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Sample records for hypertrophyc cardiomyopathy infrequent

  1. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or ... tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have ...

  2. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Arany, Zolt; Elkayam, Uri

    2016-04-05

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a potentially life-threatening pregnancy-associated disease that typically arises in the peripartum period and is marked by left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. The disease is relatively uncommon, but its incidence is rising. Women often recover cardiac function, but long-lasting morbidity and mortality are not infrequent. Management of peripartum cardiomyopathy is largely limited to the same neurohormonal antagonists used in other forms of cardiomyopathy, and no proven disease-specific therapies exist yet. Research in the past decade has suggested that peripartum cardiomyopathy is caused by vascular dysfunction, triggered by late-gestational maternal hormones. Most recently, information has also indicated that many cases of peripartum cardiomyopathy have genetic underpinnings. We review here the known epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management of peripartum cardiomyopathy, as well as the current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the disease. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Pediatric Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa M; Hsu, Daphne T; Kantor, Paul; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Ware, Stephanie M; Colan, Steven D; Chung, Wendy K; Jefferies, John L; Rossano, Joseph W; Castleberry, Chesney D; Addonizio, Linda J; Lal, Ashwin K; Lamour, Jacqueline M; Miller, Erin M; Thrush, Philip T; Czachor, Jason D; Razoky, Hiedy; Hill, Ashley; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2017-09-15

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are rare diseases with an annual incidence of 1.1 to 1.5 per 100 000. Dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies are the most common; restrictive, noncompaction, and mixed cardiomyopathies occur infrequently; and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is rare. Pediatric cardiomyopathies can result from coronary artery abnormalities, tachyarrhythmias, exposure to infection or toxins, or secondary to other underlying disorders. Increasingly, the importance of genetic mutations in the pathogenesis of isolated or syndromic pediatric cardiomyopathies is becoming apparent. Pediatric cardiomyopathies often occur in the absence of comorbidities, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, renal dysfunction, and diabetes mellitus; as a result, they offer insights into the primary pathogenesis of myocardial dysfunction. Large international registries have characterized the epidemiology, cause, and outcomes of pediatric cardiomyopathies. Although adult and pediatric cardiomyopathies have similar morphological and clinical manifestations, their outcomes differ significantly. Within 2 years of presentation, normalization of function occurs in 20% of children with dilated cardiomyopathy, and 40% die or undergo transplantation. Infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have a 2-year mortality of 30%, whereas death is rare in older children. Sudden death is rare. Molecular evidence indicates that gene expression differs between adult and pediatric cardiomyopathies, suggesting that treatment response may differ as well. Clinical trials to support evidence-based treatments and the development of disease-specific therapies for pediatric cardiomyopathies are in their infancy. This compendium summarizes current knowledge of the genetic and molecular origins, clinical course, and outcomes of the most common phenotypic presentations of pediatric cardiomyopathies and highlights key areas where additional research is required. URL: http

  4. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy; Idiopathic myocardial fibrosis ... In a case of restrictive cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle is of normal size or slightly enlarged. Most of the time, it also pumps normally. However, it does ...

  5. Types of Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Cardiomyopathy The types of cardiomyopathy include: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy Dilated ... cardiomyopathy Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy Unclassified ... Cardiomyopathy Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is very common and can affect ...

  6. What's Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... people in the U.S. with children under 12 accounting for less than 10% of all cases. According ... RCM) is the least common type of cardiomyopathy accounting for only 5% of patients with cardiomyopathy. It ...

  7. Peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Grixti, Sarah; Magri, Caroline J; Xuereb, Robert; Fava, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy of indeterminate aetiology occurring in late pregnancy or the months following delivery. This article reviews current knowledge of its pathophysiology, therapeutic strategies and prognosis, as well as new treatments and future directions.

  8. Doxorubicin Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kanu; Zhang, Jianqing; Honbo, Norman; Karliner, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Established doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is a lethal disease. When congestive heart failure develops, mortality is approximately 50%. Extensive research has been done to understand the mechanism and pathophysiology of doxorubicin cardiomyopathy, and considerable knowledge and experience has been gained. Unfortunately, no effective treatment for established doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is presently available. Extensive research has been done and is being done to discover preventive treatments. However an effective and clinically applicable preventive treatment is yet to be discovered. PMID:20016174

  9. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia.

  10. INHERITED CARDIOMYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Towbin, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies, diseases of the heart muscle, are major causes of morbidity and mortality. A significant percentage of patients with cardiomyopathies have genetic-based, inheritable disease and, over the past two decades the genetic causes of these disorders have been increasingly discovered. The genes causing these disorders when they are mutated appear to encode proteins that frame a “final common pathway” for that specific disorder but the specifics of the phenotype, including age of onset, severity, and outcome is variable for reasons not yet understood. The “final common pathways” for the classified forms of cardiomyopathy include the sarcomere in the primarily diastolic dysfunction disorders hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), the linkage of the sarcomere and sarcolemma in the systolic dysfunction disorder dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and the desmosome in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AVC). Left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) is an overlap disorder and appears that any of these “final common pathways” can be involved depending on the specific form of LVNC. The genetics and mechanisms responsible for these clinical phenotypes will be described. PMID:25186923

  11. Peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Courtney Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a very rare, but serious life-threatening emergency. Early recognition of signs and symptoms, along with radiologic imaging and blood work, can facilitate timely diagnosis. Once peripartum cardiomyopathy is diagnosed, a multidisciplinary team can facilitate the delivery of quality care to promote optimal outcomes.

  12. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20–40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  13. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Mouquet, Frédéric; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    The peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy resulting from alteration of angiogenesis toward the end of pregnancy. The diagnosis is based on the association of clinical heart failure and systolic dysfunction assessed by echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnoses to rule out are myocardial infarction, amniotic liquid embolism, myocarditis, inherited cardiomyopathy, and history of treatment by anthracycline. Risk factors are advance maternal age (>30), multiparity, twin pregnancy, African origin, obesity, preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, and prolonged tocolytic therapy. Treatment of acute phase is identical to usual treatment of acute systolic heart failure. After delivery, VKA treatment should be discussed in case of systolic function <25% because of higher risk of thrombus. A specific treatment by bromocriptine can be initiated on a case-by-case basis. Complete recovery of systolic function is observed in 50% of cases. The mortality risk is low. Subsequent pregnancy should be discouraged, especially if systolic function did not recover.

  14. Restrictive cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Dawson, David

    2009-12-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathies constitute a heterogenous group of heart muscle conditions that all have, in common, the symptoms of heart failure. Diastolic dysfunction with preserved systolic function is often the only echocardiographic abnormality that may be noted, although systolic dysfunction may also be an integral part of some specific pathologies, particularly in the most advanced cases such as amyloid infiltration of the heart. By far, the majority of restrictive cardiomyopathies are secondary to a systemic disorder such as amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, scleroderma, haemochromatosis, eosinophilic heart disease, or as a result of radiation treatment. The much more rare diagnosis of idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy is supported only by the absence of specific pathology on either endomyocardial biopsies or at post-mortem. Restrictive cardiomyopathy is diagnosed based on medical history, physical examination, and tests: such as blood tests, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. With its wide availability, echocardiography is probably the most important investigation to identify the left ventricular dysfunction and should be performed early and by groups that are familiar with the wide variety of aetiologies. Finally, on rare occasions, the differential diagnosis from constrictive pericarditis may be necessary.

  15. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-del-Árbol, Luis; Serradilla, Regina

    2015-11-07

    During the course of cirrhosis, there is a progressive deterioration of cardiac function manifested by the disappearance of the hyperdynamic circulation due to a failure in heart function with decreased cardiac output. This is due to a deterioration in inotropic and chronotropic function which takes place in parallel with a diastolic dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the absence of other known cardiac disease. Other findings of this specific cardiomyopathy include impaired contractile responsiveness to stress stimuli and electrophysiological abnormalities with prolonged QT interval. The pathogenic mechanisms of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy include impairment of the b-adrenergic receptor signalling, abnormal cardiomyocyte membrane lipid composition and biophysical properties, ion channel defects and overactivity of humoral cardiodepressant factors. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be difficult to determine due to the lack of a specific diagnosis test. However, an echocardiogram allows the detection of the diastolic dysfunction and the E/e' ratio may be used in the follow-up progression of the illness. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the impairment of effective arterial blood volume and correlates with the degree of liver failure. A clinical consequence of cardiac dysfunction is an inadequate cardiac response in the setting of vascular stress that may result in renal hypoperfusion leading to renal failure. The prognosis is difficult to establish but the severity of diastolic dysfunction may be a marker of mortality risk. Treatment is non-specific and liver transplantation may normalize the cardiac function.

  16. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. What Is Cardiomyopathy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiomyopathy? Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle. These ... many causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments. In cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick, or rigid. ...

  18. Renal Pelvis Leiomyoma- An Infrequent Clinical Case.

    PubMed

    Romano, Fernando Ugarte-Y; González-Serrano, Adolfo; Moreno-Aranda, Jorge

    2017-05-01

    Renal pelvis leiomyomas are infrequent benign tumours. These tumours are more frequent in women, usually asymptomatic and difficult to distinguish from malign kidney masses. A 27-year-old female presented with an asymptomatic renal mass discovered after abdominal ultrasound during routine check-up. Percutaneous renal biopsy was performed and reported urothelial carcinoma. After open nephroureterectomy, histopathological evaluation and immunohistochemistry were positive for Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA), Ki67 <5%, and negative for cytokeratin and HMB-45. Thus, confirming the diagnosis of renal leiomyoma. The diagnosis of these infrequent tumours is often difficult and it is usually made by immunohistochemistry after surgical treatment.

  19. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  20. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina; Judge, Daniel P

    2017-09-15

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy is an inherited heart muscle disorder, predisposing to sudden cardiac death, particularly in young patients and athletes. Pathological features include loss of myocytes and fibrofatty replacement of right ventricular myocardium; biventricular involvement is often observed. It is a cell-to-cell junction cardiomyopathy, typically caused by genetically determined abnormalities of cardiac desmosomes, which leads to detachment of myocytes and alteration of intracellular signal transduction. The diagnosis of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy does not rely on a single gold standard test but is achieved using a scoring system, which encompasses familial and genetic factors, ECG abnormalities, arrhythmias, and structural/functional ventricular alterations. The main goal of treatment is the prevention of sudden cardiac death. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the only proven lifesaving therapy; however, it is associated with significant morbidity because of device-related complications and inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator interventions. Selection of patients who are the best candidates for implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation is one of the most challenging issues in the clinical management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. [Cardiomyopathies. I: classification of cardiomyopathies--dilated cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, H P; Noutsias, M; Kühl, U; Lassner, D; Gross, U; Poller, W; Pauschinger, M

    2005-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies are common causes of heart failure and sudden cardiac death. According to the WHO classification, "specific" cardiomyopathies are differentiated from "idiopathic" cardiomyopathies. Thus, this classification is primarily based on pathophysiological characteristics. The diagnostic spectrum in cardiomyopathies comprises the entire spectrum of non-invasive and invasive cardiological examination techniques. The exact verification of certain cardiomyopathies necessitates additionally investigations. For example, immunohistological and molecular biological investigations of endomyocardial biopsies may confirm inflammatory cardiomyopathy, which is often induced by viruses. Several studies have shown that specific immunomodulatory treatment options can halt the progressive course of the disease. Several gene mutations have been identified in genetic/familial dilated cardiomyopathy. First-degree relatives should be screened for early stages. Primary prevention of sudden cardiac death shows increasing superiority of the implantable defibrillator compared with pharmacological approaches (i.e. amiodarone).

  2. SNTEMP (In)frequently asked questions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Here, you will find a series of questions and answers resulting from many years of technical assistance with SNTEMP and SSTEMP. These (in)frequently asked questions are presented here so that you may get a feel for the range of questions posed, learn from the questions and their 'answers,' and share in the discussions if you wish. I certainly didn't answer all the questions, nor do I feel like I've got the only answer for them all.

  3. Metabolic cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Guertl, Barbara; Noehammer, Christa; Hoefler, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    The energy needed by cardiac muscle to maintain proper function is supplied by adenosine Ariphosphate primarily (ATP) production through breakdown of fatty acids. Metabolic cardiomyopathies can be caused by disturbances in metabolism, for example diabetes mellitus, hypertrophy and heart failure or alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Deficiency in enzymes of the mitochondrial β-oxidation show a varying degree of cardiac manifestation. Aberrations of mitochondrial DNA lead to a wide variety of cardiac disorders, without any obvious correlation between genotype and phenotype. A completely different pathogenetic model comprises cardiac manifestation of systemic metabolic diseases caused by deficiencies of various enzymes in a variety of metabolic pathways. Examples of these disorders are glycogen storage diseases (e.g. glycogenosis type II and III), lysosomal storage diseases (e.g. Niemann-Pick disease, Gaucher disease, I-cell disease, various types of mucopolysaccharidoses, GM1 gangliosidosis, galactosialidosis, carbohydrate–deficient glycoprotein syndromes and Sandhoff's disease). There are some systemic diseases which can also affect the heart, for example triosephosphate isomerase deficiency, hereditary haemochromatosis, CD 36 defect or propionic acidaemia. PMID:11298185

  4. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pilichou, Kalliopi; Thiene, Gaetano; Bauce, Barbara; Rigato, Ilaria; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Migliore, Federico; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Rizzo, Stefania; Zorzi, Alessandro; Daliento, Luciano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2016-04-02

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a heart muscle disease clinically characterized by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and pathologically by an acquired and progressive dystrophy of the ventricular myocardium with fibro-fatty replacement. Due to an estimated prevalence of 1:2000-1:5000, AC is listed among rare diseases. A familial background consistent with an autosomal-dominant trait of inheritance is present in most of AC patients; recessive variants have also been reported, either or not associated with palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair. AC-causing genes mostly encode major components of the cardiac desmosome and up to 50% of AC probands harbor mutations in one of them. Mutations in non-desmosomal genes have been also described in a minority of AC patients, predisposing to the same or an overlapping disease phenotype. Compound/digenic heterozygosity was identified in up to 25% of AC-causing desmosomal gene mutation carriers, in part explaining the phenotypic variability. Abnormal trafficking of intercellular proteins to the intercalated discs of cardiomyocytes and Wnt/beta catenin and Hippo signaling pathways have been implicated in disease pathogenesis.AC is a major cause of sudden death in the young and in athletes. The clinical picture may include a sub-clinical phase; an overt electrical disorder; and right ventricular or biventricular pump failure. Ventricular fibrillation can occur at any stage. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies led to identify biventricular and dominant left ventricular variants, thus supporting the use of the broader term AC.Since there is no "gold standard" to reach the diagnosis of AC, multiple categories of diagnostic information have been combined and the criteria recently updated, to improve diagnostic sensitivity while maintaining specificity. Among diagnostic tools, contrast enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance is playing a major role in detecting left dominant forms of AC, even preceding morpho

  5. Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Washington, D.C. and help cardiomyopathy related bills get passed into law and protect at-risk children from sudden cardiac death. TAKE ACTION TODAY Disclaimer & Privacy Policy © 2017 Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... purchased, 10% will be donated to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. iGive.com - Online Shopping Joing iGive.com to ... 5% of the purchase price to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. Bookmark the link http://smile.amazon.com/ch/ ...

  7. Anthracycline cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kobrinsky, N L; Ramsay, N K; Krivit, W

    1982-01-01

    Life-threatening irreversible cardiomyopathy is a major complication of anthracycline therapy, particularly in the pediatric population. The pediatric cardiologist, in concert with the primary oncologist, should therefore play a major role in the care of patients receiving these agents and in clinical trials involving their use. Many risk factors and their relationships to drug pharmacokinetics, mechanisms of action, and toxicity have been identified. These data provide a rational basis for present-day recommendations regarding anthracycline administration and dosage scheduling. They furthermore provide potential avenues for clinical investigation aimed at improving the therapeutic index of these agents: alpha-tocopherol, cytochrome Q10, and other free radical scavengers may decrease the deleterious effects of free radical generation on the myocardium without apparent interference with tumoricidal effect. The cardiac glycosides may decrease cardiac toxicity by specific myocardial exclusion. Anthracycline analogs have been designed to specifically inhibit myocardial binding and/or free radical generation. Clinical trials involving these agents are difficult to interpret because of variability in front end risk factors and dosage schedules in the study population. Furthermore, the relatively low (5 to 10%) incidence of affected patients implies the need for large numbers to demonstrate a statistically significant benefit. Pediatric protocols addressing these issues are urgently needed. Guidelines for present-day management and future studies are outlined.

  8. Dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Robert G; Semsarian, Christopher; Macdonald, Peter

    2017-02-09

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is defined by the presence of left ventricular dilatation and contractile dysfunction. Genetic mutations involving genes that encode cytoskeletal, sarcomere, and nuclear envelope proteins, among others, account for up to 35% of cases. Acquired causes include myocarditis and exposure to alcohol, drugs and toxins, and metabolic and endocrine disturbances. The most common presenting symptoms relate to congestive heart failure, but can also include circulatory collapse, arrhythmias, and thromboembolic events. Secondary neurohormonal changes contribute to reverse remodelling and ongoing myocyte damage. The prognosis is worst for individuals with the lowest ejection fractions or severe diastolic dysfunction. Treatment of chronic heart failure comprises medications that improve survival and reduce hospital admission-namely, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and β blockers. Other interventions include enrolment in a multidisciplinary heart failure service, and device therapy for arrhythmia management and sudden death prevention. Patients who are refractory to medical therapy might benefit from mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation. Treatment of preclinical disease and the potential role of stem-cell therapy are being investigated.

  9. Inherited cardiomyopathies mimicking arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason D; Veinot, John P; Rutberg, Julie; Gollob, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) represents an inherited cardiomyopathy that manifests clinically with malignant ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, and less commonly heart failure. The condition is characterized by replacement of the myocardium, primarily of the right ventricle, with fibrofatty tissue. Extensive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium has been previously thought to be pathognomonic of ARVC; however, this report details two other forms of inherited cardiomyopathy, namely hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and the PRKAG2 cardiac syndrome, that were found to have significant fibrofatty myocardial replacement at pathologic examination. This report represents the first documentation of inherited cardiomyopathies mimicking ARVC and highlights the concept that other cardiac conditions can be associated with fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Classification of cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Asakura, Masanori; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a group of cardiovascular diseases with poor prognosis. Some patients with dilated cardiomyopathy need heart transplantations due to severe heart failure. Some patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy die unexpectedly due to malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Various phenotypes of cardiomyopathies are due to the heterogeneous group of diseases. The classification of cardiomyopathies is important and indispensable in the clinical situation. However, their classification has not been established, because the causes of cardiomyopathies have not been fully elucidated. We usually use definition and classification offered by WHO/ISFC task force in 1995. Recently, several new definitions and classifications of the cardiomyopathies have been published by American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology and Japanese Circulation Society.

  11. Neonatal dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paulo; Rocha, Gustavo; Pissarra, Susana; Soares, Henrique; Flôr-de-Lima, Filipa; Costa, Sandra; Moura, Cláudia; Dória, Sofia; Guimarães, Hercília

    2017-03-01

    Cardiomyopathies are rare diseases of the heart muscle, of multiple causes, that manifest with various structural and functional phenotypes but are invariably associated with cardiac dysfunction. Dilated cardiomyopathy is the commonest cardiomyopathy in children, and the majority present before one year of age. Its etiology may be acquired or genetic. Myocarditis is an important cause and is responsible for the majority of acquired cases. Inherited (familial) forms of dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in 25-50% of patients. Echocardiographic and tissue Doppler studies are the basis for diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy in most patients. Marked dilatation of the left ventricle with global hypokinesis is the hallmark of the disease. This review will cover the classification, epidemiology and management of newborns with dilated cardiomyopathy. In particular, a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the genetic study of dilated cardiomyopathy and of detailed echocardiographic assessment of these patients will be presented.

  12. Pregnancy, cardiomyopathies, and genetics.

    PubMed

    Van Tintelen, J Peter; Pieper, Petronella G; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Van Den Berg, Maarten P

    2014-03-15

    Although familial forms of cardiomyopathy such as hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy have been recognized for decades, it is only recently that much of the genetic basis of these inherited cardiomyopathies has been elucidated. This has provided important insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease phenotype. This increased knowledge and the availability of genetic testing has resulted in increasing numbers of mutation carriers who are being monitored, including many who are now of child-bearing age. Pregnancy is generally well tolerated in asymptomatic patients or mutation carriers with inherited cardiomyopathies. However, since pregnancy leads to major physiological changes in the cardiovascular system, in women with genetic cardiomyopathies or who carry a mutation pre-disposing to a genetic cardiomyopathy, pregnancy entails a risk of developing heart failure and/or arrhythmias. This deterioration of cardiac function may occur despite optimal medical treatment. Advanced left ventricular dysfunction, poor functional class (NYHA class III or IV), or prior cardiac events appear to increase the risk of maternal cardiac complications. However, there are no large series of cardiomyopathy patients who are regularly evaluated for cardiac complications during pregnancy and for certain types of inherited cardiomyopathy, only case reports on individual pregnancies are available. Pre-conception cardiologic evaluation and genetic counselling are important for every woman with a cardiomyopathy or a cardiomyopathy-related mutation who is considering having a family. In this article, we give an overview of the basic clinical aspects, genetics, and pregnancy outcome in women with different types of inherited cardiomyopathies. We also discuss the genetic aspects of pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy.

  13. Ventricular hypertrophy in cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Oakley, C

    1971-01-01

    Semantic difficulties arise when hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is seen without obstruction and with congestive failure, and also when congestive cardiomyopathy is seen with gross hypertrophy but without heart failure. Retention of a small left ventricular cavity and a normal ejection fraction characterizes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at all stages of the disorder. Congestive cardiomyopathy is recognized by the presence of a dilated left ventricular cavity and reduced ejection fraction regardless of the amount of hypertrophy and the presence or not of heart failure. Longevity in congestive cardiomyopathy seems to be promoted when hypertrophy is great relative to the amount of pump failure as measured by increase in cavity size. Conversely, death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is most likely when hypertrophy is greatest at a time when outflow tract obstruction has been replaced by inflow restriction caused by diminishing ventricular distensibility. Hypertrophy is thus beneficial and compensatory in congestive cardiomyopathy, whereas it may be the primary disorder and eventual cause of death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Reasons are given for believing that hypertension may have been the original cause of left ventricular dilatation in some case of congestive cardiomyopathy in which loss of stroke output thenceforward is followed by normotension. Development of severe hypertension in these patients after recovery from a prolonged period of left ventricular failure with normotension lends weight to this hypothesis. No fault has been found in the large or small coronary arteries in either hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or congestive cardiomyopathy when they have been examined in life by selective coronary angiography, or by histological methods in biopsy or post-mortem material. Coronary blood supply may be a limiting factor in the compensatory hypertrophy of congestive cardiomyopathy, and the ability to hypertrophy may explain the better prognosis of some

  14. Human viral cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard; Ristic, Arsen D; Portig, Irene; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    Viral infection of the heart is relatively common, usually asymptomatic and has a spontaneous and complete resolution. It can, however, in rare cases, lead to substantial cardiac damage, development of viral cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Viral cardiomyopathy is defined as viral persistence in a dilated heart. It may be accompanied by myocardial inflammation and then termed inflammatory viral cardiomyopathy (or viral myocarditis with cardiomegaly). If no inflammation is observed in the biopsy of a dilated heart (<14 lymphocytes and macrophages/mm ) the term viral cardiomyopathy or viral persistence in dilated cardiomyopathy should be applied. The diagnosis of myocarditis and viral cardiomyopathy can be made only by endomyocardial biopsy, implementing the WHO/WHF criteria, and PCR techniques for identification of viral genome. The most frequent cardiotropic viruses detected by endomyocardial biopsy are Parvo B19, enteroviruses, adenoviruses, cytomegalovirus, and less frequently Epstein-Barr virus, and influenza virus.

  15. [Desmin-related cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Rybakova, M G; Kuznetsova, I A; Gudkova, A Ia; Kostareva, A A; Semernin, E N

    2011-01-01

    The observation of 26 years old patient with desminopathy declared itself by hypertrophied cardiomyopathy with its transformation into restrictive phenotype is presented. The features of pathologic course at the patient were a dominance and diversity of cardiac manifestations. Endomyocardiac biopsy allowed suspecting the desminopathy confirmed by genetic analysis. Morphological features of desmin-related cardiomyopathy were irregular desmin conglomerates mainly located under sarcolemma and an indirect histological signs of idiopathic cardiomyopathy as well nuclear polymorphism, perinuclear "nimbus", chaotic located myofibrils.

  16. Molecular mechanisms in cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dadson, Keith; Hauck, Ludger; Billia, Filio

    2017-07-01

    Cardiomyopathies represent a heterogeneous group of diseases that negatively affect heart function. Primary cardiomyopathies specifically target the myocardium, and may arise from genetic [hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D), mitochondrial cardiomyopathy] or genetic and acquired [dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM)] etiology. Modern genomics has identified mutations that are common in these populations, while in vitro and in vivo experimentation with these mutations have provided invaluable insight into the molecular mechanisms native to these diseases. For example, increased myosin heavy chain (MHC) binding and ATP utilization lead to the hypercontractile sarcomere in HCM, while abnormal protein-protein interaction and impaired Ca(2+) flux underlie the relaxed sarcomere of DCM. Furthermore, expanded access to genetic testing has facilitated identification of potential risk factors that appear through inheritance and manifest sometimes only in the advanced stages of the disease. In this review, we discuss the genetic and molecular abnormalities unique to and shared between these primary cardiomyopathies and discuss some of the important advances made using more traditional basic science experimentation. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  17. [Genetic diagnostics for cardiomyopathies].

    PubMed

    Czepluch, Frauke; Wollnik, Bernd; Hasenfuß, Gerd

    2017-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies often have a genetic etiology. New genetic diagnostic strategies based on next generation sequencing (NGS)-approaches will continuously increase our knowledge about the genetic basis of cardiomyopathies within the following years. Diagnostics and therapy of rare, genetically-induced cardiac diseases increasingly require special cardiac and genetic knowledge. Interestingly, mutations in the same gene or even identical gene mutations can be associated with different cardiomyopathy phenotypes and can exhibit incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity. In the future, the correct interpretation and classification of novel gene variants identified in patients with inherited cardiomyopathy forms will represent a great challenge. Genetic counselling and - if appropriate - subsequent genetic testing for cardiomyopathy patients and their asymptomatic relatives is essential for an early diagnosis of the disease, a prognostic evaluation and possibly for the start of preventive or therapeutic measures. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. [Gender effect on cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Biagini, Elena; Berardini, Alessandra; Graziosi, Maddalena; Rosmini, Stefania; Pazzi, Chiara; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    The role of a gender effect (that means differences in clinical manifestations, access to therapies and response to treatments according to gender) in cardiomyopathies remains a matter of debate. Although recent studies have evaluated the differences in the clinical features and prognosis between the two sexes, many issues remain to be elucidated. At present, the only sex-specific condition that affects females is peripartum cardiomyopathy. Recent evidence suggests a pathogenetic role of a prolactin derivative, and ongoing clinical trials are investigating the possibility of targeted therapies using prolactin secretion inhibitors, such as bromocriptine and carbegoline. Although women were considered so far only carriers of X-linked diseases (Anderson-Fabry disease, Danon disease, Hunter syndrome and dystrophinopathies), clinical experience showed a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations in females due to random X chromosome inactivation. Conversely, in mitochondrial diseases (with matrilineal inheritance), cardiomyopathies may occur in the context of clinical multisystemic involvement without significant gender-related differences. Autosomal inherited cardiomyopathies also show different phenotypes and prognostic impact according to gender. The hypothesis of a premenopausal protective role of female hormones towards myocardial involvement has been raised by recent data on transtiretin-related amyloidosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Preexisting cardiomyopathies may affect pregnancy, labor and delivery in women, since all these conditions are associated with important hemodynamic changes. Women with low-risk hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (asymptomatic and without left ventricular outflow tract gradient) usually can tolerate pregnancy. Conversely, women who are symptomatic before pregnancy or have severe hypertrophy with important outflow tract gradient are at higher risk and should be referred to a tertiary center to be evaluated on a case by case basis

  19. Cardiomyopathy in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hetzer, Roland; Siegel, Günter; Delmo Walter, Eva Maria

    2016-02-01

    This report aims to evaluate the existence of primary and secondary cardiomyopathy in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) who underwent surgical management for primary cardiovascular sequelae of this genetic disorder. Likewise, we aim to determine whether the myocardium in MFS is susceptible to ischaemia independent of myocardial protection used during surgery. Between April 1986 and May 2012, 421 patients with MFS were surgically treated for cardiovascular manifestations. Among them, 47 (mean age: 39.45 ± 12.64, median: 36, range: 19-66, years) eventually were surgically treated for cardiomyopathy. They were grouped into A: patients who subsequently developed ischaemic cardiomyopathy and eventually underwent coronary revascularization for coronary artery disease (n = 11); B: patients who subsequently developed end-stage cardiomyopathy for which a mechanical circulatory support device was implanted to support the failing heart (n = 13) and C: patients who subsequently developed end-stage cardiomyopathy (n = 23), among whom 21 underwent primary heart transplantation, while 2 patients are still waiting for donor hearts. Retrospective analysis of the medical records of 47 patients revealed the following: In Group A, 3 (27.2%) patients had already existing ischaemic cardiomyopathy before the first various cardiovascular surgeries, while ischaemic cardiomyopathy in the other 8 (72.7%) developed postoperatively. The interval between previous surgery and development of cardiomyopathy was a mean of 8.0 ± 07 years. In Group B, 5 (38.4%) had existing primary cardiomyopathy prior to surgery, while 8 (61.5%) developed end-stage cardiomyopathy postoperatively. The interval between previous surgery and development of cardiomyopathy was a mean of 9.0 ± 4 months. In Group C, 5 (21.7%) had been diagnosed with cardiomyopathy prior to the cardiovascular surgery, while 18 (78.2%) developed end-stage cardiomyopathy postoperatively. The mean interval between previous surgery and

  20. Nutrition in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Tracie L.; Neri, Daniela; Extein, Jason; Somarriba, Gabriel; Strickman-Stein, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are heterogeneous groups of serious disorders of the heart muscle and are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality among children who have the disease. While enormous improvements have been made in the treatment and survival of children with congenital heart disease, parallel strides have not been made in the outcomes for cardiomyopathies. Thus, ancillary therapies, such as nutrition and nutritional interventions, that may not cure but may potentially improve cardiac function and quality of life, are imperative to consider in children with all types of cardiomyopathy. Growth failure is one of the most significant clinical problems of children with cardiomyopathy with nearly one-third of children with this disorder manifesting some degree of growth failure during the course of their illness. Optimal intake of macronutrients can help improve cardiac function. In addition, several specific nutrients have been shown to correct myocardial abnormalities that often occur with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, antioxidants that can protect against free radical damage that often occurs in heart failure and nutrients that augment myocardial energy production are important therapies that have been explored more in adults with cardiomyopathy than in the pediatric population. Future research directions should pay particular attention to the effect of overall nutrition and specific nutritional therapies on clinical outcomes and quality of life in children with pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:18159216

  1. Genetics of restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sen-Chowdhry, Srijita; Syrris, Petros; McKenna, William J

    2010-04-01

    Restrictive physiology, a severe form of diastolic dysfunction, is characteristically observed in the setting of constrictive pericarditis and myocardial restriction. The latter is commonly due to systemic diseases, some of which are inherited as mendelian traits (eg, hereditary amyloidosis), while others are multifactorial (eg, sarcoidosis). When restrictive physiology occurs as an early and dominant feature of a primary myocardial disorder, it may be termed restrictive cardiomyopathy. In the past decade, clinical and genetic studies have demonstrated that restrictive cardiomyopathy as such is part of the spectrum of sarcomeric disease and frequently coexists with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in affected families.

  2. Mitochondrial Diseases and Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Levtova, Alina; Sasarman, Florin

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. An integrative approach encompassing clinical, biochemical, and molecular investigations is required to reach a specific diagnosis. In this review we summarize the clinical and genetic aspects of mitochondrial disorders associated with cardiomyopathy, including disorders of oxidative phosphorylation. It also describes groups of disorders that, although not usually classified as mitochondrial disorders, stem from defects in mitochondrial function (eg, disorders of β-oxidation and the carnitine cycle), are associated with secondary mitochondrial impairment (eg, organic acidurias), and are important diagnostically because they are treatable. Current biochemical and molecular techniques for the diagnosis of mitochondrial cardiomyopathies are described, and a diagnostic algorithm is proposed, to help clinicians in their approach to cardiomyopathies in the context of mitochondrial diseases.

  3. Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy Scott W. Sharkey , John R. Lesser , Barry ... heart contraction has returned to normal. Importance of Stress In 85% of cases, takotsubo is triggered by ...

  4. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Basra, Sukhdeep Singh; Sen, Priyanka; Kar, Biswajit

    2012-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is idiopathic heart failure occurring in the absence of any determinable heart disease during the last month of pregnancy or the first 5 months postpartum. The incidence varies worldwide but is high in developing nations; the cause of the disease might be a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Diagnostic echocardiographic criteria include left ventricular ejection fraction <0.45 or M-mode fractional shortening <30% (or both) and end-diastolic dimension >2.7 cm/m(2). Electrocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, endomyocardial biopsy, and cardiac catheterization aid in the diagnosis and management of peripartum cardiomyopathy. Cardiac protein assays can also be useful, as suggested by reports of high levels of NT-proBNP, cardiac troponin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interferon-γ, and C-reactive protein in peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of mutations associated with familial dilated-cardiomyopathy genes in patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy suggests an overlap in the clinical spectrum of these 2 diseases.Treatment for peripartum cardiomyopathy includes conventional pharmacologic heart-failure therapies-principally diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, vasodilators, digoxin, β-blockers, anticoagulants, and peripartum cardiomyopathy-targeted therapies. Therapeutic decisions are influenced by drug-safety profiles during pregnancy and lactation. Mechanical support and transplantation might be necessary in severe cases. Targeted therapies (such as intravenous immunoglobulin, pentoxifylline, and bromocriptine) have shown promise in small trials but require further evaluation. Fortunately, despite a mortality rate of up to 10% and a high risk of relapse in subsequent pregnancies, many patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy recover within 3 to 6 months of disease onset.

  5. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, Luis de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder with heterogeneity in mutations, forms of presentation, prognosis and treatment strategies. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is recognized as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death that occurs in young people, including athletes. The clinical diagnosis is complemented with the ecocardiographic study, in which an abnormal myocardial hypertrophy of the septum can be observed in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease (arterial systemic hypertension, aortic stenosis). The annual sudden mortality rate is 1% and, in selected populations, it ranges between 3 and 6%. The therapeutic strategies depend on the different subsets of patients according to the morbidity and mortality, sudden cardiac death, obstructive symptoms, heart failure or atrial fibrillation and stroke. High risk patients for sudden death may effectively be treated with the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

  6. Stress-related cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Stress-related cardiomyopathies can be observed in the four following situations: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy or apical ballooning syndrome; acute left ventricular dysfunction associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage; acute left ventricular dysfunction associated with pheochromocytoma and exogenous catecholamine administration; acute left ventricular dysfunction in the critically ill. Cardiac toxicity was mediated more by catecholamines released directly into the heart via neural connection than by those reaching the heart via the bloodstream. The mechanisms underlying the association between this generalized autonomic storm secondary to a life-threatening stress and myocardial toxicity are widely discussed. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been reported all over the world and has been acknowledged by the American Heart Association as a form of reversible cardiomyopathy. Four "Mayo Clinic" diagnostic criteria are required for the diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: 1) transient left ventricular wall motion abnormalities involving the apical and/or midventricular myocardial segments with wall motion abnormalities extending beyond a single epicardial coronary artery distribution; 2) absence of obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease that could be responsible for the observed wall motion abnormality; 3) ECG abnormalities, such as transient ST-segment elevation and/or diffuse T wave inversion associated with a slight troponin elevation; and 4) the lack of proven pheochromocytoma and myocarditis. ECG changes and LV dysfunction occur frequently following subarachnoid hemorrhage and ischemic stroke. This entity, referred as neurocardiogenic stunning, was called neurogenic stress-related cardiomyopathy. Stress-related cardiomyopathy has been reported in patients with pheochromocytoma and in patients receiving intravenous exogenous catecholamine administration. The role of a huge increase in endogenous and/or exogenous catecholamine level in critically ill patients

  7. Cardiomyopathy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lewey, Jennifer; Haythe, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Cardiomyopathy during pregnancy is uncommon but potentially catastrophic to maternal health, accounting for up to 11% of maternal deaths. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is diagnosed in women without a history of heart disease 1 month before delivery or within 5 months postpartum. About half of all women will have full myocardial recovery within 6 months of diagnosis, but complications such as severe heart failure or death are not rare. African-American women have higher rates of diagnosis and adverse events. Women with preexisting cardiomyopathy, such as dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, followed closely during pregnancy often tolerate pregnancy and delivery. Risk factors for adverse outcomes include functional status at baseline, severity of systolic dysfunction or outflow tract gradient, or history of prior cardiac event, such as arrhythmia or stroke. The level of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) can be used to risk stratify women for adverse events. Pregnant women with cardiomyopathy should be followed closely by a multidisciplinary team comprised of nurses, obstetricians, neonatologists, cardiologists, anesthesiologists, and cardiac surgeons.

  8. Development of an Infrequency Index for the CAARS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhr, Julie A.; Buelow, Melissa; Riddle, Tara

    2011-01-01

    There is a clinical need for measurement of noncredible self-reporting of symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults presenting for ADHD evaluation. The present study describes the development of initial validity data for an Infrequency Index for the Conner's Adult Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Rating Scale (CII).…

  9. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiologic insights

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Mariann R.; Phillips, Shane A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is a specific heart muscle disease found in individuals with a history of long-term heavy alcohol consumption. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is associated with a number of adverse histological, cellular, and structural changes within the myocardium. Several mechanisms are implicated in mediating the adverse effects of ethanol, including the generation of oxidative stress, apoptotic cell death, impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics/stress, derangements in fatty acid metabolism and transport, and accelerated protein catabolism. In this review, we discuss the evidence for such mechanisms and present the potential importance of drinking patterns, genetic susceptibility, nutritional factors, race, and sex. The purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic paradigm for future research in the area of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:24671642

  10. Treatment of Chagas Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Botoni, Fernando A.; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P.; Marinho, Carolina Coimbra; Lima, Marcia Maria Oliveira; Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira; Rocha, Manoel Otávio C.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas' disease (ChD), caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), was discovered and described by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas in 1909. After a century of original description, trypanosomiasis still brings much misery to humanity and is classified as a neglected tropical disease prevalent in underdeveloped countries, particularly in South America. It is an increasing worldwide problem due to the number of cases in endemic areas and the migration of infected subjects to more developed regions, mainly North America and Europe. Despite its importance, chronic chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) pathophysiology is yet poorly understood, and independently of its social, clinical, and epidemiological importance, the therapeutic approach of CCC is still transposed from the knowledge acquired from other cardiomyopathies. Therefore, the objective of this review is to describe the treatment of Chagas cardiomyopathy with emphasis on its peculiarities. PMID:24350293

  11. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy and related arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Montaigne, David; Pentiah, Anju Duva

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been shown to be involved in the pathophysiology of arrhythmia, not only in inherited cardiomyopathy due to specific mutations in the mitochondrial DNA but also in acquired cardiomyopathy such as ischemic or diabetic cardiomyopathy. This article briefly discusses the basics of mitochondrial physiology and details the mechanisms generating arrhythmias due to mitochondrial dysfunction. The clinical spectrum of inherited and acquired cardiomyopathies associated with mitochondrial dysfunction is discussed followed by general aspects of the management of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy and related arrhythmia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Arrhythmias in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Honigberg, Michael C; Givertz, Michael M

    2015-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a complication of late pregnancy and the early postpartum period characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Approximately half of women fail to recover left ventricular function. Standard management of heart failure is indicated, with some exceptions for women who are predelivery or breastfeeding. Atrial and ventricular arrhythmias are reported in PPCM, but the frequency of arrhythmias in this condition is not well characterized. Management of PPCM-associated arrhythmias may include antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation, and wearable or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Further research is needed on the prevalence, natural history, and optimal management of arrhythmias in PPCM.

  13. Cardiomyopathy Following Latrodectus Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Michael; Canning, Josh; Chase, Robyn; Ruha, Anne-Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Latrodectus envenomations are common throughout the United States and the world. While many envenomations can result in catecholamine release with resultant hypertension and tachycardia, myocarditis is very rare. We describe a case of a 22-year-old male who sustained a Latrodectus envenomation complicated by cardiomyopathy. PMID:21293781

  14. Myocardial mechanics in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Modesto, Karen; Sengupta, Partho P

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that can be phenotypically recognized by specific patterns of ventricular morphology and function. The authors summarize recent clinical observations that mechanistically link the multidirectional components of left ventricular (LV) deformation with morphological phenotypes of cardiomyopathies for offering key insights into the transmural heterogeneity of myocardial function. Subendocardial dysfunction predominantly alters LV longitudinal shortening, lengthening and suction performance and contributes to the phenotypic patterns of heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (EF) seen with hypertrophic and restrictive patterns of cardiomyopathy. On the other hand, a more progressive transmural disease results in reduction of LV circumferential and twist mechanics leading to the phenotypic pattern of dilated cardiomyopathy and the clinical syndrome of HF with reduced (EF). A proper characterization of LV transmural mechanics, energetics, and space-time distributions of pressure and shear stress may allow recognition of early functional changes that can forecast progression or reversal of LV remodeling. Furthermore, the interactions between LV muscle and fluid mechanics hold the promise for offering newer mechanistic insights and tracking impact of novel therapies.

  15. Infrequent dialysis: a new paradigm for hemodialysis initiation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Connie M; Unruh, Mark; Chen, Jing; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Zager, Phillip; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Nearly a half-century ago, the thrice-weekly hemodialysis schedule was empirically established as a means to provide an adequate dialysis dose while also treating the greatest number of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients using limited resources. Landmark trials of hemodialysis adequacy have historically been anchored to thrice-weekly regimens, but a recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated that frequent hemodialysis (six times per week) confers cardiovascular and survival benefits. Based on these collective data and experience, clinical practice guidelines advise against a less than thrice-weekly treatment schedule in patients without residual renal function, yet provide limited guidance on the optimal treatment frequency when substantial native kidney function is present. Thus, during the transition from Stage 5 chronic kidney disease to ESRD, the current paradigm is to initiate hemodialysis on a "full-dose" thrice-weekly regimen even among patients with substantial residual renal function. However, emerging data suggest that frequent hemodialysis accelerates residual renal function decline, and infrequent regimens may provide better preservation of native kidney function. Given the high mortality rates during the first 6 months of hemodialysis and the survival benefits of preserved native kidney function, initiation with twice-weekly treatment schedules ("infrequent hemodialysis") with an incremental increase in frequency over time may provide an opportunity to optimize patient survival. This review outlines the clinical benefits of post-hemodialysis residual renal function, studies of twice-weekly treatment regimens, and the potential risks and benefits of infrequent hemodialysis.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial restrictive cardiomyopathy familial restrictive cardiomyopathy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. For ...

  17. Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMI).

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard; Richter, Anette; Sandmöller, Andrea; Portig, Irene; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2005-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are heart muscle diseases, which have been defined by their central hemodynamics and macropathology and divided in five major forms: dilated (DCM), hypertrophic (HCM), restrictive (RCM), right ventricular (RVCM), and nonclassifiable cardiomyopathies (NCCM). Furthermore, the most recent WHO/WHF definition also comprises, among the specific cardiomyopathies, inflammatory cardiomyopathy as a distinct entity, defined as myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction. Idiopathic, autoimmune, and infectious forms of inflammatory cardiomyopathy were recognized. Viral cardiomyopathy has been defined as viral persistence in a dilated heart. It may be accompanied by myocardial inflammation and then termed inflammatory viral cardiomyopathy (or viral myocarditis with cardiomegaly). If no inflammation is observed in the biopsy of a dilated heart (< 14 lymphocytes and macrophages/mm(2)), the term viral cardiomyopathy or viral persistence in DCM should be applied according to the WHF Task Force recommendations. Within the German heart failure net it is the authors' working hypothesis, that DCM shares genetic risk factors with other diseases of presumed autoimmune etiology and, therefore, the same multiple genes in combination with environmental factors lead to numerous different autoimmune diseases including DCM. Therefore, the authors' primary goal is to acquire epidemiologic data of patients with DCM regarding an infectious and inflammatory etiology of the disease. Circumstantial evidence points to a major role of viral myocarditis in the etiology of DCM. The common presence of viral genetic material in the myocardium of patients with DCM provides the most compelling evidence, but proof of causality is still lacking. In addition, autoimmune reactions have been described in many studies, indicating them as an important etiologic factor. Nevertheless, data on the proportion of patients, in whom both mechanisms play a role are still missing.A pivotal role for

  18. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Capriola, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy of unclear etiology affecting women without preexisting heart disease during the last month of pregnancy or during the first 5 months postpartum. Its incidence shows marked geographic and ethnic variation, being most common in Africa and among women of African descent. Most women present in the first month postpartum with typical heart failure symptoms such as dyspnea, lower extremity edema, and fatigue. These symptoms are often initially erroneously diagnosed as part of the normal puerperal process. Diagnosis can be aided by the finding of a significantly elevated serum brain natriuretic peptide. The etiology of PPCM is unclear; however, recent research suggests abnormal prolactin metabolism is seminal in its development, and prolactin antagonism with bromocriptine shows promise as a novel treatment for PPCM. PMID:23300351

  19. [Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Povolný, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous group of diseases of heart muscle accompanied with impaired cardiac function. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC) is caused by prolonged tachycardia leading to dilatation and systolic dysfunction with clinical manifestation of heart failure. This state is reversible after normalization of heart rate. The diagnosis is usually made retrospectively after normalization of heart rate and recovery of left ventricular function (LVF). More than 100 years after the first documented case (described in 1913 in a young patient with atrial fibrillation and symptoms of heart failure [25]) is still limited knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms. The most common arrhythmias responsible for the TIC include atrial fibrillation [1,2], atrial flutter [3], incessant supraventricular tachycardia [4], ventricular tachycardia (VT) [5] and frequent ventricular extrasystoles (VES) [6]. TIC detection and therapeutic intervention is crucial considering potential reversibility of tachycardia. Current options of treatment involve drug therapy and surgical or catheter ablation.

  20. Infrequent Dialysis: A New Paradigm for Hemodialysis Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Connie M.; Unruh, Mark; Chen, Jing; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Zager, Phillip; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Nearly a half-century ago, the thrice-weekly hemodialysis schedule was empirically established as a means to provide an adequate dialysis dose while also treating the greatest number of end-stage renal disease patients using limited resources. Landmark trials of hemodialysis adequacy have historically been anchored to thrice-weekly regimens, but a recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated that frequent hemodialysis (six times per week) confers cardiovascular and survival benefits. Based on these collective data and experience, clinical practice guidelines advise against a less than thrice-weekly treatment schedule in patients without residual renal function, yet provide limited guidance on the optimal treatment frequency when substantial native kidney function is present. Thus, during the transition from Stage 5 chronic kidney disease to end-stage renal disease, the current paradigm is to initiate hemodialysis on a “full dose” thrice-weekly regimen even among patients with substantial residual renal function. However, emerging data suggests that frequent hemodialysis accelerates residual renal function decline, and infrequent regimens may provide better preservation of native kidney function. Given the high mortality rates during the first 90 days of hemodialysis and the survival benefits of preserved native kidney function, initiation with twice-weekly treatment schedules (“infrequent hemodialysis”) with an incremental increase in frequency over time may provide an opportunity to optimize patient survival. This review outlines the clinical benefits of post-hemodialysis residual renal function, studies of twice-weekly treatment regimens, and the potential risks and benefits of infrequent hemodialysis. PMID:24016197

  1. Hyaluronan synthase 3 variant and anthracycline-related cardiomyopathy: a report from the children's oncology group.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuexia; Liu, Wei; Sun, Can-Lan; Armenian, Saro H; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hageman, Lindsey; Ding, Yan; Landier, Wendy; Blanco, Javier G; Chen, Lu; Quiñones, Adolfo; Ferguson, Daniel; Winick, Naomi; Ginsberg, Jill P; Keller, Frank; Neglia, Joseph P; Desai, Sunil; Sklar, Charles A; Castellino, Sharon M; Cherrick, Irene; Dreyer, ZoAnn E; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Leslie L; Yasui, Yutaka; Relling, Mary V; Bhatia, Smita

    2014-03-01

    The strong dose-dependent association between anthracyclines and cardiomyopathy is further exacerbated by the co-occurrence of cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes and hypertension). The high morbidity associated with cardiomyopathy necessitates an understanding of the underlying pathogenesis so that targeted interventions can be developed. By using a two-stage design, we investigated host susceptibility to anthracycline-related cardiomyopathy by using the ITMAT/Broad CARe cardiovascular single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to profile common SNPs in 2,100 genes considered relevant to de novo cardiovascular disease. By using a matched case-control design (93 cases, 194 controls), we identified a common SNP, rs2232228, in the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) gene that exerts a modifying effect on anthracycline dose-dependent cardiomyopathy risk (P = 5.3 × 10(-7)). Among individuals with rs2232228 GG genotype, cardiomyopathy was infrequent and not dose related. However, in individuals exposed to high-dose (> 250 mg/m(2)) anthracyclines, the rs2232228 AA genotype conferred an 8.9-fold (95% CI, 2.1- to 37.5-fold; P = .003) increased cardiomyopathy risk compared with the GG genotype. This gene-environment interaction was successfully replicated in an independent set of 76 patients with anthracycline-related cardiomyopathy. Relative HAS3 mRNA levels measured in healthy hearts tended to be lower among individuals with AA compared with GA genotypes (P = .09). Hyaluronan (HA) produced by HAS3 is a ubiquitous component of the extracellular matrix and plays an active role in tissue remodeling. In addition, HA is known to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) -induced cardiac injury. The high cardiomyopathy risk associated with AA genotype could be due to inadequate remodeling and/or inadequate protection of the heart from ROS-mediated injury on high anthracycline exposure.

  2. Hyaluronan Synthase 3 Variant and Anthracycline-Related Cardiomyopathy: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuexia; Liu, Wei; Sun, Can-Lan; Armenian, Saro H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hageman, Lindsey; Ding, Yan; Landier, Wendy; Blanco, Javier G.; Chen, Lu; Quiñones, Adolfo; Ferguson, Daniel; Winick, Naomi; Ginsberg, Jill P.; Keller, Frank; Neglia, Joseph P.; Desai, Sunil; Sklar, Charles A.; Castellino, Sharon M.; Cherrick, Irene; Dreyer, ZoAnn E.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Robison, Leslie L.; Yasui, Yutaka; Relling, Mary V.; Bhatia, Smita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The strong dose-dependent association between anthracyclines and cardiomyopathy is further exacerbated by the co-occurrence of cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes and hypertension). The high morbidity associated with cardiomyopathy necessitates an understanding of the underlying pathogenesis so that targeted interventions can be developed. Patients and Methods By using a two-stage design, we investigated host susceptibility to anthracycline-related cardiomyopathy by using the ITMAT/Broad CARe cardiovascular single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to profile common SNPs in 2,100 genes considered relevant to de novo cardiovascular disease. Results By using a matched case-control design (93 cases, 194 controls), we identified a common SNP, rs2232228, in the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) gene that exerts a modifying effect on anthracycline dose-dependent cardiomyopathy risk (P = 5.3 × 10−7). Among individuals with rs2232228 GG genotype, cardiomyopathy was infrequent and not dose related. However, in individuals exposed to high-dose (> 250 mg/m2) anthracyclines, the rs2232228 AA genotype conferred an 8.9-fold (95% CI, 2.1- to 37.5-fold; P = .003) increased cardiomyopathy risk compared with the GG genotype. This gene-environment interaction was successfully replicated in an independent set of 76 patients with anthracycline-related cardiomyopathy. Relative HAS3 mRNA levels measured in healthy hearts tended to be lower among individuals with AA compared with GA genotypes (P = .09). Conclusion Hyaluronan (HA) produced by HAS3 is a ubiquitous component of the extracellular matrix and plays an active role in tissue remodeling. In addition, HA is known to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) –induced cardiac injury. The high cardiomyopathy risk associated with AA genotype could be due to inadequate remodeling and/or inadequate protection of the heart from ROS-mediated injury on high anthracycline exposure. PMID:24470002

  3. Dystrophin-Deficient Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Forum; Garry, Daniel J

    2016-05-31

    Dystrophinopathies are a group of distinct neuromuscular diseases that result from mutations in the structural cytoskeletal Dystrophin gene. Dystrophinopathies include Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy, as well as DMD and BMD female carriers. The primary presenting symptom in most dystrophinopathies is skeletal muscle weakness. However, cardiac muscle is also a subtype of striated muscle and is similarly affected in many of the muscular dystrophies. Cardiomyopathies associated with dystrophinopathies are an increasingly recognized manifestation of these neuromuscular disorders and contribute significantly to their morbidity and mortality. Recent studies suggest that these patient populations would benefit from cardiovascular therapies, annual cardiovascular imaging studies, and close follow-up with cardiovascular specialists. Moreover, patients with DMD and BMD who develop end-stage heart failure may benefit from the use of advanced therapies. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, cardiac involvement, and treatment of cardiomyopathy in the dystrophic patient. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inflammation and metabolic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kazuhiko; Otsu, Kinya

    2017-03-15

    Excessive feeding is associated with an increase in the incidence of chronic metabolic diseases, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Metabolic disturbance induces chronic low-grade inflammation in metabolically-important organs, such as the liver and adipose tissue. Many of the inflammatory signalling pathways are directly triggered by nutrients. The pro-inflammatory mediators in adipocytes and macrophages infiltrating adipose tissue promote both local and systemic pro-inflammatory status. Metabolic cardiomyopathy is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by structural and functional alterations and interstitial fibrosis without coronary artery disease or hypertension. In the early stage of metabolic cardiomyopathy, metabolic disturbance is not accompanied by substantial changes in myocardial structure and cardiac function. However, metabolic disturbance induces subcellular low-grade inflammation in the heart, and in turn, subcellular component abnormalities, such as oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and impaired calcium handling, leading to impaired myocardial relaxation. In the advanced stage, the vicious cycle of subcellular component abnormalities, inflammatory cell infiltration, and neurohumoral activation induces cardiomyocyte injury and death, and cardiac fibrosis, resulting in impairment of both diastolic and systolic functions. This review discusses some recent advances in understanding involvement of inflammation in metabolic cardiomyopathy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Decade in review--cardiomyopathies: Cardiomyopathy on the move.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Magdi H

    2014-11-01

    Since Wallace Brigden first used the term 'cardiomyopathy' in 1952, this group of diseases has continued to attract the interest of clinicians, researchers, and importantly, patients. The past decade has seen a substantial accumulation of knowledge relating to various cardiomyopathies, which has partially lifted the mystery surrounding this topic.

  6. Dispersal Mutualism Incorporated into Large-Scale, Infrequent Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Parker, V Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Because of their influence on succession and other community interactions, large-scale, infrequent natural disturbances also should play a major role in mutualistic interactions. Using field data and experiments, I test whether mutualisms have been incorporated into large-scale wildfire by whether the outcomes of a mutualism depend on disturbance. In this study a seed dispersal mutualism is shown to depend on infrequent, large-scale disturbances. A dominant shrubland plant (Arctostaphylos species) produces seeds that make up a persistent soil seed bank and requires fire to germinate. In post-fire stands, I show that seedlings emerging from rodent caches dominate sites experiencing higher fire intensity. Field experiments show that rodents (Perimyscus californicus, P. boylii) do cache Arctostaphylos fruit and bury most seed caches to a sufficient depth to survive a killing heat pulse that a fire might drive into the soil. While the rodent dispersal and caching behavior itself has not changed compared to other habitats, the environmental transformation caused by wildfire converts the caching burial of seed from a dispersal process to a plant fire adaptive trait, and provides the context for stimulating subsequent life history evolution in the plant host.

  7. Dispersal Mutualism Incorporated into Large-Scale, Infrequent Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Parker, V. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Because of their influence on succession and other community interactions, large-scale, infrequent natural disturbances also should play a major role in mutualistic interactions. Using field data and experiments, I test whether mutualisms have been incorporated into large-scale wildfire by whether the outcomes of a mutualism depend on disturbance. In this study a seed dispersal mutualism is shown to depend on infrequent, large-scale disturbances. A dominant shrubland plant (Arctostaphylos species) produces seeds that make up a persistent soil seed bank and requires fire to germinate. In post-fire stands, I show that seedlings emerging from rodent caches dominate sites experiencing higher fire intensity. Field experiments show that rodents (Perimyscus californicus, P. boylii) do cache Arctostaphylos fruit and bury most seed caches to a sufficient depth to survive a killing heat pulse that a fire might drive into the soil. While the rodent dispersal and caching behavior itself has not changed compared to other habitats, the environmental transformation caused by wildfire converts the caching burial of seed from a dispersal process to a plant fire adaptive trait, and provides the context for stimulating subsequent life history evolution in the plant host. PMID:26151560

  8. Role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova; Kruzliak, Peter; Rabkin, Simon W

    2014-11-01

    The role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathy-associated heart failure has been garnering more attention. Several neuropeptides--Neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and their receptors have been studied in the various types of cardiomyopathies. The data indicate associations with the strength of the association varying depending on the kind of neuropeptide and the nature of the cardiomyopathy--diabetic, ischemic, inflammatory, stress-induced or restrictive cardiomyopathy. Several neuropeptides appear to alter regulation of genes involved in heart failure. Demonstration of an association is an essential first step in proving causality or establishing a role for a factor in a disease. Understanding the complexity of neuropeptide function should be helpful in establishing new or optimal therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure in cardiomyopathies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lisung, Fausto Gabriel; Shah, Ankit B; Levitt, Howard L; Coplan, Neil B

    2015-01-01

    A woman in her early 70s presented with chest pain, dyspnoea and diaphoresis 30 min after her husband expired in our hospital. Cardiac markers were elevated and there were acute changes in ECG suggestive for acute coronary syndrome. Echocardiogram showed apical akinesis, basal segment hyperkinesis with an ejection fraction of 30%. Cardiac catheterisation was performed showing non-obstructive coronary arteries, leading to the diagnosis of stress-induced cardiomyopathy. The patient improved with medical management. Repeat echocardiogram 2 months later showed resolution of heart failure with an ejection fraction of 65–70%. PMID:25858931

  10. [Non-compaction cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Wieneke, Heinrich; Neumann, Till; Breuckmann, Frank; Hunold, Peter; Fries, Jochen W U; Dirsch, Olaf; Erbel, Raimund

    2005-09-01

    Isolated non-compaction of the ventricular myocardium (INVM), also known as left ventricular hypertrabeculation or spongy myocardium, belongs to the "unclassified" cardiomyopathies according to the World Health Organization. The main characteristic of this entity is a prominent trabeculation of the left ventricle with deep intertrabecular recesses communicating with the ventricular cavity. The pathomechanism of INVM is thought to be an arrest in cardiac myogenesis with persistence of embryonic myocardial morphology. The most frequent clinical manifestations include congestive heart failure, ventricular arrhythmias and systemic thromboembolic events. The therapy of INVM comprises standard medical therapy for heart failure.

