cryogen-spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Kono, Taro; Erçöçen, Ali Rza; Nakazawa, Hiroaki; Nozaki, Motohiro

    2005-05-01

    Hypertrophic scars are common and cause functional and psychologic morbidity. The conventional pulsed dye laser (585 nm) has been shown previously to be effective in the treatment of a variety of traumatic and surgical scars, with improvement in scar texture, color, and pliability, with minimal side effects. This prospective study was performed to determine the effectiveness of the long-pulsed dye laser (595 nm) with cryogen-spray cooling device in the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Fifteen Asian patients with 22 hypertrophic scars were treated by the long-pulsed dye laser (595 nm) with cryogen-spray cooling device. In 5 patients, the scar area was divided into halves, one half of which was treated with the laser, whereas the other half was not treated and was used as a negative control. All patients received 2 treatments at 4-week intervals, and evaluations were done by photographic and clinical assessment and histologic evaluation before the treatment and 1 month after the last laser treatment. Treatment outcome was graded by a blind observer using the Vancouver General Hospital (VGH) Burn Scar Assessment Scale. Symptoms such as pain, pruritus, and burning of the scar improved significantly. VGH scores improved in all treated sites, and there was a significant difference between the baseline and posttreatment scores, corresponding to an improvement of 51.4 +/- 14.7% (P < 0.01). Compared with the baseline, the mean percentage of scar flattening and erythema elimination was 40.7 +/- 20.7 and 65.3 +/- 25.5%, respectively (P < 0.01). The long-pulsed dye laser (595-nm) equipped with cryogen spray cooling device is an effective treatment of hypertrophic scars and can improve scar pliability and texture and decrease scar erythema and associated symptoms.

  5. Hypertrophic osteodystrophy preceding canine juvenile cellulitis in an Australian shepherd puppy

    PubMed Central

    Wentzell, Meaghan L.

    2011-01-01

    A 10-week-old intact female Australian shepherd dog was presented sternally recumbent, mildly pyrexic, and painful on long bone palpation of both forelimbs. Based on radiographs she was diagnosed with hypertrophic osteodystrophy. Analgesia was provided with intravenous, oral, and topical medications. Approximately 2 wk later she was presented for facial swelling, regional dermatitis, and lymphadenopathy. Canine juvenile cellulitis was diagnosed and successfully treated. PMID:21731101

  6. Evidence of invasive and noninvasive treatment modalities for hypertrophic scars: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Mona; Collins, Vanessa; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Rappl, Thomas; Branski, Ludwik K; Wurzer, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there are various therapeutic approaches to reduce hypertrophic scarring; however, there is no standard evidence-based treatment protocol. Hence, a systematic review was performed to obtain a summary of the latest clinical trials to evaluate evidence for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. The review protocol was registered and approved by PROSPERO (CRD42015027040). PubMed and Web of Science were searched using predefined MeSH-Terms to identify studies published within the last 10 years regarding treatment for hypertrophic scars. Exclusion criteria included a level of evidence (LoE) lower than I, nonhuman in vivo studies, in vitro studies, studies on keloids, literature reviews, and non-English articles. The literature search identified 1,029 unique articles, whereas 6 articles were prospective, randomized, blinded, controlled clinical trials with a LoE I, and were thus included in the systematic analysis. Three clinical trials evaluated silicone products and pressure garments, and the other three studies investigated the efficacy of intralesional injections of triamcinolone (TAC), 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) combined with TAC as well as the additional irradiation with a 585 nm pulsed-dye laser (PDL). Intralesional injections revealed significant improvements of the scar quality in terms of height, thickness, erythema, and pigmentation. Pressure garments showed favorable results but there was no evidence that silicone products were able to improve the scar quality. The systematic review demonstrated that there are just a few clinical trials with a LoE of I. Consequently, evidence is still lacking especially for noninvasive treatment regimens for hypertrophic scars. Intralesional injections of 5-FU mixed with a low dose of TAC can be seen as most appropriate treatment modality. Prospective clinical trials to determine the efficiency of silicone products are warranted.

  7. Vagal enhancement linking abnormal blood pressure response and subendocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Sugihara, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    An abnormal blood pressure response to exercise has been reported to be associated with left ventricular subendocardial ischemia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We report a case of HCM with an abnormal blood pressure response and subendocardial ischemia, in which the analysis of heart rate variability revealed exercise-induced vagal enhancement. The present case highlights the possible mechanism linking abnormal blood pressure response and left ventricular subendocardial ischemia in patients with HCM.

  8. Methane and Carbon Cioxide Emissions from 40 Lakes Along a North-South Latitudinal Transect in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter Anthony, K. M.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Anthony, P.; Grosse, G.; Chanton, J.

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the relationship between CH4 and CO2 emission modes in 40 lakes along a latitudinal transect in Alaska to physicochemical limnology, geographic characteristics and permafrost soil types and carbon stocks surrounding lakes. We found that all lakes were net sources of atmospheric CH4 and CO2 but that the climate warming impact of lake CH4 emissions was two times higher than that of CO2. Ebullition and Diffusion were the dominant modes of CH4 and CO2 emissions respectively. Geographically, CH4 emissions from stratified, dystrophic interior Alaska thermokarst (thaw) lakes formed in icy, organic-rich yedoma permafrost soils were 6-fold higher than from non-yedoma lakes near Toolik Field Station and the rest of Alaska. Total CH4 emission was correlated with soil carbon stocks adjacent to lakes, concentrations of phosphate and total nitrogen in lake water, Secchi depth and lake area, with yedoma lakes having higher carbon stocks and nutrient concentrations, shallower Secchi depth, and smaller lake areas. Our findings suggest that permafrost type plays important roles in determining CH4 emissions from lakes by both supplying organic matter to methanogenesis directly from thawing permafrost and by enhancing nutrient availability to primary production, which can also fuel decomposition and methanogenesis.

  9. Lake Michigan fish acoustic data from 2011 to 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, David M.; Claramunt, Randall M.; Hanson, Dale

    2016-01-01

    Each line in the file “Lake Michigan fish acoustic data from 2011 to 2016.csv” represents the acoustic data and estimated fish density for a single depth layer of water. Surveys are conducted along transects, transects are divided horizontally into successive intervals, and then within an interval there are multiple successive depth layers. Area backscattering (ABC), mean acoustic size (sigma), and fish density are reported for each unique transect-interval – layer from Lake Michigan in the years 2011-2016. Area backscattering (PRC_ABC), mean acoustic size (sigma), and fish density in the intervals and layers of acoustic survey transects of Lake Michigan in the years 2011-2016. The survey is carried out using a stratified, systematic design with transect locations randomized within each stratum. As a result, transect location varies each year.

  10. Short term reduction of left ventricular mass in primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by octreotide injections.

    PubMed Central

    Günal, A. I.; Işik, A.; Celiker, H.; Eren, O.; Celebi, H.; Günal, S. Y.; Lüleci, C.

    1996-01-01

    Growth factors have been shown to be associated with primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Octreotide, a long acting somatostatin analogue, can prevent the stimulating effect of growth factors and decrease the left ventricular mass in patients with acromegaly. In the light of these results, three patients with primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were treated with subcutaneous octreotide (50 micrograms three times a day during the first week and 100 micrograms twice a day for the following three weeks). Initially, two patients were in New York Heart Association class II in and one was in class III. At the end of a four week treatment session all were in class I. There were significant decreases in left ventricular posterior wall thickness, interventricular septum thickness, and left ventricular mass in all three patients. Both left ventricular end diastolic and end systolic diameters had increased in all of the patients at the end of the fourth week. Two of three patients showed improved diastolic filling: their hyperdynamic systolic performance returned to normal. No side effects were observed during octreotide treatment. The considerable improvement obtained with the short term octreotide treatment in patients with primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy seems promising. PMID:8944587

  11. Altered hypertrophic chondrocyte kinetics in GDF-5 deficient murine tibial growth plates.

    PubMed

    Mikic, B; Clark, R T; Battaglia, T C; Gaschen, V; Hunziker, E B

    2004-05-01

    The growth/differentiation factors (GDFs) are a subgroup of the bone morphogenetic proteins best known for their role in joint formation and chondrogenesis. Mice deficient in one of these signaling proteins, GDF-5, exhibit numerous skeletal abnormalities, including shortened limb bones. The primary aim of this study was determine whether GDF-5 deficiency would alter the growth rate in growth plates from the long bones in mice and, if so, how this is achieved. Stereologic and cell kinetic parameters in proximal tibial growth plates from 5-week-old female GDF-5 -/- mice and control littermates were examined. GDF-5 deficiency resulted in a statistically significant reduction in growth rate (-14%, p=0.03). The effect of genotype on growth rate was associated with an altered hypertrophic phase duration, with hypertrophic cells from GDF-5 deficient mice exhibiting a significantly longer phase duration compared to control littermates (+25%, p=0.006). These data suggest that one way in which GDF-5 might modulate the rate of endochondral bone growth could be by affecting the duration of the hypertrophic phase in growth plate chondrocytes.

  12. HOXA9 regulates angiogenesis in human hypertrophic scars: induction of VEGF secretion by epidermal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Peng-Fei; Xu, Ying-Bin; Tang, Jin-Ming; Yang, Rong-Hua; Liu, Xu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars are fibroproliferative disorders of excessive wound healing after skin injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis plays a major role in fibrogenesis and hypertrophic scar formation. Over recent years, there has been a major interest in homeobox gene regulation of VEGF-VEGFR mediated angiogenesis in dermal tissue. In the current study, we investigated the role of homeobox genes in the epidermis, for their role in angiogenesis, with a focus on epidermal-mesenchymal interactions. As epidermal stem cells (ESCs) have a central role in epidermal homeostasis, we tested the hypothesis that these cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scars through the HOXA9-VEGF/VEGFR signaling pathways. We found significant differences in the expression of homeobox A9 in hyperplastic scar tissue during different phases of development. These differences coincided with similar regulations in VEGF expression and with the distribution of ESCs. HOXA9 is expressed in cultured human ESCs in vitro. Antisense suppression of HOXA9 expression was found to suppress VEGF levels in ESCs. Together these findings indicate that homeobox A9 regulates the expression of VEGF in ESCs. PMID:25031718

  13. Acute effects of sildenafil and dobutamine in the hypertrophic and failing right heart in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate whether acute intravenous administration of the phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor sildenafil in a single clinically relevant dose improves the in vivo function of the hypertrophic and failing right ventricle (RV). Wistar rats () were subjected to pulmonary trunk banding (PTB) causing RV hypertrophy and failure. Four weeks after surgery, they were randomized to receive an intravenous bolus dose of sildenafil (1 mg/kg; ), vehicle (), or dobutamine (10 μg/kg; ). Invasive RV pressures were recorded continuously, and transthoracic echocardiography was performed 1, 5, 15, 25, 35, 50, 70, and 90 minutes after injecting the bolus. Cardiac function was compared to baseline measurements to evaluate the in vivo effects of each specific treatment. The PTB procedure caused significant hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, and reduction in RV function evaluated by echocardiography (TAPSE) and invasive pressure measurements. Sildenafil did not improve the function of the hypertrophic failing right heart in vivo, measured by TAPSE, RV systolic pressure (RVsP), and dp/dtmax. Dobutamine improved RV function 1 minute after injection measured by TAPSE ( vs. cm; ), RVsP ( vs. mmHg; ), and dp/dtmax ( vs. mmHg/s; ). Acute administration of the PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil in a single clinically relevant dose did not modulate the in vivo function of the hypertrophic failing right heart of the rat measured by echocardiography and invasive hemodynamics. In the same model, dobutamine acutely improved RV function. PMID:24618544

  14. Benazepril and subclinical feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A prospective, blinded, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Di Fruscia, Rocky

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Twenty-one cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were enrolled in this study to determine if the administration of benazepril (0.5 mg/kg body weight [BW], PO, q24h) to cats with subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy improves cardiac diastolic function and reverses left ventricular hypertrophy when compared with diltiazem controlled delivery (CD) (10 mg/kg BW, PO, q24h). Cats were evaluated at day 0 and after 3 and 6 months of therapy. In the benazepril group (n = 11), the diastolic transmitral flow of the E and A waves ratio (E/A ratio) increased significantly between 0 and 6 months (P = 0.009) and the thickness of the left ventricular free wall in systole (LVFWs) decreased significantly between 0 and 3 months (P = 0.04). In the diltiazem CD group (n = 5), none of the parameters varied significantly throughout the study. There was no difference between the benazepril and the diltiazem CD group throughout the study. Therefore, the variations observed for the E/A ratio and the LVFWs may have been incidental. Further studies will be needed to establish the role of benazepril in subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cat. PMID:16734369

  15. Aberrant α-Adrenergic Hypertrophic Response in Cardiomyocytes from Human Induced Pluripotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Földes, Gabor; Matsa, Elena; Kriston-Vizi, János; Leja, Thomas; Amisten, Stefan; Kolker, Ljudmila; Kodagoda, Thusharika; Dolatshad, Nazanin F.; Mioulane, Maxime; Vauchez, Karine; Arányi, Tamás; Ketteler, Robin; Schneider, Michael D.; Denning, Chris; Harding, Sian E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-CMs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-CMs) represent new models for drug discovery. Although hypertrophy is a high-priority target, we found that hiPSC-CMs were systematically unresponsive to hypertrophic signals such as the α-adrenoceptor (αAR) agonist phenylephrine (PE) compared to hESC-CMs. We investigated signaling at multiple levels to understand the underlying mechanism of this differential responsiveness. The expression of the normal α1AR gene, ADRA1A, was reversibly silenced during differentiation, accompanied by ADRA1B upregulation in either cell type. ADRA1B signaling was intact in hESC-CMs, but not in hiPSC-CMs. We observed an increased tonic activity of inhibitory kinase pathways in hiPSC-CMs, and inhibition of antihypertrophic kinases revealed hypertrophic increases. There is tonic suppression of cell growth in hiPSC-CMs, but not hESC-CMs, limiting their use in investigation of hypertrophic signaling. These data raise questions regarding the hiPSC-CM as a valid model for certain aspects of cardiac disease. PMID:25418732

  16. Co-localization of LTBP-2 with FGF-2 in fibrotic human keloid and hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Sideek, Mohamed A; Teia, Abdulrahman; Kopecki, Zlatko; Cowin, Allison J; Gibson, Mark A

    2016-02-01

    We have recently shown that Latent transforming growth factor-beta-1 binding protein-2 (LTBP-2) has a single high-affinity binding site for fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and that LTBP-2 blocks FGF-2 induced cell proliferation. Both proteins showed strong co-localisation within keloid skin from a single patient. In the current study, using confocal microscopy, we have investigated the distribution of the two proteins in normal and fibrotic skin samples including normal scar tissue, hypertrophic scars and keloids from multiple patients. Consistently, little staining for either protein was detected in normal adult skin and normal scar samples but extensive co-localisation of the two proteins was observed in multiple examples of hypertrophic scars and keloids. LTBP-2 and FGF-2 were co-localised to fine fibrous elements within the extracellular matrix identified as elastic fibres by immunostaining with anti-fibrillin-1 and anti-elastin antibodies. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of RNA samples from multiple patients confirmed dramatically increased expression of LTBP-2 and FGF-2, similar TGF-beta 1, in hypertrophic scar compared to normal skin and scar tissue. Overall the results suggest that elevated LTBP-2 may bind and sequester FGF-2 on elastic fibres in fibrotic tissues and modulate FGF-2's influence on the repair and healing processes.

  17. Idiopathic non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in an infant successfully treated via endoscopic approach

    PubMed Central

    Karnsakul, Wikrom; Cannon, Mary L; Gillespie, Stacey; Vaughan, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Non-peptic, non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis has rarely been reported in pediatric literature. Endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation has been shown to be a safe procedure in treating gastric outlet obstruction in older children and adults. Partial gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) was diagnosed in an infant by history and confirmed by an upper gastrointestinal series (UGI). Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography scan excluded idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, abdominal tumors, gastrointestinal and hepato-biliary-pancreatic anomalies. Endoscopic findings showed a pinhole-sized pylorus and did not indicate peptic ulcer disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, antral web, or evidence of allergic and inflammatory bowel diseases. Three sessions of a step-wise endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation were conducted under general anesthesia and a fluoroscopy at two week intervals using catheter balloons (Boston Scientific Microvasive®, MA, USA) of increasing diameters. Repeat UGI after the first session revealed normal gastrointestinal transit and no intestinal obstruction. The patient tolerated solid food without any gastrointestinal symptoms since the first session. The endoscope was able to be passed through the pylorus after the last session. Although the etiology of GOO in this infant is unclear (proposed mechanisms are herein discussed), endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation was a safe procedure for treating this young infant with non-peptic, non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis and should be considered as an initial approach before pyloroplasty in such presentations. PMID:21191516

  18. Porous decellularized tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilage as a scaffold for large bone defect healing.

    PubMed

    Cunniffe, Gráinne M; Vinardell, Tatiana; Murphy, J Mary; Thompson, Emmet M; Matsiko, Amos; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Clinical translation of tissue engineered therapeutics is hampered by the significant logistical and regulatory challenges associated with such products, prompting increased interest in the use of decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) to enhance endogenous regeneration. Most bones develop and heal by endochondral ossification, the replacement of a hypertrophic cartilaginous intermediary with bone. The hypothesis of this study is that a porous scaffold derived from decellularized tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilage will retain the necessary signals to instruct host cells to accelerate endogenous bone regeneration. Cartilage tissue (CT) and hypertrophic cartilage tissue (HT) were engineered using human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, decellularized and the remaining ECM was freeze-dried to generate porous scaffolds. When implanted subcutaneously in nude mice, only the decellularized HT-derived scaffolds were found to induce vascularization and de novo mineral accumulation. Furthermore, when implanted into critically-sized femoral defects, full bridging was observed in half of the defects treated with HT scaffolds, while no evidence of such bridging was found in empty controls. Host cells which had migrated throughout the scaffold were capable of producing new bone tissue, in contrast to fibrous tissue formation within empty controls. These results demonstrate the capacity of decellularized engineered tissues as 'off-the-shelf' implants to promote tissue regeneration.

