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Sample records for hypervelocity metal jets

  1. High-resolution imaging of hypervelocity metal jets using advanced high-speed photographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, L.L.; Muelder, S.A.

    1995-08-29

    It is now possible to obtain high resolution sequential photographs of the initial formation and evolution of hypervelocity metal jets formed by shaped charge devices fired in air. Researchers have been frustrated by the high velocity of the jet material and the luminous sheath of hot gases cloaking the jet that made detailed observation of the jet body extremely difficult. The camera system that provides the photographs is a large format multi-frame electro-optic camera, referred to as an IC camera (IC stands for image converter), that utilizes electro-optic shuttering, monochromatic pulsed laser illumination and bandpass filtering to provide sequential pictures (in 3D if desired) with minimal degradation due to luminous air shocks or motion blur. The large format (75mm image plane), short exposure (15 ns minimum), ruby laser illumination and bandpass filtering (monochromatic illumination while excluding extraneous light) produces clear, sharp, images of the detailed surface structure of a metal shaped charge jet during early jet formation, elongation of the jet body, jet tip evolution and subsequent particulation (breakup) of the jet body. By utilizing the new camera system in conjunction with the more traditional rotating mirror high speed cameras, pulsed radiography, and electrical sensors, a maximum amount of, often unique, data can be extracted from a single experiment. This paper was intended primarily as an oral presentation. For purposes of continuity and simplicity in these proceedings, the authors have chosen to concentrate on the development of the IC camera system and its impact on the photography of high speed shaped chargejets.

  2. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  3. Plasma jet acceleration of dust particles to hypervelocities

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, C. M.; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.

    2008-10-15

    A convenient method to accelerate simultaneously hundreds of micron-size dust particles to a few km/s over a distance of about 1 m is based on plasma drag. Plasma jets which can deliver sufficient momentum to the dust particles need to have speeds of at least several tens of km/s, densities of the order of 10{sup 22} m{sup -3} or higher, and low temperature {approx}1 eV, in order to prevent dust destruction. An experimental demonstration of dust particles acceleration to hypervelocities by plasma produced in a coaxial gun is presented here. The plasma flow speed is deduced from photodiode signals while the plasma density is measured by streaked spectroscopy. As a result of the interaction with the plasma jet, the dust grains are also heated to high temperatures and emit visible light. A hypervelocity dust shower is imaged in situ with a high speed video camera at some distance from the coaxial gun, where light emission from the plasma flow is less intense. The bright traces of the flying microparticles are used to infer their speed and acceleration by employing the time-of-flight technique. A simple model for plasma drag which accounts for ion collection on the grain surface gives predictions for dust accelerations which are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. Dynamics of hypervelocity jetting during oblique impacts of spherical projectiles investigated via ultrafast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Kosuke; Nagaoka, Yoichi; Senshu, Hiroki; Wada, Koji; Hasegawa, Sunao; Sugita, Seiji; Matsui, Takafumi

    2015-07-01

    A series of hypervelocity impact experiments was conducted in a new laboratory at Planetary Exploration Research Center of Chiba Institute of Technology (Japan). We present the results of high-speed imaging observations of impact jetting during blunt-body penetration under oblique impacts. The observations were sampled at a frame rate of 100 ns frame-1, which is much shorter than the characteristic time of projectile penetration under our experimental conditions. The maximum jet velocity was obtained as a function of both impact velocity and the contrast of shock impedance between a projectile and target, enabling us to test theoretical models of impact jetting during oblique impacts of spherical projectiles. We find that the jet velocities measured in this study are much slower than the prediction by the standard theory based on the previous experimental/theoretical results of collisions between two metal plates. A decaying shock pressure during blunt-body penetration is a possible origin of the discrepancy. We also present a new formulation of the jet velocity with the equations of state for realistic materials. The particle velocities of ejected materials from a free surface are calculated using the Riemann invariant along the isentropes and the Tillotson equations of state in this study. Based on the extremely high velocity of the jet, we point out that impact jetting might contribute to chemistry near the ground surface of planets/satellites with a thick atmosphere, such as Titan.

  5. Hypervelocity Impact Evaluation of Metal Foam Core Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, John; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    A series of hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were conducted by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HITF) [1], building 267 (Houston, Texas) between January 2003 and December 2005 to test the HVI performance of metal foams, as compared to the metal honeycomb panels currently in service. The HITF testing was conducted at the NASA JSC White Sands Testing Facility (WSTF) at Las Cruces, New Mexico. Eric L. Christiansen, Ph.D., and NASA Lead for Micro-Meteoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD) Protection requested these hypervelocity impact tests as part of shielding research conducted for the JSC Center Director Discretionary Fund (CDDF) project. The structure tested is a metal foam sandwich structure; a metal foam core between two metal facesheets. Aluminum and Titanium metals were tested for foam sandwich and honeycomb sandwich structures. Aluminum honeycomb core material is currently used in Orbiter Vehicle (OV) radiator panels and in other places in space structures. It has many desirable characteristics and performs well by many measures, especially when normalized by density. Aluminum honeycomb does not perform well in Hypervelocity Impact (HVI) Testing. This is a concern, as honeycomb panels are often exposed to space environments, and take on the role of Micrometeoroid / Orbital Debris (MMOD) shielding. Therefore, information on possible replacement core materials which perform adequately in all necessary functions of the material would be useful. In this report, HVI data is gathered for these two core materials in certain configurations and compared to gain understanding of the metal foam HVI performance.

  6. Hypervelocity Impact Test Results for a Metallic Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Katherine L.; Poteet, Carl C.; Blosser, Max L.

    2003-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests have been performed on specimens representing metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) developed at NASA Langley Research Center for use on next-generation reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The majority of the specimens tested consists of a foil gauge exterior honeycomb panel, composed of either Inconel 617 or Ti-6Al-4V, backed with 2.0 in. of fibrous insulation and a final Ti-6Al-4V foil layer. Other tested specimens include titanium multi-wall sandwich coupons as well as TPS using a second honeycomb sandwich in place of the foil backing. Hypervelocity impact tests were performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Orbital Debris Simulation Facility. An improved test fixture was designed and fabricated to hold specimens firmly in place during impact. Projectile diameter, honeycomb sandwich material, honeycomb sandwich facesheet thickness, and honeycomb core cell size were examined to determine the influence of TPS configuration on the level of protection provided to the substructure (crew, cabin, fuel tank, etc.) against micrometeoroid or orbit debris impacts. Pictures and descriptions of the damage to each specimen are included.

  7. Improving Metallic Thermal Protection System Hypervelocity Impact Resistance Through Design of Experiments Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteet, Carl C.; Blosser, Max L.

    2001-01-01

    A design of experiments approach has been implemented using computational hypervelocity impact simulations to determine the most effective place to add mass to an existing metallic Thermal Protection System (TPS) to improve hypervelocity impact protection. Simulations were performed using axisymmetric models in CTH, a shock-physics code developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and validated by comparison with existing test data. The axisymmetric models were then used in a statistical sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of five design parameters on degree of hypervelocity particle dispersion. Several damage metrics were identified and evaluated. Damage metrics related to the extent of substructure damage were seen to produce misleading results, however damage metrics related to the degree of dispersion of the hypervelocity particle produced results that corresponded to physical intuition. Based on analysis of variance results it was concluded that the most effective way to increase hypervelocity impact resistance is to increase the thickness of the outer foil layer. Increasing the spacing between the outer surface and the substructure is also very effective at increasing dispersion.

  8. Study of hypervelocity projectile impact on thick metal plates

    DOE PAGES

    Roy, Shawoon K.; Trabia, Mohamed; O’Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Pena, Michael T.; Jennings, Richard; Somasoundaram, Deepak; Matthes, Melissa; Daykin, Edward P.; et al

    2016-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This paper proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments:more » Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. Finally, the results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.« less

  9. Study of hypervelocity projectile impact on thick metal plates

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Shawoon K.; Trabia, Mohamed; O’Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Pena, Michael T.; Jennings, Richard; Somasoundaram, Deepak; Matthes, Melissa; Daykin, Edward P.; Machorro, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This paper proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments: Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. Finally, the results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.

  10. Chemical fractionation resulting from the hypervelocity impact process on metallic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libourel, Guy; Ganino, Clément; Michel, Patrick; Nakamura, Akiko

    2016-10-01

    In a regime of hypervelocity impact cratering, the internal energy deposited in target + projectile region is large enough to melt and/or vaporize part of the material involved, which expands rapidly away from the impact site. Fast and energetic impact processes have therefore important chemical consequences on the projectile and target rock transformations during major impact events. Several physical and chemical processes occurred indeed in the short duration of the impact, e.g., melting, coating, mixing, condensation, crystallization, redox reactions, quenching, etc., all concurring to alter both projectile and target composition on the irreversible way.In order to document such hypervelocity impact chemical fractionation, we have started a program of impact experiments by shooting doped (27 trace elements) millimeter–sized basalt projectiles on metallic target using a two stages light gas gun. With impact velocity in the range from 0.25 to 7 km.s-1, these experiments are aimed i) to characterize chemically and texturally all the post-mortem materials (e.g., target, crater, impact melt, condensates, and ejectas), in order ii) to make a chemical mass balance budget of the process, and iii) to relate it to the kinetic energy involved in the hypervelocity impacts for scaling law purpose. Irrespective of the incident velocities, our preliminary results show the importance of redox processes, the significant changes in the ejecta composition (e.g., iron enrichment) and the systematic coating of the crater by the impact melt [1]. On the target side, characterizations of the microstructure of the shocked iron alloys to better constrain the shielding processes. We also show how these results have great implications in our understanding on the current surface properties of small bodies, and chiefly in the case of M-type asteroids. [1] Ganino C, Libourel G, Nakamura AM & Michel P (2015) Goldschmidt Abstracts, 2015 990.

  11. SEGUE-2 LIMITS ON METAL-RICH OLD-POPULATION HYPERVELOCITY STARS IN THE GALACTIC HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Juna A.; Gould, Andrew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Rockosi, Constance; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Knapp, Gillian; Morrison, Heather; Harding, Paul; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2010-11-01

    We present new limits on the ejection of metal-rich old-population hypervelocity stars (HVSs) from the Galactic center (GC) as probed by the SEGUE-2 survey. Our limits are a factor of 3-10 more stringent than previously reported, depending on stellar type. Compared to the known population of B-star ejectees, there can be no more than 30 times more metal-rich old-population F/G stars ejected from the GC. Because B stars comprise a tiny fraction of a normal stellar population, this places significant limits on the combination of the GC mass function and the ejection mechanism for HVSs. In the presence of a normal GC mass function, our results require an ejection mechanism that is about 5.5 times more efficient at ejecting B stars compared to low-mass F/G stars.

  12. Modeling of the merging, liner formation, implosion of hypervelocity plasma jets for the PLX- α project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; Schillo, Kevin; Samulyak, Roman; Stoltz, Peter; Beckwith, Kris

    2015-11-01

    A suite of numerical tools will support the conical and 4 π plasma-liner-formation experiments for the PLX- α project. A new Lagrangian particles (LP) method will provide detailed studies of the merging of plasma jets and plasma-liner formation/convergence. A 3d smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code will simulate conical (up to 9 jets) and 4 π spherical (up to 60 jets) liner formation and implosion. Both LP and SPH will use the same tabular EOS generated by Propaceos, thermal conductivity, optically thin radiation and physical viscosity models. With LP and SPH,the major objectives are to study Mach-number degradation during jet merging, provide RMS amplitude and wave number of the liner nonuniformity at the leading edge, and develop scaling laws for ram pressure and liner uniformity as a function of jet parameters. USIM, a 3D multi-fluid plasma code, will be used to perform 1D and 2D simulations of plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) to identify initial conditions in which the ``liner gain'' exceeds unity. A brief overview of the modeling program will be provided. Results from SPH modeling to support the PLX- α experimental design will also be presented, including preliminary ram-pressure scaling and non-uniformity characterization.

  13. Testing astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes with hypervelocity jet experiments on the nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K; Farley, D; Glendinning, S G; Remington, B A; Stone, J; Turner, N

    1999-09-22

    Recent shock tube experiments using the Nova laser facility have demonstrated that strong shocks and highly supersonic flows similar to those encountered in astrophysical jets can be studied in detail through carefully controlled experiment. We propose the use of high power lasers such as Nova, Omega, and NIF to perform experiments on radiation hydrodynamic problems such as jets involving the multidimensional dynamics of strong shocks. High power lasers are the only experimental facilities that can reach the very high Mach number regime. The experiments will serve both as diagnostics of astrophysically interesting gas dynamic problems, and could also form the basis of test problems for numerical algorithms for astrophysical radiation hydrodynamic codes, The potential for experimentally achieving a strongly radiative jet seems very good.

  14. The techniques of metallic foil electrically exploding driving hypervelocity flyer to more than 10 km/s for shock wave physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiji; He, Jia; Zhao, Jianheng; Tan, Fuli; Sun, Chengwei; Mo, Jianjun; Xong, Xin; Wu, Gang

    2011-09-01

    Electrical explosion of metallic foil or wire is widely used to the fields of material science (preparation of nao-meter materials), dynamics of materials, and high energy density physics. In this paper, the techniques of gaining hypervelocity flyer driven by electrical explosion of metallic foil were researched, which are used to study dynamics of materials and hypervelocity impact modeling of space debris. Based on low inductance technologies of pulsed storage energy capacitor, detonator switch and parallel plate transmission lines with solid films insulation, two sets of experimental apparatuses with storage energy of 14.4 kJ and 40 kJ were developed for launching hypervelocity flyer. By means of the diagnostic technologies of velocity interferometer system for any reflectors and fibre-optic pins, the hypervelocity polyester (Mylar) flyers were gained. For the apparatus of 14.4 kJ, flyer of diameter φ6 ~ φ10 mm and thickness of 0.1 ~ 0.2 mm was accelerated to the hypervelocity of 10 ~ 14 km/s. And for the apparatus of 40 kJ, flyer of diameter φ20 ~ 30 mm and thickness of 0.2 mm was launched to the velocity of 5 ~ 8 km/s. The flatness of the flyer is not more than 34 ns for the flyer with diameter of 20 mm, and less than 22 ns for the flyer with diameter of 10 mm. Based on the Lagrange hydrodynamic code, one dimensional simulation was done by introducing database of equation of states, discharging circuit equation and Joule heat equation, and modifying energy equation. The simulation results are well agreed with the experimental results in accelerating processing. The simulation results can provide good advices in designing new experiments and developing new experimental devices. Finally, some experiments of materials dynamics and hypervelocity impact of space debris were done by using the apparatus above. The results show that the apparatus of metallic foil electrically exploding driving hypervelocity flyer is a good and versatile tool for shock dynamics.

  15. The techniques of metallic foil electrically exploding driving hypervelocity flyer to more than 10 km/s for shock wave physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guiji; He, Jia; Zhao, Jianheng; Tan, Fuli; Sun, Chengwei; Mo, Jianjun; Xong, Xin; Wu, Gang

    2011-09-01

    Electrical explosion of metallic foil or wire is widely used to the fields of material science (preparation of nao-meter materials), dynamics of materials, and high energy density physics. In this paper, the techniques of gaining hypervelocity flyer driven by electrical explosion of metallic foil were researched, which are used to study dynamics of materials and hypervelocity impact modeling of space debris. Based on low inductance technologies of pulsed storage energy capacitor, detonator switch and parallel plate transmission lines with solid films insulation, two sets of experimental apparatuses with storage energy of 14.4 kJ and 40 kJ were developed for launching hypervelocity flyer. By means of the diagnostic technologies of velocity interferometer system for any reflectors and fibre-optic pins, the hypervelocity polyester (Mylar) flyers were gained. For the apparatus of 14.4 kJ, flyer of diameter ϕ6 ˜ ϕ10 mm and thickness of 0.1 ˜ 0.2 mm was accelerated to the hypervelocity of 10 ˜ 14 km/s. And for the apparatus of 40 kJ, flyer of diameter ϕ20 ˜ 30 mm and thickness of 0.2 mm was launched to the velocity of 5 ˜ 8 km/s. The flatness of the flyer is not more than 34 ns for the flyer with diameter of 20 mm, and less than 22 ns for the flyer with diameter of 10 mm. Based on the Lagrange hydrodynamic code, one dimensional simulation was done by introducing database of equation of states, discharging circuit equation and Joule heat equation, and modifying energy equation. The simulation results are well agreed with the experimental results in accelerating processing. The simulation results can provide good advices in designing new experiments and developing new experimental devices. Finally, some experiments of materials dynamics and hypervelocity impact of space debris were done by using the apparatus above. The results show that the apparatus of metallic foil electrically exploding driving hypervelocity flyer is a good and versatile tool for shock dynamics.

  16. Ram-pressure scaling and non-uniformity characterization of a spherically imploding liner formed by hypervelocity plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason; Dougherty, Jesse; Thompson, Seth; Hsu, Scott; Witherspoon, F. D.; University of AL in Huntsville Team; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team; HyperV Technologies Corp. Team

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional modeling of plasma liner formation and implosion is performed using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) with radiation, thermal transport, and tabular equations of state (EOS), accounting for ionization, in support of a proposed 60-gun plasma liner formation experiment for plasma-jet driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF). Previous SPHC modeling showed that ideal gas law scaling of peak stagnation pressure increased linearly with density and number of jets, quadratically with jet radius and velocity, and inversely with the initial jet length, while results with tabular EOS, thermal transport, and radiation have greater sensitivity to the initial jet distribution. A series of simulations are conducted to study the effects of initial jet conditions on peak ram pressure and liner non-uniformity during plasma liner implosion. The growth rate of large-amplitude density perturbations introduced by the discrete jets are computed and compared with predictions by the Bell-Plesset equation.

  17. Magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of hypervelocity neutral plasma jets and their interactions with materials generating extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan; Sitaraman, Hariswaran

    2014-10-01

    The development of a Magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) numerical tool to study high density thermal plasma in a co-axial plasma gun is presented. The MHD governing equations are numerically solved using a matrix free implicit scheme in an unstructured grid finite volume framework. The MHD model is used to characterize the high energy jet which emanates from the accelerator. The solver is then used to predict the conditions created at the surface of a flat plate placed at a fixed distance from the exit of the gun. The model parameters are adjusted so that the energy density of the jet impacting the plate is of the same order of magnitude as that of the Edge Localized Mode (ELM) disruptions in thermonuclear fusion reactors. The idea is to use the pressure and temperature on the plate surface to obtain an estimate of the stress created on the plate due to jet impact. The model is used to quantify damage caused by ELM disruptions on the confining material surface.

  18. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-09-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Targets A-1, Ag-1, B-1, and Bg-1 was to study hypervelocity impacts on the reinforced Shuttle Heat Shield Tiles of the Wing. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  19. Oxidation of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Subjected to Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.; Pham, Vuong T.; Norman, Ignacio; Chao, Dennis C.; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Results of arc-jet tests conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) on Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) samples subjected to hypervelocity impact are presented. The RCC test specimens are representative of RCC component used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The objective of the arc jet testing was to establish the oxidation characteristics of RCC when hypervelocity projectiles, simulating meteoroid/orbital debris (MOD), impact the RCC material. In addition, analytical modeling of the increased material oxidation in the impacted area, using measured hole growth data, to develop correlations for use in trajectory simulations is also discussed.

  20. Impinging jet separators for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    In many liquid metal MHD power, cycles, it is necessary to separate the phases of a high-speed liquid-gas flow. The usual method is to impinge the jet at a glancing angle against a solid surface. These surface separators achieve good separation of the two phases at a cost of a large velocity loss due to friction at the separator surface. This report deals with attempts to greatly reduce the friction loss by impinging two jets against each other. In the crude impinging jet separators tested to date, friction losses were greatly reduced, but the separation of the two phases was found to be much poorer than that achievable with surface separators. Analyses are presented which show many lines of attack (mainly changes in separator geometry) which should yield much better separation for impinging jet separators).

  1. Thermo Physics Facilities Branch Brochure ARC Jet Complex Fact Sheets, Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility Fact Sheets, Ames Vertical Gun Range Fact Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fretter, E. F. (Editor); Kuhns, Jay (Editor); Nuez, Jay (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The Ames Arc Jet Complex has a rich heritage of over 40 years in Thermal Protection System (TPS) development for every NASA Space Transportation and Planetary program, including Apollo, Space Shuttle, Viking, Pioneer-Venus, Galileo, Mars Pathfinder,Stardust, NASP,X-33,X-34,SHARP-B1 and B2,X-37 and Mars Exploration Rovers. With this early TPS history came a long heritage in the development of the arc jet facilities. These are used to simulate the aerodynamic heating that occurs on the nose cap, wing leading edges and on other areas of the spacecraft requiring thermal protection. TPS samples have been run in the arc jets from a few minutes to over an hour,from one exposure to multiple exposures of the same sample, in order t o understand the TPS materials response to a hot gas flow environment (representative of real hyperthermal environments experienced in flight). The Ames Arc l e t Complex is a key enabler for customers involved in the three major areas of TPS development: selection, validation, and qualification. The arc jet data are critical for validating TPS thermal models, heat shield designs and repairs, and ultimately for flight qualification.

  2. Cosmology with hypervelocity stars

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, Abraham

    2011-04-01

    In the standard cosmological model, the merger remnant of the Milky Way and Andromeda (Milkomeda) will be the only galaxy remaining within our event horizon once the Universe has aged by another factor of ten, ∼ 10{sup 11} years after the Big Bang. After that time, the only extragalactic sources of light in the observable cosmic volume will be hypervelocity stars being ejected continuously from Milkomeda. Spectroscopic detection of the velocity-distance relation or the evolution in the Doppler shifts of these stars will allow a precise measurement of the vacuum mass density as well as the local matter distribution. Already in the near future, the next generation of large telescopes will allow photometric detection of individual stars out to the edge of the Local Group, and may target the ∼ 10{sup 5±1} hypervelocity stars that originated in it as cosmological tracers.

  3. Hypervelocity impact physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Bean, Alan J.; Darzi, Kent

    1991-01-01

    All large spacecraft are susceptible to impacts by meteoroids and orbiting space debris. These impacts occur at extremely high speed and can damage flight-critical systems, which can in turn lead to a catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. Therefore, the design of a spacecraft for a long-duration mission must take into account the possibility of such impacts and their effects on the spacecraft structure and on all of its exposed subsystems components. The work performed under the contract consisted of applied research on the effects of meteoroid/space debris impacts on candidate materials, design configurations, and support mechanisms of long term space vehicles. Hypervelocity impact mechanics was used to analyze the damage that occurs when a space vehicle is impacted by a micrometeoroid or a space debris particle. An impact analysis of over 500 test specimens was performed to generate by a hypervelocity impact damage database.

  4. Hypervelocity impact phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.

    1995-07-01

    There is a need to determine the equations of state of materials in regimes of extreme high pressures, temperatures and strain rates that are not attainable on current two-stage light-gas guns. Understanding high-pressure material behavior is crucial to address the physical processes associated with a variety of hypervelocity impact events related to space sciences-orbital-debris impact, debris-shield designs, high-speed plasma propagation, and impact lethality applications. At very high impact velocities material properties will be dominated by phase-changes, such as melting or vaporization, which cannot be achieved at lower impact velocities. Development of well-controlled and repeatable hypervelocity launch capabilities is the first step necessary to improve our understanding of material behavior at extreme pressures and temperatures not currently available using conventional two-stage light-gas gun techniques. In this paper, techniques that have been used to extend both the launch capabilities of a two-stage light gas gun to 16 km/s, and their use to determine the material properties at pressures and temperature states higher than those ever obtained in the laboratory are summarized. The newly developed hypervelocity launcher (HVL) can launch intact (macroscopic dimensions) plates to 16 km/s. Time-resolved interferometric techniques have been used to determine shock-loading/release characteristics of materials impacted by such fliers as well as shock-induced vaporization phenomena in fully vaporized states. High-speed photography or radiography has been used to evaluate the debris propagation characteristics resulting from disc impact of thin bumper sheets at hypervelocities in excess of 10 km/s using the HVL. Examples of these experiments are provided in this paper.

  5. Hypervelocity microparticle characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Idzorek, G.C.

    1996-11-01

    To protect spacecraft from orbital debris requires a basic understanding of the processes involved in hypervelocity impacts and characterization of detectors to measure the space environment. Both require a source of well characterized hypervelocity particles. Electrostatic acceleration of charged microspheres provides such a source. Techniques refined at the Los Alamos National Laboratory provided information on hypervelocity impacts of particles of known mass and velocity ranging from 20-1000 nm diameter and 1-100 km/s. A Van De Graaff generator operating at 6 million volts was used to accelerate individual carbonyl iron microspheres produced by a specially designed particle source. Standard electrostatic lenses and steering were used to control the particles flight path. Charge sensitive pickoff tubes measured the particle charge and velocity in- flight without disturbing the particle. This information coupled with the measured Van De Graaff terminal voltage allowed calculation of the particle energy, mass, momenta and (using an assumed density) the size. Particles with the desired parameters were then electrostatically directed to a target chamber. Targets used in our experiments included cratering and foil puncture targets, microphone momentum enhancement detectors, triboluminescent detectors, and ``splash`` charge detectors. In addition the system has been used to rapidly characterize size distributions of conductive plastic particles and potentially provide a method of easily sorting microscopic particles by size.

  6. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  7. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Norberg, Seth A. Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-07

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O{sub 2} = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  8. Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    With three missions outstanding, the Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database has nearly 3000 entries. The data is divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the database provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. Details and insights on the contents of the database including examples of descriptive statistics will be provided. Post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will also be discussed. Potential enhancements to the database structure and availability of the data for other researchers will be addressed in the Future Work section. A related database of returned surfaces from the International Space Station will also be introduced.

  9. Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James I.; Christiansen, Eric I.; Lear, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    With three flights remaining on the manifest, the shuttle impact hypervelocity database has over 2800 entries. The data is currently divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the database provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. The paper will provide details and insights on the contents of the database including examples of descriptive statistics using the impact data. A discussion of post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will be presented. Future work to be discussed will be possible enhancements to the database structure and availability of the data for other researchers. A related database of ISS returned surfaces that are under development will also be introduced.

  10. Oxidation of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Subjected to Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.; Pham, Vuong T.; Norman, Ignacio; Chao, Dennis C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results from arc jet tests conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center on reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples subjected to hypervelocity impact. The RCC test specimens are representative of RCC components used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The arc jet testing established the oxidation characteristics of RCC when hypervelocity projectiles, simulating meteoroid/orbital debris, impact the RCC material. In addition to developing correlations for use in trajectory simulations, we discuss analytical modeling of the increased material oxidation in the impacted area using measured hole growth data. Entry flight simulations are useful in assessing the increased Space Shuttle RCC component degradation as a result of impact damage and the hot gas flow through an enlarging hole into the wing leading-edge cavity.

  11. Analysis of impingement heat transfer for two parallel liquid-metal slot jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical method is developed for determining heat transfer by impinging liquid-metal slot jets. The method involves mapping the jet flow region, which is bounded by free streamlines, into a potential plane where it becomes a uniform flow in a channel of constant width. The energy equation is transformed into potential plane coordinates and is solved in the channel flow region. Conformal mapping is then used to transform the solution back into the physical plane and obtain the desired heat-transfer characteristics. The analysis given here determines the heat-transfer characteristics for two parallel liquid-metal slot jets impinging normally against a uniformly heated flat plate. The liquid-metal assumptions are made that the jets are inviscid and that molecular conduction is dominating heat diffusion. Wall temperature distributions along the heated plate are obtained as a function of spacing between the jets and the jet Peclet number.

  12. Conical shaped charge pressed powder, metal liner jet characterization and penetration in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1997-05-01

    This work was conducted as part of a Near-wellbore Mechanics program at Sandia National Laboratories. An understanding of the interaction of the perforator jet from an explosive shaped charge with the fluid filled porous sandstone media is of basic importance to the completion of oil wells. Tests were conducted using the five-head Flash X-ray Test Site to measure the jet tip velocities and jet geometry for the OMNI and CAPSULE Conical Shaped Charge (CSC) oil well perforator jets fired into air. These tests were conducted to generate jet velocity and geometry information to be used in validating the CTH hydrocode modeling/simulation development of pressed powder, metal liner jets in air. Ten tests were conducted to determine the CSC jet penetration into 6061-T6 aluminum targets. Five tests were conducted with the OMNI CSC at 0.25, 6.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. Five tests were conducted with the CAPSULE CSC at 0.60, 5.0, 10.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. These tests were conducted to generate jet penetration into homogeneous target information for use in validating the CTH code modeling/simulation of pressed powder, metal liner jets penetrating aluminum targets. The Flash X-ray radiographs, jet velocities, jet diameters, and jet lengths data for jets fired into air are presented in this report. The jet penetration into aluminum and penetration hole profile data are also presented for the OMNI and CAPSULE perforators. Least Squares fits are presented for the measured jet velocity and jet penetration data.

  13. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  14. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  15. Assessment of ink jet technology for micro-dispensing of metal particle-bearing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, T.C.

    1988-05-01

    Ink jet printing technology is explored as a means for precisely depositing metal-bearing fluids on porous and nonporous substrates. Several inks were formulated and evaluated in related, but separate, ink jet experiments. Alternative ink jet hardware configurations were examined to show the influence of ink jet system parameters on droplet formation and system reliability. The experiments successfully demonstrated the feasibility of generating metal-bearing ink droplets with velocities less than 1 m/s and diameters as small as 28 micrometers. 3 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Analysis of liquid-metal-jet impingement cooling in a corner region and for a row of jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A conformal mapping method was used to analyze liquid-metal-jet impingement heat transfer. The jet flow region and energy equation are transformed to correspond to uniform flow in a parallel plate channel with nonuniform heat addition along a portion of one wall. The exact solution for the wall-temperature distribution was obtained in the transformed channel, and the results are mapped back into the physical plane. Two geometries are analyzed. One is for a single slot jet directed either into an interior corner formed by two flat plates, or over the external sides of the corner; the flat plates are uniformly heated, and the corner can have various included angles. The heat-transfer coefficient at the stagnation point at the apex of the plates is obtained as a function of the corner angle, and temperature distributions are calculated along the heated walls. The second geometry is an infinite row of uniformly spaced parallel slot jets impinging normally against a uniformly heated plate. The heat-transfer behavior is obtained as a function of the spacing between the jets. Results are given for several jet Peclet numbers from 5 to 50.

  17. Hypervelocity impact shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne Lee (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield and method for protecting a wall structure, such as a spacecraft wall, from impact with particles of debris having densities of about 2.7 g/cu cm and impact velocities up to 16 km/s are disclosed. The shield comprises a stack of ultra thin sheets of impactor disrupting material supported and arranged by support means in spaced relationship to one another and mounted to cover the wall in a position for intercepting the particles. The sheets are of a number and spacing such that the impacting particle and the resulting particulates of the impacting particle and sheet material are successively impact-shocked to a thermal state of total melt and/or vaporization to a degree as precludes perforation of the wall. The ratio of individual sheet thickness to the theoretical diameter of particles of debris which may be of spherical form is in the range of 0.03 to 0.05. The spacing between adjacent sheets is such that the debris cloud plume of liquid and vapor resulting from an impacting particle penetrating a sheet does not puncture the next adjacent sheet prior to the arrival thereat of fragment particulates of sheet material and the debris particle produced by a previous impact.

  18. Ink-jet printing of silver metallization for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the ink-jet printing program at Purdue University is described. The drop-on-demand printing system was modified to use metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) inks. Also, an IBM AT computer was integrated into the ink-jet printer system to provide operational functions and contact pattern configuration. The integration of the ink-jet printing system, problems encountered, and solutions derived were described in detail. The status of ink-jet printing using a MOD ink was discussed. The ink contained silver neodecanate and bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate dissolved in toluene; the MOD ink decomposition products being 99 wt% AG, and 1 wt% Bi.

  19. Removal of Machine Oil from Metal Surface by Mesoplasma Jet under Open Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Haruki; Shiki, Hajime; Tsujii, Kenichi; Oke, Shinichiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Okawa, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shigenobu

    2009-08-01

    An attempt was made to employ the plasma-energized jet (PEN-jet) generated by pulsed arc discharge, one of the atmospheric-pressure mesoplasmas, for removal of machine oil from the surface of electrically-grounded aluminum (Al) alloy substrate under open atmosphere. Three types of nozzle configurations were examined; a metal nozzle, ceramic nozzle, and electrically-floated metal nozzle. Electric input power to the pulsed arc plasma discharge was 700 W constant. First, free-burning of the PEN-jet was observed as a function of air gas flow. When the PEN-jets were irradiated to the clean substrate, the PEN-jet with the metal nozzle caused substrate damage by the arc spot due to transferring arc discharge. Then the PEN-jet with the ceramic nozzle was irradiated to the oily substrate. The adhesion strength of sealant and water contact angle of the treated surface were then measured. As a result, these values of the oily substrate treated by the PEN-jet were almost the same as those of clean substrate. The treated surface was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and reflectance spectroscopy. Their spectral profiles clearly indicated oil removal from the surface by PEN-jet.

  20. Analysis of heat transfer for a normally impinging liquid-metal slot jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1973-01-01

    A two-dimensional liquid-metal slot jet that is impinging normally against a uniformly heated flat plate is analyzed. The distributions of wall temperature and heat-transfer coefficient are obtained as functions of position along the plate. The liquid-metal assumptions are made that the jet is inviscid and that molecular condition is dominating heat diffusion. The solution is obtained by mapping the jet flow region into a potential plane where it occupies a strip of uniform width. The energy equation is transformed into potential coordinates, and an exact solution obtained in the strip region. Conformal mapping is then used to transform the solution into the physical plane.

  1. Capacitors Would Help Protect Against Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David; Hubbs, Whitney; Hovater, Mary

    2007-01-01

    A proposal investigates alternatives to the present bumper method of protecting spacecraft against impacts of meteoroids and orbital debris. The proposed method is based on a British high-voltage-capacitance technique for protecting armored vehicles against shaped-charge warheads. A shield, according to the proposal, would include a bare metal outer layer separated by a gap from an inner metal layer covered with an electrically insulating material. The metal layers would constitute electrodes of a capacitor. A bias potential would be applied between the metal layers. A particle impinging at hypervelocity on the outer metal layer would break apart into a debris cloud that would penetrate the electrical insulation on the inner metal layer. The cloud would form a path along which electric current could flow between the metal layers, thereby causing the capacitor to discharge. With proper design, the discharge current would be large enough to vaporize the particles in the debris cloud to prevent penetration of the spacecraft. The shield design can be mass optimized to be competitive with existing bumper designs. Parametric studies were proposed to determine optimum correction between bias voltage, impacting particle velocity, gap space, and insulating material required to prevent spacecraft penetration.

  2. Hypervelocity flow over spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chihyung

    The nature of the nonequilibrium flow of dissociating gases over spheres was investigated experimentally, numerically and theoretically. A series of experiments with three different gases, nitrogen, air and carbon dioxide, was performed in the shock tunnel T5 at GALCIT. Five spheres of different radii equipped with thermocouples for surface heat flux measurements were used. The state-of-the-art numerical method by Candler (1988) was used to conduct a parallel study which strongly complemented the experimental and theoretical efforts.Experimental heat flux measurements are presented. Good agreement was observed among the measured stagnation point heat transfer rates, computational results and Fay and Riddell's theoretical predictions. For nitrogen and air, the measured heat flux distributions were also in good agreement with numerical computation results and Lees' theory. For carbon dioxide, large deviations were observed. Early transition tripped by surface roughness is a possible cause for the deviation of heat flux distribution from the theory. The experimental differential interferograms were compared with the images constructed from computational flowfields. Good agreement of fringe pattern and shock shape was observed.An analytical solution is obtained for inviscid hypervelocity dissociating flow over spheres. The solution explains the correlation between the dimensionless stand-off distance and the dimensionless reaction rate parameter previously observed by Hornung (1972) for nitrogen. The physics of the correlation can be shown as the binary scaling. Based on the solution, a new dimensionless reaction rate parameter is defined to generalize Hornung's correlation for more complex gases than nitrogen. Experimental and numerical results confirm the new correlation.The effect of nonequilibrium recombination downstream of a curved two-dimensional shock was also addressed. An analytical solution for an ideal dissociating gas was obtained, giving an expression for

  3. Three-phase hypervelocity projectile launcher

    DOEpatents

    Fugelso, L. Erik; Langner, Gerald C.; Burns, Kerry L.; Albright, James N.

    1994-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile launcher for use in perforating borehole casings provides improved penetration into the surrounding rock structure. The launcher includes a first cylinder of explosive material that defines an axial air-filled cavity, a second cylinder of explosive material defining an axial frustum-shaped cavity abutting and axially aligned with the first cylinder. A pliant washer is located between and axially aligned with the first and second cylinders. The frustum shaped cavity is lined with a metal liner effective to form a projectile when the first and second cylinders are detonated. The washer forms a unique intermediate projectile in advance of the liner projectile and enables the liner projectile to further penetrate into and fracture the adjacent rock structure.

  4. Ink jet printing of silver metallization for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Progress was made in the continuing development of the ink jet printing system for thick film circuits. The unit being used is a prototype ink jet printer. One of the first tasks completed was the complete documentation of this ink jet printing system as it existed. It was determined that this was an essential step in deciding what modifications were needed to the system and how these modifications would be implemented. Design modification studies were started for electronic, mechanical, and programming aspects of the ystem. The areas needeing improvement were discussed and applicable changes decided upon. Some improvments were completed. Although the general areas needing improving were identified and some changes decided upon, the exact details of how other changes can be implemented are yet been decided.

  5. X-ray grating interferometry with a liquid-metal-jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Thüring, T.; Rutishauser, S.; Stampanoni, M.; Zhou, T.; Lundström, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.; David, C.

    2013-08-26

    A liquid-metal-jet X-ray tube is used in an X-ray phase-contrast microscope based on a Talbot type grating interferometer. With a focal spot size in the range of a few microns and a photon flux of ∼10{sup 12} photons/s×sr, the brightness of such a source is approximately one order of magnitude higher than for a conventional microfocus source. For comparison, a standard microfocus source was used with the same grating interferometer, showing significantly increased visibility for the liquid-metal-jet arrangement. Together with the increased flux, this results in improved signal-to-noise ratio.

  6. Flash x-ray radiography using imaging plates for the observation of hypervelocity objects

    SciTech Connect

    Mizusako, F.; Ogasawara, K.; Kondo, K.; Saito, F.; Tamura, H.

    2005-02-01

    Flash x-ray radiography was conducted using imaging plates (IP) to observe high-speed thermal spray jets and debris clouds produced from hypervelocity impact. The radiographs of the spray jets or debris cloud shadows on the IPs were analyzed to estimate the distribution of mass per unit area, i.e., Areal mass density, due to the distribution of the intensities of stimulated emissions from the IPs. The wide dynamic range of the IPs led to the detection of an Areal mass density one hundred times as large as the minimum Areal mass density and the very detailed densities. The availability of the IPs for the flash x-ray radiography of a high-speed thermal spray jet and a hypervelocity-impact-produced debris cloud was demonstrated.

  7. Mod silver metallization: Screen printing and ink-jet printing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.; Vest, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Basic material efforts have proven to be very successful. Adherent and conductive films were achieved. A silver neodecanoate/bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate mixture has given the best results in both single and double layer applications. Another effort is continuing to examine the feasibility of applying metallo-organic deposition films by use of an ink jet printer. Direct line writing would result in a saving of process time and materials. So far, some well defined lines have been printed.

  8. Jet formation in cerium metal to examine material strength

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B. J. Cherne, F. J.; Prime, M. B.; Yeager, J. D.; Ramos, K. J.; Hooks, D. E.; Cooley, J. C.; Dimonte, G.; Fezzaa, K.; Iverson, A. J.; Carlson, C. A.

    2015-11-21

    Examining the evolution of material properties at extreme conditions advances our understanding of numerous high-pressure phenomena from natural events like meteorite impacts to general solid mechanics and fluid flow behavior. Recent advances in synchrotron diagnostics coupled with dynamic compression platforms have introduced new possibilities for examining in-situ, spatially resolved material response with nanosecond time resolution. In this work, we examined jet formation from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cerium initially shocked into a transient, high-pressure phase, and then released to a low-pressure, higher-temperature state. Cerium's rich phase diagram allows us to study the yield stress following a shock induced solid-solid phase transition. X-ray imaging was used to obtain images of jet formation and evolution with 2–3 μm spatial resolution. From these images, an analytic method was used to estimate the post-shock yield stress, and these results were compared to continuum calculations that incorporated an experimentally validated equation-of-state (EOS) for cerium coupled with a deviatoric strength model. Reasonable agreement was observed between the calculations and the data illustrating the sensitivity of jet formation on the yield stress values. The data and analysis shown here provide insight into material strength during dynamic loading which is expected to aid in the development of strength aware multi-phase EOS required to predict the response of matter at extreme conditions.

  9. The mechanism of liquid metal jet formation in the cathode spot of vacuum arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashkov, M. A.; Zubarev, N. M.; Mesyats, G. A.; Uimanov, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    We have theoretically studied the dynamics of molten metal during crater formation in the cathode spot of vacuum arc discharge. At the initial stage, a liquid-metal ridge is formed around the crater. This process has been numerically simulated in the framework of the two-dimensional axisymmetric heat and mass transfer problem in the approximation of viscous incompressible liquid. At a more developed stage, the motion of liquid metal loses axial symmetry, which corresponds to a tendency toward jet formation. The development of azimuthal instabilities of the ridge is analyzed in terms of dispersion relations for surface waves. It is shown that maximum increments correspond to instability of the Rayleigh-Plateau type. Estimations of the time of formation of liquid metal jets and their probable number are obtained.

  10. Hypervelocity plate acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P.; Tan, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tubes have been used to accelerate 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel plates to high velocity while retaining their integrity. The fast shock tubes are 5.1-cm-diameter, 15.2-cm-long cylinders of PBX-9501 explosive containing a 1.1-cm-diameter cylindrical core of low-density polystyrene foam. The plates have been placed directly in contact with one face of the explosive system. Plane-wave detonation was initiated on the opposite face. A Mach disk was formed in the imploding styrofoam core, which provided the impulse required to accelerate the metal plate to high velocity. Parametric studies were made on this system to find the effect of varying plate metal, plate thickness, foam properties, and addition of a barrel. A maximum plate velocity of 9.0 km/s has been observed. 6 refs., 17 figs.

  11. Characterization of Debris from the DebriSat Hypervelocity Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivero, M.; Kleespies, J.; Patankar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    The DebriSat project is an effort by NASA and the DoD to update the standard break-up model for objects in orbit. The DebriSat object, a 56 kg representative LEO satellite, was subjected to a hypervelocity impact in April 2014. For the hypervelocity test, the representative satellite was suspended within a "soft-catch" arena formed by polyurethane foam panels to minimize the interactions between the debris generated from the hypervelocity impact and the metallic walls of the test chamber. After the impact, the foam panels and debris not caught by the panels were collected and shipped to the University of Florida where the project has now advanced to the debris characterization stage. The characterization effort has been divided into debris collection, measurement, and cataloguing. Debris collection and cataloguing involves the retrieval of debris from the foam panels and cataloguing the debris in a database. Debris collection is a three-step process: removal of loose debris fragments from the surface of the foam panels; X-ray imaging to identify/locate debris fragments embedded within the foam panel; extraction of the embedded debris fragments identified during the X-ray imaging process. As debris fragments are collected, they are catalogued into a database specifically designed for this project. Measurement involves determination of size, mass, shape, material, and other physical properties and well as images of the fragment. Cataloguing involves a assigning a unique identifier for each fragment along with the characterization information.

  12. Chunk projectile launch using the Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Trucano, T.G.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental technique is described to launch an intact ``chunk,`` i.e. a 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm diameter cylindrical titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) flyer, to 10.2 km/s. The ability to launch fragments having such an aspect ratio is important for hypervelocity impact phenomenology studies. The experimental techniques used to accomplish this launch were similar but not identical to techniques developed for the Sandia HyperVelocity Launcher (HVL). A confined barrel impact is crucial in preventing the two-dimensional effects from dominating the loading response of the projectile chunk. The length to diameter ratio of the metallic chunk that is launched to 10.2 km/s is 0.5 and is an order of magnitude larger than those accomplished using the conventional hypervelocity launcher. The multi-dimensional, finite-difference (finite-volume), hydrodynamic code CTH was used to evaluate and assess the acceleration characteristics i.e., the in-bore ballistics of the chunky projectile launch. A critical analysis of the CTH calculational results led to the final design and the experimental conditions that were used in this study. However, the predicted velocity of the projectile chunk based on CTH calculations was {approximately} 6% lower than the measured velocity of {approximately}10.2 km/S.

  13. Hypervelocity cutting machine and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Reich, Morris

    1996-11-12

    A method and machine 14 are provided for cutting a workpiece 12 such as concrete. A gun barrel 16 is provided for repetitively loading projectiles 22 therein and is supplied with a pressurized propellant from a storage tank 28. A thermal storage tank 32,32A is disposed between the propellant storage tank 28 and the gun barrel 16 for repetitively receiving and heating propellant charges which are released in the gun barrel 16 for repetitively firing projectiles 22 therefrom toward the workpiece 12. In a preferred embodiment, hypervelocity of the projectiles 22 is obtained for cutting the concrete workpiece 12 by fracturing thereof.

  14. Hypervelocity cutting machine and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.

    1996-11-12

    A method and machine are provided for cutting a workpiece such as concrete. A gun barrel is provided for repetitively loading projectiles therein and is supplied with a pressurized propellant from a storage tank. A thermal storage tank is disposed between the propellant storage tank and the gun barrel for repetitively receiving and heating propellant charges which are released in the gun barrel for repetitively firing projectiles therefrom toward the workpiece. In a preferred embodiment, hypervelocity of the projectiles is obtained for cutting the concrete workpiece by fracturing thereof. 10 figs.

  15. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  16. Venturi jet ventilation through the metal endotracheal tube: a nonflammable system.

    PubMed

    Woo, P; Strong, M S

    1983-01-01

    In an effort to design a fireproof and reliable method of ventilation during CO2 laser laryngoscopies, a new Venturi jet endotracheal tube coupler has been designed. This allows microdirect laryngoscopy. Its design features are described. Sixteen clinical cases of various laryngeal pathologies treated with direct laryngoscopy and laser excision are ventilated using this system. The clinical data and experiences are discussed. The arterial blood gases done at 20 minutes after muscular paralysis showed a median value of pH 7.45/PO2 252/PCO2 36. No complications or adverse effects were noted. The Venturi jet endotracheal tube coupler allows for jet ventilation through a metal endotracheal tube with reliable ventilation. This is an alternate, reliable, and fire-safe method during laser use.

  17. A 24 keV liquid-metal-jet x-ray source for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, D. H.; Takman, P. A. C.; Lundstroem, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.

    2011-12-15

    We present a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-indium/gallium-jet anode. The 30-70 W electron beam is magnetically focused onto the jet, producing a circular 7-13 {mu}m full width half maximum x-ray spot. The measured spectral brightness at the 24.2 keV In K{sub {alpha}} line is 3 x 10{sup 9} photons/(s x mm{sup 2}x mrad{sup 2}x 0.1% BW) at 30 W electron-beam power. The high photon energy compared to existing liquid-metal-jet sources increases the penetration depth and allows imaging of thicker samples. The applicability of the source in the biomedical field is demonstrated by high-resolution imaging of a mammography phantom and a phase-contrast angiography phantom.

  18. Fluid Dynamics of Submerged Gas-Particle Jets and Injection Refining of Liquid Metals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yeu-Wen

    In order to model the transition of flow from bubbling to jetting flow behavior, a variety of liquids, particles and injection parameters have been used in this study to identify all the possible variables which can affect flow behavior of submerged gas-particle jets. The transition between jetting and bubbling is controlled by momentum transfer from particles to gas bubbles via the liquid phase. The ratio of drag force in liquid to buoyancy force of bubble, N(,R), can be used to predict the flow transition. When N(,R) is greater than 1300, jetting occurs. When N(,R) is less than 800, bubbling occurs. The feasibility of metal matrix composite manufacture by gas-particle injection has been investigated. Gas-particle jets could be used to make composites, if injection parameters and casting conditions are well controlled. The deoxidation of molten copper by graphite covering and gas injection have been investigated. The oxygen concentration in copper can be reduced down to 10 ppm or less by inert gas injection with graphite covering. The rate of deoxidation of molten copper by graphite with gas stirring obeys the first order rate equation and the rate constant is determined by mixed control of chemical reaction and liquid phase mass transfer. The rate constant can be calculated from the equation: 1/k = 1/k(,R) + 1/k(,L).

  19. Hypervelocity High Speed Projectile Imagery and Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    This DVD contains video showing the results of hypervelocity impact. One is showing a projectile impact on a Kevlar wrapped Aluminum bottle containing 3000 psi gaseous oxygen. One video show animations of a two stage light gas gun.

  20. Ink jet assisted metallization for low cost flat plate solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, K. F.; Vest, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Computer-controlled ink-jet-assisted metallization of the front surface of solar cells with metalorganic silver inks offers a maskless alternative method to conventional photolithography and screen printing. This method can provide low cost, fine resolution, reduced process complexity, avoidance of degradation of the p-n junction by firing at lower temperature, and uniform line film on rough surface of solar cells. The metallization process involves belt furnace firing and thermal spiking. With multilayer ink jet printing and firing, solar cells of about 5-6 percent efficiency without antireflection (AR) coating can be produced. With a titanium thin-film underlayer as an adhesion promoter, solar cells of average efficiency 8.08 percent without AR coating can be obtained. This efficiency value is approximately equal to that of thin-film solar cells of the same lot. Problems with regard to lower inorganic content of the inks and contact resistance are noted.

  1. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 1; General Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. This volume contains an executive summary, overview of the method, brief descriptions of all targets, and highlights of results and conclusions.

  2. Hypervelocity impact simulations of Whipple shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segletes, Steven B.; Zukas, Jonas A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem associated with protecting space vehicles from space debris impact is described. Numerical simulation is espoused as a useful complement to experimentation: as a means to help understand and describe the hypervelocity impact phenomena. The capabilities of a PC-based hydrocode, ZeuS, are described, for application to the problem of hypervelocity impact. Finally, results of ZeuS simulations, as applied to the problem of bumper shield impact, are presented and compared with experimental results.

  3. Exploratory investigations of hypervelocity intact capture spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tsou, P; Griffiths, D J

    1993-01-01

    The ability to capture hypervelocity projectiles intact opens a new technique available for hypervelocity research. A determination of the reactions taking place between the projectile and the capture medium during the process of intact capture is extremely important to an understanding of the intact capture phenomenon, to improving the capture technique, and to developing a theory describing the phenomenon. The intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles by underdense media generates spectra, characteristic of the material species of projectile and capture medium involved. Initial exploratory results into real-time characterization of hypervelocity intact capture techniques by spectroscopy include ultra-violet and visible spectra obtained by use of reflecting gratings, transmitting gratings, and prisms, and recorded by photographic and electronic means. Spectrometry proved to be a valuable real-time diagnostic tool for hypervelocity intact capture events, offering understanding of the interactions of the projectile and the capture medium during the initial period and providing information not obtainable by other characterizations. Preliminary results and analyses of spectra produced by the intact capture of hypervelocity aluminum spheres in polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), and polyurethane (PU) foams are presented. Included are tentative emission species identifications, as well as gray body temperatures produced in the intact capture process.

  4. Exploratory investigations of hypervelocity intact capture spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Griffiths, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The ability to capture hypervelocity projectiles intact opens a new technique available for hypervelocity research. A determination of the reactions taking place between the projectile and the capture medium during the process of intact capture is extremely important to an understanding of the intact capture phenomenon, to improving the capture technique, and to developing a theory describing the phenomenon. The intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles by underdense media generates spectra, characteristic of the material species of projectile and capture medium involved. Initial exploratory results into real-time characterization of hypervelocity intact capture techniques by spectroscopy include ultra-violet and visible spectra obtained by use of reflecting gratings, transmitting gratings, and prisms, and recorded by photographic and electronic means. Spectrometry proved to be a valuable real-time diagnostic tool for hypervelocity intact capture events, offering understanding of the interactions of the projectile and the capture medium during the initial period and providing information not obtainable by other characterizations. Preliminary results and analyses of spectra produced by the intact capture of hypervelocity aluminum spheres in polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), and polyurethane (PU) foams are presented. Included are tentative emission species identifications, as well as gray body temperatures produced in the intact capture process.

  5. Hypervelocity impact technology and applications: 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Chhabildas, Lalit C.