  11. Dilated cardiomyopathy in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Sidwell, R; Yates, R; Atherton, D

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is an uncommon genetic disorder of the skin and mucosae. In 1996, we reported the occurrence of lethal dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in two affected children.
METHODS—In the past seven years we have routinely screened patients with severe DEB who have been under the care of this hospital by yearly clinical review, echocardiography, and quantification of plasma selenium and carnitine concentrations, as deficiency of these micronutrients is known to be associated with the development of DCM.
RESULTS—Six of 61 children have developed DCM over the seven year period of this study, four of whom have not been previously reported, and three of whom have since died. We compared the concentrations of selenium and free and total carnitine in the children who developed DCM to concentrations in those with severe DEB who did not. The concentrations of free and total carnitine when first measured were significantly lower in the children with DCM, but the selenium concentrations were not.
CONCLUSIONS—We now believe that DCM is a not infrequent complication of severe recessive DEB, and may be related in part to carnitine concentrations, though the exact mechanism remains unclear. We therefore recommend that patients with this condition should undergo regular cardiac review including echocardiography.

 PMID:10869001

  12. Genetics of inherited cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Daniel; McKenna, William J

    2012-02-01

    During the past two decades, numerous disease-causing genes for different cardiomyopathies have been identified. These discoveries have led to better understanding of disease pathogenesis and initial steps in the application of mutation analysis in the evaluation of affected individuals and their family members. As knowledge of the genetic abnormalities, and insight into cellular and organ biology has grown, so has appreciation of the level of complexity of interaction between genotype and phenotype across disease states. What were initially thought to be one-to-one gene-disease correlates have turned out to display important relational plasticity dependent in large part on the genetic and environmental backgrounds into which the genes of interest express. The current state of knowledge with regard to genetics of cardiomyopathy represents a starting point to address the biology of disease, but is not yet developed sufficiently to supplant clinically based classification systems or, in most cases, to guide therapy to any significant extent. Future work will of necessity be directed towards elucidation of the biological mechanisms of both rare and common gene variants and environmental determinants of plasticity in the genotype-phenotype relationship with the ultimate goal of furthering our ability to identify, diagnose, risk stratify, and treat this group of disorders which cause heart failure and sudden death in the young.

  13. Genetics of inherited cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Daniel; McKenna, William J.

    2012-01-01

    During the past two decades, numerous disease-causing genes for different cardiomyopathies have been identified. These discoveries have led to better understanding of disease pathogenesis and initial steps in the application of mutation analysis in the evaluation of affected individuals and their family members. As knowledge of the genetic abnormalities, and insight into cellular and organ biology has grown, so has appreciation of the level of complexity of interaction between genotype and phenotype across disease states. What were initially thought to be one-to-one gene-disease correlates have turned out to display important relational plasticity dependent in large part on the genetic and environmental backgrounds into which the genes of interest express. The current state of knowledge with regard to genetics of cardiomyopathy represents a starting point to address the biology of disease, but is not yet developed sufficiently to supplant clinically based classification systems or, in most cases, to guide therapy to any significant extent. Future work will of necessity be directed towards elucidation of the biological mechanisms of both rare and common gene variants and environmental determinants of plasticity in the genotype–phenotype relationship with the ultimate goal of furthering our ability to identify, diagnose, risk stratify, and treat this group of disorders which cause heart failure and sudden death in the young. PMID:21810862

  14. [Etiopathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathies].

    PubMed

    Petronio, A S; Manes, M T; Di Meco, F; Nardini, V; Pecori, F; Ceccherini-Nellis, L; Barsotti, A; Mariani, M

    1993-12-01

    This study was carried out on 43 patients affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to investigate some of the etiopathological hypotheses on this illness. The Authors investigated: the persistence of virus genoma (coxsackie, HBV) on endomyocardial biopsies; the pattern of the II class major histocompatibility complex (MHC) were in the blood lymphocytes; the microvascular aspect of coronary circulation in the endomyocardial biopsies. Finally, in a separated group of 19 patients, the microvascular circulation was studied on skin biopsies and correlated with diabetic, valvular and normal subject. The results showed a 14% positivity for the presence of the virus genoma and a significant predominate of DR5 in the II class MHC of patients with a worse ventricular function. Capillary vessels of the coronary microcirculation were dilated in the 48% of the patients, especially in more compromised subjects. Viral myocarditis seem to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM) and the pattern of MHC could influence the progression of the illness. The microcirculation is probably a pathophysiological aspect. No etiological hypothesis seems to predominate.

  15. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (Broken heart syndrome).

    PubMed

    Javed, Aqib; Chitkara, Kamal; Mahmood, Arslan; Kainat, Aleesha

    2015-11-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an acute reversible cardiomyopathy characterised by transient regional left ventricular (LV) motion abnormalities. It is diagnosed on a coronary angiography and left ventriculography. We report the case of a 50-year-old lady who presented with sudden onset of chest pain, with no history of cardiac disease and no risk factors. Remarkably though, she had lost her husband the previous night. Coronary and LV angiography was done which revealed findings typical of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We report this case for its rarity. Informed consent was taken from the patient before undertaking and reporting this study.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy is a form of heart disease. Dilated cardiomyopathy ...

  17. Genetics of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Felix W; Carrier, Lucie

    2012-10-01

    Cardiomyopathies are categorized as extrinsic, being caused by external factors, such as hypertension, ischemia, inflammation, valvular dysfunction, or as intrinsic, which correspond to myocardial diseases without identifiable external causes. These so called primary cardiomyopathies can be categorized in four main forms: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathies are diagnosed by clinical expression, echocardiography, electrocardiography, non-invasive imaging, and sometimes by cardiac catheterization to rule out external causes as ischemia. The two main forms of primary cardiomyopathies are the hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Most of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 20-50% of dilated cardiomyopathy are familial showing a wide genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. This review presents the current knowledge on the causative genes, molecular mechanisms and the genotype � phenotype relations of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies.

  18. Cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Goel, Nisheeth K; McBane, Robert D; Kamath, Patrick S

    2005-05-01

    Celiac disease or celiac sprue is predominantly a disease of the small intestine characterized by chronic malabsorption in genetically susceptible individuals who ingest grains containing gluten, such as wheat, barley, and rye. Although previously believed to be uncommon, celiac disease may be present in up to 1% of the general population. Celiac disease is associated frequently with iron deficiency anemia, dermatitis herpetiformis, selective IgA deficiency, thyroid disorders, diabetes mellitus, and various connective tissue disorders but is rarely associated with cardiomyopathy. We describe a patient with celiac disease associated with cardiomyopathy whose cardiac function improved substantially after treatment with a gluten-free diet. Cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease is a serious and potentially lethal condition. However, with early diagnosis and treatment with a gluten-free diet, cardiomyopathy in patients with celiac disease may be completely reversible.

  19. Cytokines in myocarditis and cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Matsumori, A

    1996-05-01

    Myocarditis is thought to be caused by various viruses, and accumulating evidence links viral myocarditis with the eventual development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recently the importance of hepatitis C virus infection was noted in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Cytokines are increasingly recognized as an important factor in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. Elevated circulating cytokines have been reported in patients with heart failure, and various cytokines have been shown to depress myocardial contractility in vitro and in vivo. A number of recent studies showed that cytokines generated by activated immune cells cause an increase in NO (nitric oxide) via induction of NO synthase. Increased generation of NO may induce negative inotropism and myocardial damage. This review discusses the etiology and pathogenesis of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy from this point of view.

  20. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Hidetsugu; Hadeishi, Hiromu

    2014-08-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and a 12-lead ECG showed ST segment elevation. Transthoracic echocardiography confirmed akinesis of the left ventricular mid-apical segment, with an ejection fraction of 26%, features characteristic of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Five days later, we identified thrombus in the apex of the left ventricle. Sixteen days after onset, the thrombus had disappeared and wall motion improved (ejection fraction 58%) without evidence of cardioembolism. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a cause of cardiac dysfunction after stroke, including SAH. It is characterised by transiently depressed contractile function of the left mid and apical ventricle, without obstructive coronary artery disease. Clinicians should suspect takotsubo cardiomyopathy in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage who have an ECG abnormality. Echocardiography is needed to detect the distinctive regional wall motion abnormality. Despite its severity in the acute phase, takotsubo cardiomyopathy is self-limiting and its management is conservative.

  1. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy post liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vachiat, Ahmed; McCutcheon, Keir; Mahomed, Adam; Schleicher, Gunter; Brand, Liezl; Botha, Jean; Sussman, Martin; Manga, Pravin

    2016-10-23

    A patient with end-stage liver disease developed stress-induced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy post liver transplantation, with haemodynamic instability requiring a left ventricular assist device. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this condition.

  2. Molecular etiology of idiopathic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, T; Hayashi, T; Kimura, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Idiopathic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is a primary cardiac disorder associated with abnormalities of ventricular wall thickness, size of ventricular cavity, contraction, relaxation, conduction and rhythm. Over the past two decades, molecular genetic analyses have revealed that mutations in the various genes cause ICM and such information concerning the genetic basis of ICM enables us to speculate the pathogenesis of this heterogeous cardiac disease. This review focuses on the molecular pathogenesis, i.e., genetic abnormalities and functional alterations due to the mutations especially in sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in three characteristic features of ICM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Understanding the functional abnormalities of the sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in ICM, has unraveled the function of these components not only as a contractile unit but also as a pivot for transduction of biochemical signals. PMID:18646564

  3. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  4. Pure red cell aplasia and lymphoproliferative disorders: an infrequent association.

    PubMed

    Vlachaki, Efthymia; Diamantidis, Michael D; Klonizakis, Philippos; Haralambidou-Vranitsa, Styliani; Ioannidou-Papagiannaki, Elizabeth; Klonizakis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare bone marrow failure syndrome defined by a progressive normocytic anaemia and reticulocytopenia without leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Secondary PRCA can be associated with various haematological disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The aim of the present review is to investigate the infrequent association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders. PRCA might precede the appearance of lymphoma, may present simultaneously with the lymphoid neoplastic disease, or might appear following the lymphomatic disorder. Possible pathophysiological molecular mechanisms to explain the rare association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders are reported. Most cases of PRCA are presumed to be autoimmune mediated by antibodies against either erythroblasts or erythropoietin, by T-cells secreting factors selectively inhibiting erythroid colonies in the bone marrow or by NK cells directly lysing erythroblasts. Finally, focus is given to the therapeutical approach, as several treatment regimens have failed for PRCA. Immunosuppressive therapy and/or chemotherapy are effective for improving anaemia in the majority of patients with lymphoma-associated PRCA. Further investigation is required to define the pathophysiology of PRCA at a molecular level and to provide convincing evidence why it might appear as a rare complication of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  5. Agents of newly recognized or infrequently encountered mycobacterial diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, L G; Sramek, H A

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews recent information on the systematics and clinical significance of potentially pathogenic environmental mycobacteria. A short history of these mycobacteria is given. Information on species for which clinical and systematic aspects have already been well documented, i.e., Mycobacterium kansasii, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. simiae, M. szulgai, M. ulcerans, M. xenopi, and members of the M. fortuitum complex, is updated. Although the M. avium complex was extensively reviewed in earlier literature, major new systematic and clinical information is presented in some detail. Species that have received very limited prior coverage, i.e., M. asiaticum, M. haemophilum, M. malmoense, and M. shimoidei, are the main subjects of this review and are discussed in detail. The rare infections attributed to species that are normally considered nonpathogenic, i.e., M. gastri, M. gordonae, the M. terrae complex, and most of the rapidly growing mycobacteria outside of the M. fortuitum complex, are critically reviewed. Finally, suggestions are offered for practical measures that can minimize the risk of failing to isolate or misidentifying some of the more obscure potentially pathogenic environmental mycobacteria that are only infrequently recognized. PMID:1735092

  6. Infrequent Loss of Luminal Differentiation in Ductal Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Julia; Sánchez-Cid, Lourdes; Muñoz, Montserrat; Lozano, Juan José; Thomson, Timothy M.; Fernández, Pedro L.

    2013-01-01

    Lymph node involvement is a major prognostic variable in breast cancer. Whether the molecular mechanisms that drive breast cancer cells to colonize lymph nodes are shared with their capacity to form distant metastases is yet to be established. In a transcriptomic survey aimed at identifying molecular factors associated with lymph node involvement of ductal breast cancer, we found that luminal differentiation, assessed by the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and/or progesterone receptor (PR) and GATA3, was only infrequently lost in node-positive primary tumors and in matched lymph node metastases. The transcription factor GATA3 critically determines luminal lineage specification of mammary epithelium and is widely considered a tumor and metastasis suppressor in breast cancer. Strong expression of GATA3 and ER in a majority of primary node-positive ductal breast cancer was corroborated by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in the initial sample set, and by immunohistochemistry in an additional set from 167 patients diagnosed of node-negative and –positive primary infiltrating ductal breast cancer, including 102 samples from loco-regional lymph node metastases matched to their primary tumors, as well as 37 distant metastases. These observations suggest that loss of luminal differentiation is not a major factor driving the ability of breast cancer cells to colonize regional lymph nodes. PMID:24205108

  7. Buprenorphine infrequently found in fatal overdose in New York City.

    PubMed

    Paone, Denise; Tuazon, Ellenie; Stajic, Marina; Sampson, Barbara; Allen, Bennett; Mantha, Shivani; Kunins, Hillary

    2015-10-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid agonist medication that is both safe and effective in the treatment of opioid use disorders and the prevention of opioid overdoses. Despite this, media coverage has highlighted public concerns about the potential safety consequences of buprenorphine misuse and diversion. To address the possible contribution of buprenorphine to overdose mortality, we systematically tested post mortem blood specimens from decedents who had died of an unintentional drug overdoses in 2013. We retrospectively tested consecutive drug overdose cases that occurred from June through October 2013. Cases with available blood specimens were tested for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Toxicology results were linked to death certificates and case files from New York City Vital Statistics and New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. Of the 98 unintentional drug overdose fatalities tested, only 2 (2.0%) tested positive for buprenorphine metabolites. All 98 unintentional fatalities involved multiple substances. Buprenorphine was infrequently found in drug overdose deaths in New York City. Since the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine are well documented, and overdoses resulting from buprenorphine treatment or diversion are very rare, facilitating access to buprenorphine treatment is strongly recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypocalcemic rachitic cardiomyopathy in infants

    PubMed Central

    Elidrissy, Abdelwahab T.H.; Munawarah, Medinah; Alharbi, Khalid M.

    2012-01-01

    Hypocalcemic cardiomyopathy in infants is characterized by heart failure in a previously normal infant with hypocalcemia without organic cardiac lesion. Vitamin D deficiency rickets is increasing in Middle East. In a six month study 136 cases of rickets were diagnosed in the main Children’s Hospital in Almadinah but none of them showed evidence of cardiomyopathy. Concerned of missing this serious complication of rickets we searched pub med and present this review article. Results 61 cases of hypocalcemic cardiomyopathy were reported as case reports with two series of 16 and 15 cases from London and Delhi, respectively. The major features of these cases: the age ranged from one month to 15 months with a mean age of 5 months. All presented with heart failure and hypocalcemia. There was a minor feature of rickets in a few of the cases. All had high alkaline phosphatase. Echocardiology evidence of cardiomyopathy was found in all. Most of them responded to calcium, vitamin D and cardiotonic and diuretics. Discussion We concentrated on pathogenesis of this hypocalcemic cardiomyopathy and reviewed the literature. The evidence available supports that the most likely cause of cardiomyopathy is hypocalcemia. Hypovitamin D also contributes but hyperparathyroidism might have a protective role as we did not detect any evidence of cardiomyopathy with hyperparathyroidism and florid features of rickets. Conclusion We need to look out for cardiomyopathy among infants with hypocalcemia. For prevention maternal supplementation during pregnancy and lactation with up to 2000 units of vitamin D and 400 units for their infants. PMID:24174842

  9. Misconceptions and Facts About Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Sherrid, Mark V; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common genetic heart disease. Once considered relentless, untreatable, and deadly, it has become a highly treatable disease with contemporary management. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is one of cardiology's "great masqueraders." Mistakes and delays in diagnosis abound. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy commonly "masquerades" as asthma, anxiety, mitral prolapse, and coronary artery disease. However, once properly diagnosed, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be effectively managed to improve both symptoms and survival. This review highlights some of the misconceptions about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Providers at all levels should have awareness of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to promptly diagnose and properly manage these individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Methamphetamine-Associated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Sekon; Hong, Robert A.; Shohet, Ralph V.; Seto, Todd B.; Parikh, Nisha I.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine and related compounds are now the second most commonly used illicit substance worldwide, after cannabis. Reports of methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy (MAC) are increasing, but MAC has not been well reviewed. This analysis of MAC will provide an overview of the pharmacology of methamphetamine, historical perspective and epidemiology, a review of case and clinical studies, and a summary of the proposed mechanisms for MAC. Clinically, many questions remain, including the appropriate therapeutic interventions for MAC, the incidence and prevalence of cardiac pathology in methamphetamine users, risk factors for developing MAC, and prognosis of these patients. In conclusion, recognition of the significance of MAC among physicians and other medical caregivers is important given the growing use of methamphetamine and related stimulants worldwide. PMID:24037954

  11. Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Veselka, Josef; Anavekar, Nandan S; Charron, Philippe

    2017-03-25

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is an inherited myocardial disease defined by cardiac hypertrophy (wall thickness ≥15 mm) that is not explained by abnormal loading conditions, and left ventricular obstruction greater than or equal to 30 mm Hg. Typical symptoms include dyspnoea, chest pain, palpitations, and syncope. The diagnosis is usually suspected on clinical examination and confirmed by imaging. Some patients are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Patients with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death undergo cardioverter-defibrillator implantation; in patients with severe symptoms related to ventricular obstruction, septal reduction therapy (myectomy or alcohol septal ablation) is recommended. Life-long anticoagulation is indicated after the first episode of atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Following Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiariello, Giovanni Alfonso; Bruno, Piergiorgio; Colizzi, Christian; Crea, Filippo; Massetti, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy syndrome, commonly occurring in postmenopausal women, is characterized by transient apical systolic dysfunction in absence of coronary lesions. The cardiomyopathy is often observed after intense stressful events such as a major surgical procedure. A 72-year-old woman symptomatic for dyspnea at rest, chest pain, and peripheral edema successfully underwent surgery for noncoronary sinus aneurysm-right atrium fistula repair. Two days after surgery the patient developed takotsubo syndrome, diagnosed according to the Mayo Clinic criteria. We reviewed the literature on takotsubo cardiomyopathy as a complication of major cardiac surgery procedures. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is confirmed as a possible early complication of cardiac surgery. Exaggerated sympathetic stimulation may cause massive endogenous catecholamine release. Hypoperfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass, inotropic drugs administration, and postoperative anxiety and pain are all factors generating stress, possible coronary artery spasm and transient cardiomyopathy, clinically simulating acute myocardial infarction. Several clinical features have been described such as acute mitral insufficiency, systolic anterior motion of the anterior mitral valve leaflet, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, acute cardiac failure, and cardiogenic shock. Intraventricular thrombi and adverse cerebrovascular events may also be possible complications. Rare catastrophic events such as left ventricular free wall rupture and ventricular septal perforation have been also encountered. After cardiac surgery takotsubo cardiomyopathy should be suspected if clinical and instrumental criteria are met, and promptly differentiated from the more frequent acute myocardial infarction. Prognosis may be favorable if appropriate conservative medical treatment is promptly started. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cerebral embolic stroke after disappearing takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Ikeda, Yoshio; Deguchi, Shoko; Yamashita, Toru; Kurata, Tomoko; Deguchi, Kentaro; Abe, Koji

    2013-11-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy can induce cerebral embolic stroke because of intracardiac thrombosis, but the timing of cardiogenic embolism relating to takotsubo cardiomyopathy has not been well described. We evaluated a 71-year-old woman with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, who developed cardiogenic cerebral embolism after recovery of cardiac wall motion. Nevertheless, we treated her with anticoagulation therapy. The present clinical observation suggests that attention should be paid to the timing when takotsubo cardiomyopathy resolves against risk of cardiogenic cerebral embolism.

  14. Subaortic and midventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with extreme segmental hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiadis, Georgios K; Giannakoulas, Georgios; Parcharidou, Despina G; Ziakas, Antonios G; Papadopoulos, Christodoulos E; Karoulas, Takis; Pliakos, Christodoulos; Parcharidis, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    Background Subaortic and midventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with extreme segmental hypertrophy exceeding the usual maximum wall thickness reported in the literature is a rare phenomenon. Case Presentation A 19-year-old man with recently diagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was referred for sudden death risk assessment. The patient had mild exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association functional class II), but without syncope or chest pain. There was no family history of HCM or sudden death. A two dimensional echocardiogram revealed an asymmetric type of LV hypertrophy; anterior ventricular septum = 49 mm; posterior ventricular septum = 20 mm; anterolateral free wall = 12 mm; and posterior free wall = 6 mm. The patient had 2 types of obstruction; a LV outflow obstruction due to systolic anterior motion of both mitral leaflets (Doppler-estimated 38 mm Hg gradient at rest); and a midventricular obstruction (Doppler-estimated 43 mm Hg gradient), but without apical aneurysm or dyskinesia. The patient had a normal blood pressure response on exercise test and no episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 24-h ECG recording. Cardiac MRI showed a gross late enhancement at the hypertrophied septum. Based on the extreme degree of LV hypertrophy and the myocardial hyperenhancement, an implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator was recommended prophylactically for primary prevention of sudden death. Conclusion Midventricular HCM is an infrequent phenotype, but may be associated with an apical aneurysm and progression to systolic dysfunction (end-stage HCM). PMID:17349063

  15. Prevalence and outcome of peripartum cardiomyopathy in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chee, K H; Azman, W

    2009-05-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is an uncommon form of congestive heart failure, afflicting obstetric patients around the time of delivery. The epidemiology of PPCM is infrequently reported. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report from Asia. To define the prevalence, presentation and outcome of PPCM in a major referral centre in Malaysia. Retrospective case record analysis of all patients admitted and diagnosed with PPCM at the University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, over 5 years from 1st January, 2001 to 31st December, 2004. Eight patients were diagnosed with PPCM over the study period reflecting a prevalence of 34: 100,000 life births. Five were diagnosed within 5 months after delivery. Three were associated with twin pregnancies. There was one death (12.5% mortality). The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) at the time of diagnosis was 27.1 +/- SD 6.4% (range: 17-35%). Following the index event, the left ventricular function recovered in three of the eight patients (37.5%) with restoration of normal LVEF (LVEF > 50%). Two patients had subsequent pregnancies. One was terminated at 7 weeks, and the other delivered uneventfully with a normal LVEF. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is uncommon in Malaysia. It appears to be associated with twin pregnancy. The outcome is variable with 37.5% recovering normal left ventricular function, 12.5% mortality and persistently impaired left ventricular function in the remainder.

  16. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy triggered by alcohol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Joakim; Benouda, Leila; Champ-Rigot, Laure; Labombarda, Fabien

    2011-07-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a reversible cardiomyopathy frequently precipitated by a sudden emotional or physical stress. The exact physiopathology is still debated and may involve catecholamine-induced myocardial stunning. Alcohol withdrawal is associated with an hyperadrenergic state and may be a period at risk of cardiac events. We report a 56-year-old man with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy triggered by alcohol withdrawal.

  17. Biventricular Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in Graves hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Matthew J; Schachter, David T

    2014-03-01

    Graves hyperthyroidism is commonly seen in clinical practice and Takotsubo stress cardiomyopathy is an increasingly recognized cardiac complication of physical or emotional stress. We report the rare case of a patient with Graves hyperthyroidism that was complicated by severe biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy, which was demonstrated on heart catheterization. After appropriate pharmacologic treatment of her hyperthyroidism, she had complete resolution of her cardiomyopathy.

  18. PSORIASIS AND CARDIOMYOPATHY: AN INTRIGUING ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Anupam; Deepshikha

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old male symptomatic of heart disease for four months presented with biventricular failure. Echocardiography revealed dilated cardiomyopathy. He had skin lesions for 10 years which were clinically and histopathologically identified as psoriasis. Association of cardiomyopathy with psoriasis is uncommon and intriguing. The link between dilated cardiomyopathy and psoriasis on a common inflammatory background is discussed. PMID:21063523

  19. Peripartum cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy: different at heart

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Ilse A. E.; Van Deel, Elza D.; Kuster, Diederik W. D.; Van Der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a severe cardiac disease occurring in the last month of pregnancy or in the first 5 months after delivery and shows many similar clinical characteristics as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) such as ventricle dilation and systolic dysfunction. While PPCM was believed to be DCM triggered by pregnancy, more and more studies show important differences between these diseases. While it is likely they share part of their pathogenesis such as increased oxidative stress and an impaired microvasculature, discrepancies seen in disease progression and outcome indicate there must be differences in pathogenesis as well. In this review, we compared studies in DCM and PPCM to search for overlapping and deviating disease etiology, pathogenesis and outcome in order to understand why these cardiomyopathies share similar clinical features but have different underlying pathologies. PMID:25642195

  20. Discoveries in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fett, James D; Markham, David W

    2015-07-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable gains for outcomes in peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM), one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in the USA and many other countries, including the high-incidence areas of Haiti and South Africa. This review article emphasizes the importance of continuing the process of increasing awareness of PPCM and presents details of this evolving picture, including important discoveries that point the way to full recovery for almost all PPCM subjects. In addition, new interventions will be highlighted, which may facilitate recovery. Numerous studies have demonstrated that when the diagnosis of PPCM is made with LVEF > 0.30, the probability is that recovery to LVEF ≥ 0.50 will occur in the overwhelming majority of subjects. PPCM patients diagnosed with severely depressed systolic function (LVEF < 0.30) and a remodeled left ventricle with greater dilatation (LVEDd ≥ 60mm) are least likely to reach the outcome recovery goals. These are the patients with the greatest need for newer interventional strategies.

  1. 33 CFR 117.39 - Authorized closure of drawbridge due to infrequent requests for openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Authorized closure of drawbridge due to infrequent requests for openings. 117.39 Section 117.39 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 117.39 Authorized closure of drawbridge due to infrequent requests for openings. (a) When there...

  2. Trileaflet Mitral Valve with Three Papillary Muscles Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Novel Case.

    PubMed

    Rosanio, Salvatore; Simonsen, Cameron J; Starwalt, John; Keylani, Abdul M; Vitarelli, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Congenital mitral valve (MV) malformations are uncommon, except for MV prolapse. Despite their infrequency, most of them are well-known and defined entities, such as congenital MV stenosis with two papillary muscles, parachute MV, supravalvular mitral ring, hypoplastic MV, isolated cleft in the anterior and/or posterior leaflets, and double-orifice MV. A trileaflet MV with three separate papillary muscles with concordant atrioventricular and ventricle-arterial connections is exceptionally rare. To the best of the authors' knowledge, it has been reported only once in association with subaortic valvular stenosis. We hereby describe a novel case associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. An update on peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, Jonathan R; Jackson, Colette E; Gardner, Roy S

    2011-09-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but potentially devastating complication of pregnancy. Although the definition of this condition has recently been revised by the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the pathogenesis of peripartum cardiomyopathy is not well understood and relatively little is known about its incidence and prevalence. Hence, peripartum cardiomyopathy is often under-recognized in the clinical setting. A heightened awareness of this condition and its current management options is therefore warranted throughout primary and secondary care. The identification of the putative role of prolactin in the development and progression of this condition has been recently discovered, with preclinical work suggesting beneficial effects of prolactin antagonism. In this article, we review the literature regarding this condition including these recent advances.

  4. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: a contemporary review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tina; Ather, Sameer; Bavishi, Chirag; Bambhroliya, Arvind; Ma, Tony; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2013-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and potentially fatal disease. Though approximately half of the patients recover, the clinical course is highly variable and some patients develop refractory heart failure and persistent left ventricular systolic dysfunction. It is diagnosed when women present with heart failure secondary to left ventricular systolic dysfunction towards the end of pregnancy or in the months following delivery, where no other cause of heart failure is found. Etiology remains unclear, and treatment is similar to other cardiomyopathies and includes evidence-based standard heart failure management strategies. Experimental strategies such as intravenous immunoglobulin and bromocriptine await further clinical validation.

  5. The Cardiomyopathy of Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Nikita; Rich, Michael W.; Gayomali, Charina

    2006-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia can have deleterious effects on the heart. Herein, we describe the effects of iron deficiency on the heart as corroborated with electrocardiography, radiology, echocardiography, and cardiac catheterization. We review the pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of iron-deficiency–induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:17041692

  6. The genetics of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dellefave, Lisa; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review More than forty different individual genes have been implicated in the inheritance of dilated cardiomyopathy. For a subset of these genes, mutations can lead to a spectrum of cardiomyopathy that extends to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction. In nearly all cases, there is an increased risk of arrhythmias. With some genetic mutations, extracardiac manifestations are likely to be present. The precise genetic etiology can usually not be discerned from the cardiac and/or extracardiac manifestations and requires molecular genetic diagnosis for prognostic determination and cardiac care. Recent findings Newer technologies are influencing genetic testing, especially cardiomyopathy genetic testing, where an increased number of genes are now routinely being tested simultaneously. While this approach to testing multiple genes is increasing the diagnostic yield, the analysis of multiple genes in one test is also resulting in a large amount of genetic information of unclear significance. Summary Genetic testing is highly useful in the care of patients and families, since it guides diagnosis, influences care and aids in prognosis. However, the large amount of benign human genetic variation may complicate genetic results, and often requires a skilled team to accurately interpret the findings. PMID:20186049

  7. Recent advances in cirrhotic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Karagiannakis, Dimitrios S; Papatheodoridis, George; Vlachogiannakos, Jiannis

    2015-05-01

    Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, a cardiac dysfunction presented in patients with cirrhosis, represents a recently recognized clinical entity. It is characterized by altered diastolic relaxation, impaired contractility, and electrophysiological abnormalities, in particular prolongation of the QT interval. Several mechanisms seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, including impaired function of beta-receptors, altered transmembrane currents, and overproduction of cardiodepressant factors, like nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and endogenous cannabinoids. Diastolic dysfunction is the first manifestation of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy and reflects the increased stiffness of the cardiac mass, which leads to delayed left ventricular filling. On the other hand, systolic incompetence is presented later, is usually unmasked during pharmacological or physical stress, and predisposes to the development of hepatorenal syndrome. The prolongation of QT is found in about 50 % of cirrhotic patients, but rarely leads to fatal arrhythmias. Cirrhotics with blunted cardiac function seem to have poorer survival rates compared to those without, and the risk is particularly increased during the insertion of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt or liver transplantation. Till now, there is no specific treatment for the management of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. New agents, targeting to its pathogenetical mechanisms, may play some role as future therapeutic options.

  8. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O; Orlikowski, D; Annane, D

    2008-07-21

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spinocerebellar degeneration. It is caused by a mutation that consists of an unstable expansion of GAA repeats in the first intron of the gene encoding frataxin on chromosome 9 (9q13). We reported a case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia in a twenty year old patient.

  9. Classification, Epidemiology, and Global Burden of Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    McKenna, William J; Maron, Barry J; Thiene, Gaetano

    2017-09-15

    In the past 25 years, major advances were achieved in the nosography of cardiomyopathies, influencing the definition and taxonomy of this important chapter of cardiovascular disease. Nearly, 50% of patients dying suddenly in childhood or adolescence or undergoing cardiac transplantation are affected by cardiomyopathies. Novel cardiomyopathies have been discovered (arrhythmogenic, restrictive, and noncompacted) and added to update the World Health Organization classification. Myocarditis has also been named inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Extraordinary progress accomplished in molecular genetics of inherited cardiomyopathies allowed establishment of dilated cardiomyopathy as mostly cytoskeleton, force transmission disease; hypertrophic-restrictive cardiomyopathies as sarcomeric, force generation disease; and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy as desmosome, cell junction disease. Channelopathies (short and long QT, Brugada, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia syndromes) should also be considered cardiomyopathies because of electric myocyte dysfunction. Cardiomyopathies are easily diagnosed but treated only with palliative pharmacological or invasive therapy. Curative therapy, thanks to insights into the molecular pathogenesis, has to target the fundamental mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of these conditions. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Living with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Subasic, Kim

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an insider's account of what it is like to live with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic cardiovascular illness that carries the risk for sudden cardiac death. This study aims to reveal how HCM impacts the family and guides the decision whether or not to pursue genetic testing, how the physical limitations associated with HCM alter being-in-the-world, and how HCM alters social relationships. Fifteen adults with HCM were recruited for a longitudinal, phenomenological, qualitative study through purposive sampling and word of mouth. A total of 45 interviews were conducted by the researcher at a time and place designated by the participant between August 2011 and January 2012. The first interview with each participant was conducted in person. While efforts were made to conduct all interviews in person, a total of three interviews were conducted by telephone as requested by three participants due to scheduling conflicts. Through methods of interpretive phenomenology, three audio-recorded, semistructured interviews occurred over the course of 3 months. Detailed narratives were solicited and transcribed verbatim. Methodological and analytical documentation was supported with the identification of key phrases, similar experiences, themes, and documentation of the rationale for decisions throughout the research process. Participation in genetic testing carries a multitude of personal, familial, financial, and emotional implications. The results of a genetic test elicited an emotional response regardless of whether the results were negative, positive, or inconclusive. Living with a potentially life-threatening illness altered identity, disrupted social relationships, and generated chronic fear and uncertainty. A new normal was re-ordered or transformed by the demands and limitations posed by HCM, and by the person's concerns, priorities, and the meaning of the illness. Results from this study underscore the need for healthcare

  11. Negative and positive association rules mining from text using frequent and infrequent itemsets.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Sajid; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Guergachi, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Association rule mining research typically focuses on positive association rules (PARs), generated from frequently occurring itemsets. However, in recent years, there has been a significant research focused on finding interesting infrequent itemsets leading to the discovery of negative association rules (NARs). The discovery of infrequent itemsets is far more difficult than their counterparts, that is, frequent itemsets. These problems include infrequent itemsets discovery and generation of accurate NARs, and their huge number as compared with positive association rules. In medical science, for example, one is interested in factors which can either adjudicate the presence of a disease or write-off of its possibility. The vivid positive symptoms are often obvious; however, negative symptoms are subtler and more difficult to recognize and diagnose. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for discovering positive and negative association rules among frequent and infrequent itemsets. We identify associations among medications, symptoms, and laboratory results using state-of-the-art data mining technology.

  12. Negative and Positive Association Rules Mining from Text Using Frequent and Infrequent Itemsets

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Sajid; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Guergachi, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Association rule mining research typically focuses on positive association rules (PARs), generated from frequently occurring itemsets. However, in recent years, there has been a significant research focused on finding interesting infrequent itemsets leading to the discovery of negative association rules (NARs). The discovery of infrequent itemsets is far more difficult than their counterparts, that is, frequent itemsets. These problems include infrequent itemsets discovery and generation of accurate NARs, and their huge number as compared with positive association rules. In medical science, for example, one is interested in factors which can either adjudicate the presence of a disease or write-off of its possibility. The vivid positive symptoms are often obvious; however, negative symptoms are subtler and more difficult to recognize and diagnose. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for discovering positive and negative association rules among frequent and infrequent itemsets. We identify associations among medications, symptoms, and laboratory results using state-of-the-art data mining technology. PMID:24955429

  13. Heart failure and tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ethan R; Josephson, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major health care concern affecting almost six million Americans and an estimated 23 million people worldwide, and its prevalence is increasing with time. Long-standing tachycardia is a well-recognized cause of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction and has led to the nomenclature, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy is generally a reversible cardiomyopathy with effective treatment of the causative arrhythmia, either with medications, surgery, or catheter ablation. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy remains poorly understood and is likely under-diagnosed. A better understanding of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy and improved recognition of its presence in clinical practice is vital to the health of patients with this disorder. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy, as well as approaches to its diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Role of cardiac MRI in nonischemic cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Anand, Senthil; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) with its higher spatial resolution is considered the gold standard for evaluating ventricular mass, volumes, and ejection fraction. CMR can be used for accurate diagnosis of several conditions, especially cardiomyopathies. The purpose of this article is to review the utility of CMR in the diagnosis and management of nonischemic cardiomyopathies. We have reviewed both common and rare types of nonischemic cardiomyopathies in detail and elaborated on the specific CMR findings in each. We believe that CMR is an invaluable tool, not only in differentiating nonischemic from ischemic cardiomyopathy, but also in aiding the accurate diagnosis and management of the subtype of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. CMR should routinely be integrated in the diagnostic workup of various cardiomyopathies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. 40 CFR 1042.525 - How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to adjust emission results from engines using aftertreatment technology with infrequent regeneration... engineering judgment. All adjustment factors for regeneration are additive. Determine adjustment factors... your engines use aftertreatment technology with extremely infrequent regeneration and you are unable to...

  16. 40 CFR 1042.525 - How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to adjust emission results from engines using aftertreatment technology with infrequent regeneration... engineering judgment. All adjustment factors for regeneration are additive. Determine adjustment factors... your engines use aftertreatment technology with extremely infrequent regeneration and you are unable to...

  17. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Anil C; Prapa, Matina; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Mabote, Thato; Nasir, Mansoor; Clark, Andrew L

    2016-10-01

    Heart failure in pregnancy is rare, but usually ascribed to peripartum cardiomyopathy in the absence of other possible diagnoses. However, heart failure can develop solely due to a tachycardia, so-called 'tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy'. The incidence of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in pregnancy is unknown, but it is a treatable and potentially reversible cause of heart failure. Clinically, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy during pregnancy might present in a similar manner, but its management has to be individualized according to the arrhythmic substrate and usually involve multidisciplinary input from specialists in obstetrics, cardiac electrophysiology and heart failure.

  18. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affected with the disease may present with acute metabolic decompensation during infancy or with severe cardiomyopathy in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and treatment with L-carnitine may be life-saving. In this review article, the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of PCD are discussed, with a focus on cardiac involvements. PMID:24385988

  19. Genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Toro, Rocio; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; de Gonzalo-Calvo, David; Cesar, Sergi; Carro, Esther; Llorente-Cortes, Vicenta; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon; Campuzano, Oscar

    2016-12-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a rare cardiac disease characterized by left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction leading to heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Currently, despite several conditions have been reported as aetiologies of the disease, a large number of cases remain classified as idiopathic. Recent studies determine that nearly 60% of cases are inherited, therefore due to a genetic cause. Progressive technological advances in genetic analysis have identified over 60 genes associated with this entity, being TTN the main gene, so far. All these genes encode a wide variety of myocyte proteins, mainly sarcomeric and desmosomal, but physiopathologic pathways are not yet completely unraveled. We review the recent published data about genetics of familial dilated cardiomyopathy.

  20. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Presenting as Bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Carl H.; Tweet, Marysia S.; Hayes, Sharonne N.; Best, Patricia J. M.; Blauwet, Lori A.

    2017-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a disease that typically affects young otherwise healthy women. As PPCM is associated with significant mortality, timely diagnosis is necessary to ensure appropriate care. To our knowledge, this represents the first reported case of PPCM presenting as symptomatic bradycardia. We describe the patient's clinical presentation and relevant findings and review the potential etiology and ramifications of bradycardia in patients with PPCM. PMID:28255481

  1. Research priorities in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, Jolanda; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Tardiff, Jil C.; Olivotto, Iacopo; Knollmann, Bjorn C.; Carrier, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    The clinical variability in patients with sarcomeric cardiomyopathies is striking: a mutation causes cardiomyopathy in one individual, while the identical mutation is harmless in a family member. Moreover, the clinical phenotype varies ranging from asymmetric hypertrophy to severe dilatation of the heart. Identification of a single phenotype-associated disease mechanism would facilitate the design of targeted treatments for patient groups with different clinical phenotypes. However, evidence from both the clinic and basic knowledge of functional and structural properties of the sarcomere argues against a ‘one size fits all’ therapy for treatment of one clinical phenotype. Meticulous clinical and basic studies are needed to unravel the initial and progressive changes initiated by sarcomere mutations to better understand why mutations in the same gene can lead to such opposing phenotypes. Ultimately, we need to design an ‘integrative physiology’ approach to fully realize patient/gene-tailored therapy. Expertise within different research fields (cardiology, genetics, cellular biology, physiology, and pharmacology) must be joined to link longitudinal clinical studies with mechanistic insights obtained from molecular and functional studies in novel cardiac muscle systems. New animal models, which reflect both initial and more advanced stages of sarcomeric cardiomyopathy, will also aid in achieving these goals. Here, we discuss current priorities in clinical and preclinical investigation aimed at increasing our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms leading from mutation to disease. Such information will provide the basis to improve risk stratification and to develop therapies to prevent/rescue cardiac dysfunction and remodelling caused by sarcomere mutations. PMID:25631582

  2. Determinants of Thyrotoxic Cardiomyopathy Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Oliveros-Ruiz, Lucia; Vallejo, Maite; Diez Canseco, L. Fernando; Cárdenas, Manuel; Hermosillo, J. Antonio G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the effect of the disease duration prior to treatment, thyroid hormones level, or both on the reversibility of dilated cardiomyopathy. Between January 2006 and December 2010, a longitudinal study with a 6 months follow-up was carried on. One hundred and seventy patients with hyperthyroidism were referred to the cardiologist, and 127 had a 6 months followup after antithyroid treatment and were evaluated by echocardiography. Dilated cardiomyopathy reversibility criteria were established according to echocardiographic parameters. Complete reversibility existed when all parameters were met, partial reversibility when LVEF was ≥55% plus two or three other parameters, and no reversibility when LVEF was ≤55% regardless of other parameters. The results showed that echocardiography parameters related to the regression of myocardial mass were associated with a disease duration shorter than 10.38 months. This was the main predictive variable for reversal of dilated cardiomyopathy, followed by β-blocker treatment, and the last predictive variable was the serum level of free triiodothyronine. This study showed that the effect on the myocardium related to thyrotoxicosis was associated with the disease duration before treatment. PMID:24106705

  3. Genetic Variations Leading to Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kae Won; Lee, Jongsung; Kim, Youngjo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a major cause of death worldwide. Based on pathohistological abnormalities and clinical manifestation, cardiomyopathies are categorized into several groups: hypertrophic, dilated, restricted, arrhythmogenic right ventricular, and unclassified. Dilated cardiomyopathy, which is characterized by dilation of the left ventricle and systolic dysfunction, is the most severe and prevalent form of cardiomyopathy and usually requires heart transplantation. Its etiology remains unclear. Recent genetic studies of single gene mutations have provided significant insights into the complex processes of cardiac dysfunction. To date, over 40 genes have been demonstrated to contribute to dilated cardiomyopathy. With advances in genetic screening techniques, novel genes associated with this disease are continuously being identified. The respective gene products can be classified into several functional groups such as sarcomere proteins, structural proteins, ion channels, and nuclear envelope proteins. Nuclear envelope proteins are emerging as potential molecular targets in dilated cardiomyopathy. Because they are not directly associated with contractile force generation and transmission, the molecular pathways through which these proteins cause cardiac muscle disorder remain unclear. However, nuclear envelope proteins are involved in many essential cellular processes. Therefore, integrating apparently distinct cellular processes is of great interest in elucidating the etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy. In this mini review, we summarize the genetic factors associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and discuss their cellular functions. PMID:27802374

  4. Recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a child.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nayan T; Parent, John J; Hurwitz, Roger A

    2016-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy or transient apical ballooning syndrome very rarely presents in children. In all patients with takotsubo, it is estimated that only 3.5% will have recurrence. In this study, we describe a case of recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a child, likely triggered by status epilepticus.

  5. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in a weimaraner

    PubMed Central

    Eason, Bryan D.; Leach, Stacey B.; Kuroki, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) was diagnosed postmortem in a weimaraner dog. Syncope, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death in this patient combined with the histopathological fatty tissue infiltration affecting the right ventricular myocardium are consistent with previous reports of ARVC in non-boxer dogs. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy has not been previously reported in weimaraners. PMID:26483577

  6. Genetic Variations Leading to Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kae Won; Lee, Jongsung; Kim, Youngjo

    2016-10-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a major cause of death worldwide. Based on pathohistological abnormalities and clinical manifestation, cardiomyopathies are categorized into several groups: hypertrophic, dilated, restricted, arrhythmogenic right ventricular, and unclassified. Dilated cardiomyopathy, which is characterized by dilation of the left ventricle and systolic dysfunction, is the most severe and prevalent form of cardiomyopathy and usually requires heart transplantation. Its etiology remains unclear. Recent genetic studies of single gene mutations have provided significant insights into the complex processes of cardiac dysfunction. To date, over 40 genes have been demonstrated to contribute to dilated cardiomyopathy. With advances in genetic screening techniques, novel genes associated with this disease are continuously being identified. The respective gene products can be classified into several functional groups such as sarcomere proteins, structural proteins, ion channels, and nuclear envelope proteins. Nuclear envelope proteins are emerging as potential molecular targets in dilated cardiomyopathy. Because they are not directly associated with contractile force generation and transmission, the molecular pathways through which these proteins cause cardiac muscle disorder remain unclear. However, nuclear envelope proteins are involved in many essential cellular processes. Therefore, integrating apparently distinct cellular processes is of great interest in elucidating the etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy. In this mini review, we summarize the genetic factors associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and discuss their cellular functions.

  7. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Associated with Severe Hypothyroidism in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Brenes-Salazar, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as stress cardiomyopathy, is a syndrome that affects predominantly postmenopausal women. Despite multiple described mechanisms, intense, neuroadrenergic myocardial stimulation appears to be the main trigger. Hyperthyroidism, but rarely hypothyroidism, has been described in association with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Herein, we present a case of stress cardiomyopathy in the setting of symptomatic hypothyroidism. PMID:27512537

  8. Herpes simplex virus-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Kuchynka, Petr; Palecek, Tomas; Hrbackova, Hana; Vitkova, Ivana; Simek, Stanislav; Nemecek, Eduard; Aster, Viktor; Louch, William E; Aschermann, Michael; Linhart, Ales

    2010-10-01

    Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) represents an acquired form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Viral infection is the most common cause of DCMi. In contrast with other cardiotropic viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a very rare finding in endomyocardial biopsies of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a case of HSV-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

  9. Nemaline myopathy with dilated cardiomyopathy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Gatayama, Ryohei; Ueno, Kentaro; Nakamura, Hideaki; Yanagi, Sadamitsu; Ueda, Hideaki; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Seiyo

    2013-06-01

    We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with nemaline myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. The combination of nemaline myopathy and cardiomyopathy is rare, and this is the first reported case of dilated cardiomyopathy associated with childhood-onset nemaline myopathy. A novel mutation, p.W358C, in ACTA1 was detected in this patient. An unusual feature of this case was that the patient's cardiac failure developed during early childhood with no delay of gross motor milestones. The use of a β-blocker did not improve his clinical course, and the patient died 6 months after diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Congenital nonprogressive nemaline myopathy is not necessarily a benign disorder: deterioration can occur early in the course of dilated cardiomyopathy with neuromuscular disease, and careful clinical evaluation is therefore necessary.

  10. Cardiomyopathy in Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    PubMed

    Facher, Jennifer J; Regier, Elizabeth J; Jacobs, Gretta H; Siwik, Ernest; Delaunoy, Jean-Pierre; Robin, Nathaniel H

    2004-07-15

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is a rare but well-documented X-linked disorder characterized by small size, developmental delay/mental retardation, and characteristic facial and skeletal findings in affected males. The phenotype in affected females is far more variable and can include developmental differences, obesity, and characteristic facial and skeletal differences. Cardiac anomalies are reported in less than 20% of affected males, with cardiomyopathy being one of the rare but reported complications of this disorder. However, cardiomyopathy is not well characterized in CLS. Here, we report on a 14-year-old boy with physical and developmental findings consistent with CLS who presented with a relatively sudden onset of signs of congestive heart failure due to a restrictive cardiomyopathy; an endomyocardial biopsy demonstrated non-specific hypertrophic myocyte alterations consistent with cardiomyopathy. This is the first description of the histology and electron microscopy of cardiomyopathy in CLS. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Imaging Phenotype vs. Genotype in Non-Hypertrophic Heritable Cardiomyopathies: Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Subha V.; Basso, Cristina; Tandri, Harikrishna; Taylor, Matthew R. G.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular imaging increasingly afford unique insights into heritable myocardial disease. As clinical presentation of genetic cardiomyopathies may range from nonspecific symptoms to sudden cardiac death, accurate diagnosis has implications for individual patients as well as related family members. The initial consideration of genetic cardiomyopathy may occur in the imaging laboratory, where one must recognize the patient with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) among the many with ventricular arrhythmia referred to define myocardial substrate. Accurate diagnosis of the patient presenting with dyspnea and palpitations whose first-degree relatives have lamin A/C cardiomyopathy may warrant genetic testing1, 2 plus imaging of diastolic function and myocardial fibrosis3. As advances in cardiac imaging afford detection of subclinical structural and functional changes, the imaging specialist must be attuned to signatures of specific genetic disorders. With increased availability of both advanced imaging as well as genotyping techniques, this review seeks to provide cardiovascular imaging specialists and clinicians with the contemporary information needed for more precise diagnosis and treatment of heritable myocardial disease. A companion paper in this series covers imaging phenotype and genotype considerations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This review details clinical features, imaging phenotype and current genetic understanding for two of the most common non-HCM conditions that prompt myocardial imaging - dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). While all modalities are considered herein, considerable focus is given to CMR with its unique capabilities for myocardial tissue characterization. PMID:21081743

  12. Research priorities in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Jolanda; Ho, Carolyn Y; Tardiff, Jil C; Olivotto, Iacopo; Knollmann, Bjorn C; Carrier, Lucie

    2015-04-01

    The clinical variability in patients with sarcomeric cardiomyopathies is striking: a mutation causes cardiomyopathy in one individual, while the identical mutation is harmless in a family member. Moreover, the clinical phenotype varies ranging from asymmetric hypertrophy to severe dilatation of the heart. Identification of a single phenotype-associated disease mechanism would facilitate the design of targeted treatments for patient groups with different clinical phenotypes. However, evidence from both the clinic and basic knowledge of functional and structural properties of the sarcomere argues against a 'one size fits all' therapy for treatment of one clinical phenotype. Meticulous clinical and basic studies are needed to unravel the initial and progressive changes initiated by sarcomere mutations to better understand why mutations in the same gene can lead to such opposing phenotypes. Ultimately, we need to design an 'integrative physiology' approach to fully realize patient/gene-tailored therapy. Expertise within different research fields (cardiology, genetics, cellular biology, physiology, and pharmacology) must be joined to link longitudinal clinical studies with mechanistic insights obtained from molecular and functional studies in novel cardiac muscle systems. New animal models, which reflect both initial and more advanced stages of sarcomeric cardiomyopathy, will also aid in achieving these goals. Here, we discuss current priorities in clinical and preclinical investigation aimed at increasing our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms leading from mutation to disease. Such information will provide the basis to improve risk stratification and to develop therapies to prevent/rescue cardiac dysfunction and remodelling caused by sarcomere mutations. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Cardiomyopathies and the Armed Forces.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, D A; Cox, A T; Boos, C; Hardman, R; Sharma, S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a group of heterogeneous myocardial diseases that are frequently inherited and are a recognised cause of premature sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Incomplete expressions of disease and the overlap with the physiological cardiac manifestations of regular intensive exercise create diagnostic challenges in young athletes and military recruits. Early identification is important because sudden death in the absence of prodromal symptoms is a common presentation, and there are several therapeutic strategies to minimise this risk. This paper examines the classification and clinical features of cardiomyopathies with specific reference to a military population and provides a detailed account of the optimum strategy for diagnosis, indications for specialist referral and specific guidance on the occupational significance of cardiomyopathy. A 27-year-old Lance Corporal Signaller presents to his Regimental medical officer (RMO) after feeling 'light-headed' following an 8 mile unloaded run. While waiting to see the RMO, the medical sergeant records a 12-lead ECG. The ECG is reviewed by the RMO immediately prior to the consultation and shows voltage criteria for left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and inverted T-waves in II, III, aVF and V1-V3 (Figure 1). This Lance Corporal is a unit physical training instructor and engages in >10 h of aerobic exercise per week. He is a non-smoker and does not have any significant medical history. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Scintigraphic characterization of amyloid cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.K.; Rabinovitch, M.A.; Juni, J.E.; Thrall, J.H.; Pitt, B.; Das, S.K.; Abrams, G.D.; Helvie, M.

    1985-03-01

    Amyloidosis is an important entity in the differential diagnosis of cardiac failure of undetermined etiology. In this case report, the typical pattern of combined systolic and diastolic impairment in amyloid cardiomyopathy was demonstrated by analysis of the cardiac blood pool study. In addition, the patient described had mild uptake of Ga-67 citrate, as well as the characteristically intense myocardial uptake of Tc-99m pyrophosphate. Scintigraphic assessment may be particularly helpful when the diagnosis of amyloidosis is being considered in a patient with unexplained cardiac failure.

  15. Improving outcomes in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, Jonathan R; Cannon, Jane A; Simpson, Joanne; Gardner, Roy S; Petrie, Mark C

    2015-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare condition with a diverse spectrum of potential outcomes, ranging from frequent complete recovery to fulminant heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of PPCM is not well understood, and relatively little is known about its incidence and prevalence. PPCM is often under-recognised in the clinical setting. Early investigation and diagnosis with subsequent expert management may improve outcomes. The development of registries will allow this condition to be better characterised and may help answer crucial questions regarding its optimal medical and surgical management. This paper reviews the potential approaches to improve outcomes in patients with PPCM.

  16. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: summary of an international survey on peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Veille, J C; Zaccaro, D

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this survey was to assess the evaluation, management, and future recommendations of patients with the diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy and to evaluate the interest in the creation of a prospective database regarding this rare disorder. A total of 116 surveys were sent to major teaching institutions in the United States (including Puerto Rico), Canada, Crete, and South Korea after a national conference held at the National Institutes of Health regarding peripartum cardiomyopathy. This was an open-ended survey containing 17 specific questions regarding this disorder and its management. A total of 78 (67%) maternal-fetal specialists responded to the survey. Diuretics and digoxin were used as first-line treatment for this disorder. Only 6% used angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors during pregnancy. Fifty-eight percent of the perinatologists (58%) recommended either intrauterine contraceptive devices or foam and condoms, whereas oral contraceptives (progesterone-only pill or estrogen-progesterone mix) were recommended in 23% and 41%, respectively. Sixty-six percent (66%) of the respondents would recommend future pregnancy if ventricular function returned to normal. Fundamental clinical and basic research is lacking regarding this rare but potentially devastating disorder. Major teaching institutions do not have significant numbers of patients with this disorder to provide concrete recommendations, and starting a database will be useful in the gathering of important epidemiologic information. A secondary aim of such a registry would be to establish a repository for tissue and blood samples to answer basic mechanistic questions about this disorder.

  17. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy--a case report].

    PubMed

    Banaczek, Zbigniew; Rak, Grzegorz; Gołyska-Rączkiewicz, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy, a type of dilated cardiomyopathy of unknown origin, occurs in previously healthy women in the final month of pregnancy and up to 5 months after delivery. Although the incidence is low--less than 0.1% of pregnancies--morbidity and mortality rates are high at 5% to 32%. The etiology of left ventricular dysfunction is unknown. Diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy requires heightened awareness among multidisciplinary patient care teams and a high degree of suspicion. Confirmation involves the echocardiography reveals severe left ventricular failure. The outcome of peripartum cardiomyopathy is also highly variable. For some women, the clinical and echocardiographic status improves and sometimes returns to normal, whereas for others, the disease progresses to severe cardiac failure and even sudden cardiac death. Management of peripartum cardiomyopathy should aim first at improving heart-failure symptoms through conventional therapies, and then at administering targeted therapies.The prognosis is best when peripartum cardiomyopathy is diagnosed and treated early. Fortunately, despite a high risk of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies, many patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy recover within 3 to 6 months of disease onset. Future pregnancy is not recommended especially in patients with persistent left ventricular dysfunction because of the risk of dangerous complications.