  19. Spin-up from rest in a stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flor, Jan-Bert; Bush, John; Ungarish, Marius

    2002-11-01

    We investigate the spin-up from rest of a stratified fluid with initial Brunt-Väisälä frequency N bound within a cylindrical container of height H and radius R which is set to rotate impulsively with angular speed Ω. The initial phase of motion is marked by the establishment of axisymmetric corner vortices fed by radial Ekman transport, a process detailed in Flor, Ungarish & Bush (2001). The subsequent evolution of the central vortex depends critically on N/f. For N/f > 1 and H/R >1, the axisymmetry of the system is retained throughout the spin-up process: the central vortex attains a state of near solid body rotation by the diffusion of vorticity from the sidewalls. For N/f > 1 and H/R < 1, the central vortex breaks up into a series of vertical vortices that enhance transfer of angular momentum from the boundaries and so expedite the spin-up process. For N/f < 1, the central vortex becomes unstable through a tilting instability. In a short tank, this is marked by a simple tipping of the central stratified vortex. In a tall tank, the centerline of the central vortex is twisted from its vertical position, and the resulting instability gives rise to a stack of vortices with approximately constant Burger ratio Nh/fR.

  20. Stability of steam-water countercurrent stratified flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S C

    1985-10-01

    Two flow instabilities which limit the normal condensation processes in countercurrent stratified steam-water flow have been identified experimentally: flooding and condensation-induced waterhammer. In order to initiate condensation-induced waterhammer in nearly horizontal or moderately-inclined steam/subcooled-water flow, two conditions, the appearance of a wavy interface and complete condensation of the incoming steam, are necessary. Analyses of these conditions are performed on a basis of flow stability and heat transfer considerations. Flooding data for several inclinations and channel heights are collected. Effects of condensation, inclination angle and channel height on the flooding characteristics are discussed. An envelope theory for the onset of flooding in inclined stratified flow is developed, which agrees well with the experimental data. Some empirical information on basic flow parameters, such as mean film thickness and interfacial friction factor required for this theory are measured. The previous viewpoints on flooding appear not to conflict with the present experimental data in nearly horizontal flow but the flooding phenomena in nearly vertical flow appear to be more complicated than those described by these viewpoints because of liquid droplet entrainment.

  1. Experiments on conical beam waves in a rotating stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P.; Peacock, T.

    2003-11-01

    Though the theory of linear disturbances in a rotating stratified fluid is well known (Waves in the Ocean, Le Blond and Mysak), direct experimental verification of the cut-off frequencies and inclination angles of these gyroscopic/internal gravity wave conical beams seems not to have been performed. A large cylindrical tank riding on an air-bearing platform is linearly stratified with salt-water using the double-bucket method. Density profiles are measured in situ with a conductivity probe. Visualization of a section of the upward and downward propagating conical beams generated from a sphere vertically oscillating about its central position along the cylinder axis is performed using the ``synthetic schlieren" technique for axisymmetric density fields. Preliminary data for the beam angles θ from horizontal at three nominal Brunt-Väisälä freqencies N = 0.55, 1.05, 1.60 show good quantative agreement with theory at three nominal rotation rates 2 Ω/N = 0, 1/3, 2/3.

  2. Effective mass discontinuity and current oscillations in stratified systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halilov, S.; Mil'shtein, S.

    2015-11-01

    Tunnelling transport in modulated film, which occurs either stoichiometrically or due to a stress field, is analysed in terms of the variable carrier effective mass tensor. It is shown that the mass tensor discontinuity alone, i.e. with no actual potential barrier present, may lead to current oscillations versus the size of the modulated region. While both effects of mass discontinuity and the band offset upon the carrier flow are formally described in terms of wave mechanics, their mechanisms are quite distinct: the magnitude of the current oscillations due to mass disruption is determined by the differential mass across the interface, i.e. by change in the covalency due to structural modulation, whereas the band offset is generally an effect of the affinity change across the interface. Both effects are superimposed by the 3D kinematic coupling of the orthogonal transport, either constructively or destructively, leading to an oscillatory dependence of the current magnitude on the film dimension. As an illustration, the analysis is applied to a Si1-x Ge x /Si stratified structure to demonstrate the effect of quasi-bound states on the transport. The modelling is corroborated by a device simulation of a SiGe system in a heterojunction bipolar transistor setting. The findings can be used as a general method to control anisotropic tunnelling transport in stratified structures.

  3. LOCAL RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC INSTABILITIES IN MAGNETICALLY STRATIFIED MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Ted; Blaes, Omer

    2011-11-20

    We study local radiation magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in static, optically thick, vertically stratified media with constant flux mean opacity. We include the effects of vertical gradients in a horizontal background magnetic field. Assuming rapid radiative diffusion, we use the zero gas pressure limit as an entry point for investigating the coupling between the photon bubble instability and the Parker instability. Apart from factors that depend on wavenumber orientation, the Parker instability exists for wavelengths longer than a characteristic wavelength {lambda}{sub tran}, while photon bubbles exist for wavelengths shorter than {lambda}{sub tran}. The growth rate in the Parker regime is independent of the orientation of the horizontal component of the wavenumber when radiative diffusion is rapid, but the range of Parker-like wavenumbers is extended if there exists strong horizontal shear between field lines (i.e., horizontal wavenumber perpendicular to the magnetic field). Finite gas pressure introduces an additional short-wavelength limit to the Parker-like behavior, and also limits the growth rate of the photon bubble instability to a constant value at short wavelengths. We also consider the effects of differential rotation with accretion disk applications in mind. Our results may explain why photon bubbles have not yet been observed in recent stratified shearing box accretion disk simulations. Photon bubbles may physically exist in simulations with high radiation to gas pressure ratios, but higher spatial resolution will be needed to resolve the asymptotically growing unstable wavelengths.

  4. Large-scale anisotropy in stably stratified rotating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, R.; Mininni, P. D.; Rosenberg, D. L.; Pouquet, A.

    2014-08-28

    We present results from direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations in the presence of rotation and/or stratification, both in the vertical direction. The runs are forced isotropically and randomly at small scales and have spatial resolutions of up to $1024^3$ grid points and Reynolds numbers of $\\approx 1000$. We first show that solutions with negative energy flux and inverse cascades develop in rotating turbulence, whether or not stratification is present. However, the purely stratified case is characterized instead by an early-time, highly anisotropic transfer to large scales with almost zero net isotropic energy flux. This is consistent with previous studies that observed the development of vertically sheared horizontal winds, although only at substantially later times. However, and unlike previous works, when sufficient scale separation is allowed between the forcing scale and the domain size, the total energy displays a perpendicular (horizontal) spectrum with power law behavior compatible with $\\sim k_\\perp^{-5/3}$, including in the absence of rotation. In this latter purely stratified case, such a spectrum is the result of a direct cascade of the energy contained in the large-scale horizontal wind, as is evidenced by a strong positive flux of energy in the parallel direction at all scales including the largest resolved scales.

  5. Large-scale anisotropy in stably stratified rotating flows

    DOE PAGES

    Marino, R.; Mininni, P. D.; Rosenberg, D. L.; ...

    2014-08-28

    We present results from direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations in the presence of rotation and/or stratification, both in the vertical direction. The runs are forced isotropically and randomly at small scales and have spatial resolutions of up tomore » $1024^3$ grid points and Reynolds numbers of $$\\approx 1000$$. We first show that solutions with negative energy flux and inverse cascades develop in rotating turbulence, whether or not stratification is present. However, the purely stratified case is characterized instead by an early-time, highly anisotropic transfer to large scales with almost zero net isotropic energy flux. This is consistent with previous studies that observed the development of vertically sheared horizontal winds, although only at substantially later times. However, and unlike previous works, when sufficient scale separation is allowed between the forcing scale and the domain size, the total energy displays a perpendicular (horizontal) spectrum with power law behavior compatible with $$\\sim k_\\perp^{-5/3}$$, including in the absence of rotation. In this latter purely stratified case, such a spectrum is the result of a direct cascade of the energy contained in the large-scale horizontal wind, as is evidenced by a strong positive flux of energy in the parallel direction at all scales including the largest resolved scales.« less

  6. LONGITUDINAL OSCILLATIONS IN DENSITY STRATIFIED AND EXPANDING SOLAR WAVEGUIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Luna-Cardozo, M.; Verth, G.; Erdelyi, R. E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk

    2012-04-01

    Waves and oscillations can provide vital information about the internal structure of waveguides in which they propagate. Here, we analytically investigate the effects of density and magnetic stratification on linear longitudinal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. The focus of this paper is to study the eigenmodes of these oscillations. It is our specific aim to understand what happens to these MHD waves generated in flux tubes with non-constant (e.g., expanding or magnetic bottle) cross-sectional area and density variations. The governing equation of the longitudinal mode is derived and solved analytically and numerically. In particular, the limit of the thin flux tube approximation is examined. The general solution describing the slow longitudinal MHD waves in an expanding magnetic flux tube with constant density is found. Longitudinal MHD waves in density stratified loops with constant magnetic field are also analyzed. From analytical solutions, the frequency ratio of the first overtone and fundamental mode is investigated in stratified waveguides. For small expansion, a linear dependence between the frequency ratio and the expansion factor is found. From numerical calculations it was found that the frequency ratio strongly depends on the density profile chosen and, in general, the numerical results are in agreement with the analytical results. The relevance of these results for solar magneto-seismology is discussed.

  7. Zombie Turbulence and More in Stratified Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Philip; Barranco, Joe; Pei, Suyang; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang

    2016-11-01

    Zombie turbulence occurs in rotating, shearing vertically-stratified flows such as stratified Couette flows. The turbulence is triggered by a neutrally-stable eigenmode with a critical layer receptive to finite-amplitude perturbations. Once excited, the critical layer becomes a vortex layer pair that rolls up into discrete vortices. Those vortices excite new critical layers, and the process repeats ad infinitum. When the vortex amplitudes become sufficiently large, the flow becomes turbulent. Although possessing a mid-range energy spectrum with E (k) k - 5 / 3 , the turbulence is non-Kolmogorov, highly anisotropic, and with large turbulent, but coherent, structures that retain the length scales of the spacing between the critical layers. The motivation for this study is protoplanetary disks (PPDs) where new stars form. In the PPD the Brunt-Vaisala frequency N increases as a function of distance from the midplane where it is zero. We cannot trigger the initial finite amplitude instability where N is small (close to the midplane). However, computations in PPDs and Couette flows show that zombie turbulence forms where N is large, and then a new type of turbulence, that is neither zombie nor Kolmogorov turbulence, fills in the remainder of the domain even where N = 0 .

  8. Lake Nasser and Toshka Lakes, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Nasser (center) and the Toshka Lakes (center left) glow emerald green and black in this MODIS true-color image acquired March 8, 2002. Located on and near the border of Egypt and Norther Sudan, these lakes are an oasis of water in between the Nubian (lower right) and Libyan Deserts (upper left). Also visible are the Red Sea (in the upper right) and the Nile River (running north from Lake Nasser). Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  9. Thermal characteristics of Lake Michigan, 1954-55

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, John F.; Moffett, James W.; Gannon, John E.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal regime of Lake Michigan is described on the basis of the analysis of 1,671 bathythermograph casts made in 1954 and 1955. The beginning, duration, geographic extent, and ending of thermal stratification were determined from 51 thermal profiles from all areas of the open lake. The lake gained heat for about 5 months (mid-March to mid-August) and lost heat over the rest of the year. It was thermally stratified during much of the warming cycle and vertically isothermal during much of the cooling cycle. The annual warming period began by April and was well underway by mid-May. During the transitional period between the isothermal conditions of winter and the thermal stratification of summer, the rate of warming was relatively fast. Seasonal warming began in the shallow inshore waters, which were usually thermally stratified by mid to late May. Stratification persisted in the deeper offshore water into December. Maximum surface temperatures and highest average metalimnion temperatures were reached in early August. Local variations in water temperatures during stratification, however, were a common feature of the thermal characteristics of Lake Michigan. These sometimes sudden changes were caused by upwellings of cold bottom waters that in some instances affected areas of hundreds of square miles. During the warming period of 1954, the heat content of Lake Michigan increased an average of 425 gm-cal/cm??/day. The annual heat budget of the lake for 1954 was 51,700 calories which is similar to that reported for 1942 (50,000 calories) and 1943 (62,000 calories). Heat was lost from mid-August until March, at a rate of about 250 gm-cal/cm??/day. Seasonal thermal characteristics differed little between 1954 and 1955, and were similar to those observed during studies in 1941 and 1942.

  10. Molecular and isotopic insights into methane oxidation in Lake Kivu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigah, P. K.; Wehrli, B.; Schubert, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Kivu is a meromictic lake in the East African Rift Valley, located between the Republic of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The hypolimnion is permanently stratified and contain an unusually high amount of dissolved methane (CH4; ~ 60 km3) and carbon dioxide (CO2; ~300 km3) at standard temperature and pressure. While microbial-mediated methane oxidation is an important sink of methane in the lake, little is known about the distribution of microbes involved in the methane oxidation. To provide insights into methanotrophy in the lake, we analyzed depth profile of CH4, δ13C-CH4 and δ13C-DIC, δ13C-POC and the biomarkers of methanotrophic archaea and bacteria and their stable carbon isotopic composition from suspended particulate matter isolated from the lake water column. Our preliminary data show enhanced methane oxidation in oxic-anoxic transition zone in the water column. Depth distribution of diagnostic methanotrophic archaeal biomarkers such as archaeol and hydroxyarchaeol suggest archaea might be involved in anaerobic methane oxidation. Phospholipid fatty acids and diplopterol distribution and carbon isotopic signatures indicate bacteria-mediated anaerobic (and aerobic) methane oxidation in the lake.

  11. Calcite dissolution in two deep eutrophic lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramisch, F.; Dittrich, M.; Mattenberger, C.; Wehrli, B.; Wueest, A.

    1999-10-01

    The calcium cycle, in particular carbonate dissolution, was analyzed in two deep eutrophic lakes, Lago di Lugano (288 m maximum depth) and Sempachersee (87 m) located in Switzerland. A box model approach was used to calculate calcite dissolution in the water column and at the sediment-water interface based on various lake monitoring data such as sediment traps, sediment cores, water and pore-water interface based on various lake monitoring data such as sediment traps, sediment cores, water and pore-water analysis. A model for stationary conditions allowing the calculation of calcite dissolution in the water column for a given particle size distribution was developed. The relative values of the simulated flux were consistent with sediment trap observations. The best fit of the dissolution rate constant of sinking calcite in Lago di Lugano was on the same order of magnitude (3 {center{underscore}dot} 10{sup {minus}10} kg{sup 1/3} s{sup {minus}1}) as published laboratory values for this surface controlled process. Both lakes show a similar specific calcite precipitation rate of 170 g Ca m{sup {minus}2} a{sup {minus}1}. The diffusive flux across the sediment-water interface amounts to about 15 and 10% of total calcite precipitation in Sempachersee and Lago di Lugano, respectively. However, 61% of the precipitated calcite is dissolved in the water column of Lago di Lugano compared to only 13% in Sempachersee. These results point towards the importance of grain size distributions and settling times in stratified deep waters as the two most important factors determining calcite retention in sediments of hard water lakes.

  12. Thermal structure of proglacial lakes in Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Shin; Minowa, Masahiro; Sakakibara, Daiki; Skvarca, Pedro; Sawagaki, Takanobu; Ohashi, Yoshihiko; Naito, Nozomu; Chikita, Kazuhisa

    2016-12-01

    Calving glaciers are rapidly retreating in many regions under the influence of ice-water interactions at the glacier front. In contrast to the numerous researches conducted on fjords in front of tidewater glaciers, very few studies have been reported on lakes in which freshwater calving glaciers terminate. To better understand ice-water interactions at the front of freshwater calving glaciers, we measured lakewater temperature, turbidity, and bathymetry near Glaciar Perito Moreno, Upsala, and Viedma, large calving glaciers of the Southern Patagonia Icefield. The thermal structures of these lakes were significantly different from those reported in glacial fjords. There was no indication of upwelling subglacial meltwater; instead, turbid and cold glacial water discharge filled the region near the lake bottom. This was because water density was controlled by suspended sediment concentrations rather than by water temperature. Near-surface wind-driven circulation reaches a depth of 180 m, forming a relatively warm isothermal layer (mean temperature of 5-6°C at Perito Moreno, 3-4°C at Upsala, and 6-7°C at Viedma), which should convey heat energy to the ice-water interface. However, the deeper part of the glacier front is in contact with stratified cold water, implying a limited amount of melting there. In the lake in front of Glaciar Viedma, the region deeper than 120 m was filled entirely with turbid and very cold water at pressure melting temperature. Our results revealed a previously unexplored thermal structure of proglacial lakes in Patagonia, suggesting its importance in the subaqueous melting of freshwater calving glaciers.

  13. Abundant iron and sulfur oxidizers in the stratified sediment of a eutrophic freshwater reservoir with annual cyanobacterial blooms

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Long; Lee, Chang Soo; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Lee, Hyung-Gwan; Lee, Sanghyup; Shin, Hyeon Ho; Lim, Dhongil; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2017-01-01

    The microbial community in eutrophic freshwater sediment was investigated from a 67-cm-deep sediment core collected from the Daechung Reservoir in South Korea, where cyanobacterial blooms have occurred annually for the past 30 years. The majority of core sediments were characterized by dark-grayish, fine-grained mud with abundant gas-escaped and thinly laminated layers. Intervals of summer and winter seasons were represented by periodic peaks of geochemical profiles of parameters such as grain size and relative carbon mass ratios to various nutrients such as nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus. In bacteria, Proteobacteria (66.6%) was the most prevalent phylum, followed by Chloroflexi (8.9%), Bacteroidetes (5.1%), and Spirochaetes (2.6%). Archaea were also abundant, representing approximately half of the total prokaryotes in the sediments. Notably, three Bacteria (Sulfuricurvum, Sideroxydans, and Gallionella) and one Archaea (Thermoplasmata) accounted for 43.4% and 38.4% of the total bacteria and archaea, respectively, implying that iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms dominate in this eutrophic freshwater sediment. These results indicate that 1) eutrophic freshwater lakes in monsoon climates undergo a stratified sedimentary process with seasonal and annual variations in geochemical and microbial profiles, and 2) the microbial oxidative metabolism of iron and sulfur is notably active in sediments from a eutrophic lake. PMID:28266642

  14. Abundant iron and sulfur oxidizers in the stratified sediment of a eutrophic freshwater reservoir with annual cyanobacterial blooms.