    2008-07-01

    The Hypervelocity Impact Society is devoted to the advancement of the science and technology of hypervelocity impact and related technical areas required to facilitate and understand hypervelocity impact phenomena. Topics of interest include experimental methods, theoretical techniques, analytical studies, phenomenological studies, dynamic material response as related to material properties (e.g., equation of state), penetration mechanics, and dynamic failure of materials, planetary physics and other related phenomena. The objectives of the Society are to foster the development and exchange of technical information in the discipline of hypervelocity impact phenomena, promote technical excellence, encourage peer review publications, and hold technical symposia on a regular basis. It was sometime in 1985, partly in response to the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), that a small group of visionaries decided that a conference or symposium on hypervelocity science would be useful and began the necessary planning. A major objective of the first Symposium was to bring the scientists and researchers up to date by reviewing the essential developments of hypervelocity science and technology between 1955 and 1985. This Symposia--HVIS 2007 is the tenth Symposium since that beginning. The papers presented at all the HVIS are peer reviewed and published as a special volume of the archival journal International Journal of Impact Engineering. HVIS 2007 followed the same high standards and its proceedings will add to this body of work.

  6. Ink jet printable silver metallization with zinc oxide for front side metallization for micro crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurk, Robert; Fritsch, Marco; Eberstein, Markus; Schilm, Jochen; Uhlig, Florian; Waltinger, Andreas; Michaelis, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Ink jet printable water based inks are prepared by a new silver nanoparticle synthesis and the addition of nanoscaled ZnO particles. For the formation of front side contacts the inks are ink jet printed on the front side of micro crystalline silicon solar cells, and contact the cell directly during the firing step by etching through the wafers’ anti-reflection coating (ARC). In terms of Ag dissolution and precipitation the mechanism of contact formation can be compared to commercial glass containing thick film pastes. This avoids additional processing steps, like laser ablation, which are usually necessary to open the ARC prior to ink jet printing. As a consequence process costs can be reduced. In order to optimize the ARC etching and contact formation during firing, zinc oxide nanoparticles are investigated as an ink additive. By utilization of in situ contact resistivity measurements the mechanism of contacting was explored. Our results show that silver inks containing ZnO particles realize a specific contact resistance below 10 mΩṡcm2. By using a multi-pass ink jet printing and plating process a front side metallization of commercial 6  ×  6 inch2 standard micro crystalline silicone solar cells with emitter resistance of 60 Ω/◽ was achieved and showed an efficiency of 15.7%.

  7. Hypervelocity impact on shielded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James P.

    1993-01-01

    A ballistic limit equation for hypervelocity impact on thin plates is derived analytically. This equation applies to cases of impulsive impact on a plate that is protected by a multi-shock shield, and it is valid in the range of velocity above 6 km/s. Experimental tests were conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center on square aluminum plates. Comparing the center deflections of these plates with the theoretical deflections of a rigid-plastic plate subjected to a blast load, one determines the dynamic yield strength of the plate material. The analysis is based on a theory for the expansion of the fragmented projectile and on a simple failure criterion. Curves are presented for the critical projectile radius versus the projectile velocity, and for the critical plate thickness versus the velocity. These curves are in good agreement with curves that have been generated empirically.

  8. Advanced Hypervelocity Aerophysics Facility Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witcofski, Robert D. (Compiler); Scallion, William I. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective of the workshop was to obtain a critical assessment of a concept for a large, advanced hypervelocity ballistic range test facility powered by an electromagnetic launcher, which was proposed by the Langley Research Center. It was concluded that the subject large-scale facility was feasible and would provide the required ground-based capability for performing tests at entry flight conditions (velocity and density) on large, complex, instrumented models. It was also concluded that advances in remote measurement techniques and particularly onboard model instrumentation, light-weight model construction techniques, and model electromagnetic launcher (EML) systems must be made before any commitment for the construction of such a facility can be made.

  9. Fragmentation of hypervelocity aluminum projectiles on fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Martin; Schäfer, Frank; Destefanis, Roberto; Faraud, Moreno; Lambert, Michel

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents work performed for a study investigating the ability of different flexible materials to induce fragmentation of a hypervelocity projectile. Samples were chosen to represent a wide range of industrially available types of flexible materials like ceramic, aramid and carbon fabrics as well as a thin metallic mesh. Impact conditions and areal density were kept constant for all targets. Betacloth and multi-layer insulation (B-MLI) are mounted onto the targets to account for thermal system engineering requirements. All tests were performed using the Space light-gas gun facility (SLGG) of the Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institut, EMI. Projectiles were aluminum spheres with 5 mm diameter impacting at approximately 6.3 km/s. Fragmentation was evaluated using a witness plate behind the target. An aramid and a ceramic fabric lead the ranking of fabrics with the best projectile fragmentation and debris cloud dispersion performance. A comparison with an equal-density rigid aluminum plate is presented. The work presented can be applied to optimize the micrometeoroid and space debris (MM/SD) shielding structure of inflatable modules.

  10. Heat Transfer Between a Plasma Jet and a Metal Surface in a Cut Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veremeichik, A. N.; Sazonov, M. I.; Khvisevich, V. M.; Tsyganov, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    Investigations are presented of the formation of a plasma jet and of the current-density and heat-flux distributions in the process of metal cutting along the cut cavity with direct and reverse polarities of the plasmatron connection. The study of the specific features of heat transfer of the arc with the surface of the cut cavity was carried out on the basis of the developed plasma unit which makes it possible to model the technological process of separating metal cutting. A sectional cut model is proposed which can be used to work out and optimize the methods of determination of cutting parameters.

  11. Hypervelocity Capability of the HYPULSE Shock-Expansion Tunnel for Scramjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foelsche, Robert O.; Rogers, R. Clayton; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Bakos, Robert J.; Shih, Ann T.

    2001-01-01

    New hypervelocity capabilities for scramjet testing have recently been demonstrated in the HYPULSE Shock-Expansion Tunnel (SET). With NASA's continuing interests in scramjet testing at hypervelocity conditions (Mach 12 and above), a SET nozzle was designed and added to the HYPULSE facility. Results of tests conducted to establish SET operational conditions and facility nozzle calibration are presented and discussed for a Mach 15 (M15) flight enthalpy. The measurements and detailed computational fluid dynamics calculations (CFD) show the nozzle delivers a test gas with sufficiently wide core size to be suitable for free-jet testing of scramjet engine models of similar scale as, those tested in conventional low Mach number blow-down test facilities.

  12. An investigation of oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles on multi-sheet aluminum structures. A model to be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations relating crater and perforation damage of a multi-sheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multi-sheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the hazardous meteoroid and space debris environment.

  13. Analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles on multisheet aluminum structures. A model that can be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations that relate crater and perforation damage of a multisheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multisheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to a meteoroid or space debris environement.

  14. DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR OUTFLOW OF METAL-ENRICHED GAS ALONG THE RADIO JETS OF HYDRA A

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; Cavagnolo, K. W.; McNamara, B. R.; Gitti, M.; David, L. P.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Wise, M. W.

    2009-12-10

    Using deep Chandra observations of the Hydra A galaxy cluster, we examine the metallicity structure near the central galaxy and along its powerful radio source. We show that the metallicity of the intracluster medium is enhanced by up to 0.2 dex along the radio jets and lobes compared to the metallicity of the undisturbed gas. The enhancements extend from a radius of 20 kpc from the central galaxy to a distance of approx120 kpc. We estimate the total iron mass that has been transported out of the central galaxy to be between 2 x 10{sup 7} M {sub sun} and 7 x 10{sup 7} M {sub sun}, which represents 10%-30% of the iron mass within the central galaxy. The energy required to lift this gas is roughly 1% to 5% of the total energetic output of the active galactic nuclei. Evidently, Hydra A's powerful radio source is able to redistribute metal-enriched, low entropy gas throughout the core of the galaxy cluster. The short re-enrichment timescale <10{sup 9} yr implies that the metals lost from the central galaxy will be quickly replenished.

  15. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures

    PubMed Central

    Zenou, M.; Sa’ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures. PMID:26602432

  16. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures.

    PubMed

    Zenou, M; Sa'ar, A; Kotler, Z

    2015-11-25

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures.

  17. Metal shell technology based upon hollow jet instability. [for inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M.; Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    Spherical shells of submillimeter size are sought as ICF targets. Such shells must be dimensionally precise, smooth, of high strength, and composed of a high atomic number material. A technology for the production of shells based upon the hydrodynamic instability of an annular jet of molten metal is described. Shells in the 0.7-2.0 mm size range have been produced using tin as a test material. Specimens exhibit good sphericity, fair concentricity, and excellent finish over most of the surface. Work involving a gold-lead-antimony alloy is in progress. Droplets of this are amorphous and possess superior surface finish. The flow of tin models that of the alloy well; experiments on both metals show that the technique holds considerable promise.

  18. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenou, M.; Sa'Ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures.

  19. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures.

    PubMed

    Zenou, M; Sa'ar, A; Kotler, Z

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures. PMID:26602432

  20. Simulation of Motion, Heating, and Breakup of Molten Metal Droplets in the Plasma Jet at Plasma-Arc Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamov, M. Yu.; Krivtsun, I. V.; Korzhyk, V. N.; Ryabovolyk, Y. V.; Demyanov, O. I.

    2015-04-01

    The mathematical model for the process of plasma-arc wire spraying is proposed, which describes behavior of molten metal droplets in the plasma jet, allowing for the processes of their deformation and gas-dynamic breakup. Numerical analysis of the processes of motion, heating, and breakup of molten metal droplets, detached from the sprayed wire at plasma-arc spraying of coatings, was performed. It is shown that during molten droplets movement in the plasma jet their multiple breakup takes place, leading to formation of sprayed particles with dimensions much smaller than dimensions of initial droplets, detached from the sprayed wire tip.

  1. Simulating plasma production from hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Alex; Close, Sigrid; Mathias, Donovan

    2015-09-01

    Hypervelocity particles, such as meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and are energetic enough to vaporize and ionize themselves and as well as a portion of the target material. The resulting plasma rapidly expands into the surrounding vacuum. While plasma measurements from hypervelocity impacts have been made using ground-based technologies such as light gas guns and Van de Graaff dust accelerators, some of the basic plasma properties vary significantly between experiments. There have been both ground-based and in-situ measurements of radio frequency (RF) emission from hypervelocity impacts, but the physical mechanism responsible and the possible connection to the impact-produced plasma are not well understood. Under certain conditions, the impact-produced plasma can have deleterious effects on spacecraft electronics by providing a new current path, triggering an electrostatic discharge, causing electromagnetic interference, or generating an electromagnetic pulse. Multi-physics simulations of plasma production from hypervelocity impacts are presented. These simulations incorporate elasticity and plasticity of the solid target, phase change and plasma formation, and non-ideal plasma physics due to the high density and low temperature of the plasma. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to perform a continuum dynamics simulation with these additional physics. By examining a series of hypervelocity impacts, basic properties of the impact produced plasma plume (density, temperature, expansion speed, charge state) are determined for impactor speeds between 10 and 72 km/s. For a large range of higher impact speeds (30-72 km/s), we find the temperature is unvarying at 2.5 eV. We also find that the plasma plume is weakly ionized for impact speeds less than 14 km/s and fully ionized for impact speeds greater than 20 km/s, independent of impactor mass. This is the same velocity threshold for the detection of RF emission in recent Van de Graaff

  2. Demonstration of Hazardous Hypervelocity Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Karen M.

    1991-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) participated in a joint test program with NASA JSC Hypervelocity Impact Research Laboratory (HIRL) to determine if JSC was capable of performing hypervelocity impact tests on hazardous targets. Seven pressurized vessels were evaluated under hypervelocity impact conditions. The vessels were tested with various combinations of liquids and gasses at various pressures. Results from the evaluation showed that vessels containing 100-percent pressurized gas sustained more severe damage and had a higher potential for damaging nearby equipment, than vessels containing 75-percent liquid, 25-percent inert pressurized gas. Two water-filled test vessels, one of which was placed behind an aluminum shield, failed by bulging and splitting open at the impact point; pressure was relieved without the vessel fragmenting or sustaining internal damage. An additional water-filled test vessel, placed a greater distance behind an aluminum shield, sustained damage that resembled a shotgun blast, but did not bulge or split open; again, pressure was relieved without the vessel fragmenting. Two test vessels containing volatile liquids (nitro methane and hydrazine) also failed by bulging and splitting open; neither liquid detonated under hypervelocity test conditions. A test vessel containing nitrogen gas failed by relieving pressure through a circular entry hole; multiple small penetrations opposite the point of entry provided high velocity target debris to surrounding objects. A high-pressure oxygen test vessel fragmented upon impact; the ensuing fire and high velocity fragments caused secondary damage to surrounding objects. The results from the evaluation of the pressurized vessels indicated that JSC is capable of performing hypervelocity impact tests on hazardous targets.

  3. Use of shutdown of the capacitive storage in implementing electrical action on metallic shaped-charge jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Tto improve the efficiency of electrical action on metallic shaped-charge jets, it is proposed to use shutdown of the capacitive storage at the time when the voltage on it during passage of an alternating discharge becomes zero. It has been shown that using this expedient eliminates recharging of the capacitive storage and provides better matching between the current pulse and the time of motion of various parts of the shaped-charge jet through the electrode gap. Studies have been conducted using a computational procedure in which the development of magnetohydrodynamic instability of the jet and the dispersion of its material are considered possible physical mechanisms reducing the penetration capability of shaped-charge jets under the action of high current pulses.

  4. Observation of Hypervelocity Dust in Dense Supersonic Plasma Flows: Physics and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, C. M.; Wang, Z.; Wurden, G. A.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    Synthetic diamond and graphite dust powders with a wide range of sizes, from a few to several tens of microns in diameter were accelerated to velocities up to 4 km/s in vacuum by plasma jet produced in a coaxial gun. Some of the key features of the plasma flow are high density, of the order of 10{sup 22} m{sup -3}, low ion and electron temperatures, of only a few eV, and good collimation over a distance of {approx_equal}2 m due to confinement by the self-generated magnetic field. The main features of this plasma-drag acceleration technique are presented and discussed. From basic science point of view hypervelocity dust is useful for studying the physics of dust interaction with energetic plasma flows at microscopic level. In physical applications, it has been proposed to use hypervelocity dust for diagnostic or control of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. In engineering, hypervelocity dusty plasmas are extensively employed in industrial processes involved in the processing of surfaces.

  5. Stability and debris in high-brightness liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Otendal, M.; Tuohimaa, T.; Hertz, H. M.

    2007-01-15

    We investigate the x-ray spot stability and the debris emission in liquid-metal-jet anode electron-impact x-ray sources operating in the 10-100 W microfocus regime. The x-ray spot size is 15-23 {mu}m in diameter and the electron-beam power density is up to {approx}210 kW/mm{sup 2}, an order of magnitude higher than for conventional microfocus sources. In the power range of the investigation the source is stable in terms of spot size and position. The debris emission rate increases exponentially with the applied electron-beam power but may be reduced by combining larger and faster target jets with smaller e-beam foci and by mitigation schemes. It is concluded that the investigated factors will not limit the performance and function of liquid-metal-jet-anode electron-impact microfocus sources when operating in this high-brightness regime.

  6. Correlation between the ultimate elongations of rapidly expanding rings and stretching metal jets

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W.H.

    1990-08-01

    The recent work of Duffy and Golaski and Lichtenberger demonstrated that the initial metallurgical condition of a material can significantly affect its performance when used as a shaped-charge liner. Duffy and Golaski showed that the penetration of copper shaped charges increases by 10--20% when the grain size of the liner is reduced from 150 to 25 {mu}m and the uniformity of the microstructure is improved. Lichtenberger confirmed this behavior in liners made from oxygen-free electronic (OFE) grade copper and also showed that the purity of the liner material can produce similar effects. These observations suggest that some characteristic of the liner material itself can be correlated with shaped-charge performance. Such a characteristic, along with a corresponding laboratory test procedure, would be very useful as a means of identifying promising candidate materials prior to the expensive testing of prototype munitions. Lichtenberger has suggested that the recrystallization temperature'' is one such characteristic, and he has successfully demonstrated a correlation with jet behavior. In this paper, I suggest that the ultimate elongation of specimen rings expanded by means of the electromagnetic launch technique is another material characteristic that appears to correlate with the breakup behavior of stretching metal jets. I briefly discuss in general terms why such a correlation may exist and then offer some limited experimental evidence for it.

  7. A research program in magnetogasdynamics utilizing hypervelocity coaxial plasma generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spight, C.

    1976-01-01

    A broadly-gauged research program in magnetogasdynamics utilizing hypervelocity coaxial plasma generators is presented. A complete hypervelocity coaxial plasma generator facility was assembled and tested. Significant progress was made in the direction of understanding the important processes in the interaction of hypervelocity MGD flow with transverse applied fields. It is now proposed to utilize the accumulated experimental capability and theoretical analysis in application to the analysis and design parameterization of pulsed magnetogasdynamic direct energy convertor configurations.

  8. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging with a liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus source

    SciTech Connect

    Tuohimaa, T.; Otendal, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2007-08-13

    Phase-contrast methods increase contrast, detail, and selectivity in x-ray imaging. Present compact x-ray sources do not provide the necessary spatial coherence with sufficient power to allow the laboratory-scale high-resolution phase-contrast imaging with adequate exposure times. In this letter, the authors demonstrate phase-contrast imaging with few-micron detail employing a compact {approx}6.5 {mu}m spot liquid-metal-jet-anode high-brightness microfocus source. The 40 W source is operated at more than ten times higher electron-beam power density than present microfocus sources and is shown to provide sufficient spatial coherence as well as scalability to high power, thereby enabling the application of phase-contrast x-ray imaging with short exposure times in clinics and laboratories.

  9. Simulating plasma production from hypervelocity impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Alex Close, Sigrid; Mathias, Donovan

    2015-09-15

    Hypervelocity particles, such as meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and are energetic enough to vaporize and ionize themselves and as well as a portion of the target material. The resulting plasma rapidly expands into the surrounding vacuum. While plasma measurements from hypervelocity impacts have been made using ground-based technologies such as light gas guns and Van de Graaff dust accelerators, some of the basic plasma properties vary significantly between experiments. There have been both ground-based and in-situ measurements of radio frequency (RF) emission from hypervelocity impacts, but the physical mechanism responsible and the possible connection to the impact-produced plasma are not well understood. Under certain conditions, the impact-produced plasma can have deleterious effects on spacecraft electronics by providing a new current path, triggering an electrostatic discharge, causing electromagnetic interference, or generating an electromagnetic pulse. Multi-physics simulations of plasma production from hypervelocity impacts are presented. These simulations incorporate elasticity and plasticity of the solid target, phase change and plasma formation, and non-ideal plasma physics due to the high density and low temperature of the plasma. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to perform a continuum dynamics simulation with these additional physics. By examining a series of hypervelocity impacts, basic properties of the impact produced plasma plume (density, temperature, expansion speed, charge state) are determined for impactor speeds between 10 and 72 km/s. For a large range of higher impact speeds (30–72 km/s), we find the temperature is unvarying at 2.5 eV. We also find that the plasma plume is weakly ionized for impact speeds less than 14 km/s and fully ionized for impact speeds greater than 20 km/s, independent of impactor mass. This is the same velocity threshold for the detection of RF emission in recent

  10. Laboratory investigations of the survivability of bacteria in hypervelocity impacts.

    PubMed

    Burchell, M J; Shrine, N R; Mann, J; Bunch, A W; Brandao, P; Zarnecki, J C; Galloway, J A

    2001-01-01

    It is now well established that material naturally moves around the Solar System, even from planetary surface to planetary surface. Accordingly, the idea that life is distributed throughout space and did not necessarily originate on the Earth but migrated here from elsewhere (Panspermia) is increasingly deemed worthy of consideration. If life arrived at the Earth from space, its relative speed will typically be of order many km s-1, and the resulting collision with the Earth and its atmosphere will be in the hypervelocity regime. A mechanism for the bacteria to survive such an impact is required. Therefore a programme of hypervelocity impacts in the laboratory at (4.5 +/- 0.6) km s-1 was carried out using bacteria (Rhodococcus) laden projectiles. After impacts on a variety of target materials (rock, glass and metal) attempts were made to culture Rhodococcus from the surface of the resulting craters and also from the target material ejected during crater formation. Control shots with clean projectiles yielded no evidence for Rhodococcus growth from any crater surface or ejecta. When projectiles doped with Rhodococcus were used no impact crater surface yielded colonies of Rhodococcus. However, for four shots of bacteria into rock (two on chalk and two on granite) the ejecta was afterwards found to give colonies of Rhodococcus. This was not true for shots onto glass. In addition, shots into aerogel (density 96 kg m-3) were also carried out (two with clean projectiles and two with projectiles with Rhodococcus). This crudely simulated aero-capture in a planetary atmosphere. No evidence for Rhodococcus growth was found from the projectiles captured in the aerogel from any of the four shots.

  11. Experimental observations of the breakup of multiple metal jets in a volatile liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Marciniak, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    A postulated severe loss of coolant accident in a nuclear reactor can lead to significant core damage due to residual heat generation. Subsequently, melted core materials (i.e.; corium) could migrate downward and impinge upon the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). During this relocation, the complexity of the reactor structure could segregate the molten corium into various flow paths. A perforated flow plate could readily provide the mechanism to segregate the molten corium. The resulting small (a few cm) diameter melt streams, driven by gravity, could then penetrate the remaining coolant in the RPV and cause any of the following events: impingement of the high temperature melt streams on the lower head could breach the RPV; re-agglomeration of the corium melt on the lower head could influence the coolability of the debris bed; {open_quotes}pre-mixing{close_quotes} of the melt streams with the coolant could lead to a vapor explosion; or, sufficient quenching of the melt streams by the coolant could produce a stabilized debris bed. An overview of the thermo-science issues related to core-melt accidents is presented by Theofanous. Thus, insight into the melt stream breakup mechanisms (i.e.; interfacial conditions, fragmentation, and geometric spacing) during the melt-coolant interactions is necessary to evaluate the plausibility, and characteristics, of these events. Molten Fuel Stream Breakup Simulation (MFSBS) experiments have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory in which simulant materials were used to determine a `boiling` jet breakup length correlation and to visualize the melt fragmentation mechanisms during the penetration of a single molten metal jet into a volatile liquid. The goal was to characterize the hydrodynamics of the corium-water interactions in a postulated core melt accident. The present experiment closely follows the procedures of the MFSBS.

  12. Global and pedestal confinement in JET with a Be/W metallic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Challis, C.; Giroud, C.; Saarelma, S.; Alper, B.; Angioni, C.; Bilkova, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Brezinsek, S.; Buratti, P.; Calabro, G.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; Giovannozzi, E.; Groth, M.; Hobirk, J.; Joffrin, E.; Leyland, M. J.; Lomas, P.; de la Luna, E.; Kempenaars, M.; Maddison, G.; Maggi, C.; Mantica, P.; Maslov, M.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Neu, R.; Nunes, I.; Osborne, T.; Rimini, F.; Scannell, R.; Solano, E. R.; Snyder, P. B.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; de Vries, Peter; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2014-04-01

    Type I ELMy H-mode operation in JET with the ITER-like Be/W wall (JET-ILW) generally occurs at lower pedestal pressures compared to those with the full carbon wall (JET-C). The pedestal density is similar but the pedestal temperature where type I ELMs occur is reduced and below to the so-called critical type I-type III transition temperature reported in JET-C experiments. Furthermore, the confinement factor H98(y,2) in type I ELMy H-mode baseline plasmas is generally lower in JET-ILW compared to JET-C at low power fractions Ploss/Pthr,08 < 2 (where Ploss is (Pin - dW/dt), and Pthr,08 the L-H power threshold from Martin et al 2008 (J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 123 012033)). Higher power fractions have thus far not been achieved in the baseline plasmas. At Ploss/Pthr,08 > 2, the confinement in JET-ILW hybrid plasmas is similar to that in JET-C. A reduction in pedestal pressure is the main reason for the reduced confinement in JET-ILW baseline ELMy H-mode plasmas where typically H98(y,2) = 0.8 is obtained, compared to H98(y,2) = 1.0 in JET-C. In JET-ILW hybrid plasmas a similarly reduced pedestal pressure is compensated by an increased peaking of the core pressure profile resulting in H98(y,2) ⩽ 1.25. The pedestal stability has significantly changed in high triangularity baseline plasmas where the confinement loss is also most apparent. Applying the same stability analysis for JET-C and JET-ILW, the measured pedestal in JET-ILW is stable with respect to the calculated peeling-ballooning stability limit and the ELM collapse time has increased to 2 ms from typically 200 µs in JET-C. This indicates that changes in the pedestal stability may have contributed to the reduced pedestal confinement in JET-ILW plasmas. A comparison of EPED1 pedestal pressure prediction with JET-ILW experimental data in over 500 JET-C and JET-ILW baseline and hybrid plasmas shows a good agreement with 0.8 < (measured pped)/(predicted pped,EPED) < 1.2, but that the role of triangularity is generally

  13. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Compact heat exchangers have been designed following the same basic methodology for over fifty years. However, with the present emphasis on energy efficiency and light weight of prime movers there is increasing demand for completely new heat exchangers. Moreover, new materials and mesoscale fabrication technologies offer the possibility of significantly improving heat exchanger performance over conventional designs. This work involves fundamental flow and heat transfer experimentation to explore two new heat exchange systems: in Part I, large arrays of impinging jets with local extraction and in Part II, metal foams used as fins. Jet impingement cooling is widely used in applications ranging from paper manufacturing to the cooling of gas turbine blades because of the very high local heat transfer coefficients that are possible. While the use of single jet impingement results in non-uniform cooling, increased and more uniform mean heat transfer coefficients may be attained by dividing the total cooling flow among an array of smaller jets. Unfortunately, when the spent fluid from the array's central jets interact with the outer jets, the overall mean heat transfer coefficient is reduced. This problem can be alleviated by locally extracting the spent fluid before it is able to interact with the surrounding jets. An experimental investigation was carried out on a compact impingement array (Xn/Djet = 2.34) utilizing local extraction of the spent fluid (Aspent/Ajet = 2.23) from the jet exit plane. Spatially resolved measurements of the mean velocity field within the array were carried out at jet Reynolds numbers of 2300 and 5300 by magnetic resonance velocimetry, MRV. The geometry provided for a smooth transition from the jet to the target surface and out through the extraction holes without obvious flow recirculation. Mean Nusselt number measurements were also carried out for a Reynolds number range of 2000 to 10,000. The Nusselt number was found to increase with the

  14. Maximizing power dissipation by impurity seeding on JET with metal plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischmeier, Marco; Huber, Alexander; Lowry, Christopher; Maggi, Costanza; Reinke, Matthew; JET contributors Team

    2015-11-01

    A reactor such as DEMO will operate at considerably higher total heating power even when compared to ITER. This will require mitigating a much higher power flux density in the Scrape-Off Layer. A highly detached divertor will be required for maximizing the lifetime of the eroding plasma facing components, PFCs, in the divertor as well as for operating within the engineering limits expected for the power handling components. A dissipation of ~ 95% of the total heating power will be needed, with more than 70% being radiation on closed field lines. On JET with metal PFCs highly radiative conditions with N2, Ne, both combined and Ar as radiators were approached in H-mode plasmas. For all seeding species radiative power fractions larger than 70% were achieved under stable discharge conditions with a concentration of the radiation in the X-point region. Detachment along both divertor plates was complete. A degradation of the pedestal profile was compensated by steeper core profiles. See the Appendix of F. Romanelli et al., 25th FEC 2014, Russia, Supported by EUROfusion No 633053.

  15. Hypervelocity Impact of Explosive Transfer Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Michael D.; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests of 2.5 grains per foot flexible confined detonating chord (FCDC) shielded by a 1 mm thick 2024-T3 aluminum alloy bumper standing off 51 mm from the FCDC were performed. Testing showed that a 6 mm diameter 2017-T4 aluminum alloy ball impacting the bumper at 6.97 km/s and 45 degrees impact angle initiated the FCDC. However, impact by the same diameter and speed ball at 0 degrees angle of impact did not initiate the FCDC. Furthermore, impact at 45 degrees and the same speed by a slightly smaller diameter ball (5.8 mm diameter) also did not initiate the FCDC.

  16. Railgun rail gouging by hypervelocity sliding contact

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, L.M.; Trucano, T.G. ); Susoeff, A.R. )

    1989-01-01

    A description is given of a recently resolved mechanisms of gouging which occurs during hypervelocity sliding contact between two materials. A parameter study based on computer modeling of the gouging mechanism is presented in which gouging velocity thresholds are determined for several combinations of sliding materials. Materials which can gouge each other are found to do so only within a certain range of velocities. Related calculations of gaseous material ahead of railgun projectiles are also presented. Gun bore gouging experience with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory railgun project is reviewed.

  17. Railgun rail gouging by hypervelocity sliding contact

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, L.M.; Trucano, T.G.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of a recently resolved mechanism of gouging which occurs during hypervelocity sliding contact between two materials. A parameter study based on computer modelling of the gouging mechanism is presented in which gouging velocity thresholds are determined for several combinations of sliding materials. Materials which can gouge each other are found to do so only within a certain range of velocities. Related calculations of gaseous material ahead of railgun projectiles are also presented. Gun bore gouging experience with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory railgun project is reviewed.

  18. Hypervelocity Railgun:. the Optimal Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostashev, V. E.; Lebedev, E. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2004-11-01

    The paper describes the concept of a multistage plasma armature railgun (PARG). A conventional multistage PARG can be disabled to operate principally as an electromagnetic (EM) launcher. In order to create a multistage PARG one must create acceleration in each rail gun (RG) section, initiating the PA from a new metal foil adjacent to the back of the projectile; to ignite discharge moving with projectile velocity, to stabilize the PA at the initial phase of acceleration in each section while d(mv)<0 to decrease the duration of this phase at the expense of a quickly growing RG current; to form specific time dependence of the energy supply for each RG section both for igniting the discharge, and accelerating the plasma without changing energy sources; and to alternatively feed the energy supply. Presented is the computer evaluation of the acceleration of a 2 g projectile from its initial velocity of 5km/s over an acceleration distance of 2.5m, with a permissible operating current of up to 1 MA. The proposed pulse-forming network (PFN) creates a powerful impulse for initiating PA from a metal foil, and also forms a quickly growing RG current. This PFN can transfer up to 45% of its initial energy into RG. The calculated results have shown that, under these circumstances, a muzzle velocity of 10-12 km/s may be achieved in PARG.

  19. Breakup of metal jets penetrating a volatile liquid. Final report, October 1, 1991--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.P.

    1995-07-01

    In a loss of coolant accident, the core may become uncovered, causing the fuel pins to melt. The molten fuel would pour onto the plenum and collect on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. The RPV internal structure includes one or more perforated plates in the lower plenum which would divide the molten fuel into small diameter streams or jets, which would break up as they penetrate the coolant in the lower plenum. The breakup of these jets would occur in two phases, each dominated by a distinct fragmentation mechanism. As a fuel jet first penetrates the coolant, a stagnation flow develops at its leading edge, causing the column to spread radially and eject molten fuel into the coolant. The jet fluid in the column is fragmented by pressure fluctuations due to the jet/ambient fluid relative motion, so that a steady jet is reduced to a field of falling drops below a critical depth called the breakup length. The present work includes analyses yielding simple correlations for jet breakup length and jet leading edge penetration.

  20. Hypervelocity Impact Studies on Solar Cell Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Best, Stevie R.

    2001-01-01

    Space environmental effects have caused severe problems as satellites move toward increased power and operating voltage levels. The greatest unknown, however, is the effect of high velocity micrometeoroid impacts on high voltage arrays (>200V). Understanding such impact phenomena is necessary for the design of future reliable, high voltage solar arrays, especially for Space Solar Power applications. Therefore, the objective of this work was to study the effect of hypervelocity impacts on high voltage solar arrays. Initially, state of the art, 18% efficient GaAs solar cell strings were targeted. The maximum bias voltage on a two-cell string was -200 V while the adjacent string was held at -140 V relative to the plasma potential. A hollow cathode device provided the plasma. Soda lime glass particles 40-120 micrometers in diameter were accelerated in the Hypervelocity Impact Facility to velocities as high as 11.6 km/sec. Coordinates and velocity were obtained for each of the approximately 40 particle impact sites on each shot. Arcing did occur, and both discharging and recharging of arcs between the two strings was observed. The recharging phenomena appeared to stop at approximately 66V string differential. No arcing was observed at 400 V on concentrator cell modules for the Stretched Lens Array.

  1. Modelling of plasma-edge and plasma-wall interaction physics at JET with the metallic first-wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesen, S.; Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Wischmeier, M.; contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    An overview is given on the recent progress on edge modelling activities for the JET ITER-like wall using the computational tools like the SOLPS or EDGE2D-EIRENE code. The validation process of these codes on JET with its metallic plasma-facing components is an important step towards predictive studies for ITER and DEMO in relevant divertor operational conditions, i.e., for detached, radiating divertors. With increased quantitative credibility in such codes more reliable input to plasma-wall and plasma-material codes can be warranted, which in turn results in more realistic and physically sound estimates of the life-time expectations and performance of a Be first-wall and a W-divertor, the same materials configuration foreseen for ITER. A brief review is given on the recent achievements in the plasma-wall interaction and material migration studies. Finally, a short summary is given on the availability and development of integrated codes to assess the performance of an JET-ILW baseline scenario also in view of the preparation for a JET DT-campaign.

  2. Subsurface Deformation of Nonporous Rocks Induced by Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Poelchau, M. H.; Michalski, C.; Kenkmann, T.

    2015-09-01

    Two hypervelocity impact experiments into quarzite and marble were conducted under similar impact condition. Both experiments show tensile failure; quarzite developed zones of strong grain size reduction, while marble shows intragranular fracturing.

  3. NASA White Sands Test Facility Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory

    NASA Video Gallery

    Tour the NASA White Sands Test Facility's Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory in Las Cruces, New Mexico. To learn more about White Sands Test Facility, go to http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wstf/home/...

  4. Ejecta Dynamics during Hypervelocity Impacts into Dry and Wet Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Thoma, K.; Poelchau, M.; Kenkmann, T.; Deutsch, A.

    2011-03-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments into dry and water saturated porous Seeberger sandstone were conducted at the two-stage light gas accelerator at the Ernst-Mach-Institute (EMI) and the ejecta dynamics were analyzed.

  5. The XLLGG — A Hypervelocity Launcher for Impact Cratering Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexow, B.; Bückle, A.; Wickert, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2015-09-01

    Hypervelocity launchers are used to accelerate projectiles that simulate impacting meteoroids or asteroids. The XLLGG (eXtra Large Light Gas Gun) at the EMI (Ernst-Mach-Institute) was used within the MEMIN program.

  6. Satellite Failure Risk Due to Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegel, S.; Wiedemann, C.; Gelhaus, J.; Dietze, C.; Vorsmann, P.; Alwes, D.

    2009-03-01

    The increasing accumulation of space debris objects on earth orbits represents a risk for spaceflight missions. Particle impacts on satellites can lead to serious damages or even to the loss of a mission. In this paper the risk for historical and future satellite missions is analyzed separately. For historical satellite missions, the risk analysis is combined with cost estimations. Altogether 3893 satellites were examined and their analysis results evaluated. The failure probability of selected future satellite missions due to hypervelocity impacts from space debris is estimated for the years 2005 and 2055. The future evolution of the spatial density is predicted for a business-as-usual scenario which is based on the launch activity in the years preceding 2005. The predicted evolution of the space debris environment is discussed in terms of object sources and orbit altitudes. The analysis shows that an increase in the failure probability of satellites is likely.

  7. Hypervelocity Stars. II. The Bound Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Bromley, Benjamin C.

    2007-05-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) are stars ejected completely out of the Milky Way by three-body interactions with the massive black hole in the Galactic center. We describe 643 new spectroscopic observations from our targeted survey for HVSs. We find a significant (3.5 σ) excess of B-type stars with large velocities +275 km s-1 < vrf < 450 km s-1 and distances d>10 kpc that are most plausibly explained as a new class of HVSs: stars ejected from the Galactic center on bound orbits. If a Galactic center ejection origin is correct, the distribution of HVSs on the sky should be anisotropic for a survey complete to a fixed limiting apparent magnitude. The unbound HVSs in our survey have a marginally anisotropic distribution on the sky, consistent with the Galactic center ejection picture.

  8. Hypervelocity atmospheric flight: Real gas flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Flight in the atmosphere is examined from the viewpoint of including real gas phenomena in the flow field about a vehicle flying at hypervelocity. That is to say, the flow field is subject not only to compressible phenomena, but is dominated by energetic phenomena. There are several significant features of such a flow field. Spatially, its composition can vary by both chemical and elemental species. The equations which describe the flow field include equations of state and mass, species, elemental, and electric charge continuity; momentum; and energy equations. These are nonlinear, coupled, partial differential equations that were reduced to a relatively compact set of equations of a self-consistent manner (which allows mass addition at the surface at a rate comparable to the free-stream mass flux). The equations and their inputs allow for transport of these quantities relative to the mass-averaged behavior of the flow field. Thus transport of mass by chemical, thermal, pressure, and forced diffusion; transport of momentum by viscosity; and transport of energy by conduction, chemical considerations, viscosity, and radiative transfer are included. The last of these complicate the set of equations by making the energy equation a partial integrodifferential equation. Each phenomenon is considered and represented mathematically by one or more developments. The coefficients which pertain are both thermodynamically and chemically dependent. Solutions of the equations are presented and discussed in considerable detail, with emphasis on severe energetic flow fields. For hypervelocity flight in low-density environments where gaseous reactions proceed at finite rates, chemical nonequilibrium is considered and some illustrations are presented. Finally, flight where the flow field may be out of equilibrium, both chemically and thermodynamically, is presented briefly.

  9. Hypervelocity atmospheric flight: Real gas flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1989-01-01

    Flight in the atmosphere is examined from the viewpoint of including real gas phenomena in the flow field about a vehicle flying at hypervelocity. That is to say, the flow field is subject not only to compressible phenomena, but is dominated by energetic phenomena. There are several significant features of such a flow field. Spatially, its composition can vary by both chemical and elemental species. The equations which describe the flow field include equations of state and mass, species, elemental, and electric charge continuity; momentum; and energy equations. These are nonlinear, coupled, partial differential equations that have been reduced to a relatively compact set of equations in a self-consistent manner (which allows mass addition at the surface at a rate comparable to the free-stream mass flux). The equations and their inputs allow for transport of these quantities relative to the mass-average behavior of the flow field. Thus transport of mass by chemical, thermal, pressure, and forced diffusion; transport of momentum by viscosity; and transport of energy by conduction, chemical considerations, viscosity, and radiative transfer are included. The last of these complicate the set of equations by making the energy equations a partial integrodifferential equation. Each phenomenon is considered and represented mathematically by one or more developments. The coefficients which pertain are both thermodynamically and chemically dependent. Solutions of the equations are presented and discussed in considerable detail, with emphasis on severe energetic flow fields. Hypervelocity flight in low-density environments where gaseous reactions proceed at finite rates chemical nonequilibrium is considered, and some illustrations are presented. Finally, flight where the flow field may be out of equilibrium, both chemically and thermodynamically, is presented briefly.

  10. Hypervelocity impact survivability experiments for carbonaceous impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, Luann; Bada, Jeffrey; Macklin, John; Radicatidibrozolo, Filippo; Fleming, R. H.; Erlichman, Jozef

    1993-01-01

    We performed a series of hypervelocity impact experiments using carbon-bearing impactors (diamond, graphite, fullerenes, phthalic acid crystals, and Murchison meteorite) into Al plate at velocities between 4.2 and 6.1 km/s. These tests were made to do the following: (1) determine the survivability of carbon forms and organize molecules in low hypervelocity impact; (2) characterize carbonaceous impactor residues; and (3) determine whether or not fullerenes could form from carbonaceous impactors, under our experimental conditions, or survive as impactors. An analytical protocol of field emission SEM imagery, SEM-EDX, laser Raman spectroscopy, single and 2-stage laser mass spectrometry, and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) found the following: (1) diamonds did not survive impact at 4.8 km/s, but were transformed into various forms of disordered graphite; (2) intact, well-ordered graphite impactors did survive impact at 5.9 km/sec, but were only found in the crater bottom centers; the degree of impact-induced disorder in the graphite increases outward (walls, rims, ejecta); (3) phthalic acid crystals were destroyed on impact (at 4.2 km/s, although a large proportion of phthalic acid molecules did survive impact); (4) fullerenes did not form as products of carbonaceous impactors (5.9 - 6.1 km/s, fullerene impactor molecules mostly survived impact at 5.9 km/s; and (5) two Murchison meteorite samples (launched at 4.8 and 5.9 km/s) show preservation of some higher mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared with the non-impacted sample. Each impactor type shows unique impactor residue morphologies produced at a given impact velocity. An expanded methodology is presented to announce relatively new analytical techniques together with innovative modifications to other methods that can be used to characterize small impact residues in LDEF craters, in addition to other acquired extraterrestrial samples.

  11. Linearized model for the hydrodynamic stability investigation of molten fuel jets into the coolant of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartel, K.

    1986-02-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of liquid jets in a liquid continuum, both characterized by low viscosity was analyzed. A linearized mathematical model was developed. This model enables the length necessary for fragmentation of a vertical, symmetric jet of molten fuel by hydraulic forces in the coolant of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor to be evaluated. On the basis of this model the FRAG code for numerical calculation of the hydrodynamic fragmentation mechanism was developed.

  12. Thermal softening of metallic shaped-charge jets formed by the collapse of shaped-charge liners in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the possibility of increasing the ultimate stretching and penetration capability of metallic shaped-charge jets in the presence of an axial magnetic field in the shaped-charge liner due to heating and thermal softening of the jet material as a result of a sharp increase in the magnetic-field induction in the jet formation region upon liner collapse. This process is studied by numerical simulation in a quasi-two-dimensional formulation taking into account the inertial stretching of the conductive rigid-plastic rod in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field in it.

  13. Metal-mesh based transparent electrode on a 3-D curved surface by electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Baekhoon; Yoo, Hyunwoong; Dat Nguyen, Vu; Jang, Yonghee; Ryu, Changkook; Byun, Doyoung

    2014-09-01

    Invisible Ag mesh transparent electrodes (TEs), with a width of 7 μm, were prepared on a curved glass surface by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing. With a 100 μm pitch, the EHD jet printed the Ag mesh on the convex glass which had a sheet resistance of 1.49 Ω/□. The printing speed was 30 cm s-1 using Ag ink, which had a 10 000 cPs viscosity and a 70 wt% Ag nanoparticle concentration. We further showed the performance of a 3-D transparent heater using the Ag mesh transparent electrode. The EHD jet printed an invisible Ag grid transparent electrode with good electrical and optical properties with promising applications on printed optoelectronic devices.

  14. NASA Ames Arc Jets and Range, Capabilities for Planetary Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fretter, Ernest F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA is pursuing innovative technologies and concepts as part of America's Vision for Space Exploration. The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has led to new concepts for multipurpose shields to prevent catastrophic loss of vehicles and crew against the triple threats of aeroheating during atmospheric entry, radiation (Solar and galactic cosmic rays) and Micrometorid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) strikes. One proposed concept is the Thermal Radiation Impact Protection System (TRIPS) using carbon nanotubes, hydrogenated carbon nanotubes, and ceramic coatings as a multi-use TPS. The Thermophysics Facilities Branch of the Space Technology Division at NASA Ames Research Center provides testing services for the development and validation of the present and future concepts being developed by NASA and national and International research firms. The Branch operates two key facilities - the Range Complex and the Arc Jets. The Ranges include both the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) and the Hypervelocity Free Flight (HFF) gas guns best suited for MMOD investigations. Test coupons can be installed in the AVGR or HFF and subjected to particle impacts from glass or metal particles from micron to _ inch (6.35-mm) diameters and at velocities from 5 to 8 kilometers per second. The facility can record high-speed data on film and provide damage assessment for analysis by the Principle Investigator or Ames personnel. Damaged articles can be installed in the Arc Jet facility for further testing to quantify the effects of damage on the heat shield s performance upon entry into atmospheric environments.

  15. An investigation on co-axial water-jet assisted fiber laser cutting of metal sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhukar, Yuvraj K.; Mullick, Suvradip; Nath, Ashish K.

    2016-02-01

    Water assisted laser cutting has received significant attention in recent times with assurance of many advantages than conventional gas assisted laser cutting. A comparative study between co-axial water-jet and gas-jet assisted laser cutting of thin sheets of mild steel (MS) and titanium (Ti) by fiber laser is presented. Fiber laser (1.07 μm wavelength) was utilised because of its low absorption in water. The cut quality was evaluated in terms of average kerf, projected dross height, heat affected zone (HAZ) and cut surface roughness. It was observed that a broad range process parameter could produce consistent cut quality in MS. However, oxygen assisted cutting could produce better quality only with optimised parameters at high laser power and high cutting speed. In Ti cutting the water-jet assisted laser cutting performed better over the entire range of process parameters compared with gas assisted cutting. The specific energy, defined as the amount of laser energy required to remove unit volume of material was found more in case of water-jet assisted laser cutting process. It is mainly due to various losses associated with water assisted laser processing such as absorption of laser energy in water and scattering at the interaction zone.

  16. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Dynamics of formation of the liquid-drop phase of laser erosion jets near the surfaces of metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. K.; Kontsevoi, V. L.; Puzyrev, M. V.

    1995-03-01

    An investigation was made of laser erosion jets formed at 0.1-1.5 mm above the surfaces of Pb, Co, Ni, Sn, and Zn targets. A neodymium laser emitting rectangular pulses of 400 μs duration and of energy up to 400 J was used. The diameters, as well as the number density and volume fraction of the metal particles present in the jet, were measured. An analysis of the results showed that the metal liquid drops broke up near the surface and experienced additional evaporation because of their motion opposite to the laser beam.

  17. Theory and experiments characterizing hypervelocity impact plasmas on biased spacecraft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nicolas; Close, Sigrid; Goel, Ashish; Lauben, David; Linscott, Ivan; Johnson, Theresa; Strauss, David; Bugiel, Sebastian; Mocker, Anna; Srama, Ralf

    2013-03-01

    Space weather including solar activity and background plasma sets up spacecraft conditions that can magnify the threat from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity impactors include both meteoroids, traveling between 11 and 72 km/s, and orbital debris, with typical impact speeds of 10 km/s. When an impactor encounters a spacecraft, its kinetic energy is converted over a very short timescale into energy of vaporization and ionization, resulting in a small, dense plasma. This plasma can produce radio frequency (RF) emission, causing electrical anomalies within the spacecraft. In order to study this phenomenon, we conducted ground-based experiments to study hypervelocity impact plasmas using a Van de Graaff dust accelerator. Iron projectiles ranging from 10-16 g to 10-11 g were fired at speeds of up to 70 km/s into a variety of target materials under a range of surface charging conditions representative of space weather effects. Impact plasmas associated with bare metal targets as well as spacecraft materials were studied. Plasma expansion models were developed to determine the composition and temperature of the impact plasma, shedding light on the plasma dynamics that can lead to spacecraft electrical anomalies. The dependence of these plasma properties on target material, impact speed, and surface charge was analyzed. Our work includes three major results. First, the initial temperature of the impact plasma is at least an order of magnitude lower than previously reported, providing conditions more favorable for sustained RF emission. Second, the composition of impact plasmas from glass targets, unlike that of impact plasmas from tungsten, has low dependence on impact speed, indicating a charge production mechanism that is significant down to orbital debris speeds. Finally, negative ion formation has a strong dependence on target material. These new results can inform the design and operation of spacecraft in order to mitigate future impact-related space weather

  18. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  19. Endoscopic transluminal pancreatic necrosectomy using a self-expanding metal stent and high-flow water-jet system

    PubMed Central

    Hritz, István; Fejes, Roland; Székely, András; Székely, Iván; Horváth, László; Sárkány, Ágnes; Altorjay, Áron; Madácsy, László

    2013-01-01

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and a pancreatic abscess are the most severe complications of acute pancreatitis. Surgery in such critically ill patients is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality within the first few weeks after the onset of symptoms. Minimal invasive approaches with high success and low mortality rates are therefore of considerable interest. Endoscopic therapy has the potential to offer safe and effective alternative treatment. We report here on 3 consecutive patients with infected walled-off pancreatic necrosis and 1 patient with a pancreatic abscess who underwent direct endoscopic necrosectomy 19-21 d after the onset of acute pancreatitis. The infected pancreatic necrosis or abscess was punctured transluminally with a cystostome and, after balloon dilatation, a non-covered self-expanding biliary metal stent was placed into the necrotic cavity. Following stent deployment, a nasobiliary pigtail catheter was placed into the cavity to ensure continuous irrigation. After 5-7 d, the metal stent was removed endoscopically and the necrotic cavity was entered with a therapeutic gastroscope. Endoscopic debridement was performed via the simultaneous application of a high-flow water-jet system; using a flush knife, a Dormia basket, and hot biopsy forceps. The transluminal endotherapy was repeated 2-5 times daily during the next 10 d. Supportive care included parenteral antibiotics and jejunal feeding. All patients improved dramatically and with resolution of their septic conditions; 3 patients were completely cured without any further complications or the need for surgery. One patient died from a complication of prolonged ventilation severe bilateral pneumonia, not related to the endoscopic procedure. No procedure related complications were observed. Transluminal endoscopic necrosectomy with temporary application of a self-expanding metal stent and a high-flow water-jet system shows promise for enhancing the potential of this endoscopic

  20. Emission FTIR analyses of thin microscopic patches of jet fuel residues deposited on heated metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Vogel, P.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship of fuel stability to fuel composition and the development of mechanisms for deposit formation were investigated. Fuel deposits reduce heat transfer efficiency and increase resistance to fuel flow and are highly detrimental to aircraft performance. Infrared emission Fourier transform spectroscopy was chosen as the primary method of analysis because it was sensitive enough to be used in-situ on tiny patches of monolayers or of only a few molecular layers of deposits which generally proved completely insoluble in any nondestructive solvents. Deposits of four base fuels were compared; dodecane, a dodecane/tetralin blend, commercial Jet A fuel, and a broadened-properties jet fuel particularly rich in polynuclear aromatics. Every fuel in turn was provided with and without small additions of such additives as thiophene, furan, pyrrole, and copper and iron naphthenates.

  1. Hypervelocity orbital intercept guidance using certainty control

    SciTech Connect

    Alfano, S.; Fosha, C.E., Jr. Colorado, University, Colorado Springs )

    1991-06-01

    Terminal guidance of a hypervelocity exoatmospheric orbital interceptor with free end time is examined. A new approach called certainty control is developed where control energy expenditure is reduced by constraining the expected final state to a function of projected estimate error. Conceptually, the constraint produces a shrinking sphere about the predicted impact point with the radius being a function of estimated error. If the predicted miss is inside or touching the sphere, thrusting is not necessary. The interceptor is modeled as a satellite with lateral thrusting capability using two-body orbital dynamics. The target is modeled as an intercontinental ballistic missile (IBM) in its final boost phase prior to burnout. Filtering is accomplished using an eight-state extended Kalman filter with line-of-sight and range updates. The estimated relative trajectory and variances are propagated numerically to predicted impact time and then approximated by splines, eliminating the need to propagate new data repeatedly when present conditions are varied. A search is then made for a new impact time and point that will minimize present interceptor velocity changes and final mass distance. This control strategy, which is applied to two intercept problems, substantially reduces fuel consumption. 28 refs.

  2. Calculations supporting HyperVelocity Launcher development

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a HyperVelocity Launcher (also referred to as HVL) in which a thin flier plate (nominally 1 mm thick) is launched to velocities in excess of 12 km/s. The length to diameter ratio of these launched flier plates varies from 0.02 to 0.06. The launch technique is based upon using structured, time-dependant, high-pressure, high-acceleration pulses to drive the flier plates. Such pulses are achieved by using a graded-density material to impact a stationary flier. A computational and experimental program at Sandia seeks to extend this technique to allow launching thick plates whose length-to-diameter ratio is 10 to 20 times larger than thin plates. Hydrodynamic codes are used to design modifications to the basic technique. The authors have controlled and used these effects to successfully launch a chunk-flier, consisting of 0.33 gm of titanium alloy, 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm in diameter, to a velocity of 10.2 km/s. This is the largest chunky size ever launched at this velocity from a gas gun configuration.

  3. Orbiter Window Hypervelocity Impact Strength Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Lynda R.

    2011-01-01

    When the Space Shuttle Orbiter incurs damage on its windowpane during flight from particles traveling at hypervelocity speeds, it produces a distinctive damage that reduces the overall strength of the pane. This damage has the potential to increase the risk associated with a safe return to Earth. Engineers at Boeing and NASA/JSC are called to Mission Control to evaluate the damage and provide an assessment on the risk to the crew. Historically, damages like these were categorized as "accepted risk" associated with manned spaceflight, and as long as the glass was intact, engineers gave a "go ahead" for entry for the Orbiter. Since the Columbia accident, managers have given more scrutiny to these assessments, and this has caused the Orbiter window engineers to capitalize on new methods of assessments for these damages. This presentation will describe the original methodology that was used to asses the damages, and introduce a philosophy new to the Shuttle program for assessing structural damage, reliability/risk-based engineering. The presentation will also present a new, recently adopted method for assessing the damage and providing management with a reasonable assessment on the realities of the risk to the crew and vehicle for return.

