Science.gov

Sample records for hypertrophic stratified lake

  1. Nonlinear internal waves in shallow stratified lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkina, Oxana; Talipova, Tatiana; Kurkin, Andrey; Ruvinskaya, Ekaterina; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2015-04-01

    Weakly nonlinear model of internal waves based on the extended Korteweg-de Vries equation - Gardner equation is applied to analyze possible shapes in shallow stratified lake - Sankhar Lake, Russia. Series of temperature variation in space and time are collected and analyzed. The spectra of such variations can be fitted by power function of frequency with exponent minus one, minus two. It is shown that temperature variations influence on kinematic characteristics of internal waves, mainly on the coefficient of quadratic nonlinearity. The solitary wave (soliton) of the first mode is an elevation wave with amplitude less 3 m (total depth of 15 m). The solitons of the second mode can have any polarity. Also the breathers of second mode can be generated in such lake.

  2. Methane metabolism in a stratified boreal lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykänen, Hannu; Peura, Sari; Kankaala, Paula; Jones, Roger

    2013-04-01

    Stratified lakes, typical of the boreal zone, are naturally anoxic from their bottoms. In these lakes methanogenesis can account for up to half of organic matter degradation. However, a major part of the methane (CH4) is oxidized in the water column before reaching the atmosphere. Since methanotrophs use CH4 as their sole carbon and energy source, much CH4-derived carbon is incorporated into their biomass. Microbially produced CH4 has strongly negative δ13C compared to other carbon forms in ecosystems, making it possible to follow its route in food webs. However, only a few studies have estimated the amount of this microbial biomass or its carbon stable isotopic composition due to difficulties in separating it from other biomass or from other carbon forms in the water column. We estimated methanotrophic biomass from measured CH4 oxidation, and δ13C of the biomass from measured δ13C values of CH4, DIC, POM and DOC. An estimate of the fraction of methanotrophs in total microbial biomass is derived from bacterial community composition measurements. The study was made in, Alinen Mustajärvi, a small (area 0.75 ha, maximum depth 6.5 m, mean depth 4.2 m,), oligotrophic, mesohumic headwater lake located in boreal coniferous forest in southern Finland. CH4 and DIC concentrations and their δ13C were measured over the deepest point of the lake at 1 m intervals. 13C of DOM and POM were analyzed from composite samples from epi-, meta-, and hypolimnion. Evasion of CH4 and carbon dioxide from the lake surface to the atmosphere was estimated with boundary layer diffusion equations. CH4oxidation was estimated by comparing differences between observed concentrations and CH4potentially transported by turbulent diffusion between different vertical layers in the lake and also by actual methanotrophy measurements and from vertical differences in δ13C-CH4. The estimate of CH4 production was based on the sum of oxidized and released CH4. Molecular microbiology methods were used to

  3. Thiols in a Connecticut Stratified Freshwater Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Mylon, S. E.; Benoit, G.

    2003-12-01

    Thiols are an important class of dissolved reduced sulfur (DRS) species in aquatic environments. They are generally formed from biological processes or during diagenesis of biogenic matter. Thiols can affect the biogeochemistry of B-type metals as they form strong complexes that influence trace metal speciation, bioavailability and toxicity. While current literature focuses on the biogeochemistry of thiols in marine systems, little is known about the biogeochemistry of thiols in oxic freshwaters. We chose to study thiols in Linsley Pond a stratified freshwater lake that has been extensively studied by Hutchinson. Our goals were to identify and quantify the range of thiols present throughout this small lake. Additionally, we hoped to discern the environmental factors that influence the production and distribution of thiols in the water column, and to evaluate importance of thiols in trace metal speciation. To identify and quantify various thiols in freshwaters, we adopted a sensitive and selective analytical method, which involves precolumn fluorometric labeling coupled to high performance liquid chromatography and sensitive fluorescence detection. Using this method, our analytical detection limit is below one nanomolar. Among others, two thiol species were observed in Linsley Pond: 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) and glutathione (GSH). 3-MPA exists in both oxic and anoxic water layers at nanomolar levels, and increases from surface to bottom. GSH is only detected in subsurface layer and co-varies with Chl a, indicating possible biological sources of GSH in these layers. There is a third, unidentified thiol species which is currently under investigation. The unidentified thiol species appears only in anoxic lake waters, and tests indicate that it is not PC2 (phytochelatin with 2 glutamic acid-cysteine units). Throughout the water column, concentrations of all three thiols are greater in whole water samples than in the dissolved phase (0.45 um).

  4. Identification of major planktonic sulfur oxidizers in stratified freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hisaya; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Iwata, Tomoya; Fukui, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Planktonic sulfur oxidizers are important constituents of ecosystems in stratified water bodies, and contribute to sulfide detoxification. In contrast to marine environments, taxonomic identities of major planktonic sulfur oxidizers in freshwater lakes still remain largely unknown. Bacterioplankton community structure was analyzed in a stratified freshwater lake, Lake Mizugaki in Japan. In the clone libraries of 16S rRNA gene, clones very closely related to a sulfur oxidizer isolated from this lake, Sulfuritalea hydrogenivorans, were detected in deep anoxic water, and occupied up to 12.5% in each library of different water depth. Assemblages of planktonic sulfur oxidizers were specifically analyzed by constructing clone libraries of genes involved in sulfur oxidation, aprA, dsrA, soxB and sqr. In the libraries, clones related to betaproteobacteria were detected with high frequencies, including the close relatives of Sulfuritalea hydrogenivorans.

  5. Green River iaminites: does the playa-lake model really invalidate the stratified-lake model

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, B.W.

    1982-06-01

    Proponents of the playa-lake model have proposed deposition of most of the Green River Formation microlaminated carbonates (including oil shales) in lakes that were not perennially stratified (meromictic). However, there is a variety of evidence favoring a meromictic depositional environment: (1) close similarity of much of the lamination to varves in modern meromictic lakes, (2) evidence that hydrologic events favoring development of meromixis (chemical stratification) occurred prior to deposition of major accumulations of oil shale, (3) mutually exclusive distribution of fossil nekton (especially fish) and normal lacustrine benthos (including mollusks), and (4) analogy with a Quaternary playa that became a meromictic lake following increased inflow. The playa-lake model is untenable for the typical fish-bearing, kerogen-rich microlaminated sediments. These laminites were probably deposited in a large ectogenic meromictic lake - a chemically stratified lake that formed when increased fresh-water inflow ''drowned'' a saline playa complex.

  6. Crenothrix are major methane consumers in stratified lakes.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Kirsten; Graf, Jon S; Littmann, Sten; Tienken, Daniela; Brand, Andreas; Wehrli, Bernhard; Albertsen, Mads; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael; Kuypers, Marcel Mm; Schubert, Carsten J; Milucka, Jana

    2017-09-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria represent a major biological sink for methane and are thus Earth's natural protection against this potent greenhouse gas. Here we show that in two stratified freshwater lakes a substantial part of upward-diffusing methane was oxidized by filamentous gamma-proteobacteria related to Crenothrix polyspora. These filamentous bacteria have been known as contaminants of drinking water supplies since 1870, but their role in the environmental methane removal has remained unclear. While oxidizing methane, these organisms were assigned an 'unusual' methane monooxygenase (MMO), which was only distantly related to 'classical' MMO of gamma-proteobacterial methanotrophs. We now correct this assignment and show that Crenothrix encode a typical gamma-proteobacterial PmoA. Stable isotope labeling in combination swith single-cell imaging mass spectrometry revealed methane-dependent growth of the lacustrine Crenothrix with oxygen as well as under oxygen-deficient conditions. Crenothrix genomes encoded pathways for the respiration of oxygen as well as for the reduction of nitrate to N2O. The observed abundance and planktonic growth of Crenothrix suggest that these methanotrophs can act as a relevant biological sink for methane in stratified lakes and should be considered in the context of environmental removal of methane.

  7. Volatile organic sulfur compounds in a stratified lake.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haiying; Mylon, Steven E; Benoit, Gaboury

    2007-03-01

    Three volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon disulfide (CS(2)), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), were detected in the stratified water column of a lake (Linsley Pond) in Connecticut. The compounds DMS and DMDS appeared in both the oxic and the anoxic portions of the water column, CS(2) was primarily found in anoxic hypolimnion. Algal metabolism and/or bacterial degradation of sulfur-containing amino acids or other organic materials are potential sources of VOSCs in the oxic lake water. Reactions of hydrogen sulfide with organic compounds and microbial degradation of organic matter may be responsible for the production of VOSCs in the anoxic lake water. The vertical distribution patterns of these three VOSCs varied from month to month in the summer, but the daily profiles obtained in one 5-day period in the summer displayed consistency. No clear diurnal pattern for any of the three VOSCs was observed. Based on observation that these VOSCs were not present in surface and near surface waters of Linsley Pond, freshwater inputs of reduced sulfur compounds to the atmosphere may be insignificant.

  8. Statistics of microstructure patchiness in a stratified lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planella Morato, J.; Roget, E.; Lozovatsky, I.

    2011-10-01

    Statistics of microstructure patches in a sheared, strongly stratified metalimnion of Lake Banyoles (Catalonia, Spain), which occupied ˜40% of the total lake depth of 12 m, are analyzed. Light winds (<3 m s-1) dominated the periods of observation in late June and early July of 2009. The patch sizes hp and the corresponding patch Thorpe scales LTp were identified using profiling measurements of temperature microstructure and small-scale shear. The distribution of hp was found to be lognormal with mean and median values of 0.69 m and 0.50 m respectively. The distribution of LTp within the patches was also fitted to a lognormal model and the mean and median values found to be close to 0.1 m. The probability distribution of the ratio LTp/hp was approximated by the Weibull probability model with a shape parameter cw ≈ 2, and also by beta probability distribution. For hp > 0.25 m, the ratio LTp/hp depends on the patch Richardson and mixing Reynolds numbers following the parameterization of Lozovatsky and Fernando (2002). Analysis of the dynamics of mixing reveals that averaged vertical diffusivities ranged between ˜1 × 10-4 m2 s-1 and ˜5 × 10-5 m2 s-1, depending on the phase of the internal waves. Episodic wind gusts (wind speed above 6 m s-1) transfer ˜1.6% of the wind energy to the metalimnion and ˜0.7% to the hypolimnion, generating large microstructure patches with hp of several meters.

  9. The structure of winter phytoplankton in Lake Nero, Russia, a hypertrophic lake dominated by Planktothrix-like Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The permanent dominance of Planktothrix-like сyanobacteria has been often reported for shallow eutrophic\\hypertrophic lakes in central Europe in summer\\autumn. However studies on phytoplankton growth under ice cover in nutrient-rich lakes are very scarce. Lake Nero provides a good example of the contrasting seasonal extremes in environmental conditions. Moreover, the ecosystem underwent a catastrophic transition from eutrophic to hypertrophic 2003–05, with dominance of filamentous cyanobacteria in summer\\autumn. Towards the end of the period of ice cover, there is an almost complete lack of light and oxygen but abundance in nutrients, especially ammonium nitrogen, soluble reactive phosphorus and total phosphorus in lake Nero. The aim of the present study was to describe species composition and abundance of the phytoplankton, in relation to the abiotic properties of the habitat to the end of winters 1999–2010. We were interested if Planktothrix-like сyanobacteria kept their dominant role under the ice conditions or only survived, and how did the under-ice phytoplankton community differ from year to year. Results Samples collected contained 172 algal taxa of sub-generic rank. Abundance of phytoplankton varied widely from very low to the bloom level. Cyanobacteria (Limnothrix, Pseudanabaena, Planktothrix) were present in all winter samples but did not always dominate. Favourable conditions included low winter temperature, thicker ice, almost complete lack of oxygen and high ammonium concentration. Flagellates belonging to Euglenophyta and Cryptophyta dominated in warmer winters, when phosphorus concentrations increased. Conclusion A full picture of algal succession in the lake may be obtained only if systematic winter observations are taken into account. Nearly anoxic conditions, severe light deficiency and high concentration of biogenic elements present a highly selective environment for phytoplankton. Hypertrophic water bodies of moderate zone

  10. Lateral Solute Concentration Gradients in Stratified Eutrophic Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Robert E.

    1985-04-01

    Lateral concentration gradients in dissolved oxygen and phosphorus were studied in the metalimnion of Lake Mendota and the hypolimnion of Green Lake, Wisconsin. Oxygen concentrations were invariably lower (by up to 4.5 mg/L) in the 3-m interval overlying shelf sediments as compared to adjacent stations in deeper water. Conversely, phosphorus concentrations were up to 65 mg/m3 higher overlying the shelves. In Mendota, the "shelf shift," -ΔO/ΔP, was low as compared to expectations based on Redfield's equation for the aerobic oxidation of sedimenting phytoplankton; this difference indicates a net sediment release of P under aerobic conditions, corroborating laboratory studies. For Lake Mendota a phosphorus profile at the deep hole station underestimates total lake phosphorus by circa 3% in midsummer. Because of its elongated asymmetric basin and related factors, the deep hole sampling bias is larger (circa 15%) for Green Lake. Based on lateral oxygen gradients and flux-gradient computations, the lateral eddy diffusivity is 2 × 105 m2 day-1 in the metalimnion of Mendota and the hypolimnion of Green Lake.

  11. Change in the wind flow regime in stratified lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belolipetskii, V. M.; Belolipetskii, P. V.

    2016-01-01

    Wind flows in meromictic saline lakes in which the water column is not mixed to the bottom for at least one year are studied. This leads to the formation of upper and depth layers with small density gradients, between which there is a water layer with a large density gradient. It has been shown that, depending on the density stratification and the wind speed, wind flows (in the vertical plane) of two types are possible: with one or two circulation zones. For a two-layer lake model, a criterion for the change in the wind flow regime is proposed.

  12. Groundwater flow patterns adjacent to a long-term stratified (meromictic) lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, I.; Shalev, E.; Gvirtzman, H.; Yechieli, Y.; Gavrieli, I.

    2011-08-01

    This paper examines, for the first time, the unique situation of a groundwater system adjacent to a long-term stratified (meromictic) lake. Using conceptual and numerical models, the configuration of groundwater interfaces between the three different water bodies (regional groundwater and upper and lower lake waters) and the flow patterns were quantitatively evaluated assuming a homogenous aquifer. A complex flow system, controlled by density difference, is created near the lake, where three circulation cells are developed. These results are different from the classic circulation cell that is found adjacent to nonstratified water bodies (lakes or oceans). Sensitivity analyses reveal that the results are sensitive to changes in thickness and density of the upper water mass of the lake. The Dead Sea, under its possible future meromictic conditions, serves as an ideal example of such a system. Thus, the model's results can be used as a preliminary assessment for groundwater behavior adjacent to the lake, if and when stratification will develop.

  13. Rising CO2 levels will intensify phytoplankton blooms in eutrophic and hypertrophic lakes.

    PubMed

    Verspagen, Jolanda M H; Van de Waal, Dedmer B; Finke, Jan F; Visser, Petra M; Van Donk, Ellen; Huisman, Jef

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms threaten the water quality of many eutrophic and hypertrophic lakes and cause severe ecological and economic damage worldwide. Dense blooms often deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration and raise pH. Yet, quantitative prediction of the feedbacks between phytoplankton growth, CO2 drawdown and the inorganic carbon chemistry of aquatic ecosystems has received surprisingly little attention. Here, we develop a mathematical model to predict dynamic changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), pH and alkalinity during phytoplankton bloom development. We tested the model in chemostat experiments with the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at different CO2 levels. The experiments showed that dense blooms sequestered large amounts of atmospheric CO2, not only by their own biomass production but also by inducing a high pH and alkalinity that enhanced the capacity for DIC storage in the system. We used the model to explore how phytoplankton blooms of eutrophic waters will respond to rising CO2 levels. The model predicts that (1) dense phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters can deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration to limiting levels and raise the pH over a relatively wide range of atmospheric CO2 conditions, (2) rising atmospheric CO2 levels will enhance phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters with high nutrient loads, and (3) above some threshold, rising atmospheric CO2 will alleviate phytoplankton blooms from carbon limitation, resulting in less intense CO2 depletion and a lesser increase in pH. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the model predictions were qualitatively robust. Quantitatively, the predictions were sensitive to variation in lake depth, DIC input and CO2 gas transfer across the air-water interface, but relatively robust to variation in the carbon uptake mechanisms of phytoplankton. In total, these findings warn that rising CO2 levels may result in a marked intensification of

  14. Rising CO2 Levels Will Intensify Phytoplankton Blooms in Eutrophic and Hypertrophic Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Verspagen, Jolanda M. H.; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Finke, Jan F.; Visser, Petra M.; Van Donk, Ellen; Huisman, Jef

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms threaten the water quality of many eutrophic and hypertrophic lakes and cause severe ecological and economic damage worldwide. Dense blooms often deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration and raise pH. Yet, quantitative prediction of the feedbacks between phytoplankton growth, CO2 drawdown and the inorganic carbon chemistry of aquatic ecosystems has received surprisingly little attention. Here, we develop a mathematical model to predict dynamic changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), pH and alkalinity during phytoplankton bloom development. We tested the model in chemostat experiments with the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at different CO2 levels. The experiments showed that dense blooms sequestered large amounts of atmospheric CO2, not only by their own biomass production but also by inducing a high pH and alkalinity that enhanced the capacity for DIC storage in the system. We used the model to explore how phytoplankton blooms of eutrophic waters will respond to rising CO2 levels. The model predicts that (1) dense phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters can deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration to limiting levels and raise the pH over a relatively wide range of atmospheric CO2 conditions, (2) rising atmospheric CO2 levels will enhance phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters with high nutrient loads, and (3) above some threshold, rising atmospheric CO2 will alleviate phytoplankton blooms from carbon limitation, resulting in less intense CO2 depletion and a lesser increase in pH. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the model predictions were qualitatively robust. Quantitatively, the predictions were sensitive to variation in lake depth, DIC input and CO2 gas transfer across the air-water interface, but relatively robust to variation in the carbon uptake mechanisms of phytoplankton. In total, these findings warn that rising CO2 levels may result in a marked intensification of

  15. Effect of eddy diffusivity on wind-driven currents in a two-layer stratified lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, R. T.; Lick, W.; Molls, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    The steady state wind-driven circulation was numerically calculated in a rectangular stratified lake. The lake is composed of two layers having uniform but unequal densities and eddy diffusivities. The position in thermocline and the three-dimensional velocities in both layers calculated using shallow lake equations. The results show that, as the eddy diffusivity in the hypolimnion is increased, the thermocline tilt and hypolimnetic velocities increase. The effect of the other variables such as wind stress, density, basin length, and mean thermocline depth are also shown.

  16. Diurnal sulfur isotope patterns in a stratified euxinic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilhooly, W., III; Werne, J. P.; O'Beirne, M.; Harris, J. H., IV; Fouskas, F.; Havig, J. R.; Hamilton, T. L.; McCormick, M.

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of sulfur isotopes in the environment is controlled by fractionations imparted during microbial sulfate reduction that commonly range between 19‰ and 66‰. In addition, microbial sulfide oxidation and subsequent disproportionation of intermediate phases of sulfur may contribute to the net isotopic offset observed between sulfate and sulfide. Thus, it has been proposed that the cycling of sulfur, comprising repeated cycles of reduction, oxidation, and disproportionation, is responsible for producing offsets up to 65‰ between the δ34S values of sulfate and sulfide. Such large fractionations are often observed in nature though disproportionation is not necessarily required to produce such large offsets. To address these questions, we report on initial results from inorganic sulfur cycling in the water column and pore waters of euxinic Fayetteville Green Lake (FGL), New York. Water column samples were collected during the day when phototrophic sulfide oxidation is likely active and during the night when chemolithotrophy is likely operative. The sulfur isotopic offsets between sulfate and sulfide at the sediment water interface (57‰) are strikingly similar to those reported for the bottom waters of FGL (55‰; Zerkle et al., GCA, 4953-4970, 2010). The offset increases to nearly 70‰ at 25 cm within the sediments, suggesting ongoing microbial sulfur cycling or possibly differential diffusion during sulfate reduction within the sediments. We will compare the day/night isotope patterns with those of the pore waters to focus on the net isotope effects of sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation.

  17. Community Shift from Phototrophic to Chemotrophic Sulfide Oxidation following Anoxic Holomixis in a Stratified Seawater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Korlević, Marino; Berg, Jasmine S.; Bura-Nakić, Elvira; Ciglenečki, Irena; Amann, Rudolf; Orlić, Sandi

    2014-01-01

    Most stratified sulfidic holomictic lakes become oxygenated after annual turnover. In contrast, Lake Rogoznica, on the eastern Adriatic coast, has been observed to undergo a period of water column anoxia after water layer mixing and establishment of holomictic conditions. Although Lake Rogoznica's chemistry and hydrography have been studied extensively, it is unclear how the microbial communities typically inhabiting the oxic epilimnion and a sulfidic hypolimnion respond to such a drastic shift in redox conditions. We investigated the impact of anoxic holomixis on microbial diversity and microbially mediated sulfur cycling in Lake Rogoznica with an array of culture-independent microbiological methods. Our data suggest a tight coupling between the lake's chemistry and occurring microorganisms. During stratification, anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria were dominant at the chemocline and in the hypolimnion. After an anoxic mixing event, the anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria entirely disappeared, and the homogeneous, anoxic water column was dominated by a bloom of gammaproteobacterial sulfur oxidizers related to the GSO/SUP05 clade. This study is the first report of a community shift from phototrophic to chemotrophic sulfide oxidizers as a response to anoxic holomictic conditions in a seasonally stratified seawater lake. PMID:25344237

  18. Biogeochemistry of natural gases in three alkaline, permanently stratified (meromictic) lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G. )

    1993-01-01

    Methane and associated light hydrocarbons are present as dissolved gases in the water columns of three alkaline, permanently stratified (meromictic) lakes: Big Soda Lake (Nevada), Mono Lake (California), and Soap Lake (Washington). Methane originates in the bottom sediments, but higher gaseous hydrocarbons (that is, gaseous hydrocarbons of higher molecular weight) have either microbial or thermal sources in the different lakes. Stable isotopic composition, hydrocarbon indices, radiocarbon dating, abundance-versus-depth profiles, and biological experiments indicate that methane is formed in the sediments by microbial processes. Methanogenesis and sulfate-reduction have much higher activity in the shallow littoral sediments than in the colder, more saline pelagic sediments of all three lakes. Methane-rich gas seeps are common in Mono Lake and emanate from a natural-gas deposit underlying the current lakebed. Seeps do not occur in either Big Soda Lake or Soap Lake. Ethane and higher alkanes are present in Big Soda Lake and Mono Lake, but are not present in significant quantities in Soap Lake. It is not clear if the presence of these higher alkanes is a consequence of biological activity, a result of mixing with thermogenic gases, or a combination of both factors. These results indicate the potential complexity and diversity encountered in studying light-hydrocarbon biogeochemistry in thermally and microbially active systems. Hence, in the case of methane, detailed multidisciplinary studies are often needed to determine its origin. For ethane and higher alkanes, there is currently a paucity of basic scientific information to allow for unequivocal identification of microbial and thermogenetic sources. 61 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Distribution and Diversity of Archaea Corresponding to the Limnological Cycle of a Hypersaline Stratified Lake (Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt)

    PubMed Central

    Cytryn, Eddie; Minz, Dror; Oremland, Ronald S.; Cohen, Yehuda

    2000-01-01

    The vertical and seasonal distribution and diversity of archaeal sequences was investigated in a hypersaline, stratified, monomictic lake, Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt, during the limnological development of stratification and mixing. Archaeal sequences were studied via phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequences as well as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. The 165 clones studied were grouped into four phylogenetically different clusters. Most of the clones isolated from both the aerobic epilimnion and the sulfide-rich hypolimnion were defined as cluster I, belonging to the Halobacteriaceae family. The three additional clusters were all isolated from the anaerobic hypolimnion. Cluster II is phylogenetically located between the genera Methanobacterium and Methanococcus. Clusters III and IV relate to two previously documented groups of uncultured euryarchaeota, remotely related to the genus Thermoplasma. No crenarchaeota were found in the water column of the Solar Lake. The archaeal community in the Solar Lake under both stratified and mixed conditions was dominated by halobacteria in salinities higher than 10%. During stratification, additional clusters, some of which may possibly relate to uncultured halophilic methanogens, were found in the sulfide- and methane-rich hypolimnion. PMID:10919780

  20. Vertical distribution of microbial communities in a perennially stratified Arctic lake with saline, anoxic bottom waters

    PubMed Central

    Comeau, André M.; Harding, Tommy; Galand, Pierre E.; Vincent, Warwick F.; Lovejoy, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Meromictic lakes are useful biogeochemical models because of their stratified chemical gradients and separation of redox reactions down the water column. Perennially ice-covered meromictic lakes are particularly stable, with long term constancy in their density profiles. Here we sampled Lake A, a deep meromictic lake at latitude 83°N in High Arctic Canada. Sampling was before (May) and after (August) an unusual ice-out event during the warm 2008 summer. We determined the bacterial and archaeal community composition by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene tag-pyrosequencing. Both prokaryote communities were stratified by depth and the Bacteria differed between dates, indicating locally driven selection processes. We matched taxa to known taxon-specific biogeochemical functions and found a close correspondence between the depth of functional specialists and chemical gradients. These results indicate a rich microbial diversity despite the extreme location, with pronounced vertical structure in taxonomic and potential functional composition, and with community shifts during ice-out. PMID:22930670

  1. Vertical distribution of microbial communities in a perennially stratified Arctic lake with saline, anoxic bottom waters.

    PubMed

    Comeau, André M; Harding, Tommy; Galand, Pierre E; Vincent, Warwick F; Lovejoy, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Meromictic lakes are useful biogeochemical models because of their stratified chemical gradients and separation of redox reactions down the water column. Perennially ice-covered meromictic lakes are particularly stable, with long term constancy in their density profiles. Here we sampled Lake A, a deep meromictic lake at latitude 83°N in High Arctic Canada. Sampling was before (May) and after (August) an unusual ice-out event during the warm 2008 summer. We determined the bacterial and archaeal community composition by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene tag-pyrosequencing. Both prokaryote communities were stratified by depth and the Bacteria differed between dates, indicating locally driven selection processes. We matched taxa to known taxon-specific biogeochemical functions and found a close correspondence between the depth of functional specialists and chemical gradients. These results indicate a rich microbial diversity despite the extreme location, with pronounced vertical structure in taxonomic and potential functional composition, and with community shifts during ice-out.

  2. Influence of wind and lake morphometry on the interaction between two rivers entering a stratified lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morillo, S.; Imberger, J.; Antenucci, J.P.; Woods, P.F.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of two rivers flowing into Coeur d'Alene Lake (United States) was investigated with a field experiment and three-dimensional numerical simulations. The focus was on the influence of basin morphology, wind speed, and wind direction on the fate and transport of the inflowing water. Data from the field campaign showed that intrusions from the two rivers propagated into the lake at different depths, with the trace element polluted Coeur d'Alene River flowing into the lake above the trace element poor and nutrient rich St. Joe River inflow. The inflows initially intruded horizontally into the lake at their level of neutral buoyancy and later mixed vertically. Model results revealed that, as the intrusions entered the main lake basin, a forced horizontal mode-two basin-scale internal wave interacted with the intrusions to frequently siphon them into the lake proper and where rapid vertical mixing followed. The results serve to show how detailed transport and mixing patterns in a lake can have important consequences for the plankton ecology in the lake. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  3. Diversity and Abundance of Methanotrophic Bacteria in a Permanently Stratified Lake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M. C.; Udert, K.; Gschwend, P. M.; Cavanaugh, C. M.

    2005-12-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria are globally significant due to their role as a major biological sink for methane, a greenhouse gas. These microorganisms are especially active at interfaces where methane and oxygen meet. Methanotrophs are also of environmental interest because of their ability to co-metabolize many common organic pollutants including halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons. Lake Mishawum in Woburn, MA, is a shallow, permanently stratified lake with an anoxic, methane-rich hypolimnion and an oxic epilimnion. This unique stratification is maintained because the bottom water continually receives inputs of salty groundwater, while the upper layer is fed by rainwater runoff. Modeling of methane concentration profiles in the lake showed high rates of methane oxidation at the oxic-anoxic interface. Hence, methanotrophs have been postulated to be a significant and active population of the bacteria residing in the lake's metalimnion. The diversity, abundance, and seasonal variation of methanotrophic bacteria at this interface was investigated using PCR gene diversity studies, quantitative PCR (QPCR), and cultures of methane-oxidizing isolates from metalimnion water samples. Gene diversity and isolate analyses revealed that as in other saline lakes, both Type I and Type II methanotrophs were present at the interface. QPCR studies using the methanol dehydrogenase gene showed that their populations comprised up to 15 percent of the total bacterial population in the summer months. Year long QPCR studies of methanotrophs populations at the Lake Mishawum interface indidcated that, while total bacteria numbers do not change over time, methanotroph population size varied seasonally and correlated with temperature changes in the lake. These results suggest that methanotrophs are a diverse and highly active population in the oxic-anoxic interface of Lake Mishawum. The finding of both Type I and Type II methanotrophs at the interface calls into question the role of these two

  4. Modeling the Thickness of Perennial Ice Covers on Stratified Lakes of the Taylor Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obryk, M. K.; Doran, P. T.; Hicks, J. A.; McKay, C. P.; Priscu, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional ice cover model was developed to predict and constrain drivers of long term ice thickness trends in chemically stratified lakes of Taylor Valley, Antarctica. The model is driven by surface radiative heat fluxes and heat fluxes from the underlying water column. The model successfully reproduced 16 years (between 1996 and 2012) of ice thickness changes for west lobe of Lake Bonney (average ice thickness = 3.53 m; RMSE = 0.09 m, n = 118) and Lake Fryxell (average ice thickness = 4.22 m; RMSE = 0.21 m, n = 128). Long-term ice thickness trends require coupling with the thermal structure of the water column. The heat stored within the temperature maximum of lakes exceeding a liquid water column depth of 20 m can either impede or facilitate ice thickness change depending on the predominant climatic trend (temperature cooling or warming). As such, shallow (< 20 m deep water columns) perennially ice-covered lakes without deep temperature maxima are more sensitive indicators of climate change. The long-term ice thickness trends are a result of surface energy flux and heat flux from the deep temperature maximum in the water column, the latter of which results from absorbed solar radiation.

  5. Morphological characterization of viruses in the stratified water column of alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jennifer R; Steward, Grieg F

    2010-10-01

    Concentrations of viruses and prokaryotes in the alkaline, moderately hypersaline, seasonally stratified Mono Lake are among the highest reported for a natural aquatic environment. We used electron microscopy to test whether viral morphological characteristics differed among the epilimnion, metalimnion, and the anoxic hypolimnion of the lake and to determine how the properties of viruses in Mono Lake compare to other aquatic environments. Viral capsid size distributions were more similar in the metalimnion and hypolimnion of Mono Lake, while viral tail lengths were more similar in the epilimnion and metalimnion. The percentage of tailed viruses decreased with depth and the relative percentages of tailed phage families changed with depth. The presence of large (>125 nm capsid), untailed viruses in the metalimnion and hypolimnion suggests that eukaryotic viruses are produced in these suboxic and anoxic, hypersaline environments. Capsid diameters of viruses were larger on average in Mono Lake compared to other aquatic environments, and no lemon-shaped or filamentous viruses were found, in contrast to other high-salinity or high-altitude lakes and seas. Our data suggest that the physically and chemically distinct layers of Mono Lake harbor different viral assemblages, and that these assemblages are distinct from other aquatic environments that have been studied. Furthermore, we found that filtration of a sample through a 0.22-µm pore-size filter significantly altered the distribution of viral capsid diameters and tail lengths, resulting in a relative depletion of viruses having larger capsids and longer tails. This observation highlights the potential for bias in molecular surveys of viral diversity, which typically rely on filtration through 0.2- or 0.22-µm pore-size membrane filters to remove bacteria during sample preparation.

  6. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Kirsten; Milucka, Jana; Brand, Andreas; Littmann, Sten; Wehrli, Bernhard; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere. PMID:26193458

  7. Invasive alien species water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes as abode for macroinvertebrates in hypertrophic Ramsar Site, Lake Xochimilco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Ramirez, A; Robles-Valderrama, E; Ramirez-Flores, E

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents information on the density, diversity and functional feeding groups of macroinvertebrate assemblages associated with water hyacinth in Antiguo Canal Cuemanco, part of Lake Xochimilco in Mexico City. Rare (low frequency and density) and dominant (high frequency and density) taxa prevailed in the assemblages, with the most predominant being Hyalella azteca, Chironomus plumosus and Ischnura denticollis. Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling confirmed two climatic seasons: warm-rainy and cold-dry; the former with the highest diversity and density of taxa. Canonical Correspondence Analysis showed that conductivity, nitrates and turbidity explained the density variations of taxa. Antiguo Canal Cuemanco waters are spatially homogeneous with the characteristics of hypertrophic shallow lakes, inhabited by scrapers and gathering-collectors. The species found were tolerant to organic pollution.

  8. Instabilities in Non-Boussinesq Density Stratified Long and Narrow Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Anirban; Shete, Mihir

    2016-11-01

    We have discovered a new type of instability that can potentially occur in density stratified long and narrow lakes. The non-Boussinesq air-water interface plays a major role in this instability mechanism. A two layered lake driven by wind is considered; in such wind driven scenarios circulation sets up in each layer of the lake. The flow is assumed to be two dimensional, inviscid and incompressible. A surface gravity wave exists on the interface between air and water while an interfacial gravity wave exists on the interface between the two water layers (interface between warm and cold water). The resonant interactions between these two waves under a suitable doppler shift gives rise to normal mode growth rates leading to instability. We verify these claims analytically by piecewise linear velocity and density profiles. Furthermore we also use a realistic velocity and density profiles that are smooth and perform a linear stability analysis using a non-Boussinesq Taylor-Goldstein equation solver. We find that the normal mode instabilities are instigated by realistic wind velocities. Planetary Science and Exploration (PLANEX) Programme Grant No. PLANEX/PHY/2015239.

  9. Protistan diversity in a permanently stratified meromictic lake (Lake Alatsee, SW Germany).

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Andreas; Filker, Sabine; Breiner, Hans-Werner; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Protists play a crucial role for ecosystem function(ing) and oxygen is one of the strongest barriers against their local dispersal. However, protistan diversity in freshwater habitats with oxygen gradients received very little attention. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the V9 region (18S rRNA gene) to provide a hitherto unique spatiotemporal analysis of protistan diversity along the oxygen gradient of a freshwater meromictic lake (Lake Alatsee, SW Germany). In the mixolimnion, the communities experienced most seasonal structural changes, with Stramenopiles dominating in autumn and Dinoflagellata in summer. The suboxic interface supported the highest diversity, but only 23 OTUs95% (mainly Euglenozoa, after quality check and removal of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with less than three sequences) were exclusively associated with this habitat. Eukaryotic communities in the anoxic monimolimnion showed the most stable seasonal pattern, with Chrysophyta and Bicosoecida being the dominant taxa. Our data pinpoint to the ecological role of the interface as a short-term 'meeting point' for protists, contributing to the coupling of the mixolimnion and the monimolimnion. Our analyses of divergent genetic diversity suggest a high degree of previously undescribed OTUs. Future research will have to reveal if this result actually points to a high number of undescribed species in such freshwater habitats. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Vertical stratification of bacteria and archaea in sediments of a boreal stratified humic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, Antti J.; Mpamah, Promise; Peura, Sari; Taipale, Sami; Biasi, Christina; Nykänen, Hannu

    2015-04-01

    Boreal stratified humic lakes, with steep redox gradients in the water column and in the sediment, are important sources of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. CH4 flux from these lakes is largely controlled by the balance between CH4-production (methanogenesis), which takes place in the organic rich sediment and in the deepest water layers, and CH4-consumption (methanotrophy), which takes place mainly in the water column. While there is already some published information on the activity, diversity and community structure of bacteria in the water columns of these lakes, such information on sediment microbial communities is very scarce. This study aims to characterize the vertical variation patterns in the diversity and the structure of microbial communities in sediment of a boreal stratified lake. Particular focus is on microbes with the potential to contribute to methanogenesis (fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea) and to methanotrophy (methanotrophic bacteria and archaea). Two sediment cores (26 cm deep), collected from the deepest point (~6 m) of a small boreal stratified lake during winter-stratification, were divided into depth sections of 1 to 2 cm for analyses. Communities were studied from DNA extracted from sediment samples by next-generation sequencing (Ion Torrent) of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - amplified bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The abundance of methanogenic archaea was also specifically studied by quantitative-PCR of methyl coenzyme-M reductase gene (mcrA) amplicons. Furthermore, the community structure and the abundance of bacteria were studied by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Dominant potential fermentative bacteria belonged to families Syntrophaceae, Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae. There were considerable differences in the vertical distribution among these groups. The relative abundance of Syntrophaceae started to increase from the sediment surface, peaked at depth layer from 5 to 10 cm (up

  11. Stable isotope profiles of nitrogen gas indicate denitrification in oxygen-stratified humic lakes.

    PubMed

    Tiirola, Marja A; Rissanen, Antti J; Sarpakunnas, Miika; Arvola, Lauri; Nykänen, Hannu

    2011-06-15

    Mid-summer N(2) profiles were analyzed from nine oxygen-stratified, humic-acid-rich lakes using a continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer and a Gasbench II device. Sample preparation steps were performed under water to avoid air contamination. The instrument precision for the δ(15)N measurement was high (0.03‰), but for the whole sampling and analysis procedure the mean deviation between replicate samples was 0.13‰ for the δ(15)N measurements and 5.5% for the N(2) gas concentration analysis. The results show that the Gasbench peripheral was suitable for measurement of the (15)N natural abundance of dissolved nitrogen gas, with denitrification indicated by the oversaturation and slightly (<1‰) depleted δ(15)N values of the dissolved N(2) gas in the suboxic zones of some of the study lakes. Calculated values for the denitrified (excess) N(2) varied between -5.3 and 0.7‰. The denitrification potential was determined using the (15)N tracer method, with results showing nitrate-inducible denitrification and no signs of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Response in the trophic state of stratified lakes to changes in hydrology and water level: potential effects of climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, William J.

    2011-01-01

    To determine how climate-induced changes in hydrology and water level may affect the trophic state (productivity) of stratified lakes, two relatively pristine dimictic temperate lakes in Wisconsin, USA, were examined. Both are closed-basin lakes that experience changes in water level and degradation in water quality during periods of high water. One, a seepage lake with no inlets or outlets, has a small drainage basin and hydrology dominated by precipitation and groundwater exchange causing small changes in water and phosphorus (P) loading, which resulted in small changes in water level, P concentrations, and productivity. The other, a terminal lake with inlets but no outlets, has a large drainage basin and hydrology dominated by runoff causing large changes in water and P loading, which resulted in large changes in water level, P concentrations, and productivity. Eutrophication models accurately predicted the effects of changes in hydrology, P loading, and water level on their trophic state. If climate changes, larger changes in hydrology and water levels than previously observed could occur. If this causes increased water and P loading, stratified (dimictic and monomictic) lakes are expected to experience higher water levels and become more eutrophic, especially those with large developed drainage basins.

  13. The relationships between certain physical and chemical variables and the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton assemblages of two inlets of a shallow hypertrophic lake with different nutrient inputs.

    PubMed

    Celik, Kemal; Ongun, Tugba

    2007-01-01

    The relationships between water discharge, temperature, total dissolved solids (TDS) conductivity, turbidity, nitrate, ammonium, phosphate and the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton assemblages of two inlets of a shallow hypertrophic lake (Lake Manyas, Turkey) were studied between January 2003 and December 2004. The results showed that different levels of water discharge, turbidity, conductivity, TDS and nutrients could lead to the development of significantly different phytoplankton assemblages in inlets of shallow hypertrophic lakes. The multiple regression analysis identified water discharge, turbidity and water temperature as the driving factors behind the dynamics of phytoplankton biovolume in the studied inlets. The first two axes of Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) explained 78% of the total variance in dominant phytoplankton species at Siğirci Inlet and 88% at Kocaçay Inlet, respectively. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between water discharge, temperature, conductivity, turbidity, pH, TDS, nitrate, ammonium, phosphate and the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton assemblages of two inlets of the shallow hypertrophic Lake Manyas, Turkey by means of multivariate statistical analysis.

  14. Contrasting patterns of community assembly in the stratified water column of Great Salt Lake, Utah.

    PubMed

    Meuser, Jonathan E; Baxter, Bonnie K; Spear, John R; Peters, John W; Posewitz, Matthew C; Boyd, Eric S

    2013-08-01

    Phylogenetic examinations of communities sampled along geochemical gradients provide a framework for inferring the relative importance of niche-based ecological interactions (competition, environmental filtering) and neutral-based evolutionary interactions in structuring biodiversity. Great Salt Lake (GSL) in Utah exhibits strong spatial gradients due to both seasonal variation in freshwater input into the watershed and restricted fluid flow within North America's largest saline terminal lake ecosystem. Here, we examine the phylogenetic structure and composition of archaeal, bacterial, and eukaryal small subunit (SSU) rRNA genes sampled along a stratified water column (DWR3) in the south arm of GSL in order to infer the underlying mechanism of community assembly. Communities sampled from the DWR3 epilimnion were phylogenetically clustered (i.e., coexistence of close relatives due to environmental filtering) whereas those sampled from the DWR3 hypolimnion were phylogenetically overdispersed (i.e., coexistence of distant relatives due to competitive interactions), with minimal evidence for a role for neutral processes in structuring any assemblage. The shift from phylogenetically clustered to overdispersed assemblages was associated with an increase in salinity and a decrease in dissolved O2 (DO) concentration. Likewise, the phylogenetic diversity and phylogenetic similarity of assemblages was strongly associated with salinity or DO gradients. Thus, salinity and/or DO appeared to influence the mechanism of community assembly as well as the phylogenetic diversity and composition of communities. It is proposed that the observed patterns in the phylogenetic composition and structure of DWR3 assemblages are attributable to the meromictic nature of GSL, which prevents significant mixing between the epilimnion and the hypolimnion. This leads to strong physicochemical gradients at the halocline, which are capable of supporting a greater diversity. However, concomitant

  15. Interference pattern of the sound field in the presence of an internal Kelvin wave in a stratified lake.

    PubMed

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lunkov, Andrey; Ostrovsky, Ilia

    2016-02-01

    Internal Kelvin waves (IKWs) initiated by rotation of the Earth are one of the main hydrodynamic phenomena in large stratified lakes where baroclinic Rossby radius of deformation is smaller than the horizontal scale of the lake. IKWs can be identified using the spectra of internal waves, where in the presence of IKWs, the inertial frequency is at maximum. IKWs play a rather important role in the lake's dynamics for different processes, both in the water layer and sediment, especially at the periphery of lake. Due to influence of internal waves on the sound propagation, acoustical methods can be used for estimation of behaviour of IKWs. In this paper, the spatiotemporal variability of the mid-frequency (∼1 kHz) sound field in the presence of IKWs in a deep stratified Lake Kinneret is studied using numerical simulations based on normal-mode theory. Due to the specific character of perturbation of the water layer, IKWs can cause specific variations of interference pattern, in particular, a significant shift of the sound interference pattern both in spatial and frequency domain. These shifts can be easily measured and used for reconstruction of IKW parameters.

  16. Hydrological investigation of a multi-stratified pit lake using radioactive and stable isotopes combined with hydrometric monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-España, Javier; Diez Ercilla, Marta; Pérez Cerdán, Fernando; Yusta, Iñaki; Boyce, Adrian J.

    2014-04-01

    The internal configuration and hydrological dynamics of meromictic pit lakes is often complex and needs to be studied by different tools including stable and radiogenic isotopes. This study combines a multi-isotopic approach (3Hw, δ2Hw, δ18Ow, δ34SSO4) with meteorological, hydrological and hydrochemical monitoring to deduce the flooding history and hydrological dynamics of a meromictic and deeply stratified pit lake (Cueva de la Mora mine, SW Spain). The mine system is complex and includes horizontal galleries, shafts and large rooms physically connected to the mine pit. Specific conductance and temperature profiles obtained in the pit lake draw a physical structure with four monimolimnetic sub-layers of increasing density with depth. This characteristic stratification with m-scale layers separated by sharp transitional zones is rather unusual in other pit lakes and in most natural lakes. Tritium abundance in the different layers indicates that the deep lake water entered the pit basin between 1971 and 1972 which is coincident with the dates of mine closure. The oxygen and deuterium isotope composition of the different layers describes a marked and stable stratification, with an increasing evaporative influence towards the lake surface and a minimal influence of groundwater flow on the structure and composition of the monimolimnion. This study reveals that the initial stages of flooding (via influx of metal- and sulfate-loaded mine drainage from underlying galleries at different depths) may be essential to imprint a layered physical structure to pit lakes which would be very difficult to explain merely by physical processes. After reaching its present water level and morphology, the monimolimnion of this pit lake seems to have remained essentially isolated and chemically unmodified during decades.

  17. Controlling cyanobacterial blooms in hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China: will nitrogen reductions cause replacement of non-N2 fixing by N2 fixing taxa?

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Xu, Hai; Hall, Nathan S; Zhu, Guangwei; Qin, Boqiang; Wu, Yali; Rossignol, Karen L; Dong, Linghan; McCarthy, Mark J; Joyner, Alan R

    2014-01-01

    Excessive anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs have caused an alarming increase in harmful cyanobacterial blooms, threatening sustainability of lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China's third largest freshwater lake, typifies this predicament, with toxic blooms of the non-N2 fixing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. dominating from spring through fall. Previous studies indicate N and P reductions are needed to reduce bloom magnitude and duration. However, N reductions may encourage replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria. This potentially counterproductive scenario was evaluated using replicate, large (1000 L), in-lake mesocosms during summer bloom periods. N+P additions led to maximum phytoplankton production. Phosphorus enrichment, which promoted N limitation, resulted in increases in N2 fixing taxa (Anabaena spp.), but it did not lead to significant replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria, and N2 fixation rates remained ecologically insignificant. Furthermore, P enrichment failed to increase phytoplankton production relative to controls, indicating that N was the most limiting nutrient throughout this period. We propose that Microcystis spp. and other non-N2 fixing genera can maintain dominance in this shallow, highly turbid, nutrient-enriched lake by outcompeting N2 fixing taxa for existing sources of N and P stored and cycled in the lake. To bring Taihu and other hypertrophic systems below the bloom threshold, both N and P reductions will be needed until the legacy of high N and P loading and sediment nutrient storage in these systems is depleted. At that point, a more exclusive focus on P reductions may be feasible.

  18. Controlling Cyanobacterial Blooms in Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China: Will Nitrogen Reductions Cause Replacement of Non-N2 Fixing by N2 Fixing Taxa?

    PubMed Central

    Paerl, Hans W.; Xu, Hai; Hall, Nathan S.; Zhu, Guangwei; Qin, Boqiang; Wu, Yali; Rossignol, Karen L.; Dong, Linghan; McCarthy, Mark J.; Joyner, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs have caused an alarming increase in harmful cyanobacterial blooms, threatening sustainability of lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China’s third largest freshwater lake, typifies this predicament, with toxic blooms of the non-N2 fixing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. dominating from spring through fall. Previous studies indicate N and P reductions are needed to reduce bloom magnitude and duration. However, N reductions may encourage replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria. This potentially counterproductive scenario was evaluated using replicate, large (1000 L), in-lake mesocosms during summer bloom periods. N+P additions led to maximum phytoplankton production. Phosphorus enrichment, which promoted N limitation, resulted in increases in N2 fixing taxa (Anabaena spp.), but it did not lead to significant replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria, and N2 fixation rates remained ecologically insignificant. Furthermore, P enrichment failed to increase phytoplankton production relative to controls, indicating that N was the most limiting nutrient throughout this period. We propose that Microcystis spp. and other non-N2 fixing genera can maintain dominance in this shallow, highly turbid, nutrient-enriched lake by outcompeting N2 fixing taxa for existing sources of N and P stored and cycled in the lake. To bring Taihu and other hypertrophic systems below the bloom threshold, both N and P reductions will be needed until the legacy of high N and P loading and sediment nutrient storage in these systems is depleted. At that point, a more exclusive focus on P reductions may be feasible. PMID:25405474

  19. GDGT distribution in a stratified lake and implications for the application of TEX86 in paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Bradley, Raymond S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the relationship between distributions of GDGTs, GDGT-based proxies and environmental factors in a stratified lake in northwestern Norway. More than 90% of isoGDGTs were produced at the bottom of the oxycline, indicating a predominance of ammonia-oxidizing Group I.1a of Thaumarchaeota, supported by high crenarchaeol/caldarchaeol ratios. Dissolved oxygen content, rather than temperature, exercised a primary control on TEX86 values. In spite of low BIT value in surface sediment, the reconstructed lake surface temperature was “cold” biased. MBT values in streams and lake surface water were significantly smaller than those in the catchment soil, suggesting in situ production of brGDGTs in streams. A rapid transition of MBT vs. temperature/pH relationships occurring at the bottom of oxycline indicated the differential production of various brGDGTs with D.O. and depths. Only within the oxycline were CBT-based pH values close to in situ pH. Our results confirm earlier studies calling for caution in applying TEX86 as a surface temperature proxy, or MBT and/or CBT for reconstructing pH, in anoxic or euxinic lakes, estuaries and ocean basins. We propose that caldarchaeol/crenarchaeol ratio, an indicator of contributions from methanogenic archaea, together with the BIT and TEX86 proxies, can help reconstruct past levels of stratification.

  20. GDGT distribution in a stratified lake and implications for the application of TEX86 in paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Bradley, Raymond S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between distributions of GDGTs, GDGT-based proxies and environmental factors in a stratified lake in northwestern Norway. More than 90% of isoGDGTs were produced at the bottom of the oxycline, indicating a predominance of ammonia-oxidizing Group I.1a of Thaumarchaeota, supported by high crenarchaeol/caldarchaeol ratios. Dissolved oxygen content, rather than temperature, exercised a primary control on TEX86 values. In spite of low BIT value in surface sediment, the reconstructed lake surface temperature was “cold” biased. MBT values in streams and lake surface water were significantly smaller than those in the catchment soil, suggesting in situ production of brGDGTs in streams. A rapid transition of MBT vs. temperature/pH relationships occurring at the bottom of oxycline indicated the differential production of various brGDGTs with D.O. and depths. Only within the oxycline were CBT-based pH values close to in situ pH. Our results confirm earlier studies calling for caution in applying TEX86 as a surface temperature proxy, or MBT and/or CBT for reconstructing pH, in anoxic or euxinic lakes, estuaries and ocean basins. We propose that caldarchaeol/crenarchaeol ratio, an indicator of contributions from methanogenic archaea, together with the BIT and TEX86 proxies, can help reconstruct past levels of stratification. PMID:27694918

  1. Establishment of microbial eukaryotic enrichment cultures from a chemically stratified antarctic lake and assessment of carbon fixation potential.

    PubMed

    Dolhi, Jenna M; Ketchum, Nicholas; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2012-04-20

    Lake Bonney is one of numerous permanently ice-covered lakes located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The perennial ice cover maintains a chemically stratified water column and unlike other inland bodies of water, largely prevents external input of carbon and nutrients from streams. Biota are exposed to numerous environmental stresses, including year-round severe nutrient deficiency, low temperatures, extreme shade, hypersalinity, and 24-hour darkness during the winter (1). These extreme environmental conditions limit the biota in Lake Bonney almost exclusively to microorganisms (2). Single-celled microbial eukaryotes (called "protists") are important players in global biogeochemical cycling (3) and play important ecological roles in the cycling of carbon in the dry valley lakes, occupying both primary and tertiary roles in the aquatic food web. In the dry valley aquatic food web, protists that fix inorganic carbon (autotrophy) are the major producers of organic carbon for organotrophic organisms (4, 2). Phagotrophic or heterotrophic protists capable of ingesting bacteria and smaller protists act as the top predators in the food web (5). Last, an unknown proportion of the protist population is capable of combined mixotrophic metabolism (6, 7). Mixotrophy in protists involves the ability to combine photosynthetic capability with phagotrophic ingestion of prey microorganisms. This form of mixotrophy differs from mixotrophic metabolism in bacterial species, which generally involves uptake dissolved carbon molecules. There are currently very few protist isolates from permanently ice-capped polar lakes, and studies of protist diversity and ecology in this extreme environment have been limited (8, 4, 9, 10, 5). A better understanding of protist metabolic versatility in the simple dry valley lake food web will aid in the development of models for the role of protists in the global carbon cycle. We employed an enrichment culture approach to isolate potentially

  2. Explosive eruption records from Eastern Africa: filling in the gaps with tephra records from stratified lake sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Christine; Asrat, Asfawossen; Cohen, Andy; Cullen, Victoria; Johnson, Thomas; Lamb, Henry; Martin-Jones, Catherine; Poppe, Sam; Schaebitz, Frank; Scholz, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    On-going research into the preservation of volcanic ash fall in stratified Holocene lake sediments in Eastern Africa reveals the level of incompleteness of our explosive eruption record. Only nine eruptions with VEI >4 are recorded in the LaMEVE database (Crosweller et al., 2012) and of the 188 Holocene eruptions listed for East African volcanoes in the Global Volcanism Programme database, only 24 are dated to > 2000 years ago (GVP, 2013). Tephrostratigraphic investigation of Holocene sediments from a number of lakes, including Lake Kivu (south of the Virunga volcanic field), Lake Victoria (west of the Kenyan Rift volcanism) and palaeolake Chew Bahir (southern Ethiopia), all reveal multiple tephra layers, which indicate vastly underestimated eruption histories. Whereas the tephra layers in Lake Kivu were all located macroscopically, no visible tephra layers were observed in the sediments from Lake Victoria and Chew Bahir. Instead, tephra are preserved as non-visible horizons (cryptotephra), revealed only after laboratory processing. These results indicate that even where we do have stratified visible tephra records, the number of past eruptions may still be a minimum. Cryptotephra studies therefore play a fundamental role in building comprehensive records of past volcanism. Challenges remain, in this understudied region, to identify the volcanic source of each of the tephra layers, which requires geochemical correlation to proximal volcanic deposits. Where correlations to source can be achieved, explosive eruption frequencies and recurrence rates may be assessed for individual volcanoes. Furthermore, if a tephra layer can be traced into multiple sedimentary sequences, the potential exists to evaluate eruption magnitude, providing a more useful criterion for risk assessment. Filling in the gaps in our understanding of East African Rift volcanism and the associated hazards is therefore critically dependent upon bringing together this important data from distal

  3. Quadruple sulfur isotope constraints on the origin and cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds in a stratified sulfidic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduro, Harry; Kamyshny, Alexey; Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Li, Yue; Farquhar, James

    2013-11-01

    We have quantified the major forms of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) distributed in the water column of stratified freshwater Fayetteville Green Lake (FGL), to evaluate the biogeochemical pathways involved in their production. The lake's anoxic deep waters contain high concentrations of sulfate (12-16 mmol L-1) and sulfide (0.12 μmol L-1 to 1.5 mmol L-1) with relatively low VOSC concentrations, ranging from 0.1 nmol L-1 to 2.8 μmol L-1. Sulfur isotope measurements of combined volatile organic sulfur compounds demonstrate that VOSC species are formed primarily from reduced sulfur (H2S/HS-) and zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), with little input from sulfate. Thedata support a role of a combination of biological and abiotic processes in formation of carbon-sulfur bonds between reactive sulfur species and methyl groups of lignin components. These processes are responsible for very fast turnover of VOSC species, maintaining their low levels in FGL. No dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) was detected by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) in the lake water column or in planktonic extracts. These observations indicate a pathway distinct from oceanic and coastal marine environments, where dimethylsulfide (DMS) and other VOSC species are principally produced via the breakdown of DMSP by plankton species.

  4. Change in the circulation regime in the stratified saline Lake Shira (Siberia, Republic of Khakassia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belolipetskii, V. M.; Degermendzhi, A. G.; Genova, S. N.; Rogozin, D. Y.

    2017-06-01

    The in-situ data on the vertical structure and stability of the vertical stratification of saline Lake Shira over the past decade (2007-2015) are analyzed. Simplified mathematical models have shown that strong wind in the autumn of 2014 together with rather thick ice in the winter of 2015 caused a change in the circulation regime of this water reservoir from meromictic (incomplete mixing) to holomictic (compete mixing). Based on the results obtained, a circulation regime for deep saline lakes located in the continental climate zone, in particular, in the arid zones of Southern Siberia (Khakassia, Transbaikal, and Altai) can be predicted under various climate scenarios of the future.

  5. Stratified distribution of nutrients and extremophile biota within freshwater ice covering the surface of Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Nina A; Belykh, Olga I; Golobokova, Ludmila P; Artemyeva, Olga V; Logacheva, Natalia F; Tikhonova, Irina V; Lipko, Irina A; Kostornova, Tatyana Ya; Parfenova, Valentina V; Khodzher, Tamara V; Ahn, Tae-Seok; Zo, Young-Gun

    2012-02-01

    Biological entities and gradients of selected chemicals within the seemingly barren ice layers covering Lake Baikal were investigated. Ice cores 40-68 cm long were obtained from in shore and offshore sites of Southern Lake Baikal during the cold period of a year (March-April) in 2007 and 2008. In microscopic observations of the melted ice, both algae and bacteria were found in considerable numbers (>10(3) cells/L and >10(4) cells/ml, respectively). Among all organisms found, diatom was generally the most predominant taxon in the ice. Interestingly, both planktonic and benthic algae were present in considerable numbers (2-4×10(4) cells/L). Dominant phototrophic picoplankton were comprised of small green algae of various taxa and cyanobacteria of Synechococcus and Cyanobium. The bacterial community consisted mostly of short rod and cocci cells, either free-living or aggregated. Large numbers of yeast-like cells and actinomycete mycelium were also observed. Concentrations of silica, phosphorus, and nitrate were low by an order of magnitude where biota was abundant. The profile of the ice could be interpreted as vertical stratification of nutrients and biomass due to biological activities. Therefore, the organisms in the ice were regarded to maintain high activity while thriving under freezing conditions. Based on the results, it was concluded that the freshwater ice covering the surface of Lake Baikal is considerably populated by extremophilic microorganisms that actively metabolize and form a detritus food chain in the unique large freshwater ecosystem of Lake Baikal.

  6. Plasticity in habitat use determines metabolic response of fish to global warming in stratified lakes.

    PubMed

    Busch, Susan; Kirillin, Georgiy; Mehner, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    We used a coupled lake physics and bioenergetics-based foraging model to evaluate how the plasticity in habitat use modifies the seasonal metabolic response of two sympatric cold-water fishes (vendace and Fontane cisco, Coregonus spp.) under a global warming scenario for the year 2100. In different simulations, the vertically migrating species performed either a plastic strategy (behavioral thermoregulation) by shifting their population depth at night to maintain the temperatures occupied at current in-situ observations, or a fixed strategy (no thermoregulation) by keeping their occupied depths at night but facing modified temperatures. The lake physics model predicted higher temperatures above 20 m and lower temperatures below 20 m in response to warming. Using temperature-zooplankton relationships, the density of zooplankton prey was predicted to increase at the surface, but to decrease in hypolimnetic waters. Simulating the fixed strategy, growth was enhanced only for the deeper-living cisco due to the shift in thermal regime at about 20 m. In contrast, simulating the plastic strategy, individual growth of cisco and young vendace was predicted to increase compared to growth currently observed in the lake. Only growth rates of older vendace are reduced under future global warming scenarios irrespective of the behavioral strategy. However, performing behavioral thermoregulation would drive both species into the same depth layers, and hence will erode vertical microhabitat segregation and intensify inter-specific competition between the coexisting coregonids.

  7. Performance of novel media in stratified filters to remove organic carbon from lake water.

    PubMed

    Grace, Maebh A; Clifford, Eoghan; Healy, Mark G

    2016-11-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are an ever-increasing occurrence in water networks, particularly those which abstract water from peatland areas. Although much research has been carried out to discover novel methods to remove specific DBPs, the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) from source water may provide a more sustainable solution in many areas. This study focuses on the removal of NOM by novel filters, which could be retrospectively fitted to any conventional water treatment facility. The filters comprised stratified layers of a variety of media, including sand, Bayer residue, granular activated carbon (GAC), and pyritic fill. The filters were operated under two loading regimes, continuous and intermittent, at loading rates similar to recognised design standards. The most successful filter design comprised stratified layers of sand, GAC, and pyritic fill. Over the duration of a 240 day study, these filters obtained average dissolved organic carbon removal rates of 40%, and achieved average specific ultra-violet absorbance reductions from 2.9 to 2.4 L mg(-1) m(-1). The study demonstrates that these novel filters may be used to reduce NOM levels, thus reducing the potential for DBP formation. Such designs can incorporate the use of waste media, making the overall design more sustainable and robust. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stratified tephra records from lake sediment archives: Holocene eruptions of the Virunga Volcanic Province, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Christine; Scholz, Christopher; Poppe, Sam; Schmid, Martin; Ross, Kelly Ann

    2016-04-01

    Lake sediments preserve rare stratified records of explosive volcanism, often with accompanying chronological controls or climatostratigraphic detail. In proximal areas where outcrop stratigraphies are complex, exposures isolated and sediments frequently eroded, the lacustrine archive provides a means to check the order of events and identify additional eruptions not preserved on land. The visible volcanic ash (tephra) record within lake sediments may be limited by eruption volume, distance from source and high sedimentation rates. A more complete eruption history can be detected through the study of non-visible tephra layers. Such "cryptotephra" records may be revealed through non-destructive core-scanning methods, such as XRF-scanning or magnetic susceptibility measurements, or by more thorough laboratory processes and microscopic analysis. Compositional analysis of tephra glass shards using WDS-EPMA and LA-ICP-MS provide a means to provenance eruptions, to cross-correlate between multiple sediment cores, and to establish connections between the lacustrine record and proximal outcrops. Here we present the results of such a "tephrostratigraphic" approach applied to the Holocene volcanic record of the Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP). More than 10 explosive volcanic eruptions, attributed to multiple volcanic centres, are evidenced over the last 12,000 years. This unique insight into the frequency of explosive eruptions from the VVP, demonstrates the potential of visible and cryptotephra investigations in lacustrine sediment archives as a means of studying past, present and future volcanic hazards.