    PubMed

    Jin, Long; Lee, Chang Soo; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Lee, Hyung-Gwan; Lee, Sanghyup; Shin, Hyeon Ho; Lim, Dhongil; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2017-03-07

    The microbial community in eutrophic freshwater sediment was investigated from a 67-cm-deep sediment core collected from the Daechung Reservoir in South Korea, where cyanobacterial blooms have occurred annually for the past 30 years. The majority of core sediments were characterized by dark-grayish, fine-grained mud with abundant gas-escaped and thinly laminated layers. Intervals of summer and winter seasons were represented by periodic peaks of geochemical profiles of parameters such as grain size and relative carbon mass ratios to various nutrients such as nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus. In bacteria, Proteobacteria (66.6%) was the most prevalent phylum, followed by Chloroflexi (8.9%), Bacteroidetes (5.1%), and Spirochaetes (2.6%). Archaea were also abundant, representing approximately half of the total prokaryotes in the sediments. Notably, three Bacteria (Sulfuricurvum, Sideroxydans, and Gallionella) and one Archaea (Thermoplasmata) accounted for 43.4% and 38.4% of the total bacteria and archaea, respectively, implying that iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms dominate in this eutrophic freshwater sediment. These results indicate that 1) eutrophic freshwater lakes in monsoon climates undergo a stratified sedimentary process with seasonal and annual variations in geochemical and microbial profiles, and 2) the microbial oxidative metabolism of iron and sulfur is notably active in sediments from a eutrophic lake.

  15. Abundant iron and sulfur oxidizers in the stratified sediment of a eutrophic freshwater reservoir with annual cyanobacterial blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Long; Lee, Chang Soo; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Lee, Hyung-Gwan; Lee, Sanghyup; Shin, Hyeon Ho; Lim, Dhongil; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2017-03-01

    The microbial community in eutrophic freshwater sediment was investigated from a 67-cm-deep sediment core collected from the Daechung Reservoir in South Korea, where cyanobacterial blooms have occurred annually for the past 30 years. The majority of core sediments were characterized by dark-grayish, fine-grained mud with abundant gas-escaped and thinly laminated layers. Intervals of summer and winter seasons were represented by periodic peaks of geochemical profiles of parameters such as grain size and relative carbon mass ratios to various nutrients such as nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus. In bacteria, Proteobacteria (66.6%) was the most prevalent phylum, followed by Chloroflexi (8.9%), Bacteroidetes (5.1%), and Spirochaetes (2.6%). Archaea were also abundant, representing approximately half of the total prokaryotes in the sediments. Notably, three Bacteria (Sulfuricurvum, Sideroxydans, and Gallionella) and one Archaea (Thermoplasmata) accounted for 43.4% and 38.4% of the total bacteria and archaea, respectively, implying that iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms dominate in this eutrophic freshwater sediment. These results indicate that 1) eutrophic freshwater lakes in monsoon climates undergo a stratified sedimentary process with seasonal and annual variations in geochemical and microbial profiles, and 2) the microbial oxidative metabolism of iron and sulfur is notably active in sediments from a eutrophic lake.

  16. Lakes Ecosystem Services Online

    EPA Science Inventory

    Northeastern lakes provide valuable ecosystem services that benefit residents and visitors and are increasingly important for provisioning of recreational opportunities and amenities. Concurrently, however, population growth threatens lakes by, for instance, increasing nutrient ...

  17. National Lakes Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Lakes Assessment is a collaborative, statistical survey of the nation's lakes. It is one of four national surveys that EPA and its partners conduct to assess the condition and health of the nation's water resources.

  18. Lake Huron LAMPs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The approach in Lake Huron differs from the Lakewide Management Plans of the other Great Lakes: no formal binational designation of lakewide beneficial use impairments, nor extensive lakewide modeling of chemical loadings

  19. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  20. The Great Lakes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Great Lakes form the largest surface freshwater system on Earth. The U.S. and Canada work together to restore and protect the environment in the Great Lakes Basin. Top issues include contaminated sediments, water quality and invasive species.

  1. About Lake Tahoe

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the Lake Tahoe watershed, EPA's protection efforts, water quality issues, effects of climate, change, Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load TMDL), EPA-sponsored projects, list of partner agencies.

  2. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Eckert, Thomas H.; Schaner, Ted; Bowlby, James N.; Schleen, Larry P.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to maintain the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) population in Lake Ontario by stocking fry failed and the species was extirpated by the 1950s. Hatchery fish stocked in the 1960s did not live to maturity because of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) predation and incidental commercial harvest. Suppression of sea lampreys began with larvicide treatments of Lake Ontario tributaries in 1971 and was enhanced when the tributaries of Oneida Lake and Lake Erie were treated in the 1980s. Annual stocking of hatchery fish was resumed with the 1972 year class and peaked at about 1.8 million yearlings and 0.3 million fingerlings from the 1985–1990 year classes. Survival of stocked yearlings declined over 50% in the 1980 s and was negatively correlated with the abundance of lake trout > 550 mm long (r = −0.91, P < 0.01, n = 12). A slot length limit imposed by the State of New York for the 1988 fishing season reduced angler harvest. Angler harvest in Canadian waters was 3 times higher in eastern Lake Ontario than in western Lake Ontario. For the 1977–1984 year classes, mean annual survival rate of lake trout age 6 and older was 0.45 (range: 0.35–0.56). In U.S. waters during 1985–1992, the total number of lake trout harvested by anglers was about 2.4 times greater than that killed by sea lampreys. The number of unmarked lake trout < 250 mm long in trawl catches in 1978–1992 was not different from that expected due to loss of marks and failure to apply marks at the hatchery, and suggested that recruitment of naturally-produced fish was nil. However, many of the obstacles which may have impeded lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario during the 1980s are slowly being removed, and there are signs of a general ecosystem recovery. Significant recruitment of naturally produced lake trout by the year 2000, one interim objective of the rehabilitation plan for the Lake, may be achieved.

  3. [Mode of splitting of the second heart sound in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, N; Oki, T; Sakai, H; Asai, M; Ohshima, C; Kusaka, Y; Tominaga, T; Murao, A; Niki, T; Mori, H

    1983-06-01

    Mode of the splitting of the second heart sound ( IIs ) and left ventricular systolic time intervals (STIs) in patients (pts) with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were compared with those in hypertension (HT) with the global hypertrophy of the left ventricular wall. Forty-seven pts with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy [non-obstructive type (HCM, 30 pts), obstructive type (HOCM, 17 pts)] and 21 pts with HT were studied. The pts with HCM were classified as septal hypertrophic type (19 pts) and apical hypertrophic type (11 pts) on the basis of the echocardiographic findings. The pts with HOCM were classified as resting type (13 pts) and latent type (provoked by amyl nitrite: 4 pts) on the basis of the obstructive sign at rest. Mode of the splitting of the IIs : a) The pts with HCM showed a wide splitting of the IIs . The mean split interval during held expiration (IIA-IIP) was 41.0 +/- 9.9 msec. Twenty pts (67%) showed abnormal respiratory splitting. The mean IIA-IIP interval in septal hypertrophic type (45.3 +/- 9.0 msec) was significantly wider than that in apical hypertrophic type (33.6 +/- 6.7 msec) (p less than 0.05). There was a positive correlation between IIA-IIP interval and the thickness of the upper portion of the interventricular septum (r = 0.63). b) Nine out of 13 pts with resting type of HOCM showed a paradoxical (reversed) splitting with a mean IIA-IIP interval of -23.8 +/- 24.4 msec. On the other hand, pts with latent type showed a wide splitting similar to HCM with a mean IIA-IIP interval of 35.0 +/- 7.1 msec. c) The pts with HT showed a single IIs or physiological splitting. The mean IIA-IIP interval was 14.5 +/- 9.3 msec, which was significantly decreased than that of normals or the pts with HCM (p less than 0.01). Left ventricular systolic time intervals: a) The pts with an either type of HCM showed a short corrected left ventricular electromechanical systole [(Q-IIA)c] due to the shortening of the corrected left ventricular ejection time (LVETc). b) The

  4. A Killer Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In 1986, Lake Nyos, a volcanic lake in Cameroon, released a huge amount of carbon dioxide gas, killing over 1,700 people in the surrounding area. This case study, developed for use in a limnology or aquatic biology course, explores that event, introducing students to concepts relating to lake formation, thermal stratification, and dissolved gases.…

  5. Lake Layers: Stratification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Chris; And Others

    This teacher guide and student workbook set contains two learning activities, designed for fifth through ninth grade students, that concentrate on lake stratification and water quality. In the activities students model the seasonal temperature changes that occur in temperate lakes and observe the resulting stratification of lake waters. Students…

  6. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This book contains lesson plans that provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into elementary subjects. The book is divided into three subject areas: (1) History, which includes the origins of the Great Lakes, Great Lakes people, and shipwrecks; (2) Social Studies, which covers government, acid rain as a…

  7. Great Lakes: Chemical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1976-01-01

    The Tenth Great Lakes Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society met to assess current Chemical Research activity in the Great Lakes Basin, and addressed to the various aspects of the theme, Chemistry of the Great Lakes. Research areas reviewed included watershed studies, atmospheric and aquatic studies, and sediment studies. (BT)

  8. Lake Effects: The Lake Superior Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beery, Tom; And Others

    This curriculum guide was launched in response to a need for Lake Superior-specific educational materials and contains lessons and activities that can be used to teach about Lake Superior. The lessons in this book are divided into four sections. Each of the first three sections has a background section that provides basic information about Lake…

  9. Sedimentation from particle-bearing plumes in a stratified ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce R.; Hong, Youn Sub Dominic

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory experiments are performed to examine the sedimentation of particles that initially rise in a plume, then spread radially and settle in uniformly stratified fluid. Using light attenuation, the depth of the sediment bed is measured nonintrusively as a function of radius from the center of the plume. To gain some insight into these dynamics, an idealized model is developed by adapting well-established plume theory and a theory that accounts for sedimentation from surface gravity currents emanating from a plume impacting a rigid lid. We also account for recycling of falling particles that are re-entrained into the plume. With a suitable choice of parameters determining the intrusion height, entrainment during fountain collapse, and the radius at which settling from the intrusion begins, in most cases for which particles are predicted to be drawn back into the plume and recycled. The predictions for intrusion height, particle mound height, and spread agree within 20% of observations.

  10. Thermal surface signatures of ship propeller wakes in stratified waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voropayev, S. I.; Nath, C.; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    When a ship moves in temperature stratified water, e.g., in the ocean diurnal thermocline, the propeller(s) as well as the turbulent boundary layer of the hull mix the surface water with underlying colder fluid. As a result, when observed from above, a temperature "wake signature" of ˜1-2 °C may be detected at the water surface. To quantify this phenomenon, theoretical modeling and physical experiments were conducted. The dominant processes responsible for thermal wake generation were identified and parameterized. Most important similarity parameters were derived and estimates for wake signature contrast were made. To verify model predictions, scaled experiments were conducted, with the water surface temperature measured using a sensitive infrared camera. Comparison of laboratory measurements with model estimates has shown satisfactory agreement, both qualitative and quantitatively. Estimates for ocean ship-wake scenarios are also given, which are supported by available field observations.

  11. FULLY CONVECTIVE MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE IN STRATIFIED SHEARING BOXES

    SciTech Connect

    Bodo, G.; Rossi, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.

    2013-07-10

    We present a numerical study of turbulence and dynamo action in stratified shearing boxes with zero magnetic flux. We assume that the fluid obeys the perfect gas law and has finite (constant) thermal diffusivity. We choose radiative boundary conditions at the vertical boundaries in which the heat flux is proportional to the fourth power of the temperature. We compare the results with the corresponding cases in which fixed temperature boundary conditions are applied. The most notable result is that the formation of a fully convective state in which the density is nearly constant as a function of height and the heat is transported to the upper and lower boundaries by overturning motions is robust and persists even in cases with radiative boundary conditions. Interestingly, in the convective regime, although the diffusive transport is negligible, the mean stratification does not relax to an adiabatic state.

  12. A numerical and experimental study of stratified thermal storage

    SciTech Connect

    Oppel, F.J.; Ghajar, A.J.; Moretti, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    A one-dimensional, implicit, finite-difference model of a single stratified thermal storage tank has been developed. The model covers variable flow rates for charging or discharging the thermal storage tank and conduction and turbulent mixing within the water for two different inlet configurations. In order to handle variable flow rates, a ''conceptual buffer tank'' algorithm was developed. Turbulent mixing occurring in the tank was simulated through thermal eddy conductivity factors, which were determined from experimental data. A decreasing hyperbolic function predicted the best variation of the eddy conductivity factor inside the tank. A general relationship between the inlet eddy conductivity factor and the ratio of Reynolds number over Richardson number was established for the inlets investigated. The simulation model adequately predicted the experimental data. In addition, the model reproduced hydraulic test data better than a recent one-dimensional model found in the literature.

  13. Microfluidic titer plate for stratified 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Trietsch, Sebastiaan J; Israëls, Guido D; Joore, Jos; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vulto, Paul

    2013-09-21

    Human tissues and organs are inherently heterogeneous. Their functionality is determined by the interplay between different cell types, their secondary architecture, vascular system and gradients of signaling molecules and metabolites. Here we propose a stratified 3D cell culture platform, in which adjacent lanes of gels and liquids are patterned by phaseguides to capture this tissue heterogeneity. We demonstrate 3D cell culture of HepG2 hepatocytes under continuous perfusion, a rifampicin toxicity assay and co-culture with fibroblasts. 4T1 breast cancer cells are used to demonstrate invasion and aggregation models. The platform is incorporated in a microtiter plate format that renders it fully compatible with automation and high-content screening equipment. The extended functionality, ease of handling and full compatibility to standard equipment is an important step towards adoption of Organ-on-a-Chip technology for screening in an industrial setting.

  14. Advanced stratified charge rotary aircraft engine design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badgley, P.; Berkowitz, M.; Jones, C.; Myers, D.; Norwood, E.; Pratt, W. B.; Ellis, D. R.; Huggins, G.; Mueller, A.; Hembrey, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    A technology base of new developments which offered potential benefits to a general aviation engine was compiled and ranked. Using design approaches selected from the ranked list, conceptual design studies were performed of an advanced and a highly advanced engine sized to provide 186/250 shaft Kw/HP under cruise conditions at 7620/25,000 m/ft altitude. These are turbocharged, direct-injected stratified charge engines intended for commercial introduction in the early 1990's. The engine descriptive data includes tables, curves, and drawings depicting configuration, performance, weights and sizes, heat rejection, ignition and fuel injection system descriptions, maintenance requirements, and scaling data for varying power. An engine-airframe integration study of the resulting engines in advanced airframes was performed on a comparative basis with current production type engines. The results show airplane performance, costs, noise & installation factors. The rotary-engined airplanes display substantial improvements over the baseline, including 30 to 35% lower fuel usage.

  15. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D.; Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  16. Hydrodynamics of stratified epithelium: Steady state and linearized dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Ting; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical model for stratified epithelium is presented. The viscoelastic properties of the tissue are assumed to be dependent on the spatial distribution of proliferative and differentiated cells. Based on this assumption, a hydrodynamic description of tissue dynamics at the long-wavelength, long-time limit is developed, and the analysis reveals important insights into the dynamics of an epithelium close to its steady state. When the proliferative cells occupy a thin region close to the basal membrane, the relaxation rate towards the steady state is enhanced by cell division and cell apoptosis. On the other hand, when the region where proliferative cells reside becomes sufficiently thick, a flow induced by cell apoptosis close to the apical surface enhances small perturbations. This destabilizing mechanism is general for continuous self-renewal multilayered tissues; it could be related to the origin of certain tissue morphology, tumor growth, and the development pattern.

  17. The current structure of stratified tidal planetary boundary layer flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D.; Slaattelid, O.H.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents the bottom shear stress and velocity profiles in stratified tidal planetary boundary layer flow by using similarity theory. For a given seabed roughness length, free stream current velocity components, frequency of tidal oscillation, Coriolis parameter and stratification parameter the maximum bottom shear stress is determined for flow conditions in the rough, smooth and transitional smooth-to-rough turbulent regime. Further, the direction of the bottom shear stress and the velocity profiles are given. Comparison is made with data from field measurements of time-independent as well as tidal planetary boundary layer flow for neutral conditions, and the agreement between the predictions and the data is generally good. Further, an example of application for stable stratification is given, and qualitatively the predictions show, as expected, that the bottom shear stress and the thickness of the boundary layer become smaller for stable than for neutral stratification. Other features of the tidal planetary boundary layer flow are also discussed.

  18. An Anelastic Allspeed Projection Method for GravitationallyStratified Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti-Bono, Caroline; Colella, Phillip

    2005-02-24

    This paper looks at gravitationally-stratified atmospheric flows at low Mach and Froude numbers and proposes a new algorithm to solve the compressible Euler equations, in which the asymptotic limits are recovered numerically and the boundary conditions for block-structured local refinement methods are well-posed. The model is non-hydrostatic and the numerical algorithm uses a splitting to separate the fast acoustic dynamics from the slower anelastic dynamics. The acoustic waves are treated implicitly while the anelastic dynamics is treated semi-implicitly and an embedded-boundary method is used to represent mountain ranges. We present an example that verifies our asymptotic analysis and a set of results that compares very well with the classical gravity wave results presented by Durran.

  19. DNS of helicity-induced stratified turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandy, Abhilash J.; Rahimi, Abbas

    2013-11-01

    Helical flows undergoing density stratification have wide applications in meteorological phenomena such as dust devils, tornadoes, and hurricanes due to the complexity and disasters caused by them. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of transition to turbulence in a stably stratified Boussinesq fluid are presented for different rotation and stratification intensities. In order to understand the effect of velocity on the energy cascade, comparisons are made between helicity initiated and non-helical flows. Results show that stratification decelerates the helicity decay and causes velocity and vorticity to align with each other. With respect to the helical and non-helical flow comparisons, the total energy in the presence of stratification decays faster with helicity. In addition, the behavior of length scales were examined by comparing temporal variations of the vertical shearing of velocities. Results showed a growing asymmetry with time in the case of helical flow, while non-helical flow stayed close to begin symmetric.