  18. CELF4 Variant and Anthracycline-Related Cardiomyopathy: A Children's Oncology Group Genome-Wide Association Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuexia; Sun, Can-Lan; Quiñones-Lombraña, Adolfo; Singh, Purnima; Landier, Wendy; Hageman, Lindsey; Mather, Molly; Rotter, Jerome I; Taylor, Kent D; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Armenian, Saro H; Winick, Naomi; Ginsberg, Jill P; Neglia, Joseph P; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Castellino, Sharon M; Dreyer, Zoann E; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Leslie L; Blanco, Javier G; Bhatia, Smita

    2016-03-10

    Interindividual variability in the dose-dependent association between anthracyclines and cardiomyopathy suggests that genetic susceptibility could play a role. The current study uses an agnostic approach to identify genetic variants that could modify cardiomyopathy risk. A genome-wide association study was conducted in childhood cancer survivors with and without cardiomyopathy (cases and controls, respectively). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that surpassed a prespecified threshold for statistical significance were independently replicated. The possible mechanistic significance of validated SNP(s) was sought by using healthy heart samples. No SNP was marginally associated with cardiomyopathy. However, SNP rs1786814 on the CELF4 gene passed the significance cutoff for gene-environment interaction (Pge = 1.14 × 10(-5)). Multivariable analyses adjusted for age at cancer diagnosis, sex, anthracycline dose, and chest radiation revealed that, among patients with the A allele, cardiomyopathy was infrequent and not dose related. However, among those exposed to greater than 300 mg/m(2) of anthracyclines, the rs1786814 GG genotype conferred a 10.2-fold (95% CI, 3.8- to 27.3-fold; P < .001) increased risk of cardiomyopathy compared with those who had GA/AA genotypes and anthracycline exposure of 300 mg/m(2) or less. This gene-environment interaction was successfully replicated in an independent set of anthracycline-related cardiomyopathy. CUG-BP and ETR-3-like factor proteins control developmentally regulated splicing of TNNT2, the gene that encodes for cardiac troponin T (cTnT), a biomarker of myocardial injury. Coexistence of more than one cTnT variant results in a temporally split myofilament response to calcium, which causes decreased contractility. Analysis of TNNT2 splicing variants in healthy human hearts suggested an association between the rs1786814 GG genotype and coexistence of more than one TNNT2 splicing variant (90.5% GG v 41.7% GA/AA; P = .005). We

  19. CELF4 Variant and Anthracycline-Related Cardiomyopathy: A Children’s Oncology Group Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuexia; Sun, Can-Lan; Quiñones-Lombraña, Adolfo; Singh, Purnima; Landier, Wendy; Hageman, Lindsey; Mather, Molly; Rotter, Jerome I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Armenian, Saro H.; Winick, Naomi; Ginsberg, Jill P.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Castellino, Sharon M.; Dreyer, Zoann E.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Robison, Leslie L.; Blanco, Javier G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Interindividual variability in the dose-dependent association between anthracyclines and cardiomyopathy suggests that genetic susceptibility could play a role. The current study uses an agnostic approach to identify genetic variants that could modify cardiomyopathy risk. Methods A genome-wide association study was conducted in childhood cancer survivors with and without cardiomyopathy (cases and controls, respectively). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that surpassed a prespecified threshold for statistical significance were independently replicated. The possible mechanistic significance of validated SNP(s) was sought by using healthy heart samples. Results No SNP was marginally associated with cardiomyopathy. However, SNP rs1786814 on the CELF4 gene passed the significance cutoff for gene-environment interaction (Pge = 1.14 × 10−5). Multivariable analyses adjusted for age at cancer diagnosis, sex, anthracycline dose, and chest radiation revealed that, among patients with the A allele, cardiomyopathy was infrequent and not dose related. However, among those exposed to greater than 300 mg/m2 of anthracyclines, the rs1786814 GG genotype conferred a 10.2-fold (95% CI, 3.8- to 27.3-fold; P < .001) increased risk of cardiomyopathy compared with those who had GA/AA genotypes and anthracycline exposure of 300 mg/m2 or less. This gene-environment interaction was successfully replicated in an independent set of anthracycline-related cardiomyopathy. CUG-BP and ETR-3-like factor proteins control developmentally regulated splicing of TNNT2, the gene that encodes for cardiac troponin T (cTnT), a biomarker of myocardial injury. Coexistence of more than one cTnT variant results in a temporally split myofilament response to calcium, which causes decreased contractility. Analysis of TNNT2 splicing variants in healthy human hearts suggested an association between the rs1786814 GG genotype and coexistence of more than one TNNT2 splicing variant (90.5% GG v 41.7% GA

  20. 40 CFR 1033.535 - Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices. 1033.535 Section 1033.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS...

  1. 40 CFR 1033.535 - Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices. 1033.535 Section 1033.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS...

  2. 40 CFR 1033.535 - Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices. 1033.535 Section 1033.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS...

  3. 40 CFR 1033.535 - Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices. 1033.535 Section 1033.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS...

  4. 40 CFR 1033.535 - Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices. 1033.535 Section 1033.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS...

  5. The Incremental Validity and Clinical Utility of the MMPI-2 Infrequency Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Margarita B.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The incremental validity and clinical utility of the recently developed Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Infrequency Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale (Fptsd) was examined in relation to the family of MMPI-2 F scales in distinguishing feigned post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from disability claimants with PTSD.…

  6. Evaluation of the CAARS Infrequency Index for the Detection of Noncredible ADHD Symptom Report in Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuermaier, Anselm B. M.; Tucha, Lara; Koerts, Janneke; Weisbrod, Matthias; Grabemann, Marco; Zimmermann, Marco; Mette, Christian; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The reliance on self-reports in detecting noncredible symptom report of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adulthood (aADHD) has been questioned due to findings showing that symptoms can easily be feigned on self-report scales. In response, Suhr and colleagues developed an infrequency index for the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CII)…

  7. Evaluation of the CAARS Infrequency Index for the Detection of Noncredible ADHD Symptom Report in Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuermaier, Anselm B. M.; Tucha, Lara; Koerts, Janneke; Weisbrod, Matthias; Grabemann, Marco; Zimmermann, Marco; Mette, Christian; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The reliance on self-reports in detecting noncredible symptom report of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adulthood (aADHD) has been questioned due to findings showing that symptoms can easily be feigned on self-report scales. In response, Suhr and colleagues developed an infrequency index for the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CII)…

  8. The Incremental Validity and Clinical Utility of the MMPI-2 Infrequency Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Margarita B.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The incremental validity and clinical utility of the recently developed Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Infrequency Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale (Fptsd) was examined in relation to the family of MMPI-2 F scales in distinguishing feigned post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from disability claimants with PTSD.…

  9. Stress cardiomyopathy in a patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and myocardial bridging

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Miguel; Vinardell, Juan M; Arenas, Ivan; Santana, Orlando

    2017-01-01

    Stress cardiomyopathy is an acquired cardiomyopathy of unknown aetiology. It usually occurs in women over the age of 70 who have experienced physical or emotional stress. It is most commonly characterised by a transient, left ventricular systolic dysfunction in the apical portion and hyperkinesia in the basal segments, without obstructive coronary artery disease. Its association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and myocardial bridging is rare. Herein, we present such a case. PMID:28228389

  10. Transformation of myocarditis and inflammatory cardiomyopathy to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Figulla, Hans R

    2004-05-01

    There is broad evidence that enteroviruses and adenoviruses can induce an acute inflammation of the myocardium without cardiac dysfunction (i.e. myocarditis) or with cardiac dysfunction (i.e. inflammatory cardiomyopathy) that can transform to a virus-negative dilated cardiomyopathy. In the adult patient neither other viruses (parvo-B 19 virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus) nor post-infection autoimmunity are likely to induce idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

  11. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Gillette, Thomas G.; Wang, Zhao V.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus are each increasing rapidly in our society. The majority of patients with diabetes succumb ultimately to heart disease, much of which stems from atherosclerotic disease and hypertension. However, cardiomyopathy can develop independent of elevated blood pressure or coronary artery disease, a process termed diabetic cardiomyopathy. This disorder is a complex diabetes-associated process characterized by significant changes in the physiology, structure, and mechanical function of the heart. Here, we review recently derived insights into mechanisms and molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21274425

  12. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy due to iatrogenic methadone withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Saiful, Faisal B; Lafferty, James; Jun, Chin Hee; Teli, Sumaya; Duvvuri, Srinivas; Khattri, Saakshi; Bhat, Tariq

    2011-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a syndrome characterized by transient apical ballooning or reversible midventricular systolic dysfunction. Most cases occur in postmenopausal women and are typically triggered by an acute medical illness or emotional or physical stress. Its presentation is highly suggestive of myocardial ischemia, but there is little or no evidence of epicardial coronary artery disease. To our knowledge there are only three reported cases in the literature of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by opioid agonist withdrawal in adults; ours is the first reported case of iatrogenic methadone withdrawal leading to Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  13. Evolutionary change mimicking apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hui-Jeong; Lee, Hyae-Min; Yang, In-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hee; Byun, Jong-Kyu; Sohn, Il Suk

    2014-11-01

    In this report, we introduce a case of thickening of the involved left ventricular apical segment on echocardiography and deep T-wave inversions in precordial leads on electrocardiography transiently seen in the course of recovery from biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy, mimicking apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This result suggests that the echocardiographic finding of transient myocardial edema can be identified by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Additionally, it persisted a few weeks after full functional recovery. We believe that this case will contribute in part toward clarifying the pathophysiology of takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  14. Importance of genetic evaluation and testing in pediatric cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Muhammad; Ware, Stephanie M

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are clinically heterogeneous heart muscle disorders that are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Phenotypes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. There is substantial evidence for a genetic contribution to pediatric cardiomyopathy. To date, more than 100 genes have been implicated in cardiomyopathy, but comprehensive genetic diagnosis has been problematic because of the large number of genes, the private nature of mutations, and difficulties in interpreting novel rare variants. This review will focus on current knowledge on the genetic etiologies of pediatric cardiomyopathy and their diagnostic relevance in clinical settings. Recent developments in sequencing technologies are greatly impacting the pace of gene discovery and clinical diagnosis. Understanding the genetic basis for pediatric cardiomyopathy and establishing genotype-phenotype correlations may help delineate the molecular and cellular events necessary to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for heart muscle dysfunction in children. PMID:25429328

  15. Evolving Approaches to Genetic Evaluation of Specific Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Teo, Loon Yee Louis; Moran, Rocio T; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of the genetic basis of cardiomyopathy has expanded significantly over the past 2 decades. The increasing availability, shortening diagnostic time, and lowering costs of genetic testing have provided researchers and physicians with the opportunity to identify the underlying genetic determinants for thousands of genetic disorders, including inherited cardiomyopathies, in effort to improve patient morbidities and mortality. As such, genetic testing has advanced from basic scientific research to clinical application and has been incorporated as part of patient evaluations for suspected inherited cardiomyopathies. Genetic evaluation framework of inherited cardiomyopathies typically encompasses careful evaluation of family history, genetic counseling, clinical screening of family members, and if appropriate, molecular genetic testing. This review summarizes the genetics, current guideline recommendations, and evidence supporting the genetic evaluation framework of five hereditary forms of cardiomyopathy: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC).

  16. Importance of genetic evaluation and testing in pediatric cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad; Ware, Stephanie M

    2014-11-26

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are clinically heterogeneous heart muscle disorders that are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Phenotypes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. There is substantial evidence for a genetic contribution to pediatric cardiomyopathy. To date, more than 100 genes have been implicated in cardiomyopathy, but comprehensive genetic diagnosis has been problematic because of the large number of genes, the private nature of mutations, and difficulties in interpreting novel rare variants. This review will focus on current knowledge on the genetic etiologies of pediatric cardiomyopathy and their diagnostic relevance in clinical settings. Recent developments in sequencing technologies are greatly impacting the pace of gene discovery and clinical diagnosis. Understanding the genetic basis for pediatric cardiomyopathy and establishing genotype-phenotype correlations may help delineate the molecular and cellular events necessary to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for heart muscle dysfunction in children.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cardiomyopathy is a heart condition characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle . Thickening usually occurs ... also lead to symptoms of the condition. Cardiac hypertrophy often begins in adolescence or young adulthood, although ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis and Management Resources (4 links) Brigham and Women's Hospital Cleveland Clinic: How Are Arrhythmias Treated? GeneReview: Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center General ...

  19. Who Is at Risk for Cardiomyopathy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Cardiomyopathy? People of all ages and races ... dysplasia, although it's rare in both groups. Major Risk Factors Certain diseases, conditions, or factors can raise ...

  20. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Clinical recognition and management

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Cate, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the titles are: Hemodynamics and angiography; Familial and genetic aspects; Recognition and management in children; Morphologic and microscopic aspects of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; Clinical recognition; and Management with beta-adrenergic blocking drugs.

  1. [Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a cardiology department].

    PubMed

    Cesário, Vera; Loureiro, Maria José; Pereira, Hélder

    2012-09-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, stress-induced cardiomyopathy and broken heart syndrome, is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. It was first described in 1990 in Japan, and gained worldwide recognition following the publication of several series of case reports. Its prevalence is estimated to be 1.7-2.2% of suspected acute coronary syndromes. Although takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been progressively better characterized, certain aspects remain to be clarified, and it is still under study. In this article, we report a series of ten cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy admitted to a cardiology department, and compare the clinical, laboratory, electrocardiographic and imaging characteristics, therapeutic regimens and follow-up of these patients with those described in the latest scientific reviews.

  2. Echocardiographic differences between preeclampsia and peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A T; Castro, J M

    2014-08-01

    Peripartum heart failure due to preeclampsia or peripartum cardiomyopathy represents a significant global health issue. Transthoracic echocardiography enables differentiation of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, commonly observed in women with preeclampsia, from that with peripartum cardiomyopathy in which a reduced ejection fraction is more common. An understanding of the different definitions and diagnostic features of these two diseases, as well as accurate characterisation of the haemodynamics in preeclampsia and peripartum cardiomyopathy, allows clinicians to manage these conditions appropriately. This article outlines the echocardiographic differences between preeclampsia and peripartum cardiomyopathy, the likely mechanisms for heart failure in preeclampsia and the relevance of these differences to clinicians in relation to prevention and treatment. It also emphasises the importance of disease definitions as a key framework for the more consistent classification of the two diseases.

  3. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T; Hauptman, Paul J; Stolker, Joshua M

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  4. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T.; Hauptman, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  5. Mechanical aberrations in hypetrophic cardiomyopathy: emerging concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, Dimitrios; Tzimagiorgis, Georgios; Efthimiadis, Georgios K.; Karvounis, Haralambos

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common monogenic disorder in cardiology. Despite important advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, it is not clear how flaws in individual sarcomere components are responsible for the observed phenotype. The aim of this article is to provide a brief interpretative analysis of some currently proposed pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with a special emphasis on alterations in the cardiac mechanical properties. PMID:26347658

  6. Pregnancy in inherited and acquired cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Herrey, Anna S

    2014-05-01

    Cardiomyopathy encompasses a wide spectrum of heart muscle disease, which can have an impact on the patient's ability to sustain the increased cardiac workload of pregnancy. Pregnancy can also unmask previously unknown cardiomyopathy. The outcome for both mother and baby is often related to the patient's functional class prior to pregnancy, and a multidisciplinary approach to managing this challenging group of patients is pivotal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A New Perspective in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Marmoush, Fady Y.; Barbour, Mohamad F.; Noonan, Thomas E.; Al-Qadi, Mazen O.

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is an entity of reversible cardiomyopathy known for its association with physical or emotional stress and may mimic myocardial infarction. We report an exceedingly rare case of albuterol-induced TCM with moderate asthma exacerbation. An interesting association that may help in understanding the etiology of TCM in the asthmatic population. Although the prognosis of TCM is excellent, it is crucial to recognize beta agonists as a potential stressor. PMID:26246918

  8. [The origin of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Moiseev, V S

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the clinical cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMP). The development of obstructive CMP in a patient with hyperparathyroidism indicates a possible pathogenetic role of endocrine factors and calcium metabolism abnormalities. The familial character of the disease and its combination with hereditary diseases (familial microspherocytosis) point to the significance of genetic factors. In addition, marked hypertrophy of the myocardium (without dilatation) including hypertrophy with obstruction of the outflow tract of the left ventricle was observed in nonspecific protracted myocarditis, alcoholic injury to the heart, in athletes, in coronary heart disease (after survival of myocardial infarction). It is suggested that hypertrophic CMP (similarly to restrictive and congestive CMP) is most likely a syndrome of varying origin.

  9. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the early years.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2009-12-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) has four major features: (1) severe left ventricular hypertrophy, often most prominent in the basal interventricular septum; (2) frequent familial occurrence with autosomal dominant transmission; (3) occurrence of sudden cardiac death that is usually considered to be due to ventricular fibrillation; and (4) presence of hemodynamic evidence of labile intraventricular obstruction. The key papers describing the recognition of each of these features, as well as of various combinations of them, are reviewed in this paper. Particular attention is focused on the very frequent finding of marked lability of intraventricular obstruction. The recognition of this fourth and last major feature in 1959 makes 2009 the golden anniversary year marking completion of the description of the major features of HOCM.

  10. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Occurring in the Postoperative Period.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Süleyman; Bakal, Ömer; İnangil, Gökhan; Şen, Hüseyin; Özkan, Sezai

    2015-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy simulates acute myocardial infarction, and it is characterised by reversible left ventricular failure. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy diagnosed after emergency angiography performed in a patient with evidence of acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period will be described in this report. Transurethral resection of a bladder tumour (TUR-BT) was performed in a 92-year-old male patient by the urology clinic. The patient was transferred to the post-anaesthesia care unit after the operation. An echocardiography was performed because of the sudden onset of dyspnoea, tachycardia (140-150 beats per minute, rhythm-atrial fibrillation) and ST-segment elevation on electrocardiography (ECG) at the first postoperative hour, and midapical dyskinesia was detected at the patient. An immediate angiography was performed due to suspicion of acute coronary syndrome. Patent coronary arteries and temporary aneurysmatic dilatation of the apex of the heart were revealed by angiography. As a result of these findings, the patient was diagnosed with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy by the cardiology service. The patient was discharged uneventfully following 10 days in the intensive care unit. Aneurysm of the apex of the left ventricle and normal anatomy of the coronary arteries in the angiography have diagnostic value for Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Diuretics (furosemide) and beta-blockers (metoprolol) are commonly used for the treatment of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Even though Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare and benign disease, it should be kept in mind in patients suspected for acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period.

  11. Familial cardiomyopathy in Norwegian Forest cats.

    PubMed

    März, Imke; Wilkie, Lois J; Harrington, Norelene; Payne, Jessie R; Muzzi, Ruthnea A L; Häggström, Jens; Smith, Ken; Luis Fuentes, Virginia

    2015-08-01

    Norwegian Forest cats (NFCs) are often listed as a breed predisposed to cardiomyopathy, but the characteristics of cardiomyopathy in this breed have not been described. The aim of this preliminary study was to report the features of NFC cardiomyopathy based on prospective echocardiographic screening of affected family groups; necropsy findings; and open-source breed screening databases. Prospective examination of 53 NFCs revealed no murmur or left ventricular (LV) outflow tract obstruction in any screened cat, though mild LV hypertrophy (defined as diastolic LV wall thickness ≥5.5mm) was present in 13/53 cats (25%). Gross pathology results and histopathological sections were analysed in eight NFCs, six of which had died of a cardiac cause. Myocyte hypertrophy, myofibre disarray and interstitial fibrosis typical of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were present in 7/8 cats, but endomyocardial fibrosis suggestive of restrictive cardiomyopathy was also present in the same cats. Pedigree data analysis from 871 NFCs was supportive of a familial cardiomyopathy in this breed.

  12. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy: A multiple entity].

    PubMed

    Vanzetto, Gérald; Martin, Alix; Bouvaist, Hélène; Marlière, Stéphanie; Durand, Michel; Chavanon, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCMP) is a dilated and hypokinetic cardiomyopathy occurring during pregnancy or after delivery, with an estimated incidence between 1/1000 and 1/4000 births. It has been defined as a new onset of heart failure in the month preceding or following delivery, without demonstrated aetiology nor previously known heart disease, and with echocardiographic evidences of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (LV ejection fraction<0.45). It's a multifactorial disease, immunologic, hormonal, and possibly viral mechanisms playing a determinant pathophysiological role. The classical clinical presentation is a rapid and unexpected onset of heart failure in a previously healthy woman, echocardiography being the key examination for positive and differential diagnosis, prognostication, therapeutic decision-making, and follow-up. The potential severity of PPCMP, and its unpredictable evolution in the first days following diagnosis, require that patients be referred to a tertiary care centre with a high skill in intensive cardiology care. Therapeutic management of PPCMP does not offer any specificity when compared to other causes of acute or chronic heart failure (from diuretics to extracorporeal life support), except for ACE-inhibitors, that are contraindicated before delivery. The high incidence of thrombo-embolic complications observed in the disease requires however rapid and curative anticoagulation, and immuno-suppressive treatment has been proposed in fulminant and highly inflammatory presentation, but its efficacy remains controversial. Very recently, promising results have been reported with bromocriptin-a prolactin secretion inhibitor-for reducing 6-month morbidity and mortality, but these findings have to be confirmed in larger scale randomised trials. As for the long-term evolution, approximately half of the patients will heal, while half of the women will keep some degree of LV dysfunction, 25% of them developing moderate to severe chronic heart

  13. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... In most cases of ischemia, this temporary blood shortage to the heart causes pain in the chest ( ... doctor. Also, because drinking too much alcohol, eating foods without the proper vitamins, and exposure to toxins ...

  14. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the myocardium and endocardium. In Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... failure: management and diagnosis. In Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  15. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to grow in the heart and other organs (sarcoidosis) A disorder that causes the buildup of abnormal ... to grow in the heart and other organs (sarcoidosis), connective tissue disorders, or a disorder that causes ...

  16. Vesicoureteral reflux in the child with lazy bladder syndrome: the infrequent voider.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Marco; Torelli, Fabrizio; Blanco, Salvatore; Fortuna, Flavio; Baruffi, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The Infrequent Voider Syndrome or Lazy Bladder Syndrome in children is characterized by a large capacity bladder, frequently associated with a significant volume of residual urine. Usually these patients arrive at medical examination with a history of recurrent urinary infections but without anomalies in the upper urinary tract. We report about a young girl affected by one-sided 2 degrees degree vesico-ureteral reflux due to Lazy Bladder Syndrome that had never been diagnosed before. This patient has been submitted to a prompt bladder training and seems presently to have at last gained a physiological micturition after 9 months of follow-up, without actual evidence of vesicoureteral reflux. Therefore we must stress that it is prominently important considering about infrequent micturition in a paediatric case history or a large capacity bladder, possible presence of bladder dysfunction and vesicoureteral reflux too.

  17. Vesicoureteral Reflux in the Child with Lazy Bladder Syndrome: The Infrequent Voider

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Marco; Torelli, Fabrizio; Blanco, Salvatore; Fortuna, Flavio; Baruffi, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The Infrequent Voider Syndrome or Lazy Bladder Syndrome in children is characterized by a large capacity bladder, frequently associated with a significant volume of residual urine. Usually these patients arrive at medical examination with a history of recurrent urinary infections but without anomalies in the upper urinary tract. We report about a young girl affected by one-sided 2° degree vesico-ureteral reflux due to Lazy Bladder Syndrome that had never been diagnosed before. This patient has been submitted to a prompt bladder training and seems presently to have at last gained a physiological micturition after 9 months of follow-up, without actual evidence of vesicoureteral reflux. Therefore we must stress that it is prominently important considering about infrequent micturition in a paediatric case history or a large capacity bladder, possible presence of bladder dysfunction and vesicoureteral reflux too. PMID:18615185

  18. Lazy bladder syndrome (the infrequent voider) causing a vesicoureteral reflux in the child.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Marco; Torelli, Fabrizio; Blanco, Salvatore; Fortuna, Flavio; Baruffi, Marco

    2007-03-01

    The Infrequent Voider Syndrome or Lazy Bladder Syndrome in children is characterized by a large capacity bladder, frequently associated with a significant volume of residual urine. Usually these patients arrive at medical examination with a history of recurrent urinary infections but without anomalies in the upper urinary tract. We report about a young girl affected by one-sided 20 degree vesico-ureteral reflux due to Lazy Bladder Syndrome that had never been diagnosed before. This patient has been submitted to a prompt bladder training and seems presently to have at last gained a physiological micturition after 9 months of follow-up,without actual evidence of vesico-ureteral reflux. Therefore we must stress that it is prominently important considering every notice about infrequent micturition in a paediatric case history or a large capacity bladder, noticed by chance too. These reports may be fundamental for early diagnosis of Lazy Bladder Syndrome.

  19. 40 CFR 1039.525 - How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adjust emission results from engines using aftertreatment technology with infrequent regeneration events... an engine family, as described in § 1039.235(d), consistent with good engineering judgment. All... regard to regeneration. (2) If your engines use aftertreatment technology with extremely infrequent...

  20. Cardiomyopathy in a dish: using human inducible pluripotent stem cells to model inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Forum; Klaassen Kamdar, Andre; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Mary G; Garry, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathies, arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and other inherited forms of heart failure, represent a unique set of genetically defined cardiovascular disease processes. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms of these deadly forms of human heart disease has been challenging, but recent groundbreaking scientific advances in stem cell technology have allowed for the generation of patient-specific human inducible stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs). hiPSC-derived CMs retain the genetic blueprint of the patient, they can be maintained in culture, and they recapitulate the phenotypic characteristics of the disease in vitro, thus serving as a disease in a dish. This review provides an overview of in vitro modeling of inherited cardiomyopathies with the use of patient-specific hiPSC-derived CMs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Cardiomyopathy in a dish: Using human inducible pluripotent stem cells to model inherited cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Forum; Kamdar, Andre Klaassen; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Mary G.; Garry, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM), arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and other inherited forms of heart failure represent a unique set of genetically defined cardiovascular disease processes. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms of these deadly forms of human heart disease has been challenging, however recent groundbreaking scientific advances in stem cell technology has allowed for the generation of patient-specific human inducible stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-derived CMs). hiPSC-derived CMs retain the genetic blueprint of the patient, they can be maintained in culture, and they recapitulate the phenotypic characteristics of the disease in vitro, thus serving as a disease in a dish. This review provides an overview of in vitro modeling of inherited cardiomyopathies using patient-specific hiPSC-derived CMs. PMID:25934595

  2. [Hereditary cardiomyopathies: a review. Mutation of structural proteins a common cause of hereditary cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Gunnar; Kostareva, Anna; Sejersen, Thomas

    Cardiomyopathy is a disorder of the cardiac muscle and can be either primary or secondary. The primary disorders have been classified by WHO into 4 groups based on structure and function; hypertrophic, dilated and restricted cardiomyopathies and arrythmogenic right ventricle dysplasia. During the last decade the familial nature of many of these cardiomyopathies has been elucidated and different genes have been found to be mutated and causative of disease. Certain patterns can be distinguished in the mutated genes, e.g. in general the genes causing hypertrophic cardiomyopathies code for proteins involved in the contractile apparatus, the sarcomere, and the genes causing dilated cardiomyopathy code for proteins that anchor the sarcomere to the cell membrane and extracellular matrix. This article reviews these recent genetic findings and discusses their potential clinical applicability.

  3. Salience in a social landscape: electrophysiological effects of task-irrelevant and infrequent vocal change

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Carla; Pedrosa, João

    2016-01-01

    In a dynamically changing social environment, humans have to face the challenge of prioritizing stimuli that compete for attention. In the context of social communication, the voice is the most important sound category. However, the existing studies do not directly address whether and how the salience of an unexpected vocal change in an auditory sequence influences the orientation of attention. In this study, frequent tones were interspersed with task-relevant infrequent tones and task-irrelevant infrequent vocal sounds (neutral, happy and angry vocalizations). Eighteen healthy college students were asked to count infrequent tones. A combined event-related potential (ERP) and EEG time–frequency approach was used, with the focus on the P3 component and on the early auditory evoked gamma band response, respectively. A spatial-temporal principal component analysis was used to disentangle potentially overlapping ERP components. Although no condition differences were observed in the 210–310 ms window, larger positive responses were observed for emotional than neutral vocalizations in the 310–410 ms window. Furthermore, the phase synchronization of the early auditory evoked gamma oscillation was enhanced for happy vocalizations. These findings support the idea that the brain prioritizes the processing of emotional stimuli, by devoting more attentional resources to salient social signals even when they are not task-relevant. PMID:26468268

  4. Incremental and infrequent hemodialysis: a new paradigm for both dialysis initiation and conservative management.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Connie M; Ghahremani-Ghajar, Mehrdad; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2017-06-01

    Registry or national dialysis data show that a sizeable proportion of contemporary dialysis patients have substantial levels of residual kidney function especially upon transitioning to dialysis therapy. However, among incident hemodialysis patients, the prevailing paradigm has been to initiate "full-dose" triweekly treatment schedules irrespective of native kidney function in most developed countries. Recognizing the benefits of residual kidney function upon the health and survival of dialysis patients, there has been growing interest in incremental hemodialysis, in which dialysis frequency and dose are tailored according to the degree of patients' residual kidney function. Infrequent hemodialysis can also be used for those who prefer a more conservative approach in managing uremia. Clinical practice guidelines support the use of twice-weekly hemodialysis among patients with adequate residual kidney function (renal urea clearance >3 mL/min/1.73 m2), and a growing body of evidence indicates that incremental hemodialysis is associated with better preservation of residual kidney function without adversely impacting survival. Nonetheless, incremental hemodialysis remains an underutilized approach in this population. In this review, we will discuss the history of the twice- versus triweekly hemodialysis schedules; current clinical practice guidelines regarding infrequent hemodialysis; emerging data on incremental treatment regimens and outcomes; and guidelines for the practical implementation of incremental and infrequent hemodialysis in the clinical setting.

  5. Salience in a social landscape: electrophysiological effects of task-irrelevant and infrequent vocal change.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana P; Barros, Carla; Pedrosa, João

    2016-01-01

    In a dynamically changing social environment, humans have to face the challenge of prioritizing stimuli that compete for attention. In the context of social communication, the voice is the most important sound category. However, the existing studies do not directly address whether and how the salience of an unexpected vocal change in an auditory sequence influences the orientation of attention. In this study, frequent tones were interspersed with task-relevant infrequent tones and task-irrelevant infrequent vocal sounds (neutral, happy and angry vocalizations). Eighteen healthy college students were asked to count infrequent tones. A combined event-related potential (ERP) and EEG time-frequency approach was used, with the focus on the P3 component and on the early auditory evoked gamma band response, respectively. A spatial-temporal principal component analysis was used to disentangle potentially overlapping ERP components. Although no condition differences were observed in the 210-310 ms window, larger positive responses were observed for emotional than neutral vocalizations in the 310-410 ms window. Furthermore, the phase synchronization of the early auditory evoked gamma oscillation was enhanced for happy vocalizations. These findings support the idea that the brain prioritizes the processing of emotional stimuli, by devoting more attentional resources to salient social signals even when they are not task-relevant. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Arterial microembolisation: an unusual presentation of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, R L; Mullen, G M; Costanzo-Nordin, M R

    1990-01-01

    Systemic embolisation is common in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Microembolisation as a presenting sign of dilated cardiomyopathy, however, has not been reported before. A 37 year old woman in whom dilated cardiomyopathy presented as arterial microembolisation to the toes is described. Images PMID:2310647

  7. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  8. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  9. Catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmia in nonischemic cardiomyopathy: anteroseptal versus inferolateral scar sub-types.

    PubMed

    Oloriz, Teresa; Silberbauer, John; Maccabelli, Giuseppe; Mizuno, Hiroya; Baratto, Francesca; Kirubakaran, Senthil; Vergara, Pasquale; Bisceglia, Caterina; Santagostino, Giulia; Marzi, Alessandra; Sora, Nicoleta; Roque, Carla; Guarracini, Fabrizio; Tsiachris, Dimitris; Radinovic, Andrea; Cireddu, Manuela; Sala, Simone; Gulletta, Simone; Paglino, Gabriele; Mazzone, Patrizio; Trevisi, Nicola; Della Bella, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    The aim was to relate distinct scar distributions found in nonischemic cardiomyopathy with ventricular tachycardia (VT) morphology, late potential distribution, ablation strategy, and outcome. Eighty-seven patients underwent catheter ablation for drug-refractory VT. Based on endocardial unipolar voltage, 44 were classified as predominantly anteroseptal and 43 as inferolateral. Anteroseptal patients more frequently fulfilled diagnostic criteria for dilated cardiomyopathy (64% versus 36%), associated with more extensive endocardial unipolar scar (41 [22-83] versus 9 [1-29] cm(2); P<0.001). Left inferior VT axis was predictive of anteroseptal scar (positive predictive value, 100%) and right superior axis for inferolateral (positive predictive value, 89%). Late potentials were infrequent in the anteroseptal group (11% versus 74%; P<0.001). Epicardial late potentials were common in the inferolateral group (81% versus 4%; P<0.001) and correlated with VT termination sites (κ=0.667; P=0.014), whereas no anteroseptal patient had an epicardial VT termination (P<0.001). VT recurred in 44 patients (51%) during a median follow-up of 1.5 years. Anteroseptal scar was associated with higher VT recurrence (74% versus 25%; log-rank P<0.001) and redo procedure rates (59% versus 7%; log-rank P<0.001). After multivariable analysis, clinical predictors of VT recurrence were electrical storm (hazard ratio, 3.211; P=0.001) and New York Heart Association class (hazard ratio, 1.608; P=0.018); the only procedural predictor of VT recurrence was anteroseptal scar pattern (hazard ratio, 5.547; P<0.001). Unipolar low-voltage distribution in nonischemic cardiomyopathy allows categorization of scar pattern as inferolateral, often requiring epicardial ablation mainly based on late potentials, and anteroseptal, which frequently involves an intramural septal substrate, leading to a higher VT recurrence. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Cardiomyopathy in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Garner, M M

    2000-09-01

    From 1994 to 1999, 16 captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), from among 42 necropsy cases, were diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. The incidence of cardiomyopathy in this study population was 38%. Fourteen of 16 hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy were males and all hedgehogs were adult (>1 year old). Nine hedgehogs exhibited 1 or more of the following clinical signs before death: heart murmur, lethargy, icterus, moist rales, anorexia, dyspnea, dehydration, and weight loss. The remaining 7 hedgehogs died without premonitory clinical signs. Gross findings were cardiomegaly (6 cases), hepatomegaly (5 cases), pulmonary edema (5 cases), pulmonary congestion (4 cases), hydrothorax (3 cases), pulmonary infarct (1 case), renal infarcts (1 case), ascites (1 case), and 5 cases showed no changes. Histologic lesions were found mainly within the left ventricular myocardium and consisted primarily of myodegeneration, myonecrosis, atrophy, hypertrophy, and disarray of myofibers. All hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy had myocardial fibrosis, myocardial edema, or both. Other common histopathologic findings were acute and chronic passive congestion of the lungs, acute passive congestion of the liver, renal tubular necrosis, vascular thrombosis, splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, and hepatic lipidosis. This is the first report of cardiomyopathy in African hedgehogs.

  11. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies.

  12. CURRENT MANAGEMENT OF PERIPARTUM CARDIOMYOPATHY: A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Dodiyi-Manuel, S T; Ezennaka, R C

    2015-01-01

    Demarkis et al in 1971 described 27 patients who presented during pueperium with cardiomegaly, abnormal electrocardiographic findings, congestive heart failure and named the syndrome "peripartum cardiomyopathy". The aim of this review is to document the current concepts in the management of peripartum cardiomyopathy. A search of the literature was done using PubMed, Goggle scholar and books from authors' collections. The cause of the disease might be environmental and genetic factors. Diagnostic echocardiographic criteria include left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 45% or a combination of M-mode fractional shortening of less than 30% and end diastolic dimension of greater than 2.7 cm/m². Electrocardiogram, magnetic resonance imaging, endomyocardial biopsy and cardiac catheterization aid in the diagnosis and management of peripartum cardiomyopathy. Treatment includes both conventional pharcomological heart failure and peripartum cardiomyopathy targeted therapies.Therapeutic decisions are influenced by drug safety profiles during pregnancy and lactation. Mechanical support and transplantation might be necessary in severe cases. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is an uncommon but life threatening cardiac failure of unknown aetiology encountered in late pregnancy or postpartum period. Management aims at improving heart failure symptoms through conventional therapies and then at administering targeted therapies.The risk of recurrence in future pregnancies should always be considered.

  13. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Sowers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated hyperinsulinaemia can promote the development of a specific form of cardiomyopathy that is independent of coronary artery disease and hypertension. Termed diabetic cardiomyopathy, this form of cardiomyopathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed nations, and the prevalence of this condition is rising in parallel with increases in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Of note, female patients seem to be particularly susceptible to the development of this complication of metabolic disease. The diabetic cardiomyopathy observed in insulin-resistant or hyperinsulinaemic states is characterized by impaired myocardial insulin signalling, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, impaired calcium homeostasis, abnormal coronary microcirculation, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and maladaptive immune responses. These pathophysiological changes result in oxidative stress, fibrosis, hypertrophy, cardiac diastolic dysfunction and eventually systolic heart failure. This Review highlights a surge in diabetic cardiomyopathy research, summarizes current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning this condition and explores potential preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26678809

  14. Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy in Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gerçek, Mustafa; Gerçek, Muhammed; Kant, Sebastian; Simsekyilmaz, Sakine; Kassner, Astrid; Milting, Hendrik; Liehn, Elisa A; Leube, Rudolf E; Krusche, Claudia A

    2017-04-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a hereditary disease leading to sudden cardiac death or heart failure. AC pathology is characterized by cardiomyocyte loss and replacement fibrosis. Our goal was to determine whether cardiomyocytes respond to AC progression by pathological hypertrophy. To this end, we examined tissue samples from AC patients with end-stage heart failure and tissue samples that were collected at different disease stages from desmoglein 2-mutant mice, a well characterized AC model. We find that cardiomyocyte diameters are significantly increased in right ventricles of AC patients. Increased mRNA expression of the cardiac stress marker natriuretic peptide B is also observed in the right ventricle of AC patients. Elevated myosin heavy chain 7 mRNA expression is detected in left ventricles. In desmoglein 2-mutant mice, cardiomyocyte diameters are normal during the concealed disease phase but increase significantly after acute disease onset on cardiomyocyte death and fibrotic myocardial remodeling. Hypertrophy progresses further during the chronic disease stage. In parallel, mRNA expression of myosin heavy chain 7 and natriuretic peptide B is up-regulated in both ventricles with right ventricular preference. Calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (Nfat) signaling, which is linked to pathological hypertrophy, is observed during AC progression, as evidenced by Nfatc2 and Nfatc3 mRNA in cardiomyocytes and increased mRNA of the Nfat target regulator of calcineurin 1. Taken together, we demonstrate that pathological hypertrophy occurs in AC and is secondary to cardiomyocyte loss and cardiac remodeling.

  15. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cardiac function is energetically demanding, reliant on efficient well-coupled mitochondria to generate adenosine triphosphate and fulfill the cardiac demand. Predictably then, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with cardiac pathologies, often related to metabolic disease, most commonly diabetes. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by decreased left ventricular function, arises independently of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. Dysregulation of Ca2+ handling, metabolic changes, and oxidative stress are observed in DCM, abnormalities reflected in alterations in mitochondrial energetics. Cardiac tissue from DCM patients also presents with altered mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a possible role of mitochondrial dynamics in its pathological progression. Recent Advances: Abnormal mitochondrial morphology is associated with pathologies across diverse tissues, suggesting that this highly regulated process is essential for proper cell maintenance and physiological homeostasis. Highly structured cardiac myofibers were hypothesized to limit alterations in mitochondrial morphology; however, recent work has identified morphological changes in cardiac tissue, specifically in DCM. Critical Issues: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported independently from observations of altered mitochondrial morphology in DCM. The temporal relationship and causative nature between functional and morphological changes of mitochondria in the establishment/progression of DCM is unclear. Future Directions: Altered mitochondrial energetics and morphology are not only causal for but also consequential to reactive oxygen species production, hence exacerbating oxidative damage through reciprocal amplification, which is integral to the progression of DCM. Therefore, targeting mitochondria for DCM will require better mechanistic characterization of morphological distortion and bioenergetic dysfunction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1545–1562. PMID

  16. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Revealing Cushing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Lucien; Segrestin, Bérénice; Lapoirie, Marion; Favrel, Véronique; Dementhon, Julie; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Raverot, Gérald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular impairments are frequent in Cushing's syndrome and the hypercortisolism can result in cardiac structural and functional changes that lead in rare cases to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Such cardiac impairment may be reversible in response to a eucortisolaemic state. A 43-year-old man with a medical past of hypertension and history of smoking presented to the emergency department with global heart failure. Coronary angiography showed a significant stenosis of a marginal branch and cardiac MRI revealed a nonischemic DCM. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was estimated as 28% to 30%. Clinicobiological features and pituitary imaging pointed toward Cushing's disease and administration of adrenolytic drugs (metyrapone and ketoconazole) was initiated. Despite the normalization of cortisol which had been achieved 2 months later, the patient presented an acute heart failure. A massive mitral regurgitation secondary to posterior papillary muscle rupture was diagnosed as a complication of the occlusion of the marginal branch. After 6 months of optimal pharmacological treatment for systolic heart failure, as well as treatment with inhibitors of steroidogenesis, there was no improvement of LVEF. The percutaneous mitral valve was therefore repaired and a defibrillator implanted. The severity of heart failure contraindicated pituitary surgery and the patient was instead treated by stereotaxic radiotherapy. This is the first case reporting a Cushing's syndrome DCM without improvement of LVEF despite normalization of serum cortisol levels. PMID:26579807

  17. Diagnostic approaches for diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Almorós, A; Tuñón, J; Orejas, M; Cortés, M; Egido, J; Lorenzo, Ó

    2017-02-23

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a cardiac dysfunction which affects approximately 12% of diabetic patients, leading to overt heart failure and death. However, there is not an efficient and specific methodology for DCM diagnosis, possibly because molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated, and it remains asymptomatic for many years. Also, DCM frequently coexists with other comorbidities such as hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and vasculopathies. Thus, human DCM is not specifically identified after heart failure is established. In this sense, echocardiography has been traditionally considered the gold standard imaging test to evaluate the presence of cardiac dysfunction, although other techniques may cover earlier DCM detection by quantification of altered myocardial metabolism and strain. In this sense, Phase-Magnetic Resonance Imaging and 2D/3D-Speckle Tracking Echocardiography may potentially diagnose and stratify diabetic patients. Additionally, this information could be completed with a quantification of specific plasma biomarkers related to related to initial stages of the disease. Cardiotrophin-1, activin A, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-7 (IGFBP-7) and Heart fatty-acid binding protein have demonstrated a stable positive correlation with cardiac hypertrophy, contractibility and steatosis responses. Thus, we suggest a combination of minimally-invasive diagnosis tools for human DCM recognition based on imaging techniques and measurements of related plasma biomarkers.

  18. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Singh Gulati, G; Seth, S; Sharma, S

    2012-02-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  19. Electrocardiographic predictors of peripartum cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karaye, Kamilu M; Karaye, Kamilu M; Lindmark, Krister; Henein, Michael Y; Lindmark, Krister; Henein, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To identify potential electrocardiographic predictors of peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Methods: This was a case–control study carried out in three hospitals in Kano, Nigeria. Logistic regression models and a risk score were developed to determine electrocardiographic predictors of PPCM. Results: A total of 54 PPCM and 77 controls were consecutively recruited after satisfying the inclusion criteria. After controlling for confounding variables, a rise in heart rate of one beat/minute increased the risk of PPCM by 6.4% (p = 0.001), while the presence of ST–T-wave changes increased the odds of PPCM 12.06-fold (p < 0.001). In the patients, QRS duration modestly correlated (r = 0.4; p < 0.003) with left ventricular dimensions and end-systolic volume index, and was responsible for 19.9% of the variability of the latter (R2 = 0.199; p = 0.003). A risk score of ≥ 2, developed by scoring 1 for each of the three ECG disturbances (tachycardia, ST–T-wave abnormalities and QRS duration), had a sensitivity of 85.2%, specificity of 64.9%, negative predictive value of 86.2% and area under the curve of 83.8% (p < 0.0001) for potentially predicting PPCM. Conclusion In postpartum women, using the risk score could help to streamline the diagnosis of PPCM with significant accuracy, prior to confirmatory investigations PMID:27213852

  20. Pathophysiological Fundamentals of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyue; Bai, Tao; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Qiuju; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2017-03-16

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) was first recognized more than four decades ago and occurred independent of cardiovascular diseases or hypertension in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. The exact mechanisms underlying this disease remain incompletely understood. Several pathophysiological bases responsible for DCM have been proposed, including the presence of hyperglycemia, nonenzymatic glycosylation of large molecules (e.g., proteins), energy metabolic disturbance, mitochondrial damage and dysfunction, impaired calcium handling, reactive oxygen species formation, inflammation, cardiac cell death, and cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, leading to impairment of cardiac contractile functions. Increasing evidence also indicates the phenomenon called "metabolic memory" for diabetes-induced cardiovascular complications, for which epigenetic modulation seemed to play an important role, suggesting that the aforementioned pathogenic bases may be regulated by epigenetic modification. Therefore, this review aims at briefly summarizing the current understanding of the pathophysiological bases for DCM. Although how epigenetic mechanisms play a role remains incompletely understood now, extensive clinical and experimental studies have implicated its importance in regulating the cardiac responses to diabetes, which are believed to shed insight into understanding of the pathophysiological and epigenetic mechanisms for the development of DCM and its possible prevention and/or therapy. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:693-711, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Cardiac sarcoid: a chameleon masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anushree; Sulemanjee, Nasir Z; Cheema, Omar; Downey, Francis X; Tajik, A Jamil

    2014-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology often seen in young adults, with cardiac involvement in more than one-quarter of sarcoid patients. The clinical presentation of cardiac sarcoid depends upon the location and extent of myocardium involved. Although cardiac sarcoid may produce asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, it is most commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypertrophic stage of cardiac sarcoid is rarely seen. We describe a case of cardiac sarcoid in a young patient wherein a distinctive appearance of the cardiac sarcoid spectrum from "hypertrophic" stage to thinned/scarred stage, masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy followed by dilated cardiomyopathy, is demonstrated.

  2. Infrequent low dose testosterone treatment maintains male sexual behavior in Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Piekarski, David J; Routman, David M; Schoomer, Elanor E; Driscoll, Joseph R; Park, Jin Ho; Butler, Matthew P; Zucker, Irving

    2009-01-01

    Testosterone (T) secreted in short pulses several times each day is essential for the maintenance of male sex behavior (MSB) in mammals. Blood T concentrations are relatively low during inter-pulse intervals. Assessment of androgenic influences on MSB of rodents has, with very few exceptions, involved either injections of pure or esterified hormones dissolved in oil or implantation of constant release capsules that generate supraphysiological and/or constantly elevated T concentrations. The minimum daily concentration of T necessary to maintain and restore MSB when T is delivered as a discrete short pulse remains unspecified; nor is it known whether infrequent T pulses in the physiological range sustain MSB. To address these questions, we varied T injection concentrations and frequencies in castrated, sexually-experienced Syrian hamsters. All males injected daily with an aqueous vehicle failed to display the ejaculatory reflex 5 weeks after castration. Once daily 15 microg subcutaneous T injections both maintained and restored MSB, whereas once daily 5 microg T injections resulted in fewer males ejaculating and longer ejaculation latencies. Substantially higher T doses were required to restore MSB in previous studies when T was administered in an oil vehicle. 50 microg T maintained MSB in most hamsters injected once every 4 or 7 days, despite long intervals between injections during which circulating T was undetectable or well below physiological concentrations. Some T regimens that maintained MSB were associated with subnormal seminal vesicle and ventral prostate weights. The demonstration that relatively brief, infrequent elevations of T are sufficient to support MSB provides a useful model to assess the neuroendocrine basis of MSB and raises the possibility that infrequent low dose androgen replacement protocols may restore sex behavior to hypogonadal men without inducing some of the negative side-effects associated with more frequent, higher dose treatments.

  3. Baroreflex physiology studied in healthy subjects with very infrequent muscle sympathetic bursts

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, André; Crossman, Alexandra A.; Beightol, Larry A.; Tahvanainen, Kari U. O.; Kuusela, Tom A.; Ertl, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Because it is likely that, in healthy human subjects, baroreflex mechanisms operate continuously, independent of experimental interventions, we asked the question, In what ways might study of unprovoked, very infrequent muscle sympathetic bursts inform baroreflex physiology? We closely examined arterial pressure and R-R interval responses of 11 supine healthy young subjects to arterial pressure ramps triggered by large isolated muscle sympathetic bursts. We triggered data collection sweeps on the beginnings of sympathetic bursts and plotted changes of arterial pressure (finger volume clamp or intra-arterial) and R-R intervals occurring before as well as after the sympathetic triggers. We estimated baroreflex gain from regression of R-R intervals on systolic pressures after sympathetic bursts and from the transfer function between cross-spectra of systolic pressure and R-R intervals at low frequencies. Isolated muscle sympathetic bursts were preceded by arterial pressure reductions. Baroreflex gain, calculated with linear regression of R-R intervals on systolic pressures after bursts, was virtually identical to baroreflex gain, calculated with the cross-spectral modulus [mean and (range): 24 (7–43) vs. 24 (8–45) ms/mmHg], and highly significant, according to linear regression (r2 = 0.91, P = 0.001). Our results indicate that 1) since infrequent human muscle sympathetic bursts are almost deterministically preceded by arterial pressure reductions, their occurrence likely reflects simple baroreflex physiology, and 2) the noninvasive low-frequency modulus reliably reproduces gains derived from R-R interval responses to arterial pressure ramps triggered by infrequent muscle sympathetic bursts. PMID:23195626

  4. Infrequent TRIB3 coding variants and coronary artery disease in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Prudente, Sabrina; Bailetti, Diego; Mendonca, Christine; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Fontana, Andrea; Andreozzi, Francesco; Hastings, Timothy; Mercuri, Luana; Alberico, Federica; Basile, Giorgio; Copetti, Massimiliano; Sesti, Giorgio; Doria, Alessandro; Trischitta, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Genes that modulate insulin sensitivity may also be involved in shaping the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relatively common TRIB3 Q84R polymorphism (rs2295490) has been associated with abnormal insulin signaling, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, and pro-atherogenic phenotypes. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between low-frequency TRIB3 coding variants and CAD in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Three case-control studies for CAD from Italy and US were analyzed, for a total of 1,565 individuals, all with type 2 diabetes. Infrequent variants were identified by re-sequencing TRIB3 exons in 140 “extreme cases” and 140 “super-controls” and then genotyped in all study subjects. Results TRIB3 infrequent variants (n=8), considered according to a collapsing rare variants framework, were significantly associated with CAD in diabetic patients from Italy (n=700, OR=0.43, 95% CI 0.20–0.91; p=0.027), but not from the US (n=865, OR==1.22, 95% CI 0.69–2.18; p=0.49). In the Italian sets, the association was especially strong among individuals who also carried the common R84 variant. Conclusion Although preliminary, our finding suggests a role of TRIB3 low-frequency variants on CAD among Italian patients with T2D. Further studies are needed to address the role of TRIB3 infrequent variants in other populations of both European and non-European ancestries. PMID:26253791

  5. Exercise Prescription for the Athlete with Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Sara; Day, Sharlene M

    2016-11-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies have highly variable expression in terms of symptoms, functional limitations, and disease severity. Associated risk of sudden cardiac death is also variable. International guidelines currently recommend restriction of all athletes with cardiomyopathy from participation in competitive sports. While the guidelines are necessarily conservative because predictive risk factors for exercise-triggered SCD have not been clearly identified, the risk is clearly not uniform across all athletes and all sports. The advent of implantable cardioverter defibrillators, automated external defibrillators, and successful implementation of emergency action plans may safely mitigate risk of sudden cardiac death during physical activity. An individualized approach to risk stratification of athletes that recognizes patient autonomy may allow many individuals with cardiomyopathies to safely train and compete. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dilated cardiomyopathy and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephanie; Waterhouse, Deirdre; McDonald, Kenneth; O'Hanlon, Rory

    2014-01-01

    This case is of a 29-year-old man with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 also known as Byler's disease. At the age of 21, our patient developed non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac MRI demonstrated global wall thinning, with significant areas of myocardial fibrosis in the mid and epicardial walls from base to apex on postgadolinium late contrast enhanced images. No shared genetic loci between dilated cardiomyopathy and Byler's or cholestatic liver disease have yet been found. This presents the first documented case of non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy, with evidence of mid wall fibrosis, in association with an established diagnosis of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 since childhood. PMID:24654243

  7. Role of Cardiac MR Imaging in Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christopher M

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac MR imaging has made major inroads in the new millennium in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis for patients with cardiomyopathies. Imaging of left and right ventricular structure and function and tissue characterization with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) as well as T1 and T2 mapping enable accurate diagnosis of the underlying etiology. In the setting of coronary artery disease, either transmurality of LGE or contractile reserve in response to dobutamine can assess the likelihood of recovery of function after revascularization. The presence of scar reduces the likelihood of a response to medical therapy and to cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure. The presence and extent of LGE relate to overall cardiovascular outcome in cardiomyopathies. A major role for cardiac MR imaging in cardiomyopathies is to identify myocardial scar for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  8. The Role of CMR in Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has made major inroads in the new millenium in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis for patients with cardiomyopathies. Imaging of left and right ventricular structure and function and tissue characterization with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) as well as T1 and T2 mapping enable accurate diagnosis of the underlying etiology. In the setting of coronary artery disease, either transmurality of LGE or contractile reserve in response to dobutamine can assess the likelihood of recovery of function after revascularization. The presence of scar reduces the likelihood of response to medical therapy and to cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure. The presence and extent of LGE relate to overall cardiovascular outcome in cardiomyopathies. An emerging major role for CMR in cardiomyopathies is to identify myocardial scar for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. PMID:26033902

  9. A fatal case of peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ronny; Mallet, Thierry; Mirrer, Brooks; Loarte, Pablo; Gale, Michael; Kastell, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a life-threatening cardiac condition affecting pregnant women either late in pregnancy or early in the post-partum period. The latest studies show a dramatic improvement in the mortality rates of women affected with this disorder, which has been correlated with advances in medical therapy for heart failure. However, patients continue to die of this condition. The following case report describes a typical patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy diagnosed on clinical grounds, along with echocardiogram findings of severe systolic dysfunction and global hypokinesis consistent with dilated cardiomyopathy. Emergency cesarean delivery had to be performed for fetal distress. There was significant improvement of the patient's condition with standard pharmacological management for heart failure at the time of discharge. However, five weeks after discharge, fatal cardiac arrest occurred. It is hoped that this article will raise awareness about this rare but potentially fatal condition and promote understanding of its main clinical features, diagnostic criteria, and conventional pharmacological management.

  10. Sheehan syndrome with reversible dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Laway, Bashir A; Alai, Mohammad S; Gojwari, Tariq; Ganie, Mohd A; Zargar, Abdul Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac abnormalities in patients with Sheehan syndrome are uncommon. A case of Sheehan syndrome with dilated cardiomyopathy is presented in whom hormone replacement with levothyroxine and prednisolone resulted in complete recovery of cardiomyopathy. A 25-year-old woman presented with lactation failure, secondary amenorrhea, features of hypothyroidism and a hypocortisol state following severe postpartum hemorrhage after her last child birth. She also had smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis. After starting antitubercular treatment, she developed shock, suggestive of hypocortisol crisis. Hormonal investigations revealed evidence of panhypopitutarism and magnetic resonance imaging revealed partial empty sella. Meanwhile echocardiography revealed evidence of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The patient was given replacement therapy in the form of glucocorticoids and levothyroxine in addition to antitubercular treatment. She improved and on follow-up over a period of 7 months, the DCM completely reversed. To our knowledge this is the first report of reversible DCM in a patient with Sheehan syndrome.

  11. Infrequent normal B lymphocytes express features of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    An infrequent (2-3%) B lymphocyte subpopulation was found in the normal human tonsil and lymph nodes that shows the phenotypic characteristics of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) (rosette formation with mouse erythrocytes, weak expression of membrane Ig, staining for HLA-DR, and OKT1 or Leu-1 detecting a T cell-associated p65 antigen). Preliminary evidence suggests that at least a subpopulation of these cells is found, in small proportions, within the germinal centers. These cells were not observed in the human bone marrow. B-CLL may involve this peripheral B lymphocyte subset. PMID:6977012

  12. X-linked cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.J.; Sillence, D.O.; Mulley, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Two major loci of X-linked cardiomyopathy have been mapped by linkage analysis. The gene for X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is mapped to the dystrophin locus at Xp21, while Barth syndrome has been localised to distal Xq28. XLCM usually presents in juvenile males with no skeletal disease but decreased dystrophin in cardiac muscle. Barth syndrome most often presents in infants and is characterized by skeletal myopathy, short stature and neutropenia in association with cardiomyopathy of variable severity. Prior to carrier or prenatal diagnosis in a family, delineation of the cardiomyopathy locus involved is essential. We report the linkage mapping of a large kindred in which several male infants have died with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There is a family history of unexplained death of infant males less than 6 months old over 4 generations. Features of Barth syndrome such as short stature, skeletal myopathy and neutropenia have not been observed. Genotyping at 10 marker loci in Xq28 has revealed significant pairwise lod scores with the cardiomyopathy phenotype at DXS52 (Z=2.21 at {theta}=0.0), at markers p26 and p39 near DXS15 (Z=2.30 at {theta}=0.0) and at F8C (Z=2.24 at {theta}=0.0). A recombinant detected with DXS296 defines the proximal limit to the localization. No recombinants were detected at any of the loci distal to DXS296. The most distal marker in Xq28, DXS1108, is within 500 kb of the telomere. As the gene in this family is localized to Xq28, it is possible that this disorder is an allelic variant at the Barth syndrome locus.

  13. Two Cases of Stress Cardiomyopathy during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jong Won; Park, Jongha; Song, Pil Sang; Park, Jae Hyun; Kim, Min Sung; Jeon, Gi Jung; Kim, Min Sik; Kim, Tae Oh

    2016-01-01

    Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) is considered a relatively safe procedure. However, the procedure and the materials used in EGD with conscious sedation can cause stress to the patient. Adverse events during EGD have been reported, represented by cardiopulmonary complications. To date, five cases have reported worldwide to be associated with gastrointestinal endoscopy. Stress cardiomyopathy (SCMP) is a reversible cardiomyopathy that typically occurs in postmenopausal women due to stress and may resolve within a few weeks. SCMP resembles acute myocardial infarction but differs in terms of treatment and prognosis. Here, we describe two cases of SCMP with shock during EGD with conscious sedation. PMID:26855928

  14. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: definition and clinical profile.