  9. Remote sensing of the surface layer dynamics of a stratified lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steissberg, Todd Eugene

    Physical processes, such as upwelling, circulation, and small-scale eddies, affect aquatic ecosystem functioning, controlling nutrient and light availability and pollutant transport in inland and coastal waters. These processes can be characterized and tracked across time and space using a combination of thermal infrared and reflective-solar (visible light) satellite measurements. Thermal gradients, created and altered by physical processes, facilitate daytime and nighttime detection and tracking of upwelling fronts, surface jets, basin-scale gyres, and small-scale eddies. Similarly, sunglint patterns in reflective-solar satellite measurements are altered by internal waves, current shear, and rotation, improving delineation of fronts, jets, and eddies, and determination of transport direction or rotational characteristics. This study applied thermal infrared and reflective-solar satellite images and field measurements, collected across multiple spatial and temporal scales, to characterize upwelling, circulation, and eddies at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada. This included developing a novel technique to improve the quality of moderate-resolution satellite temperature data, creating filtered, calibrated Water Skin Temperature (WST) maps that clearly delineate thermal features, while preserving nearshore data and temperature accuracy. Time series of filtered WST maps acquired by two moderate-resolution satellite sensors were used to track up-welling fronts and jets, which can recur at moderate wind speeds when wind forcing is in phase with internal wave motion. High-resolution temperature and sunglint maps were used to characterize several, small-scale "spiral eddies" at Lake Tahoe. These features, although common in the ocean, have not been documented before in lakes. Satellite measurements showed spiral eddies form along thermal fronts and shear zones at Lake Tahoe, rotating predominantly cyclonically, as in the ocean, with sub-inertial periods longer than 21 hours

  10. Winds and the distribution of nearshore phytoplankton in a stratified lake.

    PubMed

    Cyr, Hélène

    2017-10-01

    The distribution of phytoplankton in lakes is notoriously patchy and dynamic, but wind-driven currents and algal buoyancy/motility are thought to determine where algae accumulate. In this study, nearshore phytoplankton were sampled from different parts of a lake basin twice a day for 4-5 consecutive days, in the spring and in late summer, to test whether short-term changes in phytoplankton biomass and community composition can be predicted from wind-driven currents. On windy days, phytoplankton biomass was higher at downwind than at upwind nearshore sites, and the magnitude of this difference increased linearly with increasing wind speed. However, contrary to the generally assumed downwind phytoplankton aggregations, these differences were mostly due to upwelling activity and the dilution of phytoplankton at upwind nearshore sites. The distribution of individual taxa was also related to wind speed, but only during late stratification (except for cryptophytes), and these relationships were consistent with the buoyancy and motility of each group. On windy days, large diatoms and cyanobacteria concentrated upwind, neutrally buoyant taxa (green algae, small diatoms) were homogeneously distributed, and motile taxa (cryptophytes, chrysophytes, dinoflagellates) concentrated downwind. Predictable differences in the biomass and composition of phytoplankton communities could affect the efficiency of trophic transfers in nearshore areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Depth profiles of spectral and hydrological characteristics of water and their relation to abundances of green sulfur bacteria in the stratified lakes of the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Krasnova, Elena D.; Gorlenko, Vladimir M.; Lunina, Olga N.; Savvichev, Alexander S.; Voronov, Dmitry A.; Zhiltsova, Anna A.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the results received from two expeditions performed in August-September 2013, August-September 2014 and February 2015 in the Kandalaksha Bay of the White Sea. Depth profiles of hydrological characteristics and optical properties of water were recorded for five marine lakes being on different stages of isolation from the White Sea. Those relic lakes demonstrate a tendency to meromixis and are characterized by apparent stratification of the water bodies from the brackish top layer to the bottom salt water. Maximal concentrations of anoxygenic phototrophs (green sulfur bacteria) were found at depths close to the redox interface in all the studied lakes. To discriminate differently pigmented groups of microorganisms the fluorescence emission spectra of bacteriochlorophylls from the living cells were used. We puzzle out the data on light spectrum propagation through the water body in each lake using optical properties of water (attenuation spectra) in the UV, visible and NIR ranges, as well as direct measurements of the total irradiances at various depths. The changes in optical characteristics of water in the stratified reservoirs due to cromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and microbial pigments affect the light intensity and its spectral distribution at each water layer thus influencing the living conditions for differently pigmented phototrophic microorganisms and determining the composition of microbial community.

  12. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... purchased, 10% will be donated to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. iGive.com - Online Shopping Joing iGive.com to ... 5% of the purchase price to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. Bookmark the link http://smile.amazon.com/ch/ ...

  13. New insights into the biogeochemistry of extremely acidic environments revealed by a combined cultivation-based and culture-independent study of two stratified pit lakes.

    PubMed

    Falagán, Carmen; Sánchez-España, Javier; Johnson, David Barrie

    2014-01-01

    The indigenous microbial communities of two extremely acidic, metal-rich stratified pit lakes, located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (Spain), were identified, and their roles in mediating transformations of carbon, iron, and sulfur were confirmed. A combined cultivation-based and culture-independent approach was used to elucidate microbial communities at different depths and to examine the physiologies of isolates, which included representatives of at least one novel genus and several species of acidophilic Bacteria. Phosphate availability correlated with redox transformations of iron, and this (rather than solar radiation) dictated where primary production was concentrated. Carbon fixed and released as organic compounds by acidophilic phototrophs acted as electron donors for acidophilic heterotrophic prokaryotes, many of which catalyzed the dissimilatory reduction in ferric iron; the ferrous iron generated was re-oxidized by chemolithotrophic acidophiles. Bacteria that catalyze redox transformations of sulfur were also identified, although these Bacteria appeared to be less abundant than the iron oxidizers/reducers. Primary production and microbial numbers were greatest, and biogeochemical transformation of carbon, iron, and sulfur, most intense, within a zone of c. 8-10 m depth, close to the chemocline, in both pit lakes. Archaea detected in sediments included two Thaumarchaeota clones, indicating that members of this recently described phylum can inhabit extremely acidic environments.

  14. Size and elemental distributions of nano- to micro-particulates in the geochemically-stratified Great Salt Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diaz, X.; Johnson, W.P.; Fernandez, D.; Naftz, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    The characterization of trace elements in terms of their apportionment among dissolved, macromolecular, nano- and micro-particulate phases in the water column of the Great Salt Lake carries implications for the potential entry of toxins into the food web of the lake. Samples from the anoxic deep and oxic shallow brine layers of the lake were fractionated using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). The associated trace elements were measured via online collision cell inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CC-ICP-MS). Results showed that of the total (dissolved + particulate) trace element mass, the percent associated with particulates varied from negligible (e.g. Sb), to greater than 50% (e.g. Al, Fe, Pb). Elements such as Cu, Zn, Mn, Co, Au, Hg, and U were associated with nanoparticles, as well as being present as dissolved species. Particulate-associated trace elements were predominantly associated with particulates larger than 450 nm in size. Among the smaller nanoparticulates (<450 nm), some trace elements (Ni, Zn, Au and Pb) showed higher percent mass (associated with nanoparticles) in the 0.9-7.5 nm size range relative to the 10-250 nm size range. The apparent nanoparticle size distributions were similar between the two brine layers; whereas, important differences in elemental associations to nanoparticles were discerned between the two layers. Elements such as Zn, Cu, Pb and Mo showed increasing signal intensities from oxic shallow to anoxic deep brine, suggesting the formation of sulfide nanoparticles, although this may also reflect association with dissolved organic matter. Aluminum and Fe showed greatly increased concentration with depth and equivalent size distributions that differed from those of Zn, Cu, Pb and Mo. Other elements (e.g. Mn, Ni, and Co) showed no significant change in signal intensity with depth. Arsenic was associated with <2 nm nanoparticles, and showed no increase in concentration with depth, possibly indicating

  15. Density-stratified flow events in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA: implications for mercury and salinity cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, David L.; Carling, Gregory T.; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Pazmiño, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Density stratification in saline and hypersaline water bodies from throughout the world can have large impacts on the internal cycling and loading of salinity, nutrients, and trace elements. High temporal resolution hydroacoustic and physical/chemical data were collected at two sites in Great Salt Lake (GSL), a saline lake in the western USA, to understand how density stratification may influence salinity and mercury (Hg) distributions. The first study site was in a causeway breach where saline water from GSL exchanges with less saline water from a flow restricted bay. Near-surface-specific conductance values measured in water at the breach displayed a good relationship with both flow and wind direction. No diurnal variations in the concentration of dissolved (total and MeHg loadings was observed during periods of elevated salinity. The second study site was located on the bottom of GSL where movement of a high-salinity water layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), is restricted to a naturally occurring 1.5-km-wide “spillway” structure. During selected time periods in April/May, 2012, wind-induced flow reversals in a railroad causeway breach, separating Gunnison and Gilbert Bays, were coupled with high-velocity flow pulses (up to 55 cm/s) in the DBL at the spillway site. These flow pulses were likely driven by a pressure response of highly saline water from Gunnison Bay flowing into the north basin of Gilbert Bay. Short-term flow reversal events measured at the railroad causeway breach have the ability to move measurable amounts of salt and Hg from Gunnison Bay into the DBL. Future disturbance to the steady state conditions currently imposed by the railroad causeway infrastructure could result in changes to the existing chemical balance between Gunnison and Gilbert Bays. Monitoring instruments were installed at six additional sites in the DBL during October 2012 to assess impacts from any future modifications to the railroad causeway.

  16. Absorption and fluorescence of hydrophobic components of dissolved organic matter in several Karelian lakes with stratified structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khundzhua, Daria A.; Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Krasnova, Elena D.; Gorshkova, Olga M.; Chevel, Kira A.; Yuzhakov, Viktor I.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic components of cromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) extracted from water samples and sediments taken in several relic basins located on Karelian shoreline of the White Sea were analyzed using spectroscopic techniques. Those water reservoirs exist at various stages of isolation from the White Sea and represent complex stratified systems of fresh and marine water layers not completely mixing trough the year. Basins separating from the White Sea are the unique natural objects for investigations of properties CDOM, its transformation in the process of turning the marine ecosystem into freshwater environment. CDOM occurring in all types of natural water represents a significant reservoir of organic carbon and plays a key role in the carbon cycle on the Earth. However, aquatic CDOM and nonliving organic matter in sediments from relic separating basins still have not been studied. The target of this work was to study absorption and fluorescence spectra of hydrophobic components of aquatic CDOM from different water depth and sediments in several separated basins of the Kandalaksha Gulf of the White Sea located near the N.A. Pertsov White Sea Biological Station.

  17. Hydraulic Jumps, Waves and Other Flow Features Found by Modeling Stably-Stratified Flows in the Salt Lake Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Ludwig, F.; Street, R.

    2003-12-01

    The Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) was used to simulate weak synoptic wind conditions with stable stratification and pronounced drainage flow at night in the vicinity of the Jordan Narrows at the south end of Salt Lake Valley. The simulations showed the flow to be quite complex with hydraulic jumps and internal waves that make it essential to use a complete treatment of the fluid dynamics. Six one-way nested grids were used to resolve the topography; they ranged from 20-km grid spacing, initialized by ETA 40-km operational analyses down to 250-m horizontal resolution and 200 vertically stretched levels to a height of 20 km, beginning with a 10-m cell at the surface. Most of the features of interest resulted from interactions with local terrain features, so that little was lost by using one-way nesting. Canyon, gap, and over-terrain flows have a large effect on mixing and vertical transport, especially in the regions where hydraulic jumps are likely. Our results also showed that the effect of spatial resolution on simulation performance is profound. The horizontal resolution must be such that the smallest features that are likely to have important impact on the flow are spanned by at least a few grid points. Thus, the 250 m minimum resolution of this study is appropriate for treating the effects of features of about 1 km or greater extent. To be consistent, the vertical cell dimension must resolve the same terrain features resolved by the horizontal grid. These simulations show that many of the interesting flow features produce observable wind and temperature gradients at or near the surface. Accordingly, some relatively simple field measurements might be made to confirm that the mixing phenomena that were simulated actually take place in the real atmosphere, which would be very valuable for planning large, expensive field campaigns. The work was supported by the Atmospheric Sciences Program, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, U

  18. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, Luis de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder with heterogeneity in mutations, forms of presentation, prognosis and treatment strategies. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is recognized as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death that occurs in young people, including athletes. The clinical diagnosis is complemented with the ecocardiographic study, in which an abnormal myocardial hypertrophy of the septum can be observed in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease (arterial systemic hypertension, aortic stenosis). The annual sudden mortality rate is 1% and, in selected populations, it ranges between 3 and 6%. The therapeutic strategies depend on the different subsets of patients according to the morbidity and mortality, sudden cardiac death, obstructive symptoms, heart failure or atrial fibrillation and stroke. High risk patients for sudden death may effectively be treated with the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

  19. Biological activity at the limits of life: Microbial cycling of C, S and N in cold, permanently stratified, hypersaline Lake Vanda, Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joye, S. B.; Schutte, C.; Samarkin, V.; Casciotti, K. L.; Madigan, M.; Saxton, M.

    2014-12-01

    The lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MCM) are the only perennially ice covered lakes on Earth and are the primary refuge for life in this hyper-arid polar desert. As a result of the ice cover and an uncoupled day/night cycle, the physical and biogeochemical processes in the lakes are highly unusual, with biogeochemical gradients and concentrations of specific compounds often exceeding those found in other aquatic ecosystems on Earth. These lakes are ideal systems for the study of redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes, model systems for understanding the effects of global climate change on polar ecosystems, end-member systems that provide insight into biogeochemical and limnological dynamics in meromictic lakes, analogues for life on other planets, and perfect systems to study microbial life at its thermodynamic limits. Lake Vanda, in the Wright valley, is relatively deep (73 m), hypersaline and has anoxic bottom water. High concentrations of chacotrophic salts results in low water activities that exert further challenges on microbial life. We collected details geochemical profiles of nutrients, major ions, dissolved gases, and redox metabolites and measured rates of microbially-mediated processes that cycle carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the lakes waters and sediments. Despite the harsh and extreme nature of Lake Vanda and the thermodynamic barriers to microbially-mediated geochemical reactions, microorganisms are not only present in the lake but they mediate a diverse suite of geochemical processes. Statistical correlations between geochemical parameters, microbial activity and microbial community composition shed light on the factors that regulate and limit microbial activity in this unique extreme environment.

  20. A hydrodynamics-based approach to evaluating the risk of waterborne pathogens entering drinking water intakes in a large, stratified lake.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Andrea B; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Rueda, Francisco J

    2015-10-15

    Pathogen contamination of drinking water lakes and reservoirs is a severe threat to human health worldwide. A major source of pathogens in surface sources of drinking waters is from body-contact recreation in the water body. However, dispersion pathways of human waterborne pathogens from recreational beaches, where body-contact recreation is known to occur to drinking water intakes, and the associated risk of pathogens entering the drinking water supply remain largely undocumented. A high spatial resolution, three-dimensional hydrodynamic and particle tracking modeling approach has been developed to analyze the risk and mechanisms presented by pathogen dispersion. The pathogen model represents the processes of particle release, transport and survival. Here survival is a function of both water temperature and cumulative exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Pathogen transport is simulated using a novel and computationally efficient technique of tracking particle trajectories backwards, from a drinking water intake toward their source areas. The model has been applied to a large, alpine lake - Lake Tahoe, CA-NV (USA). The dispersion model results reveal that for this particular lake (1) the risk of human waterborne pathogens to enter drinking water intakes is low, but significant; (2) this risk is strongly related to the depth of the thermocline in relation to the depth of the intake; (3) the risk increases with the seasonal deepening of the surface mixed layer; and (4) the risk increases at night when the surface mixed layer deepens through convective mixing and inactivation by UV radiation is eliminated. While these risk factors will quantitatively vary in different lakes, these same mechanisms will govern the process of transport of pathogens.

  1. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  2. Optical Measurements Reveal Interplay Between Surface and Bottom Processes Involving Phytoplankton, Organic Carbon, Iron, Light, and Oxygen in Two Stratified Mesotrophic Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, B. R.; Vaidya, A.; Wiles, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Water column distribution of phytoplankton, organic carbon, particulate and dissolved iron are described through detailed vertical optical measurements that include downwelling cosine irradiance, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence by CDOM, Chl-a, phycobilin pigments, and diffuse attenuation for several UV wavebands, plus pH, temperature, and specific conductance. These measurements were completed with a group of profiling instruments during summer in two mid-latitude small lakes. Special calibration allowed for correcting the impact of CDOM and turbidity on the pigment fluorescence signals. These in situ data were combined with laboratory analysis of discrete water column samples for methanol-extracted chlorophyll-a, spectral absorbance of particles, concentration of particulates (dry mass and ash-free mass), total particulate and "dissolved" iron, DOC and CDOM (the "dissolved fraction" passes through a GF/F filter). Surface processes revealed by these measurement include solar heating and photobleaching of CDOM (partly distributed by wind-driven mixing), and nonphotochemical quenching of phytoplankton chlorophyll-a fluorescence. Bottom processes revealed by these measurements include oxygen consumption by net heterotrophic metabolism, release of DOC, CDOM, and iron from anoxic bottom sediments, and the development of a biological community structured by the light and temperature gradients and absence or scarcity of dissolved oxygen near the bottom. The iron associated with CDOM and particles in the deep samples substantially increased the latter's DOC-specific absorption once there was an opportunity for oxidation. A model for mass-specific spectral absorption of particulates accounts for the contribution of organic matter and iron associated with the particles. A detailed hydrologic budget for one of the lakes will allow the water column processes to be explored further by accounting for inputs and outputs of water and organic carbon (via precipitation

  3. Geohydrology, water quality, and simulation of groundwater flow in the stratified-drift aquifer system in Virgil Creek and Dryden Lake Valleys, Town of Dryden, Tompkins County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Todd S.; Bugliosi, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tompkins County Planning Department and the Town of Dryden, New York, began a study of the stratified-drift aquifer system in the Virgil Creek and Dryden Lake Valleys in the Town of Dryden, Tompkins County. The study provided geohydrologic data needed by the town and county to develop a strategy to manage and protect their water resources. In this study area, three extensive confined sand and gravel aquifers (the upper, middle, and lower confined aquifers) compose the stratified-drift aquifer system. The Dryden Lake Valley is a glaciated valley oriented parallel to the direction of ice movement. Erosion by ice extensively widened and deepened the valley, truncated bedrock hillsides, and formed a nearly straight, U-shaped bedrock trough. The maximum thickness of the valley fill in the central part of the valley is about 400 feet (ft). The Virgil Creek Valley in the east part of the study area underwent less severe erosion by ice than the Dryden Lake Valley, and hence, it has a bedrock floor that is several hundred feet higher in altitude than that in the Dryden Lake Valley. The sources and amounts of recharge were difficult to identify in most areas because the confined aquifers are overlain by confining units. However, in the vicinity of the Virgil Creek Dam, the upper confined aquifer crops out at land surface in the floodplain of a gorge eroded by Virgil Creek, and this is where the aquifer receives large amounts of recharge from precipitation that directly falls over the aquifer and from seepage losses from Virgil Creek. The results of streamflow measurements made in Virgil Creek where it flows through the gorge indicated that the stream lost 1.2 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) or 0.78 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water in the reach extending from 220 ft downstream from the dam to 1,200 ft upstream from the dam. In the southern part of the study area, large amounts of recharge also replenish the

  4. Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Veselka, Josef; Anavekar, Nandan S; Charron, Philippe

    2017-03-25

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is an inherited myocardial disease defined by cardiac hypertrophy (wall thickness ≥15 mm) that is not explained by abnormal loading conditions, and left ventricular obstruction greater than or equal to 30 mm Hg. Typical symptoms include dyspnoea, chest pain, palpitations, and syncope. The diagnosis is usually suspected on clinical examination and confirmed by imaging. Some patients are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Patients with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death undergo cardioverter-defibrillator implantation; in patients with severe symptoms related to ventricular obstruction, septal reduction therapy (myectomy or alcohol septal ablation) is recommended. Life-long anticoagulation is indicated after the first episode of atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  6. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Farina Júnior, Jayme Adriano

    2014-08-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin.

  7. Misconceptions and Facts About Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Sherrid, Mark V; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common genetic heart disease. Once considered relentless, untreatable, and deadly, it has become a highly treatable disease with contemporary management. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is one of cardiology's "great masqueraders." Mistakes and delays in diagnosis abound. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy commonly "masquerades" as asthma, anxiety, mitral prolapse, and coronary artery disease. However, once properly diagnosed, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be effectively managed to improve both symptoms and survival. This review highlights some of the misconceptions about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Providers at all levels should have awareness of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to promptly diagnose and properly manage these individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-07-01

    An 18-year-old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected.She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients.

  9. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: An 18-year old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected. She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients. PMID:23456048

  10. Settling and swimming in density stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardekani, Arezoo

    2016-11-01

    Many aquatic environments are stratified, characterized by regions of vertical variation in fluid density caused by gradients in temperature or salinity. In oceans and lakes, intense biological activity and accumulation of particles and organisms are associated with pycnoclines and the occurrence of important environmental and oceanographic processes is correlated with stratification. We explore the effects of stratification on the fundamental hydrodynamics of small organisms, settling particles, and rising drops. These results demonstrate an unexpected effect of buoyancy, potentially affecting a broad range of processes at pycnoclines in oceans and lakes. In particular, stratification has a major effect on the flow field, energy expenditure and nutrient uptake of small organisms. We show that elongation affects both the settling orientation and the settling rate of particles in stratified fluids, which will have direct consequences on the vertical flux of particulate matter and carbon flux in the ocean.

  11. Living with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Subasic, Kim

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an insider's account of what it is like to live with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic cardiovascular illness that carries the risk for sudden cardiac death. This study aims to reveal how HCM impacts the family and guides the decision whether or not to pursue genetic testing, how the physical limitations associated with HCM alter being-in-the-world, and how HCM alters social relationships. Fifteen adults with HCM were recruited for a longitudinal, phenomenological, qualitative study through purposive sampling and word of mouth. A total of 45 interviews were conducted by the researcher at a time and place designated by the participant between August 2011 and January 2012. The first interview with each participant was conducted in person. While efforts were made to conduct all interviews in person, a total of three interviews were conducted by telephone as requested by three participants due to scheduling conflicts. Through methods of interpretive phenomenology, three audio-recorded, semistructured interviews occurred over the course of 3 months. Detailed narratives were solicited and transcribed verbatim. Methodological and analytical documentation was supported with the identification of key phrases, similar experiences, themes, and documentation of the rationale for decisions throughout the research process. Participation in genetic testing carries a multitude of personal, familial, financial, and emotional implications. The results of a genetic test elicited an emotional response regardless of whether the results were negative, positive, or inconclusive. Living with a potentially life-threatening illness altered identity, disrupted social relationships, and generated chronic fear and uncertainty. A new normal was re-ordered or transformed by the demands and limitations posed by HCM, and by the person's concerns, priorities, and the meaning of the illness. Results from this study underscore the need for healthcare

  12. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O; Orlikowski, D; Annane, D

    2008-07-21

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spinocerebellar degeneration. It is caused by a mutation that consists of an unstable expansion of GAA repeats in the first intron of the gene encoding frataxin on chromosome 9 (9q13). We reported a case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia in a twenty year old patient.

  13. Stratified models of care.

    PubMed

    Foster, Nadine E; Hill, Jonathan C; O'Sullivan, Peter; Hancock, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Stratified care for back pain involves targeting treatment to subgroups of patients based on their key characteristics such as prognostic factors, likely response to treatment and underlying mechanisms. It aims to tailor therapeutic decisions in ways that maximise treatment benefit, reduce harm and increase health-care efficiency by offering the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. From being called the 'Holy Grail' of back pain research over a decade ago, stratified care is becoming the zeitgeist in research and clinical practice. In this chapter, we introduce and evaluate the quality and underpinning evidence for three examples of stratified care for back pain to highlight their general principles, research design issues and clinical practice implications. We include consideration of their merits for implementation in practice. We conclude with a set of remaining, key research questions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [The origin of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Moiseev, V S

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the clinical cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMP). The development of obstructive CMP in a patient with hyperparathyroidism indicates a possible pathogenetic role of endocrine factors and calcium metabolism abnormalities. The familial character of the disease and its combination with hereditary diseases (familial microspherocytosis) point to the significance of genetic factors. In addition, marked hypertrophy of the myocardium (without dilatation) including hypertrophy with obstruction of the outflow tract of the left ventricle was observed in nonspecific protracted myocarditis, alcoholic injury to the heart, in athletes, in coronary heart disease (after survival of myocardial infarction). It is suggested that hypertrophic CMP (similarly to restrictive and congestive CMP) is most likely a syndrome of varying origin.

  15. Planktonic ciliates in a hypertrophic pond: functional role and importance.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Rodriguez, Ma del Rosario; Lugo Vazquez, Alfonso; Oliva Martinez, Ma Guadalupe; Verver y Vargas, Jaqueline Garcia; Rodriguez Rocha, Armando; Peralta Soriano, Laura

    2011-07-01

    Taxonomical composition and abundance of the planktonic ciliate assemblage in a Lake Tezozomoc, a hypertrophic pond located into an urban park in Mexico City, was investigated along the rainy season (May to October). The aims of the study were to know the main trophic roles and ecological significance of ciliates in a highly productive environment. A low number of taxa (27) and a wide abundance fluctuation (104-387 cil ml(-1)) were found. The most abundant species (up to 162 cil ml(-1)) was Halteria grandinella, an oligotrich ciliate that graze on bacteria and picoplankton, but also several big body sized species that feed on pico and nanoplankton were abundant. Sudden temporal changes in species dominance occurred. Ciliate biomass was very high and fluctuated widely (1.6-88 10(6) microm(3) ml(-1)) being dominated by the >50 microm size fraction that mainly included the pico and nanoplankton feeders. Ciliates are a very important component in the plankton of hypertrophic lakes and their main control factor seems to be the grazing by big-body size Daphnia species.

  16. Stratified vapor generator

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan [Lakewood, CO; Hassani, Vahab [Golden, CO

    2008-05-20

    A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

  17. Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Auboire, Laurent; Boutemy, Jonathan; Constans, Jean Marc; Le Gallou, Thomas; Busson, Philippe; Bienvenu, Boris

    2015-03-01

    Although occipital neuralgia is usually caused by degenerative arthropathy, nearly 20 other aetiologies may lead to this condition. We present the first case report of hypertrophic pachymeningitis revealed by isolated occipital neuralgia. Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis is a plausible cause of occipital neuralgia and may present without cranial-nerve palsy. There is no consensus on the treatment for idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis, but the usual approach is to start corticotherapy and then to add immunosuppressants. When occipital neuralgia is not clinically isolated or when a first-line treatment fails, another disease diagnosis should be considered. However, the cost effectiveness of extended investigations needs to be considered.

  18. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vijay K; Aggarwal, Kamal; Jain, Sarika; Singh, Sunita

    2009-07-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis occurring in previously sensitized individuals with a high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Various forms including plaque, ulcerative, hypertrophic, vegetative, papular, and nodular forms have been described. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a very large hypertrophic lupus vulgaris lesion over left side of chest since 22 years. Histopathological examination showed granulomatous infiltration without caseation necrosis. The Mantoux reaction was strongly positive. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris of such a giant size and that too at an unusual site is extremely rare and hence is being reported.

  19. HYPERTROPHIC LUPUS VULGARIS: AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vijay K; Aggarwal, Kamal; Jain, Sarika; Singh, Sunita

    2009-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis occurring in previously sensitized individuals with a high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Various forms including plaque, ulcerative, hypertrophic, vegetative, papular, and nodular forms have been described. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a very large hypertrophic lupus vulgaris lesion over left side of chest since 22 years. Histopathological examination showed granulomatous infiltration without caseation necrosis. The Mantoux reaction was strongly positive. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris of such a giant size and that too at an unusual site is extremely rare and hence is being reported. PMID:20161866

  20. Laser application for hypertrophic rhinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inouye, Tetsuzo; Tanabe, Tetsuya; Nakanoboh, Manabu; Ogura, Masami

    1995-05-01

    The CO2 and KTP/532 lasers have been used in the treatment of an allergic and hypertrophic rhinitis for the past several years. As we know, the laser enables a surgeon to perform the operation with minimum hemorrhage and minimized pain, during and after the procedure. Additionally many of these operations can be performed under local anesthesia instead of general anesthesia, on an outpatient basis. The laser is used to irradiate the mucous membranes of the inferior turbinates. Vaporization and cutting is easily done. Post operative management of the local operated area is easy. The advantages of laser surgery over regular surgical techniques are supreme for intranasal operations when performed under local anesthesia.

  1. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the early years.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2009-12-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) has four major features: (1) severe left ventricular hypertrophy, often most prominent in the basal interventricular septum; (2) frequent familial occurrence with autosomal dominant transmission; (3) occurrence of sudden cardiac death that is usually considered to be due to ventricular fibrillation; and (4) presence of hemodynamic evidence of labile intraventricular obstruction. The key papers describing the recognition of each of these features, as well as of various combinations of them, are reviewed in this paper. Particular attention is focused on the very frequent finding of marked lability of intraventricular obstruction. The recognition of this fourth and last major feature in 1959 makes 2009 the golden anniversary year marking completion of the description of the major features of HOCM.

  2. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Clinical recognition and management

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Cate, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the titles are: Hemodynamics and angiography; Familial and genetic aspects; Recognition and management in children; Morphologic and microscopic aspects of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; Clinical recognition; and Management with beta-adrenergic blocking drugs.

  3. Genetics of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Felix W; Carrier, Lucie

    2012-10-01

    Cardiomyopathies are categorized as extrinsic, being caused by external factors, such as hypertension, ischemia, inflammation, valvular dysfunction, or as intrinsic, which correspond to myocardial diseases without identifiable external causes. These so called primary cardiomyopathies can be categorized in four main forms: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathies are diagnosed by clinical expression, echocardiography, electrocardiography, non-invasive imaging, and sometimes by cardiac catheterization to rule out external causes as ischemia. The two main forms of primary cardiomyopathies are the hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Most of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 20-50% of dilated cardiomyopathy are familial showing a wide genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. This review presents the current knowledge on the causative genes, molecular mechanisms and the genotype � phenotype relations of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies.

  4. Fluttering in Stratified Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Try; Vincent, Lionel; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    The descent motion of heavy objects under the influence of gravitational and aerodynamic forces is relevant to many branches of engineering and science. Examples range from estimating the behavior of re-entry space vehicles to studying the settlement of marine larvae and its influence on underwater ecology. The behavior of regularly shaped objects freely falling in homogeneous fluids is relatively well understood. For example, the complex interaction of a rigid coin with the surrounding fluid will cause it to either fall steadily, flutter, tumble, or be chaotic. Less is known about the effect of density stratification on the descent behavior. Here, we experimentally investigate the descent of discs in both pure water and in a linearly salt-stratified fluids where the density is varied from 1.0 to 1.14 of that of water where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is 1.7 rad/sec and the Froude number Fr < 1. We found that stratification enhances the radial dispersion of the disc at landing, and simultaneously, decrease the descent speed and the inclination (or nutation) angle while falling. We conclude by commenting on the relevance of these results to the use of unpowered vehicles and robots for space exploration and underwater missions.

  5. Low deuterium content of Lake Vanda, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ragotzkie, R.A.; Friedman, I.

    1965-01-01

    Lake Vanda in Victoria Land, Antarctica, is permanently ice-covered and permanently stratified, with warm, salty water near the bottom. Deuterium analyses of lake water from several levels indicate that the lake has a low deuterium content, and that it is stratified with respect to this isotope. This low deuterium content supports the evidence from the lake's ionic content that the saline layer is not of marine origin, and it indicates that evaporation from the ice surface has taken place. The stratification of the lake with respect to deuterium suggests that the upper and lower layers of water were formed at different times from different sources of glacial melt water.

  6. Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Fernando; Ramos, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela C.; Fariñas, M. Carmen; de Berrazueta, José Ramón; Zarauza, Jesús; Pericás Pulido, Juan Manuel; Paré, Juan Carlos; de Alarcón, Arístides; Sousa, Dolores; Rodriguez Bailón, Isabel; Montejo-Baranda, Miguel; Noureddine, Mariam; García Vázquez, Elisa; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) complicating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a poorly known entity. Although current guidelines do not recommend IE antibiotic prophylaxis (IEAP) in HCM, controversy remains. This study sought to describe the clinical course of a large series of IE HCM and to compare IE in HCM patients with IE patients with and without an indication for IEAP. Data from the GAMES IE registry involving 27 Spanish hospitals were analyzed. From January 2008 to December 2013, 2000 consecutive IE patients were prospectively included in the registry. Eleven IE HCM additional cases from before 2008 were also studied. Clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic characteristics were analyzed in IE HCM patients (n = 34) and in IE HCM reported in literature (n = 84). Patients with nondevice IE (n = 1807) were classified into 3 groups: group 1, HCM with native-valve IE (n = 26); group 2, patients with IEAP indication (n = 696); group 3, patients with no IEAP indication (n = 1085). IE episode and 1-year follow-up data were gathered. One-year mortality in IE HCM was 42% in our study and 22% in the literature. IE was more frequent, although not exclusive, in obstructive HCM (59% and 74%, respectively). Group 1 exhibited more IE predisposing factors than groups 2 and 3 (62% vs 40% vs 50%, P < 0.01), and more previous dental procedures (23% vs 6% vs 8%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, Group 1 experienced a higher incidence of Streptococcus infections than Group 2 (39% vs 22%, P < 0.01) and similar to Group 3 (39% vs 30%, P = 0.34). Overall mortality was similar among groups (42% vs 36% vs 35%, P = 0.64). IE occurs in HCM patients with and without obstruction. Mortality of IE HCM is high but similar to patients with and without IEAP indication. Predisposing factors, previous dental procedures, and streptococcal infection are higher in IE HCM, suggesting that HCM patients could benefit from IEAP. PMID:27368014

  7. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  8. [Gastric adenomyoma clinically simulating hypertrophic pyloric stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sánchez García, S; Rubio Solís, D; Anes González, G; González Sánchez, S

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenomyomas are extremely uncommon benign tumors in children. On histologic examination, these tumors have an epithelial component similar to pancreatic ducts. We present a case of a pyloric adenomyoma that clinically simulated hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn girl. Imaging tests, fundamentally magnetic resonance imaging, were very important in the characterization and diagnosis of this entity.

  9. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  10. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  11. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy: a palindrome with a pathogenic connotation.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lavin, Manuel; Vargas, Angélica; Rivera-Viñas, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    The review seeks to update advances on the pathogenesis of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, describe a previously unrecognized palindrome that occurs in hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and that may have pathogenic implications, and review the role of bisphosphonates in the treatment of this condition. Some patients with primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy display an interesting palindrome. Many years after the onset of the osteoarthropathy, they develop diseases that in other circumstances are known to generate secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. This palindrome has been reported in cases of patent ductus arteriosus, Crohn's disease and myelofibrosis. Additionally, primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and POEMS syndrome share important clinical features. The many diseases associated with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy have in common abnormal production of vascular endothelial growth factor. This cytokine has been proposed to play a major role in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease, myelofibrosis and POEMS syndrome. A controlled study showed that vascular endothelial growth factor is abnormally expressed in cases of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. The biologic effects of vascular endothelial growth factor may explain hypertrophic osteoarthropathy histological features. Several isolated reports suggest that pamidronate is effective in relieving painful osteoarthropathy. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is a palindromic syndrome. Anomalous vascular endothelial growth factor expression may explain this phenomenon. Bisphosphonates may have a role in the symptomatic treatment of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  12. Long-term Simulation Study about the Impact of submerse Macrophytes on thermal Stratification Dynamics and Transport Processes in an extreme shallow water lake - Lake Federsee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Thomas; Pöschke, Franziska; Pflugbeil, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Lake Federsee is formed primarily by ice age processes and was subjected to strong siltation processes in post-glacial times, while in the last two centuries anthropogenic impact due to amelioration projects became more important and determined it's morphometry. Lake Federsee has a maximum length of 2.4 km, a maximum width of 1.1 km and an area of approx. 1.4 km2. With respect to it's area Lake Federsee is the third largest lake in the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg situated in the south of Germany. It is characterized by its very flat bathymetry with a maximum depth of about 3.15 m and an average depth of about 1 m. In recent years Lake Federsee has undergone a strong reduction of the nutrient content, thus developing from hypertrophic states in the years 1980ies to eutrophic conditions in the years 2000ies. Since 2005 this development is accompanied by a change of the general habitus of the lake converting from a lake dominated by algae to a lake dominated by macrophytes. Changing successions of aquatic plants have been observed in the lake with strong seasonal variations in the composition and density of the vegetation cover, however forming often an almost complete coverage of the lake. In the present study the implementation of the hydrodynamic, three-dimensional model DELFT3D - FLOW for this extreme shallow water lake will be presented. The impact of some numerical parameters will be investigated in a sensitivity study, which is aiming to set up the hydrodynamic model in an optimal way. This 3-dim hydrodynamic model is used to simulate the 3-dim flow field and to investigate the thermal stratification as well as the mixing processes taking place in this lake. The model is run for the simulation time period 2000 - 2016 having a horizontal resolution of dx=dy=50 m and 10 or 20 equidistantly spaced fixed vertical layers giving a vertical resolution of 0.32 or 0.16 m respectively. The timestep is choosen to be dt = 10 s. Analysis of the simulated vertical

  13. Scar contractures, hypertrophic scars, and keloids.

    PubMed

    Brissett, A E; Sherris, D A

    2001-11-01

    A scar contracture is the result of a contractile wound-healing process occurring in a scar that has already been reepithelialized and adequately healed. Keloids and hypertrophic scars (HTSs) are fibrous tissue outgrowths that result from a derailment in the normal wound-healing process. The exact incidence of keloids and HTSs remains unknown. Beyond the common belief that trauma is the initiating event of keloid and hypertrophic scar formation, the remainder of the process remains uncertain. A combination of biochemical factors, skin tension, endocrinologic factors, and genetic factors are the likely culprits. Treatment begins by educating the patient about the etiology of the scarring process. All treatment protocols are individualized, but the standard approach to keloids and HTSs begins with corticosteroid injection followed by surgical excision, pressure dressings, and long-term follow-up.

  14. Calcification of in vitro developed hypertrophic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Tacchetti, C.; Quarto, R.; Campanile, G.; Cancedda, R.

    1989-04-01

    We have recently reported that dedifferentiated cells derived from stage 28-30 chick embryo tibiae, when transferred in suspension culture in the presence of ascorbic acid, develop in a tissue closely resembling hypertrophic cartilage. Ultrastructural examination of this in vitro formed cartilage showed numerous matrix vesicles associated with the extracellular matrix. In the present article we report that the in vitro developed hypertrophic cartilage undergoes calcification. We indicate a correlation between the levels of alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition at different times of development. Following the transfer of cells into suspension culture and an initial lag phase, the level of alkaline phosphatase activity rapidly increased. In most experiments the maximum of activity was reached after 5 days of culture. When alkaline phosphatase activity and /sup 45/Ca deposition were measured in the same experiment, we observed that the increase in alkaline phosphatase preceded the deposition of nonwashable calcium deposits in the cartilage.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypertrophic olivary degeneration.

    PubMed

    Blanco Ulla, M; López Carballeira, A; Pumar Cebreiro, J M

    2015-01-01

    To review the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in hypertrophic olivary degeneration, with attention to epidemiologic and clinical aspects and especially to imaging findings. We reviewed 5 patients diagnosed with hypertrophic olivary degeneration at our center from 2010 through 2013, analyzing relevant clinical, epidemiologic, and radiologic findings. In all cases, a hyperintensity was seen in the inferior olivary nuclei in FLAIR and T2-weighted sequences. No signal alterations were seen on T1-weighted sequences, and no enhancement was seen after intravenous injection of contrast material. In the cases studied by diffusion-weighted imaging, no significant alterations were seen in these sequences. Olivary hypertrophy was seen in all patients except in one, in whom presumably not enough time had elapsed for hypertrophy to occur. The alterations were bilateral in two of the five cases. Only one case exhibited the typical clinical manifestations. Given that patients may not present clinical manifestations that can be attributed to hypertrophic olivary degeneration, it is important to recognize the characteristic radiologic signs of this entity. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tomoya; Nishijima, Haruo; Haga, Rie; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Ueno, Tatsuya; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2015-10-15

    We report a case of idiopathic cerebral hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. No other identifiable cause of pachymeningitis was detected. Corticosteroid therapy was effective for both diseases. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis is closely related to autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. This case supports the hypothesis that hypertrophic pachymeningitis can be a rare comorbidity of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. An unusual ST-segment elevation: apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy shows the ace up its sleeve.

    PubMed

    de Santis, Francesco; Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Pero, Gaetano; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Minardi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is part of the broad clinical and morphologic spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report a patient with electrocardiographic abnormalities in whom acute coronary syndrome was excluded and apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was demonstrated by careful differential diagnosis.

  18. RADIAL STABILITY IN STRATIFIED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Rueda, Jorge A. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2015-03-01

    We formulate within a generalized distributional approach the treatment of the stability against radial perturbations for both neutral and charged stratified stars in Newtonian and Einstein's gravity. We obtain from this approach the boundary conditions connecting any two phases within a star and underline its relevance for realistic models of compact stars with phase transitions, owing to the modification of the star's set of eigenmodes with respect to the continuous case.

  19. Inflammation and cutaneous nervous system involvement in hypertrophic scarring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-hua; Yang, Heng-lian; Xiao, Hu; Wang, Yi-bing; Wang, De-chang; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to use a mouse model of hypertrophic scarring by mechanical loading on the dorsum of mice to determine whether the nervous system of the skin and inflammation participates in hypertrophic scarring. Results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that inflammation contributed to the formation of a hypertrophic scar and increased the nerve density in scar tissue.Western blot assay verified that interleukin-13 expression was increased in scar tissue. These findings suggest that inflammation and the cutaneous nervous system play a role in hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:26692869

  20. Association between ventricular filling patterns and the extent of late enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    De Zan, M; Carrascosa, P; Deviggiano, A; Capunay, C; Rodríguez-Granillo, G A

    To explore the relationship between ventricular filling curves and the extent of late enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We retrospectively included consecutive patients with suspected and/or confirmed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a control group of patients matched for age and sex who underwent cardiac MRI with evaluation of late enhancement. Among other determinations, we evaluated the following parameters on cine sequences: peak filling rate, time to the first peak filling rate, and filling rate normalized to the filling volume. Late enhancement was observed in 29 (73%) of the 40 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The normalized peak filling rate was significantly lower in patients with late enhancement (4.9 ± 1.6 in those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy positive for late enhancement vs. 5.8 ± 2.2 in those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy negative for late enhancement vs. 6.3 ± 1.5 in controls, p = 0.008) and the time to peak filling was longer in patients with late enhancement (540.6 ± 89.7 ms vs. 505.5 ± 99.3 ms in those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy negative for late enhancement vs. 486.9 ± 86.3 ms in controls, p = 0.02). When the population was stratified into three groups in function of the normalized peak filling rate, significant differences were observed among groups for age (p = 0.002), mean wall thickness (p = 0.036), and myocardial mass (p = 0.046) and atrial dimensions, whereas no significant differences with respect to late enhancement were seen. In patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, we found a significant association between ventricular filling patterns and age, wall thicknesses, and atrial dimensions, but not with the extent of late enhancement. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry: The rationale and design of an international, observational study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christopher M; Appelbaum, Evan; Desai, Milind Y; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; DiMarco, John P; Friedrich, Matthias G; Geller, Nancy; Heckler, Sarahfaye; Ho, Carolyn Y; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ivey, Elizabeth A; Keleti, Julianna; Kim, Dong-Yun; Kolm, Paul; Kwong, Raymond Y; Maron, Martin S; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Piechnik, Stefan; Watkins, Hugh; Weintraub, William S; Wu, Pan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic heart disease with a frequency as high as 1 in 200. In many cases, HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding the different components of the sarcomere apparatus. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, myofibrillar disarray, and myocardial fibrosis. The phenotypic expression is quite variable. Although most patients with HCM are asymptomatic, serious consequences are experienced in a subset of affected individuals who present initially with sudden cardiac death or progress to refractory heart failure. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry study is a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored 2,750-patient, 44-site, international registry and natural history study designed to address limitations in extant evidence to improve prognostication in HCM (NCT01915615). In addition to the collection of standard demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic variables, patients will undergo state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance for assessment of left ventricular mass and volumes as well as replacement scarring and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, genetic and biomarker analyses will be performed. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry has the potential to change the paradigm of risk stratification in HCM, using novel markers to identify those at higher risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Myocardial Fibrosis as an Early Manifestation of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; López, Begoña; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R.; Lakdawala, Neal K.; Cirino, Allison L.; Jarolim, Petr; Kwong, Raymond; González, Arantxa; Colan, Steven D.; Seidman, J.G.; Díez, Javier; Seidman, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Myocardial fibrosis is a hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a proposed substrate for arrhythmias and heart failure. In animal models, profibrotic genetic pathways are activated early, before hypertrophic remodeling. Data showing early profibrotic responses to sarcomere-gene mutations in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are lacking. METHODS We used echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and serum biomarkers of collagen metabolism, hemodynamic stress, and myocardial injury to evaluate subjects with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a confirmed genotype. RESULTS The study involved 38 subjects with pathogenic sarcomere mutations and overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 39 subjects with mutations but no left ventricular hypertrophy, and 30 controls who did not have mutations. Levels of serum C-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) were significantly higher in mutation carriers without left ventricular hypertrophy and in subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy than in controls (31% and 69% higher, respectively; P<0.001). The ratio of PICP to C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen was increased only in subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, suggesting that collagen synthesis exceeds degradation. Cardiac MRI studies showed late gadolinium enhancement, indicating myocardial fibrosis, in 71% of subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy but in none of the mutation carriers without left ventricular hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS Elevated levels of serum PICP indicated increased myocardial collagen synthesis in sarcomere-mutation carriers without overt disease. This profibrotic state preceded the development of left ventricular hypertrophy or fibrosis visible on MRI. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:20818890

  3. Psychosocial impact of specialized cardiac genetic clinics for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Lind, Joanne M; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Semsarian, Christopher

    2008-02-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, an autosomal dominant chronic heart disease, can have significant implications, including increased risk of sudden death, exercise limitations, and risk of transmission to offspring. This study sought to describe the psychosocial factors associated with attending a specialty cardiac genetic clinic, and to determine whether these may be predictors of comorbid anxiety and depression in this population. Questionnaires were sent to 184 individuals attending the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic. Questionnaires were anonymous and comprised demographics, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Patient Experience Scales, and Patient Satisfaction Scales. Completed questionnaires were returned by 109 participants (59.2% response rate), of which 76.9% had a diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, while 23.1% were at-risk relatives attending for clinical screening. Patient satisfaction scores were generally high to very high across all groups, though only 24% of HCM patients showed good adjustment to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 10% had low worry about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy scores. Within the disease group, logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, gender, and education revealed adjustment to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and worry about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy scores to be significantly associated with anxiety, while adjustment scores and location of patient follow-up (i.e., Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy clinic or another cardiologist) to be significantly associated with depression scores. HCM patients who attend specialized cardiac genetic clinics are better adjusted and worry less, than those who do not attend. An integrated approach, including a genetic counselor, is important in the management of HCM families.

  4. Periostin induces fibroblast proliferation and myofibroblast persistence in hypertrophic scarring.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Justin; Nygard, Karen; Gan, Bing Siang; O'Gorman, David Brian

    2015-02-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is characterized by the excessive development and persistence of myofibroblasts. These cells contract the surrounding extracellular matrix resulting in the increased tissue density characteristic of scar tissue. Periostin is a matricellular protein that is abnormally abundant in fibrotic dermis, however, its roles in hypertrophic scarring are largely unknown. In this report, we assessed the ability of matrix-associated periostin to promote the proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation of dermal fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of hypertrophic scars or healthy skin. Supplementation of a thin type-I collagen cell culture substrate with recombinant periostin induced a significant increase in the proliferation of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts but not normal dermal fibroblasts. Periostin induced significant increases in supermature focal adhesion formation, α smooth muscle actin levels and collagen contraction in fibroblasts cultured from hypertrophic scars under conditions of increased matrix tension in three-dimensional type-I collagen lattices. Inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase activity significantly attenuated the effects of matrix-associated periostin on hypertrophic scar fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Depletion of endogenous periostin expression in hypertrophic scar myofibroblasts resulted in a sustained decrease in α smooth muscle actin levels under conditions of reducing matrix tension, while matrix-associated periostin levels caused the cells to retain high levels of a smooth muscle actin under these conditions. These findings indicate that periostin promotes Rho-associated protein kinase-dependent proliferation and myofibroblast persistence of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts and implicate periostin as a potential therapeutic target to enhance the resolution of scars.

  5. [Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Bellina, V; Saavedra-Pastor, H; Alvarado-Rosales, M; Porras-Carrión, M; Cjuno-Pinto, R; Gonzales-Quispe, I; Alban-Zapata, G

    Hypertrophic pachymeningitis is a clinical condition that is caused by a diffuse or localised thickening of the dura mater. It predominantly affects males and manifests as chronic headache, with or without association to neurological manifestations, such as paralysis of the cranial nerves, cerebellar ataxia and neuro-ophthalmic complications. A 61-year-old male, with no relevant past history, who, one month before admission, had begun to suffer from right frontotemporal headache that irradiated to the ipsilateral orbital region and was more pronounced at night. A week later he was affected by a decrease in visual acuity in the right eye and two weeks later he noted the presence of right palpebral ptosis, while the headaches increased. The examination showed: right palpebral ptosis with global ophthalmoparesis with predominance of adduction and abduction, and diminished photomotor reflex in the right eye. The visual acuity of the right eye was reduced and the palpebral fissure was 0 in the right eye. The fundus oculi was normal. Infectious and non-infectious causations of meningitis were precluded. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a diffuse thickening of the supratentorial and infratentorial meninges, as well as diffuse uptake of the paramagnetic substance; thickening of the mucus in both paranasal maxillary sinuses was also observed. A meningeal biopsy study confirmed the existence of hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Treatment was established with prednisone and the clinical symptoms improved. Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis is an underdiagnosed condition that must be taken into consideration in cases of patients with a history of subacute or chronic meningitis in which infectious and non-infectious causations have been precluded, and high-dose steroid treatment must be established.

  6. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy simulating an infiltrative myocardial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, A; Loperfido, F; Pennestrì, F

    1985-01-01

    Congestive heart failure developed in a patient with low electrocardiographic QRS voltages, diffuse thickening of the septum and free cardiac wall, and a reduction in left ventricular internal diameter, which suggested an infiltrative heart muscle disease. Histological examination at necropsy showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with symmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy. Myocardial disarray of type 1A disorganisation was extensive and equally distributed in the ventricular septum and the left anterior and left posterior ventricular free walls. Severe fibrosis (40%) was also present and may have been a possible cause of the electrocardiographic abnormalities as well as of the lack of ventricular dilatation. Images PMID:4041302

  7. Factors associated with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jedd, M B; Melton, L J; Griffin, M R; Kaufman, B; Hoffman, A D; Broughton, D; O'Brien, P C

    1988-03-01

    We examined perinatal factors in relation to the rise in incidence of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis among children in Olmsted County, Minnesota, during the period from 1950 through 1984. Primogeniture was associated with male infants but not female infants; some factor related to primogeniture, such as breast-feeding, may be etiologically important. Our data did not support a role for maternal disease, use of doxylamine succinate-pyridoxide hydrochloride (Bendectin), or an infectious process. Further study should be directed toward environmental factors associated with primogeniture.

  8. Blepharoptosis and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Aysun Şanal; Acaroğlu, Gölge; Dikmetas, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old male patient presented to our hospital with a history of secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) associated with an abdominal neoplasia and blepharoptosis. He had finger clubbing, hyperhidrosis, and hypertrichosis. He also had a recent history of extensive abdominal surgery with a pathology report of myelolipoma. Routine blood work was unremarkable. Upper eyelid reconstruction with blepharoplasty, upper eyelid wedge resection, and brow suspension was performed to address his eyelid concerns. By this case report, we would like to attract notice that the eyelid involvement may be a part of HOA and to emphasize the importance of systemic and pathologic evaluation in failed blepharoptosis surgery. PMID:27221686

  9. Diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, Annina S; Perez-Tome, Maria Carrillo; Castelletti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is complex and includes a variety of phenotypes, which leads to different types of manifestations. Although most of the patients are asymptomatic, a significant proportion of them will develop symptoms or risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Therefore, the objectives of HCM diagnosis and management are to relieve the patients' symptoms (chest pain, heart failure, syncope, palpitations, etc.), prevent disease progression and major cardiovascular complications and SCD. The heterogeneity of HCM patterns, their symptoms and assessment is a challenge for the cardiologist. PMID:26693331

  10. Screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cats.

    PubMed

    Häggström, Jens; Luis Fuentes, Virginia; Wess, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats, and it can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Cats are often screened for HCM because of the presence of a heart murmur, but screening for breeding purposes has also become common. These cats are usually purebred cats of breeding age, and generally do not present with severe disease or with any clinical signs. This type of screening is particularly challenging because mild disease may be difficult to differentiate from a normal phenotype, and the margin for error is small, with potentially major consequences for the breeder. This article reviews HCM screening methods, with particular emphasis on echocardiography.

  11. Bioenergetic evaluation of diel vertical migration by bull trout ( Salvelinus confluentus ) in a thermally stratified reservoir

    Treesearch

    Madeleine Eckmann; Jason Dunham; Edward J. Connor; Carmen A. Welch

    2016-01-01

    Many species living in deeper lentic ecosystems exhibit daily movements that cycle through the water column, generally referred to as diel vertical migration (DVM). In this study, we applied bioenergetics modelling to evaluate growth as a hypothesis to explain DVM by bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in a thermally stratified reservoir (Ross Lake...

  12. Economics of stratified medicine in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gavan, Sean; Harrison, Mark; Iglesias, Cynthia; Barton, Anne; Manca, Andrea; Payne, Katherine

    2014-12-01

    Clinically relevant examples of stratified medicine are available for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to understand the current economic evidence for stratified medicine in RA. Two systematic reviews were conducted to identify: (1) all economic evaluations of stratified treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, or those which have used a subgroup analysis, and (2) all stated preference studies of treatments for rheumatoid arthritis. Ten economic evaluations of stratified treatments for RA, 38 economic evaluations including with a subgroup analysis and eight stated preference studies were identified. There was some evidence to support that stratified approaches to treating a patient with RA may be cost-effective. However, there remain key gaps in the economic evidence base needed to support the introduction of stratified medicine in RA into healthcare systems and considerable uncertainty about how proposed stratified approaches will impact future patient preferences, outcomes and costs when used in routine practice.

  13. Identification and immunolocalization of the innate immune receptor CD14 in hypertrophic adenoids and tonsils.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yaakov, Avraham; Maly, Bella; Abu-Ita, Rani; Elidan, Josef; Gross, Menachem

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the expression of CD14 as a marker of the innate immunity in hypertrophic adenoids and tonsils. Twenty-four pediatric patients (age <12 years) with obstructive adenotonsillar hypertrophy, confirmed by sleep study were included in this study. Intensity and expression of positive CD14 infiltrating cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry in specific histologic areas. In tonsils, CD14 immunoreactivity was demonstrated in intraepithelial lymphocytes located in the basal layer of the stratified squamous mucoepithelium. CD14 expression was significantly higher in mucosal layers and inter-follicular areas of tonsils than adenoid tissues [(p < 0.001), (p = 0.021), respectively]. CD14 expression was significantly higher in the submucosal layers of adenoids than tonsil tissues (p = 0.002). Hypertrophic adenoids and tonsils from children with OSA are prominent sites of innate defense, with over expression of CD14. The enhanced expressions of CD14 cells in adenoids and tonsils may be an important factor for the development and persistence of adenoids and tonsils enlargement causing OSA in children. CD14 expression in adenoids and tonsils illustrates an important immunological sentinel function of the innate immunity of the upper airway.

  14. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys (Aotus spp.).

    PubMed

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly.

  15. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Owl Monkeys (Aotus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly. PMID:23759531

  16. [Cost-effectiveness evaluation on comprehensive control measures carrying out in schistosomiasis endemic areas with regard to different layers of administrative villages stratified by infection situation of human and domestic animals. I. Cost-effectiveness study in inner embankment of marshland and lake regions from 2006 to 2010].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-ming; Yu, Qing; Zhang, Xia; Coa, Chun-li; Li, Shi-zhu; Zhu, Hong

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the comprehensive control measures carrying out in schistosomiasis endemic inner embankment of marshland and lake regions from 2006 to 2010, so as to provide the reference for further rational allocation of limited health resources and ultimately speeding up the procedure of schistosomiasis elimination. With reference to the requirements of the national schistosomiasis transmission control and phase goals for schistosomiasis control in Hubei Province, Jiangling County, one schistosomiasis control pilot of Hubei Province combined with the National Health and Family Planning Commission and Ministry of Agriculture, was selected for the study. A definition of the infection rates of human and domestic animals was used for endemic villages stratified by different layers (i.e., the village with the infection rates of human and domestic animals ≥ 3% belonged to the first layer, ≥ 1% belonged to the second layer; < 1% belonged to the third layer). By using the stratification method and cost-effectiveness analysis, the endemic villages stratified with the different layers were investigated and all the data of schistosomiasis endemic situation, cost and effectiveness of schistosomiasis control were collected and comprehensively analyzed from 2006 to 2010. In the effectiveness of schistosomiasis control, by the end of 2010, there were no first layer villages, there were 114 second layer villages, and there were 18 third layer villages in Jiangling County. In the former first layer villages, the schistosomiasis patients decreased year by year ultimately to 0; but in the second and third layer villages, the schistosomiasis patients increased. In the fecal treatment and management, the coverage rates of harm less sanitary latrines were 27.45% in 2009 and 48.74% in 2010 respectively in the second layer villages, whereas there were no harmless sanitary latrines in the first and third layer villages. In the 5 years, the input of

  17. What is the prevalence of hypertrophic scarring following burns?

    PubMed

    Bombaro, Kristine M; Engrav, Loren H; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Wiechman, Shelly A; Faucher, Lee; Costa, Beth A; Heimbach, David M; Rivara, Frederick P; Honari, Shari

    2003-06-01

    Hypertrophic scarring after burns remains a major problem and is considered to be "common". Pressure garments are commonly used as treatment even though there is little sound data that they reduce the prevalence or magnitude of the scarring. In 1999 we began a study of the efficacy of pressure garments on forearm burns. After studying 30 patients, mainly white adults, we found no hypertrophic scar in either those treated with pressure or without. This prompted us to review the literature on the prevalence of hypertrophic scarring after burns and found only four articles with a relatively small number of patients and only three geographical locations. It became clear that the prevalence of hypertrophic scarring is really unknown. We then did a retrospective study of 110 burn survivors and counted all hypertrophic scars of all sizes and locations in all races and found the prevalence hypertrophic scarring to be 67% which conflicts with the published reports and our prospective study and suggests that further research is necessary. We concluded that a worldwide, prospective survey is necessary to establish the prevalence of hypertrophic scarring after burns. In this article we are calling for and offering to organize this survey.

  18. Clinical predictors of genetic testing outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Sarina, Tanya; Yeates, Laura; Hunt, Lauren; Macciocca, Ivan; McCormack, Louise; Winship, Ingrid; McGaughran, Julie; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    Genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been commercially available for almost a decade; however, low mutation detection rate and cost have hindered uptake. This study sought to identify clinical variables that can predict probands with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in whom a pathogenic mutation will be identified. Probands attending specialized cardiac genetic clinics across Australia over a 10-year period (2002-2011), who met clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and who underwent genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were included. Clinical, family history, and genotype information were collected. A total of 265 unrelated individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were included, with 138 (52%) having at least one mutation identified. The mutation detection rate was significantly higher in the probands with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with an established family history of disease (72 vs. 29%, P < 0.0001), and a positive family history of sudden cardiac death further increased the detection rate (89 vs. 59%, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified female gender, increased left-ventricular wall thickness, family history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and family history of sudden cardiac death as being associated with greatest chance of identifying a gene mutation. Multiple mutation carriers (n = 16, 6%) were more likely to have suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death (31 vs. 7%, P = 0.012). Family history is a key clinical predictor of a positive genetic diagnosis and has direct clinical relevance, particularly in the pretest genetic counseling setting.

  19. Metagenome sequencing of the prokaryotic microbiota of the hypersaline and meromictic soap lake, washington.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Erik R; Hess, Matthias

    2014-01-23

    Soap Lake is a small saline lake in central eastern Washington that is sharply stratified into two layers. In addition to being highly alkaline (~pH 10), Soap Lake also contains high concentrations of sulfide. Here, we report the community profile of the prokaryotic microbiota associated with Soap Lake surface water.

  20. Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a rare, but clinically significant variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Perens, Gregory; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare variant of HCM. Segmental HCM is seen in 12% of cases of HCM. Among the patterns of segmental HCM, posterolateral HCM is the least common type. Our case of an 18-year old male documents this unusual type of cardiomyopathy. In this form of HCM, left ventricular thickness and the extent of hypertrophy might be underestimated by 2-dimensional echocardiography. This case illustrates the echocardiographic and pathologic features of posterolateral HCM.

  1. Stratified volume diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Diana Marie

    2000-11-01

    Gratings with high diffraction efficiency into a single order find use in applications ranging from optical interconnects to beam steering. Such gratings have been realized with volume holographic, blazed, and diffractive optical techniques. However, each of these methods has limitations that restrict the range of applications in which they can be used. In this work an alternate, novel approach and method for creating high efficiency gratings has been developed. These new gratings are named stratified volume diffractive optical elements (SVDOE's). In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. An SVDOE consists of binary gratings interleaved with homogeneous layers in a multi-layer, stratified grating structure. The ridges of the binary gratings form fringe planes analogous to those of a volume hologram. The modulation and diffraction of an incident beam, which occur concurrently in a volume grating, are achieved sequentially by the grating layers and the homogeneous layers, respectively. The layers in this type of structure must be fabricated individually, which introduces the capability to laterally shift the binary grating layers relative to one another to create a grating with slanted fringe planes. This allows an element to be designed with high diffraction efficiency into the first order for any arbitrary angle of incidence. A systematic design process has been developed for SVDOE's. Optimum modulation depth of the SVDOE is determined analytically and the number of grating layers along with the thickness of homogeneous layers is determined by numerical simulation. A rigorous electromagnetic simulation of the diffraction properties of multi-layer grating structures, based on the Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) algorithm, was developed and applied to SVDOE performance prediction. Fabrication of an SVDOE structure presents unique challenges. Microfabrication combined with

  2. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Magri, Damiano; Santolamazza, Caterina

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the functional limitation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the most common inherited heart disease, is challenging. Beside the occurrence of disease-related complications, several factors are potential determinants of exercise limitation, including left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial fiber disarray, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, microvascular ischemia, and interstitial fibrosis. Furthermore, drugs commonly used in the daily management of these patients may interfere with exercise capacity, especially those with a negative chronotropic effect. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing can safely and objectively evaluate the functional capacity of these patients and help the physician in understanding the mechanisms that underlie this limitation. Features that reduce exercise capacity may predict progression to heart failure in these patients and even the risk of sudden cardiac death.

  3. Mucin gene expression in hypertrophic adenoids.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mahmoud S; Wilson, J A; Bennett, M; Pearson, Jeffrey P

    2007-10-01

    Membrane-bound mucin MUC4 represents the predominant mucin expressed in the adenoid epithelium followed by MUC5AC (gel-forming mucin). This may suggest that membrane-bound mucins could be involved in pathogen binding and immunological stimulation. The aim of this study was to investigate mucin expression in hypertrophic adenoids. Adenoidal samples were obtained from 12 children. The expression of eight mucin genes, MUC1-4, MUC5AC, 5B, 6 and 7 was studied by in situ hybridization utilizing digoxigenin-labelled oligonucleotide probes. The dominant mucin genes were MUC4, 3 and 5AC, while MUC1, 2, 5B and 7 were sparsely expressed and MUC6 was not expressed. Expression patterns were very different from those in the upper airways. Most samples expressed two membrane-bound mucins (MUC4 and 3) and one secretory mucin (MUC5AC).

  4. Idiopathic hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Park, S. H.; Whang, C. J.; Sohn, M.; Oh, Y. C.; Lee, C. H.; Whang, Y. J.