  20. Creation of residual flows in a partially stratified estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, M.T.; Burau, J.R.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2001-01-01

    The creation of residual flows in estuaries is examined using acoustic Doppler current profiler data sets from northern San Francisco Bay. The data sets are analyzed using principal component analysis to examine the temporal variability of the flows which create the residual circulation. It is seen that in this periodically and partially stratified estuary the residual flows are created through a series of pulses with strong variability at the 24-hour timescale, through the interaction of shear, stratification and mixing. This interaction is captured through the use of a dimensionless number, the horizontal Richardson number (Rix), which is developed to examine the local balance between the stratifying and destratifying forces at the tidal timescale. It is seen that Rix is a valuable parameter in predicting the onset of the residual-creating events, with a threshold value of ??? 3 on ebb tides. This critical value is argued to be a threshold, above which the stratification and shear flow create a feedback effect, each further intensifying the other. This feedback results in a highly variable exchange flow which creates the estuarine residual in intermittent pulses rather than as a steady flow. Although typically attributed to baroclinic forcing, an argument is made that these pulses of residual-creating exchange flow could be created by barotropic forcing in the presence of variable stratification which is asymmetric between flood and ebb tides. This result poses a great challenge for turbulence modeling, as the timing and magnitude of stratification and shear must be correctly simulated on the tidal timescale in order to reproduce the effects seen in the data sets presented. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. RESISTIVITY-DRIVEN STATE CHANGES IN VERTICALLY STRATIFIED ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Hawley, John F.; Beckwith, Kris

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the effect of shear viscosity, {nu}, and Ohmic resistivity, {eta}, on the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in vertically stratified accretion disks through a series of local simulations with the Athena code. First, we use a series of unstratified simulations to calibrate physical dissipation as a function of resolution and background field strength; the effect of the magnetic Prandtl number, P{sub m} = {nu}/{eta}, on the turbulence is captured by {approx}32 grid zones per disk scale height, H. In agreement with previous results, our stratified disk calculations are characterized by a subthermal, predominately toroidal magnetic field that produces MRI-driven turbulence for |z| {approx}< 2H. Above |z| {approx} 2H, the magnetic pressure dominates and the field is buoyantly unstable. Large-scale radial and toroidal fields are also generated near the mid-plane and subsequently rise through the disk. The polarity of this mean field switches on a roughly 10 orbit period in a process that is well modeled by an {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo. Turbulent stress increases with P{sub m} but with a shallower dependence compared to unstratified simulations. For sufficiently large resistivity, {eta} {approx} c{sub s} H/1000, where c{sub s} is the sound speed, MRI turbulence within 2H of the mid-plane undergoes periods of resistive decay followed by regrowth. This regrowth is caused by amplification of the toroidal field via the dynamo. This process results in large amplitude variability in the stress on 10-100 orbital timescales, which may have relevance for partially ionized disks that are observed to have high- and low-accretion states.

  2. Turbulent thermal convection in a rotating stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. A.; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2002-09-01

    Turbulent convection induced by heating the bottom boundary of a horizontally homogeneous, linearly (temperature) stratified, rotating fluid layer is studied using a series of laboratory experiments. It is shown that the growth of the convective mixed layer is dynamically affected by background rotation (or Coriolis forces) when the parameter R = (h2[Omega]3/q0)2/3 exceeds a critical value of Rc [approximate] 275. Here h is the depth of the convective layer, [Omega] is the rate of rotation, and q0 is the buoyancy flux at the bottom boundary. At larger R, the buoyancy gradient in the mixed layer appears to scale as (db/dz)ml = C[Omega]2, where C [approximate] 0.02. Conversely, when R < Rc, the buoyancy gradient is independent of [Omega] and approaches that of the non-rotating case. The entrainment velocity, ue, for R > Rc was found to be dependent on [Omega] according to E = [Ri(1 + C[Omega]2/N2)][minus sign]1, where E is the entrainment coefficient based on the convective velocity w[low asterisk] = (q0h)1/3, E = ue/w[low asterisk], Ri is the Richardson number Ri = N2h2/w2[low asterisk], and N is the buoyancy frequency of the overlying stratified layer. The results indicate that entrainment in this case is dominated by non-penetrative convection, although the convective plumes can penetrate the interface in the form of lenticular protrusions.

  3. Visualization periodic flows in a continuously stratified fluid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardakov, R.; Vasiliev, A.

    2012-04-01

    To visualize the flow pattern of viscous continuously stratified fluid both experimental and computational methods were developed. Computational procedures were based on exact solutions of set of the fundamental equations. Solutions of the problems of flows producing by periodically oscillating disk (linear and torsion oscillations) were visualized with a high resolutions to distinguish small-scale the singular components on the background of strong internal waves. Numerical algorithm of visualization allows to represent both the scalar and vector fields, such as velocity, density, pressure, vorticity, stream function. The size of the source, buoyancy and oscillation frequency, kinematic viscosity of the medium effects were traced in 2D an 3D posing problems. Precision schlieren instrument was used to visualize the flow pattern produced by linear and torsion oscillations of strip and disk in a continuously stratified fluid. Uniform stratification was created by the continuous displacement method. The buoyancy period ranged from 7.5 to 14 s. In the experiments disks with diameters from 9 to 30 cm and a thickness of 1 mm to 10 mm were used. Different schlieren methods that are conventional vertical slit - Foucault knife, vertical slit - filament (Maksoutov's method) and horizontal slit - horizontal grating (natural "rainbow" schlieren method) help to produce supplementing flow patterns. Both internal wave beams and fine flow components were visualized in vicinity and far from the source. Intensity of high gradient envelopes increased proportionally the amplitude of the source. In domains of envelopes convergence isolated small scale vortices and extended mushroom like jets were formed. Experiments have shown that in the case of torsion oscillations pattern of currents is more complicated than in case of forced linear oscillations. Comparison with known theoretical model shows that nonlinear interactions between the regular and singular flow components must be taken

  4. Status and trends in the fish community of Lake Superior, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorman, Owen T.; Evrard, Lori M.; Cholwek, Gary A.; Vinson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Due to ship mechanical failures, nearshore sampling was delayed from mid-May to mid-June to mid-June to late August. The shift to summer sampling when the lake was stratified may have affected our estimates, thus our estimates of status and trends for the nearshore fish community in 2012 are tentative, pending results of future surveys. However, the results of the 2012 survey are comparable with those during 2009 and 2010 when lake-wide fish biomass declined to < 1.40 kg/ha. Declines in prey fish biomass since the late 1990s can be attributed to a combination of increased predation by recovered lake trout populations and infrequent and weak recruitment by the principal prey fishes, cisco and bloater. In turn declines in lake trout biomass since the mid-2000s are likely linked to declines in prey fish biomass. If lean and siscowet lake trout populations in nearshore waters continue to remain at current levels, predation mortality will likely maintain the relatively low prey fish biomass observed in recent years. Alternatively, if lake trout populations show a substantial decline in abundance in upcoming years, prey fish populations may rebound in a fashion reminiscent to what occurred in the late 1970s to mid-1980s. However, this scenario depends on substantial increases in harvest of lake trout, which seems unlikely given that levels of lake trout harvest have been flat or declining in many regions of Lake Superior since 2000.

  5. Repair of bone defects in vivo using tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilage grafts produced from nasal chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bardsley, Katie; Kwarciak, Agnieska; Freeman, Christine; Brook, Ian; Hatton, Paul; Crawford, Aileen

    2017-01-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects remains clinically challenging. The aim of our study was to use a rat model to use nasal chondrocytes to engineer a hypertrophic cartilage tissue which could be remodelled into bone in vivo by endochondral ossification. Primary adult rat nasal chondrocytes were isolated from the nasal septum, the cell numbers expanded in monolayer culture and the cells cultured in vitro on polyglycolic acid scaffolds in chondrogenic medium for culture periods of 5-10 weeks. Hypertrophic differentiation was assessed by determining the temporal expression of key marker genes and proteins involved in hypertrophic cartilage formation. The temporal changes in the genes measured reflected the temporal changes observed in the growth plate. Collagen II gene expression increased 6 fold by day 7 and was then significantly downregulated from day 14 onwards. Conversely, collagen X gene expression was detectable by day 14 and increased 100-fold by day 35. The temporal increase in collagen X expression was mirrored by increases in alkaline phosphatase gene expression which also was detectable by day 14 with a 30-fold increase in gene expression by day 35. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of the engineered constructs showed increased chondrocyte cell volume (31-45 μm), deposition of collagen X in the extracellular matrix and expression of alkaline phosphatase activity. However, no cartilage mineralisation was observed in in vitro culture of up to 10 weeks. On subcutaneous implantation of the hypertrophic engineered constructs, the grafts became vascularised, cartilage mineralisation occurred and loss of the proteoglycan in the matrix was observed. Implantation of the hypertrophic engineered constructs into a rat cranial defect resulted in angiogenesis, mineralisation and remodelling of the cartilage tissue into bone. Micro-CT analysis indicated that defects which received the engineered hypertrophic constructs showed 38.48% in bone volume

  6. Settling-driven convection: A mechanism of sedimentation from stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyal, David C. J. D.; Bursik, Marcus I.; Atkinson, Joseph F.

    1999-04-01

    Convection driven by sediment particles may play an important role in sedimentation from the base of buoyant (hypopycnal) plumes, for example, fluvial plumes in stratified estuaries and lakes, black smokers on the ocean floor, volcanic clouds, and coastal currents. In addition to the well-known double-diffusive convection mechanism, another mode of convective instability development is by settling across the density interface. We performed laboratory experiments to investigate this fingering/convective instability mechanism and its effect on particle distribution in the water column and deposition at the bed. A simple theoretical model of finger formation at a fluid density interface is developed based on an analogy with thermal/plume formation at a flat heated plate. This model, which involves a thickening interface layer that becomes gravitationally unstable relative to the ambient fluid, is in good agreement with measurements of finger size and instability wavelength from visualization experiments. Since fingering at the density interface drives larger-scale convection in the fluid below, a mass balance model of the lower layer, assuming strong mixing (i.e., uniform sediment concentration) is successfully applied to predict sediment concentration in the water column and deposition at the bed. Strong mixing can be assumed since convective velocities are usually much greater than the particle fall velocities. As convection proceeds, the sediment concentrations in the two layers approach each other and convection will die out. Using the model equations, we develop analytical expressions for the time when convection ceases and the portion of sediment remaining in the water column.

  7. Long Term Deep Mixing Changes in Lakes to Climate Change. The Question of When and How?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, G. B.; Schladow, S. G.; Reuter, J.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Tahoe (California-Nevada), an ice free warm-monomictic lake, has been warmed up over the last 35 years due to climate change. Lake Tahoe strongly stratifies during summer and its water body mixes well during winter. The last 35 years records indicate that complete lake turn over takes place once or twice in 3 to 4 years. If the lake warming trend continues, its deep mixing might be stopped at some point in the future. Since deep mixing supplies dissolved oxygen from surface to bottom, reduced mixing may result in evolution of anoxic condition near the sediment-water interface. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report (IPCC 2007) indicates continued warming over the next few decades. It is therefore important to assess mixing dynamics of the lake using predictions of the global circulation models (GCMs). The dynamic lake model (DLM), developed by University of California Davis researcher was used to estimate the mixing dynamics of the lake. The GCM-predicted trends in meteorological variables for the grid cell that includes Lake Tahoe were obtained from GCMs: (1) Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate V. 3.2 High Resolution (MIROC-HIRES) Japan, (2) National Center for Atmospheric Research, Community Climate Model (NCAR CCM V. 3.0), and (3) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory V CM2.1 (NOAA GFDL CM2.1). Sensitivity analysis results demonstrates that a change in longwave radiations has pronounced effect on lake warming. Results of 40-year simulations show that the lake continues to become warmer at the rate of approximately 0.013 oC per year and more stable. With continued climate change, deep mixing (full or greater than 300m) will cease after one-two decades. This indicates that Lake Tahoe is likely to transition to meromictic lake because of reduced mixing and increasing stability. This may result in major water quality problems and ecological changes over time.

  8. Mitochondrial ND5 12338T>C variant is associated with maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Chinese pedigree.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong; Song, Yanrui; Gu, Shulian; He, Xiangyu; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Shen, Yaoyao; Wu, Bifeng; Wang, Wei; Li, Shishi; Jiang, Pingping; Lu, Jianhua; Huang, Wendong; Yan, Qingfeng

    2012-09-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a primary disorder characterized by asymmetric thickening of the septum and left ventricular wall, which affects 1 in 500 individuals in the general population. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA have been found to be one of the most important causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Here we report the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of a Han Chinese family with a likely maternally transmitted hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Four (2 men/2 women) of 5 matrilineal relatives in this 3-generation family exhibited the variable severity and age at onset of 44 to 79 years old. Sequence analysis of the entire mitochondrial DNA in this pedigree identified the known homoplasmic ND5 12338T>C variant. This mitochondrial DNA haplogroup belongs to the Eastern Asian F2a. The 12338T>C variant, highly evolutionarily conserved, resulted in the replacement of the translation initiating methionine with a threonine, shortening the ND5 polypeptide by 2 amino acids. The occurrence of ND5 12338T>C variant exclusively in maternal members of this Chinese family suggested that the 12338T>C variant is associated with maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Our findings will provide theoretical basis for genetic counseling of maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  9. Nonobstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Out of the Shadows: Known from the Beginning but Largely Ignored … Until Now.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Rowin, Ethan J; Maron, Martin S; Braunwald, Eugene

    2017-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was first recognized as a disease of obstruction to left ventricular outflow, hence, its early names and acronyms such as idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic obstruction. The nonobstructive subset of patients, incapable of developing mechanical impedance to left ventricular outflow at rest or with physiologic exercise, was initially recognized by the Braunwald group at the National Institutes of Health >50 years ago in the preimaging era, and is now recognized as comprising about one-third of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients. Nevertheless, until recently, and for 25 years, this substantial patient subset has been largely ignored and incompletely understood in terms of its clinical significance and consequences. However, the newfound interest in nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with recent cohort data permits more robust clarity of this subset, as well as the overall disease spectrum. As a group, patients with nonobstructive disease experience a largely stable clinical course at relatively low risk for progressive heart failure symptoms to New York Heart Association class III/IV in (90%). On the other hand, there is a small but important subgroup of 10% at risk for developing drug-refractory advanced heart failure sufficient to justify consideration for heart transplant as the only definitive treatment option. This recognition closes a significant gap in understanding the natural history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, also underscoring that the disease is not uniformly grim but instead consistent with extended longevity, thereby providing many patients with a measure of reassurance.

  10. A Review of the Results and Methodology in the 1999 Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey at Salt Lake Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, Frank

    This report analyzes the 1999 Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) survey results of Salt Lake Community College (SLCC) (Utah) conducted by the Noel-Levitz company. In 1999, a stratified random sample was utilized that produced a more representative profile of the student demographics compared to previous years (e.g., the percentage of full-time…

  11. Lake Superior Zooplankton Biomass Predictions from LOPC Tow Surveys Compare Well with a Probability Based Net Survey

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a probability-based sampling of Lake Superior in 2006 and compared the zooplankton biomass estimate with laser optical plankton counter (LOPC) predictions. The net survey consisted of 52 sites stratified across three depth zones (0-30, 30-150, >150 m). The LOPC tow...

  12. Hazardous crater lakes studied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Minoru

    Crater lakes usually sit on top of volcanic conduits and act as condensers of magmatic vapor. Studies of crater lakes can therefore provide information on both deep magmatic activity and variations in the degassing state of a shallow magmatic body. The Lake Nyos gas disaster of August 1986 and a similar event in August 1984 at Lake Monoun, both in Cameroon, resulted from the accumulation of magmatic CO2 in the bottom layers of the lakes. Geochemical monitoring of crater lakes is a promising tool for forecasting not only limnic but also volcanic eruptions. Acid-mineralized waters formed by condensation of hot magmatic volatiles in crater lakes are thought to bear some resemblance to hydrothermal fluids acting in the genesis of acid-sulfate alteration and Au-Cu-Ag mineralization of volcanic-hosted precious metal deposits.

  13. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshenroder, Randy L.; Payne, N. Robert; Johnson, James E.; Bowen, Charles; Ebener, Mark P.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to restore lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Huron after their collapse in the 1940s were underway in the early 1970s with completion of the first round of lampricide applications in tributary streams and the stocking of several genotypes. We assess results of rehabilitation and establish a historical basis for comparison by quantifying the catch of spawning lake trout from Michigan waters in 1929-1932. Sixty-eight percent of this catch occurred in northern waters (MH-1) and most of the rest (15%) was from remote reefs in the middle of the main basin. Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) increased in the early 1980s in the main basin and depressed spawning populations of lake trout. This increase was especially severe in northern waters and appeared to be associated with untreated populations in the St. Marys River. Excessive commercial fishing stemming from unresolved treaty rights also contributed to loss of spawning fish in northern Michigan waters. Seneca-strain lake trout did not appear to be attacked by sea lampreys until they reached a size > 532 mm. At sizes > 632 mm, Seneca trout were 40-fold more abundant than the Marquette strain in matched-planting experiments. Natural reproduction past the fry stage has occurred in Thunder Bay and South Bay, but prospects for self-sustaining populations of lake trout in the main basin are poor because sea lampreys are too abundant, only one side of the basin is stocked, and stocking is deferred to allow commercial gillnetting in areas where most of the spawning occurred historically. Backcross lake trout, a lake trout x splake (s. Fontinalis x s. Namaycush) hybrid, did not reproduce in Georgian Bay, but this genotype is being replaced with pure-strain lake trout, whose early performance appears promising.

  14. Myocardial edema in Takotsubo syndrome mimicking apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: An insight into diagnosis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Izgi, Cemil; Ray, Sanjoy; Nyktari, Evangelia; Alpendurada, Francisco; Lyon, Alexander R; Rathore, Sudhir; Baksi, Arun John

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial edema is one of the characteristic features in the pathogenesis of Takotsubo syndrome. We report a middle aged man who presented with typical clinical and echocardiographic features of apical variant of Takotsubo syndrome. However, a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study performed 10 days after presentation did not show any apical 'ballooning' but revealed features of an apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy on cine images. Tissue characterization with T2 weighted images proved severe edema as the cause of significantly increased apical wall thickness. A follow-up cardiovascular magnetic resonance study was performed 5 months later which showed that edema, wall thickening and the appearance of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy all resolved, confirming Takotsubo syndrome as the cause of the initial appearance. As the affected myocardium most commonly involves the apical segments, an edema induced increase in apical wall thickness may lead to appearances of an apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy rather than apical ballooning in the acute to subacute phase of Takotsubo syndrome.