    PubMed

    Summers, Matthew R; Prasad, Abhiram

    2013-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is an increasingly recognized, reversible cardiomyopathy with a clinical presentation that mimics an acute coronary syndrome but without evidence of obstructive coronary lesions. Typical presentation involves chest pain and/or dyspnea, transient ST-segment elevation on the electrocardiogram, and a modest increase in cardiac troponin. Cardiac imaging demonstrates wall-motion abnormalities that extend beyond the territory of a single epicardial coronary artery, and the absence of obstructive coronary lesions. Supportive treatment leads to spontaneous, rapid recovery of ventricular function, but about 10% of patients have recurrent events. This article reviews the defining features and clinical profile of TTC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Differentiating constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Kambiz; Maraj, Suraj; Amanullah, Aman M

    2005-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy are 2 forms of diastolic dysfunction with similar presentation but different treatment options. Whereas constrictive pericarditis has the potential of being cured with pericardiectomy, restrictive cardiomyopathy is usually incurable. It is therefore crucial to differentiate between the 2 disorders. In the last few years, new diagnostic techniques have become available to differentiate these causes of diastolic dysfunction from each other. This review provides a complete, in-depth comparison of the 2 disorders with regard to their symptoms and clinical features, etiology, pathophysiology, hemodynamics, echocardiographic presentation, and finally the different available management options.

  16. Rigid spine syndrome and fatal cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Colver, A F; Steer, C R; Godman, M J; Uttley, W S

    1981-01-01

    A 7 1/2-year-old girl had the clinical features of the rigid spine syndrome of Dubowitz. Muscle biopsy showed a predominance of type 2 fibres with neither myopathic features nor an increase in connective tissue. In addition, she had a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with which she presented in heart failure and from which she died suddenly one month later. The association of rigid spine syndrome with cardiomyopathy has not been reported previously. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7193439

  17. Cardiomyopathy from 1,1-Difluoroethane Inhalation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suwen; Joginpally, Tejaswini; Kim, David; Yadava, Mrinal; Norgais, Konchok; Laird-Fick, Heather S

    2016-10-01

    Consumer aerosol products can be inhaled for their psychoactive effects, but with attendant adverse health effects including "sudden sniffing death." Cardiomyopathy has rarely been described in association with 1,1-difluoroethane (DFE), a common aerosol propellant. We report a 33-year-old male who developed acute myocardial injury and global hypokinesis along with rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, and fulminant hepatitis after 2 days' nearly continuous huffing. Workup for other causes, including underlying coronary artery disease, was negative. His cardiac function improved over time. The exact mechanism of DFE's effects is uncertain but may include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, coronary vasospasm, or direct cellular toxicity.

  18. Systematic review of pregnancy in women with inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Krul, Sébastien P J; van der Smagt, Jasper J; van den Berg, Maarten P; Sollie, Krystyna M; Pieper, Petronella G; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y

    2011-06-01

    Pregnancy exposes women with inherited cardiomyopathies to increased risk for heart failure and arrhythmias. In this paper, we review the clinical course and management of pregnant women with the following inherited cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy, and restrictive cardiomyopathy. We also discuss peripartum cardiomyopathy. Pregnancy is generally well tolerated in asymptomatic patients with inherited cardiomyopathies. However, worsening of the clinical condition can occur during pregnancy, despite intensive medical treatment. If prior cardiac events, poor functional class (New York Heart Association class III or IV), or advanced left ventricular systolic dysfunction are present, the risk of maternal cardiac complications during pregnancy are markedly increased. The postpartum condition is generally no worse than the antepartum condition, but no long-term follow-up studies have been reported. Preconception evaluation and counselling are important aspects of managing women with inherited cardiomyopathies. Genetic counselling and DNA testing should be offered to all women following the diagnosis of an inherited cardiomyopathy.

  19. Prevalence and Clinical Features of Focal Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ken; Kitahara, Hideki; Fujimoto, Yoshihide; Sakai, Yoshiaki; Ishibashi, Iwao; Himi, Toshiharu; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-07-25

    Because it is difficult to distinguish between focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy and aborted myocardial infarction, there is little information about the prevalence and clinical features of focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Our cardiac catheterization databases were queried to identify patients with focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy and other types of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We defined focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy as hypo-, a- or dyskinesis in both anterolateral and septal segments without obstructive coronary artery disease explaining the wall motion abnormality. A total of 10 patients were diagnosed with focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy. The control group comprised patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy with apical, mid-ventricular, or basal ballooning. Clinical features and in-hospital outcomes were compared between patients with focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy and those with other types of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Among the 144 patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, the apical, mid-ventricular, basal, and focal types occurred in 85 (59.0%), 49 (34.0%), 0 (0%), and 10 patients (6.9%), respectively. The left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly higher in the focal group compared with the apical and mid-ventricular group (56±13 vs. 45±13 vs. 46±12%, P=0.03). In-hospital outcome was not significantly different among the 3 groups. Focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy is not rare. Biplane left ventriculography is useful for its diagnosis. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1824-1829).

  20. Different desmin peptides are distinctly deposited in cytoplasmic aggregations and cytoplasm of desmin-related cardiomyopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Shintani-Domoto, Yukako; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Maeda, Daichi; Masaki, Noritaka; Ito, Takashi K; Sakuma, Kei; Tanaka, Michio; Kabashima, Katsuya; Takei, Shiro; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Fukayama, Masashi

    2017-07-01

    Desmin-related cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous group of myofibrillar myopathies characterized by aggregates of desmin and related proteins in myocytes. It has been debated how the expression and protein structure are altered in the aggregates and other parts of myocytes in patients. To address this question, we investigated the proteome quantification as well as localization in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens of the heart of patients by imaging mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Fifteen tryptic peptide signals were enriched in the desmin-related cardiomyopathy myocardium, twelve of which were identified as desmin peptides with 14.3- to 27.3-fold increase compared to normal hearts. High-intensity signals at m/z 1032.5 and 1002.5, which were desmin peptides 59-70 at the head portion and 213-222 at the 1B domain, were with infrequent colocalization distributed not only in desmin-positive intracytoplasmic aggregates but also in histologically normal cytoplasm, indicating that desmin protein is fragmented and different types of naturally-occurring truncated proteins ectopically assemble throughout the heart of patients. Thus, in addition to conventional histological identification of protein aggregates, specific desmin peptides show a marked difference in quantity and localization in a tissue section of desmin-related cardiomyopathy and differentiate from other cardiomyopathies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Favourable outcome after peripartum cardiomyopathy: a ten-year study on peripartum cardiomyopathy in a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Chee, Kok-Han

    2013-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is an uncommon form of congestive heart failure, affecting obstetric patients around the time of delivery. The epidemiology of PPCM is infrequently reported. This study was undertaken to define the prevalence, presentation and outcome of PPCM among women giving birth in a teaching hospital in Malaysia. A retrospective case record analysis was conducted on all patients admitted and diagnosed with PPCM at the University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2009. All deliveries were undertaken in the same hospital. A total of 12 patients were diagnosed with PPCM during the ten-year study period. The prevalence of PPCM was 2.48 in 100,000 (1 in 40,322) live births. Nine women were diagnosed with PPCM within five months of delivery. Three women had twin pregnancies. There was one death in the group (mortality rate 8.3%). The mean left ventricular ejection fraction at the time of diagnosis was 28.9% ± 8.5% (range 15%-40%). Following the index event, left ventricular function normalised in six of the nine patients (66.7%) who underwent subsequent echocardiography one year later. All patients were treated with standard heart failure therapy. Two patients with normalised left ventricular function had subsequent pregnancies - one pregnancy was terminated at seven weeks and the other patient delivered uneventfully at full term. PPCM is uncommon. The outcome in our series was favourable, with 66.7% of patients with PPCM recovering their left ventricular function. The mortality rate was 8.3%.

  2. Arrhythmogenic Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy: Is There an Echocardiographic Phenotypic Overlap of Two Distinct Cardiomyopathies?

    PubMed

    Aras, Dursun; Ozeke, Ozcan; Cay, Serkan; Ozcan, Firat; Baser, Kazım; Dogan, Umuttan; Unlu, Murat; Demirkan, Burcu; Tufekcioglu, Omac; Topaloglu, Serkan

    2015-09-01

    The clinical diagnosis of right ventricular (RV) cardiomyopathies is often challenging. It is difficult to differentiate the isolated left ventricular (LV) noncompaction cardiomyopathy (NC) from biventricular NC or from coexisting arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy (AC). There are currently few established morphologic criteria for the diagnosis other than RV dilation and presence of excessive regional trabeculation. The gross and microscopic changes suggest pathological similarities between, or coexistence of, RV-NC and AC. Therefore, the term arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is somewhat misleading as isolated LV or biventricular involvement may be present and thus a broader term such as AC should be preferred. We describe an unusual case of AC associated with a NC in a 27-year-old man who had a history of permanent pacemaker 7 years ago due to second-degree atrioventricular block.

  3. Platelet function in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Bernardo, Esther; Feltes, Gisela; Escaned, Javier; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; De Agustín, José Alberto; Vivas, David; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TK) includes a transient left ventricular dysfunction without obstructive coronary disease, sometimes after stressful situations with elevated cathecolamines. Since catecholamines activate platelets we aimed to study the platelet influence in a TK setting. We included 32 patients with a TK diagnosis, 13 with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and 18 healthy volunteers. Once consent informed was obtained, blood samples were extracted and processed (at admission and after 3 months follow-up). Clinical, ecg, echocardiographic and angiographic features were thoroughly recorded.Previous treatment before admission was similar between groups. No differences were observed in clinical features or any of the acute markers studied regarding platelet reactivity between TK compared to ACS. After follow-up, aggregation levels and platelet reactivity showed differences, mainly due to the antithrombotic therapy prescribed at discharge, but similar to volunteers. Circulating epinephrine during the acute phase was significantly higher in TK (p < 0.001). Patients with higher levels of epinephrine had elevated platelet activation and aggregation after 3 months. No differences were observed in Takotsubo acute platelet aggregation compared to patients with ACS, in spite of higher blood levels of adrenaline. Takotsubo patients had elevated platelet aggregation and activation compared with ACS patients at 3 months follow-up because they were less frequently on chronic clopidogrel and ASA. However, they had similar platelet aggregation and activation levels to healthy volunteers despite treatment with low-dose ASA. Takotsubo patients who had higher levels of adrenaline in the acute phase displayed increased platelet reactivity during follow-up.

  4. Heart Transplantation for Chagas Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Rodolfo D; Oliveira, Guilherme H; Bacal, Fernando

    2017-06-01

    Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC) is one of the chronic manifestations of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection and is a major public health disease in Latin America. Since it is a chronic systemic infection, Chagas disease was long considered a potential contraindication for transplantation because of the risk of recurrence with immunosuppression. However, early South American experience in the 1980's established the feasibility of heart transplantation (HT) in patients with Chagas disease. Indeed, the first cardiac transplant for a recipient with CC was performed in 1985 in Brazil. Chagas etiology of heart failure has become the third most common indication for HT in South America. T. cruzi reactivation post-transplant is a common issue that requires prophylactic surveillance but responds well to appropriate therapy. Chagas reactivation has been associated with the potency of the immunosuppressive protocol and occurs more frequently after rejection episodes. Yet, many important questions regarding the management of Chagas HT candidates and recipients remain unanswered. For example, biventricular systolic failure is frequent in end-stage CC, but its impact on the modality of mechanical circulatory bridging has not been described. Also, there is no consensus regarding the most adequate immunosuppressive regimen that balances the risk of graft rejection and disease reactivation. The real efficacy and safety of HT for end-stage CC will only be appreciated when a Latin American transplant registry is established. This review covers the current state of the art of HT for CC. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of oral chemical irritation on tastes and flavors in frequent and infrequent users of chili.

    PubMed

    Prescott, J; Stevenson, R J

    1995-12-01

    The studies reported here addressed the question of whether the pungent principle in chilies, capsaicin, suppresses taste and flavor intensity. Over a period of several minutes, groups of frequent and infrequent eaters of chili repeatedly rated the taste and flavor intensities of sweet and sour solutions that also contained either orange or vanilla flavor, and capsaicin at 0, 2, 4, and 16 ppm. As well as the intensity of the qualities while in the mouth, measures of the number of rating periods for the intensity to dissipate to zero, and the summed total intensity were also derived. Infrequent chili users rated the capsaicin burn as more intense than did the frequent users. With few exceptions, and for groups, sweetness was suppressed by the presence of capsaicin. By contrast, sourness was unaffected by capsaicin. Flavor intensities also showed suppression by capsaicin. High correlations between ratings of sweetness and flavor were found, suggesting that perceptual confusion between the two qualities may have been responsible for the flavor suppression. A second experiment examined the effects of capsaicin on ratings of strawberry flavor alone. This study produced little evidence of flavor suppression by capsaicin. These results are discussed in terms of an attentional model of capsaicin's effects.

  6. On the fate of old stored carbon after large-infrequent disturbances in plants.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rodrigo

    2009-07-01

    Plants have the capacity to store and reallocate stored nonstructural C, but little is known about the age and ecological roles of these pools. It was thought that plants allocate recently assimilated C to produce new fine roots. However, there is recent evidence that plants can allocate old stored C for the production of fine roots following a large-infrequent disturbance (LID) providing a new dimension of the fate and the implied role of stored C in plants. Here, I explore other possible adaptations of plants to allocate stored C reserves, and provide a series of open questions on the fate of old stored C in plants. Specifically, I propose that another metabolic function of old stored C may be for supporting mycorrhizal fungi colonization after a large-infrequent disturbance, because the production of hyphae may be more economical in terms of C to the plant under stressful conditions. Finally, in order to better understand plant resilience to LIDs it is critical to understand the mechanisms that regulate the fate of old stored C in plants.

  7. A Study on the Characteristics of Infrequent and Frequent Outpatients Visiting Korean Traditional Medical Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jinwon; Park, Haemo; Chu, Chaeshin; Choi, Sung-Yong; Lee, Kibum; Lee, Sundong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was intended to analyze the characteristics of infrequent and frequent outpatients visiting Korean medical facilities, and find the related variables of frequent users. Methods The data source was the Report on the Usage and Consumption of Korean Medicine (2011) published by the Ministry of Health and Welfare and Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs. We analyzed outpatient data using SAS 9.2. Results As much as 46.6% of the patients used Korean medical services over 11 times in 3 months. The proportion of frequent users increased depending on age, and their proportion was high in the low-income and low-education group. People with musculoskeletal disease, stroke, hypertension, and obesity were more likely to use Korean medical services. In general, patients were satisfied with their treatment, with frequent outpatients being more satisfied than infrequent outpatients. In logistic regression analysis, age and musculoskeletal disease were significant determinants of frequency of use of Korean medical services. Conclusion Age, musculoskeletal disease, and specific diseases were highly associated with frequent Korean medical utilization. PMID:26430614

  8. The bacterial flagellar protein export apparatus processively transports flagellar proteins even with extremely infrequent ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Kinoshita, Miki; Aldridge, Phillip D; Namba, Keiichi

    2014-12-22

    For self-assembly of the bacterial flagellum, a specific protein export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) as the energy source to transport component proteins to the distal growing end. The export apparatus consists of a transmembrane PMF-driven export gate and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex composed of FliH, FliI and FliJ. The FliI(6)FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α(3)β(3)γ complex of F(O)F(1)-ATPase. FliJ allows the gate to efficiently utilize PMF to drive flagellar protein export but it remains unknown how. Here, we report the role of ATP hydrolysis by the FliI(6)FliJ complex. The export apparatus processively transported flagellar proteins to grow flagella even with extremely infrequent or no ATP hydrolysis by FliI mutation (E211D and E211Q, respectively). This indicates that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is not at all coupled with the export rate. Deletion of FliI residues 401 to 410 resulted in no flagellar formation although this FliI deletion mutant retained 40% of the ATPase activity, suggesting uncoupling between ATP hydrolysis and activation of the gate. We propose that infrequent ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ ring is sufficient for gate activation, allowing processive translocation of export substrates for efficient flagellar assembly.

  9. Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a rare, but clinically significant variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Perens, Gregory; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare variant of HCM. Segmental HCM is seen in 12% of cases of HCM. Among the patterns of segmental HCM, posterolateral HCM is the least common type. Our case of an 18-year old male documents this unusual type of cardiomyopathy. In this form of HCM, left ventricular thickness and the extent of hypertrophy might be underestimated by 2-dimensional echocardiography. This case illustrates the echocardiographic and pathologic features of posterolateral HCM.

  10. Mitogenic cardiomyopathy: a lethal neonatal familial dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by myocyte hyperplasia and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kenneth T E; Taylor, Glenn P; Meschino, Wendy S; Kantor, Paul F; Cutz, Ernest

    2010-07-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a heterogenous group of conditions of which dilated cardiomyopathies are the most common clinicomorphologic subtype. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of many cases of dilated cardiomyopathies remain unknown. We describe a series of 5 cases of a rare but clinically and histologically distinctive dilated cardiomyopathy that was uniformly lethal in early infancy. The 5 cases include 2 pairs of siblings. There was parental consanguinity in 1 of the 2 pairs of siblings. Death occurred in early infancy (range, 22-67 days; mean, 42 days) after a short history of general lethargy, decreased feeding, respiratory distress, or cyanosis. There was no specific birth or early neonatal problems. Autopsy revealed congestive cardiac failure and enlarged, dilated hearts with ventricular dilatation more pronounced than atrial dilatation, and endocardial fibroelastosis. Histology showed prominent hypertrophic nuclear changes of cardiac myofibers and markedly increased myocyte mitotic activity including occasional atypical mitoses. Immunohistochemical staining for Mib1 showed a markedly increased proliferative index of 10% to 20%. Ancillary investigations, including molecular studies, did not reveal a primary cause for the cardiomyopathies. This distinctive dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by unusual histologic features of myocyte nuclear hypertrophy and marked mitotic activity is lethal in early infancy. Its occurrence in 2 pairs of siblings suggests familial inheritance. Although the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains to be elucidated, it is important to recognize this distinctive entity for purposes of genetic counseling.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10.1056/NEJMoa1110186. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Hershberger RE, Hedges DJ, Morales A. Dilated cardiomyopathy: the complexity of a diverse genetic architecture. Nat Rev Cardiol. 2013 Sep;10(9):531- ...

  12. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  13. Relation between stress cardiomyopathy and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mansencal, Nicolas; N'Guetta, Roland; Desperramons, Julien; Dubourg, Olivier

    2011-02-17

    We present the case of an 89-year-old woman with no previous cardiovascular disease who presented a stress cardiomyopathy secondary to acute hemorrhagic stroke. Contrast and two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography was helpful to perform the diagnosis and the follow-up.

  14. Biomarkers in inflammatory and noninflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Noutsias, Michel; Pankuweit, Sabine; Maisch, Bernhard

    2009-12-01

    Acute myocarditis (AMC) and its sequela, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), are most often caused by cardiotropic viral infections in the Western world. Inflammatory cardiomyopathy (DCMi) is a specific cardiomyopathy entity of DCM, being defined by the proof of intramyocardial inflammation and/or viral infection in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs). Diagnostic procedures of EMBs are indispensable for the etiopathogenic differentiation of the disease. Experienced cardiology centers have reported low complication rates of EMB obtainment. The histological Dallas criteria are prone to substantial sampling error and interobserver variability, have no prognostic impact and, moreover, are not suitable to select AMC/DCMi patients who favorably respond to immunosuppression. Immunohistological detection of myocarditis and viral persistence have proven adverse prognostic impact in AMC and DCM patients, respectively. This contemporary diagnostic repertoire on EMBs is essential for the selection of DCMi patients who will likely benefit from immunomodulatory treatment, which has been addressed in randomized trials. During the past decade, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has developed as a valuable noninvasive diagnostic approach for the detection and localization of intramyocardial inflammation, and CMR guidelines for AMC have been elaborated. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) has been associated with adverse prognostic outcome in DCM patients. CMR techniques, however, are not suitable to specifically detect myocardial viral infections. To date, no classic biomarker has been shown to differentiate between DCMi and noninflammatory cardiomyopathies.

  15. Ubiquitin-proteasome system and hereditary cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Frey, Norbert; Carrier, Lucie

    2014-06-01

    Adequate protein turnover is essential for cardiac homeostasis. Different protein quality controls are involved in the maintenance of protein homeostasis, including molecular chaperones and co-chaperones, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In the last decade, a series of evidence has underlined a major function of the UPS in cardiac physiology and disease. Particularly, recent studies have shown that dysfunctional proteasomal function leads to cardiac disorders. Hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies are the two most prevalent inherited cardiomyopathies. Both are primarily transmitted as an autosomal-dominant trait and mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding components of the cardiac sarcomere, including a relevant striated muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase. A growing body of evidence indicates impairment of the UPS in inherited cardiomyopathies as determined by measurement of the level of ubiquitinated proteins, the activities of the proteasome and/or the use of fluorescent UPS reporter substrates. The present review will propose mechanisms of UPS impairment in inherited cardiomyopathies, summarize the potential consequences of UPS impairment, including activation of the unfolded protein response, and underline some therapeutic options available to restore proteasome function and therefore cardiac homeostasis and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  17. Clinical and molecular classification of cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Cecchi, Franco; Tomberli, Benedetta; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The term “cardiomyopathies” was used for the first time 55 years ago, in 1957. Since then awareness and knowledge of this important and complex group of heart muscle diseases have improved substantially. Over these past five decades a large number of definitions, nomenclature and schemes, have been advanced by experts and consensus panel, which reflect the fast and continued advance of the scientific understanding in the field. Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited myocardial diseases, which represent an important cause of disability and adverse outcome. Although considered rare diseases, the overall estimated prevalence of all cardiomyopathies is at least 3% in the general population worldwide. Furthermore, their recognition is increasing due to advances in imaging techniques and greater awareness in both the public and medical community. Cardiomyopathies represent an ideal translational model of integration between basic and clinical sciences. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore essential in order to ensure their correct diagnosis and management. In the present work, we aim to provide a concise overview of the historical background, genetic and phenotypic spectrum and evolving concepts leading to the various attempts of cardiomyopathy classifications produced over the decades. PMID:25610835

  18. Secondary Coronary Artery Vasospasm Promotes Cardiomyopathy Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Matthew T.; Korcarz, Claudia E.; Collins, Keith A.; Lapidos, Karen A.; Hack, Andrew A.; Lyons, Matthew R.; Zarnegar, Sara; Earley, Judy U.; Lang, Roberto M.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2004-01-01

    Genetic defects in the plasma membrane-associated sarcoglycan complex produce cardiomyopathy characterized by focal degeneration. The infarct-like pattern of cardiac degeneration has led to the hypothesis that coronary artery vasospasm underlies cardiomyopathy in this disorder. We evaluated the coronary vasculature of γ-sarcoglycan mutant mice and found microvascular filling defects consistent with arterial vasospasm. However, the vascular smooth muscle sarcoglycan complex was intact in the coronary arteries of γ-sarcoglycan hearts with perturbation of the sarcoglycan complex only within the adjacent myocytes. Thus, in this model, coronary artery vasospasm derives from a vascular smooth muscle-cell extrinsic process. To reduce this secondary vasospasm, we treated γ-sarcoglycan-deficient mice with the calcium channel antagonist verapamil. Verapamil treatment eliminated evidence of vasospasm and ameliorated histological and functional evidence of cardiomyopathic progression. Echocardiography of verapamil-treated, γ-sarcoglycan-null mice showed an improvement in left ventricular fractional shortening (44.3 ± 13.3% treated versus 37.4 ± 15.3% untreated), maximal velocity at the aortic outflow tract (114.9 ± 27.9 cm/second versus 92.8 ± 22.7 cm/second), and cardiac index (1.06 ± 0.30 ml/minute/g versus 0.67 ± 0.16 ml/minute/g, P < 0.05). These data indicate that secondary vasospasm contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and is an important therapeutic target to limit cardiomyopathy progression. PMID:14982859

  19. The Insular Cortex and Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Michiaki; Dote, Keigo; Kato, Masaya; Sasaki, Shota; Oda, Noboru; Kagawa, Eisuke; Nakano, Yoshinori; Yamane, Aya; Higashihara, Tasuku; Miyauchi, Shunsuke; Tsuchiya, Akane; Harada, Wakako; Kario, Kazuomi

    2017-01-01

    Transient left ventricular dysfunction in patients under emotional stress, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, has been recognized as a distinct clinical entity. Recent studies have supported the concept notion that the cardiovascular system is regulated by cortical modulation. A network consisting of the insular cortex (Ic), anterior cingulate gyrus, and amygdala plays a crucial role in the regulation of the central autonomic nervous system in relation to emotional stress such as anxiety, fear and sadness. Because the Ic is located in the region of the middle cerebral arteries, its structure tends to be exposed to a higher risk of cerebrovascular disease. Ic damage has been associated with myocardial injury, increased brain natriuretic peptide, and the incidence of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Because Ic damage has been associated with increased sympathetic nervous system activity, Ic damage is suggested to have a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. In this review, we focus on the role of the Ic as a mediator for the cardiovascular system in relation to emotional stress, and we summarizes the current knowledge on the relationships between the Ic and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Diagnosis and management of inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Millar, Lynne; Sharma, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Inherited heart conditions are the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in those under the age of 35 and the leading cause of non-traumatic death in young athletes. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease affecting 1 in 500 of the population. Some patients may exhibit severe left ventricular hypertrophy, others may show nothing more than an abnormal ECG. Left ventricular hypertrophy most commonly manifests in the second decade of life. Sudden death is rare and usually affects patients in the first three decades whereas older patients present with heart failure, atrial fibrillation and stroke. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is a rare, autosomal dominant heart muscle disorder which affects between 1 in 1,000 and 1 in 5,000 of the population. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterised by a dilated left ventricle with impaired function that cannot be explained by ischaemic heart disease, hypertension or valvular heart disease. At least 25% of cases of DCM are familial. DCM may be associated with multisystem conditions such as muscular dystrophy. Chemotherapy and certain other drugs, alcohol abuse and myocarditis may also lead to a dilated and poorly contracting left ventricle. In many cases the first manifestation of an inherited cardiomyopathy can be a sudden cardiac arrest. Other presentations include chest pain or breathlessness during exertion, palpitations and syncope. In many of the cardiomyopathies, the diagnosis can be made with a standard ECG and echocardiogram. However if the diagnosis is not certain or the cardiologist wishes to look at the heart structure in greater detail, a cardiac MRI may be performed.

  1. Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Fernando; Ramos, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela C.; Fariñas, M. Carmen; de Berrazueta, José Ramón; Zarauza, Jesús; Pericás Pulido, Juan Manuel; Paré, Juan Carlos; de Alarcón, Arístides; Sousa, Dolores; Rodriguez Bailón, Isabel; Montejo-Baranda, Miguel; Noureddine, Mariam; García Vázquez, Elisa; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) complicating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a poorly known entity. Although current guidelines do not recommend IE antibiotic prophylaxis (IEAP) in HCM, controversy remains. This study sought to describe the clinical course of a large series of IE HCM and to compare IE in HCM patients with IE patients with and without an indication for IEAP. Data from the GAMES IE registry involving 27 Spanish hospitals were analyzed. From January 2008 to December 2013, 2000 consecutive IE patients were prospectively included in the registry. Eleven IE HCM additional cases from before 2008 were also studied. Clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic characteristics were analyzed in IE HCM patients (n = 34) and in IE HCM reported in literature (n = 84). Patients with nondevice IE (n = 1807) were classified into 3 groups: group 1, HCM with native-valve IE (n = 26); group 2, patients with IEAP indication (n = 696); group 3, patients with no IEAP indication (n = 1085). IE episode and 1-year follow-up data were gathered. One-year mortality in IE HCM was 42% in our study and 22% in the literature. IE was more frequent, although not exclusive, in obstructive HCM (59% and 74%, respectively). Group 1 exhibited more IE predisposing factors than groups 2 and 3 (62% vs 40% vs 50%, P < 0.01), and more previous dental procedures (23% vs 6% vs 8%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, Group 1 experienced a higher incidence of Streptococcus infections than Group 2 (39% vs 22%, P < 0.01) and similar to Group 3 (39% vs 30%, P = 0.34). Overall mortality was similar among groups (42% vs 36% vs 35%, P = 0.64). IE occurs in HCM patients with and without obstruction. Mortality of IE HCM is high but similar to patients with and without IEAP indication. Predisposing factors, previous dental procedures, and streptococcal infection are higher in IE HCM, suggesting that HCM patients could benefit from IEAP. PMID:27368014

  2. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  3. WiFi Miner: An Online Apriori-Infrequent Based Wireless Intrusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Ahmedur; Ezeife, C. I.; Aggarwal, A. K.

    Intrusion detection in wireless networks has become a vital part in wireless network security systems with wide spread use of Wireless Local Area Networks (WLAN). Currently, almost all devices are Wi-Fi (Wireless Fidelity) capable and can access WLAN. This paper proposes an Intrusion Detection System, WiFi Miner, which applies an infrequent pattern association rule mining Apriori technique to wireless network packets captured through hardware sensors for purposes of real time detection of intrusive or anomalous packets. Contributions of the proposed system includes effectively adapting an efficient data mining association rule technique to important problem of intrusion detection in a wireless network environment using hardware sensors, providing a solution that eliminates the need for hard-to-obtain training data in this environment, providing increased intrusion detection rate and reduction of false alarms.

  4. 46 XX pure gonadal dysgenesis: an infrequent cause of primary amenorrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Pertusa, Salvador; Palacios, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Amenorrhoea can be primary or secondary. Primary amenorrhoea is a relatively common problem among teenage girls. They usually consult their paediatrician or family doctor. This condition is present in patients with normal secondary sexual characteristics but no menarche by 16 years of age, or patients who have not had menstrual flow by age 14 and are lacking normal secondary sexual characteristics. Gonadal dysgenesis is an infrequent cause for primary amenorrhoea. In this paper, the case of a 16-year-old girl whose mother consulted their family doctor because of worries about her daughter’s lack of menarche is presented. A blood test showed elevated levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinising hormone (LH) and low levels of oestradiol. An abdominal ultrasound was abnormal. A diagnostic laparoscopy with biopsy of both gonads was performed. Replacement hormonal therapy was applied resulting in normal menstruations after few months. An early diagnosis is extremely important. PMID:21686785

  5. Infrequent Production of Xanthomegnin by Fungal Strains Recovered from Patients with Ocular Mycoses.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Havva Gül; Kandemir, Hazal; Çürük, Akif; Ilkit, Macit; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2016-04-01

    Mycotoxins are putative virulence factors of fungi that play an important role in the pathogenesis of fungal infections. Mycotoxin production has been used as a diagnostic marker for the early diagnosis of fungal diseases. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we investigated whether the fungal strains recovered from eye tissue samples obtained from patients with ocular mycoses produced the mycotoxin xanthomegnin. We tested 62 well-characterized strains of fungi, including Aspergillus spp. (n = 14), Exophiala spp. (n = 9), Fusarium spp. (n = 15), and several molds (n = 24). All isolates were identified to the species level using PCR and DNA sequencing of rRNA genes. We detected xanthomegnin activity (0.02 µg/ml) in one of the three Aspergillus flavus strains. However, we were unable to detect xanthomegnin in any of the other 61 fungal strains. Our result suggests that xanthomegnin production was infrequent in fungal strains recovered from patients with ocular mycoses.

  6. An unusual ST-segment elevation: apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy shows the ace up its sleeve.

    PubMed

    de Santis, Francesco; Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Pero, Gaetano; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Minardi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is part of the broad clinical and morphologic spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report a patient with electrocardiographic abnormalities in whom acute coronary syndrome was excluded and apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was demonstrated by careful differential diagnosis.

  7. Infrequent bilateral orbital tumors and simulating lesions: the experience of a Chinese institute.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Kang, Li; Xiao, LiHua

    2009-11-01

    To determine the types, frequency, and clinical features of infrequent bilateral orbital lesions. We reviewed 41 cases of either histopathologically or radiologically verified bilateral orbital lesions. The number and entities in each category were recorded. Clinical data and imaging findings were reviewed. The number and percentage of lesions in each general category were leukemia lesions in eight patients (19.5%), metastatic tumors in seven (17%), optic nerve and meningeal tumors in six (14.6%), secondary tumors in six (14.6%), peripheral nerve lesions in four (9.8%), inflammatory lesions in four (9.8%), and vasculogenic, histiocytic, and miscellaneous lesions, each in two patients (4.9%). These lesions occurred in both childhood and adulthood, but were infrequent in people over 60 years old. Of all cases, 51.2% were benign and 48.8% were malignant. The ocular symptoms and signs presented unilaterally in 18 (43.9%) cases and bilaterally in 23 (56.1%). Of the 15 patients with either metastatic tumors or blood disorders, two (13.3%) had a history of primary neoplasm at presentation. In 19 (46.3%) cases, the configuration of the bilateral lesions was symmetrical, and they were of equal size. Computed tomography scans revealed bone changes in 13 patients (31.7%), while magnetic resonance imaging revealed intracranial extension in nine (22%). Varied lesions can involve the bilateral orbits simultaneously or on follow-up. Through the combination of history, bilateral ocular manifestations, radiologic findings, and systemic examinations, the correct diagnosis can be made, which is valuable for early identification of both metastasis and blood disorders.

  8. Differentiating cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease from nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy utilizing positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mody, F.V.; Brunken, R.C.; Stevenson, L.W.; Nienaber, C.A.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R. )

    1991-02-01

    To determine if imaging of blood flow (using N-13 ammonia) and glucose metabolism (using F-18 2-deoxyglucose) with positron emission tomography can distinguish cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease from nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, 21 patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction who were evaluated for cardiac transplantation were studied. The origin of left ventricular dysfunction had been previously determined by coronary angiography to be ischemic (11 patients) or nonischemic (10 patients). Images were visually analyzed by three observers on a graded scale in seven left ventricular segments and revealed fewer defects in dilated cardiomyopathy compared with ischemic cardiomyopathy for N-13 ammonia (2.7 +/- 1.6 versus 5 +/- 0.6; p less than 0.03) and F-18 deoxyglucose (2.8 +/- 2.1 versus 4.6 +/- 1.1; p less than 0.03). An index incorporating extent and severity of defects revealed more homogeneity with fewer and less severe defects in subjects with nonischemic than in those with ischemic cardiomyopathy as assessed by imaging of flow (2.8 +/- 1.8 versus 9.2 +/- 3; p less than 0.001) and metabolism (3.8 +/- 3.3 versus 8.5 +/- 3.6; p less than 0.005). Diagnostic accuracy for distinguishing the two subgroups by visual image analysis was 85%. Using previously published circumferential count profile criteria, patients with dilated cardiomyopathy had fewer ischemic segments (0.4 +/- 0.8 versus 2.5 +/- 2 per patient; p less than 0.01) and infarcted segments (0.1 +/- 0.3 versus 2.4 +/- 1.4 per patient; p less than 0.001) than did patients with cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease. The sensitivity for differentiating the two clinical subgroups using circumferential profile analysis was 100% and the specificity 80%.

  9. Biomarkers and mortality in severe Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sherbuk, Jacqueline E; Okamoto, Emi E; Marks, Morgan A; Fortuny, Enzo; Clark, Eva H; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Vasquez-Villar, Angel; Fernandez, Antonio B; Crawford, Thomas C; Do, Rose Q; Flores-Franco, Jorge Luis; Colanzi, Rony; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2015-09-01

    Chagas cardiomyopathy is a chronic sequela of infection by the parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Advanced cardiomyopathy is associated with a high mortality rate, and clinical characteristics have been used to predict mortality risk. Though multiple biomarkers have been associated with Chagas cardiomyopathy, it is unknown how these are related to survival. This study aimed to identify biomarkers associated with mortality in individuals with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy in an urban Bolivian hospital. The population included individuals with and without T. cruzi infection recruited in an urban hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Baseline characteristics, electrocardiogram findings, medications, and serum cardiac biomarker levels (B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP], N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP], creatine kinase-myocardial band [CK-MB], troponin I, matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-2, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases [TIMP] 1 and 2, transforming growth factor [TGF] beta 1 and 2) were ascertained. Echocardiograms were performed on those with cardiac symptoms or electrocardiogram abnormalities at baseline. Participants were contacted approximately 1 year after initial evaluation; deaths were reported by family members. Receiver-operating characteristic curves (ROC) were used to optimize cutoff values for each marker. For markers with area under the curve (AUC) >0.55, Cox proportional hazards models were performed to determine the hazards ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association of each marker with mortality. The median follow-up time was 14.1 months (interquartile range 12.5, 16.7). Of 254 individuals with complete cardiac data, 220 (87%) had follow-up data. Of 50 patients with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy at baseline, 20 (40%) had died. Higher baseline levels of BNP (HR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.2 to 8.4), NT-proBNP (HR: 4.4, 95% CI: 1.8 to 11.0), CK-MB (HR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.3 to 8.0), and MMP-2 (HR: 4.2, 95% CI: 1.5 to 11.8) were

  10. [Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a novel beta-adrenergic blocker withdrawal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tomcsányi, János; Jávor, Kinga; Arabadzisz, Hrisula; Zsoldos, András; Wagner, Vince; Sármán, Balázs

    2013-02-17

    The authors describe two cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy developing after an abrupt withdrawal of carvedilol and bisoprolol. Takotsubo or stress cardiomyopathy is characterized by acute and reversible cardiac dysfunction without coronary artery disease. It is triggered by acute emotional or physical stress, drugs or drug withdrawal. The immediate discontinuation of the long acting vasodilator beta-blocker, carvedilol has not yet been described to cause takotsubo cardiomyopathy. The authors recommend cautious withdrawal of beta-blockers.

  11. Cardiomyopathy: a late complication of hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walker, A M; Benson, L N; Wilson, G J; Arbus, G S

    1997-04-01

    This report describes a child who presented with classic hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and 4 months later developed a life-threatening but reversible cardiomyopathy with global cardiac dysfunction and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 14%. There was no evidence of electrolyte abnormalities, anemia, hypertension, severe fluid overload, or viral infection. Endomyocardial biopsies were consistent with a dilated cardiomyopathy. This paper highlights the importance of considering the diagnosis of associated cardiomyopathy when presenting with late-onset edema following HUS.

  12. Heart failure in pregnant women: is it peripartum cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Dennis, Alicia Therese

    2015-03-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Women with peripartum cardiomyopathy often present with symptoms and signs of heart failure. The diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy is made after all other causes of heart failure are excluded. Emphasis is on the immediate recognition of an unwell pregnant or recently pregnant woman, early diagnosis with the use of echocardiography, and the correct treatment of heart failure.

  13. Reversible catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy due to pheochromocytoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Satendra, Milan; de Jesus, Cláudia; Bordalo e Sá, Armando L; Rosário, Luís; Rocha, José; Bicha Castelo, Henrique; Correia, Maria José; Nunes Diogo, António

    2014-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor originating from chromaffin tissue. It commonly presents with symptoms and signs of catecholamine excess, such as hypertension, tachycardia, headache and sweating. Cardiovascular manifestations include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which may present as severe left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure. We report a case of pheochromocytoma which was diagnosed following investigation of dilated cardiomyopathy. We highlight the dramatic symptomatic improvement and reversal of cardiomyopathy, with recovery of left ventricular function after treatment.

  14. Progress with genetic cardiomyopathies: screening, counseling, and testing in dilated, hypertrophic, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Ray E; Cowan, Jason; Morales, Ana; Siegfried, Jill D

    2009-05-01

    This review focuses on the genetic cardiomyopathies: principally dilated cardiomyopathy, with salient features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy, regarding genetic etiology, genetic testing, and genetic counseling. Enormous progress has recently been made in identifying genetic causes for each cardiomyopathy, and key phenotype and genotype information is reviewed. Clinical genetic testing is rapidly emerging with a principal rationale of identifying at-risk asymptomatic or disease-free relatives. Knowledge of a disease-causing mutation can guide clinical surveillance for disease onset, thereby enhancing preventive and treatment interventions. Genetic counseling is also indicated for patients and their family members regarding the symptoms of their cardiomyopathy, its inheritance pattern, family screening recommendations, and genetic testing options and possible results.

  15. Cardiomyopathies: Evolution of pathogenesis concepts and potential for new therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sisakian, Hamayak

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are defined as diseases of the myocardium with associated structural and functional abnormalities. Knowledge of these pathologies for a long period was not clear in clinical practice due to uncertainties regarding definition, classification and clinical diagnosis. In recent decades, major advances have been made in the understanding of the molecular and genetic issues, pathophysiology, and clinical and radiological assessment of the diseases. Progress has been made also in management of several types of cardiomyopathy. Advances in the understanding of these diseases show that cardiomyopathies represent complex entities. Here, special attention is given to evolution of classification of cardiomyopathies, with the aim of assisting clinicians to look beyond schematic diagnostic labels in order to achieve more specific diagnosis. Knowledge of the genotype of cardiomyopathies has changed the pathophysiological understanding of their etiology and clinical course, and has become more important in clinical practice for diagnosis and prevention of cardiomyopathies. New approaches for clinical and prognostic assessment are provided based on contemporary molecular mechanisms of contribution in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathies. The genotype-phenotype complex approach for assessment improves the clinical evaluation and management strategies of these pathologies. The review covers also the important role of imaging methods, particularly echocardiography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of different types of cardiomyopathies. In summary, this review provides complex presentation of current state of cardiomyopathies from genetics to management aspects for cardiovascular specialists. PMID:24976920

  16. Two Cases of Apical Ballooning Syndrome Masking Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ranjini Raina; Hakim, Fayaz A.; Hurst, R. Todd; Simper, David; Appleton, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Apical akinesis and dilation in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease is a typical feature of stress-induced (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy, whereas apical hypertrophy is seen in apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report the cases of 2 patients who presented with takotsubo cardiomyopathy and were subsequently found to have apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, after the apical ballooning from the takotsubo cardiomyopathy had resolved. The first patient, a 43-year-old woman with a history of alcohol abuse, presented with shortness of breath, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, and no significant coronary artery disease. An echocardiogram 2 weeks later revealed a normal left ventricular ejection fraction and newly apparent apical hypertrophy. The 2nd patient, a 70-year-old woman with pancreatitis, presented with chest pain, apical akinesis, and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.39, consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. One month later, her left ventricular ejection fraction was normal; however, hypertrophy of the left ventricular apex was newly noted. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases in which apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was masked by apical ballooning from stress-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:24808780

  17. Intrathecal baclofen withdrawal: A rare cause of reversible cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Awuor, Stephen O; Kitei, Paul M; Nawaz, Yassir; Ahnert, Amy M

    2016-03-01

    Baclofen is commonly used to treat spasticity of central etiology. Unfortunately, a potentially lethal withdrawal syndrome can complicate its use. This is especially true when the drug is administered intrathecally. There are very few cases of baclofen withdrawal leading to reversible cardiomyopathy described in the literature. The authors present a patient with a history of chronic intrathecal baclofen use who, in the setting of acute baclofen withdrawal, develops laboratory, electrocardiogram, and echocardiogram abnormalities consistent with cardiomyopathy. Upon reinstitution of intrathecal baclofen, the cardiomyopathy and associated abnormalities quickly resolve. Although rare, it is crucial to be aware of this reversible cardiomyopathy to ensure its prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Psychological disorders in adults with inherited cardiomyopathies and Takotsubo syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suárez Bagnasco, Mariana; Núñez-Gil, Iván J

    2016-06-03

    We performed a narrative review about psychological disorders in adults with Takotsubo syndrome and inherited cardiomyopathies. Through the electronic database PubMed and PsycINFO we searched all relevant related manuscripts published between 2000 and 2015. We found twelve studies that explore psychological disorders in Takotsubo syndrome and eight about inherited cardiomyopathies: five enrolled patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, two dilated cardiomyopathy, and one arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. All papers reported the presence of psychological disorders. In Takotsubo syndrome, depression fluctuates between 20.5 and 48% and anxiety was present among 26 and 56%. A study reported that anxiety increases the probability of developing Takotsubo syndrome. In dilated cardiomyopathy, anxiety was present in 50% and depression in 22%. In arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, younger age, poorer functional capacity and having experienced at least one implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock, were significant independent predictors of both device-specific and generalized anxiety. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, anxiety and depression were present in 45.2% and 17.9%, respectively. Thirty seven percent met diagnostic criteria for anxiety disorders and 21% for mood disorders. Nearby half hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients report triggering of chest pain, dyspnea, and dizziness by emotional stress. Due to the small number of studies, conclusions are limited. However, we discuss some results.

  19. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Malley, Tamir; Watson, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the case of a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who was admitted to hospital for an elective autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant after cytotoxic treatment with lomustine, cytarabine, cyclophosphomide and etoposide (LACE). On the final day of chemotherapeutic treatment, she developed sudden onset dyspnoea. Electrocardiography confirmed acute antero-lateral T-wave inversion. She went onto have coronary angiography that demonstrated unobstructed coronary arteries. Left ventriculography demonstrated apical ballooning, consistent with Takotsubo (stress) cardiomyopathy. The link between chemotherapy and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has become increasingly recognized in recent years, although causality remains to be established and the mechanism of action is not yet fully understood. PMID:27066260

  20. Targets for therapy in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tardiff, Jil C.; Carrier, Lucie; Bers, Donald M.; Poggesi, Corrado; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Maier, Lars S.; Ashrafian, Houman; Huke, Sabine; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    To date, no compounds or interventions exist that treat or prevent sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. Established therapies currently improve the outcome, but novel therapies may be able to more fundamentally affect the disease process and course. Investigations of the pathomechanisms are generating molecular insights that can be useful for the design of novel specific drugs suitable for clinical use. As perturbations in the heart are stage-specific, proper timing of drug treatment is essential to prevent initiation and progression of cardiac disease in mutation carrier individuals. In this review, we emphasize potential novel therapies which may prevent, delay, or even reverse hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by sarcomeric gene mutations. These include corrections of genetic defects, altered sarcomere function, perturbations in intracellular ion homeostasis, and impaired myocardial energetics. PMID:25634554

  1. Cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, James A

    2004-09-01

    The pericardium envelopes the cardiac chambers and under physiological conditions exerts subtle functions, including mechanical effects that enhance normal ventricular interactions that contribute to balancing left and right cardiac outputs. Because the pericardium is non-compliant, conditions that cause intrapericardial crowding elevate intrapericardial pressure, which may be the mediator of adverse cardiac compressive effects. Elevated intrapericardial pressure may result from primary disease of the pericardium itself (tamponade or constriction) or from abrupt chamber dilatation (eg, right ventricular infarction). Regardless of the mechanism leading to increased intrapericardial pressure, the resultant pericardial constraint exerts adverse effects on cardiac filling and output. Constriction and restrictive cardiomyopathy share common pathophysiological and clinical features; their differentiation can be quite challenging. This review will consider the physiology of the normal pericardium and its dynamic interactions with the heart and review in detail the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  2. What About Tachycardia-induced Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Ethan R; Josephson, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    Long-standing tachycardia is a well-recognised cause of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, and has led to the nomenclature, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC). TIC is generally a reversible cardiomyopathy if the causative tachycardia can be treated effectively, either with medications, surgery or catheter ablation. The diagnosis is usually made after demonstrating recovery of left ventricular function with normalisation of heart rate in the absence of other identifiable aetiologies. One hundred years after the first reported case of TIC, our understanding of the pathophysiology of TIC in humans remains limited despite extensive work in animal models of TIC. In this review we will discuss the proposed mechanisms of TIC, the causative tachyarrhythmias and their treatment, outcomes for patients diagnosed with TIC, and future directions for research and clinical care. PMID:26835045

  3. Targets for therapy in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Tardiff, Jil C; Carrier, Lucie; Bers, Donald M; Poggesi, Corrado; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Maier, Lars S; Ashrafian, Houman; Huke, Sabine; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-04-01

    To date, no compounds or interventions exist that treat or prevent sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. Established therapies currently improve the outcome, but novel therapies may be able to more fundamentally affect the disease process and course. Investigations of the pathomechanisms are generating molecular insights that can be useful for the design of novel specific drugs suitable for clinical use. As perturbations in the heart are stage-specific, proper timing of drug treatment is essential to prevent initiation and progression of cardiac disease in mutation carrier individuals. In this review, we emphasize potential novel therapies which may prevent, delay, or even reverse hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by sarcomeric gene mutations. These include corrections of genetic defects, altered sarcomere function, perturbations in intracellular ion homeostasis, and impaired myocardial energetics. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Developments in the management of Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Spray, David C; Friedman, Joel M; Weiss, Oren S; Lora, Jose N; Nagajyothi, Jyothi; Moraes, Diego N; Garg, Nisha Jain; Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P

    2015-12-01

    Over 100 years have elapsed since the discovery of Chagas disease and there is still much to learn regarding pathogenesis and treatment. Although there are antiparasitic drugs available, such as benznidazole and nifurtimox, they are not totally reliable and often toxic. A recently released negative clinical trial with benznidazole in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy further reinforces the concerns regarding its effectiveness. New drugs and new delivery systems, including those based on nanotechnology, are being sought. Although vaccine development is still in its infancy, the reality of a therapeutic vaccine remains a challenge. New ECG methods may help to recognize patients prone to developing malignant ventricular arrhythmias. The management of heart failure, stroke and arrhythmias also remains a challenge. Although animal experiments have suggested that stem cell based therapy may be therapeutic in the management of heart failure in Chagas cardiomyopathy, clinical trials have not been promising.

  5. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cavayero, Chase; Kar, Pran; Kar, Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Although originally considered to be uncommon, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is becoming increasingly visible, annually comprising an increasing portion of suspected diagnoses of acute coronary syndrome. This condition is characterized by reversible left ventricular akinesis without significant coronary artery obstruction. This case study presents five patients diagnosed with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, as confirmed by echocardiogram and angiography. All of the patients presented with classic myocardial chest pain and elevated troponins. Following diagnosis, they were treated with supportive measures, particularly angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and beta-blockers. All patients made a full recovery. Though the mechanism of Takotsubo has not been fully elucidated, hypotheses suggest it may be related to excessive catecholamine levels causing either myocardial stunning or coronary vasospasm. Recognition and understanding of this unusual pathology are essential because it can lead to improved clinical management. PMID:27446769

  6. [Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: Cause of a Cardiogenic Shock].

    PubMed

    Fevereiro, Maria do Carmo; Simões, Maria Inês; Lampreia, Fátima; Marcão, Isabel; Godinho, António; Lopes, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, of unknown etiology, is characterized by sudden and transient systolic dysfunction of the mid-apical segments of the left ventricle without significant coronary disease, and full normalization of segmental changes. More common in middle-aged women, it is cause of differential diagnosis with acute coronary syndrome. We present the case of a 59 year old woman admitted to the emergency room with sudden chest pain and dyspnea. At presentation: acute hypotensive pulmonary edema requiring aminergic support and invasive ventilation. Blood tests showed elevated necrosis myocardial enzymes. Serial electrocardiograms: sinus rhythm with progressive inversion of the T wave through the precordial leads (v2 - v6). Control echocardiograms: overall decreased systolic function with apical akinesia, and full reversal of the changes in 2 weeks. Cardiogenic shock of unknown etiology was admitted and a coronary computed tomography angiography was performed excluding coronary heart disease, supporting the diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  7. Developments in the management of Chagas cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Spray, David C; Friedman, Joel M; Weiss, Oren S; Lora, Jose N; Nagajyothi, Jyothi; Moraes, Diego N; Garg, Nisha Jain; Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P

    2016-01-01

    Over 100 years have elapsed since the discovery of Chagas disease and there is still much to learn regarding pathogenesis and treatment. Although there are antiparasitic drugs available, such as benznidazole and nifurtimox, they are not totally reliable and often toxic. A recently released negative clinical trial with benznidazole in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy further reinforces the concerns regarding its effectiveness. New drugs and new delivery systems, including those based on nanotechnology, are being sought. Although vaccine development is still in its infancy, the reality of a therapeutic vaccine remains a challenge. New ECG methods may help to recognize patients prone to developing malignant ventricular arrhythmias. The management of heart failure, stroke and arrhythmias also remains a challenge. Although animal experiments have suggested that stem cell based therapy may be therapeutic in the management of heart failure in Chagas cardiomyopathy, clinical trials have not been promising. PMID:26496376

  8. The broken heart syndrome: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Peters, Matthew N; George, Praveen; Irimpen, Anand M

    2015-05-01

    First described in 1990, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy consists of a transient systolic dysfunction of localized segments of the left ventricle. Commonly occurring in postmenopausal women, Takotsubo is often associated with intense physical and/or emotional stress. It is traditionally identified by distinctive wall motion patterns on transthoracic echocardiogram and left ventriculography. Further understanding of the disease mechanisms and recognition of at-risk populations has potentially tremendous therapeutic benefit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Symmetrical peripheral gangrene associated with peripartum cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jaryal, Ajay; Raina, Sujeet; Thakur, Surender; Sontakke, Tushar

    2013-01-01

    Symmetrical peripheral gangrene (SPG) is a rare clinical entity. It was first described in late 19th century and since then has been reported with array of medical conditions mainly those complicated with shock, sepsis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Here in, we describe a parturient with peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) and SPG. Clinicians should be aware of this entity as early recognition can help in reducing morbidity and mortality. PMID:23984243

  10. An obstetric emergency called peripartum cardiomyopathy!

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare obstetric emergency affecting women in late pregnancy or up to five months of postpartum period. The etiology of PPCM is still not known. It has potentially devastating effects on mother and fetus if not treated early. The signs, symptoms and treatment of PPCM are similar to that of heart failure. Early diagnosis and proper management is the corner stone for better outcome of these patients. The only way to prevent PPCM is to avoid further pregnancies.

  11. Evolving molecular diagnostics for familial cardiomyopathies: at the heart of it all.

    PubMed

    Callis, Thomas E; Jensen, Brian C; Weck, Karen E; Willis, Monte S

    2010-04-01

    Cardiomyopathies are an important and heterogeneous group of common cardiac diseases. An increasing number of cardiomyopathies are now recognized to have familial forms, which result from single-gene mutations that render a Mendelian inheritance pattern, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. Recently, clinical genetic tests for familial cardiomyopathies have become available for clinicians evaluating and treating patients with these diseases, making it necessary to understand the current progress and challenges in cardiomyopathy genetics and diagnostics. In this review, we summarize the genetic basis of selected cardiomyopathies, describe the clinical utility of genetic testing for cardiomyopathies and outline the current challenges and emerging developments.

  12. Evolving molecular diagnostics for familial cardiomyopathies: at the heart of it all

    PubMed Central

    Callis, Thomas E; Jensen, Brian C; Weck, Karen E; Willis, Monte S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are an important and heterogeneous group of common cardiac diseases. An increasing number of cardiomyopathies are now recognized to have familial forms, which result from single-gene mutations that render a Mendelian inheritance pattern, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. Recently, clinical genetic tests for familial cardiomyopathies have become available for clinicians evaluating and treating patients with these diseases, making it necessary to understand the current progress and challenges in cardiomyopathy genetics and diagnostics. In this review, we summarize the genetic basis of selected cardiomyopathies, describe the clinical utility of genetic testing for cardiomyopathies and outline the current challenges and emerging developments. PMID:20370590

  13. Cardiomyopathy Phenotypes and Outcomes for Children with Left Ventricular Myocardial Noncompaction: Results from the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, John L.; Wilkinson, James D.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Colan, Steven D.; Lu, Minmin; Pahl, Elfriede; Kantor, Paul F.; Everitt, Melanie D.; Webber, Steven A.; Kaufman, Beth D.; Lamour, Jacqueline M.; Canter, Charles E.; Hsu, Daphne T.; Addonizio, Linda J.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a distinct form of cardiomyopathy characterized by hypertrabeculation of the left ventricle. The LVNC phenotype may occur in isolation or with other cardiomyopathy phenotypes. Prognosis is incompletely characterized in children. Methods and Results Using diagnoses from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry from 1990-2008, 155 of 3219 children (4.8%) had LVNC. Each LVNC patient was also classified as having an associated echocardiographically diagnosed cardiomyopathy phenotype (dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), isolated, or indeterminate). The time to death or transplant differed among the phenotypic groups (P = 0.035). Time to listing for cardiac transplantation significantly differed by phenotype (P < 0.001), as did time to transplantation (P = 0.015). The hazard ratio for death/transplant (with isolated LVNC as the reference group) was 4.26 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 23.3) for HCM, 6.35 (95% CI, 1.52 to 26.6) for DCM, and 5.66 (95% CI, 1.04 to 30.9) for the indeterminate phenotype. Most events occurred in the first year after diagnosis. Conclusion LVNC is present in at least 5% of children with cardiomyopathy. The specific LVNC-associated cardiomyopathy phenotype predicts the risk of death/transplant and should inform clinical management. PMID:26164213

  14. SPARC–Dependent Cardiomyopathy in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Bodmer, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Background— The Drosophila heart is an important model for studying the genetics underpinning mammalian cardiac function. The system comprises contractile cardiomyocytes, adjacent to which are pairs of highly endocytic pericardial nephrocytes that modulate cardiac function by uncharacterized mechanisms. Identifying these mechanisms and the molecules involved is important because they may be relevant to human cardiac physiology. Methods and Results— This work aimed to identify circulating cardiomodulatory factors of potential relevance to humans using the Drosophila nephrocyte–cardiomyocyte system. A Kruppel-like factor 15 (dKlf15) loss-of-function strategy was used to ablate nephrocytes and then heart function and the hemolymph proteome were analyzed. Ablation of nephrocytes led to a severe cardiomyopathy characterized by a lengthening of diastolic interval. Rendering adult nephrocytes dysfunctional by disrupting their endocytic function or temporally conditional knockdown of dKlf15 led to a similar cardiomyopathy. Proteomics revealed that nephrocytes regulate the circulating levels of many secreted proteins, the most notable of which was the evolutionarily conserved matricellular protein Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC), a protein involved in mammalian cardiac function. Finally, reducing SPARC gene dosage ameliorated the cardiomyopathy that developed in the absence of nephrocytes. Conclusions— The data implicate SPARC in the noncell autonomous control of cardiac function in Drosophila and suggest that modulation of SPARC gene expression may ameliorate cardiac dysfunction in humans. PMID:26839388

  15. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys (Aotus spp.).

    PubMed

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly.