    2001-01-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis (IHP) is a rare, chronic nonspecific and granulomatous inflammatory disorder of the dura with unknown etiology. The diagnosis can be established by open biopsy and exclusion of all other specific granulomatous and infectious diseases. We report a typical case of spinal IHP occurring in a long segment of cervical and thoracic dura from C6 to T8. The patient was 56-yr-old female, who had been suffered from pain on her upper back and both arms for 3 months and recent onset motor weakness of both legs. During the 9 months of follow-up period, she experienced the improvement of her neurologic symptoms with combined therapy of partial excision and corticosteroid medication. Since early surgical intervention and subsequent pulse steroid therapy are mandatory for this disease to avoid irreversible damage of nervous system, the identification of this unique disease entity is essential on frozen diagnosis. A few cases have been reported in Korean literature. PMID:11641545

  5. Hypertrophic gastropathy with transient sessile polyps.

    PubMed

    Pesce, F; Barabino, A; Dufour, C; Caffarena, P E; Callea, F; Gatti, R

    1992-04-01

    We report an 8-year-old boy with hypertrophic gastropathy (HG) associated with duodenal Giardia lamblia infestation. The follow-up was complicated by the development of gastric polyps at the site of previous biopsies that spontaneously disappeared within 15 months. Despite the histological similarity, the different course between Ménétrier's disease (MD) in adults (chronic, with frequent development of sessile or pedunculate polyps) and HG (uncomplicated and usually spontaneously resolving) suggests a different pathogenesis. Viral (cytomegalovirus) and bacterial (Helicobacter pylori) infections have been described in association with HG and they could play an important pathogenetic role. The term HG better defines the childhood disease in which a conservative management is recommended.

  6. [Hypertrophic miocardiopathy. An historical and anatomopathological review].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F; Ruíz-Siller, Teresita de Jesús; Méndez-Ramos, Rosario; Karabut, Erick; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Jiménez-Becerra, Silvia

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by the presence of an abnormal hypertrophy of the left ventricle (LV), without dilation, and in the absence of any condition or another cardiac or systemic disease capable of inducing such hypertrophy. This primary or idiopathic hypertrophy can occur with or without dynamic obstruction (induced by exercise) of the LV outflow tract, so in its natural history two fundamental aspects are highlighted: the production of symptoms by blocking the LV outflow tract and the occurrence of sudden cardiac death secondary to ventricular arrhythmias. This revision includes the work of different Iberoamerican investigators, who contributed in an important way to lay the groundwork of what we know nowadays as HCM. It also includes the main anatomopathological characteristics, from its initial description to the new perspective we have concerning the myofiber disarray as the main histopathologic feature.

  7. PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION FROM STRATIFIED JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Yamada, Shoichi; Pe'er, Asaf; Mizuta, Akira; Harikae, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E{sub p}-L{sub p} relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  8. Current Therapeutic Approach to Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Mokos, Zrinka Bukvić; Jović, Anamaria; Grgurević, Lovorka; Dumić-Čule, Ivo; Kostović, Krešimir; Čeović, Romana; Marinović, Branka

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal scarring and its accompanying esthetic, functional, and psychological sequelae still pose significant challe nges. To date, there is no satisfactory prevention or treatment option for hypertrophic scars (HSs), which is mostly due to not completely comprehending the mechanisms underlying their formation. That is why the apprehension of regular and controlled physiological processes of scar formation is of utmost importance when facing hypertrophic scarring, its pathophysiology, prevention, and therapeutic approach. When treating HSs and choosing the best treatment and prevention modality, physicians can choose from a plethora of therapeutic options and many commercially available products, among which currently there is no efficient option that can successfully overcome impaired skin healing. This article reviews current therapeutic approach and emerging therapeutic strategies for the management of HSs, which should be individualized, based on an evaluation of the scar itself, patients’ expectations, and practical, evidence-based guidelines. Clinicians are encouraged to combine various prevention and treatment modalities where combination therapy that includes steroid injections, 5-fluorouracil, and pulsed-dye laser seems to be the most effective. On the other hand, the current therapeutic options are usually empirical and their results are unreliable and unpredictable. Therefore, there is an unmet need for an effective, targeted therapy and prevention, which would be based on an action or a modulation of a particular factor with clarified mechanism of action that has a beneficial effect on wound healing. As the extracellular matrix has a crucial role in cellular and extracellular events that lead to pathological scarring, targeting its components mostly by regulating bone morphogenetic proteins may throw up new therapeutic approach for reduction or prevention of HSs with functionally and cosmetically acceptable outcome. PMID:28676850

  9. Dynamics of CFCs in northern temperate lakes and adjacent groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, John F.; Saad, David A.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2007-04-01

    Three dimictic lakes and one meromictic lake in and near the Trout Lake, Wisconsin, watershed were sampled to determine the variation of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) concentrations within the lakes. The lakes were sampled during stratified conditions, during fall turnover, and during ice cover. The results demonstrate a considerable variation in CFC concentrations and corresponding atmospheric mixing ratios in the lakes sampled, both with depth and season within a given lake, and across different lakes. CFC profiles and observed degradation were not related to the groundwater inflow rate and hence are likely the result of in-lake processes influenced by CFC degradation in the (lake) water column, CFC degradation in the lake-bed sediments, and gas exchange rates and the duration of turnover (turnover efficiency).

  10. Dynamics of CFCs in northern temperate lakes and adjacent groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, J.F.; Saad, D.A.; Hunt, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    [1] Three dimictic lakes and one meromictic lake in and near the Trout Lake, Wisconsin, watershed were sampled to determine the variation of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) concentrations within the lakes. The lakes were sampled during stratified conditions, during fall turnover, and during ice cover. The results demonstrate a considerable variation in CFC concentrations and corresponding atmospheric mixing ratios in the lakes sampled, both with depth and season within a given lake, and across different lakes. CFC profiles and observed degradation were not related to the groundwater inflow rate and hence are likely the result of in-lake processes influenced by CFC degradation in the (lake) water column, CFC degradation in the lake-bed sediments, and gas exchange rates and the duration of turnover (turnover efficiency).

  11. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a neonate associated with nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mir, Arshid; Lemler, Matthew; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Blalock, Shannon; Ikemba, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a congenital nonprogressive skeletal muscle disorder with a characteristic rod body formation in the skeletal muscle fibers. Cardiac involvement in nemaline myopathy is rare, although both dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have been reported. We describe an infant diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypotonia on the first day of life. Muscle biopsy confirmed nemaline myopathy at 3 weeks of age. The diagnosis of nemaline myopathy precluded consideration of heart transplantation, thus shifting the focus to comfort care. This is the earliest presentation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy reported in the literature in the setting of nemaline myopathy. The approach to determining an etiology for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an infant is reviewed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in a patient with Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Conte, M R; Bonfiglio, G; Orzan, F; Mangiardi, L; Camaschella, C; Alfarano, A; Brusca, A

    1995-12-01

    A case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in a patient with Turner syndrome is reported. The most frequently associated cardiac anomalies are coarctation of the aorta and bicuspid aortic valve. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has never been reported in this syndrome but is frequent in Noonan syndrome. In these two conditions the phenotype may be indistinguishable but the cariotype is different: normal in Noonan and 45X in Turner syndrome. Our patient had the typical somatic features, and the cariotype was 45X in all examined cells. A familial form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was excluded by the normal clinical examination of other members of the family. The presence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also in Turner syndrome and the recent localization on the long arm of the chromosome 12 of the gene for Noonan syndrome might postulate a common pathogenesis of the two syndromes.

  13. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    MedlinePlus

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hyperthyroidism: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Symons, C.; Richardson, P. J.; Feizi, O.

    1974-01-01

    Symons, C., Richardson, P. J., and Feizi, O. (1974).Thorax, 29, 713-719. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hyperthyroidism. The combination of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hyperthyroidism gives rise to a complex clinical picture as some of the symptoms and signs may be common to both conditions. The presentation and investigation of three patients are reported. In one patient there was evidence of progression from the hypertrophic obstructive phase to that associated with loss of outflow tract obstruction. The echocardiogram was especially useful in assessing the presence or absence of hypertrophic disease in the thyrotoxic subject. It is suggested that the long continued high-output circulatory state in clinically undetected hyperthyroidism may prove to be a stimulus for unrestrained cardiac muscle hypertrophy. Images PMID:4281112

  15. Epidermolysis Bullosa with Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in a Newborn.

    PubMed

    Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Ammar, Saloua; Louati, Hamdi; Zitouni, Hayet; Jallouli, Mohamed; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited blistering disorder characterized by the fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. Extracutaneous manifestations can be associated. We report a unique concomitant occurrence of EB and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn.

  16. Epidermolysis Bullosa with Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Ammar, Saloua; Louati, Hamdi; Zitouni, Hayet; Jallouli, Mohamed; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited blistering disorder characterized by the fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. Extracutaneous manifestations can be associated. We report a unique concomitant occurrence of EB and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn. PMID:26500857

  17. Mixing in confined stratified aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolster, Diogo; Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; LeBorgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Carrera, Jesus

    2011-03-01

    Spatial variability in a flow field leads to spreading of a tracer plume. The effect of microdispersion is to smooth concentration gradients that exist in the system. The combined effect of these two phenomena leads to an 'effective' enhanced mixing that can be asymptotically quantified by an effective dispersion coefficient (i.e. Taylor dispersion). Mixing plays a fundamental role in driving chemical reactions. However, at pre-asymptotic times it is considerably more difficult to accurately quantify these effects by an effective dispersion coefficient as spreading and mixing are not the same (but intricately related). In this work we use a volume averaging approach to calculate the concentration distribution of an inert solute release at pre-asymptotic times in a stratified formation. Mixing here is characterized by the scalar dissipation rate, which measures the destruction of concentration variance. As such it is an indicator for the degree of mixing of a system. We study pre-asymptotic solute mixing in terms of explicit analytical expressions for the scalar dissipation rate and numerical random walk simulations. In particular, we divide the concentration field into a mean and deviation component and use dominant balance arguments to write approximate governing equations for each, which we then solve analytically. This allows us to explicitly evaluate the separate contributions to mixing from the mean and the deviation behavior. We find an approximate, but accurate expression (when compared to numerical simulations) to evaluate mixing. Our results shed some new light on the mechanisms that lead to large scale mixing and allow for a distinction between solute spreading, represented by the mean concentration, and mixing, which comes from both the mean and deviation concentrations, at pre-asymptotic times.

  18. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy associated with Fallot's tetralogy—a case report

    PubMed Central

    George, B. Olu.; Mabayoje, J. Olu.

    1975-01-01

    A case of Fallot's tetralogy associated with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a young Nigerian female is described. The clinical spectrum of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is reviewed. The rarity of this syndrome is stressed. Some other aspects of the clinical manifestation of cyanotic congenital heart disease which may mimic the skeletal syndrome are mentioned. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:1197165

  19. Primary intrapulmonary neurogenic sarcoma with hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy and asbestosis

    PubMed Central

    Caves, P. K.; Jacques, J.

    1971-01-01

    A case of primary intrapulmonary neurogenic sarcoma with hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy and asbestosis is described. The essential histological features of this rare tumour are detailed, and the five authentic cases previously reported are reviewed. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy and its occurrence in this case are discussed. After surgical removal of the tumour recurrence appeared in the chest within six months. It responded poorly to radiotherapy, and death from metastases occurred 16 months after operation. Images PMID:5576539

  20. Management of scar contractures, hypertrophic scars, and keloids.

    PubMed

    Sherris, D A; Larrabee, W F; Murakami, C S

    1995-10-01

    Aberrant fibrous tissue formation after surgery or trauma still presents a challenge to surgeons. Current research hopes to identify the characteristics of the population of fibroblasts that lead to hypertrophic or keloid scar formation. Surgical procedures and laser therapy followed by intralesional steroid treatments still are the foundation of treatment; but new modalities are being applied. The pathogenesis and management of hypertrophic scars, keloids, and scar contractures are discussed in this article.

  1. How stratified is mantle convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puster, Peter; Jordan, Thomas H.

    1997-04-01

    due to slabs alone. A stratification index, Sƒ≲0.2, is sufficient to exclude many stratified convection models still under active consideration, including most forms of chemical layering between the upper and lower mantle, as well as the more extreme versions of avalanching convection governed by a strong endothermic phase change.

  2. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    stability of the solution at infinite vertical wavelength (k(3) = 0): There is an oscillatory behavior for τ > 1+|K(2)/k(1)|, where τ = St is a dimensionless time and K(2) is the radial component of the wave vector at τ = 0. The model is suitable to describe instabilities leading to turbulence by the bypass mechanism that can be relevant for the analysis of magnetized stratified Keplerian disks with a purely azimuthal field. For initial isotropic conditions, the time evolution of the spectral density of total energy (kinetic + magnetic + potential) is considered. At k(3) = 0, the vertical motion is purely oscillatory, and the sum of the vertical (kinetic + magnetic) energy plus the potential energy does not evolve with time and remains equal to its initial value. The horizontal motion can induce a rapid transient growth provided K(2)/k(1)>1. This rapid growth is due to the aperiodic velocity vortex mode that behaves like K(h)/k(h) where k(h)(τ)=[k(1)(2) + (K(2) - k(1)τ)(2)](1/2) and K(h) =k(h)(0). After the leading phase (τ > K(2)/k(1)>1), the horizontal magnetic energy and the horizontal kinetic energy exhibit a similar (oscillatory) behavior yielding a high level of total energy. The contribution to energies coming from the modes k(1) = 0 and k(3) = 0 is addressed by investigating the one-dimensional spectra for an initial Gaussian dense spectrum. For a magnetized Keplerian disk with a purely vertical field, it is found that an important contribution to magnetic and kinetic energies comes from the region near k(1) = 0. The limit at k(1) = 0 of the streamwise one-dimensional spectra of energies, or equivalently, the streamwise two-dimensional (2D) energy, is then computed. The comparison of the ratios of these 2D quantities with their three-dimensional counterparts provided by previous direct numerical simulations shows a quantitative agreement.

  3. Sediment Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms in Two Plateau Freshwater Lakes at Different Trophic States.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Zhang, Jingxu; Zhao, Qun; Zhou, Qiheng; Li, Ningning; Wang, Yilin; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) can contribute to ammonia biotransformation in freshwater lake ecosystems. However, the factors shaping the distribution of sediment AOA and AOB in plateau freshwater lake remains unclear. The present study investigated sediment AOA and AOB communities in two freshwater lakes (hypertrophic Dianchi Lake and mesotrophic Erhai Lake) on the Yunnan Plateau (China). A remarkable difference in the abundance, diversity, and composition of sediment AOA and AOB communities was observed between Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake. AOB usually outnumbered AOA in Dianchi Lake, but AOA showed the dominance in Erhai Lake. Organic matter (OM), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) might be the key determinants of AOB abundance, while AOA abundance was likely influenced by the ration of OM to TN (C/N). AOA or AOB community structure was found to be relatively similar in the same lake. TN and TP might play important roles in shaping sediment AOA and AOB compositions in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake. Moreover, Nitrososphaera-like AOA were detected in Dianchi Lake. Nitrosospira- and Nitrosomonas-like AOB were dominant in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake, respectively. Sediment AOA and AOB communities in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake were generally regulated by trophic state.

  4. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: Pathophysiology, Classification, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Berman, Brian; Maderal, Andrea; Raphael, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Keloid and hypertrophic scars represent an aberrant response to the wound healing process. These scars are characterized by dysregulated growth with excessive collagen formation, and can be cosmetically and functionally disruptive to patients. Objectives are to describe the pathophysiology of keloid and hypertrophic scar, and to compare differences with the normal wound healing process. The classification of keloids and hypertrophic scars are then discussed. Finally, various treatment options including prevention, conventional therapies, surgical therapies, and adjuvant therapies are described in detail. Literature review was performed identifying relevant publications pertaining to the pathophysiology, classification, and treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars. Though the pathophysiology of keloid and hypertrophic scars is not completely known, various cytokines have been implicated, including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10, as well as various growth factors including transforming growth factor-beta and platelet-derived growth factor. Numerous treatments have been studied for keloid and hypertrophic scars,which include conventional therapies such as occlusive dressings, compression therapy, and steroids; surgical therapies such as excision and cryosurgery; and adjuvant and emerging therapies including radiation therapy, interferon, 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, tacrolimus, sirolimus, bleomycin, doxorubicin, transforming growth factor-beta, epidermal growth factor, verapamil, retinoic acid, tamoxifen, botulinum toxin A, onion extract, silicone-based camouflage, hydrogel scaffold, and skin tension offloading device. Keloid and hypertrophic scars remain a challenging condition, with potential cosmetic and functional consequences to patients. Several therapies exist which function through different mechanisms. Better understanding into the pathogenesis will allow for development of newer and more targeted therapies in the future.

  5. Waves in Turbulent Stably Stratified Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobitz, F. G.; Rogers, M. M.; Ferziger, J. H.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Two approaches for the identification of internal gravity waves in sheared and unsheared homogeneous stratified turbulence are investigated. First, the phase angle between the vertical velocity and density fluctuations is considered. It was found, however, that a continuous distribution of the phase angle is present in weakly and strongly stratified flow. Second, a projection onto the solution of the linearized inviscid equations of motion of unsheared stratified flow is investigated. It was found that a solution of the fully nonlinear viscous Navier-Stokes equations can be represented by the linearized inviscid solution. The projection yields a decomposition into vertical wave modes and horizontal vortical modes.

  6. Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in the third world.

    PubMed

    Saula, P W; Hadley, G P

    2011-10-01

    The relative rarity of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) in the developing world makes its diagnosis a challenge to many physicians. This study audits the management of HPS at a tertiary hospital in South Africa, with a view to defining its regional pattern. This is a retrospective review of records of all patients (n = 63) managed for HPS over an eight-year period (2002-2010). The mean age at presentation was 6.2 weeks and the male/female ratio was 6:1. The majority of patients presented with non-bilious vomiting. Abdominal ultrasound had a sensitivity of 65% and 81.3% when the criteria of pyloric muscle thickness >4 mm and pyloric channel length >16 mm were used, respectively. The overall complication rate was 14.3% and the mortality rate was 0%. Despite the rarity of HPS in the Third World, the outcome of its management is favourable. However, the sensitivity of abdominal ultrasound for diagnosing HPS is low.

  7. Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy in 30 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Withers, S. S.; Johnson, E. G.; Culp, W. T. N.; Rodriguez, C. O.; Skorupski, K. A.; Rebhun, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy (pHO) is known to occur in both canine and human cancer patients. While the pathology of pHO is well-described in the dog, very little information exists regarding the true clinical presentation of dogs affected with pHO. The primary objective of this study was to provide a more comprehensive clinical picture of pHO. To this end, we retrospectively identified 30 dogs and recorded data regarding presenting complaints and physical examination (PE) findings on the date of pHO diagnosis. As a secondary objective, any blood test results were also collected from the computerized records. The most common clinical signs included leg swelling, ocular discharge and/or episcleral injection, lameness, and lethargy. The most common haematological and serum biochemical abnormalities included anaemia, neutrophilia and elevated alkaline phosphatase. In addition to presenting a more detailed clinical description of pHO in the dog, these data support the previously described haematological, serum biochemical and PE abnormalities published in individual case reports. PMID:23489591

  8. Hypertrophic olivary degeneration secondary to pontine haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wein, Sara; Yan, Bernard; Gaillard, Frank

    2015-07-01

    We report a 58-year-old man who developed hyptertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) after haemorrhage of a cavernous malformation in the pons. Lesions of the triangle of Guillain and Mollaret (the dentatorubro-olivary pathway) may lead to HOD, a secondary transsynaptic degeneration of the inferior olivary nucleus. HOD is considered unique because the degenerating olive initially becomes hypertrophic rather than atrophic. The primary lesion causing pathway interruption is often haemorrhage, either due to hypertension, trauma, surgery or, as in our patient, a vascular malformation such as a cavernoma. Ischaemia and demyelination can also occasionally be the inciting events. The classic clinical presentation of HOD is palatal myoclonus, although not all patients with HOD develop this symptom. The imaging features of HOD evolve through characteristic phases. The clue to the diagnosis of HOD is recognition of the distinct imaging stages and identification of a remote primary lesion in the triangle of Guillain and Mollaret. Familiarity with the classic imaging findings of this rare phenomenon is necessary in order to avoid misdiagnosis and prevent unnecessary intervention.

  9. Cardiac norepinephrine kinetics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, J.E. Jr.; Eisenhofer, G.; Garty, M.; Stull, R.; Maron, B.J.; Cannon, R.O. III; Panza, J.A.; Epstein, S.E.; Goldstein, D.S.

    1989-04-01

    We examined the uptake and release of norepinephrine in the cardiac circulation and other regional vascular beds in 11 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and in 10 control subjects during simultaneous infusion of tracer-labeled norepinephrine and isoproterenol. Cardiac neuronal uptake of norepinephrine was assessed by comparing regional removal of tracer-labeled norepinephrine with that of tracer-labeled isoproterenol (which is not a substrate for neuronal uptake) and by the relation between production of dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), an exclusively intraneuronal metabolite of norepinephrine, and regional spillover of norepinephrine. Cardiac extraction of norepinephrine averaged 59 +/- 17% in the patients with HCM, significantly less than in the control subjects (79 +/- 13%, p less than 0.05), whereas cardiac extraction of isoproterenol was similar in the two groups (13 +/- 23% versus 13 +/- 14%), indicating that neuronal uptake of norepinephrine was decreased in the patients with HCM. The cardiac arteriovenous difference in norepinephrine was significantly larger in the patients with HCM than in the control subjects (73 +/- 77 versus 13 +/- 50 pg/ml, p less than 0.05), as was the product of the arteriovenous difference in norepinephrine and coronary blood flow (7.3 +/- 7.3 versus 0.8 +/- 3.0 ng/min, p less than 0.05).

  10. Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy in 30 dogs.

    PubMed

    Withers, S S; Johnson, E G; Culp, W T N; Rodriguez, C O; Skorupski, K A; Rebhun, R B

    2015-09-01

    Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy (pHO) is known to occur in both canine and human cancer patients. While the pathology of pHO is well-described in the dog, very little information exists regarding the true clinical presentation of dogs affected with pHO. The primary objective of this study was to provide a more comprehensive clinical picture of pHO. To this end, we retrospectively identified 30 dogs and recorded data regarding presenting complaints and physical examination (PE) findings on the date of pHO diagnosis. As a secondary objective, any blood test results were also collected from the computerized records. The most common clinical signs included leg swelling, ocular discharge and/or episcleral injection, lameness, and lethargy. The most common haematological and serum biochemical abnormalities included anaemia, neutrophilia and elevated alkaline phosphatase. In addition to presenting a more detailed clinical description of pHO in the dog, these data support the previously described haematological, serum biochemical and PE abnormalities published in individual case reports.

  11. Future volcanic lake research: revealing secrets from poorly studied lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, D.; Tassi, F.; Mora-Amador, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic lake research boosted after the 1986 Lake Nyos lethal gas burst, a limnic rather than volcanic event. This led to the formation of the IAVCEI-Commission on Volcanic Lakes, which grew out into a multi-disciplinary scientific community since the 1990's. At Lake Nyos, a degassing pipe is functional since 2001, and two additional pipes were added in 2011, aimed to prevent further limnic eruption events. There are between 150 and 200 volcanic lakes on Earth. Some acidic crater lakes topping active magmatic-hydrothermal systems are monitored continuously or discontinuously. Such detailed studies have shown their usefulness in volcanic surveillance (e.g. Ruapehu, Yugama-Kusatsu-Shiran, Poás). Others are "Nyos-type" lakes, with possible gas accumulation in bottom waters and thus potentially hazardous. "Nyos-type" lakes tend to remain stably stratified in tropical and sub-tropical climates (meromictic), leading to long-term gas build-up and thus higher potential risk. In temperate climates, such lakes tend to turn over in winter (monomictic), and thus liberating its gas charge yearly. We line out research strategies for the different types of lakes. We believe a complementary, multi-disciplinary approach (geochemistry, geophysics, limnology, biology, statistics, etc.) will lead to new insights and ideas, which can be the base for future following-up and monitoring. After 25 years of pioneering studies on rather few lakes, the scientific community should be challenged to study the many poorly studied volcanic lakes, in order to better constrain the related hazard, based on probabilistic approaches.

  12. Interaction of two spheres settling in a linearly stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Matthieu; Toupoint, Clement; Ern, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    The settling dynamics of small objects in stratified fluids is important to understand the fate of the biomass in lakes or oceanic environments, for industrial applications such as waste-water disposal. More specifically, the interaction of two settling bodies is a fundamental problem recently studied numerically for spheres. Experimental results are needed for validation, especially at low and moderate values of the Reynolds number, for different values of the Froude number, the other parameter of interest. We present experimental results on the interaction of two spheres settling in a linearly stratified fluid. The settling dynamics is investigated by tracking their trajectories in three dimensions, using a pair of cameras imaging two perpendicular planes. Two typical cases are observed, the horizontal repulsion of particles initially aligned horizontally, and the Drafting-Kissing-Tumbling of spheres initially aligned vertically. The influence of the initial positions of the spheres, the Reynolds and Froude numbers, is investigated to quantify these effects and their robustness, in comparison to the dynamics in an homogeneous fluid.

  13. Generalized scaling of seasonal thermal stratification in lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatwell, T.; Kirillin, G.

    2016-12-01

    The mixing regime is fundamental to the biogeochemisty and ecology of lakes because it determines the vertical transport of matter such as gases, nutrients, and organic material. Whereas shallow lakes are usually polymictic and regularly mix to the bottom, deep lakes tend to stratify seasonally, separating surface water from deep sediments and deep water from the atmosphere. Although empirical relationships exist to predict the mixing regime, a physically based, quantitative criterion is lacking. Here we review our recent research on thermal stratification in lakes at the transition between polymictic and stratified regimes. Using the mechanistic balance between potential and kinetic energy in terms of the Richardson number, we derive a generalized physical scaling for seasonal stratification in a closed lake basin. The scaling parameter is the critical mean basin depth that delineates polymictic and seasonally stratified lakes based on lake water transparency (Secchi depth), lake length, and an annual mean estimate for the Monin-Obukhov length. We validated the scaling on available data of 374 global lakes using logistic regression and found it to perform better than other criteria including a conventional open basin scaling or a simple depth threshold. The scaling has potential applications in estimating large scale greenhouse gas fluxes from lakes because the required inputs, like water transparency and basin morphology, can be acquired using the latest remote sensing technologies. The generalized scaling is universal for freshwater lakes and allows the seasonal mixing regime to be estimated without numerically solving the heat transport equations.

  14. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Wang, Su-Juan; Chen, Jian-Yu; Xin, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing on medicinal plants which have been scientifically tested in vitro and/or in vivo and proved as potential agents for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Although the chemical components and mechanisms of action of medicinal plants with antihypertrophic scarring potential have been investigated, many others remain unknown. More investigations and clinical trials are necessary to make use of these medical plants reasonably and phytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach against hypertrophic scars. PMID:25861351

  15. Potential applications for transesophageal echocardiography in hypertrophic cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Widimsky, P; Ten Cate, F J; Vletter, W; van Herwerden, L

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential advantages of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in comparison with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in selected patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Ten patients with previously established or suspected diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were examined by TEE to solve specific clinical questions. TEE was well tolerated by all patients; no arrhythmias were seen during the procedure. The comparison of TTE and TEE showed the following: Advantages of TTE--better assessment of the left ventricle, myocardial thickness measurements available in all regions and sufficient for the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in nine out of 10 patients; advantages of TEE--precise assessment of mitral valve morphology and regurgitant jets, detailed evaluation of systolic anterior motion, and subaortic membrane (not seen by TTE) recognized in one patient. Clinically, in three patients TEE influenced the management (mitral leaflet perforation, subaortic membrane, and residual mitral regurgitation after valvuloplasty). Thus TEE enables more precise diagnosis in some patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and has the potential to influence their surgical management. However, for medical treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, TTE is sufficient.

  16. Impaired cardiac hypertrophic response in Calcineurin Aβ-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Orlando F.; Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Tymitz, Kevin M.; Glascock, Betty J.; Kimball, Thomas F.; Lorenz, John N.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2002-01-01

    Calcineurin is a calcium–calmodulin-regulated, serine–threonine phosphatase that functions as a key inducer of stress responsive gene expression in multiple cell types through a direct activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells and myocyte enhancer factor 2 transcription factors. In cardiomyocytes, calcineurin signaling has been implicated in the regulation of the hypertrophic response caused by pressure overload or neuroendocrine stimulation. Three separate genes encode the catalytic subunit of calcineurin in mammalian cells, CnAα, CnAβ, and CnAγ. To evaluate the necessary function of calcineurin as a hypertrophic regulatory factor, the CnAβ gene was disrupted in the mouse. CnAβ-deficient mice were viable, fertile, and overtly normal well into adulthood, but displayed a 80% decrease in calcineurin enzymatic activity in the heart that was associated with a 12% reduction in basal heart size. CnAβ-deficient mice were dramatically impaired in their ability to mount a productive hypertrophic response induced by pressure overload, angiotensin II infusion, or isoproterenol infusion. Analysis of marker genes associated with the hypertrophic response revealed a partial defect in the molecular program of hypertrophy. Collectively, these data solidify the hypothesis that calcineurin functions as a central regulator of the cardiac hypertrophic growth response in vivo. PMID:11904392

  17. Stratified Scaffolds for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-01-01

    Stratified scaffolds are promising devices finding application in the field of osteochondral tissue engineering. In this scaffold type, different biomaterials are chosen to fulfill specific features required to mimic the complex osteochondral tissue interface, including cartilage, interlayer tissue, and subchondral bone. Here, the biomaterials and fabrication methods currently used to manufacture stratified multilayered scaffolds as well as cell seeding techniques for their characterization are presented.

  18. Radiative transfer in a plane stratified dielectric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, T. T., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A model is developed for calculating radiative transfer in a stratified dielectric. This model is used to show that the reflectivity of a stratified dielectric is primarily determined by gradients in the real part of the refractive index over distances on the order of 1/10 wavelength in the medium. The effective temperature of the medium is determined by the thermodynamic temperature profile over distances of the order delta T.

  19. Penile agenesis and congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis: an association or a random coexistence?

    PubMed

    Yagmurlu, Aydin; Vargun, Rahsan; Gollu, Gulnur; Gokcora, I Haluk

    2004-01-01

    A neonate with penile agenesis and congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is presented. The patterns of associated anomalies with penile agenesis, and those of congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis are discussed.

  20. Genetic risk factors for hypertrophic scar development.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Callie M; Hocking, Anne M; Honari, Shari; Muffley, Lara A; Ga, Maricar; Gibran, Nicole S

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTSs) occur in 30 to 72% patients after thermal injury. Risk factors include skin color, female sex, young age, burn site, and burn severity. Recent correlations between genetic variations and clinical conditions suggest that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be associated with HTS formation. The authors hypothesized that an SNP in the p27 gene (rs36228499) previously associated with decreased restenosis after coronary stenting would be associated with lower Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) measurements and decreased itching. Patient and injury characteristics were collected from adults with thermal burns. VSS scores were calculated at 4 to 9 months after injury. Genotyping was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for HTS as measured by a VSS score >7. Three hundred subjects had a median age of 39 years (range, 18-91); 69% were male and median burn size was 7% TBSA (range, 0.25-80). Consistent with literature, the p27 variant SNP had an allele frequency of 40%, but was not associated with reduced HTS formation or lower itch scores in any genetic model. HTS formation was associated with American Indian/Alaskan Native race (odds ratio [OR], 12.2; P = .02), facial burns (OR, 9.4; P = .04), and burn size ≥20% TBSA (OR, 1.99; P = .03). Although the p27 SNP may protect against vascular fibroproliferation, the effect cannot be generalized to cutaneous scars. This study suggests that American Indian/Alaskan Native race, facial burns, and higher %TBSA are independent risk factors for HTS. The American Indian/Alaskan Native association suggests that there are potentially yet-to-be-identified genetic variants.

  1. Platelet activation in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tablin, F; Schumacher, T; Pombo, M; Marion, C T; Huang, K; Norris, J W; Jandrey, K E; Kittleson, M D

    2014-01-01

    Cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are at risk for development of systemic thromboembolic disease. However, the relationship between platelet activation state and cardiovascular parameters associated with HCM is not well described. To characterize platelet activation by flow cytometric evaluation of platelet P-selectin and semiquantitative Western blot analysis of soluble platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (sPECAM-1). Eight normal healthy cats (controls) owned by staff and students of the School of Veterinary Medicine and 36 cats from the UC Davis Feline HCM Research Laboratory were studied. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was used for all flow cytometry studies. Platelet surface CD41 and P-selectin expression were evaluated before and after ADP stimulation. sPECAM-1 expression was evaluated by Western blot analysis of platelet-poor plasma that had been stabilized with aprotinin. Standard echocardiographic studies were performed. Resting platelets from cats with severe HCM had increased P-selectin expression compared to controls, and expressed higher surface density of P-selectin reflected by their increased mean fluorescence intensities (MFI). Stimulation with ADP also resulted in significantly increased P-selectin MFI of platelets from cats with severe HCM. Increased P-selectin expression and MFI correlated with the presence of a heart murmur and end-systolic cavity obliteration (ESCO). sPECAM-1 expression from cats with moderate and severe HCM was significantly increased above those of control cats. P-selectin and sPECAM expression may be useful biomarkers indicating increased platelet activation in cats with HCM. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Williams-Beuren syndrome with brain malformation and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Noriko; Yamagata, Takanori; Yada, Yukari; Ichihashi, Ko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Momoi, Mariko Y; Mizuguchi, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a multisystemic genetic disorder caused by a contiguous gene deletion at 7q11.23. We report a severely affected WBS patient with cerebral and cerebellar dysplasia as well as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) detected a deletion on 7q11.23 expanding from RP11-614D7 to RP11-137E8, which is a typical deletion in WBS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a WBS patient with severe congenital central nervous system anomaly and progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The relationship between the genes deleted in WBS and a CNS anomaly plus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy requires further analysis. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hypertrophic scarring: the greatest unmet challenge following burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Branski, Ludwik K; Barret, Juan P.; Dziewulski, Peter; Herndon, David N

    2017-01-01

    Summary Improvements in acute burn care have enabled patients to survive massive burns which would have once been fatal. Now up to 70% of patients develop hypertrophic scars following burns. The functional and psychosocial sequelae remain a major rehabilitative challenge, decreasing quality of life and delaying reintegration into society. The current approach is to optimise the healing potential of the burn wound using targeted wound care and surgery in order to minimise the development of hypertrophic scarring. This approach often fails, and modulation of established scar is continued although the optimal indication, timing, and combination of therapies have yet to be established. The need for novel treatments is paramount, and future efforts to improve outcomes and quality of life should include optimisation of wound healing to attenuate or prevent hypertrophic scarring, well-designed trials to confirm treatment efficacy, and further elucidation of molecular mechanisms to allow development of new preventative and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27707499

  4. Risk-stratified imputation in survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Richard E; Adragni, Kofi P; Tiwari, Hemant K; Voeks, Jenifer H; Brott, Thomas G; Howard, George

    2013-08-01

    Censoring that is dependent on covariates associated with survival can arise in randomized trials due to changes in recruitment and eligibility criteria to minimize withdrawals, potentially leading to biased treatment effect estimates. Imputation approaches have been proposed to address censoring in survival analysis; while these approaches may provide unbiased estimates of treatment effects, imputation of a large number of outcomes may over- or underestimate the associated variance based on the imputation pool selected. We propose an improved method, risk-stratified imputation, as an alternative to address withdrawal related to the risk of events in the context of time-to-event analyses. Our algorithm performs imputation from a pool of replacement subjects with similar values of both treatment and covariate(s) of interest, that is, from a risk-stratified sample. This stratification prior to imputation addresses the requirement of time-to-event analysis that censored observations are representative of all other observations in the risk group with similar exposure variables. We compared our risk-stratified imputation to case deletion and bootstrap imputation in a simulated dataset in which the covariate of interest (study withdrawal) was related to treatment. A motivating example from a recent clinical trial is also presented to demonstrate the utility of our method. In our simulations, risk-stratified imputation gives estimates of treatment effect comparable to bootstrap and auxiliary variable imputation while avoiding inaccuracies of the latter two in estimating the associated variance. Similar results were obtained in analysis of clinical trial data. Risk-stratified imputation has little advantage over other imputation methods when covariates of interest are not related to treatment. Risk-stratified imputation is intended for categorical covariates and may be sensitive to the width of the matching window if continuous covariates are used. The use of the risk-stratified

  5. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects in children

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, A.J.; Schiapachasse, V.; Guerrero, R.

    1982-05-01

    Three children with idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects are reported. The syndrome was recognized after birth and in the two oldest siblings, the cranial defects and subperiosteal bone formation resolved almost completely by age 4 and 6 years. The joint swelling and clubbing persisted and mild bone reabsorption of the distal phalanges became apparent at an older age. Two siblings and both parents had normal bone X-rays and no clubbing. This study confirms the association of cranial sutural defects and familial idopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  6. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4)…

  7. BEHAVIOR OF ARSENIC AND OTHER REDOX-SENSITIVE ELEMENTS IN CROWLEY LAKE, CA: A RESERVOIR IN THE LOS ANGELES AQUEDUCT SYSTEM. (R826202)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated arsenic concentrations in Crowley Lake derive from upstream geothermal inputs. We examined the water column of Crowley Lake under stratified and unstratified conditions, seeking evidence for algal uptake and transformation of arsenic and its deposition to and release fro...

  8. THE WESTERN LAKE SUPERIOR COMPARATIVE WATERSHED FRAMEWORK: A FIELD TEST OF GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEPENDENT VS. THRESHOLD-BASED GEOGRAPHICALLY-INDEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stratified random selection of watersheds allowed us to compare geographically-independent classification schemes based on watershed storage (wetland + lake area/watershed area) and forest fragmentation with a geographically-based classification scheme within the Northern Lakes a...

  9. THE WESTERN LAKE SUPERIOR COMPARATIVE WATERSHED FRAMEWORK: A FIELD TEST OF GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEPENDENT VS. THRESHOLD-BASED GEOGRAPHICALLY-INDEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stratified random selection of watersheds allowed us to compare geographically-independent classification schemes based on watershed storage (wetland + lake area/watershed area) and forest fragmentation with a geographically-based classification scheme within the Northern Lakes a...

  10. BEHAVIOR OF ARSENIC AND OTHER REDOX-SENSITIVE ELEMENTS IN CROWLEY LAKE, CA: A RESERVOIR IN THE LOS ANGELES AQUEDUCT SYSTEM. (R826202)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated arsenic concentrations in Crowley Lake derive from upstream geothermal inputs. We examined the water column of Crowley Lake under stratified and unstratified conditions, seeking evidence for algal uptake and transformation of arsenic and its deposition to and release fro...

  11. Nitrate and pesticides in surficial aquifers and trophic state and phosphorus sources for selected lakes, eastern Otter Tail County, west-central Minnesota, 1993-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Phosphorus at depth in Little Pine and Big Pine Lakes was mostly orthophosphate. During the fall turnover of the lakes, this orthophosphate may have circulated to near the lake surface and became an available nutrient for phytoplankton during the following growing season. The internal phosphorus load to Little Pine Lake may have been important because about three-fourths of the lake probably became stratified and anoxic in the hypolimnion. The internal phosphorus load to Big Pine Lake may not have been important because only a small portion of the lake became stratified and anoxic at depth.

  12. Basic limnology of fifty-one lakes in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Haberyan, Kurt A; Horn, Sally P; Umaña, Gerardo

    2003-03-01

    We visited 51 lakes in Costa Rica as part of a broad-based survey to document their physical and chemical characteristics and how these relate to the mode of formation and geographical distribution of the lakes. The four oxbow lakes were low in elevation and tended to be turbid, high in conductivity and CO2, but low in dissolved O2; one of these, L. Gandoca, had a hypolimnion essentially composed of sea water. These were similar to the four wetland lakes, but the latter instead had low conductivities and pH, and turbidity was often due to tannins rather than suspended sediments. The thirteen artificial lakes formed a very heterogenous group, whose features varied depending on local factors. The thirteen lakes dammed by landslides, lava flows, or lahars occurred in areas with steep slopes, and were more likely to be stratified than most other types of lakes. The eight lakes that occupy volcanic craters tended to be deep, stratified, clear, and cool; two of these, L. Hule and L. Río Cuarto, appeared to be oligomictic (tending toward meromictic). The nine glacial lakes, all located above 3440 m elevation near Cerro Chirripó, were clear, cold, dilute, and are probably polymictic. Cluster analysis resulted in three significant groups of lakes. Cluster 1 included four calcium-rich lakes (average 48 mg l-1), Cluster 2 included fourteen lakes with more Si than Ca+2 and higher Cl- than the other clusters, and Cluster 3 included the remaining thirty-three lakes that were generally less concentrated. Each cluster included lakes of various origins located in different geographical regions; these data indicate that, apart from the high-altitude glacial lakes and lakes in the Miravalles area, similarity in lake chemistry is independent of lake distribution.

  13. Stratified charge rotary engine for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, R. E.; Parente, A. M.; Hady, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    A development history, a current development status assessment, and a design feature and performance capabilities account are given for stratified-charge rotary engines applicable to aircraft propulsion. Such engines are capable of operating on Jet-A fuel with substantial cost savings, improved altitude capability, and lower fuel consumption by comparison with gas turbine powerplants. Attention is given to the current development program of a 400-hp engine scheduled for initial operations in early 1990. Stratified charge rotary engines are also applicable to ground power units, airborne APUs, shipboard generators, and vehicular engines.

  14. On Stratified Vortex Motions under Gravity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    AD-A156 930 ON STRATIFIED VORTEX MOTIONS UNDER GRAVITY (U) NAVAL i/i RESEARCH LAB WASHINGTON DC Y T FUNG 20 JUN 85 NRL-MIR-5564 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 20/4...Under Gravity LCn * Y. T. Fung Fluid Dynamics Branch - Marine Technologyv Division June 20, 1985 SO Cyk. NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY Washington, D.C...DN880-019 TITLE (Include Security Classification) On Stratified Vortex Motions Under Gravity 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Funa, Y.T. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b

  15. Stratified charge rotary engine for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, R. E.; Parente, A. M.; Hady, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    A development history, a current development status assessment, and a design feature and performance capabilities account are given for stratified-charge rotary engines applicable to aircraft propulsion. Such engines are capable of operating on Jet-A fuel with substantial cost savings, improved altitude capability, and lower fuel consumption by comparison with gas turbine powerplants. Attention is given to the current development program of a 400-hp engine scheduled for initial operations in early 1990. Stratified charge rotary engines are also applicable to ground power units, airborne APUs, shipboard generators, and vehicular engines.

  16. Lisp: A Language for Stratified Design,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    stratified design , lisp 2 0. AOST RACY (Conlonue enipwe** side I Poseawe end inif 7 60419& umb") We exhibit programs that illustrate the power of Lisp as a...in program design and to draw attention to the use of procedures to express abstractions. 4IDD R 1473 EDITION OF I NOV S SOSSOLE E UNCLASSIFIED rN 00...August 1987 Lisp: A Language for Stratified Design Harold Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman Abstract We exhibit programs that illustrate the power of Lisp

  17. Process of Hypertrophic Scar Formation: Expression of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing-Qing; Yang, Si-Si; Tan, Jiang-Lin; Luo, Gao-Xing; He, Wei-Feng; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic scar is one of the most common complications and often causes the disfigurement or deformity in burn or trauma patients. Therapeutic methods on hypertrophic scar treatment have limitations due to the poor understanding of mechanisms of hypertrophic scar formation. To throw light on the molecular mechanism of hypertrophic scar formation will definitely improve the outcome of the treatment. This study aimed to illustrate the negative role of eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6) in the process of human hypertrophic scar formation, and provide a possible indicator of hypertrophic scar treatment and a potential target molecule for hypertrophic scar. Methods: In the present study, we investigated the protein expression of eIF6 in the human hypertrophic scar of different periods by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Results: In the hypertrophic scar tissue, eIF6 expression was significantly decreased and absent in the basal layer of epidermis in the early period, and increased slowly and began to appear in the basal layer of epidermis by the scar formation time. Conclusions: This study confirmed that eIF6 expression was significantly related to the development of hypertrophic scar, and the eIF6 may be a target molecule for hypertrophic scar control or could be an indicator of the outcomes for other treatment modalities. PMID:26481747

  18. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical Steps for Preventing Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare cause of death among athletes, with deaths occurring in young, apparently healthy people. Differentiating HCM from conditioning hypertrophy is challenging. Routine detection involves family history, physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Keys to differential diagnosis include…

  19. Adult hypertrophic pyloric stenosis — a description in 1834?

    PubMed Central

    Stout, G.

    1983-01-01

    John Peacock MD was in practice in Darlington when he published his Practical Hints on the Treatment of Several Diseases in 1834. It is suggested that his cases described therein of `scirrhous pylorus' are adult hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. If authenticated, his work would predate the earliest description of this condition by the French pathologist, Professor Jean Cruveilhier in 1835. PMID:6350566

  20. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical Steps for Preventing Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare cause of death among athletes, with deaths occurring in young, apparently healthy people. Differentiating HCM from conditioning hypertrophy is challenging. Routine detection involves family history, physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Keys to differential diagnosis include…

  1. Difficulty of diagnosing infected hypertrophic pseudarthrosis by radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjipavlou, A.; Lisbona, R.; Rosenthall, L.

    1983-02-01

    Hypertrophic pseudarthrosis was studied with /sup 99m/Tc MDP and /sup 67/Ga citrate in 11 patients. Two of the 11 pseudarthroses were complicated by infection. A high concentration of both radiopharmaceuticals was obtained at all 11 sites and their distribution patterns were identical. It was therefore impossible to distinguish the infected from the noninfected pseudarthroses by using /sup 67/Ga.

  2. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, B.J.; Tajik, A.J.; Ruttenberg, H.D.; Graham, T.P.; Atwood, G.F.; Victorica, B.E.; Lie, J.T.; Roberts, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure.

  3. Hypertrophic scar in a dog: histological and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Avallone, Giancarlo; Bonaldi, Martina; Caniatti, Mario; Lombardo, Rocco

    2011-08-01

    An adult male bullmastiff dog was treated for paraparesis and ataxia due to discospondylitis and disc herniation. At this time, the dog had a nonhealing ulcer between the pads of the left hindfoot. At re-evaluation, the dog had developed a large exophitic mass in the previously ulcerated area. Cytological examination revealed occasional spindle cells with mild atypia, and a soft tissue tumour was suspected. The mass was excised and submitted for histology. The lesion was characterized by superficial ulceration, an intermediate layer of granulation tissue and a deep portion containing vertically orientated capillaries and perpendicularly arranged fibroblasts and collagen. The histological features led to a diagnosis of hypertrophic scar. Eight weeks after surgery, the lesion recurred and was treated with an intralesional injection of methylprednisolone acetate. The lesion regressed in 10 days, but recurred after 3 months following severe self-trauma. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are two types of exuberant scarring reported in human beings, the pathogenesis of which is still unclear but seems to involve several cytokines, growth factors and inflammatory cells. The histological features identified in this case paralleled those reported in hypertrophic scars in humans. In this case, intralesional corticosteroid therapy was useful in the management of the lesion, but the severe self-trauma could have influenced the recurrence. Even if uncommon, hypertrophic scar should be included among the differential diagnoses of spindle cell tumours in dogs. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology. © 2011 ESVD and ACVD.

  4. A case of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a Belgian blue cow

    PubMed Central

    Guyot, Hugues; Sandersen, Charlotte; Rollin, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    A 12-year-old cow was presented with chronic respiratory disease and lameness. Chronic pleuritis, pneumonia, and bronchial carcinoma were found as well as periosteal proliferation on limb bones. Ancillary tests and necropsy confirmed a combined pathology of pulmonary inflammation and neoplasm, and hypertrophic pulmonary osteopathy. PMID:22654134

  5. Sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: genetic profile in a Portuguese population.

    PubMed

    Brito, Dulce; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Vale Pereira, Sónia; Silva, Doroteia; Diogo, António Nunes; Madeira, Hugo

    2012-09-01

    Sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has heterogeneous phenotypic expressions, of which sudden cardiac death is the most feared. A genetic diagnosis is essential to identify subjects at risk in each family. The spectrum of disease-causing mutations in the Portuguese population is unknown. Seventy-seven unrelated probands with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were systematically screened for mutations by PCR and sequencing of five sarcomeric genes: MYBPC3, MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3 and MYL2. Familial cosegregation analysis was performed in most patients. Thirty-four different mutations were identified in 41 (53%) index patients, 71% with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The most frequently involved gene was MYBPC3 (66%) with 22 different mutations (8 novel) in 27 patients, followed by MYH7 (22%), TNNT2 (12%) and TNNI3 (2.6%). In three patients (7%), two mutations were found in MYBPC3 and/or MYH7. Additionally, 276 relatives were screened, leading to the identification of a mean of three other affected relatives for each pedigree with the familial form of the disease. Disease-associated mutations were identified mostly in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, corroborating the idea that rarely studied genes may be implicated in sporadic forms. Private mutations are the rule, MYBPC3 being the most commonly involved gene. Mutations in MYBPC3 and MYH7 accounted for most cases of sarcomere-related disease. Multiple mutations in these genes may occur, which highlights the importance of screening both. The detection of novel mutations strongly suggests that all coding regions should be systematically screened. Genotyping in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy enables a more precise diagnosis of the disease, with implications for risk stratification and genetic counseling. Copyright © 2011 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Direct multiangle solution for poorly stratified atmospheres

    Treesearch

    Vladimir Kovalev; Cyle Wold; Alexander Petkov; Wei Min Hao

    2012-01-01

    The direct multiangle solution is considered, which allows improving the scanning lidar-data-inversion accuracy when the requirement of the horizontally stratified atmosphere is poorly met. The signal measured at zenith or close to zenith is used as a core source for extracting optical characteristics of the atmospheric aerosol loading. The multiangle signals are used...

  7. Characteristics of Stratified Bedded Pack Dairy Manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    "Compost" dairy barns are a relatively new housing system that generates a deep (0.9 to 1.5 m), stratified bedded pack (SBP) manure source. Bedding composed of sawdust, wood chips, or crop residues accumulates as additions are made to maintain a dry surface. Surface drying is promoted by a combinati...

  8. Broadband acoustic quantification of stratified turbulence.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Andone C; Geyer, W Rockwell; Scully, Malcolm E

    2013-07-01

    High-frequency broadband acoustic scattering techniques have enabled the remote, high-resolution imaging and quantification of highly salt-stratified turbulence in an estuary. Turbulent salinity spectra in the stratified shear layer have been measured acoustically and by in situ turbulence sensors. The acoustic frequencies used span 120-600 kHz, which, for the highly stratified and dynamic estuarine environment, correspond to wavenumbers in the viscous-convective subrange (500-2500 m(-1)). The acoustically measured spectral levels are in close agreement with spectral levels measured with closely co-located micro-conductivity probes. The acoustically measured spectral shapes allow discrimination between scattering dominated by turbulent salinity microstructure and suspended sediments or swim-bladdered fish, the two primary sources of scattering observed in the estuary in addition to turbulent salinity microstructure. The direct comparison of salinity spectra inferred acoustically and by the in situ turbulence sensors provides a test of both the acoustic scattering model and the quantitative skill of acoustical remote sensing of turbulence dissipation in a strongly sheared and salt-stratified estuary.

  9. Oscillations in a Linearly Stratified Salt Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Our physics students like to watch a ball bouncing underwater. They do this by dropping a weighted plastic ball into a 1000-ml cylinder filled with a linearly stratified salt-water solution at room temperature. The ball oscillates and comes to rest at about mid-depth. Its motion is analogous to the damped vertical oscillations of a mass hanging…

  10. Dynamics of Vorticity Defects in Stratified Shear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-19

    conserved quantities - Casimirs . For 2D homogeneous fluid any functional of vorticity is a conserved quantity. Enstrophy - a representative of vortex...conserved. For stratified ‘defects’ one instead has the any functional of buoyancy and product of vorticity with any buoyancy functional as the Casimirs

  11. Oscillations in a Linearly Stratified Salt Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Our physics students like to watch a ball bouncing underwater. They do this by dropping a weighted plastic ball into a 1000-ml cylinder filled with a linearly stratified salt-water solution at room temperature. The ball oscillates and comes to rest at about mid-depth. Its motion is analogous to the damped vertical oscillations of a mass hanging…

  12. The Stratified Adaptive Computerized Ability Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    This report describes the stratified adaptive (stradaptive) test as a strategy for tailoring an ability test to individual differences in testee ability; administration of the test is controlled by a time-shared computer system. The rationale of this method is described as it derives from Binet's strategy of ability test administration and…

  13. Mixing efficiency of turbulent stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, B. L.; Scotti, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Small-scale mixing in the stratified interior of the ocean is a fundamental, but poorly characterized, controlling factor of the global Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC). The mixing efficiency in the ocean has typically been assumed to be 20%, which is used as a basis to estimate the required turbulent dissipation to support the ocean diapycnal buoyancy flux. In this talk, we use DNS datasets to calculate the mixing efficiency in different classes of stratified turbulent flows. In particular, we compare flows forced thermodynamically by production of Available Potential Energy (APE) at a boundary, such as horizontal convection (a simple model for an ocean forced by differential surface heating) and flows that are forced mechanically by surface stresses. The mixing efficiency is calculated based on the irreversible diapycnal flux of buoyancy (Winters and D'Asaro, 1996; Scotti et al., 2006) instead of the more customary turbulent buoyancy flux, thereby isolating mixing from reversible processes (e.g., internal waves). For mechanically-driven flows, profiles of mixing efficiency vs. buoyancy Reynolds number are in agreement with accepted values for stratified turbulent shear flows. However, for flows in which mixing is driven in part or fully by thermodynamic forcing and an excess of APE, DNS results show much higher values of the mixing efficiency, approaching unity for horizontal convection. Implications of these results for the energy budget of the MOC are discussed. Note: The DNS data sets of turbulent stratified channel flow are provided courtesy of M. Garcia-Villalba and J. C. del Alamo.

  14. Diagram of Lake Stratification on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-01

    This diagram presents some of the processes and clues related to a long-ago lake on Mars that became stratified, with the shallow water richer in oxidants than deeper water was. The sedimentary rocks deposited within a lake in Mars' Gale Crater more than three billion years ago differ from each other in a pattern that matches what is seen in lakes on Earth. As sediment-bearing water flows into a lake, bedding thickness and particle size progressively decrease as sediment is deposited in deeper and deeper water as seen in examples of thick beds (PIA19074) from shallowest water, thin beds (PIA19075) from deeper water and even thinner beds (PIA19828) from deepest water. At sites on lower Mount Sharp, inside the crater, measurements of chemical and mineral composition by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover reveal a clear correspondence between the physical characteristics of sedimentary rock from different parts of the lake and how strongly oxidized the sediments were. Rocks with textures indicating that the sediments were deposited near the edge of a lake have more strongly oxidized composition than rocks with textures indicating sedimentation in deep water. For example, the iron mineral hematite is more oxidized than the iron mineral magnetite. An explanation for why such chemical stratification occurs in a lake is that the water closer to the surface is more exposed to oxidizing effects of oxygen in the atmosphere and ultraviolet light. On Earth, a stratified lake with a distinct boundary between oxidant-rich shallows and oxidant-poor depths provides a diversity of environments suited to different types of microbes. If Mars has ever hosted microbial live, the stratified lake at Gale Crater may have similarly provided a range of different habitats for life. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21500

  15. Optimizing fluid resuscitation in hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian G A; Gonzalez, Katherine W; Boda, Sushanth R; Thomas, Priscilla G; Sherman, Ashley K; St Peter, Shawn D

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) is the most common diagnosis requiring surgery in infants. Electrolytes are used as a marker of resuscitation for these patients prior to general anesthesia induction. Often multiple fluid boluses and electrolyte panels are needed, delaying operative intervention. We have attempted to predict the amount of IV fluid boluses needed for electrolyte correction based on initial values. A single center retrospective review of all patients diagnosed with HPS from 2008 through 2014 was performed. Abnormal electrolytes were defined as chloride <100mmol/L, bicarbonate ≥30mmol/L or potassium >5.2 or <3.1mmol/L. Patients with abnormal electrolytes were resuscitated with 20ml/kg saline boluses and continuous fluids at 1.5 times maintenance rate. During the study period 542 patients were identified with HPS. Of the 505 who were analyzed 202 patients had electrolyte abnormalities requiring IV fluid resuscitation above maintenance, and 303 patients had normal electrolytes at time of diagnosis. Weight on presentation was significantly lower in the patients with abnormal electrolytes (3.8 vs 4.1kg, p<0.01). Length of stay was significantly longer in the patients with electrolyte abnormalities, 2.6 vs 1.9days (p<0.01). Fluid given was higher over the entire hospital stay for patients with abnormal electrolytes (106 vs 91ml/kg/d, p<0.01). The number of electrolyte panels drawn was significantly higher in patients with initial electrolyte abnormalities, 2.8 vs 1.3 (p<0.01). Chloride was the most sensitive and specific indicator of the need for multiple saline boluses. Using an ROC curve, parameters of initial Cl(-)80mmol/L and the need for 3 or more boluses AUC was 0.71. Modifying the parameters to initial Cl(-) ≤97mmol/L and 2 boluses AUC was 0.65. A patient with an initial Cl(-)85 will need three 20ml/kg boluses 73% (95% CI 52-88%) of the time. A patient with an initial Cl(-) ≤97 will need two 20ml/kg boluses at a rate of 73% (95% CI 64

  16. Lake Tahoe

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the Lake Tahoe watershed, EPA's protection efforts, water quality issues, effects of climate change, Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), EPA-sponsored projects, list of partner agencies.

  17. Flow and transport within a coastal aquifer adjacent to a stratified water body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, Imri; Yechieli, Yoseph; Eyal, Shalev; Gavrieli, Ittai; Gvirtzman, Haim

    2016-04-01

    The existence of a freshwater-saltwater interface and the circulation flow of saltwater beneath the interface is a well-known phenomenon found at coastal aquifers. This flow is a natural phenomenon that occurs due to density differences between fresh groundwater and the saltwater body. The goals of this research are to use analytical, numerical, and physical models in order to examine the configuration of the freshwater-saltwater interface and the density-driven flow patterns within a coastal aquifer adjacent to long-term stratified saltwater bodies (e.g. meromictic lake). Such hydrological systems are unique, as they consist of three different water types: the regional fresh groundwater, and low and high salinity brines forming the upper and lower water layers of the stratified water body, respectively. This research also aims to examine the influence of such stratification on hydrogeological processes within the coastal aquifer. The coastal aquifer adjacent to the Dead Sea, under its possible future meromictic conditions, serves as an ideal example to examine these processes. The results show that adjacent to a stratified saltwater body three interfaces between three different water bodies are formed, and that a complex flow system, controlled by the density differences, is created, where three circulation cells are developed. These results are significantly different from the classic circulation cell that is found adjacent to non-stratified water bodies (lakes or oceans). In order to obtain a more generalized insight into the groundwater behavior adjacent to a stratified water body, we used the numerical model to perform sensitivity analysis. The hydrological system was found be sensitive to three dimensionless parameters: dimensionless density (i.e. the relative density of the three water bodies'); dimensionless thickness (i.e. the ratio between the relative thickness of the upper layer and the whole thickness of the lake); and dimensionless flux. The results

  18. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry (HCMR): The rationale and design of an international, observational study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.; Appelbaum, Evan; Desai, Milind Y.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; DiMarco, John P.; Friedrich, Matthias G.; Geller, Nancy; Heckler, Sarahfaye; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ivey, Elizabeth A.; Keleti, Julianna; Kim, Dong-Yun; Kolm, Paul; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Maron, Martin S.; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Piechnik, Stefan; Watkins, Hugh; Weintraub, William S.; Wu, Pan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic heart disease with a frequency as high as 1 in 200. In many cases, HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding the different components of the sarcomere apparatus. HCM is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), myofibrillar disarray, and myocardial fibrosis. The phenotypic expression is quite variable. While the majority of patients with HCM are asymptomatic, serious consequences are experienced in a subset of affected individuals who present initially with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or progress to refractory heart failure (HF). The HCMR study is a National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 2750 patient, 41 site, international registry and natural history study designed to address limitations in extant evidence to improve prognostication in HCM (NCT01915615). In addition to collection of standard demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic variables, patients will undergo state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for assessment of left ventricular (LV) mass and volumes as well as replacement scarring and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, genetic and biomarker analysis will be performed. HCMR has the potential to change the paradigm of risk stratification in HCM, using novel markers to identify those at higher risk. PMID:26299218

  19. Analysis of 8 sarcomeric candidate genes for feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Meurs, K M; Norgard, M M; Kuan, M; Haggstrom, J; Kittleson, M

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats. Causative mutations have been identified in the Maine Coon (MC) and Ragdoll breed in the cardiac myosin binding protein C gene (MYBPC3). HCM is thought to be inherited in other breeds. That a causative mutation for HCM in the British Shorthair (BSH), Norwegian Forest (NWF), Siberian, Sphynx, or MC cats would be identified in the exonic and splice site regions of 1 of 8 genes associated with human familial HCM. Three affected BSH, NWF, Siberians, Sphynx, 2 MC (without the known MC mutation), and 2 Domestic Shorthair cats (controls) were studied. Prospective, observational study. Exonic and splice site regions of the genes encoding the proteins cardiac troponin I, troponin T, MYBPC3, cardiac essential myosin light chain, cardiac regulatory myosin light chain, alpha tropomyosin, actin, and beta-myosin heavy chain were sequenced. Sequences were compared for nucleotide changes between affected cats, the published DNA sequences, and control cats. Changes were considered to be causative for HCM if they involved a conserved amino acid and changed the amino acid to a different polarity, acid-base status, or structure. A causative mutation for HCM was not identified, although several single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected. Mutations within these cardiac genes do not appear to be the only cause of HCM in these breeds. Evaluation of additional cardiac genes is warranted to identify additional molecular causes of this feline cardiac disease.

  20. A novel phylogenetic clade of picocyanobacteria from the Mazurian lakes (Poland) reflects the early ontogeny of glacial lakes.

    PubMed

    Jasser, Iwona; Królicka, Adriana; Karnkowska-Ishikawa, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The community of picocyanobacteria inhabiting the Great Mazurian Lakes system (comprising lakes ranging from mesotrophic to hypertrophic) is dominated by phycoerythrin-rich cells, which outnumber phycocyanin-rich cells, even in hypertrophic lakes. The genetic diversity and phylogeny of 43 strains of picocyanobacteria isolated from four Mazurian lakes were studied by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and cpcBA-IGS operon. Phylogenetic analyses assigned some of the strains to several previously described clusters (Groups A, B, C, E and I) and revealed the existence of a novel clade, Group M (Mazurian), which exhibited a low level of similarity to the other clusters. Both phycocyanin and phycoerythrin picocyanobacteria were assigned to this clade based on an analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. The cpcBA sequence analysis assigned only phycocyanin strains to Group M, whereas the phycoerythrin strains from the M ribogroup were assigned to Groups B and E. We hypothesize that Group M originally contained only phycocyanin picocyanobacteria. The phycoerythrin found in strains belonging to ribogroup M seems to have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer as an adaptation to the changing environment early in the ontogeny of these glacial lakes.

  1. Wakes of Maneuvering Bodies in Stratified Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voropayev, S. I.; Fernando, H. J.