  15. Myocardial metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrocardiographic significance of reversible thallium-201 abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, R.O. 3d.; Dilsizian, V.; O'Gara, P.T.; Udelson, J.E.; Schenke, W.H.; Quyyumi, A.; Fananapazir, L.; Bonow, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Exercise-induced abnormalities during thallium-201 scintigraphy that normalize at rest frequently occur in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, it is not known whether these abnormalities are indicative of myocardial ischemia. Fifty patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy underwent exercise {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy and, during the same week, measurement of myocardial lactate metabolism and hemodynamics during pacing stress. Thirty-seven patients (74%) had one or more {sup 201}Tl abnormalities that completely normalized after 3 hours of rest; 26 had regional myocardial {sup 201}Tl defects, and 26 had apparent left ventricular cavity dilatation with exercise, with 15 having coexistence of these abnormal findings. Of the 37 patients with reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, 27 (73%) had metabolic evidence of myocardial ischemia during rapid atrial pacing compared with four of 13 patients (31%) with normal {sup 201}Tl scans (p less than 0.01). Eleven patients had apparent cavity dilatation as their only {sup 201}Tl abnormality; their mean postpacing left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly higher than that of the 13 patients with normal {sup 201}Tl studies (33 +/- 5 versus 21 +/- 10 mm Hg, p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the angiographic presence of systolic septal or epicardial coronary arterial compression and the presence or distribution of {sup 201}Tl abnormalities. Patients with ischemic ST segment responses to exercise had an 80% prevalence rate of reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities and a 70% prevalence rate of pacing-induced ischemia. However, 69% of patients with nonischemic ST segment responses had reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, and 55% had pacing-induced ischemia. Reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities during exercise stress are markers of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most likely identify relatively underperfused myocardium.

  16. The Dynamic Nature of Hypertrophic and Fibrotic Remodeling of the Fish Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Adam N.; Fenna, Andrew J.; McConnell, James C.; Sherratt, Michael J.; Gardner, Peter; Shiels, Holly A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pressure or volume overload can cause the vertebrate heart to remodel. The hearts of fish remodel in response to seasonal temperature change. Here we focus on the passive properties of the fish heart. Building upon our previous work on thermal-remodeling of the rainbow trout ventricle, we hypothesized that chronic cooling would initiate fibrotic cardiac remodeling, with increased myocardial stiffness, similar to that seen with pathological hypertrophy in mammals. We hypothesized that, in contrast to pathological hypertrophy in mammals, the remodeling response in fish would be plastic and the opposite response would occur following chronic warming. Rainbow trout held at 10°C (control group) were chronically (>8 weeks) exposed to cooling (5°C) or warming (18°C). Chronic cold induced hypertrophy in the highly trabeculated inner layer of the fish heart, with a 41% increase in myocyte bundle cross-sectional area, and an up-regulation of hypertrophic marker genes. Cold acclimation also increased collagen deposition by 1.7-fold and caused an up-regulation of collagen promoting genes. In contrast, chronic warming reduced myocyte bundle cross-sectional area, expression of hypertrophic markers and collagen deposition. Functionally, the cold-induced fibrosis and hypertrophy were associated with increased passive stiffness of the whole ventricle and with increased micromechanical stiffness of tissue sections. The opposite occurred with chronic warming. These findings suggest chronic cooling in the trout heart invokes a hypertrophic phenotype with increased cardiac stiffness and fibrosis that are associated with pathological hypertrophy in the mammalian heart. The loss of collagen and increased compliance following warming is particularly interesting as it suggests fibrosis may oscillate seasonally in the fish heart, revealing a more dynamic nature than the fibrosis associated with dysfunction in mammals. PMID:26834645

  17. Fate of the hypertrophic chondrocyte: microenvironmental perspectives on apoptosis and survival in the epiphyseal growth plate.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Irving M; Adams, Christopher S; Freeman, Theresa; Srinivas, Vickram

    2005-12-01

    The goal of this review is to examine the fate of the hypertrophic chondrocyte in the epiphyseal growth plate and consider the impact of the cartilage microenvironment on cell survival and apoptosis. Early investigations pointed to a direct role of the hypertrophic chondrocyte in osteogenesis. The terminally differentiated cells were considered to undergo a dramatic change in shape, size, and phenotype, and assume the characteristics of an osteoblast. While some studies have supported the notion of transdifferentiation, much of the evidence in favor of reprogramming epiphyseal chondrocytes is circumstantial and based on microscopic evaluation of cells that are present at the chondro-osseous junction. Although these investigations provided a novel perspective on endochondral bone formation, they were flawed by the failure to consider the importance of stem cells in osseous tissue formation. Subsequent studies indicated that many, if not all, of the cells of the cartilage plate die through the induction of apoptosis. With respect to agents that mediate apoptosis, at the chondro-osseous junction, solubilization of mineral and hydrolysis of organic matrix constituents by septoclasts generates high local concentrations of ions, peptides, and glycans, and secreted matrix metalloproteins. Individually, and in combination, a number of these agents serve as potent chondrocyte apoptogens. We present a new concept: hypertrophic cells die through the induction of autophagy. In the cartilage microenvironment, combinations of local factors cause chondrocytes to express an initial survival phenotype and oxidize their own structural macromolecules to generate ATP. While delaying death, autophagy leads to a state in which cells are further sensitized to changes in the local microenvironment. One such change is similar to ischemia reperfusion injury, a condition that leads to tissue damage and cell death. In the growth cartilage, an immediate effect of this type of injury is

  18. Generation of Immortalized Equine Chondrocytes With Inducible Sox9 Expression Allows Control of Hypertrophic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gurusinghe, Saliya; Hilbert, Bryan; Trope, Gareth; Wang, Lexin; Bandara, Nadeeka; Strappe, Padraig

    2016-10-27

    Immortalization of chondrocytes enables long term in vitro culture; however, the chondrogenic capacity of transformed cells varies, thus highlighting the need to develop a proliferative and tuneable chondrocyte cell line where hypertrophic differentiation can be controlled. In this study the SV40 large T antigen and human telomerase reverse transcriptase were employed to immortalize pooled equine chondrocytes through lentiviral vector mediated transduction either singly or on combination. Transformed chondrocytes proliferated stably over multiple passages, but resulted in significantly lower expression of chondrocyte specific collagen II mRNA (P < 0.0001) and up regulation of the hypertrophic marker collagen X (P < 0.0001) in three dimensional cultures. A Col2a1 promoter driven GFP reporter was constructed for real time monitoring of chondrogenic differentiation and a significant increase in promoter activation was observed in cultures treated with the growth factor TGFβ-3 (P < 0.05). To recapitulate the native articular chondrocyte phenotype we further transduced large T antigen immortalized chondrocytes with lentiviral vectors allowing either constitutive or doxycycline inducible expression of Sox9. In 3D cultures, the Sox9 over-expressing chondrocytes secreted significantly higher levels of extracellular matrix polysaccharide glycosaminoglycan (P < 0.05), while up-regulating collagen II and Aggrecan mRNA (P < 0.05) in both expression systems with a similar patterns observed with imunohistochemical staining. High levels of collagen X mRNA and protein were maintained with constitutive sox9 reflecting hypetrophic differentiation but significantly lower expression could be achieved with inducible Sox9. In conclusion, immortalization of equine chondrocytes results in stable proliferation but a reduction of chondrogenic potential whilst modulation of sox9 expression enabled control of hypertrophic characteristics. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1

  19. Thermal Injury Model in the Rabbit Ear with Quantifiable Burn Progression and Hypertrophic Scar.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Emily E; Niknam-Bienia, Solmaz; Xie, Ping; Jia, Sheng-Xian; Hong, Seok Jong; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2017-04-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a major clinical outcome of deep-partial thickness to full thickness thermal burn injury. Appropriate animal models are a limitation to burn research due to the lack of, or access to, animal models which address the endpoint of hypertrophic scar. Lower species, such as rodents, heal mainly by contracture, which limits the duration of study. Higher species, such as pigs, heal more similarly to humans, but are associated with high cost, long duration for scar development, challenges in quantifying scar hypertrophy, and poor manageability. Here we present a quantifiable deep-partial thickness burn model in the rabbit ear. Burns were created using a dry-heated brass rod for 10 s and 20 s at 90°C. At the time of eschar excision on day 3, excisional wounds were made on the contralateral ear for comparison. Burn wound progression, in which the wound size expands over time is a major distinction between excisional and thermal injuries, was quantified at 1 h and 3 d after the injuries using calibrated photographs and histology and the size of the wounds was found to be unchanged from the initial wound size at 1 h, but 10% in the 20 s burn wounds at 3 d. A quantifiable hypertrophic scar, measured by histology as the scar elevation index, was present in both 20 s burn wounds and excisional wounds at day 35. ImageJ measurements revealed that the 20 s burn wound scars were 22% larger than the excisional wound scars and the 20 s burn scar area measurements from histology were 26% greater than in the excisional wound scar. The ability to measure both burn progression and scar hypertrophy over a 35-day time frame suits this model to screening early intervention burn wound therapeutics or scar treatments in a burn-specific scar model. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Suppressed inflammatory gene expression during human hypertrophic scar compared to normotrophic scar formation.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Lenie J; van der Veer, Willem M; de Jong, Etty H; Gibbs, Susan; Niessen, Frank B

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic scar formation is a result of adverse cutaneous wound healing. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar formation is still poorly understood. A problem next to the lack of suitable animal models is that often normal skin is compared to hypertrophic scar (HTscar) and not to normotrophic scar (NTscar) tissue. Another drawback is that often only one time period after wounding is studied, while scar formation is a dynamic process over a period of several months. In this study, we compared the expression of genes involved in inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and also macrophage infiltration in biopsies obtained before and up to 52 weeks after standard surgery in five patients who developed HTscar and six patients who developed NTscar. It was found that HTscar formation coincided with a prolonged decreased expression of inflammatory genes (TNFα, IL-1α, IL-1RN, CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2, CXCR2, C3 and IL-10) and an extended increased expression of ECM-related genes (PLAU, Col3A1, TGFβ3). This coincided with a delayed but prolonged infiltration of macrophages (type 2) in HTscar tissue compared to NTscar tissue. These findings were supported by immunohistochemical localization of proteins coding for select genes named above. Our study emphasizes that human cutaneous wound healing is a dynamic process that is needed to be studied over a period of time rather than a single point of time. Taken together, our results suggest innate immune stimulatory therapies may be a better option for improving scar quality than the currently used anti-inflammatory scar therapies.

  1. Methane and carbon dioxide emissions from 40 lakes along a north–south latitudinal transect in Alaska

    DOE PAGES

    Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Martinez-Cruz, K.; ...

    2014-09-12

    Uncertainties in the magnitude and seasonality of various gas emission modes, particularly among different lake types, limit our ability to estimate methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from northern lakes. Here we assessed the relationship between CH4 and CO2 emission modes in 40 lakes along a latitudinal transect in Alaska to physicochemical limnology and geographic characteristics, including permafrost soil type surrounding lakes. Emission modes included Direct Ebullition, Diffusion, Storage flux, and a newly identified Ice-Bubble Storage (IBS) flux. We found that all lakes were net sources of atmospheric CH4 and CO2, but the climate warming impact of lake CH4more » emissions was two times higher than that of CO2. Ebullition and Diffusion were the dominant modes of CH4 and CO2 emissions respectively. IBS, ~ 10% of total annual CH4 emissions, is the release to the atmosphere of seasonally ice-trapped bubbles when lake ice confining bubbles begins to melt in spring. IBS, which has not been explicitly accounted for in regional studies, increased the estimate of springtime emissions from our study lakes by 320%. Geographically, CH4 emissions from stratified, dystrophic interior Alaska thermokarst (thaw) lakes formed in icy, organic-rich yedoma permafrost soils were 6-fold higher than from non-yedoma lakes throughout the rest of Alaska. Total CH4 emission was correlated with concentrations of phosphate and total nitrogen in lake water, Secchi depth and lake area, with yedoma lakes having higher nutrient concentrations, shallower Secchi depth, and smaller lake areas. Our findings suggest that permafrost type plays important roles in determining CH4 emissions from lakes by both supplying organic matter to methanogenesis directly from thawing permafrost and by enhancing nutrient availability to primary production, which can also fuel decomposition and methanogenesis.« less

  2. Methane and carbon dioxide emissions from 40 lakes along a north-south latitudinal transect in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Anthony, K. M. Walter; Martinez-Cruz, K.; Greene, S.; Thalasso, F.

    2014-09-01

    Uncertainties in the magnitude and seasonality of various gas emission modes, particularly among different lake types, limit our ability to estimate methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from northern lakes. Here we assessed the relationship between CH4 and CO2 emission modes in 40 lakes along a latitudinal transect in Alaska to physicochemical limnology and geographic characteristics, including permafrost soil type surrounding lakes. Emission modes included Direct Ebullition, Diffusion, Storage flux, and a newly identified Ice-Bubble Storage (IBS) flux. We found that all lakes were net sources of atmospheric CH4 and CO2, but the climate warming impact of lake CH4 emissions was two times higher than that of CO2. Ebullition and Diffusion were the dominant modes of CH4 and CO2 emissions respectively. IBS, ~ 10% of total annual CH4 emissions, is the release to the atmosphere of seasonally ice-trapped bubbles when lake ice confining bubbles begins to melt in spring. IBS, which has not been explicitly accounted for in regional studies, increased the estimate of springtime emissions from our study lakes by 320%. Geographically, CH4 emissions from stratified, dystrophic interior Alaska thermokarst (thaw) lakes formed in icy, organic-rich yedoma permafrost soils were 6-fold higher than from non-yedoma lakes throughout the rest of Alaska. Total CH4 emission was correlated with concentrations of phosphate and total nitrogen in lake water, Secchi depth and lake area, with yedoma lakes having higher nutrient concentrations, shallower Secchi depth, and smaller lake areas. Our findings suggest that permafrost type plays important roles in determining CH4 emissions from lakes by both supplying organic matter to methanogenesis directly from thawing permafrost and by enhancing nutrient availability to primary production, which can also fuel decomposition and methanogenesis.

  3. Spatial and seasonal variability in water quality of Devils Lake, North Dakota, September 1988 through October 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, S.K.; Lent, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Devils Lake is a closed-basin lake characterized by large fluctuations in water level and in concen- trations of dissolved chemical constituents. A study was conducted to assess spatial and seasonal variability in water-quality conditions in Devils Lake during September 1988 through October 1990. Specific conductance generally increased from west to east in Devils Lake and East Devils Lake. pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen generally were similar among sites. Devils Lake generally does not undergo thermal stratification during open-water periods but does undergo inverse thermal stratifi- cation in the winter. The potential exists for establishment of near-bottom anoxia during the summer and during the winter. Most inflow enters the western part of Devils Lake and becomes progres- sively more concentrated by evaporation as it moves eastward through Devils Lake and East Devils Lake. Concentrations of all major ions, except calcium, bicarbonate, and sulfate, were larger in water samples from Devils Lake and East Devils Lake than in water samples from tributaries. Concentrations of all major ions generally increased eastward through Devils Lake and East Devils Lake, but sodium, sulfate, and chloride were enriched relative to the other major ions. Dissolved-solids concen- trations varied both spatially and seasonally. Median dissolved-solids concentrations generally increased from west to east. Dissolved-solids concentrations generally were largest in the winter, smallest in the spring, and increased in the summer and fall. Nutrients also varied spatially and seasonally. Nutrient concentrations tended to be largest at shallower sites. The ratio of sediment surface area to lake volume for a given part of the lake may partly explain spatial variability in concentrations of nitrogen species.

  4. Observations of turbulence in a partially stratified estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stagey, M.T.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Burau, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    The authors present a field study of estuarine turbulence in which profiles of Reynolds stresses were directly measured using an ADCP throughout a 25-h tidal day. The dataset that is discussed quantifies turbulent mixing for a water column in northern San Francisco Bay that experiences a sequence of states that includes a weak ebb and flood that are stratified, followed by a strong, and eventually unstratified, ebb and flood. These measurements show that energetic turbulence is confined to a bottom mixed layer by the overlying stratification. Examination of individual Reynolds stress profiles along with profiles of Richardson number and turbulent Froude number shows that the water column can be divided into regions based on the relative importance of buoyancy effects. Using the measured turbulence production rate P, the dissipation rate e. is estimated. The observed turbulence had values of e/vN2 > 20 all of the time and e/vN2 > 200 most of the time, suggesting that the observed motions were buoyancy affected turbulence rather than internal waves. However, at times, turbulent Froude numbers in much of the upper-water column were less than one, indicating important stratification effects. Taken as a whole, the data show that stratification affects the turbulent velocity variance q2 most severely; that is, observed reductions in u'w' are largely associated with small values of q2 rather than with a dramatic reduction in the efficiency with which turbulent motions produce momentum fluxes. Finally, the dataset is compared to predictions made using the popular Mellor-Yamada level 2.5 closure. These comparisons show that the model tends to underestimate the turbulent kinetic energy in regions of strong stratification where the turbulence is strongly inhomogeneous and to overestimate the turbulent kinetic energy in weakly stratified regions. The length scale does not appear to compensate for these errors, and, as a result, similar errors are seen in the eddy viscosity

  5. Stratified Diffractive Optic Approach for Creating High Efficiency Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.

    1998-01-01

    Gratings with high efficiency in a single diffracted order can be realized with both volume holographic and diffractive optical elements. However, each method has limitations that restrict the applications in which they can be used. For example, high efficiency volume holographic gratings require an appropriate combination of thickness and permittivity modulation throughout the bulk of the material. Possible combinations of those two characteristics are limited by properties of currently available materials, thus restricting the range of applications for volume holographic gratings. Efficiency of a diffractive optic grating is dependent on its approximation of an ideal analog profile using discrete features. The size of constituent features and, consequently, the number that can be used within a required grating period restricts the applications in which diffractive optic gratings can be used. These limitations imply that there are applications which cannot be addressed by either technology. In this paper we propose to address a number of applications in this category with a new method of creating high efficiency gratings which we call stratified diffractive optic gratings. In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. To illustrate the stratified diffractive optic grating concept we consider a specific application, a scanner for a space-based coherent wind lidar, with requirements that would be difficult to meet by either volume holographic or diffractive optic methods. The lidar instrument design specifies a transmissive scanner element with the input beam normally incident and the exiting beam deflected at a fixed angle from the optical axis. The element will be rotated about the optical axis to produce a conical scan pattern. The wavelength of the incident beam is 2.06 microns and the required deflection angle is 30 degrees, implying a grating period of approximately 4 microns

  6. Two different cardiomyopathies in a single patient : hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Sunbul, M; Ozben, B; Mutlu, B

    2013-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a complex and relatively common genetic disorder characterized by left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, usually associated with a nondilated and hyperdynamic chamber with heterogeneous phenotypic expression and clinical course. On the other hand, LV noncompaction is an uncommon cardiomyopathy characterized by the persistence of fetal myocardium with a pattern of prominent trabecular meshwork and deep intertrabecular recesses, systolic dysfunction, and LV dilatation. We report a 29-year-old man with these two different inherent conditions. Our case raises the possibility of a genetic mutation common to these two clinical entities or different gene mutations existing in the same individual.