  16. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Owl Monkeys (Aotus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly. PMID:23759531

  17. Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy: Immunopathology and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chevillard, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in Latin America and affects ca. 10 million people worldwide. About 30% of Chagas disease patients develop chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), a particularly lethal inflammatory cardiomyopathy that occurs decades after the initial infection, while most patients remain asymptomatic. Mortality rate is higher than that of noninflammatory cardiomyopathy. CCC heart lesions present a Th1 T-cell-rich myocarditis, with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and prominent fibrosis. Data suggest that the myocarditis plays a major pathogenetic role in disease progression. Major unmet goals include the thorough understanding of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic targets and identification of prognostic genetic factors. Chagas disease thus remains a neglected disease, with no vaccines or antiparasitic drugs proven efficient in chronically infected adults, when most patients are diagnosed. Both familial aggregation of CCC cases and the fact that only 30% of infected patients develop CCC suggest there might be a genetic component to disease susceptibility. Moreover, previous case-control studies have identified some genes associated to human susceptibility to CCC. In this paper, we will review the immunopathogenesis and genetics of Chagas disease, highlighting studies that shed light on the differential progression of Chagas disease patients to CCC. PMID:25210230

  18. Desmin-related cardiomyopathy: an unfolding story

    PubMed Central

    McLendon, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    The intermediate filament protein desmin is an integral component of the cardiomyocyte and serves to maintain the overall structure and cytoskeletal organization within striated muscle cells. Desmin-related myopathy can be caused by mutations in desmin or associated proteins, which leads to intracellular accumulation of misfolded protein and production of soluble pre-amyloid oligomers, which leads to weakened skeletal and cardiac muscle. In this review, we examine the cellular phenotypes in relevant animal models of desmin-related cardiomyopathy. These models display characteristic sarcoplasmic protein aggregates. Aberrant protein aggregation leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, abnormal metabolism, and altered cardiomyocyte structure. These deficits to cardiomyocyte function may stem from impaired cellular proteolytic mechanisms. The data obtained from these models allow a more complete picture of the pathology in desmin-related cardiomyopathy to be described. Moreover, these studies highlight the importance of desmin in maintaining cardiomyocyte structure and illustrate how disrupting this network can be deleterious to the heart. We emphasize the similarities observed between desmin-related cardiomyopathy and other protein conformational disorders and speculate that therapies to treat this disease may be broadly applicable to diverse protein aggregation-based disorders. PMID:21784990

  19. Desmin-related cardiomyopathy: an unfolding story.

    PubMed

    McLendon, Patrick M; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2011-10-01

    The intermediate filament protein desmin is an integral component of the cardiomyocyte and serves to maintain the overall structure and cytoskeletal organization within striated muscle cells. Desmin-related myopathy can be caused by mutations in desmin or associated proteins, which leads to intracellular accumulation of misfolded protein and production of soluble pre-amyloid oligomers, which leads to weakened skeletal and cardiac muscle. In this review, we examine the cellular phenotypes in relevant animal models of desmin-related cardiomyopathy. These models display characteristic sarcoplasmic protein aggregates. Aberrant protein aggregation leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, abnormal metabolism, and altered cardiomyocyte structure. These deficits to cardiomyocyte function may stem from impaired cellular proteolytic mechanisms. The data obtained from these models allow a more complete picture of the pathology in desmin-related cardiomyopathy to be described. Moreover, these studies highlight the importance of desmin in maintaining cardiomyocyte structure and illustrate how disrupting this network can be deleterious to the heart. We emphasize the similarities observed between desmin-related cardiomyopathy and other protein conformational disorders and speculate that therapies to treat this disease may be broadly applicable to diverse protein aggregation-based disorders.

  20. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy From a Genetic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Chizuko A; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2016-07-25

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare, but life-threatening condition that occurs during the peripartum period in previously healthy women. Although its etiology remains unknown, potential risk factors include hypertensive disorders during pregnancy, such as preeclampsia, advanced maternal age, multiparity, multiple gestation, and African descent. Several cohort studies of PPCM revealed that the prevalence of these risk factors was quite similar. Clinically, approximately 40% of PPCM patients are complicated with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Because PPCM is a diagnosis of exclusion, heterogeneity is a common element in its pathogenesis. Recent genetic research has given us new aspects of the disease. PPCM and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) share genetic predisposition: 15% of PPCM patients were found to have genetic mutations that have been associated with DCM, and they showed a lower recovery rate. Other basic research using PPCM model mice suggests that predisposition genes related to both hypertensive and cardiac disorders via angiogenic imbalance may explain common elements of hypertensive disorders and PPCM. Furthermore, hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are now found to be a risk factor of not only PPCM, but also cardiomyopathy in the future. Understanding genetic variations allows us to stratify PPCM patients and to guide therapy. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1684-1688).

  1. Genetic mutations and mechanisms in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Golbus, Jessica R; Puckelwartz, Megan J

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mutations account for a significant percentage of cardiomyopathies, which are a leading cause of congestive heart failure. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cardiac output is limited by the thickened myocardium through impaired filling and outflow. Mutations in the genes encoding the thick filament components myosin heavy chain and myosin binding protein C (MYH7 and MYBPC3) together explain 75% of inherited HCMs, leading to the observation that HCM is a disease of the sarcomere. Many mutations are "private" or rare variants, often unique to families. In contrast, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is far more genetically heterogeneous, with mutations in genes encoding cytoskeletal, nucleoskeletal, mitochondrial, and calcium-handling proteins. DCM is characterized by enlarged ventricular dimensions and impaired systolic and diastolic function. Private mutations account for most DCMs, with few hotspots or recurring mutations. More than 50 single genes are linked to inherited DCM, including many genes that also link to HCM. Relatively few clinical clues guide the diagnosis of inherited DCM, but emerging evidence supports the use of genetic testing to identify those patients at risk for faster disease progression, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmia.

  2. Two different cardiomyopathies in a single patient : hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Sunbul, M; Ozben, B; Mutlu, B

    2013-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a complex and relatively common genetic disorder characterized by left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, usually associated with a nondilated and hyperdynamic chamber with heterogeneous phenotypic expression and clinical course. On the other hand, LV noncompaction is an uncommon cardiomyopathy characterized by the persistence of fetal myocardium with a pattern of prominent trabecular meshwork and deep intertrabecular recesses, systolic dysfunction, and LV dilatation. We report a 29-year-old man with these two different inherent conditions. Our case raises the possibility of a genetic mutation common to these two clinical entities or different gene mutations existing in the same individual.

  3. Shared Genetic Predisposition in Peripartum and Dilated Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Ware, James S; Li, Jian; Mazaika, Erica; Yasso, Christopher M; DeSouza, Tiffany; Cappola, Thomas P; Tsai, Emily J; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Kamiya, Chizuko A; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A; Halder, Indrani; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pisarcik, Jessica; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Alharethi, Rami; Damp, Julie; Hsich, Eileen; Elkayam, Uri; Sheppard, Richard; Kealey, Angela; Alexis, Jeffrey; Ramani, Gautam; Safirstein, Jordan; Boehmer, John; Pauly, Daniel F; Wittstein, Ilan S; Thohan, Vinay; Zucker, Mark J; Liu, Peter; Gorcsan, John; McNamara, Dennis M; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-21

    Background Peripartum cardiomyopathy shares some clinical features with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a disorder caused by mutations in more than 40 genes, including TTN, which encodes the sarcomere protein titin. Methods In 172 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, we sequenced 43 genes with variants that have been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We compared the prevalence of different variant types (nonsense, frameshift, and splicing) in these women with the prevalence of such variants in persons with dilated cardiomyopathy and with population controls. Results We identified 26 distinct, rare truncating variants in eight genes among women with peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of truncating variants (26 in 172 [15%]) was significantly higher than that in a reference population of 60,706 persons (4.7%, P=1.3×10(-7)) but was similar to that in a cohort of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (55 of 332 patients [17%], P=0.81). Two thirds of identified truncating variants were in TTN, as seen in 10% of the patients and in 1.4% of the reference population (P=2.7×10(-10)); almost all TTN variants were located in the titin A-band. Seven of the TTN truncating variants were previously reported in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In a clinically well-characterized cohort of 83 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, the presence of TTN truncating variants was significantly correlated with a lower ejection fraction at 1-year follow-up (P=0.005). Conclusions The distribution of truncating variants in a large series of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy was remarkably similar to that found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. TTN truncating variants were the most prevalent genetic predisposition in each disorder.

  4. Shared Genetic Predisposition in Peripartum and Dilated Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ware, James S.; Li, Jian; Mazaika, Erica; Yasso, Christopher M.; DeSouza, Tiffany; Cappola, Thomas P.; Tsai, Emily J.; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Kamiya, Chizuko A.; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A.; Halder, Indrani; Prasad, Sanjay K.; Pisarcik, Jessica; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Alharethi, Rami; Damp, Julie; Hsich, Eileen; Elkayam, Uri; Sheppard, Richard; Kealey, Angela; Alexis, Jeffrey; Ramani, Gautam; Safirstein, Jordan; Boehmer, John; Pauly, Daniel F.; Wittstein, Ilan S.; Thohan, Vinay; Zucker, Mark J.; Liu, Peter; Gorcsan, John; McNamara, Dennis M.; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Peripartum cardiomyopathy shares some clinical features with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a disorder caused by mutations in more than 40 genes, including TTN, which encodes the sarcomere protein titin. METHODS In 172 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, we sequenced 43 genes with variants that have been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We compared the prevalence of different variant types (nonsense, frameshift, and splicing) in these women with the prevalence of such variants in persons with dilated cardiomyopathy and with population controls. RESULTS We identified 26 distinct, rare truncating variants in eight genes among women with peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of truncating variants (26 in 172 [15%]) was significantly higher than that in a reference population of 60,706 persons (4.7%, P = 1.3×10−7) but was similar to that in a cohort of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (55 of 332 patients [17%], P = 0.81). Two thirds of identified truncating variants were in TTN, as seen in 10% of the patients and in 1.4% of the reference population (P = 2.7×10−10); almost all TTN variants were located in the titin A-band. Seven of the TTN truncating variants were previously reported in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In a clinically well-characterized cohort of 83 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, the presence of TTN truncating variants was significantly correlated with a lower ejection fraction at 1-year follow-up (P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS The distribution of truncating variants in a large series of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy was remarkably similar to that found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. TTN truncating variants were the most prevalent genetic predisposition in each disorder. PMID:26735901

  5. Biallelic Truncating Mutations in ALPK3 Cause Severe Pediatric Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Almomani, Rowida; Verhagen, Judith M A; Herkert, Johanna C; Brosens, Erwin; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Asimaki, Angeliki; van der Zwaag, Paul A; Frohn-Mulder, Ingrid M E; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Boven, Ludolf G; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon A; van der Smagt, Jasper J; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Timmer, Bert; van Stuijvenberg, Margriet; Verdijk, Rob M; Saffitz, Jeffrey E; du Plessis, Frederik A; Michels, Michelle; Hofstra, Robert M W; Sinke, Richard J; van Tintelen, J Peter; Wessels, Marja W; Jongbloed, Jan D H; van de Laar, Ingrid M B H

    2016-02-09

    Cardiomyopathies are usually inherited and predominantly affect adults, but they can also present in childhood. Although our understanding of the molecular basis of pediatric cardiomyopathy has improved, the underlying mechanism remains elusive in a substantial proportion of cases. This study aimed to identify new genes involved in pediatric cardiomyopathy. The authors performed homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in 2 consanguineous families with idiopathic pediatric cardiomyopathy. Sixty unrelated patients with pediatric cardiomyopathy were subsequently screened for mutations in a candidate gene. First-degree relatives were submitted to cardiac screening and cascade genetic testing. Myocardial samples from 2 patients were processed for histological and immunohistochemical studies. We identified 5 patients from 3 unrelated families with pediatric cardiomyopathy caused by homozygous truncating mutations in ALPK3, a gene encoding a nuclear kinase that plays an essential role in early differentiation of cardiomyocytes. All patients with biallelic mutations presented with severe hypertrophic and/or dilated cardiomyopathy in utero, at birth, or in early childhood. Three patients died from heart failure within the first week of life. Moreover, 2 of 10 (20%) heterozygous family members showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with an atypical distribution of hypertrophy. Deficiency of alpha-kinase 3 has previously been associated with features of both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy in mice. Consistent with studies in knockout mice, we provide microscopic evidence for intercalated disc remodeling. Biallelic truncating mutations in the newly identified gene ALPK3 give rise to severe, early-onset cardiomyopathy in humans. Our findings highlight the importance of transcription factor pathways in the molecular mechanisms underlying human cardiomyopathies. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pregnancy-Associated Cardiomyopathy in Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Melissa R.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Green, Daniel M.; Howard, Scott C.; Krasin, Matthew; Metzger, Monika L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Current information regarding pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy among women treated for childhood cancer is insufficient to appropriately guide counseling and patient management. This study aims to characterize its prevalence within a large cohort of females exposed to cardiotoxic therapy. Methods Retrospective cohort study of female cancer survivors treated at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital between 1963 and 2006, at least 5 years from diagnosis, ≥ 13 years old at last follow-up, and with at least one successful pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy was defined as shortening fraction < 28% or ejection fraction < 50% or treatment for cardiomyopathy during or up to 5 months after completion of pregnancy. Results Among 847 female cancer survivors with 1554 completed pregnancies only 3 (0.3%) developed pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy, 40 developed non-pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy either 5 months post-partum (n=14), or prior to pregnancy (n=26). Among those with cardiomyopathy prior to pregnancy (n=26), cardiac function deteriorated during pregnancy in 8 patients (3 patients with normalization of cardiac function prior to pregnancy, 3 with persistently abnormal cardiac function, and 2 for whom resolution of cardiomyopathy was unknown prior to pregnancy). Patients that developed cardiomyopathy recevied a higher median dose of anthracyclines compared to those that did not (321 mg/m2 versus 164 mg/m2; p< 0.01). Conclusions Pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy in childhood cancer survivors is rare. Implications for cancer survivors Most female childhood cancer survivors will have no cardiac complications during or after childbirth, however those with a history of cardiotoxic therapies should be followed carefully during pregnancy particularly those with a history of anthracycline exposures and if they had documented previous or current subclinical or symptomatic cardiomyopathy. Female childhood cancer survivors with a history of

  7. High morphological variation of vestibular system accompanies slow and infrequent locomotion in three-toed sloths.

    PubMed

    Billet, Guillaume; Hautier, Lionel; Asher, Robert J; Schwarz, Cathrin; Crumpton, Nick; Martin, Thomas; Ruf, Irina

    2012-10-07

    The semicircular canals (SCs), part of the vestibular apparatus of the inner ear, are directly involved in the detection of angular motion of the head for maintaining balance, and exhibit adaptive patterns for locomotor behaviour. Consequently, they are generally believed to show low levels of intraspecific morphological variation, but few studies have investigated this assumption. On the basis of high-resolution computed tomography, we present here, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive study of the pattern of variation of the inner ear with a focus on Xenarthra. Our study demonstrates that extant three-toed sloths show a high level of morphological variation of the bony labyrinth of the inner ear. Especially, the variation in shape, relative size and angles of their SCs greatly differ from those of other, faster-moving taxa within Xenarthra and Placentalia in general. The unique pattern of variation in three-toed sloths suggests that a release of selection and/or constraints on their organ of balance is associated with the observed wide range of phenotypes. This release is coincident with their slow and infrequent locomotion and may be related, among other possible factors, to a reduced functional demand for a precise sensitivity to movement.

  8. Development of new drug strategies in infrequent digestive tumors: esophageal, biliary tract, and anal cancers.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Jaume; Ramos, Francisco Javier; Macarulla, Teresa; Elez, Elena; Ruiz-Echarri, Manuel; Perez-Garcia, Jose; Tabernero, Josep

    2009-07-01

    In the last years, interesting advances have been reported in the treatment of infrequent digestive tumors. The increasing development of new targeted therapies in human cancer has also impacted in these rare gastrointestinal malignancies providing a wide range of possibilities in the design of future clinical trials. The inhibition of angiogenesis and the blockage of the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway have provided the most interesting activity in recently reported studies for esophageal and biliary tract carcinomas. Additionally, several targeted therapies have been developed to target the main kinase proteins of the most important pathways of these malignancies. The results of the biggest phase III trial in locally advanced anal carcinoma have been recently published. Finally, the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor has also showed promising activity in anal carcinomas. Recent advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis have led to meaningful changes in the management of gastrointestinal cancers. Although the major advances in targeted therapy have been introduced in the treatment of colorectal cancer, new interesting approaches have been reported in less frequent gastrointestinal tumors such as esophageal, biliary tract, and anal canal carcinoma opening a new hope in the treatment of these rare tumors in the molecular targeted therapy era.

  9. Halothane, an effective infrequently used drug, in the treatment of pediatric status asthmaticus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Ruben D; Pettignano, Robert; DeMeuse, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Despite a better understanding of the disease process and its management, status asthmaticus continues to be a life-threatening event. The use of volatile inhaled anesthetics is infrequently reported as adjunctive therapy to conventional treatment of this condition. We report the use of halothane in a mechanically ventilated pediatric patient with life-threatening status asthmaticus who was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) after failing to respond to standard medical therapy and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. A 12-year-old African American male was seen in the emergency department and treated with intravenous corticosteroids, beta-agonist therapy. He deteriorated rapidly and required endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Two hours later, the patient developed an acute, severe respiratory acidosis (pH=6.97, PaCO2=171, PaO2=162, BE=1.7). Halothane was started at 2% by using the Siemens Servo 900C anesthesia ventilator. Improvement in both arterial blood gases and exhaled tidal volume were noted 30 minutes after initiation of the anesthetic gas. The patient remained on halothane for a total of 36 hours. No adverse effects associated with the use of halothane were noted. The patient was extubated to BiPAP 16/6, FiO2=0.30 at 68 hours and was discharged home 5 days later.

  10. High morphological variation of vestibular system accompanies slow and infrequent locomotion in three-toed sloths

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Guillaume; Hautier, Lionel; Asher, Robert J.; Schwarz, Cathrin; Crumpton, Nick; Martin, Thomas; Ruf, Irina

    2012-01-01

    The semicircular canals (SCs), part of the vestibular apparatus of the inner ear, are directly involved in the detection of angular motion of the head for maintaining balance, and exhibit adaptive patterns for locomotor behaviour. Consequently, they are generally believed to show low levels of intraspecific morphological variation, but few studies have investigated this assumption. On the basis of high-resolution computed tomography, we present here, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive study of the pattern of variation of the inner ear with a focus on Xenarthra. Our study demonstrates that extant three-toed sloths show a high level of morphological variation of the bony labyrinth of the inner ear. Especially, the variation in shape, relative size and angles of their SCs greatly differ from those of other, faster-moving taxa within Xenarthra and Placentalia in general. The unique pattern of variation in three-toed sloths suggests that a release of selection and/or constraints on their organ of balance is associated with the observed wide range of phenotypes. This release is coincident with their slow and infrequent locomotion and may be related, among other possible factors, to a reduced functional demand for a precise sensitivity to movement. PMID:22859594

  11. Infrequent occurrence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in poultry from Malaysian wet markets.

    PubMed

    Ong, C H S; Asaad, M; Lim, K C; Ngeow, Y F

    2002-12-01

    Fifty samples of chicken, duck and geese faeces were obtained from 13 wet markets in Kuala Lumpur to study the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) among local market poultry. Biotyping of colonies grown on azide agar incubated at 45 degrees C yielded E. pseudoavium, E. faecalis, E. faecium and E. gallinarum from chicken faeces and E. malodoratus, E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. gallinarum, E. hirae/dispar, and E. durans from goose and duck faeces. On agar containing 6 mg/ l of vancomycin, one strain of E. flavescens was identified, giving a VRE detection rate of 2.0%. This isolate had a vancomycin M.I.C. of 8 mg/l as determined by the Etest, and the van C-3 gene that was identified by PCR followed by sequence analysis. The prevalence of VRE among poultry sold in local markets appears to be low, and may reflect the infrequent use of antimicrobials in our poultry farms. Nevertheless, the possibility of human acquisition of microbes via the food chain cautions against the use of antimicrobials in animal husbandry that may encourage the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant organisms like the VRE among animal microbial flora.

  12. Using naturalistic driving data to identify variables associated with infrequent, occasional, and consistent seat belt use.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Ian J; McClafferty, Julie A; Berlin, Sharon P; Hankey, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Seat belt use is one of the most effective countermeasures to reduce traffic fatalities and injuries. The success of efforts to increase use is measured by road side observations and self-report questionnaires. These methods have shortcomings, with the former requiring a binary point estimate and the latter being subjective. The 100-car naturalistic driving study presented a unique opportunity to study seat belt use in that seat belt status was known for every trip each driver made during a 12-month period. Drivers were grouped into infrequent, occasional, or consistent seat belt users based on the frequency of belt use. Analyses were then completed to assess if these groups differed on several measures including personality, demographics, self-reported driving style variables as well as measures from the 100-car study instrumentation suite (average trip speed, trips per day). In addition, detailed analyses of the occasional belt user group were completed to identify factors that were predictive of occasional belt users wearing their belts. The analyses indicated that consistent seat belt users took fewer trips per day, and that increased average trip speed was associated with increased belt use among occasional belt users. The results of this project may help focus messaging efforts to convert occasional and inconsistent seat belt users to consistent users.

  13. The risk of unblinding was infrequently and incompletely reported in 300 randomized clinical trial publications.

    PubMed

    Bello, Segun; Moustgaard, Helene; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2014-10-01

    To assess the proportion of clinical trials explicitly reporting the risk of unblinding, to evaluate the completeness of reporting on unblinding risk, and to describe the reported procedures involved in assessing unblinding. We sampled at random 300 blinded randomized clinical trials indexed in PubMed in 2010. Two authors read the trial publications and extracted data independently. Twenty-four trial publications, or 8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5, 12%), explicitly reported the risk of unblinding, of which 16 publications, or 5% (95% CI, 3, 8%), reported compromised blinding; and 8 publications, or 3% (95% CI, 1, 5%), intact blinding. The reporting on risk of unblinding in the 24 trial publications was generally incomplete. The median proportion of assessments per trial affected by unblinding was 3% (range 1-30%). The most common mechanism for unblinding was perceptible physical properties of the treatments, for example, a difference in the taste and odor of a typhoid vaccine compared with its placebo. Published articles on randomized clinical trials infrequently reported risk of unblinding. This may reflect a tendency for avoiding reporting actual or suspected unblinding or a genuine low risk of unblinding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The more, the better? Behavioral and neural correlates of frequent and infrequent vowel exposure.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sho; Fikkert, Paula; Minagawa, Yasuyo; Dupoux, Emmanuel; Filippin, Luca; Versteegh, Maarten; Hagoort, Peter; Cristia, Alejandrina

    2017-07-01

    A central assumption in the perceptual attunement literature holds that exposure to a speech sound contrast leads to improvement in native speech sound processing. However, whether the amount of exposure matters for this process has not been put to a direct test. We elucidated indicators of frequency-dependent perceptual attunement by comparing 5-8-month-old Dutch infants' discrimination of tokens containing a highly frequent [hɪt-he:t] and a highly infrequent [hʏt-hø:t] native vowel contrast as well as a non-native [hɛt-haet] vowel contrast in a behavioral visual habituation paradigm (Experiment 1). Infants discriminated both native contrasts similarly well, but did not discriminate the non-native contrast. We sought further evidence for subtle differences in the processing of the two native contrasts using near-infrared spectroscopy and a within-participant design (Experiment 2). The neuroimaging data did not provide additional evidence that responses to native contrasts are modulated by frequency of exposure. These results suggest that even large differences in exposure to a native contrast may not directly translate to behavioral and neural indicators of perceptual attunement, raising the possibility that frequency of exposure does not influence improvements in discriminating native contrasts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Incidence of appropriate cardioverter-defibrillator shocks and mortality in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators with ischemic cardiomyopathy versus nonischemic cardiomyopathy at 33-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Kaushang; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Desai, Harit; Amin, Harshad; Lai, Hoang M.; Frishman, William H.; Cohen, Martin; Sorbera, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to investigate at long-term follow-up the incidence of appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shocks and of all-cause mortality in patients with ICDs with ischemic cardiomyopathy versus nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Material and methods ICDs were implanted in 485 patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and in 299 patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy, all of whom had coronary angiography. Baseline characteristics were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Follow-up was 965 days in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy versus 1039 days in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy (p not significant). The ICDs were interrogated every 3 months to see if shocks occurred. Results Appropriate ICD shocks occurred in 179 of 485 patients (37%) with ischemic cardiomyopathy and in 93 of 299 patients (31%) with nonischemic cardiomyopathy (p not significant). All-cause mortality occurred in 162 of 485 patients (33%) with ischemic cardiomyopathy and in 70 of 299 patients (23%) with nonischemic cardiomyopathy (p = 0.002). Conclusions The incidence of appropriate ICD shocks was not significantly different at 33-month follow-up in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy versus nonischemic cardiomyopathy. However, patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy had a significantly higher incidence of all-cause mortality than patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy (p = 0.002). PMID:22427764

  16. Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Attributed to Adult Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Kyung; Park, Won Hyeong; Song, Dae-Geun; Kim, Tae Gyoon; Min, Bo Young; Lee, Keun

    2009-01-01

    In patients with myotonic dystrophy (MD), impairment of the conduction system is a common and progressive finding. However, only a few cases of MD with cardiomyopathy have been reported. Herein we report a case of MD with progressive non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and severe electrocardiographic abnormalities. PMID:19949641

  17. Lessons learned from the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry (PCMR) Study Group.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, James D; Westphal, Joslyn A; Bansal, Neha; Czachor, Jason D; Razoky, Hiedy; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2015-08-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a rare disorder of the heart muscle, affecting 1.13 cases per 100,000 children, from birth to 18 years of age. Cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of heart transplantation in children over the age of 1. The Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry funded in 1994 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute was established to examine the epidemiology of the disease in children below 18 years of age. More than 3500 children across the United States and Canada have been enrolled in the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, which has followed-up these patients until death, heart transplantation, or loss to follow-up. The Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry has provided the most in-depth illustration of this disease regarding its aetiology, clinical course, associated risk factors, and patient outcomes. Data from the registry have helped in guiding the clinical management of cardiomyopathy in children under 18 years of age; however, questions still remain regarding the most clinically effective diagnostic and treatment approaches for these patients. Future directions of the registry include the use of next-generation whole-exome sequencing and cardiac biomarkers to identify aetiology-specific treatments and improve diagnostic strategies. This article provides a brief synopsis of the work carried out by the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry since its inception, including the current knowledge on the aetiologies, outcomes, and treatments of cardiomyopathy in children.

  18. Reverse takotsubo cardiomyopathy with use of male enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Saifuddin, Fatima; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Said, Sarmad; Gough, David; Siddiqui, Tariq; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Abbas, Aamer

    2015-01-01

    Reverse takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare heart failure condition characterized by systolic dysfunction of the basal segments of the left ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. We present a case of a 54-year-old man with an overdose of Extenze (a male enhancer pill containing yohimbine) who was hospitalized with heart failure due to reverse takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:25552809

  19. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Emily E.; Johnson, Sara W.; Nguyen, Phu; Kang, Christopher; Mallon, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is an unusual form of acute cardiomyopathy showing left ventricular apical ballooning. It is often triggered by intense physical or emotional distress. We report here four cases of TCM and a review of the literature on the topic. PMID:19561716

  20. Psychosocial impact of specialized cardiac genetic clinics for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Lind, Joanne M; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Semsarian, Christopher

    2008-02-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, an autosomal dominant chronic heart disease, can have significant implications, including increased risk of sudden death, exercise limitations, and risk of transmission to offspring. This study sought to describe the psychosocial factors associated with attending a specialty cardiac genetic clinic, and to determine whether these may be predictors of comorbid anxiety and depression in this population. Questionnaires were sent to 184 individuals attending the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic. Questionnaires were anonymous and comprised demographics, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Patient Experience Scales, and Patient Satisfaction Scales. Completed questionnaires were returned by 109 participants (59.2% response rate), of which 76.9% had a diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, while 23.1% were at-risk relatives attending for clinical screening. Patient satisfaction scores were generally high to very high across all groups, though only 24% of HCM patients showed good adjustment to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 10% had low worry about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy scores. Within the disease group, logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, gender, and education revealed adjustment to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and worry about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy scores to be significantly associated with anxiety, while adjustment scores and location of patient follow-up (i.e., Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy clinic or another cardiologist) to be significantly associated with depression scores. HCM patients who attend specialized cardiac genetic clinics are better adjusted and worry less, than those who do not attend. An integrated approach, including a genetic counselor, is important in the management of HCM families.

  1. Discriminating Malingered from Genuine Civilian Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Validation of Three MMPI-2 Infrequency Scales (F, Fp, and Fptsd)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elhai, Jon D.; Naifeh, James A.; Zucker, Irene S.; Gold, Steven N.; Deitsch, Sarah E.; Frueh, B. Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The Infrequency-Posttraumatic Stress Disorder scale (Fptsd), recently created for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), has demonstrated incremental validity over other MMPI-2 scales in malingered posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) detection. Fptsd was developed with combat-exposed PTSD patients, potentially limiting its…

  2. Discriminating Malingered from Genuine Civilian Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Validation of Three MMPI-2 Infrequency Scales (F, Fp, and Fptsd)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elhai, Jon D.; Naifeh, James A.; Zucker, Irene S.; Gold, Steven N.; Deitsch, Sarah E.; Frueh, B. Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The Infrequency-Posttraumatic Stress Disorder scale (Fptsd), recently created for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), has demonstrated incremental validity over other MMPI-2 scales in malingered posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) detection. Fptsd was developed with combat-exposed PTSD patients, potentially limiting its…

  3. [The benefit of magnetic resonance for diagnosing cardiomyopathy and myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Fikrle, Michal; Kuchynka, Petr; Mašek, Martin; Podzimková, Jana; Kuchař, Jan; Linhart, Aleš; Paleček, Tomáš

    Magnetic resonance is becoming an increasingly used examination in cardiology, since it greatly improves the accuracy of diagnosing of many heart diseases. At present magnetic resonance is the gold standard in assessing the volumes of the heart chambers and the systolic function of both ventricles. The possibility of detecting tissue characteristics to refine the diagnostics of different types of myocardial pathology is of essential importance. The authors summarize in the article the present knowledge about the use of magnetic resonance of the heart in the field of myocardial disease, i.e. cardiomyopathy and myocarditis. The first part of the review gives a general introduction into the topic of magnetic resonance examination of myocardial diseases, which is followed by a detailed descrip-tion of the benefits of this imaging method in dilated cardiomyopathy and myocarditis,in hypertrophic cardio-myopathy, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.Key words: fibrosis - cardiomyopathy - magnetic resonance - myocarditis - late contrast agent saturation.

  4. Hypertension, tachycardia, and reversible cardiomyopathy temporally associated with milnacipran use.

    PubMed

    Forman, Mervyn B; Sutej, Paul G; Jackson, Edwin K

    2011-01-01

    Elevated catecholamine levels are a well-recognized cause of various types of cardiomyopathy. Causes of catecholamine elevation include tumors, toxins, drugs, emotional stress, and sepsis. Milnacipran is a dual and equipotent inhibitor of norepinephrine and serotonin uptake. It is frequently prescribed as therapy for fibromyalgia, and the drug has a good safety profile. Herein, we report the case of a 42-year-old woman with undefined connective-tissue disease and fibromyalgia who developed a severe and reversible cardiomyopathy while taking recommended doses of milnacipran. The cardiomyopathy was associated with a hyperadrenergic state manifested by tachycardia, hypertension, and elevated plasma catecholamine levels. The discontinuation of milnacipran and the initiation of anti-failure therapy resulted in complete resolution of the cardiomyopathy in 6 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report of milnacipran as a possible cause of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy.

  5. Patient with Eating Disorder, Carnitine Deficiency and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fotino, A Domnica; Sherma, A

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by a dilated and poorly functioning left ventricle and can result from several different etiologies including ischemic, infectious, metabolic, toxins, autoimmune processes or nutritional deficiencies. Carnitine deficiency-induced cardiomyopathy (CDIM) is an uncommon cause of dilated cardiomyopathy that can go untreated if not considered. Here, we describe a 30-year-old woman with an eating disorder and recent percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy (PEG) tube placement for weight loss admitted to the hospital for possible PEG tube infection. Carnitine level was found to be low. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed ejection fraction 15%. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis from a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). She was discharged on a beta-blocker and carnitine supplementation. One month later her cardiac function had normalized. Carnitine deficiency-induced myopathy is an unusual cause of cardiomyopathy and should be considered in adults with decreased oral intake or malabsorption who present with cardiomyopathy.

  6. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Complicating Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation in a Child.

    PubMed

    Dalla Pozza, Robert; Lehner, Anja; Ulrich, Sarah; Näbauer, Michael; Haas, Nikolaus A; Heineking, B

    2017-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy describes a sudden onset cardiomyopathy with acute impairment of left ventricular function and spontaneous resolution over time. Only a few cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in childhood have been described. We report the case of a 12-year-old girl with repaired tetralogy of Fallot who experienced acute onset of left ventricular dysfunction without coronary arterial involvement, suggesting Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, during an interventional catheterization procedure. Cardiogenic shock necessitated mechanical circulatory support with extracorporeal membrane oxygenator for ten days and mechanical ventilation for 12 days. The girl recovered without sequelae. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation was performed four months later without complications. Unusual aspects of this case include the use of mechanical circulatory support during the recovery phase of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  7. Myocardial recovery in peripartum cardiomyopathy: prospective comparison with recent onset cardiomyopathy in men and nonperipartum women.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leslie T; Mather, Paul J; Alexis, Jeffrey D; Pauly, Daniel F; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Wittstein, Ilan S; Dec, G William; Zucker, Mark; Narula, Jagat; Kip, Kevin; McNamara, Dennis M

    2012-01-01

    Whether myocardial recovery occurs more frequently in peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) than in recent onset cardiomyopathies in men and nonperipartum women has not been prospectively evaluated. This was examined through an analysis of outcomes in the Intervention in Myocarditis and Acute Cardiomyopathy 2 (IMAC2) registry. IMAC2 enrolled 373 subjects with recent onset nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was assessed at entry and 6 months, and subjects followed for up to 4 years. Myocardial recovery was compared between men (group 1), nonperipartum women (group 2) and subjects with PPCM (group 3). The cohort included 230 subjects in group 1, 104 in group 2, and 39 in group 3. The mean LVEF at baseline in groups 1, 2, and 3 was 0.23 ± 0.08, 0.24 ± 0.08, and 0.27 ± 0.07 (P = .04), and at 6 months was 0.39 ± 0.12, 0.42 ± 0.11, and 0.45 ± 0.14 (P = .007). Subjects in group 3 had a much greater likelihood of achieving an LVEF >0.50 at 6 months than groups 1 or 2 (19 %, 34%, and 48% respectively, P = .002). Prospective evaluation confirms myocardial recovery is greatest in women with PPCM, poorest in men, and intermediate in nonperipartum women. On contemporary therapy, nearly half of women with PPCM normalize cardiac function by 6 months. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry: The rationale and design of an international, observational study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christopher M; Appelbaum, Evan; Desai, Milind Y; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; DiMarco, John P; Friedrich, Matthias G; Geller, Nancy; Heckler, Sarahfaye; Ho, Carolyn Y; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ivey, Elizabeth A; Keleti, Julianna; Kim, Dong-Yun; Kolm, Paul; Kwong, Raymond Y; Maron, Martin S; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Piechnik, Stefan; Watkins, Hugh; Weintraub, William S; Wu, Pan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic heart disease with a frequency as high as 1 in 200. In many cases, HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding the different components of the sarcomere apparatus. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, myofibrillar disarray, and myocardial fibrosis. The phenotypic expression is quite variable. Although most patients with HCM are asymptomatic, serious consequences are experienced in a subset of affected individuals who present initially with sudden cardiac death or progress to refractory heart failure. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry study is a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored 2,750-patient, 44-site, international registry and natural history study designed to address limitations in extant evidence to improve prognostication in HCM (NCT01915615). In addition to the collection of standard demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic variables, patients will undergo state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance for assessment of left ventricular mass and volumes as well as replacement scarring and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, genetic and biomarker analyses will be performed. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry has the potential to change the paradigm of risk stratification in HCM, using novel markers to identify those at higher risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Blinded Outcome Assessment Was Infrequently Used and Poorly Reported in Open Trials.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Brennan C; Rehal, Sunita; Cro, Suzie

    2015-01-01

    Unblinded outcome assessment can lead to biased estimates of treatment effect in randomised trials. We reviewed published trials to assess how often blinded assessment is used, and whether its use varies according to the type of outcome or assessor. A review of parallel group, individually randomised phase III trials published in four general medical journals (BMJ, Journal of the American Medical Association, The Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine) in 2010. Whether assessment of the primary outcome was blinded, and whether this differed according to outcome or assessor type. We identified 258 eligible trials. Of these, 106 (41%) were reported as double-blind, and 152 (59%) as partially or fully open-label (that is, they included some groups who were unblinded, such as patients, those delivering the intervention, or those in charge of medical care). Of the 152 open trials, 125 required outcome assessment. Of these 125 trials, only 26% stated that outcome assessment was blinded; 51% gave no information on whether assessment was blinded or not. Furthermore, 18% of trials did not state who performed the assessment. The choice of outcome type (e.g. instrument measured, rated, or naturally occurring event) did not appear to influence whether blinded assessment was performed (range 24-32% for the most common outcome types). However, the choice of outcome assessor did influence blinding; independent assessors were blinded much more frequently (71%) than participant (5%) or physician (24%) assessors. Despite this, open trials did not use independent assessors any more frequently than double-blind trials (17% vs. 18% respectively). Blinding of outcome assessors is infrequently used and poorly reported. Increased use of independent assessors could increase the frequency of blinded assessment.

  10. Blinded Outcome Assessment Was Infrequently Used and Poorly Reported in Open Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Brennan C.; Rehal, Sunita; Cro, Suzie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Unblinded outcome assessment can lead to biased estimates of treatment effect in randomised trials. We reviewed published trials to assess how often blinded assessment is used, and whether its use varies according to the type of outcome or assessor. Design and setting A review of parallel group, individually randomised phase III trials published in four general medical journals (BMJ, Journal of the American Medical Association, The Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine) in 2010. Main outcome measures Whether assessment of the primary outcome was blinded, and whether this differed according to outcome or assessor type. Results We identified 258 eligible trials. Of these, 106 (41%) were reported as double-blind, and 152 (59%) as partially or fully open-label (that is, they included some groups who were unblinded, such as patients, those delivering the intervention, or those in charge of medical care). Of the 152 open trials, 125 required outcome assessment. Of these 125 trials, only 26% stated that outcome assessment was blinded; 51% gave no information on whether assessment was blinded or not. Furthermore, 18% of trials did not state who performed the assessment. The choice of outcome type (e.g. instrument measured, rated, or naturally occurring event) did not appear to influence whether blinded assessment was performed (range 24-32% for the most common outcome types). However, the choice of outcome assessor did influence blinding; independent assessors were blinded much more frequently (71%) than participant (5%) or physician (24%) assessors. Despite this, open trials did not use independent assessors any more frequently than double-blind trials (17% vs. 18% respectively). Conclusions Blinding of outcome assessors is infrequently used and poorly reported. Increased use of independent assessors could increase the frequency of blinded assessment. PMID:26120839

  11. Infrequent Reservoir‐Related Complications of Urologic Prosthetics: A Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Terlecki, Ryan; Mirzazadeh, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction and Aim Complications related to inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) and artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) reservoirs are rare, potentially life threatening, and poorly described in the literature. As more devices are implanted, the incidence of reservoir‐related complications may increase, and it will be important to recognize the relevant signs and symptoms. Methods and Main Outcome Measures We present a case series of reservoir‐related complications presenting to our institution for treatment. We also reviewed all accounts of reservoir‐related complications within the urologic literature Results Three cases of reservoir‐related complications are presented. Case 1 involves erosion of an intact AUS reservoir into the cecum of a patient with a history of myelomeningocele and bladder augmentation. Case 2 involves an IPP reservoir causing vascular compression, resulting in open exploration and repositioning of the reservoir. Case 3 involves intraperitoneal migration of a retained IPP reservoir to a subhepatic area, which was then removed laparoscopically. Literature review yielded descriptions of eight cases of intestinal complications, five cases of vascular complications, but zero reports of migration to a subhepatic area. Other notable complications include 20 reported cases of reservoir erosion into the bladder and inguinal herniation of the reservoir. Conclusion Complications involving urologic prosthesis reservoirs, although rare, can have serious implications for patients. A high index of suspicion and familiarity with treatment options is required in order to allow timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Patients with prior major abdominal surgeries seem to be more prone to intestinal complications of reservoirs and warrant special concern. Cui T, Terlecki R, and Mirzazadeh M. Infrequent reservoir‐related complications of urologic prosthetics: A case series and literature review. Sex Med 2015;3:334–338. PMID:26797069

  12. Infrequent Reservoir-Related Complications of Urologic Prosthetics: A Case Series and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cui, Tao; Terlecki, Ryan; Mirzazadeh, Majid

    2015-12-01

    Complications related to inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) and artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) reservoirs are rare, potentially life threatening, and poorly described in the literature. As more devices are implanted, the incidence of reservoir-related complications may increase, and it will be important to recognize the relevant signs and symptoms. We present a case series of reservoir-related complications presenting to our institution for treatment. We also reviewed all accounts of reservoir-related complications within the urologic literature. Three cases of reservoir-related complications are presented. Case 1 involves erosion of an intact AUS reservoir into the cecum of a patient with a history of myelomeningocele and bladder augmentation. Case 2 involves an IPP reservoir causing vascular compression, resulting in open exploration and repositioning of the reservoir. Case 3 involves intraperitoneal migration of a retained IPP reservoir to a subhepatic area, which was then removed laparoscopically. Literature review yielded descriptions of eight cases of intestinal complications, five cases of vascular complications, but zero reports of migration to a subhepatic area. Other notable complications include 20 reported cases of reservoir erosion into the bladder and inguinal herniation of the reservoir. Complications involving urologic prosthesis reservoirs, although rare, can have serious implications for patients. A high index of suspicion and familiarity with treatment options is required in order to allow timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Patients with prior major abdominal surgeries seem to be more prone to intestinal complications of reservoirs and warrant special concern. Cui T, Terlecki R, and Mirzazadeh M. Infrequent reservoir-related complications of urologic prosthetics: A case series and literature review. Sex Med 2015;3:334-338.

  13. Acute effects of THC on time perception in frequent and infrequent cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Sewell, R Andrew; Schnakenberg, Ashley; Elander, Jacqueline; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Williams, Ashley; Skosnik, Patrick D; Pittman, Brian; Ranganathan, Mohini; D'Souza, D Cyril

    2013-03-01

    Cannabinoids have been shown to alter time perception, but existing literature has several limitations. Few studies have included both time estimation and production tasks, few control for subvocal counting, most had small sample sizes, some did not record subjects' cannabis use, many tested only one dose, and used either oral or inhaled administration of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), leading to variable pharmacokinetics, and some used whole-plant cannabis containing cannabinoids other than THC. Our study attempted to address these limitations. This study aims to characterize the acute effects of THC and frequent cannabis use on seconds-range time perception. THC was hypothesized to produce transient, dose-related time overestimation and underproduction. Frequent cannabis smokers were hypothesized to show blunted responses to these alterations. IV THC was administered at doses from 0.015 to 0.05 mg/kg to 44 subjects who participated in several double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, crossover, placebo-controlled studies. Visual time estimation and production tasks in the seconds range were presented to subjects three times on each test day. All doses induced time overestimation and underproduction. Chronic cannabis use had no effect on baseline time perception. While infrequent/nonsmokers showed temporal overestimation at medium and high doses and temporal underproduction at all doses, frequent cannabis users showed no differences. THC effects on time perception were not dose related. A psychoactive dose of THC increases internal clock speed as indicated by time overestimation and underproduction. This effect is not dose related and is blunted in chronic cannabis smokers who did not otherwise have altered baseline time perception.

  14. Discovery of African bat polyomaviruses and infrequent recombination in the large T antigen in the Polyomaviridae.

    PubMed

    Carr, Michael; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Sasaki, Michihito; Ito, Kimihito; Ishii, Akihiro; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Orba, Yasuko; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2017-04-01

    Bat species represent natural reservoirs for a number of high-consequence human pathogens. The present study investigated the diversity of polyomaviruses (PyVs) in Zambian insectivorous and fruit bat species. We describe the complete genomes from four newly proposed African bat PyV species employing the recently recommended criteria provided by the Polyomaviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. A comprehensive phylogenetic and recombination analysis was performed to determine genetic relationships and the distribution of recombination events in PyV from mammalian and avian species. The novel species of PyV from Zambian bats segregated with members of the genera Alphapolyomavirus and Betapolyomavirus, forming monophyletic clades with bat and non-human primate PyVs. Miniopterus schreibersii polyomavirus 1 and 2 segregated in a clade with South American bat PyV species, Old World monkey and chimpanzee PyVs and Human polyomavirus 13 (New Jersey PyV). Interestingly, the newly described Egyptian fruit bat PyV, tentatively named Rousettus aegyptiacus polyomavirus 1, had the highest nucleotide sequence identity to species of PyV from Indonesian fruit bats, and Rhinolophus hildebrandtii polyomavirus 1 was most closely related to New World monkey PyVs. The distribution of recombination events in PyV genomes was non-random: recombination boundaries existed in the intergene region between VP1 and LTAg and also at the 3' end of VP2/3 in the structural genes, whereas infrequent recombination was present within the LTAg gene. These findings indicate that recombination within the LTAg gene has been negatively selected against during polyomaviral evolution and support the recent proposal for taxonomic classification based on LTAg to define novel PyV species.

  15. The role of infrequent and extraordinary deep dives in leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea).

    PubMed

    Houghton, Jonathan D R; Doyle, Thomas K; Davenport, John; Wilson, Rory P; Hays, Graeme C

    2008-08-01

    Infrequent and exceptional behaviours can provide insight into the ecology and physiology of a particular species. Here we examined extraordinarily deep (300-1250 m) and protracted (>1h) dives made by critically endangered leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the context of three previously suggested hypotheses: predator evasion, thermoregulation and exploration for gelatinous prey. Data were obtained via satellite relay data loggers attached to adult turtles at nesting beaches (N=11) and temperate foraging grounds (N=2), constituting a combined tracking period of 9.6 years (N=26,146 dives) and spanning the entire North Atlantic Ocean. Of the dives, 99.6% (N=26,051) were to depths <300 m with only 0.4% (N=95) extending to greater depths (subsequently termed ;deep dives'). Analysis suggested that deep dives: (1) were normally distributed around midday; (2) may exceed the inferred aerobic dive limit for the species; (3) displayed slow vertical descent rates and protracted durations; (4) were much deeper than the thermocline; and (5) occurred predominantly during transit, yet ceased once seasonal residence on foraging grounds began. These findings support the hypothesis that deep dives are periodically employed to survey the water column for diurnally descending gelatinous prey. If a suitable patch is encountered then the turtle may cease transit and remain within that area, waiting for prey to approach the surface at night. If unsuccessful, then migration may continue until a more suitable site is encountered. Additional studies using a meta-analytical approach are nonetheless recommended to further resolve this matter.

  16. Dietary taurine deficiency and dilated cardiomyopathy in the fox.

    PubMed

    Moise, N S; Pacioretty, L M; Kallfelz, F A; Stipanuk, M H; King, J M; Gilmour, R F

    1991-02-01

    Taurine deficiency has been implicated as a potential cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the relationship between taurine and myocardial function is presently unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dilated cardiomyopathy in the fox is associated with dietary taurine deficiency. A total of 68 foxes from farms with a history of death caused by dilated cardiomyopathy and 14 foxes from a farm with no history of dilated cardiomyopathy were studied. Dilated cardiomyopathy was diagnosed by echocardiography in 48% of the foxes from one farm with a positive history and in none of the foxes from the control farm. Foxes less than 9 months of age were more commonly affected than older foxes (p = 0.03). Plasma taurine concentrations were significantly less (p less than 0.01) in foxes that had dilated cardiomyopathy (26.8 +/- 16.4 nmol/ml) than in the control foxes (99.3 +/- 60.2 nmol/ml). A significantly higher (p less than 0.01) incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy was present in foxes with a history of a sibling or offspring that died of dilated cardiomyopathy than in foxes without a family history of cardiac death. In one fox with dilated cardiomyopathy that was tested, the myocardial taurine concentration was lower (1.7 mumol/gm wet weight) than that of control foxes (7.3 +/- 1.6 mumol/gm wet weight). Hepatic cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase activity was significantly less (p less than 0.001) in foxes with dilated cardiomyopathy (0.97 +/- 0.2 nmol/mm.mg protein) than in control foxes (2.11 +/- 0.07 nmol CO2/mm.mg protein).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy in survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Hines, Melissa R; Mulrooney, Daniel A; Hudson, Melissa M; Ness, Kirsten K; Green, Daniel M; Howard, Scott C; Krasin, Matthew; Metzger, Monika L

    2016-02-01

    Current information regarding pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy among women treated for childhood cancer is insufficient to appropriately guide counseling and patient management. This study aims to characterize its prevalence within a large cohort of females exposed to cardiotoxic therapy. This is a retrospective cohort study of female cancer survivors treated at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital between 1963 and 2006, at least 5 years from diagnosis, ≥13 years old at last follow-up, and with at least one successful pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy was defined as shortening fraction <28 % or ejection fraction <50 % or treatment for cardiomyopathy during or up to 5 months after completion of pregnancy. Among the 847 female cancer survivors with 1554 completed pregnancies, only 3 (0.3 %) developed pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy and 40 developed non-pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy either 5 months postpartum (n = 14) or prior to pregnancy (n = 26). Among those with cardiomyopathy prior to pregnancy (n = 26), cardiac function deteriorated during pregnancy in eight patients (three patients with normalization of cardiac function prior to pregnancy, three with persistently abnormal cardiac function, and two for whom resolution of cardiomyopathy was unknown prior to pregnancy). Patients that developed cardiomyopathy received a higher median dose of anthracyclines compared to those that did not (321 versus 164 mg/m(2); p < 0.01). Pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy in childhood cancer survivors is rare. Most female childhood cancer survivors will have no cardiac complications during or after childbirth; however, those with a history of cardiotoxic therapies should be followed carefully during pregnancy, particularly those with a history of anthracycline exposures and if they had documented previous or current subclinical or symptomatic cardiomyopathy.

  18. Left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy: updated review.

    PubMed

    Udeoji, Dioma U; Philip, Kiran J; Morrissey, Ryan P; Phan, Anita; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2013-10-01

    The first case of noncompaction was described in 1932 after an autopsy performed on a newborn infant with aortic atresia/coronary-ventricular fistula. Isolated noncompaction cardiomyopathy was first described in 1984. A review on selected/relevant medical literature was conducted using Pubmed from 1984 to 2013 and the pathogenesis, clinical features, and management are discussed. Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a relatively rare congenital condition that results from arrest of the normal compaction process of the myocardium during fetal development. LVNC shows variability in its genetic pattern, pathophysiologic findings, and clinical presentations. The genetic heterogeneity, phenotypical overlap, and variety in clinical presentation raised the suspicion that LVNC might just be a morphological variant of other cardiomyopathies, but the American Heart Association classifies LVNC as a primary genetic cardiomyopathy. The familiar type is common and follows a X-linked, autosomal-dominant, or mitochondrial-inheritance pattern (in children). LVNC can occur in isolation or coexist with other cardiac and/or systemic anomalies. The clinical presentations are variable ranging from asymptomatic patients to patients who develop ventricular arrhythmias, thromboembolism, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. Increased awareness over the last 25 years and improvements in technology have increased the identification of this illness and improved the clinical outcome and prognosis. LVNC is commonly diagnosed by echocardiography. Other useful diagnostic techniques for LVNC include cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography, and left ventriculography. Management is symptom based and patients with symptoms have a poorer prognosis. LVNC is a genetically heterogeneous disorder which can be associated with other anomalies. Making the correct diagnosis is important because of the possible associations and the need for long-term management and screening of

  19. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy simulating an infiltrative myocardial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, A; Loperfido, F; Pennestrì, F

    1985-01-01

    Congestive heart failure developed in a patient with low electrocardiographic QRS voltages, diffuse thickening of the septum and free cardiac wall, and a reduction in left ventricular internal diameter, which suggested an infiltrative heart muscle disease. Histological examination at necropsy showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with symmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy. Myocardial disarray of type 1A disorganisation was extensive and equally distributed in the ventricular septum and the left anterior and left posterior ventricular free walls. Severe fibrosis (40%) was also present and may have been a possible cause of the electrocardiographic abnormalities as well as of the lack of ventricular dilatation. Images PMID:4041302

  20. Molecular biology of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Umlauf, J; Horký, M

    2002-01-01

    The anthracycline doxorubicin is an antineoplastic agent, eliciting chronic cardiac toxicity. It occurs in patients after prolonged administration of doxorubicin, leading to congestive heart failure. The pathogenesis of the doxorubicin-induced car-diomyopathy is not well understood. The present article summarizes the unique effect of doxorubicin on cardiac-specific gene expression. In addition to binding to DNA, doxorubicin directly affects the function of a variety of proteins. Free radical generation, damage to mitochondria and active cell death are also critical in the development of doxorubicin-induced cardiac toxicity. Agents providing effective cardioprotection are also reviewed. PMID:19644577

  1. Dilated cardiomyopathy and inclusion body myositis.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Chiodi, Leandro; Cameli, Matteo; Malandrini, Alessandro; Federico, Antonio; Mondillo, Sergio; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-04-01

    Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is the most common inflammatory myopathy after 50 years of age. In contrast to polymyositis and dermatomyositis, in which cardiac involvement is relatively common, current evidences indicate that IBM is not associated with cardiac disease. We report the case of a patient with biopsy-proven IBM who developed heart failure and major ventricular arrhythmias secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy few months after the clinical onset of IBM, and in whom no pathophysiologic causes explaining cardiac enlargement and dysfunction were found by laboratory and instrumental investigations. The hypothesis of a pathophysiologic association between the two conditions is discussed.

  2. Diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, Annina S; Perez-Tome, Maria Carrillo; Castelletti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is complex and includes a variety of phenotypes, which leads to different types of manifestations. Although most of the patients are asymptomatic, a significant proportion of them will develop symptoms or risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Therefore, the objectives of HCM diagnosis and management are to relieve the patients' symptoms (chest pain, heart failure, syncope, palpitations, etc.), prevent disease progression and major cardiovascular complications and SCD. The heterogeneity of HCM patterns, their symptoms and assessment is a challenge for the cardiologist. PMID:26693331

  3. Screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cats.

    PubMed

    Häggström, Jens; Luis Fuentes, Virginia; Wess, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats, and it can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Cats are often screened for HCM because of the presence of a heart murmur, but screening for breeding purposes has also become common. These cats are usually purebred cats of breeding age, and generally do not present with severe disease or with any clinical signs. This type of screening is particularly challenging because mild disease may be difficult to differentiate from a normal phenotype, and the margin for error is small, with potentially major consequences for the breeder. This article reviews HCM screening methods, with particular emphasis on echocardiography.

  4. Cardiomyopathy induced by incessant fascicular ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Rodríguez, Enrique; Rodríguez-Piña, Horacio; Pacheco-Bouthillier, Alex; Deras-Mejía, Luz María

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl with symptoms of fatigue, decreased exercise tolerance and progressive dyspnea (New York Heart Association functional class III) with a possible diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to viral myocarditis. Because of incessant wide QRS tachycardia refractory to antiarrhythmic drugs, she was referred for electrophysiological study. The diagnosis was idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia involving the posterior fascicle of the left bundle branch. After successful treatment with radiofrequency catheter ablation guided by a Purkinje potential radiological and echocardiographic evaluation showed complete reversal of left ventricular function in the first 3 months and no recurrence of arrhythmia during 2 years of follow up.

  5. [Ocra Method: development of a new procedure for analysis of multiple tasks subject to infrequent rotation].