  4. Electromagnetic Pulses Generated by Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, S.

    2011-12-01

    Hypervelocity impacts on spacecraft are known to cause mechanical damage, but their electrical effect on spacecraft systems are not well-characterized. We present a theory to explain plasma production and subsequent electric fields occurring when a meteoroid or piece of space debris strikes a spacecraft, ionizing itself and part of the spacecraft. This plasma, with a charge separation commensurate with different species mobilities, can produce a strong electromagnetic pulse (EMP), potentially causing catastrophic damage if the impact is relatively near an area with low shielding or an open umbilical. The plasma density, and hence plasma frequency, sweeps down as the plasma expands ballistically into the vacuum causing a chirp. Subsequent plasma oscillations can also emit significant power and may be responsible for many reported satellite anomalies. The presented theory discusses both a dust-free plasma expansion with coherent electron oscillation and a dusty plasma expansion with macroscopic charge separation. We show that significant RF can be emitted from frequencies ranging from VLF through S-band.

  5. Morphology correlation of craters formed by hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Gary D.; Rose, M. Frank; Zee, Ralph H.

    1993-01-01

    Dust-sized olivine particles were fired at a copper plate using the Space Power Institute hypervelocity facility, simulating micrometeoroid damage from natural debris to spacecraft in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Techniques were developed for measuring crater volume, particle volume, and particle velocity, with the particle velocities ranging from 5.6 to 8.7 km/s. A roughly linear correlation was found between crater volume and particle energy which suggested that micrometeoroids follow standard hypervelocity relationships. The residual debris analysis showed that for olivine impacts of up to 8.7 km/s, particle residue is found in the crater. By using the Space Power Institute hypervelocity facility, micrometeoroid damage to satellites can be accurately modeled.

  6. Penetration and ricochet phenomena in oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile on multisheet aluminum structures is described. A model that can be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations that relate crater and perforation damage of a multisheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multisheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  7. A novel three-jet microreactor for localized metal-organic chemical vapour deposition of gallium arsenide: design and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel three-jet microreactor design for localized deposition of gallium arsenide (GaAs) by low-pressure Metal-Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD) for semiconductor devices, microelectronics and solar cells. Our approach is advantageous compared to the standard lithography and etching technology, since it preserves the nanostructure of the deposited material, it is less time-consuming and less expensive. We designed two versions of reactor geometry with a 10-micron central microchannel for precursor supply and with two side jets of a dilutant to control the deposition area. To aid future experiments, we performed computational modeling of a simplified-geometry (twodimensional axisymmetric) microreactor, based on Navier-Stokes equations for a laminar flow of chemically reacting gas mixture of Ga(CH3)3-AsH3-H2. Simulation results show that we can achieve a high-rate deposition (over 0.3 μm/min) on a small area (less than 30 μm diameter). This technology can be used in material production for microelectronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, solar cells, etc.

  8. Shock tunnel measurements of hypervelocity blunted cone drag

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, L.M.; Paull, A.; Mee, D.J.; Simmons, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    Presented here are results obtained from an investigation into the effects of nose bluntness on slender cone drag in the hypervelocity flight regime. The results indicate that, for small cone angles, the drag of a blunt cone is reasonably well predicted by the Newtonian sine-square law modified for blunt bodies. This suggests the absence of any real gas effects on the total drag. The effect of nose bluntness at the smaller bluntness ratios is relatively small. This is encouraging for the design of a hypervelocity space plane or a centerbody for an axisymmetric scramjet where a slightly blunted nose is required to reduce stagnation point heating. 7 refs.

  9. In-flight detection of small hypervelocity particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. M.; Goad, J. H.; Chu, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    A technique is described in which small (25-micron) hypervelocity (10-km/sec) in-flight particles can be detected in the presence of high background noise. The system is based on a spatial filtering principle whereby spurious noise effects are reduced by use of a beam stop in the entrance aperture of the system and a bandpass filter in the transform plane. A theoretical analysis of the system is presented, and some experimental results are obtained by detecting in-flight hypervelocity particles generated by an exploding lithium wire electrothermal accelerator.

  10. Burst Pressure Failure of Titanium Tanks Damaged by Secondary Plumes from Hypervelocity Impacts on Aluminum Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry; Ghosn, Louis; Christiansen, Eric; Davis, B. Alan; Keddy, Chris; Rodriquez, Karen; Miller, Joshua; Bohl, William

    2011-01-01

    Metallic pressure tanks used in space missions are inherently vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris; thereby knowledge of impact damage and its effect on the tank integrity is crucial to a spacecraft risk assessment. This paper describes tests that have been performed to assess the effects of hypervelocity impact (HVI) damage on Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) pressure vessels burst pressure and characteristics. The tests consisted of a pair of HVI impact tests on water-filled Ti-6Al-4V tanks (water being used as a surrogate to the actual propellant) and subsequent burst tests as well as a burst test on an undamaged control tank. The tanks were placed behind Aluminum (Al) shields and then each was impacted with a 7 km/s projectile. The resulting impact debris plumes partially penetrated the Ti-6Al-4V tank surfaces resulting in a distribution of craters. During the burst tests, the tank that failed at a lower burst pressure did appear to have the failure initiating at a crater site with observed spall cracks. A fracture mechanics analysis showed that the tanks failure at the impact location may have been due to a spall crack that formed upon impact of a fragmentation on the Titanium surface. This result was corroborated with a finite element analysis from calculated Von-Mises and hoop stresses.

  11. The velocity distribution of hypervelocity stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Elena M.; Kobayashi, Shiho; Sari, Re'em

    2014-11-10

    We consider the process of stellar binaries tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH). For highly eccentric orbits, as one star is ejected from the three-body system, the companion remains bound to the BH. Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) observed in the Galactic halo and S-stars observed orbiting the central BH may originate from such mechanism. In this paper, we predict the velocity distribution of the ejected stars of a given mass, after they have traveled out of the Galactic potential. We use both analytical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. We find that each part of the velocity distribution encodes different information. At low velocities <800 km s{sup –1}, the Galactic potential universally shapes the observed distribution, which rises toward a peak, related to the Galactic escape velocity. Beyond the peak, the velocity distribution depends on binary mass and separation distributions. Finally, the finite star life introduces a break related to their mass. A qualitative comparison of our models with current observations shows the great potential of HVSs to constrain bulge and Galactic properties. Standard choices for parameter distributions predict velocities below and above ∼800 km s{sup –1} with equal probability, while none are observed beyond ∼700 km s{sup –1} and the current detections are more clustered at low velocities 300-400 km s{sup –1}. These features may indicate that the separation distribution of binaries that reach the tidal sphere is not flat in logarithmic space, as observed in more local massive binaries, but has more power toward larger separations, enhancing smaller velocities. In addition, the binary formation/evolution process or the injection mechanism might also induce a cut-off a {sub min} ∼ 10 R {sub ☉} in the separation distribution.

  12. Flowfield Establishment and Unsteadiness in Hypervelocity Double Wedge Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swantek, A. B.; Knisely, A. M.; Austin, J. M.

    Significant discrepancies between experiments and simulations have been reported in the normalized establishment times for hypervelocity double wedge and double cone flows. Experimental results for flow establishment times based on heat transfer measurements have been reported by Holden and Mallinson, Gai, and Mudford [1, 2].

  13. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact: Consulting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A portion of the contract NAS8-38856, 'Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts,' from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), included consulting which was to be documented in the final report. This attachment to the final report contains memos produced as part of that consulting.

  14. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

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  15. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

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  16. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

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  17. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  18. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  19. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  20. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

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  1. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

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  2. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

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  3. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  4. Survey of the hypervelocity impact technology and applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra; Orphal, Dennis L.

    2006-05-01

    HVIS 2005 was a clear success. The Symposium brought together nearly two hundred active researchers and students from thirteen countries around the world. The 84 papers presented at HVIS 2005 constitute an ''update'' on current research and the state-of-the-art of hypervelocity science. Combined with the over 7000 pages of technical papers from the eight previous Symposia, beginning in 1986, all published in the International Journal of Impact Engineering, the papers from HVIS 2005 add to the growing body of knowledge and the progressing state-of-the-art of hypervelocity science. It is encouraging to report that even with the limited funding resources compared to two decades ago, creativity and ingenuity in hypervelocity science are alive and well. There is considerable overlap in different disciplines that allows researchers to leverage. Experimentally, higher velocities are now available in the laboratory and are ideally suited for space applications that can be tied to both civilian (NASA) and DoD military applications. Computationally, there is considerable advancement both in computer and modeling technologies. Higher computing speeds and techniques such as parallel processing allow system level type applications to be addressed directly today, much in contrast to the situation only a few years ago. Needless to say, both experimentally and computationally, the ultimate utility will depend on the curiosity and the probing questions that will be incumbent upon the individual researcher. It is quite satisfying that over two dozen students attended the symposium. Hopefully this is indicative of a good pool of future researchers that will be needed both in the government and civilian industries. It is also gratifying to note that novel thrust areas exploring different and new material phenomenology relevant to hypervelocity impact, but a number of other applications as well, are being pursued. In conclusion, considerable progress is still being made that is

  5. Hypervelocity Impact Initiation of Explosive Transfer Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Michael D.; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    The Gemini, Apollo and Space Shuttle spacecraft utilized explosive transfer lines (ETL) in a number of applications. In each case the ETL was located behind substantial structure and the risk of impact initiation by micrometeoroids and orbital debris was negligible. A current NASA program is considering an ETL to synchronize the actuation of pyrobolts to release 12 capture latches in a contingency. The space constraints require placing the ETL 50 mm below the 1 mm thick 2024-T72 Whipple shield. The proximity of the ETL to the thin shield prompted analysts at NASA to perform a scoping analysis with a finite-difference hydrocode to calculate impact parameters that would initiate the ETL. The results suggest testing is required and a 12 shot test program with surplused Shuttle ETL is scheduled for February 2012 at the NASA White Sands Test Facility. Explosive initiation models are essential to the analysis and one exists in the CTH library for HNS I, but not the HNS II used in the Shuttle 2.5 gr/ft rigid shielded mild detonating cord (SMDC). HNS II is less sensitive than HNS I so it is anticipated that these results using the HNS I model are conservative. Until the hypervelocity impact test results are available, the only check on the analysis was comparison with the Shuttle qualification test result that a 22 long bullet would not initiate the SMDC. This result was reproduced by the hydrocode simulation. Simulations of the direct impact of a 7 km/s aluminum ball, impacting at 0 degree angle of incidence, onto the SMDC resulted in a 1.5 mm diameter ball initiating the SMDC and 1.0 mm ball failing to initiate it. Where one 1.0 mm ball could not initiate the SMDC, a cluster of six 1.0 mm diameter aluminum balls striking simultaneously could. Thus the impact parameters that will result in initiating SMDC located behind a Whipple shield will depend on how well the shield fragments the projectile and spreads the fragments. An end-to-end simulation of the impact of an

  6. Emission FTIR analyses of thin microscopic patches of jet fuel residue deposited on heated metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Vogel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Deposits laid down in patches on metal strips in a high pressure/high temperature fuel system simulator operated with aerated fuel at varying flow rates were analyzed by emission FTIR in terms of functional groups. Significant differences were found in the spectra and amounts of deposits derived from fuels to which small concentrations of oxygen-, nitrogen-, or sulfur-containing heterocyclics or metal naphthenates were added. The spectra of deposits generated on strips by heating fuels and air in a closed container were very different from those of the flowing fluid deposits. One such closed-container dodecane deposit on silver gave a strong surface-enhanced Raman spectrum.

  7. Vapor Explosion of Coolant Jet When Penetrating a Hot Molten Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Perets, Y.; Harari, R.; Sher, E.

    2005-06-15

    The vapor explosion phenomenon is investigated experimentally for a geometrical arrangement in which a cold liquid (water) jet is injected into a hot liquid surface (tin). Medium-scale experiments using 1 kg of molten tin were performed in an open geometry experiment system. In the first phase of the research, the influence of the injection mass flow rate on the likelihood of vapor explosion was investigated in order to map the various relevant regimes. In the second phase, the influence of some selected parameters on the interaction was studied to characterize the relevant parameters of the vapor explosion phenomenon.The range of the initial tin and water temperatures that leads to vapor explosion has been determined in order to define the thermal interaction zone. It is noticed that vapor explosion can occur at high water temperatures even near the saturation point. The delay time for the explosion to occur and the degree of the interaction violence were correlated with the initial tin and water temperatures. We also clarified the triggering point and noted a correlation between the quench temperature and the likelihood of the vapor explosion occurrence.

  8. High strain rate and high temperature behaviour of metallic materials for jet engine turbine containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, F.; Cendón, D.; Enfedaque, A.; Sánchez-Gálvez, V.

    2006-08-01

    This work presents a study on the mechanical characterisation of the materials involved in air jet engine turbines. The final objective is to analyse the phenomenon of a turbine blade off failure, to verify the requirements of the case containment. The materials in the turbine are under high temperatures, ranging from 400circC to 800circC and when the fail of the blade occurs if impacts against the case, reaching strain rates up to 103 s - 1. To obtain the behaviour of the materials, testing at high strain rate and high temperature at one time is necessary. The experimental set-up used was a split Hopkinson pressure bar, with a high temperature furnace adapted. The bars used on the device were high strength nickel alloys with a cooling system to decrease the temperature of the measurement devices. The effect of wave dispersion due to the temperature gradient has been also studied to correct the measurements if necessary. The material tested has been the FV535 stainless steel used on the case. The full stress-strain curves at different temperatures and at strain rates up to 103 s-1 have been obtained. The experimental results show a marked influence of the strain rate and the temperature that cannot be neglected. The Johnson-Cook material model has been used to fit the results of the material tests.

  9. Hypervelocity nanoparticle impacts on free-standing graphene: A sui generis mode of sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Eller, Michael J.; Della-Negra, Serge; Kim, Hansoo; Young, Amanda E.

    2015-01-28

    The study of the interaction of hypervelocity nano-particles with a 2D material and ultra-thin targets (single layer graphene, multi-layer graphene, and amorphous carbon foils) has been performed using mass selected gold nano-particles produced from a liquid metal ion source. During these impacts, a large number of atoms are ejected from the graphene, corresponding to a hole of ∼60 nm{sup 2}. Additionally, for the first time, secondary ions have been observed simultaneously in both the transmission and reflection direction (with respect to the path of the projectile) from a 2D target. The ejected area is much larger than that predicted by molecular dynamic simulations and a large ionization rate is observed. The mass distribution and characteristics of the emitted secondary ions are presented and offer an insight into the process to produce the large hole observed in the graphene.

  10. Hypervelocity Impact Experiments on Epoxy/Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Composite Panels Reinforced with Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatiwada, Suman; Laughman, Jay W.; Armada, Carlos A.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Barrera, Enrique V.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composites with multi-functional capabilities are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) reinforced with high strength fibers provide a lightweight and high strength alternative to metals and metal alloys conventionally used in aerospace architectures. Novel reinforcements such as nanofillers offer potential to improve the mechanical properties and add multi-functionality such as radiation resistance and sensing capabilities to the PMCs. This paper reports the hypervelocity impact (HVI) test results on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber composites reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT). Woven UHMWPE fabrics, in addition to providing excellent impact properties and high strength, also offer radiation resistance due to inherent high hydrogen content. SWCNT have exceptional mechanical and electrical properties. BNNT (figure 1) have high neutron cross section and good mechanical properties that add multi-functionality to this system. In this project, epoxy based UHMWPE composites containing SWCNT and BNNT are assessed for their use as bumper shields and as intermediate plates in a Whipple Shield for HVI resistance. Three composite systems are prepared to compare against one another: (I) Epoxy/UHMWPE, (II) Epoxy/UHMWPE/SWCNT and (III) Epoxy/UHMWPE/SWCNT/BNNT. Each composite is a 10.0 by 10.0 by 0.11 cm3 panel, consisting of 4 layers of fabrics arranged in cross-ply orientation. Both SWCNT and BNNT are 0.5 weight % of the fabric preform. Hypervelocity impact tests are performed using a two-stage light gas gun at Rice University

  11. The Rayleigh-Plateau instability and jet formation during the extrusion of liquid metal from craters in a vacuum arc cathode spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesyats, G. A.; Zubarev, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the displacement of molten metal from a crater being formed on the cathode during the operation of a vacuum arc under the pressure of the cathode plasma and formulate a criterion for the formation of a thin ridge of expelled liquid metal (a sheet-like jet) at the crater edge. When the ridge height is substantially greater than its thickness, conditions arise for the development of the Rayleigh-Plateau capillary instability, which breaks the axial symmetry of the problem. Estimates are presented, which suggest that this instability is responsible for the breakup of the liquid ridge into jets, which play an important role in the self-sustained operation of a discharge.

  12. Quantitative analysis of toxic metals lead and cadmium in water jet by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheri, M. Sadegh; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2011-03-20

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the analysis of toxic metals Pb and Cd in Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Cd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O aqueous solutions, respectively. The plasma is generated by focusing a nanosecond Nd:YAG ({lambda}=1064 nm) laser on the surface of liquid in the homemade liquid jet configuration. With an assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), calibration curves of Pb and Cd were obtained at different delay times between 1 to 5 {mu}s. The temporal behavior of limit of detections (LOD) was investigated and it is shown that the minimum LODs for Pb and Cd are 4 and 68 parts in 10{sup 6} (ppm), respectively. In order to demonstrate the correctness of the LTE assumption, plasma parameters including plasma temperature and electron density are evaluated, and it is shown that the LTE condition is satisfied at all delay times.

  13. Flash characteristics of plasma induced by hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Long, Renrong; Zhang, Qingming; Xue, Yijiang; Ju, Yuanyuan

    2016-08-01

    Using a two-stage light gas gun, a series of hypervelocity impact experiments was conducted in which 6.4-mm-diameter spherical 2024-aluminum projectiles impact 23-mm-thick targets made of the same material at velocities of 5.0, 5.6, and 6.3 km/s. Both an optical pyrometer composed of six photomultiplier tubes and a spectrograph were used to measure the flash of the plasma during hypervelocity impact. Experimental results show that, at a projectile velocity of 6.3 km/s, the strong flash lasted about 10 μs and reached a temperature of 4300 K. Based on the known emission lines of AL I, spectral methods can provide the plasma electron temperature. An electron-temperature comparison between experiment and theoretical calculation indicates that single ionization and secondary ionization are the two main ionizing modes at velocities 5.0-6.3 km/s.

  14. Hypervelocity impact response of aluminum multi-wall structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Bean, Alan J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of an investigation in which the perforation resistance of aluminum multiwall structures is analyzed under a variety of hypervelocity impact loading conditions are presented. A comparative analysis of the impact damage in structural systems with two or more bumpers and the damage in single-bumper systems of similar weight is performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of employing more than one bumper in structural wall systems for long-duration spacecraft. A significant increase in protection against perforation by hypervelocity projectiles can be achieved if a single bumper is replaced by two bumpers of similar weight while the total wall spacing is kept constant. It is found that increasing the number of bumpers beyond two while keeping the total stand-off distance constant does not result in a substantial increase in protection over that offered by two bumpers of similar weight.

  15. A new technique for ground simulation of hypervelocity debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roybal, R.; Shively, J.; Stein, C.; Miglionico, C.; Robertson, R.

    1995-01-01

    A series of hypervelocity damage experiments were preformed on spacecraft materials. These experiments employed a technique which accelerates micro flyer plates simulating space debris traveling at 3 to 8 km/sec. The apparatus used to propel the micro flyer plates was compact and fit well into a space environmental chamber equipped with instrumentation capable of analyzing the vapor ejected from the sample. Mechanical damage to the sample was also characterized using optical and scanning electron microscpopy. Data for this work was obtained from hypervelocity impacts on a polysulfone resin and a graphite polysulfone composite. Polysulfone was selected because it was flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) which spent several years in low earth orbit (LEO). Chemistry of the vapor produced by the impact was analyzed with a time of flight mass spectrometer, (TOFMS). This represents the first time that ejected vapors from hypervelocity collisions were trapped and analyzed with a mass spectrometer. With this approach we are able to study changes in the vapor chemistry as a function of time after impact, obtain a velocity measurement of the vapor, and estimate a temperature of the surface at time of impact using dynamic gas equations. Samples of the vapor plume may be captured and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Studies were also conducted to determine mechanical damage to a graphite polysulfone composite and a polysulfone resin. Impact craters were examined under optical and scanning electron microscopes. The collision craters in the matrix were typical of those shown in conventional shock experiments. However, the hypervelocity collisions with the graphite polysulfone composite were remarkably different than those with the resin.

  16. Hypervelocity supersonic nozzle beam source of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, A.; Unkel, W.; Silver, J.; Kolb, C.

    1984-01-01

    A hypervelocity source of atomic oxygen was developed. Dissociation of molecular oxygen is accomplished by injection into a flow of helium and/or argon which has been heated in a commercial plasma torch. Atomic velocities of up to 4 kms(-1) were produced; recent improvements offer the possibility of even higher velocities. This source was utilized in studies of translational-to-vibrational energy transfer in carbon dioxide and in an investigation of the shuttle glow effect.

  17. Hypervelocity impact simulation for micrometeorite and debris shield design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1992-01-01

    A new capability has been developed for direct computer simulation of hypervelocity impacts on multi-plate orbital debris shields, for combinations of low shield thickness and wide shield spacing which place extreme demands on conventional Eulerian analysis techniques. The modeling methodology represents a novel approach to debris cloud dynamics simulation, a problem of long term interest in the design of space structures. Software implementation of the modeling methodology provides a new design tool for engineering analysis of proposed orbital debris protection systems.

  18. Distributed energy store powered railguns for hypervelocity launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Brian L.; Bauer, David P.; Marshall, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly distributed power supplies are proposed as a basis for current difficulties with hypervelocity railgun power-supply compactness. This distributed power supply configuration reduces rail-to-rail voltage behind the main armature, thereby reducing the tendency for secondary armature current formation; secondary current elimination is essential for achieving the efficiencies associated with muzzle velocity above 6 km/sec. Attention is given to analytical and experimental results for two distributed energy storage schemes.

  19. Jet formation in spallation of metal film from substrate under action of femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Inogamov, N. A.; Zhakhovskii, V. V.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2015-01-15

    It is well known that during ablation by an ultrashort laser pulse, the main contribution to ablation of the substance is determined not by evaporation, but by the thermomechanical spallation of the substance. For identical metals and pulse parameters, the type of spallation is determined by film thickness d{sub f}. An important gauge is metal heating depth d{sub T} at the two-temperature stage, at which electron temperature is higher than ion temperature. We compare cases with d{sub f} < d{sub T} (thin film) and d{sub f} ≫ d{sub T} (bulk target). Radius R{sub L} of the spot of heating by an optical laser is the next (after d{sub f}) important geometrical parameter. The morphology of film bulging in cases where d{sub f} < d{sub T} on the substrate (blistering) changes upon a change in radius R{sub L} in the range from diffraction limit R{sub L} ∼ λ to high values of R{sub L} ≫ λ, where λ ∼ 1 μm is the wavelength of optical laser radiation. When d{sub f} < d{sub T}, R{sub L} ∼ λ, and F{sub abs} > F{sub m}, gold film deposited on the glass target acquires a cupola-shaped blister with a miniature frozen nanojet in the form of a tip on the circular top of the cupola (F{sub abs} and F{sub m} are the absorbed energy and the melting threshold of the film per unit surface area of the film). A new physical mechanism leading to the formation of the nanojet is proposed.

  20. Theoretical and numerical predictions of hypervelocity impact-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianqiao; Song, Weidong Ning, Jianguo

    2014-08-15

    The hypervelocity impact generated plasmas (HVIGP) in thermodynamic non-equilibrium state were theoretically analyzed, and a physical model was presented to explore the relationship between plasma ionization degree and internal energy of the system by a group of equations including a chemical reaction equilibrium equation, a chemical reaction rate equation, and an energy conservation equation. A series of AUTODYN 3D (a widely used software in dynamic numerical simulations and developed by Century Dynamic Inc.) numerical simulations of the impacts of hypervelocity Al projectile on its targets at different incident angles were performed. The internal energy and the material density obtained from the numerical simulations were then used to calculate the ionization degree and the electron temperature. Based on a self-developed 2D smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code and the theoretical model, the plasmas generated by 6 hypervelocity impacts were directly simulated and their total charges were calculated. The numerical results are in good agreements with the experimental results as well as the empirical formulas, demonstrating that the theoretical model is justified by the AUTODYN 3D and self-developed 2D SPH simulations and applicable to predict HVIGPs. The study is of significance for astrophysical and cosmonautic researches and safety.

  1. Hyper-velocity impact risk assessment study for LOFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perinati, Emanuele

    Within the ESA Cosmic Vision programme, the Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) mission is one of the candidates for the M3 slot opportunity. LOFT is an x-ray (2-30 keV) experiment with two instruments on-board: the Large Area Detector (LAD) and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM). Both are based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs). Due to the design of the instrumental configuration, hyper-velocity impacts of micrometeoroids and orbital debris represent a significant hazard factor. During the three-year assessment phase of LOFT, we performed experimental test campaigns at the MPIK Van de Graaff accelerator to measure the degradation of LOFT SDD prototypes induced by hyper-velocity impacts. For the WFM, to mitigate the impact risk we designed and tested at the TUM plasma accelerator a compact double-wall shield using thin (~10 micron) foils of Kapton and Polypropylene, capable to effectively stop hyper-velocity particles up to 70 micron in size, in a remarkable agreement with simulations performed in ESABASE2. We present the results of these activities in the context of LOFT, and brievly discuss the potential applicability of the SDD as a debris detector.

  2. Experimental hypervelocity impact effects on simulated planetesimal materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tedeschi, W.J.; Schulze, J.F.; Remo, J.L.; Young, R.P. Jr

    1994-08-01

    Experimental results are presented from a series of hypervelocity impact tests on simulated comet and asteroid materials for the purpose of characterizing their response to hypervelocity kinetic energy impacts. Nine tests were conducted at the Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) S1 Range Facility on ice, rock, and iron target samples using a spherical 2.39 mm diameter aluminum impactor (0.0192 gm) at impact velocities of from 7.6 to 8.4 km/sec. The test objectives were to collect target response phenomenology data on cratering, momentum deposition and enhancement, target fragmentation, and material response under hypervelocity impact loading conditions. A carefully designed ballistic pendulum was used to measure momentum deposition into the targets. Observations and measurements of the impacted samples provide important insights into the response of these materials to kinetic energy impacts, especially in regards to unexpectedly large measured values of momentum enhancement to some of the targets. Such information is required to allow us to successfully deflect or fragment comets or asteroids which might someday be detected on collision trajectories with Earth.

  3. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: High-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Lundstroem, Ulf; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. Methods: The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga/In/Sn alloy and the other an In/Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with {approx}7 {mu}m x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. Results: High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 {mu}m bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. Conclusions: This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  4. Impact features tracing hypervelocity airbursts on earth from the atmosphere to the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    In the absence of deep craters, impact features have been debated to possibly tracing proximal ejecta from yet undetected structure or airburst debris from a meteorite collision with the terrestrial atmosphere or lithosphere. We examine the possibility for impact features to have originated from the shock layer formed ahead of a hypervelocity collider in the earth atmosphere. This hypothesis is approached by comparing impact features from controlled materials to puzzling geological ones: (1) debris collected at the ground from a high altitude meteor airburst recorded on 2011 August 2nd in Southern France; (2) laboratory experiments performed for defense purposes at the CEA Gramat Center (France) with the Persephone hypervelocity light gas gun; (3) the Zhamanshin impact breccia, the Lybian glass, the Egyptian Dakhleh glass, the Tasmanian Darwin glass, the Australasian tektite strewnfield and the Australian Henbury crater field. The Persephone experiments include collisions from 4.1 to 7.9 km/s by a steel projectile embedded into a polycarbonate holder with a polystyrene separator on to a 40 mm thick aluminum target. The impact features been characterized by coupling Environmental SEM with EDS, Raman micro-spectrometry, XRD, TEM, Tof-SIMS, ICP-MS and isotope analyses. Similar carbonaceous polymorphs that are closely imbricated at meso to nano-scales to the crystallized components (including the metal blebs) and to the glass phases (spherules or matrix) are present in all the impact features studied. They dominantly consist of aliphatic polymers, rare aromatic compounds, with graphite-lonsdaleite inclusions. The Persephone experiments help relating the graphite-lonsdaleite couple to transformed organic residues by the transient high pressure shock (a few tens MPa) and the transient heating (ca 100°C) and the aliphatic polymers to new hydrocarbons that formed from the pulverized polycarbonate and polystyrene. The Persephone experiments provide the controlled situation

  5. Elemental analyses of hypervelocity micro-particle impact sites on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. R.; Wortman, Jim J.

    1992-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity micro-particles that struck the active sensors with enough energy to breakdown the 0.4 to 1.0 micron thick SiO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. These discharge features, which include 50 micron diameter areas where the aluminum top layer has been vaporized, facilitate the location of the impacts. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allow detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of micro-particle impact sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts are corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results are used to classify the particles' origins as 'manmade', 'natural' or 'indeterminate'. The last classification results from the presence of too little impactor residue (a frequent occurrence on leading edge impacts), analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon residue, the limited usefulness of data on aluminum in the central craters, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters, of these features. A

  6. Hypervelocity Launcher for Aerothermodynamic Experiments. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, Timothy J.; Bauer, David P.

    1995-01-01

    The capability of an Ultra Distributed Energy Store System (UDESS) powered electromagnetic launcher (EM) is experimentally assessed. The UDESS system was developed specifically to address the velocity speed limit seen in plasma armature EM launchers. Metal armature launch packages were also developed and tested to assess the usefulness of the UDESS concept for low velocity applications.

  7. Deposition in the inner and outer corners of the JET divertor with carbon wall and metallic ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, J.; Widdowson, A.; Heinola, K.; Baron-Wiechec, A.; Gibson, K. J.; Coad, J. P.; Alves, E.; Lipschultz, B.; Kirschner, A.; Esser, H. G.; Matthews, G. F.; Brezinsek, S.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Rotating collectors and quartz microbalances (QMBs) are used in JET to provide time-dependent measurements of erosion and deposition. Rotation of collector discs behind apertures allows recording of the long term evolution of deposition. QMBs measure mass change via the frequency deviations of vibrating quartz crystals. These diagnostics are used to investigate erosion/deposition during JET-C carbon operation and JET-ILW (ITER-like wall) beryllium/tungsten operation. A simple geometrical model utilising experimental data is used to model the time-dependent collector deposition profiles, demonstrating good qualitative agreement with experimental results. Overall, the JET-ILW collector deposition is reduced by an order of magnitude relative to JET-C, with beryllium replacing carbon as the dominant deposit. However, contrary to JET-C, in JET-ILW there is more deposition on the outer collector than the inner. This reversal of deposition asymmetry is investigated using an analysis of QMB data and is attributed to the different chemical properties of carbon and beryllium.

  8. Ink jet printing of silver metallization for photovoltaics: Final technical report for the period 10/1/84 through 9/30/86

    SciTech Connect

    Vest, R.W.

    1986-09-30

    A computer controlled ink jet printing system for depositing any desired pattern of conductor lines was developed. Major changes were made in the ink supply and pressure control systems and in all electronic sub-systems for pulsing the spray head and driving the positioning table. A personal computer was integrated into the system. The preferred ink was identified, and the effects of ink viscosity, drop frequency, pulse voltage and nozzle diameter on line definition and ink flow rate were experimentally determined. A theoretical model for ink flow rate was developed, and the agreement between theory and experiment was determined. The characteristics of solar cells metallized by the ink jet printing system were evaluated. (LEW)

  9. A hypervelocity projectile launcher for well perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J.N.; Fugelso, L.E.; Lagner, G.C.; Burns, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    Current oil well perforation techniques use low- to medium-velocity gun launchers for completing wells in soft rock. Shaped-charge jets are normally used in harder, more competent rock. A device to create a much higher velocity projectile was designed. This launcher will provide an alternative technique to be used when the conventional devices do not yield the maximum well performance. It is an adaptation of the axial cavity in a high explosive (HE) annulus design, with the axial cavity being filled with a low density foam material. Two configurations were tested; both had an HE annulus filled with organic foam, one had a projectile. Comparison of the two shots was made. A time sequence of Image Intensifier Camera photographs and sequential, orthogonal flash x-ray radiographs provided information on the propagation of the foam fragments, the first shock wave disturbance, the projectile motion and deformation, and the direct shock wave transmission from the main HE charge. DYNA2D calculations were made to assist in the experimental interpretation. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S.; Ordonez, E.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Open cell metallic foam core sandwich panel structures are of interest for application in spacecraft micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields due to their novel form and advantageous structural and thermal performance. Repeated shocking as a result of secondary impacts upon individual foam ligaments during the penetration process acts to raise the thermal state of impacting projectiles ; resulting in fragmentation, melting, and vaporization at lower velocities than with traditional shielding configurations (e.g. Whipple shield). In order to characterize the protective capability of these structures, an extensive experimental campaign was performed by the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility, the results of which are reported in this paper. Although not capable of competing against the protection levels achievable with leading heavy shields in use on modern high-risk vehicles (i.e. International Space Station modules), metallic foam core sandwich panels are shown to provide a substantial improvement over comparable structural panels and traditional low weight shielding alternatives such as honeycomb sandwich panels and metallic Whipple shields. A ballistic limit equation, generalized in terms of panel geometry, is derived and presented in a form suitable for application in risk assessment codes.

  11. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  12. Matched asymptotic solutions for a hypervelocity atmospheric entry vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Chris F.; McInnes, Colin R.

    1993-10-01

    The trajectories of unguided hypervelocity atmospheric entry vehicles are investigated analytically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. Ballistic entry into the atmosphere of a spherical, non-rotating planet is solved for using both constant and velocity dependent drag coefficient models. The analytical solutions are used to predict a variety of re-entry parameters and comparisons are made with a variable drag coefficient numerical simulation. The derived relations represent a quick method of obtaining accurate trajectory data without the need for numerical computation and as such appear suitable for onboard guidance purposes.

  13. Status Report for the Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelison, Charles J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility, located at Ames Research Center, is NASA's only aeroballistic facility. During 1997, its model imaging and time history recording systems were the focus of a major refurbishment effort. Specifically the model detection, spark gap (light source); Kerr cell (high speed shuttering); and interval timer sub-systems were inspected, repaired, modified or replaced as required. These refurbishment efforts have fully restored the HFFAF's capabilities to a much better condition, comparable to what it was 15 years ago. Details of this refurbishment effort along with a brief discussion of future upgrade plans are presented.

  14. Hypervelocity dissociating flow over a spherically blunted cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togami, Kenji

    Recently several hypersonic vehicles are being developed in several countries. For the design of these vehicles, understanding the flow physics is necessary. Recently, the free piston driver for large shock tunnels became practical and it enables us to simulate the hypervelocity flow in the ground based facilities. Also the computing resources have grown dramatically and it enables us to compute the hypervelocity flow which is chemically and thermally nonequilibrium in a reasonable computation time. In this thesis the combined approach of experiment and computation has been applied to the hypervelocity flow on a spherically blunted cone.The experiments are conducted in the newly developed free piston shock tunnel called T5 at the Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories, California Institute of Technology. Three kinds of the gases, nitrogen, air and carbon dioxide are used. The flow fields are computed by a CFD code using the two temperature model by Park. Since the flow field in the experiments is visualized with the differential interferogram, the computed density field is used to generate the differential interferogram. It can be concluded that the two temperature model CFD code can reproduce the basic flow feature such as the inflection point in the shock wave.Heat transfer at the stagnation point is then examined. It correlates well with the equation by Fay and Riddell. Subsequently, the after body heat flux can be predicted by Lees' theory very well. The heat flux on after body is well correlated with Stanton number and local Reynolds number for each gas but the difference between the gases are significant. This is partly because the recombination plays a more important role in the after body flow. The results of the experiments and the computations points to the necessity of other correlation parameters for the after body heat transfer in hypervelocity flows.Then the difference between the shock tunnel experiment and actual flight was examined. The most dominant

  15. Hypervelocity impact testing of Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Ortega, Javier

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from a series of 22 hypervelocity impact tests carried out on the thermal protection system (TPS) for the Shuttle Orbiter. Both coated and uncoated low-density (0.14 g/cu cm) LI-900 and high-density (0.35 g/cu cm) LI-2200 tiles were tested. The results are used to develop the penetration and damage correlations which can be used in meteoroid and debris hazard analyses for spacecraft with a ceramic tile TPS. It is shown that tile coatings act as a 'bumper' to fragment the impacting projectile, with thicker coating providing increased protection.

  16. Modeling of an Implosion Driven Hypervelocity Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Szirti, Daniel; Batchelor, Patrick; Zhang, Fan; Tanguay, Vincent

    2007-06-01

    Modelling work carried out on the implosion driven launcher under concurrent development is presented. The launcher consists of a thin walled metal tube surrounded by explosive which when detonated pinches the tube shut and drives a strong shock into the projectile. The commercial hydrocode LS-DYNA was used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the design parameters of the launcher and their effect on implosion dynamics and performance. These parameters include fill pressure, tube diameter, explosive layer thickness, and explosives tampering. The launcher is primarily modeled using a quasi 2D Arbitrary Langrage Euler formulation. A full 3-D axisymmetric model is also employed. The model is evaluated against experimental data previously collected. Additional developmental work on a second stage launcher taking advantage of a phase velocity between the imploding tube and explosives via the use of angled flyer plates and cones is also carried out.

  17. Axial focusing of energy from a hypervelocity impact on earth

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Chael, E.P.; Trucano, T.G.; Crawford, D.A.

    1994-12-01

    We have performed computational simulations to determine how energy from a large hypervelocity impact on the Earth`s surface would couple to its interior. Because of the first-order axial symmetry of both the impact energy source and the stress-wave velocity structure of the Earth, a disproportionate amount of energy is dissipated along the axis defined by the impact point and its antipode (point opposite the impact). For a symmetric and homogeneous Earth model, all the impact energy that is radiated as seismic waves into the Earth at a given takeoff angle (ray parameter), independent of azimuthal direction, is refocused (minus attenuation) on the axis of symmetry, regardless of the number of reflections and refractions it has experienced. Material on or near the axis of symmetry experiences more strain cycles with much greater amplitude than elsewhere, and therefore experiences more irreversible heating. The focusing is most intense in the upper mantle, within the asthenosphere, where seismic energy is most effectively converted to heat. For a sufficiently energetic impact, this mechanism might generate enough local heating to create an isostatic instability leading to uplift, possibly resulting in rifting, volcanism, or other rearrangement of the interior dynamics of the planet. These simulations demonstrate how hypervelocity impact energy can be transported to the Earth`s interior, supporting the possibility of a causal link between large impacts on Earth and major internally-driven geophysical processes.

  18. An Imaging System for Satellite Hypervelocity Impact Debris Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moraguez, Matthew; Patankar, Kunal; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Liou, J.-C.; Cowardin, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of an automated imaging system for size characterization of debris produced by the DebriSat hypervelocity impact test. The goal of the DebriSat project is to update satellite breakup models. A representative LEO satellite, DebriSat, was constructed and subjected to a hypervelocity impact test. The impact produced an estimated 85,000 debris fragments. The size distribution of these fragments is required to update the current satellite breakup models. An automated imaging system was developed for the size characterization of the debris fragments. The system uses images taken from various azimuth and elevation angles around the object to produce a 3D representation of the fragment via a space carving algorithm. The system consists of N point-and-shoot cameras attached to a rigid support structure that defines the elevation angle for each camera. The debris fragment is placed on a turntable that is incrementally rotated to desired azimuth angles. The number of images acquired can be varied based on the desired resolution. Appropriate background and lighting is used for ease of object detection. The system calibration and image acquisition process are automated to result in push-button operations. However, for quality assurance reasons, the system is semi-autonomous by design to ensure operator involvement. This paper describes the imaging system setup, calibration procedure, repeatability analysis, and the results of the debris characterization.

  19. Survivability of bacteria ejected from icy surfaces after hypervelocity impact.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Mark J; Galloway, James A; Bunch, Alan W; Brandão, Pedro F B

    2003-02-01

    Both the Saturnian and Jovian systems contain satellites with icy surfaces. If life exists on any of these icy bodies (in putative subsurface oceans for example) then the possibility exists for transfer of life from icy body to icy body. This is an application of the idea of Panspermia, wherein life migrates naturally through space. A possible mechanism would be that life, here taken as bacteria, could become frozen in the icy surface of one body. If a high-speed impact occurred on that surface, ejecta containing the bacteria could be thrown into space. It could then migrate around the local region of space until it arrived at a second icy body in another high-speed impact. In this paper we consider some of the necessary steps for such a process to occur, concentrating on the ejection of ice bearing bacteria in the initial impact, and on what happens when bacteria laden projectiles hit an icy surface. Laboratory experiments using high-speed impacts with a light gas gun show that obtaining icy ejecta with viable bacterial loads is straightforward. In addition to demonstrating the viability of the bacteria carried on the ejecta, we have also measured the angular and size distribution of the ejecta produced in hypervelocity impacts on ice. We have however been unsuccessful at transferring viable bacteria to icy surfaces from bacteria laden projectiles impacting at hypervelocities. PMID:12967273

  20. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Nickel Hydrogen Battery Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frate, David T.; Nahra, Henry K.

    1996-01-01

    Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni/H2) battery cells have been used on several satellites and are planned for use on the International Space Station. In January 1992, the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) conducted hypervelocity impact testing on Ni/H2 cells to characterize their failure modes. The cell's outer construction was a 24 mil-thick Inconel 718 pressure vessel. A sheet of 1.27 cm thick honeycomb was placed in front of the battery cells during testing to simulate the on-orbit box enclosure. Testing was conducted at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). The hypervelocity gun used was a 7.6 mm (0.30 caliber) two-stage light gas gun. Test were performed at speeds of 3, 6, and 7 km/sec using aluminum 2017 spherical particles of either 4.8 or 6.4 mm diameter as the projectile. The battery cells were electrically charged to about 75 percent of capacity, then back-filled with hydrogen gas to 900 psi simulating the full charge condition. High speed film at 10,000 frames/sec was taken of the impacts. Impacts in the dome area (top) and the electrode area (middle) of the battery cells were investigated. Five tests on battery cells were performed. The results revealed that in all of the test conditions investigated, the battery cells simply vented their hydrogen gas and some electrolyte, but did not burst or generate any large debris fragments.

  1. Hyper-velocity impact experiments with electrostatic dust accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocker, Anna; Aust, Thomas; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hillier, Jonathan; Hornung, Klaus; Li, Yan-Wei; Strack, Heiko; Ralf, Srama

    2015-06-01

    Hypervelocity impacts (HVI) of micrometer-sized particles play an important role in a variety of fields such as the investigation of matter at extreme pressures and temperatures, shock waves in solid bodies, planetology and cosmic dust. The physical phenomena occurring upon impact are fragmentation and cratering, shock waves, the production of neutral and ionized gas, and light flashes. Advanced analysis techniques promise new insights into short time-scale high-pressure states of matter, requiring the production of high speed projectiles. Electrostatic accelerators act as a source of micrometer and sub-micrometer particles as projectiles for HVI experiments. This paper describes an HVI facility, capable of accelerating particles to over 100 km/s, currently located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, together with planned improvements. The facility is about to be relocated to the University of Stuttgart. This is an opportunity to enhance the facility to meet the requirements of future experimental campaigns, necessary to better understand the micrometeoroid hypervelocity impact process and develop new in situ dust experiments. We will present the design of the new facility and the planned enhancements, including new diagnostic apparatus.

  2. Survivability of bacteria ejected from icy surfaces after hypervelocity impact.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Mark J; Galloway, James A; Bunch, Alan W; Brandão, Pedro F B

    2003-02-01

    Both the Saturnian and Jovian systems contain satellites with icy surfaces. If life exists on any of these icy bodies (in putative subsurface oceans for example) then the possibility exists for transfer of life from icy body to icy body. This is an application of the idea of Panspermia, wherein life migrates naturally through space. A possible mechanism would be that life, here taken as bacteria, could become frozen in the icy surface of one body. If a high-speed impact occurred on that surface, ejecta containing the bacteria could be thrown into space. It could then migrate around the local region of space until it arrived at a second icy body in another high-speed impact. In this paper we consider some of the necessary steps for such a process to occur, concentrating on the ejection of ice bearing bacteria in the initial impact, and on what happens when bacteria laden projectiles hit an icy surface. Laboratory experiments using high-speed impacts with a light gas gun show that obtaining icy ejecta with viable bacterial loads is straightforward. In addition to demonstrating the viability of the bacteria carried on the ejecta, we have also measured the angular and size distribution of the ejecta produced in hypervelocity impacts on ice. We have however been unsuccessful at transferring viable bacteria to icy surfaces from bacteria laden projectiles impacting at hypervelocities.

  3. Survival of fossils under extreme shocks induced by hypervelocity impacts.

    PubMed

    Burchell, M J; McDermott, K H; Price, M C; Yolland, L J

    2014-08-28

    Experimental data are shown for survival of fossilized diatoms undergoing shocks in the GPa range. The results were obtained from hypervelocity impact experiments which fired fossilized diatoms frozen in ice into water targets. After the shots, the material recovered from the target water was inspected for diatom fossils. Nine shots were carried out, at speeds from 0.388 to 5.34 km s(-1), corresponding to mean peak pressures of 0.2-19 GPa. In all cases, fragmented fossilized diatoms were recovered, but both the mean and the maximum fragment size decreased with increasing impact speed and hence peak pressure. Examples of intact diatoms were found after the impacts, even in some of the higher speed shots, but their frequency and size decreased significantly at the higher speeds. This is the first demonstration that fossils can survive and be transferred from projectile to target in hypervelocity impacts, implying that it is possible that, as suggested by other authors, terrestrial rocks ejected from the Earth by giant impacts from space, and which then strike the Moon, may successfully transfer terrestrial fossils to the Moon. PMID:25071234

  4. Survival of fossils under extreme shocks induced by hypervelocity impacts

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, M. J.; McDermott, K. H.; Price, M. C.; Yolland, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data are shown for survival of fossilized diatoms undergoing shocks in the GPa range. The results were obtained from hypervelocity impact experiments which fired fossilized diatoms frozen in ice into water targets. After the shots, the material recovered from the target water was inspected for diatom fossils. Nine shots were carried out, at speeds from 0.388 to 5.34 km s−1, corresponding to mean peak pressures of 0.2–19 GPa. In all cases, fragmented fossilized diatoms were recovered, but both the mean and the maximum fragment size decreased with increasing impact speed and hence peak pressure. Examples of intact diatoms were found after the impacts, even in some of the higher speed shots, but their frequency and size decreased significantly at the higher speeds. This is the first demonstration that fossils can survive and be transferred from projectile to target in hypervelocity impacts, implying that it is possible that, as suggested by other authors, terrestrial rocks ejected from the Earth by giant impacts from space, and which then strike the Moon, may successfully transfer terrestrial fossils to the Moon. PMID:25071234

  5. Survival of fossils under extreme shocks induced by hypervelocity impacts.

    PubMed

    Burchell, M J; McDermott, K H; Price, M C; Yolland, L J

    2014-08-28

    Experimental data are shown for survival of fossilized diatoms undergoing shocks in the GPa range. The results were obtained from hypervelocity impact experiments which fired fossilized diatoms frozen in ice into water targets. After the shots, the material recovered from the target water was inspected for diatom fossils. Nine shots were carried out, at speeds from 0.388 to 5.34 km s(-1), corresponding to mean peak pressures of 0.2-19 GPa. In all cases, fragmented fossilized diatoms were recovered, but both the mean and the maximum fragment size decreased with increasing impact speed and hence peak pressure. Examples of intact diatoms were found after the impacts, even in some of the higher speed shots, but their frequency and size decreased significantly at the higher speeds. This is the first demonstration that fossils can survive and be transferred from projectile to target in hypervelocity impacts, implying that it is possible that, as suggested by other authors, terrestrial rocks ejected from the Earth by giant impacts from space, and which then strike the Moon, may successfully transfer terrestrial fossils to the Moon.

  6. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 3; WLE Small-Scale Fiberglass Panel Flat Target C-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Target C-1 was to study hypervelocity impacts on the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels of the Wing Leading Edge. Fiberglass was used in place of RCC in the initial tests. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  7. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 6; WLE High Fidelity Specimen Fg(RCC)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Target Fg(RCC)-2 was to study hypervelocity impacts through the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels of the Wing Leading Edge. Fiberglass was used in place of RCC in the initial tests. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  8. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 7; WLE High Fidelity Specimen RCC16R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Target RCC16R was to study hypervelocity impacts through the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels of the Wing Leading Edge. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  9. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 5; WLE High Fidelity Specimen Fg(RCC)-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Target Fg(RCC)-1 was to study hypervelocity impacts through the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels of the Wing Leading Edge. Fiberglass was used in place of RCC in the initial tests. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  10. A Plasma Drag Hypervelocity Particle Accelerator (HYPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Steve R.; Rose, M. Frank

    1998-01-01

    Current debris models are able to predict the growth of the space debris problem and suggest that spacecraft must employ armor or bumper shields for some orbital altitudes now and that the problem will become worse as a function of time. The practical upper limit to the velocity distribution is on the order of 40 km/s and is associated with the natural environment. The velocity distribution of the man-made component peaks at 9-10 km/s with maximum velocity in the 14-16 km/s range. Experience in space has verified that the "high probability of impact" particles are in the microgram to milligram range. These particles can have very significant effects on coatings, insulators, and thin metallic layers. The surface of thick materials becomes pitted and the local debris component is enhanced by ejecta from the impact events. In this paper, the HYPER facility is described which produces a reasonable simulation of the man-made space debris spectrum in a controlled environment. The facility capability is discussed in terms of drive geometry, energetics, velocity distribution, diagnostics, and projectile/debris loading. The facility has been used to study impact phenomena on Space Station Freedom's solar array structure, the calibration of space debris collectors, other solar array materials, potential structural materials for use in space, electrical breakdown in the space environment, and as a means of clarifying or duplicating the impact phenomena on surfaces which have been exposed in space.

  11. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric; Lear, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Metallic foams are a relatively new class of materials with low density and novel physical, mechanical, thermal, electrical and acoustic properties. Although incompletely characterized, they offer comparable mechanical performance to traditional spacecraft structural materials (i.e. honeycomb sandwich panels) without detrimental through-thickness channeling cells. There are two competing types of metallic foams: open cell and closed cell. Open cell foams are considered the more promising technology due to their lower weight and higher degree of homogeneity. Leading micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields (MMOD) incorporate thin plates separated by a void space (i.e. Whipple shield). Inclusion of intermediate fabric layers, or multiple bumper plates have led to significant performance enhancements, yet these shields require additional non-ballistic mass for installation (fasteners, supports, etc.) that can consume up to 35% of the total shield weight [1]. Structural panels, such as open cell foam core sandwich panels, that are also capable of providing sufficient MMOD protection, represent a significant potential for increased efficiency in hypervelocity impact shielding from a systems perspective through a reduction in required non-ballistic mass. In this paper, the results of an extensive impact test program on aluminum foam core sandwich panels are reported. The effect of pore density, and core thickness on shielding performance have been evaluated over impact velocities ranging from 2.2 - 9.3 km/s at various angles. A number of additional tests on alternate sandwich panel configurations of comparable-weight have also been performed, including aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels (see Figure 1), Nomex honeycomb core sandwich panels, and 3D aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels. A total of 70 hypervelocity impact tests are reported, from which an empirical ballistic limit equation (BLE) has been derived. The BLE is in the standard form suitable for implementation in

  12. Hypervelocity impact effects on solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. Frank

    1992-01-01

    One of the space hazards of concern is the problem of natural matter and space debris impacting spacecraft. In addition to mechanical damage, impact velocities greater than 5 km/sec can produce shock induced ionization effects with resultant surface charging and complex chemical interactions. The upper limit of the velocity distribution for these particles is on the order of 70 km/sec. The second source of particulate matter is due to the presence of man and the machinery needed to place satellites in orbit. This 'man made' component of the space debris consists of waste, rocket exhaust, and debris caused by satellite break-up. Most of the particles are small. However as the size increases, debris purposefully thrown overboard such as garbage and human waste, combined with paint chips, plastic, wire fragments, bolts, etc., become formidable hazards which completely dominate the distribution function for some orbits. These larger fragments can produce penetration and spalling of the thick metallic structures associated with spacecraft. The particles most often encountered are aluminum oxide, associated with fuel residue, and paint chips. These debris types can have a wide range of particle sizes. It has been stated that the design of spacecraft will have to take the debris evolution into account and provide additional suitable armor for key components in the near future. The purpose of this work was to subject samples from solar power arrays, one of the key components of any spacecraft, to a debris flux typical of what might be found in space, and measure the degradation of the power panels after impact.