  7. Indomethacin Therapy for Hypertrophic Pulmonary Osteoarthropathy in Patients With Bronchogenic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Felix W.; Williams, Adrian J.; Fan, Peng

    1985-01-01

    Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPO) is a disabling complication of lung cancer often requiring thoracotomy with vagotomy for control of pain. This condition was confirmed by scintigraphy in six consecutive patients with biopsy-proved lung cancer. All had characteristic bone and joint pain unresponsive to a variety of analgesics. Treatment with indomethacin gave dramatic relief of pain within 72 hours in all six. Consideration should be given to instituting a controlled trial to establish the efficacy of indomethacin for the treatment of HPO. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:3993010

  8. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy After a Single Dose of Dexamethasone in a Preterm Infant.

    PubMed

    Kale, Yusuf; Aydemir, Ozge; Ceylan, Ozben; Bas, Ahmet Yagmur; Demirel, Nihal

    2015-08-01

    Dexamethasone is widely used in preterm infants with severe pulmonary disease. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a transient side effect observed after multiple doses of dexamethasone. We report a preterm infant with myocardial hypertrophy after a single dose of dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg) used to treat laryngeal edema secondary to prolonged intubation. A benign course was observed without left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and with recovery within 4 weeks. Myocardial effects of dexamethasone may be independent of dose and duration of treatment. The risk/benefit ratio must be carefully considered before using even a single dose of dexamethasone in preterm infants.

  9. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy due to Mitochondrial Disease: Prenatal Diagnosis, Management, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    García-Díaz, Lutgardo; Coserria, Félix; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    A case of prenatally diagnosed fetal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reported. The mother was referred to our department at 37 weeks' gestation because of suspected congenital heart disease. Prenatal echocardiography showed biventricular hypertrophy and pericardial effusion, without additional abnormalities. Postnatal echocardiography confirmed prenatal diagnosis. Neonatal EKG showed biventricular hypertrophy and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Skeletal muscle biopsy was consistent with mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defect involving a combined defect of respiratory complexes I and IV. Echocardiographic followup during the first year of life showed progressive regression of hypertrophy and evolution to left ventricular myocardial noncompaction. PMID:23346437

  10. Evolutionary change mimicking apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hui-Jeong; Lee, Hyae-Min; Yang, In-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hee; Byun, Jong-Kyu; Sohn, Il Suk

    2014-11-01

    In this report, we introduce a case of thickening of the involved left ventricular apical segment on echocardiography and deep T-wave inversions in precordial leads on electrocardiography transiently seen in the course of recovery from biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy, mimicking apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This result suggests that the echocardiographic finding of transient myocardial edema can be identified by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Additionally, it persisted a few weeks after full functional recovery. We believe that this case will contribute in part toward clarifying the pathophysiology of takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  11. Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis as an Early Manifestation of Relapsing Polychondritis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ushiyama, Satoru; Kinoshita, Tomomi; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Ohashi, Nobuhiko; Kishida, Dai; Miyazaki, Daigo; Nakamura, Katsuya; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Neurological involvement in relapsing polychondritis (RP) is relatively rare. We describe the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP) together with arthritis as the first manifestation of RP. Auricular chondritis, which subsequently determined the diagnosis of RP, occurred a few weeks after the detection of HP. The neurological symptoms, as well as arthritis, were promptly improved by treatment with corticosteroids. It is generally difficult to diagnose RP in the absence of typical cartilaginous involvement; however, the present case suggests that HP may occur as an early clinical manifestation of RP. PMID:27920712

  12. Long-Term Survival Following Cardiac Arrest Without Implantable Defibrillator Protection in a Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Mustafa; Ucar, Ozgul; Canbay, Alper; Cetin, Zehra Guven; Cicekcioglu, Hulya; Diker, Erdem

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young people. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the optimal therapy in patients with HCM, both for primary or secondary prevention of sudden death. Left ventricular systolic function in HCM is usually normal. However, in few patients, HCM has been reported to progress to a state that is characterized by left ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction, resembling dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Although arrhythmias are common in HCM, advanced or complete atrioventricular block (AV) is very rare. This case report describes a HCM patient who progressed to DCM with advanced AV block and survived 31 years following cardiac arrest without ICD protection.

  13. Successful surgical optic nerve decompression in a patient with hypertrophic pachymeningitis due to granulomatous polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    de Hoog, Joeri; Volovici, Victor; Dammers, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with subacute vision loss of first the left, and later the right eye. She was diagnosed with granulomatous polyangiitis with hypertrophic pachymeningitis and optic nerve compression. Her visual acuity could not be permanently restored with immune suppressants alone, so a surgical decompression of the right optic nerve, via a modified cranio-orbitozygomatic pretemporal approach, was performed. Her right eye regained 20/20 vision and has remained stable during 8 months of follow-up. PMID:25612758

  14. Visualization of myocardial perfusion after percutaneous myocardial septal ablation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using superharmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Folkert J; Bouakaz, Ayache; Krenning, Boudewijn; Vletter, Wim; de Jong, Nico

    2003-04-01

    Harmonic imaging is used for detection of ultrasound contrast agents in myocardial perfusion studies. However, harmonic imaging has limitations because of the presence of tissue harmonics, which results in less specificity and sensitivity, thus, lower contrast-to-tissue ratio. We describe a clinical example using superharmonic imaging. This technique detects the third, fourth, and fifth harmonics. These harmonics are not created in tissue, resulting, hence, in a high contrast-to-tissue ratio. After myocardial alcohol ablation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy areas of nontreated and treated myocardium, normal and low flow could be visualized with superharmonic imaging.

  15. Salting our freshwater lakes.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Hilary A; Bartlett, Sarah L; Burke, Samantha M; Doubek, Jonathan P; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E; Skaff, Nicholas K; Summers, Jamie C; Farrell, Kaitlin J; McCullough, Ian M; Morales-Williams, Ana M; Roberts, Derek C; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2017-04-10

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L(-1)), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue.

  16. Allelopathy-mediated Competition in Microbial Mats from Antarctic Lakes.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Marc; Lesser, Michael P

    2017-02-18

    Microbial mats are vertically stratified communities that host a complex consortium of microorganisms, dominated by cyanobacteria, that compete for available nutrients and environmental niches, within these extreme habitats. The Antarctic Dry Valleys near McMurdo Sound include a series of lakes within the drainage basin that are bisected by glacial traverses. These lakes are traditionally independent, but recent increases in glacial melting have allowed two lakes (Chad and Hoare) to become connected by a meltwater stream. Microbial mats were collected from these lakes, and cultured under identical conditions at the McMurdo Station laboratory. Replicate pairings of the microbial mats exhibited consistent patterns of growth inhibition indicative of competitive dominance. Natural products were extracted from the microbial mats, and a disc diffusion assay was utilized to show that allelochemical compounds mediate competitive interactions. Both microscopy and 16S rRNA sequencing show that these mats contain significant populations of cyanobacteria known to produce allelochemicals. Two compounds were isolated from these microbial mats that might be important in the chemical ecology of these psychrophiles. In other disc:mat pairings, including extract versus mat of origin, the allelochemicals exhibited no effect. Taken together, these results indicate that Antarctic lake microbial mats can compete via allelopathy.

  17. Sedimentary evolution of Lake Van (Eastern Turkey) reconstructed from high-resolution seismic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cukur, Deniz; Krastel, Sebastian; Demirel-Schlüter, Filiz; Demirbağ, Emin; Imren, Caner; Niessen, Frank; Toker, Mustafa

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents results of a multi-channel seismic reflection survey at Lake Van and provides constraints on the sedimentary evolution of the lake. The geophysical data of the lake confirm the existence of three physiographic provinces: a shelf, a slope, and a deep, relatively flat basin. The most prominent features identified on the shelf and slope are clinoforms, submerged channels, as well as closely spaced lake floor depressions, reflecting a highly variable lake-level history. The morphological depressions are interpreted as resulting from subaquatic erosion by channelized, sediment-laden currents into horizontally bedded fan sediments. Submerged channels on the eastern shelf are interpreted as meandering-slope channels, probably as a consequence of a lake-level fall that exposed the shelf area. Clinoforms on the Eastern fan may represent relict deltas formed during stationary or slightly rising lake-level intervals. Merging subsurface imaging interpretation with morphological studies of exposed sediments reveals lake-level fluctuations of several hundreds of meters during the past ca. ~550 ka. The lake has three prominent basins (Tatvan, Deveboynu, and the Northern basin) separated by basement ridges (e.g., the Northern ridge). The seismic units in the Tatvan and Northern basins are dominated by alternations of well-stratified and chaotic reflections, while the Deveboynu basin subsurface consists mainly of chaotic units. The chaotic seismic facies are interpreted as mass-flow deposits, probably triggered by earthquakes and/or rapid lake-level fluctuations. The moderate-to-high-amplitude, well-stratified facies seen in the deeper parts of the basins are interpreted as lacustrine deposits intercalated with tephra layers. The occurrence of a clinoform in the deepest part of the lake suggests a major flooding stage of Lake Van more than ~400 ka ago. Seismic profiles from the deepest part of the lake basin show remarkably uniform and continuous stratigraphic

  18. Using time scales to characterize phytoplankton assemblages in a deep subalpine lake during the thermal stratification period: Lake Iseo, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Clelia Luisa; Imberger, Jörg; Garibaldi, Letizia; Leoni, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    A combination of field observations and 3-D hydrodynamic simulations were used to identify the phytoplankton species and to estimate the various time scales of the dominant physical and biological processes in Lake Iseo, a deep subalpine lake located in northern Italy, during a stratified period (July 2010). By ordering the rate processes time scales, we derive a phytoplankton patch categorization and growth interpretation that provides a general framework for the spatial distribution of phytoplankton concentration in Lake Iseo and illuminates the characteristics of their ecological niches. The results show that the diurnal surface layer was well mixed, received strong diurnal radiation, had low phosphorus concentrations and the phytoplankton biomass was sustained by the green alga Sphaerocystis schroeterii. The vertical mixing time scales were much shorter than horizontal mixing time scales causing a depth-uniform chlorophyll a concentration. The horizontal patch scale was determined by horizontal dispersion balancing the phytoplankton growth time scale, dictating the success of the observed green algae. The strongly stratified nutrient-rich metalimnion had mild light conditions and Diatoma elongatum and Planktothrix rubescens made up the largest proportions of the total phytoplankton biomass at the intermediate and deeper metalimnetic layers. The vertical transport time scales were much shorter than horizontal transport and vertical dispersion leading to growth niche for the observed phytoplankton. The study showed that time-scale hierarchy mandates the essential phytoplankton attributes or traits for success in a particular section of the water column and/or water body.

  19. 9. GRANT LAKE AND MONO LAKE IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GRANT LAKE AND MONO LAKE IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. In-lake Modeling Recommendation Report for Lake Champlain TMDL

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report describes the recommended modeling approach for the in-lake modeling component of the Lake Champlain TMDL project. The report was prepared by Tetra Tech, with input from the Lake Champlain modeling workgroup. (TetraTech, 2012b)

  1. View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ridge showing spillway at photo center, view southwest - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  2. Secondary currents in a curved, stratified, estuarine channel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, J.R.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a study of secondary circulation in a curved stratified channel in northern San Francisco Bay over a 12.5-hour tidal cycle. Secondary currents were strong at times (varying by up to 35 cm/s from top to bottom) but relatively transient, as the balance between centrifugal and lateral baroclinic forcing changed over time. The short travel time around the bend did not allow a steady state balance to develop between centrifugal and lateral baroclinic forcing. During the flood tide the confluence of two streams with different velocities produced a strong lateral gradient in streamwise velocity. As a result, lateral advection was a significant term in the streamwise momentum balance, having the same order of magnitude as the barotropic and baroclinic pressure gradients, and the frictional terms. During the first part of the ebb, secondary currents were induced by lateral baroclinic forcing. The direction of the secondary circulation reversed later in the ebb, as the baroclinic forcing became weaker than the centrifugal acceleration. The gradient Richardson number showed that stratification was stable over most of the tidal cycle, decreasing the importance of friction and allowing secondary currents to persist. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Decay of dipolar vortex structures in a stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flór, J. B.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Delfos, R.

    1995-02-01

    In this paper the viscous decay of dipolar vortex structures in a linearly stratified fluid is investigated experimentally, and a comparison of the experimental results with simple theoretical models is made. The dipoles are generated by a pulsed horizontal injection of fluid. In a related experimental study by Flór and van Heijst [J. Fluid Mech. 279, 101 (1994)], it was shown that, after the emergence of the pancake-shaped vortex structure, the flow is quasi-two-dimensional and decays due to the vertical diffusion of vorticity and entrainment of ambient irrotational fluid. This results in an expansion of the vortex structure. Two decay models with the horizontal flow based on the viscously decaying Lamb-Chaplygin dipole, are presented. In a first model, the thickness and radius of the dipole are assumed constant, and in a second model also the increasing thickness of the vortex structure is taken into account. The models are compared with experimental data obtained from flow visualizations and from digital analysis of particle-streak photographs. Although both models neglect entrainment and the decay is modeled by diffusion only, a reasonable agreement with the experiments is obtained.

  4. Local properties of countercurrent stratified steam-water flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H J

    1985-10-01

    A study of steam condensation in countercurrent stratified flow of steam and subcooled water has been carried out in a rectangular channel/flat plate geometry over a wide range of inclination angles (4/sup 0/-87/sup 0/) at several aspect ratios. Variables were inlet water and steam flow rates, and inlet water temperature. Local condensation rates and pressure gradients were measured, and local condensation heat transfer coefficients and interfacial shear stress were calculated. Contact probe traverses of the surface waves were made, which allowed a statistical analysis of the wave properties. The local condensation Nusselt number was correlated in terms of local water and steam Reynolds or Froude numbers, as well as the liquid Prandtl number. A turbulence-centered model developed by Theofanous, et al. principally for gas absorption in several geometries, was modified. A correlation for the interfacial shear stress and the pressure gradient agreed with measured values. Mean water layer thicknesses were calculated. Interfacial wave parameters, such as the mean water layer thickness, liquid fraction probability distribution, wave amplitude and wave frequency, are analyzed.

  5. A method to calculate synthetic waveforms in stratified VTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Wen, L.

    2012-12-01

    Transverse isotropy with a vertical axis of symmetry (VTI) may be an important material property in the Earth's interior. In this presentation, we develop a method to calculate synthetic seismograms for wave propagation in stratified VTI media. Our method is based on the generalized reflection and transmission method (GRTM) (Luco & Apsel 1983). We extend it to transversely isotropic VTI media. GRTM has the advantage of remaining stable in high frequency calculations compared to the Haskell Matrix method (Haskell 1964), which explicitly excludes the exponential growth terms in the propagation matrix and is limited to low frequency computation. In the implementation, we also improve GRTM in two aspects. 1) We apply the Shanks transformation (Bender & Orszag 1999) to improve the convergence rate of convergence. This improvement is especially important when the depths of source and receiver are close. 2) We adopt a self-adaptive Simpson integration method (Chen & Zhang 2001) in the discrete wavenumber integration so that the integration can still be efficiently carried out at large epicentral distances. Because the calculation is independent in each frequency, the program can also be effectively implemented in parallel computing. Our method provides a powerful tool to synthesize broadband seismograms of VIT media at a large epicenter distance range. We will present examples of using the method to study possible transverse isotropy in the upper mantle and the lowermost mantle.

  6. Simulation and study of stratified flows around finite bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchin, V. A.; Matyushin, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    The flows past a sphere and a square cylinder of diameter d moving horizontally at the velocity U in a linearly density-stratified viscous incompressible fluid are studied. The flows are described by the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. Variations in the spatial vortex structure of the flows are analyzed in detail in a wide range of dimensionless parameters (such as the Reynolds number Re = Ud/ ν and the internal Froude number Fr = U/( Nd), where ν is the kinematic viscosity and N is the buoyancy frequency) by applying mathematical simulation (on supercomputers of Joint Supercomputer Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences) and three-dimensional flow visualization. At 0.005 < Fr < 100, the classification of flow regimes for the sphere (for 1 < Re < 500) and for the cylinder (for 1 < Re < 200) is improved. At Fr = 0 (i.e., at U = 0), the problem of diffusion-induced flow past a sphere leading to the formation of horizontal density layers near the sphere's upper and lower poles is considered. At Fr = 0.1 and Re = 50, the formation of a steady flow past a square cylinder with wavy hanging density layers in the wake is studied in detail.

  7. Mixing efficiency of turbulent patches in stably stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanaik, Amrapalli; Venayagamoorthy, Subhas Karan

    2016-11-01

    A key quantity that is essential for estimating the turbulent diapycnal (irreversible) mixing in stably stratified flow is the mixing efficiency Rf*, which is a measure of the amount of turbulent kinetic energy that is irreversibly converted into background potential energy. In particular, there is an ongoing debate in the oceanographic mixing community regarding the utility of the buoyancy Reynolds number (Reb) , particularly with regard to how mixing efficiency and diapycnal diffusivity vary with Reb . Specifically, is there a universal relationship between the intensity of turbulence and the strength of the stratification that supports an unambiguous description of mixing efficiency based on Reb ? The focus of the present study is to investigate the variability of Rf* by considering oceanic turbulence data obtained from microstructure profiles in conjunction with data from laboratory experiments and DNS. Field data analysis has done by identifying turbulent patches using Thorpe sorting method for potential density. The analysis clearly shows that high mixing efficiencies can persist at high buoyancy Reynolds numbers. This is contradiction to previous studies which predict that mixing efficiency should decrease universally for Reb greater than O (100) . Funded by NSF and ONR.

  8. Relevancy of the buoyancy Reynolds number in stably stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mater, Benjamin; Venayagamoorthy, Subhas Karan

    2013-11-01

    The buoyancy Reynolds number, Reb = ɛ / (νN2) , has become a widely popular parameter with which to describe turbulent mixing in the stratified environment of the open ocean. This popularity has arisen largely on the practical grounds that the constituent quantities are available through common measurement techniques: estimates of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation (ɛ) are available from observations of fine-scale shear, and the buoyancy frequency (N) can be determined from profiles of density. Despite practical appeal, however, Reb is ambiguous in that it fails to distinguish between regimes of weak stratification and strong turbulence. This becomes obvious in the formulation Reb = ReL(Frk) 2 , where ReL =k2 / (ɛν) is a turbulent Reynolds number, Frk = ɛ / (Nk) is a turbulent Froude number, and k is the turbulent kinetic energy. In considering both ReL and Frk independently, the time scale of the turbulence, TL = k / ɛ , is made explicit. We explore the duality of Reb in describing mixing efficiency using a ReL - Frk parameter space and argue the importance of TL in parameterization of flow behavior. Data from direct numerical simulations, laboratory experiments, and field observations are considered. This work funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  9. Light propagation in stratified media with soft interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Broeck, N.; Brosens, F.; Tempere, J.; Silvera, I. F.

    2016-04-01

    The propagation of light through materials in which the density of charge carriers varies smoothly on a scale smaller than or comparable to the wavelength requires a description that goes beyond the commonly used Fresnel equations. We propose a method to solve Maxwell's equations in such a way that any linear response theory for the bulk material can be combined with a given smooth density profile for the (free or bound) charge carriers. This method is implemented for linearly polarized monochromatic light impinging on inhomogeneous multilayer systems, leading to a fast algorithm that yields reflectance and transmittance for such systems. We apply our algorithm to investigate the difference in optical response between smooth interfaces and abrupt interfaces in stratified systems where the materials can have complex bulk permittivities, and find that the smoothening of the interface on a wavelength scale significantly reduces reflection in favor of absorption. This result is of importance to current experiments that aim to detect metallic hydrogen and deuterium films using their optical response. Our results show that for a correct interpretation of these experiments it is important to consider the smoothness of the density profile of the metallic layer. Also, for nonabsorbing layers, a smooth, rather than abrupt transition, can have an important impact on the design of optical filters.

  10. Stratified charge rotary engine critical technology enablement. Volume 2: Appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irion, C. E.; Mount, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    This second volume of appendixes is a companion to Volume 1 of this report which summarizes results of a critical technology enablement effort with the stratified charge rotary engine (SCRE) focusing on a power section of 0.67 liters (40 cu. in.) per rotor in single and two rotor versions. The work is a continuation of prior NASA Contracts NAS3-23056 and NAS3-24628. Technical objectives are multi-fuel capability, including civil and military jet fuel and DF-2, fuel efficiency of 0.355 Lbs/BHP-Hr. at best cruise condition above 50 percent power, altitude capability of up to 10Km (33,000 ft.) cruise, 2000 hour TBO and reduced coolant heat rejection. Critical technologies for SCRE's that have the potential for competitive performance and cost in a representative light-aircraft environment were examined. Objectives were: the development and utilization of advanced analytical tools, i.e. higher speed and enhanced three dimensional combustion modeling; identification of critical technologies; development of improved instrumentation; and to isolate and quantitatively identify the contribution to performance and efficiency of critical components or subsystems. A family of four-stage third-order explicit Runge-Kutta schemes is derived that required only two locations and has desirable stability characteristics. Error control is achieved by embedding a second-order scheme within the four-stage procedure. Certain schemes are identified that are as efficient and accurate as conventional embedded schemes of comparable order and require fewer storage locations.

  11. Inertial solitary waves with multiple eddy bifurcations in stratified flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnikov, Victor A.

    2000-11-01

    It has been long recognized that internal nonlinear waves are important dynamical feature in both the oceans and the lower atmosphere. The theoretical work reported herein studies fully nonlinear internal solitary waves with vortical cores formed by the flow separation that is effected by uniform or exponential stratification, uniform rotation, inertia, constant shear, and asymmetry of the upstream flow. The kinematic problem is formulated by the Long's equation for high Froude numbers when gravity is negligible compared with inertia. The exact nonlinear solution is derived in the form of the infinite series in modified spherical Bessel functions complemented by the recurrence relation. The dynamic problem is solved by the Bernoulli integral generalized for stratified rotating fluid. Necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for the formation of one-, two-, and three-eddy bifurcations of open-ended wavy streamlines resulting in wave-vortex structures with multiple eddies and vortex shells. Complete set of one-, two-, and three-eddy bifurcations is considered that includes embedded, expanded, degenerated, and combined bifurcations. Symbolic calculations of the series solution up to 150,000 terms are implemented by the code for symbolic programming. Properties and nonlinear stability of the wave-eddy structures are studied. The results are compared with the field observations with reasonable agreement.

  12. Stratified Flow Past a Hill: Dividing Streamline Concept Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Laura S.; Thompson, Michael Y.; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Fernando, Harindra J. S.

    2016-06-01

    The Sheppard formula (Q J R Meteorol Soc 82:528-529, 1956) for the dividing streamline height H_s assumes a uniform velocity U_∞ and a constant buoyancy frequency N for the approach flow towards a mountain of height h, and takes the form H_s/h=( {1-F} ) , where F=U_{∞}/Nh. We extend this solution to a logarithmic approach-velocity profile with constant N. An analytical solution is obtained for H_s/h in terms of Lambert-W functions, which also suggests alternative scaling for H_s/h. A `modified' logarithmic velocity profile is proposed for stably stratified atmospheric boundary-layer flows. A field experiment designed to observe H_s is described, which utilized instrumentation from the spring field campaign of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program. Multiple releases of smoke at F≈ 0.3-0.4 support the new formulation, notwithstanding the limited success of experiments due to logistical constraints. No dividing streamline is discerned for F≈ 10, since, if present, it is too close to the foothill. Flow separation and vortex shedding is observed in this case. The proposed modified logarithmic profile is in reasonable agreement with experimental observations.

  13. Two phenomenological constants explain similarity laws in stably stratified turbulence.

    PubMed

    Katul, Gabriel G; Porporato, Amilcare; Shah, Stimit; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2014-02-01

    In stably stratified turbulent flows, the mixing efficiency associated with eddy diffusivity for heat, or equivalently the turbulent Prandtl number (Pr(t)), is fraught with complex dynamics originating from the scalewise interplay between shear generation of turbulence and its dissipation by density gradients. A large corpus of data and numerical simulations agree on a near-universal relation between Pr(t) and the Richardson number (R(i)), which encodes the relative importance of buoyancy dissipation to mechanical production of turbulent kinetic energy. The Pr(t)-R(i) relation is shown to be derivable solely from the cospectral budgets for momentum and heat fluxes if a Rotta-like return to isotropy closure for the pressure-strain effects and Kolmogorov's theory for turbulent cascade are invoked. The ratio of the Kolmogorov to the Kolmogorov-Obukhov-Corrsin phenomenological constants, and a constant associated with isotropization of the production whose value (= 3/5) has been predicted from Rapid Distortion Theory, explain all the macroscopic nonlinearities.

  14. Energy and water vapor transport in a turbulent stratified environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallana, Luca; de Santi, Francesca; Iovieno, Michele; Richiardone, Renzo; Tordella, Daniela

    2015-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations about the transport of kinetic energy and unsaturated water vapor across a thin layer which separates two decaying turbulent flows with different energy. This interface lies in a shearless stratified environment modeled by means of Boussinesq's approximation. Water vapor is treated as a passive scalar (Kumar et al. 2014). Initial conditions have Fr2 between 0.64 and 64 (stable case) and between -3.2 and -19 (unstable case) and Reλ = 250 . Dry air is in the lower half of the domain and has a higher turbulent energy, seven times higher than the energy of moist air in the upper half. In the early stage of evolution, as long as | F r2 | > 1 , stratification plays a minor role and the flows follows closely neutral stratification mixing. As the buoyancy terms grows, Fr2 ~ O (1) , the mixing process deeply changes. A stable stratification generates a separation layer which blocks the entrainment of dry air into the moist one, characterized by a relative increment of the turbulent dissipation rate compared to the local turbulent energy. On the contrary, an unstable stratification sligthy enhances the entrainment. Growth-decay of energy and mixing layer thichness are discussed and compared with laboratory and numerical experiments.

  15. TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS OF A LONGITUDINALLY STRATIFIED CORONAL LOOP SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fathalian, N.; Safari, H. E-mail: safari@znu.ac.i

    2010-11-20

    Collective transverse coronal loop oscillations seem to be detected in observational studies. In this regard, Luna et al. modeled the collective kink-like normal modes of several cylindrical loop systems using the T-matrix theory. This paper investigates the effects of longitudinal density stratification along the loop axis on the collective kink-like modes of the system of coronal loops. The coronal loop system is modeled as cylinders of parallel flux tubes, with two ends of each loop at the dense photosphere. The flux tubes are considered as uniform magnetic fields, with stratified density along the loop axis which changes discontinuously at the lateral surface of each cylinder. The MHD equations are reduced to solve a set of two coupled dispersion relations for frequencies and wavenumbers, in the presence of a stratification parameter. The fundamental and first overtone frequencies and longitudinal wavenumbers are computed. The previous results are verified for an unstratified coronal loop system. Finally, we conclude that an increased longitudinal density stratification parameter will result in an increase of the frequencies. The frequency ratios, first overtones to fundamentals, are very sensitive functions of the density scale height parameter. Therefore, stratification should be included in dynamics of coronal loop systems. For unstratified coronal loop systems, these ratios are the same as monoloop ones.

  16. Oblique, Stratified Winds about a Shelter Fence. Part I: Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John D.

    2004-08-01

    Wind statistics were measured using cup and sonic anemometers, placed upwind and downwind from a porous plastic windbreak fence (height h = 1.25 m, length Y = 114 m, resistance coefficient kr0 = 2.4, and porosity p = 0.45) standing on otherwise uniform land (short grass with roughness length z0 1.9 cm). Intercomparison with collocated two-dimensional sonic anemometers suggested that, except in strongly stratified winds, cup anemometers (distance constant 1.5 m), subjected to a uniform overspeeding correction (here 10%), provide a reasonably accurate transect of the mean wind across the disturbed flow region. The measurements, binned with respect to mean wind direction and stratification, establish that the resistance coefficient of a windbreak of this type implies the maximum (or “potential”) mean wind reduction, a potential that is realized in neutral, perpendicular flow and for which a semiempirical formula is derived. Obliquity of the approaching wind reduces actual shelter effectiveness below the potential value, as was already known. However, a systematic influence of stratification could only be discriminated in winds that were not too far (say, within about ±30°) from perpendicular, under which conditions both stable and unstable stratification reduced shelter effectiveness. The “quiet zone,” in which velocity standard deviations (σu, σ) are reduced relative to the approach flow, was found to extend farther downwind for the normal velocity component (u) than for the parallel component ().


  17. An optimal stratified Simon two-stage design.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Deepak; Bowden, Jack; Starr, Colin; Wernisch, Lorenz; Mander, Adrian

    2016-07-01

    In Phase II oncology trials, therapies are increasingly being evaluated for their effectiveness in specific populations of interest. Such targeted trials require designs that allow for stratification based on the participants' molecular characterisation. A targeted design proposed by Jones and Holmgren (JH) Jones CL, Holmgren E: 'An adaptive Simon two-stage design for phase 2 studies of targeted therapies', Contemporary Clinical Trials 28 (2007) 654-661.determines whether a drug only has activity in a disease sub-population or in the wider disease population. Their adaptive design uses results from a single interim analysis to decide whether to enrich the study population with a subgroup or not; it is based on two parallel Simon two-stage designs. We study the JH design in detail and extend it by providing a few alternative ways to control the familywise error rate, in the weak sense as well as the strong sense. We also introduce a novel optimal design by minimising the expected sample size. Our extended design contributes to the much needed framework for conducting Phase II trials in stratified medicine. © 2016 The Authors Pharmaceutical Statistics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Turbulent reconnection of magnetic bipoles in stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, S.; Brandenburg, A.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2016-07-01

    We consider strongly stratified forced turbulence in a plane-parallel layer with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower part and non-helical turbulence in the upper. The magnetic field is found to develop strongly concentrated bipolar structures near the surface. They form elongated bands with a sharp interface between opposite polarities. Unlike earlier experiments with imposed magnetic field, the inclusion of rotation does not strongly suppress the formation of these structures. We perform a systematic numerical study of this phenomenon by varying magnetic Reynolds number, scale-separation ratio, and Coriolis number. We focus on the formation of a current sheet between bipolar regions where reconnection of oppositely oriented field lines occurs. We determine the reconnection rate by measuring either the inflow velocity in the vicinity of the current sheet or by measuring the electric field in the reconnection region. We demonstrate that for large Lundquist numbers, S > 103, the reconnection rate is nearly independent of S in agreement with results of recent numerical simulations performed by other groups in simpler settings.

  19. Numerical Study of Stratified Charge Combustion in Wave Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalim, M. Razi

    1997-01-01

    A wave rotor may be used as a pressure-gain combustor effecting non-steady flow, and intermittent, confined combustion to enhance gas turbine engine performance. It will be more compact and probably lighter than an equivalent pressure-exchange wave rotor, yet will have similar thermodynamic and mechanical characteristics. Because the allowable turbine blade temperature limits overall fuel/air ratio to sub-flammable values, premixed stratification techniques are necessary to burn hydrocarbon fuels in small engines with compressor discharge temperature well below autoignition conditions. One-dimensional, unsteady numerical simulations of stratified-charge combustion are performed using an eddy-diffusivity turbulence model and a simple reaction model incorporating a flammability limit temperature. For good combustion efficiency, a stratification strategy is developed which concentrates fuel at the leading and trailing edges of the inlet port. Rotor and exhaust temperature profiles and performance predictions are presented at three representative operating conditions of the engine: full design load, 40% load, and idle. The results indicate that peak local gas temperatures will result in excessive temperatures within the rotor housing unless additional cooling methods are used. The rotor itself will have acceptable temperatures, but the pattern factor presented to the turbine may be of concern, depending on exhaust duct design and duct-rotor interaction.

  20. Stratified crustal shortening under the Longmenshan thrust belt, Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.

    2014-12-01

    Stratified crustal shortening under the Longmenshan thrust belt, Tibetan plateau Xiwei Xu1&2, Baojin Liu3, John H. Shaw2, Guihua Yu11. Key Lab of Active Tectonics & Volcano, Institute of Geology, CEA, Beijing 100029, China 2. Department of Earth & Planetary Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA 3. Geophysical Prospecting Center, CEA, Zhengzhou 450002, China Crustal velocity structure and new seismic reflection profiling across the foothills of the Longmen Shan and Sichuan Basin reveals a distinct pattern of crustal structure under Longmenshan thrust belt: brittle thrust faults with multiple detachments in the upper crust that are localized above, but decoupled from, a steep contact (FL) in the lower crust and upper mantle across which the lower crust thickens abruptly. Then two models are presented: 1) Model showing breakthrough thrusting of the plateau crust over the Sichuan Basin above the basal detachment (FD2); 2) Model showing indentation of a strong structural wedge of the Yangtze Craton into the weak plateau, but no sliding on the contact FL or sliding on the contact FL. This observation provides insights that help us to understand the mechanisms of crustal shortening, thickening, and uplift of the Tibetan Plateau.

  1. Near wake characteristics in a stably-stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madison, Trystan; Xiang, Xinjiang; Sellappan, Prabu; Spedding, Geoffrey

    2016-11-01

    Decaying stratified turbulence that is free to evolve in the presence of a stable density gradient eventually reaches a state dominated by low Froude number dynamics where persistent patterns emerge. Whether or not information from the initial turbulence creator persists in the formation of these patterns is still an open question. For example the late time evolution of bluff body wakes have been shown to have universal characteristics that are independent of the details of the original generator while experiments on the near wake of a towed grid suggest that the earliest stages of flow development do depend on the initial conditions. Here we present near wake characteristics of two grids with varied mesh spacing and similar solidity, a disk, and a sphere, all of equivalent drag, for Re = { 1000 , 3000 } and Fr = { 1 , 4 } . Quantitative measures in the wake signature deriving from whole-field PIV measurements will be used to specify when and how near wakes are similar, or different from each other, and from expectations or suppositions in the literature. Support from ONR Grant N00014-15-1-2506 is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Observations of Instabilities in Stratified Taylor-Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenborn, Bruce; Ibanez, Ruy; Swinney, Harry L.

    2016-11-01

    Inviscid analyses by Molemaker et al. and by Dubrulle et al. predicted that a fluid with a vertically varying density will be less stable than a uniform fluid when the fluid is contained inside a concentric rotating cylinder system and subject to anticyclonic shear. Dubrulle et al. named this instability the stratorotational instability and a subsequent viscous theory by Shalybkov and Rudiger hypothesized that such stratified flow is stable when the ratio of outer and inner cylinder rotation rates μ is less than the ratio of the inner and outer cylinder radii η. Le Bars and Le Gal confirmed this hypothesis in experiments for Re < 1200 with Re ≡ (ro -ri) Ωiri / ν . However, we find the SRI exists for μ > η when the density gradient is large. We also find that the axial wavelength scales linearly with the internal Froude number and that the onset of the SRI is suppressed for Re > 4000 , a region previously unexplored in experiments. For Re > 8000 , we find that the fluid does not exhibit the SRI but transitions to a spatially nonperiodic state that mixes the fluid. This research was supported in part by the Sid W. Richardson Foundation.

  3. Plankton dynamics in thermally-stratified free-surface turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovecchio, Salvatore; Soldati, Alfredo

    2015-11-01

    Thermal stratification induced by solar heating near the ocean-atmosphere interface influences the transfer fluxes of heat, momentum and chemical species across the interface. Due to thermal stratification, a region of large temperature gradients (thermocline) may form with strong consequences for the marine ecosystem. In particular, the thermocline is believed to prevent phytoplankton from reaching the well-lit surface layer, where they can grow through the process of photosynthesis. In this paper, we use a DNS-based Eulerian-Lagrangian approach to examine the role of stratification on phytoplankton dynamics in thermally-stratified free-surface turbulence. We focus on gyrotactic self-propelled phytoplankton cells, considering different stratification levels (quantified by the Richardson number) and different gyro tactic re-orientation times. We show that the modulation of turbulent fluctuations induced by stable stratification has a strong effect on the orientation and distribution of phytoplankton, possibly leading to trapping of some species within the thermocline. Specifically, we observe the appearance of a depletion layer just below the free-surface as stratification increases, accompanied by a reduction in the vertical stability of phytoplankton cells.

  4. 3D Zombie Vortices in Rotating Stratified Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Philip; Pei, Suyang; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Barranco, Joseph; Lecoanet, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    We have shown that there is a finite-amplitude instability in linearly-stable, rotating, vertically-stratified, horizontally-shearing flows. The instability is due to excitations of baroclinic critical layers in which the vertical velocity of a neutrally-stable eigenmode is singular in the inviscid limit. This singularity coupled with the Coriolis and stretching terms in the vertical vorticity equation create intense vortex layers. Those layers roll-up into 3D vortices, which then de-stabilize other critical layers. These vortices, which we call zombie vortices, can fill the dead zone of a protoplanetary disk around a forming star. The vortices, either by themselves or by exciting inertio-gravity waves or acoustic waves, can transport angular momentum in a protoplanetary disk and thereby allow a protostar to form into a star. We find that the zombie vortices are similar in flows with Boussinesq, anelastic, and fully compressible equations of state. However, the rates of angular momentum transport and the mechanisms by which it is transported vary significantly in flows with different equations of state.

  5. Automated identification of stratifying signatures in cellular subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Bruggner, Robert V.; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Dill, David L.; Tibshirani, Robert J.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation and examination of cellular subpopulations that display condition-specific behavior can play a critical contributory role in understanding disease mechanism, as well as provide a focal point for development of diagnostic criteria linking such a mechanism to clinical prognosis. Despite recent advancements in single-cell measurement technologies, the identification of relevant cell subsets through manual efforts remains standard practice. As new technologies such as mass cytometry increase the parameterization of single-cell measurements, the scalability and subjectivity inherent in manual analyses slows both analysis and progress. We therefore developed Citrus (cluster identification, characterization, and regression), a data-driven approach for the identification of stratifying subpopulations in multidimensional cytometry datasets. The methodology of Citrus is demonstrated through the identification of known and unexpected pathway responses in a dataset of stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells measured by mass cytometry. Additionally, the performance of Citrus is compared with that of existing methods through the analysis of several publicly available datasets. As the complexity of flow cytometry datasets continues to increase, methods such as Citrus will be needed to aid investigators in the performance of unbiased—and potentially more thorough—correlation-based mining and inspection of cell subsets nested within high-dimensional datasets. PMID:24979804

  6. BIPOLAR MAGNETIC SPOTS FROM DYNAMOS IN STRATIFIED SPHERICAL SHELL TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Sarah; Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Recent work by Mitra et al. (2014) has shown that in strongly stratified forced two-layer turbulence with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower layer, and nonhelical turbulence in the upper, a magnetic field occurs in the upper layer in the form of sharply bounded bipolar magnetic spots. Here we extend this model to spherical wedge geometry covering the northern hemisphere up to 75° latitude and an azimuthal extent of 180°. The kinetic helicity and therefore also the large-scale magnetic field are strongest at low latitudes. For moderately strong stratification, several bipolar spots form that eventually fill the full longitudinal extent. At early times, the polarity of spots reflects the orientation of the underlying azimuthal field, as expected from Parker’s Ω-shaped flux loops. At late times their tilt changes such that there is a radial field of opposite orientation at different latitudes separated by about 10°. Our model demonstrates the spontaneous formation of spots of sizes much larger than the pressure scale height. Their tendency to produce filling factors close to unity is argued to be reminiscent of highly active stars. We confirm that strong stratification and strong scale separation are essential ingredients behind magnetic spot formation, which appears to be associated with downflows at larger depths.

  7. Stratified Charge Rotary Engine Critical Technology Enablement, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irion, C. E.; Mount, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes results of a critical technology enablement effort with the stratified charge rotary engine (SCRE) focusing on a power section of 0.67 liters (40 cu. in.) per rotor in single and two rotor versions. The work is a continuation of prior NASA Contracts NAS3-23056 and NAS3-24628. Technical objectives are multi-fuel capability, including civil and military jet fuel and DF-2, fuel efficiency of 0.355 Lbs/BHP-Hr. at best cruise condition above 50 percent power, altitude capability of up to 10Km (33,000 ft.) cruise, 2000 hour TBO and reduced coolant heat rejection. Critical technologies for SCRE's that have the potential for competitive performance and cost in a representative light-aircraft environment were examined. Objectives were: the development and utilization of advanced analytical tools, i.e. higher speed and enhanced three dimensional combustion modeling; identification of critical technologies; development of improved instrumentation, and to isolate and quantitatively identify the contribution to performance and efficiency of critical components or subsystems.

  8. The emerging agenda of stratified medicine in neurology.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Paul M; Edison, Paul; Geraghty, Olivia C; Johnson, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Stratified medicine can reduce the costs of neurological care, bringing benefits to both patients and physicians. The availability of routine genetic testing, new biomarkers and advanced imaging, as well as new technologies for patient-centred data collection, has expanded the potential for patient stratification. Several neurology subspecialities, including stroke, epilepsy and behavioural neurology, have already applied stratification for disease prognosis, optimization of disease management and reduction of treatment-related adverse events. Stratification approaches could improve the cost-effectiveness of neurological care that involves treatments with high costs or risks of adverse reactions, as well as guide the use of emerging, highly individualized therapies. There are still major challenges in the development of clinically actionable stratification concepts, and practical barriers can limit adoption of these concepts into clinical practice. However, improved technologies and disease understanding are making more precise stratification practical. We believe that neurologists should become leaders in the development and validation of these practices, and that use of these approaches should be part of a broader strategy for addressing both the growing needs of an ageing population and the rising pressures for rapid improvements in the cost-effectiveness of therapeutics.

  9. Stratified shear flow in an inclined square duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Colin; Linden, Paul

    2014-11-01

    We present results of experiments on stratified shear flow in an inclined duct. The duct connects two reservoirs of fluid with different densities, which drives a counterflow with a dense layer flowing beneath a less-dense layer moving in the opposite direction. Depending on the dimensionless Atwood number A and duct angle θ, we identify four flow states: a laminar L state, a Holmboe wavemode H state, a spatio-temporally intermittent I state, and a fully developed turbulent T state. We map a state diagram of these flows in the Atwood number - θ plane and examine the force balances that determine each of these states. We find the L and H states to be hydraulically controlled at the ends of the duct and the flow is determined by the pressure difference associated with the density difference between the reservoirs. The I and T states are associated with increasing dissipation within the duct. We replot the state-space in the Grashof number - θ phase plane and find the transition to the T -state is governed by a critical Grashof number. We then evaluate the level of turbulence by examining scalings for the thickness of interfacial region between the two layers. NSF GRF No. DGE1144152.

  10. Spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emission from stratified jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Matsumoto, Jin; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Tolstov, Alexey; Mao, Jirong; Dainotti, Maria; Mizuta, Akira

    2014-07-10

    We explore the spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emissions from stratified jets in which multiple components, separated by sharp velocity shear regions, are distributed in lateral directions. Propagation of thermal photons injected at a high optical depth region are calculated until they escape from the photosphere. It is found that the presence of the lateral structure within the jet leads to the nonthermal feature of the spectra and significant polarization signal in the resulting emission. The deviation from thermal spectra, as well as the polarization degree, tends to be enhanced as the velocity gradient in the shear region increases. In particular, we show that emissions from multicomponent jet can reproduce the typical observed spectra of gamma-ray bursts irrespective of the position of the observer when a velocity shear region is closely spaced in various lateral (θ) positions. The degree of polarization associated with the emission is significant (>few percent) at a wide range of observer angles and can be higher than 30%.

  11. Neoproterozoic cap-dolostone deposition in stratified glacial meltwater plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Zhengrong; Raub, Timothy D.; Macdonald, Francis A.; Evans, David A. D.

    2014-10-01

    Neoproterozoic cap carbonates host distinctive geochemical and sedimentological features that reflect prevailing conditions in the aftermath of Snowball Earth. Interpretation of these features has remained contentious, with hypotheses hinging upon timescale and synchronicity of deposition, and whether or not geochemical signatures of cap carbonates represent those of a well-mixed ocean. Here we present new high-resolution Sr and Mg isotope results from basal Ediacaran cap dolostones in South Australia and Mongolia. Least-altered Sr and Mg isotope compositions of carbonates are identified through a novel incremental leaching technique that monitors the purity of a carbonate sample and the effects of diagenesis. These data can be explained by the formation of these cap dolostones involving two chemically distinct solutions, a glacial meltwater plume enriched in radiogenic Sr, and a saline ocean residue with relatively lower 87Sr/86Sr ratios. Model simulations suggest that these water bodies remained dynamically stratified during part of cap-dolostone deposition, most likely lasting for ∼8 thousand years. Our results can potentially reconcile previous conflicts between timescales estimated from physical mixing models and paleomagnetic constraints. Geochemical data from cap carbonates used to interpret the nature of Snowball Earth and its aftermath should be recast in terms of a chemically distinct meltwater plume.

  12. Biofluid dynamics of two phase stratified flow through flexible membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagavatula Nvssr, Dinesh; Pushpavanam, S.

    2016-11-01

    Two phase stratified flows between flexible membranes arise in biological flows like lung airway reopening, blood flow in arteries and movement of spinal cord. It is important to understand the physics behind the interaction of flexible membranes and the fluid flow. In this work, a theoretical model is developed and different types of instabilities that arise due to the fluid flow are understood. The solid membrane is modeled as an incompressible linear viscoelastic solid. To simplify the analysis, inertia in the solid is neglected. Linear stability analysis is carried around the base state velocity of the fluid and displacement field of the solid. The flow is perturbed by a small disturbance and a normal mode analysis is carried out to study the growth rate of the disturbance. An eigenvalue problem in formulated using Chebyshev spectral method and is solved to obtain the growth rate of the disturbance. The effect of different parameters such as thickness of the flexible membrane, Reynolds number, viscosity ratio, density ratio, Capillary number and Weissenberg number on the stability characteristics of the flow is studied in detail. Dispersion curves are obtained which explain the stability of the flow. A detail energy analysis is carried out to determine different ways through which energy transfers from the base flow to the disturbed flow.

  13. Origins of rainbow smelt in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.

    1983-01-01

    The first rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) to enter Lake Ontario were probably migrants from an anadromous strain introduced into New York's Finger Lakes. Since the upper Great Lakes were originally stocked with a landlocked strain from Green Lake, Maine, subsequent migration to Lake Ontario from Lake Erie makes Lake Ontario unique among the Great Lakes in probably having received introductions from two distinct populations.

  14. Speciation in ancient lakes.

    PubMed

    Martens, K

    1997-05-01

    About a dozen lakes in the world are up to three orders of magnitude older than most others. Lakes Tanganyika (East Africa) and Baikal (Siberia) have probably existed in some form for 12-20 million years, maybe more. Such lakes can have different origins, sizes, shapes, depths and limnologies, but, in contrast to short-lived (mostly post-glacial) lakes, they have exceptionally high faunal diversity and levels of endemicity. A multitude of and processes accounting for these explosive radiations have recently been documented, most of them based on particular groups in certain lakes, but comparative research can detect repeated patterns. No special speciafion mechanism, exclusive to ancient lakes has been demonstrated, although cases of ultra-rapid speciation have been documented. Extant diversity results not by simple accumulation, but by a complex process of immigration, speciation and extinction.

  15. Hydrology of Indiana lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perrey, Joseph Irving; Corbett, Don Melvin

    1956-01-01

    The stabilization of lake levels often requires the construction of outlet control structures. A detailed study of past lake-level elevations and other hydologic date is necessary to establish a level that can be maintained and to determine the means necessary for maintaining the established level. Detailed lake-level records for 28 lakes are included in the report, and records for over 100 other lakes data are available in the U.S. Geological Survey Office, Indianapolis, Ind. Evaporation data from the four Class A evaporation station of the U. S. Weather Bureau have been compiled in this report. A table showing the established legal lake level and related data is included.

  16. Planktonic events may cause polymictic-dimictic regime shifts in temperate lakes.

    PubMed

    Shatwell, Tom; Adrian, Rita; Kirillin, Georgiy

    2016-04-14

    Water transparency affects the thermal structure of lakes, and within certain lake depth ranges, it can determine whether a lake mixes regularly (polymictic regime) or stratifies continuously (dimictic regime) from spring through summer. Phytoplankton biomass can influence transparency but the effect of its seasonal pattern on stratification is unknown. Therefore we analysed long term field data from two lakes of similar depth, transparency and climate but one polymictic and one dimictic, and simulated a conceptual lake with a hydrodynamic model. Transparency in the study lakes was typically low during spring and summer blooms and high in between during the clear water phase (CWP), caused when zooplankton graze the spring bloom. The effect of variability of transparency on thermal structure was stronger at intermediate transparency and stronger during a critical window in spring when the rate of lake warming is highest. Whereas the spring bloom strengthened stratification in spring, the CWP weakened it in summer. The presence or absence of the CWP influenced stratification duration and under some conditions determined the mixing regime. Therefore seasonal plankton dynamics, including biotic interactions that suppress the CWP, can influence lake temperatures, stratification duration, and potentially also the mixing regime.

  17. Excess warming of a Central European lake driven by solar brightening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Köster, O.

    2016-10-01

    Recent trends in summer surface temperatures of many lakes exceed the corresponding air temperature trends. This disagrees with expectations from lake surface heat budgets, which predict that lake surface temperatures should increase by 75-90% of the increase in air temperatures. Here we investigate the causes for this excess warming for Lower Lake Zurich, a representative deep and stratified Central European lake, by a combined data analysis and modeling approach. Lake temperatures are simulated using a one-dimensional vertical model driven by 33 years of homogenized meteorological data. The model is calibrated and validated using an equally long time series of monthly water temperature profiles. The effects of individual forcing parameters are investigated by scenarios where the trends of single variables are retained while those of all other forcing variables are removed. The results show that ˜60% of the observed warming of spring and summer lake surface temperatures were caused by increased air temperature and ˜40% by increased solar radiation. The effects of the trends of all other forcing variables were small. Following projections of climate models, the increasing trends in solar radiation, and consequently the excess warming of lake surface temperatures, are not likely to continue in the future.

  18. Cold-Active, Heterotrophic Bacteria from the Highly Oligotrophic Waters of Lake Vanda, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Vander Schaaf, Nicole A.; Cunningham, Anna M. G.; Cluff, Brandon P.; Kraemer, CodyJo K.; Reeves, Chelsea L.; Riester, Carli J.; Slater, Lauren K.; Madigan, Michael T.; Sattley, W. Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The permanently ice-covered lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica are distinctive ecosystems that consist strictly of microbial communities. In this study, water samples were collected from Lake Vanda, a stratified Dry Valley lake whose upper waters (from just below the ice cover to nearly 60 m) are highly oligotrophic, and used to establish enrichment cultures. Six strains of psychrotolerant, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from lake water samples from a depth of 50 or 55 m. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Lake Vanda strains to be species of Nocardiaceae, Caulobacteraceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and Bradyrhizobiaceae. All Lake Vanda strains grew at temperatures near or below 0 °C, but optimal growth occurred from 18 to 24 °C. Some strains showed significant halotolerance, but no strains required NaCl for growth. The isolates described herein include cold-active species not previously reported from Dry Valley lakes, and their physiological and phylogenetic characterization broadens our understanding of these limnologically unique lakes. PMID:27682095

  19. Planktonic events may cause polymictic-dimictic regime shifts in temperate lakes

    PubMed Central

    Shatwell, Tom; Adrian, Rita; Kirillin, Georgiy

    2016-01-01

    Water transparency affects the thermal structure of lakes, and within certain lake depth ranges, it can determine whether a lake mixes regularly (polymictic regime) or stratifies continuously (dimictic regime) from spring through summer. Phytoplankton biomass can influence transparency but the effect of its seasonal pattern on stratification is unknown. Therefore we analysed long term field data from two lakes of similar depth, transparency and climate but one polymictic and one dimictic, and simulated a conceptual lake with a hydrodynamic model. Transparency in the study lakes was typically low during spring and summer blooms and high in between during the clear water phase (CWP), caused when zooplankton graze the spring bloom. The effect of variability of transparency on thermal structure was stronger at intermediate transparency and stronger during a critical window in spring when the rate of lake warming is highest. Whereas the spring bloom strengthened stratification in spring, the CWP weakened it in summer. The presence or absence of the CWP influenced stratification duration and under some conditions determined the mixing regime. Therefore seasonal plankton dynamics, including biotic interactions that suppress the CWP, can influence lake temperatures, stratification duration, and potentially also the mixing regime. PMID:27074883

  20. Sedimentary DNA Reveals Cyanobacterial Community Diversity over 200 Years in Two Perialpine Lakes.

    PubMed

    Monchamp, Marie-Eve; Walser, Jean-Claude; Pomati, Francesco; Spaak, Piet

    2016-11-01

    We reconstructed cyanobacterial community structure and phylogeny using DNA that was isolated from layers of stratified sediments spanning 200 years of lake history in the perialpine lakes Greifensee and Lake Zurich (Switzerland). Community analysis based on amplification and sequencing of a 400-nucleotide (nt)-long 16S rRNA fragment specific to Cyanobacteria revealed operational taxonomic units (OTUs) capturing the whole phylum, including representatives of a newly characterized clade termed Melainabacteria, which shares common ancestry with Cyanobacteria and has not been previously described in lakes. The reconstruction of cyanobacterial richness and phylogenetic structure was validated using a data set consisting of 40 years of pelagic microscopic counts from each lake. We identified the OTUs assigned to common taxa known to be present in Greifensee and Lake Zurich and found a strong and significant relationship (adjusted R(2) = 0.89; P < 0.001) between pelagic species richness in water and OTU richness in the sediments. The water-sediment richness relationship varied between cyanobacterial orders, indicating that the richness of Chroococcales and Synechococcales may be underestimated by microscopy. PCR detection of the microcystin synthetase gene mcyA confirmed the presence of potentially toxic cyanobacterial taxa over recent years in Greifensee and throughout the last century in Lake Zurich. The approach presented in this study demonstrates that it is possible to reconstruct past pelagic cyanobacterial communities in lakes where the integrity of the sedimentary archive is well preserved and to explore changes in phylogenetic and functional diversity over decade-to-century timescales.