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, E; Colombini, Daniela; Occhipinti, M

    2008-01-01

    In the Ocra methods (Ocra index and Ocra Checklist), when computing the final indices (Ocra index or checklist score), in the case of more than one repetitive task a "traditional" procedure was already proposed, the results of which could be defined as "time-weighted average". This approach appears to be appropriate when considering rotations among tasks that are performed very frequently, for instance almost once every hour (or for shorter periods). However, when rotation among repetitive tasks is less frequent (i.e. once every 1 1/2 or more hours), the "time-weighted average" approach could result in an underestimation of the exposure level (as it practically flattens peaks of high exposures). For those scenarios an alternative approach based on the "most stressful task as minimum" might be more realistic. This latter approach has already been included in the NIOSH approach for multiple sequential lifting tasks and, given the recent availability in the Ocra method of more detailed duration multipliers (practically one different Du(M) for each different step of one hour of duration of the repetitive task), it is now possible to define a particular procedure to compute the complex Ocra Multitask Index (cOCRA) and the complex Checklist Score (cCHESCO) for the analysis of two or more repetitive tasks when rotations are infrequent (rotations every 1 1/2 hours or more). The result of this approach will be at least equal to the index of the most stressful task considered for its individual daily duration and at the most equal to the index of the most stressful task when it is (only theoretically) considered as lasting for the overall daily duration of all examined repetitive tasks. The procedure is based on the following formula: Complex Ocra Multitask Index = Ocra(1(Dum1) + (Delta ocra1xK) where 1,2,3,...,N = repetitive tasks ordered by ocra index values (1 = highest; N = lowest) computed considering respective real duration multipliers (Dum(i)). ocra1 = ocra index of

  6. Multiple Sclerosis Presents with Psychotic Symptoms and Coexists with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Muhammed Emin; İnce, Bahri; Karadeli, Hasan Hüseyin; Asil, Talip

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Psychiatric symptoms are not infrequent during MS, yet onset of MS with psychosis is rarely encountered. A 27-year-old Caucasian male was admitted due to numbness in his right arm and difficulty in walking. His clinical and laboratorial exams lead to the MS diagnosis. Nine months earlier, he also developed psychotic disorder, not otherwise specified (PD-NOS). His sudden onset of PD-NOS, his rapid and complete response to antipsychotics, and a relatively short interval between psychiatric and neurological signs indicate a high likelihood that PD-NOS was a manifestation of underlying MS. He also suffers from hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). The patient's neurological complaints were recovered with methylprednisolone (1 g/day, i.v.) given for five days. Glatiramer acetate (1 × 1 tb.s.c.) was prescribed for consolidation and, after nine months of his admission, the patient fully recovered from neurological and psychiatric complaints. Interestingly, very recent studies indicate specific alpha-actinin antibodies in MS and alpha-actinin mutations cause HOCM. Thus, concurrence of MS with HOCM can be even a new syndrome, if further genetic studies prove. PMID:25197588

  7. Molecular Characterization of Pediatric Restrictive Cardiomyopathy from Integrative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Rindler, Tara N.; Hinton, Robert B.; Salomonis, Nathan; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a genetically heterogeneous heart disease with limited therapeutic options. RCM cases are largely idiopathic; however, even within families with a known genetic cause for cardiomyopathy, there is striking variability in disease severity. Although accumulating evidence implicates both gene expression and alternative splicing in development of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), there have been no detailed molecular characterizations of underlying pathways dysregulated in RCM. RNA-Seq on a cohort of pediatric RCM patients compared to other forms of adult cardiomyopathy and controls identified transcriptional differences highly common to the cardiomyopathies, as well as those unique to RCM. Transcripts selectively induced in RCM include many known and novel G-protein coupled receptors linked to calcium handling and contractile regulation. In-depth comparisons of alternative splicing revealed splicing events shared among cardiomyopathy subtypes, as well as those linked solely to RCM. Genes identified with altered alternative splicing implicate RBM20, a DCM splicing factor, as a potential mediator of alternative splicing in RCM. We present the first comprehensive report on molecular pathways dysregulated in pediatric RCM including unique/shared pathways identified compared to other cardiomyopathy subtypes and demonstrate that disruption of alternative splicing patterns in pediatric RCM occurs in the inverse direction as DCM. PMID:28098235

  8. Prospect of gene therapy for cardiomyopathy in hereditary muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Binalsheikh, Ibrahim M.; Leach, Stacey B.; Domeier, Timothy L.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac involvement is a common feature in muscular dystrophies. It presents as heart failure and/or arrhythmia. Traditionally, dystrophic cardiomyopathy is treated with symptom-relieving medications. Identification of disease-causing genes and investigation on pathogenic mechanisms have opened new opportunities to treat dystrophic cardiomyopathy with gene therapy. Replacing/repairing the mutated gene and/or targeting the pathogenic process/mechanisms using alternative genes may attenuate heart disease in muscular dystrophies. Areas covered Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common muscular dystrophy. Duchenne cardiomyopathy has been the primary focus of ongoing dystrophic cardiomyopathy gene therapy studies. Here, we use Duchenne cardiomyopathy gene therapy to showcase recent developments and to outline the path forward. We also discuss gene therapy status for cardiomyopathy associated with limb-girdle and congenital muscular dystrophies, and myotonic dystrophy. Expert opinion Gene therapy for dystrophic cardiomyopathy has taken a slow but steady path forward. Preclinical studies over the last decades have addressed many fundamental questions. Adeno-associated virus-mediated gene therapy has significantly improved the outcomes in rodent models of Duchenne and limb girdle muscular dystrophies. Validation of these encouraging results in large animal models will pave the way to future human trials. PMID:27340611

  9. Molecular Characterization of Pediatric Restrictive Cardiomyopathy from Integrative Genomics.

    PubMed

    Rindler, Tara N; Hinton, Robert B; Salomonis, Nathan; Ware, Stephanie M

    2017-01-18

    Pediatric restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a genetically heterogeneous heart disease with limited therapeutic options. RCM cases are largely idiopathic; however, even within families with a known genetic cause for cardiomyopathy, there is striking variability in disease severity. Although accumulating evidence implicates both gene expression and alternative splicing in development of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), there have been no detailed molecular characterizations of underlying pathways dysregulated in RCM. RNA-Seq on a cohort of pediatric RCM patients compared to other forms of adult cardiomyopathy and controls identified transcriptional differences highly common to the cardiomyopathies, as well as those unique to RCM. Transcripts selectively induced in RCM include many known and novel G-protein coupled receptors linked to calcium handling and contractile regulation. In-depth comparisons of alternative splicing revealed splicing events shared among cardiomyopathy subtypes, as well as those linked solely to RCM. Genes identified with altered alternative splicing implicate RBM20, a DCM splicing factor, as a potential mediator of alternative splicing in RCM. We present the first comprehensive report on molecular pathways dysregulated in pediatric RCM including unique/shared pathways identified compared to other cardiomyopathy subtypes and demonstrate that disruption of alternative splicing patterns in pediatric RCM occurs in the inverse direction as DCM.

  10. Myocardial Fibrosis as an Early Manifestation of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; López, Begoña; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R.; Lakdawala, Neal K.; Cirino, Allison L.; Jarolim, Petr; Kwong, Raymond; González, Arantxa; Colan, Steven D.; Seidman, J.G.; Díez, Javier; Seidman, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Myocardial fibrosis is a hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a proposed substrate for arrhythmias and heart failure. In animal models, profibrotic genetic pathways are activated early, before hypertrophic remodeling. Data showing early profibrotic responses to sarcomere-gene mutations in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are lacking. METHODS We used echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and serum biomarkers of collagen metabolism, hemodynamic stress, and myocardial injury to evaluate subjects with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a confirmed genotype. RESULTS The study involved 38 subjects with pathogenic sarcomere mutations and overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 39 subjects with mutations but no left ventricular hypertrophy, and 30 controls who did not have mutations. Levels of serum C-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) were significantly higher in mutation carriers without left ventricular hypertrophy and in subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy than in controls (31% and 69% higher, respectively; P<0.001). The ratio of PICP to C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen was increased only in subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, suggesting that collagen synthesis exceeds degradation. Cardiac MRI studies showed late gadolinium enhancement, indicating myocardial fibrosis, in 71% of subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy but in none of the mutation carriers without left ventricular hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS Elevated levels of serum PICP indicated increased myocardial collagen synthesis in sarcomere-mutation carriers without overt disease. This profibrotic state preceded the development of left ventricular hypertrophy or fibrosis visible on MRI. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:20818890

  11. Clinical predictors of genetic testing outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Sarina, Tanya; Yeates, Laura; Hunt, Lauren; Macciocca, Ivan; McCormack, Louise; Winship, Ingrid; McGaughran, Julie; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    Genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been commercially available for almost a decade; however, low mutation detection rate and cost have hindered uptake. This study sought to identify clinical variables that can predict probands with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in whom a pathogenic mutation will be identified. Probands attending specialized cardiac genetic clinics across Australia over a 10-year period (2002-2011), who met clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and who underwent genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were included. Clinical, family history, and genotype information were collected. A total of 265 unrelated individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were included, with 138 (52%) having at least one mutation identified. The mutation detection rate was significantly higher in the probands with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with an established family history of disease (72 vs. 29%, P < 0.0001), and a positive family history of sudden cardiac death further increased the detection rate (89 vs. 59%, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified female gender, increased left-ventricular wall thickness, family history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and family history of sudden cardiac death as being associated with greatest chance of identifying a gene mutation. Multiple mutation carriers (n = 16, 6%) were more likely to have suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death (31 vs. 7%, P = 0.012). Family history is a key clinical predictor of a positive genetic diagnosis and has direct clinical relevance, particularly in the pretest genetic counseling setting.

  12. Cardiomyopathy Associated With Targeted Therapy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Kamesh; Rahman, Zia U; Paul, Timir

    2016-02-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents directed against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) have significantly improved the prognosis of patients who are positive for this receptor. However, cardiomyopathy remains as a common adverse effect of using these agents. Literature search was conducted via PubMed using the keywords of "Trastuzumab Cardiomyopathy," "Lapatinib Cardiomyopathy" and "Pertuzumab Cardiomyopathy," which provided 104 results. These articles were then screened for relevance to the targeted subject based on their title and abstracts. Case reports and articles that were not discussing any aspect of cardiomyopathy secondary to targeted therapy for breast cancer and articles not in English were eliminated. After elimination, a bibliography search among selected articles was done and a total of 46 articles were identified. The collected articles were then meticulously analyzed and summarized. The use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) receptor targeted chemotherapy in breast cancer is limited because of a higher incidence (19-22%) of cardiomyopathy. The incidence of cardiomyopathy is not dose dependent and in most cases it is reversible after discontinuation of the drug and treatment with heart failure medications. Severe adverse outcomes including death or permanent disability are rare. HER-2 targeted chemotherapy for breast cancer has a higher incidence of associated reversible cardiomyopathy. Patients should be monitored by serial echocardiography starting at the beginning of the treatment and followed by every 3 months until the completion of chemotherapy. Co-ordination between oncologists and cardiologists is needed to develop evidence-based protocols to prevent, identify, monitor and treat trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The risk of cardiomyopathy in inherited epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Fine, J-D; Hall, M; Weiner, M; Li, K-P; Suchindran, C

    2008-01-01

    Background Case reports have suggested that cardiomyopathy may be a complication of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). Objective To determine the risk of congestive heart failure (CHF) or cardiomyopathy in each major EB subtype. Methods These data represent systematic case findings and data collection performed throughout the continental United States from 1986 through 2002, by the National Epidermolysis Bullosa Registry. Study design is cross-sectional (n = 3280) with a nested randomly sampled longitudinal subcohort (n = 450). Frequencies of CHF and cardiomyopathy were determined by patient self-reporting, medical histories and review of medical records. In those who died, death certificates were reviewed and histories obtained from surviving family. Cumulative risks were stratified by cause and EB subtype. Results Cardiomyopathy was reported as early as within the first year of life. In patients having no other known risk factors for CHF or cardiomyopathy, the highest risk of cardiomyopathy was seen among patients with Hallopeau–Siemens RDEB (RDEB-HS), with a cumulative risk of 4·51% on or after age 20 years. The cumulative risk of cardiomyopathy was only 1·14% and 0·40% in non-Herlitz junctional EB (JEB) and non-Hallopeau–Siemens RDEB, respectively, and was not observed in any other EB subtype. When patients with coexistent chronic renal failure were included, the cumulative risk for RDEB-HS rose to 18·86% by age 35 years. About 30% of our patients affected with RDEB-HS died of CHF or cardiomyopathy, even those with no other known risk factors. Conclusions CHF and cardiomyopathy are uncommon complications in both major RDEB subtypes and non-Herlitz JEB, and may be fatal. PMID:18616785

  14. Primary Prevention of Sudden Death in Patients With Valvular Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; Barrio-López, María Teresa; Assi, Emad Abu; Expósito-García, Víctor; Bertomeu-González, Vicente; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan Miguel; González-Torres, Luis; García-Bolao, Ignacio; Gaztañaga, Larraitz; Cabanas-Grandío, Pilar; Iglesias-Bravo, José Antonio; Arce-León, Álvaro; la Huerta, Ana Andrés; Fernández-Armenta, Juan; Peinado, Rafael; Arias, Miguel Angel; Díaz-Infante, Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    Few data exist on the outcomes of valvular cardiomyopathy patients referred for defibrillator implantation for primary prevention. The aim of the present study was to describe the outcomes of this cardiomyopathy subgroup. This multicenter retrospective study included consecutive patients referred for defibrillator implantation to 15 Spanish centers in 2010 and 2011, and to 3 centers after 1 January 2008. Of 1174 patients, 73 (6.2%) had valvular cardiomyopathy. These patients had worse functional class, wider QRS, and a history of atrial fibrillation vs patients with ischemic (n=659; 56.1%) or dilated (n=442; 37.6%) cardiomyopathy. During a follow-up of 38.1 ± 21.3 months, 197 patients (16.7%) died, without significant differences among the groups (19.2% in the valvular cardiomyopathy group, 15.8% in the ischemic cardiomyopathy group, and 17.9% in the dilated cardiomyopathy group; P=.2); 136 died of cardiovascular causes (11.6%), without significant differences among the groups (12.3%, 10.5%, and 13.1%, respectively; P=.1). Although there were no differences in the proportion of appropriate defibrillator interventions (13.7%, 17.9%, and 18.8%; P=.4), there was a difference in inappropriate interventions (8.2%, 7.1%, and 12.0%, respectively; P=.03). All-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with valvular cardiomyopathy were similar to those in other patients referred for defibrillator implantation. They also had similar rates of appropriate interventions. These data suggest that defibrillator implantation in this patient group confers a similar benefit to that obtained by patients with ischemic or dilated cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Symptoms in women with Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: A mixed method study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Harshida; Berg, Marie; Barasa, Anders; Begley, Cecily; Schaufelberger, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Peripartum Cardiomyopathy is a form of cardiac disease often associated with cardiac failure, occurring in late pregnancy or after childbirth. The anatomical and physiological changes in the mother associated with normal pregnancy are profound, and this may result in symptoms and signs that overlap with Peripartum Cardiomyopathy, leading to missed or delayed diagnosis. Women's experiences of Peripartum Cardiomyopathy symptoms remain poorly studied. The aim of this study was to explore and describe women's experiences of symptoms in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy. A triangulation of methods with individual interviews and data from medical records. Mothers with Peripartum Cardiomyopathy diagnosis were recruited from Western Sweden as a part of research project. 19 women were interviewed and medical records were reviewed by authors. All interview transcripts were analysed using qualitative inductive content analysis to identify key themes. The main theme, meaning of onset and occurrence of symptoms is captured in the metaphor: being caught in a spider web, comprising subthemes, invasion of the body by experienced symptoms and feeling of helplessness. Symptoms related to Peripartum Cardiomyopathy started for 17 women during pregnancy and in two post partum and time from symptoms to diagnosis varied between three and 190 days (median 40). The physical symptoms were:shortness of breath, excessive fatigue and swelling, bloatedness, nausea, palpitation, coughing, chest tightness, bodily pain, headache, fever, tremor, dizziness, syncope, restless and tingly body and reduced urine output. Emotional symptoms were: fear, anxiety, feelings of panic, and thoughts of impending death. Symptoms of Peripartum Cardiomyopathy were debilitating, exhausting and frightening for the women interviewed in this study. Health care professionals responsible for the antenatal care, especially midwives, need skills to identify initial symptoms of Peripartum Cardiomyopathy for early referral and

  16. Genetic Variation in Cardiomyopathy and Cardiovascular Disorders.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Puckelwartz, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    With the wider deployment of massively-parallel, next-generation sequencing, it is now possible to survey human genome data for research and clinical purposes. The reduced cost of producing short-read sequencing has now shifted the burden to data analysis. Analysis of genome sequencing remains challenged by the complexity of the human genome, including redundancy and the repetitive nature of genome elements and the large amount of variation in individual genomes. Public databases of human genome sequences greatly facilitate interpretation of common and rare genetic variation, although linking database sequence information to detailed clinical information is limited by privacy and practical issues. Genetic variation is a rich source of knowledge for cardiovascular disease because many, if not all, cardiovascular disorders are highly heritable. The role of rare genetic variation in predicting risk and complications of cardiovascular diseases has been well established for hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, where the number of genes that are linked to these disorders is growing. Bolstered by family data, where genetic variants segregate with disease, rare variation can be linked to specific genetic variation that offers profound diagnostic information. Understanding genetic variation in cardiomyopathy is likely to help stratify forms of heart failure and guide therapy. Ultimately, genetic variation may be amenable to gene correction and gene editing strategies.

  17. Present Insights on Cardiomyopathy in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Felício, João Soares; Koury, Camila Cavalcante; Carvalho, Carolina Tavares; Neto, João Felício 
Abrahão; Miléo, Karem Barbosa; Arbage, Thaís Pontes; Silva, Denisson Dias; Ferreira de Oliveira, Alana; Peixoto, Amanda Soares; Junior, Antônio Bentes Figueiredo; Ribeiro dos Santos, Ândrea Kely Campos; Yamada, Elizabeth Sumi; Zanella, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is partially understood and is likely to be multifactorial, involving metabolic disturbances, hypertension and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN). Therefore, an important need remains to further delineate the basic mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy and to apply them to daily clinical practice. We attempt to detail some of these underlying mechanisms, focusing in the clinical features and management. The novelty of this review is the role of CAN and reduction of blood pressure descent during sleep in the development of DCM. Evidence has suggested that CAN might precede left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction in normotensive patients with type 2 diabetes, serving as an early marker for the evaluation of preclinical cardiac abnormalities. Additionally, a prospective study demonstrated that an elevation of nocturnal systolic blood pressure and a loss of nocturnal blood pressure fall might precede the onset of abnormal albuminuria and cardiovascular events in hypertensive normoalbuminuric patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, existing microalbuminuria could imply the presence of myocardium abnormalities. Considering that DCM could be asymptomatic for a long period and progress to irreversible cardiac damage, early recognition and treatment of the preclinical cardiac abnormalities are essential to avoid severe cardiovascular outcomes. In this sense, we recommend that all type 2 diabetic patients, especially those with microalbuminuria, should be regularly submitted to CAN tests, Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring and echocardiography, and treated for any abnormalities in these tests in the attempt of reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26364799

  18. Epidemiology and clinical profile of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Scott W; Maron, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    First described in Japan over 2 decades ago, takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) has emerged as a unique cardiomyopathy with world-wide recognition, mimicking acute coronary syndrome. In early TTC experience, typical patients were older women, with a triggering emotional event, ST-segment elevation, and apical ballooning left ventricular (LV) contraction pattern. However, TTC is now more heterogeneous, occurring in males and younger individuals, without ST-segment elevation, as a spontaneous event in the absence of a trigger, and with diverse LV contraction patterns. Furthermore, TTC is more common than initially thought, now constituting 10% of women with suspected acute coronary syndrome. TTC is also associated with a broader range of psychological or physical triggers, including presentation during outpatient medical evaluations or hospitalization for acute illness. Although TTC has been considered a benign condition, it now carries a small but important risk for adverse outcomes, including cardiac arrest in 5%. Hemodynamic instability requiring intervention with vasopressor drugs or intra-aortic balloon pump is necessary in 15% and in-hospital mortality is approximately 5%, largely because of refractory cardiogenic shock or irreversible major comorbid conditions. Although complete cardiac recovery usually occurs rapidly, post-hospital survival may be less than the general population of similar age, largely because of concomitant illnesses. TTC may reoccur in up to 10% of patients, but β-blocking drugs are not absolutely preventive for initial or subsequent events.

  19. Barth Syndrome: Connecting Cardiolipin to Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ikon, Nikita; Ryan, Robert O

    2017-02-01

    The Barth syndrome (BTHS) is caused by an inborn error of metabolism that manifests characteristic phenotypic features including altered mitochondrial membrane phospholipids, lactic acidosis, organic acid-uria, skeletal muscle weakness and cardiomyopathy. The underlying cause of BTHS has been definitively traced to mutations in the tafazzin (TAZ) gene locus on chromosome X. TAZ encodes a phospholipid transacylase that promotes cardiolipin acyl chain remodeling. Absence of tafazzin activity results in cardiolipin molecular species heterogeneity, increased levels of monolysocardiolipin and lower cardiolipin abundance. In skeletal muscle and cardiac tissue mitochondria these alterations in cardiolipin perturb the inner membrane, compromising electron transport chain function and aerobic respiration. Decreased electron flow from fuel metabolism via NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity leads to a buildup of NADH in the matrix space and product inhibition of key TCA cycle enzymes. As TCA cycle activity slows pyruvate generated by glycolysis is diverted to lactic acid. In turn, Cori cycle activity increases to supply muscle with glucose for continued ATP production. Acetyl CoA that is unable to enter the TCA cycle is diverted to organic acid waste products that are excreted in urine. Overall, reduced ATP production efficiency in BTHS is exacerbated under conditions of increased energy demand. Prolonged deficiency in ATP production capacity underlies cell and tissue pathology that ultimately is manifest as dilated cardiomyopathy.

  20. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, Deniz; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat

    2016-01-01

    This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete’s heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation. PMID:27617087

  1. Coronary artery disease and lunar catecholamine cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rowe, William J

    2017-03-15

    Show how lunar catecholamine cardiomyopathy alone, exemplified by Neil Armstrong's single space walk, prior to exposure to inhalation of fine particulate matter, can trigger " Neil Armstrong Syndrome" or by Irwin with coronary, possibly hypertensive heart disease, and catecholamine cardiomyopathy. With space flight, invariably magnesium ion deficits, catecholamine elevations, vicious cycles. Design Use lunar heart rates while configuring rover to show severe tachycardia component of the syndrome. Use Irwin's stress test-" cyanotic fingernails" to support Apollo 15 Space Syndrome. Use Irwin's autobiography to compensate for often incomplete data. Results Paper shows that both Irwin as well as Armstrong meet criteria of my 2nd. Space Syndrome: severe thirst, severe shortness of breath, severe tachycardia, the latter, corrected by replenishing plasma volume. Conclusions Irwin, with a history of hypertension prior to the Apollo 15 mission and classical angina during Earth reentry, may have had coronary as well as hypertensive heart disease whereas there was no evidence that Armstrong had these conditions prior or during his mission. However both, on return to Earth, had abnormal stress tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: a challenge for cardiologist.

    PubMed

    Aursulesei, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition that occurs in previously healthy women during the last month of pregnancy and up to 5-6 months postpartum. The etiology and pathophysiology remain uncertain, although recent observations strongly suggest the specific role of prolactin cleavage secondary to unbalanced peri/postpartum oxidative stress. PPCM is a diagnosis of exclusion, as it shares many clinical characteristics with other forms of systolic heart failure secondary to cardiomyopathy. The management of heart failure requires a multidisciplinary approach during pregnancy, considering the possible adverse effects on the fetus. After delivery, the treatment is in accordance with the current guidelines for heart failure. Some novel therapies, such as prolactin blockade, are proposed to either prevent or treat the patients with PPCM. A critical individual counseling concerning the risks of subsequent pregnancy must be considered. Because of its rare incidence, geographical differences, and heterogeneous presentation, PPCM continues to be incompletely characterized and understood. For all these reasons, PPCM remains a challenge in clinical practice, so future epidemiological trials and national registries are needed to learn more about the disease.

  3. Pathophysiology and epidemiology of peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Sliwa, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of complications in pregnancy worldwide, and the number of patients who develop cardiac problems during pregnancy is increasing. Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a potentially life-threatening heart disease that emerges towards the end of pregnancy or in the first months postpartum, in previously healthy women. Symptoms and signs of PPCM are similar to those in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. The incidence varies geographically, most likely because of socioeconomic and genetic factors. The syndrome is associated with a high morbidity and mortality, and diagnosis is often delayed. Various mechanisms have been investigated, including the hypothesis that unbalanced peripartum or postpartum oxidative stress triggers the proteolytic cleavage of the nursing hormone prolactin into a potent antiangiogenic, proapoptotic, and proinflammatory 16 kDa fragment. This theory provides the basis for the discovery of disease-specific biomarkers and promising novel therapeutic targets. In this Review, we describe the latest understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and novel treatment strategies for patients with PPCM.

  4. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a 68-year old Russian female

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardena, Suriya; Sooriabalan, Danushan; Burzyantseva, Olga; Sinnapunayagm, Selvarathnam

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Takotsubo cardiomyopathy also known as transient left ventricular apical ballooning, stress-induced cardiomyopathy can present with retrosternal chest pain with EKG changes that can mimic a myocardial infraction. Case Presentation We present a 68 female with sudden onset retrosternal squeezing chest pain with positive cardiac enzymes and EKG changes suggestive of acute ST-elevation myocardial infraction. Patient was thrombolysed and cardiac cauterization done later showed normal coronaries with ballooning of the left ventricle apex. Conclusion Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a very rare disease entity yet can present to the emergency room as acute myocardial infraction. PMID:18662406

  5. Stem Cell-Based Therapies in Chagasic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Campos de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos; Bastos Carvalho, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and can lead to a dilated cardiomyopathy decades after the prime infection by the parasite. As with other dilated cardiomyopathies, conventional pharmacologic therapies are not always effective and as heart failure progresses patients need heart transplantation. Therefore alternative therapies are highly desirable and cell-based therapies have been investigated in preclinical and clinical studies. In this paper we review the main findings of such studies and discuss future directions for stem cell-based therapies in chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26161401

  6. Sepsis-associated takotsubo cardiomyopathy can be reversed with levosimendan.

    PubMed

    Karvouniaris, Marios; Papanikolaou, John; Makris, Demosthenes; Zakynthinos, Epameinondas

    2012-06-01

    Sepsis is a stressful physical condition, and at the acute phase, overstimulation of the sympathetic nervous system may occur; these events have the potential to induce cardiomyopathy. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a form of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which occurs very rarely in sepsis. However, TTC management in critically ill patients with sepsis may be challenging because the use of exogenous catecholamines for circulatory support might augment further TTC. Herein, we report a rare case of TTC after urosepsis; and we point out that cardiac function may improve after catecholamine withdrawal and the application of calcium channel sensitizer levosimendan.

  7. Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kanu; Alpert, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy, two relatively uncommon clinical conditions, create a diagnostic dilemma primarily because of the many similarities in both their clinical and hemodynamic presentations. However, considerable differences exist in the pathophysiology, management, and prognosis between these two syndromes. Furthermore, the precise diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy is mandatory, as the former is often curable whereas only palliative treatments are available for the latter. In this brief review, similarities and differences in the various aspects of constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy will be discussed.

  8. Value of radionuclide imaging techniques in assessing cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.R.; Boucher, C.A.

    1980-12-18

    Radionuclide imaging techniques add an important dimension to the diagnosis, classification and management of myocardial disease. The gated blood pool scan provides information allowing determination of the functional type of cardiomyopathy (congestive, restrictive or hypertrophic) as well as evaluation of ventricular performance. Myocardial perfusion imaging with thallium-201 is useful in distinguishing congestive cardiomyopathy from severe coronary artery disease and also in depicting septal abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Radionuclide techniques also prove useful in following progression of disease and in evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic interventions.

  9. Life threatening causes of syncope: channelopathies and cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Herman, Adam; Bennett, Matthew T; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Chakrabarti, Santabahnu; Krahn, Andrew D

    2014-09-01

    Syncope is common, has a high recurrence rate and carries a risk of morbidity and, dependent on the cause, mortality. Although the majority of patients with syncope have a benign prognosis, syncope as a result of cardiomyopathy or channelopathy carries a poor prognosis. In addition, the identification of these disorders allows for the institution of treatments, which are effective at reducing the risk of both syncope and mortality. It is for these reasons that the identification of a cardiomyopathy or channelopathy in patients with syncope is crucial. This review article will describe the characteristics of common cardiomyopathies and channelopathies and their investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient with Addison disease.

    PubMed

    Punnam, Sujeeth Reddy; Gourineni, Nandu; Gupta, Vishal

    2010-10-08

    Transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, also known as Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy (Broken Heart Syndrome) is increasingly being reported in the medical literature. Its clinical picture resembles of an acute coronary syndrome with transient apical dyskinesia and normal coronary arteries. We report here a case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient with Addison disease with reversible cardiomyopathy. To the best of our knowledge there has been only one other reported case of this syndrome with Addison disease but with a different outcome. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk of Cardiomyopathy in Younger Persons With a Family History of Death from Cardiomyopathy: A Nationwide Family Study in a Cohort of 3.9 Million Persons.

    PubMed

    Ranthe, Mattis F; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Øyen, Nina; Jensen, Morten K; Axelsson, Anna; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads; Bundgaard, Henning; Boyd, Heather A

    2015-09-15

    Recommendations for presymptomatic screening of relatives of cardiomyopathy patients are based on findings from tertiary centers. Cardiomyopathy inheritance patterns are fairly well understood, but how cardiomyopathy in younger persons (<50 years) aggregates in families at the population level is unclear. In a nationwide cohort, we examined the risk of cardiomyopathy by family history of premature death (<60 years) from cardiomyopathy. By linking Danish national register data, we constructed a cohort of 3.9 million persons born from 1950 to 2008. We ascertained family history of premature (<60 years) death from cardiomyopathy or other conditions, and cohort members were followed from 1977 to 2008 for cardiomyopathy diagnosed at <50 years. We identified 3890 cardiomyopathies in 89 million person-years of follow-up. Using Poisson regression, we estimated incidence rate ratios for cardiomyopathy by family history of premature death. Premature cardiomyopathy deaths in first- and second-degree relatives were associated with 29- and 6-fold increases in the rate of cardiomyopathy, respectively. If the first-degree relative died aged <35 years, the rate of cardiomyopathy increased 100-fold; given ≥2 premature deaths in first-degree relatives, the rate increased more than 400-fold. In contrast, a family history of premature death from other cardiac or noncardiac conditions increased the rate of cardiomyopathy 3-fold at most. A family history of premature cardiomyopathy death was associated with an increase in risk of cardiomyopathy ranging from 6- to 400-fold, depending on age, kinship, gender and number of affected family members. Our general population-based results support recommendations for presymptomatic screening of relatives of cardiomyopathy patients. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. TEXTING WHILE DRIVING: EVALUATION OF GLANCE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR FREQUENT/INFREQUENT TEXTERS AND KEYPAD/TOUCHPAD TEXTERS

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Siby; Pollatsek, Alexander; Fisher, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Summary The threat that cell-phones pose to driving has been a well researched topic. There are fewer studies of the threat that texting creates for drivers, but the risks are obvious and the few existing studies confirm this. What is not obvious is whether frequent texters will expose themselves to the same risks as infrequent texters. This is important to know because many texters, especially teens who text frequently, may consider themselves immune to the dangers of texting while driving. As such, a comparison of frequent and infrequent texters was undertaken on a driving simulator. It is also not immediately clear what effects the different types of interfaces have on driving performance while text messaging. The interfaces under evaluation included keypad or “qwerty” phones (e.g., Blackberries) and touchpad phones (iPhone). It was found that the frequent and infrequent texters were equally likely to glance at least once for more than 2s inside the vehicle while sending a text message. It was also found that touchpad texters had a larger number of glances above the 2s threshold than keypad users, though this difference was not significant. The implications of this for future public policy are discussed. PMID:25279388

  13. TEXTING WHILE DRIVING: EVALUATION OF GLANCE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR FREQUENT/INFREQUENT TEXTERS AND KEYPAD/TOUCHPAD TEXTERS.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Siby; Pollatsek, Alexander; Fisher, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The threat that cell-phones pose to driving has been a well researched topic. There are fewer studies of the threat that texting creates for drivers, but the risks are obvious and the few existing studies confirm this. What is not obvious is whether frequent texters will expose themselves to the same risks as infrequent texters. This is important to know because many texters, especially teens who text frequently, may consider themselves immune to the dangers of texting while driving. As such, a comparison of frequent and infrequent texters was undertaken on a driving simulator. It is also not immediately clear what effects the different types of interfaces have on driving performance while text messaging. The interfaces under evaluation included keypad or "qwerty" phones (e.g., Blackberries) and touchpad phones (iPhone). It was found that the frequent and infrequent texters were equally likely to glance at least once for more than 2s inside the vehicle while sending a text message. It was also found that touchpad texters had a larger number of glances above the 2s threshold than keypad users, though this difference was not significant. The implications of this for future public policy are discussed.

  14. Condom use and correlates of African American adolescent females' infrequent communication with sex partners about preventing sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Richard A; DiClemente, Ralph J; Wingood, Gina M; Cobb, Brenda K; Harrington, Kathy; Davies, Susan L; Hook, Edward W; Oh, M Kim

    2002-04-01

    This study of 522 African American female adolescents, ages 14 to 18, investigated associations between condom use and infrequently communicating with sex partners about sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and pregnancy prevention. Correlates of infrequent communication were identified. Sexually active adolescents were recruited from schools and adolescent medicine clinics in low-income neighborhoods of Birmingham, Alabama. Adolescents completed a self-administered survey and face-to-face interview. Communication frequency was assessed using a five-item scale. Infrequent communication was significantly associated with lower odds of condom use. Multivariate correlates of infrequent communication were less frequent communication with parents about STD/pregnancy prevention, recent sex with a nonsteady partner, low perceived ability to negotiate condom use and fear of this negotiation, and low motivation to use condoms. Given the importance of partner communication in promoting safer sex behaviors, STD and pregnancy prevention programs may benefit adolescents by addressing the identified psychosocial correlates of infrequent communication with their partners.

  15. Preoperative preparation of patients with cardiomyopathies in non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bradić, Zeljko; Ivanović, Branislava; Marković, Dejan; Simić, Dusica; Janković, Radmilo; Kalezić, Nevena

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are myocardial diseases in which there is structural and functional disorder of the heart muscle, in the absence of coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease and congenital heart disease. Cardiomyopathies are grouped into specific morphological and functional phenotypes: dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and unclassified cardiomyopathies. Patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomypathy are prone to the development of congestive heart failure in the perioperative period. Also, patients with hypertrophic and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy are prone to arrhythmias in the perioperative period. Preoperative evaluation includes history, physical examination, ECG, chest radiography, complete blood count, electrolytes, creatinine, glomerular filtration rate, glucose, liver enzymes, urin analysis, BNP and echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular function. Drug therapy should be optimized and continued preoperatively. Surgery should be delayed (unless urgent) in patients with decompensated or untreated cardiomyopathy. Preoperative evaluation requires integrated multidisciplinary approach of anesthesiologists, cardiologist and surgeons.

  16. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: A potentially serious trap (Data from the International Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Wagdy, Kerolos; ElMaghawry, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is an acute cardiac condition characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction with wall motion abnormalities, most commonly in the form of apical ballooning. Despite being considered as a generally benign condition, many studies have emphasized potentially sinister outcomes associated with TTC. In this article, we review the most recent results of the International Takotsubo Registry, which investigated the clinical features, prognostic predictors, and outcomes of 1750 patients. PMID:26779527

  17. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a new concept of cardiomyopathy: clinical features and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Tsutomu

    2015-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a new concept of cardiomyopathy, is characterized by transient cardiac dysfunction, commonly triggered by physical or emotional stress. Differential diagnosis is important, since takotsubo cardiomyopathy presents similar images to those shown in acute coronary syndrome, with ST-segment elevation, T-wave inversion, QT-prolongation, and others on electrocardiogram. Typically, apical involvement with hypercontraction of basal left ventricle (apical type) is predominant, but atypical types involving basal, mid-ventricular, and right ventricular myocardium are also described. In-hospital death occurs at similar level with patients with acute coronary syndrome, but it is significantly affected by underlying diseases. This disease presents diverse cardiac complications in acute phase, such as life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, pump failure, cardiac rupture, and systemic embolism. The pathogenic mechanism of this disease is still unclear but sympathetic hyperactivity, as well as coronary vasospasm, microcirculatory disorder, and estrogen deficiency, have been considered as one of the most likely pathogenic mechanism. Long-term prognosis is also largely unknown. Issues such as establishment of acute phase treatment, prediction of cardiac complications, and prophylactic measures against recurrence need to be further explored.

  18. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a neonate associated with nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mir, Arshid; Lemler, Matthew; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Blalock, Shannon; Ikemba, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a congenital nonprogressive skeletal muscle disorder with a characteristic rod body formation in the skeletal muscle fibers. Cardiac involvement in nemaline myopathy is rare, although both dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have been reported. We describe an infant diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypotonia on the first day of life. Muscle biopsy confirmed nemaline myopathy at 3 weeks of age. The diagnosis of nemaline myopathy precluded consideration of heart transplantation, thus shifting the focus to comfort care. This is the earliest presentation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy reported in the literature in the setting of nemaline myopathy. The approach to determining an etiology for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an infant is reviewed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    PubMed

    Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Bakos, Andrea; Checton, John

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old female presenting with a new-onset heart failure that was contributed secondary to noncompaction cardiomyopathy. The diagnosis was made by echocardiogram and confirmed by cardiac MRI. Noncompaction cardiomyopathy (also known as ventricular hypertrabeculation) is a newly discovered disease. It is considered to be congenital (genetic) cardiomyopathy. It is usually associated with genetic disorders and that could explain the genetic pathogenesis of the non-compaction cardiomyopathy. Our case had a history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. There is a high incidence of arrhythmia and embolic complications. The treatment usually consists of the medical management, defibrillator placement, and lifelong anticoagulation. Heart transplantation will be the last resort.

  20. [Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in a patient with Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Conte, M R; Bonfiglio, G; Orzan, F; Mangiardi, L; Camaschella, C; Alfarano, A; Brusca, A

    1995-12-01

    A case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in a patient with Turner syndrome is reported. The most frequently associated cardiac anomalies are coarctation of the aorta and bicuspid aortic valve. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has never been reported in this syndrome but is frequent in Noonan syndrome. In these two conditions the phenotype may be indistinguishable but the cariotype is different: normal in Noonan and 45X in Turner syndrome. Our patient had the typical somatic features, and the cariotype was 45X in all examined cells. A familial form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was excluded by the normal clinical examination of other members of the family. The presence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also in Turner syndrome and the recent localization on the long arm of the chromosome 12 of the gene for Noonan syndrome might postulate a common pathogenesis of the two syndromes.

  1. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Isoproterenol-induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure rats (SHHFs) take far longer to develop compensated heart failure and congestive decompensation than common surgical models of heart failure. Isoproterenol (ISO) infusion can accelerate cardiomyopathy in young SHHFs, while dietary salt loa...

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy: Cardiac Homing and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Van Linthout, S.; Stamm, Ch.; Schultheiss, H.-P.; Tschöpe, C.

    2011-01-01

    Under conventional heart failure therapy, inflammatory cardiomyopathy usually has a progressive course, merging for alternative interventional strategies. There is accumulating support for the application of cellular transplantation as a strategy to improve myocardial function. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the advantage over other stem cells that they possess immunomodulatory features, making them attractive candidates for the treatment of inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Studies in experimental models of inflammatory cardiomyopathy have consistently demonstrated the potential of MSCs to reduce cardiac injury and to improve cardiac function. This paper gives an overview about how inflammation triggers the functionality of MSCs and how it induces cardiac homing. Finally, the potential of intravenous application of MSCs by inflammatory cardiomyopathy is discussed. PMID:21403844

  3. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    MedlinePlus

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Is LAD encasement a common substrate component in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Joshua; Hoffman, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from computerized tomographic angiography (CTA) has demonstrated LAD encasement with compromised antegrade systolic flow In Takotsubo cardiomyopathy patients. This mechanism may explain both the contractile and ECG abnormalities observed in this disorder.

  5. Cardiomyopathies in Noonan syndrome and the other RASopathies

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, Bruce D.; Roberts, Amy E.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome and related disorders (Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines, Costello syndrome, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, Noonan syndrome with loose anagen hair, and other related traits) are autosomal dominant traits. Mutations causing these disorders alter proteins relevant for signaling through RAS. Thus, these traits are now collectively called the RASopathies. While the RASopathies have pleiomorphic features, this review will focus on the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy observed in varying percentages of all of these traits. In addition, inherited abnormalities in one pathway gene, RAF1, cause pediatric-onset dilated cardiomyopathy. The pathogeneses for the RASopathy-associated cardiomyopathies are being elucidated, principally using animal models, leading to genotype-specific insights into how signal transduction is perturbed. Based on those findings, small molecule therapies seem possible for RASopathy-associated cardiomyopathies. PMID:26380542

  6. Cardiac effects of HDL and its components on diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Frank; Van Linthout, Sophie; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2012-06-01

    Diabetic cardiopathy includes a specific cardiomyopathy, which occurs in the absence of coronary heart disease and hypertension under diabetes mellitus. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperlipidemia, characteristic metabolic disturbances evident in diabetes mellitus, all three lead to a specific altered cardiac structure and function. Recently, it has been demonstrated that altered HDL, be it low HDL or dysfunctional HDL is not only a consequence of diabetes mellitus, but can also contribute to the development of diabetes mellitus, and therefore also of diabetic cardiomyopathy. This review summarizes how HDL can indirectly affect diabetic cardiomyopathy via their influence on the metabolic triggers hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperlipidemia, and how they can directly influence the cardiac cellular consequences, typical for diabetic cardiomyopathy, including inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, fibrosis, Ca2+ handling, glucose homeostasis, and endothelial dysfunction.

  7. A Tension-Based Model Distinguishes Hypertrophic versus Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Davis, L Craig; Correll, Robert N; Makarewich, Catherine A; Schwanekamp, Jennifer A; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Wang, Dan; York, Allen J; Wu, Haodi; Houser, Steven R; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Regnier, Michael; Metzger, Joseph M; Wu, Joseph C; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-05-19

    The heart either hypertrophies or dilates in response to familial mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, which are responsible for contraction and pumping. These mutations typically alter calcium-dependent tension generation within the sarcomeres, but how this translates into the spectrum of hypertrophic versus dilated cardiomyopathy is unknown. By generating a series of cardiac-specific mouse models that permit the systematic tuning of sarcomeric tension generation and calcium fluxing, we identify a significant relationship between the magnitude of tension developed over time and heart growth. When formulated into a computational model, the integral of myofilament tension development predicts hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies in mice associated with essentially any sarcomeric gene mutations, but also accurately predicts human cardiac phenotypes from data generated in induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived myocytes from familial cardiomyopathy patients. This tension-based model also has the potential to inform pharmacologic treatment options in cardiomyopathy patients.

  8. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Isoproterenol-induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure rats (SHHFs) take far longer to develop compensated heart failure and congestive decompensation than common surgical models of heart failure. Isoproterenol (ISO) infusion can accelerate cardiomyopathy in young SHHFs, while dietary salt loa...

  9. Consequences of misdiagnosis and mismanagement of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Chirayu; Shah, Sanjay; Pancholy, Sameer; Patel, Tejas; Moussa, Isam

    2012-12-01

    We report a patient who presented with takotsubo cardiomyopathy but was misdiagnosed as an anterior wall ST elevation myocardial infarction (AWMI). We illustrate how misdiagnosis led to mismanagement by initiating intravenous inotropic agents that led to further hemodynamic compromise. Subsequent withdrawal of the inotropic agents and simultaneous administration of oral metoprolol therapy led to hemodynamic and clinical improvement re-affirming the diagnosis of takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  10. Dilated cardiomyopathy: a preventable presentation of DiGeorge Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, A; Smith, C J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cardiac failure require careful evaluation to determine the precise nature of the cause of their illness. Genetic causes of dilated cardiomyopathy are well known but inherited conditions may lead to unexpected consequences through intermediate mechanisms not readily recognised as a feature of the inherited disorder. We describe a case of dilated cardiomyopathy resulting from prolonged hypocalcaemia due to previously undiagnosed hypoparathyroidism resulting from DiGeorge Syndrome and describe the features of this case and the treatment of hypoparathyroidism.

  11. Haploinsufficiency of Target of Rapamycin Attenuates Cardiomyopathies in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yonghe; Sun, Xiaojing; Huang, Wei; Hoage, Tiffany; Redfield, Margaret; Kushwaha, Sudhir; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Lin, Xueying; Ekker, Stephen; Xu, Xiaolei

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Although a cardioprotective function of target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling inhibition has been suggested by pharmacological studies using rapamycin, genetic evidences are still lacking. Here, we explored adult zebrafish as a novel vertebrate model for dissecting signaling pathways in cardiomyopathy. Objective We generate the second adult zebrafish cardiomyopathy model induced by doxorubicin (DOX). By genetically analyzing both the DOX and our previous established anemia-induced cardiomyopathy models, we aim to decipher the functions of TOR signaling in cardiomyopathies of different etiology. Methods and Results Along the progression of both cardiomyopathy models, we detected dynamic TOR activity at different stages of pathogenesis as well as distinct effects of TOR signaling inhibition. Nevertheless, cardiac enlargement in both models can be effectively attenuated by inhibition of TOR signaling via short-term rapamycin treatment. To assess the long term effects of TOR reduction, we utilized a zebrafish target of rapamycin (ztor) mutant identified from an insertional mutagenesis screen. We show that TOR haploinsufficiency in the ztor heterozygous fish improved cardiac function, prevented pathological remodeling events, and ultimately reduced mortality in both adult fish models of cardiomyopathy. Mechanistically, these cardioprotective effects are conveyed by the anti-hypertrophy, anti-apoptosis, and proautophagy function of TOR signaling inhibition. Conclusions Our results prove adult zebrafish as a conserved novel vertebrate model for human cardiomyopathies. Moreover, we provide the first genetic evidence to demonstrate a long-term cardioprotective effect of TOR signaling inhibition on at least two cardiomyopathies of distinct etiology, despite dynamic TOR activities during their pathogenesis. PMID:21757652

  12. Doxorubicin cardiomyopathy in children with left-sided Wilms tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Camitta, B.; Kun, L.; Howarth, C.; Tang, T.

    1982-01-01

    Two children with Wilms tumor of the left kidney experienced severe anthracycline cardiomyopathy after irradiation to the tumor bed and conventional dosage of doxorubicin. The cardiomyopathy is attributed 1) to the fact that radiation fields for left Wilms tumor include the lower portion of the heart and 2) to the interaction of doxorubicin and irradiation on cardiac muscle. It is recommended that doxorubicin dosage be sharply restricted in children with Wilms tumor of the left kidney who receive postoperative irradiation.

  13. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Magri, Damiano; Santolamazza, Caterina

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the functional limitation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the most common inherited heart disease, is challenging. Beside the occurrence of disease-related complications, several factors are potential determinants of exercise limitation, including left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial fiber disarray, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, microvascular ischemia, and interstitial fibrosis. Furthermore, drugs commonly used in the daily management of these patients may interfere with exercise capacity, especially those with a negative chronotropic effect. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing can safely and objectively evaluate the functional capacity of these patients and help the physician in understanding the mechanisms that underlie this limitation. Features that reduce exercise capacity may predict progression to heart failure in these patients and even the risk of sudden cardiac death.

  14. Gaining insights into diabetic cardiomyopathy from Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Soda Balla; Bodmer, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The high degree of genetic conservation between Drosophila melanogaster and mammals has helped to translate many important findings into new knowledge, and has led to better understanding of many biological processes in vertebrates. For over a century, the Drosophila model has been used in studies aimed at understanding molecular mechanisms implicated in heredity, development, disease progression, and aging. The current epidemic of obesity and associated diabetic cardiomyopathy and heart failure has led to a shift in Drosophila research towards understanding the basic mechanisms leading to metabolic syndrome and associated cardiac risk factors. Here, we discuss recent findings in Drosophila that highlight the importance of this organism as an excellent model to study the effects of metabolic imbalance on cardiac function. PMID:26482877

  15. Acute mitral regurgitation in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Wang, Zhen; Lecomte, Milena; Ennezat, Pierre V; Blanchard, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a well-recognised entity that commonly manifests with chest pain, ST segment abnormalities and transient left ventricular apical ballooning without coronary artery obstructive disease. This syndrome usually portends a favourable outcome. In the rare haemodynamically unstable TTC patients, acute mitral regurgitation (MR) related to systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) is to be considered. Bedside echocardiography is key in recognition of this latter condition as vasodilators, inotropic agents or intra-aortic balloon counter-pulsation worsen the patient's clinical status. We discuss here a case of TTC where nitrate-induced subaortic obstruction and mitral regurgitation led to haemodynamic instability.

  16. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Komamura, Kazuo; Fukui, Miho; Iwasaku, Toshihiro; Hirotani, Shinichi; Masuyama, Tohru

    2014-07-26

    In 1990, takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) was first discovered and reported by a Japanese cardiovascular specialist. Since then, this heart disease has gained worldwide acceptance as an independent disease entity. TCM is an important entity that differs from acute myocardial infarction. It occurs more often in postmenopausal elderly women, is characterized by a transient hypokinesis of the left ventricular (LV) apex, and is associated with emotional or physical stress. Wall motion abnormality of the LV apex is generally transient and resolves within a few days to several weeks. Its prognosis is generally good. However, there are some reports of serious TCM complications, including hypotension, heart failure, ventricular rupture, thrombosis involving the LV apex, and torsade de pointes. It has been suggested that coronary spasm, coronary microvascular dysfunction, catecholamine toxicity and myocarditis might contribute to the pathogenesis of TCM. However, its pathophysiology is not clearly understood.

  17. Constrictive Pericarditis Versus Restrictive Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mario J

    2016-05-03

    About one-half of the patients with congestive heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although the etiology of HFpEF is most commonly related to long-standing hypertension and atherosclerosis, a significant number of suspected HFpEF patients have a restrictive cardiomyopathy or chronic pericardial disease. Recognizing these syndromes is important because early diagnosis may lead to instituting specific therapy that may prolong survival, improve quality of life, and/or recognize and treat an underlying systemic disorder. Advances in diagnostic imaging, biomarkers, and genetic testing today allow identification of the specific etiology in most cases. Novel pharmacological, immunologic, and surgical therapies are leading to improved quality of life and survival.

  18. Two cases of restrictive cardiomyopathy in children.

    PubMed

    Kamisago, Mitsuhiro; Ohkubo, Takashi; Watanabe, Makoto; Ikegami, Ei; Fukazawa, Ryuji; Ogawa, Shunichi

    2009-12-01

    A 3-year-old girl was diagnosed with restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) after showing symptoms of heart failure, and a 6-year-old boy was found to have RCM after abnormal electrocardiographic findings were seen during school-based heart disease screening. Both had typical clinical features of the disease. Plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide increased significantly in both patients, allowing us to distinguish this disease from constrictive pericarditis which has similar clinical and hemodynamic features. The early diastolic mitral annular velocity recorded by tissue Doppler echocardiography was also useful to discriminate RCM from constrictive pericarditis. The former case successfully received heart transplantation, but the latter case died suddenly prior to receiving a heart transplant. The plasma level of brain natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler echocardiography helped us to diagnose this disease earlier and follow it more carefully, which has important implications in optimal treatment and improved prognosis of RCM in children.

  19. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in two cats.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A M; Battersby, I A; Faena, M; Fews, D; Darke, P G G; Ferasin, L

    2005-03-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a disease characterised by infiltration of the myocardium by adipose and fibrous tissue. The disease is an important cause of sudden death in humans, but has rarely been described in animals. This report describes ARVC in two cats with right-sided congestive heart failure. One cat had also experienced previous episodes of syncope. Standard six-lead and 24-hour (Holter) electrocardiogram recording revealed complete atrioventricular block and multiform ventricular ectopics in both cats, with the addition of ventricular tachycardia, ventricular bigeminy and R-on-T phenomenon in one of them. On echocardiography, the right ventricle and atrium were massively dilated and hypokinetic. The survival times of the cats were three days and 16 days following diagnosis. Histopathology in one case revealed fibro-fatty infiltration of the myocardium, predominantly affecting the right ventricular free wall.

  20. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: current knowledge and future directions.

    PubMed

    Davis, Melinda; Duvernoy, Claire

    2015-07-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a form of heart failure occurring at the end of pregnancy or early in the postpartum period. Women may recover, have persistent cardiac dysfunction or suffer complications and death. Women who are African-American, older, hypertensive or have multiple gestation pregnancies have increased risk. Diagnosis and treatment may be delayed due to similarities between symptoms of normal pregnancy and heart failure. Echocardiography is essential for the diagnosis, and B-type natriuretic peptide can be helpful. Treatment for systolic heart failure must be adjusted during pregnancy, and anticoagulation may be indicated. Even after recovery, subsequent pregnancy confers substantial risk of worsening heart failure. Further investigations into the etiology, duration of treatment and risks for relapse are needed.

  1. Assessment of ventricular function in dilated cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Pak, P H; Kass, D A

    1995-05-01

    Regardless of its cause, systolic dysfunction in dilated cardiomyopathy triggers a wide variety of compensatory responses resulting in cardiac dilatation, fluid retention, and systemic vasoconstriction. Standard therapy with vasodilators, digoxin, and diuretics can provide symptomatic relief in many patients. However, many others do not respond adequately, and mortality from heart failure remains high. This has driven the search for novel therapies. To evaluate the efficacy and decipher mechanisms of action of these treatments, accurate assessments of left ventricular function are valuable. In particular, one seeks indexes that are cardiac-specific, in that they are minimally influenced by vascular loading conditions. An increasingly used "gold standard" that can achieve this goal is the invasively measured pressure-volume relation. Newer noninvasive methods have yielded several surrogates that have the key advantage of being applicable to chronic disease assessment. In this report, we review the current state-of-the-art in left ventricular function assessment, and describe recent advances in its noninvasive evaluation.

  2. Characterization of mitochondrial DNA in primary cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Giannattasio, S; Pucci, A; Lippolis, R; Camaschella, C; Marra, E

    1995-12-29

    With the aim of studying the involvement of the mitochondrial genome in the impairment of heart function, mitochondrial DNA was analyzed by modified primer shift-polymerase chain reaction in a panel of young patients affected by primary cardiomyopathies. Mitochondrial DNA molecules harboring the 7436 bp deletion were specifically found in cardiomyopathic patients as compared with a panel of control subjects. The 4977 bp deletion was commonly detected among the subjects analyzed whereas none of the specific tRNA gene point mutations generally associated with the cardiomyopathic trait were detected. The presence of the 7436 bp deletion as a consequence of a premature aging of the heart muscle, secondary to heart dysfunction, is discussed.

  3. Apoptosis in Endomyocardial Biopsies from Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Glumac, S; Pejić, S; Kostadinovic, S; Stojšić, Z; Vasiljevic, J

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is an active energy-consuming mechanism of cell death, which may contribute to heart failure in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a common clinical outcome of many prolonged cardiac insults, and therefore is considered as the most prevalent form of cardiomyopathy. Loss of heart mass is highly correlated with the heart failure and mortality, thus the purpose of this study was to define the apoptotic index in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Apoptosis was detected by the TUNEL method in 30 patients. Biopsies were obtained from the left ventricle, and at least three specimens were taken. TUNEL-positive cardiomyocytes were found in 26 of 30 cases (86.7 %) and the mean apoptotic index for the entire specimen series was 5.41 ± 1.70 %. The analysis showed that patients with dilated cardiomyopathy had significantly higher apoptotic index (P < 0.001) than healthy subjects. One subject (man, 41 years old) had a markedly elevated apoptotic index of 52.2 %. In the remaining subjects, the percentage of cardiomyocyte death ranged from 0 % to 15.5 %. The high percentage of apoptosis found in our study may be in accordance with the clinically manifested cardiac failure in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy since in most patients we recorded the left ventricular ejection fraction values below 30 %.

  4. Therapeutic effects of rapamycin on alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xilin; Wang, Chao; Ru, Xiaoxue; Jing, Lili; Zhou, Lijun; Jing, Ling

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether rapamycin has therapeutic potential as a treatment for alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Rats were divided into eight groups (n=7 in each group): The control group; the alcohol group; abstinence in the first week; abstinence in the third week; abstinence in the fourth week; abstinent+rapamycin (AB-RAP) until the first week (AB-RAP 1); AB-RAP until the third week (AB-RAP 3); and AB-RAP until the fourth week (AB-RAP 4). Subsequently, echocardiography, and hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's staining were performed, followed by electron microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay. Finally, expression levels of B cell lymphoma-2, Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The levels of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension in AB-RAP 3 (7.00±0.41) and AB-RAP 4 (6.33±0.68) groups were significantly lower when compared with the alcohol group (8.01±0.30; P<0.05). Compared with the alcohol group, the apoptosis rate of left ventricular myocardial tissue in the AB+RAP 3 (37.68±2.15) and AB+RAP 4 (26.97±2.11) groups was significantly reduced (P<0.05). To conclude, rapamycin may be considered as a therapeutic tool to attenuate alcoholic cardiomyopathy and improve cardiac function through increasing autophagy and reducing apoptosis.

  5. Adderall induced inverted-Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Alsidawi, Said; Muth, James; Wilkin, James

    2011-11-15

    Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy (TTC), also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy, was initially described in Japan in 1990. Both illicit and prescription drugs have added to the growing list of insulting stressors. We describe an interesting case of atypical TTC triggered by adderall overdose. A 19-year-old female was brought to the Emergency Department after ingesting 30 Adderall tablets. She was complaining of pressure like chest pain and shortness of breath. Her cardiac enzymes were elevated but the electrocardiogram was unremarkable. Echocardiography identified an ejection fraction (EF) of 25-30% with severe hypokinesis of the base and a preserved apex. Cardiac angiography demonstrated normal coronary arteries with an EF of 35%, hyperkinetic apex and akinetic base consistent with the diagnosis of inverted-TTC. Her symptoms resolved in 24 hrs. Repeat echocardiogram performed 3 days later showed an EF of 60% with no regional wall motion abnormalities. TTC can be identified as a rapid development of severe and reversible left ventricular dysfunction extending beyond the territory of a single epicardial coronary artery in the absence of coronary artery disease or pheochromocytoma. Clinical presentation can be challenging and very hard to distinguish from acute myocardial infarction. Medication induced-TTC has been reported. In our case, the patient overdosed on Adderall which is a sympathomimetic medication. Cardiac imaging identified wall motion abnormalities consistent with inverted type TTC. Restoration of left ventricular function within days confirms the diagnosis of TTC. In conclusion, this case offers an interesting insight into the pathophysiology of TTC. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Female infant with oncocytic cardiomyopathy and microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS): A clue to the pathogenesis of oncocytic cardiomyopathy?

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.M.; Krous, H.F.; Eichenfield, L.F.; Swalwell, C.I.; Jones, M.C.