  13. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of International Space Station Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Shielding Using an Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Justin H.; Grosch, Donald

    2001-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Johnson Space Center have conducted hypervelocity impact (HVI) performance evaluations of spacecraft meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) shields at velocities in excess of 7 km/s. The inhibited shaped charge launcher (ISCL), developed by the Southwest Research Institute, launches hollow, circular, cylindrical jet tips to approximately 11 km/s. Since traditional M/OD shield ballistic limit performance is defined as the diameter of sphere required to just perforate or spall a spacecraft pressure wall, engineers must decide how to compare ISCL derived data with those of the spherical impactor data set. Knowing the mass of the ISCL impactor, an equivalent sphere diameter may be calculated. This approach is conservative since ISCL jet tips are more damaging than equal mass spheres. A total of 12 tests were recently conducted at the Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) on International Space Station M/OD shields. Results of these tests are presented and compared to existing ballistic limit equations. Modification of these equations is suggested based on the results.

  14. Physics of debris clouds from hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph

    1993-01-01

    The protection scheme developed for long duration space platforms relies primarily upon placing thin metal plates or 'bumpers' around flight critical components. The effectiveness of this system is highly dependent upon its ability to break up and redistribute the momentum of any particle which might otherwise strike the outer surface of the spacecraft. Therefore it is of critical importance to design the bumpers such that maximum dispersion of momentum is achieved. This report is devoted to an in-depth study into the design and development of a laboratory instrument which would permit the in-situ monitoring of the momentum distribution as the impact event occurs. A series of four designs were developed, constructed and tested culminating with the working instrument which is currently in use. Each design was individually tested using the Space Environmental Effects Facility (SEEF) at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Along with the development of the device, an experimental procedure was developed to assist in the investigation of various bumper materials and designs at the SEEF. Preliminary results were used to compute data which otherwise were not experimentally obtainable. These results were shown to be in relative agreement with previously obtained values derived through other methods. The results of this investigation indicated that momentum distribution could in fact be measured in-situ as the impact event occurred thus giving a more accurate determination of the effects of experimental parameters on the momentum spread. Data produced by the instrument indicated a Gaussian-type momentum distribution. A second apparatus was developed and it was placed before the shield in the line of travel utilized a plate to collect impact debris scattered backwards. This plate had a passage hole in the center to allow the particle to travel through it and impact the proposed shield material. Applying the law of conservation of angular momentum a

  15. Subsurface Deformation of Experimental Hypervelocity Impacts in Non-Porous Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Poelchau, M. H.; Schäfer, F.; Kenkmann, T.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental hypervelocity impacts in quartzite and marble targets under similar impact conditions reveal great differences in impact induced deformation mechanisms, due to the dynamic mechanical properties of the main rock-forming minerals.

  16. Characterization of Orbital Debris via Hyper-Velocity Ground-Based Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the DebriSat project is to replicate a hyper-velocity fragmentation event using modern-day spacecraft materials and construction techniques to better improve the existing DoDand NASA breakup models.

  17. Elemental Analyses of Hypervelocity Microparticle Impact Sites on Interplanetary Dust Experiment Sensor Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, C. G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. A.; Wortman, J. J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity microparticles (approximately 0.2 to approximately 100 micron diameter) that struck the active sensors with enough energy to breakdown the 0.4 or 1.0 micron thick SiO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allowed detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of microparticle sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts were corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results classification resulted from the particles' origins as 'manmade', 'natural', or 'indeterminate'. The last classification resulted from the presence of too little impactor residue, analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon and aluminum residues, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters, of these features. Thus far, a total of 79 randomly selected microparticle impact sites from the six primary sides of the LDEF were analyzed: 36 from tray C-9 (Leading (ram), or east, side), 18 from tray C-3 (Trailing

  18. Elemental analyses of hypervelocity microparticle impact sites on Interplanetary Dust Experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. A.; Wortman, Jim J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity microparticles (approximately 0.2 to approximately 100 micron diameter) that struck the active sensors with enough energy to break down the 0.4 or 1.0 micron thick SIO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allowed detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of microparticle impact sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts were corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results were used to classify the particles' origins as 'manmade,' 'natural,' or 'indeterminate.' The last classification resulted from the presence of too little impactor residue, analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon and aluminum residues, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters of these features. Thus far a total of 79 randomly selected microparticle impact sites from the six primary sides of the LDEF have been analyzed: 36 from tray C-9 (Leading (ram), or East, side), 18 from tray C-3

  19. Design of orbital debris shields for oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1994-01-01

    A new impact debris propagation code was written to link CTH simulations of space debris shield perforation to the Lagrangian finite element code DYNA3D, for space structure wall impact simulations. This software (DC3D) simulates debris cloud evolution using a nonlinear elastic-plastic deformable particle dynamics model, and renders computationally tractable the supercomputer simulation of oblique impacts on Whipple shield protected structures. Comparison of three dimensional, oblique impact simulations with experimental data shows good agreement over a range of velocities of interest in the design of orbital debris shielding. Source code developed during this research is provided on the enclosed floppy disk. An abstract based on the work described was submitted to the 1994 Hypervelocity Impact Symposium.

  20. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts: Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, N. C.

    1996-01-01

    This handbook reviews the analysis of structural damage on spacecraft due to hypervelocity impacts by meteoroid and space debris. These impacts can potentially cause structural damage to a Space Station module wall. This damage ranges from craters, bulges, minor penetrations, and spall to critical damage associated with a large hole, or even rupture. The analysis of damage depends on a variety of assumptions and the area of most concern is at a velocity beyond well controlled laboratory capability. In the analysis of critical damage, one of the key questions is how much momentum can actually be transfered to the pressure vessel wall. When penetration occurs without maximum bulging at high velocity and obliquities (if less momentum is deposited in the rear wall), then large tears and rupture may be avoided. In analysis of rupture effects of cylindrical geometry, biaxial loading, bending of the crack, a central hole strain rate and R-curve effects are discussed.

  1. Study of hypervelocity meteoroid impact on orbital space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimbach, K. R.; Prozan, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Structural damage resulting in hypervelocity impact of a meteorite on a spacecraft is discussed. Of particular interest is the backside spallation caused by such a collision. To treat this phenomenon two numerical schemes were developed in the course of this study to compute the elastic-plastic flow fracture of a solid. The numerical schemes are a five-point finite difference scheme and a four-node finite element scheme. The four-node finite element scheme proved to be less sensitive to the type of boundary conditions and loadings. Although further development work is needed to improve the program versatility (generalization of the network topology, secondary storage for large systems, improving of the coding to reduce the run time, etc.), the basic framework is provided for a utilitarian computer program which may be used in a wide variety of situations. Analytic results showing the program output are given for several test cases.

  2. Applications of the ram accelerator to hypervelocity aerothermodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Knowlen, C.; Hertzberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    A ram accelerator used as a hypervelocity launcher for large-scale aeroballistic range applications in hypersonics and aerodynamics research is presented. It is an in-bore ramjet device in which a projectile shaped like the centerbody of a supersonic ramjet is propelled down a stationary tube filled with a tailored combustible gas mixture. Ram accelerator operation has been demonstrated at 39 mm and 90 mm bores, supporting the proposition that this launcher concept can be scaled up to very large bore diameters of the order of 30-60 cm. It is concluded that high quality data obtained from the tube wall and projectile during the aceleration process itself are very useful for understanding aerothermodynamics of hypersonic flow in general, and for providing important CFD validation benchmarks.

  3. Design of orbital debris shields for oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1994-02-01

    A new impact debris propagation code was written to link CTH simulations of space debris shield perforation to the Lagrangian finite element code DYNA3D, for space structure wall impact simulations. This software (DC3D) simulates debris cloud evolution using a nonlinear elastic-plastic deformable particle dynamics model, and renders computationally tractable the supercomputer simulation of oblique impacts on Whipple shield protected structures. Comparison of three dimensional, oblique impact simulations with experimental data shows good agreement over a range of velocities of interest in the design of orbital debris shielding. Source code developed during this research is provided on the enclosed floppy disk. An abstract based on the work described was submitted to the 1994 Hypervelocity Impact Symposium.

  4. Theoretical model for plasma expansion generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming Zhang, Dongjiang; Long, Renrong; Chen, Li; Huang, Fenglei; Gong, Zizheng

    2014-09-15

    The hypervelocity impact experiments of spherical LY12 aluminum projectile diameter of 6.4 mm on LY12 aluminum target thickness of 23 mm have been conducted using a two-stage light gas gun. The impact velocity of the projectile is 5.2, 5.7, and 6.3 km/s, respectively. The experimental results show that the plasma phase transition appears under the current experiment conditions, and the plasma expansion consists of accumulation, equilibrium, and attenuation. The plasma characteristic parameters decrease as the plasma expands outward and are proportional with the third power of the impact velocity, i.e., (T{sub e}, n{sub e}) ∝ v{sub p}{sup 3}. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model on the plasma expansion is developed and the theoretical results are consistent with the experimental data.

  5. Multi-Dimensional Hydrocode Analyses of Penetrating Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessette, G. C.; Lawrence, R. J.; Chhabildas, L. C.; Reinhart, W. D.; Thornhill, T. F.; Saul, W. V.

    2004-07-01

    The Eulerian hydrocode, CTH, has been used to study the interaction of hypervelocity flyer plates with thin targets at velocities from 6 to 11 km/s. These penetrating impacts produce debris clouds that are subsequently allowed to stagnate against downstream witness plates. Velocity histories from this latter plate are used to infer the evolution and propagation of the debris cloud. This analysis, which is a companion to a parallel experimental effort, examined both numerical and physics-based issues. We conclude that numerical resolution and convergence are important in ways we had not anticipated. The calculated release from the extreme states generated by the initial impact shows discrepancies with related experimental observations, and indicates that even for well-known materials (e.g., aluminum), high-temperature failure criteria are not well understood, and that non-equilibrium or rate-dependent equations of state may be influencing the results.

  6. Multi-dimensional hydrocode analyses of penetrating hypervelocity impacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Saul, W. Venner; Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Lawrence, Raymond Jeffery Jr.; Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra; Bessette, Gregory Carl

    2003-08-01

    The Eulerian hydrocode, CTH, has been used to study the interaction of hypervelocity flyer plates with thin targets at velocities from 6 to 11 km/s. These penetrating impacts produce debris clouds that are subsequently allowed to stagnate against downstream witness plates. Velocity histories from this latter plate are used to infer the evolution and propagation of the debris cloud. This analysis, which is a companion to a parallel experimental effort, examined both numerical and physics-based issues. We conclude that numerical resolution and convergence are important in ways we had not anticipated. The calculated release from the extreme states generated by the initial impact shows discrepancies with related experimental observations, and indicates that even for well-known materials (e.g., aluminum), high-temperature failure criteria are not well understood, and that non-equilibrium or rate-dependent equations of state may be influencing the results.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Interaction of Hypervelocity Particle Stream with a Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya; Liu, Benjamin; Georgevich, Vlad; Antoun, Tarabay

    2007-12-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulations of impact of hypervelocity particle stream with a target. The stream of interest consists of submillimeter (30-300 micron) brittle ceramic particles. Current supercomputer capabilities make it possible to simulate a realistic size of streams (up to 20 mm in diameter and 500 mm in length) while resolving each particle individually. Such simulations make possible to study the damage of the target from synergistic effects of individual impacts. In our research we fixed the velocity distribution along the axis of the stream (1-4 km/s) and volume fraction of the solid material (1-10%) and study effects of particle size variation, particle and target material properties and surrounding air properties. We ran 3D calibration simulations with up to 10 million individual particles and conducted sensitivity studies with 2D cylindrically symmetric simulations. We used an Eulerian Godunov hydrocode with adaptive mesh refinement. The particles, target material and air are represented with volume-of-fluid approach. Brittle particle and target material has been simulated with pressure-dependent yield strength and Steinberg model has been used for metal targets. Simulations demonstrated penetration depth and a hole diameter similar to experimental observations and can explain the influence of parameters of the stream on the character of the penetration.

  8. Numerical simulation of interaction of hypervelocity particle stream with a target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya; Liu, Benjamin; Georgevich, Vlad; Antoun, Tarabay

    2007-06-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulations of impact of hypervelocity particle stream with a target. The stream of interest consists of submillimeter (30-300 micron) brittle ceramic particles. Current supercomputer capabilities make it possible to simulate a realistic size of streams (up to 20 mm in diameter and 500 mm in length) while resolving each particle individually. Such simulations make possible to study the damage of the target from synergistic effects of individual impacts. In our research we fixed the velocity distribution along the axis of the stream (1-4 km/s) and volume fraction of the solid material (1-10%) and study effects of particle size variation, particle and target material properties and surrounding air properties. We ran 3D calibration simulations with up to 10 million individual particles and conducted sensitivity studies with 2D cylindrically symmetric simulations. We used an Eulerian Godunov hydrocode with adaptive mesh refinement. The particles, target material and air are represented with volume-of-fluid approach. Brittle particle and target material has been simulated with pressure-dependent yield strength and Steinberg model has been used for metal targets. Simulations demonstrated penetration depth and a hole diameter similar to experimental observations and can explain the influence of parameters of the stream on the character of the penetration.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Interaction of Hypervelocity Particle Stream with a Target

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Liu, B; Georgevich, V; Antoun, T

    2007-07-31

    We present results of direct numerical simulations of impact of hypervelocity particle stream with a target. The stream of interest consists of submillimeter (30-300 micron) brittle ceramic particles. Current supercomputer capabilities make it possible to simulate a realistic size of streams (up to 20 mm in diameter and 500 mm in length) while resolving each particle individually. Such simulations make possible to study the damage of the target from synergistic effects of individual impacts. In our research we fixed the velocity distribution along the axis of the stream (1-4 km/s) and volume fraction of the solid material (1-10%) and study effects of particle size variation, particle and target material properties and surrounding air properties. We ran 3D calibration simulations with up to 10 million individual particles and conducted sensitivity studies with 2D cylindrically symmetric simulations. We used an Eulerian Godunov hydrocode with adaptive mesh refinement. The particles, target material and air are represented with volume-of-fluid approach. Brittle particle and target material has been simulated with pressure-dependent yield strength and Steinberg model has been used for metal targets. Simulations demonstrated penetration depth and a hole diameter similar to experimental observations and can explain the influence of parameters of the stream on the character of the penetration.

  10. Mass spectrometry of hyper-velocity impacts of organic micrograins.

    PubMed

    Srama, Ralf; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Postberg, Frank; Armes, Steven P; Fujii, Syuji; Dupin, Damien; Ormond-Prout, Jonathan; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Kempf, Sascha; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Mocker, Anna; Grün, Eberhard

    2009-12-01

    The study of hyper-velocity impacts of micrometeoroids is important for the calibration of dust sensors in space applications. For this purpose, submicron-sized synthetic dust grains comprising either polystyrene or poly[bis(4-vinylthiophenyl)sulfide] were coated with an ultrathin overlayer of an electrically conductive organic polymer (either polypyrrole or polyaniline) and were accelerated to speeds between 3 and 35 km s(-1) using the Heidelberg Dust Accelerator facility. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied to analyse the resulting ionic impact plasma using a newly developed Large Area Mass Analyser (LAMA). Depending on the projectile type and the impact speed, both aliphatic and aromatic molecular ions and cluster species were identified in the mass spectra with masses up to 400 u. Clusters resulting from the target material (silver) and mixed clusters of target and projectile species were also observed. Impact velocities of between 10 and 35 km s(-1) are suitable for a principal identification of organic materials in micrometeoroids, whereas impact speeds below approximately 10 km s(-1) allow for an even more detailed analysis. Molecular ions and fragments reflect components of the parent molecule, providing determination of even complex organic molecules embedded in a dust grain. In contrast to previous measurements with the Cosmic Dust Analyser instrument, the employed LAMA instrument has a seven times higher mass resolution--approximately 200--which allowed for a detailed analysis of the complex mass spectra. These fundamental studies are expected to enhance our understanding of cometary, interplanetary and interstellar dust grains, which travel at similar hyper-velocities and are known to contain both aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds.

  11. Simulation of hypervelocity impact on massively parallel supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    Hypervelocity impact studies are important for debris shield and armor/anti-armor research and development. Numerical simulations are frequently performed to complement experimental studies, and to evaluate code accuracy. Parametric computational studies involving material properties, geometry and impact velocity can be used to understand hypervelocity impact processes. These impact simulations normally need to address shock wave physics phenomena, material deformation and failure, and motion of debris particles. Detailed, three-dimensional calculations of such events have large memory and processing time requirements. At Sandia National Laboratories, many impact problems of interest require tens of millions of computational cells. Furthermore, even the inadequately resolved problems often require tens or hundred of Cray CPU hours to complete. Recent numerical studies done by Grady and Kipp at Sandia using the Eulerian shock wave physics code CTH demonstrated very good agreement with many features of a copper sphere-on-steel plate oblique impact experiment, fully utilizing the compute power and memory of Sandia`s Cray supercomputer. To satisfy requirements for more finely resolved simulations in order to obtain a better understanding of the crater formation process and impact ejecta motion, the numerical work has been moved from the shared-memory Cray to a large, distributed-memory, massively parallel supercomputing system using PCTH, a parallel version of CTH. The current work is a continuation of the studies, but done on Sandia`s Intel 1840-processor Paragon X/PS parallel computer. With the great compute power and large memory provided by the Paragon, a highly detailed PCTH calculation has been completed for the copper sphere impacting steel plate experiment. Although the PCTH calculation used a mesh which is 4.5 times bigger than the original Cray setup, it finished in much less CPU time.

  12. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis of hypervelocity microparticle impact sites on LDEF surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, C. G.; Buonaquisti, A. J.; Batchelor, D. A.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. R.; Wortman, J. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Best, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Two dimensional elemental ion maps have been recorded for hundreds of microparticle impact sites and contamination features on LDEF surfaces. Since the majority of the analyzed surfaces were metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) impact detectors from the Interplanetary Dust Experiment, a series of 'standard' and 'blank' analyses of these surfaces are included. Hypervelocity impacts of forsterite olivine microparticles on activated flight sensors served as standards while stylus and pulsed laser simulated 'impacts' served as analytical blanks. Results showed that despite serious contamination issues, impactor residues can be identified in greater than 1/3 of the impact sites. While aluminum oxide particles could not be detected on aluminum surfaces, they were detected on germanium surfaces from row 12. Remnants of manmade debris impactors consisting of paint chips and bits of metal were identified on surfaces from LDEF Rows 3 (west or trailing side), 6 (south), 9 (ram or leading side), 12 (north) and the space end. Higher than expected ratios of manmade microparticle impacts to total microparticle impacts were found on the space end and the trailing side. These results were consistent with time-tagged and time-segregated microparticle impact data from the IDE and other LDEF experiments. A myriad of contamination interferences were identified and their effects on impactor debris identification mitigated during the course of this study. These interferences include pre-, post and inflight deposited surface contaminants as well as indigenous heterogeneous material contaminants. Non-flight contaminations traced to human origins, including spittle and skin oils, contributed significant levels of alkali-rich carbonaceous interferences. A ubiquitous layer of in-flight deposited silicaceous contamination varied in thickness with location on LDEF, even on a micro scale. In-flight deposited (low velocity) contaminants include urine droplets and bits of metal film from eroded thermal

  13. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  14. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  15. X-ray grating interferometry for 9.25 keV design energy at a liquid-metal-jet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balles, A.; Fella, Ch.; Dittmann, J.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a grating interferometer setup with a liquid-metal-jet source and a high resolution detector. It will be shown that this source is suitable for interferometer setups as it delivers a sufficient spatial coherence that makes a source grating unnecessary. This is confirmed twice by the results of an interferometer setup and a single grating setup, respectively. Both show comparable information on the samples. Furthermore, it was possible to measure the Talbot effect due to the self-built high resolution detector with an effective pixel size of 0.67 µm and due to the coherence of the source, thanks to a small spot size of a few microns. The information on the absorption of a nylon fiber is observed to include inline phase contrast effects. The dark-field signal of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is not quite well understood because of its inhomogeneity.

  16. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  17. Measurements of Shaped Charge Jet Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2013-06-01

    Penetration depth is an important requirement in oil/gas well perforating jobs. The depth determines how far the wellbore can directly communicate with reservoir fluids. Deep perforation charges are widely used in oilfield industry and most of those are powder metal liner charge for no carrot-like slug left as solid liner does. Comprehensive measurements for the powder metal liner shaped charge jet characteristics, namely, the jet density and velocity, are needed to predict the shaped charge performance and to plan the perforating job. This paper focuses on an experimental work of jet velocity measurements. A medium size of powder metal liner charges (27 grams HMX) is used in the tests. The powder jet shoots through a stack of limestone blocks with shorting switch set in between. Half inch air-gap between two blocks is design to provide space for jet traveling in air to record free fly velocity, meanwhile the jet penetration velocity in the limestone is measured. Aluminum foil switches are used to record the jet Time of Arrival (TOA). The charged switch shorted by the metal jet when it arrives. The shorting signal is recorded. The two velocities can be used to estimate the jet penetration effectiveness. A series of TOA tests show that jet velocity along its length linearly decreases from jet tip to tail until the stagnation points referring to which jet material moves in opposite direction.

  18. Ink jet printing of silver metallization for photovoltaics. Quarterly technical report, 10/1/85-12/31/85

    SciTech Connect

    Vest, R.W.

    1986-01-21

    A new base for the x-y table/print head assembly was constructed in conjunction with improvements made to the ink pressure control system. Computer equipment was acquired and set up. A printing and firing study was completed. A study was done to evaluate the stability of a silver/bismuth ink. Theoretical studies of ink jet printing were initiated to develop a model to relate the amount of ink deposited per unit time to the physical properties of the ink and the machine parameters. (LEW)

  19. LDEF's map experiment foil perforations yield hypervelocity impact penetration parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonnell, J. A. M.

    1992-01-01

    The space exposure of LDEF for 5.75 years, forming a host target in low earth orbit (LEO) orbit to a wide distribution of hypervelocity particulates of varying dimensions and different impact velocities, has yielded a multiplicity of impact features. Although the projectile parameters are generally unknown and, in fact not identical for any two impacts on a target, the great number of impacts provides statistically meaningful basis for the valid comparison of the response of different targets. Given sufficient impacts for example, a comparison of impact features (even without knowledge of the project parameters) is possible between: (1) differing material types (for the same incident projectile distribution); (2) differing target configurations (e.g., thick and thin targets for the same material projectiles; and (3) different velocities (using LDEF's different faces). A comparison between different materials is presented for infinite targets of aluminum, Teflon, and brass in the same pointing direction; the maximum finite-target penetration (ballistic limit) is also compared to that of the penetration of similar materials comprising of a semi-infinite target. For comparison of impacts on similar materials at different velocities, use is made of the pointing direction relative to LDEF's orbital motion. First, however, care must be exercised to separate the effect of spatial flux anisotropies from those resulting from the spacecraft velocity through a geocentrically referenced dust distribution. Data comprising thick and thin target impacts, impacts on different materials, and in different pointing directions is presented; hypervelocity impact parameters are derived. Results are also shown for flux modeling codes developed to decode the relative fluxes of Earth orbital and unbound interplanetary components intercepting LDEF. Modeling shows the west and space pointing faces are dominated by interplanetary particles and yields a mean velocity of 23.5 km/s at LDEF

  20. Hypervelocity Launching and Frozen Fuels as a Major Contribution to Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocks, F. H.; Harman, C. M.; Klenk, P. A.; Simmons, W. N.

    Acting as a virtual first stage, a hypervelocity launch together with the use of frozen hydrogen/frozen oxygen propellant, offers a Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) system that promises an enormous increase in SSTO mass-ratio. Ram acceleration provides hypervelocity (2 km/sec) to the orbital vehicle with a gas gun supplying the initial velocity required for ram operation. The vehicle itself acts as the center body of a ramjet inside a launch tube, filled with gaseous fuel and oxidizer, acting as an engine cowling. The high acceleration needed to achieve hypervelocity precludes a crew, and it would require greatly increased liquid fuel tank structural mass if a liquid propellant is used for post-launch vehicle propulsion. Solid propellants do not require as much fuel- chamber strengthening to withstand a hypervelocity launch as do liquid propellants, but traditional solid fuels have lower exhaust velocities than liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen. The shock-stability of frozen hydrogen/frozen oxygen propellant has been experimentally demonstrated. A hypervelocity launch system using frozen hydrogen/frozen oxygen propellant would be a revolutionary new development in spaceflight.

  1. Electromagnetic diagnostic techniques for hypervelocity projectile detection, velocity measurement, and size characterization: Theoretical concept and first experimental test

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlig, W. Casey; Heine, Andreas

    2015-11-14

    A new measurement technique is suggested to augment the characterization and understanding of hypervelocity projectiles before impact. The electromagnetic technique utilizes magnetic diffusion principles to detect particles, measure velocity, and indicate relative particle dimensions. It is particularly suited for detection of small particles that may be difficult to track utilizing current characterization methods, such as high-speed video or flash radiography but can be readily used for large particle detection, where particle spacing or location is not practical for other measurement systems. In this work, particles down to 2 mm in diameter have been characterized while focusing on confining the detection signal to enable multi-particle characterization with limited particle-to-particle spacing. The focus of the paper is on the theoretical concept and the analysis of its applicability based on analytical and numerical calculation. First proof-of-principle experimental tests serve to further validate the method. Some potential applications are the characterization of particles from a shaped-charge jet after its break-up and investigating debris in impact experiments to test theoretical models for the distribution of particles size, number, and velocity.

  2. Electromagnetic diagnostic techniques for hypervelocity projectile detection, velocity measurement, and size characterization: Theoretical concept and first experimental test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, W. Casey; Heine, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    A new measurement technique is suggested to augment the characterization and understanding of hypervelocity projectiles before impact. The electromagnetic technique utilizes magnetic diffusion principles to detect particles, measure velocity, and indicate relative particle dimensions. It is particularly suited for detection of small particles that may be difficult to track utilizing current characterization methods, such as high-speed video or flash radiography but can be readily used for large particle detection, where particle spacing or location is not practical for other measurement systems. In this work, particles down to 2 mm in diameter have been characterized while focusing on confining the detection signal to enable multi-particle characterization with limited particle-to-particle spacing. The focus of the paper is on the theoretical concept and the analysis of its applicability based on analytical and numerical calculation. First proof-of-principle experimental tests serve to further validate the method. Some potential applications are the characterization of particles from a shaped-charge jet after its break-up and investigating debris in impact experiments to test theoretical models for the distribution of particles size, number, and velocity.

  3. Identification of a jet-driven supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud: Possible evidence for the enhancement of bipolar explosions at low metallicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Laura A.; Castro, Daniel; Slane, Patrick O.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Badenes, Carles

    2014-06-10

    Recent evidence has suggested that the supernova remnant (SNR) 0104–72.3 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) may be the result of a 'prompt' Type Ia SN on the basis of enhanced iron abundances and its association with a star-forming region. In this paper, we present evidence that SNR 0104–72.3 arose from a jet-driven bipolar core-collapse (CC) SN. Specifically, we use serendipitous Chandra data of SNR 0104–72.3 taken because of its proximity to the calibration source SNR E0102–72.3. We analyze 56 Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) observations of SNR 0104–72.3 to produce imaging and spectra with an effective exposure of 528.6 ks. We demonstrate that SNR 0104–72.3 is highly elliptical relative to other nearby young SNRs, suggesting a CC SN origin. Furthermore, we compare ejecta abundances derived from spectral fits to nucleosynthetic yields of Type Ia and CC SNe, and we find that the iron, neon, and silicon abundances are consistent with either a spherical CC SN of a 18-20 M {sub ☉} progenitor or an aspherical CC SN of a 25 M {sub ☉} progenitor. We show that the star formation history at the site of SNR 0104–72.3 is also consistent with a CC origin. Given the bipolar morphology of the SNR, we favor the aspherical CC SN scenario. This result may suggest jet-driven SNe occur frequently in the low-metallicity environment of the SMC, consistent with the observational and theoretical work on broad-line Type Ic SNe and long-duration gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Hypervelocity Heat-Transfer Measurements in an Expansion Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Perkins, John N.

    1996-01-01

    A series of experiments has been conducted in the NASA HYPULSE Expansion Tube, in both CO2 and air test gases, in order to obtain data for comparison with computational results and to assess the capability for performing hypervelocity heat-transfer studies in this facility. Heat-transfer measurements were made in both test gases on 70 deg sphere-cone models and on hemisphere models of various radii. HYPULSE freestream flow conditions in these test gases were found to be repeatable to within 3-10%, and aerothermodynamic test times of 150 microsec in CO2 and 125 microsec in air were identified. Heat-transfer measurement uncertainty was estimated to be 10-15%. Comparisons were made with computational results from the non-equilibrium Navier-Stokes solver NEQ2D. Measured and computed heat-transfer rates agreed to within 10% on the hemispheres and on the sphere-cone forebodies, and to within 10% in CO2 and 25% in air on the afterbodies and stings of the sphere-cone models.

  5. Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility: A gun for hire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Calvin R.; Rose, M. F.; Hill, D. C.; Best, S.; Chaloupka, T.; Crawford, G.; Crumpler, M.; Stephens, B.

    1994-01-01

    An affordable technique has been developed to duplicate the types of impacts observed on spacecraft, including the Shuttle, by use of a certified Hypervelocity Impact Facility (HIF) which propels particulates using capacitor driven electric gun techniques. The fully operational facility provides a flux of particles in the 10-100 micron diameter range with a velocity distribution covering the space debris and interplanetary dust particle environment. HIF measurements of particle size, composition, impact angle and velocity distribution indicate that such parameters can be controlled in a specified, tailored test designed for or by the user. Unique diagnostics enable researchers to fully describe the impact for evaluating the 'targets' under full power or load. Users regularly evaluate space hardware, including solar cells, coatings, and materials, exposing selected portions of space-qualified items to a wide range of impact events and environmental conditions. Benefits include corroboration of data obtained from impact events, flight simulation of designs, accelerated aging of systems, and development of manufacturing techniques.

  6. Correlation between speed and size for ejecta from hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachse, M.; Schmidt, J.; Kempf, S.; Spahn, F.

    2015-11-01

    Ejecta created in hypervelocity impacts of micrometeoroids on atmosphereless bodies are an efficient source for circumplanetary and interplanetary dust. The impact erodes the target surface and releases material into space. The ejecta are typically micron sized and populate a dust cloud around the parent body, whose number density decreases with increasing distance from the target. Unbound particles escape and add to the planetary dust environment. Here we explore the influence of a correlation between the fragment size and the ejection speed, such that larger fragments are (on average) launched with lower speeds. This behavior is suggested by theoretical considerations and impact experiments. We find that such a correlation provides a dynamical filter that removes large ejecta from high altitudes. The effect is stronger for bigger ejecta and for more massive parent bodies. Our results suggest that large particles found in the circumplanetary and interplanetary dust environment either originate from impacts on smaller moons, impacts of unusually large or fast impactors, or an entirely different process of dust production.

  7. Induction Heating of Hypervelocity Impact Samples to 2500 Degrees Centigrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Joshua; Pardo, Art; Henderson, Don; Rodriguez, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory (RHTL) at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was asked to heat samples up to 2500 degrees Centigrade (4532 degrees Fahrenheit) to simulate reentry scenarios of crafts where heated shields are impacted with single small particles ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 millimeters (.008 to.039 inches) of various materials. The team decided an electromagnetic induction (induction heater) was the best method to achieve and control the temperatures in a rapid manner. The samples consisted of three-dimensional carbon-carbon and two-dimensional carbon-phenolic, which are both electrically conductive. After several attempts the team was able to achieve over 2500 degrees Centigrade (4532 degrees Fahrenheit) in ambient atmosphere. When the system was moved to the target chamber and the vacuum system evacuated down to 250 millitorr, arcing occurred between the bus bars and tank, the feedthrough fittings that carried the coolant and current, and between the target sample and coil. To overcome this arcing, conformal coatings, room temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone, and other non-conductive materials were used to isolate the electromagnetic fields.

  8. MMT Hypervelocity Star Survey. II. Five New Unbound Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2012-05-01

    We present the discovery of five new unbound hypervelocity stars (HVSs) in the outer Milky Way halo. Using a conservative estimate of Galactic escape velocity, our targeted spectroscopic survey has now identified 16 unbound HVSs as well as a comparable number of HVSs ejected on bound trajectories. A Galactic center origin for the HVSs is supported by their unbound velocities, the observed number of unbound stars, their stellar nature, their ejection time distribution, and their Galactic latitude and longitude distribution. Other proposed origins for the unbound HVSs, such as runaway ejections from the disk or dwarf galaxy tidal debris, cannot be reconciled with the observations. An intriguing result is the spatial anisotropy of HVSs on the sky, which possibly reflects an anisotropic potential in the central 10-100 pc region of the Galaxy. Further progress requires measurement of the spatial distribution of HVSs over the southern sky. Our survey also identifies seven B supergiants associated with known star-forming galaxies; the absence of B supergiants elsewhere in the survey implies there are no new star-forming galaxies in our survey footprint to a depth of 1-2 Mpc.

  9. Evolution of Imposed Vortices Over Concave Surfaces in Hypervelocity Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, William; Austin, Joanna

    2012-11-01

    Steamwise oriented vortices in the boundary layer of a hypersonic flow have the potential to affect heat transfer and skin friction significantly. These effects can be exacerbated by the addition of extra strain rates associated with concave surface curvature. Vortices can either occur naturally (in the form of Goertler vortices), or be introduced by some form of mechanical distortion (such as a protuberance). In this work we experimentally investigate the effect of concave surface curvature on the propagation of imposed vortices. These experiments are carried out in the Hypervelocity Expansion Tube at the University of Illinois. This facility is capable of generating flows with high enthalpies (4-9MJ/kg) and Mach numbers (3-7). Using a novel, fast-response pressure sensitive paint we are able to observe the development of vortices which are induced using diamond-shaped vortex generators. Models with varying amount of surface curvature (encompassing Goertler numbers between 10-22) are used to investigate the dynamics of vortex propagation and interaction. Our results show that the vortices remain attached and of constant strength for 10-12cm (80 boundary layer thicknesses) along the curved surfaces, while on flat plates the vortices are no longer apparent within 6 cm downstream.

  10. RUNAWAY STARS, HYPERVELOCITY STARS, AND RADIAL VELOCITY SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J. E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.ed

    2009-12-01

    Runaway stars ejected from the Galactic disk populate the halo of the Milky Way. To predict the spatial and kinematic properties of runaways, we inject stars into a Galactic potential, compute their trajectories through the Galaxy, and derive simulated catalogs for comparison with observations. Runaways have a flattened spatial distribution, with higher velocity stars at Galactic latitudes less than 30{sup 0}. Due to their shorter stellar lifetimes, massive runaway stars are more concentrated toward the disk than low mass runaways. Bound (unbound) runaways that reach the halo probably originate from distances of 6-12 kpc (10-15 kpc) from the Galactic center, close to the estimated origin of the unbound runaway star HD 271791. Because runaways are brighter and have smaller velocities than hypervelocity stars (HVSs), radial velocity surveys are unlikely to confuse runaway stars with HVSs. We estimate that at most one runaway star contaminates the current sample. We place an upper limit of 2% on the fraction of A-type main-sequence stars ejected as runaways.

  11. MMT hypervelocity star survey. III. The complete survey

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-05-20

    We describe our completed spectroscopic survey for unbound hypervelocity stars (HVSs) ejected from the Milky Way. Three new discoveries bring the total number of unbound late B-type stars to 21. We place new constraints on the nature of the stars and on their distances using moderate resolution MMT spectroscopy. Half of the stars are fast rotators; they are certain 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} main sequence stars at 50-120 kpc distances. Correcting for stellar lifetime, our survey implies that unbound 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} stars are ejected from the Milky Way at a rate of 1.5 × 10{sup –6} yr{sup –1}. These unbound HVSs are likely ejected continuously over the past 200 Myr and do not share a common flight time. The anisotropic spatial distribution of HVSs on the sky remains puzzling. Southern hemisphere surveys like SkyMapper will soon allow us to map the all-sky distribution of HVSs. Future proper motion measurements with Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia will provide strong constraints on origin. Existing observations are all consistent with HVS ejections from encounters with the massive black hole in the Galactic center.

  12. Spectral Effects of Hypervelocity Impact on Powdered Bushveldt Gabbro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Beth Ellen; Ockert-Bell, M.; Cintala, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    Evidence of the role of impact in sculpting the histories of asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system mounts as each new object is examined by spacecraft. Not only have these objects attained their current dimensions by collisional disruption of larger bodies, but the majority of their subsequent evolution also can be attributed to impact. This investigation simulates the effects that hypervelocity impact may have on the asteroid regolith by exploring first the effect on terrestrial samples. South African Bushveldt Gabbro, a reasonable planetary analogue, was sieved to include grain sizes between 125 and 250 µm contained in a polyethylene holder and retained by a thin, microscope-slide cover; and impacted by a ceramic sphere (3.18-mm in diameter) at 5.7 km/s. The light-gas gun chamber and area up range of the target were lined with aluminum foil to collect ejecta. After the shot, all material was collected from the chamber. The spectra were measured at RELAB using the Bi-directional spectrometer (0.32 - 2.6 µm). Among the initial results are distinct changes in spectral slopes in the visible wavelengths from 0.4 to 0.7 microns, and reddening in the near-infrared from 1.1 to 2.5 microns. Absorption bands at 1 and 2 microns were not observed to change as a result of impact.

  13. MMT HYPERVELOCITY STAR SURVEY. II. FIVE NEW UNBOUND STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-05-20

    We present the discovery of five new unbound hypervelocity stars (HVSs) in the outer Milky Way halo. Using a conservative estimate of Galactic escape velocity, our targeted spectroscopic survey has now identified 16 unbound HVSs as well as a comparable number of HVSs ejected on bound trajectories. A Galactic center origin for the HVSs is supported by their unbound velocities, the observed number of unbound stars, their stellar nature, their ejection time distribution, and their Galactic latitude and longitude distribution. Other proposed origins for the unbound HVSs, such as runaway ejections from the disk or dwarf galaxy tidal debris, cannot be reconciled with the observations. An intriguing result is the spatial anisotropy of HVSs on the sky, which possibly reflects an anisotropic potential in the central 10-100 pc region of the Galaxy. Further progress requires measurement of the spatial distribution of HVSs over the southern sky. Our survey also identifies seven B supergiants associated with known star-forming galaxies; the absence of B supergiants elsewhere in the survey implies there are no new star-forming galaxies in our survey footprint to a depth of 1-2 Mpc.

  14. Imaging system for hypervelocity dust injection diagnostic on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L. A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Wurden, G. A.; Ticos, C. M.; Wang, Zhehui

    2006-10-01

    The novel hypervelocity dust injection diagnostic will facilitate our understanding of basic aspects of dust-plasma interaction and magnetic field topology in fusion plasma devices, by observing "comet tails" associated with the injected micron-size dust particles. A single projection of the tail onto an image plane will not provide sufficient information; therefore, we plan to use two views, with intensified DiCam-Pro cameras on two NSTX ports. Each camera can furnish up to five overlaying sequential images with gate times greater than 3ns and 1280×1024pixel resolution. A coherent fiber bundle with 1500×1200 fibers will relay the image from an imaging lens installed directly on the port to the camera optics. The lens receives light from the outer portion of the NSTX cross section and focuses a 1cm tail onto at least 60 fibers for adequate resolution. The estimated number of photons received by the camera indicates signal-to-noise ratios of 102-104, with the use of a 10nm bandwidth filter. The imaging system with one camera was successfully tested on NSTX in 2005. Photographing lithium pellets yielded bright and distinctive pictures of the tails nearly aligned with B lines. We also observed that the bright "filaments"—plasma cords with high density and temperature—are present in both top and bottom portions of the machine.

  15. An Exponential Luminous Efficiency Model for Hypervelocity Impact into Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, W. R.; Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Cooke, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The flash of thermal radiation produced as part of the impact-crater forming process can be used to determine the energy of the impact if the luminous efficiency is known. From this energy the mass and, ultimately, the mass flux of similar impactors can be deduced. The luminous efficiency, eta, is a unique function of velocity with an extremely large variation in the laboratory range of under 6 km/s but a necessarily small variation with velocity in the meteoric range of 20 to 70 km/s. Impacts into granular or powdery regolith, such as that on the moon, differ from impacts into solid materials in that the energy is deposited via a serial impact process which affects the rate of deposition of internal (thermal) energy. An exponential model of the process is developed which differs from the usual polynomial models of crater formation. The model is valid for the early time portion of the process and focuses on the deposition of internal energy into the regolith. The model is successfully compared with experimental luminous efficiency data from both laboratory impacts and from lunar impact observations. Further work is proposed to clarify the effects of mass and density upon the luminous efficiency scaling factors. Keywords hypervelocity impact impact flash luminous efficiency lunar impact meteoroid 1

  16. Impact sensor network for detection of hypervelocity impacts on spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Frank; Janovsky, Rolf

    2007-11-01

    With regard to hypervelocity impact detection, a sensor network that can be applied on typical spacecraft structures is under development at Fraunhofer EMI (Ernst-Mach-Institut), supported by OHB-System. For impact detection, acoustic transducers are used. The structure types investigated are a 2 mm thick plate from aluminium alloy and a 49 mm thick sandwich panel with aluminium face-sheets and aluminium honeycomb core. One impact test was performed on each of the panels, which were instrumented with 6 ultrasonic transducers. The signals recorded at the various sensor locations varied with regard to peak amplitude and elapse time of the signal. Using this information and combining it with a localization algorithm, the impact location could be successfully determined. A description of the impact sensor network and the mathematical model to determine the impact location is provided. The impact tests on the spacecraft structure, the response of the sensor network and the analysis performed to determine the impact location are described.

  17. Modelling hypervelocity impacts into aluminum structures based on LDEF data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, C. R.; Atkinson, D. R.; Watts, A. J.; Wagner, J. R.; Allbrooks, M. K.; Hennessy, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Realizing and understanding the effects of the near-Earth space environment on a spacecraft during its mission lifetime is becoming more important with the regeneration of America's space program. Included among these potential effects are the following: erosion and surface degradation due to atomic oxygen impingement; ultraviolet exposure embrittlement; and delamination, pitting, cratering, and ring formation due to micrometeoroid and debris impacts. These effects may occur synergistically and may alter the spacecraft materials enough to modify the resultant crater, star crack, and/or perforation. This study concentrates on modelling the effects of micrometeoroid and debris hypervelocity impacts into aluminum materials (6061-T6). Space debris exists in all sizes, and has the possibility of growing into a potentially catastrophic problem, particularly since self-collisions between particles can rapidly escalate the number of small impactors. We have examined the morphologies of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) impact craters and the relationship between the observed impact damage on LDEF versus the existing models for both the natural (micrometeoroid) and manmade (debris) environments in order to better define these environments.

  18. Enhanced magnetic field production during oblique hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    The natural remanent magnetization of the lunar surface as displayed in returned lunar samples and the data returned by the Apollo subsatellite magnetometer has an unexpectedly high magnitude and exhibits spatial variation at all scales. The origin of the lunar remanent fields may be due to crustal remanence of a core dynamo field occurring early in lunar history prior to extensive modification by impact or remanence of transient fields, particularly associated with impacts, occurring on a local scale throughout lunar history. The presence of an early core dynamo field would have strong consequences for the formation and early evolution of the Moon, yet to deconvolve the role that an internally generated core dynamo field may have had, it is necessary to understand how the magnetic state of the lunar surface has developed through time. Impact-induced magnetism may be an important component of the present magnetic state of the lunar surface. New theoretical considerations suggest that transient magnetic fields within plasma produced by hypervelocity meteorite impacts may have greater significance at larger scales than previously thought.

  19. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Space Station Freedom Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Best, Steve R.; Myhre, Craig A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar array coupons designed for the Space Station Freedom electrical power system were subjected to hypervelocity impacts using the HYPER facility in the Space Power Institute at Auburn University and the Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Simulation Facility in the Materials and Processes Laboratory at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At Auburn, the solar cells and array blanket materials received several hundred impacts from particles in the micron to 100 micron range with velocities typically ranging from 4.5 to 10.5 km/s. This fluence of particles greatly exceeds what the actual components will experience in low earth orbit. These impacts damaged less than one percent of total area of the solar cells and most of the damage was limited to the cover glass. There was no measurable loss of electrical performance. Impacts on the array blanket materials produced even less damage and the blanket materials proved to be an effective shield for the back surface of the solar cells. Using the light gas gun at MSFC, one cell of a four cell coupon was impacted by a 1/4 inch spherical aluminum projectile with a velocity of about 7 km/s. The impact created a neat hole about 3/8 inch in diameter. The cell and coupon were still functional after impact.

  20. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, Norman

    1995-01-01

    It is necessary to integrate a wide variety of technical disciplines to provide an analysis of structural damage to a spacecraft due to hypervelocity impact. There are many uncertainties, and more detailed investigation is warranted, in each technical discipline. However, a total picture of the debris and meteoroid hazard is required to support manned spaceflight in general, and the international Space Station in particular. In the performance of this contract, besides producing a handbook, research and development was conducted in several different areas. The contract was broken into six separate tasks. Each task objectives and accomplishments will be reviewed in the following sections. The Handbook and separate task reports are contained as attachments to the final report. The final section summarizes all of the recommendations coming out of this study. The analyses and comments are general design guidelines and not necessarily applicable to final Space Station designs since several configuration and detailed design changes were being made during the course of this contract. Rather, the analyses and comments may indicate either a point-in-time concept analysis, available test data, or desirable protection goals, not hindered by the design and operation constraints faced by Space Station designers.

  1. Theory of an Electromagnetic Mass Accelerator for Achieving Hypervelocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    It is shown that for any electromagnetic accelerator which employs an electromagnetic force for driving the projectile and uses the projectile as the heat sink for the energy dissipated in it by ohmic heating, the maximum velocity attainable without melting is a function of the mass of the projectile. Therefore, for hypervelocities a large projectile mass is required and thus a power supply of very large capacity is necessary. It is shown that the only means for reducing the power requirement is maximizing the gradient of the mutual inductance. In the scheme of the sliding-coil accelerator investigated herein, the gradient of the mutual inductance is continuously maintained at a high value. It is also shown that for minimum length of the accelerator, the current must be kept constant despite the rise in induced voltage during acceleration. The use of a capacitor bank as an energy source with the condition that the current be kept constant is investigated. Experiments at low velocities are described.

  2. Hypervelocity-impact studies on titanium, titanium alloys, and beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Bless, S.J.; Girrens, S.P.; Green, J.E.

    1982-08-01

    The hypervelocity-impact behavior of commercial-pure, Grade 2 Ti, Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.25Si, and pure beryllium was studied by impacting targets of these materials with millimeter-sized spheres of glass, copper, aluminum, and cadmium propelled from a light-gas gun at velocities ranging from 4.5 to 7.6 km/s. Target temperatures ranged from 295 to 775/sup 0/K when impacted. Semi-infinite targets were impacted to determine cratering behavior, and some correlations were made to thin-target perforation. Thin titanium targets with a variety of surface coatings and finishes were also impacted. Titanium and the titanium alloys were found to behave in a ductile manner when impacted, but beryllium was found to be brittle even at 775/sup 0/K. An extrapolation equation was used to optimize a titanium heat pipe radiator mass for a space nuclear power application.

  3. Water Jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  4. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  5. Investigation on plasma generated during hypervelocity impact at different impact velocities and angles

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Weidong Lv, Yangtao; Wang, Cheng; Li, Jianqiao

    2015-12-15

    A 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code was developed to investigate plasma generation by considering a chemical reaction process in hypervelocity impacts of an aluminum projectile on an aluminum target. The chemical reaction process was described by the reaction rate based on the Arrhenius equation and used to calculate the plasma generation during the impact simulation. The predicted result was verified by empirical formulas and a new empirical formula was proposed based on the comparisons and analyses. The influence of the impact angle was discussed for different impact velocities. Then, the application of both the new and original empirical formulas for protection design from plasma generated by hypervelocity impact was discussed, which demonstrated that the code and model were useful in the prediction of hypervelocity impacts on spacecraft.

  6. An analysis of penetration and ricochet phenomena in oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.; Horn, Jennifer R.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles on multisheet aluminum structures is described. A model that can be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations that relate crater and perforation damage of a multisheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multisheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  7. Multi-shock assembly for protecting a spacecraft surface from hypervelocity impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, Bruce D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield assembly for protecting a spacecraft surface from hypervelocity impactors. The shield assembly includes at least one sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer of hypervelocity impactor disrupting/shocking material. A primary spacing element, including space-rated open cell foam material, is positioned between the at least one sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer and a spacecraft surface. A cover member is arranged and disposed relative to the sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer and the primary spacing element to maintain the integrity of the hypervelocity impact shield assembly. In the event of exposure to a hypervelocity impactor, the sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer is perforated while shocking the impactor breaking it into fragments, and/or melting it, and/or vaporizing it, thus providing a dispersion in the form of an expanding debris cloud/plume which spreads the impact energy of the impactor over a volume formed by the primary spacing element between the sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer and the spacecraft surface. This significantly reduces impact lethality at the spacecraft surface. The space-rated open cell foam material provides an extremely lightweight, low-cost, efficient means of spacing and supporting the at least one sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer before, during, and after launch. In a preferred embodiment, the invention is in the form of a multi-shock assembly including a plurality of sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layers. In such instance, the hypervelocity impact shield assembly includes a plurality of secondary spacing elements. Each secondary spacing element is positioned adjacent an associated sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer to form a multi-shock subassembly. Thus, a plurality of multi-shock subassemblies are provided which include alternating layers of sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layers and secondary spacing

  8. Geochemical processes between steel projectiles and silica-rich targets in hypervelocity impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Matthias; Hecht, Lutz; Deutsch, Alexander; Kenkmann, Thomas; Wirth, Richard; Berndt, Jasper

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of fractionation processes between projectile and target matter is critical with regard to the classification of the impactor type from geochemical analysis of impactites from natural craters. Here we present results of five hypervelocity MEMIN impact experiments (Poelchau et al., 2013) using the Cr-V-Co-Mo-W-rich steel D290-1 as projectile and two different silica-rich lithologies (Seeberger sandstone and Taunus quartzite) as target materials. Our study is focused on geochemical target-projectile interaction occurring in highly shocked and projectile-rich ejecta fragments. In all of the investigated impact experiments, whether sandstone or quartzite targets, the ejecta fragments show (i) shock-metamorphic features e.g., planar-deformation features (PDF) and the formation of silica glasses, (ii) partially melting of projectile and target, and (iii) significant mechanical and chemical mixing of the target rock with projectile material. The silica-rich target melts are strongly enriched in the "projectile tracer elements" Cr, V, and Fe, but have just minor enrichments of Co, W, and Mo. Inter-element ratios of these tracer elements within the contaminated target melts differ strongly from the original ratios in the steel. The fractionation results from differences in the reactivity of the respective elements with oxygen during interaction of the metal melt with silicate melt. Our results indicate that the principles of projectile-target interaction and associated fractionation do not depend on impact energies (at least for the selected experimental conditions) and water-saturation of the target. Partitioning of projectile tracer elements into the silicate target melt is much more enhanced in experiments with a non-porous quartzite target compared with the porous sandstone target. This is mainly the result of higher impact pressures, consequently higher temperatures and longer reaction times at high temperatures in the experiments with quartzite as

  9. A Study of Premixed, Shock-Induced Combustion With Application to Hypervelocity Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axdahl, Erik L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the current goals of research in hypersonic, airbreathing propulsion is access to higher Mach numbers. A strong driver of this goal is the desire to integrate a scramjet engine into a transatmospheric vehicle airframe in order to improve performance to low Earth orbit (LEO) or the performance of a semiglobal transport. An engine concept designed to access hypervelocity speeds in excess of Mach 10 is the shock-induced combustion ramjet (i.e. shcramjet). This dissertation presents numerical studies simulating the physics of a shcramjet vehicle traveling at hypervelocity speeds with the goal of understanding the physics of fuel injection, wall autoignition mitigation, and combustion instability in this flow regime.

  10. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 4; WLE Small-Scale Fiberglass Panel Flat Target C-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Target C-2 was to study impacts through the reinforced carboncarbon (RCC) panels of the Wing Leading Edge. Fiberglass was used in place of RCC in the initial tests. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  11. Computational modeling of electrostatic charge and fields produced by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, David A.

    2015-05-19

    Following prior experimental evidence of electrostatic charge separation, electric and magnetic fields produced by hypervelocity impact, we have developed a model of electrostatic charge separation based on plasma sheath theory and implemented it into the CTH shock physics code. Preliminary assessment of the model shows good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the model and prior experiments at least in the hypervelocity regime for the porous carbonate material tested. The model agrees with the scaling analysis of experimental data performed in the prior work, suggesting that electric charge separation and the resulting electric and magnetic fields can be a substantial effect at larger scales, higher impact velocities, or both.