    2007-05-01

    We present the results of experimental/theoretical studies on large momentum eddies generated in late wakes of unsteady moving self-propelled bodies in stratified fluids. The experiments were conducted with scaled submarine model at high Reynolds numbers (50,000), corresponding to the fully turbulent flow regime. Dye visualization and PIV were used for flow diagnostics. When a self-propelled body makes a maneuver, e.g. accelerates, it imparts net momentum on the surrounding fluid. We show that in a stratified fluid this leads to impulsive momentum wakes with large, long-lived coherent vortices in the late flows, which may be used as a signature for identification of submarine wakes in oceanic thermocline. First, we consider dynamics and properties of such wakes in a linearly stratified fluid and present a model that permits to predict the main flow characteristics. Second, we consider wakes in a two layer stratified fluid (analog of the upper ocean) and show that such wakes may penetrate to the water surface; we present a model for this phenomenon and propose criteria for the penetration of wake signatures to the water surface in terms of main governing parameters (signature contrast versus confinement number). Finally, we consider the evolution of such momentum wake eddies in the field of decaying background turbulence, which mimics the oceanic thermocline, and show that for the flow configuration studied the contrast number remains sufficiently large and detectable wake imprints survive for a long period of time. Some pertinent estimates for submarines cruising in the upper ocean are also given. For more details see [1-3]. This study was supported by grant from the Office of Naval Research. 1. Voropayev S.I., Fernando H.J.S., Smirnov S.A. & Morrison R.J. 2006. On surface signatures generated by submersed momentum sources. Phys. Fluids, under revision. 2. Voropayev S.I., Fernando H.J.S. & Morrison R.J. 2006. Dipolar eddies in a stratified turbulent flow. J. Fluid

  2. Lakes and lake-like waters of the Hawaiian Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maciolek, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This summary of Hawaiian lacustrine limnology is based on 12 years of field and literature surveys of archipelagic inland waters. Lakes here are distinguished from other standing waters by limits on surface oceanic area (> 0.1 ha) and depth (> 2 m), and by the absence of flatural surface oceanic connection. A variety of extinct and existing water bodies, sometimes referred to as lakes, are noted. Six lakes are described. Five of them are in crater basins, 3 are freshwater, and 2 are elevated (highest = 3969 m). The scarcity of elevated lakes results from general permeability of the substrata. Among the 6 lakes, surface areas range from 0.22 to 88 ha and maximum depths from 3 to 248 m. Naturally occurring aquatic biota generally is low in species diversity except for phytoplankton; fishes and submersed vascular plants are absent. Two lowland lakes, freshwater Green (Wai a Pele) and saline Kauhak6, are described for the first time. Profundal Kauhak6, 248 m deep, has a surface area of only 0.35 ha, which results in an extraordinary relative depth of 370%. It is permanently stratified, a condition apparently due primarily to the unique morphometry of its basin. 

  3. Lake Powell

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Lake Powell     View Larger Image ... format (14.42 mb)   This true-color image over Lake Powell was acquired by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) in late March 2000. Lake Powell was formed with the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, on ...

  4. Stable isotope composition of Earth's large lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasechko, S.; Gibson, J. J.; YI, Y.; Birks, S. J.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2011-12-01

    Lakes cover about three percent of Earth's continental area. Large lakes can significantly influence lake shore and regional climates by increasing specific humidity during evaporation and by moderating air temperatures. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen can be used to quantify lake evaporation, providing a supplementary and often cost-advantageous alternative to conventional hydrologic approaches that require over lake monitoring. Further, stable isotopes in lake sediments are an established tool in paleolimnology; however, interpreting changes to a lake's past isotope composition requires a comprehensive understanding of contemporary controls. Here, δ18O and δ2H values of water in modern lakes exceeding roughly five hundred square kilometres are compiled (n > 35). Voluminous and seasonally mixed lakes - such as the North American Great Lakes - have the most homogenous stable isotope compositions, while perennially-stratified and shallow lakes show greater variability. A rudimentary stable isotope mass balance is used to assess evaporation fluxes from large lakes on Earth. The approach taken simultaneously constrains evaporation outputs for both oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes by accounting for lake effects on the overlying atmosphere. Model development highlights important considerations such as isotopic stratification (Tanganyika), disequilibrium isotopic mass balances (Baikal), and non-steady hydrologic balances. Further, the isotope composition of Earth's continental surface water reservoir is calculated. This value - weighted to volume - is δ18O = -7.5±1.7 per mille relative to standard mean ocean water. The compiled data may be a useful tracer of continental evaporate in global atmospheric water cycle studies and could be coupled to climate models capable of incorporating oxygen-18 and deuterium tracers to improve or validate calculations of lake effects on regional water cycling.

  5. Competing Risks Regression for Stratified Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingqing; Latouche, Aurelien; Rocha, Vanderson; Fine, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Summary For competing risks data, the Fine–Gray proportional hazards model for subdistribution has gained popularity for its convenience in directly assessing the effect of covariates on the cumulative incidence function. However, in many important applications, proportional hazards may not be satisfied, including multicenter clinical trials, where the baseline subdistribution hazards may not be common due to varying patient populations. In this article, we consider a stratified competing risks regression, to allow the baseline hazard to vary across levels of the stratification covariate. According to the relative size of the number of strata and strata sizes, two stratification regimes are considered. Using partial likelihood and weighting techniques, we obtain consistent estimators of regression parameters. The corresponding asymptotic properties and resulting inferences are provided for the two regimes separately. Data from a breast cancer clinical trial and from a bone marrow transplantation registry illustrate the potential utility of the stratified Fine–Gray model. PMID:21155744

  6. Multiscale equations for strongly stratified turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Greg; Rocha, Cesar; Julien, Keith; Caulfield, Colm-Cille

    2016-11-01

    Strongly stratified turbulent shear flows are of fundamental importance owing to their widespread occurrence and their impact on diabatic mixing, yet direct numerical simulations of such flows remain challenging. Here, a reduced, multiscale description of turbulent shear flows in the presence of strong stable density stratification is derived via asymptotic analysis of the governing Boussinesq equations. The analysis explicitly recognizes the occurrence of dynamics on disparate spatiotemoporal scales, and yields simplified partial differential equations governing the coupled evolution of slowly-evolving small aspect-ratio ('pancake') modes and isotropic, strongly non-hydrostatic stratified-shear (e.g. Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability modes. The reduced model is formally valid in the physically-relevant regime in which the aspect-ratio of the pancake structures tends to zero in direct proportion to the horizontal Froude number. Relative to the full Boussinesq equations, the model offers both computational and conceptual advantages.

  7. Nitrogen transformations in stratified aquatic microbial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Revsbech, Niels Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2006-11-01

    New analytical methods such as advanced molecular techniques and microsensors have resulted in new insights about how nitrogen transformations in stratified microbial systems such as sediments and biofilms are regulated at a microm-mm scale. A large and ever-expanding knowledge base about nitrogen fixation, nitrification, denitrification, and dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium, and about the microorganisms performing the processes, has been produced by use of these techniques. During the last decade the discovery of anammmox bacteria and migrating, nitrate accumulating bacteria performing dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium have given new dimensions to the understanding of nitrogen cycling in nature, and the occurrence of these organisms and processes in stratified microbial communities will be described in detail.

  8. Low Mach Number Modeling of Stratified Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Nonaka, A.; Zingale, M.

    2015-06-01

    Low Mach number equation sets approximate the equations of motion of a compressible fluid by filtering out the sound waves, which allows the system to evolve on the advective rather than the acoustic time scale. Depending on the degree of approximation, low Mach number models retain some sub set of possible compressible effects. In this paper we give an overview of low Mach number methods for modeling stratified flows arising in astrophysics and atmospheric science as well as low Mach number reacting flows. We discuss how elements from the different fields are combined to form MAESTRO, a code for modeling low Mach number stratified flows with general equations of state, reactions and time-varying stratification.

  9. Deglacial and lake level fluctuation history recorded in cores, Beaver Lake, Upper Peninsula, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Whitman, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    Sediment cores collected from the littoral and pelagic zones of Beaver Lake, Michigan record fluctuations in the water level of Lake Superior. Beaver Lake is a small 300 ha lake in Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (PRNL) now separated from Lake Superior by a dune-capped barrier bar. Cores were collected using a vibracorer from a lake-ice platform in February 1997. A 2.85 m long core in 10 m of water contains well-sorted sand, rhythmites, peat, interbedded sand and gyttja, and is capped with 1 m of massive gyttja. A 9480 BP AMS age from the basal sand provides a minimum deglacial date for the area. Further analysis indicates a sand-dominated depositional environment from a low lake stand at approximately 8500 BP to present. An approximate 8800 BP red to gray sediment color transition records either the cessation of meltwater input from Lake Agassiz or receding ice, while a younger similarly colored transition, 6600 BP in age, likely records sediment reworking in the coastal zone. Four AMS ages on peat range from 8520 to 7340 BP and are indicative of the Houghton low phase. Burial of the peat by stratified sand and gyttja after 7340 BP indicates a rising lake level. Peat at a higher level in the lake basin, encountered in shallow littoral cores, ranges in age from 6800 to 6420 BP, which estimates a 0.91 m rise/century in lake level to the Nipissing level by 5000 BP.

  10. Turbulent Mixing in Stably Stratified Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    method of obtaining Eb, suggested by Tseng and Ferziger [2001], involves taking the probability density function (PDF) of pt, which can be thought of...Sea Research, 34:1655-1665,1987. Lucinda H. Shih, Jeffrey R. Koseff, Gregory N. Ivey, and Joel H. Ferziger . Parameterization of turbulent fluxes...and J. H. Ferziger . Mixing and available potential energy in stratified flows. Phys. Fluids, 13(5):1281 1293, 2001. J. Turner. The influence of

  11. Stably Stratified Flow in a Shallow Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrt, L.

    2017-01-01

    Stratified nocturnal flow above and within a small valley of approximately 12-m depth and a few hundred metres width is examined as a case study, based on a network of 20 sonic anemometers and a central 20-m tower with eight levels of sonic anemometers. Several regimes of stratified flow over gentle topography are conceptually defined for organizing the data analysis and comparing with the existing literature. In our case study, a marginal cold pool forms within the shallow valley in the early evening but yields to larger ambient wind speeds after a few hours, corresponding to stratified terrain-following flow where the flow outside the valley descends to the valley floor. The terrain-following flow lasts about 10 h and then undergoes transition to an intermittent marginal cold pool towards the end of the night when the larger-scale flow collapses. During this 10-h period, the stratified terrain-following flow is characterized by a three-layer structure, consisting of a thin surface boundary layer of a few metres depth on the valley floor, a deeper boundary layer corresponding to the larger-scale flow, and an intermediate transition layer with significant wind-directional shear and possible advection of lee turbulence that is generated even for the gentle topography of our study. The flow in the valley is often modulated by oscillations with a typical period of 10 min. Cold events with smaller turbulent intensity and duration of tens of minutes move through the observational domain throughout the terrain-following period. One of these events is examined in detail.

  12. Accurate confidence limits for stratified clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Chris J

    2013-09-10

    For stratified 2 × 2 tables, standard approximate confidence limits can perform poorly from a strict frequentist perspective, even for moderate-sized samples, yet they are routinely used. In this paper, I show how to use importance sampling to compute highly accurate limits in reasonable time. The methodology is very general and simple to implement, and orders of magnitude are faster than existing alternatives. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Evolution of a forced stratified mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, J.; Fernando, H. J. S.; Kit, E.

    2007-06-01

    Laboratory measurements were carried out in a spatially developing stably stratified shear layer generated downstream of a splitter plate. The instabilities were controlled using a flapper spanning the entire shear layer, with the flapper forced at the fastest growing frequency of the primary [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability. The measurements were taken as the KH instabilities roll up, break down, and degenerate into stratified turbulence. Both stratified and homogeneous shear layers were considered, the latter acting as the "baseline" case. The measurements included the streamwise and vertical velocities (made using X-wire hot film probes), which allowed calculation of the mean and rms velocities, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation, and TKE production. The density and its gradients were measured using miniature conductivity probes. The measurements and flow visualization elicited interesting features of KH evolution, namely that KH billows may be turbulent from the onset, the TKE dissipation is largest at early stages of evolution, the production of TKE is a maximum at the breakdown of billows, the decay of turbulence to fossilized motions and concomitant formation of fine (layered) structure occur rapidly after the breakdown of billows, and episodic rebirth of (zombie) turbulence develops before a final permanently fossilized state is achieved.

  14. Thermal mixing in a stratified environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Damian; Cotel, Aline

    1999-11-01

    Laboratory experiments of a thermal impinging on a stratified interface have been performed. The thermal was released from a cylindrical reservoir located at the bottom of a Lucite tank. The stratified interface was created by filling the tank with two different saline solutions. The density of the lower layer is greater than that of the upper layer and the thermal fluid, thereby creating a stable stratification. A pH indicator, phenolphthalein, is used to visualize and quantify the amount of mixing produced by the impingement of the thermal at the interface. The upper layer contains a mixture of water, salt and sodium hydroxide. The thermal fluid is composed of water, sulfuric acid and phenolphthalein. When the thermal entrains and mixes fluid from the upper layer, a chemical reaction takes place, and the resulting mixed fluid is now visible. The ratio of base to acid, called the equivalence ratio, was varied throughout the experiments, as well as the Richardson number. The Richardson number is the ratio of potential to kinetic energy, and is based on the thermal quantities at the interface. Results indicate that the amount of mixing produced is proportional to the Richardson number raised to the -3/2 power. Previous experiments (Zhang and Cotel 1999) revealed that the entrainment rate of a thermal in a stratified environment follows the same power law.

  15. Innovative Therapies in the Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Martha H.; Amini, Sadegh; Valins, Whitney

    2010-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are benign fibrous overgrowths of scar tissue, which results from an abnormal response to trauma. Several therapeutic modalities have been described for the treatment and prevention of these conditions, but the optimal management approach has not yet been defined. This article reviews the most recent, innovative, therapeutic strategies for the management of hypertrophic scars and keloids, including mitomycin-C, tamoxifen citrate, methotrexate, imidazolaquinolines, retinoids, calcineurin inhibitors, phenylakylamine calcium channel blockers, botulinum toxin, vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, interleukin-10, manosa-6-phosphate, transforming growth factor beta, antihistamines, and prostaglandin E2. No consensus in treatment regimens has been reached due to the limited evidence-based information found in the literature. Most therapeutic options have potential effectiveness as both monotherapy and as combination therapy. However, recent reports offer novel modalities that may approach scarring from different angles. PMID:20725565

  16. Atrial Myxoma in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Mahmoud; Hayek, Salim; Williams, Byron R.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most common primary cardiac tumor. Patients with atrial myxoma typically present with obstructive, embolic, or systemic symptoms; asymptomatic presentation is very rare. To our knowledge, isolated association of atrial myxoma with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been reported only once in the English-language medical literature. We report the case of an asymptomatic 71-year-old woman with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in whom a left atrial mass was incidentally identified on cardiac magnetic resonance images. After surgical excision of the mass and partial excision of the left atrial septum, histopathologic analysis confirmed the diagnosis of atrial myxoma. The patient was placed on preventive implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy and remained asymptomatic. The management of asymptomatic cardiac myxoma is a topic of debate, because no reports definitively favor either conservative or surgical measures. PMID:24082380

  17. Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Persian cat.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Tiffany L; Jennings, Ryan N

    2017-07-01

    Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) are rare causes of primary pulmonary hypertension in humans, and, in 2016, were reported in dogs. A 1-y-old, neutered male Persian cat was presented for autopsy after sudden death several hours after grooming. Grossly, the lungs were mottled red-to-pink, contained rubbery-to-firm nodular foci, and there was moderate-to-marked left-sided cardiomegaly and left atrial dilation, consistent with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Microscopically, there was multifocal to regionally extensive capillary proliferation within pulmonary alveolar septa and around respiratory bronchioles, with nodular aggregates of densely arranged capillaries that replaced pulmonary alveolar spaces. Rare occlusive venous remodeling was identified in Verhoeff-van Gieson-stained sections. The gross and microscopic changes were consistent with PCH with rare features of PVOD. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was interpreted as potentially contributing to the cause of death, but unrelated to the pulmonary vascular proliferation.

  18. A Tension-Based Model Distinguishes Hypertrophic versus Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Davis, L Craig; Correll, Robert N; Makarewich, Catherine A; Schwanekamp, Jennifer A; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Wang, Dan; York, Allen J; Wu, Haodi; Houser, Steven R; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Regnier, Michael; Metzger, Joseph M; Wu, Joseph C; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-05-19

    The heart either hypertrophies or dilates in response to familial mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, which are responsible for contraction and pumping. These mutations typically alter calcium-dependent tension generation within the sarcomeres, but how this translates into the spectrum of hypertrophic versus dilated cardiomyopathy is unknown. By generating a series of cardiac-specific mouse models that permit the systematic tuning of sarcomeric tension generation and calcium fluxing, we identify a significant relationship between the magnitude of tension developed over time and heart growth. When formulated into a computational model, the integral of myofilament tension development predicts hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies in mice associated with essentially any sarcomeric gene mutations, but also accurately predicts human cardiac phenotypes from data generated in induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived myocytes from familial cardiomyopathy patients. This tension-based model also has the potential to inform pharmacologic treatment options in cardiomyopathy patients.

  19. [Risk stratification of sudden death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 2016].

    PubMed

    Dubourg, Olivier; Charron, Philippe; Sirol, Marc; Siam-Tsieu, Valérie; Mansencal, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are at an increased risk of death from many causes and sudden cardiac death is one of them. The study of the sudden cardiac death of patients with HCM has allowed the identification of risk factors and among them major risk factor are: family history of sudden cardiac death, the occurrence of syncope/dizziness, the existence of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia an abnormal blood pressure response during stress test, presence of severe left ventricular hypertrophy≥30mm. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death is essential, for symptomatic or asymptomatic HCM patients. Two approaches are possible: the classical approach or risk stratification methods with major risk factors and the new approach using the risk-calculator recommended by the ESC. Both methods are not in opposition but complementary. The risk stratification in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy should be still improved to be sure that only the most high-risk patients receive an implantable cardiac defibrillator.

  20. Effects of Noscarna™ on hypertrophic scarring in the rabbit ear model: histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Won; Ku, Sae Kwang; Cho, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Hiep, Tran Tuan; Han, Sang Duk; Kim, Bo Gyun; Kang, Min Kyung; Do, Eui Seon; Jun, Joon Ho; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Sohn, Young Taek; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of silicone-based gel on the healing of hypertrophic scars in the rabbit ear model. After 4-week application of silicone-based gel containing allantoin, dexpanthenol and heparin (Noscarna™) to scars in a rabbit ear model of hypertrophic scarring, significant improvements in hypertrophic scar healing and a great loss of skin pigment were observed compared to the non-treated control, base or silicone control-treated scars. Furthermore, histological analysis of Noscarna™-treated scars revealed a significant reduction in scar elevation index (SEI), anterior skin and epithelial thicknesses, inflammatory cells, vessels, collagen disorganization and fibroblasts compared to all control hypertrophic scars. Furthermore, Noscarna™ showed more favorable effects on hypertrophic scars than a commercial product, Contractubex®. Therefore, these results clearly demonstrated that the newly developed silicone-based gel, Noscarna™, could be a promising formulation as an effective therapeutic agent for hypertrophic scars.

  1. Atrial fibrillation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: mechanisms, embolic risk and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ajith G; Fischer, Avi G

    2006-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is associated with an increased incidence of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in HCM with a prevalence of 20% and an annual incidence of two percent per year. Increased left atrial size and volume along with impaired left atrial function confer an increased likelihood of AF. The onset of AF is often accompanied by a decrease in functional status in conjunction with an increased risk of stroke and overall mortality.

  2. Nd:YAG Laser Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Akaishi, Satoshi; Koike, Sachiko; Dohi, Teruyuki; Kobe, Kyoko; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Ogawa, Rei

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cutaneous scars such as keloids and hypertrophic scars (HSs) are characterized by a diffuse redness that is caused by the overgrowth of capillary vessels due to chronic inflammation. Our group has been using long-pulsed, 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser in noncontact mode with low fluence and a submillisecond pulse duration to treat keloids and hypertrophic scars since 2006 with satisfactory results. The present study examined the efficacy of this approach in 22 Japanese patients with keloids (n = 16) or hypertrophic scars (n = 6) who were treated every 3 to 4 weeks. Treatment settings were as follows: 5 mm spot size diameter; 14 J/cm2 energy density; 300 μs exposure time per pulse; and 10 Hz repetition rate. The responses of the pathological scars to the treatment were assessed by measuring their erythema, hypertrophy, hardness, itching, and pain or tenderness. Moreover, skin samples from 3 volunteer patients were subjected to histological evaluation and 5 patients underwent thermography during therapy. The average total scar assessment score dropped from 9.86 to 6.34. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and Elastica Masson-Goldner staining showed that laser treatment structurally changed the tissue collagen. This influence reached a depth of 0.5 to 1 mm. Electron microscopy revealed plasma protein leakage, proteoglycan particles, and a change in the collagen fiber fascicles. Further analyses revealed that noncontact mode Nd:YAG laser treatment is highly effective for keloids and hypertrophic scars regardless of patient age, the origin and multiplicity of scarring, the location of the scar(s), or the tension on the scar. PMID:22259645

  3. Primary amyloid heart disease presenting as hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, L.T.; Raybuck, B.D.; Robinowitz, M.; Brinker, J.A.; Oetgen, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the unusual presentation of a patient with primary cardiac amyloidosis. Initial clinical symptoms and hemodynamic studies, including Technetium-99m-pyrophosphate scintigraphy, suggested hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, but endomyocardial biopsy revealed diffuse amyloid infiltration. Only two other cases of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction due to cardiac amyloidosis have been reported. The false-negative technetium-99m-pyrophosphate scintigram in this patient argues for the use of endomyocardial biopsy to aid in the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  4. [Doppler evaluation of diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Borzi, M; Capria, A; Calò, L; Luzi, M; Cannata, D

    1995-01-01

    Diastolic function may play a significant role in patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, because abnormalities in diastolic function, even in presence of a normal systolic function, may determine the clinical features of the disease. Doppler ecocardiography, using a non-invasive and not highly expensive method, easily allows to analize the indexes of diastolic function, as soon as some morpho-functional parameters, represented by extent and localization of the myocardial hypertrophy and presence or absence of obstruction in the left ventricular outflow, which have always been considered relevant in the prognosis together with the typical arrhythmic abnormalities of the disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the behaviour of Doppler ecocardiographic parameters of diastolic function in 38 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and to analize whether they might be correlated with the morpho-functional patterns and clinical features of the disease, represented by the NYHA functional class and occurrence of ventricular tachycardia during 48 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. Diastolic function abnormalities, although occurring in most patients, do not seem to be related with clinical conditions and/or with the typical morpho-functional patterns of the disease; however, an increase in the left atrial size together with a specific increase in the rate of deceleration of flow velocity in early diastole that were detected in patients with ventricular tachycardia, by suggesting a relation between diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmogenic substrate, remarks the importance of the analysis of diastolic function for a better prognostic evaluation of the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  5. Modeling Hypertrophic IP3 Transients in the Cardiac Myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Cooling, Michael; Hunter, Peter; Crampin, Edmund J.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a known risk factor for heart disease, and at the cellular level is caused by a complex interaction of signal transduction pathways. The IP3-calcineurin pathway plays an important role in stimulating the transcription factor NFAT which binds to DNA cooperatively with other hypertrophic transcription factors. Using available kinetic data, we construct a mathematical model of the IP3 signal production system after stimulation by a hypertrophic α-adrenergic agonist (endothelin-1) in the mouse atrial cardiac myocyte. We use a global sensitivity analysis to identify key controlling parameters with respect to the resultant IP3 transient, including the phosphorylation of cell-membrane receptors, the ligand strength and binding kinetics to precoupled (with GαGDP) receptor, and the kinetics associated with precoupling the receptors. We show that the kinetics associated with the receptor system contribute to the behavior of the system to a great extent, with precoupled receptors driving the response to extracellular ligand. Finally, by reparameterizing for a second hypertrophic α-adrenergic agonist, angiotensin-II, we show that differences in key receptor kinetic and membrane density parameters are sufficient to explain different observed IP3 transients in essentially the same pathway. PMID:17693463

  6. Two Cases of Apical Ballooning Syndrome Masking Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ranjini Raina; Hakim, Fayaz A.; Hurst, R. Todd; Simper, David; Appleton, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Apical akinesis and dilation in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease is a typical feature of stress-induced (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy, whereas apical hypertrophy is seen in apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report the cases of 2 patients who presented with takotsubo cardiomyopathy and were subsequently found to have apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, after the apical ballooning from the takotsubo cardiomyopathy had resolved. The first patient, a 43-year-old woman with a history of alcohol abuse, presented with shortness of breath, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, and no significant coronary artery disease. An echocardiogram 2 weeks later revealed a normal left ventricular ejection fraction and newly apparent apical hypertrophy. The 2nd patient, a 70-year-old woman with pancreatitis, presented with chest pain, apical akinesis, and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.39, consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. One month later, her left ventricular ejection fraction was normal; however, hypertrophy of the left ventricular apex was newly noted. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases in which apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was masked by apical ballooning from stress-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:24808780

  7. Age-dependent heterogeneity of familiar hypertrophic cardiomyopathy phenotype: a role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Glaveckaitė, Sigita; Rudys, Alfredas; Mikštienė, Violeta; Valevičienė, Nomeda; Palionis, Darius; Laucevičius, Aleksandras

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, we present familiar hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with age-dependent heterogeneity of the disease phenotype among the members of one family who carry the same mutation of the myosin-binding protein C gene. Phenotypic heterogeneity is common in patients with familial forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, both in clinical expression and outcome. Compared with other noninvasive cardiac imaging modalities, cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides an opportunity to more accurately characterize the varying phenotypic presentations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  8. Evaluation and reformulation of the maximum peak height algorithm (MPH) and application in a hypertrophic lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarch, Jaime; Ruiz-Verdú, Antonio; Sendra, María. D.; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2017-02-01

    We studied the performance of the MERIS maximum peak height (MPH) algorithm in the retrieval of chlorophyll-a concentration (CHL), using a matchup data set of Bottom-of-Rayleigh Reflectances (BRR) and CHL from a hypertrophic lake (Albufera de Valencia). The MPH algorithm produced a slight underestimation of CHL in the pixels classified as cyanobacteria (83% of the total) and a strong overestimation in those classified as eukaryotic phytoplankton (17%). In situ biomass data showed that the binary classification of MPH was not appropriate for mixed phytoplankton populations, producing also unrealistic discontinuities in the CHL maps. We recalibrated MPH using our matchup data set and found that a single calibration curve of third degree fitted equally well to all matchups regardless of how they were classified. As a modification to the former approach, we incorporated the Phycocyanin Index (PCI) in the formula, thus taking into account the gradient of phytoplankton composition, which reduced the CHL retrieval errors. By using in situ biomass data, we also proved that PCI was indeed an indicator of cyanobacterial dominance. We applied our recalibration of the MPH algorithm to the whole MERIS data set (2002-2012). Results highlight the usefulness of the MPH algorithm as a tool to monitor eutrophication. The relevance of this fact is higher since MPH does not require a complete atmospheric correction, which often fails over such waters. An adequate flagging or correction of sun glint is advisable though, since the MPH algorithm was sensitive to sun glint.

  9. [A computational fluid dynamics study of inner flow through nasal cavity with unilateral hypertrophic inferior turbinate].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yufeng; Zhang, Yuning; Chen, Guang; Liu, Shuhong; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Min; Cai, Changping; Chen, Xueming

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the anatomical influence of the hypertrophic inferior turbinate on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of unilateral hypertrophic inferior turbinate nasal cavity, and to analyze the bilateral detailed nasal airflow simulations under both inspiratory and expiratory phases in CFD model. One male volunteer troubled with unilateral hypertrophic inferior turbinate accepted CT scan. CFD model was built by CT scans through Simplant 10.0 and ANSYS ICEM. Fluent 6.3.26 simulated the airflow of both nasal cavity in breathing rates 200 ml/s. 1) In infraturbinal region, the cross-section area (CSA) of the nasal cavity with hypertrophic inferior turbinate was smaller than that in healthy side and the average area difference between two sides was 1.62 cm2. 2) In both inspiration and expiration phases, the hypertrophic infraturbinal produced a markable reduction in intranasal pressures drop along the full length of the infraturbinal region. The volumetric flow rate in the hypertrophic infraturbinal side was 50 ml/s, which equalled to one third of that in healthy side; Mean air speed in the anterior valve region was estimated to be 0.57 m/s at hypertrophic infraturbinal side and 1.83 m/s at healthy side during inspiration; More vortices happened in the hypertrophic infraturbinal side. The unilateral hypertrophic infraturbinal change the normal anatomy and influence the aerodynamic of nasal cavity, which is harmful to the functions of human nasal in ventilation, temperature accommodation and olfactory sensation.

  10. The fully nonlinear stratified geostrophic adjustment problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutino, Aaron; Stastna, Marek

    2017-01-01

    The study of the adjustment to equilibrium by a stratified fluid in a rotating reference frame is a classical problem in geophysical fluid dynamics. We consider the fully nonlinear, stratified adjustment problem from a numerical point of view. We present results of smoothed dam break simulations based on experiments in the published literature, with a focus on both the wave trains that propagate away from the nascent geostrophic state and the geostrophic state itself. We demonstrate that for Rossby numbers in excess of roughly 2 the wave train cannot be interpreted in terms of linear theory. This wave train consists of a leading solitary-like packet and a trailing tail of dispersive waves. However, it is found that the leading wave packet never completely separates from the trailing tail. Somewhat surprisingly, the inertial oscillations associated with the geostrophic state exhibit evidence of nonlinearity even when the Rossby number falls below 1. We vary the width of the initial disturbance and the rotation rate so as to keep the Rossby number fixed, and find that while the qualitative response remains consistent, the Froude number varies, and these variations are manifested in the form of the emanating wave train. For wider initial disturbances we find clear evidence of a wave train that initially propagates toward the near wall, reflects, and propagates away from the geostrophic state behind the leading wave train. We compare kinetic energy inside and outside of the geostrophic state, finding that for long times a Rossby number of around one-quarter yields an equal split between the two, with lower (higher) Rossby numbers yielding more energy in the geostrophic state (wave train). Finally we compare the energetics of the geostrophic state as the Rossby number varies, finding long-lived inertial oscillations in the majority of the cases and a general agreement with the past literature that employed either hydrostatic, shallow-water equation-based theory or

  11. Turbulence production in stratified Ekman flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhinini, Nadia; Dubos, Thomas; Drobinski, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Although a stable stratification should suppress vertical motions and turbulence, significant turbulence is observed in nocturnal or polar atmospheric boundary layers (ABLs), and often presents a high degree of instationarity or intermittency. In this work we use the Ekman flow as a prototype flow to explore possible dynamical mechanisms generating this turbulence. The linear instability of neutral and stratified Ekman flow has been studied theoretically and experimentally (Lilly, 1966 ; Brown, 1972). The fastest growing infinitesimal perturbations equilibrate nonlinearly in the form of longitudinal roll vortices which are close analogues of circulations found in neutral and weakly convective ABLs (Brown, 1970 ; Young, 2002). Therefore a secondary instability mechanism must be invoked for three-dimensional (3D) turbulence to be generated. Through such a mechanism, which is known to exist in the neutral case (Dubos et al., 2008), infinitesimal 3D perturbations to the equilibrated rolls grow and eventually lead to turbulence through nonlinear interactions. Vortices and stratified shear flows present various types of secondary instability (Godeferd et al., 2001 ; Peltier and Caulfield, 2003). We perform the secondary stability analysis of stratified Ekman boundary layer rolls for a few values of the Reynolds, Richardson and Prandtl numbers. For this, we first compute the equilibrated rolls and discuss their structure. Especially their exists a range of intermediate Richardson numbers for which locally unstable stratification is present in the vortex core. This feature provides a potential mechanism and energy source for the secondary instability. The energetics of the growth of three-dimensional perturbations are discussed for a few representative values of the control parameters.

  12. A Filtering Method For Gravitationally Stratified Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti-Bono, Caroline; Colella, Phillip

    2005-04-25

    Gravity waves arise in gravitationally stratified compressible flows at low Mach and Froude numbers. These waves can have a negligible influence on the overall dynamics of the fluid but, for numerical methods where the acoustic waves are treated implicitly, they impose a significant restriction on the time step. A way to alleviate this restriction is to filter out the modes corresponding to the fastest gravity waves so that a larger time step can be used. This paper presents a filtering strategy of the fully compressible equations based on normal mode analysis that is used throughout the simulation to compute the fast dynamics and that is able to damp only fast gravity modes.

  13. White dwarf stars with chemically stratified atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muchmore, D.

    1982-01-01

    Recent observations and theory suggest that some white dwarfs may have chemically stratified atmospheres - thin layers of hydrogen lying above helium-rich envelopes. Models of such atmospheres show that a discontinuous temperature inversion can occur at the boundary between the layers. Model spectra for layered atmospheres at 30,000 K and 50,000 K tend to have smaller decrements at 912 A, 504 A, and 228 A than uniform atmospheres would have. On the basis of their continuous extreme ultraviolet spectra, it is possible to distinguish observationally between uniform and layered atmospheres for hot white dwarfs.

  14. Topological Structures in Rotating Stratified Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, J. M.; Carrillo, A.; Perez, E.

    2003-04-01

    Detailled 2D Particle traking and PIV visualizations performed on a series of large scale laboratory experiments at the Coriolis Platform of the SINTEF in Trondheim have revealed several resonances which scale on the Strouhal, the Rossby and the Richardson numbers. More than 100 experiments spanned a wide range of Rossby Deformation Radii and the topological structures (Parabolic /Eliptic /Hyperbolic) of the quasi-balanced stratified-rotating flows were studied when stirring (akin to coastal mixing) occured at a side of the tank. The strong asymetry favored by the total vorticity produces a wealth of mixing patterns.

  15. On the complexity of stratified logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercelli, Luca

    2010-02-01

    Our primary motivation is the comparison of two different traditions used in ICC to characterize the class FPTIME of the polynomial time computable functions. On one side, FPTIME can be captured by Intuitionistic Light Affine Logic (ILAL), a logic derived from Linear Logic, characterized by the structural invariant Stratification. On the other side, FPTIME can be captured by Safe Recursion on Notation (SRN), an algebra of functions based on Predicative Recursion, a restriction of the standard recursion schema used to defiine primitive recursive functions. Stratifiication and Predicative Recursion seem to share common underlying principles, whose study is the main subject of this work.

  16. Bayesian stratified sampling to assess corpus utility

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, J.; Scovel, C.; Thomas, T.; Hall, S.

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes a method for asking statistical questions about a large text corpus. The authors exemplify the method by addressing the question, ``What percentage of Federal Register documents are real documents, of possible interest to a text researcher or analyst?`` They estimate an answer to this question by evaluating 200 documents selected from a corpus of 45,820 Federal Register documents. Bayesian analysis and stratified sampling are used to reduce the sampling uncertainty of the estimate from over 3,100 documents to fewer than 1,000. A possible application of the method is to establish baseline statistics used to estimate recall rates for information retrieval systems.

  17. Half wavelength dipole antennas over stratified media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorraca, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical solutions of the fields induced by half-wavelength, horizontal, electric field dipoles (HEDS) are determined based on studies of infinitesimal, horizontal, electric field dipoles over low loss plane-stratified media. To determine these solutions, an approximation to the current distribution of a half-wavelength HED is derived and experimentally verified. Traverse and antenna measurements obtained on the Athabasca Glacier in the summer of 1971 are related to the characteristics of the transmitting antenna design, and the measurement techniques and field equipment used in the glacier trials are described and evaluated.

  18. Corrections of stratified tropospheric delays in SAR interferometry: Validation with global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, Marie-Pierre; Lasserre, Cécile; Peltzer, Gilles; Cavalié, Olivier; Doubre, Cécile

    2010-05-01

    The main limiting factor on the accuracy of Interferometric SAR measurements (InSAR) comes from phase propagation delays through the troposphere. The delay can be divided into a stratified component, which correlates with the topography and often dominates the tropospheric signal, and a turbulent component. We use Global Atmospheric Models (GAM) to estimate the stratified phase delay and delay-elevation ratio at epochs of SAR acquisitions, and compare them to observed phase delay derived from SAR interferograms. Three test areas are selected with different geographic and climatic environments and with large SAR archive available. The Lake Mead, Nevada, USA is covered by 79 ERS1/2 and ENVISAT acquisitions, the Haiyuan Fault area, Gansu, China, by 24 ERS1/2 acquisitions, and the Afar region, Republic of Djibouti, by 91 Radarsat acquisitions. The hydrostatic and wet stratified delays are computed from GAM as a function of atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure e vertical profiles. The hydrostatic delay, which depends on ratio P/T, varies significantly at low elevation and cannot be neglected. The wet component of the delay depends mostly on the near surface specific humidity. GAM predicted delay-elevation ratios are in good agreement with the ratios derived from InSAR data away from deforming zones. Both estimations of the delay-elevation ratio can thus be used to perform a first order correction of the observed interferometric phase to retrieve a ground motion signal of low amplitude. We also demonstrate that aliasing of daily and seasonal variations in the stratified delay due to uneven sampling of SAR data significantly bias InSAR data stacks or time series produced after temporal smoothing. In all three test cases, the InSAR data stacks or smoothed time series present a residual stratified delay of the order of the expected deformation signal. In all cases, correcting interferograms from the stratified delay removes all these

  19. Corrections of stratified tropospheric delays in SAR interferometry: Validation with global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, M.-P.; Lasserre, C.; Peltzer, G.; Cavalié, O.; Doubre, C.

    2009-09-01

    The main limiting factor on the accuracy of Interferometric SAR measurements (InSAR) comes from phase propagation delays through the troposphere. The delay can be divided into a stratified component, which correlates with the topography and often dominates the tropospheric signal, and a turbulent component. We use Global Atmospheric Models (GAM) to estimate the stratified phase delay and delay-elevation ratio at epochs of SAR acquisitions, and compare them to observed phase delay derived from SAR interferograms. Three test areas are selected with different geographic and climatic environments and with large SAR archive available. The Lake Mead, Nevada, USA is covered by 79 ERS1/2 and ENVISAT acquisitions, the Haiyuan Fault area, Gansu, China, by 24 ERS1/2 acquisitions, and the Afar region, Republic of Djibouti, by 91 Radarsat acquisitions. The hydrostatic and wet stratified delays are computed from GAM as a function of atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure e vertical profiles. The hydrostatic delay, which depends on ratio P/ T, varies significantly at low elevation and cannot be neglected. The wet component of the delay depends mostly on the near surface specific humidity. GAM predicted delay-elevation ratios are in good agreement with the ratios derived from InSAR data away from deforming zones. Both estimations of the delay-elevation ratio can thus be used to perform a first order correction of the observed interferometric phase to retrieve a ground motion signal of low amplitude. We also demonstrate that aliasing of daily and seasonal variations in the stratified delay due to uneven sampling of SAR data significantly bias InSAR data stacks or time series produced after temporal smoothing. In all three test cases, the InSAR data stacks or smoothed time series present a residual stratified delay of the order of the expected deformation signal. In all cases, correcting interferograms from the stratified delay removes all these

  20. Stratified tests, stratified slopes, and random effects models for clinical trials with missing data.

    PubMed

    Dawson, J D; Han, S H

    2000-11-01

    Because missing observations may affect the size and power of statistical tests of equality, various analytical techniques explicitly or implicitly condition the analysis on the amount of information available per person. We illustrate the difference between stratifying a slope estimate and stratifying a test statistic based on slopes. We compare a nonparametric version of the latter approach with the parametric tests available from SAS Proc Mixed. Power and size of these two approaches are considered under different parametric settings, distributions, and missing data mechanisms.

  1. Stratified Simulations of Collisionless Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Kota; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a series of stratified-shearing-box simulations of collisionless accretion disks in the recently developed framework of kinetic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), which can handle finite non-gyrotropy of a pressure tensor. Although a fully kinetic simulation predicted a more efficient angular-momentum transport in collisionless disks than in the standard MHD regime, the enhanced transport has not been observed in past kinetic-MHD approaches to gyrotropic pressure anisotropy. For the purpose of investigating this missing link between the fully kinetic and MHD treatments, this paper explores the role of non-gyrotropic pressure and makes the first attempt to incorporate certain collisionless effects into disk-scale, stratified disk simulations. When the timescale of gyrotropization was longer than, or comparable to, the disk-rotation frequency of the orbit, we found that the finite non-gyrotropy selectively remaining in the vicinity of current sheets contributes to suppressing magnetic reconnection in the shearing-box system. This leads to increases both in the saturated amplitude of the MHD turbulence driven by magnetorotational instabilities and in the resultant efficiency of angular-momentum transport. Our results seem to favor the fast advection of magnetic fields toward the rotation axis of a central object, which is required to launch an ultra-relativistic jet from a black hole accretion system in, for example, a magnetically arrested disk state.

  2. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, S. M.; Miles, T. N.; Seroka, G. N.; Xu, Y.; Forney, R. K.; Yu, F.; Roarty, H.; Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.

    2016-03-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward.

  3. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, S. M.; Miles, T. N.; Seroka, G. N.; Xu, Y.; Forney, R. K.; Yu, F.; Roarty, H.; Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward. PMID:26953963

  4. Stratified and steady periodic water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Samuel

    This thesis considers two-dimensional stratified water waves propagating under the force of gravity over an impermeable at bed and with a free surface. In the absence of surface tension, it is proved that there exists of a global continuum of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. These waves, moreover, can exhibit large density variation, speed, and amplitude. When the motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid, it is shown that there exists global continua of such solutions. In both regimes, this is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from the laminar curve at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic argument in the spirit of Rabinowitz. We also provide an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer. Finally, we consider the question of symmetry for two-dimensional stably stratified steady periodic gravity water waves with surface profiles monotonic between crests and troughs. We provide sufficient conditions under which such waves are necessarily symmetric. We do this by first exploiting some elliptic structure in the governing equations to show that, in certain size regimes, a maximum principle holds. This then forms the basis for a method of moving planes argument.

  5. High frequency scattering from corrugated stratified cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, Kamal; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1991-01-01

    Interest in applying radar remote sensing for the study of forested areas led to the development of a model for scattering from corrugated stratified dielectric cylinders. The model is used to investigate the effect of bark and its roughness on scattering from tree trunks and branches. The outer layer of the cylinder (bark) is assumed to be a low-loss dielectric material and to have a regular (periodic) corrugation pattern. The inner layers are treated as lossy dielectrics with smooth boundaries. A hybrid solution based on the moment method and the physical optics approximation is obtained. In the solution, the corrugations are replaced with polarization currents that are identical to those of the local tangential periodic corrugated surface, and the stratified cylinder is replaced with equivalent surface currents. New expressions for the equivalent physical-optics currents are used which are more convenient than the standard ones. It is shown that the bark layer and its roughness both reduce the radar cross-section. It is also demonstrated that the corrugations can be replaced by an equivalent anisotropic layer.

  6. Pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence: A stratified approach.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A; Owens, L; Pushpakom, S P; Faizal, M; Pirmohamed, M

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol dependence is a common disorder in many societies worldwide, and remains difficult to identify and treat. It is also a risk factor for many secondary non-communicable diseases. Pharmacotherapy is one available treatment option, but appears to be underutilised in practice. Major barriers to use of medications in this area include lack of clinical guidance and questionable efficacy. However, for each medication there appears to be a subpopulation that responds positively, and understanding the moderating factors to treatment efficacy is an important research goal. Thus, this review provides a narrative regarding potential stratification techniques in pharmacological treatment of alcohol dependence, with a specific focus on typologies and pharmacogenetics. In addition, we discuss the basic background of stratified medicine and recent studies on genetic predisposition to alcohol dependence. A growing repository of data exists for both approved and non-approved pharmacotherapies, but failure to replicate findings, inadequate sample sizes, and insufficient funding has resulted in a translational gap. Implementing evidence-based stratified/personalised therapy and identifying new therapeutic agents may lead to improved clinical outcomes and reduced financial burden. Despite some promising findings to date, much work is still required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Variance estimation for stratified propensity score estimators.

    PubMed

    Williamson, E J; Morley, R; Lucas, A; Carpenter, J R

    2012-07-10

    Propensity score methods are increasingly used to estimate the effect of a treatment or exposure on an outcome in non-randomised studies. We focus on one such method, stratification on the propensity score, comparing it with the method of inverse-probability weighting by the propensity score. The propensity score--the conditional probability of receiving the treatment given observed covariates--is usually an unknown probability estimated from the data. Estimators for the variance of treatment effect estimates typically used in practice, however, do not take into account that the propensity score itself has been estimated from the data. By deriving the asymptotic marginal variance of the stratified estimate of treatment effect, correctly taking into account the estimation of the propensity score, we show that routinely used variance estimators are likely to produce confidence intervals that are too conservative when the propensity score model includes variables that predict (cause) the outcome, but only weakly predict the treatment. In contrast, a comparison with the analogous marginal variance for the inverse probability weighted (IPW) estimator shows that routinely used variance estimators for the IPW estimator are likely to produce confidence intervals that are almost always too conservative. Because exact calculation of the asymptotic marginal variance is likely to be complex, particularly for the stratified estimator, we suggest that bootstrap estimates of variance should be used in practice.

  8. Vertically integrated flow in stratified aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, Otto D. L.

    2017-05-01

    We present a set of continuous discharge potentials that can be used to determine the vertically integrated flow in stratified aquifers. The method applies to cases where the boundaries are vertical and either the hydraulic head is given, or the boundary is a seepage face, or the integrated discharge is given. The approach is valid for cases of given recharge through the upper and/or lower boundaries of the aquifer. The method is valid for any values of hydraulic conductivity; there are no limitations of the contrast for the method to be valid. The flows in the strata may be either confined or unconfined, and locally perched conditions may exist, but the effect of capillarity is not included. The hydraulic head is determined by applying the Dupuit-Forchheimer approximation. The main advantage of the approach is that very complex conditions in stratified aquifer systems, including locally perched conditions and extremely complex flow systems can be treated in a relatively straight forward approach by considering only the vertically integrated flow rates. The approach is particularly useful for assessing groundwater sustainability, as a model to be constructed prior to developing a fully three-dimensional numerical model.

  9. Mixing and Vorticity Structure in Stratified Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdalena Matulka, Anna; Redondo, Jose M.

    2010-05-01

    Several series of experiments in stratified and in rotating/stratified decaying flows after a grid is used to stir the two layer stable fluid brine and fresh water set up. (Matulka 2009). We measure by comparing the gained potential energy with the available kinetic energy AKE, the relative efficiency of mixing. The experiments in stratified rotating flows with grid driven turbulence were both periodic (quasi stationary) and non-monotonic (decaying) forcing(Matulka et al. 2008). A complex Parameter Space Using Ri, Ro, Re is used to compare field, experimental and numerical observations on the mixing structure and Topology(Redondo 2004, Redondo et al 1996) of the Stratified Rotating Flows. The horizontal spectra changes appreciable with slopes from 1.1 to 5, but relevant to dispersion, vorticity and local circulation, not only the spectral slope is important, but also the initial topology and forcing of the AKE (in Elliptical, vortex core regions ) or in hyperbolic regions dominated by shear). Using multi-fractal geometry as well, we can establish now a theoretical pattern for the turbulence behavior that is reflected in the different descriptors (volume fraction, velocity and vorticity and thus obtain a certain classification relating D3 and the sum (integral) of the different fractal dimensions D2 for different levels of scalar (volume fraction intensity or temperature). Vorticity evolution is smoother and different than that of scalar or tracer density. The correlation between the local Ri and the fractal dimension detected from energy or entropy is good. Using multi-fractal geometry we can also establish certain regions of higher local activity used to establish the geometry of the turbulence mixing, that needs to be studied in detail when interpreting the complex balance between the direct 3D Kolmogorov type cascade and the Inverse 2D Kraichnan type cascade. A large collection of SAR images obtained from three European coastal areas (Gade and Redondo 1999

  10. Soil mixing of stratified contaminated sands.

    PubMed

    Al-Tabba, A; Ayotamuno, M J; Martin, R J

    2000-02-01

    Validation of soil mixing for the treatment of contaminated ground is needed in a wide range of site conditions to widen the application of the technology and to understand the mechanisms involved. Since very limited work has been carried out in heterogeneous ground conditions, this paper investigates the effectiveness of soil mixing in stratified sands using laboratory-scale augers. This enabled a low cost investigation of factors such as grout type and form, auger design, installation procedure, mixing mode, curing period, thickness of soil layers and natural moisture content on the unconfined compressive strength, leachability and leachate pH of the soil-grout mixes. The results showed that the auger design plays a very important part in the mixing process in heterogeneous sands. The variability of the properties measured in the stratified soils and the measurable variations caused by the various factors considered, highlighted the importance of duplicating appropriate in situ conditions, the usefulness of laboratory-scale modelling of in situ conditions and the importance of modelling soil and contaminant heterogeneities at the treatability study stage.

  11. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Glenn, S M; Miles, T N; Seroka, G N; Xu, Y; Forney, R K; Yu, F; Roarty, H; Schofield, O; Kohut, J

    2016-03-08

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward.

  12. Anomalous diffusion in rotating stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yoshi; Herring, Jackson

    2006-11-01

    Diffusion in rotating and stratified fluids is one of the central subjects in geophysical and astrophysical dynamics. In this paper, we report features of the dispersion of Lagrangian fluid particles in rotating stratified flows using the Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations. And for calculation of particle dispersion, we use the cubic spline interpolation method by Yeung and Pope. Our main concern is the picture different from the Taylor dispersion theory, i.e. ˜t^2 for ttB (ballistic mode) and ˜t for ttB(Brownian mode), where tB is the time after which the Lagrangian velocity auto-correlation function drops rapidly. The different features of diffusion from the standard Taylor picture is often called anomalous diffusion. Particle dispersion shows quite large anisotropy. In the vertical direction, particles stop migration after they pass the time interval of the ballistic mode when only stratification is active and rotation enhances this tendency (for decaying turbulence). In the horizontal direction, we observe that t^2 behavior is more evident not only for the initial ballistic mode but also at later times, and that there is a transition period between the two t^2 regimes. The duration and the starting time of the transition period are a function of the parameters of stratification and rotation. For a fixed value of stratification, the transition period shifts to earlier time with rotation. And with strong stratification, the transition period disappears.

  13. Jet-mixing of initially stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stuart; Markides, Christos; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Low pipeline velocities in the oil-and-gas industry generally lead to liquid-liquid flows stratifying due to density differences. Pipeline stratified flows inherently have no single point for sub-sampling and phase slip leads to in situ phase fractions differing from input volume fractions. Establishing representative or average properties and phase fractions is therefore difficult for industry. This leads to sampling errors through measurement uncertainty. In-line mixing overcomes liquid-liquid stratification, establishing a liquid-liquid dispersion that minimises slip between phases. Here, we use jets-in-crossflow (JICF) as a means of mixing. We present results of CFD simulations using the volume-of- fluid method that demonstrate the breakup of stratification as a result of the application of JICF. A number of simple jet configurations are described, and their effectiveness in generating dispersions is compared. We also present preliminary experimental results based on the use of a matched-refractive-index method, laser-induced fluorescence, particle-tracking- and particle-image-velocimetry. Funding from Cameron for Ph.D. studentship (SW) gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Analytical investigation of stratified isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vytovtov, Konstantin A.

    2005-04-01

    A rigorous analytical approach for investigating a stratified medium with an arbitrary finite number of homogeneous isotropic layers in a period is developed. The approach is based on the translation matrix method. It is well known that the translation matrix for a period must be found as the product of the layer matrices. It is proved that this matrix can be represented as a finite sum of trigonometric matrices, and thus the dispersion relation of a stratified medium is written in an analytical form. All final expressions are obtained in terms of the constitutive parameters. To this author's knowledge, this is the first time that the new sign function that allows us to develop the presented analytical results has been described. The condition of the existence of a wave with an arbitrary period divisible by a structure period is found in analytical form. It is proved that changing the layer arrangement within the period does not affect the structure of the transmission and absorption bands.

  15. Effects of spatial allocation and parameter variability on lakewide estimates from surveys of Lake Superior, North America’s largest lake

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake Superior was sampled in 2011 using a Generalized Random Tessellation Stratified design (n=54 sites) to characterize biological and chemical properties of this huge aquatic resource, with statistical confidence. The lake was divided into two strata (inshore <100m and offsh...

  16. Effects of spatial allocation and parameter variability on lakewide estimates from surveys of Lake Superior, North America’s largest lake

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake Superior was sampled in 2011 using a Generalized Random Tessellation Stratified design (n=54 sites) to characterize biological and chemical properties of this huge aquatic resource, with statistical confidence. The lake was divided into two strata (inshore <100m and offsh...

  17. Thallium-201 imaging in a patient with mid-ventricular hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Wakasugi, S.; Shibata, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Fudemoto, Y.; Hasegawa, Y.; Nakano, S.

    1988-10-01

    Findings specific to mid-ventricular hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy were obtained in a patient by means of /sup 201/Tl planar myocardial scintigraphy. Namely, a myocardial band-like image dividing the left ventricle into two chambers was clearly shown. This was identified as hypertrophic muscle with sphincter-like muscular stenosis at the mid portion of the left ventricle.

  18. Electrocardiographic changes announcing the rapid development of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an adult male.

    PubMed

    Freites, Alfonso; Canovas, Ester; Rubio, J

    2015-07-01

    We presented the case of an adult male without structural heart disease, who in the period of 3 years developed apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. ECG changes preceded the development of ventricular hypertrophy. We discussed the appearance of ventricular enlargement during adulthood, in some cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), and how the ECG abnormalities may precede the onset of ventricular hypertrophy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Lake Constance

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... Swiss shores of Lake Constance at the town of Rorschach. Eutrophication, or the process of nutrient enrichment, is rapidly accelerated ... of the value of Lake Constance, efforts to mitigate eutrophication were initiated in the 1970's. MISR was built and is managed ...

  20. Role of beta adrenoceptors in the hypertrophic response to thyroxine

    SciTech Connect

    Eliades, D.; Weiss, H.R. )

    1989-07-01

    The ability of beta-adrenoceptor blockade to reduce the hypertrophic response to thyroxine (T4, 0.5 mg/kg per day, s.c.) was tested in New Zealand white rabbits. Two beta-adrenergic blocking agents, one a full antagonist (propranolol, 9.6 mg/kg per day) and the other a partial agonist (pindolol, 0.96 mg/kg per day) were administered in combination with T4 in an effort to reduce myocardial hypertrophy. A 3 and 16 day group were generated to test the time course of the hypertrophic and receptor responses. Coronary blood flow was measured using radioactive microspheres, and beta-adrenoceptor number and affinity were measured using 125I(-) pindolol as the radioligand. T4 increased coronary blood flow to 1.95 times control values in the 3 day group and 2.2 times control levels in the 16 day group; beta-adrenoceptor number was increased similarly in 3 and 16 day groups to 1.9 times control Bmax levels. Heart weight (HW) to body weight (BW) ratios were significantly increased in only the 16 day group to 1.22 and 1.61 times control, respectively. Treatment with propranolol + T4 blunted the coronary blood flow increase, but receptor upregulation occurred to the same extent as with either substance alone. The HW/BW was increased to 1.49 times control. Pindolol + T4 did not decrease coronary blood flow but blocked beta-adrenoceptor upregulation. The HW was reduced to control levels and the HW/BW ratio was 1.40 times control and significantly decreased from T4 alone. Thus, pindolol was effective in reducing the hypertrophic response to T4, whereas propranolol was only moderately effective in doing so.

  1. Structural differences in epiphyseal and physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Frederic; Flynn, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    We have observed that epiphyseal and physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes in BALB/c mice show considerable differences of light microscopic and ultrastructural appearance, even when the cells are at the same stage of differentiation. In addition, cell structure maintenance improved with tissue preparation controlled for osmolarity and for membrane stabilization using 0.5% ruthenium hexammine trichloride (RHT) for both light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM) or 0.5% lanthanum nitrate for LM. Physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes showed a gradual increase in size closer to the metaphysis and a change in shape as cells elongated along the long axis. The nucleus remained central, with uniformly dispersed chromatin, and the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) was randomly dispersed throughout cytoplasm with little to no presence against the cell membrane. Even the lowermost cells showed thin elongated or dilated cisternae of RER and intact cell membranes. Epiphyseal chondrocytes remained circular to oval with no elongation. Nucleus and RER were positioned as a complete transcellular central nucleocytoplasmic column or as an incomplete bud with RER of the column/bud always continuous with RER peripherally against the intact cell membrane. RER was densely packed with parallel cisternae with adjacent cytoplasm empty of organelles but often filled with circular deposits of moderately electron-dense material consistent with fat. Optimal technique for LM involved fixation using glutaraldehyde (GA) 1.3%, paraformaldehyde (PFA) 1% and RHT 0.5% (mOsm 606) embedded in JB-4 plastic and stained with 0.5% toluidine blue. Optimal technique for EM used fixation with GA 1.3%, PFA 1%, RHT 0.5% and cacodylate buffer 0.03 M (mOsm 511) and post-fixation including 1% osmium tetroxide. These observations lead to the possibility that the same basic cell, the hypertrophic chondrocyte, has differing functional mechanisms at different regions of the developing bone. PMID:25987982

  2. Compression therapy affects collagen type balance in hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Tejiram, Shawn; Zhang, Jenny; Travis, Taryn E; Carney, Bonnie C; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Moffatt, Lauren T; Johnson, Laura S; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2016-04-01

    The effects of pressure on hypertrophic scar are poorly understood. Decreased extracellular matrix deposition is hypothesized to contribute to changes observed after pressure therapy. To examine this further, collagen composition was analyzed in a model of pressure therapy in hypertrophic scar. Hypertrophic scars created on red Duroc swine (n = 8) received pressure treatment (pressure device mounting and delivery at 30 mm Hg), sham treatment (device mounting and no delivery), or no treatment for 2 wk. Scars were assessed weekly and biopsied for histology, hydroxyproline quantification, and gene expression analysis. Transcription levels of collagen precursors COL1A2 and COL3A1 were quantified using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Masson trichrome was used for general collagen quantification, whereas immunofluorescence was used for collagen types I and III specific quantification. Total collagen quantification using hydroxyproline assay showed a 51.9% decrease after pressure initiation. Masson trichrome staining showed less collagen after 1 (P < 0.03) and 2 wk (P < 0.002) of pressure application compared with sham and untreated scars. Collagen 1A2 and 3A1 transcript decreased by 41.9- and 42.3-fold, respectively, compared with uninjured skin after pressure treatment, whereas a 2.3- and 1.3-fold increase was seen in untreated scars. This decrease was seen in immunofluorescence staining for collagen types I (P < 0.001) and III (P < 0.04) compared with pretreated levels. Pressure-treated scars also had lower levels of collagen I and III after pressure treatment (P < 0.05) compared with sham and untreated scars. These results demonstrate the modulation of collagen after pressure therapy and further characterize its role in scar formation and therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lake Powell

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-20

    The white ring around Lake Powell tells the story. The surface is down 98 feet. This is critical, because Powell, Lake Mead, and other lakes along the Colorado River provide water for millions of people in five states. We are in the eighth year of a drought on the Colorado River. This year was the driest year ever reported in Southern California, and there is a severe drought in Northern California, down to less than 30-percent of snow pack. This ASTER image of part of Lake Powell was acquired in 2001. The gray area depicts the shrunken, reduced 2007 lake extent compared to the extended, larger black area in 2001. The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km, and is centered near 37.1 degrees north latitude, 111.3 degrees west longitude. This image from NASA Terra satellite. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA10614

  4. Percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    van der Lee, C.; Foley, D.P.; Vletter, W.B.; ten Cate, F.J.; Kofflard, M.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Background Percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) is a new interventional technique to treat patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods Small doses of ethanol 96% were injected into a targeted septal artery causing a chemical myocardial infarction. Three patients were evaluated, including a follow-up of three months. Results There were no complications during the procedure LVOT gradient was reduced from 120±140 mmHg. At follow-up, all three patients showed improvement in validity. Conclusion The method requires an echocardiographic contrast determination of the myocardium at risk for ethanol treatment, in addition to haemodynamic monitoring. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3A PMID:25696698

  5. Atrial fibrillation and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: who to anticoagulate?

    PubMed

    Frontera, Antonio; Wilson, D G; Sekhon, H; Duncan, E R; Thomas, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is one of the most common genetic cardiac conditions. Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been demonstrated to be the most frequent arrhythmia encountered in HCM patients. Research focusing on AF and embolic stroke in HCM patients has been sparse and the sample size of most studies is small. The prognostic significance of AF in HCM patients is still not well known. The aim of this article is to provide further understanding of the anti-coagulation requirement of HCM patients with AF.

  6. Echocardiographic sign of right-sided hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Cardiel, E A; Alonso, M; Delcan, J L; Menarguez, L

    1978-01-01

    The echocardiographic and haemodynamic findings with a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) and dynamic subpulmonary stenosis, without left ventricular gradient, are described. The echocardiogram shows not only asymmetric septal hypertrophy, systolic anterior movement of the anterior mitral leaflet, and midsystolic collapse of the aortic valve, but also increase in the right ventricular wall echoes and systolic collapse of the pulmonary valve. We believe that in the absence of pulmonary hypertension these signs, particularly the systolic closing movement of the pulmonary valve cusp, may suggest right ventricular obstruction in HOCM. Images PMID:568930

  7. Ultrasonic "double track" sign in hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H L; Schechter, S; Mestel, A L; Eaton, D H; Haller, J O

    1987-03-01

    Ultrasound has been used in the diagnosis of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis since the first reports of its use with contact B mode scanners. Real-time imaging has allowed measurements of pyloric diameter, length, and muscle wall thickness. Wall thickness measurements taken with the pylorus in longitudinal (elongated) view improve diagnostic accuracy. Fluid aided real-time examination of 10 cases showed the ultrasound equivalent of the "double track" sign. This finding is the result of pyloric fluid compressed into smaller tracks as it is impinged upon circumferentially by the thickened circular muscle. This sign, previously seen in barium studies, although nonspecific, may prove to be a sensitive diagnostic criterion.

  8. Radiotherapy for extreme hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy associated with malignancy.

    PubMed

    Yeo, W; Leung, S F; Chan, A T; Chiu, K W

    1996-01-01

    A patient with florid hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPOA) associated with metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma is presented. Despite the presence of metastatic disease in the thorax and in bone, the patient's main symptom was severe pain from the HPOA, which was temporarily relieved by chemotherapy. Her disease subsequently progressed during chemotherapy and the pain became resistant to conventional treatment, including high dose morphine, non-steriodal anti-inflammatory agents and steriods. It was only with local radiation to the involved joints that the pain could be controlled. Our patient demonstrates that local radiotherapy is an option for the palliation of extreme HPOA.

  9. Recent progress in end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Yang, Kun-Qi; Jiang, Yong; Zhou, Xian-Liang

    2015-05-01

    Within the diverse spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a unique subgroup characterized by left ventricular enlargement and systolic dysfunction has emerged (defined as end-stage HCM [ES-HCM]). This underestimated entity provides challenging treatment strategies for extremely high risk of refractory heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Over the last 2 decades, the clinical features of ES-HCM have expanded and the underlying mechanisms gradually elucidated. Moreover, there is increasing evidence for early recognition of ES-HCM. New insights into early prevention and management will improve the clinical outcomes of this entity.

  10. Simultaneous pressure recording in mid-ventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Yousuke; Misumi, Ikuo; Rokutanda, Taku; Akahoshi, Ryuichiro; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Kaikita, Koichi; Yamamuro, Megumi; Sugiyama, Seigo; Ogawa, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old man was diagnosed with mid-ventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (MVOHCM) with apical aneurysm and paradoxic jet flow. At cardiac catheterization, pressure study showed that there was a markedly high pressure-gradient of 90 mmHg between the apex and the base in systole. Apical pressure was 350 mmHg after premature ventricular contraction. The apical aneurysm was already dilated and spherical in late systole; the absence of active relaxation was considered to be the cause of the paradoxic jet flow. In this report, we suggest the pathogenesis of left ventricular apical aneurysm and paradoxic jet flow in MVOHCM.

  11. Surgical Myectomy after Failed Ablation for Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bougioukas, Ioannis; Hoppe, Uta; Danner, Bernhard; Schoendube, Friedrich A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic disease of the myocardial sarcolemma characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy. When obstruction to the left ventricular outflow tract is present and symptoms are refractory to medication, surgical myectomy or alcohol septal ablation is indicated. Case Description We report a case of a patient presented for myectomy due to recurrence only 1 year after alcohol ablation. Interesting findings were a firm subaortic membrane and a direct insertion of the papillary muscle into the mitral valve. Conclusion After myectomy and extensive papillary muscle mobilization, a significant relief of obstruction was achieved. PMID:28018818

  12. Effective Response of Methotrexate for Recurrent Idiopathic Hypertrophic Spinal Pachymeningitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Joon; Seo, Won Deok; Kim, Sang Young; Cho, Jae Hoon; Kim, Dae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (IHSP) is a chronic progressive and diffuse inflammatory fibrosis of the spinal dura mater. Though treatment of IHSP is surgical decompression with steroid therapy, treatment for recurrent IHSP is controversial. Our patient was diagnosed with IHSP based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and underwent laminectomy for decompression following steroid pulse therapy. Despite maintenance of steroid therapy, the patient experienced 3 recurrences. As an alternative immunosuppressant medication, methotrexate was introduced with low-dose steroid. Fortunately, the symptom was resolved, and a decrease of dura thickening was revealed on MRI. We present the case and suggest that methotrexate might be an effective treatment modality for recurrent IHSP. PMID:28127378

  13. Genetic counseling and testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the pediatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Demo, Erin M; Skrzynia, Cécile; Baxter, Samantha

    2009-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common cardiac disease that is now being identified in the pediatric population. The etiology of this disease is largely genetic, and as a result, genetics professionals are becoming more involved in the management of these patients. We present multiple case scenarios that highlight the complex nature of this disease and how genetic counselors and cardiologists can interact to identify the genetic etiology of HCM and provide comprehensive care for these patients. Additionally, we describe knowledge gaps in this field and how research endeavors can assist in more effectively managing this patient cohort.

  14. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a mixed breed cat family.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kiyoshi; Takemura, Naoyuki; Machida, Noboru; Kawamura, Masamichi; Amasaki, Hajime; Hirose, Hisashi

    2002-07-01

    A spayed female mixed cat (case 1) and its female offspring, the result of a pairing between case 1 and its male sibling, were diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). A pedigree survey revealed that the prevalence of HCM was at least 12.5% in the family, which was considered to be significantly higher than that in a hospital-based population (approximately 1.6%). Thus, this finding seems to support the suspected occurrence of familial HCM in this group of related cats.

  15. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy hypertrophic obstructive.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Raimundo José Almeida de Oliveira; Santos, Adaílton Araújo dos; Azevedo, Mablo de Castro; Meira, Saulo Sacramento

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare clinical condition caused by a genetic change that results in the formation of structurally or functionally altered collagen. The clinical manifestations are varied, being the most obvious skin hypermotility and increased joint flexibility, although other systems - such as cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological - may also be affected. This paper presents the report of a patient who sought medical attention with complaints of atypical chest pain. Clinical evaluation enabled hypothetical diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Initial electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and 24 hours holter allowed the confirmation of the first hypothesis. A skin biopsy performed later associated clinical data and confirmed the second hypothesis.

  16. Plasma level of big endothelin-1 predicts the prognosis in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilu; Tang, Yida; Zou, Yubao; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Ling; Tian, Tao; Wang, Jizheng; Bao, Jingru; Hui, Rutai; Kang, Lianming; Song, Lei; Wang, Ji

    2017-09-15

    Cardiac remodeling is one of major pathological process in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Endothelin-1 has been linked to cardiac remodeling. Big endothelin-1 is the precursor of endothelin-1. A total of 245 patients with HCM were enrolled from 1999 to 2011 and partitioned to low, middle and high level groups according to their plasma big endothelin-1 levels. At baseline, significant associations were found between high level of big endothelin-1 and left atrium size, heart function and atrial fibrillation. Big endothelin-1 was positively correlated with N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide (r=0.291, p<0.001) and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on magnetic resonance imaging (r=0.222, p=0.016). During a follow-up of 3 (range, 2-5) years, big endothelin-1 level was positively associated with the risks of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death and progression to NYHA class 3 or 4 (p=0.020, 0.044 and 0.032, respectively). The rate of above events in the highest tertile were 18.1%, 15.7%, 24.2%, respectively. After adjusting for multiple factors related to survival and cardiac function, the significance remained in the association of big endothelin-1 with the risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR)=4.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-22.88; p=0.041) and progression to NYHA class 3 or 4 (HR=4.10, 95%CI 1.32-12.75, p=0.015). Our study showed that high level of plasma big endothelin-1 predicted prognosis for patients with HCM and it can be added to the marker panel in stratifying HCM patients for giving treatment priority to those at high risk. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Domain Growth Kinetics in Stratifying Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Typical foam films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are μ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. We experimentally elucidate the influence of these different driving forces, and confinement on drainage kinetics of horizontal stratifying foam films. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. Quantitative characterization of domain growth visualized in a using Scheludko-type thin film cell and a theoretical model based on lubrication analysis, provide critical insights into hydrodynamics of thin foam films, and the strength and nature of surface forces, including supramolecular oscillatory structural forces.

  18. Nonlinear progressive wave equation for stratified atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Edward McDonald, B; Piacsek, Andrew A

    2011-11-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) [McDonald and Kuperman, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 81, 1406-1417 (1987)] is expressed in a form to accommodate changes in the ambient atmospheric density, pressure, and sound speed as the time-stepping computational window moves along a path possibly traversing significant altitude differences (in pressure scale heights). The modification is accomplished by the addition of a stratification term related to that derived in the 1970s for linear range-stepping calculations and later adopted into Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov-type nonlinear models. The modified NPE is shown to preserve acoustic energy in a ray tube and yields analytic similarity solutions for vertically propagating N waves in isothermal and thermally stratified atmospheres.

  19. Defining drug response for stratified medicine.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, Mike; Senn, Stephen J; McNamee, Christine; Daly, Ann K; Sutton, Robert; Hattersley, Andrew; Pearson, Ewan; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2017-01-01

    The premise for stratified medicine is that drug efficacy, drug safety, or both, vary between groups of patients, and biomarkers can be used to facilitate more targeted prescribing, with the aim of improving the benefit:risk ratio of treatment. However, many factors can contribute to the variability in response to drug treatment. Inadequate characterisation of the nature and degree of variability can lead to the identification of biomarkers that have limited utility in clinical settings. Here, we discuss the complexities associated with the investigation of variability in drug efficacy and drug safety, and how consideration of these issues a priori, together with standardisation of phenotypes, can increase both the efficiency of stratification procedures and identification of biomarkers with the potential for clinical impact.

  20. Clustering of floating particles in stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffetta, Guido; de Lillo, Filippo; Musacchio, Stefano; Sozza, Alessandro

    2016-11-01

    We study the dynamics of small floating particles transported by stratified turbulence in presence of a mean linear density profile as a simple model for the confinement and the accumulation of plankton in the ocean. By means of extensive direct numerical simulations we investigate the statistical distribution of floaters as a function of the two dimensionless parameters of the problem. We find that vertical confinement of particles is mainly ruled by the degree of stratification, with a weak dependency on the particle properties. Conversely, small scale fractal clustering, typical of non-neutral particles in turbulence, depends on the particle relaxation time and is only weakly dependent on the flow stratification. The implications of our findings for the formation of thin phytoplankton layers are discussed.

  1. Emergence of helicity in rotating stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Raffaele; Mininni, Pablo D.; Rosenberg, Duane; Pouquet, Annick

    2013-03-01

    We perform numerical simulations of decaying rotating stratified turbulence and show, in the Boussinesq framework, that helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation), as observed in supercell storms and hurricanes, is spontaneously created due to an interplay between buoyancy and rotation common to large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows. Helicity emerges from the joint action of eddies and of inertia-gravity waves (with inertia and gravity with respective associated frequencies f and N), and it occurs when the waves are sufficiently strong. For N/f<3 the amount of helicity produced is correctly predicted by a quasilinear balance equation. Outside this regime, and up to the highest Reynolds number obtained in this study, namely Re≈10000, helicity production is found to be persistent for N/f as large as ≈17, and for ReFr2 and ReRo2, respectively, as large as ≈100 and ≈24000.

  2. Stratified scaffold design for engineering composite tissues.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Christopher Z; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Lu, Helen H

    2015-08-01

    A significant challenge to orthopaedic soft tissue repair is the biological fixation of autologous or allogeneic grafts with bone, whereby the lack of functional integration between such grafts and host bone has limited the clinical success of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and other common soft tissue-based reconstructive grafts. The inability of current surgical reconstruction to restore the native fibrocartilaginous insertion between the ACL and the femur or tibia, which minimizes stress concentration and facilitates load transfer between the soft and hard tissues, compromises the long-term clinical functionality of these grafts. To enable integration, a stratified scaffold design that mimics the multiple tissue regions of the ACL interface (ligament-fibrocartilage-bone) represents a promising strategy for composite tissue formation. Moreover, distinct cellular organization and phase-specific matrix heterogeneity achieved through co- or tri-culture within the scaffold system can promote biomimetic multi-tissue regeneration. Here, we describe the methods for fabricating a tri-phasic scaffold intended for ligament-bone integration, as well as the tri-culture of fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts on the stratified scaffold for the formation of structurally contiguous and compositionally distinct regions of ligament, fibrocartilage and bone. The primary advantage of the tri-phasic scaffold is the recapitulation of the multi-tissue organization across the native interface through the layered design. Moreover, in addition to ease of fabrication, each scaffold phase is similar in polymer composition and therefore can be joined together by sintering, enabling the seamless integration of each region and avoiding delamination between scaffold layers.

  3. Stratified charge rotary engine combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, H.; Hamady, F.; Somerton, C.; Stuecken, T.; Chouinard, E.; Rachal, T.; Kosterman, J.; Lambeth, M.; Olbrich, C.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of the combustion process in a stratified charge rotary engine (SCRE) continue to be the subject of active research in recent years. Specifically to meet the demand for more sophisticated products, a detailed understanding of the engine system of interest is warranted. With this in mind the objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the controlling factors that affect the SCRE combustion process so that an efficient power dense rotary engine can be designed. The influence of the induction-exhaust systems and the rotor geometry are believed to have a significant effect on combustion chamber flow characteristics. In this report, emphasis is centered on Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurements and on qualitative flow visualizations in the combustion chamber of the motored rotary engine assembly. This will provide a basic understanding of the flow process in the RCE and serve as a data base for verification of numerical simulations. Understanding fuel injection provisions is also important to the successful operation of the stratified charge rotary engine. Toward this end, flow visualizations depicting the development of high speed, high pressure fuel jets are described. Friction is an important consideration in an engine from the standpoint of lost work, durability and reliability. MSU Engine Research Laboratory efforts in accessing the frictional losses associated with the rotary engine are described. This includes work which describes losses in bearing, seal and auxillary components. Finally, a computer controlled mapping system under development is described. This system can be used to map shapes such as combustion chamber, intake manifolds or turbine blades accurately.

  4. Laminar flame propagation in a stratified charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Youngchul

    The propagation of laminar flame from a rich or stoichiometric mixture to a lean mixture in a stratified methane-air charge was investigated experimentally and numerically. Emphasis was on the understanding of the flame behavior in the transition region; in particular, on the mechanism of burning velocity enhancement in this region. In the experimental setup, mixtures of two different equivalence ratios were separated by a soap bubble in a spherical constant volume combustion vessel. The richer mixture inside the bubble was ignited by a focused laser beam. The flame development was observed by Schlieren technique and flame speeds were measured by heat release analysis of the pressure data. An one-dimensional, time- dependant numerical simulation of the flame propagation in a charge with step-stratification was used to interpret the experimental results. Both the experimental and numerical studies showed that the instantaneous flame speed depended on the previous flame history. Thus a `strong' (with mixture equivalence ratio close to stoichiometric) flame can sustain propagation into finite regions of substantially lean equivalence ratio. Both thermal and chemical effects were crucial for explaining the mechanism of the flame speed enhancement in the transition period. Because of the presence of this `back- support' effect, the usual concept of specifying the burning velocity as a function of the end gas state is inadequate for a stratified charge. A simple correlation for instantaneous flame velocity based on the local burned gas temperature is developed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253- 1690.)

  5. Stratified sampling design based on data mining.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeonkook J; Oh, Yoonhwan; Park, Sunghoon; Cho, Sungzoon; Park, Hayoung

    2013-09-01

    To explore classification rules based on data mining methodologies which are to be used in defining strata in stratified sampling of healthcare providers with improved sampling efficiency. We performed k-means clustering to group providers with similar characteristics, then, constructed decision trees on cluster labels to generate stratification rules. We assessed the variance explained by the stratification proposed in this study and by conventional stratification to evaluate the performance of the sampling design. We constructed a study database from health insurance claims data and providers' profile data made available to this study by the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service of South Korea, and population data from Statistics Korea. From our database, we used the data for single specialty clinics or hospitals in two specialties, general surgery and ophthalmology, for the year 2011 in this study. Data mining resulted in five strata in general surgery with two stratification variables, the number of inpatients per specialist and population density of provider location, and five strata in ophthalmology with two stratification variables, the number of inpatients per specialist and number of beds. The percentages of variance in annual changes in the productivity of specialists explained by the stratification in general surgery and ophthalmology were 22% and 8%, respectively, whereas conventional stratification by the type of provider location and number of beds explained 2% and 0.2% of variance, respectively. This study demonstrated that data mining methods can be used in designing efficient stratified sampling with variables readily available to the insurer and government; it offers an alternative to the existing stratification method that is widely used in healthcare provider surveys in South Korea.

  6. Stratified Sampling Design Based on Data Mining

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeonkook J.; Oh, Yoonhwan; Park, Sunghoon; Cho, Sungzoon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To explore classification rules based on data mining methodologies which are to be used in defining strata in stratified sampling of healthcare providers with improved sampling efficiency. Methods We performed k-means clustering to group providers with similar characteristics, then, constructed decision trees on cluster labels to generate stratification rules. We assessed the variance explained by the stratification proposed in this study and by conventional stratification to evaluate the performance of the sampling design. We constructed a study database from health insurance claims data and providers' profile data made available to this study by the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service of South Korea, and population data from Statistics Korea. From our database, we used the data for single specialty clinics or hospitals in two specialties, general surgery and ophthalmology, for the year 2011 in this study. Results Data mining resulted in five strata in general surgery with two stratification variables, the number of inpatients per specialist and population density of provider location, and five strata in ophthalmology with two stratification variables, the number of inpatients per specialist and number of beds. The percentages of variance in annual changes in the productivity of specialists explained by the stratification in general surgery and ophthalmology were 22% and 8%, respectively, whereas conventional stratification by the type of provider location and number of beds explained 2% and 0.2% of variance, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated that data mining methods can be used in designing efficient stratified sampling with variables readily available to the insurer and government; it offers an alternative to the existing stratification method that is widely used in healthcare provider surveys in South Korea. PMID:24175117

  7. Assessing iron dynamics in the release from a stratified reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashby, S.L.; Faulkner, S.P.; Gambrell, R.P.; Smith, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to describe the fate of total, dissolved, and ferrous (Fe2.) iron in the release from a stratified reservoir with an anoxic hypolimnion. Concentrations of total iron in the tail water indicated a first order removal process during a low flow release (0.6 m3sec1), yet negligible loss was observed during a period of increased discharge (2.8 m 3 sec-1). Dissolved and ferrous iron concentrations in the tailwater were highly variable during both release regimes and did not follow responses based on theoretical predictions. Ferrous iron concentrations in unfiltered samples were consistently greater than concentrations observed in samples filtered separately through 0.4, 0.2, and 0.1 ??m filters. Total iron removal in laboratory studies followed first order kinetics, but was twice that rate (0.077 mg.L-1 .hr 1) observed during low flow discharge in the tailwater (0.036 mg. L1 .hr1). Dissolved and ferrous iron losses in laboratory studies were rapid (???75% in the first 15 minutes and 95% within 1 hour), followed theoretical predictions, and were much faster than observations in the tailwater (???30% within the first hour). The presence of particulate forms of ferrous iron in the field and differences in removal rates observed in field and laboratory studies indicate a need for improved field assessment techniques and consideration of complexation reactions when assessing the dynamics of iron in reservoir releases and downstream impacts as a result of operation regimes. ?? Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2004.

  8. Influence of trophic status on PCB distribution in lake sediments and biota.

    PubMed

    Berglund, O; Larsson, P; Ewald, G; Okla, L

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between trophic status and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) distribution in 19 Swedish lakes. We analyzed PCB in water, phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish and sediment during two sampling periods, in spring and summer. The mass of sigma PCB in the lake sediments was positively related to lake trophy, i.e. more PCBs were accumulated and buried in the sediment of eutrophic lakes than in oligotrophic lakes. In the oligotrophic lakes a greater fraction of the total PCB load was dissolved in water. We conclude that this is a result of higher sedimentation rates in eutrophic lakes and relatively lower turnover of organic carbon in the water column of the shallow, eutrophic lakes. In the stratified lakes, the amount of PCB per cubic meter in the epilimnion decreased from spring to summer. We suggest that sedimentation of plankton beneath the thermocline during stratification act as a sink process of PCBs from the epilimnion.

  9. Great Lakes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Bands of lake effect snow drift eastward from the western Great Lakes in this true-color image captured by the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite's Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on January 5, 2017. National Weather Service forecasters expect light to moderate lake effect snow showers to continue throughout the day today and into Saturday (1/7). Lake-effect snow forms when cold air passes over the warmer waters of a lake. This causes some lake water to evaporate into the air and warm it. This warmer, wetter air rises and cools as it moves away from the lake. When it cools, it releases that moisture and, if it’s cold enough, that moisture turns into snow. Although true-color images like this may appear to be photographs of Earth, they aren't. They are created by combining data from the three color channels on the VIIRS instrument sensitive to the red, green and blue (or RGB) wavelengths of light into one composite image. In addition, data from several other channels are often also included to cancel out or correct atmospheric interference that may blur parts of the image. Credit: NOAA/NASA/Suomi NPP via NOAA's Environmental Visualization Laboratory

  10. ANCA-Associated Systemic Vasculitis Presenting With Hypertrophic Spinal Pachymeningitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Zhao, Jiuliang; Wang, Qian; Fei, Yunyun; Zhao, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reports of hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) localized exclusively in the spine were quite rare. Two cases of ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV) presenting with hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (HSP) causing low back pain and numbness are described. Two patients showed prominent systemic and local inflammatory reactions manifested as fever, elevated levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, and markedly increased levels of total protein of cerebrospinal fluid. The gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan of spinal cord demonstrated diffuse spinal dura matter thickening. Additionally, simple microscopic hematuria was found in 1 case suggestive of renal involvement and the other 1 complicated with interstitial lung disease. Then, a diagnosis of HSP secondary to AASV was made. Combination therapy of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide produced a rapid improvement in the clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters. Followed up for 6 months, 1 case relapsed when the dosage of prednisone was tapered to 10 mg daily. Since the patient refused rituximab-based regimen, an immunosuppressive triple-therapy (corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and azathioprine) was initiated and brought control of the disease during the subsequent 6 months of follow-up. HSP is a relatively rare form of central nervous system involvement of AASV. Early recognition and intervention are of great significance since the pathogenesis of HSP starts with an inflammatory and fibrosing process. PMID:26579814

  11. Cranial and lumbosacral hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fei; Zhong, Ding-Rong; Hao, Hong-Lin; Kong, Wei-Ze; Zhu, Yi-Cheng; Guan, Hong-Zhi; Cui, Li-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP) is a chronic disease characterized by inflammatory hypertrophy and fibrosis of dura mater. It can be divided into cranial and spinal forms depending on the location of the lesion. HP involving 2 separate sites simultaneously is quite uncommon. Case summary: This study presents a case of a 49-year-old woman with pathologically confirmed cranial and lumbosacral hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which is a rare etiology of HP. She experienced persistent numbness and pain of the left lower limb, followed by headache and seizures. In laboratory tests, levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, and antinuclear antibodies and anti–double-strand deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) antibodies were detected. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed dural thickening with homogenous gadolinium enhancement both at lumbosacral level and over cerebral convexities. Histology suggested chronic inflammation in spinal dura mater with extensive fibrosis, dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, and focal vasculitis. Treatment with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide was started with significant clinical and radiological improvement. Conclusion: HP is etiologically heterogeneous. Despite its rarity, SLE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of HP. Early recognition and therapy may provide an optimal outcome. PMID:27684799

  12. Neuromuscular fatigue during dynamic maximal strength and hypertrophic resistance loadings.

    PubMed

    Walker, Simon; Davis, Lisa; Avela, Janne; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute neuromuscular fatigue during dynamic maximal strength and hypertrophic loadings, known to cause different adaptations underlying strength gain during training. Thirteen healthy, untrained males performed two leg press loadings, one week apart, consisting of 15 sets of 1 repetition maximum (MAX) and 5 sets of 10 repetition maximums (HYP). Concentric load and muscle activity, electromyography (EMG) amplitude and median frequency, was assessed throughout each set. Additionally, maximal bilateral isometric force and muscle activity was assessed pre-, mid-, and up to 30 min post-loading. Concentric load during MAX was decreased after set 10 (P<0.05), while the load was maintained throughout HYP. Both loadings caused large reductions in maximal isometric force (MAX=-30±6.4% vs. HYP=-48±9.7%, P<0.001). The decreased concentric and isometric strength during MAX loading was accompanied by reduced EMG amplitude (P<0.05). Conversely, hypertrophic loading caused decreased median frequency only during isometric contractions (P<0.01). During concentric contractions, EMG amplitude increased and median frequency decreased in HYP (P<0.01). Our results indicate reduced neural drive during MAX loading and more complex changes in muscle activity during HYP loading. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Family communication in a population at risk for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Batte, Brittany; Sheldon, Jane P; Arscott, Patricia; Huismann, Darcy J; Salberg, Lisa; Day, Sharlene M; Yashar, Beverly M

    2015-04-01

    Encouraging family communication is an integral component of genetic counseling; therefore, we sought to identify factors impacting communication to family members at risk for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). Participants (N = 383) completed an online survey assessing: 1) demographics (gender, genetic test results, HCM family history, and disease severity); 2) illness representations; 3) family functioning and cohesiveness; 4) coping styles; 5) comprehension of HCM autosomal dominant inheritance; and 6) communication of HCM risk information to at-risk relatives. Participants were a national sample of individuals with HCM, recruited through the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. Data from 183 participants were analyzed using a logistic regression analysis, with family communication as a dichotomous dependent variable. We found that female gender and higher comprehension of autosomal dominant inheritance were significant predictors of participants' communication of HCM risk information to all their siblings and children. Our results suggest that utilizing interventions that promote patient comprehension (e.g., a teaching-focused model of genetic counseling) are important and may positively impact family communication within families with HCM.

  14. Subaortic and midventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with extreme segmental hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiadis, Georgios K; Giannakoulas, Georgios; Parcharidou, Despina G; Ziakas, Antonios G; Papadopoulos, Christodoulos E; Karoulas, Takis; Pliakos, Christodoulos; Parcharidis, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    Background Subaortic and midventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with extreme segmental hypertrophy exceeding the usual maximum wall thickness reported in the literature is a rare phenomenon. Case Presentation A 19-year-old man with recently diagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was referred for sudden death risk assessment. The patient had mild exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association functional class II), but without syncope or chest pain. There was no family history of HCM or sudden death. A two dimensional echocardiogram revealed an asymmetric type of LV hypertrophy; anterior ventricular septum = 49 mm; posterior ventricular septum = 20 mm; anterolateral free wall = 12 mm; and posterior free wall = 6 mm. The patient had 2 types of obstruction; a LV outflow obstruction due to systolic anterior motion of both mitral leaflets (Doppler-estimated 38 mm Hg gradient at rest); and a midventricular obstruction (Doppler-estimated 43 mm Hg gradient), but without apical aneurysm or dyskinesia. The patient had a normal blood pressure response on exercise test and no episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 24-h ECG recording. Cardiac MRI showed a gross late enhancement at the hypertrophied septum. Based on the extreme degree of LV hypertrophy and the myocardial hyperenhancement, an implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator was recommended prophylactically for primary prevention of sudden death. Conclusion Midventricular HCM is an infrequent phenotype, but may be associated with an apical aneurysm and progression to systolic dysfunction (end-stage HCM). PMID:17349063

  15. Anesthetic Practices for Laser Rehabilitation of Pediatric Hypertrophic Burn Scars.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brendan M; Keilman, Jeffrey; Zuccaro, Jennifer; Kelly, Charis; Maynes, Jason T; Fish, Joel S

    The use of ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser therapy and pulsed dye laser therapy has led to significant improvements in the rehabilitation of hypertrophic burn scars. However, laser procedures are associated with appreciable pain among pediatric patients. Clinical consensus suggests using general anesthesia for pediatric laser procedures; however, guidelines for perioperative care are lacking. The objective of this quality improvement study is to determine whether a difference exists in postoperative pain outcomes in pediatric patients who receive intraoperative opioid regimens compared with patients who receive opioid-sparing regimens for laser therapy of hypertrophic burn scars. A retrospective review of patients who received laser therapy at a pediatric burn center from April 2014 to May 2015 was performed. Overall, 88 of the 92 procedures reviewed were included. A statistically significant difference was not found between the likelihood of postoperative pain when intraoperative opioid regimens (n = 63) were given compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) X (1, n = 88) = 2.870, P = .0902. There was also no difference between short-acting (n = 48), long-acting (n = 9), or combination (n = 6) intraoperative opioids compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) in the likelihood of postoperative pain. Despite the small sample size, the low number of postoperative pain cases is encouraging. Ultimately, these data provide a foundation for developing anesthetic guidelines for pediatric laser procedures. Specifically, clinicians should consider the potential to deliver adequate perioperative care via an opioid-sparing regimen ± adjuvant.

  16. Reversible transition from a hypertrophic to a dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spillmann, Frank; Kühl, Uwe; Van Linthout, Sophie; Dominguez, Fernando; Escher, Felicitas; Schultheiss, Heinz‐Peter; Pieske, Burkert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report the case of a 17‐year‐old female patient with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a Wolff‐Parkinson‐White syndrome. She came to our department for further evaluation of a new diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by an enlargement of the left ventricle and a fall in ejection fraction. Clinically, she complained about atypical chest pain, arrhythmic episodes with presyncopal events, and dyspnea (NYHA III) during the last 6 months. Non‐invasive and invasive examinations including magnetic resonance imaging, electrophysiological examinations, and angiography did not lead to a conclusive diagnosis. Therefore, endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) were taken to investigate whether a specific myocardial disease caused the impairment of the left ventricular function. EMB analysis resulted in the diagnosis of a virus‐negative, active myocarditis. Based on this diagnosis, an immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine was started, which led to an improvement of cardiac function and symptoms within 3 months after initiating therapy. In conclusion, we show that external stress triggered by myocarditis can induce a reversible transition from a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to a dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype. This case strongly underlines the need for a thorough and invasive examination of heart failure of unknown causes, including EMB investigations as recommend by the actual ESC position statement. PMID:27774273

  17. Vortex structure in strongly stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdalena Matulka, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Turbulence decaying experiments have been performed, with the aim of focusing in the middle of a strongly stratified density interface. The experiments have been done under different external conditions[1]: Non-Rotating Decaying 2D Turbulence experiments , Rotating Decaying 2D Turbulence experiments, And steady rotating stratified experiments. Non-Rotating experiments were performed in a 1mx1m tank, while the Rotating experiments were performed in a rectangular tank of 4mx 2m; this rectangular tank was placed in the middle of the Coriolis Rotating platform at the Trondheim Marine Systems Research Infrastructure supported by the European Union TMR Project HydraLab. The set of stirred experiments is a compilation of several series of traversing grid mixing experiments, dependent on the initial interface Richardson number [2]. PIV was used to map the velocity and vorticity plots in time. The density of the brine used in the experiments to create a sharp density interface. The boundary conditions for all the rotating experiment are related to initial Reynolds Rer, Rossby Ro, Ekman Ek and Richardson gradient Rig numbers, the results are summarized and presented in a 3D parameter map using power relationships. The experimental results of the strongly non-homogeneous turbulent dynamics shows the different decay of the strongest vortices as a function of the local Richardson number and the interaction mechanisms between inertial and internal waves. A study of vortex decay number indicates a strong non linear relationship with a slower decay due to the internal wave activity at intermediate Richardson number experiments. The intermittency of the flow is studied using a generalized intermitency parameter family that depends on the order.[3,4] [1] Matulka A.M. PhD Thesis UPC, Barcelona 2010. [2]Matulka A.M., Redondo J.M. and Carrillo A. Experiments in rotating decaying 2D flows Il nuovo cimento C, 31, 5-6, 757-770. 2008. [3]Ben-Mahjoub O., Babiano A. y Redondo J.M. Velocity

  18. Jet-front systems nearing strongly stratified region in differentially heated, rotating stratified annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Joran; Achatz, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    The differentially heated, rotating annulus configuration has been used for a long time as a model system of the earth troposphere. It can easily reproduce thermal wind and baroclinic waves in the laboratory. It has recently been shown numerically that provided the Rossby number, the rotation rate and the Brunt-Väisälä frequency were well chosen, this configuration also reproduces the spontaneous emission of gravity waves by jet front systems [1]. This offers a very practical configuration in which to study an important process of emission of atmospheric gravity waves. It has also been shown experimentally that this configuration can be modified in order to add the possibility for the emitted wave to reach a strongly stratified region [2]. It thus creates a system containing a model troposphere where gravity waves are spontaneously emitted and can propagate to a model stratosphere. For this matter a stratification was created using a salinity gradient in the experimental apparatus. Through double diffusion, this generates a strongly stratified layer in the middle of the flow (the model stratosphere) and two weakly stratified region in the top and bottom layers (the model troposphere). In this poster, we present simulations of this configuration displaying baroclinic waves in the top and bottom layers. We aim at creating jet front systems strong enough that gravity waves can be spontaneously emitted. This will thus offer the possibility of studying the wave characteristic and mechanisms in emission and propagation in details. References [1] S. Borchert, U. Achatz, M.D. Fruman, Spontaneous Gravity wave emission in the differentially heated annulus, J. Fluid Mech. 758, 287-311 (2014). [2] M. Vincze, I. Borcia, U. Harlander, P. Le Gal, Double-diffusive convection convection and baroclinic instability in a differentially heated and initially stratified rotating system: the barostrat instability, Fluid Dyn. Res. 48, 061414 (2016).

  19. Phylogenetic diversity of archaea and bacteria in the anoxic zone of a meromictic lake (Lake Pavin, France).

    PubMed

    Lehours, Anne-Catherine; Evans, Paul; Bardot, Corinne; Joblin, Keith; Gérard, Fonty

    2007-03-01

    The compositions of archaeal and bacterial populations at different depths (60 m [mixolimnion-chemocline interface], 70 m [chemocline-subchemocline interface], 90 m, and 92 m [the water-sediment interface]) in the anoxic zone of the water column in Lake Pavin, a freshwater permanently stratified mountain lake in France, were determined. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from sequences to assess archaeal and bacterial diversity at the four sites.

  20. Ablation of hypertrophic septum using radiofrequency energy: an alternative for gradient reduction in patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Riedlbauchová, Lucie; Janoušek, Jan; Veselka, Josef

    2013-06-01

    Alcohol septal ablation and surgical myectomy represent accepted therapeutic options for treatment of symptomatic patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Long-term experience with radiofrequency ablation of arrhythmogenic substrates raised a question if this technique might be effective for left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient reduction. We report on a 63-year-old patient with recurrence of symptoms 1 year after alcohol septal ablation (ASA) leading originally to a significant reduction of both symptoms and gradient. Due to a new increase of gradient in the LVOT up to 200 mm Hg with corresponding worsening of symptoms and due to refusal of surgical myectomy by the patient, endocardial radiofrequency ablation of the septal hypertrophy (ERASH) was indicated. Radiofrequency ablation was performed in the LVOT using irrigated-tip ablation catheter; the target site was identified using intracardiac echocardiography and electroanatomical CARTO mapping. ERASH caused an immediate gradient reduction due to hypokinesis of the ablated septum. At 2-month follow-up exam, significant clinical improvement was observed, together with persistent gradient reduction assessed with Doppler echocardiography. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance revealed persistent septal hypokinesis and slight thinning of the ablated region. Septal ablation using radiofrequency energy may be a promising alternative or adjunct to the treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Intracardiac echocardiography and electroanatomical CARTO mapping enable exact lesion placement and preservation of atrioventricular conduction.

  1. Z-Estimation and Stratified Samples

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, Norman E.; Hu, Jie; Wellner, Jon A.

    2015-01-01

    The infinite dimensional Z-estimation theorem offers a systematic approach to joint estimation of both Euclidean and non-Euclidean parameters in probabiity models for data. It is easily adapted for stratified sampling designs. This is important in applications to censored survival data because the inverse probability weights that modify the standard estimating equations often depend on the entire follow-up history. Since the weights are not predictable, they complicate the usual theory based on martingales. This paper considers joint estimation of regression coefficients and baseline hazard functions in the Cox proportional and Lin-Ying additive hazards models. Weighted likelihood equations are used for the former and weighted estimating equations for the latter. Regression coefficients and baseline hazards may be combined to estimate individual survival probabilities. Efficiency is improved by calibrating or estimating the weights using information available for all subjects. Although inefficient in comparison with likelihood inference for incomplete data, which is often difficult to implement, the approach provides consistent estimates of desired population parameters even under model misspecification. PMID:25588605

  2. Elliptical instability in stably stratified fluid interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, J.; Hollerbach, R.; Schaeffer, N.; Cebron, D.

    2016-12-01

    Self-sustained magnetic fields in celestial bodies (planets, moons, stars) are due to flows in internal electrically conducting fluids. These fluid motions are often attributed to convection, as it is the case for the Earth's liquid core and the Sun. However some past or present liquid cores may be stably stratified. Alternative mechanisms may thus be needed to understand the dynamo process in these celestial objects. Turbulent flows driven by mechanical forcings, such as tides or precession, seem very promising since they are dynamo capable. However the effect of density stratification is not clear, because it can stabilize or destabilize mechanically-driven flows.To mimic an elliptical distortion due to tidal forcing in spherical geometry (full sphere and shell), we consider a theoretical base flow with elliptical streamlines and an associated density profile. It allows to keep the numerical efficiency of spectral methods in this geometry. The flow satisfies the stress-free boundary condition. We perform the stability analysis of the base state using three-dimensional simulations to study both the linear and nonlinear regimes. Stable and unstable density profiles are considered. A complementary local stability analysis (WKB) is also performed. We show that elliptical instability can still grow upon a stable stratification. We also study the mixing of the stratification by the elliptical instability. Finally we look at the dynamo capability of these flows.

  3. Viscosity stratified fluids in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, Alfredo; Ahmadi, Somayeh; Roccon, Alessio; Zonta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is used to study the turbulent Poiseuille flow of two immiscible liquid layers inside a rectangular channel. A thin liquid layer (fluid 1) flows on top of a thick liquid layer (fluid 2), such that their thickness ratio is h1 /h2 = 1 / 9 . The two liquid layers have the same density but different viscosities (viscosity-stratified fluids). In particular, we consider three different values of the viscosity ratio λ =ν1 /ν2 : λ = 1 , λ = 0 . 875 and λ = 0 . 75 . Numerical Simulations are based on a Phase Field method to describe the interaction between the two liquid layers. Compared with the case of a single phase flow, the presence of a liquid-liquid interface produces a remarkable turbulence modulation inside the channel, since a significant proportion of the kinetic energy is subtracted from the mean flow and converted into work to deform the interface. This induces a strong turbulence reduction in the proximity of the interface and causes a substantial increase of the volume-flowrate. These effects become more pronounced with decreasing λ.

  4. Acoustic propagation under tidally driven, stratified flow.

    PubMed

    Finette, Steven; Oba, Roger; Shen, Colin; Evans, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Amplitude and phase variability in acoustic fields are simulated within a canonical shelf-break ocean environment using sound speed distributions computed from hydrodynamics. The submesoscale description of the space and time varying environment is physically consistent with tidal forcing of stratified flows over variable bathymetry and includes the generation, evolution and propagation of internal tides and solibores. For selected time periods, two-dimensional acoustic transmission examples are presented for which signal gain degradation is computed between 200 and 500 Hz on vertical arrays positioned both on the shelf and beyond the shelf break. Decorrelation of the field is dominated by the phase contribution and occurs over 2-3 min, with significant recorrelation often noted for selected frequency subbands. Detection range is also determined in this frequency band. Azimuth-time variations in the acoustic field are illustrated for 100 Hz sources by extending the acoustic simulations to three spatial dimensions. The azimuthal and temporal structure of both the depth-averaged transmission loss and temporal correlation of the acoustic fields under different environmental conditions are considered. Depth-averaged transmission loss varies up to 4 dB, depending on a combination of source depth, location relative to the slope and tidally induced volumetric changes in the sound speed distribution.

  5. Mercury biogeochemical cycling in a stratified estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.P.; Fitzgerald, W.F. ); Hurley, J. ); Hanson, A.K. Jr.; Donaghay, P.L.; Sieburth, J.M. )

    1993-09-01

    Total Hg in the permanently stratified Pettaquamscutt estuary was <25 pM throughout the water column, even in highly sulfidic bottom waters. Particulate Hg was typically >40% of the total Hg. Reactive Hg (Hg[sub R]) was generally <3 pM and decreased with depth, but there is Hg[sub R] even in the anoxic bottom waters. Elemental Hg (Hg[sup 0]) was highest in the mixed layer and below the detection limit at depth. Demethylation is not an important source of Hg[sup 0] in this estuary. Dimethylmercury was not detected. Monomethylmercury (MMHg) was near the detection limit in the mixed layer and increased rapidly in the low oxygen region. Dissolved MMHg correlated with bacteriochlorophyll pigments, suggesting that the microbial community plays an important role in MMHg production in the estuary. The overall distributions of dissolved and particulate Hg species result from the interaction with Fe and Mn redox cycling, particulate scavenging and sinking, and MMHg production in the pycnocline. The estimated rate of MMHg production from Hg[sub R] in the pycnocline region is 1.7% d[sup [minus]1]. Hg[sup 0] and MMHg are formed principally in the mixed layer and in the pycnocline region, respectively. Particulate scavenging is important, and sedimentation, methylation, and Hg[sup 0] production are the principal sinks for Hg[sub R].

  6. Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) suppression for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) recovery in Flathead Lake, Montana, North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.; Hansen, Barry S; Beauchamp, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-native lake trout Salvelinus namaycush displaced native bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Flathead Lake, Montana, USA, after 1984, when Mysis diluviana became abundant following its introduction in upstream lakes in 1968–1976. We developed a simulation model to determine the fishing mortality rate on lake trout that would enable bull trout recovery. Model simulations indicated that suppression of adult lake trout by 75% from current abundance would reduce predation on bull trout by 90%. Current removals of lake trout through incentivized fishing contests has not been sufficient to suppress lake trout abundance estimated by mark-recapture or indexed by stratified-random gill netting. In contrast, size structure, body condition, mortality, and maturity are changing consistent with a density-dependent reduction in lake trout abundance. Population modeling indicated total fishing effort would need to increase 3-fold to reduce adult lake trout population density by 75%. We conclude that increased fishing effort would suppress lake trout population density and predation on juvenile bull trout, and thereby enable higher abundance of adult bull trout in Flathead Lake and its tributaries.

  7. Review of Silicone Gel Sheeting and Silicone Gel for the Prevention of Hypertrophic Scars and Keloids.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuei-Chang; Luan, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Yi-Wen

    2017-05-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are fibroproliferative disorders of dermal tissue after skin injury. Many clinical control studies have reported evidence that silicone gel is effective in preventing and alleviating hypertrophic scarring. Whether silicone gel sheeting prevents hypertrophic scars or keloids requires clear evidence of its clinical effectiveness. This review investigated the effectiveness of silicone gel and silicone gel sheeting for the prevention of hypertrophic or keloid scarring in patients with newly healed wounds. The authors searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and CENTRAL databases (January 1, 1990 to September 24, 2014) for any randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing silicone gel sheeting or silicone gel with a control group for prevention of hypertrophic scars or keloids. All collected trials were assessed for methodological quality, control group and treatment group, and number of participants developing hypertrophic scars and keloids. The authors calculated risk ratios (RR) from each trial for the development of abnormal scarring and combined these using random-effects model meta-analysis. Between-study heterogeneity was calculated by using the I2 statistic. Ten trials in 9 studies were pooled (random effect; I² = 88%). There was a significant difference between the silicone gel sheeting group and the placebo group (RR 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.99; P = .04) in preventing the risk of hypertrophic scars. There was statistical significance in the effectiveness of silicone gel and silicone gel sheeting on the prevention of keloids or hypertrophic scars, especially in skin lesion wounds. However, most of the trials evaluating silicone gel sheeting or silicone gel as a prevention of hypertrophic scars and keloids had poor quality with high or uncertain risk of biases either in study design or in conduct.

  8. White Lake AOC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    White Lake is in Muskegon County along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. It was named an Area of Concern on the Great Lakes under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1987 and delisted in 2014.

  9. Hearing Profile in Patients with Dilated and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Zarea, Gehan Abd El-Rahman; Hassan, Yasser Elsayed Mohamed; Mahmoud, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy may cause disruptions in the micro-vascular system of the stria vascularis in the cochlea, and, subsequently, may result in cochlear degeneration. Degeneration in the stria vascularis affects the physical and chemical processes in the organ of Corti, thereby causing a possible hearing impairment. The objective of this study was to assess the hearing profiles of patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies to determine the relationship between the degree of hearing loss and the degree and duration of the disease and to compare the dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies as regards hearing profile. Methods In this case control study, we studied 21 patients (cases/study group/group 1) and 15 healthy individuals (controls/group 2). Six patients (group 1a) had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and 15 patients (group 1b) had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The data were analyzed using the t-test, chi-squared test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and the Multiple Mann-Whitney test. Results The results of this study showed that 80% of those patients with DCM (group 1b) had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), and 100% of the patients with HCM (group 1a) had mild to severe bilateral sloping SNHL. Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAEs) were present in 14% of the study group and in 100 % of the control group. The results of the measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) showed that 50% of the study group had abnormal latencies compared to the control group, and there was no correlation between the duration of the disease and the degree of hearing loss or DPOAE. Fifty percent of the patients with HCM and 35% of the patients with DCM had positive family histories of similar conditions, and 35% of those with HCM had a positive family history of sudden death. Conclusion The results of this study suggested that the link between heart disease and hearing loss and early identification of hearing loss in patients with

  10. Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis as a Potential Cause of Headache Associated with Temporal Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Tokushige, Shin-Ichi; Matsuura, Hiroyoshi; Hideyama, Takuto; Tamura, Koichi; Maekawa, Risa; Shiio, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a rare case of temporal arteritis associated with hypertrophic pachymeningitis. An 81-year-old man presented with a right temporal headache that had persisted for one month. A right superficial temporal artery biopsy revealed intimal hypertrophy with increased elastic fibers, consistent with temporal arteritis. Brain MRI using gadolinium enhancement showed thickened dura mater on the right frontal and temporal lobes, which led to the diagnosis of hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Intravenous methylprednisolone and oral prednisolone improved the patient's symptoms. According to our findings, hypertrophic pachymeningitis may be a potential cause of an ipsilateral temporal headache associated with temporal arteritis.

  11. Down Syndrome with Complete Atrioventricular Septal Defect, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, and Pulmonary Vein Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mahadevaiah, Guruprasad; Gupta, Manoj; Ashwath, Ravi

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease in infants with Down syndrome is 40%, compared with 0.3% in children who have normal chromosomes. Atrioventricular and ventricular septal defects are often associated with chromosomal aberrations, such as in trisomy 21, whereas hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is chiefly thought to be secondary to specific gene mutations. We found only one reported case of congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and atrioventricular septal defect in an infant with Down syndrome. Here, we report atrioventricular septal defect, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and pulmonary vein stenosis in a neonate with Down syndrome-an apparently unique combination. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature.

  12. Cardiac sarcoid: a chameleon masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anushree; Sulemanjee, Nasir Z; Cheema, Omar; Downey, Francis X; Tajik, A Jamil

    2014-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology often seen in young adults, with cardiac involvement in more than one-quarter of sarcoid patients. The clinical presentation of cardiac sarcoid depends upon the location and extent of myocardium involved. Although cardiac sarcoid may produce asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, it is most commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypertrophic stage of cardiac sarcoid is rarely seen. We describe a case of cardiac sarcoid in a young patient wherein a distinctive appearance of the cardiac sarcoid spectrum from "hypertrophic" stage to thinned/scarred stage, masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy followed by dilated cardiomyopathy, is demonstrated.

  13. An Unusual Type of Localized Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy With Wolf Parkinson White Syndrome Presenting With Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Vatan, Mehmet Bulent; Gunduz, Huseyin; Gurel, Safiye; Kocayigit, Ibrahim; Vural, Ahmet; Demirtas, Saadet; Cakar, Mehmet Akif; Gunduz, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant heart disease that is the most common genetic cardiac disorder. The disease is characterized by excessive thickening of the left ventricular myocardium. The anterior portion of the interventricular ventricular septum is often involved. Asymmetric hypertrophy of apical site, left ventricular free wall, and right ventricle are less common in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that occur in 1% cases. We report a case of a patient with an unusual type of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Wolf Parkinson White (WPW) presenting with pulmonary edema.

  14. Principles of lake sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Janasson, L.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive outline on the basic sedimentological principles for lakes, and focuses on environmental aspects and matters related to lake management and control-on lake ecology rather than lake geology. This is a guide for those who plan, perform and evaluate lake sedimentological investigations. Contents abridged: Lake types and sediment types. Sedimentation in lakes and water dynamics. Lake bottom dynamics. Sediment dynamics and sediment age. Sediments in aquatic pollution control programmes. Subject index.

  15. Magnetic flux concentrations from turbulent stratified convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Brandenburg, A.; Kleeorin, N.; Käpylä, M. J.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The formation of magnetic flux concentrations within the solar convection zone leading to sunspot formation is unexplained. Aims: We study the self-organization of initially uniform sub-equipartition magnetic fields by highly stratified turbulent convection. Methods: We perform simulations of magnetoconvection in Cartesian domains representing the uppermost 8.5-24 Mm of the solar convection zone with the horizontal size of the domain varying between 34 and 96 Mm. The density contrast in the 24 Mm deep models is more than 3 × 103 or eight density scale heights, corresponding to a little over 12 pressure scale heights. We impose either a vertical or a horizontal uniform magnetic field in a convection-driven turbulent flow in set-ups where no small-scale dynamos are present. In the most highly stratified cases we employ the reduced sound speed method to relax the time step constraint arising from the high sound speed in the deep layers. We model radiation via the diffusion approximation and neglect detailed radiative transfer in order to concentrate on purely magnetohydrodynamic effects. Results: We find that super-equipartition magnetic flux concentrations are formed near the surface in cases with moderate and high density stratification, corresponding to domain depths of 12.5 and 24 Mm. The size of the concentrations increases as the box size increases and the largest structures (20 Mm horizontally near the surface) are obtained in the models that are 24 Mm deep. The field strength in the concentrations is in the range of 3-5 kG, almost independent of the magnitude of the imposed field. The amplitude of the concentrations grows approximately linearly in time. The effective magnetic pressure measured in the simulations is positive near the surface and negative in the bulk of the convection zone. Its derivative with respect to the mean magnetic field, however, is positive in most of the domain, which is unfavourable for the operation of the negative

  16. STRATIFIED COMPOSITION EFFECTS ON PLANETARY NEUTRON FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    O. GASNAULT; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    All the bodies of the solar system that are directly irradiated by the galactic cosmic rays, emit enough neutrons to allow a measurement from space. These leakage neutron fluxes are indexes of the surface composition, depending on the energy of the neutrons [1]. Recent work propose geochemical interpretations of these fluxes: the thermal energy range is sensitive to iron, titanium, rare earth elements and thorium [2, 3], the epithermal energy range is sensitive to hydrogen, samarium and gadolinium [2] and the fast energy range is representative of the average soil atomic mass [4]. Nevertheless these studies make the hypothesis of a composition uniform within the footprint of the spectrometer and independent of depth. We show in this abstract that a stratified composition could change significantly the flux intensity and complicate the interpretation of the measurements. The neutron leakage flux is a competition between production effects (sensitive at high energy) and diffusion-capture effects (mostly sensitive at low energy). On one hand, it happens to be that the elements which produce the higher number of neutrons in typical lunar compositions are iron and titanium, which have also large cross section of absorption with the neutrons. On the other hand, the maximum of neutron intensity does not occur at the surface but at about 180 g cm{sup {minus}2} in depth. Therefore, if we have an iron- and/or titanium-rich soil (important production of neutrons) with a top layer having less iron and/or titanium (i.e. more transparent to the neutrons), we can expect an enhancement of the flux compared to a uniform composition.

  17. Stratified composition effects on planetary neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasnault, O.

    2001-01-01

    All the bodies of the solar system that are directly irradiated by the galactic cosmic rays, emit enough neutrons to allow a measurement from space. These leakage neutron fluxes are indexes of the surface composition, depending on the energy of the neutrons (1). Recent work propose geochemical interpretations of these fluxes: the thermal energy range is sensitive to iron, titanium, rare earth elements and thorium (2, 3), the epithermal energy range is sensitive to hydrogen, samarium and gadolinium (2) and the fast energy range is representative of the average soil atomic mass (4). Nevertheless these studies make the hypothesis of a composition uniform within the footprint of the spectrometer and independent of depth. We show in this abstract that a stratified composition could change significantly the flux intensity and complicate the interpretation of the measurements. The neutron leakage flux is a competition between production effects (sensitive at high energy) and diffusion-capture effects (mostly sensitive at low energy). On one hand, it happens to be that the elements which produce the higher number of neutrons in typical lunar compositions are iron and titanium, which have also large cross section of absorption with the neutrons. On the other hand, the maximum of neutron intensity does not occur at the surface but at about 180 g cm(sup (minus)2) in depth. Therefore, if we have an iron- and/or titanium-rich soil (important production of neutrons) with a top layer having less iron and/or titanium (i.e. more transparent to the neutrons), we can expect an enhancement of the flux compared to a uniform composition.

  18. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy hypertrophic obstructive*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Raimundo José Almeida de Oliveira; dos Santos, Adaílton Araújo; Azevedo, Mablo de Castro; Meira, Saulo Sacramento

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare clinical condition caused by a genetic change that results in the formation of structurally or functionally altered collagen. The clinical manifestations are varied, being the most obvious skin hypermotility and increased joint flexibility, although other systems - such as cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological - may also be affected. This paper presents the report of a patient who sought medical attention with complaints of atypical chest pain. Clinical evaluation enabled hypothetical diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Initial electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and 24 hours holter allowed the confirmation of the first hypothesis. A skin biopsy performed later associated clinical data and confirmed the second hypothesis. PMID:26312722

  19. [Cause and prevention of surgical site infection and hypertrophic scars].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Rei

    2012-03-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) occurs at the site of surgery within 1 month of an operation or within 1 year of an operation if a foreign body is implanted as part of the surgery. Most SSIs (about 70%) are superficial infections involving the skin and subcutaneous tissues only. The remaining infections are more serious and can involve tissues under the skin, organs, or implanted material. Hypertrophic scars( HSs) occur frequently on particular sites, including the anterior chest wall. The anterior chest wall is frequently subjected to skin stretching caused by the natural daily movements of the body. Most cases of SSIs and HSs can be prevented by (1) suture technique modification to prevent high stretching tension and ischemia, and (2) appropriate wound care after surgery. It would be useful to avoid subjecting wounded skin to sustained mechanical force, thereby permitting the wound to rest and heal normally.

  20. Aesthetic correction of hypertrophic frontal sinus with beveled osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok Joo; Jeon, Seong Pin; Kim, Jin Woo; Sun, Hook

    2013-01-01

    The authors performed aesthetic correction of hypertrophic frontal sinus in 3 patients with protruded supraorbital region by using beveled osteotomy. Under general anesthesia, a bicoronal incision was performed followed by dissection through the subgaleal plane to the supraorbital ridge. Subsequently, the anterior wall of the frontal sinus was sectioned with a reciprocating saw and an osteotome by using the beveled osteotomy technique. Beveled osteotomy is a technique applied during sectioning of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus whereby the upper portion of the sinus remains intact and the lower portion of the sinus is changed. The technique used by the authors differed from the conventional method in that the existing shape of the outer wall of the frontal sinus was preserved when osteotomy was performed. This technique therefore preserves a more natural contour of the forehead and is advantageous in that it does not require additional interventions.

  1. Distinguishing Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Associated Mutations from Background Genetic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Bos, J. Martijn; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant progress that has been made in identifying disease-associated mutations, the utility of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) genetic test is limited by a lack of understanding of the background genetic variation inherent to these sarcomeric genes in seemingly healthy subjects. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of genetic variation in 427 ostensibly healthy individuals for the HCM genetic test using the “Gold Standard” Sanger sequencing method validating the background rate identified in the publically available exomes. While mutations are clearly over-represented in disease, a background rate as high as ~5% among healthy individuals prevents diagnostic certainty. To this end, we have identified a number of estimated predictive value-based associations including gene-specific, topology, and conservation methods generating an algorithm aiding in the probabilistic interpretation of an HCM genetic test. PMID:24510615

  2. [A case of localized hypertrophic neuropathy in the sciatic nerve].

    PubMed

    Izumi, T; Kusaka, H; Imai, T

    1995-01-01

    A 26-year-old male patient gradually developed muscular atrophy of the right lower leg over a two-year period. Neurological examination revealed absent Achilles tendon reflex and muscular atrophy of the right lower leg and right hamstring muscles. Conduction velocity of the F waves was delayed in the right posterior tibial nerve. A computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion along the proximal segment of the right sciatic nerve. Exploration revealed a fusiformly swollen sciatic nerve. Histological examination showed that a swollen segment of the sciatic nerve was filled with onion-bulb formations of perineurial cells, consistent with the diagnosis of localized hypertrophic neuropathy. This condition should be added to several etiologies of monomelic amyotrophy. Electrophysiological studies and neuroimaging techniques were useful in obtaining differential diagnosis.

  3. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ultra-endurance running - two incompatible entities?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regular and prolonged exercise is associated with increased left ventricular wall thickness that can overlap with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Differentiating physiological from pathological hypertrophy has important implications, since HCM is the commonest cause of exercise-related sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Most deaths have been reported in intermittent 'start-stop' sports such as football (soccer) and basketball. The theory is that individuals with HCM are unable to augment stroke volume sufficiently to meet the demands of endurance sports and are accordingly 'selected-out' of participation in such events. We report the case of an ultra-endurance athlete with 25 years of > 50 km competitive running experience, with genetically confirmed HCM; thereby demonstrating that these can be two compatible entities. PMID:22122802

  4. Fabry Disease Presenting with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Tricuspid Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang-Cheol; Yoo, Han-Wook; Lee, Jae Won; Jang, Jeong Yoon; Heo, Ran

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old female who was diagnosed with nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy since 1999 presented with dyspnea and severe edema on both legs. For the management of her symptom, cardiac surgery including tricuspid annuloplasty, Maze operation and right atrial reduction plasty was performed. During follow-up after cardiac surgery, a plasma α-galactosidase activity was checked for the screening of Fabry disease and the result was around lower normal limit. DNA analysis was implemented for confirmation and it revealed a heterozygote α-galactosidase mutation at exon 6 [c.901C>T (p.Arg301Ter)]. This case suggests that Fabry disease might be easily undetected, and clinical suspicion is critical. PMID:28090261

  5. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy in Patient with Crohn's Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sung-Min; Park, Ki Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Numerous causes of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) have been reported. Commonly, secondary osteoarthropathy accompanies pulmonary diseases such as carcinoma of the lung, pleural tumors, lung abscesses, and bronchiectasis. However, HOA in inflammatory bowel disease is a rare complication. There are only a few reports of secondary HOA with Crohn's disease. Our purpose was to report another case of HOA in Crohn's disease. We describe a case of a 27-year-old man with underlying Crohn's disease presenting with 2 years of pain in multiple joints. Radiographic findings suggested HOA in extremities. We performed a conservative treatment including medication and rehabilitations. The patient's symptoms were much improved at the latest follow-up. Although numerous studies on HOA have been published, the pathogenesis of HOA is still unclear. Various treatment modalities were recommended but further studies to uncover the pathogenesis of HOA with Crohn's disease and to establish a treatment modality are needed. PMID:25025001

  6. ICD Therapy for Primary Prevention in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common and heterogeneous disorder that increases an individual’s risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). This review article discusses the relevant factors that are involved in the challenge of preventing SCD in patients with HCM. The epidemiology of SCD in patients is reviewed as well as the structural and genetic basis behind ventricular arrhythmias in HCM. The primary prevention of SCD with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy is the cornerstone of modern treatment for individuals at high risk of SCD. The focus here is on the current and emerging predictors of SCD as well as risk stratification recommendations from both North American and European guidelines. Issues related to ICD implantation, such as programming, complications and inappropriate therapies, are discussed. The emerging role of the fully subcutaneous ICD and the data regarding its implantation are reviewed. PMID:28116084

  7. Surgery Management of Rare Hypertrophic Frenum in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Stroppa, Sheila de Carvalho; da Silva, Juliana Yassue Barbosa; Tavares, Maria Cristina Reis; Duda, João Gilberto; Losso, Estela Maris

    2014-01-01

    To report a rare case of a lateral frenum hypertrophy in an infant, this paper describes the case of a girl who came to a first dental appointment when she was 4 months old. A hypertrophic lateral frenum in the upper left canine region was detected. A great depression in the gingival rodet separated the anterior maxillary segment from the posterior one and also decreased the lip mobility in this region. A frenectomy was performed when the patient was 11 months old and the clinical follow-up was done up to the age of 30 months. There was normalization in the vestibular insertion of the lateral frenum, lip mobility, physiological development of the maxilla, and eruption of the upper incisors, canines, and first primary molars. Infants should go to a dental examination precociously in order to detect possible congenital and development alterations. PMID:25180104

  8. Surgery management of rare hypertrophic frenum in an infant.

    PubMed

    Stroppa, Sheila de Carvalho; da Silva, Juliana Yassue Barbosa; Tavares, Maria Cristina Reis; Duda, João Gilberto; Losso, Estela Maris

    2014-01-01

    To report a rare case of a lateral frenum hypertrophy in an infant, this paper describes the case of a girl who came to a first dental appointment when she was 4 months old. A hypertrophic lateral frenum in the upper left canine region was detected. A great depression in the gingival rodet separated the anterior maxillary segment from the posterior one and also decreased the lip mobility in this region. A frenectomy was performed when the patient was 11 months old and the clinical follow-up was done up to the age of 30 months. There was normalization in the vestibular insertion of the lateral frenum, lip mobility, physiological development of the maxilla, and eruption of the upper incisors, canines, and first primary molars. Infants should go to a dental examination precociously in order to detect possible congenital and development alterations.

  9. Features of a syndrome with congenital cataract and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cruysberg, J R; Sengers, R C; Pinckers, A; Kubat, K; van Haelst, U J

    1986-12-15

    We studied 12 patients from six unrelated families with a syndrome that has an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance and can be diagnosed from clinical, histologic, and biochemical characteristics. The four major symptoms are congenital cataract, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, mitochondrial myopathy of voluntary muscles, and exercise-related lactic acidosis. The patients had bilateral and total cataract in the first weeks of life, underwent cataract surgery, and developed nystagmus and strabismus. Corrected visual acuity was lower than 20/40 in aphakic eyes. Patients were mentally normal, and at school age they visited a school for blind and visually impaired children. The majority of the patients developed axial myopia with myopic fundus changes; aphakic refraction usually was lower than 10.0 diopters after the first decade. The cardiac myopathy was progressive and the cause of premature death. Three of the 12 patients died in the neonatal period and six patients died in early adulthood.

  10. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a heart in need of an energy bar?

    PubMed Central

    Vakrou, Styliani; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has been recently recognized as the most common inherited cardiovascular disorder, affecting 1 in 500 adults worldwide. HCM is characterized by myocyte hypertrophy resulting in thickening of the ventricular wall, myocyte disarray, interstitial and/or replacement fibrosis, decreased ventricular cavity volume and diastolic dysfunction. HCM is also the most common cause of sudden death in the young. A large proportion of patients diagnosed with HCM have mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, it is unclear how these mutations lead to the cardiac phenotype, which is variable even in patients carrying the same causal mutation. Abnormalities in calcium cycling, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and energetic deficiency have been described constituting the basis of therapies in experimental models of HCM and HCM patients. This review focuses on evidence supporting the role of cellular metabolism and mitochondria in HCM. PMID:25191275

  11. A new era in clinical genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Matthew; Pavlovic, Aleksandra; DeGoma, Emil; Salisbury, Heidi; Brown, Colleen; Ashley, Euan A

    2009-12-01

    Building on seminal studies of the last 20 years, genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has become a clinical reality in the form of targeted exonic sequencing of known disease-causing genes. This has been driven primarily by the decreasing cost of sequencing, but the high profile of genome-wide association studies, the launch of direct-to-consumer genetic testing, and new legislative protection have also played important roles. In the clinical management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, genetic testing is primarily used for family screening. An increasing role is recognized, however, in diagnostic settings: in the differential diagnosis of HCM; in the differentiation of HCM from hypertensive or athlete's heart; and more rarely in preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Aside from diagnostic clarification and family screening, use of the genetic test for guiding therapy remains controversial, with data currently too limited to derive a reliable mutation risk prediction from within the phenotypic noise of different modifying genomes. Meanwhile, the power of genetic testing derives from the confidence with which a mutation can be called present or absent in a given individual. This confidence contrasts with our more limited ability to judge the significance of mutations for which co-segregation has not been demonstrated. These variants of "unknown" significance represent the greatest challenge to the wider adoption of genetic testing in HCM. Looking forward, next-generation sequencing technologies promise to revolutionize the current approach as whole genome sequencing will soon be available for the cost of today's targeted panel. In summary, our future will be characterized not by lack of genetic information but by our ability to effectively parse it.

  12. The genetic basis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cats and humans.

    PubMed

    Kittleson, Mark D; Meurs, Kathryn M; Harris, Samantha P

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in genes that encode for muscle sarcomeric proteins have been identified in humans and two breeds of domestic cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This article reviews the history, genetics, and pathogenesis of HCM in the two species in order to give veterinarians a perspective on the genetics of HCM. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in people is a genetic disease that has been called a disease of the sarcomere because the preponderance of mutations identified that cause HCM are in genes that encode for sarcomeric proteins (Maron and Maron, 2013). Sarcomeres are the basic contractile units of muscle and thus sarcomeric proteins are responsible for the strength, speed, and extent of muscle contraction. In people with HCM, the two most common genes affected by HCM mutations are the myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7), the gene that encodes for the motor protein β-myosin heavy chain (the sarcomeric protein that splits ATP to generate force), and the cardiac myosin binding protein-C gene (MYBPC3), a gene that encodes for the closely related structural and regulatory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C). To date, the two mutations linked to HCM in domestic cats (one each in Maine Coon and Ragdoll breeds) also occur in MYBPC3 (Meurs et al., 2005, 2007). This is a review of the genetics of HCM in both humans and domestic cats that focuses on the aspects of human genetics that are germane to veterinarians and on all aspects of feline HCM genetics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Lake Superior Phytoplankton Characterization from the 2006 Probability Based Survey

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a late summer probability based survey of Lake Superior in 2006 which consisted of 52 sites stratified across 3 depth zones. As part of this effort, we collected composite phytoplankton samples from the epilimnion and the fluorescence maxima (Fmax) at 29 of the site...

  14. Lake Superior Phytoplankton Characterization from the 2006 Probability Based Survey

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a late summer probability based survey of Lake Superior in 2006 which consisted of 52 sites stratified across 3 depth zones. As part of this effort, we collected composite phytoplankton samples from the epilimnion and the fluorescence maxima (Fmax) at 29 of the site...

  15. Lake Powell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The white ring around Lake Powell tells the story. The surface is down 98 feet. This is critical, because Powell, Lake Mead, and other lakes along the Colorado River provide water for millions of people in five states. We are in the eighth year of a drought on the Colorado River. This year was the driest year ever reported in Southern California, and there is a severe drought in Northern California, down to less than 30-percent of snow pack. This ASTER image of part of Lake Powell was acquired in 2001. The gray area depicts the shrunken, reduced 2007 lake extent compared to the extended, larger black area in 2001.

    The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km, and is centered near 37.1 degrees north latitude, 111.3 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  16. Aligning the economic value of companion diagnostics and stratified medicines.

    PubMed

    Blair, Edward D; Stratton, Elyse K; Kaufmann, Martina

    2012-11-26

    The twin forces of payors seeking fair pricing and the rising costs of developing new medicines has driven a closer relationship between pharmaceutical companies and diagnostics companies, because stratified medicines, guided by companion diagnostics, offer better commercial, as well as clinical, outcomes. Stratified medicines have created clinical success and provided rapid product approvals, particularly in oncology, and indeed have changed the dynamic between drug and diagnostic developers. The commercial payback for such partnerships offered by stratified medicines has been less well articulated, but this has shifted as the benefits in risk management, pricing and value creation for all stakeholders become clearer. In this larger healthcare setting, stratified medicine provides both physicians and patients with greater insight on the disease and provides rationale for providers to understand cost-effectiveness of treatment. This article considers how the economic value of stratified medicine relationships can be recognized and translated into better outcomes for all healthcare stakeholders.

  17. Aligning the Economic Value of Companion Diagnostics and Stratified Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Edward D.; Stratton, Elyse K.; Kaufmann, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The twin forces of payors seeking fair pricing and the rising costs of developing new medicines has driven a closer relationship between pharmaceutical companies and diagnostics companies, because stratified medicines, guided by companion diagnostics, offer better commercial, as well as clinical, outcomes. Stratified medicines have created clinical success and provided rapid product approvals, particularly in oncology, and indeed have changed the dynamic between drug and diagnostic developers. The commercial payback for such partnerships offered by stratified medicines has been less well articulated, but this has shifted as the benefits in risk management, pricing and value creation for all stakeholders become clearer. In this larger healthcare setting, stratified medicine provides both physicians and patients with greater insight on the disease and provides rationale for providers to understand cost-effectiveness of treatment. This article considers how the economic value of stratified medicine relationships can be recognized and translated into better outcomes for all healthcare stakeholders. PMID:25562363

  18. 3-D Eutrophication Modeling for Lake Simcoe, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Q.; Duckett, F.; Nairn, R.; Brunton, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Lake Simcoe Region Conservation Authority (LSRCA) and the Province of Ontario are undertaking a series of studies to facilitate management of the pressures of population growth in the Lake Simcoe watershed. With rapid population growth and urban development comes additional land clearing, storm water runoff and the discharge of treated sewage, all of which are sources of increased phosphorus loading to Lake Simcoe. Depressed oxygen levels were linked to phosphorous enrichment of the lake, with the resultant stimulation of algal growth in the sunlit upper waters of the lake, and its subsequent senescence and settling into the hypolimnion where bacterial decomposition consumes oxygen from the stratified waters. This poster describes a 3-D hydrodynamic, thermal and water quality model of Lake Simcoe developed using the Danish Hydraulics Institute (DHI) MIKE3 model. The hydrodynamic module includes wind-driven circulation, temperature variation, development of the thermocline and thermal stratification, and hydraulic forcing from inflowing tributaries. This is linked to the water quality module which simulates the eutrophication processes in the response of the lake to loadings of phosphorus, such as algal growth, the growth of aquatic plants and subsequent oxygen consumption. The model has been calibrated against Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler velocity data, plus measured temperature and water quality data at MOE stations in the lake and water intakes. The model is an important assessment tool for the management of the lake and its watersheds, allowing assessment of the impacts of the urban growth and land use change on the water quality in Lake Simcoe.

  19. Determination of multidirectional myocardial deformations in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by using two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryohei; Mochizuki, Yohei; Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Teshima, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Koyama, Hidekazu

    2017-02-01

    Objectives Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a primary disorder of the myocardium, is the most common cardiac disease in cats. However, determination of myocardial deformation with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in cats with various stages of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has not yet been reported. This study was designed to measure quantitatively multidirectional myocardial deformations of cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods Thirty-two client-owned cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 14 healthy cats serving as controls were enrolled and underwent assessment of myocardial deformation (peak systolic strain and strain rate) in the longitudinal, radial and circumferential directions. Results Longitudinal and radial deformations were reduced in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, despite normal systolic function determined by conventional echocardiography. Cats with severely symptomatic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also had lower peak systolic circumferential strain, in addition to longitudinal and radial strain. Conclusions and relevance Longitudinal and radial deformation may be helpful in the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Additionally, the lower circumferential deformation in cats with severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may contribute to clinical findings of decompensation, and seems to be related to severe cardiac clinical signs. Indices of multidirectional myocardial deformations by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography may be useful markers and help to distinguish between cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and healthy cats. Additionally, they may provide more detailed assessment of contractile function in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  20. Lake Peipsi's eutrophication issue: new insights into large scale water quality modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Gabriel; Flörke, Martina

    2017-04-01

    The large and shallow European Lake Peipsi was polluted with phosphorus loadings from different point and diffuse sources over decades. The lake's trophic state changed from mesotrophic to eutrophic and hypertrophic. In the 1990s phosphorus pollution dropped significantly. However, more than twenty years later the lake is still eutrophic (L. Peipsi s.s.) and hypertrophic (L. Pihkva). It has been determined that internal loadings from a large nutrient pool in the lake's sediments play an important role in the actual phosphorus balance. For a pursuing and comprehensive understanding, there is a need for detailed and integrated water quality data. This is necessary to assess the current state as well as the younger lake nutrient history. However, in-situ data are scarce and difficult to access. To overcome this data sparse situation the global integrated modeling framework WaterGAP3 was applied (i) to test the applicability of a global scale (5 arc minutes resolution) water quality model in a local scale eutrophication study, and (ii) to provide a detailed local analysis of the eutrophication issue for Lake Peipsi. In this setting WaterGAP3 provides a detailed description of phosphorus sources, loadings and concentrations. Furthermore the newly implemented two box eutrophication module provides a long term description of total phosphorus (TP) concentrations in lakes, the consequent potential for toxic algae blooms, and the TP balance components such as the sediment storage. The WaterGAP3 global results such as river discharge, TP loads from different sectors, TP concentration in the lake and in the catchments river system cover a period of 1990-2010. Our model results indicate that the agricultural sector (diffuse source) is the primary source of TP pollution in the Lake Peipsi catchment (45%) followed by background sources (diffuse sources) such as atmospheric deposition and weathering (33%), and domestic point sources (19%). The model results confirm the reported

  1. Community composition of nirS-type denitrifier in a shallow eutrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiang-Ke; Cheng, Zhan-Bing; Li, Jia; Miao, Li-Hong

    2013-11-01

    Denitrification is a major biological process to reduce nitrate to molecular nitrogen (N2). In shallow eutrophic lakes, this process can remove the largest portion of fixed nitrogen and plays an important role in self-purification of this ecosystem. To understand the structure of denitrifying communities in a shallow eutrophic lake, denitrifier communities in four sub-lakes of East Lake in Wuhan, China, were explored by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) analysis and sequencing of nirS gene clone libraries. nirS is a functional marker gene for denitrification encoding cytochrome cd 1-containing nitrite reductase, which catalyzes the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. Both RFLP fingerprints clustering analysis and phylogeny analysis based on the amino acid sequences of NirS revealed that NirS-type communities in East Lake sediment could be roughly divided into three clusters. Cluster I accounted for 74-82 % of clones from the moderately eutrophic sub-lakes Tuan, Tang Ling, and Guo Zheng. Cluster II accounted for 76 % of the communities in hypertrophic sub-lake Miao Lake and cluster III as a minor group (7 % of the total), mainly presented in Miao Lake. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that cluster I was related to the reference clones from a broad range of ecological environments, and clusters II and III were more phylogenetically related to the reference clones from entrophic environments. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that total nitrogen, total phosphate, total organic carbon, and NH4-N and NO2-N were important environmental factors affecting the dispersion of NirS-type denitrifier in the sediments. Cluster I showed a weak relationship with the nutrient content, while cluster II and III were positively related with the nutrient content. Principal coordinates analysis indicated that NirS-type communities from Tuan Lake, Tang Ling Lake, and Guo Zheng Lake sediments were divergent from those found in river, estuary sediment, and forest

  2. Gas slug ascent through rheologically stratified conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capponi, Antonio; James, Mike R.; Lane, Steve J.

    2016-04-01

    Textural and petrological evidence has indicated the presence of viscous, degassed magma layers at the top of the conduit at Stromboli. This layer acts as a plug through which gas slugs burst and it is thought to have a role in controlling the eruptive dynamics. Here, we present the results of laboratory experiments which detail the range of slug flow configurations that can develop in a rheologically stratified conduit. A gas slug can burst (1) after being fully accommodated within the plug volume, (2) whilst its base is still in the underlying low-viscosity liquid or (3) within a low-viscosity layer dynamically emplaced above the plug during the slug ascent. We illustrate the relevance of the same flow configurations at volcanic-scale through a new experimentally-validated 1D model and 3D computational fluid dynamic simulations. Applied to Stromboli, our results show that gas volume, plug thickness, plug viscosity and conduit radius control the transition between each configuration; in contrast, the configuration distribution seems insensitive to the viscosity of magma beneath the plug, which acts mainly to deliver the slug into the plug. Each identified flow configuration encompasses a variety of processes including dynamic narrowing and widening of the conduit, generation of instabilities along the falling liquid film, transient blockages of the slug path and slug break-up. All these complexities, in turn, lead to variations in the slug overpressure, mirrored by changes in infrasonic signatures which are also associated to different eruptive styles. Acoustic amplitudes are strongly dependent on the flow configuration in which the slugs burst, with both acoustic peak amplitudes and waveform shapes reflecting different burst dynamics. When compared to infrasonic signals from Stromboli, the similarity between real signals and laboratory waveforms suggests that the burst of a slug through a plug may represent a viable first-order mechanism for the generation of

  3. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    utility of in vitro assays for stratifying environmental contaminants based on a combination of human bioactivity and rodent toxicity. PMID:21339822

  4. A case of subarachnoid hemorrhage with pituitary apoplexy caused by idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shoko M; Aoki, Makoto; Nakane, Makoto; Nakayama, Hitoshi

    2011-06-01

    Steroid therapy is considered to improve clinical symptoms in hypertrophic pachymeningitis. We present a 70-year-old man with idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis, whose clinical signs progressively worsened despite steroid therapy. He died of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with pituitary apoplexy 2 months after the admission regardless of improvement of laboratory data and magnetic resonance imaging appearance by one-and-half-month steroid therapy. Autopsy revealed thickened dura mater supporting the diagnosis of hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Brain parenchyma is generally not affected by the disease; however, histological investigation suggested that inflammation of the dura caused damage to superior hypophyseal artery resulting in SAH and apoplexy in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland. The higher dose and the longer duration of steroid therapy should have achieved in our case although most laboratory data recovered within the normal range. The aggressiveness of hypertrophic pachymeningitis must be evaluated by clinical signs rather than by laboratory data or imaging examinations.

  5. Use of bilidase for the treatment of experimental hypertrophic postburn cicatrices.

    PubMed

    Loladze, M; Alibegashvili, M; Turmanidze, Ts; Iashvili, B; Kutivadze, D; Chanishvili, T

    2005-01-01

    The efficiency of bilidase (hyaluronidase preparation) was studied in guinea pigs with experimental postburn cicatrices. Bilidase promoted normalization of the structure and histochemical picture of new cicatricial tissue. The drug can be used for the treatment of hypertrophic postburn cicatrices.

  6. Production of cytokines by mononuclear cells of hypertrophic adenoids in children with otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Zelazowska-Rutkowska, Beata; Ilendo, Elzbieta; Skotnicka, Bozena; Wysocka, Jolanta; Kasprzycka, Edwina

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic adenoids with otitis media with effusion is a common infectious disease and present a serious otological problem in children. Cytokines, potent inflammatory mediators, play important role in the initiation of immunological response in otitis media. Adenoids excised due to hypertrophy with or without chronic otitis media with effusion were used to isolate mononuclear cells. Secretion of cytokines by non-stimulated and PHA-stimulated cells was determined by specific ELISAs. We found a significant increase in the production of IL-5 and TNF-α secreted by adenoidal cells of children with otitis media with effusion compared to group with hypertrophic adenoids. No differences were found in the secretion of IL-8, IL-6, and IL-10 between these two groups of patients. Our results suggest a difference between the immunological responses in the course of hypertrophic adenoids with otitis media as compared to hypertrophic adenoids.

  7. Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis-Associated Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis Mimicking Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Hee; Lee, Mi Ji; Lee, Chungbin; Cha, Jihoon; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2017-03-01

    Dural enhancement is a characteristic finding in both spontaneous intracranial hypotension and hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Positional headache is the most important feature that distinguishes the two diseases. We report a patient with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener's granulomatosis) who initially manifested like spontaneous intracranial hypotension. We report here the case of a 63-year old man who presented with severe positional headache. The patient had typical symptoms, symmetric dural enhancement, and a recent history of nontraumatic subdural hygroma which led to the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension, but was finally diagnosed as granulomatosis with polyangiitis-associated secondary hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Cyclophosphamide therapy was effective for the maintenance of remission. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with granulomatosis with polyangiitis can present with positional headache and subdural hygroma, mimicking spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis should be suspected when patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension or hypertrophic pachymeningitis show atypical features. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  8. [Leopard syndrome with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Cabañas, A; Baduí, E; Estañol, B; Aguilar, F; González, N; López, J

    1985-01-01

    We report a case of a 27-year-old woman with Leopard syndrome in which we observed the association of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with arteriovenous cerebral shunt. This association has not been reported previously in the literature.

  9. Subarachnoid block and enlargement of the spinal canal in hypertrophic neuritis.

    PubMed

    De León, G A; Hodges, F J

    1976-06-01

    A case of Dejerine-Sottas hypertrophic neuritis is reported. The patient, a 45-year-old male, suffered from chronic hypertrophic polyneuropathy, abnormal pupils, fasciculations, tremor, back pain, impotence, sphincter disorders, cramps, and lightning pains in the lower extremities. Besides extensive subarachnoid block, there was X-ray evidence of enlargement of the bony spinal canal with scalloping of the lumbar vertebrae. Surgical exploration showed these abnormalities to be due to extreme hypertrophy of the cauda equina. Histologic findings in peripheral nerve and lumbar root biopsies were typical of hypertrophic neuropathy of the onion bulb type. Vertebral changes secondary to hypertrophied nerve roots appear not to have been described before in hypertrophic neuritis; however, knowledge of their possible occurrence may be of practical importance in the management of similar future cases. A simple way of visualizing enlarged peripheral nerves is briefly described.

  10. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the Sphynx cat: a retrospective evaluation of clinical presentation and heritable etiology.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Sarah J; Stern, Joshua A; Meurs, Kathryn M

    2012-04-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is an inherited disease in some feline breeds including the Maine Coon and Ragdoll. In these breeds, distinct causative genetic mutations have been identified. The two breeds appear to have slightly different clinical presentations, including age of diagnosis. The observation that these two breeds may have different clinical presentations, as well as different genetic mutations, suggests that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a diverse disease in the cat. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is poorly described in the Sphynx. The objective of this study was to phenotypically characterize Sphynx hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and to evaluate for a familial etiology. Records of 18 affected cats (11 female, seven male) were evaluated. Age of affected cats ranged from 0.5 to 7 years (median, 2 years). Four affected cats were from a single family and included an affected cat in each of four generations (three females, one male). Further studies are warranted to evaluate for a causative mutation and better classify the phenotypic expression.

  11. Shifts between ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in relation to nitrification potential across trophic gradients in two large Chinese lakes (Lake Taihu and Lake Chaohu).

    PubMed

    Hou, Jie; Song, Chunlei; Cao, Xiuyun; Zhou, Yiyong

    2013-05-01

    Ammonia oxidation plays a pivotal role in the cycling and removal of nitrogen in aquatic ecosystems. Recent findings have expanded the known ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes from Bacteria to Archaea. However, the relative importance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in nitrification is still debated. Here we showed that, in two large eutrophic lakes in China (Lake Taihu and Lake Chaohu), the abundance of AOA and AOB varied in opposite patterns according to the trophic state, although both AOA and AOB were abundant. In detail, from mesotrophic to eutrophic sites, the AOA abundance decreased, while the AOB increased in abundance and outnumbered the AOA at hypertrophic sites. In parallel, the nitrification rate increased along these trophic gradients and was significantly correlated with both the AOB abundance and the numerical ratio of AOB to AOA. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial amoA sequences showed that Nitrosomonas oligotropha- and Nitrosospira-affiliated AOB dominated in both lakes, while Nitrosomonas communis-related AOB were only detected at the eutrophic sites. The diversity of AOB increased from mesotrophic to eutrophic sites and was positively correlated with the nitrification rate. Overall, this study enhances our understanding of the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes by elucidating conditions that AOB may numerically predominated over AOA, and indicated that AOA may play a less important role than AOB in the nitrification process of eutrophic lakes.

  12. Effect of Drag Reducing Polymers on Stratified and Stratified/Annular Flow in a Horizontal Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernica, Patricia; Fleck, Brian; Heidrick, Ted

    2006-11-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the effects of a drag reducing additive (DRA) on two phase flow in horizontal stratified and stratified/annular flow patterns. Experiments were conducted in an air-water flow in a transparent rectangular channel of cross-section 25.4 mm x 50.8 mm and 2.5 m in length. Pressure drop measurements, wave characteristics and observations of entrainment with and without DRA are presented. A non-contact measurement technique using laser induced fluorescence and high speed videography was used to measure span-wise liquid wave heights and to characterize the air-water interface. Pressure drop was measured at the centerline of the duct over a one meter distance. The onset of entrainment was observed visually. Effects of DRA were observed even at a low concentration of 5ppm. This concentration yielded pressure drop reductions of 10-15% which correlate with previous experiments done in horizontal pipelines. Observations also show dampening of roll waves and the suppression of atomization. Al-Sarkhi, A., Hanratty, T.J., Int J. Multiphase Flow, 27, 1151 (2001)

  13. Seasonal habitat selection by lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in a small Canadian shield lake: Constraints imposed by winter conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchfield, P.J.; Tate, L.S.; Plumb, J.M.; Acolas, M.-L.; Beaty, K.G.

    2009-01-01

    The need for cold, well-oxygenated waters significantly reduces the habitat available for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) during stratification of small temperate lakes. We examined the spatial and pelagic distribution of lake trout over two consecutive summers and winters and tested whether winter increased habitat availability and access to littoral regions in a boreal shield lake in which pelagic prey fish are absent. In winter, lake trout had a narrowly defined pelagic distribution that was skewed to the upper 3 m of the water column and spatially situated in the central region of the lake. Individual core areas of use (50% Kernel utilization distributions) in winter were much reduced (75%) and spatially non-overlapping compared to summer areas, but activity levels were similar between seasons. Winter habitat selection is in contrast to observations from the stratified season, when lake trout were consistently located in much deeper waters (>6 m) and widely distributed throughout the lake. Winter distribution of lake trout appeared to be strongly influenced by ambient light levels; snow depth and day length accounted for up to 69% of the variation in daily median fish depth. More restricted habitat use during winter than summer was in contrast to our original prediction and illustrates that a different suite of factors influence lake trout distribution between these seasons. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  14. Overview of the limnology of crater lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Crater Lake occupies the collapsed caldera of volcanic Mount Mazama in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon. It is the deepest lake (589 m) in the United States and the 7th deepest lake in the world. The water column mixes to a depth of about 200 m in winter and spring from wind energy and cooling. The deep lake is mixed in winter and early spring each year when relatively cold water near the surface sinks and exchanges positions with water in the deep basins of the lake. The lake becomes thermally stratified in summer and early fall. The metalimnion extends to a depth of about 100 m; thus most of the water column is a cold hypolimnion. Secchi disk clarity measurements typically are in the upper-20-m range to the low-30-m range in summer and early fall. Concentrations of nutrients are low, although conductivity is relatively high owing to the inflow of hydrothermal fluids. Total chlorophyll is low in concentration, but typically maximal at a depth of 120 m during periods of thermal stratification. Primary production also is low, with the maximum levels occurring between the depth of 40 and 80 m. Phytoplankton taxa are spatially segregated from each other within the water column to a depth of 200 m in summer and early fall. The same generalization applies to the Zooplankton taxa. Water level, clarity, concentrations of total chlorophyll, primary production, and abundances of zooplankton and introduced kokanee salmon exhibit long-term fluctuations. Based primarily on a recent 10-year study of the lake, the lake is considered to be pristine, except for the consequences of fish introductions. ?? 1996 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  15. Overview of the limnology of Crater Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    Crater Lake occupies the collapsed caldera of volcanic Mount Mazama in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon. It is the deepest lake (589 m) in the United States and the 7th deepest lake in the world. The water column mixes to a depth of about 200 m in winter and spring from wind energy and cooling. The deep lake is mixed in winter and early spring each year when relatively cold water near the surface sinks and exchanges positions with water in the deep basins of the lake. The lake becomes thermally stratified in summer and early fall. The metalimnion extends to a depth of about 100 m; thus most of the water column is a cold hypolimnion. Secchi disk clarity measurements typically are in the upper-20-m range to the low-30-m range in summer and early fall. Concentrations of nutrients are low, although conductivity is relatively high owing to the inflow of hydrothermal fluids. Total chlorophyll is low in concentration, but typically maximal at a depth of 120 m during periods of thermal stratification. Primary production also is low, with the maximum levels occurring between the depth of 40 and 80 m. Phytoplankton taxa are spatially segregated from each other within the water column to a depth of 200 m in summer and early fall. The same generalization applies to the zooplankton taxa. Water level, clarity, concentrations of total chlorophyll, primary production, and abundances of zooplankton and introduced kokanee salmon exhibit long-term fluctuations. Based primarily on a recent 10-year study of the lake, the lake is considered to be pristine, except for the consequences of fish introductions.

  16. Successful treatment of hypertrophic herpes simplex genitalis in HIV-infected patient with topical imiquimod.

    PubMed

    Deza, Gustavo; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Curto-Barredo, Laia; Villar García, Judit; Pujol, Ramon M

    2015-12-01

    Hypertrophic herpes simplex genitalis is an atypical presentation of genital herpes described in the context of immunosuppression, particularly HIV-positive patients. This situation can become a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. For this reason, alternative therapies are currently being discussed in the literature. We report a case of hypertrophic genital herpes in a HIV-positive patient who was successfully treated with topical 5% imiquimod after treatment failures with oral and i.v. antivirals.

  17. Pressure therapy in treatment of hypertrophic scar, burn contracture and keloid: the Kenyan experience.

    PubMed

    Haq, M A; Haq, A

    1990-11-01

    A preliminary report of the results of pressure therapy for hypertrophic scar, burn contracture and keloid is presented. Thirty four patients over a four year period were treated with four types of pressure therapy. Results showed over 50% improvement in 21 (61.8%) cases. This method obviated the need for repetitive surgery and no recurrence was noted. Pressure therapy is advocated as an adjunct measure for all cases of hypertrophic scarring, burn contracture and keloid.

  18. Vertical profiles of water and sediment denitrifiers in two plateau freshwater lakes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Guozhu; Chen, Ling; Yang, Yuyin; Wu, Zhen; Tong, Tianli; Liu, Yong; Xie, Shuguang

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the abundance, richness, diversity, and community composition of denitrifiers (based on nirS and nosZ genes) in the stratified water columns and sediments in eutrophic Dianchi Lake and mesotrophic Erhai Lake using quantitative PCR assay and high-throughput sequencing analysis. Both nirS- and nosZ denitrifiers were detected in waters of these two lakes. Surface water showed higher nosZ gene density than bottom water, and Dianchi Lake waters had larger nirS gene abundance than Erhai Lake waters. The abundance of sediment nirS- and nosZ denitrifiers in Dianchi Lake was larger than that in Erhai Lake. nirS richness and diversity and nosZ richness tended to increase with increasing sediment layer depth in both lakes. The distinct structure difference of sediment nirS- and nosZ denitrifier communities was found between in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake. These two lakes also differed greatly in water denitrifier community structure. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis indicated the presence of several different groups of nirS- or nosZ denitrifiers in both lakes. The novel nirS denitrifiers were abundant in both Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake, while most of the obtained nosZ sequences could be affiliated with known genera.

  19. Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Mac, Michael J.; Opler, Paul A.; Puckett Haecker, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    The Great Lakes region, as defined here, includes the Great Lakes and their drainage basins in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. The region also includes the portions of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the 21 northernmost counties of Illinois that lie in the Mississippi River drainage basin, outside the floodplain of the river. The region spans about 9º of latitude and 20º of longitude and lies roughly halfway between the equator and the North Pole in a lowland corridor that extends from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Ocean.The Great Lakes are the most prominent natural feature of the region (Fig. 1). They have a combined surface area of about 245,000 square kilometers and are among the largest, deepest lakes in the world. They are the largest single aggregation of fresh water on the planet (excluding the polar ice caps) and are the only glacial feature on Earth visible from the surface of the moon (The Nature Conservancy 1994a).The Great Lakes moderate the region’s climate, which presently ranges from subarctic in the north to humid continental warm in the south (Fig. 2), reflecting the movement of major weather masses from the north and south (U.S. Department of the Interior 1970; Eichenlaub 1979). The lakes act as heat sinks in summer and heat sources in winter and are major reservoirs that help humidify much of the region. They also create local precipitation belts in areas where air masses are pushed across the lakes by prevailing winds, pick up moisture from the lake surface, and then drop that moisture over land on the other side of the lake. The mean annual frost-free period—a general measure of the growing-season length for plants and some cold-blooded animals—varies from 60 days at higher elevations in the north to 160 days in lakeshore areas in the south. The climate influences the general distribution of wild plants and animals in the region and also influences the activities and distribution of the human

  20. Lake Bonneville

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, Grove Karl

    1890-01-01

    This volume is a contribution to the later physical history of the Great Basin. As a geographic province the Great Basin is characterized by a dry climate, changes of drainage, volcanic eruption, and crustal displacement. Lake Bonneville, the special theme of the volume, was a phenomenon of climate and drainage, but its complete history includes an account of contemporaneous eruption and displacement.

  1. [The stratified H-index makes scientific impact transparent].

    PubMed

    Würtz, Morten; Schmidt, Morten

    2017-04-03

    The H-index is widely used to quantify and standardize researchers' scientific impact. However, the H-index does not account for the fact that co-authors rarely contribute equally to a paper. Accordingly, we propose the use of a stratified H-index to measure scientific impact. The stratified H-index supplements the conventional H-index with three separate H-indices: one for first authorships, one for second authorships and one for last authorships. The stratified H-index takes scientific output, quality and individual author contribution into account.

  2. Waves in Turbulent Stably-Stratified Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobitz, F. G.; Rogers, M. M.; Ferziger, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Two approaches for the identification of internal gravity waves in sheared and unsheared homogeneous stratified turbulence are investigated. First, the phase angle between the vertical velocity and density fluctuations is considered. It is found, however, that a continuous distribution of the phase angle is present in weakly and strongly stratified flow. Second, a projection onto the solution of the linearized inviscid equations of motion of unsheared stratified flow is investigated. It is found that a solution of the fully nonlinear viscous Navier-Stokes equations can be represented by the linearized inviscid solution. The projection yields a decomposition into vertical wave modes and horizontal vortical modes.

  3. Observation of an internal wave attractor in a confined, stably stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Leo R. M.; Benielli, Dominique; Sommeria, Joël; Lam, Frans-Peter A.

    1997-08-01

    When a container of water is vibrated, its response can be described in terms of large-scale standing waves-the eigenmodes of the system. The belief that enclosed continuous media always possess eigenmodes is deeply rooted. Internal gravity waves in uniformly stratified fluids, however, present a counterexample. Such waves propagate at a fixed angle to the vertical that is determined solely by the forcing frequency, and a sloping side wall of the container will therefore act as a lens, resulting in ray convergence or divergence. An important consequence of this geometric focusing is the prediction that, following multiple reflections, these waves will evolve onto specific paths-or attractors-whose locations are determined only by the frequency. Here we report the results of laboratory experiments that confirm that internal-wave attractors, rather than eigenmodes, determine the response of a confined, stably stratified fluid over a broad range of vibration frequencies. The existence of such attractors could be important for mixing processes in ocean basins and lakes, and may be useful for analysing oscillations of the Earth's liquid core and the stability of spinning, fluid-filled spacecraft.

  4. Involvement of impaired desmosome-related proteins in hypertrophic scar intraepidermal blister formation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianglin; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one of the unique fibrotic diseases in human. Intraepidermal blister is a common clinical symptom following the hypertrophic scar formation. However, little is known about the reason of blister creation. In this study, we selected three patients with hypertrophic scar as manifested by raised, erythematous, pruritic, blister and thickened appearance undergoing scar resection. The first scar sample was 6 months after burn from the neck of a 3 years old male patient with 10 score by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). The second scar sample was 12 months after burn from the dorsal foot of a 16 years old female patient with 13 score by VSS. The third one was 9 months after burn from the elbow of a 34 years old male patients with 13 score by VSS. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of blister formation, we screened the different protein expression between hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue by means of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology and high throughput 2D LC-MS/MS. There were 48 proteins found to be downregulated in hypertrophic scar. Among the downregulated ones, plakophilin1 (PKP1), plakophilin3 (PKP3) and desmoplakin (DSP) were the desmosome-related proteins which were validated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay. Transmission electron microscopy further showed the considerably reduced size and intensity of hemidesmosome and desmosome in hypertrophic scar tissue, compared to control normal skin. Our data indicted for the first time that downregulation of DSP, PKP1 and PKP3 in hypertrophic scar might be responsible for intraepidermal blister formation.

  5. [Rehabilitation of phonosurgically treated patients with edematous-hypertrophic changes of larynx].

    PubMed

    Kosztyła-Hojna, Bożena; Moskal, Diana; Falkowski, Dawid; Łobaczuk-Sitnik, Anna; Kraszewska, Anna; Skorupa, Małgorzata

    2016-08-01

    Advanced change of organic dysphonia are an indication for phonosurgery. Edematous-hypertrophic changes are cause of serious disturbances of voice. High-speed digital imaging (HSDI) technique is the unique method, allowing for assessment the effects of therapy and rehabilitation. The aim of the study is evaluation the usefulness of vibratory method in voice rehabilitation of patients with edematous-hypertrophic changes treated phonosurgically. The group I contained 40 patients with edematous-hypertrophical changes phonosurgically treated. Type of clinical dysphonia was diagnosed with HSDI technique. Glottal closure was evaluated according to Committee on Phoniatrics of the European Laryngological Society (ELS) classification, postoperative material was pathomorphologically verified by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Patients with hyperfunction of larynx were rehabilitated for 21 days using massage device and after that visualization of larynx by HSDI technique was made again. Control group contains people with physiological voice. Severe dysphonia with oedematous-hypertrophic changes was found by HSDI technique in group I. Postoperative material was evaluated histopathological by TEM and confirmed the existing clinical morphological changes of larynx. Hyperfunction of phonation organ were diagnosed in 30 patients (75%). After 21 days of rehabilitation using massage device, hyperfunction was reduced as confirmed by HSDI. Normalization of amplitude, regularity, synchrony of vibration and physiological glottal closure were found at 67% cases. HSDI technique in digital sequence is useful in the diagnosis of edematous-hypertrophic changes of the larynx and monitoring the effects of the rehabilitation. Pathomorphological evaluation of postoperative material made by TEM confirmed the rightness of clinical diagnosis of the edematous-hypertrophic changes by HSDI. The consequence of phonosurgical procedures in edematous-hypertrophic changes of larynx is hyperfunction

  6. Gene regulatory mechanisms governing energy metabolism during cardiac hypertrophic growth.

    PubMed

    Lehman, John J; Kelly, Daniel P

    2002-04-01

    Studies in a variety of mammalian species, including humans, have demonstrated a reduction in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and increased glucose utilization in pathologic cardiac hypertrophy, consistent with reinduction of the fetal energy metabolic program. This review describes results of recent molecular studies aimed at delineating the gene regulatory events which facilitate myocardial energy substrate switches during hypertrophic growth of the heart. Studies aimed at the characterization of transcriptional control mechanisms governing FAO enzyme gene expression in the cardiac myocyte have defined a central role for the fatty acid-activated nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR(alpha)). Cardiac FAO enzyme gene expression was shown to be coordinately downregulated in murine models of ventricular pressure overload, consistent with the energy substrate switch away from fatty acid utilization in the hypertrophied heart. Nuclear protein levels of PPAR(alpha) decline in the ventricle in response to pressure overload, while several Sp and nuclear receptor transcription factors are induced to fetal levels, consistent with their binding to DNA as transcriptional repressors of rate-limiting FAO enzyme genes with hypertrophy. Knowledge of key components of this transcriptional regulatory pathway will allow for the development of genetic engineering strategies in mice that will modulate fatty acid oxidative flux and assist in defining whether energy metabolic derangements play a primary role in the development of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy and eventual progression to heart failure.

  7. The Signaling Pathways Involved in Chondrocyte Differentiation and Hypertrophic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes communicate with each other mainly via diffusible signals rather than direct cell-to-cell contact. The chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is well regulated by the interactions of varieties of growth factors, cytokines, and signaling molecules. A number of critical signaling molecules have been identified to regulate the differentiation of chondrocyte from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), SRY-related high-mobility group-box gene 9 (Sox9), parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (Ihh), fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), and β-catenin. Except for these molecules, other factors such as adenosine, O2 tension, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) also have a vital role in cartilage formation and chondrocyte maturation. Here, we outlined the complex transcriptional network and the function of key factors in this network that determine and regulate the genetic program of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:28074096

  8. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy--state of the art in 2007.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Silvia; Costa, Susana; Monteiro, Pedro; Gonçalves, Lino; Providência, Luís A

    2008-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary disease of the sarcomere, with considerable genetic heterogeneity and variability in phenotypic expression, whose main complication is sudden cardiac death (SCD). Genetic aspects of HCM, its molecular pathophysiology and genotype-phenotype relationships are the subject of this review, which is aimed at better understanding of practical management in this patient population. As HCM is a genetic disease whose initial manifestation can be sudden death, it is essential to establish the diagnosis at an early stage, to proceed with risk stratification and implementation of SCD prevention strategies, and to promote genetic counseling of patients and screening of their families. Detection of pathological mutations through progressive sequencing of the genes most commonly involved is the most efficient way to diagnose HCM, even in the absence of clinical evidence of the disease. Identification of individuals at high risk of SCD is a major challenge in the management of this population, since SCD can be prevented by use of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. The selection of patients for prophylactic implantation of these devices, particularly those who have only one major risk factor, is currently the subject of controversy.

  9. Hemolytic anemia in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Toru; Kitaoka, Hiroaki; Terauchi, Yasunobu; Tamura, Shinjiro; Okawa, Makoto; Yamasaki, Naohito; Yabe, Toshikazu; Doi, Yoshinori L

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman was referred for further evaluation and treatment of normocytic and normochromic anemia with hemoglobin level of 8.6 g/dL. A peripheral blood smear showed fragmented erythrocytes. The patient was then referred to the department of cardiology because of systolic murmur, ECG abnormality, and red cell fragmentation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with particularly increased interventricular septal thickness of 24 mm and a hyperkinetic wall motion, resulting in marked obstruction to left ventricular outflow tract (pressure gradient of 200 mmHg). Mitral regurgitation due to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflets was also seen. The cause of anemia was thought to be mechanical intravascular hemolysis due to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and mitral regurgitation. She was treated with atenolol and the class Ia antiarrhythmic drug cibenzoline to relieve the outflow tract obstruction, and the pressure gradient was reduced to 70 mmHg. After 3 months of treatment, her hemoglobin level had increased to 11.4 g/dL without additional treatment for anemia.

  10. The Ups and Downs of Genetic Diagnosis of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Juan; Reguero, Julián R; Coto, Eliecer

    2016-01-01

    Massive DNA sequencing, also known as next-generation sequencing, has revolutionized genetic diagnosis. This technology has reduced the effort and cost needed to analyze several genes simultaneously and has made genetic evaluation available to a larger number of patients. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, genetic analysis has increased from the 3 main genes implicated in the disease (MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2) to sequencing of more than 20 related genes. Despite the advantages of acquiring this additional information, many patients show variants of uncertain significance (mainly amino acid changes), which may also be present in at least 1 healthy control undergoing genome sequencing. This will be a dead-end situation unless the variant can be demonstrated to be associated with the disease in the patient's family. In the absence of clear evidence that these variants are truly pathogenic, they cannot be used for reliable genetic counselling in family members. Massive sequencing also enables identification of new candidate genes, but again, the problem of variants of uncertain significance limits the success of these assessments.

  11. Exercise heart rates in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong-Chang; Dimaano, Veronica L; Kembro, Jackelyn M; Hilser, Alex; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, David; Pozios, Iraklis; Tomas, Miguel S; Yalcin, Hulya; Dolores-Cerna, Ketty; Mormontoy, Wilfredo; Aon, Miguel A; Cameron, Duke; Bluemke, David A; Stewart, Kerry J; Russell, Stuart D; Cordova, Jorge G; Abraham, Theodore P; Abraham, M Roselle

    2015-04-15

    The exercise heart rate (HR) profile and its relation to cardiac function and arrhythmias were investigated in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Chronotropic response (CR) and heart rate recovery (HRR) were computed during and after treadmill exercise testing in 273 patients with HC and 95 age-matched healthy controls. Patients with HC had higher prevalence of chronotropic incompetence and lower HRR1-5min compared with controls. Exercise capacity, diastolic function (assessed by E/e') and left atrial volume index were associated with HRR1min and CR in HC. Septal myectomy was associated with reduction in chronotropic incompetence but did not affect HRR1min. In conclusion, impaired CR and HRR1min are associated with advanced disease and do not appear to be independent clinical markers indicating high-risk status in HC. Improving CR by titrating doses of negative chronotropic agents, myectomy, and atrial pacing may be useful to increase exercise capacity in patients with HC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Perioperative management for patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy undergoing noncardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Okuyama, A; Goda, Y; Kawahigashi, H; Takita, K; Okuyama, M; Kubota, M

    1992-01-01

    We had two patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy for noncardiac surgeries. Case 1: A 74-year-old man for right nephrectomy received epidural lidocaine and nitrous oxide combined with 0.2-0.6% isoflurane. During the operation, heart rate and blood pressure were relatively unstable, but he woke up promptly after the operation. Early on the morning of the 2nd post-operative day, he was found dead on his bed. Case 2: A 52-year-old man for gastrectomy was anesthetized with nitrous oxide and halothane with continuous propranolol infusion. Through the operative period, heart rate and blood pressure were stable and postoperative course was uneventful. In these two patients, preoperative Holter ECG showed ventricular tachycardia, which may increase the risk of a sudden death. These cases demonstrate that general anesthesia with nitrous oxide combined with halothane, can be administered with a low risk in patients with HCM for noncardiac surgery and that postoperative intensive care unit monitoring is necessary for these patients for several days to prevent a sudden death.

  13. Hypertrophic Olivary Degeneration: A Neurosurgical Point of View.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Carlos Henrique; Kimmig, Hubert; Lopez, William Omar Contreras; Lange, Manfred; Oeckler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) is a rare form of transsynaptic degeneration characterized by hypertrophy of the inferior olivary nucleus situated in the olivary body, part of the medulla oblongata, representing a major source of input to the cerebellum. HOD typically results from focal lesions interrupting connections from the inferior olive within the dentato-rubro-olivary pathway, a region also known as the triangle of Guillain-Mollaret (TGM) (red nucleus, inferior olivary nucleus, and contralateral dentate nucleus). Clinically, HOD presents classically as palatal tremor and can include dentatorubral tremor and/or ocular myoclonus. The pathologic changes associated with HOD feature radiologic changes with the inferior olivary nucleus appearing larger and increasing its T2-weighted signal intensity on magnetic resonance images. HOD is commonly managed with pharmacotherapy but may require surgical intervention in extreme cases. HOD has been found to develop as a consequence of any injury that disrupts the TGM pathways (e.g., pontine cavernoma).These findings highlight the critical importance of a thorough knowledge of TGM anatomy to avoid secondary HOD. We present a patient who developed HOD secondary to resection of a tectal plate cavernous malformation and review the literature with an emphasis on the current knowledge of this disorder.

  14. Diastolic filling in a physical model of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schovanec, Joseph; Samaee, Milad; Lai, Hong Kuan; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited heart disease that affects as much as one in 500 individuals, and is the most common cause of sudden death in young athletes. The myocardium becomes abnormally thick in HCM and deforms the internal geometry of the left ventricle (LV). Previous studies have shown that a vortex is formed during diastolic filling, and further that the dilated LV morphology seen in systolic heart failure results in altering the filling vortex from elliptical to spherical shape. We have also previously shown that increasing LV wall stiffness decreases the filling vortex circulation. However, alterations to intraventricular filling fluid dynamics due to an obstructive LV morphology and locally elevated wall stiffness (in the hypertrophied region) have not been previously examined from a mechanistic standpoint. We conducted an experimental study using an idealized HCM physical model and compared the intraventricular flow fields obtained from 2D PIV to a baseline LV physical model with lower wall stiffness and anatomical geometry. The obstruction in the HCM model leads to earlier breakdown of the filling vortex as compared to the anatomical LV. Intraventricular filling in both models under increased heart rates will be discussed.

  15. Office laser delivery systems for the treatment of hypertrophic turbinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krespi, Y. P.; Slatkine, Michael

    1995-05-01

    We present two different methods to treat hypertrophic turbinates in an office environment: (a) with the aid of 1 mm thin hollow waveguides transmitting a CO2 laser beam to produce char-free ablation of turbinate mucosa, and (b) with the aid of a 800 micron thin optical fiber transmitting low power Nd:YAG laser radiation to interstitially coagulate and shrink submucosal tissue. Char-free ablation of mucusal tissue: An office CO2 laser regularly used for LAUP in the treatment of snoring problems is operated in the Superpulse mode (peak power 350 W) at 8 W average power. The optical beam is coupled to angled and straight hollow waveguides. Ablation of inferior turbinates is performed within a few minutes under topical or local anesthesia. No post operative packing is required and the patient can return to normal activities. Healing is fast due to the highly controlled superficial thermal damage. Interstitial coagulation of inferior turbinates: Submucosal coagulation of tissue is attained with a flat 800 (mu) fiber longitudinally pushed and pulled while operating an Nd:YAG laser at 8 W power level. A 4 - 6 mm thin coagulated and shrunken volume of cylindrical shape is being produced with no damage to bones or mucosa. The procedure is fast and performed under local anesthesia. An analysis of both surgical techniques and clinical results with over 100 patients will be presented.

  16. Intravenous atropine treatment in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, H; Imura, K; Nishikawa, M; Yagi, M; Kubota, A

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To assess the efficacy of a new regimen of intravenous atropine treatment for infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) with special reference to regression of pyloric hypertrophy. Methods: Atropine was given intravenously at a dose of 0.01 mg/kg six times a day before feeding in 19 patients with IHPS diagnosed from radiographic and ultrasonographic findings. When vomiting ceased and the infants were able to ingest 150 ml/kg/day formula after stepwise increases in feeding volume, they were given 0.02 mg/kg atropine six times a day orally and the dose was decreased stepwise. Results: Of the 19 infants, 17 (89%) ceased projectile vomiting after treatment with intravenous (median seven days) and subsequent oral (median 44 days) atropine administration. The remaining two infants required surgery. No significant complications were encountered. Ultrasonography showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in pyloric muscle thickness, but no significant shortening of the pyloric canal after completion of the atropine treatment. The patients exhibited failure to thrive at presentation, but were thriving at 6 months of age (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This atropine therapy resulted in satisfactory clinical recovery. Pyloric muscle thickness was significantly reduced. PMID:12089130

  17. Vps34 regulates myofibril proteostasis to prevent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hirotaka; Eguchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Junko; Kuba, Keiji; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Goto, Akiteru; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi; Imai, Yumiko; Suzuki, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common heart disease with a prevalence of 1 in 500 in the general population. Several mutations in genes encoding cardiac proteins have been found in HCM patients, but these changes do not predict occurrence or prognosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying HCM remain largely elusive. Here we show that cardiac expression of vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34) is reduced in a subset of HCM patients. In a mouse model, muscle-specific loss of Vps34 led to HCM-like manifestations and sudden death. Vps34-deficient hearts exhibited abnormal histopathologies, including myofibrillar disarray and aggregates containing αB-crystallin (CryAB). These features result from a block in the ESCRT-mediated proteolysis that normally degrades K63-polyubiquitinated CryAB. CryAB deposition was also found in myocardial specimens from a subset of HCM patients whose hearts showed decreased Vps34. Our results identify disruption of the previously unknown Vps34-CryAB axis as a potentially novel etiology of HCM. PMID:28097232

  18. Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis mimicking prolactinoma with recurrent vision loss.

    PubMed

    Lok, Julie Y C; Yip, Nelson K F; Chong, Kelvin K L; Li, C L; Young, Alvin L

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis is a rare inflammatory condition with diffuse thickening of the dura mater, which may cause a compressive effect or vascular compromise. We report on a 28-year-old Chinese woman with a history of granulomatous mastitis 7 years previously and oligomenorrhoea, headache, blurred vision, and raised prolactin level 2 years previously, that was diagnosed as prolactinoma and treated conservatively with bromocriptine. However, she had recurrent bilateral vision loss when the bromocriptine was stopped. Her symptoms were resolved by high-dose steroid injection but remained steroid-dependent. Serial magnetic resonance imaging scan showed progressive diffuse thickening of the pachymeningitis with disappearance of pituitary apoplexy. Lumbar puncture showed lymphocytosis with no organisms. Open biopsy of the meninges was performed and histology showed features of inflammatory infiltrates and vasculitis. This is an unusual presentation of a rare condition in this age-group, with co-existing granulomatous mastitis and chronic otitis media, and is a diagnostic challenge mimicking pituitary macroadenoma and meningioma in initial magnetic resonance imaging scans.

  19. An event-driven phytoplankton bloom in southern Lake Michigan observed by satellite.

    SciTech Connect

    Lesht, B. M.; Stroud, J. R.; McCormick, M. J.; Fahnenstiel, G. L.; Stein, M. L.; Welty, L. J.; Leshkevich, G. A.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Chicago; Great Lakes Research Lab.

    2002-04-15

    Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) images from June 1998 show a surprising early summer phytoplankton bloom in southern Lake Michigan that accounted for approximately 25% of the lake's annual gross offshore algal primary production. By combining the satellite imagery with in situ measurements of water temperature and wind velocity we show that the bloom was triggered by a brief wind event that was sufficient to cause substantial vertical mixing even though the lake was already stratified. We conclude that episodic events can have significant effects on the biological state of large lakes and should be included in biogeochemical process models.

  20. Bioenergetic evaluation of diel vertical migration by bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in a thermally stratified reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckmann, Madeleine; Dunham, Jason; Connor, Edward J.; Welch, Carmen A.

    2016-01-01

    Many species living in deeper lentic ecosystems exhibit daily movements that cycle through the water column, generally referred to as diel vertical migration (DVM). In this study, we applied bioenergetics modelling to evaluate growth as a hypothesis to explain DVM by bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in a thermally stratified reservoir (Ross Lake, WA, USA) during the peak of thermal stratification in July and August. Bioenergetics model parameters were derived from observed vertical distributions of temperature, prey and bull trout. Field sampling confirmed that bull trout prey almost exclusively on recently introduced redside shiner (Richardsonius balteatus). Model predictions revealed that deeper (>25 m) DVMs commonly exhibited by bull trout during peak thermal stratification cannot be explained by maximising growth. Survival, another common explanation for DVM, may have influenced bull trout depth use, but observations suggest there may be additional drivers of DVM. We propose these deeper summertime excursions may be partly explained by an alternative hypothesis: the importance of colder water for gametogenesis. In Ross Lake, reliance of bull trout on warm water prey (redside shiner) for consumption and growth poses a potential trade-off with the need for colder water for gametogenesis.

  1. Lake Mackay, Australia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-27

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows Lake Mackay, the largest of hundreds of ephemeral lakes scattered throughout Western Australia and the Northern Territory, and is the second largest lake in Australia.

  2. Fixed subaortic stenosis associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: report of a rare familial occurrence.

    PubMed

    Conte, M R; Bongioanni, S; Dall'Orto, G; Nicastro, C; Bonfiglio, G; Morello, M; Mangiardi, L; Brusca, A

    1998-01-01

    Fixed subaortic stenosis is considered to be an acquired condition. It is often associated with congenital heart disease, creating a turbulence in the left ventricle outflow tract. Familial forms of fixed subaortic stenosis are very unusual. We report a remarkable familial cluster in which fixed subaortic stenosis is associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Fourteen relatives of a patient affected with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and fixed subaortic stenosis underwent cardiological examination, electrocardiogram and echo-doppler study. Two of the proband's sisters showed an association between asymmetrical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and fixed subaortic stenosis. The brother presented a subaortic ridge and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. The other members of the family (another brother and the third-generation relatives) were unaffected. While the association between fixed subaortic stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has commonly been reported, there is little in the literature to suggest the family-related nature of this association. The familial occurrence of this association reveals genetic transmission, with a recessive autosomal pattern of inheritance. This finding goes against the usual autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Familial studies of FSS are needed in order to gain a better understanding of the genetic background of these patients.

  3. Nutrient dynamics in shallow lakes of Northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Petaloti, Christina; Voutsa, Dimitra; Samara, Constantini; Sofoniou, Mihalis; Stratis, Ioannis; Kouimtzis, Themistocles

    2004-01-01

    GOAL, SCOPE, BACKGROUND: Shallow lakes display a number of features that set them apart from the more frequently studied deeper systems. The majority of lakes in Northern Greece are small to moderate in size with a relatively low depth and are considered as sites of high value of the wetland habitat. However, the water quality of these lakes has only been evaluated segmentally and occasionally. The objectives of this study were to thoroughly investigate nitrogen and phosphorus speciation in lakes of a high ecological significance located in N. Greece, in order to evaluate their eutrophication status and possible nutrient limitation factors, and to investigate the main factors/sources that affect the water quality of these systems. An extensive survey was carried out during the period from 1998-1999. Water samples were collected on a monthly basis from lakes Koronia, Volvi, Doirani, Mikri Prespa and Megali Prespa located in N. Greece. Water quality parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and conductivity), organic indices (COD, BOD5), and N- and P-species (NO3(-), NO2(-), NH4(+), and PO4(3-), Kieldahl nitrogen and acid-hydrolysable phosphorus) were determined according to standard methods for surface water. Statistical treatment of the data was employed. The physicochemical parameters determined in the lakes studied revealed a high temporal variation. The trophic state of the lakes ranged from meso- to hypertrophic. The nutrient limiting factor varied among lakes suggesting either P-limitation conditions or mixed conditions changing from P- to N-limitation throughout the year. Urban/industrial activities and agricultural runoff are the major factors affecting all lakes, although with a varying contribution. This lake-specific research offers valuable information about water quality and nutrient dynamics in lakes of significant ecological value located in N. Greece that can be useful for an effective pollution control/management of these systems. Due to the

  4. Modeling the carbon cycle in Lake Matano.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, L B; Laakso, T A; Schrag, D P; Crowe, S A

    2015-09-01

    Lake Matano, Indonesia, is a stratified anoxic lake with iron-rich waters that has been used as an analogue for the Archean and early Proterozoic oceans. Past studies of Lake Matano report large amounts of methane production, with as much as 80% of primary production degraded via methanogenesis. Low δ(13)C values of DIC in the lake are difficult to reconcile with this notion, as fractionation during methanogenesis produces isotopically heavy CO2. To help reconcile these observations, we develop a box model of the carbon cycle in ferruginous Lake Matano, Indonesia, that satisfies the constraints of CH4 and DIC isotopic profiles, sediment composition, and alkalinity. We estimate methane fluxes smaller than originally proposed, with about 9% of organic carbon export to the deep waters degraded via methanogenesis. In addition, despite the abundance of Fe within the waters, anoxic ferric iron respiration of organic matter degrades <3% of organic carbon export, leaving methanogenesis as the largest contributor to anaerobic organic matter remineralization, while indicating a relatively minor role for iron as an electron acceptor. As the majority of carbon exported is buried in the sediments, we suggest that the role of methane in the Archean and early Proterozoic oceans is less significant than presumed in other studies.

  5. Mechanisms of contaminant transport in a multi-basin lake.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Francisco J; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Clark, Jordan F

    2008-12-01

    Tracer studies are combined with a three-dimensional (3-D) numerical modeling study to provide a robust description of hydrodynamic and particle transport in Clear Lake, a multi-basin, polymictic lake in northern California, USA. The focus is on the mechanisms of transport of contaminants away from the vicinity of the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine and out of the Oaks Arm to the rest of the lake and the hydraulic connection existing among the sub-basins of the lake. Under stratified conditions, the rate of spreading of the tracer was found to be large. In less than a week the tracer spread from the eastern end of the Oaks Arm to the other basins. Under non-stratified conditions, the tracer spread more slowly and had a concentration that gradually diminished with distance from the injection location. The numerical results showed that the mechanisms accounting for these observed patterns occur in pulses, with maximum rates coinciding with the stratified periods. Stratification acts first to enhance the currents by inhibiting vertical momentum mixing and decoupling the surface currents from bottom friction. The diversity of the flow structures that results from the interaction of the wind and the density fields in the lake is responsible for the high dispersion rates. Contaminants originating in the Oaks Arm are shown to be transported into the Lower Arm following the surface currents and into the Upper Arm mainly through the bottom currents. It was also shown that, under stratified conditions, both the baroclinic (density driven) gradients and the wind forcing act jointly to exacerbate the interbasin exchange.

  6. Antibiograms in resource limited settings: Are stratified antibiograms better?

    PubMed

    Saxena, S; Ansari, S K; Raza, M W; Dutta, R

    2016-04-01

    Background Antibiograms often act as a reference guide for empirical selection of antibiotics. Hospital-wide antibiograms constructed on the basis of cumulative antimicrobial susceptibility data from diverse patient groups can often be misleading. In order to show the significance of age- and location-stratified antibiograms, this study compared hospital-wide antibiograms with stratified antibiograms for the clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods Stratified antibiograms were created on the basis of patient age (<18 years, 18-50 years, >50 years) and location (inpatient or outpatient) using all 2011, 2012 and 2013 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa isolates. Susceptibility rates were compared among cumulative and stratified antibiograms using non-parametric inferential statistics. Results The hospital-wide antibiogram under-estimated susceptibility rates in adult patients isolates (age group = 18-50 years) and over-estimated susceptibility rates in isolates from the paediatric patients and elderly. Paediatric isolates were found to be less susceptible to amikacin and imipenem, whereas isolates from elderly patients >50 years were less susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Statistically significant difference was seen in the susceptibility rates of OPD and IPD isolates of P. aeruginosa in the case of the paediatric age group. Susceptibility rates for all drugs were lower for isolates from inpatients than from outpatients. Conclusion Age and location associated differences in susceptibility rates have the potential to influence empirical antibiotic selection, which was shown in stratified antibiograms of P. aeruginosa that is obscured by hospital-wide antibiograms.

  7. Stratified Vortex Rings: Visualization of the Density Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsthoorn, Jason; Dalziel, Stuart

    2016-11-01

    The study of vortex-ring induced stratified mixing has played a key role in understanding stratified turbulent mixing. In this study, we present an experimental investigation of the mechanical evolution and the stratification-modified three-dimensional instability of these vortex rings. Using a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup, we reconstruct a full, three-dimensional, time-resolved velocity field of the interaction of a vortex ring with a stratified interface. This reconstruction agrees with previous two-dimensional studies, while capturing the three-dimensional instabilities of the dynamical evolution. The stratified three-dimensional instability of a vortex ring is similar to the unstratified instability, but here the instability occurs much earlier. Through the use of numerical integration, we use the experimentally determined velocity field to simulate the kinematic evolution of the density stratification. This technique allows us to evaluate the vertical buoyancy flux throughout the vortex-ring interaction, providing a quantitative explanation for the interface sharpening observed within the experiments. Understanding the sharpening mechanism in the context of a vortex ring has direct relevance to understanding the layer formation found in stratified turbulence NSERC, EPSRC.

  8. Clinical significance of giant negative T waves in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso, F.; Nihoyannopoulos, P.; Stewart, J.; Dickie, S.; Lemery, R.; McKenna, W.J. )

    1990-04-01

    To assess the clinical significance of giant negative T waves in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from Western nations, clinical, echocardiographic, radionuclide and 48 h electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring findings were compared in 27 patients with and 56 patients without giant negative T waves. Patients with giant negative T waves were older at diagnosis (43 +/- 15 versus 32 +/- 14 years, p less than 0.005), had greater ECG voltage (SV1 + RV5 = 57 +/- 20 versus 37 +/- 18 mm, p less than 0.001) and had a more vertical frontal plane axis (38.4 +/- 34 versus 13.4 +/- 45 degrees, p less than 0.05). Left ventricular wall thickness on two-dimensional echocardiography was similar at the mitral valve level (mean 16.5 +/- 4 versus 16.6 +/- 3 cm), but was greater at the papillary muscle level (mean 20.7 +/- 5 versus 17.6 +/- 3 mm, p less than 0.01) and apex (mean 23.3 +/- 5 versus 17.3 +/- 3 mm, p less than 0.001) in patients with giant negative T waves. Fewer patients with giant negative T waves had asymmetric septal hypertrophy (12 (44%) of 27 versus 36 (64%) of 56, p = 0.08) or systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (4 (14%) of 27 versus 25 (45%) of 56, p less than 0.01), whereas left ventricular end-diastolic (44.1 +/- 6 versus 39.6 +/- 5 mm, p = 0.01) and end-systolic dimensions (27.8 +/- 4 versus 24 +/- 6 mm, p less than 0.05) were greater in this group. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia was seen on ECG monitoring in 21% of patients in both groups.

  9. Abnormal Mitral Valve Dimensions in Pediatric Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Daryl; Benson, Lee; Windram, Jonathan; Wong, Derek; Dragulescu, Andreea; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark; Al Nafisi, Bahiyah; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) show structural abnormalities other than isolated wall thickening. Recently, adult HCM patients have been found to have longer mitral valve leaflets than control subjects. The aim of the current study was to assess whether children and adolescents with HCM have similar measureable differences in mitral valve leaflet dimensions when compared to a healthy control group. Clinical and echocardiographic data from 46 children with myocardial hypertrophy and a phenotype and/or genotype consistent with sarcomeric HCM were reviewed. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies were evaluated. The anterior and posterior mitral valve leaflet lengths and myocardial structure were compared to 20 healthy controls. The anterior mitral valve was longer in the HCM group than in the control group (28.4 ± 4.9 vs. 25.2 ± 3.6 mm in control patients, p = 0.013) as was the posterior mitral valve leaflet (16.3 ± 3.0 vs. 13.1 ± 2.3 mm for controls <0.0001). There was no correlation between the resting left ventricular outflow tract gradient and anterior mitral valve leaflet length, nor was the anterior mitral valve leaflet longer in those with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve compared to those without (28.9 ± 6.1 vs. 28.1 ± 4.5 mm, p = 0.61). Children and adolescents with HCM have abnormally long mitral valve leaflets when compared with healthy control subjects. These abnormalities do not appear to result in, or be due to, obstruction to left ventricular outflow. The mechanism of this mitral valve elongation is not clear but appears to be independent of hemodynamic disturbances.

  10. [Septal alcohol ablation in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    López-Aburto, Gustavo; Palacios-Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Cantú-Ramírez, Samuel; Galván-García, Eduardo; Tolosa-Dzul, Gonzalo; Morán-Benavente, Armando; Ontiveros-Martínez, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    to know the clinical and hemodynamic course in septal obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (SOHC) after alcohol ablation. this was an observational, longitudinal study, including 21 patients with SOHC with functional class of the New York Heart Association (CF-NYHA) refractory to treatment and/or = 30 mm Hg gradient at rest or = 60 mm Hg provoked, or have systolic anterior motion or mitral incompetence (MI) > grade II by echocardiography. average age was 50 ± 16 years, males 38.1 %, females 61.9 %; symptoms: angina 42.9 %, dyspnea 85.7 %, syncope 23.8 %. Pre-ablation CF-NYHA was III and IV in 61.9 %; after a year follow-up all of them were class I-II. Pre-ablation, after and one year later, interventricle septum measures were 22.7 ± 4.9 and 20.7 ± 3.1 mm; left ventricular ejection fraction was 65.5 ± 7 %, 62.2 % ± 6.5 % and 68.7 ± 6.2 %; the output gradient of the left ventricle were 106.9 ± 29.9, 44.6 ± 24.3 and 22.0 ± 5.7 mm Hg. Pre-ablation MI grade-III and IV were 33.3 % and 47.6 %; after a year it was grade-0, 52.4 %, grade-I 28.6 %, grade-II, 19 %. There were no hospital mortality. the alcohol septal ablation in SOHC patients had a high success treatment with a low complication rate.

  11. Hypertrophic lichen planus versus prurigo nodularis: a dermoscopic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ankad, Balachandra S.; Beergouder, Savitha L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic lichen planus (HLP) classically involves shin and ankles and is characterized by hyperkeratotic plaques and nodules. Prurigo nodularis (PN) is a chronic neurodermatitis that presents with intensely pruritic nodules. Histopathology of HLP and PN demonstrate epidermal hyperplasia, hypergranulosis, and compact hyperkeratosis. The dermis shows vertically arranged collagen fibers and an increased number of fibroblasts and capillaries in both conditions. Moreover, basal cell degeneration is confined to the tips of rete ridges, and band-like infiltration is conspicuously absent in HLP. Therefore, both conditions mimic each other clinically, which makes diagnosis difficult. Hence, there is a need for a diagnostic technique to differentiate both conditions. Objective: To evaluate dermoscopic patterns in HLP and PN and to study these patterns histopathologically. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at S. Nijalingappa Medical College in Bagalkot. It was an observational case series study. Ethical clearance and informed consent was obtained. A Dermlite 3 dermoscope (3Gen, San Juan Capistrano, CA, USA) attached to a Sony Cyber Shot camera DSC-W800 (Sony Electronics Inc., San Diego, California, USA) was employed. Histopathology was done to confirm the diagnosis. Results: There were 10 patients each with HLP and PN. HLP was seen in 8 males and 2 females. PN was observed in 7 females and 3 males. Dermoscopy of HLP demonstrated pearly white areas and peripheral striations (100%), gray-blue globules (60%), comedo-like openings (30%), red dots (40%), red globules (10%), brownish-black globules (30%), and yellowish structures (90%). In PN, red dots (70%), red globules (60%), and pearly white areas with peripheral striations (100%) were observed under dermoscopy. Conclusion: Both HLP and PN demonstrated specific dermoscopic patterns which can be demonstrated on histopathologic findings. The authors propose that these patterns are hallmarks of each

  12. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Genetics, Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Marian, Ali J; Braunwald, Eugene

    2017-09-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic disorder that is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy unexplained by secondary causes and a nondilated left ventricle with preserved or increased ejection fraction. It is commonly asymmetrical with the most severe hypertrophy involving the basal interventricular septum. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is present at rest in about one third of the patients and can be provoked in another third. The histological features of HCM include myocyte hypertrophy and disarray, as well as interstitial fibrosis. The hypertrophy is also frequently associated with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. In the majority of patients, HCM has a relatively benign course. However, HCM is also an important cause of sudden cardiac death, particularly in adolescents and young adults. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, syncope, a family history of sudden cardiac death, and severe cardiac hypertrophy are major risk factors for sudden cardiac death. This complication can usually be averted by implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator in appropriate high-risk patients. Atrial fibrillation is also a common complication and is not well tolerated. Mutations in over a dozen genes encoding sarcomere-associated proteins cause HCM. MYH7 and MYBPC3, encoding β-myosin heavy chain and myosin-binding protein C, respectively, are the 2 most common genes involved, together accounting for ≈50% of the HCM families. In ≈40% of HCM patients, the causal genes remain to be identified. Mutations in genes responsible for storage diseases also cause a phenotype resembling HCM (genocopy or phenocopy). The routine applications of genetic testing and preclinical identification of family members represents an important advance. The genetic discoveries have enhanced understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of HCM and have stimulated efforts designed to identify new therapeutic agents. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphism in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B; Peric, S.; Ross, D.

    1994-09-01

    An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) gene is a useful predictor of human plasma ACE levels. ACE levels tend to be lowest in subjects with ACE genotype DD and intermediate in subjects with ACE genotype ID. Angiotensin II (Ang II) as a product of ACE is a cardiac growth factor and produces a marked hypertrophy of the chick myocyte in cell culture. Rat experiments also suggest that a small dose of ACE inhibitor that does not affect the afterload results in prevention or regression of cardiac hypertrophy. In order to study the relationship of ACE and the severity of hypertrophy, the ACE genotype has been determined in 28 patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) and 51 normal subjects. The respective frequencies of I and D alleles were: 0.52 and 0.48 (in FHC patients) and 0.44 and 0.56 (in the normal controls). There was no significant difference in the allele frequencies between FHC and normal subjects ({chi}{sup 2}=0.023, p>0.05). The II, ID, and DD genotypes were present in 7, 15, and 6 FHC patients, respectively. The averages of maximal thickness of the interventricular septum measured by echocardiography or at autopsy were 18 {plus_minus}3, 19{plus_minus}4, and 19{plus_minus}3 mm in II, ID and DD genotypes, respectively. The ACE gene polymorphism did not correlate with the severity of left ventricular hypertrophy in FHC patients (r{sub s}=0.231, p>0.05). These results do not necessarily exclude the possible effect of Ang II on the hypertrophy since the latter may be produced through the action of chymase in the human ventricles. However, ACE gene polymorphism is not a useful predictor of the severity of myocardial hypertrophy in FHC patients.

  14. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: interrater reliability and concurrent validity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    Research into the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertrophic scar (HSc) remains limited by the heterogeneity of scar and the imprecision with which its severity is measured. The objective of this study was to test the interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the Cutometer measurement of elasticity, the Mexameter measurement of erythema and pigmentation, and total thickness measure of the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar, and HSc. Three independent investigators evaluated 128 sites (severe HSc, moderate or mild HSc, donor site, and normal skin) on 32 burn survivors using all of the above measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient, which was used to measure interrater reliability, reflects the inherent amount of error in the measure and is considered acceptable when it is >0.75. Interrater reliability of the totals of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS fell below the acceptable limit ( congruent with0.50). The individual subscales of the mVSS fell well below the acceptable level (< or =0.3). The Cutometer reading of elasticity provided acceptable reliability (>0.89) for each study site with the exception of severe scar. Mexameter and DermaScan C reliability measurements were acceptable for all sites (>0.82). Concurrent validity correlations with the mVSS were significant except for the comparison of the mVSS pliability subscale and the Cutometer maximum deformation measure comparison in severe scar. In conclusion, the Mexameter and DermaScan C measurements of scar color and thickness of all sites, as well as the Cutometer measurement of elasticity in all but the most severe scars shows high interrater reliability. Their significant concurrent validity with the mVSS confirms that these tools are measuring the same traits as the mVSS, and in a more objective way.

  15. Altered patterns of cardiac intercellular junction distribution in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, R.; Severs, N. J.; Gourdie, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the distribution pattern of intercellular junctions (the mechanically coupling desmosomes and the electrically coupling gap junctions) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) hearts showing myofibre disarray. DESIGN: Samples from six necropsied hearts were studied, representing the interventricular septum and the free walls of the left and right ventricles. Immunohistochemical labelling of desmoplakin was used as a marker for desmosomes, and of connexin43 as a marker for gap junctions, in single and double stainings. The slides were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: Marked disorganisation of intercalated discs was observed in areas featuring myofibre disarray. Besides overall derangement, localised abnormalities in desmosome organisation were evident, which included: (1) the formation of abnormally enlarged megadiscs; (2) the presence of intersecting disc structures; and (3) aberrant side to side desmosomal connections. Gap junctional abnormalities included: (1) random distribution of gap junctions over the surface of myocytes, rather than localisation to intercalated discs; (2) abundant side to side gap junction connections between adjacent myocytes; and (3) formation of abnormally shaped gap junctions. Circles of myocytes continuously interconnected by gap junctions were also observed. Regions of the diseased hearts lacking myofibre disarray, and control hearts of normal patients and patients with other cardiac diseases, did not show these alterations. CONCLUSIONS: The disorganisation of the intercellular junctions associated with myofibre disarray in HCM may play an important role in the pathophysiological manifestations of the disease. The remodelling of gap junction distribution may underlie the formation of an arrhythmogenic substrate, thereby contributing to the generation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias associated with HCM. Images PMID:8944586

  16. Clinical Characteristics and Prognosis of End-stage Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yan; Yang, Kun-Qi; Yang, Yan-Kun; Liu, Ya-Xin; Tian, Tao; Song, Lei; Jiang, Xiong-Jing; Zhou, Xian-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background: End-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is complicated by substantial adverse events. However, few studies have focused on electrocardiographic features and their prognostic values in HCM. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical manifestations and prognostic value of electrocardiography in patients with end-stage HCM. Methods: End-stage HCM patients were enrolled from a total of 1844 consecutive HCM patients from April 2002 to November 2013 at Fuwai Hospital. Clinical data, including medical history, electrocardiography, and echocardiography, were analyzed. Cox hazards regression analysis was used to assess the risk factors for cardiovascular mortality. Results: End-stage HCM was identified in 99 (5.4%) patients, averaged at 52 ± 16 years old at entry. Atrial fibrillation was observed in 53 patients and mural thrombus in 19 patients. During 3.9 ± 3.0 years of follow-up, embolic stroke, refractory heart failure, and death or transplantation were observed in 20, 39, and 51 patients, respectively. The incidence of annual mortality was 13.2%. Multivariate Cox hazards regression analysis identified New York Heart Association Class (NYHA) III/IV at entry (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–3.80; P = 0.036), left bundle branch block (LBBB) (HR: 2.80; 95% CI: 1.47–5.31; P = 0.002), and an abnormal Q wave (HR: 2.21; 95% CI: 1.16–4.23; P = 0.016) as independent predictors of cardiovascular death, in accordance with all-cause death and heart failure-related death. Conclusions: LBBB and an abnormal Q wave are risk factors of cardiovascular mortality in end-stage HCM and provide new evidence for early intervention. Susceptibility of end-stage HCM patients to mural thrombus and embolic events warrants further attention. PMID:26021505

  17. Genetics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy after 20 years: clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Maron, Martin S; Semsarian, Christopher

    2012-08-21

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common familial heart disease with vast genetic heterogeneity, demonstrated over the past 20 years. Mutations in 11 or more genes encoding proteins of the cardiac sarcomere (>1,400 variants) are responsible for (or associated with) HCM. Explosive progress achieved in understanding the rapidly evolving science underlying HCM genomics has resulted in fee-for-service testing, making genetic information widely available. The power of HCM mutational analysis, albeit a more limited role than initially envisioned, lies most prominently in screening family members at risk for developing disease and excluding unaffected relatives, which is information not achievable otherwise. Genetic testing also allows expansion of the broad HCM disease spectrum and diagnosis of HCM phenocopies with different natural history and treatment options, but is not a reliable strategy for predicting prognosis. Interfacing a heterogeneous disease such as HCM with the vast genetic variability of the human genome, and high frequency of novel mutations, has created unforeseen difficulties in translating complex science (and language) into the clinical arena. Indeed, proband diagnostic testing is often expressed on a probabilistic scale, which is frequently incompatible with clinical decision making. Major challenges rest with making reliable distinctions between pathogenic mutations and benign variants, and those judged to be of uncertain significance. Genotyping in HCM can be a powerful tool for family screening and diagnosis. However, wider adoption and future success of genetic testing in the practicing cardiovascular community depends on a standardized approach to mutation interpretation, and bridging the communication gap between basic scientists and clinicians.

  18. A myomesin mutation associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy deteriorates dimerisation properties.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Romy; Perrot, Andreas; Keller, Sandro; Behlke, Joachim; Michalewska-Włudarczyk, Aleksandra; Wycisk, Anna; Tendera, Michal; Morano, Ingo; Ozcelik, Cemil

    2011-02-18

    Myomesin plays an important structural and functional role in the M-band of striated muscles. The C-terminal domain 13 of myomesin dimerises and forms antiparallel strands which cross-link neighboring Myosin filaments and titin in the M-line of the sarcomeres. These interactions stabilise the contractile apparatus during striated muscle contraction. Since myomesin is an important component of the M-band we screened the myomesin gene for genetic variants in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We identified the missense mutation V1490I in domain 12 of myomesin in a family with inherited HCM. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments, circular dichroism spectra, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of myomesin fragments were carried out to investigate the effects of the mutation V1490I on structure and function of myomesin domains 11-13 and 12-13. Both the wild type and mutated myomesin domains My11-13 revealed similar secondary structures and formed stable dimers. Mutated myomesin domains My11-13 and My12-13 dimers revealed a reduced thermal stability and a significantly decreased dimerisation affinity, showing disturbed functional properties of V1490I mutated myomesin. However, monomeric myomesin domains My11-12, i.e. without dimerisation domain 13 showed no difference in thermal stability between wild type and V1490I mutated myomesin. In conclusion, the V1490I mutation associated with HCM lead to myomesin proteins with abnormal functional properties which affect dimerisation properties of myomesin domain 13. These effects may contribute to the pathogenesis of HCM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy and Follicular Thyroid Cancer: A Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavarelli, Martina; Sarfati, Julie; De Gennes, Christian; Haroche, Julien; Buffet, Camille; Ghander, Cécile; Simon, Jean Marc; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a rare condition characterized by bone and joint pain and digital clubbing usually associated with bronchopulmonary diseases. Primary HOA is rare and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Objectives Cases of HOA as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with thyroid carcinoma are very rare – only 2 cases have been described in the literature. Results We present the first case of a 40-year-old patient affected by HOA associated with invasive differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma operated in 2 stages. Both operations were followed by radioiodine ablation, and then a rapid unresectable local recurrence developed requiring cervical radiotherapy (70 Gy). A second treatment with 100 mCi of 131I confirmed it was a refractory thyroid cancer. Further surgery confirmed a poorly differentiated follicular cancer and 12 cycles of chemotherapy by gemcitabine and oxaliplatin followed. During the 8 years of follow-up, cervical recurrence was stable, but severe episodes of hemoptysis occurred requiring iterative embolization of the bronchial and tracheal arteries. Other lung diseases were excluded. Digital clubbing appeared, which was associated with arthritis, bone pain and inflammatory syndrome. X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging found periosteal apposition in the long bones; bone scintigraphy confirmed the HOA diagnosis. Other causes of arthritis were eliminated. She was treated with colchicine, corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but only the combination of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine reduced the morphine requirements. Conclusion HOA is exceptionally associated with thyroid cancer and we raised the hypothesis of the secretion of a circulating factor in a patient with invasive and recurrent follicular thyroid cancer, refractory to radioiodine. PMID:26835431

  20. Nonfamilial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Prevalence, Natural History, and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Burns, Charlotte; Bagnall, Richard D; Lam, Lien; Yeates, Laura; Sarina, Tanya; Puranik, Rajesh; Briffa, Tom; Atherton, John J; Driscoll, Tim; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Yield of causative variants in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is increased in some probands, suggesting different clinical subgroups of disease occur. We hypothesized that a negative family history and no sarcomere mutations represent a nonfamilial subgroup of HCM. We sought to determine the prevalence, natural history, and potential clinical implications of this nonfamilial subgroup of HCM. Four hundred and thirteen unrelated probands with HCM seen in a specialized HCM center between 2002 and 2015 and genetic testing performed were included in this retrospective cohort study. There were 251 (61%) probands with no reported family history of HCM, including 166 (40% of total) probands with no sarcomere mutation, that is, nonfamilial HCM. Quantified family pedigree data revealed no difference in mean number of first-degree relatives screened between nonfamilial and sarcomere-positive groups. Adjusted predictors of nonfamilial status were older age (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.06; P=0.0001), male sex (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-3.45; P=0.02), hypertension (odds ratio, 2.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.57-5.00; P=0.0005), and nonasymmetric septal morphology (odds ratio, 3.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-7.08; P=0.001). They had a less severe clinical course with greater event-free survival from major cardiac events (P=0.04) compared with sarcomere-positive HCM probands. Genotype prediction scores showed good performance in identifying genotype-positive patients (area under the curve, 0.71-0.75) and, in combination with pedigree characteristics, were further improved. Approximately 40% of HCM probands have a nonfamilial subtype, with later onset and less severe clinical course. We propose a revised clinical pathway for management, highlighting the role of genetic testing, a detailed pedigree, and refined clinical surveillance recommendations for family members. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Social determinants of health in the setting of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Johnson, Renee; Sarina, Tanya; Yeates, Laura; Burns, Charlotte; Gray, Belinda; Ball, Kylie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Social determinants of health play an important role in explaining poor health outcomes across many chronic disease states. The impact of the social gradient in the setting of an inherited heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), has not been investigated. This study sought to profile the socioeconomic status of patients attending a specialized multidisciplinary clinic and to determine the impact on clinical factors, psychosocial wellbeing and adherence to medical advice. Patients with HCM and at-risk relatives attending a specialized multidisciplinary clinic in Sydney Australia between 2011 and 2013 were included. Clinical, socioeconomic, geographic remoteness and adherence data were available. A broader clinic and registry-based group completed a survey including psychological wellbeing, health-related quality of life, Morisky Medication Adherence Scale and individual-level socioeconomic information. Over a 3-year period, 486 patients were seen in the specialized clinic. There was an over-representation of patients from socioeconomically advantaged and the least geographically remote areas. Socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with comorbidities, poor psychological wellbeing and health-related quality of life, lower understanding of HCM and more complex clinical management issues such as NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. Approximately 10% of patients were non-adherent to medical advice, and poor medication adherence was seen in 30% of HCM patients with associated factors being younger age, minority ethnicity, anxiety and poor mental quality of life. Of all the patients attending a specialized cardiac genetic clinic, there is an overrepresentation of patients from very advantaged and major metropolitan areas and suggests that those most in need of a multidisciplinary approach to care are not accessing it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characteristics of hypertrophic pachymeningitis in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Ah; Lee, Mi Ji; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2017-02-20

    Hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP) is an important neurologic complication of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, formerly Wegener's granulomatosis). The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical features, radiological findings, and diagnostic pitfalls of GPA-related HP. A retrospective chart review was performed to screen patients diagnosed with GPA at Samsung Medical Center between 1997 and 2016. Neurologic manifestation, laboratory findings, neuroimaging data, and clinical course were evaluated in all patients. Characteristics of patients with HP were compared to those of patients without HP. Sixty-five patients with GPA were identified. Twenty-five of these patients had central nervous system involvement. HP (N = 9, 36%) was the second most common radiologic finding. Other neurologic findings included stroke (N = 7, 28%) and granulomatous disease (N = 10, 40%). Patients with HP had lower incidences of systemic manifestations (N = 2, 22.2% vs. N = 38, 67.9%, p = 0.013 in the lung and N = 1, 11.1% vs. N = 28, 50.0%, p = 0.030 in the kidney) than those without HP. Six patients with GPA-related HP were MPO-ANCA positive (66.7%) and two had PR3-ANCA (22.2%). Most of the patients with HP presented with headache (N = 8, 88.9%) at a rate that is similar to those of primary headache disorders (migraine, tension-type, and stabbing) and other secondary headache disorders (postural type and meningitis). Patients with HP rarely had neurologic deficits (N = 3, 37.5%). Different clinical or radiologic features may be observed in GPA-related HP. Early recognition and accurate diagnosis of GPA-related HP are needed in addition to neuroimaging findings.

  3. Bimodal spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of hypertrophic skin tissue: pre-clinical experimentation, spectral data selection and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Honghui; Gisquet, Héloïse; Guillemin, F.; Blondel, Walter C. P. M.

    2011-07-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was two folds: firstly, we would like to investigate the efficiency of bimodal spectroscopic technique in characterization of hypertrophic scarring tissue deliberately created on a preclinical model (rabbit's ear); on the other hand, we evaluate the inhibition effect of an anti-inflammatory medication (tacrolimus) on hypertrophic formation in scar by using our bimodal spectroscopic system. Study design: This study was conducted on 20 New Zealand Rabbits receiving hypertrophic scarring treatment on their ears. Fluorescence and Diffuse Reflectance spectra were collected from each scar, amongst which some had received tacrolimus treatment. Features were extracted from corrected spectral data and analyzed to classify the scarring tissues into hypertrophic or non-hypertrophic. Diagnostic algorithms were developed with the use of k-NN classifier and validated by comparing to histological classification result with Leave-one- out cross validation. Results and discussion: The accuracy of our bimodal spectroscopy method for detecting hypertrophic scarring scar tissue was good (sensibility: 90.84%, specificity: 94.44%). The features used for classification were mainly extracted from the spectra exited at 360, 410 and 420 nm. This indicates that the difference between the spectra acquired from hypertrophic and non-hypertrophic tissue may be due to the different intensity distribution of several fluorophores (collagen,elastin and NADH) excited in this range, or to the change in proportion of tissue layers (epidermis and dermis) explored by the CEFS in use.

  4. Bimodal spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of hypertrophic skin tissue : pre-clinical experimentation, data selection and classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Gisquet, H; Blondel, W; Guillemin, F

    2012-12-01

    This study aims at investigating the efficiency of bimodal spectroscopy in detection of hypertrophic scar tissue on a preclinical model. Fluorescence and Diffuse Reflectance spectra were collected from 55 scars deliberately created on ears of 20 rabbits, amongst which some received tacrolimus injection to provide non-hypertrophic scar tissue. The spectroscopic data measured on hypertrophic and non-hypertrophic scar tissues were used for developing our classification algorithm. Spectral features were extracted from corrected data and analyzed to classify the scar tissues into hypertrophic or non-hypertrophic. The Algorithm was developed using k-NN classifier and validated by comparing to histological classification result with Leave-One-Out cross validation. Bimodal spectroscopy showed promising results in detecting hypertrophic tissue (sensibility 90.5%, specificity 94.4%). The features used for classification were extracted from the autofluorescence spectra collected at 4 CEFS with excitations at 360, 410, and 420 nm. This indicates the hypertrophic process may involve change in concentration of several fluorophores (collagen, elastin and NADH) excited in this range, or modification in volume of explored tissue layers (epidermis and dermis) due to tissue thickening.

  5. The presence of lysylpyridinoline in the hypertrophic cartilage of newly hatched chicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, M. W.; Martinez, D. A.; Cook, M. E.; Vailas, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of lysylpyridinoline (LP) as a nonreducible cross-link in appreciable quantities has primarily been limited to the mineralized tissues, bone and dentin. However, the results reported here show that LP is not only present in the hypertrophic cartilage of the tibiotarsus isolated from newly hatched broiler chicks, but it is approx. 4-fold as concentrated as hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP). Bone and articular cartilage surrounding the hypertrophic cartilage do not contain measurable quantities of LP. Purified LP has a fluorescent scan similar to purified HP and literature values, confirming that we indeed were measuring LP. Also, the cartilage lesion produced by immature chondrocytes from birds with tibial dyschondroplasia had LP but the HP:LP ratio was > 1. Thus, the low HP:LP ratio could be a marker for hypertrophic cartilage in avians.

  6. The presence of lysylpyridinoline in the hypertrophic cartilage of newly hatched chicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, M. W.; Martinez, D. A.; Cook, M. E.; Vailas, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of lysylpyridinoline (LP) as a nonreducible cross-link in appreciable quantities has primarily been limited to the mineralized tissues, bone and dentin. However, the results reported here show that LP is not only present in the hypertrophic cartilage of the tibiotarsus isolated from newly hatched broiler chicks, but it is approx. 4-fold as concentrated as hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP). Bone and articular cartilage surrounding the hypertrophic cartilage do not contain measurable quantities of LP. Purified LP has a fluorescent scan similar to purified HP and literature values, confirming that we indeed were measuring LP. Also, the cartilage lesion produced by immature chondrocytes from birds with tibial dyschondroplasia had LP but the HP:LP ratio was > 1. Thus, the low HP:LP ratio could be a marker for hypertrophic cartilage in avians.

  7. Successful management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei).

    PubMed

    Fredholm, Daniel V; Jones, Ashley E; Hall, Natalie H; Russell, Kathleen; Heard, Darryl J

    2015-03-01

    A 3-yr-old, intact male Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) was examined for a 1-wk history of intermittent lethargy and tachypnea. An echocardiogram revealed concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricular free wall and interventricular septum. These findings were compared to measurements from healthy Matschie's tree kangaroos, supporting a diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. At the time of publication, the patient has been managed for over 11.5 yr, using a combination of enalapril, furosemide, diltiazem, and diet modifications. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in tree kangaroos exhibiting signs of cardiovascular or respiratory distress. This case represents the first report of antemortem diagnosis and successful management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Matschie's tree kangaroo.

  8. Insight into dissolved organic matter fractions in Lake Wivenhoe during and after a major flood.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Rupak; Grinham, Alistair; Beecham, Simon

    2016-03-01

    Dissolved organic matter is an important component of biogeochemical processes in aquatic environments. Dissolved organic matter may consist of a myriad of different fractions and resultant processing pathways. In early January 2011, heavy rainfall occurred across South East Queensland, Australia causing significant catchment inflow into Lake Wivenhoe, which is the largest water supply reservoir for the city of Brisbane, Australia. The horizontal and vertical distributions of dissolved organic matter fractions in the lake during the flood period were investigated and then compared with stratified conditions with no catchment inflows. The results clearly demonstrate a large variation in dissolved organic matter fractions associated with inflow conditions compared with stratified conditions. During inflows, dissolved organic matter concentrations in the reservoir were fivefold lower than during stratified conditions. Within the dissolved organic matter fractions during inflow, the hydrophobic and humic acid fractions were almost half those recorded during the stratified period whilst low molecular weight neutrals were higher during the flood period compared to during the stratified period. Information on dissolved organic matter and the spatial and vertical variations in its constituents' concentrations across the lake can be very useful for catchment and lake management and for selecting appropriate water treatment processes.

  9. Geohydrology and water quality of stratified-drift aquifers in the middle Merrimack River basin, south-central New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Toppin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the State of New Hampshire, Department of Environmental Services, Water Resources Division has assessed the geohydrology and water quality of stratified-drift aquifers in the middle Merrimack River basin in south-central New Hampshire. The middle Merrimack River basin drains 469 square miles; 98 square miles is underlain by stratified-drift aquifers. Saturated thickness of stratified drift within the study area is generally less than 40 feet but locally greater than 100 feet. Transmissivity of stratified-drift aquifers is generally less than 2,000 feet squared per day but locally exceeds 6, 000 feet squared per day. At present (1990), ground-water withdrawals from stratified drift for public supply are about 0.4 million gallons per day within the basin. Many of the stratified-drift aquifers within the study area are not developed to their fullest potential. The geohydrology of stratified-drift aquifers was investigated by focusing on basic aquifer properties, including aquifer boundaries; recharge, discharge, and direction of ground-water flow; saturated thickness and storage; and transmissivity. Surficial geologic mapping assisted in the determination of aquifer boundaries. Data from 757 wells and test borings were used to produce maps of water-table altitude, saturated thickness, and transmissivity of stratified drift. More than 10 miles of seismic-refraction profiling and 14 miles of seismic-reflection profiling were also used to construct the water table and saturated-thickness maps. Stratified-drift aquifers in the southern, western, and central parts of the study area are typically small and discontinuous, whereas aquifers in the eastern part along the Merrimack River valley are continuous. The Merrimack River valley aquifers formed in glacial Lakes Merrimack and Hooksett. Many other smaller discontinuous aquifers formed in small temporary ponds during deglaciation. A stratified-drift aquifer in Goffstown was

  10. Effect of BTXA on Inhibiting Hypertrophic Scar Formation in a Rabbit Ear Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Qing; Li, Xiao-Jing; Weng, Xiao-Juan

    2017-06-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HS) is a refractory skin disease caused by major physical damage or other inflammation. Some reports found that botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) could be an alternative treatment of the HS. Therefore, the authors studied the effects of BTXA on the treatment of HS and the dose response of BTXA. Hypertrophic scars were harvested from the ears of 18 young adult New Zealand big-eared rabbits and treated with BTXA or triamcinolone acetonide (TAC) in vivo experiment. The hypertrophic index (HI) was measured by histological examination. Collagen fibrils were checked by sirius red straining, and the cell nucleuses of fibroblasts were checked by Ki67. The HI of hypertrophic scars with BTXA treatment was lower than that with phosphate-buffered saline treatment (P < 0.05). Compared with the TAC treatment group, the efficacy of treatment with the middle dose of BTXA (1.0, 1.5 IU) had no significant difference, as shown by sirius red staining and immunohistochemistry Ki67. These results demonstrated that BTXA effectively improved the appearance of hypertrophic scars and inhibited the formation of collagen fibrils and fibroblasts in vivo. Treatment with the middle dose of BTXA achieved similar efficacy as TAC treatment, indicating that BTXA might be useful for inhibiting hypertrophic scars and worth investigating further. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each submission to which Evidence-Based Medicine rankings are applicable. This excludes Review Articles, Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  11. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the biological characteristics of human skin fibroblasts and hypertrophic scar tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongming; Hu, Chao; Li, Fengyu; Liang, Liming; Liu, Lingying

    2013-06-01

    Burn injury-mediated destruction of the skin barrier normally induces microbial invasion, in turn leading to the development of systemic infection and occasional septic shock by the release of endotoxins. The objective of this work was to study the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the biological characteristics of normal skin fibroblasts and to elucidate the influence of LPS in the initial stage of skin wound healing. Twenty patients with hypertrophic scar in proliferative stage were selected randomly and primary cultures were established from fibroblasts derived from their hypertrophic scar tissue and normal skin. Normal skin fibroblasts of passage 3 were stimulated with different concentrations of LPS. LPS stimulated the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts within a certain extent of concentrations (0.005-0.5 μg/mL) (P < 0.05), whereas at a concentration of 1 μg/mL inhibited the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts (P < 0.05). Collagen synthesis by normal skin fibroblasts after LPS stimulation mimicked those derived from hypertrophic scar tissue. LPS of 0.1 μg/mL had significant effect on normal skin fibroblasts-continuous passage of these fibroblasts resulted in ultrastructural pattern similar to fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar tissue, and the findings was substantiated by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry detection of proliferation cell nuclear antigen, type I procollagen and α-smooth muscle actin. Our results suggest that LPS might convert normal skin fibroblasts to hypertrophic scar tissue fibroblasts and participate in the formation of hypertrophic scar; hence, appropriate concentration of LPS may have no effect or be beneficial to skin wound healing, whereas excessive concentration of LPS may delay the time of wound healing. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Past, present and future of volcanic lake monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, Dmitri; Tassi, Franco; Mora-Amador, Raúl; Sandri, Laura; Chiarini, Veronica

    2014-02-01

    Volcanic lake research boosted after lethal gas burst occurred at Lake Nyos (Cameroon) in 1986, a limnic rather than a volcanic event. This led to the foundation of the IAVCEI-Commission on Volcanic Lakes, which grew out into a multi-disciplinary scientific community since the 1990s. We here introduce the first data base of volcanic lakes VOLADA, containing 474 lakes, a number that, in our opinion, is surprisingly high. VOLADA could become an interactive, open-access working tool where our community can rely on in the future. Many of the compiled lakes were almost unknown, or at least unstudied to date, whereas there are acidic crater lakes topping active magmatic-hydrothermal systems that are continuously or discontinuously monitored, providing useful information for volcanic surveillance (e.g., Ruapehu, Yugama, Poás). Nyos-type lakes, i.e. those hosted in quiescent volcanoes and characterized by significant gas accumulation in bottom waters, are potentially hazardous. These lakes tend to remain stably stratified in tropical and sub-tropical climates (meromictic), leading to long-term build-up of gas, which can be released after a trigger. Some of the unstudied lakes are possibly in the latter situation. Acidic crater lakes are easily recognized as active, whereas Nyos-type lakes can only be recognized as potentially hazardous if bottom waters are investigated, a less obvious operation. In this review, research strategies are lined out, especially for the “active crater lakes”. We make suggestions for monitoring frequency based on the principle of the “residence time dependent monitoring time window”. A complementary, multi-disciplinary (geochemistry, geophysics, limnology, statistics) approach is considered to provide new ideas, which can be the bases for future volcanic lake monitoring. More profound deterministic knowledge (e.g., precursory signals for phreatic eruptions, or lake roll-over events) should not only serve to enhance conceptual models of

  13. The FOCUS4 design for biomarker stratified trials.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) remain the gold standard of evidence for the benefit of new therapeutics but standard designs fit awkwardly with key developments in biomarker-stratified drug development. Firstly, the unprecedented number of new agents being developed in oncology (usually with specific targets for which there may be predictive biomarkers) mandates a need for new trial designs that are more efficient in screening out new agents with modest likelihood of benefit, concentrating resources on the most promising ones. The multi-arm multi-stage (MAMS) design developed some years ago addresses this need. Secondly, biomarker-stratified trials, when tackled one biomarker/drug pairing at a time, are inherently highly inefficient. The FOCUS4 trial design was developed to overcome this problem, using a platform that incorporates multiple parallel biomarker-stratified RCTs in individual cohorts, and capable of adapting its design in response to developing evidence.

  14. Background oriented schlieren in a density stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verso, Lilly; Liberzon, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Non-intrusive quantitative fluid density measurement methods are essential in the stratified flow experiments. Digital imaging leads to synthetic schlieren methods in which the variations of the index of refraction are reconstructed computationally. In this study, an extension to one of these methods, called background oriented schlieren, is proposed. The extension enables an accurate reconstruction of the density field in stratified liquid experiments. Typically, the experiments are performed by the light source, background pattern, and the camera positioned on the opposite sides of a transparent vessel. The multimedia imaging through air-glass-water-glass-air leads to an additional aberration that destroys the reconstruction. A two-step calibration and image remapping transform are the key components that correct the images through the stratified media and provide a non-intrusive full-field density measurements of transparent liquids.

  15. Background oriented schlieren in a density stratified fluid.

    PubMed

    Verso, Lilly; Liberzon, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Non-intrusive quantitative fluid density measurement methods are essential in the stratified flow experiments. Digital imaging leads to synthetic schlieren methods in which the variations of the index of refraction are reconstructed computationally. In this study, an extension to one of these methods, called background oriented schlieren, is proposed. The extension enables an accurate reconstruction of the density field in stratified liquid experiments. Typically, the experiments are performed by the light source, background pattern, and the camera positioned on the opposite sides of a transparent vessel. The multimedia imaging through air-glass-water-glass-air leads to an additional aberration that destroys the reconstruction. A two-step calibration and image remapping transform are the key components that correct the images through the stratified media and provide a non-intrusive full-field density measurements of transparent liquids.

  16. Thermal Vibrational Convection in a Two-phase Stratified Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Qingming; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    2007-01-01

    The response of a two-phase stratified liquid system subject to a vibration parallel to an imposed temperature gradient is analyzed using a hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann method (HTLB). The vibrations considered correspond to sinusoidal translations of a rigid cavity at a fixed frequency. The layers are thermally and mechanically coupled. Interaction between gravity-induced and vibration-induced thermal convection is studied. The ability of applied vibration to enhance the flow, heat transfer and interface distortion is investigated. For the range of conditions investigated, the results reveal that the effect of vibrational Rayleigh number and vibrational frequency on a two-phase stratified fluid system is much different than that for a single-phase fluid system. Comparisons of the response of a two-phase stratified fluid system with a single-phase fluid system are discussed.

  17. Unsteady Shear Disturbances Within a Two Dimensional Stratified Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.

    1992-01-01

    The origin and evolution of shear disturbances within a stratified, inviscid, incompressible flow are investigated numerically by a Clebsch/Weber decomposition based scheme. In contrast to homogeneous flows, within which vorticity can be redistributed but not generated, the presence of a density stratification can render an otherwise irrotational flow vortical. In this work, a kinematic decomposition of the unsteady Euler equations separates the unsteady velocity field into rotational and irrotational components. The subsequent evolution of these components is used to study the influence various velocity disturbances have on both stratified and homogeneous flows. In particular, the flow within a two-dimensional channel is used to investigate the evolution of rotational disturbances, generated or convected, downstream from an unsteady inflow condition. Contrasting simulations of both stratified and homogeneous flows are used to distinguish between redistributed inflow vorticity and that which is generated by a density stratification.

  18. SINDA/FLUINT Stratified Tank Modeling for Cryrogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A general purpose SINDA/FLUINT (S/F) stratified tank model was created to simulate self-pressurization and axial jet TVS; Stratified layers in the vapor and liquid are modeled using S/F lumps.; The stratified tank model was constructed to permit incorporating the following additional features:, Multiple or singular lumps in the liquid and vapor regions of the tank, Real gases (also mixtures) and compressible liquids, Venting, pressurizing, and draining, Condensation and evaporation/boiling, Wall heat transfer, Elliptical, cylindrical, and spherical tank geometries; Extensive user logic is used to allow detailed tailoring - Don't have to rebuilt everything from scratch!!; Most code input for a specific case is done through the Registers Data Block:, Lump volumes are determined through user input:; Geometric tank dimensions (height, width, etc); Liquid level could be input as either a volume percentage of fill level or actual liquid level height

  19. Nutrient additions by waterfowl to lakes and reservoirs: predicting their effects on productivity and water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Johnson, W.C.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    Lakes and reservoirs provide water for human needs and habitat for aquatic birds. Managers of such waters may ask whether nutrients added by waterfowl degrade water quality. For lakes and reservoirs where primary productivity is limited by phosphorus (P), we developed a procedure that integrates annual P loads from waterfowl and other external sources, applies a nutrient load-response model, and determines whether waterfowl that used the lake or reservoir degraded water quality. Annual P loading by waterfowl can be derived from a figure in this report, using the days per year that each kind spent on any lake or reservoir. In our example, over 6500 Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and 4200 ducks (mostly mallards, Anas platyrhynchos) added 4462 kg of carbon (C), 280 kg of nitrogen (N), and 88 kg of P y-1 to Wintergreen Lake in southwestern Michigan, mostly during their migration. These amounts were 69% of all C, 27% of all N, and 70% of all P that entered the lake from external sources. Loads from all external sources totaled 840 mg P m-2 y-1. Application of a nutrient load-response model to this concentration, the hydraulic load (0.25 m y-1), and the water residence time (9.7 y) of Wintergreen Lake yielded an average annual concentration of total P in the lake of 818 mg m-3 that classified the lake as hypertrophic. This trophic classification agreed with independent measures of primary productivity, chlorophyll-a, total P, total N, and Secchi disk transparency made in Wintergreen Lake. Our procedure showed that waterfowl caused low water quality in Wintergreen Lake.

  20. In vitro mechanical compression induces apoptosis and regulates cytokines release in hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Renò, Filippo; Sabbatini, Maurizio; Lombardi, Francesca; Stella, Maurizio; Pezzuto, Carla; Magliacani, Gilberto; Cannas, Mario

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars resulting from severe burns are usually treated by continuous elastic compression. Although pressure therapy reaches success rates of 60-85% its mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. In this study, apoptosis induction and release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were evaluated in normal (n = 3) and hypertrophic (=7) scars from burns after in vitro mechanical compression. In the absence of compression (basal condition) apoptotic cells, scored using terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase assay, were present after 24 hours in the derma of both normal scar (23 +/- 0.4% of total cell) and hypertrophic scar (11.3 +/- 1.4%). Mechanical compression (constant pressure of 35 mmHg for 24 hours) increased apoptotic cell percentage both in normal scar (29.5 +/- 0.4%) and hypertrophic scar (29 +/- 1.7%). IL-1beta released in the medium was undetectable in normal scar under basal conditions while in hypertrophic scar the IL-1beta concentration was 3.48 +/- 0.2 ng/g. Compression in hypertrophic scar-induced secretion of IL-1beta twofold higher compared to basal condition. (7.72 +/- 0.2 ng/g). TNF-alpha basal concentration measured in normal scar medium was 8.52 +/- 4.01 ng/g and compression did not altered TNF-alpha release (12.86 +/- 7.84 ng/g). TNF-alpha basal release was significantly higher in hypertrophic scar (14.74 +/- 1.42 ng/g) compared to normal scar samples and TNF-alpha secretion was diminished (3.52 +/- 0.97 ng/g) after compression. In conclusion, in our in vitro model, mechanical compression resembling the clinical use of elastocompression was able to strongly increase apoptosis in the hypertrophic scar derma as observed during granulation tissue regression in normal wound healing. Moreover, the observed modulation of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha release by mechanical loading could play a key role in hypertrophy regression induced by elastocompression.

  1. Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in Postoperative Esophageal Atresia with Tracheoesophageal Fistula.

    PubMed

    R A A, Hassan; Y U, Choo; R, Noraida; I, Rosida

    2015-01-01

    Development of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis during postoperative period in EA with TEF is rare. Postoperative vomiting or feeding intolerance in EA is more common which is due to esophageal stricture, gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal dysmotility. A typical case of IHPS also presents with non-bilious projectile vomiting at around 3-4 weeks of life. The diagnosis of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in this subset is usually delayed because of its rarity. We report a case of IHPS in postoperative EA and emphasize on high index of suspicion to avoid any delay in diagnosis with its metabolic consequences.

  2. Physiological hypertrophic subaortic stenosis and subendocardial infarction in a patient with a pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Levister, E C; Taylor, J B

    1981-04-01

    This report describes the occurrence of a pheochromocytoma in a middle-aged, black female with a 12-year history of hypertension, and a strong family history of hypertension. In this case, the pheochromocytoma was associated with a subendocardial myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure which occurred in the presence of large, dilated coronary arteries without intraluminal obstructions. The patient also had the murmur and echocardiographic and ventriculographic signs typical of idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis, which resolved following removal of the tumor and return of the blood pressure to normal. The authors believe this to represent a form of transient physiological hypertrophic subaortic stenosis secondary to a hypercatecholamine state.

  3. The spectrum of soft tissue and skeletal abnormalities of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Pineda, C; Fonseca, C; Martinez-Lavin, M

    1990-05-01

    We review our radiographic experience with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Soft tissue abnormalities such as finger clubbing, "elephant feet" and cutis verticis gyrata are well appreciated by plain radiography. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is characterized by a bone remodeling process at the tip of the digits. In older patients it is manifested as tuftal hypertrophy whereas in younger individuals acroosteolysis takes place. Radiographic signs of inflammatory arthropathy are conspicuously absent. Periosteal proliferation is an orderly evolving process in 3 dimensions: in the number of affected bones, in the area of involvement of a given bone and in the shape of periostitis.

  4. Cytomegalovirus-induced transient protein-losing hypertrophic gastropathy in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Suter, W R; Neuweiler, J; Borovicka, J; Binek, J; Fantin, A C; Meyenberger, C

    2000-01-01

    Transient protein-losing hypertrophic gastropathy with similarity to Ménétrier's disease is described. Acute infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) could be shown to play a causative role. Immunodeficiency was ruled out. The 34-year-old patient had complete resolution of the disease without antiviral treatment. To our knowledge the present report is the first case of CMV-associated protein-losing hypertrophic gastropathy in an immunocompetent adult. To date, a similar disorder has only been described in children. CMV infection should be considered in patients with acute and symptomatic protein loss of gastrointestinal origin. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Acute monocular visual loss in carcinomatous hypertrophic pachymeningitis mimicking giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jane W

    2006-05-01

    This report describes a 69-year-old woman who presented with acute monocular visual loss, ipsilateral headache, and elevated sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Both temporal artery biopsies were negative. Neuroimaging, dural biopsy, and breast biopsy all confirmed the diagnosis of carcinomatous hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with metastatic breast carcinoma. After treatment with corticosteroids, her vision improved. Her clinical presentation initially mimicked the symptoms and signs of giant cell arteritis. Acute monocular visual loss without other cranial nerve palsies may be an uncommon presentation of hypertrophic pachymeningitis from metastatic breast carcinoma.

  6. Acute monocular visual loss in carcinomatous hypertrophic pachymeningitis mimicking giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jane W

    2006-02-01

    This report describes a 69-year-old woman who presented with acute monocular visual loss, ipsilateral headache, and elevated sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. Both temporal artery biopsies were negative. Neuroimaging, dural biopsy, and breast biopsy all confirmed the diagnosis of carcinomatous hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with metastatic breast carcinoma. After treatment with corticosteroids, her vision improved. Her clinical presentation initially mimicked the symptoms and signs of giant cell arteritis. Acute monocular visual loss without other cranial nerve palsies may be an uncommon presentation of hypertrophic pachymeningitis from metastatic breast carcinoma.

  7. [The thickness/radius ratio (t/r) in patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Guadalajara, J F; Valenzuela, F; Martínez Sánchez, C; Huerta, D

    1990-01-01

    We studied 17 patients with cardiomyopathy (10 hypertrophic and 7 dilated). With two-dimensional echocardiography, we obtained a short axis view at the level of papillary muscle. We calculated the ratio between thickness (h), of ventricular wall and cavity's radius (r) in diastole and systole (h/r ratio). Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has a high h/r ratio in diastole (inappropriate hypertrophy), hypercontractility and low and systolic wall stress. Dilated cardiomyopathy has a low diastolic h/r ratio (inadequate hypertrophy) with low contractility and elevated end-systolic, wall stress. We discuss the mechanisms and consequences of different patterns of hypertrophy on the ventricular performance.

  8. Stratified flows and internal waves in the Central West Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, K. S.; Makarenko, N. I.; Morozov, E. G.; Tarakanov, R. Yu; Frey, D. I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study stratified flows and internal waves in the fracture zones of the Mid Atlantic Ridge. The results of measurements carried out in the 39th and 40th cruises of RV Akademik Sergey Vavilov in the autumn of 2014 and 2015 are presented. Hydrophysical properties of the near-bottom flows are studied experimentally on the basis of CTD- and LADCP profiling. Theoretical analysis involves mathematical formulation of stratified fluid flow which uses CTD-data obtained from field observation in the Vema Fracture Zone region. Spectral properties and kinematic characteristics of internal waves are calculated by finite element method.

  9. Vortex systems in stratified wake flow behind a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sysoeva, E. Ia.; Chashechkin, Iu. D.

    1991-08-01

    The fine flow structure and the characteristics of the principal types of vortex structures in the wake of a sphere moving uniformly in the horizontal direction in an exponentially stratified fluid are investigated experimentally. It is found that the wake flow of a continuously stratified fluid behind a horizontally moving sphere is characterized by several types of fast and slow vortex systems whose structure and dynamics are related to the distortion of the initial uniform stratification in the vicinity of the body and far from it.

  10. A spectral model of stably stratified surface-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalini, A.; Arnqvist, J.; Carlén, I.; Bergström, H.; Alfredsson, P. H.

    2015-06-01

    A new model to determine the spectral velocity tensor in a stably stratified flow is proposed. This model is complementary to the Mann model as it solves the stratified inviscid Rapid Distortion Theory equations analytically, allowing for the determination of the single and two-point velocity spectra as well as the temperature-velocity cross-spectra. The model has been here calibrated and validated against field measurements conducted over a forested area with measurements up to 140 m, therefore covering a region of interest for wind-energy applications.

  11. Okanagan Lake, British Columbia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-01

    STS068-155-011 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- (Okanagan Lake, British Columbia) View southward down the lake; Vernon is in the foreground, Kelowna just before the bend in the lake, and Penticton at the far end of the lake. Green crops are still vigorous despite the season (early October); clear-cuts dot the forested hillsides.

  12. Hydrological Controls on Ecosystem Dynamics in Lake Fryxell, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Herbei, Radu; Rytel, Alexander L; Lyons, W Berry; McKnight, Diane M; Jaros, Christopher; Gooseff, Michael N; Priscu, John C

    2016-01-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys constitute the largest ice free area of Antarctica. The area is a polar desert with an annual precipitation of ∼ 3 cm water equivalent, but contains several lakes fed by glacial melt water streams that flow from four to twelve weeks of the year. Over the past ∼20 years, data have been collected on the lakes located in Taylor Valley, Antarctica as part of the McMurdo Dry Valley Long-Term Ecological Research program (MCM-LTER). This work aims to understand the impact of climate variations on the biological processes in all the ecosystem types within Taylor Valley, including the lakes. These lakes are stratified, closed-basin systems and are perennially covered with ice. Each lake contains a variety of planktonic and benthic algae that require nutrients for photosynthesis and growth. The work presented here focuses on Lake Fryxell, one of the three main lakes of Taylor Valley; it is fed by thirteen melt-water streams. We use a functional regression approach to link the physical, chemical, and biological processes within the stream-lake system to evaluate the input of water and nutrients on the biological processes in the lakes. The technique has been shown previously to provide important insights into these Antarctic lacustrine systems where data acquisition is not temporally coherent. We use data on primary production (PPR) and chlorophyll-A (CHL)from Lake Fryxell as well as discharge observations from two streams flowing into the lake. Our findings show an association between both PPR, CHL and stream input.

  13. Hydrological Controls on Ecosystem Dynamics in Lake Fryxell, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Rytel, Alexander L.; Lyons, W. Berry; McKnight, Diane M.; Jaros, Christopher; Gooseff, Michael N.; Priscu, John C.

    2016-01-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys constitute the largest ice free area of Antarctica. The area is a polar desert with an annual precipitation of ∼ 3 cm water equivalent, but contains several lakes fed by glacial melt water streams that flow from four to twelve weeks of the year. Over the past ∼20 years, data have been collected on the lakes located in Taylor Valley, Antarctica as part of the McMurdo Dry Valley Long-Term Ecological Research program (MCM-LTER). This work aims to understand the impact of climate variations on the biological processes in all the ecosystem types within Taylor Valley, including the lakes. These lakes are stratified, closed-basin systems and are perennially covered with ice. Each lake contains a variety of planktonic and benthic algae that require nutrients for photosynthesis and growth. The work presented here focuses on Lake Fryxell, one of the three main lakes of Taylor Valley; it is fed by thirteen melt-water streams. We use a functional regression approach to link the physical, chemical, and biological processes within the stream-lake system to evaluate the input of water and nutrients on the biological processes in the lakes. The technique has been shown previously to provide important insights into these Antarctic lacustrine systems where data acquisition is not temporally coherent. We use data on primary production (PPR) and chlorophyll-A (CHL)from Lake Fryxell as well as discharge observations from two streams flowing into the lake. Our findings show an association between both PPR, CHL and stream input. PMID:27441705

  14. Rediscovery of lake balls in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Donald W.; Hiltunen, Jarl K.; Owens, Randall W.

    1983-01-01

    For the first time in 70 years, the occurrence of a 'lake ball' in Lake Michigan is here reported in the literature. According to a published system of classification, the object we collected in 1978 was a 'false' lake ball. Dissection revealed that it was colonized by 5 chironomid larvae and 162 oligochaetes. The species and numerical proportions of the oligochaetes indicated that it was formed in or near the mouth of a eutrophic tributary rather than in the open waters of Lake Michigan where it was found. Because of their mobility, false lake balls may be ecologically important, serving as natural vehicles for the dispersal of invertebrates.

  15. Using a fast Fourier method to model sound propagation in a stratified atmosphere over a stratified porous-elastic ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooms, S.; Attenborough, K.

    1990-01-01

    Using a Fast Fourier integration method and a global matrix method for solution of the boundary condition equations at all interfaces simultaneously, a useful tool for predicting acoustic propagation in a stratified fluid over a stratified porous-elastic solid was developed. The model for the solid is a modified Biot-Stoll model incorporating four parameters describing the pore structure corresponding to the Rayleigh-Attenborough rigid-porous structure model. The method is also compared to another Fast Fourier code (CERL-FFP) which models the ground as an impedance surface under a horizontally stratified air. Agreement with the CERL FFP is good. The effects on sound propagation of a combination of ground elasticity, complex ground structure, and atmospheric conditions are demonstrated by theoretical results over a snow layer, and experimental results over a model ground surface.

  16. Geochemical and biochemical evidence of lake overturn and fish kill at Lake Averno, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliro, S.; Chiodini, G.; Izzo, G.; Minopoli, C.; Signorini, A.; Avino, R.; Granieri, D.

    2008-12-01

    Lake Averno is situated in the homonymous crater in the northwestern sector of the Campi Flegrei active volcanic system in Campania region, Italy. In February 2005 a fish kill event was observed in the lake, prompting a geochemical survey to ascertain the possible cause. In February 2005 a geochemical survey revealed that the lake water was unstratified chemically and isotopically, presumably, as a result of lake overturn. This fish kill phenomenon was recorded at least two other times in the past. In contrast to the February 2005 results, data collected in October 2005, shows the Lake Averno to be stratified, with an oxic epilimnion (surface to 6 m) and an anoxic hypolimnion (6 m to lake bottom at about 33 m). Chemical and isotopic compositions of Lake Averno waters suggest an origin by mixing of shallow waters with a Na-Cl hydrothermal component coupled with an active evaporation process. The isotopic composition of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon, as well as the composition of the non-reactive dissolved gas species again supports the occurrence of this mixing process. Decreasing levels of SO 4 and increasing levels of H 2S and CH 4 contents in lake water with depth, strongly suggests anaerobic bacterial processes are occurring through decomposition of organic matter under anoxic conditions in the sediment and in the water column. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis processes coexist and play a pivotal role in the anaerobic environment of the Lake Averno. The sulfate reducing bacterial activity has been estimated in the range of 14-22 μmol m - 2 day - 1 . Total gas pressure of dissolved gases ranges between 800 and 1400 mbar, well below the hydrostatic pressure throughout the water column, excluding the possibility, at least at the survey time, of a limnic eruption. Vertical changes in the density of lake waters indicate that overturn may be triggered by cooling of epilimnetic waters below 7 °C. This is a possible phenomenon in winter periods if atmospheric

  17. Lake Volta, Ghana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Lake Volta in Ghana was acquired March 31, 2002 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Lake Volta is one of the world's largest artificially created lakes. Lake Volta is actually a reservoir formed from the damming of the Volta River, and extends 250 miles north of the Akosombo Dam. The lake covers an area of 8,482 square km. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  18. Lake Chad, Chad, Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-04-29

    Africa's Lake Chad where the borders of Chad, Niger, Nigeria and Cameroon merge (13.0N, 14.0E) has been undergoing change for the past 25 to 30 years when it was first noticed that the lake is drying up. Since then, astronauts have been photographing it on a regular basis to record the diminishing lake bed. This lake was once the aproximate size of Lake Erie but is now only about half that size and is still receeding.

  19. Postoperative ad lib feeding for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, R O; Schaffer, R L; Maeso, C E; Sasan, F; Nuchtern, J G; Jaksic, T; Harberg, F J; Wesson, D E; Brandt, M L

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three methods of postoperative feeding after pyloromyotomy for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS). The authors reviewed retrospectively the charts of 308 patients who underwent pyloromyotomy for HPS from 1984 to 1997. Nineteen patients had prolonged hospitalization for other reasons and were excluded from the study, leaving 289 patients for analysis. All procedures were performed by a single group of pediatric surgeons. The individual preferences of these surgeons resulted in three different feeding schedules: R, strictly regimented (>12 hours nothing by mouth, then incremental feeding over > or =24 hours), I, intermediate (>8 hours nothing by mouth, then incremental feeding over <24 hours), or A, ad lib (< or =4 hours nothing by mouth, with or without a single small feeding, then ad lib feedings). Of the 289 patients, 248 (80.5%) were boys. The average age of the patients was 5.64 weeks (range, 1 to 21 weeks). A total of 265 of 289 (92%) were full term. Thirty-nine of 289 (13.5%) had a family history positive for pyloric stenosis. A total of 104 of 289 (36%) were first-born infants, 89 of 289 (31%) were second born. The diagnosis of pyloric stenosis was made by a combination of physical examination findings and diagnostic image for most patients. An "olive" was palpated in 60.6% of the patients. Sixty percent (60.4%) of patients had an upper gastrointestinal series performed, and 42.5% were examined by ultrasonography. Overall, 53% of the patients had postoperative emesis. Only 3.5% had emesis that persisted greater than 48 hours after surgery. Patients fed ad lib after pyloromyotomy had slightly more emesis (2.2 A v. 1.2 R, and 0.7 I episodes, P = .002), but tolerated full feedings sooner than patients fed with a regimented or intermediate schedule. No patient required additional therapy or readmission after tolerating two consecutive full feedings, suggesting that this might be a suitable discharge criterion for most

  20. IgG4-Related Disease and Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Zachary S.; Carruthers, Mollie N.; Khosroshahi, Arezou; Carruthers, Robert; Shinagare, Shweta; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Deshpande, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP) is an inflammatory condition in which the dura mater of the cranium or spine becomes thickened, leading to symptoms that result from mass effect, nerve compression, or vascular compromise. The differential diagnosis of HP includes immune-mediated conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and vasculitis, malignancies, and infections. Many times, no diagnosis is reached; in such cases, the disease has been described as idiopathic HP. IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently described inflammatory condition known to cause tumefactive lesions at myriad anatomical locations. Both IgG4-RD and idiopathic HP share similar demographics, histopathology, and natural history. We hypothesized that IgG4-RD is a common cause of idiopathic HP. To investigate this hypothesis, we identified all pathology specimens diagnosed as noninfectious HP during 25 years at our institution. Fourteen cases had stained slides and paraffin blocks to permit review of the original hematoxylin and eosin stained slides as well as immunostaining of cell blocks. Recently published consensus guidelines describing characteristic histopathology and the necessary quantity of IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrate were used to diagnose IgG4-RD. Four cases (66.6%) that had been regarded previously as representing idiopathic HP were diagnosed as IgG4-RD; of all the reviewed cases, IgG4-RD represented 29% of cases. Of the remaining cases, 3 cases were associated with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 2 with lymphoma, and 1 each with rheumatoid arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and sarcoidosis. Two of the cases could not be diagnosed more precisely and were classified as undifferentiated HP. Clinical history, serologic tests, cerebrospinal fluid studies, and radiology alone could not identify the cause of HP. Rather, biopsy with histopathology and immunostaining was necessary to reach an accurate diagnosis. Significant IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrates were observed in

  1. Relationship between Regional Fat Distribution and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmi, Valeria; Maresca, Luciano; Lanzillo, Chiara; Marinoni, Giorgia Michela; D’Adamo, Monica; Di Roma, Mauro; Preziosi, Paolo; Bellia, Alfonso; Calò, Leonardo; Sbraccia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common genetic heart disease, is characterized by heterogeneous phenotypic expression. Body mass index has been associated with LV mass and heart failure symptoms in HCM. The aim of our study was to investigate whether regional (trunk, appendicular, epicardial) fat distribution and extent could be related to hypertrophy severity and pattern in HCM. Methods Cardiovascular magnetic resonance was performed in 32 subjects with echocardiography-based diagnosis of HCM (22M/10F, 57.2±12.6 years) characterized by predominant hypertrophy at the interventricular septum (IVS). Regional fat distribution was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Gender differences were detected in maximum IVS thickness (M: 18.3±3.8 mm vs. F: 14.3±4 mm, p = 0.012), right ventricle (RV) systolic function (M: 61.3±6.7%; F: 67.5±6.3%, p = 0.048), indexed RV end-diastolic (M: 64.8±16.3 ml/m2; F: 50.7±15.5 ml/m2, p = 0.04) and end-systolic volumes (M: 24.3±8.3 ml/m2; F: 16.7±7.4 ml/m2, p = 0.04). After adjusting for age and gender, maximum IVS thickness was associated with truncal fat (Tr-FAT) (β = 0.43, p = 0.02), but not with either appendicular or epicardial fat. Epicardial fat resulted independently associated with NT-proBNP levels (β = 0.63, p = 0.04). Late Gadolinium Enhancement-positive subjects displayed greater maximum IVS thickness (p = 0.02), LV mass index (p = 0.015) and NT-proBNP levels (p = 0.04), but no associations with fat amount or distribution were observed. Conclusion Truncal, but not appendicular or epicardial fat amount, seems to be related with maximum IVS thickness, the hallmark feature in our cohort of HCM patients. Further prospective researches are needed to assess a potential causative effect of central adiposity on HCM phenotype. PMID:27388274

  2. DDDR pacing for symptomatic patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Achterberg, H.J.; Scheffer, M.G.; van Mechelen, R.; Kofflard, M.J.M.; ten Cate, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a primary cardiac disorder with a heterogeneous expression. When medical therapy fails in patients with symptomatic HOCM, three additional therapeutic strategies exist: ventricular septal myectomy, alcohol-induced percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) of the first septal branch of the anterior descending artery and pacemaker implantation. In this paper we present the results of seven patients in whom a dual-chamber pacemaker was implanted to reduce the gradient in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) and to relieve their symptoms. Methods In patients with drug refractory symptomatic HOCM, not eligible for surgery, pacemaker therapy was recommended. Symptomatic HOCM was defined as symptoms of angina and dyspnoea, functional class NYHA 3-4 and a resting LVOT gradient during Doppler echocardiography of more than 2.75 m/s (30 mmHg). In these patients, a dual-chamber pacemaker was implanted with a right ventricular lead positioned in the right ventricular apex and an atrial lead positioned in the right atrial appendage. In all patients the AV setting was programmed between 50 and 100 ms, using Doppler echocardiography to determine the optimal filling and to ensure ventricular capture. Results A statistically significant reduction of the LVOT gradient was observed in all patients. The pre-implantation gradient in the LVOT measured by Doppler echocardiography varied from 3-5.8 m/s with a mean of 4.7±1.1 m/s. The post-implantation gradient varied from 1.4-2.6 m/s with a mean of 1.9±0.4 m/s (p<0.001). Symptomatic improvement was present in all patients. NYHA functional class went from 3-4 (mean 3.1±0.5) pre-implantation to 1-2 mean (1.3±0.4) after implantation (p<0.001). During a mean follow-up of 2.3±1.1 years, the improvement in functional class was maintained. Conclusion Our preliminary results demonstrate that dual-chamber pacing is an effective and safe treatment for

  3. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: intrarater reliability, sensitivity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    The comparison of scar evaluation over time requires measurement tools with acceptable intrarater reliability and the ability to discriminate skin characteristics of interest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the intrarater reliability and sensitivity and specificity of the Cutometer, the Mexameter, and the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar (donor sites), and hypertrophic scar (HSc). A single investigator evaluated four tissue types (severe HSc, less severe HSc, donor site, and normal skin) in 30 burn survivors with all four measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the Cutometer was acceptable (> or =0.75) for the maximum deformation measure for the donor site and normal skin (>0.78) but was below the acceptable range for the HSc sites and all other parameters. The ICC for the Mexameter erythema (>0.75) and melanin index (>0.89) and the DermaScan C total thickness measurement (>0.82) were acceptable for all sites. The ICC for the total of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS was acceptable (0.81) for normal scar but below the acceptable range for the scar sites. The DermaScan C was clearly able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin based on the total thickness measure. The Cutometer was less discriminating but was still able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin. The Mexameter erythema index was not a good discriminator of HSc and normal scar. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to establish the best cutoff point for the DermaScan C total thickness and the Cutometer maximum deformation, which were 2.034 and 0.387 mm, respectively. This study showed that although the Cutometer, the DermaScan C, and the Mexameter have measurement properties that make them attractive substitutes for the mVSS, caution must be used when interpreting results since the Cutometer has a ceiling effect when

  4. Clinical Utility of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by substantial genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, leading to considerable diversity in clinical course including the most common cause of sudden death in young people and a determinant of heart failure symptoms in patients of any age. Traditionally, two-dimensional echocardiography has been the most reliable method for establishing a clinical diagnosis of HCM. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), with its high spatial resolution and tomographic imaging capability, has emerged as a technique particularly well suited to characterize the diverse phenotypic expression of this complex disease. For example, CMR is often superior to echocardiography for HCM diagnosis, by identifying areas of segmental hypertrophy (ie., anterolateral wall or apex) not reliably visualized by echocardiography (or underestimated in terms of extent). High-risk HCM patient subgroups identified with CMR include those with thin-walled scarred LV apical aneurysms (which prior to CMR imaging in HCM remained largely undetected), end-stage systolic dysfunction, and massive LV hypertrophy. CMR observations also suggest that the cardiomyopathic process in HCM is more diffuse than previously regarded, extending beyond the LV myocardium to include thickening of the right ventricular wall as well as substantial morphologic diversity with regard to papillary muscles and mitral valve. These findings have implications for management strategies in patients undergoing invasive septal reduction therapy. Among HCM family members, CMR has identified unique phenotypic markers of affected genetic status in the absence of LV hypertrophy including: myocardial crypts, elongated mitral valve leaflets and late gadolinium enhancement. The unique capability of contrast-enhanced CMR with late gadolinium enhancement to identify myocardial fibrosis has raised the expectation that this may represent a novel marker, which may enhance risk stratification. At

  5. Left Atrial Mechanical Function and Global Strain in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Kim, Yong-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Zo, Joo-Hee; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia and is associated with adverse outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Although left atrial (LA) remodeling and dysfunction are known to associate with the development of atrial fibrillation in HCM, the changes of the LA in HCM patients remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the changes in LA size and mechanical function in HCM patients compared to control subjects and to determine the characteristics of HCM associated with LA remodeling and dysfunction. Methods Seventy-nine HCM patients (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men) were compared to 79 age- and sex-matched controls (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men) and 20 young healthy controls (mean age, 33 ± 5 years; 45% were men). The LA diameter, volume, and mechanical function, including global strain (ε), were evaluated by 2D-speckle tracking echocardiography. The phenotype of HCM, maximal left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, LV mass, and presence and extent of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) were evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Results HCM patients showed increased LA volume index, impaired reservoir function, and decreased LA ε compared to the control subjects. When we divided the HCM group according to a maximal LA volume index (LAVImax) of 38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε of 21%, no significant differences in the HCM phenotype and maximal LV wall thickness were observed for patients with LAVImax >38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε ≤21%. Conversely, the LV mass index was significantly higher both in patients with maximal LA volume index >38.7 ml/m2 and with LA ε ≤21% and was independently associated with LAVImax and LA ε. Although the LGE extent was increased in patients with LA ε ≤21%, it was not independently associated with either LAVImax or LA ε. Conclusions HCM patients showed progressed LA remodeling and dysfunction; the determinant of LA remodeling and dysfunction was LV mass index rather than LV myocardial fibrosis

  6. Classifying Lakes to Quantify Relationships Between Epilimnetic Chlorophyll a and Hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lester L.; Pollard, Amina I.

    2015-03-01

    Excess nutrient loading increases algal abundance which can cause hypoxia in many lakes and reservoirs. We used a divisive partitioning approach to analyze dissolved oxygen profile data collected across the continental United States to increase the precision of estimated relationships between chlorophyll a (chl a) concentrations and the extent of hypoxia in the water column. Chl a concentrations predicted the extent of hypoxia most accurately in lakes that were stratified at the time of sampling with a maximum temperature gradient of at least 1.2 °C/m. Lake elevation, Secchi depth, and lake geometry ratio further refined the specification of groups of lakes with different relationships between chl a and the extent of hypoxia. The statistical relationships between chl a and the extent of hypoxia that were estimated can be used directly for setting management thresholds for chl a in particular types of lakes.

  7. Classifying lakes to quantify relationships between epilimnetic chlorophyll a and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lester L; Pollard, Amina I

    2015-03-01

    Excess nutrient loading increases algal abundance which can cause hypoxia in many lakes and reservoirs. We used a divisive partitioning approach to analyze dissolved oxygen profile data collected across the continental United States to increase the precision of estimated relationships between chlorophyll a (chl a) concentrations and the extent of hypoxia in the water column. Chl a concentrations predicted the extent of hypoxia most accurately in lakes that were stratified at the time of sampling with a maximum temperature gradient of at least 1.2 °C/m. Lake elevation, Secchi depth, and lake geometry ratio further refined the specification of groups of lakes with different relationships between chl a and the extent of hypoxia. The statistical relationships between chl a and the extent of hypoxia that were estimated can be used directly for setting management thresholds for chl a in particular types of lakes.

  8. HYDRODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT MODELING STUDY IN A HIGHLY STRATIFIED ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the preliminary results of hydrodynamic and salinity predictions and the implications to an ongoing contaminated sediment transport and fate modeling effort in the Lower Duwamish Waterway (LDW), Seattle, Washington. The LDW is highly strati-fied when freshwate...

  9. Numerical simulations of particle dispersion in stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brethouwer, G.; Lindborg, E.

    Several researchers have examined the vertical dispersion of fluid particles in stratified flows to obtain a better understanding of mixing in geophysical flows. Pearson et al. [5] used a Langevin model to predict that the mean square of vertical fluid particle displacements reaches a plateau with <δ z2rangle ˜ < w2rangle/N^2 at t ˜ N^{-1} in stationary stratified flows. Here, w is the vertical velocity fluctuation and N is the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. At long times, they predict that <δ z2rangle ˜ < w2 rangle t/N, when molecular diffusion alters the particle density. Venayagamoorthy and Stretch [6] examined the role of the changing particle density on vertical dispersion in DNS of decaying stratified turbulence and observed that after one eddy turnover time diabatic dispersion dominated. Van Aartrijk et al. [1] studied particle dispersion in DNS of stationary strat-ified turbulence and observed a plateau with <δ z2rangle ˜ < w2 rangle N^2 at t ˜ N^{-1}. However, some of the DNS showed that <δ z2rangle ˜ t at long times caused by density changes of fluid particles by molecular diffusion.

  10. Conditional Analysis of Dynamically Distinct Regions in Stratified Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portwood, Gavin; de Bruyn Kops, Stephen; Taylor, John; Salehipour, Hasem; Caulfield, Colm-Cille

    2016-11-01

    Stratified flows have been shown to exhibit broadly intermittent flow dynamics at large scales. In DNS of forced homogeneous stratified turbulence, we employ a conditional averaging technique to distinguish compositional flow regions which define the entire flow domain. Here, we condition on the vertical density gradient at inertial and buoyancy length scales to subdivide homogeneous stratified turbulence into three distinct regions that may be characterised by Gn ≡ ɛ / νN2 . We show that flows across the Fr-Re parameter space exhibit regions of (a) moderately 'quiescent' flow with few three-dimensional overturnings, (b) 'layered' turbulent regions which have constrained vertical length scales, and (c) three dimensional 'patches' of turbulence and that these regions may be characterised by Gn O (1) , Gn O (10) , and Gn O (100) , respectively. We conjecture that treating stratified turbulence as an instantaneous assemblage of these different regions in varying proportions may explain some of the apparently highly scattered flow dynamics and statistics previously reported in the literature. U.S. Office of Naval Research via Grant N00014-15-1-2248; U.K. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Grant EP/K034529/1; U.S. DoD HPCMP Frontier Project FP-CFD-FY14-007.

  11. Nonlinear instability of elementary stratified flows at large Richardson number.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J.; Shefter, Michael G.

    2000-03-01

    Elementary stably stratified flows with linear instability at all large Richardson numbers have been introduced recently by the authors [J. Fluid Mech. 376, 319-350 (1998)]. These elementary stratified flows have spatially constant but time varying gradients for velocity and density. Here the nonlinear stability of such flows in two space dimensions is studied through a combination of numerical simulations and theory. The elementary flows that are linearly unstable at large Richardson numbers are purely vortical flows; here it is established that from random initial data, linearized instability spontaneously generates local shears on buoyancy time scales near a specific angle of inclination that nonlinearly saturates into localized regions of strong mixing with density overturning resembling Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. It is also established here that the phase of these unstable waves does not satisfy the dispersion relation of linear gravity waves. The vortical flows are one family of stably stratified flows with uniform shear layers at the other extreme and elementary stably stratified flows with a mixture of vorticity and strain exhibiting behavior between these two extremes. The concept of effective shear is introduced for these general elementary flows; for each large Richardson number there is a critical effective shear with strong nonlinear instability, density overturning, and mixing for elementary flows with effective shear below this critical value. The analysis is facilitated by rewriting the equations for nonlinear perturbations in vorticity-stream form in a mean Lagrangian reference frame. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Forest inventory and stratified estimation: a cautionary note

    Treesearch

    John Coulston

    2008-01-01

    The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program uses stratified estimation techniques to produce estimates of forest attributes. Stratification must be unbiased and stratification procedures should be examined to identify any potential bias. This note explains simple techniques for identifying potential bias, discriminating between sample bias and stratification bias,...

  13. Dynamics of a vortex filament in a stratified medium

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, P. V.; Romanov, A. S.; Chukbar, K. V.

    2009-03-15

    The behavior of a vortex filament in a perfectly conducting stratified medium is analyzed. It is shown that the equation describing oscillations of a straight filament is linear, but becomes substantially non-linear with increasing inclination angle. Effects related to the finite radius of the vortex core are considered, and dispersion relations for linear oscillations of a vortex column are derived.

  14. Dual Spark Plugs For Stratified-Charge Rotary Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, John; Bracco, Frediano V.

    1996-01-01

    Fuel efficiency of stratified-charge, rotary, internal-combustion engine increased by improved design featuring dual spark plugs. Second spark plug ignites fuel on upstream side of main fuel injector; enabling faster burning and more nearly complete utilization of fuel.

  15. Stratified Fisher's Exact Test and its Sample Size Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Summary Chi-squared test has been a popular approach to the analysis of a 2 × 2 table when the sample sizes for the four cells are large. When the large sample assumption does not hold, however, we need an exact testing method such as Fisher's test. When the study population is heterogeneous, we often partition the subjects into multiple strata, so that each stratum consists of homogeneous subjects and hence the stratified analysis has an improved testing power. While Mantel-Haenszel test has been widely used as an extension of the chi-squared test to test on stratified 2×2 tables with a large-sample approximation, we have been lacking an extension of Fisher's test for stratified exact testing. In this paper, we discuss an exact testing method for stratified 2 × 2 tables which is simplified to the standard Fisher's test in single 2 × 2 table cases, and propose its sample size calculation method that can be useful for designing a study with rare cell frequencies. PMID:24395208

  16. Stratified Fisher's exact test and its sample size calculation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Chi-squared test has been a popular approach to the analysis of a 2 × 2 table when the sample sizes for the four cells are large. When the large sample assumption does not hold, however, we need an exact testing method such as Fisher's test. When the study population is heterogeneous, we often partition the subjects into multiple strata, so that each stratum consists of homogeneous subjects and hence the stratified analysis has an improved testing power. While Mantel-Haenszel test has been widely used as an extension of the chi-squared test to test on stratified 2 × 2 tables with a large-sample approximation, we have been lacking an extension of Fisher's test for stratified exact testing. In this paper, we discuss an exact testing method for stratified 2 × 2 tables that is simplified to the standard Fisher's test in single 2 × 2 table cases, and propose its sample size calculation method that can be useful for designing a study with rare cell frequencies. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. FDTD scattered field formulation for scatterers in stratified dispersive media.

    PubMed

    Olkkonen, Juuso

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a simple scattered field (SF) technique that enables finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of light scattering from dispersive objects residing in stratified dispersive media. The introduced SF technique is verified against the total field scattered field (TFSF) technique. As an application example, we study surface plasmon polariton enhanced light transmission through a 100 nm wide slit in a silver film.

  18. Profiling of poorly stratified atmospheres with scanning lidar

    Treesearch

    C. E. Wold; V. A. Kovalev; A. P. Petkov; W. M. Hao

    2012-01-01

    The direct multiangle solution may allow inversion of the scanning lidar data even when the requirement of the horizontally stratified atmosphere is poorly met. The solution is based on two principles: (1) The signal measured in zenith is the core source for extracting the information about the atmospheric aerosol loading, and (2) The multiangle signals are used as...

  19. Gravity-induced stresses in stratified rock masses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amadei, B.; Swolfs, H.S.; Savage, W.Z.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for the stress field induced by gravity in anisotropic and stratified rock masses. These rocks are assumed to be laterally restrained. The rock mass consists of finite mechanical units, each unit being modeled as a homogeneous, transversely isotropic or isotropic linearly elastic material. The following results are found. The nature of the gravity induced stress field in a stratified rock mass depends on the elastic properties of each rock unit and how these properties vary with depth. It is thermodynamically admissible for the induced horizontal stress component in a given stratified rock mass to exceed the vertical stress component in certain units and to be smaller in other units; this is not possible for the classical unstratified isotropic solution. Examples are presented to explore the nature of the gravity induced stress field in stratified rock masses. It is found that a decrease in rock mass anisotropy and a stiffening of rock masses with depth can generate stress distributions comparable to empirical hyperbolic distributions previously proposed in the literature. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  20. HYDRODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT MODELING STUDY IN A HIGHLY STRATIFIED ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the preliminary results of hydrodynamic and salinity predictions and the implications to an ongoing contaminated sediment transport and fate modeling effort in the Lower Duwamish Waterway (LDW), Seattle, Washington. The LDW is highly strati-fied when freshwate...

  1. A predictive model for rollover in stratified LNG tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, J.; Meader, J.W.; Shipman, C.W.

    1983-03-01

    The incubation period preceding ''rollover'' within a stratified LNG tank involves intensive heat and mass transfers between layers. Numerical integration of equations describing these processes leads to predicted time-history and boil-off characteristics which are in excellent agreement with Sarsten's (1972) documentation of the LaSpezia rollover incident.

  2. Geohydrology and water quality of stratified-drift aquifers in the middle Connecticut River basin, west-central New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flanagan, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    A study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, Water Resources Division, to describe the geohydrology and water quality of stratified-drift aquifers in the Middle Connecticut River Basin, west-central New Hampshire Stratified-drift aquifers discontinuously underlie 123 mi2 (square miles) of the Middle Connecticut River Basin, which has a total drainage area of 987 mi 2. Saturated thicknesses of stratified drift in the study area are locally greater than 500 feet but generally are less than 100 feet. Aquifer transmissivity locally exceeds 4,000 ft2/d (feet squared per day) but is generally less than 1,000 ft2/d. In only 17.2 mi2 of the study area are the aquifers identified as having a transmissivity greater than 1,000 ft2/d. As of 1990, total groundwater withdrawals from stratified drift for municipal supply were about 1.5 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) in the study area. Many of the stratified-drift aquifers underlying the study area are not developed to their fullest potential. The geohydrologic investigation of the stratified-drift aquifers focused on aquifer properties, including aquifer boundaries; recharge, discharge, and direction of ground-water flow; saturated thickness and storage; and transmissivity. Surficial-geologic mapping assisted in the determination of aquifer boundaries. Data from more than 1,000 wells, test borings, and springs were used to prepare maps of water-table altitude, saturated thickness, and transmissivity of stratified drift. More than 11 miles of seismic-refraction profiling at 95 sites was used in the preparation of the water-table-altitude and saturated-thickness maps. Seismic-reflection data collected along 1.6 miles of Mascoma Lake also were used in preparation of the saturated-thickness maps. Four stratified-drift aquifers in the towns of Franconia, Haverhill, and Lisbon were analyzed to estimate the water availability on the basis of analytical

  3. Numerical analysis of internal waves in stratified wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, Philppe

    2014-05-01

    In laboratory investigations, increased attention has been given to internal waves generated by stationary placed oscillating sources and moving bodies in stratified fluids [1]. The main attention was paid to study flows past bodies of perfect shapes like sphere [2], cylinder [3] of thin strip [3] which are the best theoretical (analytical or numerical) studies. Due to simplicity of geometry, flow around a strip has a potential to investigate separately effects of a drag and lift forces on the body by changing the slope of the horizontally moving strip which can be placed vertically [1], horizontally [2], or be tilted under some angle to the direction of towing velocity [5]. Numeric modeling of a flow past vertical strip uniformly towing with permanent velocity in horizontal direction in a linearly stratified talk which was based on a finite differences solver adapted to the low Reynolds Navier-Stokes equation with transport equation for salinity (LES simulation [6] and RANS [7]) has demonstrated reasonable agreement with data of Schlieren visualization, density marker and probe measurements of internal wave fields. The chosen test cases allowed demonstrating the ability of selected numerical methods to represent stably stratified flows over horizontal strip [4] and hill type 2D obstacles [1, 3] with generation of internal waves. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research work was supported by the Region Provence Alpes Côte d'Azur - Modtercom project. The work was also supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 12-01-00128). REFERENCES [1] Chashechkin Yu.D., Mitkin V.V. Experimental study of a fine structure of 2D wakes and mixing past an obstacle in a continuously stratified fluid // Dynamics of Atmosphere and Oceans. 2001. V. 34. P. 165-187. [2] Chashechkin, Yu. D. Hydrodynamics of a sphere in a stratified fluid // Fluid Dyn. 1989. V.24(1) P. 1-7. [3] Mitkin V. V., Chashechkin Yu. D. Transformation of hanging discontinuities into vortex systems in a

  4. Physical effects of thermal pollution in lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Râman Vinnâ, Love; Wüest, Alfred; Bouffard, Damien

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic heat emissions into inland waters influence water temperature and affect stratification, heat and nutrient fluxes, deep water renewal, and biota. Given the increased thermal stress on these systems by growing cooling demands of riparian/coastal infrastructures in combination with climate warming, the question arises on how to best monitor and manage these systems. In this study, we investigate local and system-wide physical effects on the medium-sized perialpine Lake Biel (Switzerland), influenced by point-source cooling water emission from an upstream nuclear power plant (heat emission ˜700 MW, ˜18 W m-2 lake wide). We use one-dimensional (SIMSTRAT) and three-dimensional (Delft3D-Flow) hydrodynamic numerical simulations and provide model resolution guidelines for future studies of thermal pollution. The effects on Lake Biel by the emitted excess heat are summarized as: (i) clear seasonal trend in temperature increase, locally up to 3.4°C and system-wide volume mean ˜0.3°C, which corresponds to one decade of regional surface water climate warming; (ii) the majority of supplied thermal pollution (˜60%) leaves this short residence time (˜58 days) system via the main outlet, whereas the remaining heat exits to the atmosphere; (iii) increased length of stratified period due to the stabilizing effects of additional heat; (iv) system-wide effects such as warmer temperature, prolonged stratified period, and river-caused epilimnion flushing are resolved by both models whereas local raised temperature and river short circuiting was only identifiable with the three-dimensional model approach. This model-based method provides an ideal tool to assess man-made impacts on lakes and their downstream outflows.

  5. Helicity dynamics in stratified turbulence in the absence of forcing.

    PubMed

    Rorai, C; Rosenberg, D; Pouquet, A; Mininni, P D

    2013-06-01

    A numerical study of decaying stably stratified flows is performed. Relatively high stratification (Froude number ≈10(-2)-10(-1)) and moderate Reynolds (Re) numbers (Re≈ 3-6×10(3)) are considered and a particular emphasis is placed on the role of helicity (velocity-vorticity correlations), which is not an invariant of the nondissipative equations. The problem is tackled by integrating the Boussinesq equations in a periodic cubical domain using different initial conditions: a nonhelical Taylor-Green (TG) flow, a fully helical Beltrami [Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC)] flow, and random flows with a tunable helicity. We show that for stratified ABC flows helicity undergoes a substantially slower decay than for unstratified ABC flows. This fact is likely associated to the combined effect of stratification and large-scale coherent structures. Indeed, when the latter are missing, as in random flows, helicity is rapidly destroyed by the onset of gravitational waves. A type of large-scale dissipative "cyclostrophic" balance can be invoked to explain this behavior. No production of helicity is observed, contrary to the case of rotating and stratified flows. When helicity survives in the system, it strongly affects the temporal energy decay and the energy distribution among Fourier modes. We discover in fact that the decay rate of energy for stratified helical flows is much slower than for stratified nonhelical flows and can be considered with a phenomenological model in a way similar to what is done for unstratified rotating flows. We also show that helicity, when strong, has a measurable effect on the Fourier spectra, in particular at scales larger than the buoyancy scale, for which it displays a rather flat scaling associated with vertical shear, as observed in the planetary boundary layer.

  6. Performance of Stratified and Subgrouped Disproportionality Analyses in Spontaneous Databases.

    PubMed

    Seabroke, Suzie; Candore, Gianmario; Juhlin, Kristina; Quarcoo, Naashika; Wisniewski, Antoni; Arani, Ramin; Painter, Jeffery; Tregunno, Philip; Norén, G Niklas; Slattery, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Disproportionality analyses are used in many organisations to identify adverse drug reactions (ADRs) from spontaneous report data. Reporting patterns vary over time, with patient demographics, and between different geographical regions, and therefore subgroup analyses or adjustment by stratification may be beneficial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of subgroup and stratified disproportionality analyses for a number of key covariates within spontaneous report databases of differing sizes and characteristics. Using a reference set of established ADRs, signal detection performance (sensitivity and precision) was compared for stratified, subgroup and crude (unadjusted) analyses within five spontaneous report databases (two company, one national and two international databases). Analyses were repeated for a range of covariates: age, sex, country/region of origin, calendar time period, event seriousness, vaccine/non-vaccine, reporter qualification and report source. Subgroup analyses consistently performed better than stratified analyses in all databases. Subgroup analyses also showed benefits in both sensitivity and precision over crude analyses for the larger international databases, whilst for the smaller databases a gain in precision tended to result in some loss of sensitivity. Additionally, stratified analyses did not increase sensitivity or precision beyond that associated with analytical artefacts of the analysis. The most promising subgroup covariates were age and region/country of origin, although this varied between databases. Subgroup analyses perform better than stratified analyses and should be considered over the latter in routine first-pass signal detection. Subgroup analyses are also clearly beneficial over crude analyses for larger databases, but further validation is required for smaller databases.

  7. Hydrologic data and description of a hydrologic monitoring plan for Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Tiffany Rae; McFarland, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    A hydrologic reconnaissance of the Medicine Lake Volcano area was done to collect data needed for the design of a hydrologic monitoring plan. The reconnaissance was completed during two field trips made in June and September 1992, during which geothermal and hydrologic features of public interest in the Medicine Lake area were identified. Selected wells, springs, and geothermal features were located and documented, and initial water-level, discharge, temperature, and specific-conductance measurements were made. Lakes in the study area also were surveyed during the September field trip. Temperature, specific- conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH data were collected by using a multiparameter probe. The proposed monitoring plan includes measurement of water levels in wells, discharge from springs, and lake stage, as well as analysis of well-,spring-, and lake-water quality. In determining lake-water quality, data for both stratified and unstratified conditions would be considered. (Data for stratified conditions were collected during the reconnaissance phase of this project, but data for unstratified conditions were not.) In addition, lake stage also would be monitored. A geothermal feature near Medicine Lake is a "hot spot" from which hot gases discharge from two distinct vents. Gas chemistry and temperature would be monitored in one of these vents.

  8. The trophic status of Suwałki Landscape Park lakes based on selected parameters (NE Poland).

    PubMed

    Jekatierynczuk-Rudczyk, Elżbieta; Zieliński, Piotr; Grabowska, Magdalena; Ejsmont-Karabin, Jolanta; Karpowicz, Maciej; Więcko, Adam

    2014-08-01

    This study describes changes in the trophic status of 12 lakes within Suwałki Landscape Park (SLP). All of the trophic classifications of the lakes were based on the trophic continuum division. Trophic status was determined by means of multiparameter indices using several diverse criteria. In this study, the assessment of the trophic status of lakes included water quality; abundance and biomass of bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, and zooplankton; and primary production of phytoplankton. The Carlson trophic state index (TSI) describes the level of water fertility and indicated the dominance of moderately eutrophic waters. Lakes Perty, Jeglówek, and Hańcza have a trophic status that indicates mesotrophy (TSI <50). The trophic status of the studied lakes was determined based on the bacterial abundance and clearly showed a lack of oligotrophic lakes in SLP. Based on the number of bacteria, only Lake Szurpiły can be classified as β-mesotrophic, whereas Lake Linówek can be characterized as hypertrophic with some features typical for humic waters. The greatest value of gross primary production was observed in Lake Linówek (126.4 mg C/m(3)/h). The phytoplankton trophy index varied from 1.59 to 2.28, and its highest value, which indicated eutrophy, was determined for Lake Udziejek. In the case of Lakes Hańcza, Szurpiły, Perty, Jeglówek, and Kojle, the index ranged from 1.25 to 1.74, which indicated mesotrophy. The majority of the lakes were classified as mesoeutrophic (1.75-2.24). The highest trophic status was assessed for lakes with a marked dominance of cyanobacteria (Lake Przechodnie, Lake Krajwelek, Lake Udziejek, and Lake Pogorzałek), which is commonly recognized as an indicator of high trophic status. Considering all of the indices of trophic status, the analysis of rotifer community structure indicates that the studied group of lakes is mesoeutrophic or eutrophic. The values of crustacean zooplankton indices indicated that the trophic status of the

  9. Seismic reflection study of recessional moraines beneath Lake Superior and their relationship to regional deglaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmesser, C.W.; Johnson, T.C.; Wold, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 8000 km of continuous seismic reflection profiles throughout Lake Superior were examined for evidence of recessional moraines and other ice-margin deposits associated with the retreat of late Wisconsin ice. These features are correlated with the record of glacial-lake evolution in western Lake Superior. An offlapping sequence of glacial and glacial-lacustrine dediments overlying bedrock is recognized in west-central Lake Superior that is progressively younger to the northeast. The sequence underlies more recent glaical-lacustrine and postglacial sediments. Four facies are recognized on the basis of geomorphologic and acoustic properties and are interpreted to represent a southwest-to-northeast assemblage of: proglacial stratified drift (facies A), drift in major end moraines (facies B), till deposited as glacial retreat resumed, or possibly late-stage ablation till (facies C), and basal till (facies D). The prominent moraines of facies B are unusually thick and are believed to mark the ice-margin shorelines of successive major proglacial lakes that formerly occupied parts of western Lake Superior. The moraines are tentatively correlated with Glacial Lake Duluth (unit 1), Glacial Lake Washburn (unit 2), and Glacial Lake Beaver Bay (unit 3), the most prominent of lakes drained via the progressively lower outlets via the Moose Lake/ Brule-St. Croix Rivers, the Huron Mountains, and the Au Train-Whitefish regions, respectively. ?? 1982.

  10. Between- and within-lake responses of macrophyte richness metrics to shoreline developmen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beck, Marcus W.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Hatch, Lorin K.

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic habitat in littoral environments can be affected by residential development of shoreline areas. We evaluated the relationship between macrophyte richness metrics and shoreline development to quantify indicator response at 2 spatial scales for Minnesota lakes. First, the response of total, submersed, and sensitive species to shoreline development was evaluated within lakes to quantify macrophyte response as a function of distance to the nearest dock. Within-lake analyses using generalized linear mixed models focused on 3 lakes of comparable size with a minimal influence of watershed land use. Survey points farther from docks had higher total species richness and presence of species sensitive to disturbance. Second, between-lake effects of shoreline development on total, submersed, emergent-floating, and sensitive species were evaluated for 1444 lakes. Generalized linear models were developed for all lakes and stratified subsets to control for lake depth and watershed land use. Between-lake analyses indicated a clear response of macrophyte richness metrics to increasing shoreline development, such that fewer emergent-floating and sensitive species were correlated with increasing density of docks. These trends were particularly evident for deeper lakes with lower watershed development. Our results provide further evidence that shoreline development is associated with degraded aquatic habitat, particularly by illustrating the response of macrophyte richness metrics across multiple lake types and different spatial scales.

  11. Spatial structure and persistence of methanogen populations in humic bog lakes.

    PubMed

    Milferstedt, Kim; Youngblut, Nicholas D; Whitaker, Rachel J

    2010-06-01

    Patterns of diversity within methanogenic archaea in humic bog lakes are quantified over time and space to determine the roles that spatial isolation and seasonal mixing play in structuring microbial populations. The protein encoding gene mcrA is used as a molecular marker for the detection of fine-scale differences between methanogens in four dimictic bog lakes in which the water column is mixed twice a year and one meromictic lake that is permanently stratified. Although similar sequences are observed in each bog lake, each lake has its own characteristic set of persisting sequence types, indicating that methanogen populations are delimited either by low migration between the anaerobic hypolimnia or by lake-specific selection. The meromictic lake is differentiated from all other lakes and contains sequences with a higher degree of microdiversity than the dimictic lakes. By relating the structure of diversity to the depth of each bog lake, we propose the hypothesis that the deeper parts of the water column favor microdiversification of methanogens, whereas the periodically disturbed water column of shallower dimictic lakes promote genetically more diverse methanogen communities.

  12. Stratified Bacterial Diversity along Physico-chemical Gradients in High-Altitude Modern Stromatolites.

    PubMed

    Toneatti, Diego M; Albarracín, Virginia H; Flores, Maria R; Polerecky, Lubos; Farías, María E

    2017-01-01

    At an altitude of 3,570 m, the volcanic lake Socompa in the Argentinean Andes is presently the highest site where actively forming stromatolite-like structures have been reported. Interestingly, pigment and microsensor analyses performed through the different layers of the stromatolites (50 mm-deep) showed steep vertical gradients of light and oxygen, hydrogen sulfide and pH in the porewater. Given the relatively good characterization of these physico-chemical gradients, the aim of this follow-up work was to specifically address how the bacterial diversity stratified along the top six layers of the stromatolites which seems the most metabolically important and diversified zone of the whole microbial community. We herein discussed how, in only 7 mm, a drastic succession of metabolic adaptations occurred: i.e., microbial communities shift from a UV-high/oxic world to an IR-low/anoxic/high H2S environment which force stratification and metabolic specialization of the bacterial community, thus, modulating the chemical faces of the Socompa stromatolites. The oxic zone was dominated by Deinococcus sp. at top surface (0.3 mm), followed by a second layer of Coleofasciculus sp. (0.3 to ∼2 mm). Sequences from anoxygenic phototrophic Alphaproteobacteria, along with an increasing diversity of phyla including Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes were found at middle layers 3 and 4. Deeper layers (5-7 mm) were mostly occupied by sulfate reducers of Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, next to a high diversity and equitable community of rare, unclassified and candidate phyla. This analysis showed how microbial communities stratified in a physicochemical vertical profile and according to the light source. It also gives an insight of which bacterial metabolic capabilities might operate and produce a microbial cooperative strategy to thrive in one of the most extreme environments on Earth.

  13. Stratified Bacterial Diversity along Physico-chemical Gradients in High-Altitude Modern Stromatolites

    PubMed Central

    Toneatti, Diego M.; Albarracín, Virginia H.; Flores, Maria R.; Polerecky, Lubos; Farías, María E.

    2017-01-01

    At an altitude of 3,570 m, the volcanic lake Socompa in the Argentinean Andes is presently the highest site where actively forming stromatolite-like structures have been reported. Interestingly, pigment and microsensor analyses performed through the different layers of the stromatolites (50 mm-deep) showed steep vertical gradients of light and oxygen, hydrogen sulfide and pH in the porewater. Given the relatively good characterization of these physico-chemical gradients, the aim of this follow-up work was to specifically address how the bacterial diversity stratified along the top six layers of the stromatolites which seems the most metabolically important and diversified zone of the whole microbial community. We herein discussed how, in only 7 mm, a drastic succession of metabolic adaptations occurred: i.e., microbial communities shift from a UV-high/oxic world to an IR-low/anoxic/high H2S environment which force stratification and metabolic specialization of the bacterial community, thus, modulating the chemical faces of the Socompa stromatolites. The oxic zone was dominated by Deinococcus sp. at top surface (0.3 mm), followed by a second layer of Coleofasciculus sp. (0.3 to ∼2 mm). Sequences from anoxygenic phototrophic Alphaproteobacteria, along with an increasing diversity of phyla including Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes were found at middle layers 3 and 4. Deeper layers (5–7 mm) were mostly occupied by sulfate reducers of Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, next to a high diversity and equitable community of rare, unclassified and candidate phyla. This analysis showed how microbial communities stratified in a physicochemical vertical profile and according to the light source. It also gives an insight of which bacterial metabolic capabilities might operate and produce a microbial cooperative strategy to thrive in one of the most extreme environments on Earth. PMID:28446906

  14. [Atrial fibrillation in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: clinical characteristics and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Cui, H; Wang, J J; Xiao, M H; Lu, J; Zheng, X X; Guo, Y; Wang, S Y; Huang, X H

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for atrial fibrillation(AF)in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy(OHCM). Methods: Patients with OHCM hospitalized in Fuwai Hospital from March 2011 to January 2016 were enrolled in the present study. Each patient underwent examinations including transthoracic echocardiography, body surface electrocardiograph or dynamic electrocardiogram (Holter). Cardiac troponin I (cTNI) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP)levels were tested and clinical profiles were collected.The subjects were divided into two groups (the AF group and non-AF group). Risk factors for AF in patients with OHCM were assessed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 309 patients were evaluated in the study. Among them, 17.5%( 54/309) patients were with AF.Age[(51.2±10.1)years vs (43.1 ± 14.4)years], New York Heart Association class(NYHA class)(2.8±0.5 vs 2.6±0.6), disease duration[6.0(4.0, 10.0)years vs 3.0(1.0, 6.0)years], left atrial (LA) dimension[(45.1±7.0)mm vs(42.6 ± 7.4)mm]and NT-pro-BNP levels[2 007(1 565, 3 199)pmol/L vs 1 509(729, 2 921)pmol/L]in the AF group were significantly higher than those in the non-AF group (all P<0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that advanced age(OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.08, P<0.01), higher NYHA class(OR=2.00, 95% CI 1.08-3.70, P<0.05)and longer disease duration(OR=1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.15, P<0.05)were independent risk factors for AF in patients with OHCM, in which advanced age(OR=1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.09, P<0.01), higher NYHA class(OR=3.39, 95% CI 1.53-7.54, P<0.01), LA dimension(OR=1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12, P<0.05)and longer clinical course(OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.04-1.20, P<0.01)were associated with AF in male patients, and advanced age (OR=1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.09, P<0.05)and longer disease duration(OR=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.28, P<0.01)were associated with AF in female patients when stratified by gender. Conclusion

  15. Anesthetic Management Guided by Transthoracic Echocardiography During Cesarean Delivery Complicated by Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    DesRoches, Jaclyn M; McKeen, Dolores Madeline; Warren, Andrew; Allen, Victoria M; George, Ronald B; Kells, Catherine; Shukla, Romesh

    2016-03-15

    We describe the management of a parturient woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who developed a symptomatic accelerated idioventricular rhythm who required an urgent cesarean delivery at 32 weeks. Transthoracic echocardiography helped guide anesthetic management, including epidural dosing, fluid management, and phenylephrine infusion rates. This case demonstrates the application of transthoracic echocardiography to guide anesthetic management in a parturient woman at risk for cardiovascular compromise.

  16. [Apical hypertrophic myocardiopathy. Report of the first case identified on the American continent].

    PubMed

    Zanoniani, C; Guadalajara, J F; Gil, M; Medrano, G A; Vargas, J; Salazar, E

    1981-01-01

    What appears to be the first case of hypertrophic apical myocardiography described in the western hemisphere is presented in this report. The diagnosis was confirmed by angiocardiography and echocardiography. The electrocardiogram showed the characteristic giant T waves. It is of interest that the coronary radioangiography suggested alterations in the microcirculation which could explain the striking electrocardiographic pattern of subepicardial ischemia seen in these patients.

  17. [Molecular targets and novel pharmacological options to prevent myocardial hypertrophic remodeling].

    PubMed

    Coppini, Raffaele; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Poggesi, Corrado; Mugelli, Alessandro; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial hypertrophic remodeling is a pathophysiological feature of several cardiac conditions and is the hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common monogenic inherited disease of the heart. In recent years, preclinical and clinical studies investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms and intracellular signaling pathways involved in pathologic cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and highlighted a number of possible molecular targets of therapy aimed at preventing its development. Early prevention of myocardial hypertrophic remodeling is particularly sought after in HCM, as current therapeutic strategies are unable to remove the primary cause of disease, i.e. the disease-causing gene mutation. Studies on transgenic animal models or human myocardial samples from patients with HCM identified intracellular calcium overload as a central mechanism driving pathological hypertrophy. In this review, we analyze recent preclinical and clinical studies on animal models and patients with HCM aimed at preventing or modifying hypertrophic myocardial remodeling. Mounting evidence shows that prevention of pathological hypertrophy is a feasible strategy in HCM and will enter the clinical practice in the near future. Considering the close mechanistic similarities between HCM and secondary hypertrophy, these studies are also relevant for the common forms of cardiac hypertrophy, such as hypertensive or valvular heart disease.

  18. Galangin inhibits hypertrophic scar formation via ALK5/Smad2/3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifan; Shan, Shengzhou; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Xinyu; Yi, Bo; Zhou, Jia; Li, Qingfeng

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HS) is characterized by excessive fibrosis associated with aberrant function of fibroblasts. Currently, no satisfactory drug has been developed to treat the disease. Here we found that a flavonoid natural product, galangin, could significantly attenuate hypertrophic scar formation in a mechanical load-induced mouse model. Both in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that galangin remarkably inhibited collagen production, proliferation, and activation of fibroblasts. Besides, galangin suppressed the contractile ability of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts. Further Western blot analysis revealed that galangin dose-dependently down-regulated Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation. Such bioactivity of galangin resulted from its selective targeting to the activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) was demonstrated by ALK5 knockdown and over-expression experiments. Taken together, this compound could simultaneously inhibit both the accumulation of collagen and abnormal activation/proliferation of fibroblasts, which were the two pivotal factors for hypertrophic scar formation, thus suggesting that galangin serves as a potential agent for treatment of HS or other fibroproliferative disorders.

  19. Hair-thread tourniquet syndrome of the hypertrophic clitoris in a 6-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Parlak, Mesut; Karakaya, Ali Erdal

    2015-05-01

    Hair-thread tourniquet syndrome is defined as the ischemic strangulation of hair resulting in edema and severe pain and may cause amputation of organs. Strangulation of the external genitalia (clitoris, labia minora) has rarely been described in girls. Here, we present a case of hypertrophic clitoris injury secondary to hair strangulation in a 6-year-old girl.

  20. [Right ventricular involvement in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A case report and brief review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Comella, Alessandro; Magnacca, Massimo; Gistri, Roberto; Lombardi, Massimo; Neglia, Danilo; Poddighe, Rosa; Pesola, Antonio

    2004-02-01

    A clinical case of non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with involvement of the right ventricle is reported. The patient was a 42-year-old male with symptoms suggesting an effort angina of recent onset. The diagnosis was established by echocardiography, which showed asymmetric hypertrophy of the interventricular septum (20 mm), hypertrophy of the right ventricular free wall, and severe hypertrophy of the septal papillary muscle of the tricuspid valve. The patient underwent a complete diagnostic evaluation, including exercise stress test, Holter monitoring, magnetic resonance, myocardial tomoscintigraphy and complete hemodynamic assessment. Medical treatment with atenolol 50 mg day was started; at 1-year follow-up the patient's clinical conditions are good, with decrease of anginal episodes. The literature review elicits the paucity of information about this condition, despite a frequent involvement of both ventricles in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. The case reported shows two atypical aspects: a) the involvement of the right ventricle in non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is anecdotal; b) this pattern of hypertrophy (right ventricular free wall/septal papillary muscle) has never been previously reported. Right ventricular involvement in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy must be carefully investigated, because it may be more frequent than conventionally deemed.

  1. Clinical features and outcomes of childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: results from a national population-based study.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Alan W; Daubeney, Piers E F; Chondros, Patty; Carlin, John B; Colan, Steven D; Cheung, Michael; Davis, Andrew M; Chow, C W; Weintraub, Robert G

    2005-08-30

    Population-based studies have provided insight into the natural history of adult hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but comparable information for affected children is lacking. All Australian children who presented with primary cardiomyopathy at 0 to 10 years of age between January 1, 1987, and December 31, 1996, were enrolled in a longitudinal cohort study. A single cardiologist reviewed serial cardiac investigations on each subject. A total of 80 subjects with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were identified. An underlying syndromal, genetic, or metabolic condition was identified in 46 subjects (57.5%). There were no cases of sudden death at presentation. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was present in 32 subjects (40%); right ventricular outflow obstruction was present in 10 (12.5%). Freedom from death or transplantation was 83% (95% CI, 73 to 90) 5 years after presentation and 76% (95% CI, 62 to 86) 10 years after presentation. By proportional-hazards regression analysis, risk factors for death or transplantation included concentric left ventricular hypertrophy, age at presentation <1 year, lower initial fractional shortening Z score, and increasing left ventricular posterior wall thickness relative to body surface area. At the latest follow-up, 54 of 65 surviving subjects had no symptoms, and 46 were receiving no regular medication. Syndromal, genetic, and metabolic causes predominate in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Ventricular outflow tract obstruction is common. The clinical status of long-term survivors is good. This population-based study identifies children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who are at risk of adverse events.

  2. Missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy-chain gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Shoichi; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Hirayama, Kenji; Sakurai, Hisanao

    1995-09-11

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy occurs as an autosomal dominant familial disorder or as a sporadic disease without familial involvement. We describe a missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, a G to T transversion (741 Gly{r_arrow}Trp) identified by direct sequencing of exon 20 in four individuals affected with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Three individuals with sporadic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, whose parents are clinically and genetically unaffected, had sequence variations of exon 34 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion, 1658 Asp{r_arrow}Asp, resulting in FokI site polymorphism), of intron 33 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a G to A and an A to T transversion), and also of intron 14 of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion in a patient with Noonan syndrome). Including our case, 30 missense mutations of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene in 49 families have been reported thus far worldwide. Almost all are located in the region of the gene coding for the globular head of the molecule, and only one mutation was found in both Caucasian and Japanese families. Missense mutations of the {Beta}-cardiac MHC gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may therefore differ according to race. 29 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Three patients presenting with severe macrosomia and congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Marie; Benbrik, Nadir; Romefort, Bénédicte; Colombel, Agnès; Bézieau, Stéphane; Isidor, Bertrand

    2017-03-24

    Macrosomia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are two features often associated in neonates of diabetic mothers. We report the cases of three patients with severe macrosomia and critical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy without severely unbalanced maternal diabetes. Only three patients with those two features and no uncontrolled maternal diabetes have been previously reported. The first patient was a 39-week-old girl, the second patient was a 39-week-old girl, and the third patient was a 41-week-old boy. The two French girls and the French boy had severe macrosomia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, leading to the death of the boy. The outcome of the two girls was favorable, with a standardization of growth curves and ventricular hypertrophy. Their mothers presented with high body mass index but no severe documented maternal diabetes; glycemic imbalance was only suspected on postnatal analyses. There was no hydramnios during pregnancy and no other environmental factor, especially toxic exposure. Their parents are from Mayotte, Guadeloupe, and Guinea-Conakry. The usual genetics causes, Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, and chromosomal copy number variation, were also excluded. This report suggests the implication of other factors in addition to glycemic disorders, including genetic factors, in the occurrence of macrosomia and severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in neonates. These three original observations indicate that gynecologists and neonatologists should pay attention to neonates from mothers with a high body mass index and when maternal diabetes is not documented.

  4. Osteogenic Treatment Initiating a Tissue-Engineered Cartilage Template Hypertrophic Transition.

    PubMed

    Fu, J Y; Lim, S Y; He, P F; Fan, C J; Wang, D A

    2016-10-01

    Hypertrophic chondrocytes play a critical role in endochondral bone formation as well as the progress of osteoarthritis (OA). An in vitro cartilage hypertrophy model can be used as a platform to study complex molecular mechanisms involved in these processes and screen new drugs for OA. To develop an in vitro cartilage hypertrophy model, we treated a tissue-engineered cartilage template, living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), with osteogenic medium for hypertrophic induction. In addition, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were seeded onto LhCG constructs to mimic vascular invasion. The results showed that osteogenic treatment significantly inhibited the synthesis of endostatin in LhCG constructs and enhanced expression of hypertrophic marker-collagen type X (Col X) and osteogenic markers, as well as calcium deposition in vitro. Upon subcutaneous implantation, osteogenic medium-treated LhCG constructs all stained positive for Col X and showed significant calcium deposition and blood vessel invasion. Col X staining and calcium deposition were most obvious in osteogenic medium-treated only group, while there was no difference between EPC-seeded and non-seeded group. These results demonstrated that osteogenic treatment was of the primary factor to induce hypertrophic transition of LhCG constructs and this model may contribute to the establishment of an in vitro cartilage hypertrophy model.

  5. Scar management practice and science: a comprehensive approach to controlling scar tissue and avoiding hypertrophic scarring.

    PubMed

    Widgerow, Alan David; Chait, Laurence A

    2011-12-01

    A meta-analysis of the literature forms the basis of a treatment regimen focused on the principles of support, controlled inflammation, hydration, and hastened collagen remodeling. The presented clinical trial avoided hypertrophic scarring in more than 80% of cases, validating the theory of targeting many areas of scar control in 1 approach.

  6. Marked left ventricular hypertrophy mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with steroid therapy for congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Scirè, Giuseppe; D'Anella, Giorgio; Cristofori, Laura; Mazzuca, Valentina; Cianfarani, Stefano

    2007-06-01

    We describe a child treated with high-dose steroid therapy for congenital adrenal hyperplasia who showed marked left ventricular hypertrophy mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with steroid therapy for congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Cardiomyopathy reversed completely when an appropriate steroid therapeutic regimen was established.

  7. The effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Soo; Jeon, Jong Hyun; Hong, Aram; Yang, Hyeong Tae; Yim, Haejun; Cho, Yong Suk; Kim, Do-Hern; Hur, Jun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Chun, Wook; Lee, Boung Chul; Seo, Cheong Hoon

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn. One hundred and forty-six burn patients with hypertrophic scar(s) were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. All patients received standard rehabilitation therapy for hypertrophic scars and 76 patients (massage group) additionally received burn scar rehabilitation massage therapy. Both before and after the treatment, we determined the scores of visual analog scale (VAS) and itching scale and assessed the scar characteristics of thickness, melanin, erythema, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), sebum, and elasticity by using ultrasonography, Mexameter(®), Tewameter(®), Sebumeter(®), and Cutometer(®), respectively. The scores of both VAS and itching scale decreased significantly in both groups, indicating a significant intragroup difference. With regard to the scar characteristics, the massage group showed a significant decrease after treatment in scar thickness, melanin, erythema, TEWL and a significant intergroup difference. In terms of scar elasticity, a significant intergroup difference was noted in immediate distension and gross skin elasticity, while the massage group significant improvement in skin distensibility, immediate distension, immediate retraction, and delayed distension. Our results suggest that burn rehabilitation massage therapy is effective in improving pain, pruritus, and scar characteristics in hypertrophic scars after burn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy with myelofibrosis and anemia: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheyu; Li, Qianrui; Wang, Qin; Chen, Decai; Li, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO) is a rare and usually benign disorder of bone and connective tissue growth. Here we present a 28-year-old male patient presenting to our hospital with PHO and symptomatic anemia. Bone marrow biopsy suggested myelofibrosis, a serious complication of PHO, which is often neglected upon admission, but may lead to life-threatening anemia. PMID:25785156

  9. Transforming growth factor alpha controls the transition from hypertrophic cartilage to bone during endochondral bone growth.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Shirine E; Pest, Michael A; Kim, Gunwoo; Ohora, Sara N; Qin, Ling; Beier, Frank

    2012-07-01

    We have recently identified transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) as a novel growth factor involved in the joint disease osteoarthritis. The role of TGFα in normal cartilage and bone physiology however, has not been well defined. The objective of this study was to determine the role of TGFα in bone development through investigation of the Tgfa knockout mouse. The gross skeletons as well as the cartilage growth plates of Tgfa knockout mice and their control littermates were examined during several developmental stages ranging from newborn to ten weeks old. Knockout mice experienced skeletal growth retardation and expansion of the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate. These phenotypes were transient and spontaneously resolved by ten weeks of age. Tgfa knockout growth plates also had fewer osteoclasts along the cartilage/bone interface. Furthermore, knockout mice expressed less RUNX2, RANKL, and MMP13 mRNA in their cartilage growth plates than controls did. Tgfa knockout mice experience a delay in bone development, specifically the conversion of hypertrophic cartilage to true bone. The persistence of the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate appears to be mediated by a decrease in MMP13 and RANKL expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes and a resulting reduction in osteoclast recruitment. Overall, TGFα appears to be an important growth factor regulating the conversion of cartilage to bone during the process of endochondral ossification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced in Vivo Delivery of 5-Fluorouracil by Ethosomal Gels in Rabbit Ear Hypertrophic Scar Model

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Kan; Mao, Xiaohui; Su, Weijie; Li, Ke; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Applying Ethosomal Gels (EGs) in transdermal drug delivery systems has evoked considerable interest because of their good water-solubility and biocompatibility. However, there has not been an explicit description of applying EGs as a vehicle for hypertrophic scars treatment. Here, a novel transdermal EGs loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU EGs) was successfully prepared and characterized. The stability assay in vitro revealed that 5-FU EGs stored for a period of 30 days at 4 ± 1 °C had a better size stability than that at 25 ± 1 °C. Furthermore, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, EGs labeled with Rhodamine 6 G penetrated into the deep dermis of the hypertrophic scar within 24 h in the rabbit ear hypertrophic model suggested that the EGs were an optional delivery carrier through scar tissues. In addition, the value of the Scar Elevation Index (SEI) of 5-FU EGs group in the rabbit ear scar model was lower than that of 5-FU Phosphate Buffered Saline gel and Control groups. To conclude, these results suggest that EGs delivery system loaded 5-fluorouracil is a perfect candidate drug for hypertrophic scars therapy in future. PMID:25501333

  11. Regime Shifts in Lakes: Organic Carbon Dynamics and Whole Ecosystem Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of using sediment records to identify regime shifts in lakes has largely focussed on biological proxies, such as diatoms and chironomids. In this approach, long-term records of rapid ecological change are compared with independent proxies of the variables driving ecosystem change, for example, climate or catchment disturbance processes (hydrological budgets, deforestation, fire etc.). One of the main problems with this approach is that the sediment cores upon which the data analyses are made are taken from the central part of lakes, often at the deepest point. As a result, the ecological changes observed reflect pelagic (open water) processes rather than whole-lake responses. As most lakes (apart from hypertrophic systems) are dominated by benthic production it is unclear whether palaeolimnological assessments of regime shifts are representative of the whole lake response. Theoretically, this question can be addressed simply by using cores from shallow water. There are a number of problems with this approach, most notably the loss of temporal resolution in shallow water cores (due to the slower sediment accumulation rate) and the different biological assemblages in the shallow water (littoral) cores. There is a strong effect of water depth on the zonation and distribution of biological remains across any lake. An alternative approach therefore is to use total organic carbon [OC] accumulation rate as a measure of the whole lake response to see if there is, in fact, a regime shift at the whole lake scale. Here I present examples of Holocene OC accumulation rate responses to external forcing from shallow eutrophic and boreal lakes and compare them to biological records of structural ecological change to determine whether there has been a whole-lake regime shift.

  12. MicroRNA 181b regulates decorin production by dermal fibroblasts and may be a potential therapy for hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Peter; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is a frequent fibroproliferative complication following deep dermal burns leading to impaired function and lifelong disfigurement. Decorin reduces fibrosis and induces regeneration in many tissues, and is significantly downregulated in hypertrophic scar and normal deep dermal fibroblasts. It was hypothesized that microRNAs in these fibroblasts downregulate decorin and blocking them would increase decorin and may prevent hypertrophic scarring. Lower decorin levels were found in hypertrophic scar as compared to normal skin, and in deep as compared to superficial dermis. A decorin 3' un-translated region reporter assay demonstrated microRNA decreased decorin in deep dermal fibroblasts, and microRNA screening predicted miR- 24, 181b, 421, 526b, or 543 as candidates. After finding increased levels of mir-181b in deep dermal fibroblasts, it was demonstrated that TGF-β1 stimulation decreased miR-24 but increased miR-181b and that hypertrophic scar and deep dermis contained increased levels of miR-181b. By blocking miR-181b with an antagomiR, it was possible to increase decorin protein expression in dermal fibroblasts. This suggests miR-181b is involved in the differential expression of decorin in skin and wound healing. Furthermore, blocking miR-181b reversed TGF-β1 induced decorin downregulation and myofibroblast differentiation in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts, suggesting a potential therapy for hypertrophic scar.

  13. Biogeochemistry of manganese in Lake Matano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C.; Crowe, S. A.; Sturm, A.; Leslie, K. L.; Maclean, L. C. W.; Katsev, S.; Henny, C.; Fowle, D. A.; Canfield, D. E.

    2011-04-01

    This study explores Mn biogeochemistry in a stratified, ferruginous lake. Intense Mn cycling occurs in the chemocline where Mn is recycled at least 15 times before sedimentation. The kinetics of Mn oxidation in Lake Matano are similar to other studied environments, implying that Mn oxidation is relatively insensitive to environmental parameters and may be controlled by similar mechanisms in diverse settings. The product of biologically catalyzed Mn oxidation in Lake Matano is birnessite. Although there is evidence for abiotic Mn reduction with Fe(II), Mn reduction likely occurs through a variety of pathways. The flux of Fe(II) is insufficient to balance the reduction of Mn at 125 m depth in the water column, and Mn reduction could be a significant contributor to CH4 oxidation. By combining results from synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray spectroscopy, extractions of sinking particles, and reaction transport modeling, we find the kinetics of Mn reduction in the lake's reducing waters are sufficiently rapid to preclude the deposition of Mn oxides from the water column to the sediments underlying anoxic water. Rather, Mn is likely sequestered in these sediments as pseudo kutnahorite. This has strong implications for the interpretation of the sedimentary Mn record.

  14. GPR Profiles of Stratified Deposits in Eastern Taylor Valley, Antarctica: Permafrost Periglacial or Glacial?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcone, S. A.; Prentice, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    In the Antarctic Dry Valleys, what might seem to be a permafrost periglacial feature such as a moraine, may actually be a dirt-rich or dirt-covered glacial structure. We discuss ground-penetrating radar (GPR) profiles we recorded along transects over the deeply frozen deposits of Hjorth Hill in Eastern Taylor Valley, Antarctica, overlooking the Ross Sea. The dirt-covered surface, uneven topography, and proximity to the nearby Wilson Piedmont Glacier and to the long receded Ross Sea Ice Sheet (RSIS), suggest the confluence of several glacial moraines and therefore, a permafrost feature. A few borehole logs up to 14 m depth reveal the nature and age of a few important horizons. Instead of a more random and partially or unstratified morainal structure, our 100 and 200 MHz profiles are well stratified, the major events of which are piece-wise continuous layers of ice 1-2 m thick and extending at least hundreds of meters. Bubbles within some of this ice suggest a lake-type origin. Although one log shows that a 9 m layer between these ice horizons is only about 22 percent ice by volume and not visibly stratified, thereby making this layer appear as an embedded permafrost feature, in the profiles the layers often appear relatively transparent, which suggests greater ice content at other locations and a glacial origin. In addition, and stratification within some of the ice within the cores appears basal (glacial) in origin. The relative dielectric permittivity for the whole section is near 5, as expected for ice and felsic mineralogy. Most C14 dates within the core range from 10000-12000 years BP. Wavelet phase structures suggest that the long horizons deeper than the cores are also responses to ice layers and that they are less thick than the insitu wavelength of about 2 m. The more detailed 400 MHz profiles show that material within 10 m of the surface appears be mainly ice with suspended clasts. Maximum penetration achieved within our time range was about 45 m within

  15. Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars Are the Result of Chronic Inflammation in the Reticular Dermis

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Rei

    2017-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are caused by cutaneous injury and irritation, including trauma, insect bite, burn, surgery, vaccination, skin piercing, acne, folliculitis, chicken pox, and herpes zoster infection. Notably, superficial injuries that do not reach the reticular dermis never cause keloidal and hypertrophic scarring. This suggests that these pathological scars are due to injury to this skin layer and the subsequent aberrant wound healing therein. The latter is characterized by continuous and histologically localized inflammation. As a result, the reticular layer of keloids and hypertrophic scars contains inflammatory cells, increased numbers of fibroblasts, newly formed blood vessels, and collagen deposits. Moreover, proinflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are upregulated in keloid tissues, which suggests that, in patients with keloids, proinflammatory genes in the skin are sensitive to trauma. This may promote chronic inflammation, which in turn may cause the invasive growth of keloids. In addition, the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in pathological scars suggests that, rather than being skin tumors, keloids and hypertrophic scars are inflammatory disorders of skin, specifically inflammatory disorders of the reticular dermis. Various external and internal post-wounding stimuli may promote reticular inflammation. The nature of these stimuli most likely shapes the characteristics, quantity, and course of keloids and hypertrophic scars. Specifically, it is likely that the intensity, frequency, and duration of these stimuli determine how quickly the scars appear, the direction and speed of growth, and the intensity of symptoms. These proinflammatory stimuli include a variety of local, systemic, and genetic factors. These observations together suggest that the clinical differences between keloids and hypertrophic scars merely reflect differences in the intensity, frequency, and duration of

  16. Demonstration of antifreeze protein activity in Antarctic lake bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jack A; Hill, Philip J; Dodd, Christine E R; Laybourn-Parry, Johanna

    2004-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse group of proteins that have the ability to modify ice crystal structure and inhibit recrystallization of ice. AFPs are well characterized in fish and insects, but very few bacterial species have been shown to have AFP activity to date. Thirty eight freshwater to hypersaline lakes in the Vestfold Hills and Larsemann Hills of Eastern Antarctica were sampled for AFPs during 2000. Eight hundred and sixty six bacterial isolates were cultivated. A novel AFP assay, designed for high-throughput analysis in Antarctica, demonstrated putative activity in 187 of the cultures. Subsequent analysis of the putative positive isolates showed 19 isolates with significant recrystallization inhibition (RI) activity. The 19 RI active isolates were characterized using ARDRA (amplified rDNA restriction analysis) and 16S rDNA sequencing. They belong to genera from the alpha- and gamma-Proteobacteria, with genera from the gamma-subdivision being predominant. The 19 AFP-active isolates were isolated from four physico-chemically diverse lakes. Ace Lake and Oval Lake were both meromictic with correspondingly characteristic chemically stratified water columns. Pendant Lake was a saline holomictic lake with different chemical properties to the two meromictic lakes. Triple Lake was a hypersaline lake rich in dissolved organic carbon and inorganic nutrients. The environments from which the AFP-active isolates were isolated are remarkably diverse. It will be of interest, therefore, to elucidate the evolutionary forces that have led to the acquisition of functional AFP activity in microbes of the Vestfold Hills lakes and to discover the role the antifreezes play in these organisms.

  17. A new 4D trajectory-based approach unveils abnormal LV revolution dynamics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Andrea; Piras, Paolo; Re, Federica; Gabriele, Stefano; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Torromeo, Concetta; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Giura, Geltrude; Evangelista, Antonietta; Dominici, Tania; Varano, Valerio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of left ventricular shape changes during cardiac revolution may be a new step in clinical cardiology to ease early diagnosis and treatment. To quantify these changes, only point registration was adopted and neither Generalized Procrustes Analysis nor Principal Component Analysis were applied as we did previously to study a group of healthy subjects. Here, we extend to patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the original approach and preliminarily include genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals to explore the potential that incumbent pathology might also be detected. Using 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, we recorded left ventricular shape of 48 healthy subjects, 24 patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 3 genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals. We then applied Generalized Procrustes Analysis and Principal Component Analysis and inter-individual differences were cleaned by Parallel Transport performed on the tangent space, along the horizontal geodesic, between the per-subject consensuses and the grand mean. Endocardial and epicardial layers were evaluated separately, different from many ecocardiographic applications. Under a common Principal Component Analysis, we then evaluated left ventricle morphological changes (at both layers) explained by first Principal Component scores. Trajectories' shape and orientation were investigated and contrasted. Logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to compare these morphometric indicators with traditional 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters. Geometric morphometrics indicators performed better than 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters in recognizing pathology both in systole and diastole. Genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals clustered with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during diastole, suggesting that incumbent pathology may indeed be foreseen by these methods. Left

  18. Potential Molecular Mechanisms Involved in 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Based Photodynamic Therapy against Human Hypertrophic Scars.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mengling; Ma, Xiaorong; Ouyang, Tianxiang; Lin, Jun; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Huiping; Yu, Jie; Huang, Yingying; Xu, Miao

    2015-10-01

    Hypertrophic scars are manifestations of an abnormal process of tissue repair. Although photodynamic therapy is a promising treatment, details of the mechanisms underlying its inhibitory effects remain to be elucidated. Fibroblasts were isolated from human hypertrophic scar specimens and subjected to photodynamic therapy; 5-aminolevulinic acid was used as a photosensitizer. The accumulation of 5-aminolevulinic acid-derived protoporphyrin IX was detected under fluorescence microscopy. The potential cytotoxicity of 5-aminolevulinic acid alone and with photodynamic therapy was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry were conducted to search for clues to apoptosis. Protein and/or mRNA expression levels of apoptosis-related pathways and other hypertrophic scar pathogenesis-associated signaling were investigated by Western blot analysis and/or real-time polymerase chain reaction. Protoporphyrin IX accumulation peak was achieved at 1.0 mM 5-aminolevulinic acid. 5-Aminolevulinic acid ranging from 0 to 1.0 mM was demonstrated to be noncytotoxic but reduced cell viabilities in a dose-dependent manner with acid-based photodynamic therapy were demonstrated. Reduction of cell viability was attributed mainly to cell apoptosis and probably to mechanisms such as up-regulation of p53/p21, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and cleaved caspase-3. Concurrently, deregulation of transforming growth factor-β1-mediated signaling, serving as another putative mechanism underlying hypertrophic scar formation, was found to be reversely modulated in response to acid-based photodynamic therapy. The p53-related apoptosis pathway and transforming growth factor-β1-mediated signaling may be important factors used to predict and evaluate the treatment outcomes of 5-aminolevulinic acid-based photodynamic therapy used in hypertrophic scar patients. Therapeutic, V.

  19. Identification of sirtuin 1 as a promising therapeutic target for hypertrophic scars

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao‐Zhi; Liu, Jia‐Qi; Yang, Long‐Long; Fan, Lei; He, Ting; Su, Lin‐Lin; Shi, Ji‐Hong; Tang, Chao‐Wu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sirtuin1 (SIRT1), the founding member of mammalian class III histone deacetylases, is reported to be a drug target involved in fibrotic diseases. However, whether it is an effective drug target in hypertrophic scar treatment is still not known. Experimental Approach In the present study, we observed that SIRT1 localized to both the epidermis and the dermis of skin tissues by immunohistochemistry. After knock‐down of SIRT1 by shRNA or up‐regulating SIRT1 by resveratrol, the expression of α‐SMA, Col1 and Col3 in fibroblasts were detected by western blots. A mouse excision wound healing model was used to observe the changes in collagen fibre associated with the different expression levels of SIRT1. Key Results SIRT1 expression was inhibited in hypertrophic scar tissue. The down‐regulation of SIRT1 resulted in an increased expression of α‐SMA, Col1 and Col3 in hypertrophic scar‐derived fibroblasts. In contrast, the up‐regulation of SIRT1 not only inhibited the expression of α‐SMA, Col1 and Col3 in hypertrophic scar‐derived fibroblasts but also blocked the activation of TGFβ1‐induced normal skin‐derived fibroblasts. In the mouse model of wound healing, the deletion of SIRT1 resulted in denser collagen fibres and a more disordered structure, whereas resveratrol treatment led to a more organized and thinner collagen fibre, which was similar to that observed during normal wound healing. Conclusions and Implications The results revealed that SIRT1 negatively regulates TGFβ1‐induced fibroblast activation and inhibits excessive scar formation and is, therefore, a promising drug target for hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:26891034

  20. A New 4D Trajectory-Based Approach Unveils Abnormal LV Revolution Dynamics in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Madeo, Andrea; Piras, Paolo; Re, Federica; Gabriele, Stefano; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Torromeo, Concetta; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Giura, Geltrude; Evangelista, Antonietta; Dominici, Tania; Varano, Valerio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of left ventricular shape changes during cardiac revolution may be a new step in clinical cardiology to ease early diagnosis and treatment. To quantify these changes, only point registration was adopted and neither Generalized Procrustes Analysis nor Principal Component Analysis were applied as we did previously to study a group of healthy subjects. Here, we extend to patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the original approach and preliminarily include genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals to explore the potential that incumbent pathology might also be detected. Using 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, we recorded left ventricular shape of 48 healthy subjects, 24 patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 3 genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals. We then applied Generalized Procrustes Analysis and Principal Component Analysis and inter-individual differences were cleaned by Parallel Transport performed on the tangent space, along the horizontal geodesic, between the per-subject consensuses and the grand mean. Endocardial and epicardial layers were evaluated separately, different from many ecocardiographic applications. Under a common Principal Component Analysis, we then evaluated left ventricle morphological changes (at both layers) explained by first Principal Component scores. Trajectories’ shape and orientation were investigated and contrasted. Logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to compare these morphometric indicators with traditional 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters. Geometric morphometrics indicators performed better than 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters in recognizing pathology both in systole and diastole. Genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals clustered with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during diastole, suggesting that incumbent pathology may indeed be foreseen by these methods