    1994-11-01

    A infant girl had red stellate skin lesions on the cheeks and neck, and mildly short palpebral fissures. Her skin abnormality was typical of microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS), a newly recognized syndrome consisting of congenital linear skin defects and ocular abnormalities in females monosomic for Xp22. She died suddenly and unexpectedly at age 4 months; the cause of death was ascribed to oncocytic cardiomyopathy. Oncocytic cardiomyopathy occurs only in young children, who present with refractory arrhythmias leading to cardiac arrest. The coexistence of two rare conditions, one of which is mapped to the X chromosome, and an excess of affected females with oncocytic cardiomyopathy is also X-linked, with Xp22 being a candidate region. Overlapping manifestations in the two conditions (ocular abnormalities in cases of oncocytic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias in MLS) offer additional support for this hypothesis. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy and coronary fistulae: a case report. One genotype, three phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Delgado, Anne; Moreira, Davide; Rodrigues, Bruno; Correia, Emanuel; Gama, Pedro; Cabral, Costa; Marinho, António; Santos, Oliveira

    2013-11-01

    The authors present a rare case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy and coronary artery-left ventricular fistulae in a 42-year-old woman presenting with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography, transthoracic echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance revealed the structural abnormalities of the left ventricle and the coronary tree. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiomyopathy Phenotypes and Outcomes for Children With Left Ventricular Myocardial Noncompaction: Results From the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, John L; Wilkinson, James D; Sleeper, Lynn A; Colan, Steven D; Lu, Minmin; Pahl, Elfriede; Kantor, Paul F; Everitt, Melanie D; Webber, Steven A; Kaufman, Beth D; Lamour, Jacqueline M; Canter, Charles E; Hsu, Daphne T; Addonizio, Linda J; Lipshultz, Steven E; Towbin, Jeffrey A

    2015-11-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a distinct form of cardiomyopathy characterized by hypertrabeculation of the left ventricle. The LVNC phenotype may occur in isolation or with other cardiomyopathy phenotypes. Prognosis is incompletely characterized in children. According to diagnoses from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry from 1990 to 2008, 155 of 3,219 children (4.8%) had LVNC. Each LVNC patient was also classified as having an associated echocardiographically diagnosed cardiomyopathy phenotype: dilated (DCM), hypertrophic (HCM), restrictive (RCM), isolated, or indeterminate. The time to death or transplantation differed among the phenotypic groups (P = .035). Time to listing for cardiac transplantation significantly differed by phenotype (P < .001), as did time to transplantation (P = .015). The hazard ratio for death/transplantation (with isolated LVNC as the reference group) was 4.26 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78-23.3) for HCM, 6.35 (95% CI 1.52-26.6) for DCM, and 5.66 (95% CI 1.04-30.9) for the indeterminate phenotype. Most events occurred in the 1st year after diagnosis. LVNC is present in at least 5% of children with cardiomyopathy. The specific LVNC-associated cardiomyopathy phenotype predicts the risk of death or transplantation and should inform clinical management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Furthering the link between the sarcomere and primary cardiomyopathies: restrictive cardiomyopathy associated with multiple mutations in genes previously associated with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Caleshu, Colleen; Sakhuja, Rahul; Nussbaum, Robert L; Schiller, Nelson B; Ursell, Philip C; Eng, Celeste; De Marco, Teresa; McGlothlin, Dana; Burchard, Esteban González; Rame, J Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    Mutations in genes that encode components of the sarcomere are well established as the cause of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere genes, however, are increasingly being associated with other cardiomyopathies. One phenotype more recently recognized as a disease of the sarcomere is restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). We report on two patients with RCM associated with multiple mutations in sarcomere genes not previously associated with RCM. Patient 1 presented with NYHA Class III/IV heart failure at 22 years of age. She was diagnosed with RCM and advanced heart failure requiring heart transplantation. Sequencing of sarcomere genes revealed previously reported homozygous p.Glu143Lys mutations in MYL3, and a novel heterozygous p.Gly57Glu mutation in MYL2. The patient's mother is a double heterozygote for these mutations, with no evidence of cardiomyopathy. Patient 2 presented at 35 years of age with volume overload while hospitalized for oophorectomy. She was diagnosed with RCM and is being evaluated for heart transplantation. Sarcomere gene sequencing identified homozygous p.Asn279His mutations in TPM1. The patient's parents are consanguineous and confirmed heterozygotes. Her father was diagnosed with HCM at 42 years of age. This is the first report of mutations in TPM1, MYL3, and MYL2 associated with primary, non-hypertrophied RCM. The association of more sarcomere genes with RCM provides further evidence that mutations in the various sarcomere genes can cause different cardiomyopathy phenotypes. These cases also contribute to the growing body of evidence that multiple mutations have an additive effect on the severity of cardiomyopathies. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. DNA fingerprinting of Ralstonia paucula by infrequent-restriction-site PCR and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Moissenet, Didier; Vu-Thien, Hoang; Benzerara, Yahia; Arlet, Guillaume

    2003-12-01

    Ralstonia paucula (formerly CDC group IV c-2) is an environmental organism that can cause serious human infections, occasionally clusters of nosocomial infections. In the present work, 26 strains of R. paucula (4 from the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collection, 10 from the Belgian Laboratorium voor Microbiologie [LMG] collection, and 12 French clinical isolates) were analyzed with infrequent-restriction-site PCR and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. Both techniques accurately distinguished between collection strains. Two close patterns obtained for all the French isolates suggested a clonal strain. Two LMG collection strains originating from human sources in the United States also showed patterns close to those of French isolates.

  11. Evolution of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) from idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (IHCM) vs. inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi): a rare case of sudden death in an 8-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Schmidt, Peter; Kandolf, Reinhard; Madea, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    In rare cases, the diagnosis of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in children was established postmortem. Our case report deals with the sudden and unexpected death of an 8-year-old boy. The postmortem examination revealed non-obstructive hypertrophy with irregular arrangement of muscular fibers, dilatation of the ventricles, endocardial fibrosis, microfocal vacuolization with enlarged hyperchromatic nuclei, and signs of inflammation with interstitial fibrosis. We present an evolution from idiopathic cardiomyopathy to DCM. To some extent, there were morphologic signs of an inflammatory process that first led us to suspect a specific inflammatory DCM.

  12. The MOGE(S) classification : A TNM-like classification for cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Şahan, E; Şahan, S; Karamanlıoğlu, M; Gul, M; Tufekcioğlu, O

    2016-09-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a disease of the heart muscle resulting from genetic defects, cardiac myocyte injury, or infiltration of the myocardium. Cardiomyopathies are traditionally defined as dilated, restrictive, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Today, the genetic basis of most diseases has been clearly defined and has influenced the approach to familial diseases such as cardiomyopathies. Traditional definitions of cardiomyopathies, such as those by the American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology, do not consider the genetic basis of cardiomyopathies. In 2013, the World Heart Federation added the genetic basis of cardiomyopathies and proposed a descriptive genotype-phenotype nosology system termed "MOGE(S)." The MOGE(S) system resembles the TNM classification system for malignancy, and therefore it can be useful for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of cardiomyopathies in a similar manner to cancer management.

  13. Dilated cardiomyopathy update: infectious-immune theory revisited.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Chuichi; Matsumori, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by dilatation of the left or right ventricle, or both ventricles. The degree of myocardial dysfunction is not attributable to abnormal loading conditions. The infectious-immune theory has long been hypothesized to explain the pathogenesis of many etiologically unrecognized dilated cardiomyopathies. Inflammations followed by immune reactions, which may be excessive, in the myocardium, evoked by external triggers such as viral infections and/or autoimmune antibodies, continue insidiously, and lead to the process of cardiac remodeling with ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction. This ultimately results in dilated cardiomyopathy. Hepatitis C virus-associated heart diseases are good examples of cardiac lesions definitely induced by viral infections in humans that progress to a chronic stage through complicated immune mechanisms. Therapeutic strategies for myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy have been obtained through analyses of the acute, subacute, and chronic phases of experimental viral myocarditis in mice. The appropriate modulation of excessive immune reactions during myocarditis, rather than their complete elimination, appears to be a key option in the prevention and treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy. The clinical application of an NF-κB decoy and immune adsorption of IgG3 cardiac autoantibodies have been used as immunomodulating therapies and may provide novel approaches for the treatment of refractory patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Conventional therapeutic agents for chronic heart failure such as β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and aldosterone antagonists in particular should be re-evaluated on the basis of their anti-inflammatory properties in the treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  14. Characterization and Long-Term Prognosis of Postmyocarditic Dilated Cardiomyopathy Compared With Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Marco; Anzini, Marco; Bussani, Rossana; Artico, Jessica; Barbati, Giulia; Stolfo, Davide; Gigli, Marta; Muça, Matilda; Naso, Paola; Ramani, Federica; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Pinamonti, Bruno; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2016-09-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) is the final common pathway of different pathogenetic processes and presents a significant prognostic heterogeneity, possibly related to its etiologic variety. The characterization and long-term prognosis of postmyocarditic dilated cardiomyopathy (PM-DC) remain unknown. This study assesses the clinical-instrumental evolution and long-term prognosis of a large cohort of patients with PM-DC. We analyzed 175 patients affected with DC consecutively enrolled from 1993 to 2008 with endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) data available. PM-DC was defined in the presence of borderline myocarditis at EMB or persistent left ventricular dysfunction 1 year after diagnosis of active myocarditis at EMB. Other patients were defined as affected by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC). Analysis of follow-up evaluations was performed at 24, 60, and 120 months. We found 72 PM-DC of 175 enrolled patients (41%). Compared with IDC, patients with PM-DC were more frequently females and less frequently presented a familial history of DC. No other baseline significant differences were found. During the long-term follow-up (median 154, first to third interquartile range 78 to 220 months), patients with PM-DC showed a trend toward slower disease progression. Globally, 18 patients with PM-DC (25%) versus 49 with IDC (48%) experienced death/heart transplantation (p = 0.045). The prognostic advantage for patients with PM-DC became significant beyond 40 months of follow-up. At multivariable time-dependent Cox analysis, PM-DC was confirmed to have a global independent protective role (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.28 to 0.97, p = 0.04). In conclusion, PM-DC is characterized by better long-term prognosis compared with IDC. An exhaustive etiologic characterization appears relevant in the prognostic assessment of DC.

  15. [A full-term pregnant woman with non-compaction cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Bañuls Pellicer, G; Domingo-Triadó, V

    2014-01-01

    Non-compaction cardiomyopathy, a genetic primary cardiomyopathy, is being increasingly diagnosed. Pregnant women with non-compaction cardiomyopathy are more susceptible to complications, such as heart failure, arrhythmias and embolic events. This paper reports the case of a pregnant woman with non-compaction cardiomyopathy under treatment and asymptomatic, who received epidural analgesia during labor and delivery. The clinical course is described and a brief review is presented.

  16. Reversible cushing dilated cardiomyopathy mimicking peripartum cardiomyopathy with successful subsequent pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Al Banna, Rashed; Husain, Aysha; Al Aali, Jalila; Ebrahim, Khalid; Mohammed, AbdulAziz

    2011-01-01

    A 29-year-old lady G4P3A0 has been admitted in her last trimester with features of peripartum cardiomyopathy. She was treated accordingly with comprehensive antifailure therapy. She lost follow-up but reappeared 12 weeks later with further deterioration of her heart failure, severe depression and osteoporotic multiple lumbar fractures. She turned to be having Cushing syndrome secondary to adrenal adenoma. Post adrenalectomy all her symptoms subsided and her cardiac function fully recovered as shown by stress echocardiography. She reconceived with uneventful pregnancy and delivery. PMID:22674115

  17. [Factors associated with infrequent condom use amongst men having sex with other men in Ciudad Juárez].

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pérez, Juan C; Ortiz-Hernández, Luis

    2009-10-01

    Analysing the factors associated with inconsistent condom use amongst men having sex with other men (MSM) in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua. This was an observational, cross-sectional analytic study using a convenience sample (n=186) of MSM from Ciudad Juarez. Socioeconomic status, attitudes toward condom use, drug use, alcohol consumption, sexual orientation were considered as independent variables. Dependent variables were sexual behaviour related to HIV infection (inconsistent condom use in anal penetration and receiving semen in the mouth or anus). Whereas 30 % of the MSM interviewed infrequently used a condom when they practiced receptive anal sex, when they had insertive anal sex, 39.1 % reported receiving semen in the mouth and 35.5 % in the anus. Multivariate logistic regression models were used, observing that the groups of men having the highest probability of risky sexual behavior (compared to their counterparts) were younger men (<20 years), those earning medium income, those having a negative attitude towards condom use, men using drugs or alcohol and those who reported homosexual identity. An important percentage of MSM infrequently used a condom. The implications of our findings should be used when designing programmes for promoting condom use amongst MSM.

  18. Autosomal Recessive Cardiomyopathy Presenting as Acute Myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Belkaya, Serkan; Kontorovich, Amy R; Byun, Minji; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Bajolle, Fanny; Cobat, Aurelie; Josowitz, Rebecca; Itan, Yuval; Quint, Raphaelle; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Boucherit, Soraya; Stoven, Cecile; Di Filippo, Sylvie; Abel, Laurent; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Bonnet, Damien; Gelb, Bruce D; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2017-04-04

    Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle that can follow various viral infections. Why children only rarely develop life-threatening acute viral myocarditis (AVM), given that the causal viral infections are common, is unknown. Genetic lesions might underlie such susceptibilities. Mouse genetic studies demonstrated that interferon (IFN)-α/β immunity defects increased susceptibility to virus-induced myocarditis. Moreover, variations in human TLR3, a potent inducer of IFNs, were proposed to underlie AVM. This study sought to evaluate the hypothesis that human genetic factors may underlie AVM in previously healthy children. We tested the role of TLR3-IFN immunity using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We then performed whole-exome sequencing of 42 unrelated children with acute myocarditis (AM), some with proven viral causes. We found that TLR3- and STAT1-deficient cardiomyocytes were not more susceptible to Coxsackie virus B3 (CVB3) infection than control cells. Moreover, CVB3 did not induce IFN-α/β and IFN-α/β-stimulated genes in control cardiomyocytes. Finally, exogenous IFN-α did not substantially protect cardiomyocytes against CVB3. We did not observe a significant enrichment of rare variations in TLR3- or IFN-α/β-related genes. Surprisingly, we found that homozygous but not heterozygous rare variants in genes associated with inherited cardiomyopathies were significantly enriched in AM-AVM patients compared with healthy individuals (p = 2.22E-03) or patients with other diseases (p = 1.08E-04). Seven of 42 patients (16.7%) carried rare biallelic (homozygous or compound heterozygous) nonsynonymous or splice-site variations in 6 cardiomyopathy-associated genes (BAG3, DSP, PKP2, RYR2, SCN5A, or TNNI3). Previously silent recessive defects of the myocardium may predispose to acute heart failure presenting as AM, notably after common viral infections in children. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation

  19. Joint Symbolic Dynamics Analysis of Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Interactions in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract- The dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) induces important changes in the autonomic control. Measures of heart rate (HR) variability and systolic...rather simple physiological interpretations and seems to be particularly suitable for risk stratification in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy ...Keywords - Symbolic dynamics, heart rate variability, blood pressure variability I. INTRODUCTION Patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy

  20. Importance of transesophageal echocardiography in peripartum cardiomyopathy undergoing lower section cesarean section under regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Goyal, Sameer; Irpachi, Kalpana; Smita, Barya

    2014-07-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a relatively rare but life threatening disease. The etiology and pathogenesis of peripartum cardiomyopathy is generally centered upon viral and autoimmune mechanism. This case report describes the anesthetic management of a patient with term pregnancy suffering from dilated peripartum cardiomyopathy planned for cesarean section, successfully managed with epidural anesthesia after precipitate labour.

  1. Differentiation of infiltrative cardiomyopathy from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Toru; Baba, Yuichi; Hirota, Takayoshi; Tanioka, Katsutoshi; Yamasaki, Naohito; Yamanaka, Shigeo; Iiyama, Tatsuo; Kumagai, Naoko; Furuno, Takashi; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Kitaoka, Hiroaki

    2015-06-16

    Because infiltrative cardiomyopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) share clinical and hemodynamic features of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and abnormal diastolic function, it is often difficult to distinguish these entities. We investigated the potential role of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) for differentiation of infiltrative cardiomyopathy from HCM. The study group consisted of 46 consecutive patients with infiltrative cardiomyopathies or HCM in whom sarcomere protein gene mutations were identified at Kochi Medical School Hospital; of these, there were 11 patients with infiltrative cardiomyopathy (cardiac amyloidosis in 8 patients and Fabry disease in 3 patients) and 35 HCM patients. Serum hs-cTnT level was significantly higher in patients who had infiltrative cardiomyopathy than in those who had HCM (0.083 ± 0.057 ng/ml versus 0.027 ± 0.034 ng/ml, p < 0.001), whereas brain natriuretic peptide levels did not differ between the two groups. In two age-matched the 2 cohorts (patients evaluated at > 40 years at age), hs-cTnT level, maximum LV wall thickness, posterior wall thickness, peak early (E) transmitral filling velocity, peak early diastolic (Ea) velocity of tissue Doppler imaging at the lateral corner and E/Ea ratios at both the septal and lateral corners were significantly different between the two groups. As for diagnostic accuracy to differentiate the two groups by using receiver operating characteristic analysis, hs-cTnT was the highest value of area under the curve (0.939) and E/Ea (lateral) was second highest value (0.914). Serum hs-cTnT is a helpful diagnostic indicator for accurate differentiation between infiltrative cardiomyopathy and HCM.

  2. Value of cardiovascular MR in diagnosing left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy and in discriminating between other cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Grothoff, Matthias; Pachowsky, Milena; Hoffmann, Janine; Posch, Maximilian; Klaassen, Sabine; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Gutberlet, Matthias

    2012-12-01

    To analyse the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial parameters to differentiate left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) from other cardiomyopathies and controls. We retrospectively analysed 12 patients with LVNC, 11 with dilated and 10 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and compared them to 24 controls. LVNC patients had to fulfil standard echocardiographic criteria as well as additional clinical and imaging criteria. Cine steady-state free precession and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging was performed. The total LV myocardial mass index (LV-MMI), compacted (LV-MMI(compacted)), non-compacted (LV-MMI(non-compacted)), percentage LV-MM(non-compacted), ventricular volumes and function were calculated. Data were compared using analysis of variance and Dunnett's test. Additionally, semi-quantitative segmental analyses of the occurrence of increased trabeculation were performed. Total LV-MMI(non-compacted) and percentage LV-MM(non-compacted) were discriminators between patients with LVCN, healthy controls and those with other cardiomyopathies with cut-offs of 15 g/m(2) and 25 %, respectively. Furthermore, trabeculation in basal segments and a ratio of non-compacted/compacted myocardium of ≥3:1 were criteria for LVNC. A combination of these criteria provided sensitivities and specificities of up to 100 %. None of the LVNC patients demonstrated LGE. Absolute CMR quantification of the LV-MMI(non-compacted) or the percentage LV-MM(non-compacted) and increased trabeculation in basal segments allows one to reliably diagnose LVNC and to differentiate it from other cardiomyopathies. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can reliably diagnose left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy. Differentiation of LVNC from other cardiomyopathies and normal hearts is possible. The best diagnostic performance can be achieved if combined MRI criteria for the diagnosis are used.

  3. Genetic advances in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ho, Carolyn Y; Charron, Philippe; Richard, Pascale; Girolami, Francesca; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Pinto, Yigal

    2015-04-01

    Genetic studies in the 1980s and 1990s led to landmark discoveries that sarcomere mutations cause both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere mutations also likely play a role in more complex phenotypes and overlap cardiomyopathies with features of hypertrophy, dilation, diastolic abnormalities, and non-compaction. Identification of the genetic cause of these important conditions provides unique opportunities to interrogate and characterize disease pathogenesis and pathophysiology, starting from the molecular level and expanding from there. With such insights, there is potential for clinical translation that may transform management of patients and families with inherited cardiomyopathies. If key pathways for disease development can be identified, they could potentially serve as targets for novel disease-modifying or disease-preventing therapies. By utilizing gene-based diagnostic testing, we can identify at-risk individuals prior to the onset of clinical disease, allowing for disease-modifying therapy to be initiated early in life, at a time that such treatment may be most successful. In this section, we review the current application of genetics in clinical management, focusing on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as a paradigm; discuss state-of-the-art genetic testing technology; review emerging knowledge of gene expression in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies; and discuss both the prospects, as well as the challenges, of bringing genetics to medicine.

  4. Atropine aggravates signs and symptoms of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gagangeet; Servetnyk, Zhanna; Croitor, Sherryl; Herzog, Eyal

    2010-02-01

    We present a novel case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, associated with worsening chest pain and T-wave inversions on electrocardiogram after atropine use. Our patient was an 82-year-old woman who complained of substernal chest discomfort of 5 hours duration. Atropine 0.5 mg was administered intravenously by the emergency medical service for symptomatic bradycardia. The patient subsequently complained of worsening chest pain and developed new T-wave inversions on the electrocardiogram. Cardiac catheterization was diagnostic and revealed normal coronary arteries but akinesis of the apical segment. Although the pathogenesis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is not completely understood, catecholamine-mediated myocardial stunning due to enhanced sympathetic activity is the most widely accepted underlying mechanism. The withdrawal of parasympathetic drive in such cases should exacerbate sympathetic activity, leading to the genesis or worsening of disease activity. The role of atropine in relation to Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been questioned before. However, it was always in the setting of general anesthesia induction, at which time atropine had been used for reversal of symptomatic bradycardia; consequently, determining the exact role of atropine in the disease process was difficult. Our patient received only atropine and therefore illustrated its capacity to worsen signs and symptoms of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy. Because patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy may present with recurrent chest pain, we would recommend caution against the use of atropine for symptomatic bradycardia in such patients in the emergency department. Transcutaneous pacemaker should be preferred.

  5. Genetic advances in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; Charron, Philippe; Richard, Pascale; Girolami, Francesca; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Pinto, Yigal

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies in the 1980s and 1990s led to landmark discoveries that sarcomere mutations cause both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere mutations also likely play a role in more complex phenotypes and overlap cardiomyopathies with features of hypertrophy, dilation, diastolic abnormalities, and non-compaction. Identification of the genetic cause of these important conditions provides unique opportunities to interrogate and characterize disease pathogenesis and pathophysiology, starting from the molecular level and expanding from there. With such insights, there is potential for clinical translation that may transform management of patients and families with inherited cardiomyopathies. If key pathways for disease development can be identified, they could potentially serve as targets for novel disease-modifying or disease-preventing therapies. By utilizing gene-based diagnostic testing, we can identify at-risk individuals prior to the onset of clinical disease, allowing for disease-modifying therapy to be initiated early in life, at a time that such treatment may be most successful. In this section, we review the current application of genetics in clinical management, focusing on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as a paradigm; discuss state-of-the-art genetic testing technology; review emerging knowledge of gene expression in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies; and discuss both the prospects, as well as the challenges, of bringing genetics to medicine. PMID:25634555

  6. The association of methamphetamine use and cardiomyopathy in young patients.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Khung-Keong; Wijetunga, Mevan; Ito, Hiroki; Efird, Jimmy T; Tay, Kevin; Seto, Todd B; Alimineti, Kavitha; Kimata, Chieko; Schatz, Irwin J

    2007-02-01

    Methamphetamine is the most widespread illegally used stimulant in the United States. Previously published case reports and series suggest a potential association between methamphetamine exposure and cardiomyopathy. The objective of this study is to demonstrate an association between methamphetamine use and cardiomyopathy. Case-control study based on chart review of discharges from a tertiary care medical center from January 2001 to June 2004. Patients were < or =45 years old. Cases included patients with a discharge diagnosis of either cardiomyopathy or heart failure. Controls included hospitalized patients who had an echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular function with ejection fraction > or =55% and no wall motion abnormalities. One hundred and seven cases and 114 controls were identified. Both groups had similar gender distribution, length of hospital stay, rates of health insurance, prevalence of coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cigarette smoking, alcohol abuse, and marijuana and cocaine use. Cases were older than controls (mean age: 38 vs 35 years; P=.008), had higher body mass index (BMI) (mean BMI: 37 vs 30 kg/m2; P<.001), and higher prevalence of renal failure (13% vs 4.4%; P=.03). Methamphetamine users had a 3.7-fold increased odds ratio [95% confidence interval, 1.8-7.8] for cardiomyopathy, adjusting for age, body mass index, and renal failure. Methamphetamine use was associated with cardiomyopathy in young patients.

  7. Involvement of activated SUMO-2 conjugation in cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Zhang, Yi; Ye, Bo; Segura, Ana Maria; Beketaev, Ilimbek; Xi, Yutao; Yu, Wei; Chang, Jiang; Li, Faqian; Wang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Sumoylation is a posttranslational modification that regulates a wide spectrum of cellular activities. Cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of heart failure. Whether sumoylation, particularly SUMO-2/3 conjugation, is involved in cardiomyopathy has not been investigated. We report here that SUMO-2/3 conjugation was elevated in the human failing hearts, and we investigated the impact of increased SUMO-2 conjugation on heart function by using the gain-of-function approach in mice, in which cardiac specific expression of constitutively active SUMO-2 was governed by alpha myosin heavy chain promoter (MHC-SUMO-2 transgenic, SUMO-2-Tg). Four of five independent SUMO-2-Tg mouse lines exhibited cardiomyopathy with various severities, ranging from acute heart failure leading to early death to the development of chronic cardiomyopathy with aging. We further revealed that SUMO-2 directly regulated apoptotic process by at least partially targeting calpain 2 and its natural inhibitor calpastatin. SUMO conjugation to calpain 2 promoted its enzymatic activity, and SUMO attachment to calpastatin mainly promoted its turnover and altered its subcellular distribution. Thus, enhanced SUMO-2 conjugation led to increased apoptosis and played a pathogenic role in the development of cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Potential applications for transesophageal echocardiography in hypertrophic cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Widimsky, P; Ten Cate, F J; Vletter, W; van Herwerden, L

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential advantages of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in comparison with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in selected patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Ten patients with previously established or suspected diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were examined by TEE to solve specific clinical questions. TEE was well tolerated by all patients; no arrhythmias were seen during the procedure. The comparison of TTE and TEE showed the following: Advantages of TTE--better assessment of the left ventricle, myocardial thickness measurements available in all regions and sufficient for the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in nine out of 10 patients; advantages of TEE--precise assessment of mitral valve morphology and regurgitant jets, detailed evaluation of systolic anterior motion, and subaortic membrane (not seen by TTE) recognized in one patient. Clinically, in three patients TEE influenced the management (mitral leaflet perforation, subaortic membrane, and residual mitral regurgitation after valvuloplasty). Thus TEE enables more precise diagnosis in some patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and has the potential to influence their surgical management. However, for medical treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, TTE is sufficient.

  9. Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to chronic cocaine abuse: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Chad J; Said, Sarmad; Alkhateeb, Haider; Rodriguez, Emmanuel; Trien, Remi; Ajmal, Shajeea; Blandon, Pedro A; Hernandez, German T

    2013-12-17

    Cocaine is a potent sympathomimetic agent associated with the development of possible fatal cardiovascular complications. Dysrhythmias, acute myocardial infarction, hypertension and dilated cardiomyopathy are just some of many cardiovascular effects related to the abuse of cocaine. A 38-year-old Hispanic male with a past medical history of hypertension presented with a chief complaint of progressive shortness of breath. The patient confessed to the use of cocaine for almost 18 years once per week. On examination he was hypertensive and tachycardic with a systolic murmur over the 5th intercostal space at the level of the left mid-clavicular line. Laboratory workup revealed an elevated Brain natriuretic peptide; urine toxicology was positive for cocaine. 2D-echocardiogram showed dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac catheterization excluded angioischemic cause. He was managed medically and subsequently discharged with drug rehabilitation. On follow-up diagnostic evaluation after 5 months of cocaine cessation, his ejection function improved significantly. The exact incidence of cocaine related cardiomyopathy is unknown and likely underreported. The clinical course is abrupt and comparatively similar to other types of cardiomyopathy. The management is like other forms of cardiomyopathy; however β-blockers should be avoided. The myocardial dysfunction is reversible with abstaining from additional cocaine ingestion. Non-invasive testing should be performed after several months to re-evaluate the treatment response.

  10. The Use of Fluoxetine in a Patient With Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Suki K; Catalano, Maria C; Catalano, Glenn

    2016-05-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an acute coronary syndrome that is believed to be brought on by stress. Symptoms, which are similar to an acute myocardial infarction, include chest pain, shortness of breath, arrhythmias, and cardiogenic shock, and the electrocardiogram often shows ST and T wave changes. Left ventricular wall hypokinesis along with a significantly reduced ejection fraction are seen on echocardiogram. The great majority of these symptoms all occur in the absence of occlusive disease. Many cases have been reported in which the development of takotsubo cardiomyopathy was associated with serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants. However, no cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been reported involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. This article presents the case of a 51-year-old woman receiving stable therapy with fluoxetine who developed takotsubo cardiomyopathy after an acute stress. We also discuss the clinical presentation of takotsubo cardiomyopathy, review possible causes, and discuss the treatment of depressive symptoms in patients who are at increased risk of developing this illness.

  11. Medicinal chemistry of drugs used in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Adeghate, E; Kalasz, H; Veress, G; Teke, K

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease and contributes to a high degree of morbidity and mortality. Cardiovascular complications, including diabetic cardiomyopathy are major causes of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a condition that affects the myocardium, primarily. It is not necessarily associated with ischemic heart disease, high blood pressure, valvular or congenital anomalies. The pathology of diabetic cardiomyopathy includes interstitial fibrosis, apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, abnormal energy utilization, small vessel disease and cardiac neuropathy. These pathologies are induced by hyperglycemia and oxidative stress. Biochemical as well as electrolyte changes, especially reduced calcium availability also occurs in the myocardium of diabetic patients. The abnormal structure and biochemistry of the myocardium result in functional problems such as diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, which may cause symptoms of dyspnea and inability to tolerate exercise. No single specific therapeutic agent can treat diabetic cardiomyopathy because once the disease is overt, the management may require a variety of approaches such as risk factors and lifestyle modification, glucose control (insulin, alpha glucosidase inhibitors, sulfonylureas, biguanides, meglitinides, thiazolidinediones and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors); hormones (IGF-1); ACE inhibitors (captopril, enalapril); angiotensin II receptor antagonists (losartan, olmesartan); beta adrenoreceptor antagonists (acebutolol, carvedilol); peptides (adrenomedullin); endothelin-1 receptor antagonists (bosentan, tezosentan); calcium channel blockers (amlodipine, verapamil); antioxidants (methalothionein, alpha tocopherol, alpha lipoic acid) and antihyperlipidemic drugs (simvastatin, fenofibrate, ezetimibe) to effectively treat patients with diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  12. [Preserving autologous heart operation for dilated cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Joji; Fukada, Yasuhisa; Hirota, Masanori; Kondo, Taichi; Isomura, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    We report non transplant surgical procedure (preserving autologous heart operation) for the patients with dilated cardiomyopathy( DCM), clinical outcomes, and the factor of predict prognosis. Since May 2000, 258 patients received surgical procedure for 11 years. We performed mitral surgery (plasty or replacement) for the patients with more than mild mitral regurgitation (MR). We performed papirally muscule plication since 2005, and we performed 2nd chordal cutting since 2008, for the patients with MR due to mitral tethering. The surgical left ventricular reconstruction( SVR) was performed for the patients with dilated left ventricular. We use spackle tracking echocardiography to decide the type of SVR since 2008. Hospital death was 18.2%, and late cardiac death was 27.5%.Almost the cause of death was congestive heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia. Five years survival was 58%, 10 years survival was 39%. Preoperative condition, emergent operation, inotropic support, intra aortic balloon pumping(IABP),affect the prognosis. But left ventricular size did not affect it. Surgical treatment for the patient with DCM should be performed with stable preoperative condition.

  13. Cardiomyopathy in Patients With Hereditary Bullous Epidermolysis.

    PubMed

    Batalla, A; Vicente, A; Bartrons, J; Prada, F; Fortuny, C; González-Enseñat, M A

    In recent decades, an association has been reported between epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DC). DC is typically in an advanced phase when detected, leading to a poorer prognosis. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of DC in patients with EB seen in Hospital San Joan de Déu in Barcelona, Spain, between May 1986 and April 2015. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional chart-review study in which we recorded the type and main subtypes of EB and the presence or absence of DC. Fifty-seven patients with EB were found, 19 with EB simplex, 10 with junctional EB, 27 with dystrophic EB (14 dominant dystrophic and 13 recessive dystrophic), and just 1 with Kindler syndrome. DC was detected in only 2 patients with recessive dystrophic EB. Twenty-three patients had presented factors that could have had a causal relationship with the potential onset of DC. DC is a possible complication of EB, particularly in recessive dystrophic EB. Periodic follow-up should be performed to make an early diagnosis and start treatment. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy: a disease of intercalated discs.

    PubMed

    Calore, Martina; Lorenzon, Alessandra; De Bortoli, Marzia; Poloni, Giulia; Rampazzo, Alessandra

    2015-06-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is an acquired progressive disease having an age-related penetrance and showing clinical manifestations usually during adolescence and young adulthood. It is characterized clinically by a high incidence of severe ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death and pathologically by degeneration of ventricular cardiomyocytes with replacement by fibro-fatty tissue. Whereas, in the past, the disease was considered to involve only the right ventricle, more recent clinical studies have established that the left ventricle is frequently involved. ACM is an inherited disease in up to 50% of cases, with predominantly an autosomal dominant pattern of transmission, although recessive inheritance has also been described. Since most of the pathogenic mutations have been identified in genes encoding desmosomal proteins, ACM is currently defined as a disease of desmosomes. However, on the basis of the most recent description of the intercalated disc organization and of the identification of a novel ACM gene encoding for an area composita protein, ACM can be considered as a disease of the intercalated disc, rather than only as a desmosomal disease. Despite increasing knowledge of the genetic basis of ACM, we are just beginning to understand early molecular events leading to cardiomyocyte degeneration, fibrosis and fibro-fatty substitution. This review summarizes recent advances in our comprehension of the link between the molecular genetics and pathogenesis of ACM and of the novel role of cardiac intercalated discs.

  15. C-Reactive protein in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, K; Kanda, T; Yamauchi, Y; Hasegawa, A; Iwasaki, T; Arai, M; Suzuki, T; Kobayashi, I; Nagai, R

    1999-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is poor, although clinical features are variable. Prediction of outcome has been difficult in individual patients based on laboratory data. In some patients with DCM, myocardial damage secondary to viral or immune-mediated myocardial inflammation may persist. To objectively assess inflammation, we measured plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in 188 patients with idiopathic DCM over 5-8 years. All had dyspnea and fatigue at rest; all patients had a left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40% by echocardiography or by contrast or radionuclide ventriculography. We divided these patients into two groups: patients dying within 5 years following admission (n = 49) and the remainder surviving for at least 5 years (n = 139). CRP concentrations in the patients dying early were significantly higher than in the long-term survivors (1. 05 +/- 1.37 vs. 0.49 +/- 1.04 mg/dl, p < 0.05). Sixty-two percent of the patients with CRP>1.0 died within 5 years. In addition to other laboratory tests including electrocardiography and echocardiography, routine CRP measurements proved to be valuable for identifying high-risk patients who require special treatment strategies.

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunctions during progression of dystrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kyrychenko, Victoria; Poláková, Eva; Janíček, Radoslav; Shirokova, Natalia

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle disease with severe cardiac complications. It is believed that cellular oxidative stress and augmented Ca(2+) signaling drives the development of cardiac pathology. Some mitochondrial and metabolic dysfunctions have also been reported. Here we investigate cellular mechanisms responsible for impaired mitochondrial metabolism in dystrophic cardiomyopathy at early stages of the disease. We employed electrophysiological and imaging techniques to study mitochondrial structure and function in cardiomyocytes from mdx mice, an animal model of DMD. Here we show that mitochondrial matrix was progressively oxidized in myocytes isolated from mdx mice. Moreover, an abrupt increase in workload resulted in significantly more pronounced oxidation of mitochondria in dystrophic cells. Electron micrographs revealed a gradually increased number of damaged mitochondria in mdx myocytes. Degradation in mitochondrial structure was correlated with progressive increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) sequestration and mitochondrial depolarization, despite a substantial and persistent elevation in resting cytosolic sodium levels. Treatment of mdx cells with cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), shifted both resting and workload-dependent mitochondrial redox state to the levels recorded in control myocytes. It also significantly reduced workload dependent depolarization of mitochondrial membrane in dystrophic cardiomyocytes. Overall, our studies highlight age dependent deterioration of mitochondrial function in dystrophic cardiomyocytes, which seems to be associated with excessive opening of mPTP due to oxidative stress and cellular Ca(2+) overload.

  17. [Nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Parameters of autonomic tone].

    PubMed

    Demming, Thomas; Sandrock, Sarah; Bonnemeier, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    Nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM) are the most common reason for heart failure in developed countries after ischemic disease. They often lead to device therapy. Left ventricular ejection fraction as a single parameter to identify patients at risk for sudden cardiac death revealed inconclusive data in patients with DCM. Autonomic tone, measured by classical and innovative parameters of heart rate variability (HRV), heart rate turbulence or baroreceptor reflex, was demonstrated to give valuable prognostic information especially in patients with ischemic disease and after acute myocardial infarction. In patients with DCM, classical parameters of HRV showed inhomogeneous data in a heterogeneous patient collective caused by unsystematic measurement of single parameters in various patient collectives. Innovative parameters of HRV are promising in patients with DCM and showed prognostic relevance although patient numbers are limited and prospective data are missing. Further studies are needed in this field. Despite the in part convincing evidence for the relevance of autonomic tone as a prognostic marker in patients with DCM, their evaluation is still not part of clinical routine. Additional parameters to estimate the risk of sudden cardiac death are urgently needed.

  18. Mendelian bases of myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Piluso, G; Aurino, S; Cacciottolo, M; Del Vecchio Blanco, F; Lancioni, A; Rotundo, IL; Torella, A; Nigro, V

    2010-01-01

    Summary A second genetic revolution is approaching thanks to next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. In the next few years, the 1,000$-genome sequencing promises to reveal every individual variation of DNA. There is, however, a major problem: the identification of thousands of nucleotide changes per individual with uncertain pathological meaning. This is also an ethical issue. In the middle, there is today the possibility to address the sequencing analysis of genetically heterogeneous disorders to selected groups of genes with defined mutation types. This will be cost-effective and safer. We assembled an easy-to manage overview of most Mendelian genes involved in myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies. This was entirely put together using a number of open access web resources that are listed below. During this effort we realized that there are unexpected countless sources of data, but the confusion is huge. In some cases, we got lost in the validation of disease genes and in the difficulty to discriminate between polymorphisms and disease-causing alleles. In the table are the annotated genes, their associated disorders, genomic, mRNA and coding sizes. We also counted the number of pathological alleles so far reported and the percentage of single nucleotide mutations. PMID:22029103

  19. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: current management and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Haghikia, Arash; Nonhoff, Justus; Bauersachs, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with marked physiological changes challenging the cardiovascular system. Among the more severe pregnancy associated cardiovascular complications, peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a potentially life-threatening heart disease emerging towards the end of pregnancy or in the first postpartal months in previously healthy women. A major challenge is to distinguish the peripartum discomforts in healthy women (fatigue, shortness of breath, and oedema) from the pathological symptoms of PPCM. Moreover, pregnancy-related pathologies such as preeclampsia, myocarditis, or underlying genetic disease show overlapping symptoms with PPCM. Difficulties in diagnosis and the discrimination from other pathological conditions in pregnancy may explain why PPCM is still underestimated. Additionally, underlying pathophysiologies are poorly understood, biomarkers are scarce and treatment options in general limited. Experience in long-term prognosis and management including subsequent pregnancies is just beginning to emerge. This review focuses on novel aspects of physiological and pathophysiological changes of the maternal cardiovascular system by comparing normal conditions, hypertensive complications, genetic aspects, and infectious disease in PPCM-pregnancies. It also presents clinical and basic science data on the current state of knowledge on PPCM and brings them in context thereby highlighting promising new insights in diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches and management. PMID:25636745

  20. Cardiac norepinephrine kinetics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, J.E. Jr.; Eisenhofer, G.; Garty, M.; Stull, R.; Maron, B.J.; Cannon, R.O. III; Panza, J.A.; Epstein, S.E.; Goldstein, D.S.

    1989-04-01

    We examined the uptake and release of norepinephrine in the cardiac circulation and other regional vascular beds in 11 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and in 10 control subjects during simultaneous infusion of tracer-labeled norepinephrine and isoproterenol. Cardiac neuronal uptake of norepinephrine was assessed by comparing regional removal of tracer-labeled norepinephrine with that of tracer-labeled isoproterenol (which is not a substrate for neuronal uptake) and by the relation between production of dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), an exclusively intraneuronal metabolite of norepinephrine, and regional spillover of norepinephrine. Cardiac extraction of norepinephrine averaged 59 +/- 17% in the patients with HCM, significantly less than in the control subjects (79 +/- 13%, p less than 0.05), whereas cardiac extraction of isoproterenol was similar in the two groups (13 +/- 23% versus 13 +/- 14%), indicating that neuronal uptake of norepinephrine was decreased in the patients with HCM. The cardiac arteriovenous difference in norepinephrine was significantly larger in the patients with HCM than in the control subjects (73 +/- 77 versus 13 +/- 50 pg/ml, p less than 0.05), as was the product of the arteriovenous difference in norepinephrine and coronary blood flow (7.3 +/- 7.3 versus 0.8 +/- 3.0 ng/min, p less than 0.05).

  1. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: A puzzle closer to solution

    PubMed Central

    Fett, James D

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) represents new heart failure in a previously heart-healthy peripartum patient. It is necessary to rule out all other known causes of heart failure before accepting a diagnosis of PPCM. The modern era for PPCM in the United States and beyond began with the report of the National Institutes of Health PPCM Workshop in 2000, clarifying all then-currently known aspects of the disease. Since then, hundreds of publications have appeared, an indication of how devastating this disease can be to young mothers and their families and the urgent desire to find solutions for its cause and better treatment. The purpose of this review is to highlight the important advances that have brought us nearer to the solution of this puzzle, focusing on what we have learned about PPCM since 2000; and what still remains unanswered. Despite many improvements in outcome, we still do not know the actual triggers that initiate the pathological process; but realize that cardiac angiogenic imbalances resulting from complex pregnancy-related immune system and hormonal changes play a key role. PMID:24669290

  2. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in a cat.

    PubMed

    Schober, K E; Kent, A M; Aeffner, F

    2014-03-01

    A 10-year-old male castrated Domestic Shorthair cat was evaluated for an asymptomatic tachyarrhythmia noted two weeks prior. Electrocardiography revealed a normal sinus rhythm with atrial premature complexes and paroxysms of supraventricular tachycardia with a heart rate between 300 and 400 min-1. Echocardiography was unremarkable, and concentrations of circulating cardiac troponin I, T4, and blood taurine were within reference ranges. The cat was treated with sotalol (2.1 mg/kg q12h, PO) but the arrhythmia was insufficiently controlled as determined during several re-examinations within a two-year time period. Twenty four months after initial presentation atrial fibrillation with fast ventricular response rate (200 to 300 min-1) was diagnosed, along with severe eccentric chamber remodeling and systolic dysfunction. The cat developed congestive heart failure and cardiogenic shock and was euthanized nearly 27 months after the first exam. Gross and histopathologic findings ruled out commonly seen types of primary myocardial disease in cats. The persistent nature of the tachyarrhythmia, the progressive structural and functional cardiac changes, and comparative gross and histopathologic post-mortem findings are consistent with the diagnosis of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

  3. Current therapeutic concepts in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Jan; Poloczkova, Hana; Nemec, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a relatively rare disease characterized by systolic heart failure occuring towards the end of pregnancy or during the months following birth. It is most often seen in women of African descent, and its incidence seems to be slightly increasing in recent years. Other etiologies of heart failure should be excluded to determine the diagnosis of PPCM. The clinical picture corresponds to systolic heart failure. The rapid onset of the symptoms in relation to pregnancy is striking. The essential diagnostic procedures such as echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy may be beneficial in certain situations. The etiology of the disease remains unclear. Speculated causes include myocarditis, autoimmune disorders, cardiotropic virus infection, and abnormal responses to hemodynamic and hormonal changes during pregnancy. Particular attention is currently given to the concept of increased oxidative stress inducing production of proapoptotic, angiostatic and proinflammatory mediators. Recovery of left ventricular systolic function occurs in about half of the cases. Mortality has been decreasing in recent years, especially in the United States, but is still between 10-15% in less developed countries where therapeutic possibilities are limited. In addition to standard heart failure therapy, specific treatments (pentoxyfilline, bromocriptine, immunomodulatory therapy) have been tested. Mechanical circulatory support is sometimes needed. Heart transplantation is the therapeutic option for the most severe heart failure and is used in about 10% of the cases. Recurrence in subsequent pregnancy is common and therefore, another pregnancy is not recommended in many cases.

  4. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhakta, Pradipta; Banerjee, Basudeb

    2007-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare but serious form of cardiac failure affecting women in the last months of pregnancy or early puerperium. Clinical presentation of PPCM is similar to that of systolic heart failure from any cause, and it can sometimes be complicated by a high incidence of thromboembolism. Prior to the availability of echocardiography, diagnosis was based only on clinical findings. Recently, inclusion of echocardiography has made diagnosis of PPCM easier and more accurate. Its etiopathogenesis is still poorly understood, but recent evidence supports inflammation, viral infection and autoimmunity as the leading causative hypotheses. Prompt recognition with institution of intensive treatment by a multidisciplinary team is a prerequisite for improved outcome. Conventional treatment consists of diuretics, β blockers, vasodilators, and sometimes digoxin and anticoagulants, usually in combination. In resistant cases, newer therapeutic modalities such as immunomodulation, immunoglobulin and immunosuppression may be considered. Cardiac transplantation may be necessary in patients not responding to conventional and newer therapeutic strategies. The role of the anesthesiologist is important in perioperative and intensive care management. Prognosis is highly related to reversal of ventricular dysfunction. Compared to historically higher mortality rates, recent reports describe better outcome, probably because of advances in medical care. Based on current information, future pregnancy is usually not recommended in patients who fail to recover heart function. This article aims to provide a comprehensive updated review of PPCM covering etiopathogeneses, clinical presentation and diagnosis, as well as pharmacological, perioperative and intensive care management and prognosis, while stressing areas that require further research. PMID:17963329

  5. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok-Jin; Hong, Yoon-Ho; Shin, Je-Young; Yoon, Byung-Nam; Sohn, Sung-Yeon; Park, Chan Soon; Sung, Jung-Joon

    2017-04-15

    To investigate the frequency, features, and prognosis of takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We reviewed detailed clinical, laboratory, and cardiovascular data from 64 ALS patients (38 men and 26 women) who underwent echocardiographic evaluation for various reasons at a single referral center between January 2011 and December 2015. TTC was diagnosed in 9 ALS patients (4 men and 5 women). Mean age was 61.3years (range 55-71years), and median disease duration was 51.5months (range 18-134months). All patients were bulbar or cervical onset, and were at advanced stages of ALS when TTC was diagnosed. Acute exacerbation of dyspnea was an invariable presentation, and chest discomfort mimicking acute coronary syndrome was present in 2 patients. Six patients had significant hypotension requiring intravenous fluid challenge and inotropic support. Three patients showed altered mentality, and 2 of them suffered cardiopulmonary arrest. TTC should be suspected in ALS patients presenting with acute exacerbation of dyspnea and chest discomfort, particularly at advanced stages of the disease. This study highlights the need for proper evaluation and management of cardiac dysfunction in ALS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. In-hospital and long-term mortality in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a community hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Vriz, Olga; Brosolo, Gabriele; Martina, Stefano; Pertoldi, Franco; Citro, Rodolfo; Mos, Lucio; Ferrara, Francesco; Bossone, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by reversible left ventricular dysfunction, frequently precipitated by a stressful event. Despite the favorable course and good long-term prognosis, a variety of complications may occur in the acute phase of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-hospital and long-term outcomes of a cohort of TTC patients. Methods Fifty-five patients (mean age 68.1±12 years) were prospectively followed for a mean of 69.6±32.2 months (64,635 days). In-hospital (death, heart failure, arrhythmias) and long-term events (death and recurrences) were recorded. Results Patients were predominantly women (87.3%) who experienced a recent stressful event (emotional or physical) and were admitted to hospital for chest pain. Eleven patients (20%) had a diagnosis of depressive disorder, and arterial hypertension was the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor. The ECG revealed ST-segment elevation in 43.6% of patients. At angiography, seven cases (12.7%) had at least one significant (≥50%) coronary artery stenosis and four patients (7.3%) had myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending artery. During hospitalization, three patients died (one from cardiac causes) and cardiovascular complications occurred in 12 patients. During follow-up, five patients died (none from cardiac causes), six patients had recurrences within the first year. Two patients had two recurrences: one after 114 days, triggered by an asthma attack as the first event, and the other after 1,850 days. Conclusions In TTC patients, in-hospital and long-term mortality is primarily due to non-cardiovascular causes. Recurrences are not infrequent and coronary artery disease is not an uncommon finding. PMID:27406446

  7. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Myocardial Infarction, Viability, and Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    West, Amy M.; Kramer, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides the opportunity for a truly comprehensive evaluation of patients with a history of MI, with regards to characterizing the extent of disease, impact on LV function and degree of viable myocardium. The use of contrast-enhanced CMR for first-pass perfusion and late gadolinium enhancement is a powerful technique for delineating areas of myocardial ischemia and infarction. Using a combination of T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced CMR images, information about the acuity of an infarct can be obtained. There is an extensive amount of literature using contrast-enhanced CMR to predict myocardial functional recovery with revascularization in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathies. In addition, CMR imaging in patients with cardiomyopathies can distinguish between ischemic and non-ischemic etiologies, with the ability to further characterize the underlying pathology for non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. PMID:20197150

  8. Wearable cardioverter defibrillator in stress cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Francisco O; Krishna, Rama K; Hrachian, Hakop; Santana, Orlando

    2013-09-13

    A 57-year-old woman presented with nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. She had severe hypokalaemia and hypomagnesemia with marked QTc (680 ms) prolongation after suspected viral diarrhoea. She then developed progressive dyspnoea with congestion. An echocardiogram was obtained and showed severe hypokinesis with apical ballooning and hyperdynamic cardiac base, suggestive of stress cardiomyopathy. A repeat ECG showed further prolongation of the QTc (883 ms) and she rapidly developed polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. She underwent cardiac arrest and was successfully resuscitated. A coronary angiogram confirmed the diagnosis of stress cardiomyopathy. We had therapeutic dilemma at discharge to implant a permanent automated implantable cardiac defibrillator in view of the high risk for recurrent ventricular tachycardia, or follow-up for resolution of both reversible causes of the prolonged QTc (stress cardiomyopathy and electrolytes abnormalities). We suggested an alternate treatment for sudden death prevention in high risk patients who have reversible cause for QT interval prolongation.

  9. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cork, David P.; Mehrotra, Amit K.; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a fatal disease. Intravenous prostanoids are often utilized for long-term management of patients. The therapy requires a significant commitment and change in lifestyle for both the patient and family. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, transient apical ballooning syndrome, has been reported in association with emotional and physical stress. This case report describes a patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension who developed Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after treatment initiation with intravenous treprostinil. Over time, the syndrome resolved and the patient had return of normal left ventricular function. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy should be recognized as a potential, rare complication of therapy initiation due to the severity of the illness and the emotional stress of the disease. PMID:23130109

  10. Reversible electrocardiogram changes and cardiomyopathy secondary to baclofen withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kireyev, Dmitriy; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2010-01-01

    Baclofen withdrawal syndrome is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition manifesting with autonomic dysreflexia, high fevers, spasticity, seizures, and multiorgan failure. Reversible cardiomyopathy due to this condition is extremely rare. A high level of suspicion is needed to recognize this condition and start an early intervention to improve patient outcome. Electrocardiographic ST-segment elevation in lead aVR was previously described in association with left main, left anterior descending, and triple-vessel coronary artery disease as well as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. In this article we present a rare case of reversible cardiomyopathy due to baclofen withdrawal syndrome associated with diffuse ST-segment depressions and ST-segment elevation in lead aVR.

  11. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Peng, Teng J; Patchett, Nicholas D; Bernard, Sheilah A

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal.

  12. Williams-Beuren syndrome with brain malformation and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Noriko; Yamagata, Takanori; Yada, Yukari; Ichihashi, Ko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Momoi, Mariko Y; Mizuguchi, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a multisystemic genetic disorder caused by a contiguous gene deletion at 7q11.23. We report a severely affected WBS patient with cerebral and cerebellar dysplasia as well as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) detected a deletion on 7q11.23 expanding from RP11-614D7 to RP11-137E8, which is a typical deletion in WBS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a WBS patient with severe congenital central nervous system anomaly and progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The relationship between the genes deleted in WBS and a CNS anomaly plus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy requires further analysis. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy: new insights into mechanisms of disease.

    PubMed

    Saffitz, Jeffrey E; Asimaki, Angeliki; Huang, Hayden

    2010-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is a primary heart muscle disorder characterized by the early occurrence of arrhythmias often out of proportion to the extent of structural remodeling and contractile derangement. Approximately 40% of patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy have one or more mutations in genes encoding proteins in desmosomes, intercellular adhesion junctions which, in cardiac myocytes, reside within intercalated disks. Some desmosomal proteins fulfill roles both as structural proteins in cell-cell adhesion junctions and as signaling molecules in pathways mediated by Wnt ligands. Evidence is increasing that mutations in desmosomal proteins can perturb the normal balance of critical proteins in junctions and the cytosol which, in turn, could alter gene expression by circumventing normal Wnt signaling pathways. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and presents evidence suggesting that the disease is caused by a combination of altered cellular biomechanical behavior and altered signaling.

  14. Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy in the modern era.

    PubMed

    Mookadam, Farouk; Jiamsripong, Panupong; Raslan, Serageldin F; Panse, Prasad M; Tajik, A Jamil

    2011-07-01

    The differentiation between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy can be clinically challenging. Pericardial constriction results from scarring and consequent loss of pericardial elasticity leading to impaired ventricular filling. Restrictive cardiomyopathy is characterized by a nondilated rigid ventricle, severe diastolic dysfunction and restrictive filling producing hemodynamic changes, similar to those in constrictive pericarditis. While constrictive pericarditis is usually curable by surgical treatment, restrictive cardiomyopathy requires medical therapy and in appropriate patients, the definitive treatment is cardiac transplantation. Sufficient differences exist between the two conditions to allow noninvasive differentiation, but no single diagnostic tool can be relied upon to make this distinction. Newer echocardiographic techniques such as speckle-track imaging, velocity vector imaging, as well as cardiac computed tomography and cardiac MRI can help differentiate constriction from restriction with high sensitivity and specificity. Outcomes are better with early diagnosis of constriction in particular and early surgical resection.

  15. Premature ventricular contraction-induced cardiomyopathy: an emerging entity.

    PubMed

    Tran, Cao Thach; Calkins, Hugh

    2016-11-01

    Over the past 10-15 years, there has been an increasing amount of evidence that frequent premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) are associated with the development of a reversible cardiomyopathy. Areas covered: This review considers current evidence of the association between PVCs and the development of cardiomyopathy, risk factors, and available treatment modalities based on available published literature. Expert commentary: The field is rapidly evolving, although evidence is based primarily on observational studies. Pharmacological therapy may suppress PVCs and lead to resolution of cardiomyopathy in many patients. In addition, catheter ablation has emerged as an effective treatment modality that has compared favorably to pharmacological antiarrhythmic therapy. The excellent outcome in successfully treated patients should prompt physicians to consider whether frequent PVCs may be a contributing factor in patients with heart failure.

  16. Pediatric cardiomyopathies: causes, epidemiology, clinical course, preventive strategies and therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Steven E; Cochran, Thomas R; Briston, David A; Brown, Stefanie R; Sambatakos, Peter J; Miller, Tracie L; Carrillo, Adriana A; Corcia, Liat; Sanchez, Janine E; Diamond, Melissa B; Freundlich, Michael; Harake, Danielle; Gayle, Tamara; Harmon, William G; Rusconi, Paolo G; Sandhu, Satinder K; Wilkinson, James D

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies, which are rare but serious disorders of the muscles of the heart, affect at least one in every 100,000 children in the USA. Approximately 40% of children with symptomatic cardiomyopathy undergo heart transplantation or die from cardiac complications within 2 years. However, a significant number of children suffering from cardiomyopathy are surviving into adulthood, making it an important chronic illness for both pediatric and adult clinicians to understand. The natural history, risk factors, prevalence and incidence of this pediatric condition were not fully understood before the 1990s. Questions regarding optimal diagnostic, prognostic and treatment methods remain. Children require long-term follow-up into adulthood in order to identify the factors associated with best clinical practice including diagnostic approaches, as well as optimal treatment approaches. In this article, we comprehensively review current research on various presentations of this disease, along with current knowledge about their causes, treatments and clinical outcomes. PMID:24180540

  17. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following electroconvulsive therapy: an increasingly recognised phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, A; Russell, M D; Sundararaman, S; Shankar, K K; Artman, B

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of patients with severe depressive illnesses requiring electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is challenging. This is compounded by the presence of physical comorbidities and potential complications. We report the case of a patient, on long-term bisoprolol, who developed acute epigastric pain and dyspnoea shortly after receiving ECT for treatment-refractory depression. An ECG showed new-onset ischaemic changes and a troponin-I level was elevated at 12 h. A diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy was reached following angiography, which demonstrated left ventricular hypokinesia in the absence of coronary artery disease. With supportive treatment the patient made a good recovery. This report highlights the risk of developing Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following ECT despite β-adrenergic receptor blockade, and adds to a growing number of cases reporting this complication. Clinicians involved in the care of patients undergoing ECT must be aware of this complication and should consider Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in patients who develop atypical chest pain after ECT. PMID:25425252

  18. Transient Reverse Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Following a Spider Bite in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Alexakis, Lykourgos-Christos; Arapi, Sophia; Stefanou, Ioannis; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Astriti, Myrto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Black widow spider is endemic in the Mediterranean area and although envenomations are rare, may occasionally lead to death. We present a case of a 64-year-old female developing a rare variant of takotsubo, stress-induced, cardiomyopathy after a spider bite. This resulted in acute heart failure within 24 hours of the bite. With medical treatment and supportive care, the patient's clinical condition improved. Reverse takotsubo cardiomyopathy was diagnosed by echocardiography, which was transient. Clinical and echocardiographic findings have been completely resolved on follow-up 46 days later. Reverse takotsubo cardiomyopathy has not been yet described following a spider bite. Doctors in the emergency department of endemic countries should be familiar with this potential complication. PMID:25654384

  19. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Induced by Chronic Starvation and Selenium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) has been rarely documented as a cause of cardiovascular abnormalities, including dilated cardiomyopathy. Selenium is responsible for antioxidant defense mechanisms in cardiomyocytes, and its deficiency in the setting of PEM and disease related malnutrition (DRM) may lead to exacerbation of the dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a rare case of a fourteen-year-old boy who presented with symptoms of congestive heart failure due to DRM and PEM (secondary to chronic starvation) along with severe selenium deficiency. An initial echocardiogram showed severely depressed systolic function consistent with dilated cardiomyopathy. Aggressive nutritional support and replacement of selenium and congestive heart failure medications that included diuretics and ACE inhibitors with the addition of carvedilol led to normalization of the cardiac function within four weeks. He continues to have significant weight gain and is currently completely asymptomatic from a cardiovascular standpoint. PMID:27994905

  20. An update on treatments and outcomes in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Richard; Rajagopalan, Navin; Safirstein, Jordan; Briller, Joan

    2014-05-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a well-established complication of pregnancy. Criteria include heart failure that presents with reduced left ventricular function, signs and symptoms of heart failure either late in pregnancy or early in the postpartum period. The incidence varies widely depending geography and ethnicity. The pathophysiology of PPCM is still an area of active investigation, but includes immune and inflammatory mechanisms, which are the subject of several investigations. Therapies for chronic heart failure from PPCM are similar to those patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy from different etiologies, however novel therapies may include bromocriptine, pentoxifylline or other potential therapies influencing the immune system. The need for implantable defibrillators, left ventricular assist devices and cardiac transplant in women with PPCM is rare, and prognosis is better than other forms of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Despite this, further information about the epidemiology, prognosis and potential therapies are required to better manage and diagnose PPCM in women with signs and symptoms of heart failure.