  12. Hypervelocity impact survivability experiments for carbonaceous impactors, part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bunch, T.E.; Paque, J.M.; Becker, L.; Vedder, J.F.; Erlichman, J. ||

    1995-02-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments were performed to further test the survivability of carbonaceous impactors and to determine potential products that may have been synthesized during impact. Diamonds were launched by the Ames two-stage light gas gun into Al plate at velocities of 2.75 and 3.1 km sec(exp -1). FESEM imagery confirms that diamond fragments survived in both experiments. Earlier experiments found that diamonds were destroyed on impact above 4.3 km sec(exp -1). Thus, the upper stability limit for diamond on impact into Al, as determined from our experimental conditions, is between 3.1 and 4.3 km sec(exp -1). Particles of the carbonaceous chondrite Nogoya were also launched into Al at a velocity of 6.2 km sec (exp -1). Laser desorption (L (exp 2) MS) analyses of the impactor residues indicate that the lowest and highest mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH`s) were largely destroyed on impact; those of intermediate mass (202-220 amu) remained at the same level or increased in abundance. In addition, alkyl-substituted homologs of the most abundant pre-impacted PAH`s were synthesized during impact. These results suggest that an unknown fraction of some organic compounds can survive low to moderate impact velocities and that synthesized products can be expected to form up to velocities of, at least, 6.5 km sec(exp -1). The authors also present examples of craters formed by a unique microparticle accelerator that could launch micron-sized particles of almost any coherent material at velocities up to approximately 15 km sec(exp -1). Many of the experiments have a direct bearing on the interpretation of LDEF craters.

  13. Hypervelocity impact survivability experiments for carbonaceous impactors, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Paque, Julie M.; Becker, Luann; Vedder, James F.; Erlichman, Jozef

    1995-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments were performed to further test the survivability of carbonaceous impactors and to determine potential products that may have been synthesized during impact. Diamonds were launched by the Ames two-stage light gas gun into Al plate at velocities of 2.75 and 3.1 km sec(exp -1). FESEM imagery confirms that diamond fragments survived in both experiments. Earlier experiments found that diamonds were destroyed on impact above 4.3 km sec(exp -1). Thus, the upper stability limit for diamond on impact into Al, as determined from our experimental conditions, is between 3.1 and 4.3 km sec(exp -1). Particles of the carbonaceous chondrite Nogoya were also launched into Al at a velocity of 6.2 km sec (exp -1). Laser desorption (L (exp 2) MS) analyses of the impactor residues indicate that the lowest and highest mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) were largely destroyed on impact; those of intermediate mass (202-220 amu) remained at the same level or increased in abundance. In addition, alkyl-substituted homologs of the most abundant pre-impacted PAH's were synthesized during impact. These results suggest that an unknown fraction of some organic compounds can survive low to moderate impact velocities and that synthesized products can be expected to form up to velocities of, at least, 6.5 km sec(exp -1). We also present examples of craters formed by a unique microparticle accelerator that could launch micron-sized particles of almost any coherent material at velocities up to approximately 15 km sec(exp -1). Many of the experiments have a direct bearing on the interpretation of LDEF craters.

  14. Hypervelocity Stars and the Restricted Parabolic Three-Body Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Re'em; Kobayashi, Shiho; Rossi, Elena M.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by detections of hypervelocity stars that may originate from the Galactic center, we revisit the problem of a binary disruption by a passage near a much more massive point mass. The six orders of magnitude mass ratio between the Galactic center black hole (BH) and the binary stars allows us to formulate the problem in the restricted parabolic three-body approximation. In this framework, results can be simply rescaled in terms of binary masses, their initial separation, and the binary-to-black hole mass ratio. Consequently, an advantage over the full three-body calculation is that a much smaller set of simulations is needed to explore the relevant parameter space. Contrary to previous claims, we show that, upon binary disruption, the lighter star does not remain preferentially bound to the black hole. In fact, it is ejected in exactly 50% of the cases. Nonetheless, lighter objects have higher ejection velocities, since the energy distribution is independent of mass. Focusing on the planar case, we provide the probability distributions for disruption of circular binaries and for the ejection energy. We show that even binaries that penetrate deeply into the tidal sphere of the BH are not doomed to disruption, but survive in 20% of the cases. Nor do these deep encounters produce the highest ejection energies, which are instead obtained for binaries arriving to 0.1-0.5 of the tidal radius in a prograde orbit. Interestingly, such deep-reaching binaries separate widely after penetrating the tidal radius, but always approach each other again on their way out from the BH. Finally, our analytic method allows us to account for a finite size of the stars and recast the ejection energy in terms of a minimal possible separation. We find that, for a given minimal separation, the ejection energy is relatively insensitive to the initial binary separation.

  15. Detection of meteoroid hypervelocity impacts on the Cluster spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaverka, Jakub; Mann, Ingrid; Kero, Johan; De Spiegeleer, Alexandre; Hamrin, Maria; Norberg, Carol; Pitkanen, Timo; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta

    2016-07-01

    There are several methods to measure the cosmic dust entering the Earth's atmosphere such as space-born dust detectors, meteor and HPLA radars, and optical imaging. One complementary method could be to use electric field instruments initially designed to measure electric waves. A plasma cloud generated by a hypervelocity dust impact on a spacecraft body can be detected by the electric field instruments commonly operated on the spacecraft. Since Earth-orbiting missions are generally not equipped with conventional dust detectors, the electric field instruments offer an alternative method to measure the Earth's dust environment. We present the first detection of dust impacts on one of the Earth-orbiting Cluster satellites recorded by the Wide-Band Data (WBD) instrument. We describe the concept of dust impact detection focused on specifics of the Cluster spacecraft and the WBD instrument and their influence on dust impact detection. The detected pulses are compared with theoretical shape based on the model of the recollection of plasma clouds electrons. The estimation of the size and the velocity of the impinging dust grains from the amplitude of the Cluster voltage pulses shown that such impacts can be generated by grains of radius of r = 0.1 μm impacting with the velocity v ˜100 km/s or by grains of radius r = 1 μm impacting with the velocity v ˜10 km/s. We discuss the sensitivity of this method for dust grain detection showing that grains of radius r = 0.01 μm can be detected when impacting with velocity v ˜300 km/s and grains of radius r = 10 μm with velocity v ˜1 km/s if the WBD instrument operates in the high gain level (75 dB).

  16. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 8; Tile Small Targets A-1, Ag-1, B-1, and Bg-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Targets A-1, Ag-1, B-1, and Bg-1 was to study hypervelocity impacts on the reinforced Shuttle Heat Shield Tiles of the Wing. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  17. Sweep Langmuir Probe and Triple Probe Diagnostics for Transient Plasma Produced by Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Enling; Xiang, Shenghai; Yang, Minghai; Li, Lexin

    2012-08-01

    Two techniques are applied to diagnose characteristic parameters of plasma created by hypervelocity impact, such as electron temperature and electron density. The first technique is a sweep Langmuir probe (SLP), which is a new apparatus based on a dual channel circuit that can compensate for stray capacitance and obtain a good synchronicity, so that electrostatic turbulence with a good temporal resolution can be acquired. The second technique is a triple Langmuir probe (TLP), which is an electrostatic triple Langmuir probe diagnostic system, in which no voltage and frequency sweep is required. This technique allows to measure electron temperature, electron density as a function of time. Moreover, the triple Langmuir probe diagnostic system allows the direct display of electron temperature and semidirect display of electron density by an appropriate display system, the system permits us to eliminate almost all data processing procedures. SLP and TLP were applied to obtain fluctuations of the characteristic parameters of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact. As an example of their application to time-dependent plasma measurement, the electron temperature and electron density of plasmas were acquired in hypervelocity impact experiments. Characteristic parameters of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact were compared by the two kinds of diagnostic techniques mentioned above.

  18. FAR-TECH's Nanoparticle Plasma Jet System and its Application to Disruptions, Deep Fueling, and Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. R.; Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.

    2012-10-01

    Hyper-velocity plasma jets have potential applications in tokamaks for disruption mitigation, deep fueling and diagnostics. Pulsed power based solid-state sources and plasma accelerators offer advantages of rapid response and mass delivery at high velocities. Fast response is critical for some disruption mitigation scenario needs, while high velocity is especially important for penetration into tokamak plasma and its confining magnetic field, as in the case of deep fueling. FAR-TECH is developing the capability of producing large-mass hyper-velocity plasma jets. The prototype solid-state source has produced: 1) >8.4 mg of H2 gas only, and 2) >25 mg of H2 and >180 mg of C60 in a H2/C60 gas mixture. Using a coaxial plasma gun coupled to the source, we have successfully demonstrated the acceleration of composite H/C60 plasma jets, with momentum as high as 0.6 g.km/s, and containing an estimated C60 mass of ˜75 mg. We present the status of FAR-TECH's nanoparticle plasma jet system and discuss its application to disruptions, deep fueling, and diagnostics. A new TiH2/C60 solid-state source capable of generating significantly higher quantities of H2 and C60 in <0.5 ms will be discussed.

  19. ELM control at the L → H transition by means of pellet pacing in the ASDEX Upgrade and JET all-metal-wall tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, P. T.; Meyer, H.; Birkenmeier, G.; Burckhart, A.; Carvalho, I. S.; Delabie, E.; Frassinetti, L.; Huijsmans, G.; Kocsis, G.; Loarte, A.; Maggi, C. F.; Maraschek, M.; Ploeckl, B.; Rimini, F.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Szepesi, T.; Wolfrum, E.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Contributors, JET

    2015-04-01

    In ITER, pellets are used for ELM pacing and fueling. More importantly, ELM control and in particular control of the first ELM needs to be demonstrated in the non-nuclear phase of ITER during operation in H or He. Whilst D pellets have been established as an ELM control technique in the stationary phase with D target plasmas in devices with C as plasma-facing component, the behavior of other isotopes in non-stationary phases are not so well known. Here, we report on new pellet triggering experiments in ASDEX Upgrade and JET that mimic specific ITER operating scenarios. Both machines are equipped with an all-metal wall; recent investigations have shown that pellet triggering and pacing become more intricate when an all-metal wall surface is employed. In both machines, ELM triggering has been shown to occur after injection of D pellets into D plasmas during extended ELM-free phases, often following the L → H transition. In both devices the pellets are found to induce ELMs under conditions far from the stability boundary for type-I ELMs. Near the L → H transition, induced ELMs in some cases are more likely to have type-III rather than type-I characteristics. Furthermore, in ASDEX Upgrade this study was conducted during L → H transitions in the current ramp-up phase as envisaged for ITER. In addition, the pellet’s ELM trigger potential has been proven in ASDEX Upgrade with a correct isotopic compilation for the non-nuclear phase in ITER, viz. H pellets into either He or H plasmas. Results from this study are encouraging since they have demonstrated the pellets’ potential to provoke ELMs even under conditions that are quite far from the stability boundaries attributed to the occurrence of spontaneous ELMs. However, with the recent change from carbon to an all-metal plasma-facing component, examples have been found in both machines where pellets failed to establish ELM control under conditions where this would be expected and needed. Consequently, a major task

  20. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  1. Survivability of copper projectiles during hypervelocity impacts in porous ice: A laboratory investigation of the survivability of projectiles impacting comets or other bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, K. H.; Price, M. C.; Cole, M.; Burchell, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    During hypervelocity impact (>a few km s-1) the resulting cratering and/or disruption of the target body often outweighs interest on the outcome of the projectile material, with the majority of projectiles assumed to be vaporised. However, on Earth, fragments, often metallic, have been recovered from impact sites, meaning that metallic projectile fragments may survive a hypervelocity impact and still exist within the wall, floor and/or ejecta of the impact crater post-impact. The discovery of the remnant impactor composition within the craters of asteroids, planets and comets could provide further information regarding the impact history of a body. Accordingly, we study in the laboratory the survivability of 1 and 2 mm diameter copper projectiles fired onto ice at speeds between 1.00 and 7.05 km s-1. The projectile was recovered intact at speeds up to 1.50 km s-1, with no ductile deformation, but some surface pitting was observed. At 2.39 km s-1, the projectile showed increasing ductile deformation and broke into two parts. Above velocities of 2.60 km s-1 increasing numbers of projectile fragments were identified post impact, with the mean size of the fragments decreasing with increasing impact velocity. The decrease in size also corresponds with an increase in the number of projectile fragments recovered, as with increasing shock pressure the projectile material is more intensely disrupted, producing smaller and more numerous fragments. The damage to the projectile is divided into four classes with increasing speed and shock pressure: (1) minimal damage, (2) ductile deformation, start of break up, (3) increasing fragmentation, and (4) complete fragmentation. The implications of such behaviour is considered for specific examples of impacts of metallic impactors onto Solar System bodies, including LCROSS impacting the Moon, iron meteorites onto Mars and NASA's "Deep Impact" mission where a spacecraft impacted a comet.

  2. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  3. Spectroscopy of jet-cooled AlMn and trends in the electronic structure of the 3d transition metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Jane M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1994-10-01

    Jet-cooled diatomic AlMn has been spectroscopically investigated and is shown to possess a 5Πi ground state deriving from the Al (3s23p1,2P0)+Mn (3d54s2,6S) separated atom limit. This implies that the aluminum atom favors a 3pπ approach to the manganese atom, a result that is in agreement with previous studies on the related AlCa and AlZn molecules. The ground state bond length has been measured as 2.6384±0.0010 Å, a value which includes corrections due to spin-uncoupling effects in the X 5Πi state. It is suggested that the 5Πi state emerges as the ground state due to a particularly favorable configuration interaction with a low-lying 5Πi state that derives from the interaction of Al (3s23p1,2P0)+Mn [3d6(5D)4s1,6D]. Combination of the atoms in this excited state leads to a strong σ2 covalent bond via a 3pσAl-4sσMn interaction, which causes this excited electronic state to drop in energy so that it is expected to lie within a few thousand cm-1 of the ground electronic state. Following a discussion of the spectroscopic results on AlMn, an overall summary of the spectroscopic results on the 3d series of transition metal aluminides is presented, along with predictions of the ground electronic states of the as yet unobserved AlSc, AlTi, and AlFe molecules.

  4. The NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility: Experimental Simulation of the Atmospheric Break-Up of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility at NASA Ames Research Center provides a potential platform for the experimental simulation of meteor breakup at conditions that closely match full-scale entry condition for select parameters. The poster describes the entry environment simulation capabilities of the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center and provides example images of the fragmentation of a hypersonic projectile for which break-up was initiated by mechanical forces (impact with a thin polymer diaphragm).

  5. [Jet lag].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Doireau, P

    1997-01-01

    Desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity resulting from rapid travel through at least four time zones leads to symptoms known in everyday English as jet-lag. The most detrimental effect of jet-lag is fatigue with poor alertness and psychomotor performance. Severity is subject to individual variation in susceptibility (morning/evening typology, age,...) and environmental factors (direction of travel, number of time zones crossed, psychosocial environment...). Many measures used to prevent or reduce jet lag are inappropriate or ineffective and some may even be dangerous, such as use of melatonin. One of the most reliable preventive techniques consists of reinforcing social synchronizers by maintaining exposure to sunlight and social activity. Only two drugs currently available on the market can be recommended, i.e. non-benzodiazepinic hypnotics which induce high quality sleep to allow quick recovery and a new time-release caffeine agent which has been shown to prolong psychomotor performance.

  6. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  7. Impact jetting as the origin of chondrules.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brandon C; Minton, David A; Melosh, H J; Zuber, Maria T

    2015-01-15

    Chondrules are the millimetre-scale, previously molten, spherules found in most meteorites. Before chondrules formed, large differentiating planetesimals had already accreted. Volatile-rich olivine reveals that chondrules formed in extremely solid-rich environments, more like impact plumes than the solar nebula. The unique chondrules in CB chondrites probably formed in a vapour-melt plume produced by a hypervelocity impact with an impact velocity greater than 10 kilometres per second. An acceptable formation model for the overwhelming majority of chondrules, however, has not been established. Here we report that impacts can produce enough chondrules during the first five million years of planetary accretion to explain their observed abundance. Building on a previous study of impact jetting, we simulate protoplanetary impacts, finding that material is melted and ejected at high speed when the impact velocity exceeds 2.5 kilometres per second. Using a Monte Carlo accretion code, we estimate the location, timing, sizes, and velocities of chondrule-forming impacts. Ejecta size estimates indicate that jetted melt will form millimetre-scale droplets. Our radiative transfer models show that these droplets experience the expected cooling rates of ten to a thousand kelvin per hour. An impact origin for chondrules implies that meteorites are a byproduct of planet formation rather than leftover building material.

  8. Impact jetting as the origin of chondrules.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brandon C; Minton, David A; Melosh, H J; Zuber, Maria T

    2015-01-15

    Chondrules are the millimetre-scale, previously molten, spherules found in most meteorites. Before chondrules formed, large differentiating planetesimals had already accreted. Volatile-rich olivine reveals that chondrules formed in extremely solid-rich environments, more like impact plumes than the solar nebula. The unique chondrules in CB chondrites probably formed in a vapour-melt plume produced by a hypervelocity impact with an impact velocity greater than 10 kilometres per second. An acceptable formation model for the overwhelming majority of chondrules, however, has not been established. Here we report that impacts can produce enough chondrules during the first five million years of planetary accretion to explain their observed abundance. Building on a previous study of impact jetting, we simulate protoplanetary impacts, finding that material is melted and ejected at high speed when the impact velocity exceeds 2.5 kilometres per second. Using a Monte Carlo accretion code, we estimate the location, timing, sizes, and velocities of chondrule-forming impacts. Ejecta size estimates indicate that jetted melt will form millimetre-scale droplets. Our radiative transfer models show that these droplets experience the expected cooling rates of ten to a thousand kelvin per hour. An impact origin for chondrules implies that meteorites are a byproduct of planet formation rather than leftover building material. PMID:25592538

  9. Computational modeling of electrostatic charge and fields produced by hypervelocity impact

    DOE PAGES

    Crawford, David A.

    2015-05-19

    Following prior experimental evidence of electrostatic charge separation, electric and magnetic fields produced by hypervelocity impact, we have developed a model of electrostatic charge separation based on plasma sheath theory and implemented it into the CTH shock physics code. Preliminary assessment of the model shows good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the model and prior experiments at least in the hypervelocity regime for the porous carbonate material tested. The model agrees with the scaling analysis of experimental data performed in the prior work, suggesting that electric charge separation and the resulting electric and magnetic fields can be a substantial effectmore » at larger scales, higher impact velocities, or both.« less

  10. Conceptual Design of a Hypervelocity Asteroid Intercept Vehicle (HAIV) Flight Validation Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent W.; Wie, Bong; Steiner, Mark; Getzandanner, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed overview of the MDL study results and subsequent advances in the design of GNC algorithms for accurate terminal guidance during hypervelocity NEO intercept. The MDL study produced a conceptual con guration of the two-body HAIV and its subsystems; a mission scenario and trajectory design for a notional flight validation mission to a selected candidate target NEO; GNC results regarding the ability of the HAIV to reliably intercept small (50 m) NEOs at hypervelocity (typically greater than 10 km/s); candidate launch vehicle selection; a notional operations concept and cost estimate for the flight validation mission; and a list of topics to address during the remainder of our NIAC Phase II study.

  11. Detection of electromagnetic pulses produced by hypervelocity micro particle impact plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Sigrid; Lee, Nicolas; Johnson, Theresa; Goel, Ashish; Fletcher, Alexander; Linscott, Ivan; Strauss, David; Lauben, David; Srama, Ralf; Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian

    2013-09-15

    Hypervelocity micro particles (mass < 1 ng), including meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and produce plasmas that are initially dense (∼10{sup 28} m{sup −3}), but rapidly expand into the surrounding vacuum. We report the detection of radio frequency (RF) emission associated with electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) from hypervelocity impacts of micro particles in ground-based experiments using micro particles that are 15 orders of magnitude less massive than previously observed. The EMP production is a stochastic process that is influenced by plasma turbulence such that the EMP detection rate that is strongly dependent on impact speed and on the electrical charge conditions at the impact surface. In particular, impacts of the fastest micro particles occurring under spacecraft charging conditions representative of high geomagnetic activity are the most likely to produce RF emission. This new phenomenon may provide a source for unexplained RF measurements on spacecraft charged to high potentials.

  12. Experimental demonstration of plasma-drag acceleration of a dust cloud to hypervelocities.

    PubMed

    Ticoş, C M; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, G A; Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Dorf, L A; Shukla, P K

    2008-04-18

    Simultaneous acceleration of hundreds of dust particles to hypervelocities by collimated plasma flows ejected from a coaxial gun is demonstrated. Graphite and diamond grains with radii between 5 and 30 microm, and flying at speeds up to 3.7 km/s, have been recorded with a high-speed camera. The observations agree well with a model for plasma-drag acceleration of microparticles much larger than the plasma screening length.

  13. Test study on the performance of shielding configuration with stuffed layer under hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Fa-wei; Huang, Jie; Wen, Xue-zhong; Ma, Zhao-xia; Liu, Sen

    2016-10-01

    In order to study the cracking and intercepting mechanism of stuffed layer configuration on the debris cloud and to develop stuffed layer configuration with better performance, the hypervelocity impact tests on shielding configurations with stuffed layer were carried out. Firstly, the hypervelocity impact tests on the shielding configuration with stuffed layer of 3 layer ceramic fibre and 3 layer aramid fibre were finished, the study results showed that the debris cloud generated by the aluminum sphere impacting bumper at the velocity of about 6.2 km/s would be racked and intercepted by the stuffed layer configuration efficiently when the ceramic fibre layers and aramid fibre layers were jointed together, however, the shielding performance would be declined when the ceramic fibre layers and aramid fibre layers were divided by some distance. The mechanism of stuffed layer racking and intercepting the debris cloud was analyzed according to the above test results. Secondly, based on the mechanism of the stuffed layer cracking and intercepint debirs cloud the hypervelocity impact tests on the following three stuffed layer structures with the equivalent areal density to the 1 mm-thick aluminum plate were also carried out to compare their performance of cracking and intercepting debris cloud. The mechanisms of stuffed layer racking and intercepting the debris cloud were validated by the test result. Thirdly, the influence of the stuffed layer position on the shielding performance was studied by the test, too. The test results would provide reference for the design of better performance shielding configuration with stuffed layer.

  14. Damage Characteristics of the Logical Chip Module Due to Plasma Created by Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Enling; Wu, Jin; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Lijiao; Xiang, Shenghai; Xia, Jin; Liu, Shuhua; He, Liping; Han, Yafei; Xu, Mingyang; Zhang, Shuang; Yuan, Jianfei

    2016-04-01

    To researching the damage characteristics of typical logical chip modules in spacecraft due to plasma generated by hypervelocity impacts, we have established a triple Langmuir probe diagnostic system and a logical chips measurement system, which were used to diagnose plasma characteristic parameters and the logical chip module's logical state changes due to the plasma created by a 7075 aluminum projectile hypervelocity impact on the 2A12 aluminum target. Three sets of experiments were performed with the collision speeds of 2.85 km/s, 3.1 km/s and 2.20 km/s, at the same incident angles of 30 degrees and logical chip module's positions by using a two-stage light gas gun loading system, a plasma characteristic parameters diagnostic system and a logical chip module's logical state measurement system, respectively. Electron temperature and density were measured at given position and azimuth, and damage estimation was performed for the logical chip module by using the data acquisition system. Experimental results showed that temporary damage could be induced on logical chip modules in spacecraft by plasma generated by hypervelocity impacts under the given experimental conditions and the sensors' position and azimuth. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10972145, 11272218, 11472178), Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University of China (No. LR2013008), Open Foundation of Key Laboratory of Liaoning Weapon Science and Technology, Liaoning Province Talents Engineering Projects of China (No. 2012921044)

  15. Dust generation at interaction of plasma jet with surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticos, Catalin; Toader, Dorina; Banu, Nicoleta; Scurtu, Adrian; Oane, Mihai

    2013-10-01

    Coatings of W and C with widths of a few microns will be exposed to plasma jet for studying the erosion of the surface and detachment of micron size dust particles. A coaxial plasma gun has been built inside a vacuum chamber for producing supersonic plasma jets. Its design is based on a 50 kJ coaxial plasma gun which has been successfully used for accelerating hypervelocity dust. Initial shots were carried out for a capacitor bank with C = 12 μF and charged up to 2 kV. Currents of tens of amps were measured with a Rogowsky coil and plasma flow speeds of 4 km/s were inferred from high-speed images of jet propagation. An upgrade consisting in adding capacitors in parallel will be performed in order to increase the energy up to 2 kJ. A coil will be installed at the gun muzzle to compress the plasma flow and increase the energy density of the jet on the sample surface. A CCD camera with a maximum recording speed of 100 k fps and a maximum resolution of 1024 × 1024 pixels was set for image acquisition of the plasma and dust. A laser system used to illuminate the ejected dust from the surface includes a laser diode emitting at 650 nm with a beam power of 25 mW. The authors acknowledge support from EURATOM WP13-IPH-A03-P2-02-BS22.

  16. Turbulent Jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, B. H.; Rosen, P. A.; Foster, J. M.; Perry, T. S.; Steinkamp, M. J.; Robey, H. F.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Gittings, M. L.; Coker, R. F.; Keiter, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Drake, R. P.; Remington, B. A.; Bennett, G. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Campbell, R. B.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2003-10-01

    Over the last few years we have fielded numerous supersonic jet experiments on the NOVA and OMEGA lasers and Sandia's pulsed-power Z-machine in a collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Atomic Weapons Establishment, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. These experiments are being conducted to help validate our radiation-hydrodynamic codes, especially the newly developing ASC codes. One of the outstanding questions is whether these types of jets should turn turbulent given their high Reynolds number. Recently we have modified our experiments to have more Kelvin-Helmholtz shear, run much later in time and therefore have a better chance of going turbulent. In order to diagnose these large (several mm) jets at very late times ( 1000 ns) we are developing point-projection imaging on both the OMEGA laser, the Sandia Z-Machine, and ultimately at NIF. Since these jets have similar Euler numbers to jets theorized to be produced in supernovae explosions, we are also collaborating with the astrophysics community to help in the validation of their new codes. This poster will present a review of the laser and pulsed-power experiments and a comparison of the data to simulations by the codes from the various laboratories. We will show results of simulations wherein these jets turn highly 3-dimensional and show characteristics of turbulence. With the new data, we hope to be able to validate the sub-grid-scale turbulent mix models (e. g. BHR) that are being incorporated into our codes.*This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48, the Laboratory for Laser Energetics under Contract No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, Sandia National Laboratories under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000, the Office of Naval Research, and the NASA Astrophysical Theory Grant.

  17. CQ-4: a 4 MA, 500ns Compact Pulsed Power Generator Dedicated to Magnetically Driven Quasi-isentropic Compression Experiments (ICE) and Hypervelocity Flyer Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guiji; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Kuai, Bin; Mo, Jianjun; Wu, Gang

    2011-06-01

    Compact pulsed power generators have been widely used to produce high magnetic pressure to study dynamic behaviors of materials and do some hypervelocity impact experiments. After the compact pulsed power generator CQ-1.5 developed by us, a larger current and shorter rise time compact pulsed power generator CQ-4 has been designed and being constructed. The generator CQ-4 is composed of 20 energy-storage modules in parallel, of which is constituted by a 1.6 μF, 100 kV capacitor and a coaxial field-distortion spark gas switch with inductance of 25 nH. The energy is transmitted by the aluminum strip transmission lines insulated by 16 layers of Mylar films, of which is 0.1 mm in thickness. Before the short-circuit load, 72 peaking capacitors in parallel with the energy-storage capacitors are used to shape the discharging current waveforms in load. Each peaking capacitor is with rated capacitance of 0.1 μF and rated voltage of 120 kV. When the capacitor is charged to 70-80 kV, the peak current can reach 4-5MA, and the rise time is 400-500 ns (0-100%). The expected magnetic pressure can be up to 100GPa on the metallic loads and a hypervelocity of 12-15 km/s can be reached for the aluminum flyer plates with size of 10 mm in diameter and 1.0 mm in thickness.

  18. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  19. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  20. Jets and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-03-01

    This Letter applies the concept of “jets,” as constructed from calorimeter cell four-vectors, to jets composed (primarily) of photons (or leptons). Thus jets become a superset of both traditional objects such as QCD jets, photons, and electrons, and more unconventional objects such as photon jets and electron jets, defined as collinear photons and electrons, respectively. Since standard objects such as single photons become a subset of jets in this approach, standard jet substructure techniques are incorporated into the photon finder toolbox. Using a (reasonably) realistic calorimeter model we demonstrate that, for a single photon identification efficiency of 80% or above, the use of jet substructure techniques reduces the number of QCD jets faking photons by factors of 2.5 to 4. Depending on the topology of the photon jets, the substructure variables reduce the number of photon jets faking single photons by factors of 10 to 103 at a single photon identification efficiency of 80%.

  1. Hypervelocity Impacts on ISS Handrails and Evaluation of Alternative Materials to Prevent Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Glove Damage During EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eruc; Davis, B. Alan; Ordonez, Erick

    2009-01-01

    During post-flight processing of STS-116, damage to crewmember Robert Curbeam's Phase VI Glove Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment was discovered. This damage consisted of: loss of RTV-157 palm pads on the thumb area on the right glove, a 0.75 inch cut in the Vectran adjacent to the seam and thumb pad (single event cut), constituting the worst glove damage ever recorded for the U.S. space program. The underlying bladder and restraint were found not be damaged by this event. Evaluation of glove damage found that the outer Vectran fibers were sliced as a result of contact with a sharp edge or pinch point rather than general wear or abrasion (commonly observed on the RTV pads). Damage to gloves was also noted on STS-118 and STS-120. One potential source of EMU glove damages are sharp crater lips on external handrails, generated by micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts. In this paper, the results of a hypervelocity impact (HVI) test program on representative and actual ISS handrails are presented. These tests were performed in order to characterize impact damage profiles on ISS handrails and evaluate alternatives for limiting risk to future missions. It was determined that both penetrating and non-penetrating MMOD impacts on aluminum and steel ISS handrails are capable of generating protruding crater profiles which exceed the heights required for EMU glove abrasion risk by an order of magnitude. Testing demonstrated that flexible overwraps attached to the outside of existing handrails are capable of limiting contact between hazardous crater formations and crewmember gloves during extravehicular activity (EVA). Additionally, replacing metallic handrails with high strength, low ductility, fiber reinforced composite materials would limit the formation of protruding crater lips on new ISS modules.

  2. Study of Forebody Injection and Mixing with Application to Hypervelocity Airbreathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axdahl, Erik; Kumar, Ajay; Wilhite, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The use of premixed, shock-induced combustion in the context of a hypervelocity, airbreathing vehicle requires effective injection and mixing of hydrogen fuel and air on the vehicle forebody. Three dimensional computational simulations of fuel injection and mixing from flush-wall and modified ramp and strut injectors are reported in this study. A well-established code, VULCAN, is used to conduct nonreacting, viscous, turbulent simulations on a flat plate at conditions relevant to a Mach 12 flight vehicle forebody. In comparing results of various fuel injection strategies, it is found that strut injection provides the greatest balance of performance between mixing efficiency and stream thrust potential.

  3. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of hypervelocity nanoparticle impacts on amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai

    2010-02-01

    We have investigated the transition from the atomistic to the macroscopic impact mechanism by simulating large Argon cluster impacts on amorphous silica. The transition occurs at cluster sizes less than 50 000 atoms at hypervelocity regime (22 km/s). After that, the crater volume increases linearly with the cluster size opposite to the nonlinear scaling typical of small cluster impacts. The simulations demonstrate that the molecular dynamics method can be used to explore atomistic mechanisms that lead to damage formation in small particle impacts, for example, in impacts of micrometeorites on spacecraft.

  4. A Kernel-Free Particle-Finite Element Method for Hypervelocity Impact Simulation. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Young-Keun; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    An improved hybrid particle-finite element method has been developed for the simulation of hypervelocity impact problems. Unlike alternative methods, the revised formulation computes the density without reference to any kernel or interpolation functions, for either the density or the rate of dilatation. This simplifies the state space model and leads to a significant reduction in computational cost. The improved method introduces internal energy variables as generalized coordinates in a new formulation of the thermomechanical Lagrange equations. Example problems show good agreement with exact solutions in one dimension and good agreement with experimental data in a three dimensional simulation.

  5. An Ellipsoidal Particle-Finite Element Method for Hypervelocity Impact Simulation. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivarama, Ravishankar; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    A number of coupled particle-element and hybrid particle-element methods have been developed for the simulation of hypervelocity impact problems, to avoid certain disadvantages associated with the use of pure continuum based or pure particle based methods. To date these methods have employed spherical particles. In recent work a hybrid formulation has been extended to the ellipsoidal particle case. A model formulation approach based on Lagrange's equations, with particles entropies serving as generalized coordinates, avoids the angular momentum conservation problems which have been reported with ellipsoidal smooth particle hydrodynamics models.

  6. Experimental static aerodynamics of a regular hexagonal prism in a low density hypervelocity flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, R. W.; Mueller, J. N.; Lee, L. P.

    1972-01-01

    A regular hexagonal prism, having a fineness ratio of 1.67, has been tested in a wind tunnel to determine its static aerodynamic characteristics in a low-density hypervelocity flow. The prism tested was a 1/4-scale model of the graphite heat shield which houses the radioactive fuel for the Viking spacecraft auxiliary power supply. The basic hexagonal prism was also modified to simulate a prism on which ablation of one of the six side flats had occurred. This modified hexagonal prism was tested to determine the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of a shape change caused by ablation during a possible side-on stable reentry.

  7. Microfractures produced by a laboratory scale hypervelocity impact into granite. [for lunar sample crack spectra interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, R. W., II; Simmons, G.; Richter, D.; Hoerz, F.

    1977-01-01

    Differential strain analysis and scanning electron microscopy are employed to study the microcracks produced in a granite block by shock waves from a hypervelocity impact. The anisotropy of the pre-shock cracks appears to control the orientations of the microcracks. Over the range 2 to 20 kbar, total crack porosity proves to be linearly related to shock pressure. The effect of the peak shock pressure on the width and median closure pressure of the crack spectra is also investigated. The results of the microcrack study may be useful in interpreting lunar samples.

  8. Analytical Ballistic Limit Equation for Projectiles Hypervelocity Impacting on Dual Wall Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li; Li, Canan; Pang, Baojun; Zhang, Wei

    2009-03-01

    Ballistic limit of shielding structures are an important field in the research of space shielding technology. Based on the theories of plates, the paper obtains the ballistic limit equation for dual-wall structures. The equation obtained is valid for dual-wall structures subjected to hypervelocity impacts by spherical projectiles. The Rayleigh-Ritz method and Tresca yielding criteria is used in the analysis. To verify the equation, predictions to experimental tests are presented. Analysis of the predictions and comparisons with existing ballistic limit equations are also presented. The ballistic limit curve agrees well with existing ones.

  9. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changyi; Wu, Yiyong; Lv, Gang; Rubanov, Sergey; Jamieson, David N.

    2015-04-01

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5-30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11-68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the differences

  10. Predicting multi-wall structural response to hypervelocity impact using the hull code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1993-01-01

    Previously, multi-wall structures have been analyzed extensively, primarily through experiment, as a means of increasing the meteoroid/space debris impact protection of spacecraft. As structural configurations become more varied, the number of tests required to characterize their response increases dramatically. As an alternative to experimental testing, numerical modeling of high-speed impact phenomena is often being used to predict the response of a variety of structural systems under different impact loading conditions. The results of comparing experimental tests to Hull Hydrodynamic Computer Code predictions are reported. Also, the results of a numerical parametric study of multi-wall structural response to hypervelocity cylindrical projectile impact are presented.

  11. Measurement of incident position of hypervelocity particles on piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate detector.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Seiji; Onishi, Toshiyuki; Minami, Shigeyuki; Miyachi, Takashi; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Nogami, Ken-ichi; Ohashi, Hideo; Sasaki, Sho; Shibata, Hiromi; Iwai, Takeo; Grün, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf; Okada, Nagaya

    2008-04-01

    A cosmic dust detector for use onboard a satellite is currently being developed by using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT). The characteristics of the PZT detector have been studied by bombarding it with hypervelocity iron (Fe) particles supplied by a Van de Graaff accelerator. One central electrode and four peripheral electrodes were placed on the front surface of the PZT detector to measure the impact positions of the incident Fe particles. It was demonstrated that the point of impact on the PZT detector could be identified by using information on the time at which the first peak of the output signal obtained from each electrode appeared.

  12. Plasma jet ignition device

    DOEpatents

    McIlwain, Michael E.; Grant, Jonathan F.; Golenko, Zsolt; Wittstein, Alan D.

    1985-01-15

    An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

  13. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  14. Impact jetting of geological materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenbo; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1995-08-01

    To understand jetting of earth materials, gabbro slabs (5 mm thick) were accelerated to 1.5-2 km sec -1 and impacted gabbro (5-10 mm thick), novaculite (10 mm thick), and porous sandstone (12 mm thick) targets at inclination angles of 30°-60°. The ejecta were collected using a catcher box filled with styrofoam and the particles are extracted using chloroform. Jetting angles are determined by the relative positions of the target and the crater produced by the ejecta. The mass of the ejected particles per unit area (˜50 mg cm -2) of the impactor remains almost independent of the impact velocity, inclination angle, thickness of the target and sample mineralogy, and density. Hydrodynamic models are used to calculate the jetting mass, angle, and velocity. Theoretical models predict ˜6 times more ejecta than the experimentally measured as the inclination angle increases. X-ray diffraction of the recovered ejecta shows that it is still in crystalline form, which agrees with thermodynamic calculations. Because the experimental results indicate that the theoretical jetting model for thin metal plates provides a poor description of the experiments, the application of metal plate theory to planet-sized objects appears to be questionable.

  15. Focused Ion Beam Recovery of Hypervelocity Impact Residue in Experimental Craters on Metallic Foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G A; Teslich, N; Dai, Z R; Bradley, J P; Kearsley, A T; Horz, F

    2005-11-04

    The Stardust sample return capsule will return to Earth in January 2006 with primitive debris collected from Comet 81P/Wild-2 during the fly-by encounter in 2004. In addition to the cometary particles embedded in low-density silica aerogel, there will be microcraters preserved in the Al foils (1100 series; 100 {micro}m thick) that are wrapped around the sample tray assembly. Soda lime spheres ({approx}49 {micro}m in diameter) have been accelerated with a Light Gas Gun into flight-grade Al foils at 6.35 km s{sup -1} to simulate the capture of cometary debris. The experimental craters have been analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) to locate and characterize remnants of the projectile material remaining within the craters. In addition, ion beam induced secondary electron imaging has proven particularly useful in identifying areas within the craters that contain residue material. Finally, high-precision focused ion beam (FIB) milling has been used to isolate and then extract an individual melt residue droplet from the interior wall of an impact. This enabled further detailed elemental characterization, free from the background contamination of the Al foil substrate. The ability to recover ''pure'' melt residues using FIB will significantly extend the interpretations of the residue chemistry preserved in the Al foils returned by Stardust.

  16. Focused Ion Beam Recovery of Hypervelocity Impact Residue in Experimental Craters on Metallic Foils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, G. A.; Teslich, N.; Dai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Kearsley, A. T.; Horz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The Stardust sample return capsule will return to Earth in January 2006 with primitive debris collected from Comet 81P/Wild-2 during the fly-by encounter in 2004. In addition to the cometary particles embedded in low-density silica aerogel, there will be microcraters preserved in the Al foils (1100 series; 100 micrometers thick) that are wrapped around the sample tray assembly. Soda lime spheres (approximately 49 m in diameter) have been accelerated with a light-gas-gun into flight-grade Al foils at 6.35 km s(sup -1) to simulate the potential capture of cometary debris. The preserved crater penetrations have been analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) to locate and characterize remnants of the projectile material remaining within the craters. In addition, ion beam induced secondary electron imaging has proven particularly useful in identifying areas within the craters that contain residue material. Finally, high-precision focused ion beam (FIB) milling has been used to isolate and then extract an individual melt residue droplet from the interior wall of an impact penetration. This enabled further detailed elemental characterization, free from the background contamination of the Al foil substrate. The ability to recover pure melt residues using FIB will significantly extend the interpretations of the residue chemistry preserved in the Al foils returned by Stardust.

  17. Bacillus subtilis spores on artificial meteorites survive hypervelocity atmospheric entry: implications for Lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Link, Lindsey; Melosh, H Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2005-12-01

    An important but untested aspect of the lithopanspermia hypothesis is that microbes situated on or within meteorites could survive hypervelocity entry from space through Earth's atmosphere. The use of high-altitude sounding rockets to test this notion was explored. Granite samples permeated with spores of Bacillus subtilis strain WN511 were attached to the exterior telemetry module of a sounding rocket and launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico into space, reaching maximum atmospheric entry velocity of 1.2 km/s. Maximum recorded temperature during the flight was measured at 145 degrees C. The surfaces of the post-flight granite samples were swabbed and tested for recovery and survival of WN511 spores, using genetic markers and the unique DNA fingerprint of WN511 as recovery criteria. Spore survivors were isolated at high frequency, ranging from 1.2% to 4.4% compared with ground controls, from all surfaces except the forward-facing surface. Sporulation-defective mutants were noted among the spaceflight survivors at high frequency (4%). These experiments constitute the first report of spore survival to hypervelocity atmospheric transit, and indicate that sounding rocket flights can be used to model the high-speed atmospheric entry of bacteria-laden artificial meteorites.

  18. Analysis of simulated hypervelocity impacts on a titanium fuel tank from the Salyut 7 space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantou, V.; McPhail, D. S.; Chater, R. J.; Kearsley, A.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this project was to gain a better understanding of the microstructural effects of hypervelocity impacts (HVI) in titanium alloys. We investigated a titanium fuel tank recovered from the Russian Salyut 7 space station, which was launched on April 19, 1982 before being destroyed during an un-controlled re-entry in 1991, reportedly scattering debris over parts of South America. Several sections were cut out from the tank in order to undergo HVI simulations using a two-stage light gas gun. In addition, a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was studied for further comparison. The crater morphologies produced were successfully characterised using microscope-based white light interferometry (Zygo ® Corp, USA), while projectile remnants were identified via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Microstructural alterations were investigated using focused ion beam (FIB) milling and depth profiling, as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). There was evidence of a very high density of dislocations in the vicinity of the crater. The extent of the deformation was localised in a region of about one to two radii of the impact craters. No notable differences were observed between the titanium alloys used during the hypervelocity impact tests.

  19. Determine ISS Soyuz Orbital Module Ballistic Limits for Steel Projectiles Hypervelocity Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Frankel

    2013-01-01

    A new orbital debris environment model (ORDEM 3.0) defines the density distribution of the debris environment in terms of the fraction of debris that are low-density (plastic), medium-density (aluminum) or high-density (steel) particles. This hypervelocity impact (HVI) program focused on assessing ballistic limits (BLs) for steel projectiles impacting the enhanced Soyuz Orbital Module (OM) micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shield configuration. The ballistic limit was defined as the projectile size on the threshold of failure of the OM pressure shell as a function of impact speeds and angle. The enhanced OM shield configuration was first introduced with Soyuz 30S (launched in May 2012) to improve the MMOD protection of Soyuz vehicles docked to the International Space Station (ISS). This test program provides HVI data on U.S. materials similar in composition and density to the Russian materials for the enhanced Soyuz OM shield configuration of the vehicle. Data from this test program was used to update ballistic limit equations used in Soyuz OM penetration risk assessments. The objective of this hypervelocity impact test program was to determine the ballistic limit particle size for 440C stainless steel spherical projectiles on the Soyuz OM shielding at several impact conditions (velocity and angle combinations). This test report was prepared by NASA-JSC/ HVIT, upon completion of tests.

  20. Hypervelocity impact testing above 10 km/s of advanced orbital debris shields

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, E.L.; Crews, J.L.; Kerr, J.H.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1996-05-01

    NASA has developed enhanced performance shields to improve the protection of spacecraft from orbital debris and meteoroid impacts. One of these enhanced shields includes a blanket of Nextel{trademark} ceramic fabric and Kevlar{trademark} high strength fabric that is positioned midway between an aluminum bumper and the spacecraft pressure wall. As part of the evaluation of this new shielding technology, impact data above 10 km/sec has been obtained by NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) from the Sandia National Laboratories HVL ({open_quotes}hypervelocity launcher{close_quotes}) and the Southwest Research Institute inhibited shaped charge launcher (ISCL). The HVL launches flyer-plates in the velocity range of 10 to 15 km/s while the ISCL launches hollow cylinders at {approximately}11.5km/s. The {gt}10km/s experiments are complemented by hydrocode analysis and light-gas gun testing at the JSC Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility (HIT-F) to assess the effects of projectile shape on shield performance. Results from the testing and analysis indicate that the Nextel{trademark}/Kevlar{trademark} shield provides superior protection performance compared to an all-aluminum shield alternative. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas.

    PubMed

    Goel, A; Tarantino, P M; Lauben, D S; Close, S

    2015-04-01

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  2. Nitric oxide emission spectroscopy measurements in a hypervelocity post-shock flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swantek, Andrew; Austin, Joanna

    2012-11-01

    In hypervelocity flight conditions, typical of sub-orbital and reentry trajectories, the coupling between the fluid mechanics and the thermochemistry of the flow becomes important. In the current work, we use an expansion tube facility to accelerate air to hypervelocity test conditions (stagnation enthalpy 8MJ/kg, velocity 3.8 km/s). A double wedge model is used to generate an oblique shock, a strong bow shock, and a shock-boundary-layer interaction which is known to be very sensitive to the thermochemical state of the gas. We investigate the nitric oxide emission signal in the ultraviolet region (220-255 nm, A-X transition) at four spatial locations downstream of the bow shock (0, 2, 4, and 6 mm). An in-house code is used to simulate the spectrum in this region and thus obtain a temperature fit. Temperatures are observed to decrease when traversing downstream, starting at approximately the frozen temperature (about 7700 K) at the location of the shock (0 mm). The furthest downstream point deviates from this trend, potentially due to heating in a shear layer formed in the flow field. The flow field is seen to be in non-equilibrium in this region, as temperatures do not reach the equilibrium temperature (about 3900 K). This work was supported by an AFOSR award FA9550-11-1-0129 with Dr John Schmisseur as Program Manager.

  3. Influence of impact conditions on plasma generation during hypervelocity impact by aluminum projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Weidong; Lv, Yangtao; Li, Jianqiao; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    For describing hypervelocity impact (relative low-speed as related to space debris and much lower than travelling speed of meteoroids) phenomenon associated with plasma generation, a self-developed 3D code was advanced to numerically simulate projectiles impacting on a rigid wall. The numerical results were combined with a new ionization model which was developed in an early study to calculate the ionized materials during the impact. The calculated results of ionization were compared with the empirical formulas concluded by experiments in references and a good agreement was obtained. Then based on the reliable 3D numerical code, a series of impacts with different projectile configurations were simulated to investigate the influence of impact conditions on hypervelocity impact generated plasma. It was found that the form of empirical formula needed to be modified. A new empirical formula with a critical impact velocity was advanced to describe the velocity dependence of plasma generation and the parameters of the modified formula were ensured by the comparison between the numerical predictions and the empirical formulas. For different projectile configurations, the changes of plasma charges with time are different but the integrals of charges on time almost stayed in the same level.

  4. Hypervelocity gun. [using both electric and chemical energy for projectile propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, F. C.; Biehl, A. J. (Inventor)

    1965-01-01

    A velocity amplifier system which uses both electric and chemical energy for projectile propulsion is provided in a compact hypervelocity gun suitable for laboratory use. A relatively heavy layer of a tamping material such as concrete encloses a loop of an electrically conductive material. An explosive charge at least partially surrounding the loop is adapted to collapse the loop upon detonation of the charge. A source of electricity charges the loop through two leads, and an electric switch which is activated by the charge explosive charge, disconnects the leads from the source of electricity and short circuits them. An opening in the tamping material extends to the loop and forms a barrel. The loop, necked down in the opening, forms the sabot on which the projectile is located. When the loop is electrically charged and the explosive detonated, the loop is short circuited and collapsed thus building up a magnetic field which acts as a sabot catcher. The sabot is detached from the loop and the sabot and projectile are accelerated to hypervelocity.

  5. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas.

    PubMed

    Goel, A; Tarantino, P M; Lauben, D S; Close, S

    2015-04-01

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments. PMID:25933852

  6. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, A. Tarantino, P. M.; Lauben, D. S.; Close, S.

    2015-04-15

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  7. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 2; WLE Small-Scale Fiberglass Panel Flat Multi-Layer Targets A-1, A-2, and B-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Targets A-1, A-2, and B-2 was to study hypervelocity impacts through multi-layered panels simulating Whipple shields on spacecraft. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  8. Momentum distribution in debris cloud during hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaster, P.; Mount, A.; Zee, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The long term operation of the Space Station Freedom requires a scheme to protect it from high velocity impacts by both man-made particles and micrometeor fragments. One such scheme is the use of metal plates to serve as shields against such orbital debris. These 'bumper' plates, as they are referred to, serve to break up any incident particle and redistribute its momentum over a larger area. It is therefore necessary to determine the momentum distribution within the debris cloud produced by such collisions in order to evaluate a materials effectiveness at accomplishing this task. This paper details the design and development of an innovative device which has made this possible. Momentum profiles were obtained for a series of test conditions. Total momentum values in the debris cloud were then calculated from these profiles. These results indicated that a momentum amplification exists with a multiplication factor of between 2 and 3. Thus the role of the bumper to serve as a means for momentum redistribution and not reduction was verified.

  9. The Giant Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, T.; Chanrion, O.; Arnone, E.; Zanotti, F.; Cummer, S.; Li, J.; Füllekrug, M.; van der Velde, O.

    2012-04-01

    Thunderstorm clouds may discharge directly to the ionosphere in spectacular luminous jets - the longest electric discharges on our planet. The electric properties of jets, such as their polarity, conductivity, and currents, have been predicted by models, but are poorly characterized by measurements. Here we present an analysis of the first gigantic jet that with certainty has a positive polarity. The jet region in the mesosphere was illuminated by an unusual sprite discharge generated by a positive cloud-to-ground lightning flash shortly after the onset of the jet. The sprite appeared with elements in a ring at ~40 km distance around the jet, the elements pointing curving away from the jet. This suggests that the field close the jet partially cancels the field driving the sprite. From a simple model of the event we conclude that a substantial portion of the positive cloud potential must be carried to ~50 km altitude, which is also consistent with the observed channel expansion and the electromagnetic radiation associated with the jet. It is further shown that blue jets are likely to substantially modify the free electron content in the lower ionosphere because of increased electron attachment driven by the jet electric field. The model further makes clear the relationship between jets, gigantic jets, and sprites. This is the first time that sprites are used for sounding the properties of the mesosphere. The observations presented here will allow evaluation of theories for jet and gigantic jet generation and of their influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere system.

  10. Composition of Plasma Formed from Hypervelocity Dust Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, N.; Close, S.; Rymer, A. M.; Mocker, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dust impacts can occur on all solar system bodies but are especially prevalent in the case of the Saturnian moons that are near or within the dust torus produced by Enceladus's plumes. Depending on the mass and charge on these plume particles, they will be influenced by both gravitational and electrodynamic forces, resulting in a range of possible impact speeds on the moons. The plasma formed upon impact can have very different characteristics depending on impact speed and on the electric field due to surface charging at the impact point. Through recent tests conducted at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics using a Van de Graaff dust accelerator, iron dust particles were electrostatically accelerated to speeds of 3-65 km/s and impacted on a variety of target materials including metallic and glassy surfaces. The target surfaces were connected to a biasing supply to represent surface charging effects. Because of the high specific kinetic energy of the dust particles, upon impact they vaporize along with part of the target surface and a fraction of this material is ionized forming a dense plasma. The impacts produced both positive and negative ions. We made measurements of the net current imparted by this expanding plasma at a distance of several centimeters from the impact point. By setting the bias of the target, we impose an electric field on the charge population, allowing a measurement of plasma composition through time of flight analysis. The figure shows representative measurements of the net current measured by a retarding potential analyzer (RPA) from separate 18 and 19 km/s impacts of 7 fg particles on a glassy surface that was negatively and positively biased, respectively. This target was an optical solar reflector donated by J. Likar of Lockheed Martin for these experiments. These results show that ions of both positive and negative charge can be formed through the mechanism of dust impacts, and has implications on the surface plasma environment

  11. Contrasting H-mode behaviour with deuterium fuelling and nitrogen seeding in the all-carbon and metallic versions of JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddison, G. P.; Giroud, C.; Alper, B.; Arnoux, G.; Balboa, I.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Boboc, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Coffey, I.; da Silva Aresta Belo, P. C.; Devaux, S.; Devynck, P.; Eich, T.; Felton, R. C.; Flanagan, J.; Frassinetti, L.; Garzotti, L.; Groth, M.; Jachmich, S.; Järvinen, A.; Joffrin, E.; Kempenaars, M. A. H.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K. D.; Lehnen, M.; Leyland, M. J.; Liu, Y.; Lomas, P. J.; Lowry, C. G.; Marsen, S.; Matthews, G. F.; McCormick, G. K.; Meigs, A. G.; Morris, A. W.; Neu, R.; Nunes, I. M.; Oberkofler, M.; Rimini, F. G.; Saarelma, S.; Sieglin, B.; Sips, A. C. C.; Sirinelli, A.; Stamp, M. F.; van Rooij, G. J.; Ward, D. J.; Wischmeier, M.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-07-01

    The former all-carbon wall on JET has been replaced with beryllium in the main torus and tungsten in the divertor to mimic the surface materials envisaged for ITER. Comparisons are presented between type I H-mode characteristics in each design by examining respective scans over deuterium fuelling and impurity seeding, required to ameliorate exhaust loads both in JET at full capability and in ITER. Attention is focused upon a common high-triangularity, single-null divertor configuration at 2.5 MA, q95 ≈ 3.5 yielding the most robust all-C performance. Contrasting results between the alternative linings are found firstly in unseeded plasmas, for which purity is improved and intrinsic radiation reduced in the ITER-like wall (ILW) but normalized energy confinement is ≈30% lower than in all-C counterparts, owing to a commensurately lower (electron) pedestal temperature. Divertor recycling is also radically altered, with slower, inboard-outboard asymmetric transients at ELMs and spontaneous oscillations in between them. Secondly, nitrogen seeding elicits opposite responses in the ILW to all-C experience, tending to raise plasma density, reduce ELM frequency, and above all to recover (electron) pedestal pressure, hence global confinement, almost back to previous levels. A hitherto unrecognized role of light impurities in pedestal stability and dynamics is consequently suggested. Thirdly, while heat loads on the divertor outboard target between ELMs are successfully reduced in proportion to the radiative cooling and ELM frequency effects of N in both wall environments, more surprisingly, average power ejected by ELMs also declines in the same proportion for the ILW. Detachment between transients is simultaneously promoted. Finally, inter-ELM W sources in the ILW divertor tend to fall with N input, although core accumulation possibly due to increased particle confinement still leads to significantly less steady conditions than in all-C plasmas. This limitation of ILW H

  12. Asteroid deflection using a kinetic impactor: Insights from hypervelocity impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerth, Tobias; Schäfer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of the planned AIDA mission [1], an impactor spacecraft (DART) hits the second component of the asteroid Didymos at hypervelocity. The impact crater will be observed from the AIM spacecraft and an observation of the ejecta plume is possible [1]. This allows conclusions to be drawn about the physical properties of the target material, and the momentum transfer will be studied [1]. In preparation for this mission, hypervelocity impact experiments can provide valuable information about the outcome of an impact event as a function of impactor and target material properties and, thus, support the interpretation of the data from the DART impact. In addition, these impact experiments provide an important means to validate numerical impact simulations required to simulate large-scale impacts that cannot be studied in laboratory experiments. Impact experiments have shown that crater morphology and size, crater growth and ejecta dynamics strongly depend on the physical properties of the target material [2]. For example, porous materials like sandstone lead to a shallower and slower ejection than low-porous materials like quartzite, and the cratering efficiency is reduced in porous targets leading to a smaller amount of ejected mass [3]. These phenomena result in a reduced momentum multiplication factor (often called "beta-value"), i.e. the ratio of the change in target momentum after the impact and the momentum of the projectile is smaller for porous materials. Hypervelocity impact experiments into target materials with different porosities and densities such as quartzite (2.9 %, 2.6 g/cm3), sandstone (25.3 %, 2 g/cm3), limestone (31 %, 1.8 g/cm3), and highly porous aerated concrete (87.5 %, 0.4 g/cm3) were conducted. Projectile velocities were varied between about 3 km/s and almost 7 km/s. A ballistic pendulum was used to measure the momentum transfer. The material strength required for scaling laws was determined for all target materials. The highest

  13. Control of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    To investigate the possibility of active control of jet noise, knowledge of the noise generation mechanisms in natural jets is essential. Once these mechanisms are determined, active control can be used to manipulate the noise production processes. We investigated the evolution of the flow fields and the acoustic fields of rectangular and circular jets. A predominant flapping mode was found in the supersonic rectangular jets. We hope to increase the spreading of supersonic jets by active control of the flapping mode found in rectangular supersonic jets.

  14. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  15. Control of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  16. Finite element analysis of hypervelocity impact behaviour of CFRP-Al/HC sandwich panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, Vaibhav A.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical response of CFRP-Al/HC (carbon fibre-reinforced/epoxy composite face sheets with Al honeycomb core) sandwich panels to hyper-velocity impact (up to 1 km/s) is studied using a finite-element model developed in ABAQUS/Explicit. The intraply damage of CFRP face sheets is analysed by mean of a user-defined material model (VUMAT) employing a combination of Hashin and Puck criteria, delamination modelled using cohesive-zone elements. The damaged Al/HC core is assessed on the basis of a Johnson Cook dynamic failure model while its hydrodynamic response is captured using the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state. The results obtained with the developed finite-element model showed a reasonable correlation to experimental damage patterns. The surface peeling of both face sheets was evident, with a significant delamination around the impact location accompanied by crushing HC core.

  17. The effect of impact angle on craters formed by hypervelocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, David C.; Rose, M. Frank; Best, Steve R.; Crumpler, Michael S.; Crawford, Gary D.; Zee, Ralph H.-C.; Bozack, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    The Space Power Institute (SPI) at Auburn University has conducted experiments on the effects of impact angle on crater morphology and impactor residue retention for hypervelocity impacts. Copper target plates were set at angles of 30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg, and 75 deg from the particle flight path. For the 30 deg and 45 deg impacts, in the velocity regime greater than 8 km s(exp -1) the resultant craters are almost identical to normal incidence impacts. The only difference found was in the apparent distribution of particle residue within the crater, and further research is needed to verify this. The 60 deg and 75 deg impacts showed marked differences in crater symmetry, crater lip shape, and particle residue distribution in the same velocity regime. Impactor residue shock fractionation effects have been quantified in first-order. It is concluded that a combination of analysis techniques can yield further information on impact velocity, direction, and angle of incidence.

  18. Hypervelocity impact tests on Space Shuttle Orbiter RCC thermal protection material. [Reinforced Carbon-Carbon laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    It is noted that the Shuttle Orbiter will be more subject to meteoroid impact than previous spacecraft, due to its greater surface area and longer cumulative time in space. The Orbiter structural material, RCC, a reinforced carbon-carbon laminate with a diffused silicon carbide coating, is evaluated in terms of its resistance to hypervelocity impact. It was found that the specimens (disks with a mass of 34 g and a thickness of 5.0 mm) were cratered only on the front surface when the impact energy was 3 J or less. At 3 J, a trace of the black carbon interior was exposed. The specimens were completely penetrated when the energy was 34 J or greater.

  19. Threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming

    2015-12-15

    Molecular dynamics method is used to study the threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact. Two effective simulation methods, piston-driven method and multi-scale shock technique, are used to simulate the shock wave. The simulation results from the two methods agree well with the experimental data, indicating that the shock wave velocity is linearly dependent on the particle velocity. The atom is considered to be ionized if the increase of its internal energy is larger than the first ionization energy. The critical impact velocity for plasma phase transition is about 13.0 km/s, corresponding to the threshold of pressure and temperature which is about 220 GPa and 11.0 × 10{sup 3 }K on the shock Hugoniot, respectively.

  20. Hypervelocity dust impacts on the Wind spacecraft: Correlations between Ulysses and Wind interstellar dust detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, S. R.; Malaspina, David M.; Andersson, Laila; Horanyi, Mihaly

    2015-09-01

    The Wind spacecraft is positioned just sunward of Earth at the first Lagrange point, while the Ulysses spacecraft orbits above and below the ecliptic plane crossing the ecliptic as far from the Sun as the orbit of Jupiter (˜5 AU). While Wind does not carry a dedicated dust detector, we demonstrate the ability of Wind electric field measurements to detect hypervelocity dust impacts through their impact plasma signatures. Interstellar dust (ISD) and interplanetary dust particles are differentiated based on a yearly modulation of the ISD flux. Measurements of ISD flux variation by Wind are found to be in good agreement with ISD flux variation measured by Ulysses. While measurements of the ISD flow direction through the Solar System determined by Wind could not be directly compared to those from Ulysses, strong variation in ISD flow direction was observed during similar time periods by both spacecraft.

  1. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of IM7/977-3 with Micro-Sized Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G.; Jegley, D. C.; Siochi, E. J.; Wells, B. K.

    2010-01-01

    Ground-based hypervelocity imapct testing was conducted on IM7/977-3 quasi-isotropic flat panels at normal incidence using micron-sized particles (i.e. less than or equal to 100 microns) of soda lime glass and olivine. Testing was performed at room temperature (RT) and 175 C with results from the 175 C test compared to those obtained at RT. Between 10 and 30 particles with velocities ranging from 5 to 13 km/s impacted each panel surface for each test temperature. Panels were ultrasonically scanned prior to and after impact testing to assess internal damage. Post-impact analysis included microscopic examination of the surface, determination of particle speed and location, and photomicroscopy for microcrack assessment. Internal damage was observed by ultrasonic inspection on panels impacted at 175 C, whereas damage for the RT impacted panels was confined to surface divets/craters as determined by microscopic analysis.

  2. Simulation of Hypervelocity Impact on Aluminum-Nextel-Kevlar Orbital Debris Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2000-01-01

    An improved hybrid particle-finite element method has been developed for hypervelocity impact simulation. The method combines the general contact-impact capabilities of particle codes with the true Lagrangian kinematics of large strain finite element formulations. Unlike some alternative schemes which couple Lagrangian finite element models with smooth particle hydrodynamics, the present formulation makes no use of slidelines or penalty forces. The method has been implemented in a parallel, three dimensional computer code. Simulations of three dimensional orbital debris impact problems using this parallel hybrid particle-finite element code, show good agreement with experiment and good speedup in parallel computation. The simulations included single and multi-plate shields as well as aluminum and composite shielding materials. at an impact velocity of eleven kilometers per second.

  3. Magnetic field amplification and generation in hypervelocity meteoroid impacts with application to lunar paleomagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, L.L.; Vickery, A.

    1984-11-15

    A one-dimensional numerical model for the expansion of impact-produced vapor clouds is used to investigate magnetic field generation mechanisms in events such as meteor collisions with the moon. The resulting cloud properties, such as ionization fraction, electrical conductivity, radial expansion velocity, mass density, and energy density are estimated. The model is initiated with the peak shock states and pressure thresholds for incipient and complete vaporization of anorthosite lunar surface materials by iron and GA composition meteorites. The expansion of the spherical gas cloud into a vacuum was traced with a one-dimensional explicit lagrangian hydrodynamic code. The hypervelocity impact plasmas produced are found to be significant in the amplitudes and orientations of the magnetic fields generated. An ambient magnetic field could have been provided by the core dynamo, which would have interacted with the expanding plasmas and formed induced paleomagnetic fields. Several other field-contribution mechanisms are discussed and discarded as potential remanent magnetism contributors.

  4. Aerothermal Performance Constraints for Hypervelocity Small Radius Unswept Leading Edges and Nosetips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziej, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Small radius leading edges and nosetips were utilized to minimize wave drag in early hypervelocity vehicle concepts until further analysis demonstrated that extreme aerothermodynamic heating would cause severe ablation or blunting of the available thermal protection system materials. Recent studies indicate that ultrahigh temperature ceramic (UHTC) materials are shape stable at temperatures approaching 3033 K and will be available for use as sharp UHTC leading edge components in the near future. Aerothermal performance constraints for sharp components made from these materials are presented in this work to demonstrate the effects of convective blocking, surface catalycity, surface emissivity, and rarefied flow effects on steady state operation at altitudes from sea level to 90 km. These components are capable of steady state operation at velocities up to 7.9 km/s at attitudes near 90 km.

  5. Hypervelocity impact study: The effect of impact angle on crater morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Gary; Hill, David; Rose, Frank E.; Zee, Ralph; Best, Steve; Crumpler, Mike

    1993-01-01

    The Space Power Institute (SPI) of Auburn University has conducted preliminary tests on the effects of impact angle on crater morphology for hypervelocity impacts. Copper target plates were set at angles of 30 deg and 60 deg from the particle flight path. For the 30 deg impact, the craters looked almost identical to earlier normal incidence impacts. The only difference found was in the apparent distribution of particle residue within the crater, and further research is needed to verify this. The 60 deg impacts showed marked differences in crater symmetry, crater lip shape, and particle residue distribution. Further research on angle effects is planned, because the particle velocities for these shots were relatively slow (7 km/s or less).

  6. Observation of mass and velocity of projectile fragments produced by hypervelocity impact with lightweight ceramic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kawai, Nobuaki; Tamura, Hideki

    2012-03-01

    In order to characterize the dynamic fracture of Al projectiles caused by impact with lightweight ceramic targets, we perform hypervelocity impact experiments of lightweight ceramic targets using spherical Al projectiles accelerated by a mini two-stage light-gas gun, and we propose a new method for estimating fragment mass by quantitative image analysis. As materials for the targets, 1-mm thick mullite, silicon nitride, and alumina ceramics are chosen. Aluminum-alloy projectiles 2.0 mm in diameter are impacted onto the targets under normal impact conditions. The dynamic fracture of the targets and projectiles is observed using flash x-ray radiography. In comparison with silicon nitride and alumina targets, a mullite target breaks a projectile into smaller fragments, and the splay angle of the debris generated from a mullite target is larger than that of the other targets. These results suggest that mullite ceramic would be a promising structural member for a debris shield.

  7. Modelling hypervelocity impact fracture of ceramic panels using a mesh-free method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, R.; Mikhail, J.; Cleary, P. W.

    2010-06-01

    This paper studies the application of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) for modelling hyper-velocity impact fracture and fragmentation in ceramic panels. Numerical modelling of complex fracture processes is important to understand the fundamental failure mechanisms in a variety of systems. Finite Element Method (FEM) is the mesh-based method conventionally applied to numerical simulation of fracture and fragmentation. However, the mesh generation and manipulation do not often provide the desired accuracy of the solutions, especially in problems with extreme deformations and discontinuities. To overcome this, here we use a mesh-free method called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) to investigate the three-dimensional fracture of ceramic panels. The effect of impact speed on the fracture pattern and energy transfer is analysed. The SPH simulations are found to be robust in understanding the fracture mechanisms and in providing crucial design parameters.

  8. Problems associated with launching hypervelocity projectiles from the Fast Shock Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.; Meier, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    Modeling and experiments are being done with the goal of understanding the physics of projectile acceleration at high driving pressures (megabar range) and short acceleration times (a few microseconds) well enough to design and test successful hypervelocity launch systems. The Fast Shock Tube, a cylindrically convergent high-explosive driver, has been used to accelerate projectiles. Detailed modeling of the experiments, including high-pressure gas flow, projectile instability, and projectile fracture, has been done with MESA/2D. Modeling results show quantitative agreement with the average behavior of the system. However, details of projectile behavior are not predicted well. Observed velocity distributions across the diameter of a projectile or projectile shapes are only in qualitative agreement with calculations. This, then, presents the major constraint on the successful design of a launch system: that the processes that limit projectile integrity depend on the details of the drive conditions, and these details are not quantitatively modeled at this time.

  9. Problems associated with launching hypervelocity projectiles from the Fast Shock Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.; Meier, J.K.

    1992-07-01

    Modeling and experiments are being done with the goal of understanding the physics of projectile acceleration at high driving pressures (megabar range) and short acceleration times (a few microseconds) well enough to design and test successful hypervelocity launch systems. The Fast Shock Tube, a cylindrically convergent high-explosive driver, has been used to accelerate projectiles. Detailed modeling of the experiments, including high-pressure gas flow, projectile instability, and projectile fracture, has been done with MESA/2D. Modeling results show quantitative agreement with the average behavior of the system. However, details of projectile behavior are not predicted well. Observed velocity distributions across the diameter of a projectile or projectile shapes are only in qualitative agreement with calculations. This, then, presents the major constraint on the successful design of a launch system: that the processes that limit projectile integrity depend on the details of the drive conditions, and these details are not quantitatively modeled at this time.

  10. Plasma flow and fast particles in a hypervelocity accelerator - A color presentation. [micrometeoroid simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igenbergs, E. B.; Cour-Palais, B.; Fisher, E.; Stehle, O.

    1975-01-01

    A new concept for particle acceleration for micrometeoroid simulation was developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, using a high-density self-luminescent fast plasma flow to accelerate glass beads (with a diameter up to 1.0 mm) to velocities between 15-20 km/sec. After a short introduction to the operation of the hypervelocity range, the eight-converter-camera unit used for the photographs of the plasma flow and the accelerated particles is described. These photographs are obtained with an eight-segment reflecting pyramidal beam splitter. Wratten filters were mounted between the beam splitter and the converter tubes of the cameras. The photographs, which were recorded on black and white film, were used to make the matrices for the dye-color process, which produced the prints shown.

  11. A Dipole on the Sky: Predictions for Hypervelocity Stars from the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubert, Douglas; Evans, N. Wyn

    2016-07-01

    We predict the distribution of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) ejected from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), under the assumption that the dwarf galaxy hosts a central massive black hole (MBH). For the majority of stars ejected from the LMC, the orbital velocity of the LMC has contributed a significant fraction of their galactic rest-frame velocity, leading to a dipole density distribution on the sky. We quantify the dipole using spherical harmonic analysis and contrast with the monopole expected for HVSs ejected from the Galactic center (GC). There is a tendril in the density distribution that leads the LMC, which is coincident with the well-known and unexplained clustering of HVSs in the constellations of Leo and Sextans. Our model is falsifiable since it predicts that Gaia will reveal a large density of HVSs in the southern hemisphere.

  12. Projectile shape and material effects in hypervelocity impact response of dual-wall structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Darzi, Kent

    1992-01-01

    All large spacecraft are susceptible to impacts by meteoroids and pieces of orbiting space debris. These impacts occur at extremely high speeds and can damage flight-critical systems, which can in turn lead to catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. A long-duration spacecraft developed for a mission into this environment must include adequate protection against perforation of pressurized components by such impacts. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the effects of projectile shape and material on the perforation of aluminum dual-wall structural systems. Impact damage is characterized according to the extent of perforation, crater, and spall damage in the structural systems as a result of hypervelocity projectile impact loadings. Analysis of the damage data shows that there are distinct differences in impact damage from cylindrical and spherical projectiles. Projectile density is also found to affect the type and extent of damage sustained by dual-wall structural systems.

  13. Simulation of Hypervelocity Impact Effects on Reinforced Carbon-Carbon. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Young-Keun; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft operating in low earth orbit face a significant orbital debris impact hazard. Of particular concern, in the case of the Space Shuttle, are impacts on critical components of the thermal protection system. Recent research has formulated a new material model of reinforced carbon-carbon, for use in the analysis of hypervelocity impact effects on the Space Shuttle wing leading edge. The material model has been validated in simulations of published impact experiments and applied to model orbital debris impacts at velocities beyond the range of current experimental methods. The results suggest that momentum scaling may be used to extrapolate the available experimental data base, in order to predict the size of wing leading edge perforations at impact velocities as high as 13 km/s.

  14. Mitigation of Autoignition Due to Premixing in a Hypervelocity Flow Using Active Wall Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axdahl, Erik; Kumar, Ajay; Wilhite, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Preinjection of fuel on the forebody of an airbreathing vehicle is a proposed method to gain access to hypervelocity flight Mach numbers. However, this creates the possibility of autoignition either near the wall or in the core of the flow, thereby consuming fuel prematurely as well as increasing the amount of pressure drag on the vehicle. The computational fluid dynamics code VULCAN was used to conduct three dimensional simulations of the reacting flow in the vicinity of hydrogen injectors on a flat plate at conditions relevant to a Mach 12 notional flight vehicle forebody to determine the location where autoignition occurs. Active wall cooling strategies were formulated and simulated in response to regions of autoignition. It was found that tangential film cooling using hydrogen or helium were both able to nearly or completely eliminate wall autoignition in the flow domain of interest.

  15. Analysis of energy dissipation and deposition in elastic bodies impacting at hypervelocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, David F.; Allahdadi, Firooz A.

    1992-01-01

    A series of impact problems were analyzed using the Eulerian hydrocode CTH. The objective was to quantify the amount of energy dissipated locally by a projectile-infinite plate impact. A series of six impact problems were formulated such that the mass and speed of each projectile were varied in order to allow for increasing speed with constant kinetic energy. The properties and dimensions of the plate were the same for each projectile impact. The resulting response of the plate was analyzed for global Kinetic Energy, global momentum, and local maximum shear stress. The percentage of energy dissipated by the various hypervelocity impact phenomena appears as a relative change of shear stress at a point away from the impact in the plate.

  16. TEM characterization of dislocations in TiB2 particles after hypervelocity impact.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Li, J F; Hou, L L; Sun, D L

    2014-12-01

    Characteristic of dislocations in TiB2 particles associated with hypervelocity impact craters in 65 vol.% TiB2/Al composite were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two kinds of dislocation networks in as-impacted TiB2 particles were identified. One is hexagonal dislocation networks including 1/3〈1̄21̄0〉, 〈0001〉, 1/3〈1̄21̄3〉 type dislocations on {0001}, {101̄0}, and {123̄0} planes. Another one is the hexagonal dislocation networks including 1/3〈112̄0〉, 〈0001〉, and 1/3〈112̄3〉 type dislocations on {0001}, {101̄0}, and {11̄00} planes. Formation of dislocation network should be contributed to the parallel sets of "a" type dislocations (1/3〈112̄0〉 or 1/3〈1̄21̄0〉 type dislocations) reacting with parallel sets of "b" type dislocations (〈0001〉 type dislocations) to form "c" type dislocations (1/3〈112̄3〉 or 1/3〈1̄21̄3〉 type dislocations). Moreover, dislocations reaction processes do not result in an energy reduction, and are called quasi-equilibrium configurations. Formation of dislocations may result from high temperature or pressure generated by hypervelocity impact. During the cooling from high temperature and unloading from high pressure, dislocations in TiB2 particles rearranged and transformed to dislocation networks to lower the defect energy. PMID:25108104

  17. Time Resolved Temperature Measurement of Hypervelocity Impact Generated Plasma Using a Global Optimization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hew, Y. M.; Linscott, I.; Close, S.

    2015-12-01

    Meteoroids and orbital debris, collectively referred to as hypervelocity impactors, travel between 7 and 72 km/s in free space. Upon their impact onto the spacecraft, the energy conversion from kinetic to ionization/vaporization occurs within a very brief timescale and results in a small and dense expanding plasma with a very strong optical flash. The radio frequency (RF) emission produced by this plasma can potentially lead to electrical anomalies within the spacecraft. In addition, space weather, such as solar activity and background plasma, can establish spacecraft conditions which can exaggerate the damages done by these impacts. During the impact, a very strong impact flash will be generated. Through the studying of this emission spectrum of the impact, we hope to study the impact generated gas cloud/plasma properties. The impact flash emitted from a ground-based hypervelocity impact test is long expected by many scientists to contain the characteristics of the impact generated plasma, such as plasma temperature and density. This paper presents a method for the time-resolved plasma temperature estimation using three-color visible band photometry data with a global pattern search optimization method. The equilibrium temperature of the plasma can be estimated using an optical model which accounts for both the line emission and continuum emission from the plasma. Using a global pattern search based optimizer, the model can isolate the contribution of the continuum emission versus the line emission from the plasma. The plasma temperature can thus be estimated. Prior to the optimization step, a Gaussian process is also applied to extract the optical emission signal out of the noisy background. The resultant temperature and line-to-continuum emission weighting factor are consistent with the spectrum of the impactor material and current literature.

  18. SILICATE DUST SIZE DISTRIBUTION FROM HYPERVELOCITY COLLISIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR DUST PRODUCTION IN DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Takasawa, S.; Nakamura, A. M.; Arakawa, M.; Seto, Y.; Sangen, K.; Setoh, M.; Machii, N.; Kadono, T.; Shigemori, K.; Hironaka, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Sano, T.; Watari, T.; Dohi, K.; Ohno, S.; Maeda, M.; Sakaiya, T.; Otani, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    2011-06-01

    Fragments generated by high-velocity collisions between solid planetary bodies are one of the main sources of new interplanetary dust particles. However, only limited ranges of collision velocity, ejecta size, and target materials have been studied in previous laboratory experiments, and the collision condition that enables the production of dust-sized particles remains unclear. We conducted hypervelocity impact experiments on silicate rocks at relative velocities of 9 to 61 km s{sup -1}, which is beyond the upper limit of previous laboratory studies. Sub-millimeter-diameter aluminum and gold spheres were accelerated by laser ablation and were shot into dunite and basalt targets. We analyzed the surfaces of aerogel blocks deployed near the targets using an electron probe micro analyzer and counted the number of particles that contained the target material. The size distributions of ejecta ranged from five to tens of microns in diameter. The total cross-sectional area of dust-sized ejecta monotonically increased with the projectile kinetic energy, independent of impact velocity, projectile diameter, and projectile and target material compositions. The slopes of the cumulative ejecta-size distributions ranged from -2 to -5. Most of the slopes were steeper than the -2.5 or -2.7 that is expected for a collisional equilibrium distribution in a collision cascade with mass-independent or mass-dependent catastrophic disruption thresholds, respectively. This suggests that the steep dust size-distribution proposed for the debris disk around HD172555 (an A5V star) could be due to a hypervelocity collision.

  19. Macroscopic electric charge separation during hypervelocity impacts: Potential implications for planetary paleomagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    The production of transient magnetic fields by hypervelocity meteoroid impact has been proposed to possibly explain the presence of paleomagnetic fields in certain lunar samples as well as across broader areas of the lunar surface. In an effort to understand the lunar magnetic record, continued experiments at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range allow characterizing magnetic fields produced by the 5 km/s impacts of 0.32-0.64 cm projectiles over a broad range of impact angles and projectile/target compositions. From such studies, another phenomenon has emerged, macroscopic electric charge separation, that may have importance for the magnetic state of solid-body surfaces. This phenomenon was observed during explosive cratering experiments, but the magnetic consequences of macroscopic electric charge separation (as opposed to plasma production) during explosion and impact cratering have not, to our knowledge, been explored before now. It is straightforward to show that magnetic field production due to this process may scale as a weakly increasing function of impactor kinetic energy, although more work is needed to precisely assess the scaling dependence. The original intent of our experiments was to assess the character of purely electrostatic signals for comparison with inferred electrostatic noise signals acquired by shielded magnetic sensors buried within particulate dolomite targets. The results demonstrated that electrostatic noise does affect the magnetic sensors but only at relatively short distances (less than 4 cm) from the impact point (our magnetic studies are generally performed at distances greater than approximately 5.5 cm). However, to assess models for magnetic field generation during impact, measurements are needed of the magnetic field as close to the impact point as possible; hence, work with an improved magnetic sensor design is in progress. In this paper, we focus on electric charge separation during hypervelocity impacts as a potential transient

  20. Shock Tunnel Studies of the Hypersonic Flowfield around the Hypervelocity Ballistic Models with Aerospikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakalyani, G.; Saravanan, S.; Jagadeesh, G.

    Reduced drag and aerodynamic heating are the two basic design requirements for any hypersonic vehicle [1]. The flowfield around an axisymmetric blunt body is characterized by a bow shockwave standing ahead of its nose. The pressure and temperature behind this shock wave are very high. This increased pressure and temperature are responsible for the high levels of drag and aerodynamic heating over the body. In the past, there have been many investigations on the use of aerospikes as a drag reduction tool. These studies on spiked bodies aim at reducing both the drag and aerodynamic heating by modifying the hypersonic flowfield ahead of the nose of the body [2]. However, most of them used very simple configurations to experimentally study the drag reduction using spikes at hypersonic speeds [3] and therefore very little experimental data is available for a realistic geometric configuration. In the present study, the standard AGARD Hypervelocity Ballistic model 1 is used as the test model. The addition of the spike to the blunt body significantly alters the flowfield ahead of the nose, leading to the formation of a low pressure conical recirculation region, thus causing a reduction in drag and wall heat flux [4]. In the present investigation, aerodynamic drag force is measured over the Hypervelocity Ballistic model-1, with and without spike, at a flow enthalpy of 1.7 MJ/kg. The experiments are carried out at a Mach number of 8 and at zero angle of attack. An internally mountable accelerometer based 3-component force balance system is used to measure the aerodynamic forces on the model. Also computational studies are carried out to complement the experiments.

  1. Characteristics of hypervelocity impact craters on LDEF experiment S1003 and implications of small particle impacts on reflective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Merrow, James E.

    1992-01-01

    The Ion Beam Textured and Coated Surfaces Experiment (IBEX) was designated S1003 on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) at a location of 98 degrees relative to the ram direction. Thirty-six diverse materials were exposed to the micrometeoroid (and some debris) environment for 5.8 years. Optical property measurements indicated no changes for almost all of the materials except S-13G, Kapton, and Kapton-coated surfaces, and these changes can be explained by other environmental effects. From the predicted micrometeoroid flux of NASA SP-8013, no changes in optical properties of the surfaces due to micrometeoroids were expected. However, there were hypervelocity impacts on the various diverse materials flown on IBEX. The characteristics of these craters were documented using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and are presented. Interest in placing large solar concentrator/solar dynamic systems in space for power generation has again brought up a concern for maintaining the integrity of the optical properties of highly specular reflecting surfaces in the near-Earth space environment. It has been shown that highly reflective polished metals and thin film coatings degrade when exposed to simulated micrometeoroids in the laboratory. At LeRC, a shock tube was used to simulate the phenomenon of micrometeoroid optical properties of surfaces exposed to this impact were then evaluated. A calibrated sensor, 2000 A Al/stainless steel, was developed to not only detect the small size micrometeoroid environment, but also to evaluate the degradation of the optical properties of thin aluminum films in space. This sensor was flown on LDEF experiment S1003 and also on the OSO 3 and SERT 2 satellites that were launched in 1967 and 1970, respectively. No changes in the optical properties of the highly reflective surface sensor on SERT 2 were measured during 20 years in space. The results, as determined by the accuracy of the sensor, indicate that a highly reflective surface should

  2. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  3. Risk factors of jet fuel combustion products.

    PubMed

    Tesseraux, Irene

    2004-04-01

    Air travel is increasing and airports are being newly built or enlarged. Concern is rising about the exposure to toxic combustion products in the population living in the vicinity of large airports. Jet fuels are well characterized regarding their physical and chemical properties. Health effects of fuel vapors and liquid fuel are described after occupational exposure and in animal studies. Rather less is known about combustion products of jet fuels and exposure to those. Aircraft emissions vary with the engine type, the engine load and the fuel. Among jet aircrafts there are differences between civil and military jet engines and their fuels. Combustion of jet fuel results in CO2, H2O, CO, C, NOx, particles and a great number of organic compounds. Among the emitted hydrocarbons (HCs), no compound (indicator) characteristic for jet engines could be detected so far. Jet engines do not seem to be a source of halogenated compounds or heavy metals. They contain, however, various toxicologically relevant compounds including carcinogenic substances. A comparison between organic compounds in the emissions of jet engines and diesel vehicle engines revealed no major differences in the composition. Risk factors of jet engine fuel exhaust can only be named in context of exposure data. Using available monitoring data, the possibilities and limitations for a risk assessment approach for the population living around large airports are presented. The analysis of such data shows that there is an impact on the air quality of the adjacent communities, but this impact does not result in levels higher than those in a typical urban environment.

  4. Risk factors of jet fuel combustion products.

    PubMed

    Tesseraux, Irene

    2004-04-01

    Air travel is increasing and airports are being newly built or enlarged. Concern is rising about the exposure to toxic combustion products in the population living in the vicinity of large airports. Jet fuels are well characterized regarding their physical and chemical properties. Health effects of fuel vapors and liquid fuel are described after occupational exposure and in animal studies. Rather less is known about combustion products of jet fuels and exposure to those. Aircraft emissions vary with the engine type, the engine load and the fuel. Among jet aircrafts there are differences between civil and military jet engines and their fuels. Combustion of jet fuel results in CO2, H2O, CO, C, NOx, particles and a great number of organic compounds. Among the emitted hydrocarbons (HCs), no compound (indicator) characteristic for jet engines could be detected so far. Jet engines do not seem to be a source of halogenated compounds or heavy metals. They contain, however, various toxicologically relevant compounds including carcinogenic substances. A comparison between organic compounds in the emissions of jet engines and diesel vehicle engines revealed no major differences in the composition. Risk factors of jet engine fuel exhaust can only be named in context of exposure data. Using available monitoring data, the possibilities and limitations for a risk assessment approach for the population living around large airports are presented. The analysis of such data shows that there is an impact on the air quality of the adjacent communities, but this impact does not result in levels higher than those in a typical urban environment. PMID:15093276

  5. Jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-08-01

    Recent jet results in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from the CDF experiment at the Tevatron are presented. The jet inclusive cross section is compared to next-to-leading order QCD prediction in different rapidity regions. The b-jet inclusive cross section is measured exploiting the long lifetime and large mass of B-hadrons. Jet shapes, W+jets and W/Z+photon cross sections are also measured and compared to expectations from QCD production.

  6. Protostellar Jets: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, B. F.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Opher, R.

    1998-11-01

    Numerical simulations of astrophysical jets have been made in order to study their collimation and internal structure. Recently Ouyed & Pudritz (1997) did numerical simulations of axi-simetric magnetocentrifugal jets from a keplerian acretion disk employing the eulerian finite difference code Zeus-2D. During their simulation, it was raised a steady state jet confirming a lot of results of the MHD winds steady state theory. Following this scenario we did tridimensional numerial simulations of this model allowing the jet, after a perturbation, evolve into a not steady state producing the helical features observed in some protostellar jets.

  7. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact: Properties of Largest Fragment Produced by Hypervelocity Impact of Aluminum Spheres with Thin Aluminum Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piekutowski, Andrew J.

    1995-01-01

    Results of a series of hypervelocity impact tests are presented. In these tests, 1.275-g, 9.53-mm-diameter, 2017-T4 aluminum spheres were fired at normal incidence at eight thicknesses of 6061-T6 aluminum sheet. Bumper thickness to projectile diameter (t/D) ratio ranged from 0.026 to 0.424. Nominal impact velocity was 6.7 km/s. Results of five tests using 6.35, 9.53, and 12.70-mm-diameter aluminum spheres and other aluminum alloy bumpers are also given. A large chunky fragment of projectile was observed at the center of the debris clouds produced by the impacts. The equivalent diameter of this large fragment ranged from 5.5 mm for the lowest t/D ratio to a minimum of 0.6 mm for the case where maximum breakup of the projectile occurred (t/D approximately 0.2 to 0.3). When the t/D ratio was 0.42, numerous large flaky fragments were evenly distributed in the external bubble of bumper debris. Velocity of the large central fragments decreased continuously with increasing t/D ratio, ranging from about 99 percent to less than 80 percent of the impact velocity. The change in the velocity of small fragments spalling from the rear of the projectile was used to obtain a relationship showing a linear increase in the size of the central projectile fragment with decrease in the shock-induced stress in the projectile.

  8. Extension and Validation of a Hybrid Particle-Finite Element Method for Hypervelocity Impact Simulation. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.; Shivarama, Ravishankar

    2004-01-01

    The hybrid particle-finite element method of Fahrenthold and Horban, developed for the simulation of hypervelocity impact problems, has been extended to include new formulations of the particle-element kinematics, additional constitutive models, and an improved numerical implementation. The extended formulation has been validated in three dimensional simulations of published impact experiments. The test cases demonstrate good agreement with experiment, good parallel speedup, and numerical convergence of the simulation results.

  9. Reusable Metallic Thermal Protection Systems Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.; Martin, Carl J.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Poteet, Carl C.

    1998-01-01

    Metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) are being developed to help meet the ambitious goals of future reusable launch vehicles. Recent metallic TPS development efforts at NASA Langley Research Center are described. Foil-gage metallic honeycomb coupons, representative of the outer surface of metallic TPS were subjected to low speed impact, hypervelocity impact, rain erosion, and subsequent arcjet exposure. TPS panels were subjected to thermal vacuum, acoustic, and hot gas flow testing. Results of the coupon and panel tests are presented. Experimental and analytical tools are being developed to characterize and improve internal insulations. Masses of metallic TPS and advanced ceramic tile and blanket TPS concepts are compared for a wide range of parameters.

  10. On jet substructure methods for signal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Powling, Alexander; Siodmok, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    We carry out simple analytical calculations and Monte Carlo studies to better understand the impact of QCD radiation on some well-known jet substructure methods for jets arising from the decay of boosted Higgs bosons. Understanding differences between taggers for these signal jets assumes particular significance in situations where they perform similarly on QCD background jets. As an explicit example of this we compare the Y-splitter method to the more recently proposed Y-pruning technique. We demonstrate how the insight we gain can be used to significantly improve the performance of Y-splitter by combining it with trimming and show that this combination outperforms the other taggers studied here, at high p T . We also make analytical estimates for optimal parameter values, for a range of methods and compare to results from Monte Carlo studies.

  11. Ejection and Lofting of Dust from Hypervelocity Impacts on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermalyn, B.; Schultz, P. H.

    2011-12-01

    Hypervelocity impact events mobilize and redistribute fine-grained regolith dust across the surfaces of planetary bodies. The ejecta mass-velocity distribution controls the location and emplacement of these materials. The current flux of material falling on the moon is dominated by small bolides and should cause frequent impacts that eject dust at high speeds. For example, approximately 25 LCROSS-sized (~20-30m diameter) craters are statistically expected to be formed naturally on the moon during any given earth year. When scaled to lunar conditions, the high-speed component of ejecta from hypervelocity impacts can be lofted for significant periods of time (as evidenced by the LCROSS mission results, c.f., Schultz, et al., 2010, Colaprete, et al., 2010). Even at laboratory scales, ejecta can approach orbital velocities; the higher impact speeds and larger projectiles bombarding the lunar surface may permit a significant portion of material to be launched closer to escape velocity. When these ejecta return to the surface (or encounter local topography), they impact at hundreds of meters per second or faster, thereby "scouring" the surface with low mass oblique impacts. While these high-speed ejecta represent only a small fraction of the total ejected mass, the lofting and subsequent ballistic return of this dust has the highest mobilization potential and will be directly applicable to the upcoming LADEE mission. A suite of hypervelocity impact experiments into granular materials was performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). This study incorporates both canonical sand targets and air-fall pumice dust to simulate the mechanical properties of lunar regolith. The implementation of a Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) technique permits non-intrusive measurement of the ejecta velocity distribution within the ejecta curtain by following the path of individual ejecta particles. The PTV system developed at the AVGR uses a series of high-speed cameras (ranging

  12. Liquid jet target x-ray tube with field emission cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heid, Oliver; Polikhov, Stepan; Karpinskiy, Gennadiy; Geisler, Andreas; Bondarenko, Taras; Botyachkova, Alexandra; Frolov, Sergey; Ivanov, Vladislav

    2015-08-01

    We introduce first results of our research in a promising approach for micro focal x-ray generation. The approach combines the use of liquid metal jet target as anode and carbon based nanostructures as field emission cathode. Results of metal jet break-up CFD simulation and cold cathode performance tests are described. The planned experimental program is discussed herein as well.

  13. Cavitation Inception in Immersed Jet Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockett, R. D.; Ndamuso, N.; Price, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation inception occurring in immersed jets was investigated in a purpose-built mechanical flow rig. The rig utilized custom-built cylindrical and conical nozzles to direct high-velocity jets of variable concentration n-octane-hexadecane mixtures into a fused silica optically accessible receiver. The fluid pressure upstream and down-stream of the nozzles were manually controlled. The study employed a variety of acrylic and metal nozzles. The results show that the critical upstream pressure to downstream pressure ratio for incipient cavitation decreases with increasing n-octane concentration for the cylindrical nozzles, and increases with increasing n-octane concentration for the conical nozzle.

  14. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  15. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Continued Development of a Global Heat Transfer Measurement System at AEDC Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurits, Inna; Lewis, M. J.; Hamner, M. P.; Norris, Joseph D.

    2007-01-01

    Heat transfer rates are an extremely important consideration in the design of hypersonic vehicles such as atmospheric reentry vehicles. This paper describes the development of a data reduction methodology to evaluate global heat transfer rates using surface temperature-time histories measured with the temperature sensitive paint (TSP) system at AEDC Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9. As a part of this development effort, a scale model of the NASA Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) was painted with TSP and multiple sequences of high resolution images were acquired during a five run test program. Heat transfer calculation from TSP data in Tunnel 9 is challenging due to relatively long run times, high Reynolds number environment and the desire to utilize typical stainless steel wind tunnel models used for force and moment testing. An approach to reduce TSP data into convective heat flux was developed, taking into consideration the conditions listed above. Surface temperatures from high quality quantitative global temperature maps acquired with the TSP system were then used as an input into the algorithm. Preliminary comparison of the heat flux calculated using the TSP surface temperature data with the value calculated using the standard thermocouple data is reported.

  17. New experimental capability to investigate the hypervelocity micrometeoroid bombardment of cryogenic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andrew Oakleigh; Dee, Richard; Gudipati, Murthy S; Horányi, Mihály; James, David; Kempf, Sascha; Munsat, Tobin; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Ulibarri, Zach

    2016-02-01

    Ice is prevalent throughout the solar system and beyond. Though the evolution of many of these icy surfaces is highly dependent on associated micrometeoroid impact phenomena, experimental investigation of these impacts has been extremely limited, especially at the impactor speeds encountered in space. The dust accelerator facility at the Institute for Modeling Plasmas, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) of NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute has developed a novel cryogenic system that will facilitate future study of hypervelocity impacts into ice and icy regolith. The target consists of a copper block, cooled by liquid nitrogen, upon which layers of vapor-deposited ice, pre-frozen ice, or icy regolith can be built in a controlled and quantifiable environment. This ice can be grown from a variety of materials, including H2O, CH3OH, NH3, and slurries containing nanophase iron. Ice temperatures can be varied between 96 K and 150 K and ice thickness greater than 150 nm can be accurately measured. Importantly, the composition of ion plumes created during micrometeoroid impacts onto these icy layers can be measured even in trace amounts by in situ time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. In this paper, we present the fundamental design components of the cryogenic target chamber at IMPACT and proof-of-concept results from target development and from first impacts into thick layers of water ice.

  18. Local and distant trauma after hypervelocity ballistic impact to the pig hind limb.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Wei; Kang, Jian-Yi; Chen, Kui-Jun; Wang, Ai-Min; Wang, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    The development of high-energy weapons could increase the velocity of projectiles to well over 1000 m/s. The nature of the injuries caused by the ballistic impact of projectiles at velocities much faster than 1000 m/s is unclear. This study characterizes the mechanical and biochemical alterations caused by high-speed ballistic impact generated by spherical steel ball to the hind limbs of the pig. That the local and distal injuries caused by hypervelocity ballistic impact to the living body are also identified. It is showed that the severity of the injury was positively correlated with the velocity of the projectile. And 4000 m/s seems to be the critical velocity for the 5.6 mm spherical steel ball, which would cause severe damage to either local or distal organs, as below that speed the projectile penetrated the body while above that speed it caused severe damage to the body. In addition, vaporization prevented the projectile from penetrating the body and the consequent pressure wave seems to be the causal factor for the distant damage.

  19. Conceptual design of a flight validation mission for a Hypervelocity Asteroid Intercept Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbee, Brent W.; Wie, Bong; Steiner, Mark; Getzandanner, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) are asteroids and comets whose orbits approach or cross Earth's orbit. NEOs have collided with our planet in the past, sometimes to devastating effect, and continue to do so today. Collisions with NEOs large enough to do significant damage to the ground are fortunately infrequent, but such events can occur at any time and we therefore need to develop and validate the techniques and technologies necessary to prevent the Earth impact of an incoming NEO. In this paper we provide background on the hazard posed to Earth by NEOs and present the results of a recent study performed by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Mission Design Lab (MDL) in collaboration with Iowa State University's Asteroid Deflection Research Center (ADRC) to design a flight validation mission for a Hypervelocity Asteroid Intercept Vehicle (HAIV) as part of a Phase 2 NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) research project. The HAIV is a two-body vehicle consisting of a leading kinetic impactor and trailing follower carrying a Nuclear Explosive Device (NED) payload. The HAIV detonates the NED inside the crater in the NEO's surface created by the lead kinetic impactor portion of the vehicle, effecting a powerful subsurface detonation to disrupt the NEO. For the flight validation mission, only a simple mass proxy for the NED is carried in the HAIV. Ongoing and future research topics are discussed following the presentation of the detailed flight validation mission design results produced in the MDL.

  20. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De'an; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft.

  1. Screening Tests for Enhanced Shielding Against Hypervelocity Particle Impacts for Future Unmanned Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzar, Robin; Hupfer, Jan; Aridon, Gwenaelle; Gergonne, Bernard; David, Matthieu; Bourke, Paul; Cougnet, Claude

    2013-08-01

    Protection of components of unmanned spacecraft against particle impacts is typically provided by the spacecraft's structure together with the intrinsic protection capabilities of the components themselves. Thus to increase the survivability of future spacecraft, one option is to enhance the protection already provided using enhanced materials and additional shielding. As part of the EU funded FP7 research project ReVuS ("Reducing the Vulnerability of Space systems"), the configurations of equipment typically found on board unmanned spacecraft were identified. For each of those configurations, potential solutions have been identified which enhance the robustness against particle impacts. The solutions are broken down into a number of shielding components that include e.g. additional protective layers made from aluminum, Kevlar, Nextel, stainless steel mesh and ceramics. To evaluate the characteristics and performances of these shielding components, a number of screening hypervelocity impact tests were performed. During these tests, representative configurations have been subjected to impacts of aluminum spheres of 3 mm and 5 mm diameter at a nominal impact velocity of 7 km/s. This paper describes the targets and presents and compares the results.

  2. A Technique for Obtaining Hypervelocity Impact Data by using the Relative Velocities of Two Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Collins, Rufus D., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    A facility has been developed and put into operation to determine the feasibility of obtaining hypervelocity impact data by using the relative velocities of two projectiles. The facility utilizes the technique of firing a target toward an oncoming high-velocity projectile so that the impact velocity is equal to the sum of the projectile velocity and the target velocity. A 37-millimeter powder gun is utilized to accelerate the targets, and a specially designed 22-caliber light-gas gun accelerates the impacting projectiles. The light-gas gun is operated by detonating an explosive charge which permits it to be synchronized with the firing of the 37-millimeter gun. Impact velocities as great as 21,850 ft/sec have been obtained during development of the facility. After the oncoming projectiles impact the targets fired from the 37-millimeter gun, these targets are recovered by allowing them to impact into Celotex and soft wooden blocks. The craters formed in the targets then can be observed and measured. The results of several preliminary firings of the facility are included in this report.

  3. Hypervelocity Impact Test Fragment Modeling: Modifications to the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouge, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests on test satellites are performed by members of the orbital debris scientific community in order to understand and typify the on-orbit collision breakup process. By analysis of these test satellite fragments, the fragment size and mass distributions are derived and incorporated into various orbital debris models. These same fragments are currently being put to new use using emerging technologies. Digital models of these fragments are created using a laser scanner. A group of computer programs referred to as the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve code uses these digital representations in a multitude of ways that describe, measure, and model on-orbit fragments and fragment behavior. The Dynamic Rotation subroutine generates all of the possible reflected intensities from a scanned fragment as if it were observed to rotate dynamically while in orbit about the Earth. This calls an additional subroutine that graphically displays the intensities and the resulting frequency of those intensities as a range of solar phase angles in a Probability Density Function plot. This document reports the additions and modifications to the subset of the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve concerned with the Dynamic Rotation and Probability Density Function plotting subroutines.

  4. Hypervelocity launching of flyers at the SG-III prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Min; Chu, Genbai; Zhu, Bin; He, Weihua; Xi, Tao; Fan, Wei; Xin, Jianting; Gu, Yuqiu

    2016-01-01

    Experiments of laser-driven hypervelocity flyers have been conducted at the SG-III prototype laser facility. Using the continuum phase plate technique, four laser beams each with a 3-ns quadratic profile are configured to produce relatively uniform irradiated spots of diameter size either 500 μm or 2000 μm. With the former, specifically designed multi-layered flyers (polyimide/copper) were accelerated by shock impedance and reverberation techniques via direct laser ablation to a super-high averaged velocity of 55 km/s, much faster than recently reported results. Light-emission signals of shock breakout and flyer impact on flat or stepped windows were obtained that indicated good planarity and integrity for the flyer. In the latter, single-layered aluminum flyers were gradually accelerated to a terminal velocity of 11 km/s, as measured by optical velocimetry, without melting and vaporization. The results suggest that the SG-III prototype laser facility has the capability to launch high-speed flyers to create extreme conditions for investigating the science of shock compression and its equation of state.

  5. New experimental capability to investigate the hypervelocity micrometeoroid bombardment of cryogenic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andrew Oakleigh; Dee, Richard; Gudipati, Murthy S; Horányi, Mihály; James, David; Kempf, Sascha; Munsat, Tobin; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Ulibarri, Zach

    2016-02-01

    Ice is prevalent throughout the solar system and beyond. Though the evolution of many of these icy surfaces is highly dependent on associated micrometeoroid impact phenomena, experimental investigation of these impacts has been extremely limited, especially at the impactor speeds encountered in space. The dust accelerator facility at the Institute for Modeling Plasmas, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) of NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute has developed a novel cryogenic system that will facilitate future study of hypervelocity impacts into ice and icy regolith. The target consists of a copper block, cooled by liquid nitrogen, upon which layers of vapor-deposited ice, pre-frozen ice, or icy regolith can be built in a controlled and quantifiable environment. This ice can be grown from a variety of materials, including H2O, CH3OH, NH3, and slurries containing nanophase iron. Ice temperatures can be varied between 96 K and 150 K and ice thickness greater than 150 nm can be accurately measured. Importantly, the composition of ion plumes created during micrometeoroid impacts onto these icy layers can be measured even in trace amounts by in situ time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. In this paper, we present the fundamental design components of the cryogenic target chamber at IMPACT and proof-of-concept results from target development and from first impacts into thick layers of water ice. PMID:26931872

  6. Local and distant trauma after hypervelocity ballistic impact to the pig hind limb.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Wei; Kang, Jian-Yi; Chen, Kui-Jun; Wang, Ai-Min; Wang, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    The development of high-energy weapons could increase the velocity of projectiles to well over 1000 m/s. The nature of the injuries caused by the ballistic impact of projectiles at velocities much faster than 1000 m/s is unclear. This study characterizes the mechanical and biochemical alterations caused by high-speed ballistic impact generated by spherical steel ball to the hind limbs of the pig. That the local and distal injuries caused by hypervelocity ballistic impact to the living body are also identified. It is showed that the severity of the injury was positively correlated with the velocity of the projectile. And 4000 m/s seems to be the critical velocity for the 5.6 mm spherical steel ball, which would cause severe damage to either local or distal organs, as below that speed the projectile penetrated the body while above that speed it caused severe damage to the body. In addition, vaporization prevented the projectile from penetrating the body and the consequent pressure wave seems to be the causal factor for the distant damage. PMID:27652070

  7. Survivability to Hypervelocity Impacts of Electrodynamic Tape Tethers for Deorbiting Spacecraft in LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesconi, A.; Giacomuzzo, C.; Lorenzini, E. C.

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports the results of 16 hypervelocity impact experiments on a composite flat electrodynamic tether for LEO spacecraft end-of-life deorbiting. The system is being developed within the EU FP7 BETs program. Impact tests were carried out at CISAS impact facility, with the aim of deriving failure equations that include the impact angle dependence up to grazing incidence. Experiments were realised with 1.5 and 2.3 mm aluminium spheres, at velocities between 3 and 5 km/s and impact angle from 0° to 90° from the tape normal. After a preliminary post-impact inspection of the target, the damage extension on the tape was evaluated using an automatic image processing technique. Ballistic limit equations were developed in the experimental range using a procedure that allows to estimate the uncertainty in the failure predictions starting from the measurement of the damage area. Experiments showed that the impact damage is very close to the projectile size in case of normal impact, while it increases significantly at highly oblique impact angles.

  8. Scaling of heat transfer augmentation due to mechanical distortions in hypervelocity boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, W.; Austin, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    We examine the response of hypervelocity boundary layers to global mechanical distortions due to concave surface curvature. Surface heat transfer and visual boundary layer thickness data are obtained for a suite of models with different concave surface geometries. Results are compared to predictions using existing approximate methods. Near the leading edge, good agreement is observed, but at larger pressure gradients, predictions diverge significantly from the experimental data. Up to a factor of five underprediction is reported in regions with greatest distortion. Curve fits to the experimental data are compared with surface equations. We demonstrate that reasonable estimates of the laminar heat flux augmentation may be obtained as a function of the local turning angle for all model geometries, even at the conditions of greatest distortion. This scaling may be explained by the application of Lees similarity. As a means of introducing additional local distortions, vortex generators are used to impose streamwise structures into the boundary layer. The response of the large scale vortices to an adverse pressure gradient is investigated. Surface streak evolution is visualized over the different surface geometries using fast response pressure sensitive paint. For a flat plate baseline case, heat transfer augmentation at similar levels to turbulent flow is measured. For the concave geometries, increases in heat transfer by factors up to 2.6 are measured over the laminar values. The scaling of heat transfer with turning angle that is identified for the laminar boundary layer response is found to be robust even in the presence of the imposed vortex structures.

  9. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De’an; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft. PMID:27618989

  10. THE NATURE OF HYPERVELOCITY STARS AND THE TIME BETWEEN THEIR FORMATION AND EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Cohen, Judith G. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu

    2012-07-20

    We obtain Keck HIRES spectroscopy of HVS5, one of the fastest unbound stars in the Milky Way halo. We show that HVS5 is a 3.62 {+-} 0.11 M{sub Sun} main-sequence B star at a distance of 50 {+-} 5 kpc. The difference between its age and its flight time from the Galactic center is 105 {+-} 18 (stat) {+-}30 (sys) Myr; flight times from locations elsewhere in the Galactic disk are similar. This 10{sup 8} yr 'arrival time' between formation and ejection is difficult to reconcile with any ejection scenario involving massive stars that live for only 10{sup 7} yr. For comparison, we derive arrival times of 10{sup 7} yr for two unbound runaway B stars, consistent with their disk origin where ejection results from a supernova in a binary system or dynamical interactions between massive stars in a dense star cluster. For HVS5, ejection during the first 10{sup 7} yr of its lifetime is ruled out at the 3{sigma} level. Together with the 10{sup 8} yr arrival times inferred for three other well-studied hypervelocity stars (HVSs), these results are consistent with a Galactic center origin for the HVSs. If the HVSs were indeed ejected by the central black hole, then the Galactic center was forming stars {approx_equal}200 Myr ago, and the progenitors of the HVSs took {approx_equal}100 Myr to enter the black hole's loss cone.

  11. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De’An; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-09-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft.

  12. Chemical and Thermal Nonequilibrium Heat-Transfer Analysis for Hypervelocity, Low Reynolds Number Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kevin G.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical and thermal nonequilibrium phenomena are studied in the stagnation region of a hypervelocity blunt body. This investigation is motivated by the need to predict the heat-transfer rate to the leading edge of aeromaneuvering orbital transfer vehicles. Flight speeds of approximately 10 km/s at altitudes of approximately 80 km are considered for body radii of 1-50 cm. The analysis is based on continuum theory and is applicable to the viscous and incipient merged layer regimes of rarefied flow. A two-species, two-temperature gas model is assumed. Comparisons are made with previous theories, experimental data, and results based on the thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. The equation accounting for vibrational nonequilibrium is presented and its effects on flow properties are discussed. Parameters requiring further investigation are identified. Preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of vibrational relaxation has little effect on the heat-transfer rate for a fully catalytic surface. However, vibrational nonequilibrium may increase the heat-transfer rate to a noncatalytic surface, depending on the degree of nonequilibrium.

  13. Chemical and thermal nonequilibrium heat transfer analysis for hypervelocity, low Reynolds number flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. G.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical and thermal nonequilibrium phenomena are studied in the stagnation region of a hypervelocity blunt body. This investigation is motivated by the need to predict the heat transfer rate to the leading edge of Aeromaneuvering Orbital Transfer Vehicles. Flight speeds of approximately 10 km/s at altitudes of approximately 80 km are considered for body radii of 1 to 50 cm. The analysis is based on continuum theory and is applicable to the viscous-layer and incipient-merged-layer rarefied-flow regimes. A two-species, two-temperature gas model is assumed. Comparisons are made with previous theories, experimental data, and results based on the thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. The equation accounting for vibrational nonequilibrium is presented and its effects on flow properties are discussed. Parameters which require further investigation are identified. Preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of vibrational relaxation has little effect on heat transfer rate for a catalytic surface. However, vibrational nonequilibrium may increase the heat transfer rate to a noncatalytic surface, depending on the degree of nonequilibrium.

  14. SUPERNOVAE IN THE CENTRAL PARSEC: A MECHANISM FOR PRODUCING SPATIALLY ANISOTROPIC HYPERVELOCITY STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zubovas, Kastytis; Wynn, Graham A.; Gualandris, Alessia

    2013-07-10

    Several tens of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) have been discovered escaping our Galaxy. These stars share a common origin in the Galactic center and are distributed anisotropically in Galactic longitude and latitude. We examine the possibility that HVSs may be created as the result of supernovae (SNe) occurring within binary systems in a disk of stars around Sgr A* over the last 100 Myr. Monte Carlo simulations show that the rate of binary disruption is {approx}10{sup -4} yr{sup -1}, comparable to that of tidal disruption models. The SN-induced HVS production rate ({Gamma}{sub HVS}) is significantly increased if the binaries are hardened via migration through a gaseous disk. Moderate hardening gives {Gamma}{sub HVS} {approx_equal} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} yr{sup -1} and an estimated population of {approx}20 HVSs in the last 100 Myr. SN-induced HVS production requires the internal and external orbital velocity vectors of the secondary binary component to be aligned when the binary is disrupted. This leaves an imprint of the disk geometry on the spatial distribution of the HVSs, producing a distinct anisotropy.

  15. Conceptual Design of a Flight Validation Mission for a Hypervelocity Asteroid Intercept Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent W.; Wie, Bong; Steiner, Mark; Getzandanner, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) are asteroids and comets whose orbits approach or cross Earth s orbit. NEOs have collided with our planet in the past, sometimes to devastating effect, and continue to do so today. Collisions with NEOs large enough to do significant damage to the ground are fortunately infrequent, but such events can occur at any time and we therefore need to develop and validate the techniques and technologies necessary to prevent the Earth impact of an incoming NEO. In this paper we provide background on the hazard posed to Earth by NEOs and present the results of a recent study performed by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center s Mission Design Lab (MDL) in collaboration with Iowa State University s Asteroid Deflection Research Center (ADRC) to design a flight validation mission for a Hypervelocity Asteroid Intercept Vehicle (HAIV) as part of a Phase 2 NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) research project. The HAIV is a two-body vehicle consisting of a leading kinetic impactor and trailing follower carrying a Nuclear Explosive Device (NED) payload. The HAIV detonates the NED inside the crater in the NEO s surface created by the lead kinetic impactor portion of the vehicle, effecting a powerful subsurface detonation to disrupt the NEO. For the flight validation mission, only a simple mass proxy for the NED is carried in the HAIV. Ongoing and future research topics are discussed following the presentation of the detailed flight validation mission design results produced in the MDL.

  16. New experimental capability to investigate the hypervelocity micrometeoroid bombardment of cryogenic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew Oakleigh; Dee, Richard; Gudipati, Murthy S.; Horányi, Mihály; James, David; Kempf, Sascha; Munsat, Tobin; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Ulibarri, Zach

    2016-02-01

    Ice is prevalent throughout the solar system and beyond. Though the evolution of many of these icy surfaces is highly dependent on associated micrometeoroid impact phenomena, experimental investigation of these impacts has been extremely limited, especially at the impactor speeds encountered in space. The dust accelerator facility at the Institute for Modeling Plasmas, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) of NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute has developed a novel cryogenic system that will facilitate future study of hypervelocity impacts into ice and icy regolith. The target consists of a copper block, cooled by liquid nitrogen, upon which layers of vapor-deposited ice, pre-frozen ice, or icy regolith can be built in a controlled and quantifiable environment. This ice can be grown from a variety of materials, including H2O, CH3OH, NH3, and slurries containing nanophase iron. Ice temperatures can be varied between 96 K and 150 K and ice thickness greater than 150 nm can be accurately measured. Importantly, the composition of ion plumes created during micrometeoroid impacts onto these icy layers can be measured even in trace amounts by in situ time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. In this paper, we present the fundamental design components of the cryogenic target chamber at IMPACT and proof-of-concept results from target development and from first impacts into thick layers of water ice.

  17. Panspermia Survival Scenarios for Organisms that Survive Typical Hypervelocity Solar System Impact Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, D.

    2014-04-01

    Previous experimental studies have demonstrated the survivability of living cells during hypervelocity impact events, testing the panspermia and litho-panspermia hypotheses [1]. It has been demonstrated by the authors that Nannochloropsis Oculata Phytoplankton, a eukaryotic photosynthesizing autotroph found in the 'euphotic zone' (sunlit surface layers of oceans [2]), survive impacts up to 6.93 km s-1 (approx. shock pressure 40 GPa) [3, 4]. Also shown to survive impacts up to 5.49 km s-1 is the tardigrade species Hypsibius dujardini (a complex micro-animal consisting of 40,000 cells) [5, 6]. It has also been shown that they can survive sustained pressures up to 600 MPa using a water filled pressure capsule [7]. Additionally bacteria can survive impacts up to 5.4 km s-1 (~30 GPa) - albeit with a low probability of survival [1], and the survivability of yeast spores in impacts up to 7.4 km s-1 (~30 GPa) has also recently been demonstrated [8]. Other groups have also reported that the lichen Xanthoria elegans is able to survive shocks in similar pressure ranges (~40 GPa) [9]. Here we present various simulated impact regimes to show which scenarios are condusive to the panspermia hypothesis of the natural transfer of life (via an icy body) through space to an extraterrestrial environment.

  18. Hypervelocity impact testing of advanced materials and structures for micrometeoroid and orbital debris shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2013-02-01

    A series of 66 hypervelocity impact experiments have been performed to assess the potential of various materials (aluminium, titanium, copper, stainless steel, nickel, nickel/chromium, reticulated vitreous carbon, silver, ceramic, aramid, ceramic glass, and carbon fibre) and structures (monolithic plates, open-cell foam, flexible fabrics, rigid meshes) for micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding. Arranged in various single-, double-, and triple-bumper configurations, screening tests were performed with 0.3175 cm diameter Al2017-T4 spherical projectiles at nominally 6.8 km/s and normal incidence. The top performing shields were identified through target damage assessments and their respective weight. The top performing candidate shield at the screening test condition was found to be a double-bumper configuration with a 0.25 mm thick Al3003 outer bumper, 6.35 mm thick 40 PPI aluminium foam inner bumper, and 1.016 mm thick Al2024-T3 rear wall (equal spacing between bumpers and rear wall). In general, double-bumper candidates with aluminium plate outer bumpers and foam inner bumpers were consistently found to be amongst the top performers. For this impact condition, potential weight savings of at least 47% over conventional all-aluminium Whipple shields are possible by utilizing the investigated materials and structures. The results of this study identify materials and structures of interest for further, more in-depth, impact investigations.

  19. Characterization of Orbital Debris Via Hyper-Velocity Ground-Based Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather

    2015-01-01

    To replicate a hyper-velocity fragmentation event using modern-day spacecraft materials and construction techniques to better improve the existing DoD and NASA breakup models. DebriSat is intended to be representative of modern LEO satellites.Major design decisions were reviewed and approved by Aerospace subject matter experts from different disciplines. DebriSat includes 7 major subsystems. Attitude determination and control system (ADCS), command and data handling (C&DH), electrical power system (EPS), payload, propulsion, telemetry tracking and command (TT&C), and thermal management. To reduce cost, most components are emulated based on existing design of flight hardware and fabricated with the same materials. A key laboratory-based test, Satellite Orbital debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), supporting the development of the DoD and NASA satellite breakup models was conducted at AEDC in 1992 .Breakup models based on SOCIT have supported many applications and matched on-orbit events reasonably well over the years.

  20. Hypervelocity impact testing of the Space Station utility distribution system carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazaroff, Scott

    1993-01-01

    A two-phase, joint JSC and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace-Huntington Beach hypervelocity impact (HVI) test program was initiated to develop an improved understanding of how meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) impacts affect the Space Station Freedom (SSF) avionic and fluid lines routed in the Utility Distribution System (UDS) carrier. This report documents the first phase of the test program which covers nonpowered avionic line segment and pressurized fluid line segment HVI testing. From these tests, a better estimation of avionic line failures is approximately 15 failures per year and could very well drop to around 1 or 2 avionic line failures per year (depending upon the results of the second phase testing of the powered avionic line at White Sands). For the fluid lines, the initial McDonnell Douglas analysis calculated 1 to 2 line failures over a 30 year period. The data obtained from these tests indicate the number of predicted fluid line failures increased slightly to as many as 3 in the first 10 years and up to 15 for the entire 30 year life of SSF.

  1. DebriSat: The New Hypervelocity Impact Test for Satellite Breakup Fragment Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather

    2015-01-01

    To replicate a hyper-velocity fragmentation event using modern-day spacecraft materials and construction techniques to better improve the existing DoD and NASA breakup models: DebriSat is intended to be representative of modern LEO satellites. Major design decisions were reviewed and approved by Aerospace subject matter experts from different disciplines. DebriSat includes 7 major subsystems. Attitude determination and control system (ADCS), command and data handling (C&DH), electrical power system (EPS), payload, propulsion, telemetry tracking and command (TT&C), and thermal management. To reduce cost, most components are emulated based on existing design of flight hardware and fabricated with the same materials. center dotA key laboratory-based test, Satellite Orbital debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), supporting the development of the DoD and NASA satellite breakup models was conducted at AEDC in 1992. Breakup models based on SOCIT have supported many applications and matched on-orbit events reasonably well over the years.

  2. Processing and Synthesis of Pre-Biotic Chemicals in Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickerhoff, W. B.; Managadze, G. G.; Chumikov, A. E.; Managadze, N. G.

    2005-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts (HVIs) may have played a significant role in establishing the initial organic inventory for pre-biotic chemistry on the Earth and other planetary bodies. In addition to the delivery of organic compounds intact to planetary surfaces, generally at velocities below approx.20 km/s, HVIs also enable synthesis of new molecules. The cooling post-impact plasma plumes of HVIs in the interstellar medium (ISM), the protosolar nebula (PSN), and the early solar system comprise pervasive conditions for organic synthesis. Such plasma synthesis (PS) can operate over many length scales (from nm-scale dust to planets) and energy scales (from molecular rearrangement to atomization and recondensation). HVI experiments with the flexibility to probe the highest velocities and distinguish synthetic routes are a high priority to understand the relevance of PS to exobiology. We describe here recent studies of PS at small spatial scales and extremely high velocities with pulsed laser ablation (PLA). PLA can simulate the extreme plasma conditions generated in impacts of dust particles at speeds of up to 100 km/s or more. When applied to carbonaceous solids, new and pre-biotically relevant molecular species are formed with high efficiency [1,2].

  3. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De'an; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft. PMID:27618989

  4. Subsurface deformation in hypervelocity cratering experiments into high-porosity tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Rebecca; Poelchau, Michael H.; Moser, Stefan; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments on porous tuff targets were carried out to determine the effect of porosity on deformation mechanisms in the crater's subsurface. Blocks of Weibern Tuff with about 43% porosity were impacted by 2.5 mm and 12.0 mm diameter steel spheres with velocities between 4.8 km s-1 and 5.6 km s-1. The postimpact subsurface damage was quantified with computer tomography as well as with meso- and microscale analyses of the bisected crater subsurface. The intensity and style of deformation in mineral clasts and the tuff matrix were mapped and their decay with subsurface depth was determined. Subsurface deformation styles include pore space compaction, clast rotation, as well as microfracture formation. Evaluation of the deformation indicates near-surface energy coupling at a calculated depth of burial of ~2 projectile diameters (dp), which is in conflict with the crater shape, which displays a deep, central penetration tube. Subsurface damage extends to ~2 dp beneath the crater floor in the experiments with 2.5 mm projectiles and increases to ~3 dp for 12 mm projectiles. Based on overprinting relationships and the geometrical orientation of deformation features, a sequence of subsurface deformation events was derived (1) matrix compaction, (2) intragranular crack formation in clasts, (3) deformation band formation in the compacted matrix, (4) tensile fracturing.

  5. Consideration of some fundamental erosion processes encountered in hypervelocity electromagnetic propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Hawke, R.S.

    1982-09-30

    Experimental and theoretical research has been conducted jointly at the Livermore and Los Alamos National laboratories on dc electromagnetic railgun Lorentz accelerators. Pellets weighing a few grams to tens of grams have been launched at velocities up to better than 11 km/s. The research is addressed to attaining repeated launches of samples at hypervelocity in target impact experiments. In these experiments, shock-induced pressures in the tens of megabars range are obtained for high pressure equation-of-state research. Primary energy sources of the order of several hundred kJ to a MJ and induction currents of the order of 1 or more MA are necessary for these launches. Erosion and deformation of the conductor rails and the accelerated sample material are continuing problems. The heating, stress, and erosion resulting from simultaneous imposition of rail induction current, dense plasma (armature) interaction, current distribution, magnetic field stresses and projectile/rail contact friction are examined. It is found that while frictional heating and consequent sliding contact erosion are minor contributors to the overall erosion process, the same cannot be said for plasma impingement, penetration, and almost simultaneous induction current (Joule) heating.

  6. Fabrication issues and technology development for HELEOS (Hypervelocity Electromagnetic Launcher for Equation of State)

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Balk, J.K.; Hall, C.A.; McDonald, M.J.

    1988-02-01

    Starfire is a joint railgun project of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque. The goal of Starfire is to develop a Hypervelocity Electromagnetic Launcher for Equation of State (HELEOS) experiments. A two-stage light-gas gun is used as pre-injector. Each round-bore HELEOS railgun module is 12.7 mm in diameter and 2.4 m long. The muzzle end of the railgun is connected to a vacuum tank. Common materials and fabrication technology are used in the manufacture of all components,a nd modular design allows for extending the length of the railgun as progress dictates. The launcher uses a ''vee block'' geometry, which is designed to: provide compressive preload; operate with a 300-MPa (3-kbar) internal bore pressure; and easily accommodate interchangeable materials in the bore support structure and rail. We have performed full-scale material testing of the railgun and have developed a precision round-bore fabrication process. Air-gage inspection is used to determine bore diameter and straightness. We have also developed a surface mapping system to document the surface topography of the bore before and after an experiment. This paper presents fabrication details, results of tests conducted, and areas for potential improvement. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Capillary instability of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anuj

    This thesis studies the capillary instability of a compound jet. A compound jet comprises an inner core of a primary fluid surrounded by an annulus of an immiscible secondary fluid. The compound jet is unstable due to capillarity. A compound jet finds applications in a variety of fields, such as, ink jet printing, particle sorting, extrusion, molding, particle production etc. In some of these applications such as molding, the disturbances that could cause the jet breakup start as periodic spatial disturbances of Fourier wave number k and grow in time. This is the temporal instability. In some other applications, such as, ink-jet printing, the disturbances initiate at the edge of the nozzle from which the jet issues out. These disturbances grow in space. This is the spatial instability. At small velocities, even if the initial disturbances are periodic in time, they grow exponentially in time. This is the absolute instability. We perform the temporal, spatial and the absolute stability analysis of an inviscid compound jet in a unified framework using the theory of transforms. Further, we solve the temporal instability problem for a viscous jet to understand the effect of viscosity on breakup dynamics. In the temporal analysis, we show that each interface of the compound jet contributes one mode to the instability. The modes contributed by the inner and outer interfaces grow for waves longer than the inner and the outer circumference of the undisturbed jet, respectively. The inner interface mode has a higher growth rate and hence dominates the breakup. The two interfaces grow exactly in phase in this mode and hence it is refereed to as the stretching mode. The other mode is the squeezing mode because the two interfaces grow exactly out of phase. The same two modes are also present in the spatial analysis. At high Weber numbers the predictions of the spatial theory reduce to those of the temporal theory because the waves simply convect with the jet velocity and there

  8. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  9. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  10. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  11. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  12. First Production of C60 Nanoparticle Plasma Jet for Study of Disruption Mitigation for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Thompson, J. R.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2012-10-01

    Unique fast response and large mass-velocity delivery of nanoparticle plasma jets (NPPJs) provide a novel application for ITER disruption mitigation, runaway electrons diagnostics and deep fueling. NPPJs carry a much larger mass than usual gases. An electromagnetic plasma gun provides a very high injection velocity (many km/s). NPPJ has much higher ram pressure than any standard gas injection method and penetrates the tokamak confining magnetic field. Assimilation is enhanced due to the NP large surface-to-volume ratio. Radially expanding NPPJs help achieving toroidal uniformity of radiation power. FAR-TECH's NPPJ system was successfully tested: a coaxial plasma gun prototype (˜35 cm length, 96 kJ energy) using a solid state TiH2/C60 pulsed power cartridge injector produced a hyper-velocity (>4 km/s), high-density (>10^23 m-3), C60 plasma jet in ˜0.5 ms, with ˜1-2 ms overall response-delivery time. We present the TiH2/C60 cartridge injector output characterization (˜180 mg of sublimated C60 gas) and first production results of a high momentum C60 plasma jet (˜0.6 g.km/s).

  13. Spray casting of metallic preforms

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.; Burch, Joseph V.; Sears, James W.

    2000-01-01

    A metal alloy is melted in a crucible and ejected from the bottom of the crucible as a descending stream of molten metal. The descending stream is impacted with a plurality of primary inert gas jets surrounding the molten metal stream to produce a plume of atomized molten metal droplets. An inert gas is blown onto a lower portion of the plume with a plurality of auxiliary inert gas jets to deflect the plume into a more restricted pattern of high droplet density, thereby substantially eliminating unwanted overspray and resulting wasted material. The plume is projected onto a moving substrate to form a monolithic metallic product having generally parallel sides.

  14. A Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD): Support for the Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate Code Validation Program (COVAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, S.A.; Anderson, C.E. Jr.; Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Hunt, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    The Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD) described in this paper was developed to aid researchers with code validation for impacts that occur at velocities faster than the testable regime. Codes of concern include both hydrocodes and fast-running analytical or semi-empirical models used to predict the impact phenomenology and damage that results to projectiles and targets. There are several well documented experimental programs that can serve as benchmarks for code validation; these are identified and described. Recommendations for further experimentation (a canonical problem) to provide validation data are also discussed.

  15. High Resolution Diagnostics of a Linear Shaped Charge Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.B.; Kuklo, R.M.; Shaw, L.L.; Carter, D.L.; Baum, D.W.

    1999-08-10

    The linear shaped charge is designed to produce a knife blade-like flat jet, which will perforate and sever one side of a modestly hard target from the other. This charge is approximately plane wave initiated and used a water pipe quality circular copper liner. To establish the quality of this jet we report about an experiment using several of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory high-resolution diagnostics previously published in this meeting [1]. Image converter tube camera stereo image pairs were obtained early in the jet formation process. Individual IC images were taken just after the perforation of a thin steel plate. These pictures are augmented with 70 mm format rotating mirror framing images, orthogonal 450 KeV flash radiograph pairs, and arrival time switches (velocity traps) positioned along the length of the jet edge. We have confirmed that linear shaped charges are subject to the same need for high quality copper as any other metal jetting device.

  16. Mechanism of anomalous penetration of shaped charge jet into ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, Boris V.; Klimenko, Vladimir Yu.

    2012-03-01

    The mechanism of penetration of the jet in silicon carbide had been investigated experimentally and numerically. In contrast to of metals, the penetration of shaped-charge jet into ceramics has an anomalous character and a smaller depth of penetration. The penetration into ceramics is accompanied by a radial interaction of a crater wall fragments with the jet elements and this leads to a partial melting and evaporation of the elements. Appearance of a "gas" phase enables dispersion of the elements, mixing with the wall fragments, formation of an internal absorption volume, and destabilization of further part of the jet. As a result a considerable part of the jet loses the ability by the penetration.

  17. Desktop Prototyping of Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.H.

    2000-03-30

    It has been shown possible to prepare nanoscale nickel oxide by the NRC plasma process. Dispersion were successfully made from the nickel oxide that could be ink-jetted using Sanders International ModelMaker equipment. Ink-jetted layers were sintered to nickel metal thus demonstrating the feasibility of desktop prototyping of metal and alloy miniature components.

  18. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  19. Bacterial Spores in Granite Survive Hypervelocity Launch by Spallation: Implications for Lithopanspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Langenhorst, Falko; Melosh, H. Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for endolithic life-forms that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes, i. e., lithopanspermia. Organisms within rock can only embark on an interplanetary journey if they survive ejection from the surface of the donor planet and the associated extremes of compressional shock, heating, and acceleration. Previous simulation experiments have measured each of these three stresses more or less in isolation of one another, and results to date indicate that spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis can survive each stress applied singly. Few simulations, however, have combined all three stresses simultaneously. Because considerable experimental and theoretical evidence supports a spallation mechanism for launch, we devised an experimental simulation of launch by spallation using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). B. subtilis spores were applied to the surface of a granite target that was impacted from above by an aluminum projectile fired at 5.4 km/s. Granite spall fragments were captured in a foam recovery fixture and then recovered and assayed for shock damage by transmission electron microscopy and for spore survival by viability assays. Peak shock pressure at the impact site was calculated to be 57.1 Pa, though recovered spall fragments were only very lightly shocked at pressures of 5-7 GPa. Spore survival was calculated to be on the order of 10-5, which is in agreement with results of previous static compressional shock experiments. These results demonstrate that endolithic spores can survive launch by spallation from a hypervelocity impact, which lends further evidence in favor of lithopanspermia theory.

  20. CFD Analysis of Mixing Characteristics of Several Fuel Injectors at Hypervelocity Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Drummond, J. Philip; Baurle, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    CFD analysis is presented of the mixing characteristics and performance of three fuel injectors at hypervelocity flow conditions. The calculations were carried out using the VULCAN-CFD solver and Reynolds-Averaged Simulations (RAS). The high Mach number flow conditions match those proposed for the planned experiments conducted as a part of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project (EIMP) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The EIMP aims to investigate scramjet fuel injection and mixing physics, improve the understanding of underlying physical processes, and develop enhancement strategies and functional relationships relevant to flight Mach numbers greater than eight. Because of the high Mach number flow considered, the injectors consist of a fuel placement device, a strut; and a fluidic vortical mixer, a ramp. These devices accomplish the necessary task of distributing and mixing fuel into the supersonic cross-flow albeit via different strategies. Both of these devices were previously studied at lower flight Mach numbers where they exhibited promising performance in terms of mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery. For comparison, a flush-wall injector is also included. This type of injector generally represents the simplest method of introducing fuel into a scramjet combustor, however, at high flight Mach number conditions, the dynamic pressure needed to induce sufficient fuel penetration may be difficult to achieve along with other requirements such as achieving desired levels of fuel-to-air mixing at the required equivalence ratio. The three injectors represent the baseline configurations planned for the experiments. The current work discusses the mixing flow field behavior and differences among the three fuel injectors, mixing performance as described by the mixing efficiency and the total pressure recovery, and performance considerations based on the thrust potential.

  1. 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Anthony; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kempf, Sascha; Thomas, Evan; Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Northway, Paige; Gruen, Eberhard; Mocker, Anna; Munsat, Tobin; Srama, Ralf; and others

    2012-07-15

    A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Instituet fuer Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -7} torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -10} torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

  2. 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Anthony; Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Grün, Eberhard; Horányi, Mihály; Kempf, Sascha; Mocker, Anna; Munsat, Tobin; Northway, Paige; Srama, Ralf; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Thomas, Evan

    2012-07-01

    A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Institüt für Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10-7 torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10-10 torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

  3. Effects of local and global mechanical distortions to hypervelocity boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, William P.

    The response of hypervelocity boundary layers to global mechanical distortions due to concave surface curvature is examined. Surface heat transfer, visual boundary layer thickness, and pressure sensitive paint (PSP) data are obtained for a suite of models with different concave surface geometries. Results are compared to predictions using existing approximate methods. Near the leading edge, good agreement is observed, but at larger pressure gradients, predictions diverge significantly from the experimental data. Up to a factor of five underprediction is reported in regions with greatest distortion. Curve fits to the experimental data are compared with surface equations. It is demonstrated that reasonable estimates of the laminar heat flux augmentation may be obtained as a function of the local turning angle for all model geometries, even at the conditions of greatest distortion. As a means of introducing additional local distortions, vortex generators are used to impose streamwise structures into the boundary layer. The response of the large scale vortical structures to an adverse pressure gradient is investigated. For a flat plate baseline case, heat transfer augmentation at similar levels to turbulent flow is measured. For the concave geometries, increases in heat transfer by factors up to 2.6 are measured over the laminar values, though for higher turning angle cases, a relaxation to below undisturbed values is reported at turning angles between 10 and 15 degrees. The scaling of heat transfer with turning angle that is identified for the laminar boundary layer response is found to be robust even in the presence of the imposed vortex structures. PSP measurements indicated that natural streaks form over concave models even when imposed vorticity is present. Correlations found between the heat transfer and natural streak formation are discussed and indicate possible vortex interactions.

  4. Bacterial spores in granite survive hypervelocity launch by spallation: implications for lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Langenhorst, Falko; Melosh, H Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for endolithic life-forms that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes, i.e., lithopanspermia. Organisms within rock can only embark on an interplanetary journey if they survive ejection from the surface of the donor planet and the associated extremes of compressional shock, heating, and acceleration. Previous simulation experiments have measured each of these three stresses more or less in isolation of one another, and results to date indicate that spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis can survive each stress applied singly. Few simulations, however, have combined all three stresses simultaneously. Because considerable experimental and theoretical evidence supports a spallation mechanism for launch, we devised an experimental simulation of launch by spallation using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). B. subtilis spores were applied to the surface of a granite target that was impacted from above by an aluminum projectile fired at 5.4 km/s. Granite spall fragments were captured in a foam recovery fixture and then recovered and assayed for shock damage by transmission electron microscopy and for spore survival by viability assays. Peak shock pressure at the impact site was calculated to be 57.1 GPa, though recovered spall fragments were only very lightly shocked at pressures of 5-7 GPa. Spore survival was calculated to be on the order of 10(-5), which is in agreement with results of previous static compressional shock experiments. These results demonstrate that endolithic spores can survive launch by spallation from a hypervelocity impact, which lends further evidence in favor of lithopanspermia theory.

  5. Characterization of Oribtal Debris via Hyper-Velocity Ground-Based Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    Existing DoD and NASA satellite breakup models are based on a key laboratory-based test, Satellite Orbital debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which has supported many applications and matched on-orbit events involving older satellite designs reasonably well over the years. In order to update and improve the break-up models and the NASA Size Estimation Model (SEM) for events involving more modern satellite designs, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has worked in collaboration with the University of Florida to replicate a hypervelocity impact using a satellite built with modern-day spacecraft materials and construction techniques. The spacecraft, called DebriSat, was intended to be a representative of modern LEO satellites and all major designs decisions were reviewed and approved by subject matter experts at Aerospace Corporation. DebriSat is composed of 7 major subsystems including attitude determination and control system (ADCS), command and data handling (C&DH), electrical power system (EPS), payload, propulsion, telemetry tracking and command (TT&C), and thermal management. To reduce cost, most components are emulated based on existing design of flight hardware and fabricated with the same materials. All fragments down to 2 mm is size will be characterized via material, size, shape, bulk density, and the associated data will be stored in a database for multiple users to access. Laboratory radar and optical measurements will be performed on a subset of fragments to provide a better understanding of the data products from orbital debris acquired from ground-based radars and telescopes. The resulting data analysis from DebriSat will be used to update break-up models and develop the first optical SEM in conjunction with updates into the current NASA SEM. The characterization of the fragmentation will be discussed in the subsequent presentation.

  6. 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies.

    PubMed

    Shu, Anthony; Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Grün, Eberhard; Horányi, Mihály; Kempf, Sascha; Mocker, Anna; Munsat, Tobin; Northway, Paige; Srama, Ralf; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Thomas, Evan

    2012-07-01

    A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Institüt für Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10(-7) torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10(-10) torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

  7. Tektite origin by hypervelocity asteroidal or cometary impact: The quest for the source craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeberl, Christian

    1992-01-01

    Tektites are natural glasses that are chemically homogeneous, often spherically symmetrical objects several centimeters in size, and occur in four known strewn fields on the surface of the Earth: the North American, moldavite (or Central European), Ivory Coast, and Australasian strewn fields. Tektites found within such strewn fields are related to each other with respect to their petrological, physical, and chemical properties as well as their age. A theory of tektite origin needs to explain the similarity of tektites in respect to age and certain aspects of isotopic and chemical composition within one strewn field, as well as the variety of tektite materials present in each strewn field. In addition to tektites on land, microtektites (which are generally less than 1 mm in diameter) have been found in deep-sea cores. Tektites are classified into three groups: (1) normal or splash-form tektites, (2) aerodynamically shaped tektites, and (3) Muong Nong-type tektites (sometimes also called layered tektites). The aerodynamic ablation results from partial remelting of glass during atmospheric passage after it was ejected outside the terrestrial atmosphere and quenched from a hot liquid. Aerodynamically shaped tektites are known mainly from the Australasian strewn field where they occur as flanged-button australites. The shapes of splash-form tektites (spheres, droplets, teardrops, dumbbells, etc., or fragments thereof) are the result of the solidification of rotating liquids in the air or vacuum. Mainly due to chemical studies, it is now commonly accepted that tektites are the product of melting and quenching of terrestrial rocks during hypervelocity impact on the Earth. The chemistry of tektites is in many respects identical to the composition of upper crustal material.

  8. Theoretical hypervelocity ballistic limit for single or double plates using nonlinear modal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, David

    1990-01-01

    The original research on the use on nonlinear vibration technique to solve for the hypervelocity ballistic limit for double plates is examined. Such structure is commonly found in typical Space Station design where the incoming space or man-made debris would be fragmented upon hitting the outer plate (shield) and the subsequent impact on the main wall would result in a much reduced damge of the space station or spacecraft. The existing few theoretical impact equations do not agree well with each other. The existing computer code bumper used at NASA-Johnson Space Center appears to predict an unconservative ballistic limit when compared with experimental data where the velocity ranges from 3 km/s to 8 km/s. Such unconservative prediction is unacceptable from a practical safe design point of view. The bumper code is based on Wilkinson's (1968) paper and his equations have not been improved nor modified even though they are viewed with suspicion due to lack of agreement with experiments. To make matters worse, there is not another theory which is better than Wilkinson's equation and the designers are forced to use purely empirical Nysmith (1969) or semiempirical equations developed by Cour-Palais in 1969. The Cour-Palais equations were later modified empirically in 1989. The purpose of the present investigation is to examine the many assumptions of the Wilkinson equation. An attempt is made to present design charts based on the modified-Wilkinson equation so that the designer can get a feel of the ranges of the parameters which are of interest and discard a huge range of parameters, thus, significantly reducing the number of test shots required. The analysis is based on a solution of the governing nonlinear differential equations for a plate, assuming axisymmetric behavior using polar coordinates.

  9. Bacterial spores in granite survive hypervelocity launch by spallation: implications for lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Langenhorst, Falko; Melosh, H Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for endolithic life-forms that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes, i.e., lithopanspermia. Organisms within rock can only embark on an interplanetary journey if they survive ejection from the surface of the donor planet and the associated extremes of compressional shock, heating, and acceleration. Previous simulation experiments have measured each of these three stresses more or less in isolation of one another, and results to date indicate that spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis can survive each stress applied singly. Few simulations, however, have combined all three stresses simultaneously. Because considerable experimental and theoretical evidence supports a spallation mechanism for launch, we devised an experimental simulation of launch by spallation using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). B. subtilis spores were applied to the surface of a granite target that was impacted from above by an aluminum projectile fired at 5.4 km/s. Granite spall fragments were captured in a foam recovery fixture and then recovered and assayed for shock damage by transmission electron microscopy and for spore survival by viability assays. Peak shock pressure at the impact site was calculated to be 57.1 GPa, though recovered spall fragments were only very lightly shocked at pressures of 5-7 GPa. Spore survival was calculated to be on the order of 10(-5), which is in agreement with results of previous static compressional shock experiments. These results demonstrate that endolithic spores can survive launch by spallation from a hypervelocity impact, which lends further evidence in favor of lithopanspermia theory. PMID:19778276

  10. Experimental investigation of charged liquid jet efflux from a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhakin, A. I.; Belov, P. A.; Kuz'ko, A. E.

    2013-03-01

    The shapes and electrical characteristics of charged liquid (water, ethanol, glycerol, castor oil) jets emitted from a metal capillary have been experimentally studied depending on the applied high voltage. A map of efflux regimes in the flow velocity-applied voltage coordinates is constructed for water. The effects of medium viscosity, surface tension, and charge relaxation time on the laws of jet efflux are analyzed.

  11. AngioJet thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S; Singh, Varinder; Wilentz, James R; Makkar, Raj R

    2004-10-01

    The AngioJet rheolytic thrombectomy system is designed to remove thrombus with the Venturi-Bernoulli effect, with multiple high-velocity, high-pressure saline jets which are introduced through orifices in the distal tip of the catheter to create a localized low-pressure zone, resulting in a vacuum effect with the entrainment and dissociation of bulky thrombus. Rheolytic thrombectomy with the AngioJet catheter can reduce the thrombus burden in the setting of AMI and degenerated SVGs. The long-term follow-up appears to be favorable in patients treated with rheolytic thrombectomy in the setting of acute myocardial infarction over conventional primary angioplasty. PMID:15505358

  12. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  13. Laser etching technique using bubble jet impact for glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Tsu-Shien; Tsai, Chwan-Huei

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a new laser etching technique using bubble jet impact for glass substrates. An Nd:YAG laser is applied to the backside of the substrate which is partially submerged in water. A metal plate is placed below the glass substrate. The metal vaporizes the water and generates a turbulent bubble flow. The bubble nozzle is proposed to enhance the impact of the bubble jet. The glass surface will first be softened, and then expelled by the shock wave resulting from the jet impact. The phenomena of bubble nucleation, growth, collapse, and jet impact were studied in this paper. The formation of the etching cavity can be divided into three types: double-petal, triple-petal, and four-petal. The etching pits expanded and combined to form a complete cavity. The needed laser power does not exceed 5 W. The proposed laser etching method was successfully demonstrated for etching a cavity of 5-20 µm in depth and 50-250 µm in diameter. The bubble jet of the small nozzle diameter is well concentrated, creating a strong jet impact on the glass surface. A greater nozzle depth can enhance the impact of the bubble jet. The proposed etching technique has great potential to provide an improved solution for the micro-machining of glass.

  14. Time of flight mass spectra of ions in plasmas produced by hypervelocity impacts of organic and mineralogical microparticles on a cosmic dust analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsworthy, B. J.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.; Armes, S. P.; Khan, M. A.; Lascelles, S. F.; Green, S. F.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Srama, R.; Bigger, S. W.

    2003-10-01

    The ionic plasma produced by a hypervelocity particle impact can be analysed to determine compositional information for the original particle by using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Such methods have been adopted on interplanetary dust detectors to perform in-situ analyses of encountered grains, for example, the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA). In order to more fully understand the data returned by such instruments, it is necessary to study their response to impacts in the laboratory. Accordingly, data are shown here for the mass spectra of ionic plasmas, produced through the acceleration of microparticles via a 2 MV van de Graaff accelerator and their impact on a dimensionally correct CDA model with a rhodium target. The microparticle dusts examined have three different chemical compositions: metal (iron), organic (polypyrrole and polystyrene latex) and mineral (aluminosilicate clay). These microparticles have mean diameters in the range 0.1 to 1.6 mu m and their velocities range from 1-50 km s-1. They thus cover a wide range of compositions, sizes and speeds expected for dust particles encountered by spacecraft in the Solar System. The advent of new low-density, microparticles with highly controllable attributes (composition, size) has enabled a number of new investigations in this area. The key is the use of a conducting polymer, either as the particle itself or as a thin overlayer on organic (or inorganic) core particles. This conductive coating permits efficient electrostatic charging and acceleration. Here, we examine how the projectile's chemical composition influences the ionic plasma produced after the hypervelocity impact. This study thus extends our understanding of impact plasma formation and detection. The ionization yield normalized to particle mass was found to depend on impact speed to the power (3.4 +/- 0.1) for iron and (2.9 +/- 0.1) for polypyrrole coated polystyrene and aluminosilicate clay. The ioization signal rise time was found to

  15. The Stability of Radiatively Cooling Jets I. Linear Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip E.; Stone, James M.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a spatial stability analysis of a two-dimensional slab jet, in which optically thin radiative cooling is dynamically important, are presented. We study both magnetized and unmagnetized jets at external Mach numbers of 5 and 20. We model the cooling rate by using two different cooling curves: one appropriate to interstellar gas, and the other to photoionized gas of reduced metallicity. Thus, our results will be applicable to both protostellar (Herbig-Haro) jets and optical jets from active galactic nuclei. We present analytical solutions to the dispersion relations in useful limits and solve the dispersion relations numerically over a broad range of perturbation frequencies. We find that the growth rates and wavelengths of the unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) modes are significantly different from the adiabatic limit, and that the form of the cooling function strongly affects the results. In particular, if the cooling curve is a steep function of temperature in the neighborhood of the equilibrium state, then the growth of K-H modes is reduced relative to the adiabatic jet. On the other hand, if the cooling curve is a shallow function of temperature, then the growth of K-H modes can be enhanced relative to the adiabatic jet by the increase in cooling relative to heating in overdense regions. Inclusion of a dynamically important magnetic field does not strongly modify the important differences between an adiabatic jet and a cooling jet, provided the jet is highly supermagnetosonic and not magnetic pressure-dominated. In the latter case, the unstable modes behave more like the transmagnetosonic magnetic pressure-dominated adiabatic limit. We also plot fluid displacement surfaces associated with the various waves in a cooling jet in order to predict the structures that might arise in the nonlinear regime. This analysis predicts that low-frequency surface waves and the lowest order body modes will be the most effective at producing observable features in

  16. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  17. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  18. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... your internal clock before you travel. While in flight: DO NOT sleep unless it matches the bedtime ... decrease jet lag. If you will be in flight during the bedtime of your destination, take some ...

  19. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  20. Hypervelocity Stars. III. The Space Density and Ejection History of Main-Sequence Stars from the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Bromley, Benjamin C.

    2007-12-01

    We report the discovery of three new unbound hypervelocity stars (HVSs), stars traveling with such extreme velocities that dynamical ejection from a massive black hole (MBH) is their only suggested origin. We also detect a population of possibly bound HVSs. The significant asymmetry we observe in the velocity distribution-we find 26 stars with vrf>275 km s-1 and one star with vrf<-275 km s-1-shows that HVSs must be short-lived, probably 3-4 Msolar main-sequence stars. Any population of hypervelocity post-main-sequence stars should contain stars falling back onto the Galaxy, contrary to the observations. The spatial distribution of HVSs also supports the main-sequence interpretation: longer lived 3 Msolar HVSs fill our survey volume; shorter lived 4 Msolar HVSs are missing at faint magnitudes. We infer that there are 96+/-10 HVSs of mass 3-4 Msolar within R<100 kpc, possibly enough HVSs to constrain ejection mechanisms and potential models. Depending on the mass function of HVSs, we predict that SEGUE may find up to 5-15 new HVSs. The travel times of our HVSs favor a continuous ejection process, although a ~120 Myr old burst of HVSs is also allowed.

  1. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  2. Gas Flow and Electric Field Characterization in Plasma Jets for Biomedical Applications: From Single Jet to Multi Jet Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Eric

    2015-09-01

    This work reports first on time-resolved measurement of longitudinal and radial electric fields (EF) associated with plasma propagation in dielectric capillaries. Plasma propagation occurs in a region where longitudinal EF exists ahead the ionization front position revealed from plasma emission with ICCD measurement. The ionization front propagation induces the sudden rise of a radial EF component. Both of these EF components have a few kV/cm in amplitude for helium or neon plasmas. Their amplitude is kept almost constant along a few tens of cm long capillary. The key role of the voltage pulse polarity and the drastic impact of the presence of a target in front of the plasma jet are discussed from Schlieren images. All these experimental measurements are in excellent agreement with model calculations which are used to infer EF data on capillary axis. EF diagnostics in the plasma plume in the free jet mode but also in contact with various targets is proposed. The combination of intense transient EF, both of ns and µs duration, together with significant transient reactive species generation during plasma jet treatments may be reconsidered. Typical EF amplitudes likely to induce electrostimulation, electroporation are indeed probably achieved in many in vivo protocols. Stimulation of tissue oxygenation, blood flow rate modulation and more recently immune system triggering may be examples where EF could play a significant role. The second part of this work is dedicated to the development of multi jets, using two different setups, based on a single plasma source. Plasma splitting in dielectric tubes drilled with sub millimetric orifices, but also plasma transfer across metallic tubes equipped with such orifices are analyzed from ICCD imaging and time resolved EF measurements. This allows for the design of plasma jet arrays but also emphasizes the necessity to account for voltage pulse polarity, target potential status, consecutive helium flow modulation and

  3. Effects of Hypervelocity Impacts on Silicone Elastomer Seals and Mating Aluminum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    While in space silicone based elastomer seals planned for use on NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) are exposed to threats from micrometeoroids and orbital debris (MMOD). An understanding of these threats is required to assess risks to the crew, the CEV orbiter, and missions. An Earth based campaign of hypervelocity impacts on small scale seal rings has been done to help estimate MMOD threats to the primary docking seal being developed for the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). LIDS is being developed to enable the CEV to dock to the ISS (International Space Station) or to Altair (NASA's next lunar lander). The silicone seal on LIDS seals against aluminum alloy flanges on ISS or Altair. Since the integrity of a seal depends on both sealing surfaces, aluminum targets were also impacted. The variables considered in this study included projectile mass, density, speed, incidence angle, seal materials, and target surface treatments and coatings. Most of the impacts used a velocity near 8 km/s and spherical aluminum projectiles (density = 2.7 g/cubic cm), however, a few tests were done near 5.6 km/s. Tests were also performed using projectile densities of 7.7, 2.79, 2.5 or 1.14 g/cubic cm. Projectile incidence angles examined included 0 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg from normal to the plane of the target. Elastomer compounds impacted include Parker's S0383-70 and Esterline's ELA-SA-401 in the as received condition, or after an atomic oxygen treatment. Bare, anodized and nickel coated aluminum targets were tested simulating the candidate mating seal surface materials. After impact, seals and aluminum plates were leak tested: damaged seals were tested against an undamaged aluminum plate; and undamaged seals were placed at various locations over craters in aluminum plates. It has been shown that silicone elastomer seals can withstand an impressive level of damage before leaking beyond allowable limits. In general on the tests performed to date, the diameter of the crater in

  4. Effects of Hypervelocity Impacts on Silicone Elastomer Seals and Mating Aluminum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    While in space silicone based elastomer seals planned for use on NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) are exposed to threats from micrometeoroids and orbital debris (MMOD). An understanding of these threats is required to assess risks to the crew, the CEV orbiter, and missions. An Earth based campaign of hypervelocity impacts on small scale seal rings has been done to help estimate MMOD threats to the primary docking seal being developed for the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). LIDS is being developed to enable the CEV to dock to the ISS (International Space Station) or to Altair (NASA's next lunar lander). The silicone seal on LIDS seals against aluminum alloy flanges on ISS or Altair. Since the integrity of a seal depends on both sealing surfaces, aluminum targets were also impacted. The variables considered in this study included projectile mass, density, speed, incidence angle, seal materials, and target surface treatments and coatings. Most of the impacts used a velocity near 8 km/s and spherical aluminum projectiles (density = 2.7 g/cubic centimeter), however, a few tests were done near 5.6 km/s. Tests were also performed using projectile densities of 7.7, 2.79, 2.5 or 1.14 g/cubic centimeter. Projectile incidence angles examined included 0 degrees, 45 degrees , and 60 degrees from normal to the plane of the target. Elastomer compounds impacted include Parker's S0383-70 and Esterline's ELA-SA-401 in the as received condition, or after an atomic oxygen treatment. Bare, anodized and nickel coated aluminum targets were tested simulating the candidate mating seal surface materials. After impact, seals and aluminum plates were leak tested: damaged seals were tested against an undamaged aluminum plate; and undamaged seals were placed at various locations over craters in aluminum plates. It has been shown that silicone elastomer seals can withstand an impressive level of damage before leaking beyond allowable limits. In general on the tests performed to date, the

  5. Hypervelocity experiments to estimate the light flash emitted by Smart 1 impact on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, F.; Giacomuzzo, C.; Koschny, D.; Pavarin, D.; Francesconi, A.; Bettella, A.; Tasinato, L.; Flamini, E.; Angrilli, F.

    We report on an impact hypervelocity experiments aimed at the characterization of the impact flash generated by an impact on analogues of planetary surfaces. The tests have been run at the impact facility of the CISAS "G. Colombo" of the University of Padova, using the two-stage light gas gun (http://cisas.unipd.it/lgg/lgg.html). This work is directly relevant to the Smart-1 impact on the Moon, which at present, is scheduled to occur on September 2nd , 2006. The impact geometry of the Smart-1 impact is such that a light flash could be observed from the ground if it is bright enough. Current estimates put the flash at around 16 - 18 mag in the infrared, which would be observable. However, there clearly is a lack of data to precisely make a prediction of the brightness of such a flash. Very little experimental work on impact flash measurements has been published (e.g. Eichhorn, 1976). As a sideline, few observations of meteoroids impacts on the Moon have been performed and interpreted (e.g. Ortiz et al. 2000, Bellot Rubio et al. 2000, Yanagisawa et al. 2006). Our experiments are performed in order to optically record the light flash generated by the impact as function of kinetic energy changing the mass and velocity of the projectiles. Crater size and mass are determined and eject fragment collected in order to estimate also the energy used for the fracturing process and thus further constraining the partition of the energy. The results of these experiments are mainly aimed to better predict the brightness of the expected impact flash and will also support the interpretation of the observational data of the impact event, by comparing the measurements with the observations, thus better constraining the current understanding of impact processes. References Bellot Rubio et al. (2000) Earth, Moon & Planets 82-83, 575-598. Eichhorn, G. (1976) Plan. Space Scie., 24, 771-776. Ortiz, J. L., et al. (2002) Nature, 405, Yanagisawa, M. et al. (2006) Icarus, 182, 489-495.

  6. Identification of minerals and meteoritic materials via Raman techniques after capture in hypervelocity impacts on aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, M J; Mann, J; Creighton, J A; Kearsley, A; Graham, G A; Esposito, A P; Franchi, I A; Westphal, A J; Snead, C

    2004-10-04

    For this study, an extensive suite of mineral particles analogous to components of cosmic dust were tested to determine if their Raman signatures can be recognized after hypervelocity capture in aerogel. The mineral particles were mainly of greater than 20 micrometers in size and were accelerated onto the silica aerogel by light gas gun shots. It was found that all the individual minerals captured in aerogel could be subsequently identified using Raman (or fluorescent) spectra. The beam spot size used for the laser illumination was of the order of 5 micrometers, and in some cases the captured particles were of a similar small size. In some samples fired into aerogel there was observed a shift in the wavenumbers of some of the Raman bands, a result of the trapped particles being at quite high temperatures due to heating by the laser. Temperatures of samples under laser illumination were estimated from the relative intensities of Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman bands, or, in the case of ruby particles, from the wavenumber of fluorescence bands excited by the laser. It was found that the temperature of particles in aerogel varied greatly, dependent upon laser power and the nature of the particle. In the worst case, some particles were shown to have temperatures in the 500-700 C range at a laser power of about 3 mW at the sample. However most of the mineral particles examined at this laser power had temperatures below 200 C. This is sufficiently low a temperature not to damage most materials expected to be found captured in aerogel in space. In addition, selected meteorite samples were examined to obtain Raman signatures of their constituent minerals and were then shot into aerogel. It was possible to find several Raman signatures after capture in aerogel and obtain a Raman map of a whole grain in situ in the aerogel. Finally, a Raman analysis was carried out of a particle captured in aerogel in space and carbonaceous material identified. In general therefore it is

  7. Studies of mixing and combustion in hypervelocity flows with hot hydrogen injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, Jacques Jean

    1993-01-01

    The ability to build an air-breathing single-stage-to-orbit propulsion system requires the examination of key elements such as turbulent mixing rates, especially at the 'zero shear' fuel-air mixing condition, and combustion efficiency. The required data can only be obtained in experiments which simultaneously match the flight total pressure and total enthalpy as well as the fuel conditions. GALCIT, with its new free piston shock tunnel T5, has the capability to do some of these combustion experiments. But prior to these tests, it was felt that there was a need to simulate the gas dynamical processes in the free piston shock tunnel and also in a new combustion driven shock tunnel built for these experiments so that both systems could be used as efficiently as possible. The numerical code helped explain the piston motion in the free piston shock tunnel. The code was also very useful for the design of the combustion driven shock tunnel. Because hydrogen has to be injected into the combustion chamber of the propulsion system after being used as a cooling fluid, a combustion driven shock tunnel was built to reproduce this 'hot' hydrogen at up to 1500 K for the experiments. To reduce the complexity of the problem, a very basic configuration for the hydrogen injection system was tested. This was first done with an injection system mounted flush with the surface of a flat plate in the test section of T5. Different test conditions as well as Mach 2 and 5 nozzle injectors at angles of 15 or 30 degrees were tested to determine criteria for significant combustion. Lower limits in pressure and enthalpy were found where hydrogen combustion becomes very limited using this 'hot' hydrogen fuel. The second set of experiments still used an injection system mounted slush with the surface but involved a small combustor model previously tested in the hypervelocity HYPULSE facility. Low pressure experiments were performed to reproduce some of the HYPULSE tests and excellent agreement was

  8. Radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts and its correlation with optical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, T.; Maki, K.; Yamori, A.

    This paper describes the most interesting phenomena of radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts. A projectile of polycarbonate with 1.1 g weight was accelerated by a rail gun to 3.8 km/sec, and hit two targets which are a 2 mm thick aluminum plate upstream and a 45 mm diameter aluminum column downstream, respectively. The projectile first breaks wires to give a triggering signal to a data recorder, then penetrates the aluminum plate, and finally hit the column, The emitted radio-waves propagate through the chamber window, and are received by antennas at each frequency band. The receivers in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands consist of a low noise amplifier, a mixer, a local oscillator and an IF amplifier , respectively. The receiver in 1 MHz-band is a simple RF amplifier. The outputs of all receivers are fed to a data recorder which is actually a high-speed digital oscilloscope with a large amount of memory. The radio-waves were successfully recorded in 22 GHz-band with 500 MHz bandwidth, in 2 GHz-band with 300 MHz bandwidth, and in 1MHz-band. The waveforms in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands coincide well each other, and are composed of two groups of sharp impulses with a separation of about 20 micro seconds. The width of an impulse is less than 2 n sec. which is the resolution limit of the data recorder. We carried out optical observations using an ultra-high speed camera simultaneously through another window of the chamber. The time interval between scenes is 2 micro sec. We can see a faint light of the projectile before the first impact to the plate, and then a brilliant gas exploding backward from the plate and forward to the column. After hitting the column target, the brilliant gas flows to the chamber wall and is reflected back to make a mixture with dark gas in the chamber. Excellent correlation between radio-wave emission and the observed optical phenomena was obtained in the experiment. It is easily conceived that the radio-waves consist of quite a wide frequency

  9. Thermal ink jet: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanka, Ivan

    1992-05-01

    The first public demonstration of thermal ink jet printing was done by Canon in 1981 and the first thermal ink jet product, ThinkJet, was introduced by the Hewlett-Packard Company in 1984. Since then, this powerful printing technology has assumed a strong presence in the market. In this discussion, we will first briefly review the printer market, the increasing role thermal ink jet is playing in this arena, as well as the reasons for its success. The technology discussion will follow, and will focus on several highlights in thermal ink jet physics, materials, and printing. We will conclude with our comments on future thermal ink jet developments.

  10. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  11. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  12. Jet penetration in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.; Kusubov, A.

    1991-05-01

    We describe a phenomenological model which accounts for the mechanical response of glass to intense impulsive loading. An important aspect of this response is the dilatancy accompanying fracture. We have also conducted a number of experiments with 38.1-mm diameter precision shaped charges to establish the performance against various targets and to allow evaluation of our model. At 3 charge diameters standoff, the data indicate that both virgin and damaged glass offer better (Bernoulli-scaled) resistance to penetration than either of 4340 steel, or 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Time-resolved measurements indicate two distinct phases of jet penetration in glass: An initial hydrodynamic phase, and a second phase characterized by a slower penetration velocity. Our calculations show that at early time, a crater is formed around the jet and only the tip of the undisturbed jet interacts with the glass. At late time the glass has collapsed on the jet and degraded penetration continues via a disturbed and fragmented jet.

  13. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  14. Modified shielding jet model for twin-jet shielding analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.; Gilbride, J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model to estimate the shielding of noise emitted from a point noise source has been developed assuming the shielding jet to be a cylinder of constant radius with uniform flow across the cross section. Comparison to experiment indicated that the model overestimates diffraction of sound around the jet in the far downstream region. The shielding jet model is modified to include widening downstream of the nozzle exit. This not only represents a more realistic model of the jet, but is also expected to improve the shielding estimate downstream. The modified jet model incorporates a Mach number dependent widening rate, a corresponding decrease in flow velocity downstream and an equivalent slug flow evaluation to retain the locally parallel flow approximation of the model development. The shielding analysis with modified jet model is compared to measured data for a subsonic isothermal air jet and a simulated hot subsonic jet. Improvement of the shielding estimate is discussed.

  15. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  16. New Evidence from Silica Debris Exo-Systems for Planet Building Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey

    2010-05-01

    There is abundant inferential evidence for massive collisions in the early solar system [1]: Mercury's high density; Venus' retrograde spin; Earth's Moon; Mars' North/South hemispherical cratering anisotropy; Vesta's igneous origin [2]; brecciation in meteorites [3]; and Uranus' spin axis located near the plane of the ecliptic. Recent work [4] analyzing Spitzer mid-IR spectra has demonstrated the presence of large amounts of amorphous silica and SiO gas produced by a recent (within 103 - 104 yrs) large (MExcess > MPluto) hypervelocity impact collision around the young (~12 Myr old) nearby star HD172555, at the right age to form rocky planets. Many questions still remain concerning the location, lifetime, and source of the detected silica/SiO gas, which should not be stable in orbit at the estimated 5.8 AU from the HD172555 A5V primary for more than a few decades, yet it is also highly unlikely that we are fortuitously observing these systems immediately after silica formation A tabulation of the amount counts in the fine silica dust is decidedly Fe and Mg-atom poor compared to solar [4]. Three possible origins for the observed silica/SiO gas seem currently plausible : (1) A single hyperevelocity impact (>10km/s in order to produce silica and vaporize SiO at impact) creating an optically thick circumplanetary debris ring which is overflowing or releasing silica-rich material from its Hill sphere. Like terrestrial tektites, the Fe/Mg poor amorphous silica rubble is formed from quick-quenched molten/vaporized rock created during the impact. The amount of dust detected in the HD172555 system is easily enough to fill and overflow the Hill sphere radius of 0.03 AU for a Pluto-sized body at 5.8 AU from an A5 star, unless it is optically thick (> 1 cm in physical depth). Such a disk would provide a substantial fraction of the observed IR flux, and will be dense enough to self-shield its SiO gas, greatly extending its photolytic lifetime. The lifetime for such a system

  17. Hypervelocity experiments of impact cratering and catastrophic disruption of targets representative of minor bodies of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomuzzo, Cinzia; Ferri, Francesca; Bettella, Alberto; Pavarin, Daniele; Francesconi, Alessandro; Flamini, Enrico; Angrilli, Francesco

    Impact processes influence the surface evolution of the solid bodies in the Solar System, as asteroids or comets. The better understanding of these phenomena can improve the interpretation of remote sensing data from forthcoming missions. In order to complement and to extend the available data on hypervelocity impacts on porous targets to ranges of velocity and physical conditions not yet explored, we focused our work on catastrophic fragmentation and cratering processes onto porous targets by means of high velocity impact experiments using a two-stage light-gas gun located at the impact facility of CISAS "G. Colombo" of the University of Padova. Tests have been performed on targets of different materials, e.g. glass ceramic foam, natural pumices, water ice, and different porosity (with density in the range from 0.35 to 1.07 g/cm 3 and porosity from 2% up to 65%). Results have been analysed and compared to published data. In particular, cratering morphology is studied as function of projectile velocity and density and then it is compared to empirical trend reported in Kadono [Kadono, T. Hypervelocity impact into low density material and cometary outburst. Planet. Space Sci., 47, 305-318, 1999.] with good agreement. Our tests results revealed that porosity seems to induce a rapid attenuation of the shock affecting energy propagation inside the target; craters generated by hypervelocity impacts on porous targets are smaller and much deeper than those of non porous targets. Fragments distribution resulting from disruption tests is analysed and the largest fragment mass has been studied as function of the collisional specific energy; results is compared to those of paper by Ryan et al. [Ryan, E.V., Davis, D.R., Giblin, I. A laboratory impact study of simulated edgeworth-Kuiper belt objects. Icarus 142, 56-62, 1999.]. Furthermore, numerical simulations have been performed by using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and Lagrangian grid technique in order to test some

  18. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. PMID:24679258

  19. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes.

  20. Hypersonic jet control effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D.; Stollery, J. L.; Smith, A. J.

    The present study aims to identify some of the parameters which determine the upstream extent and the lateral spreading of the separation front around an under-expanded transverse jet on a slender blunted cone. The tests were conducted in the Cranfield hypersonic facility at M∞ = 8.2, Re∞ /cm = 4.5 to 9.0 × 104 and at M∞ = 12.3, Re∞ /cm = 3.3 × 104. Air was used as the working gas for both the freestream and the jet. Schlieren pictures were used for the visualisation of the three-dimensional structures around the jet. Pressure, normal force and pitching moment measurements were conducted to quantitatively study the interaction region and its effects on the vehicle. An analytical algorithm has been developed to predict the shape of the separation front around the body.

  1. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  2. Impact of a viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Néel, Baptiste; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting onto a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We observe that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break: close to the wall, the jet cross-section is faceted and radial steady liquid films (membranes) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of membranes increases with increasing viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. A mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, is presented that explains these dependences. The large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and suspended (Savart) sheets, will also be discussed.

  3. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  4. Heat-transfer distributions on biconics at incidence in hypersonic-hypervelocity He, N2, air, and CO2 flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Micol, J. R.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Wilder, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    Laminar heat-transfer rates were measured on spherically blunted, 13 degrees/F degrees on-axis and bent biconics (fore cone bent 7 degrees upward relative to aft cone) at hypersonic-hypervelocity flow conditions in the Langley Expansion Tube. Freestream velocities from 4.5 to 6.9 km/sec and Mach numbers from 6 to 9 were generated using helium, nitrogen, air, and carbon dioxide test gases, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Angle of attack, referenced to the axis of the aft cone, was varied from zero to 20 degrees in 4 degree increments. The effect of nose bend, angle of attack, and real-gas phenomena on heating distributions are presented along with comparisons of measurement to prediction from a code which solves the three-dimensional 'parabolized Navier-Stokes' equations.

  5. Predicted space motions for hypervelocity and runaway stars: proper motions and radial velocities for the Gaia Era

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Bromley, Benjamin C. E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu

    2014-10-01

    We predict the distinctive three-dimensional space motions of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) and runaway stars moving in a realistic Galactic potential. For nearby stars with distances less than 10 kpc, unbound stars are rare; proper motions alone rarely isolate bound HVSs and runaways from indigenous halo stars. At large distances of 20-100 kpc, unbound HVSs are much more common than runaways; radial velocities easily distinguish both from indigenous halo stars. Comparisons of the predictions with existing observations are encouraging. Although the models fail to match observations of solar-type HVS candidates from SEGUE, they agree well with data for B-type HVS and runaways from other surveys. Complete samples of g ≲ 20 stars with Gaia should provide clear tests of formation models for HVSs and runaways and will enable accurate probes of the shape of the Galactic potential.

  6. Heat-transfer distributions on biconics at incidence in hypersonic-hypervelocity He, N2, air, and CO2 flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Micol, J. R.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Wilder, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Laminar heat transfer rates were measured on spherically blunted, 13 deg/7 deg on axis and bent biconics (fore cone bent 7 deg upward relative to aft cone) at hypersonic hypervelocity flow conditions in the Langley Expansion Tube. Freestream velocities from 4.5 to 6.9 km/sec and Mach numbers from 6 to 9 were generated using helium, nitrogen, air, and carbon dioxide test gases, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Angle of attack, referenced to the axis of the aft cone, was varied from 0 to 20 deg in 4 deg increments. The effect of nose bend, angle of attack, and real gas phenomena on heating distributions are presented along with comparisons of measurement to prediction from a code which solves the three dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes equations.

  7. Solitary waves on a ferrofluid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Mark; Parau, Emilian

    2015-11-01

    The propagation of axisymmetric solitary waves on the surface of an otherwise cylindrical ferrofluid jet subjected to a magnetic field is investigated. An azimuthal magnetic field is generated by an electric current flowing along a stationary metal rod which is mounted along the axis of the moving jet. A numerical method is used to compute fully-nonlinear travelling solitary waves and predictions of elevation waves and depression waves by Rannacher & Engel (2006) using a weakly-nonlinear theory are confirmed in the appropriate ranges of the magnetic Bond number. New nonlinear branches of solitary wave solutions are identified. As the Bond number is varied, the solitary wave profiles may approach a limiting configuration with a trapped toroidal-shaped bubble, or they may approach a static wave (i.e. one with zero phase speed). For a sufficiently large axial rod, the limiting profile may exhibit a cusp.

  8. ELM frequency feedback control on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennholm, M.; Beaumont, P. S.; Carvalho, I. S.; Chapman, I. T.; Felton, R.; Frigione, D.; Garzotti, L.; Goodyear, A.; Graves, J.; Grist, D.; Jachmich, S.; Lang, P.; Lerche, E.; de la Luna, E.; Mooney, R.; Morris, J.; Nave, M. F. F.; Rimini, F.; Sips, G.; Solano, E.; Tsalas, M.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the first development and implementation of a closed loop edge localized mode (ELM) frequency controller using gas injection as the actuator. The controller has been extensively used in recent experiments on JET and it has proved to work well at ELM frequencies in the 15-40 Hz range. The controller responds effectively to a variety of disturbances, generally recovering the requested ELM frequency within approximately 500 ms. Controlling the ELM frequency has become of prime importance in the new JET configuration with all metal walls, where insufficient ELM frequency is associated with excessive tungsten influx. The controller has allowed successful operation near the minimum acceptable ELM frequency where the best plasma confinement can be achieved. Use of the ELM frequency controller in conjunction with pellet injection has enabled investigations of ELM triggering by pellets while maintaining the desired ELM frequency even when pellets fail to trigger ELMs.

  9. Model for upper atmospheric aggregation of ash following hypervelocity impact events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Matthew; Artemieva, Natasha

    2014-05-01

    Introduction: Accretionary lapilli (AL) have been found in hypervelocity impact crater ejecta deposits and are similar to volcanically produced AL [1]. The initial conditions of ejection from an impact crater are vastly different than ejection from a volcano, particularly regarding the mass of ejecta and the velocity of ejection. Thus, some models of AL formation may not apply to impact ejecta. We propose an upper atmospheric aggregation model. A numerical model is herein described Numerical model: Re-entry is modeled using the 3D hydrocode SOVA [2], using mainly its "dusty flow" subroutines. Particles are treated as solid non-deformable; they move through the atmosphere and exchange momentum and energy. Radiative, conductive, and convective heat transfer are included. Details of the procedure may be found in [2]. Initial mass flux of ejecta, velocities, and re-entry angles are derived from crater-forming models. The power law SFD N>m~m-b is used with the exponent b of 0.8 and 0.9. The largest fragment for a given distance can be deduced from observations. The smallest fragments are ~10 µm in diameter. Results: During re-entry, particles decelerate due to drag, heating the atmosphere, and the atmospheric gas heats particles via conduction, convection, and radiative transfer. Additionally, shock waves are generated. Intensity of these processes depends on the total mass and velocity of ejecta, but also on the ejecta SFD. Particles of varying sizes were modeled. Large particles penetrate to low altitudes, maintaining temperature. Small particles decelerate at high altitudes, have elevated temperatures, and heat the atmosphere to T> 600 K. These particles can release water from pores or, in some cases, from mineral structures. Cold particles entering later may be coated by this water, permitting aggregation and pushing other particles to lower altitudes. Substantial mixing of particles at temperatures and densities suitable for AL formation remains as long as ejecta

  10. Meso-scale hypervelocity cratering experiments (MEMIN project): Characterization of projectile material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Isabelle; Deutsch, Alex; Hecht, Lutz; Kenkmann, Thomas; Berndt, Jasper

    2010-05-01

    The DFG-funded "MEMIN" (multidisciplinary experimental and modelling impact crater research network) research group is aimed at a better understanding of the impact cratering process by combining (i) numerical modelling of crater formation, (ii) investigation of terrestrial craters and (iii) meso-scale hypervelocity impact experiments using the large two-stage light gas gun at the Ernst-Mach-Institute (EMI; Efringen-Kirchen, Germany). In the framework of MEMIN, 1 cm-sized projectiles of the steel SAE 4130 (mass of 4.1 g) have been fired with a velocity of ~ 5.3 km s-1 onto blocks of Seeberger sandstone (size 100 x 100 x 50 cm, grain size 169+/-8 μm; porosity 12-20 vol.%). One goal of MEMIN is to document, analyze, and understand the fate of the projectile and its distribution between crater and ejecta; hence, the use of well-analyzed projectile material is mandatory. For this purpose, we use optical, and electron microscopy, electron microprobe (WWU, and MfN), and LA-ICP-MS microanalysis (WWU). Currently we evaluate which steel or iron meteorite is adequate for the intended use. Important properties of a projectile are (i) textural and chemical homogeneity, (ii) clear chemical distinction to the target sandstone, (iii) presence of elements such as Co, Ni, Cr, PGE that as "meteoritic component" are used in terrestrial craters to trace projectile matter, and characterize the type of the projectile (i.e., meteorite group), and finally (iv) mechanical properties that guarantee stability during sphere production, launch and flight. Strong chemical differences to the target material and geochemical homogeneity of the projectile will allow detection of small volumes of projectile matter by high spatial resolution in-situ analysis with the LA-ICP-MS. Steel SAE 4130 is heterogeneous at the 100-µm scale and has low trace element contents. In future, we plan the use of the alloyed heat treatable steel D290-1 as projectile as its texture is quite homogenous at the scale of

  11. Hypervelocity impact damage response and characterization of thin plate targets at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Brooke Myers

    The performance of a typical International Space Station (ISS) shield against the meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) impact threat is generally modeled by damage equations for the outer shield and the rear pressure wall. In their current forms, these damage equations neglect the on-orbit temperature extremes witnessed by the ISS. To address IF and HOW temperature extremes affect the performance of the ISS' typical M/OD shield, a comprehensive study was undertaken that investigated hole diameters in .063" thick 6061-T6 aluminum targets impacted at velocities from ˜2-7 km/s at 20°C, 110°C, and 210°C. Robust graphical and analytical analyses confirmed the existence of a statistically significant temperature effect, i.e., hole diameters in heated targets were larger than those in room temperature targets. A new temperature-dependent model was found via multivariable regression analysis that incorporates a linear velocity term and a temperature term based on a form of the cumulative distribution function. Numerical modeling of hypervelocity impacts (HVI) into elevated temperature targets was also performed to determine whether or not currently available material and failure models can adequately simulate the differences observed between room and elevated temperature target hole diameters. Statistical analyses showed that AUTODYN simulated the heated data almost as well as the room temperature data. However, the slightly worse Goodness of Fit (GOF) values between the heated empirical vs. simulated comparisons suggest that the simulations do not completely account for the observed temperature effect. A series of materials tests and observations were carried out on the post-impacted target plates to help explain the empirical data results with respect to material variability and deformation features. Rockwell B and K macro-hardness tests revealed that the hardness values for the targets impacted at 110°C were statistically significantly higher compared to those

  12. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  13. Stationary relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.; Porth, Oliver; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we describe a simple numerical approach which allows to study the structure of steady-state axisymmetric relativistic jets using one-dimensional time-dependent simulations. It is based on the fact that for narrow jets with vz≈ c the steady-state equations of relativistic magnetohydrodynamics can be accurately approximated by the one-dimensional time-dependent equations after the substitution z=ct. Since only the time-dependent codes are now publicly available this is a valuable and efficient alternative to the development of a high-specialised code for the time-independent equations. The approach is also much cheaper and more robust compared to the relaxation method. We tested this technique against numerical and analytical solutions found in literature as well as solutions we obtained using the relaxation method and found it sufficiently accurate. In the process, we discovered the reason for the failure of the self-similar analytical model of the jet reconfinement in relatively flat atmospheres and elucidated the nature of radial oscillations of steady-state jets.

  14. Jets and QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Soper, Davison E.

    2013-06-01

    An essential element of the development of the strong interaction component of the Standard Model of particle physics, QCD, has been the evolving understanding of the "jets" of particles that appear in the final states of high energy particle collisions. In this chapter we provide a historical outline of those developments...

  15. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  16. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  17. Spectroscopy with Supersonic Jets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Anne R.; Chandler, Dean W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a new technique that enables spectroscopists to study gas phase molecules at temperatures below 1 K, without traditional cryogenic apparatus. This technique uses supersonic jets as samples for gas molecular spectroscopy. Highlighted are points in the theory of supersonic flow which are important for applications in molecular…

  18. Review of jet reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, Ryan

    2015-10-01

    Accurate jet reconstruction is necessary for understanding the link between the unobserved partons and the jets of observed collimated colourless particles the partons hadronise into. Understanding this link sheds light on the properties of these partons. A review of various common jet algorithms is presented, namely the Kt, Anti-Kt, Cambridge/Aachen, Iterative cones and the SIScone, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. If one is interested in studying jets, the Anti-Kt algorithm is the best choice, however if ones interest is in the jet substructures then the Cambridge/Aachen algorithm would be the best option.

  19. Interacting jets from binary protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, G. C.; Lery, T.; O'Sullivan, S.; Spicer, D.; Bacciotti, F.; Rosen, A.

    2008-02-01

    Aims: We investigate potential models that could explain why multiple proto-stellar systems predominantly show single jets. During their formation, stars most frequently produce energetic outflows and jets. However, binary jets have only been observed in a very small number of systems. Methods: We model numerically 3D binary jets for various outflow parameters. We also model the propagation of jets from a specific source, namely L1551 IRS 5, known to have two jets, using recent observations as constraints for simulations with a new MHD code. We examine their morphology and dynamics, and produce synthetic emission maps. Results: We find that the two jets interfere up to the stage where one of them is almost destroyed or engulfed into the second one. We are able to reproduce some of the observational features of L1551 such as the bending of the secondary jet. Conclusions: While the effects of orbital motion are negligible over the jets dynamical timeline, their interaction has significant impact on their morphology. If the jets are not strictly parallel, as in most observed cases, we show that the magnetic field can help the collimation and refocusing of both of the two jets.

  20. Progress in Development of C60 Nanoparticle Plasma Jet for Diagnostic of Runaway Electron Beam-Plasma Interaction and Disruption Mitigation Study for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Thompson, J. R.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    We produced a C60 nanoparticle plasma jet (NPPJ) with uniquely fast response-to-delivery time (~ 1 - 2 ms) and unprecedentedly high momentum (~ 0 . 6 g .km/s). The C60 NPPJ was obtained by using a solid state TiH2/C60 pulsed power cartridge producing ~180 mg of C60 molecular gas by sublimation and by electromagnetic acceleration of the C60 plasma in a coaxial gun (~35 cm length, 96 kJ energy) with the output of a high-density (>1023 m-3) hyper-velocity (>4 km/s) plasma jet. The ~ 75 mg C60/C plasma jet has the potential to rapidly and deeply deliver enough mass to significantly increase electron density (to ne ~ 2 . 4 ×1021 m-3, i.e. ~ 60 times larger than typical DIII-D pre-disruption value, ne 0 ~ 4 ×1019 m-3), and to modify the 'critical electric field' and the runaway electrons (REs) collisional drag during different phases of REs dynamics. The C60 NPPJ, as a novel injection technique, allows RE beam-plasma interaction diagnostic by quantitative spectroscopy of C ions visible/UV line intensity. The system is scalable to ~ 1 - 2 g C60/C plasma jet output and technology is adaptable to ITER acceptable materials (BN and Be) for disruption mitigation. Work supported by US DOE DE-FG02-08ER85196 grant.

  1. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  2. Pileup subtraction for jet shapes.

    PubMed

    Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin P; Kim, Ji-Hun; Dutta, Souvik; Cacciari, Matteo

    2013-04-19

    Jets in high energy hadronic collisions often contain the fingerprints of the particles that produced them. Those fingerprints, and thus the nature of the particles that produced the jets, can be read off with the help of quantities known as jet shapes. Jet shapes are, however, severely affected by pileup, the accumulation in the detector of the residues of the many simultaneous collisions taking place in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We introduce a method to correct for pileup effects in jet shapes. Relative to earlier, limited approaches, the key advance resides in its full generality, achieved through a numerical determination, for each jet, of a given shape's susceptibility to pileup. The method rescues the possibility of using jet shapes in the high pileup environment of current and future LHC running, as we show with examples of quark-gluon discrimination and top tagging.

  3. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  4. Image analysis of jet structure on electrospinning from free liquid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, Jiri Linka, Ales Tunak, Maros; Lukas, David

    2014-06-16

    The work analyses intra-jet distances during electrospinning from a free surface of water based poly(vinyl alcohol) solution confined by two thin metallic plates employed as a spinning electrode. A unique computer vision system and digital image processing were designed in order to track position of every polymer jet. Here, we show that jet position data are in good compliance with theoretically predicted intra-jet distances by linear stability analysis. Jet density is a critical parameter of electrospinning technology, since it determines the process efficiency and homogeneity of produced nanofibrous layer. Achievements made in this research could be used as essential approach to study jetting from two-dimensional spinning electrodes, or as fundamentals for further development of control system related to Nanospider{sup ™} technology.

  5. A Minor-Merger Interpretation for NGC 1097's ``Jets''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, James L.; Wallin, John F.

    2003-03-01

    while passing through NGC 1097's disk, accounting for the jets' lack of H I and H II. The remnants' (B-V) color would still agree with observations even after ~3 Gyr of passive evolution, provided the cannibalized dwarf was low-metallicity and dominated by young stars at impact.

  6. SparkJet Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golbabaei-Asl, Mona; Knight, Doyle; Anderson, Kellie; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for determining the thermal efficiency of the SparkJet is proposed. A SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. The motion of the pendulum subsequent to a single spark discharge is measured using a laser displacement sensor. The measured displacement vs time is compared with the predictions of a theoretical perfect gas model to estimate the fraction of the spark discharge energy which results in heating the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). The results from multiple runs for different capacitances of c = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 micro-F show that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.

  7. Runaway beam studies during disruptions at JET-ILW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Brezinsek, S.; Decker, J.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Lupelli, I.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E. M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Manzanares, A.; Mlynář, J.; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A. E.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-08-01

    Runaway electrons (RE) during disruptions are a concern for future tokamaks including ITER with its metallic wall. Although RE are rare in spontaneous disruptions with the JET ITER-like Wall (JET-ILW), RE beams up to 380 kA were obtained using massive injection (MGI) of argon in JET-ILW divertor discharges. Entry points into the RE domain defined by operational parameters (toroidal field, argon fraction in MGI) are unchanged but higher RE currents have been obtained inside the JET-ILW MGI-generated RE domain when compared to JET-C. This might be due to the influence of the metallic wall on the current quench plasma. Temperatures of 900 °C have been observed following RE impacts on beryllium tiles. Heat deposition depth of ∼2 mm has to be assumed to match the tile cooling time. 3D simulations of the RE energy deposition using the ENDEP/MEMOS codes show that material melting is unlikely with 100 kA RE beams.

  8. Phenomenology of photon-jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges of collider physics is to unambiguously associate detector-based objects with the corresponding elementary physics objects. A particular example is the association of calorimeter-based objects such as “jets,” identified with a standard (IR-safe) jet algorithm, with the underlying physics objects, which may be QCD-jets (arising from a scattered parton), electrons, photons or, as discussed here, photon-jets (a group of collinear photons). This separation is especially interesting in the context of Higgs search, where the signal includes events with two photons (in the Standard Model) as well as events with two photon-jets (in a variety of Beyond the Standard Model scenarios), while QCD provides ever-present background. Here we describe the implementation of techniques from the rapidly evolving area of jet substructure studies, not only to enhance the more familiar photon-QCD separation, but also to separately distinguish photon-jets, i.e., to separate usual jets into three categories: single photons, photon-jets and QCD-jets. The efficacy of these techniques for separation is illustrated through studies of simulated data.

  9. Jet-Environment Interactions as Diagnostics of Jet Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sebastian

    2014-09-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the interaction of jets with their environments. Jets can transport a sizable fraction of accretion energy away from black holes and neutron stars. Because they are collimated, they can travel to distances far beyond the gravitational sphere of influence of the black hole. Yet, their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic medium must eventually halt their advance and dissipate the energy they carry. The termination of the jet, and the inflation of large scale cavities of relativistic plasma offers one of the most powerful ways to constrain the physics of jets. In this chapter, we will review the inflation of radio lobes, the propagation of hot spots, the creation of shells and cavities, and the bending of jet by proper motion through their environment, both in the context of AGN jets and microquasars.

  10. Ram jet engine

    SciTech Connect

    Crispin, B.; Pohl, W.D.; Thomaier, D.; Voss, N.

    1983-11-29

    In a ram jet engine, a tubular combustion chamber is divided into a flame chamber followed by a mixing chamber. The ram air is supplied through intake diffusers located on the exterior of the combustion chamber. The intake diffusers supply combustion air directly into the flame chamber and secondary air is conveyed along the exterior of the combustion chambers and then supplied directly into the mixing chamber.

  11. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  12. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    SciTech Connect

    Swierkowski, S.; Ciarlo, D.

    1996-05-13

    Goal is to develop a multi-channel micromachined chemical fluid jet dispenser that is applicable to prototype tests with biological samples that demonstrate its utility for molecular biology experiments. Objective is to demonstrate a new device capable of ultrasonically ejecting droplets from 10-200 {mu}m diameter capillaries that are arranged in an array that is linear or focused. The device is based on several common fabrication procedures used in MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) technology: piezoelectric actuators, silicon, etc.

  13. Inkjet printing - the physics of manipulating liquid jets and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G. D.; Hoath, S. D.; Hutchings, I. M.

    2008-03-01

    Over the last 30 years inkjet printing technology has been developed for many applications including: product date codes, mailing shots, desktop printing, large-area graphics and, most recently, the direct writing of materials to form electronic, biological, polymeric and metallic devices. The new non-graphical applications require higher print rates, better resolution and higher reliability while printing more complex, non-Newtonian and heavily solids-loaded liquids. This makes the understanding of the physics involved in the precise manipulation of liquid jets and drops ever more important. The proper understanding and control of jet formation and subsequent motion of the jetted materials requires physical studies into material properties at very high shear rates, acoustic modes in print heads, instabilities of jets, drop formation, drop motion, stretching of fluid ligaments, the role of polymers in jet break up, electrical charging of drops and the aerodynamic and electrostatic interaction of jets and drops in flight. Techniques for observation, measurement and analysis are evolving to assist these studies. This paper presents some examples of the application of physics to understanding and implementing inkjet printing, including recent work at the Cambridge Inkjet Research Centre.

  14. Behavior of Electrospinning Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Han; Reneker, Darrell

    2002-03-01

    During the electrospinning of jets of polymer solutions such as polyethylene oxide in water, interference colors similar to those seen in the walls of soap bubbles are seen if the proper illumination is provided. The colors can be seen both in the straight part of the jet and in the loops formed by the electrically driven bending instability. The colors were correlated with measurements of the diameter of segments of a particular color. The path of a slowly moving jet of polyisobutylene in a mixture of acetone and paraffin oil was recorded. A well-developed expanding spiral that moved downward was observed. The downward velocity of a typical segment was .13 m/s, and the radial velocity of the same segment was .23m/s. The development of the second bending instability occurred 180 ms after the first, and a third bending instability occurred 280 ms after the first. The growth of the bending instability clearly demonstrated its self-similar, fractal nature. A network of electrospun polyisobutylene fibers was collected in an isopropyl alcohol precipitation bath.

  15. Metal-matrix composites: Status and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Applications of metal matrix composites for air frames and jet engine components are discussed. The current state of the art in primary and secondary fabrication is presented. The present and projected costs were analyzed to determine the cost effectiveness of metal matrix composites. The various types of metal matrix composites and their characteristics are described.

  16. Mass estimation of shaped charge jets from x-ray shadow graph with new calibration curve method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Kumakura, Akira; Sakai, Shun

    2015-06-01

    In order to assess the penetration capability of the Al and Cu metal jets against a bumper structure (such as Al plate and/or Al block), we measured the initial formation process of the metal jets generated from conical shaped charge device. The shaped charge device configurations employed in the experimental and numerical investigations have conical aluminum (and cupper) liner and steel casing with PBX explosive charge. The profile and velocity of the jets are measured with flash x-ray and x-ray film system. The mass of the jet tip are estimated from x-ray images by a calibration curve method proposed by our group. Al targets are used to evaluate a penetration performance of the jets. Additionally, we have simulated the initial formation process of the shaped charge jets with Autodyne-2D hydrodynamic code, which proposed important data to compare the experimental one.

  17. Wall jets created by single and twin high pressure jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P.; Wilson, M.

    1993-03-01

    An extensive experimental investigation into the nature of the wall jets produced by single and twin normal jet impingement has been undertaken. Wall jet velocity profiles have been recorded up to 70 jet diameters from the impingement point, at pressures representative of current VStol technology. The tests used fixed convergent nozzles, with nozzle height and spacing and jet pressure being varied. Single jet impingement displays a consistent effect of nozzle height on wall jet development. For twin jet cases a powerful reinforcement exists along the wall jet interaction plane. Remote from the interaction plane the wall jets are weaker than those produced by a single jet impingement.

  18. W + jet production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, Andrea; /INFN, Rome

    2006-10-01

    A measurement of W {yields} e{nu} + n-jet cross sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run II (CDF II) is presented. The measurement is based on an integrated luminosity of 320 pb{sup -1}, and includes events with up to 4 or more jets. In each jet multiplicity sample the differential and cumulative cross sections with respect to the transverse energy of the i{sup th} jet are measured. For W+ {ge} 2 jets the differential cross section with respect to the 2-leading jets invariant mass m{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} and angural separation {Delta} R{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} is also reported. The data are compared to predictions from Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Three electrode atmospheric pressure plasma jet in helium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletic, Dejan; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma jets are widely used in various types of applications and lately more and more in the field of plasma medicine. However, it is not only their applicability that distinguishes them from other atmospheric plasma sources, but also the behavior of the plasma. It was shown that plasma plume is not continuous, but discrete set of plasma packages. Here we present iCCD images and current voltage characteristics of a three electrode plasma jet. Our plasma jet has a simple design with body made of glass tube and two transparent electrodes wrapped around it. The additional third metal tip electrode was positioned at 10 and 25 mm in front of the jet nozzle and connected to the same potential as the powered electrode. Power transmitted to the plasma was from 0.5 W to 4.0 W and the helium flow rate was kept constant at 4 slm. For the 10 mm configuration plasma is ignited on the metal tip in the whole period of the excitation signal and in the positive half cycle plasma ``bullet'' is propagating beyond the metal tip. In contrast to that, for the 25 mm configuration at the tip electrode plasma can be seen only in the minimum and maximum of the excitation signal, and there is no plasma ``bullet'' formation. This research has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Republic of Serbia, under projects ON171037 and III41011.

  20. Radiation-Driven Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2000-10-01

    Radiative winds and jets from luminous accretion disks/tori are reviewed. Among various models of astrophysical jets, plasma outflows emanating from accretion disks/tori and accelerated by the radiation pressure is the most promising one. Here explained are the roles of radiation pressure force and radiation drag force. Rise and fall of a torus model are also discussed, following its revenge. Finally, the millennium jet model, where the multistage acceleration takes place, is proposed.

  1. Electromagnetic Models of Extragalactic Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, M.; Blandford, R.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-10-22

    Relativistic jets may be confined by large-scale, anisotropic electromagnetic stresses that balance isotropic particle pressure and disordered magnetic field. A class of axisymmetric equilibrium jet models will be described and their radiative properties outlined under simple assumptions. The partition of the jet power between electromagnetic and mechanical forms and the comoving energy density between particles and magnetic field will be discussed. Current carrying jets may be recognized by their polarization patterns. Progress and prospects for measuring this using VLBI and GLAST observations will be summarized.

  2. Photon + jets at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2009-06-01

    Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb{sup -1} and 1.0 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

  3. Microplasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-11-27

    A nitrogen microplasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure was developed for treating thermally sensitive materials. For example, the plasma sources in treatment of vulnerable biological materials must operate near the room temperature at the atmospheric pressure, without any risk of arcing or electrical shock. The microplasma jet device operated by an electrical power less than 10 W exhibited a long plasma jet of about 6.5 cm with temperature near 300 K, not causing any harm to human skin. Optical emission measured at the wide range of 280-800 nm indicated various reactive species produced by the plasma jet.

  4. The formation of interstellar jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  5. Field of Flow About a Jet and Effect of Jets on Stability of Jet-Propelled Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, Herbert S.

    1946-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted on jet-induced flow deviation. Analysis is given of flow inclination induced outside cold and hot jets and jet deflection caused by angle of attack. Applications to computation of effects of jet on longitudinal stability and trim are explained. Effect of jet temperature on flow inclination was found small when thrust coefficient is used as criterion for similitude. The average jet-induced downwash over tail plane was obtained geometrically.

  6. 21 CFR 880.5475 - Jet lavage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Jet lavage. (a) Identification. A jet lavage is a device used to clean a wound by a pulsatile jet of..., and a means of propelling the fluid through the tubing, such as an electric roller pump....

  7. 21 CFR 880.5475 - Jet lavage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Jet lavage. (a) Identification. A jet lavage is a device used to clean a wound by a pulsatile jet of..., and a means of propelling the fluid through the tubing, such as an electric roller pump....

  8. Lifted turbulent jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Jay A.

    Experiments were conducted on lifted, turbulent jet diffusion flames. An automated technique using a linear photodiode array was implemented to measure the temporal history of the liftoff height h. The measurements enabled accurate determination of the mean liftoff height [...] under a wide range of flow conditions, including several fuels, nozzle diameters, and exit velocities [...]. The results showed an approximately linear relationship between [...] and [...], with a slight dependence on Reynolds number. A strain-rate model for liftoff, based on far-field scaling of turbulent jets, provides an explanation for the linear dependence of [...] on [...]. Measurements were also made in which the nozzle fluid contained varying amounts of air, where it was found that the slope of the [...] vs. [...] line increases faster than predicted by far-field scaling of turbulent jets. The discrepancy is attributed to near-field effects.The amplitudes of the fluctuations in h were found to be of the order of the local large scale of the jet. There is a slight increase in normalized fluctuation level [...] with [...], and there is some variation of [...] with fuel type. The time scales of the fluctuations of h were found to be considerably longer than the local large-scale time of the turbulence [...]. By using fuels of different chemical times to vary [...], the measured correlation time [...] normalized by [...] was found to collapse with Richardson number [...]. Experiments in which the nozzles were oriented horizontally showed no change in [...], however. Additional experiments were conducted to investigate alternative explanations for the variation of [...] with [...]. These experiments included measuring the flame length L simultaneously with h, and measuring the visible radiation I simultaneously with h. L(t) was found to be nearly uncorrelated with h(t), dismissing the possibility that a feedback mechanism from L to h controls the fluctuations of h. Although I(t) is highly

  9. Peculiarities in the formation of complex organic compounds in a nitrogen-methane atmosphere during hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, M. A.; Gerasimov, M. V.; Safonova, E. N.; Vasiljeva, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Results of the experiments on model impact vaporization of peridotite, a mineral analogue of stony asteroids, in a nitrogen-methane atmosphere are presented. Nd-glass laser (γ = 1.06 µm) was used for simulation. Pulse energy was ~600-700 J, pulse duration ~10-3 s, vaporization tempereature ~4000-5000 K. The gaseous medium (96% vol. of N2 and 4% vol. of CH4, P = 1 atm) was a possible analogue of early atmospheres of terrestrial planets and corresponded to the present-day atmosphere composition of Titan, a satellite of Saturn. By means of pyrolytic gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, it is shown that solid condensates obtained in laser experiments contain relatively complex lowand high-molecular weight (kerogen-like) organic compounds. The main products of condensate pyrolysis were benzene and alkyl benzenes (including long-chain ones), unbranched aliphatic hydrocarbons, and various nitrogen-containing compounds (aliphatic and aromatic nitriles and pyrrol). It is shown that the nitrogen-methane atmosphere favors the formation of complex organic compounds upon hypervelocity impacts with the participation of stony bodies even with a small methane content in it. In this process, falling bodies may not contain carbon, hydrogen, and other chemical elements necessary for the formation of the organic matter. In such conditions, a noticeable contribution to the impact-induced synthesis of complex organic substances is probably made by heterogeneous catalytic reactions, in particular, Fischer-Tropsch type reactions.

  10. Molecular dynamics based chemistry models of hypervelocity collisions of O(3P) + SO2(X, 1A1) in DSMC.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Neal; Levin, Deborah A; van Duin, Adri C T

    2013-01-28

    A significant process in the formation of the unique atmosphere of Io, a Jovian moon, is collision-induced dissociation of sulfur dioxide. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC) is used to model the rarefied gas dynamics of the Ionian atmosphere. However, there is a lack of reliable reaction and collision cross sections needed for hypervelocity conditions. In this work, collisions between SO(2) and O were studied using molecular dynamics/quasi-classical trajectories methods with the potential of Murrell and a force field for reactive systems (ReaxFF). Dissociation to SO was found to be the significant reacting process, but at higher collision energies, complete atomization of SO(2) was found to frequently occur. In contrast, dissociation to O(2) was found to be mostly negligible and formation of SO(3) occurred only at low impact velocities. The chemistry and collision models developed from the Murrell and ReaxFF methods were implemented in DSMC simulations and compared to the baseline DSMC collision and reaction models. It was found that the selection of both the dissociation reaction cross section and the non-reactive collision model has a significant effect on the counterflow, shock gas dynamic structure. PMID:23387593

  11. The Properties of Hypervelocity Stars and S-stars Originating from an Eccentric Disk around a Supermassive Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šubr, Ladislav; Haas, Jaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs), which are observed in the Galactic halo, are believed to be accelerated to large velocities by a process of tidal disruption of binary stars passing close to the supermassive black hole (SMBH) which resides in the center of the Galaxy. It is, however, still unclear where these relatively young stars were born and what dynamical process pushed them to nearly radial orbits around the SMBH. In this paper we investigate the possibility that the young binaries originated from a thin eccentric disk, similar to the one currently observed in the Galactic center. By means of direct N-body simulations, we follow the dynamical evolution of an initially thin and eccentric disk of stars with a 100% binary fraction orbiting around the SMBH. Such a configuration leads to Kozai-Lidov oscillations of orbital elements, bringing a considerable number of binaries to the close vicinity of the black hole. Subsequent tidal disruption of these binaries accelerates one of their components to velocities well above the escape velocity from the SMBH, while the second component becomes tightly bound to the SMBH. We describe the main kinematic properties of the escaping and tightly bound stars within our model, and compare them qualitatively to the properties of the observed HVSs and S-stars, respectively. The most prominent feature is strong anisotropy in the directions of the escaping stars, which is observed for Galactic HVSs but has not yet been explained.

  12. The Properties of Hypervelocity Stars and S-stars Originating from an Eccentric Disk around a Supermassive Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šubr, Ladislav; Haas, Jaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs), which are observed in the Galactic halo, are believed to be accelerated to large velocities by a process of tidal disruption of binary stars passing close to the supermassive black hole (SMBH) which resides in the center of the Galaxy. It is, however, still unclear where these relatively young stars were born and what dynamical process pushed them to nearly radial orbits around the SMBH. In this paper we investigate the possibility that the young binaries originated from a thin eccentric disk, similar to the one currently observed in the Galactic center. By means of direct N-body simulations, we follow the dynamical evolution of an initially thin and eccentric disk of stars with a 100% binary fraction orbiting around the SMBH. Such a configuration leads to Kozai–Lidov oscillations of orbital elements, bringing a considerable number of binaries to the close vicinity of the black hole. Subsequent tidal disruption of these binaries accelerates one of their components to velocities well above the escape velocity from the SMBH, while the second component becomes tightly bound to the SMBH. We describe the main kinematic properties of the escaping and tightly bound stars within our model, and compare them qualitatively to the properties of the observed HVSs and S-stars, respectively. The most prominent feature is strong anisotropy in the directions of the escaping stars, which is observed for Galactic HVSs but has not yet been explained.

  13. Results of Two-Stage Light-Gas Gun Development Efforts and Hypervelocity Impact Tests of Advanced Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelison, C. J.; Watts, Eric T.

    1998-01-01

    Gun development efforts to increase the launching capabilities of the NASA Ames 0.5-inch two-stage light-gas gun have been investigated. A gun performance simulation code was used to guide initial parametric variations and hardware modifications, in order to increase the projectile impact velocity capability to 8 km/s, while maintaining acceptable levels of gun barrel erosion and gun component stresses. Concurrent with this facility development effort, a hypervelocity impact testing series in support of the X-33/RLV program was performed in collaboration with Rockwell International. Specifically, advanced thermal protection system materials were impacted with aluminum spheres to simulate impacts with on-orbit space debris. Materials tested included AETB-8, AETB-12, AETB-20, and SIRCA-25 tiles, tailorable advanced blanket insulation (TABI), and high temperature AFRSI (HTA). The ballistic limit for several Thermal Protection System (TPS) configurations was investigated to determine particle sizes which cause threshold TPS/structure penetration. Crater depth in tiles was measured as a function of impact particle size. The relationship between coating type and crater morphology was also explored. Data obtained during this test series was used to perform a preliminary analysis of the risks to a typical orbital vehicle from the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  14. Observation of the mass and velocity of projectile fragments produced by hypervelocity impact with light-weight ceramic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kawai, Nobuaki; Tamura, Hideki

    2011-06-01

    In order to characterize dynamic fracture of Al projectiles caused by impact with light-weight ceramic targets, we performed hypervelocity impact experiments of light-weight ceramic targets using spherical Al projectile accelerated by mini two-stage light-gun. As ceramic targets, Mullite, Silicon nitride, and Alumina ceramics with 1 mm thick are chosen. Aluminum-alloy projectiles of 2.1 mm in diameter are accelerated up to 4.8 km/s and impacted onto the targets under normal impact condition. The dynamic fracture of targets and projectiles is observed with flash, soft x-ray radiography and high speed digital framing camera photography, and we propose a new method for calculating the mass of impact fragments by means of flash x-ray and x-ray imaging plate. A witness plate is used to evaluate a protective performance of the targets. In comparison to the results of Silicon nitride and Alumina targets, Mullite target breaks up the projectile into smaller fragments than the other targets, and the scattering angle of the debris generate from Mullite target is larger than that of the other targets. These results suggest that Mullite ceramics will be promising structural member making up debris shield.

  15. Survival of Nannochloropsis Phytoplankton in Hypervelocity Impact Events up to Velocities of 6.07 km/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, D. L. S.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    Studies have previously been conducted to verify the survivability of living cells during hypervelocity impact events to test the panspermia and lithopanspermia hypothesis [1], [2]. It has been demonstrated that bacteria survive impacts up to 5.4 km s-1 (approx. shock pressure 30 GPa) - albeit with a low probability of survival [1] whilst larger more complex objects (such as seeds) break up at ~1 km s-1 [2]. The survivability of yeast spores in impacts up to 7.4 km s-1 has also recently been shown [3]. We demonstrate here the survivability of Nannochloropsis Phytoplankton, a eukaryotic photosynthesizing autotroph found in the 'euphotic zone'(sunlit surface layers of oceans) [4] at impact velocities up to 6.07 km s-1. Phytoplankton from a culture sample was frozen and then fired into water (to simulate oceanic impacts, as described in [5]) using a light gas gun (LGG) [6]. The water was then retrieved and placed into a sealed culture vessel and left under a constant light source to check the viability of any remnant organisms.

  16. Survival of yeast spores in hypervelocity impact events up to velocities of 7.4 km s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, M. C.; Solscheid, C.; Burchell, M. J.; Josse, L.; Adamek, N.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the survivability in hypervelocity impacts of yeast in spore form, and as mature cultures, at impact velocities from 1 to 7.4 km s-1, corresponding to an estimated peak shock pressure of ˜43 GPa. Spores from a yeast strain (BY4743), deficient in an enzyme required for uracil production, were fired into water (to simulate oceanic impact from space) using a light gas gun. The water was then retrieved and filtered and the resulting retentate and filtrate cultured to determine viability and survival rates of remnant spores. Yeast growth (confirmed as coming from the original sample as it had the same enzyme deficiency) was found in recovered samples at all impact speeds, albeit in smaller quantities at the higher speeds. The survival probabilities were measured as ˜50% at 1 km s-1, falling to ˜10-3% at 7.4 km s-1. This follows the pattern observed in previous work on survival of microbial life and spores exposed to extreme shock loading, where there is reasonable survival at low peak shock pressures with more severe lethality above a critical shock pressure at the GPa scale (here between 2 and 10 GPa). These results are explained in the context of a general model for survival against extreme shock and are relevant to the hypotheses of panspermia and litho-panspermia, showing that extreme shocks during transfer across space are not necessarily sterilising.

  17. INK-JET PRINTING OF PF6 FOR OLED APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Burrasca, G.; Fasolino, T.; Miscioscia, R.; Nenna, G.; Vacca, P.; Villani, F.; Minarini, C.; Della Sala, D.

    2008-08-28

    In the last years there has been much interest in applying ink-jet printing (IJP) technology to the deposition of several materials for organic electronics applications, including metals, polymers and nanoparticles dispersions on flexible substrates. The aim of this work is to study the effect of ink-jet deposition of polymer films in the manufacturing of OLED devices comparing their performances to standard technologies. The ink-jet printed polymer is introduced in an hybrid structure in which other layers are deposited by vacuum thermal evaporation. The electrical and optical properties of the obtained devices are investigated.OLEDs with the same structure were fabricated by spin-coating a polymer film by the same solution used as ink. Results have been compared to the above ones to determine how the deposition method affects the device optoelectronic properties.

  18. Mass spectrometric gas composition measurements associated with jet interaction tests in a high-enthalpy wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Brown, K. G.; Wood, G. M., Jr.; Puster, R. L.; Paulin, P. A.; Fishel, C. E.; Ellerbe, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of test gas composition is important in wind-tunnel experiments measuring aerothermodynamic interactions. This paper describes measurements made by sampling the top of the test section during runs of the Langley 7-Inch High-Temperature Tunnel. The tests were conducted to determine the mixing of gas injected from a flat-plate model into a combustion-heated hypervelocity test stream and to monitor the CO2 produced in the combustion. The Mass Spectrometric (MS) measurements yield the mole fraction of N2 or He and CO2 reaching the sample inlets. The data obtained for several tunnel run conditions are related to the pressures measured in the tunnel test section and at the MS ionizer inlet. The apparent distributions of injected gas species and tunnel gas (CO2) are discussed relative to the sampling techniques. The measurements provided significant real-time data for the distribution of injected gases in the test section. The jet N2 diffused readily from the test stream, but the jet He was mostly entrained. The amounts of CO2 and Ar diffusing upward in the test section for several run conditions indicated the variability of the combustion-gas test-stream composition.

  19. Investigation of Dynamic Oxygen Adsorption in Molten Solder Jetting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megaridis, Constantine M.; Bellizia, Giulio; McNallan, Michael; Wallace, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Surface tension forces play a critical role in fluid dynamic phenomena that are important in materials processing. The surface tension of liquid metals has been shown to be very susceptible to small amounts of adsorbed oxygen. Consequently, the kinetics of oxygen adsorption can influence the capillary breakup of liquid-metal jets targeted for use in electronics assembly applications, where low-melting-point metals (such as tin-containing solders) are utilized as an attachment material for mounting of electronic components to substrates. By interpreting values of surface tension measured at various surface ages, adsorption and diffusion rates of oxygen on the surface of the melt can be estimated. This research program investigates the adsorption kinetics of oxygen on the surface of an atomizing molten-metal jet. A novel oscillating capillary jet method has been developed for the measurement of dynamic surface tension of liquids, and in particular, metal melts which are susceptible to rapid surface degradation caused by oxygen adsorption. The experimental technique captures the evolution of jet swells and necks continuously along the jet propagation axis and is used in conjunction with an existing linear, axisymmetric, constant-property model to determine the variation of the instability growth rate, and, in turn, surface tension of the liquid as a function of surface age measured from the exit orifice. The conditions investigated so far focus on a time window of 2-4ms from the jet orifice. The surface properties of the eutectic 63%Sn-37%Pb solder alloy have been investigated in terms of their variation due to O2 adsorption from a N2 atmosphere containing controlled amounts of oxygen (from 8 ppm to 1000 ppm). The method performed well for situations where the oxygen adsorption was low in that time window. The value of surface tension for the 63Sn-37Pb solder in pure nitrogen was found to be 0.49 N/m, in good agreement with previously published work. A characteristic

  20. Jet charge at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.