  1. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Teng J.

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  2. Dilated cardiomyopathy in an American cocker spaniel with taurine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gavaghan, B J; Kittleson, M D

    1997-12-01

    An American Cocker Spaniel with low plasma taurine concentration (< 2 nmol/mL) was presented with dyspnoea associated with pulmonary oedema and a left ventricular shortening fraction of 9%. Emergency therapy with furosemide, dobutamine, nitroglycerine and oxygen supplementation led to a good response. Chronic therapy was started with enalapril, furosemide, digoxin and taurine. Improvement in all echocardiographic indices were noted over a 22 week follow-up, most notably an increase in left ventricular shortening fraction to 20%, a decrease of E-point septal separation from 14 mm to 7 mm and marked left ventricular remodelling. This degree of improvement in myocardial function may represent a direct link between dilated cardiomyopathy in the American Cocker Spaniel and plasma taurine deficiency. Alternatively, this response may reflect a breed-related cardiomyopathy with a natural history and therapeutic response not commonly seen in the more common large breed cardiomyopathy presentations.

  3. A vicious cycle of acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy and circulatory collapse secondary to pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Otusanya, Olufisayo; Goraya, Harmeen; Iyer, Priyanka; Landi, Kristen; Tibb, Amit; Msaouel, Pavlos

    2015-10-01

    Acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy is an uncommon, life-threatening manifestation of pheochromocytoma. The massive release of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla and their toxic effects on the coronary vessels and the cardiac myocytes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy in patients with pheochromocytoma. Severe manifestations, such as acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy, may be the initial presentation, especially in unsuspected and untreated pheochromocytoma cases. The clinical course of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy is unpredictable as patients may rapidly deteriorate into circulatory collapse and multisystem crisis. We report a case of a 25-year-old man who presented with catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy.

  4. Cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain defects in two families with non-compaction cardiomyopathy: linking non-compaction to hypertrophic, restrictive, and dilated cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Hoedemaekers, Yvonne M; Caliskan, Kadir; Majoor-Krakauer, Danielle; van de Laar, Ingrid; Michels, Michelle; Witsenburg, Maarten; ten Cate, Folkert J; Simoons, Maarten L; Dooijes, Dennis

    2007-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies are classified according to distinct morphological characteristics. They occur relatively frequent and are an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Isolated ventricular non-compaction or non-compaction cardiomyopathy (NCCM) is characterized by an excessively thickened endocardial layer with deep intertrabecular recesses, reminiscent of the myocardium during early embryogenesis. Aims Autosomal-dominant as well as X-linked inheritance for NCCM has been described and several loci have been associated with the disease. Nevertheless, a major genetic cause for familial NCCM remains to be identified. Methods and Results We describe, in two separate autosomal-dominant NCCM families, the identification of mutations in the sarcomeric cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7), known to be associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), restricted cardiomyopathy (RCM), and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Conclusion These results confirm the genetic heterogeneity of NCCM and suggest that the molecular classification of cardiomyopathies includes an MYH7-associated spectrum of NCCM with HCM, RCM, and DCM.

  5. Sleep-disordered breathing in children with cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Suhail; Kantor, Paul F; Chadha, Neil K; Tirado, Yamilet; James, Adrian L; Narang, Indra

    2014-06-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a rare condition in children that is associated with high mortality. Although sleep-disordered breathing is prevalent, its frequency and patterns in children with cardiomyopathy are unknown. To evaluate the frequency and patterns of sleep-disordered breathing and their relationship to cardiac function in children with primary cardiomyopathy. This study comprised a prospective, uncontrolled case series. Children with cardiomyopathy completed a sleep questionnaire, overnight polysomnography, blood pressure monitoring, otolaryngological assessment, and transthoracic echocardiography at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. Twenty-one patients (17 males) were recruited. The median age of the patients was 10.7 years, and the median body mass index z score was 0.8. Sleep-disordered breathing was observed in 10 (48%) of 21 patients. Significant central sleep apnea was the main finding in 5 (24%) of 21 of the cohort and in 50% of the sleep-disordered breathing population. The left ventricular end diastolic volume index was greater in children with central sleep apnea than in children without sleep-disordered breathing (P = 0.03). There were significant correlations between the central apnea-hypopnea index and both left ventricular end diastolic and end systolic volume indexes (Spearman's r = 0.55, P = 0.01; Spearman's r = 0.47, P = 0.03, respectively). Snoring, sleep architecture, blood pressure, and otolaryngological findings were not significantly different between children with sleep-disordered breathing versus those without sleep-disordered breathing. Sleep-disordered breathing is common in children with cardiomyopathy. In our present study, 24% of participants exhibited primarily central sleep apnea. The severity of cardiac dysfunction, as measured by left ventricular end diastolic volume index and left ventricular end systolic volume index, is associated with central sleep apnea. Longitudinal research is necessary to better characterize

  6. Intravenous immunoglobulins in children with new onset dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Heidendael, Josephine F; Den Boer, Suzanne L; Wildenbeest, Joanne G; Dalinghaus, Michiel; Straver, Bart; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2017-08-11

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a rare but serious disorder in children. No effective diagnostic or treatment tools are readily available. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulins in children with new onset dilated cardiomyopathy. Methods and results In this retrospective cohort study, 94 children with new onset dilated cardiomyopathy were followed during a median period of 33 months. All patients with secondary dilated cardiomyopathy - for example, genetic, auto-immune or structural defects - had been excluded. Viral tests were performed in all patients and 18 (19%) children met the criteria for the diagnosis "probable or definite viral myocarditis". Intravenous immunoglobulins were administered to 21 (22%) patients. Overall transplant-free survival was 75% in 5 years and did not differ between treatment groups. The treatment was associated with a higher recovery rate within 5 years, compared with non-treated children (70 versus 43%, log rank=0.045). After correction for possible confounders the hazard ratio for recovery with intravenous immunoglobulins was not significant (hazard ratio: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.0-4.6; p=0.056). Administration of intravenous immunoglobulins resulted in a greater improvement in the shortening fraction of the left ventricle. In our population of children with new onset dilated cardiomyopathy, of either viral or idiopathic origin, intravenous immunoglobulins were administered to a minority of the patients and did not influence transplant-free survival, but were associated with better improvement of systolic left ventricular function and with better recovery. Our results support the concept that children with new onset dilated cardiomyopathy might benefit from intravenous immunoglobulins.

  7. Diagnostic approaches for diabetic cardiomyopathy and myocardial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Maya, Lisandro; Villarreal, Francisco J.

    2009-01-01

    In diabetes mellitus, alterations in cardiac structure/function in the absence of ischemic heart disease, hypertension or other cardiac pathologies is termed diabetic cardiomyopathy. In the United States, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus continues to rise and the disease currently affects about 8% of the general population. Hence, it is imperative the use of appropriate diagnostic strategies for diabetic cardiomyopathy, which may help correctly identify the disease at early stages and implement suitable corrective therapies. Currently, there is no single diagnostic method for the identification of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetic cardiomyopathy is known to induce changes in cardiac structure such as, myocardial hypertrophy, fibrosis and fat droplet deposition. Early changes in cardiac function are typically manifested as abnormal diastolic function that with time leads to loss of contractile function. Echocardiography based methods currently stands as the preferred diagnostic approach for diabetic cardiomyopathy, due to its wide availability and economical use. In addition to conventional techniques, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy along with contrast agents are now leading new approaches in the diagnosis of myocardial fibrosis, and cardiac and hepatic metabolic changes. These strategies can be complemented with serum biomarkers so they can offer a clear picture as to diabetes-induced changes in cardiac structure/function even at very early stages of the disease. This review article intends to provide a summary of experimental and routine tools currently available to diagnose diabetic cardiomyopathy induced changes in cardiac structure/function. These tools can be reliably used in either experimental models of diabetes or for clinical applications. PMID:19595694

  8. Tidal torques on infrequently colliding particle disks in binary systems and the truncation of the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, F. A.; Lecar, M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Papaloizou, J.

    1980-01-01

    Conditions leading to the truncation, at the 2:1 resonance, of a disk of infrequently colliding particles surrounding the primary of a binary system are studied numerically and analytically. Attention is given to the case in which the mass ratio, q, is sufficiently small (less than about 0.1) and the radius of the disk centered on the primary allowably larger, so that first-order orbit-orbit resonances between ring material and the secondary can lie within it. Collisions are found to be less frequent than q to the -2/3 power orbital periods (the period of the forced eccentricity at the 2:1 resonance), and truncation occurs and Kirkwood gaps are produced only if the particle eccentricity is less than some critical value, estimated to be of order q to the 5/9 power, or approximately 0.02 for the sun-Jupiter case having q equal to 10 to the -3rd power.

  9. DNA Fingerprinting of Ralstonia paucula by Infrequent-Restriction-Site PCR and Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moissenet, Didier; Vu-Thien, Hoang; Benzerara, Yahia; Arlet, Guillaume

    2003-01-01

    Ralstonia paucula (formerly CDC group IV c-2) is an environmental organism that can cause serious human infections, occasionally clusters of nosocomial infections. In the present work, 26 strains of R. paucula (4 from the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collection, 10 from the Belgian Laboratorium voor Microbiologie [LMG] collection, and 12 French clinical isolates) were analyzed with infrequent-restriction-site PCR and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. Both techniques accurately distinguished between collection strains. Two close patterns obtained for all the French isolates suggested a clonal strain. Two LMG collection strains originating from human sources in the United States also showed patterns close to those of French isolates. PMID:14662974

  10. Tidal torques on infrequently colliding particle disks in binary systems and the truncation of the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, F. A.; Lecar, M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Papaloizou, J.

    1980-01-01

    Conditions leading to the truncation, at the 2:1 resonance, of a disk of infrequently colliding particles surrounding the primary of a binary system are studied numerically and analytically. Attention is given to the case in which the mass ratio, q, is sufficiently small (less than about 0.1) and the radius of the disk centered on the primary allowably larger, so that first-order orbit-orbit resonances between ring material and the secondary can lie within it. Collisions are found to be less frequent than q to the -2/3 power orbital periods (the period of the forced eccentricity at the 2:1 resonance), and truncation occurs and Kirkwood gaps are produced only if the particle eccentricity is less than some critical value, estimated to be of order q to the 5/9 power, or approximately 0.02 for the sun-Jupiter case having q equal to 10 to the -3rd power.

  11. The infrequency of transmission of herpesviruses between humans and animals; postulation of an unrecognised protective host mechanism.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Ahmad, A; Davies, J A

    2001-10-01

    The infrequency of natural transmission of herpesviruses between humans and animals is surprising as there is extensive contact between humans and non-human species with unequivocal evidence that host cells from non-susceptible species will support replication of herpesviruses which do not seem to naturally infect that species. This review examines natural cross-infections between human and other species and suggests that, firstly, it is possible that humans and animals do become asymptomatically or symptomatically cross-infected from other species, but the infection is not diagnosed or not diagnosable by conventional methods; secondly, an as yet unidentified novel mechanism(s) may operate to prevent infection using chemical, electrical or as yet unidentified pathways and may even be 'switched on' by exposure to the virus.

  12. Inferior ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Associated with Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Koeth, Oliver; Zeymer, Uwe; Schiele, Rudolf; Zahn, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is usually characterized by transient left ventricular apical ballooning. Due to the clinical symptoms which include chest pain, electrocardiographic changes, and elevated myocardial markers, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is frequently mimicking ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the absence of a significant coronary artery disease. Otherwise an acute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery can produce a typical Takotsubo contraction pattern. ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is frequently associated with emotional stress, but to date no cases of STEMI triggering TCM have been reported. We describe a case of a female patient with inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by TCM. PMID:20811565

  13. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment of Cardiomyopathies in Children.

    PubMed

    Price, Jack F; Jeewa, Aamir; Denfield, Susan W

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart muscle, a term introduced in 1957 to identify a group of myocardial diseases not attributable to coronary artery disease. The definition has since been modified to refer to structural and or functional abnormalities of the myocardium where other known causes of myocardial dysfunction, such as systemic hypertension, valvular disease and ischemic heart disease, have been excluded. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, clinical assessment and therapeutic strategies for hypertrophic, dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, with a particular focus on aspects unique to children.

  14. Biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy: case report and general discussion.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Paolo; Monge, Jorge; Simpson, Leo

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, our understanding of the physiologic mechanisms of transient takotsubo cardiomyopathy has improved because of the growing use of emergent heart catheterization in patients who present with severe ischemic syndromes. However, even this procedure has revealed only that, in most patients with takotsubo syndrome, the sudden onset of ventricular dysfunction is not due to fixed coronary artery occlusions. We present a case of transient takotsubo cardiomyopathy with an exceptional feature--uneven impairment of both right and left ventricular function, or biventricular takotsubo--and we discuss a novel, comprehensive theory that we have devised to explain the pathophysiology of this syndrome's many manifestations.

  15. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: expanding the differential diagnosis in cardiothoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Berman, Marius; Saute, Milton; Porat, Eyal; Vaturi, Mordechai; Paul-Kislin, Leslie; Vidne, Bernardo A; Kogan, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a 69-year-old woman after right upper lobectomy, without cardiac antecedents. The immediate course of recovery was uneventful. On the first postoperative day, clinical symptoms of acute coronary syndrome developed in association with ischemic electrocardiographic changes and a mild elevation in creatinine phosphokinase levels. Echocardiography showed moderate left ventricular dysfunction, with a typical takotsubo pattern. Coronary angiography revealed no abnormalities. After 2 days of supportive treatment, the patient recovered completely. The clinical presentation, instrumental findings, additional cardiac and noncardiac diseases, and the potential pathomechanism of takotsubo cardiomyopathy are described according to the current medical literature.

  16. Inverted Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy associated with bronchoalveolar lavage.

    PubMed

    Ok, Kyeong Sam; Song, Bong Gun; Park, Kyoung Sik; Jung, Hyun Gul; Jung, Hye-Jin; Park, I Nae; Yum, Ho-Kee; Cho, Wook-Hyun; Choi, Suk-Koo

    2011-07-01

    Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC), also known as transient left ventricular (LV) ballooning syndrome or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is characterised by transient LV dysfunction in the absence of significant angiographic coronary stenoses, frequently provoked by an episode of emotional or physical stress. In TTC, typically transient akinesis or dyskinesis of the LV apical segments with normal or hypercontractile basal wall motions is observed. Recently, several cases of atypical or inverted transient TTC sparing the LV apex have been reported. We report a case of inverted TTC showing akinesis of the basal and mid-ventricular segments of the LV with apical hyperkinesia triggered by bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage.

  17. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy complicated with acute pericarditis and cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Rodolfo; Aguinaga-Meza, Melina; Hazin, Moustafa Imran; Hazin, Ribhi; McCord, James

    2007-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a relatively uncommon stress-induced cardiomyopathy that accounts for 2.2% of all acute myocardial infarctions. It occurs most commonly in postmenopausal women between the ages of 55-70. The most common complications that have been described are cardiogenic shock and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, stroke and apical thrombus formation. There have been multiple prior case reports of TC; however, our case is the first to report acute pericarditis as one of its complications. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:17393953

  18. Acute and Chronic Pheochromocytoma-Induced Cardiomyopathies: Different Prognoses?

    PubMed Central

    Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Pereira, Bruno; Motreff, Pascal; Pierrard, Romain; Burnot, Christelle; Vorilhon, Charles; Maqdasy, Salwan; Roche, Béatrice; Desbiez, Francoise; Clerfond, Guillaume; Citron, Bernard; Lusson, Jean-René; Tauveron, Igor; Eschalier, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PPG) are rare and late-diagnosed catecholamine secreting tumors, which may be associated with unrecognized and/or severe cardiomyopathies. We performed a computer-assisted systematic search of the electronic Medline databases using the MESH terms “myocarditis,” “myocardial infarction,” “Takotsubo,” “stress cardiomyopathy,” “cardiogenic shock”, or “dilated cardiomyopathy,” and “pheochromocytoma” or “paraganglioma” from 1961 to August 2012. All detailed case reports of cardiomyopathy due to a PPG, without coronary stenosis, and revealed by acute symptoms were included and analyzed. A total of 145 cases reports were collected (49 Takotsubo Cardiomyopathies [TTC] and 96 other Catecholamine Cardiomyopathies [CC]). At initial presentation, prevalence of high blood pressure (87.7%), chest pain (49.0%), headaches (47.6%), palpitations (46.9%), sweating (39.3%), and shock (51.0%) were comparable between CC and TTC. Acute pulmonary edema (58.3% vs 38.8%, P = 0.03) was more frequent in CC. There was no difference in proportion of patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LV Ejection Fraction [LVEF] < 30%) at initial presentation between both groups (P = 0.15). LVEF recovery before (64.9% vs 40.8%, P = 0.005) and after surgical resection (97.7% vs73.3%, P = 0.001) was higher in the TTC group. Death occurred in 11 cases (7.6%). In multivariate analysis, only TTC was associated with a better LV recovery (0.15 [0.03–0.67], P = 0.03). Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma can lead to different cardiomyopathies with the same brutal and life-threatening initial clinical presentation but with a different recovery rate. Diagnosis of unexplained dilated cardiomyopathy or TTC should lead clinicians to a specific search for PPG. PMID:26683930

  19. Uremic cardiomyopathy: role of circulating digitalis like substances.

    PubMed

    Mohmand, Behram; Malhotra, Deepak K; Shapiro, Joseph I

    2005-09-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure develop a cardiomyopathy characterized by marked diastolic dysfunction and left ventricular hypertrophy. Interestingly, they also have substantial increases in the circulating concentrations of digitalis like substances. Digitalis like substances produce reactive oxygen species as part of the signal cascade induced by binding to the sodium pump and patients, and this signal cascade appears to induce hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes grown in culture. Also, patients with chronic renal failure develop an oxidant stress state without a known mechanism. From these data, we propose that it is these digitalis like substances which cause cardiomyopathy of renal failure as well as the systemic oxidant stress state.

  20. Dilated cardiomyopathy after electrical injury: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Buono, Lee M; DePace, Nicholas L; Elbaum, David M

    2003-05-01

    The specific etiologic factor and pathogenesis of most dilated cardiomyopathies have yet to be described definitively. Hypotheses of the etiologic factor of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) abound. This report describes two patients with electrical injury in whom DCM developed after the electrical insult in the absence of other precipitating causes. Further histologic examination of myocardial tissue after electrical injury may reveal clues regarding the pathophysiology behind electrically induced DCM. Because electrical injury may be associated with myocardial dysfunction, short- and long-term evaluation of left ventricular function may be warranted.

  1. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment of Cardiomyopathies in Children

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jack F.; Jeewa, Aamir; Denfield, Susan W.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart muscle, a term introduced in 1957 to identify a group of myocardial diseases not attributable to coronary artery disease. The definition has since been modified to refer to structural and or functional abnormalities of the myocardium where other known causes of myocardial dysfunction, such as systemic hypertension, valvular disease and ischemic heart disease, have been excluded. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, clinical assessment and therapeutic strategies for hypertrophic, dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, with a particular focus on aspects unique to children. PMID:26926296

  2. An unusual presentation of peripartum cardiomyopathy: Recurrent transient ischemic attacks.

    PubMed

    Zehir, Regayip; Karabay, Can Yucel; Kocabay, Gonenc; Kalayci, Arzu; Akgun, Taylan; Kirma, Cevat

    2014-09-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy that is associated with high maternal morbidity and mortality. Onset is usually between the last month of pregnancy and up to the fifth month postpartum. PPCM usually presents with signs and symptoms of heart failure and rarely with thromboembolic complications. The true incidence of thromboemboli in PPCM is unknown. Herein we report an unusual case of PPCM in a previously healthy woman who presented with recurrent transient ischemic attacks due to thrombus in the left ventricle. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Peripartum cardiomyopathy in a patient with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Kajiya, Takashi; Lee, Souki; Yamashita, Makoto; Sasaki, Yuichi; Kamizono, Yusuke; Imamura, Masakazu; Toyonaga, Koichi; Toda, Hitoshi; Koriyama, Nobuyuki; Tei, Chuwa

    2010-11-05

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare life-threatening cardiomyopathy of unknown etiology that occurs during the peripartum period in previously healthy women. Autoimmune and viral factors have been suggested to be involved in PPCM. Here we describe a patient with Graves' disease, which is one of the organ-specific autoimmune diseases, who developed acute heart failure due to PPCM at 2 weeks after her first delivery. The patient recovered completely with conservative treatment for heart failure. An association between PPCM and Graves' disease has not been reported before. PPCM may be an organ-specific autoimmune disease, so the coexistence of other autoimmune diseases should be considered in PPCM patients.

  4. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Coexisting with Acute Pericarditis and Myocardial Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Sezavar, Seyed Hashem; Riahi Beni, Hassan; Ghanavati, Reza; Hajahmadi, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is a stress-induced cardiomyopathy that occurs primarily in postmenopausal women. It mimics clinical picture of acute coronary syndrome with nonobstructive coronary arteries and a characteristic transient left (or bi-) ventricular apical ballooning at angiography. The exact pathogenesis of TCM is not well recognized. Hereby we present an unusual case of TCM that presents with signs and symptoms of acute pericarditis and was also found to have a coexisting coronary muscle bridge on coronary angiography. We discuss the impact of these associations in better understanding of the pathogenesis of TCM. PMID:27437150

  5. Cancer-associated fibroblasts are an infrequent finding in the microenvironment of proliferative verrucous leukoplakia-associated squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Akrish, Sharon J; Rachmiel, Adi; Sabo, Edmond; Vered, Marilena; Ben-Izhak, Ofer

    2017-05-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are generally associated with negative prognostic factors. This study compares the clinicopathologic impact of CAFs in oral squamous cell carcinoma in patients with a history of proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (p-scca) and patients with conventional squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate (c-scca). A retrospective clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of 97 tumor specimens from 78 patients (13 patients with proliferative verrucous leukoplakia-associated squamous cell carcinoma (n = 32) and conventional squamous cell carcinoma from the buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate (n = 65) was conducted. Immunostaining with anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antibody was used to evaluate the presence of CAFs. α-SMA expression was an infrequent finding in p-scca and seen in only 6% of p-scca compared to 40% of c-scca (P < 0.0004). In the c-scca subgroup, α-SMA significantly correlated with tumor size (T) (P = 0.009), tumor thickness (P < 0.0009), perineural invasion (P = 0.009), and microscopic grade (P = 0.018). The presence of CAFs was an infrequent finding in our p-scca cohort which may contribute to its seemingly slower growing and less invasive growth pattern. In the cohort of c-scca patients, higher levels of CAFs correlated with microscopic invasiveness, tumor size, and perineural invasion. Practically, these are important observations as targeting strategies are being developed to combat carcinoma types where CAFs significance has been validated. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Infrequent breakfast consumption is associated with higher body adiposity and abdominal obesity in Malaysian school-aged adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nurul-Fadhilah, Abdullah; Teo, Pey Sze; Huybrechts, Inge; Foo, Leng Huat

    2013-01-01

    Unhealthy dietary pattern increases the risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in growing children and adolescents. However, the way the habitual pattern of breakfast consumption influences body composition and risk of obesity in adolescents is not well defined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess any associations between breakfast consumption practices and body composition profiles in 236 apparently healthy adolescents aged 12 to 19 years. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary behaviour and lifestyle practices and a dietary food frequency questionnaire were used. Body composition and adiposity indices were determined using standard anthropometric measurement protocols and dual energy χ-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Mean age of the participants was 15.3±1.9 years. The majority of participants (71.2%) fell in the normal body mass index (BMI) ranges. Breakfast consumption patterns showed that only half of the participants (50%) were consuming breakfast daily. Gender-specific multivariate analyses (ANCOVA) showed that in both boys and girls, those eating breakfast at least 5 times a week had significantly lower body weight, body mass index (BMI), BMI z-scores, waist circumference, body fat mass and percent body fat (%BF) compared to infrequent breakfast eaters, after adjustment for age, household income, pubertal status, eating-out and snacking practices, daily energy intakes, and daily physical activity levels. The present findings indicate that infrequent breakfast consumption is associated with higher body adiposity and abdominal obesity. Therefore, daily breakfast consumption with healthy food choices should be encouraged in growing children and adolescents to prevent adiposity during these critical years of growth.

  7. CINRG Duchenne Natural History Study demonstrates insufficient diagnosis and treatment of cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spurney, Christopher; Shimizu, Reiko; Hache, Lauren P.; Kolski, Hanna; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Clemens, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy is a common cause of morbidity and death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods A cross-sectional analysis of clinical data from a multi-institutional, international CINRG DMD Natural History Study of 340 DMD patients aged 2 to 28 years. Cardiomyopathy was defined as shortening fraction (SF) <28% or ejection fraction (EF) <55%. Results 231 participants reported a prior clinical echocardiogram study, and 174 had data for SF or EF. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy was 27% (47/174), and it was significantly associated with age and clinical stage. The association of cardiomyopathy with age and clinical stage was not changed by glucocorticoid use as a covariate (P>0.68). In patients with cardiomyopathy, 57 % (27/47) reported not taking any cardiac medications. Cardiac medications were used in 12% (15/127) of patients without cardiomyopathy. Discussion Echocardiograms were underutilized, and cardiomyopathy was undertreated in this DMD natural history cohort. PMID:24395289

  8. Divergent Mitochondrial Biogenesis Responses in Human Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Preeti; Wanagat, Jonathan; Wang, Zhihua; Wang, Yibin; Liem, David A.; Ping, Peipei; Antoshechkin, Igor A.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; MacLellan, W. Robb

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondria are key players in the development and progression of heart failure (HF). Mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction leads to diminished energy production and increased cell death contributing to the progression of left ventricular (LV) failure. The fundamental mechanisms that underlie mt dysfunction in HF have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Results To characterize mt morphology, biogenesis and genomic integrity in human HF, we investigated LV tissue from non-failing (NF) hearts and end-stage ischemic (ICM) or dilated (DCM) cardiomyopathic hearts. Although mt dysfunction was present in both types of cardiomyopathy, mt were smaller and increased in number in DCM compared to ICM or NF hearts. Mt volume density and mtDNA copy number was increased by ~2-fold (P<0.001) in DCM hearts in comparison to ICM hearts. These changes were accompanied by an increase in the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes in DCM versus no change in ICM. mtDNA repair and antioxidant genes were reduced in failing hearts suggestive of a defective repair and protection system, which may account for the 4.1-fold increase in mtDNA deletion mutations in DCM (P<0.05 vs NF hearts, P<0.05 vs ICM). Conclusions In DCM, mt dysfunction is associated with mtDNA damage and deletions, which could be a consequence of mutating stress coupled with a PGC-1α-dependent stimulus for mt biogenesis. However, this maladaptive compensatory response contributes to additional oxidative damage. Thus, our findings support further investigations into novel mechanisms and therapeutic strategies for mt dysfunction in DCM. PMID:23589024

  9. Cardiomyopathy in a Harris hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus).

    PubMed

    Brandão, João; Reynolds, Caryn A; Beaufrère, Hugues; Serio, Jacqueline; Blair, Robert V; Gaschen, Lorrie; Johnson, James G; Del Piero, Fabio; Barker, Steven A; Nevarez, Javier G; Tully, Thomas N

    2016-07-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION An adult sexually intact female Harris hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus) housed at a wildlife hospital was evaluated because of acute collapse during an educational exhibition. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination and hematologic analysis revealed no abnormalities; radiography revealed findings consistent with a previous tibiotarsal fracture. Coelioscopy with histologic examination and fungal culture of lung and air sac samples revealed anthracosis but no fungal infection. The hawk was discharged and temporarily removed from the education program; 1 month later, upon reintroduction into the program, it collapsed again. Physical examination and hematologic findings were similar to those after the first episode. Transcoelomic and transesophageal echocardiography and CT angiocardiography findings were consistent with cardiomyopathy. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Initial cardiac treatment included furosemide (0.5 mg/kg [0.23 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) and pimobendan (10 mg/kg [4.5 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h). After 10 days of treatment, peak and trough plasma concentrations of pimobendan were measured at 25, 196 and 715.97 ng/mL, respectively; the dosage was decreased to 0.25 mg/kg (0.11 mg/lb), PO, every 12 hours. No overt signs of toxicosis were detected. A sample was collected to reevaluate plasma pimobendan concentration after 30 days of treatment; results were not obtained prior to the patient's death but revealed a peak concentration of 16.8 ng/mL, with an undetectable trough concentration. The hawk was found dead 6 months after initial evaluation. Necropsy revealed cardiomegaly, but histologic examination did not reveal an inciting cause of cardiac dysfunction. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Cardiac disease in raptors may be underreported. Transcoelomic and transesophageal echocardiography and CT angiography provided useful information for the diagnosis of cardiac disease in the hawk of this report.

  10. Intraventricular vortex properties in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Javier; Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; Del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Pérez-David, Esther; González-Mansilla, Ana; Santa-Marta, Cristina; Barrio, Alicia; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Del Álamo, Juan C

    2014-03-01

    Vortices may have a role in optimizing the mechanical efficiency and blood mixing of the left ventricle (LV). We aimed to characterize the size, position, circulation, and kinetic energy (KE) of LV main vortex cores in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) and analyze their physiological correlates. We used digital processing of color-Doppler images to study flow evolution in 61 patients with NIDCM and 61 age-matched control subjects. Vortex features showed a characteristic biphasic temporal course during diastole. Because late filling contributed significantly to flow entrainment, vortex KE reached its maximum at the time of the peak A wave, storing 26 ± 20% of total KE delivered by inflow (range: 1-74%). Patients with NIDCM showed larger and stronger vortices than control subjects (circulation: 0.008 ± 0.007 vs. 0.006 ± 0.005 m(2)/s, respectively, P = 0.02; KE: 7 ± 8 vs. 5 ± 5 mJ/m, P = 0.04), even when corrected for LV size. This helped confining the filling jet in the dilated ventricle. The vortex Reynolds number was also higher in the NIDCM group. By multivariate analysis, vortex KE was related to the KE generated by inflow and to chamber short-axis diameter. In 21 patients studied head to head, Doppler measurements of circulation and KE closely correlated with phase-contract magnetic resonance values (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82 and 0.76, respectively). Thus, the biphasic nature of filling determines normal vortex physiology. Vortex formation is exaggerated in patients with NIDCM due to chamber remodeling, and enlarged vortices are helpful for ameliorating convective pressure losses and facilitating transport. These findings can be accurately studied using ultrasound.

  11. Intraventricular vortex properties in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Pérez-David, Esther; González-Mansilla, Ana; Santa-Marta, Cristina; Barrio, Alicia; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Vortices may have a role in optimizing the mechanical efficiency and blood mixing of the left ventricle (LV). We aimed to characterize the size, position, circulation, and kinetic energy (KE) of LV main vortex cores in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) and analyze their physiological correlates. We used digital processing of color-Doppler images to study flow evolution in 61 patients with NIDCM and 61 age-matched control subjects. Vortex features showed a characteristic biphasic temporal course during diastole. Because late filling contributed significantly to flow entrainment, vortex KE reached its maximum at the time of the peak A wave, storing 26 ± 20% of total KE delivered by inflow (range: 1–74%). Patients with NIDCM showed larger and stronger vortices than control subjects (circulation: 0.008 ± 0.007 vs. 0.006 ± 0.005 m2/s, respectively, P = 0.02; KE: 7 ± 8 vs. 5 ± 5 mJ/m, P = 0.04), even when corrected for LV size. This helped confining the filling jet in the dilated ventricle. The vortex Reynolds number was also higher in the NIDCM group. By multivariate analysis, vortex KE was related to the KE generated by inflow and to chamber short-axis diameter. In 21 patients studied head to head, Doppler measurements of circulation and KE closely correlated with phase-contract magnetic resonance values (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82 and 0.76, respectively). Thus, the biphasic nature of filling determines normal vortex physiology. Vortex formation is exaggerated in patients with NIDCM due to chamber remodeling, and enlarged vortices are helpful for ameliorating convective pressure losses and facilitating transport. These findings can be accurately studied using ultrasound. PMID:24414062

  12. Systolic and diastolic mechanics in stress cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Keith; O'Connor, Mark J; Baicu, Catalin F; Fitzgibbons, Timothy P; Shaw, Peter; Tighe, Dennis A; Zile, Michael R; Aurigemma, Gerard P

    2014-04-22

    Stress cardiomyopathy (SCM) is a peculiar form of reversible left ventricular dysfunction seen predominantly in women and occurs in response to emotional or physical stress. Because dysfunction in SCM is reversible and that of acute myocardial infarction (MI) is not, we hypothesized that these fundamental mechanistic differences between SCM and MI would be associated with different systolic and diastolic properties. We examined 3 groups, all women: patients with SCM (n=24; mean age, 63±12 years), those with left anterior (LAD) ST-segment-elevation MI (n=36; mean age, 63±10 years), and referent control subjects (n=30; mean age, 62±8 years). All underwent angiography, ventriculography, and pressure measurements within 48 hours of presentation. Left ventricular volumes, diastolic pressures, and diastolic stiffness were higher in SCM and LAD MI patients than in control subjects but no different from each other. Similarly, left ventricular diastolic pressures and diastolic stiffness were elevated in the SCM and LAD MI groups compared with the control group. Left ventricular ejection fraction in SCM and LAD MI were 40.8±12.3% and 49.6±5.6%, respectively, versus 70.4±9.4% in control subjects (P<0.001), and stroke work less than half the value of control subjects. Indexes of contractility and ventricular-arterial coupling were similarly abnormal in SCM and LAD MI. SCM and LAD MI show severe diastolic dysfunction. At similar left ventricular volumes, their diastolic pressures are more than twice as high as in control subjects, and systolic dysfunction is equally reduced in SCM and LAD MI. Despite a completely different pathophysiology in terms of systolic and diastolic function, SCM is indistinguishable from acute LAD-territory MI.

  13. Reproductive History of Women With Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Dunsiger, Shira; Swales, Heather H; Aurigemma, Gerard P; Ockene, Ira; Rosman, Lindsey; Wittstein, Ilan S

    2016-12-15

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) occurs predominantly in postmenopausal women, suggesting a possible role of reproductive and hormonal factors in the pathophysiology of this condition. Yet reproductive characteristics of women with TC have received limited attention. This prospective case-control study sought to explore reproductive characteristics associated with TC. Incident TC cases and myocardial infarction (MI) controls were recruited among consecutive women presenting at the emergency departments of 2 large medical centers in Massachusetts and Connecticut. Female healthy controls were recruited from a registry of research volunteers. Information about reproductive history was collected 1 month after discharge using standardized questionnaires completed during phone interviews. Linear and logistic regression models were used to estimate associations with reproductive factors. From March 2013 to October 2015, 209 women were screened for eligibility and 107 (45 TC, 32 MI, and 30 healthy controls) were enrolled. Conditions uniquely associated with TC were a history of irregular menses (adjusted OR, TC vs MI 8.30; 95% CI 1.01 to 69.18), number of pregnancies (adjusted β coefficient 0.69; SE 0.35, p = 0.05), and use of post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy (OR 5.79; CI 1.20 to 28.02). We did not find associations with history of infertility, breastfeeding, hysterectomy or oophorectomy, oral contraceptive use, and age at menopause. In conclusion, our findings suggest that premenopausal reproductive factors may play an important role in the onset of TC at a later age. These results need to be confirmed in future studies with larger populations.

  14. [Prognostic indexes in primary dilated cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Almazán, A; Ayala, F; Badui, E

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate, if besides the hypocontractility, which is the main finding in Primary Cardiomyopathy (PDC) there was some other mechanism in the development of heart failure and if this fact could influence in it's prognosis. We studied 13 patients with PDC in the hemodynamic cardiac laboratory from January 1982 to January 1988, these with systemic arterial hypertension. Coronary heart disease, myocarditis, primary valvular lesion, infiltrative disease, nephropathy, congenital heart disease, diabetes and alcoholism, were excluded. The control group was formed by 12 healthy subjects, which were studied for another purpose. We analyzed nine variables, including ejection fraction, peripheral vascular resistance, systolic and diastolic circumferential stress, left ventricular mass, left ventricular end diastolic and systolic volumes as well as force-velocity and force-fiber length relationship. The patients were followed up from 8 to 60 months (average 39 months). The cases with PDC were divided in two groups, "compensated" and "decompensated". The last ones with low ejection fraction and significantly increases systolic stress. We investigated which was the mechanism of compensation and decompensation through the force-velocity and force-fiber length relation. We found that compensation is associated with great increase of the after-load forces, the more end systolic volume at the end of the systole is not only controlled by the "force", but the decompensation is developed when the hypocontractility is added to the incompetence to compensate the after load. We found that the three deaths in this study had these hemodynamic characteristics, being the cause of death: the presence of heart failure in two patients and ventricular fibrillation in one.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Platelet activation in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tablin, F; Schumacher, T; Pombo, M; Marion, C T; Huang, K; Norris, J W; Jandrey, K E; Kittleson, M D

    2014-01-01

    Cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are at risk for development of systemic thromboembolic disease. However, the relationship between platelet activation state and cardiovascular parameters associated with HCM is not well described. To characterize platelet activation by flow cytometric evaluation of platelet P-selectin and semiquantitative Western blot analysis of soluble platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (sPECAM-1). Eight normal healthy cats (controls) owned by staff and students of the School of Veterinary Medicine and 36 cats from the UC Davis Feline HCM Research Laboratory were studied. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was used for all flow cytometry studies. Platelet surface CD41 and P-selectin expression were evaluated before and after ADP stimulation. sPECAM-1 expression was evaluated by Western blot analysis of platelet-poor plasma that had been stabilized with aprotinin. Standard echocardiographic studies were performed. Resting platelets from cats with severe HCM had increased P-selectin expression compared to controls, and expressed higher surface density of P-selectin reflected by their increased mean fluorescence intensities (MFI). Stimulation with ADP also resulted in significantly increased P-selectin MFI of platelets from cats with severe HCM. Increased P-selectin expression and MFI correlated with the presence of a heart murmur and end-systolic cavity obliteration (ESCO). sPECAM-1 expression from cats with moderate and severe HCM was significantly increased above those of control cats. P-selectin and sPECAM expression may be useful biomarkers indicating increased platelet activation in cats with HCM. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy systematic review: Pathophysiologic process, clinical presentation and diagnostic approach to Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ono, Ryohei; Falcão, L Menezes

    2016-04-15

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by transient left ventricular apical ballooning with the absence of coronary occlusion, which typically occurs in older women after emotional or physical stress. The pathophysiology of TTC is not well established, though several possible causes such as catecholamine cardiotoxicity, metabolic disturbance, coronary microvascular impairment and multivessel epicardial coronary artery spasm have been proposed. A number of diagnostic criteria have been suggested in the world and not unified as single, but the most common accepted one is Mayo Clinic proposed criteria. Since the clinical presentation of TTC is usually similar to acute coronary syndrome, differential diagnosis is essential to exclude other diseases and also for its treatment. Imaging modality including echocardiogram, angio CT and cardiac MRI, and lab tests for catecholamine, troponin T, creatine kinase MB and B-type natriuretic peptide can be useful to differentiate TTC from other diseases. Prognosis is generally favorable and in-hospital mortality is from 0% to within 10%.

  17. Recovery of Echocardiographic Function in Children with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Results from the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry

    PubMed Central

    Everitt, Melanie D.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Lu, Minmin; Canter, Charles E.; Pahl, Elfriede; Wilkinson, James D.; Addonizio, Linda J.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Rossano, Joseph; Singh, Rakesh K.; Lamour, Jacqueline; Webber, Steven A.; Colan, Steven D.; Margossian, Renee; Kantor, Paul F.; Jefferies, John L.; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the incidence of and predictors for recovery of normal echocardiographic function among children with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Background Most children with idiopathic DCM have poor outcomes; however, some improve. Methods We studied children less than 18 years old in the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry who had both depressed left ventricular (LV) function (fractional shortening [FS] or ejection fraction [EF] z-score <−2) and LV dilation (end-diastolic dimension [LVEDD] z-score >2) at diagnosis and who had at least one follow-up echocardiogram 30 days to 2 years from the initial echocardiogram. We estimated the cumulative incidence and predictors of normalization. Results Among 868 children who met inclusion criteria, 741 (85%) had both echocardiograms. At 2 years, 22% had recovered normal LV function and size; 51% had died or undergone heart transplant (median, 3.2 months), and 27% had persistently abnormal echocardiograms. Younger age (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.86 to 0.95) and lower LVEDD z-score (0.75; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.84) independently predicted normalization. Nine children (9%) with normal LV function and size within 2 years of diagnosis later underwent heart transplant or died. Conclusions Despite marked LV dilation and depressed function initially, children with idiopathic DCM can recover normal LV size and function, particularly those younger and with less LV dilation at diagnosis. Investigations related to predictors for recovery, such as gene associations, serum markers, and the impact of medical therapy or ventricular unloading with assist devices are important next steps. Longer follow-up after normalization is warranted as cardiac failure can recur. Clinical Trials Registration # NCT00005391 PMID:24561146

  18. Determinants of functional mitral regurgitation severity in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy versus nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Konstantinou, Dimitrios M; Papadopoulou, Klio; Giannakoulas, George; Kamperidis, Vasilis; Dalamanga, Emmanouela G; Damvopoulou, Efthalia; Parcharidou, Despina G; Karamitsos, Theodoros D; Karvounis, Haralambos I

    2014-01-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation (MR) is prevalent among patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and is associated with a poorer prognosis. Our aim was to assess the primary determinants of MR severity in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) and nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Patients with functional MR secondary to ICM (n = 55) and DCM (n = 48) were prospectively enrolled. Effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) area, global LV remodeling, regional wall-motion abnormalities, and mitral apparatus deformity indices were assessed utilizing conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiography. ICM patients had more severe MR compared with DCM patients despite similar ejection fraction and functional status (ERO = 0.16 ± 0.08 cm(2) vs. ERO = 0.12 ± 0.70 cm(2) , respectively, P = 0.002). Regional myocardial systolic velocities in mid-inferior and mid-lateral wall were negatively correlated with ERO in ICM and DCM patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified coaptation height as the only independent determinant of ERO in both groups. In a subset of ICM patients (n = 9) with relatively high ERO despite low coaptation height, a higher prevalence of left bundle branch block was detected (88.9% vs. 46.7%, P = 0.02). Functional MR severity was chiefly determined by the extent of mitral apparatus deformity, and coaptation height can provide a rapid estimation of MR severity in heart failure patients. Additional contributory mechanisms in ICM patients include depressed myocardial systolic velocities in posteromedial papillary muscle attaching site and evidence of global LV dyssynchrony. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Role Of Cardiac Mri In The Assessment Of Nonischemic Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Nabi, Faisal

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we will highlight the role of late gadolinium enhancement, along with other strengths available by cardiac MRI, in determining the underlying etiology of various nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Furthermore, we will also emphasize how late gadolinium enhancement may serve as a novel risk stratification tool to further impact patient care. PMID:24066198

  20. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical Steps for Preventing Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare cause of death among athletes, with deaths occurring in young, apparently healthy people. Differentiating HCM from conditioning hypertrophy is challenging. Routine detection involves family history, physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Keys to differential diagnosis include…

  1. Viewing Extrinsic Proteotoxic Stress Through the Lens of Amyloid Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sapp, Valerie; Jain, Mohit; Liao, Ronglih

    2016-07-01

    Proteotoxicity refers to toxic stress caused by misfolded proteins of extrinsic or intrinsic origin and plays an integral role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Herein, we provide an overview of the current understanding of mechanisms underlying proteotoxicity and its contribution in the pathogenesis of amyloid cardiomyopathy. ©2016 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  2. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with severe bradyarrhythmia following epidural insertion

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, David T; Shuttleworth, Kara J; Scally, Caroline; Leslie, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) with ventricular stand still and atrioventricular block. TTC can mimic ST elevation myocardial infarction and heart failure, but in this case resulted in a severe cardiac conduction disorder and ventricular standstill. This is a recognised but unusual presentation and serves as a lesson to those undertaking anaesthetics to be vigilant for TTC. PMID:27797840

  3. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy (Broken-Heart Syndrome): A Short Review.

    PubMed

    Potu, Kalyan Chakravarthy; Raizada, Amol; Gedela, Maheedhar; Stys, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also called "broken heart" syndrome or apical ballooning syndrome, is a reversible cardiomyopathy characterized by left ventricular dysfunction and ballooning of the left ventricular apex on imaging during systole. It predominantly occurs in post-menopausal women and is commonly associated with emotional or physical stress. Patients commonly present with chest pain and electrocardiographic evidence of ST segment elevation or T-wave-mimicking acute coronary syndrome, but with an absence of angiographic evidence of obstructive coronary disease. The exact cause is unknown, but potential contributors include catecholamine excess and sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity. There is no consensus on pharmacological treatment of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Based on the suspected pathophysiology of the disease, adrenergic blockade using beta-blocker therapy is employed. Near complete resolution of left ventricular wall motion dyskinesis occurs in the majority of takotsubo cardiomyopathy patients within a month. Although the prognosis is generally favorable, there are reports of complications during the acute phase, including cardiogenic shock, pulmonary edema, ventricular tachycardia, apical thrombus formation, and death. This review article will briefly discuss the epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of this condition.

  4. Nuclear angiography in a dog with congestive cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, A.C.; Twardock, A.R.; Gelberg, H.B.

    1986-03-01

    Nuclear angiography was used as a diagnostic aid and in monitoring the clinical course of a case of congestive cardiomyopathy in a dog. Serial examinations revealed progressively deteriorating values for left ventricular ejection fraction before the dog's death. This noninvasive technique can be an alternative to echocardiography for the evaluation of cardiac performance.

  5. Potential of vitamin D in treating diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-Wei; Lee, Ting-I; Chang, Chun-Jen; Lien, Gi-Shih; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and patients with DM frequently develop diabetic cardiomyopathy. Currently, effective treatments for diabetic cardiomyopathy are limited. Vitamin D exerts pleiotropic effects on the cardiovascular system and is associated with DM. The purpose of this review was to evaluate published research on vitamin D in diabetic cardiomyopathy by searching PubMed databases. Herein, we reviewed vitamin D metabolism; evaluated the molecular, cellular, and neuroendocrine effects in native and bioactive vitamin D; and evaluated the role of vitamin D in treating cardiovascular disease and DM. Some evidence suggests that vitamin D may improve cardiovascular outcomes in diabetes through anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antihypertrophic, antifibrotic, and antiatherosclerotic activities and by regulating advanced glycation end-product signaling, the renin-angiotensin system, and cardiac metabolism. This clinical and laboratory evidence suggests that vitamin D may be a potential agent in treating diabetic cardiomyopathy. However, using vitamin D entails possible adverse risks of hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and vascular calcifications. Therefore, future studies should be conducted that clarify the potential benefits of vitamin D through large-scale randomized clinical trials in well-defined groups of diabetic patients.

  6. Is it constrictive pericarditis or restrictive cardiomyopathy? A systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Morshedi-Meibodi, Ali; Menuet, Robert; McFadden, Michael; Ventura, Hector O; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2004-01-01

    In this case review, the authors propose a fluent diagnostic algorithm for the consideration and therapeutic approach to either constrictive pericarditis or restrictive cardiomyopathy. Additionally, while focusing on the differential diagnosis of these clinically vexing entities, the authors outline the therapeutic expectations from surgical pericardiectomy in constrictive pericarditis.

  7. Ischemic neuropathy and rhabdomyolysis as presenting symptoms of postpartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Rick C G; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C; Janssen, Mirian C H

    2009-05-01

    Rhabdomyolysis and peripheral neuropathy are two distinct disease entities which are rarely encountered in combination. We present a woman with rhabdomyolysis and peripheral neuropathy 3 weeks postpartum. Her symptoms were caused by bilateral femoral artery thrombosis due to postpartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). This demonstrates that PPCM may present with predominantly non-cardial symptoms and underscores the importance of rapidly recognizing this disorder.

  8. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jonathan T; Muchir, Antoine; Nagy, Peter L; Worman, Howard J

    2011-09-01

    Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells), cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  9. Psychological Features of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: Report of Four Cases.

    PubMed

    Jenab, Yaser; Hashemi, Seyedeh Roghaieh; Ghaffari-Marandi, Neda; Zafarghandi, Hoda; Shahmansouri, Nazila

    2017-04-01

    Takotsubo or stress-induced cardiomyopathy is a cardiomyopathy in which the patient has a sudden onset, reversible left ventricular systolic dysfunction without any significant coronary artery disease. Four women, who were at a mean age of 64 years and suffered from chest pain exacerbated by emotional stress, were admitted as cases of acute coronary syndrome and were completely evaluated through precise history taking, physical examination, and ECG. Coronary angiography or coronary multidetector computed tomography was used to exclude significant coronary artery disease. In these patients with confirmed Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, in addition to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-IV) criteria, a 71-item form of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-Mini-Mult-was employed for psychological assessment. The main common elevated scale was hypochondriasis. Individuals with high scores on this scale are obsessed with themselves, especially in regard to their body, and often use their disease symptoms in order to manipulate others. They are mainly passive aggressive, critical, and demanding, which stems from their lack of effective verbal abilities as a means of communication, specifically when it comes to anger or hostility expression. To the best of our knowledge, there is no available study evaluating patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy using the Mini-Mult questionnaire for psychological assessment.

  10. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical Steps for Preventing Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare cause of death among athletes, with deaths occurring in young, apparently healthy people. Differentiating HCM from conditioning hypertrophy is challenging. Routine detection involves family history, physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Keys to differential diagnosis include…

  11. Caloric restriction ameliorates cardiomyopathy in animal model of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Keren; Waldman, Maayan; Abraham, Nader G; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Gurfield, Danny; Aravot, Dan; Arad, Michael; Hochhauser, Edith

    2017-01-01

    The db/db mouse is an animal model of diabetes in which leptin receptor activity is deficient resulting accelerated cardiomyopathy when exposed to angiotensin (AT). Toll-like receptors 4 and 2 (TLR4, TLR2) are pattern recognition receptors, that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and exacerbate and release inflammatory cytokines. Fetuin A (Fet A) is a fatty acid carrier which affects inflammation and insulin resistance in obese humans and animals through TLRs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of caloric restriction (CR) on free fatty acids (FFA) level and the inflammatory response in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Left ventricular hypertrophy, increased fibrosis and leukocytes infiltration were observed in db/db AT treated hearts. Serum glucose, FFA, and cholesterol levels were elevated in db/db AT treated mice. Cardiac expression of PPARα increased while AKT phosphorylation was decreased. Cumulatively, CR elevated cardiac PPARα improved the utilization of fatty acids, and reduced myocardial inflammation as seen by reduced levels of Fet A. Thus CR negated cardiomyopathy associated with AT in an animal model of diabetes suggesting that CR is an effective therapeutic approach in the treatment of diabetes and associated cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zizek, David; Cvijić, Marta; Zupan, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic light chain amyloidosis carries poor prognosis. Amyloid deposition in the myocardium can alter regional left ventricular contraction and cause dyssynchrony. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment strategy for patients with advanced heart failure and echocardiographic dyssynchrony. We report a clinical and echocardiographic response of a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy, treated with a combination of chemotherapy and CRT.

  13. Experimental models of inherited cardiomyopathy and its therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Miki; Morimoto, Sachio

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a disease of myocardium categorized into three major forms, hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), which has recently been demonstrated to be a monogenic disease due to mutations in various proteins expressed in cardiomyocytes. Mutations in HCM and RCM typically increase the myofilament sensitivity to cytoplasmic Ca2+, leading to systolic hyperfunction and diastolic dysfunction. In contrast, mutations in DCM typically decrease the myofilament sensitivity to cytoplasmic Ca2+ and/or force generation/transmission, leading to systolic dysfunction. Creation of genetically-manipulated transgenic and knock-in animals expressing mutant proteins exogenously and endogenously, respectively, in their hearts provides valuable animal models to discover the molecular and cellular mechanisms for pathogenesis and promising therapeutic strategy in vivo. Recently, cardiomyocytes have been differentiated from patient’s induced pluripotent stem cells as a model of inherited cardiomyopathies in vitro. In this review, we provide overview of experimental models of cardiomyopathies with a focus on revealed molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapeutics. PMID:25548614

  14. Myocardial Recovery in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy After Hyperprolactinemia Treatment on BIVAD.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Dominik; Schlöglhofer, Thomas; Riebandt, Julia; Neuner, Markus; Tschernko, Edda; Schima, Heinrich; Zimpfer, Daniel

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCMP) requiring mechanical circulatory support is rare; however, it is a life-threatening disease with recovery rates poorer than expected. Herein, we describe a case of successful recovery of a patient with PPCMP. Implantation of a biventricular ventricular assist device was performed; additionally, the patient's hyperprolactinemia was treated with cabergoline, resulting in a fast complete restoration of ventricular function.

  15. Selenium deficiency, reversible cardiomyopathy and short-term intravenous feeding.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J. B.; Jones, H. W.; Gordon, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with Crohn's disease receiving short-term postoperative parenteral nutrition supplemented with trace elements who nevertheless became selenium deficient with evidence of a cardiomyopathy. This was fully reversible with oral selenium supplementation. Current parenteral feeding regimes may not contain enough selenium for malnourished patients. PMID:8183763

  16. [Optimal indication for surgical ventricular restoration for dilated cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Kubota, Suguru; Minamida, Taro; Iijima, Makoto; Naito, Yuji; Ooka, Tomonori; Tachibana, Tsuyoshi; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we assessed mid-term results of surgical ventricular restoration (SVR) for dilated cardiomyopathy. The study subjects were 107 patients who underwent SVR for both ischemic (ischemic cardiomyopathy:ICM, n=57) and non-ischemic (dilated cardiomyopathy:DCM, n=50) dilated cardiomyopathy. In 49(86%)patients ICM was associated with New York heart Association(NYHA) class III or more. Preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular end-diastolic dimension(LVDd)were 22±6% and 67±9 mm, respectively. Hospital mortality was 14% and 5-year mortality was 40%. In contrast, 46( 92%) of the DCM patients presented with NYHA class III or more. Preoperative LVEF and LVDd were 20±6% and 74±9 mm, respectively. Hospital mortality was 28% and 5-year mortality was 63%. For NYHA class III or less, however, 5-year mortality rates were 23% and 39% in those with ICM and DCM, respectively. For those with NYHA functional class III or less, SVR was associated with a satisfactory survival rate and is recommended. For those with severe heart failure, however, ventricular assist devices or heart transplantation may have to be indicated.

  17. Symptomatic cardiomyopathy as a presentation in Whipple's disease.

    PubMed Central

    de Takats, P. G.; de Takats, D. L.; Iqbal, T. H.; Watson, R. D.; Sheppard, M. N.; Cooper, B. T.

    1995-01-01

    A patient presenting with congestive cardiac failure and anaemia underwent investigation which led to the diagnosis of Whipple's disease, associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. Conventional antibiotic therapy for Whipple's disease resulted in resolution of the traditional features of Whipple's disease and a marked improvement in the patient's heart failure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7540301

  18. Psychological Features of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Jenab, Yaser; Hashemi, Seyedeh Roghaieh; Ghaffari-Marandi, Neda; Zafarghandi, Hoda; Shahmansouri, Nazila

    2017-01-01

    Takotsubo or stress-induced cardiomyopathy is a cardiomyopathy in which the patient has a sudden onset, reversible left ventricular systolic dysfunction without any significant coronary artery disease. Four women, who were at a mean age of 64 years and suffered from chest pain exacerbated by emotional stress, were admitted as cases of acute coronary syndrome and were completely evaluated through precise history taking, physical examination, and ECG. Coronary angiography or coronary multidetector computed tomography was used to exclude significant coronary artery disease. In these patients with confirmed Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, in addition to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-IV) criteria, a 71-item form of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-Mini-Mult-was employed for psychological assessment. The main common elevated scale was hypochondriasis. Individuals with high scores on this scale are obsessed with themselves, especially in regard to their body, and often use their disease symptoms in order to manipulate others. They are mainly passive aggressive, critical, and demanding, which stems from their lack of effective verbal abilities as a means of communication, specifically when it comes to anger or hostility expression. To the best of our knowledge, there is no available study evaluating patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy using the Mini-Mult questionnaire for psychological assessment. PMID:28828027

  19. Unbreak My Heart: Targeting Mitochondrial Autophagy in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kubli, Dieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Diabetes is strongly associated with increased incidence of heart disease and mortality due to development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Even in the absence of cardiovascular disease, cardiomyopathy frequently arises in diabetic patients. Current treatment options for cardiomyopathy in diabetic patients are the same as for nondiabetic patients and do not address the causes underlying the loss of contractility. Recent Advances: Although there are numerous distinctions between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, recent evidence suggests that the two disease states converge on mitochondria as an epicenter for cardiomyocyte damage. Critical Issues: Accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria contributes to cardiac tissue injury in both acute and chronic conditions. Removal of damaged mitochondria by macroautophagy, termed “mitophagy,” is critical for maintaining cardiomyocyte health and contractility both under normal conditions and during stress. However, very little is known about the involvement of mitophagy in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. A growing interest in this topic has given rise to a wave of publications that aim at deciphering the status of autophagy and mitophagy in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Future Directions: This review summarizes these recent studies with the goal of drawing conclusions about the activation or suppression of autophagy and mitophagy in the diabetic heart. A better understanding of how autophagy and mitophagy are affected in the diabetic myocardium is still needed, as well as whether they can be targeted therapeutically. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1527–1544. PMID:25808102

  20. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, B.J.; Tajik, A.J.; Ruttenberg, H.D.; Graham, T.P.; Atwood, G.F.; Victorica, B.E.; Lie, J.T.; Roberts, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure.