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Sample records for hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis

  1. Cutaneous lesions and finger clubbing uncovering hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis and hepatitis C with mixed cryoglobulinemia*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Almeida, Teresa; Caetano, Mónica; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis is a rare clinicopathologic entity characterized by urticarial lesions that persist for more than 24 hours and histologic features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Patients can be divided into normocomplementemic or hypocomplementemic. The authors report the case of a healthy 49-year-old woman with a 1-year history of highly pruritic generalized cutaneous lesions and finger clubbing. Laboratory tests together with histopathologic examination allowed the diagnosis of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, chronic hepatitis C and type II mixed cryoglobulinemia. The patient started symptomatic treatment and was referred to a gastroenterologist for management of the hepatitis C, with progressive improvement of the skin condition. The development of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis in the context of chronic hepatitis C is exceedingly rare and possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24474109

  2. Telmisartan induced urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vikram K; Singh, Ravinder; Gupta, Mrinal; Raina, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old man developed urticarial vasculitis following ingestion of telmisartan and hydrochlorothiazide combination for hypertension. Treatment with prednisolone and cetirizine was curative, but his lesions recurred when he continued telmisartan and hydrochlorothiazide against medical advice. Re-challenge with the same doses of telmisartan precipitated similar lesions with telmisartan and not with hydrochlorothiazide. This uncommon cutaneous adverse reaction of angiotensin II receptor blockers has implication for the clinicians as more such cases may become apparent with their wider use than in premarketing studies. PMID:26600649

  3. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Uni; Yfantis, Harris; Xie, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia. PMID:27190661

  4. Urticarial Reactions: Vascular Erythema, Urticaria, Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Sibbald, R. Gary

    1987-01-01

    Vascular erythemas, including urticaria and vasculitis, represent diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. A careful systemic approach to history and physical examination should be followed by appropriate investigations to rule out systemic disease. Chronic urticaria patients should be physically tested to identify cholinergic, dermagraphic, and cold-induced responses. Food diaries and careful drug history may be important to identify exacerbating factors in chronic urticaria. A skin biopsy is necessary to diagnose vasculitis. Therapy of any underlying cause is supplemented with H1 antihistamines in urticaria patients, while vasculitis requires a different anti-inflammatory approach. PMID:21263956

  5. Pulmonary hemosiderosis with normocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis in a child.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, H; Yilmaz, O; Savas, R; Kirmaz, C; Sogut, A; Ozalp, S

    2007-03-01

    Pulmonary hemosiderosis is rarely associated with urticarial vaculitis especially if normocomplementemic. An eigth year old girl presented with relapsing and remitting chronic and persistent urticarial lesions, conjunctival injection, recurrent cough and hemoptysis. Respiratory findings started at seven years of age. Physical examination revealed diffuse skin lesions mainly settled on the extremities, non-purulent conjunctival injection, rare ronchi and fine crackles in bilateral lower zones of the lungs. Biopsy of the urticaria like skin lesions demonstrated leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Rheumatological markers were negative. Levels of complement fractions 3 and 4 were normal. Chest x-ray demonstrated diffuse alveolar infiltrative images. High Resolution Computed Tomography of the chest revealed diffuse ground-glass appearance, increased interstitial density. Diagnostic flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed hemosiderin laden alveolar macrophages. She was started on systemic corticosteroid treatment. During follow up, pulmonary symptoms disappeared, however skin lesions and conjunctival symptoms persisted and exacerbated four times in two years. CT of lungs after two years of treatment revealed rare patchy areas of ground glass appearance in bilateral lower lobes and right upper lobe as well as a few of millimetric pleural nodules. This patient is still followed up under low dose steroids and pulmonary findings regressed but low grade inflammation due to vasculitis is thought to continue as supported by the persistence of tomographic findings in the lungs despite the absence of any symptoms. This case demonstrates association of urticarial vasculitis and pulmonary hemosiderosis in the setting of normocomplementemia.

  6. Normocomplementaemic Urticarial Vasculitis in a 19-Month-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Urticaria is common in children. Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a potentially more serious, rare variant. The youngest reported case was 12 months of age. A systemically well, 19-month-old girl presented with her mother who was concerned about the development of a rash. On presentation, the child had normal vital signs, was alert, and was well and playing with toys. There was a widespread urticarial rash (raised, pruritic, and erythematous) that was most apparent on the trunk with minimal rash on the legs. Overlying this urticarial rash in a similar distribution was a blotchy, palpable purpuric rash and associated hyperpigmentation. Investigations revealed a normal level of haemoglobin, white cells, platelets, and electrolytes. Renal function, international normalised ratio, and activated partial thromboplastin time were all normal. There was no blood or protein in the urine. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was mildly elevated at 19 mm/hour. Complement results (including C1q) obtained later were normal. This case is striking not only because of the rarity of UV in children but also due to the unique diagnostic and prognostic challenges that it raises.

  7. Evaluation of D-dimer serum levels among patients with chronic urticaria, psoriasis and urticarial vasculitis*

    PubMed Central

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Antinori, Lidi Che Leon; Maruta, Celina Wakisaka; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND It has been demonstrated that neutrophils, eosinophils and monocytes, under appropriated stimulus, may express tissue factor and therefore, activate the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. We performed a transversal and case-control study of patients with chronic urticaria and patients with psoriasis, in our outpatient clinic to evaluate the production of D-dimer. OBJECTIVE To evaluate D-dimer serum levels in patients with chronic urticaria and its possible correlation with disease activity. PATIENTS AND METHODS The study was conducted from October 2010 until March 2011. We selected 37 consecutive patients from our Allergy Unit and Psoriasis Unit, and divided them into three groups for statistical analysis: (i) 12 patients with active chronic urticaria (CU); (ii) 10 patients with chronic urticaria under remission and (iii) 15 patients with psoriasis (a disease with skin inflammatory infiltrate constituted by neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes). Another five patients with urticarial vasculitis were allocated in our study, but not included in statistical analysis. The serum levels of D-dimer were measured by Enzyme Linked Fluorescent Assay (ELFA), and the result units were given in ng/ml FEU. RESULTS Patients with active chronic urticaria had the highest serum levels of D-dimer (p<0.01), when compared to patients with CU under remission and the control group (patients with psoriasis). CONCLUSIONS Patients with active chronic urticaria have higher serum levels of D-dimer, when compared to patients with chronic urticaria under remission and patients with psoriasis. We found elevated serum levels of D-dimer among patients with urticarial vasculitis. PMID:23793207

  8. Impact of Vasculitis on Employment and Income

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-26

    Vasculitis; Systemic Vasculitis; Behcet's Disease; CNS Vasculitis; Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis; Eosinophilic Granulomatosis; Temporal Arteritis; Wegener Granulomatosis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Polyarteritis Nodosa (PAN); Takayasu's Arteritis; Urticarial Vasculitis

  9. Cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal adjuvant therapy for breast cancer: a case of localised urticarial vasculitis following anastrozole therapy and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bock, Vanessa L; Friedlander, Michael; Waring, Dale; Kossard, Steven; Wood, Glenda K

    2014-11-01

    Hormonal therapy with either tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors is commonly used to treat women with breast cancer in both the adjuvant and recurrent disease setting. Cutaneous adverse reactions to these drugs have been rarely reported in the literature. We report an unusual case of urticarial vasculitis following the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole that localised to the unilateral trunk and mastectomy scar, and review the literature on the cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal therapy for breast cancer.

  10. Acquired cutis laxa following urticarial vasculitis associated with IgA myeloma.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ryan B; Haynes, Harley A; Granter, Scott R; Miller, Danielle M

    2009-06-01

    Cutis laxa (CL) is an inherited or acquired connective tissue disorder characterized clinically by loosely hanging skin folds. There is often preceding cutaneous inflammatory eruption (ie, urticaria, eczema, erythema multiforme), and there is frequently internal organ involvement of the gastrointestinal, urogenital, pulmonary, and cardiovascular systems. Histologically, there are degenerative changes in the dermal elastic fibers. Of the few reports on this rare disorder, authors have speculated about an immune-mediated destruction of elastic fibers, and monoclonal gammopathies, such as multiple myeloma or heavy chain deposition disease, have a recognized association with CL. We report an unusual case of rapidly progressing acquired CL associated with leukocytoclastic vasculitis, IgA myeloma, and an immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Light microscopy of the lax skin revealed complete absence of elastic fibers in areas of vasculitis.

  11. Vasculitis Pregnancy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Vasculitis; Behcet's Disease; CNS Vasculitis; Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis; Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (EGPA); Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS); Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (GPA); Wegener's Granulomatosis; IgA Vasculitis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura (HSP); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); Polyarteritis Nodosa (PAN); Takayasu Arteritis (TAK); Urticarial Vasculitis; Systemic Vasculitis

  12. Vasculitis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our Videos Upcoming Events Vasculitis - A 30 Year Perspective Coping With Vasculitis One Family - Three Cases of PAN VF Physician Perspectives: Dr. Eric Matteson Cheryl and CNS Vasculitis Carol ...

  13. Rheumatoid Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... RV) is an unusual complication of longstanding, severe rheumatoid arthritis. The active vasculitis associated with rheumatoid disease occurs ... a manifestation of “extra-articular” (beyond the joint)rheumatoid arthritis and involves the small and medium-sized arteries ...

  14. Chewing-gum preservative induced toxidermic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Faure, G; Bene, M C

    1986-09-01

    This paper reports the case of a young female patient who presented with a cutaneous urticarial disseminated eruption. Drug-induced side effects were eliminated, and the only recent dietary change was the regular use of chewing-gums containing chlorophylla (E140), menthol and BHT (butylhydroxytoluene). Immunohistological analysis of a cutaneous lesion revealed signs of vasculitis. Within 1 week after stopping chewing gum, the eruption subsided. Oral provocation tests at 4-day intervals confirmed the responsibility of BHT by the reinduction of the cutaneous signs after a few hours.

  15. Pustular vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Selvan, Shilpa; Shakir, Rebecca; Chan, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case of pustular vasculitis secondary to streptococcal infection. The majority of cases described in the literature predominantly involve the dorsal hands, and may subsequently spread to involve the lower limbs. However, our case demonstrates a rare case where primary involvement of the lower limbs was present with secondary involvement at the dorsum of the hands. The patient responded well to intravenous methylprednisolone reflected both clinically and by his acute phase response. PMID:23505282

  16. Pediatric Vasculitis Initiative

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Wegeners Granulomatosis (Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis); Microscopic Polyangiitis; Churg Strauss Syndrome (Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis); Polyarteritis Nodosa; Takayasu Arteritis; Primary CNS Vasculitis; Unclassified Vasculitis

  17. Vasculitis with Alcofenac Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Billings, R. A.; Burry, H. C.; Emslie, F. S.; Kerr, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    Three patients developed a vasculitis while taking alclofenac. Two recovered with corticosteroid therapy, and the third, who had continued to take the drug for a further week despite epistaxis, haemoptysis, haematuria, and cutaneous vasculitis, developed a more persistent vasculitis with histological evidence of progressive renal involvement. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:4279126

  18. Dermatologic Diagnosis: Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Einhorn, Joseph; Levis, Joel T

    2015-01-01

    Leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV), also termed hypersensitivity vasculitis, is a small-vessel vasculitis. The skin is the organ most commonly involved in LCV. Typical presentation is a painful, burning rash predominantly in the lower extremities. The most common skin manifestation is palpable purpura. Other skin manifestations include maculopapular rash, bullae, papules, plaques, nodules, ulcers, and livedo reticularis. PMID:26176572

  19. Thromboembolic disease in vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Tomasson, Gunnar; Monach, Paul A.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To give an overview of recent clinical findings of thromboembolic disease in vasculitis and provide insight into possible explanations of the association between thrombosis and inflammation. Recent findings A high incidence of venous thrombotic events has recently been described in four distinct cohorts of patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis (AAV), especially during periods of active disease. No factors other than the vasculitis itself have been identified that explain this high occurrence of thrombosis. Several studies have shown an increased rate of thrombosis in Behçet’s disease, with a different clinical presentation than that observed in AAV. Recent laboratory findings provide exciting insights into a bidirectional feedback loop between coagulation and inflammation that may be applicable to vasculitis. Summary Thrombosis is an important clinical manifestation of some types of vasculitis. Better understanding of the association of thrombosis with inflammation in vasculitis might lead to development of clinically useful biomarkers and new approaches to therapy. Additionally, study of the specific factors involved in thrombosis in systemic vasculitis could help explain the role of inflammation in more common settings of venous thrombotic events. PMID:19077717

  20. Rheumatoid vasculitis - Case report.

    PubMed

    Pecly, Inah Maria Drummond; Ocampo, Juan Felipe; Ramirez, Guillermo Pandales; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Guedes; Saud, Claudia Guerra Murad; Arantes, Milton Dos Reis

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease and its main manifestation is persistent synovitis affecting peripheral joints symmetrically, In spite of its destructive potential, the evolution of RA is highly variable. Some patients may have only a short-term process oligoarticular with minimum lesion, while others suffers a polyarthritis evolving with progressive and continuous involvement of other organ systems such as skin, heart, lungs, muscles and blood vessels rarely leading to rheumatoid vasculitis. The aim of this study was to describe a case of rheumatoid vasculitis a rare and severe condition.

  1. Systemic vasculitis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Gedalia, Abraham; Cuchacovich, Raquel

    2009-12-01

    Systemic vasculitis is a group of disorders with multiorgan involvement. These disorders have diverse clinical manifestations associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common vasculitides in children--Henoch-Schönlein purpura and Kawasaki disease--are self-limiting conditions. The lifelong and chronic vasculitides (eg, giant cell arteritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, polyarteritis nodosa, and Takayasu arteritis) are rarely seen in children. Therefore, the outcome in general is more favorable in children. This article offers an overview of the epidemiologic, etiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical features of vasculitis in children, with emphasis on common conditions. PMID:19922729

  2. How Is Vasculitis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether vasculitis is affecting your abdominal organs. Computed Tomography Scan A computed tomography (to-MOG-rah-fee) scan, or CT scan, ... that vein or artery. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) identifies areas that show higher glucose ...

  3. Cutaneous vasculitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Crowson, A Neil; Mihm, Martin C; Magro, Cynthia M

    2003-03-01

    As the skin is commonly involved in systemic vasculitic disorders as well as those hypersensitivity states whose expression is largely skin-confined, cutaneous vasculitic lesions offer a window to diagnosis and a ready source of accessible tissue for biopsy. In this review, we discuss the pathologic manifestations of chronic vasculitic syndromes such as granuloma faciale and erythema elevatum diutinum; IgA-associated vasculitis including Henoch-Schonlein purpura; vasculitis seen in the setting of cryoglobulinemia and hypergammaglobulinemia of Waldenstrom, hereditary deficiencies of complement, and IgA deficiency; those leukocytoclastic vasculitides resulting from hypersensitivity reactions to drug, chemical and foodstuff ingestion; and those vasculitides seen in patients with systemic diseases such as polyarteritis nodosa, rheumatoid arthritis, mixed connective tissue disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, relapsing polychondritis, Behcet's disease, Wegener's granulomatosis, and allergic granulomatosis of Churg and Strauss.

  4. [Leukocytoclastic vasculitis associated with naproxen].

    PubMed

    Lossos, I S; Yossepowitch, O; Amir, G; Orren, R

    1996-05-01

    We describe a 62-year-old woman who developed severe, cutaneous, leukocytoclastic vasculitis following administration of Naproxen. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used by millions for their analgetic as well as anti-inflammatory effects. While side-effects involving the kidney and the gastrointestinal tract are well known, hypersensitivity vasculitis is rarely reported. We report an additional case.

  5. Imaging findings in pulmonary vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Castañer, Eva; Alguersuari, Anna; Andreu, Marta; Gallardo, Xavier; Spinu, Cristina; Mata, Josep M

    2012-12-01

    Vasculitis is a destructive inflammatory process affecting blood vessels. Pulmonary vasculitis may develop secondary to other conditions or constitute a primary idiopathic disorder. Thoracic involvement is most common in primary idiopathic large-vessel vasculitides (Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, Behçet disease) and primary antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitides (Wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome). Primary pulmonary vasculitides are rare, and their signs and symptoms are nonspecific, overlapping with those of infections, connective tissue diseases, and malignancies. The radiologic findings in primary pulmonary vasculitis vary widely and can include vessel wall thickening, nodular or cavitary lesions, ground-glass opacities, and consolidations, among others. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage usually results from primary small-vessel vasculitis in the lungs. To diagnose vasculitis, medical teams must recognize characteristic combinations of clinical, radiologic, laboratory, and histopathologic features. PMID:23168065

  6. [Unclear pruritic and urticarial skin inflammation. Bed bug attack].

    PubMed

    Arayesh, A; Wieczorek, D; Kapp, A; Raap, U

    2013-03-01

    A 27-year-old woman presented with severe pruritus for a few weeks and diffuse urticarial erythema with pinhead-sized papules over the entire body. The skin lesions occurred directly after a stay in her secondary residence in London. The medical history, clinical picture and histological feature of an arthropod reaction in the skin biopsy, coupled with patient offering a bed bug specimen as evidence, secured the diagnosis of a cimicosis. PMID:23223900

  7. Vasculitis Illness Perception (VIP) Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-11

    Wegener Granulomatosis; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Giant Cell Arteritis; Takayasu's Arteritis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Behcet's Disease; CNS Vasculitis

  8. Vasculitis associated with connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, E; Gasparini, G; Papini, M; Burlando, M; Drago, F; Parodi, A

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis in connective tissue disease (CTD) is quite rare, it is reported in approximately 10% of patients with CTD; systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) shows the highest association rate. Vessels of any size may be involved, but mainly small vessels vasculitis is reported. At present the classification of these vasculitis is unsatisfactory. According to the 2012 revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference, vasculitides secondary to CTD are a well identified entity and are classified under the category of "vasculitis associated with systemic disease". However only lupus vasculitis and rheumatoid vasculitis are explicitly listed, while the remaining are generically included under the heading "others". Petechiae, purpura, gangrene and ulcers are the most frequent cutaneous manifestations that should investigated in order to rule out potentially dangerous systemic involvement, especially if cryoglobulinemic or necrotizing vasculitis are suspected. This review will focus on the cutaneous involvement in CTD associated vasculitis. PMID:25732106

  9. The ANCA Vasculitis Questionnaire (AAV-PRO©)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) (EGPA); Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS); Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener's) (GPA); Wegener Granulomatosis (WG); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (AAV); Vasculitis

  10. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  11. Disseminated histoplasmosis and necrotizing vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Small, P.; Levitt, P.

    1976-01-01

    A 74-year-old man with congestive heart failure was found to have Histoplasma capsulatum in a lesion of the right nasal septum. His initial treatment with amphotericin B was inadequate because of severe intolerance to the drug. Three months after initial presentation H. capsulatum was detected in his blood and bone marrow. Slightly elevated purpuric lesions on the arms, lower legs and trunk showed the typical features of necrotizing vasculitis. Cutaneous anergy was reversed after treatment with transfer factor. Skin involvement in disseminated histoplasmosis is unusual and there are no previous reports of vasculitis associated with this infection. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1253047

  12. Retrospective chart review in a cohort of patients with urticarial dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Banan, Parastoo; Butler, Gregory; Wu, Jason

    2014-05-01

    Urticarial dermatitis is a poorly understood skin condition while it seems to be much more common than the paucity of reports suggest. It manifests with severely pruritic papules and plaques that resemble eczematous and urticarial lesions morphologically. The key clues to diagnosis are the urticarial appearance and overlap with an eczematous reaction. Here, we present a series of 19 cases (13 women and six men) with urticarial dermatitis clinically and histologically. The patients' average age was 58 and most of the cases were idiopathic. Trunk and proximal extremities were the most common sites involved followed by the distal extremities. Poor response to potent topical corticosteroids and antihistamines was usual and many patients required oral prednisone or other immunosuppressant agents or phototherapy.

  13. Circulating Immune Complexes in Cutaneous Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Mackel, Susan E.; Tappeiner, Gerhard; Brumfield, Hilton; Jordon, Robert E.

    1979-01-01

    To investigate the pathogeneic significance of immune complexes in cutaneous vasculitis, 107 patients with various forms of cutaneous vasculitis, including 59 patients with necrotizing (leukocytoclastic) vasculitis (group 1), and 48 patients with lymphocytic vasculitis, or a predominately lymphocytic perivascular infiltrate (group 2), were studied. Immunoglobulins or complement components in cutaneous blood vessels were detected by direct immunofluorescence in high frequency in both groups (91 and 88%, respectively). Using two radioassays for circulating immune complexes, Clq or monoclonal rheumatoid factor (mRF) reactive material was detected in 68% of the patients with necrotizing vasculitis but only 44% of the patients in the lymphocytic-perivascular group. The mRF radioassay was elevated in 58% of the first group of patients and 41% of the patients in group 2, although Clq binding activity was increased in 54% of the patients with necrotizing vasculitis but only in 9% of the patients with a lymphocytic vasculitis or lymphocytic perivascular infiltrate. By using both sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and Sepharose 6B gel filtration, the Clq and mRF reactive material detected in some patients with necrotizing vasculitis eluted in high molecular weight fractions that were also anticomplementary. In one patient with necrotizing vasculitis and hepatitis B antigenemia, these heavy molecular weight Clq and mRF reactive fractions contained a two- to three-fold increase in hepatitis B surface antigen when compared with lighter molecular weight fractions. Heavy and light molecular weight mRF reactive material could be detected in selected patients in the lymphocytic-perivascular group as well as in the necrotizing vasculitis group. These studies suggest that cutaneous vasculitis, including acute necrotizing (leukocytoclastic) vasculitis and some forms of lymphocytic vasculitis, and perhaps some diseases characterized by a lymphocytic perivascular infiltrate

  14. Proteinase 3-ANCA Vasculitis versus Myeloperoxidase-ANCA Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst, Marc; van Paassen, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    In patients with GN or vasculitis, ANCAs are directed against proteinase 3 (PR3) or myeloperoxidase (MPO). The differences between PR3-ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and MPO-AAV described in the past have been supplemented during the last decade. In this review, we discuss the differences between these two small-vessel vasculitides, focusing especially on possible etiologic and pathophysiologic differences. PR3-AAV is more common in northern parts of the world, whereas MPO-AAV is more common in southern regions of Europe, Asia, and the Pacific, with the exception of New Zealand and Australia. A genetic contribution has been extensively studied, and there is a high prevalence of the HLA-DPB1*04:01 allele in patients with PR3-AAV as opposed to patients with MPO-AAV and/or healthy controls. Histologically, MPO-AAV and PR3-AAV are similar but show qualitative differences when analyzed carefully. Clinically, both serotypes are difficult to distinguish, but quantitative differences are present. More organs are affected in PR3-AAV, whereas renal limited vasculitis occurs more often in patients with MPO-AAV. For future clinical trials, we advocate classifying patients by ANCA serotype as opposed to the traditional disease type classification. PMID:25956510

  15. Silica exposure and systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, Karen B

    2003-01-01

    Work in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities has exposed workers to multiple toxic agents leading to acute and chronic diseases. Many exposures were common to numerous work sites. Exposure to crystalline silica was primarily restricted to a few facilities. I present the case of a 63-year-old male who worked in DOE facilities for 30 years as a weapons testing technician. In addition to silica, other workplace exposures included beryllium, various solvents and heavy metals, depleted uranium, and ionizing radiation. In 1989 a painful macular skin lesion was biopsied and diagnosed as leukocytoclastic vasculitis. By 1992 he developed gross hematuria and dyspnea. Blood laboratory results revealed a serum creatinine concentration of 2.1 mg/dL, ethrythrocyte sedimentation rate of 61 mm/hr, negative cANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody cytoplasmic pattern), positive pANCA (ANCA perinuclear pattern), and antiglomerular basement membrane negative. Renal biopsy showed proliferative (crescentric) and necrotizing glomerulonephritis. The patient's diagnoses included microscopic polyangiitis, systemic necrotizing vasculitis, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, and glomerulonephritis. Environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of an idiopathic expression of systemic autoimmune disease. Crystalline silica exposure has been linked to rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and some of the small vessel vasculitides. DOE workers are currently able to apply for compensation under the federal Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP). However, the only diseases covered by EEOICP are cancers related to radiation exposure, chronic beryllium disease, and chronic silicosis. PMID:14644669

  16. Educational Needs of Patients With Systemic Vasculitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-11

    Behcet's Disease; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Vasculitis, Central Nervous System; Giant Cell Arteritis; Wegener Granulomatosis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Takayasu's Arteritis

  17. Urticarial papular and plaque eruptions. A noneczematous manifestation of allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Goh, C L

    1989-04-01

    A noneczematous eruption associated with allergic contact dermatitis is described. Five patients had disseminated erythematous urticarial papular and plaque eruptions secondary to contact allergy to two substances (four to proflavine and one to a permanent waving lotion). The eruption appeared to be similar to the previously described "erythema multiforme-like eruption" associated with allergic contact dermatitis. A review of the previous report indicated that the eruptions currently being reported do not have the typical clinical and histologic features of erythema multiforme. The term "urticarial papular and plaque eruption of contact allergy" is suggested to describe the eruption. The exact mechanism of the eruption remained speculative.

  18. Association of tuberculosis with vasculitis retinae.

    PubMed

    Habibullah, M; Uddin, M S; Islam, S

    2008-07-01

    Retinal vasculitis is one of the common causes of blindness among the young adult in this subcontinent. Causes of retinal vasculitis are variable and it is one of the common ocular manifestations of tuberculosis. This case control study was carried out on 45 patients with retinal vasculitis of different age groups. All the patients were purposively selected from the department of ophthalmology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University and National Institute of Ophthalmology Dhaka. This study reveals that vasculitis retinae is a disease of younger age group (68.9%). Mean+/-SD age of cases were 31.84+/-10.82 years. It occurs more in male (75.6%) and male female ratio is 3.09:1, single or both eye may involve. Retinal vasculitis occurs more in middle socio-economic status persons (62.2%). It present with floaters (58.9%), hazy media (60%), vitreous haemorrhage (57.8%) and retinal haemorrhage (42.2%). All 45 subjects both cases and control groups were tested with Mantoux test. 18(40%) subjects of cases and 13(28.9%) subjects of control group were found positive Mantoux test. It was observed that the association of tuberculosis with vasculitis retinae is not statistically significant. As tuberculosis is common in this country, further specific and extensive study over a longer period of time is necessary for understanding the role of tuberculosis in retinal vasculitis patients.

  19. [Diagnostic imaging of central nervous system vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hajime; Yamada, Kei

    2015-03-01

    Vasculitis involving the central nervous system presents with infarction and hemorrhage, which are often nonspecific findings. Laboratory examinations are essential for diagnosis of vasculitis in addition to comprehensive and systematic review of the clinical course. Although most findings tend to be nonspecific, enhancement and thickening of the vascular wall indicate vasculitis. Visualization of the vascular wall requires selection of the appropriate imaging modality and mode of image acquisition. Contrast-enhanced CT, MRI, and FDG-PET are useful for visualizing large vessel vasculitis, while CT, MRI, and angiography are effective for medium vessel vasculitis. The use of ultrasound is limited to evaluating vessels on the body surface. Although relatively thick vessels can be demonstrated by angiography, complete survey of small vessels is difficult. Here, we summarize the characteristics of each imaging modality and imaging findings of typical vasculitides-Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, Behçet's disease, primary angiitis of the CNS, and vasculitis associated with systemic disease. Differential diagnoses are also shown, including infective endocarditis, tuberculous meningitis, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. PMID:25846439

  20. Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ... Lists Supporters About Us Leadership Careers at ACR Social Media Newsroom Annual Reports & Financial Statements Policies & Guidelines ...

  1. Orlistat-induced bullous leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Tamara; Fonder, Margaret; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Wilkel, Caroline S; Della Torre, Laura

    2013-03-01

    Cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV), also known as small-vessel vasculitis, is a process thought to be related to the presence of circulating immune complexes. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is thought to be idiopathic in up to 50% of cases, but other common causes and associated disorders include certain medications, most frequently antibiotics; infections; collagen-vascular disease; paraproteinemias; and rarely neoplasia. We report a patient with cutaneous LCV induced by orlistat, a pancreatic lipase inhibitor that works as a weight-loss agent by decreasing the absorption of dietary fat. PMID:23617088

  2. Biotherapies in large vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Ferfar, Y; Mirault, T; Desbois, A C; Comarmond, C; Messas, E; Savey, L; Domont, F; Cacoub, P; Saadoun, D

    2016-06-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu's arteritis (TA) are large vessel vasculitis (LVV) and aortic involvement is not uncommon in Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). Glucocorticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy in LVV. However, a significant proportion of patients have glucocorticoid dependance, serious side effects or refractory disease to steroids and other immunosuppressive treatments such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil and methotrexate. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis have resulted in the use of biological agents in patients with LVV. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs seem effective in patients with refractory Takayasu arteritis and vascular BD but have failed to do so in giant cell arteritis. Preliminary reports on the use of the anti-IL6-receptor antibody (tocilizumab), in LVV have been encouraging. The development of new biologic targeted therapies will probably open a promising future for patients with LVV. PMID:26883459

  3. Systemic vasculitis: a dual diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Gil, Eliza; Lutalo, Pamela; D'Cruz, David

    2011-12-02

    The authors describe a 25-year-old male with systemic vasculitis fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for both granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) and polyarteritis nodosa. The patient was diagnosed with granulomatosis with polyangiitis following a mediastinal biopsy which revealed necrotising granulomas of the large airways, a positive cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and high antiproteinase 3 antibody titre. He then developed acute right-sided abdominal and testicular pain as well as areas of hyperaesthesia and parasthesiae on both lower limbs. He was found to have focal crescentic glomerulonephritis and mononeuritis multiplex, in keeping with his diagnosis of granulomatosis with polyangiitis, as well as two areas of infarction in his right testicle and multiple aneurysms of his hepatic and right renal arteries, more typical of polyarteritis nodosa. His symptoms developed 6 weeks after hepatitis B vaccination, which may have played an aetiological role.

  4. Hypersensitivity Vasculitis with Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis Associated with Alpha-1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Mwirigi, Nicola W.; Thomas, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Prolastin is a commercially available form of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) that is derived from pooled human plasma and used for treatment of severe alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). We describe a patient with AATD who developed presumed hypersensitivity vasculitis (HV) following a Prolastin infusion. Hypersensitivity vasculitis (HV), or cutaneous vasculitis, is characterized by inflammation of the small vessels of the skin with resultant ischemia to the distally supplied areas. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of presumed hypersensitivity vasculitis following Prolastin infusion. PMID:20204065

  5. Vasculitis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ernie Branson Research Although most patients with vasculitis achieve remission with treatment, many experience at least one relapse. A major focus of Dr. Grayson and his team is to identify when a relapse might occur. ...

  6. History of primary vasculitis in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Iglesias Gammara, Antonio; Coral, Paola; Quintana, Gerardo; Toro, Carlos E; Flores, Luis Felipe; Matteson, Eric L; Restrepo, José Félix

    2010-03-01

    A literature review utilizing Fepafem, Bireme, LiLacs, Scielo Colombia, Scielo Internacional, former MedLine, Pubmed, and BVS Colombia as well as manual searches in the libraries of major Latin American universities was performed to study vasculitis in Latin America. Since 1945, a total of 752 articles have been published by Latin American authors. However, only a minority are devoted to primary vasculitides, and even fewer have been published in indexed journals. Approximately 126 are in OLD, Medline, Pubmed, Bireme, and Scielo. Most publications are from Mexico, followed by Brazil and Colombia. Systematic studies of the epidemiology of primary idiopathic vasculitis are available for a few countries, i.e. Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, Chile, and Peru. Takayasu arteritis and ANCA-associated vasculitis are the best studied forms of vasculitis in Latin America. Interest and expertise in vasculitis is growing in Latin America, as reflected in the increased number of published articles from this region of the world in the last decade. Racial and environmental factors are possibly responsible for the differential expression of various types of primary vasculitis observed in Latin America. With time, the unique features, epidemiology, and better treatment strategies for idiopathic vasculitides in Latin America will emerge.

  7. Vasculitis in Sjögren's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scofield, R Hal

    2011-12-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease that is commonly manifested by immune attack on the exocrine glands with resultant dry eyes and dry mouth. Sjögren's syndrome patients also have disease in other organs. One of the most common extraglandular manifestations is vasculitis. Skin vasculitis, with palpable purpura clinically and leukocytoclastic vasculitis on pathological examination, is common. Although half of those individuals with subcutaneous vasculitis have only a single episode, skin vasculitic involvement is associated with more severe disease. Necrotizing vasculitis of medium-sized vessels resembling polyarteritis nodosa can occur in Sjögren's syndrome patients. Experience in therapy for vasculitis is limited, but intravenous IgG may be effective. Recent data support a relationship between neuromyelitis optica (Devic disease) and Sjögren's syndrome. Sjögren's syndrome patients with optic neuritis or transverse myelitis have anti-aquaporin-4, which are characteristic of Devic disease. Devic disease patients have salivary lymphocytic infiltration similar to that found among Sjögren's syndrome patients. PMID:21870104

  8. [Two cases of minocycline-induced vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyuki; Komatsu, Shigetsuna; Matsuo, Shinobu; Iizuka, Hajime

    2002-12-01

    We report two cases of drug-induced vasculitis subsequent to long-term minocycline therapy. Case 1; A 27-year-old woman, who was receiving minocycline hydrochloride for eosinophilic pustular folliculitis of 68-months'duration, showed polyarthralgia, intermittent low-grade fever, and light red reticulated erythemas with subcutaneous nodules on her extremities. Case 2; A 31-year-old man developed reddish-brown, reticulated erythemas with induration on bilateral lower legs after 24-months' duration of minocycline hydrochloride treatment for hidradenitis suppurativa. In both cases, skin biopsies demonstrated vasculitis affecting a small-sized artery at the border of the dermis and subcutis. Serum antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) showed borderline elevation. In both cases cessation of minocycline administration resulted in rapid improvement of cutaneous lesions and constitutional symptoms. Recently, attention has been focused on drug-induced ANCA-positive vasculitis. Accumulation of previous case reports of minocycline-induced vasculitis with cutaneous lesions disclosed that the duration of the treatment before clinical symptoms averaged 35 months. Patients may present with livedoid skin lesions accompanied by fever, polyarthritis, autoimmune hepatitis and drug-induced lupus. Early recognition of ANCA-positive vasculitis is essential during long-term minocycline treatment, because cessation of the drug can result in complete resolution.

  9. Reproductive Health in Men and Women With Vasculitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-25

    Giant Cell Arteritis; Takayasu's Arteritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Kawasaki Disease; Henoch-schoenlein Purpura; Vasculitis, Central Nervous System; Drug-induced Necrotizing Vasculitis

  10. Cerebral rheumatoid vasculitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Central nervous system involvement in rheumatoid arthritis is infrequent. The most frequent neurological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis are peripheral neuropathy and cervical spinal cord compression due to subluxation of the cervical vertebrae. Cerebral rheumatoid vasculitis is an uncommon and serious complication which can be life-threatening. Case presentation A 52-year-old North African Tunisian Caucasian woman presented with a six-week history of headache. She had suffered seropositive and destructive rheumatoid arthritis for nine years without any extra-articular complications. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with the T2 sequence showed high-intensity signal images at the frontal and parietal cortico-subcortical junction suggesting hemispheric vasculitis. Conclusions Cerebral vasculitis is an infrequent complication in rheumatoid arthritis which is associated with high morbidity and in some cases can be life-threatening. Early assessment and a high index of suspicion to recognize such complications are essential in managing these patients. PMID:22974191

  11. Thoughts about the classification of small vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Falk, Ronald J; Jennette, J Charles

    2004-01-01

    The classification of small vessel vasculitis has markedly changed over the past 150 years. With the discovery of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA), renewed interest in the field has spawned investigations into the immunopathogenesis of small vessel vasculitis. This review will describe the historical basis of the classification of vasculitis, the current nosology based on the Chapel Hill Nomenclature for vasculitis and then both pathogenic and clinical reasons that support the use of the term "ANCA small vessel vasculitis" to describe the pauci-immune necrotizing small vessel vasculitides, including microscopic polyangiitis, Wegener's granulomatosis, the Churg-Strauss syndrome and pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis. PMID:15599883

  12. Primary CNS vasculitis presenting as intraventricular bleeding.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Sreeja Hareendranathan; Sreedharan, Sapna Erat; Menon, Girish; Kannoth, Santhosh; Pn, Sylaja

    2016-01-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is a rare disorder affecting both medium- and small-sized vessels. Intracranial haemorrhages though less reported are in the form of parenchymal haemorrhage and subarachnoid haemorrhage. We report a case of PACNS with intraventricular haemorrhage due to aneurysms secondary to progression of vasculitis.

  13. Primary CNS vasculitis presenting as intraventricular bleeding.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Sreeja Hareendranathan; Sreedharan, Sapna Erat; Menon, Girish; Kannoth, Santhosh; Pn, Sylaja

    2016-01-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is a rare disorder affecting both medium- and small-sized vessels. Intracranial haemorrhages though less reported are in the form of parenchymal haemorrhage and subarachnoid haemorrhage. We report a case of PACNS with intraventricular haemorrhage due to aneurysms secondary to progression of vasculitis. PMID:27570401

  14. Diagnosing intracranial vasculitis: The roles of MR and angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.G.; Tran, D.D.; Sickels, W.J.; Cornell, S.H.; Yuh, W.T.C. )

    1994-02-01

    To describe our experience with MR and angiography in diagnosing intracranial vasculitis and to test the hypothesis that MR can be used to screen for patients unlikely to have vasculitis. Ninety-two patients who had angiography with [open quotes]exclude vasculitis[close quotes] as the indication or who had angiography and a clinical diagnosis of vasculitis were identified. Angiograms of all 92 patients and the MRs of the 70 patients who had both studies were reviewed. Eleven patients had intracranial vasculitis. Angiography showed characteristic changes in 8. MR performed in 9 of 11 vasculitis cases, was significantly abnormal in all 9. Among 70 patients who had both studies, 19 had MR that was completely normal or showed only incidental findings. None of these 19 was diagnosed with vasculitis. The diagnostic yield of angiography performed to exclude vasculitis was only 6%. Evaluation for intracranial vasculitis should include MR. A negative MR excludes intracranial vasculitis more definitively than does a negative angiogram and makes the likelihood of finding vasculitis with angiography negligible. 23 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Hypersensitivity vasculitis associated with leuprolide (Lupron).

    PubMed

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2010-09-01

    Leuprolide (Lupron) is a synthetic analog of naturally occurring gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Leuprolide is used as a hormonal antagonist in the treatment of advanced prostatic cancer, and as hormonal therapy in the treatment of endometriosis. Off-label, it is also used in premenopausal or perimenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer for the purpose of ovarian ablation. Ever since its FDA approval in 1985, many adverse reactions have been reported in association with leuprolide ranging from local skin irritation to severe anaphylactoid reactions. In this case report, we present a case of hypersensitivity vasculitis (serum sickness) in a patient who received leuprolide for his prostate cancer. Serum sickness has never been reported as a side-effect of leuprolide. Our case is the first case of serum sickness associated with leuprolide. We emphasize that physicians using leuprolide should be wary of signs and symptoms of hypersensitivity vasculitis or serum sickness.

  16. Warfarin-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis and proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Jumean, Khalid; Arqoub, Ahmad Abu; Hawatmeh, Amer; Qaqa, Firas; Bataineh, Ayham; Shaaban, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin is typically prescribed for patients with thromboembolic diseases and atrial fibrillation. In addition to the complications of bleeding, allergic skin reaction is one of its rare adverse effects. We herein report a case of a 79 year old male patient with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and proteinuria secondary to warfarin. The warfarin was discontinued and oral prednisone therapy was initiated. The cutaneous lesions and the proteinuria resolved thereafter. PMID:27453863

  17. Warfarin-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis and proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Jumean, Khalid; Arqoub, Ahmad Abu; Hawatmeh, Amer; Qaqa, Firas; Bataineh, Ayham; Shaaban, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin is typically prescribed for patients with thromboembolic diseases and atrial fibrillation. In addition to the complications of bleeding, allergic skin reaction is one of its rare adverse effects. We herein report a case of a 79 year old male patient with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and proteinuria secondary to warfarin. The warfarin was discontinued and oral prednisone therapy was initiated. The cutaneous lesions and the proteinuria resolved thereafter. PMID:27453863

  18. Monoclonal antibody desensitization in a patient with a generalized urticarial reaction following denosumab administration.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, D; Cruz, María-Jesús; Foncubierta-Fernández, A; Moreno-Ancillo, A; Fernández-Anguita, M J; Medina-Varo, F; Andres-García, J A

    2015-01-01

    Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody indicated for the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women with a high risk of fractures. To our knowledge, no cases of desensitization to this drug have been described in the literature. We report the first case of generalized urticarial reaction and facial angioedema after therapy with denosumab. A subcutaneous desensitization protocol was successfully completed in this patient. Rapid desensitization is a promising method for the delivery of denosumab after a hypersensitivity reaction, and should be considered in osteoporosis treatment when no acceptable therapeutic alternatives are available. PMID:26504466

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus with membranous glomerulonephritis and uterine vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Feriozzi, S; Muda, A O; Amini, M; Faraggiana, T; Ancarani, E

    1997-02-01

    We report a case of lupus vasculitis with uterine localization and concurrent membranous nephropathy. Immunofluorescence study suggested the occurrence of an immune complex nephropathy and a pauci-immune pathogenesis of vasculitis. Our case points out the event of tissue damage in two organs mediated by different pathogenetic mechanisms. In addition, uterine vasculitis without pregnancy may be observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus nephritis.

  20. A Case of Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis Caused by Listeria monocytogenes Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Daniel R; Sullivan, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Importance. Infections can cause leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Observations. We report the case of a patient with a left ventricular assist device who presented with acute kidney injury and biopsy proven leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient's rash improved with treatment of the underlying Listeria infection. Conclusion. Clinicians should be aware that there are a number of broad categories of disease associated with the histologic finding of vasculitis, including infection. It is important to keep in mind the risk factors of a particular patient when formulating a differential diagnosis. This is the first reported case of Listeria bacteremia causing leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:27313916

  1. Rare Case of Vasculitis of the Hepatic Artery.

    PubMed

    Mali, Padmavathi; Muduganti, Sudheer R; Goldberg, Jerry

    2015-12-01

    Vasculitis is an accumulation of inflammatory leucocytes in the blood vessels with reactive damage to mural structures. Isolated vasculitis of the gastrointestinal tract without systemic involvement is rare. We report a unique case of a female patient who presented with abdominal pain, and was found, on serology, to have elevated inflammatory markers without autoantibodies. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis was suggestive of vasculitis of the hepatic artery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case, to date, of vasculitis of hepatic artery.

  2. A Case of Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis Caused by Listeria monocytogenes Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Importance. Infections can cause leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Observations. We report the case of a patient with a left ventricular assist device who presented with acute kidney injury and biopsy proven leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient's rash improved with treatment of the underlying Listeria infection. Conclusion. Clinicians should be aware that there are a number of broad categories of disease associated with the histologic finding of vasculitis, including infection. It is important to keep in mind the risk factors of a particular patient when formulating a differential diagnosis. This is the first reported case of Listeria bacteremia causing leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:27313916

  3. Enhancement of mite antigen-induced histamine release by deuterium oxide from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients

    SciTech Connect

    Numata, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamura, T.

    1981-09-01

    The mite antigen-induced histamine release from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients was enhanced in the presence of deuterium oxide, which stabilizes microtubules. This enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on the histamine release from leucocytes may provide a useful means for the detection of allergens in vitro in chronic urticaria.

  4. Persistent cryoglobulinemic vasculitis following successful treatment of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Levine, James W; Gota, Carmen; Fessler, Barri J; Calabrese, Leonard H; Cooper, Sheldon M

    2005-06-01

    There is a well established link between type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and HCV is believed to be the cause of cryoprotein formation and tissue deposition. Successful treatment of HCV infection has resulted in resolution of cryoglobulinemia and vasculitis. We describe 4 patients who had persistent MC and vasculitis despite successful eradication of HCV with antiviral therapy.

  5. Paraneoplastic vasculitis associated to pelvic chondrosarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Arvinius, Camilla; González-Pérez, Ana; García-Coiradas, Javier; García-Maroto, Roberto; Cebrián-Parra, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Vasculopathic syndromes have been associated with hematological and solid organ malignancies. The pathogenesis of these syndromes remains largely unknown and there are no biologic markers identified. Whether it is or is not a paraneoplastic syndrome is under discussion, the close temporal relationship of cancer and vasculitis suggests that these vasculitides are a paraneoplastic condition. We report a case of a 45-year-old female patient with pelvic chondrosarcoma who underwent surgical treatment and started to present visual loss, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SRIS), cardiac insufficiency, hepatosplenomegaly, cholestasis as well as pulmonary bleeding suggesting a sarcoma-associated vasculitis. All antibodies were negative as in secondary vasculitis. After corticoideal therapy the vasculitis resolved and at 3-year follow-up the patient had not showed any further medical complications or recurrences of the vasculitis. The parallel evolution of the vasculitis and the solid tumor combined with the resolution of the vasculitis after corticotherapy enhances the likelihood of a paraneoplastic vasculitis associated with a chondrosarcoma according to literature review. PMID:27163097

  6. The impact of vasculitis on patients’ social participation and friendships

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Delesha M.; Meador, Amy E.; Elstad, Emily A.; Hogan, Susan L.; DeVellis, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Our objective is to explore how vasculitis, affects patients’ friendships and social participation. Methods Vasculitis patients (n=221) completed an online questionnaire that asked if, and how, relationships with friends have changed since receiving a vasculitis diagnosis. Participants’ written responses were imported into Atlas.ti, and two independent researchers used both structured and unstructured coding to identify themes. After reaching 100% consensus on the themes present in each participant’s responses, the coders determined how themes were interrelated across participants. Results Over half of patients (52%) expressed that vasculitis negatively impacted their friendships and 25% noted a negative impact on their social participation. At limes, this negative impact was related to structural changes in patients’ social networks due to loss of friendships. Reduced social participation was also associated with friends’ inability to understand vasculitis and its effects, vasculitis-related fatigue, and lifestyle changes such as not being able to drink alcohol and avoiding infection-prone events. Additionally, patients withdrew from social engagements due to fatigue or because of physical symptoms and side effects. Conclusion The unique circumstances associated with a rare chronic illness like vasculitis can create significant barriers to friendships, including loss of these relationships. Interventions designed to help patients cope with the social impact of vasculitis are implicated, especially if they increase patients’ ability to engage in dialogue about their illness with their friends. PMID:22325346

  7. Idiopathic granulomatous vasculitis: response to immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Alguacil-Garcia, G F; Moreno-Requena, J; Martinez-Albadalejo, M; Hallal-Hachem, H; Gonzalez-Pina, B; de Paco-Moya, M

    1995-01-01

    A case of idiopathic granulomatous vasculitis (disseminated visceral giant cell arteritis) is described in an old woman, the seventh case of this rare disorder reported to date. The main organ affected was the liver and, to our knowledge, this is the first patient to be diagnosed while still alive and the only case to have received medical treatment. It is also the first time that muscular involvement has been documented in this condition. Cyclophosphamide treatment resulted in disappearance of symptoms and increase in weight. The patient died of an unrelated condition. Images PMID:7665707

  8. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis caused by drug additives.

    PubMed

    Lowry, M D; Hudson, C F; Callen, J P

    1994-05-01

    Chronic cutaneous small vessel (leukocytoclastic) vasculitis (LCV) is a process believed to be related to the presence of circulating immune complexes. The most frequent causes and associated disorders are medications, infections, collagen vascular disorders, paraproteinemias, and, rarely, neoplasia. Reports of food or food additives as a causative factor for LCV have appeared but are rare. We report a patient with chronic cutaneous LCV in whom the presumed cause was an excipient (a dye) used in the capsule form of lithium carbonate. Furthermore, ingestion of foods containing dyes results in a disease flare in our patient.

  9. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.].

  10. Segmental arterial mediolysis mimics systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Kalfa, Melike; Kocanaoğulları, Hayriye; Karabulut, Gonca; Emmungil, Hakan; Çınar, Celal; Yılmaz, Zevcet; Gücenmez, Sercan; Kabasakal, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a rare, nonarteriosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease and mostly affects medium-to-large sized abdominal arteries as well as presents with hemorrhages in the abdominal cavity. We report the case of a patient with SAM of the celiac, right renal, jejunal branch of the superior mesenteric, left gastric, and splenic arteries who was diagnosed by excluding other causes and in whom transcatheter embolization was performed in two different sessions, but he died because of an undefined reason. SAM mimics systemic vasculitis and causes abdominal pain; it should be considered because abdominal hemorrhage or arterial infarction can result in death. PMID:27733945

  11. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.]. PMID:27631486

  12. Pulmonary Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis as an Initial Presentation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jae Hyung; Park, Sejin; Won, Chang Youn; Lee, Joo-Hyun; Yi, Seong Yoon; Park, Hye Kyeong; Chang, Sun Hee; Jung, Hoon; Lee, Sung-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Systemic vasculitis involving the lung is a rare manifestation of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and secondary vasculitis is considered to have poor prognosis. A 44-year-old man presented with fever and dyspnea of 1 month duration. A chest radiograph revealed bilateral multiple wedge shaped consolidations. In addition, the results of a percutaneous needle biopsy for non-resolving pneumonia were compatible with pulmonary vasculitis. Bone marrow biopsy was performed due to the persistence of unexplained anemia and the patient was diagnosed with MDS. We reported a case of secondary vasculitis presenting as non-resolving pneumonia, later diagnosed as paraneoplastic syndrome of undiagnosed MDS. The cytopenia and vasculitis improved after a short course of glucocorticoid treatment, and there was no recurrence despite the progression of underlying MDS. PMID:27790283

  13. Alveolar hemorrhage in vasculitis: primary and secondary.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Jean-François; Cottin, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) in primary and secondary vasculitis occurs when capillaritis is present. The diagnosis of DAH is considered in patients who develop progressive dyspnea with alveolar opacities on chest imaging (with density ranging from ground glass to consolidation) that cannot be explained otherwise. Hemoptysis, a valuable sign, is often absent. A decline of blood hemoglobin level over a few days without hemolysis or any hemorrhage elsewhere should be an alert for DAH. Bronchoalveolar lavage, retrieving bright red fluid, is the best diagnostic clue. Lung biopsy is not recommended. A search for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCAs) is mandatory. Once DAH is diagnosed and hemodynamic as well as infectious causes have been excluded, ANCA-associated vasculitis is taken into account (mainly microscopic polyangiitis or Wegener granulomatosis, and, exceptionally, Churg-Strauss syndrome). Drug-induced DAH, especially antithyroid drugs such as propylthiouracil may be coupled with ANCA. Isolated DAH with capillaritis with or without ANCA is rare. DAH in systemic lupus erythematosus is either associated or not with capillaritis. Treatment of DAH should target the underlying disorder. In the primary vasculitides, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants, especially cyclophosphamide, are the mainstay of therapy, but plasma exchange, particularly in severe DAH, is the rule, although evidence of its effectiveness is awaited.

  14. Serum cytokine changes in systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Grau, G E; Roux-Lombard, P; Gysler, C; Lambert, C; Lambert, P H; Dayer, J M; Guillevin, L

    1989-01-01

    Cytokines are known to alter a number of vascular tissue cell functions. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine serum cytokine levels in patients with vasculitis and to analyse the possible relation to the severity of the disease. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1)beta, IL-2, interferon (IFN)- and IFN-gamma were assayed in 33 patients with polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) or Churg and Strauss angiitis (CSA), and three with Wegener granulomatosis (WG). Serum cytokine changes were observed in most patients with active disease, i.e. before treatment was started. In the majority of patients with PAN or CSA, there was a marked increase in serum IFN-alpha and IL-2 levels, while TNF-alpha and IL-beta levels were moderately elevated. Serum IFN-gamma remained undetectable in all but one of these patients. In patients with WG, serum IFN-alpha and IL-2 levels were also elevated, whereas IL-1 beta, IFN-gamma and TNF alpha levels remained within normal limits. In paired samples of patients with PAN, IFN-alpha and IL-2 levels were significantly higher before than after treatment. These preliminary data suggest that a particular pattern of cytokine changes is associated with vasculitis and that cytokines might be involved in the pathogenesis of PAN/CSA and WG. Prospective studies are warranted to determine whether cytokines could be considered for the monitoring of disease activity and therapy. PMID:2478451

  15. Cutaneous vasculitis in breast cancer treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Maida; Grossman, Jennifer; Hahn, Bevra H; La Cava, Antonio

    2008-10-01

    A patient from the University of California Los Angeles Medical Center who developed cutaneous vasculitis during the course of treatment for metastatic breast cancer is presented (status: post-lumpectomy and radiation therapy). Since the onset of vasculitis occurred during the course of therapy for the neoplasm, it was difficult to differentiate between drug-induced vasculitis and paraneoplastic vasculitis. The patient had been exposed to medications including gabapentin, methimazole, trastuzumab, fulvestrant, and letrozole - which could cause endothelial cell toxicity. Drug-induced small vessel vasculitis usually attacks the skin or subcutaneous parts of the skin. In cancer therapy, there have been case reports that hormonal drugs such as estrogen receptor antagonists, aromatase inhibitors, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors can induce cutaneous vasculitis. On the other hand, paraneoplastic syndromes manifested as cutaneous vasculitis have been documented, possibly mediated by unknown immunological mechanisms associated with the tumor such as formation of immune complexes, direct antibody-mediated effects on endothelial cells, or direct effects of tumor cells on the vascular wall. Some patients with drug-induced cutaneous vasculitis have antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) directed to one or more neutrophil cytoplasm antigens - the most common being granule protein myeloperoxidase (MPO), human leukocyte elastase (HLE), cathepsin G and lactoferrin. Some patients also have antibodies against histones and antiphospholipid. Serologic testing and measurements suggest an influence of therapy on vasculitis, yet the lack of sensitivity and specificity for a biomarker in endothelial injury indicate the need to search and evaluate new markers for improved predictive value of the tests, and to provide guidance in therapy.

  16. Cutaneous vasculitis in breast cancer treated with chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Maida; Grossman, Jennifer; Hahn, Bevra H.; La Cava, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    A patient from the University of California Los Angeles Medical Center who developed cutaneous vasculitis during the course of treatment for metastatic breast cancer is presented (status: post-lumpectomy and radiation therapy). Since the onset of vasculitis occurred during the course of therapy for the neoplasm, it was difficult to differentiate between drug-induced vasculitis and paraneoplastic vasculitis. The patient had been exposed to medications including gabapentin, methimazole, trastuzumab, fulvestrant, and letrozole - which could cause endothelial cell toxicity. Drug-induced small vessel vasculitis usually attacks the skin or subcutaneous parts of the skin. In cancer therapy, there have been case reports that hormonal drugs such as estrogen receptor antagonists, aromatase inhibitors, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors can induce cutaneous vasculitis. On the other hand, paraneoplastic syndromes manifested as cutaneous vasculitis have been documented, possibly mediated by unknown immunological mechanisms associated with the tumor such as formation of immune complexes, direct antibody-mediated effects on endothelial cells, or direct effects of tumor cells on the vascular wall. Some patients with drug-induced cutaneous vasculitis have antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) directed to one or more neutrophil cytoplasm antigens - the most common being granule protein myeloperoxidase (MPO), human leukocyte elastase (HLE), cathepsin G and lactoferrin. Some patients also have antibodies against histones and antiphospholipid. Serologic testing and measurements suggest an influence of therapy on vasculitis, yet the lack of sensitivity and specificity for a biomarker in endothelial injury indicate the need to search and evaluate new markers for improved predictive value of the tests, and to provide guidance in therapy. PMID:18640073

  17. CNS Vasculitis Associated with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Riangwiwat, Tanawan; Wu, Chris Y.; Santos-Ocampo, Alberto S.; Liu, Randal J.

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is an indolent B cell lymphoproliferative disorder with monoclonal IgM secretion. We present a patient with WM who presented with multifocal acute cortical ischemic strokes and was found to have central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis. Workup was negative for cryoglobulins and hyperviscosity syndrome. Immunosuppression with intravenous steroids and cyclophosphamide stabilized the patient's mental status and neurologic deficits. On followup over 7 years, patient gained independence from walking aids and experienced no recurrences of CNS vasculitis. To our knowledge, CNS vasculitis in a WM patient, in the absence of cryoglobulins, has not been reported. Immunosuppression is the preferred treatment.

  18. Lepra reaction with lucio phenomenon mimicking cutaneous vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Parida, Jyoti Ranjan; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Pani, Krushna Chandra; Kumari, Niraj; Krishnani, Narendra; Agarwal, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease typically found in the tropics. Patients with leprosy can have varying presentation with constitutional symptoms, joint pains, skin nodules, and rarely a vasculitis-like picture with skin ulcers and neuropathy. We present a young lady who presented with the rare manifestation of skin infarcts mimicking cutaneous vasculitis, diagnosed on histopathology to have Lucio phenomenon on a background of lepromatous leprosy. With increasing migration and widespread use of biologic response modifiers, clinicians all over the world need to be aware of various presentations of leprosy as well as needing to keep an open mind while considering the differential diagnoses of vasculitis. PMID:25580317

  19. Lepra Reaction with Lucio Phenomenon Mimicking Cutaneous Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Parida, Jyoti Ranjan; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Pani, Krushna Chandra; Kumari, Niraj; Krishnani, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease typically found in the tropics. Patients with leprosy can have varying presentation with constitutional symptoms, joint pains, skin nodules, and rarely a vasculitis-like picture with skin ulcers and neuropathy. We present a young lady who presented with the rare manifestation of skin infarcts mimicking cutaneous vasculitis, diagnosed on histopathology to have Lucio phenomenon on a background of lepromatous leprosy. With increasing migration and widespread use of biologic response modifiers, clinicians all over the world need to be aware of various presentations of leprosy as well as needing to keep an open mind while considering the differential diagnoses of vasculitis. PMID:25580317

  20. The Spectrum of Paraneoplastic Cutaneous Vasculitis in a Defined Population

    PubMed Central

    Loricera, Javier; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; González-López, Marcos A.; Fernández-Llaca, Hector; Rueda-Gotor, Javier; Gonzalez-Vela, Maria C.; Alvarez, Lino; Mata, Cristina; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Martínez-Taboada, Victor M.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Blanco, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cutaneous vasculitis may be associated with malignancies, and may behave as a paraneoplastic syndrome. This association has been reported in a variable proportion of patients depending on population selection. We conducted the current study to assess the frequency, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of paraneoplastic vasculitis in a large unselected series of 766 patients with cutaneous vasculitis diagnosed at a single university hospital. Sixteen patients (10 men and 6 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 67.94 ± 14.20 yr; range, 40–85 yr) presenting with cutaneous vasculitis were ultimately diagnosed as having an underlying malignancy. They constituted 3.80% of the 421 adult patients. There were 9 hematologic and 7 solid underlying malignancies. Skin lesions were the initial clinical presentation in all of them, and the median interval from the onset of cutaneous vasculitis to the diagnosis of the malignancy was 17 days (range, 8–50 d). The most frequent skin lesions were palpable purpura (15 patients). Other clinical manifestations included constitutional syndrome (10 patients) and arthralgia and/or arthritis (4 cases). Hematologic cytopenias (11 cases) as well as immature peripheral blood cells (6 cases) were frequently observed in the full blood cell count, especially in those with vasculitis associated with hematologic malignancies. Specific treatment for vasculitis was prescribed in 10 patients; nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (4 patients), corticosteroids (3 patients), chloroquine (1 patient), antihistamines (1 patient), and cyclophosphamide (1 patient). Ten patients died due to the malignancy and 6 patients recovered following malignancy therapy. Patients with paraneoplastic vasculitis were older, more frequently had constitutional syndrome, and less frequently had organ damage due to the vasculitis than the remaining patients with cutaneous vasculitis. In summary, cutaneous paraneoplastic vasculitis is an entity not uncommonly

  1. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Relation to systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I

    1999-01-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (CNV) is a complex multisystem disease generally involving the skin and mucous membranes, often accompanied by renal, gastrointestinal, pericardial, neurological, and articular signs and symptoms. CNV may be idiopatical or occur in association with a drug, infection, or underlying disease. CNV has been shown in patients with chronic infections (viral, bacterial, protozoa, helminthic), serum sickness, a variety of collagen vascular diseases (systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Behçet's disease) hyperglobulinemic states, cryoglobulinemia, bowel bypass syndrome, ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and HIV infection. Association with malignancies is not frequent. Lymphoproliferative disorders (Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides, lymphosarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, multiple mieloma) and solid tumors (lung cancer, colon carcinoma, renal, prostate, head and neck cancer and breast cancer) may be associated with CNV. Whenever possible, treatment is directed at the elimination of the cause. In other cases after adequate laboratory screening local and systemic therapy are recommended. PMID:10599332

  2. Renal infarction caused by medium vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kavarthapol Jayaraman, Vinothkumar; Chakera, Aron

    2015-04-24

    A 44-year-old Italian man presented to the emergency department on three occasions over 4 days with severe left flank pain. Initial investigations including a renal tract ultrasound were normal and he was discharged with analgaesia. On his third presentation, a CT angiogram was performed due to persisting pain, which demonstrated infarction of his left kidney as well as thickening of the anterior branch of left renal artery and complete occlusion with focal intimal dissection of the coeliac artery. His antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody was negative. A medium vessel vasculitis was suspected and confirmed on positron emission tomography-CT, which revealed increased metabolic activity involving the right internal mammary artery and coeliac artery. Treatment with pulse methylprednisolone was started followed by a tapering prednisolone regimen, with a rapid reduction in his inflammatory indices. Twenty-four months later his renal function remains normal off all immunosuppression.

  3. Intravenous immunoglobulins in peripheral neuropathy associated with vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Y; Uziel, Y; Zandman, G; Amital, H; Sherer, Y; Langevitz, P; Goldman, B; Shoenfeld, Y

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present patients who exhibited various inflammatory diseases accompanied with vasculitic peripheral neuropathies for which intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) was used for treatment. Methods: Six patients with Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), vaccination induced vasculitis, Churg-Strauss vasculitis, mixed cryoglobulinaemia associated with hepatitis C infection, or sarcoidosis were included. All developed vasculitic peripheral neuropathy, and were treated with high dose IVIg (2 g/kg body weight). The patients were followed up for 1–5 years after this treatment. Results: In four patients (Sjögren's syndrome, Churg-Strauss vasculitis, SLE, and vaccination induced vasculitis) the neuropathy resolved after IVIg treatment. Conclusion: IVIg may be beneficial in cases of resistant vasculitic peripheral neuropathy. IVIg should probably be considered as a sole or adjuvant treatment for patients with contraindications to conventional treatment, or alternatively, for patients in whom conventional treatment has failed. PMID:14644864

  4. [Systemic ANCA-associated vasculitis--diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Eisenberger, Ute; Hess, Christof

    2008-05-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitis represents a group of small-vessel vasculitides, including Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and the Churg-Strauss-syndrome. These diseases affect mainly small arteries, venules and capillaries, showing a lack of immunocomplex formation on immunohistology, the so-called "pauci-immune" vasculitis. Nevertheless, Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmatic Autoantibodies (ANCA's) are pathogenic for this type of disease. In spite of important advances in technical diagnostic tools, careful medical history and clinical examinations often give the clues for the correct diagnosis. Recent collaborative therapeutic studies have lead to therapeutic schemas that are much more adapted to the individual disease state. Besides the acute and sometimes life-threatening form of ANCA-vasculitis, chronic disease and relapses become more important in clinical practice. Thus, therapeutic efficacy must be outweighed against long-term toxicity to make the right choice for therapeutic intervention in ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  5. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Vasculitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Vasculitis? The signs and symptoms ... symptoms develop quickly, over days or weeks. Systemic Signs and Symptoms Systemic signs and symptoms are those ...

  6. [Secondary amyloidosis (AA-type) due to localized cutaneous vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Esteve, V; Ribera, L; Ponz, E; Almirall, J; López, T; Martínez Ocaña, J C; Ibeas, J; Rodríguez Jornet, A; Andreu, X; García, M

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of a 49 year old man, diagnosed soon after the outcome of casual proteinuria, of AA-type amyloidosis in relation to small and medium vessel cutaneous vasculitis without systemic involvement. This combination is a rare entity and only two cases of cutaneous hypersensibility vasculitis complicated with AA-type amyloidosis had been reported. We describe the results of the use of several immunosuppressive drugs during four years follow up with temporally total remission of the disease. PMID:18045042

  7. Netting neutrophils in autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kessenbrock, Kai; Krumbholz, Markus; Schönermarck, Ulf; Back, Walter; Gross, Wolfgang L; Werb, Zena; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Brinkmann, Volker; Jenne, Dieter E

    2009-06-01

    Small-vessel vasculitis (SVV) is a chronic autoinflammatory condition linked to antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCAs). Here we show that chromatin fibers, so-called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), are released by ANCA-stimulated neutrophils and contain the targeted autoantigens proteinase-3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Deposition of NETs in inflamed kidneys and circulating MPO-DNA complexes suggest that NET formation triggers vasculitis and promotes the autoimmune response against neutrophil components in individuals with SVV.

  8. Importance of laboratory clinical investigation in the diagnosis of immune vasculitis with neurological manifestation.

    PubMed

    Hagenah, R; Senff, S H

    1984-01-01

    In this study 23 cases of immune vasculitis with predominance of neurological symptoms were analysed. Besides patient history and neurological examination, myelotomy is the most relevant means of diagnosis in immune vasculitis. For this reason myelotomy should be integrated in routine diagnostic methods if the diagnosis immune vasculitis is discussed. Other laboratory parameters have no great relevance in the diagnosis of immune vasculitis. A higher specificity of antibody tests, especially in the case of ANA, might be able to replace myelotomy in the diagnosis of immune vasculitis. The relevance of laboratory parameters in the diagnosis of immune vasculitis in neurological patients was examined.

  9. Hydralazine-induced autoimmune disease: comparison to idiopathic lupus and ANCA-positive vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Naoto; Vivino, Frederick B

    2009-01-01

    We report two cases of hydralazine-induced vasculitis with rare complications: pulmonary renal syndrome and digital gangrene. We also review 68 published cases of hydralazine-induced vasculitis. Hydralazine-induced vasculitis mimics idiopathic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis. However, it also produces other autoantibodies, such as antinuclear antibodies, antihistone antibodies, anti-dsDNA antibodies, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Patients with hydralazine-induced vasculitis typically have a more severe course than those with hydralazine-induced lupus, predominantly due to renal vasculitis, and require a more aggressive treatment.

  10. [Vasculitis as a reason of chronic headache].

    PubMed

    Ataia, I; Casaulta, C; von Vigier, R O; Pfammatter, J P; Brekenfeld, C; Sauvain, M J; Steinlin, M

    2008-03-19

    A 13-year-old girl presented to our emergency with a one week history of fever and skin rash and new onset of chorea for the last three days. There was a long standing history of right predominant headache; followed by personality change, fatigue, arthralgia and weight loss over the last few months. Previous investigations by head CT and ophthalmological examination did not explain the symptoms. Further investigations revealed peri- and pancarditis with aortic insufficiency, a renal involvement with elevated creatinin, protein- and hematuria and a hemolytic anemia. Diagnosis of lupus eythematodes was confirmed by high ANA, anti-dsDNS and Anticardiolipin antibodies. Within the first 48 hours after admission there was significant deterioration with reduced vigilance and dysarthria. MRI of the brain and dopplersonography of cerebral vessels showed a complete thrombosis of the right medial cerebral artery with a small net of collaterals, irregularities of the left cerebral artery due to vasculitis and several subacute leftsided ischemias. Immunosuppressive therapy with high-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamid together with antithrombotic therapy induced an improvement of neurologic, renal and cardiac function. PMID:18548940

  11. A Fatal Case of "Bullous Erysipelas-like" Pseudomonas Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sam Shiyao; Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Huang, Jing Xiang; Tan, Kong-Bing; Aw, Derrick Chen-Wee

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelas is a generally benign superficial bacterial skin infection, and its bullous form constitutes a rare and more severe variant. We describe the first and fatal case of "bullous erysipelas-like" septic vasculitis due to Pseudomonas bacteremi. A 69-year-old Chinese man presenting with diarrhea and septic shock initially began to rapidly develop sharply defined erythematous plaques with non-hemorrhagic bullae over his lower limbs. Culture of the aspirate from the bullae was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was also consistent with his blood cultures showing Pseudomonas bacteremia. Histology of the skin lesion showed microthrombi and neutrophilic infiltrates in blood vessels with Gram-negative bacilli extruding from the vessel walls, characteristic of septic vasculitis. The bullous erysipelas-like lesions seen in this patient represents a rare manifestation of both septic vasculitis and Pseudomonas infection. PMID:26955132

  12. An approach to the diagnosis and management of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Miller, A; Chan, M; Wiik, A; Misbah, S A; Luqmani, R A

    2010-05-01

    The systemic vasculitides are a complex and often serious group of disorders which, while uncommon, require careful management in order to ensure optimal outcome. In most cases there is no known cause. Multi-system disease is likely to be fatal without judicious use of immunosuppression. A prompt diagnosis is necessary to preserve organ function. Comprehensive and repeated disease assessment is a necessary basis for planning therapy and modification of treatment protocols according to response. Therapies typically include glucocorticoids and, especially for small and medium vessel vasculitis, an effective immunosuppressive agent. Cyclophosphamide is currently the standard therapy for small vessel multi-system vasculitis, but other agents are now being evaluated in large randomized trials. Comorbidity is common in patients with vasculitis, including the cumulative effects of potentially toxic therapy. Long-term evaluation of patients is important in order to detect and manage relapses. PMID:20070316

  13. A Fatal Case of "Bullous Erysipelas-like" Pseudomonas Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sam Shiyao; Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Huang, Jing Xiang; Tan, Kong-Bing; Aw, Derrick Chen-Wee

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelas is a generally benign superficial bacterial skin infection, and its bullous form constitutes a rare and more severe variant. We describe the first and fatal case of "bullous erysipelas-like" septic vasculitis due to Pseudomonas bacteremi. A 69-year-old Chinese man presenting with diarrhea and septic shock initially began to rapidly develop sharply defined erythematous plaques with non-hemorrhagic bullae over his lower limbs. Culture of the aspirate from the bullae was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was also consistent with his blood cultures showing Pseudomonas bacteremia. Histology of the skin lesion showed microthrombi and neutrophilic infiltrates in blood vessels with Gram-negative bacilli extruding from the vessel walls, characteristic of septic vasculitis. The bullous erysipelas-like lesions seen in this patient represents a rare manifestation of both septic vasculitis and Pseudomonas infection.

  14. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis and associated pulmonary emphysema: Breathtaking vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Gadre, Shruti K; Stoller, James K; Mehta, Atul C

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary emphysema occasionally occurs in the absence of smoking or noxious exposures. Other than through a known association with alpha-1 antitryspin deficiency, to our knowledge, no reports implicate granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) in causing airflow obstruction with small airway involvement and severe air trapping. To extend available experience, we report a 51-year-old male with biopsy-proven cytoplasmic-antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody proteinase 3 (ANCA PR3)-positive GPA who developed centrilobular emphysema and airflow obstruction during a phase of active vasculitis. He was a lifelong non-smoker and had a normal alpha-1 antitrypsin level and a PI*MM phenotype. Treatment with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide caused clinical remission of his vasculitis which was associated with improvement in his respiratory symptoms. However, to date, structural changes of emphysema have persisted for over 9 years of follow-up. Clinicians should remain vigilant to the possibility of emphysema in patients with pulmonary vasculitis.

  15. A Case of Brucellosis with Recurrent Attacks of Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Pınar; Kıdır, Mehtap; Namdar, Nazlı Dizen; Özmen, Ahmet; Uyar, Cemile; Değer, Ayşe Nur

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis that affects several organs or systems. Skin involvement is nonspecific and it is reported to range between 0,4 and 17% of the patients with brucellosis. Here, we defined a 36-year-old female patient presented to our clinic with a clinical picture of recurrent attacks of vasculitis due to brucellosis for the first time. Skin involvement and vasculitic lesions as a finding of skin involvement are nonspecific in brucellosis. Therefore, in the regions like Turkey where brucellosis is endemic, brucellosis should be kept in mind necessarily in the differential diagnosis of vasculitis. PMID:27042369

  16. Prednisone and vardenafil hydrochloride for refractory levamisole-induced vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Mandrell, Joshua; Kranc, Christina L

    2016-08-01

    Levamisole is an immunomodulatory drug that was previously used to treat various medical conditions, including parasitic infections, nephrotic syndrome, and colorectal cancer. Over the last few years, increasing amounts of levamisole have been used as an adulterant in cocaine. Levamisole-cut cocaine has become a concern because it is known to cause a necrotizing purpuric rash, autoantibody production, and life-threatening leukopenia. Mixed histologic findings of vasculitis and thrombosis are characteristic of levamisole-induced purpura. The recommended management of levamisole-induced vasculitis currently involves withdrawal of the culprit along with supportive treatment. We describe a patient with levamisole-induced vasculitis who continued to develop skin lesions despite self-reported cocaine cessation. Complete resolution of cutaneous disease occurred with the addition of oral prednisone and vardenafil hydrochloride, suggesting the possibility of a new treatment option in patients with refractory disease. In addition, we review the clinical presentation, disease course, diagnostic approach, laboratory findings, histology, and management of levamisole-induced vasculitis. The harmful effects of levamisole-cut cocaine are serious enough that public alerts have been issued to increase awareness. Clinicians should consider the possibility of levamisole exposure in cocaine users presenting with any combination of fever, neutropenia, and necrotic skin lesions, especially in acral areas including the ears. PMID:27622263

  17. Drug-Induced Vasculitis: New Insights and a Changing Lineup of Suspects.

    PubMed

    Grau, Rafael G

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of therapeutic agents have been associated with a vasculitic syndrome. This usually involves small vessels, primarily capillaries, venules, and arterioles in leukocytoclastic vasculitis, small-vessel disease similar to an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis, or mid-sized muscular arteries in a polyarteritis-like picture. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are present in many cases of vasculitis regardless of the size of the vessel involved. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat many autoimmune disorders have become the most common agents associated with drug-induced vasculitis. Important advances in epigenetics, genetics, and neutrophil apoptosis are providing new insights into the pathogenesis of both drug-induced vasculitis and idiopathic vasculitis. Although management has not changed significantly in the past few years where withdrawal of the offending agent is the primary intervention, increasing awareness of drug-induced vasculitis can lead to earlier diagnosis and prevention of severe organ damage and fatalities. PMID:26503355

  18. Eosinophilic vasculitis in an isolated central nervous system distribution

    PubMed Central

    Sommerville, R B; Noble, J M; Vonsattel, J P; Delapaz, R; Wright, C B

    2007-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic vasculitis has been described as part of the Churg–Strauss syndrome, but affects the central nervous system (CNS) in <10% of cases; presentation in an isolated CNS distribution is rare. We present a case of eosinophilic vasculitis isolated to the CNS. Case report A 39‐year‐old woman with a history of migraine without aura presented to an institution (located in the borough of Queens, New York, USA; no academic affiliation) in an acute confusional state with concurrent headache and left‐sided weakness and numbness. Laboratory evaluation showed increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein level, but an otherwise unremarkable serological investigation. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bifrontal polar gyral‐enhancing brain lesions. Her symptoms resolved over 2 weeks without residual deficit. After 18 months, later the patient presented with similar symptoms and neuroradiological findings involving territories different from those in her first episode. Again, the CSF protein level was high. She had a raised C reactive protein level and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Brain biopsy showed transmural, predominantly eosinophilic, inflammatory infiltrates of medium‐sized leptomeningeal arteries without granulomas. She improved, without recurrence, when treated with a prolonged course of corticosteroids. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first case of non‐granulomatous eosinophilic vasculitis isolated to the CNS. No aetiology for this patient's primary CNS eosinophilic vasculitis has yet been identified. Spontaneous resolution and recurrence of her syndrome is an unusual feature of the typical CNS vasculitis and may suggest an environmental epitope with immune reaction as the cause. PMID:16926236

  19. Diagnostic approach and current treatment options in childhood vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Kenan; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    All inflammatory changes in the vessel wall are defined as vasculitis. Pediatric vasculitis may present with different clinical findings. Although Henoch-Schönlein purpura which is the most common pediatric vasculitis generally recovers spontaneously, it should be monitorized closely because of the risk of renal failure. Although Kawasaki disease is easy to diagnose with its classical findings, the diagnosis may be delayed in case of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Kawasaki disease should be considered especially in infants in case of prolonged fever even if the criteria are not fully met and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment should be administered without delay in order to prevent development of coronary artery aneurism. Reaction at the site of administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine may be observed as commonly as cervical lymphadenopathy in Kawasaki disease and may be used as a valuable finding in suspicious cases. Although anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides are rare in children, renal involvement is more common and progression is more severe compared to adults. Hence, efficient and aggressive treatment is required. Takayasu’s arteritis is observed commonly in young adult women and rarely in adolescent girls. Therefore, a careful physical examination and blood pressure measurement should be performed in addition to a detailed history in daily practice. In children with unexplained neurological findings, cerebral vasculitis should be considered in the absence of other systemic vasculitides and necessary radiological investigations should be performed in this regard. This review will provide an insight into the understanding of pediatric vasculitis, current diagnostic approaches and prognosis by the aid of new studies. PMID:26884688

  20. Single-organ gallbladder vasculitis: characterization and distinction from systemic vasculitis involving the gallbladder. An analysis of 61 patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Tan, Carmela D; Rodríguez, E René; Hoffman, Gary S

    2014-11-01

    Systemic vasculitis (SV) involving abdominal structures usually has a poor prognosis. Gallbladder vasculitis (GV) has been reported as part of SV (GB-SV) and focal single-organ vasculitis (GB-SOV). We analyzed clinical and histologic characteristics of patients with GV to identify features that differentiate GB-SOV from the systemic forms of GV. To identify affected patients with GV we used pathology databases from our institution and an English-language PubMed search. Clinical manifestations, laboratory and histologic features, treatment administered, and outcomes were recorded. Patients were divided in 2 groups, GB-SOV and GB-SV. As in previous studies of single-organ vasculitis, GB-SOV was only considered to be a sustainable diagnosis if disease beyond the gallbladder was not apparent after a follow-up period of at least 6 months. Sixty-one well-characterized patients with GV were included (6 from our institution). There was no significant sex bias (32 female patients, 29 male). Median age was 52 years (range, 18-94 yr). GB-SOV was found in 20 (33%) and GB-SV in 41 (67%) patients. No differences were observed in age, sex frequency, or duration of gallbladder symptoms between groups. Past episodes of recurrent right-upper quadrant or abdominal pain and lithiasic cholecystitis were more frequent in GB-SOV patients, whereas acalculous cholecystitis occurred more often in GB-SV. In GB-SV, gallbladder-related symptoms occurred more often concomitantly with or after the systemic features, but they sometimes appeared before SV was fully developed (13.5%). Constitutional and musculoskeletal symptoms were reported only in GB-SV patients. Compared to GB-SOV, GB-SV patients presented more often with fever (62.5% vs 20%; p = 0.003) and exhibited higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate levels (80 ± 28 vs 37 ± 25 mm/h, respectively; p = 0.006). All GB-SV patients required glucocorticoids and 50% of them also received cytotoxic agents. Mortality in GB-SV was

  1. The median arcuate ligament syndrome: a mimicker of mesenteric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kay, Johnson C; Arroyo, Ramon A

    2013-08-01

    The median arcuate ligament syndrome is an uncommon condition characterized by the triad of postprandial abdominal pain, unintentional weight loss, and an epigastric bruit. This condition is diagnostically challenging and patients often undergo extensive laboratory, radiographic, and invasive evaluations before it is identified. Physicians should consider this syndrome in the differential diagnoses of chronic abdominal pain and mesenteric vasculitis. Once diagnosed, treatment is generally surgical with known predictors of favorable and unfavorable outcomes. Surgical candidates should be selected carefully. We describe the cases of two young active duty patients diagnosed with median arcuate ligament syndrome after suffering from chronic abdominal pain. Both were referred to our rheumatology department to evaluate for mesenteric vasculitis. Each had a different therapeutic outcome.

  2. Cocaine-induced vasculitis: is this a new trend?

    PubMed Central

    García Pérez, Miraida Reneé; Ortiz-González, Vanessa L; Betancourt, Maria; Mercado, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine-induced vasculitis is a rare complication found in drug abusers. It occurs due to cocaine adulterated with levamisole. Levamisole was once used as a chemotherapy and immunomodulator for different conditions. One of the side effects of this medication is necrotizing vasculitis which has been reported in the US and Puerto Rico. Here we present another case of cocaine induced vasculitis in Puerto Rico. We describe a 43-year-old female with past medical history of bronchial asthma, migraine, and crack smoking who presented to the emergency room due to blood in her urine for 5 days. She also reported fever, chills, and fatigue. At the physical exam she had a right knee ulcer with swelling erythema, warmth, and pain. Also, she had retiform purpuric plaque lesions in her ears, bilaterally. Eroded plaques with elevated borders at left foot and finger dorsum were also present. Laboratory workup was positive for cocaine. The patient showed leucopenia and microcytic anemia with a normal absolute neutrophil count in her cell blood count. Blood cultures, urine cultures, and ulcer cultures were negative. Urinalysis was positive for proteinuria and hematuria. Also, the patient had positive perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, cytoplasmic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, and antinuclear antibody tests and elastase specificity. She showed negative anticardiolipin and lupus anticoagulant antibodies. Her complement levels were decreased. The punch biopsy of her ear showed superficial thrombosis of superficial vascular plexus with perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates and deeper sections showed epidermal necrosis and necrotizing vasculitis. She was started on a high dose of steroids, but could not complete the treatment because she escaped from the hospital before finishing her treatment.

  3. Eosinophilic vasculitis in an isolated central nervous system distribution

    PubMed Central

    Sommerville, R Brian; Noble, James M; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Delapaz, Robert; Wright, Clinton B

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic vasculitis has been described as part of the Churg–Strauss syndrome, but affects the central nervous system (CNS) in <10% of cases. A 39-year-old woman with a history of migraine without aura presented to an institution in an acute confusional state with concurrent headache and left-sided weakness. Laboratory evaluation showed an increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein level, but otherwise unremarkable serologies. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bifrontal polar gyral-enhancing brain lesions. Her symptoms resolved over two weeks without residual deficits. Eighteen months later the patient presented with similar symptoms and neuroradiological findings showed involvement of territories different from those in her first episode. Brain biopsy showed transmural, predominantly eosinophilic, inflammatory infiltrates and fibrinoid necrosis without granulomas. She improved when treated with corticosteroids. To our knowledge, this is the first case of non-granulomatous eosinophilic vasculitis isolated to the CNS. No aetiology for this patient’s primary CNS eosinophilic vasculitis has yet been identified. PMID:21686608

  4. Pathophysiological importance of anti-neutrophil antibodies in vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Neil; Erwig, Lars-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of Review In this review we endeavour to provide a brief overview of the recent advances in understanding of how anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) contribute to the pathophysiology of Vasculitis. Recent Findings Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of ANCA associated vasculitides. Compelling evidence from in vitro studies and experimental models in conjunction with clinical trials has confirmed that ANCA directly contribute to the evolution and progression of the disease process. A new ANCA, directed against human lysosome membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2), has recently been described as a sensitive and specific marker for renal vasculitis and we discuss its potential impact for diagnosis and therapy. Furthermore, high throughput approaches are starting to identify genetic patterns that may identify patients likely to respond to specific therapy or having a high probability of relapse. Summary It has become increasingly clear, over the last two decades that ANCA IgG is pathogenic in vasculitis. Novel therapies aimed at selected cell populations or blocking specific pathogenic pathways offer hope for more selectively treating this heterogeneous group of patients, while avoiding non-specific immunosuppression and its adverse effects. PMID:20975556

  5. Ocular disease in patients with ANCA-positive vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Angela S.; Kempen, John H.; Choi, Dongseok; Liesegang, Teresa L.; Pujari, S. S.; Newcomb, Craig; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Foster, C. Stephen; Jabs, Douglas A.; Levy-Clarke, Grace A.; Suhler, Eric B.

    2009-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis—the term recently applied to Wegener's granulomatosis—is a rare multi-system inflammation characterized by necrotizing granulomas and vasculitis. We investigated the ocular manifestations of this disease in a group of patients drawn from five inflammatory eye disease clinics across the United States. Of 8,562 persons with ocular inflammation, 59 individuals were diagnosed with ANCA-positive vasculitis; 35 males and 21 females, aged 16 to 96 years, were included in this study. Ocular diagnoses were scleritis (75.0%), uveitis (17.9%), and other ocular inflammatory conditions (33.9%) including peripheral ulcerative keratitis and orbital pseudotumor. Mean duration of ocular disease was 4.6 years. Oral corticosteroids and other systemic immunosuppressive agents were used by 85.7% and 78.5% of patients, respectively. Over time, patients with ANCA-positive vasculitis experienced 2.75-fold higher mortality than other patients with inflammatory eye disease. PMID:20835396

  6. Pharmacological approaches to CNS vasculitis: where are we at now?

    PubMed

    Pagnoux, Christian; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis is extremely challenging. Several conditions can mimic CNS vasculitis and require totally different treatment. CNS vasculitis, once confirmed, may result from infections or systemic diseases that will warrant specific treatments, or, more rarely, be primary and isolated (PCNSV). Prospective trials to help determine the optimal treatment for PCNSV are lacking, but data from several cohorts have provided seminal data on its management. The consensus is to use glucocorticoids as first-line agents, combined with additional immunosuppressants for the most severe cases, mainly cyclophosphamide for induction, followed by less-toxic maintenance therapy with azathioprine, methotrexate, or mycophenolate mofetil. The recent identification of PCNSV subgroups and predictors of outcomes might help in deciding the adequate treatment for each patient, keeping in mind that these data are based on a small number of patients. Other agents and biologics can be considered for patients with relapsing and/or refractory disease, but evidence is limited. In practice, the diagnosis must be re-questioned in patients with PCNSV refractory to standard treatment, especially with diagnoses not based on pathology. PMID:26559201

  7. PTU-induced ANCA-positive vasculitis: an innocent or a life-threatening adverse effect?

    PubMed

    Bilge, N Sule Yaşar; Kaşifoğlu, Timuçin; Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2013-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitides are rare, but they can be triggered by chemicals, infections and drugs; among them, antithyroid drugs are common. Autoimmune disorders, such as vasculitis, are unusual, but serious complications of antithyroid therapy. Both propylthiouracil (PTU) and methimazole may induce ANCA-associated vasculitis. PTU-induced vasculitides may have different organ involvement patterns. Herein, we report four cases with ANCA-associated vasculitis with different clinical manifestations.

  8. Three cases of primary small vessel vasculitis of the skeletal muscle–an own entity

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Nadja; Daikeler, Thomas; Frank, Stephan; Mehling, Matthias; Tyndall, Alan; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2011-01-01

    Whereas systemic vasculitis is the most common form of vasculitis, vasculitis restricted to a single organ system is rare. Primary vasculitis restricted to striated skeletal muscle has been described in few case reports for polyarteritis nodosa and leucocytoclastic vasculitis, but not for small vessel vasculitis, type microscopic polyangiitis. The authors describe three patients with primary small vessel vasculitis of the skeletal muscle without evidence of other major organ involvement. All three patients presented with myalgias and highly elevated acute phase reactants while muscle weakness and elevated creatine kinase levels were not consistently present. Diagnoses were established by muscle biopsy and extensive search for potential causes of secondary vasculitis. Complete remission could be accomplished by steroids alone in only one case, while additional immunosuppressants were needed in the other two cases. Primary small vessel vasculitis of the skeletal muscle should be considered in patients presenting with myalgia and signs of systemic inflammation in the absence of other organ manifestations. Once diagnosed, aggressive systemic immunosuppression is appropriate. PMID:22674106

  9. Severe leukocytoclastic vasculitis secondary to the use of a naproxen and requiring amputation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Leukocytoclastic vasculitis (also known as hypersensitivity vasculitis and cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis) can present with various manifestations, which often delays the diagnosis and treatment. In order to show the importance of the early recognition of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, we present a case which occurred secondary to the use of a common pharmaceutical, naproxen. We were unable to find a case of leukocytoclastic vasculitis secondary to naproxen in the literature. Case presentation We present the case of a 33-year-old African American woman with below the knee and bilateral digital gangrene from hypersensitivity vasculitis secondary to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication naproxen. Conclusion This is an original case report focusing on the rheumatologic management of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. However, other specialties, such as internal medicine, dermatology, infectious disease, general surgery and pathology, can gain valuable information by reviewing this case report. Reporting a case of leukocytoclastic vasculitis secondary to treatment with naproxen will advance our understanding of this disease etiology by adding yet another non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug to the list of potential causes of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:20594300

  10. Vasculitis as a Presenting Manifestation of Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpreet; Sukhija, Gagandeep; Kaur, Parminder; Govil, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is responsible for causing hepatic complications like acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma along with some uncommon immune mediated extrahepatic manifestations. Vasculitis remains an uncommon extrahepatic complication of hepatitis B virus infection. Herein we report a case of hepatitis B infection that presented with leucocytoclastic vasculitis as an initial manifestation and managed successfully with entacavir therapy. PMID:27042512

  11. Etiologies and prognostic factors of leukocytoclastic vasculitis with skin involvement

    PubMed Central

    Bouiller, Kévin; Audia, Sylvain; Devilliers, Hervé; Collet, Evelyne; Aubriot, Marie Hélène; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Berthier, Sabine; Bonniaud, Philippe; Chavanet, Pascal; Besancenot, Jean-François; Vabres, Pierre; Martin, Laurent; Samson, Maxime; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, outcomes of patients with leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) were analyzed focusing on clinical, histopathology and laboratory findings, relapses, and survival. Data from patients with cutaneous vasculitis diagnosed between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, at Dijon University Hospital (France) were retrospectively reviewed. LCV was defined as perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate, endothelial cell nuclear swelling, extravasation of red blood cells, and/or fibrin deposition in vessels. Patients were classified according to the 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conference. Relapses were defined as the recurrence of vasculitis symptoms after a period of remission >1 month. Time to relapse and/or death was calculated from the date of diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate (Cox model) analyses were performed. A total of 112 patients (57 males and 55 females), with a mean age of 60 ± 19 (18–98) years, were analyzed. Overall follow-up was 61 ± 38 months. At diagnosis, all patients had skin lesions, purpura being the most common (n = 83). Lesions were associated with systemic involvement in 55 (51%) patients. Only 41 (36.6%) patients received specific treatment: glucocorticoids in 29 of 41 (70.7%) and immunosuppressants in 9 of 41 (22%). Sixty-two patients (55%) had LCV due to underlying causes, 29 (25.9%) had single-organ cutaneous small vessel vasculitis (SoCSVV), and 21 (18.8%) had unclassifiable LCV. Twenty patients of the cohort (18%) experienced relapse, 14 ± 13 (1–40) months after the diagnosis of LCV. None of the 29 patients with SoCSVV relapsed. Independent risk factors for relapse were vascular thrombosis in the biopsy [hazard ratio (HR) = 4.9; P = 0.017], peripheral neuropathy (HR = 9.8; P = 0.001), hepatitis (HR = 3.1; P = 0.004), and positive antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA, HR = 5.9 P = 0.005). In contrast, SoCSVV was a protective factor for relapse (HR = 0.12; P = 0.043). The 1-, 3-, and 6-year overall

  12. ANCA-associated vasculitis in Hispanic Americans: an unrecognized severity.

    PubMed

    Sreih, Antoine G; Mandhadi, Ranadeep; Aldaghlawi, Fadi; Khan, Asad; Irshad, Vajiha; Finn, Katherine; Block, Joel A

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to compare the severity and outcomes of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) between Hispanics and Caucasians living in the same geographical area. All patients diagnosed with AAV at two academic institutions in Chicago from January 2006 to December 2012 were retrospectively and prospectively identified. Disease activity was measured with the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS), and disease damage was measured with the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI). Student's t test and chi-square tests were employed; p ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Seventy patients with AAV were identified; 15 patients were excluded. Fifty-five patients were included in the study: 23 Hispanics and 32 Caucasians, 35 patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's), 12 with microscopic polyangiitis, 7 with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and 1 with renal-limited vasculitis. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics had a higher BVAS at presentation (16.3 ± 7.6 versus 10.7 ± 7.5, p = 0.006), a higher VDI at presentation (2.90 ± 1.50 versus 2.06 ± 1.30, p = 0.030), and a cumulative VDI (3.90 ± 1.70 versus 2.50 ± 1.90, p = 0.010). Renal involvement was more common among Hispanics (85 % of Hispanics versus 48 % of Caucasians, p = 0.01). Seventy percent of Hispanics had acute renal failure (mean creatinine = 3.37 ± 4.4 mg/dl) of whom seven (50 %) required dialysis, versus 25 % of Caucasians (mean creatinine = 1.78 ± 1.57 mg/dl, p = 0.03) and only two requiring dialysis. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics with AAV present with more severe disease and higher damage indices. Larger studies are required to confirm these findings and delineate the respective roles of environment and genetics in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  13. Leflunomide-induced DRESS syndrome with renal involvement and vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Benzeeta; Dhir, Varun; Krishnan, Sabari; Nada, Ritambhra

    2013-05-01

    DRESS or drug reaction (or rash) with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms belongs to the severe cutaneous adverse reaction group and is characterized by hematological abnormalities and visceral organ involvement. Although most often related with anticonvulsant and sulfonamide use, it is reported with numerous other drugs. We report an unusual case of DRESS syndrome due to Leflunomide, also complicated by renal involvement in the form of granulomatous interstitial nephritis and vasculitis. On a review of the literature, eight similar cases were found, and these are discussed.

  14. A central role for the mast cell in early phase vasculitis in the Brown Norway rat model of vasculitis: a histological study

    PubMed Central

    Vinen, Catherine S; Turner, David R; Oliveira, David B G

    2004-01-01

    Administration of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) to Brown Norway rats causes Th2-dominated autoimmunity with raised immunoglobulin E concentrations and gut vasculitis, both of which are T-cell dependent, peak at 14 days after starting HgCl2 and then spontaneously resolve. If animals are re-challenged with HgCl2 6 weeks after initial exposure, they are resistant to autoimmunity, developing only attenuated disease. Recently, a separate phase of early caecal vasculitis was described beginning 24 h after initiating HgCl2 and prior to caecal entry of T cells. Previous work suggested this early vasculitis was αβ T-cell independent and implied a role for mast cells. We further tested this hypothesis by performing a histological study during the first 93 h following HgCl2 challenge defining the precise relationship between gut mast cell degranulation and appearing caecal vasculitis. We also studied whether early caecal vasculitis enters a resistant phase upon re-challenge with HgCl2. We show a direct correlation between mast cell degranulation and early caecal vasculitis following initial HgCl2 challenge. We demonstrate resistance to re-challenge in this phase of injury, with results at re-challenge also showing a correlation between mast cell degranulation and early caecal injury. PMID:15255970

  15. Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis: An ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Rafeel; Rehman, Amina; Valecha, Gautam; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is a syndrome signified by a precipitous loss of renal function, with features of glomerulonephritis including dysmorphic erythrocyturia and glomerular proteinuria. RPGN is associated with extensive crescent formation, and, thus, the clinical term RPGN is often used interchangeably with the pathologic term crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN). From an immunopathologic standpoint, primary RPGN is divided into pauci-immune GN (PICG), anti-GBM GN, and immune complex GN. PICG, the most common etiology of primary RPGN, refers to a necrotizing glomerulonephritis with few or no immune deposits by immunofluorescence (IF) or electron microscopy (EM). In most patients, pauci-immune CGN is a component of a systemic small vessel vasculitis such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Approximately 90% of patients with PICG have circulating ANCA antibodies, leading to the nomenclature ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Recent research has identified several other antibodies associated with PICG, which is now understood to be a complex spectrum of disease with considerable overlap in terms of clinical phenotype and outcomes. In addition, several genetic and environmental factors have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disorder. With new prognostic classifications, enhanced understanding of immunopathologic mechanisms, and novel treatment paradigms, clinical and experimental interest in PICG remains high. PMID:26688808

  16. T Cell–Macrophage Interactions and Granuloma Formation in Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst, Marc; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Berry, Gerald; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma formation, bringing into close proximity highly activated macrophages and T cells, is a typical event in inflammatory blood vessel diseases, and is noted in the name of several of the vasculitides. It is not known whether specific properties of the microenvironment in the blood vessel wall or the immediate surroundings of blood vessels contribute to granuloma formation and, in some cases, generation of multinucleated giant cells. Granulomas provide a specialized niche to optimize macrophage–T cell interactions, strongly activating both cell types. This is mirrored by the intensity of the systemic inflammation encountered in patients with vasculitis, often presenting with malaise, weight loss, fever, and strongly upregulated acute phase responses. As a sophisticated and highly organized structure, granulomas can serve as an ideal site to induce differentiation and maturation of T cells. The granulomas possibly seed aberrant Th1 and Th17 cells into the circulation, which are known to be the main pathogenic cells in vasculitis. Through the induction of memory T cells, aberrant innate immune responses can imprint the host immune system for decades to come and promote chronicity of the disease process. Improved understanding of T cell–macrophage interactions will redefine pathogenic models in the vasculitides and provide new avenues for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25309534

  17. Posterior Spinal Artery Aneurysm Presenting with Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Thomas, Cheddhi; Engler, John; Shapiro, Maksim; Becske, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of isolated posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms is a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) that presents unique diagnostic challenges owing to a nuanced clinical presentation. Here, we report on the diagnosis and management of the first known case of an isolated PSA aneurysm in the context of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. A 53-year-old male presented to an outside institution with acute bilateral lower extremity paralysis 9 days after admission for recurrent cellulitis. Early magnetic resonance imaging was read as negative and repeat imaging 15 days after presentation revealed SAH and a compressive spinal subdural hematoma. Angiography identified a PSA aneurysm at T9, as well as other areas suspicious for inflammatory or post-hemorrhagic reactive changes. The patient underwent a multilevel laminectomy for clot evacuation and aneurysm resection to prevent future hemorrhage and to establish a diagnosis. The postoperative course was complicated by medical issues and led to the diagnosis of leukocytoclastic vasculitis that may have predisposed the patient to aneurysm development. Literature review reveals greater mortality for cervical lesions than thoracolumbar lesions and that the presence of meningitic symptoms portents better functional outcome than symptoms of cord compression. The outcome obtained in this case is consistent with outcomes reported in the literature. PMID:27114966

  18. Pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis: An update.

    PubMed

    Jarrot, Pierre-André; Kaplanski, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) constitutes a group of rare diseases characterized by necrotizing inflammation of small blood vessels and the presence of ANCA. Although these autoantibodies were initially used to classify pauci-immune vasculitis, increasing clinical and experimental evidence now supports their pathogenic role, mainly through ANCA-induced activation of primed neutrophils and monocytes leading to destructive vascular necrosis. The mechanisms of ANCA generation remain however unclear. Neutrophils play a central role in the pathophysiological process of AAV since they are both effector cells responsible for endothelial damage and targets of autoimmunity. Another role of neutrophils is due to their ability to generate neutrophil extracellular traps, which support the presentation of ANCA autoantigens, could break immune tolerance and induce autoantibody generation. Alternatively, the ANCA autoimmune response is facilitated by insufficient T-cell and B-cell regulation, and the role of complement alternative pathway has recently been emphasized. This review summarizes the main pathogenesis concepts of AAV as well as the putative mechanisms for the origin of ANCA autoimmune response.

  19. A project by the SIDeMaST Immunopathology Group on cutaneous vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Papini, M; Quaglino, P; La Placa, M; Marzano, A V

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitides are a challenge to the clinician, in terms of both diagnosis and therapy. Multiple classification systems have been implemented and the numerous classification schemes reflect the complexity of establishing a simple classification that could be functional for daily care. Although vasculitis classification has become increasingly elaborated, some areas remain ill defined. Some forms of vasculitis are still difficult to assign to a specific disease entity. Generally accepted operational criteria are available for many vasculitides, but for some entities there are no effective criteria. Moreover, diagnostic criteria for vasculitis with sufficient strength and/or confidence that can be universally accepted are not yet available. The need for diagnostic criteria validated and agreed upon is particularly relevant in the context of cutaneous vasculitis. The project of the SIDeMaST Italian Group of Immunopathology on cutaneous vasculitis is a national prospective observational study designed to develop and validate diagnostic criteria and to improve and validate classification criteria for cutaneous small vessel vasculitis also known as leukocytoclastic vasculitis (CLV). Primary objective of the study will also be that of developing the CUtaneous VAsculitis Severity Index (CUVASI). Secondary objectives of the project will be: 1) definition of the etiological agents that are most frequently associated with CLV; 2) search for possible correlations between causative agent and peculiar clinical and/or histopathological aspects; 3) evaluation of immunofluorescence pattern observed in this specific group of primitive cutaneous vasculitis in order to characterize the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of this technique; 4) identification of a set of clinical investigations and laboratory tests to be performed for a correct CLV assessment. Actually 15 Italian dermatological clinics are contributing to the project and anticipated recruiting >100 patients with CLV

  20. Focal cerebral vasculitis associated with circulating immune complexes and brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Groothuis, D.R.; Mikhael, M.A.

    1986-06-01

    In this report we describe a patient with a benign glioma treated with surgery and radiation. After a period of stability he developed subacute bacterial endocarditis, and deteriorated neurologically. Computed tomographic scans did not show recurrent tumor. An angiogram showed vasculitis restricted to the previously irradiated area. Secondary to subacute bacterial endocarditis was the presence of high levels of circulating immune complexes. His neurological status was unchanged after antibiotics, but improved after treatment with dexamethasone. We interpret the clinical course as an immune-complex-mediated vasculitis superimposed on a subclinical radiation vasculitis. This case supports the hypothesis that immune mechanisms may be involved in delayed radiation injury to the nervous system.

  1. Neutrophilic Dermatoses in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Martin Silva, Nicolas; de Moreuil, Claire; Néel, Antoine; de Menthon, Mathilde; Meyer, Olivier; Launay, David; Pagnoux, Christian; Guillevin, Loïc; Puéchal, Xavier; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A few reports suggest combination of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and neutrophilic dermatoses (ND). We aimed to describe the main characteristics of patients presenting with both AAV and ND in a French cohort and through a systematic literature review, and to discuss the possible common pathogenic process involved. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with both conditions. Patients were selected via the French Internal Medicine Society (SNFMI) and the French Vasculitis Study Group (FVSG). A literature review focusing on a combination of both conditions, concentrated only on publications with well-established diagnoses and individual detailed data. Seventeen patients diagnosed with AAV and ND were identified in this cohort. Twelve patients had granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 4 had microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and one had eosinophilic GPA (EGPA). Eight patients, all with GPA, displayed pyoderma gangrenosum (PG). Sweet's syndrome was observed in 6 patients (4 with MPA, one with GPA and one with EGPA) and erythema elevatum diutinum in the other three (2 with GPA and 1 with MPA). The literature review identified 33 additional patients with both conditions, including 26 with GPA. Altogether, of the 50 patients (17 from our study and 33 from the literature review), 33 (66%) patients presented with PG associated with GPA in 29 cases (89%). Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment in conjunction with an immunosuppressive agent in most cases. Outcomes were good and a total of 15 patients experienced a relapse. Patients who relapsed were more likely to have ear, nose and throat manifestation than patients who did not [12/15 (80%) relapsing patients vs. 15/35 (43%) non-relapsing patients; p = 0.03)]. In our stud, the most frequent association concerned GPA and PG. ND should be considered and specifically researched within the spectrum of cutaneous manifestations observed in AAV. PMID:26986103

  2. [Uptodate in the management and treatment of ANCA-associated vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Belaconi, Ionela Nicoleta; Toma, Claudia Lucia; Bogdan, Miron Alexandru

    2014-01-01

    The antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis are heterogeneous, multisystem, autoimmune diseases characterized by necrotizing small and medium vessel vasculitis and the association with ANCA. The diagnosis and management of these patients may be challenging due to the variability of clinical features, the possibility of life-threatening events (acute renal failure or pulmonary hemorrhage) and the relative rarity of these syndromes. ANCA-associated vasculitis include granulomatosis with polyangiitis, microscopic polyangiitis and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis. The treatment requires significant immunosuppression and there are frequent treatment related side effects. Although the standard protocol with cytotoxic agents and glucocorticoids has dramatically improved patient outcome, its toxic profile remains a major problem. Recent progress in evidence base and consensus in understanding the pathogenic mechanism and the quantification of disease activity further improved patient's life. Special attention was paid in refining immunosuppressive treatment to minimize his toxicity. This review will focus on evidence based treatment of ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  3. Cerebral angiography as a guide for therapy in isolated central nervous system vasculitis

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, R.L.; Martino, C.R.; Weinert, D.M.; Hueftle, M.; Kammer, G.M.

    1987-04-24

    The authors present a case of isolated central nervous system vasculitis documented by cerebral arteriography in which remission, using a treatment regimen of prednisone and cyclophosphamide, was guided by serial arteriography during a 15-month period.

  4. The pathogenesis of nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver associated with rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Young, I D; Segura, J; Ford, P M; Ford, S E

    1992-03-01

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia (NRH) is an uncommon liver disease that typically develops in the setting of a chronic illness such as Felty's syndrome. Although the pathogenesis of NRH has not been defined, vasculitis has been postulated to play an important pathogenetic role in some cases of NRH, even though the association of NRH and vasculitis has been reported rarely. We describe two unusual cases of NRH in patients with Felty's syndrome complicated by rheumatoid vasculitis. Morphometric analysis demonstrated evidence of injury to the hepatic vasculature in the form of loss of small intrahepatic arteries and portal spaces, findings that support the hypothesis that hepatic arteritis plays a role in the development of NRH in cases associated with systemic vasculitis.

  5. Isolated large vessel pulmonary vasculitis as a cause of chronic obstruction of the pulmonary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Guy; Gopalan, Deepa; Church, Colin; Rassl, Doris; Mukhtyar, Chetan; Wistow, Trevor; Lang, Chim; Sivasothy, Pasupathy; Stewart, Susan; Jayne, David; Sheares, Karen; Tsui, Steven; Jenkins, David P.; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Isolated pulmonary artery involvement by large vessel vasculitis is rare. This case report describes two patients with large vessel pulmonary vasculitis initially thought to have chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension who had their diagnosis revised following pulmonary endarterectomy surgery. Advances in imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have permitted complementary radiological methods of diagnosis and follow up of large vessel disease and these are discussed in conjunction with the immunosuppressive and operative management of these patients. PMID:22140633

  6. A Rare Case of Hepatitis C-Associated Cryoglobulinemic Duodenal Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Alexandra; Dholaria, Kevin; Arosemena, Leopoldo R.; Ladino-Avellaneda, Marco A.; Barisoni, Laura; Bhamidimarri, Kalyan R.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal involvement of cryoglobulinemia is an uncommon manifestation and marker of severe vasculitis. We describe the case of a woman admitted to our service for management of acute renal failure and progressive gastrointestinal symptoms after initiating hepatitis C virus treatment with ribavirin and sofosbuvir 4 weeks prior. With an undetectable hepatitis C viral load and persistent symptoms despite hepatitis C virus therapy cessation, an upper endoscopy revealed duodenal sloughing, erythema, and bleeding, sparking suspicion for recurrence of cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. PMID:27807586

  7. IL-17 production by CSF lymphocytes as a biomarker for cerebral vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Vivien; Schmid, Sabrina; Gelderblom, Mathias; Hackbusch, Romy; Kolster, Manuela; Schuster, Simon; Thomalla, Götz; Keminer, Oliver; Pleß, Ole; Bernreuther, Christian; Glatzel, Markus; Wegscheider, Karl; Gerloff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the possibility of using interleukin-17 (IL-17) production by CD4+ T cells in the CSF as a potential biomarker for cerebral vasculitis in stroke patients. Methods: In this consecutive case study, we performed prospective analysis of CSF and blood in patients admitted to a university medical center with symptoms of stroke and suspected cerebral vasculitis. Flow cytometry was performed for intracellular detection of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanded T cells from CSF. Results: CSF CD4+ lymphocytes from patients with cerebral vasculitis showed significantly higher levels of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 compared to patients with stroke not due to vasculitis or with other, noninflammatory neurologic diseases. There was no difference in the production of interferon-γ in the CSF and no overall differences in the relative frequencies of peripheral immune cells. Conclusions: Intracellular IL-17 in CSF cells is potentially useful in discriminating cerebral vasculitis as a rare cause in patients presenting with ischemic stroke. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that an increased proportion of IL-17-producing CD4+ cells in CSF of patients presenting with stroke symptoms is indicative of cerebral vasculitis (sensitivity 73%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 39–94%; specificity 100%, 95% CI 74%–100%). PMID:27144213

  8. D-penicillamine-induced ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis in pediatric patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonhee; Lee, Sang Taek; Cho, Heeyeon

    2016-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are associated with systemic vasculitis. The pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) has not been clearly proven, and drug-induced ANCA-associated vasculitis has been reported. Wilson's disease is an inborn error of copper metabolism caused by a mutation in the copper transporting gene ATP7B, and traditional treatment is based on copper chelation with agents such as D-penicillamine. There have been rare reports that prolonged D-penicillamine therapy might cause adverse renal events such as membranous nephropathy and minimal change disease, but it is questionable if D-penicillamine induces ANCA-associated vasculitis. We describe 2 patients with Wilson's disease treated with D-penicillamine who presented with ANCA (+) vasculitis and renal involvement. The 2 patients also showed positive results for antinuclear antibody (ANA). Their kidney biopsy findings were compatible with crescentic/necrotizing glomerulonephritis, pauci-immune type. After diagnosis of AAV, D-penicillamine was stopped. Patients were then treated with plasmapheresis and immunosuppressants, including methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide. One patient progressed to end-stage renal disease and the other showed persistent proteinuria. These cases suggest that D-penicillamine may induce ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis with severe renal involvement in pediatric patients, and plasmapheresis combined with immunosuppressant should be considered.

  9. D-penicillamine-induced ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis in pediatric patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonhee; Lee, Sang Taek; Cho, Heeyeon

    2016-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are associated with systemic vasculitis. The pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) has not been clearly proven, and drug-induced ANCA-associated vasculitis has been reported. Wilson's disease is an inborn error of copper metabolism caused by a mutation in the copper transporting gene ATP7B, and traditional treatment is based on copper chelation with agents such as D-penicillamine. There have been rare reports that prolonged D-penicillamine therapy might cause adverse renal events such as membranous nephropathy and minimal change disease, but it is questionable if D-penicillamine induces ANCA-associated vasculitis. We describe 2 patients with Wilson's disease treated with D-penicillamine who presented with ANCA (+) vasculitis and renal involvement. The 2 patients also showed positive results for antinuclear antibody (ANA). Their kidney biopsy findings were compatible with crescentic/necrotizing glomerulonephritis, pauci-immune type. After diagnosis of AAV, D-penicillamine was stopped. Patients were then treated with plasmapheresis and immunosuppressants, including methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide. One patient progressed to end-stage renal disease and the other showed persistent proteinuria. These cases suggest that D-penicillamine may induce ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis with severe renal involvement in pediatric patients, and plasmapheresis combined with immunosuppressant should be considered. PMID:26784915

  10. Pulmonary Fibrosis in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies (ANCA)-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Comarmond, Cloé; Crestani, Bruno; Tazi, Abdellatif; Hervier, Baptiste; Adam-Marchand, Sylvain; Nunes, Hilario; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Wislez, Marie; Cadranel, Jacques; Housset, Bruno; Lloret-Linares, Célia; Sève, Pascal; Pagnoux, Christian; Abad, Sébastien; Camuset, Juliette; Bienvenu, Boris; Duruisseaux, Michaël; Hachulla, Eric; Arlet, Jean-Benoît; Hamidou, Mohammed; Mahr, Alfred; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Brun, Anne-Laure; Grenier, Philippe; Cacoub, Patrice; Saadoun, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is an uncommon manifestation observed in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), particularly microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). While patients with PF associated with AAV seem to have a worse prognosis, these patients have been described only in case reports or small retrospective case series. In this retrospective multicenter study, we report the main features and long-term outcomes of patients with PF associated with AAV, fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria and/or Chapel Hill definitions. Forty-nine patients (30 men [61%]; median age at diagnosis of AAV, 68 [interquartile range, 58–73] years) with PF associated with AAV were identified. Forty (81.6%) patients had MPA and 9 (18.4%) had granulomatosis with polyangiitis. The diagnosis of PF preceded the onset of vasculitis in 22 (45%) patients. Usual interstitial pneumonia was the main radiologic pattern (n = 18, 43%). ANCA were mostly of antimyeloperoxidase specificity (88%). All patients were treated with glucocorticoids as induction therapy, combined with cyclophosphamide (CYC) (n = 36, 73.5%) or rituximab (RTX) (n = 1, 2%). Factors associated with mortality included occurrence of chronic respiratory insufficiency (hazard ratio [HR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6–34.5; p = 0.003), induction therapy with glucocorticoids alone (HR, 2.94; CI, 1.05–8.33; p = 0.04), and initial weigh loss (HR, 2.83; CI, 1.05–7.65; p = 0.041). The 3-year survival rate in patients treated with glucocorticoids alone or combined with an immunosuppressant (CYC or RTX) as induction therapy was 64% (95% CI, 41–99) and 94% (95% CI, 86–100), respectively (p = 0.03). After a median follow-up of 48 months [interquartile range, 14–88 mo], 18 (37%) patients died, including 11 related to respiratory insufficiency. PF is a rare manifestation of AAV with a very poor prognosis. Induction therapy with

  11. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Daniel; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    A group of pauci-immune vasculitides, characterized by neutrophil-rich necrotizing inflammation of small vessels and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), is referred to as ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs against proteinase 3 (PR3) (PR3-ANCA) or myeloperoxidase (MPO) (MPO-ANCA) are found in over 90% of patients with active disease, and these ANCAs are implicated in the pathogenesis of AAV. Dying neutrophils surrounding the walls of small vessels are a histological hallmark of AAV. Traditionally, it has been assumed that these neutrophils die by necrosis, but neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been visualized at the sites of vasculitic lesions. AAV patients also possess elevated levels of NETs in the circulation. ANCAs are capable of inducing NETosis in neutrophils, and their potential to do so has been shown to be affinity dependent and to correlate with disease activity. Neutrophils from AAV patients are also more prone to release NETs spontaneously than neutrophils from healthy blood donors. NETs contain proinflammatory proteins and are thought to contribute to vessel inflammation directly by damaging endothelial cells and by activating the complement system and indirectly by acting as a link between the innate and adaptive immune system through the generation of PR3- and MPO-ANCA. Injection of NET-loaded myeloid dendritic cells into mice results in circulating PR3- and MPO-ANCA and the development of AAV-like disease. NETs have also been shown to be essential in a rodent model of drug-induced vasculitis. NETs induced by propylthiouracil could not be degraded by DNaseI, implying that disordered NETs might be important for the generation of ANCAs. NET degradation was also highlighted in another study showing that AAV patients have reduced DNaseI activity resulting in less NET degradation. With this in mind, it might be that prolonged exposure to proteins in the NETs due to the overproduction of NETs and/or reduced

  12. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg, Daniel; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    A group of pauci-immune vasculitides, characterized by neutrophil-rich necrotizing inflammation of small vessels and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), is referred to as ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs against proteinase 3 (PR3) (PR3-ANCA) or myeloperoxidase (MPO) (MPO-ANCA) are found in over 90% of patients with active disease, and these ANCAs are implicated in the pathogenesis of AAV. Dying neutrophils surrounding the walls of small vessels are a histological hallmark of AAV. Traditionally, it has been assumed that these neutrophils die by necrosis, but neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been visualized at the sites of vasculitic lesions. AAV patients also possess elevated levels of NETs in the circulation. ANCAs are capable of inducing NETosis in neutrophils, and their potential to do so has been shown to be affinity dependent and to correlate with disease activity. Neutrophils from AAV patients are also more prone to release NETs spontaneously than neutrophils from healthy blood donors. NETs contain proinflammatory proteins and are thought to contribute to vessel inflammation directly by damaging endothelial cells and by activating the complement system and indirectly by acting as a link between the innate and adaptive immune system through the generation of PR3- and MPO-ANCA. Injection of NET-loaded myeloid dendritic cells into mice results in circulating PR3- and MPO-ANCA and the development of AAV-like disease. NETs have also been shown to be essential in a rodent model of drug-induced vasculitis. NETs induced by propylthiouracil could not be degraded by DNaseI, implying that disordered NETs might be important for the generation of ANCAs. NET degradation was also highlighted in another study showing that AAV patients have reduced DNaseI activity resulting in less NET degradation. With this in mind, it might be that prolonged exposure to proteins in the NETs due to the overproduction of NETs and/or reduced

  13. Circovirus in Tissues of Dogs with Vasculitis and Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linlin; McGraw, Sabrina; Zhu, Kevin; Leutenegger, Christian M.; Marks, Stanley L.; Kubiski, Steven; Gaffney, Patricia; Dela Cruz Jr, Florante N.; Wang, Chunlin; Delwart, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the complete genome of a novel dog circovirus (DogCV) from the liver of a dog with severe hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, vasculitis, and granulomatous lymphadenitis. DogCV was detected by PCR in fecal samples from 19/168 (11.3%) dogs with diarrhea and 14/204 (6.9%) healthy dogs and in blood from 19/409 (3.3%) of dogs with thrombocytopenia and neutropenia, fever of unknown origin, or past tick bite. Co-infection with other canine pathogens was detected for 13/19 (68%) DogCV-positive dogs with diarrhea. DogCV capsid proteins from different dogs varied by up to 8%. In situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy detected DogCV in the lymph nodes and spleens of 4 dogs with vascular compromise and histiocytic inflammation. The detection of a circovirus in tissues of dogs expands the known tropism of these viruses to a second mammalian host. Our results indicate that circovirus, alone or in co-infection with other pathogens, might contribute to illness and death in dogs. PMID:23628223

  14. [Rare forms of hypertension : From pheochromocytoma to vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Haller, H; Limbourg, F; Schmidt, B M; Menne, J

    2015-03-01

    Secondary hypertension affects only 5-10 % of hypertensive patients. Screening is expensive and time-consuming and should be performed only in patients for whom there is a high clinical suspicion of secondary hypertension. Clinical signs of secondary forms of hypertension are new-onset hypertension in patients without other risk factors (i.e., family history, obesity, etc.), sudden increase of blood pressure (BP) in a previously stable patient, increased BP in prepubertal children, resistant hypertension, and severe hypertension or hypertensive emergencies. In adults, renal parenchymal and vascular diseases as well as obstructive sleep apnea are the most common causes of secondary hypertension. Medication-induced hypertension and non-adherence to medication have to be ruled out. Of the endocrine causes associated with hypertension, primary aldosteronism is the most common. Other endocrine causes of hypertension such as thyroid disease (hypo- or hyperthyroidism), hypercortisolism (Cushing's syndrome), hyperparathyroidism, and pheochromocytoma are rare. Monogenetic forms of hypertension are mostly of tubular origin and associated with alterations in mineralocorticoid handling or signaling. Rare causes of hypertension also include inflammatory vascular disease. Acute forms of vasculitis may present as "malignant" hypertension with associated thrombotic microangiopathy and organ damage/failure. It is important to diagnose these rare forms of hypertension in order to prevent acute organ damage in these patients or unnecessary invasive treatment strategies. PMID:25700646

  15. Vasculitis following treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with extracorporeal staphylococcal protein a immunoadsorption column (prosorba).

    PubMed

    Scroggie, D; Harris, M D; Abel, M; Sakai, L; Arroyo, R

    2001-08-01

    We report a case of vasculitis after Prosorba treatment in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. The patient is a 66-year-old white male with long standing rheumatoid arthritis and hepatitis B. He was treated with the standard regimen for Prosorba treatment. He improved and met criteria for an American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20% response. While on therapy he developed a nonhealing ulcer. Approximately 2 weeks after treatment was completed, he developed palpable purpura and mononeuritis multiplex. Deep dermal biopsy confirmed the presence of both small and medium vessel vasculitis. Nerve conductions studies were consistent with neuropathic conduction delays. He was treated with 1mg/kg/day of oral prednisone. Prosorba has been reported to cause leukocytoclastic vasculitis during treatment, but has not been noted to involve medium sized vessels. This patient's history and presentation are most consistent with rheumatoid arthritis associated vasculitis, though the Prosorba treatment cannot be ruled out as a cause or a contributing factor. Importantly, although Prosorba treated his synovitis, it did not prevent concomitant vasculitis.

  16. Elevated Soluble Flt1 Inhibits Endothelial Repair in PR3-ANCA–Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Le Roux, Sandrine; Pepper, Ruth J.; Dufay, Alexandre; Néel, Mélanie; Meffray, Emmanuelle; Lamandé, Noël; Rimbert, Marie; Josien, Régis; Hamidou, Mohamed; Hourmant, Maryvonne; Cook, H. Terence; Charreau, Béatrice; Larger, Etienne; Salama, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis exhibits endothelial damage, but the capacity for vessel repair in this disorder is not well understood. Here, we observed a marked increase in serum levels of soluble Flt1 (sFlt1), a potent inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor, in patients with active ANCA-associated vasculitis compared with patients during remission and other controls. Serum levels of sFlt1 correlated with C5a, an anaphylatoxin released after complement activation. Serum from patients with acute ANCA-associated vasculitis disrupted blood flow in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay, suggesting an antiangiogenic effect. Preincubation with excess human vascular endothelial growth factor prevented this effect. Anti–proteinase-3 (PR3) mAb and serum containing PR3-ANCA from patients with active vasculitis both induced a significant and sustained release of sFlt1 from monocytes, whereas anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) mAb or polyclonal antibodies did not. However, the serum containing polyclonal PR3-ANCA did not induce release of sFlt1 from cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In summary, these data suggest that anti-PR3 antibodies, and to a much lesser extent anti-MPO antibodies, increase sFlt1 during acute ANCA-associated vasculitis, leading to an antiangiogenic state that hinders endothelial repair. PMID:22034638

  17. Metastatic Crohn's disease accompanying granulomatous vasculitis and lymphangitis in the vulva.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Mitsuaki; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease (CD) is an extremely rare extragastrointestinal manifestation of CD, and is characterized histopathologically by the presence of non-caseating granulomatous inflammation. Granulomatous vasculitis and lymphangitis have rarely been documented in metastatic CD. Herein, we report the first documented case of metastatic CD accompanied by both granulomatous vasculitis and lymphangitis in the vulva. A 35-year-old Japanese female with CD presented with multiple small nodules in her vulva. Biopsy was performed under a clinical diagnosis of genital warts. A histopathological study revealed marked lymphangiectasia in the papillary dermis. Within the dilated lymphatics, lymphocytes and aggregates of macrophages were present, which are typical features of granulomatous lymphangitis. Tiny non-caseating granulomas and granulomatous vasculitis were also observed. Accordingly, a diagnosis of metastatic CD accompanied by both granulomatous vasculitis and lymphangitis was made. The occurrence of cutaneous lesions in patients with CD is well known. Albeit extremely rare, lymphangiectasia has been reported in the vulva of CD patients that clinically mimicked viral warts, as in the present case. The diagnosis of metastatic CD in the present case was not difficult because characteristic histopathological features were present, and a clinical history of CD was available. However, a few cases of genital swelling associated with granulomatous inflammation prior to a diagnosis of gastrointestinal CD have been documented. Therefore, granulomatous vasculitis and lymphangitis in the external genitals should be considered as potential indication of metastatic CD even in cases without a history of gastrointestinal CD.

  18. Diagnosing ANCA-associated vasculitis in ANCA positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Eline; Bax, Willem A.; van Dam, Bastiaan; Slieker, Walentina A.T.; Verhave, Gideon; Frerichs, Fenneke C.P.; van Eijk, Izhar C.; Boersma, Wim G.; de Kuyper, Guido T.M.; Penne, Erik L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently no validated diagnostic system for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is available. Therefore, diagnosing AAV is often challenging. We aimed to identify factors that lead to a clinical diagnosis AAV in ANCA positive patients in a teaching hospital in The Netherlands. In this study, all patients that tested positive for ANCA proteinase 3 (PR3) and/or myeloperoxidase (MPO) between 2005 and 2015 were analysed. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of AAV were compared with patients without a clinical diagnosis of AAV. Clinical symptoms and laboratory variables at presentation, including the ANCA titre, were collected for both patients with and without AAV. Clinical and laboratory variables related with AAV were investigated, using multivariable logistic regression. Two hundred thirty seven consecutive patients with a positive ANCA were included, of whom 119 were clinically diagnosed with AAV. Of the 118 ANCA positive patients without AAV, 87 patients had an alternative diagnosis, including inflammatory bowel disease (n = 24), other rheumatic diseases (n = 23), infection (n = 11), malignancy (n = 4), and other diagnoses (n = 25). In a multivariable regression model, a high ANCA titre (odds ratio [OR] 14.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.93–28.94) and a high number of affected organ systems (OR 7.67, 95% CI 3.69–15.94) were associated with AAV. MPO and PR3 ANCA can be positive in a variety of diseases that mimic AAV. A higher ANCA titre and multiple affected organ systems may help to discriminate between AAV and other systemic illnesses in anti-PR3 and anti-MPO positive patients. A diagnostic scoring system incorporating these factors should be considered. PMID:27749588

  19. A Fatal Case of “Bullous Erysipelas-like” Pseudomonas Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sam Shiyao; Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Huang, Jing Xiang; Tan, Kong-Bing; Aw, Derrick Chen-Wee

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelas is a generally benign superficial bacterial skin infection, and its bullous form constitutes a rare and more severe variant. We describe the first and fatal case of “bullous erysipelas-like” septic vasculitis due to Pseudomonas bacteremi. A 69-year-old Chinese man presenting with diarrhea and septic shock initially began to rapidly develop sharply defined erythematous plaques with non-hemorrhagic bullae over his lower limbs. Culture of the aspirate from the bullae was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was also consistent with his blood cultures showing Pseudomonas bacteremia. Histology of the skin lesion showed microthrombi and neutrophilic infiltrates in blood vessels with Gram-negative bacilli extruding from the vessel walls, characteristic of septic vasculitis. The bullous erysipelas-like lesions seen in this patient represents a rare manifestation of both septic vasculitis and Pseudomonas infection. PMID:26955132

  20. CNS vasculitis and stroke in neonatal lupus erythematosus: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Saini, Arushi G; Sankhyan, Naveen; Bhattad, Sagar; Vyas, Sameer; Saikia, Biman; Singhi, Pratibha

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus refers to the clinical spectrum of cardiac, cutaneous and other systemic abnormalities in neonates born to mothers with autoantibodies against Ro/SSA and La/SSB antigens. Isolated central nervous system involvement is very rare and has been described as transient vasculopathy only. We describe a 2-months-old girl who presented with acute ischemic stroke secondary to central nervous system vasculitis without any cardiac, cutaneous or hematological manifestations. The mother was pauci-symptomatic with raised anti-Ro autoantibody titers; the baby was positive for autoantibodies against Ro-antigen. Angiography confirmed vasculitis in cerebral vasculature. Our case highlights that neonatal lupus erythematosus can present with isolated nervous system manifestations and the vascular damage can be permanent in the form of vasculitis. Early recognition will help pediatricians identify such possible permanent complications in newborns with neonatal lupus erythematosus. A review of previously reported central nervous system manifestations of neonatal lupus is also presented.

  1. An approach to the diagnosis and management of systemic vasculitis revised version with tracked changes removed

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A; Chan, M; Wiik, A; Misbah, S A; Luqmani, R A

    2010-01-01

    The systemic vasculitides are a complex and often serious group of disorders which, while uncommon, require careful management in order to ensure optimal outcome. In most cases there is no known cause. Multi-system disease is likely to be fatal without judicious use of immunosuppression. A prompt diagnosis is necessary to preserve organ function. Comprehensive and repeated disease assessment is a necessary basis for planning therapy and modification of treatment protocols according to response. Therapies typically include glucocorticoids and, especially for small and medium vessel vasculitis, an effective immunosuppressive agent. Cyclophosphamide is currently the standard therapy for small vessel multi-system vasculitis, but other agents are now being evaluated in large randomized trials. Comorbidity is common in patients with vasculitis, including the cumulative effects of potentially toxic therapy. Long-term evaluation of patients is important in order to detect and manage relapses. PMID:20070316

  2. PTU-associated vasculitis in a girl with Turner Syndrome and Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Olga T; Smolinski, Kara N; Yan, Albert C; Grimberg, Adda

    2006-01-01

    Palpable purpura is a concerning clinical finding in pediatric patients and can have many causes, including infectious and autoimmune processes. A rare cause, drug-induced vasculitis, may result from the production of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) in response to a medication. We report a girl with Turner syndrome and Graves' disease who presented with palpable purpuric lesions. The diagnosis of propylthiouracil (PTU)-associated vasculitis was made by observation of consistent clinical features, the detection of elevated ANA and ANCA in the blood, and the observed clinical resolution of symptoms following withdrawal of PTU. Subsequent treatment of persistent hyperthyroidism with radioablation did not result in an exacerbation of the vasculitis, a complication described in prior case reports.

  3. Transduction of a Foreign Histocompatibility Gene into the Arterial Wall Induces Vasculitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Plautz, Gregory; Nabel, Gary J.

    1992-06-01

    Autoimmune vasculitis represents a disease characterized by focal inflammation within arteries at multiple sites in the vasculature. Therapeutic interventions in this disease are empirical and often unsuccessful, and the mechanisms of immune injury are not well-defined. The direct transfer of recombinant genes and their expression in the arterial wall provides an opportunity to explore the pathogenesis and treatment of vascular disease. In this report, an animal model for vasculitis has been developed. Inflammation has been elicited by direct gene transfer of a foreign class I major histocompatibility complex gene, HLA-B7, to specific sites in porcine arteries. Transfer and expression of this recombinant gene was confirmed by a polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and cytolytic T cells specific for HLA-B7 were detected. These findings demonstrate that expression of a recombinant gene in the vessel wall can induce a focal immune response and suggest that vessel damage induced by cell-mediated immune injury can initiate vasculitis.

  4. Pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy wholly abated with one week twice daily application of fluticasone propionate lotion: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2008-01-01

    Pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (PUPPP) is among the most common dermatoses of pregnancy. Most reports of the effective treatment of PUPPP involve high potency topical corticosteroids or oral steroids. Many authorities have noted cases of PUPPP whose resolution followed parturition. A few have noted that PUPPP can arise and resolve the third trimester. A 36-year-old prima gravida at 38 weeks of gestation presented with a 2-week history of a pruritic papular abdominal eruption. She used fluticasone propionate 0.05 percent lotion twice a day. One week after starting this medication, the pruritus had resolved and the erythema/urticaria had abated; the pigmentary alteration had improved, but still remained. The PUPPP did not return after parturition. PUPPP can abate entirely during pregnancy. Fluticasone propionate 0.05 percent lotion, a class 5 (low-medium potency) corticosteroid, has a benign side effect profile and should be considered for the treatment of PUPPP during pregnancy.

  5. A case of scrotal swelling mimicking testicular torsion preceding Henoch-Schönlein vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Akgun, C

    2012-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is one of the most common types of multisystemic vasculitis seen in childhood. The major clinical manifestations are cutaneous purpura, arthritis, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and nephritis. Isolated central nervous system vasculitis, seizures, coma and hemorrhage, Guillan--Barré syndrome, ataxia and central and peripheral neuropathy, ocular involvement, orchitis, epididymitis or testicular torsion are medical or surgical complications. In this study, we report a 7-year-old boy with scrotal swelling mimicking testicular torsion with ultrasonographic and clinical findings that the typical clinical features of Henoch-Schönlein purpura including rashes and arthritis were developed after one week of surgery (Ref. 15).

  6. Management of Large-Vessel Vasculitis With FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Soussan, Michael; Nicolas, Patrick; Schramm, Catherine; Katsahian, Sandrine; Pop, Gabriel; Fain, Olivier; Mekinian, Arsene

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to clarify the role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the management of large-vessel vasculitis (LVV), focusing on 3 issues which are as follows: describe and determine the different FDG-PET criteria for the diagnosis of vascular inflammation, the performance of FDG-PET for the diagnosis of large-vessel inflammation in giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients, and the performance of FDG-PET to evaluate the disease inflammatory activity in Takayasu arteritis (TA) patients. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE database were searched for articles that evaluated the value of FDG-PET in LVV, from January 2000 to December 2013. Inclusion criteria were American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA or TA, definition PET positivity threshold, and >4 cases included. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of FDG-PET for the diagnosis of large-vessel inflammation were calculated from each included individual study, and then pooled for meta-analysis with a random-effects model. Twenty-one studies (413 patients, 299 controls) were included in the systematic review. FDG-PET showed FDG vascular uptake in 70% (288/413) of patients and 7% (22/299) of controls. Only vascular uptake equal to or higher than the liver uptake was significantly different between GCA/TA patients and controls (P < 0.001). The meta-analysis of GCA patients (4 studies, 57 patients) shows that FDG-PET has high Se and Sp for the diagnosis of large-vessel inflammation in GCA patients in comparison to controls, with a pooled Se at 90% (95% confidence interval [CI], 79%–93%) and a pooled Sp at 98% (95% CI, 94%–99%). The meta-analysis of TA patients (7 studies, 191 patients) shows that FDG-PET has a pooled Se at 87% (95% CI, 78%–93%) and Sp at 73% (95% CI, 63%–81%) for the assessment of disease activity in TA, with up to 84% Sp, with studies using National Institutes of Health criteria as the disease activity assessment scale. FDG-PET showed good

  7. Propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced vasculitis associated with antineutrophil antibody against myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA).

    PubMed

    Nakamori, Yoshitaka; Tominaga, Takayuki; Inoue, Yasushi; Shinohara, Kenji

    2003-06-01

    A 54-year-old woman had been administered propylthiouracil (PTU) for Graves' disease for 4 years. Recently, she complained of hemoptysis due to pulmonary alveolar hemorrhage causing anemia, and also had microhematuria. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody against myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA) was positive, and she was diagnosed with PTU-induced vasculitis. Cessation of PTU and the administration of corticosteroids ameliorated these manifestations.

  8. Rapid Growth of Lung Nodules due to Combined Pulmonary Vasculitis, Silicoanthracosis, and Chondrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Distler, Oliver; Kolios, Antonios G. A.; Weder, Walter; Franzen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Silicoanthracosis is a pneumoconiosis due to occupational inhalation of silica and carbon dusts. Clinically, it can be associated with vasculitis or rheumatoid arthritis. In association with these diseases, silicoanthracosis can present within the lung with multiple pulmonary nodules which, as a differential diagnosis, can mimic metastatic disease or multiple abscesses. Case Presentation. We present the case of a 62-year old former pit worker with pulmonary nodules, chondrocalcinosis due to calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD), and a history of renal cancer. Within a short period of time, pulmonary nodules grew rapidly. Thoracoscopically, the resected lung specimen revealed silicoanthracosis associated with small-to-medium-size vasculitis in the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmatic autoantibodies (c-ANCA). Conclusion. Pulmonary silicoanthracotic lesions on the base of ANCA-associated vasculitis and CPPD arthritis can rapidly grow. A mutual correlation between silicoanthracosis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and CPPD seems possible. Apart from this, consideration of metastatic disease should be obligatory in patients with a history of cancer at the same time being immunosuppressed. PMID:27478398

  9. Rapid Growth of Lung Nodules due to Combined Pulmonary Vasculitis, Silicoanthracosis, and Chondrocalcinosis.

    PubMed

    Jungraithmayr, Wolfgang; Tzafos, Stefanos; Distler, Oliver; Kolios, Antonios G A; Weder, Walter; Franzen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Silicoanthracosis is a pneumoconiosis due to occupational inhalation of silica and carbon dusts. Clinically, it can be associated with vasculitis or rheumatoid arthritis. In association with these diseases, silicoanthracosis can present within the lung with multiple pulmonary nodules which, as a differential diagnosis, can mimic metastatic disease or multiple abscesses. Case Presentation. We present the case of a 62-year old former pit worker with pulmonary nodules, chondrocalcinosis due to calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD), and a history of renal cancer. Within a short period of time, pulmonary nodules grew rapidly. Thoracoscopically, the resected lung specimen revealed silicoanthracosis associated with small-to-medium-size vasculitis in the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmatic autoantibodies (c-ANCA). Conclusion. Pulmonary silicoanthracotic lesions on the base of ANCA-associated vasculitis and CPPD arthritis can rapidly grow. A mutual correlation between silicoanthracosis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and CPPD seems possible. Apart from this, consideration of metastatic disease should be obligatory in patients with a history of cancer at the same time being immunosuppressed. PMID:27478398

  10. Necrotizing Lymphocytic Vasculitis Limited to the Peripheral Nerves: Report of Six Cases and Review

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, José Félix; Rondón, Federico; Matteson, Eric L.; Colegial, Carlos H.; Quintana, Gerardo; Iglesias-Gamarra, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background. The systemic vasculitides are syndromes characterized by inflammation and injury (necrosis or thrombosis) of blood vessels, resulting in clinical manifestations according to the affected vascular bed, but not classically in stocking-glove neuropathy. Objective. To describe a form of primary vasculitis affecting strictly peripheral nerves manifesting as stocking-glove neuropathy. Methods. Case series of 110 patients seen in three centers in Bogotá who presented with symptoms and signs of polyneuropathy and/or were identified with vasculitis affecting only the peripheral nerves, and who underwent sural nerve biopsy. Results. Six patients had a vasculitis affecting only the peripheral nerves diagnosed on sural nerve biopsy which demonstrated a mixed infiltrate of monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes especially in the small epineurial blood vessels. Over time, all had worsening of symptoms, with grip weakness and motor deficits in the hand and feet. Serologies and acute phase reactants were normal in all patients. Treatment response to immunosuppression was satisfactory in 5 patients; 1 patient had progressive neurologic damage. Conclusions. There is a distinct form of primary vasculitis of the peripheral nervous system characterized by distal sensory polyneuropathy with stocking-glove distribution with good prognosis, few and minor relapses and good response to treatment even after delayed diagnosis. PMID:20204175

  11. Epitope specificity determines pathogenicity and detectability in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3) are detectable in >90% of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCA titers do not correlate well with disease activity. In vivo and in vi...

  12. Hypernephroma Presenting with Cutaneous Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis and Lupus Anticoagulant: Resolution after Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P.; Ruíz, Amparo; Reyes, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Hypernephroma can present as a variety of paraneoplastic, nonmetastatic conditions, including vasculitis, and rarely a lupus-type anticoagulant. Nephrectomy leads to the resolution of the systemic complaints. Malignancy, in this case hypernephroma, can present as an immune-mediated paraneoplastic syndrome which resolves after removal of the underlying tumor. PMID:22919534

  13. Hydralazine-induced ANCA vasculitis with pulmonary renal syndrome: a rare clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Marina, Vamsee Priya; Malhotra, Deepak; Kaw, Dinkar

    2012-12-01

    Hydralazine is a commonly used drug for treatment of hypertension and is known to cause drug-induced lupus erythematosus. It has rarely been reported to cause anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positive vasculitis, a life-threatening complication. Presentation could be extremely variable delaying diagnosis. Although drug-induced vasculitis has been infrequently associated with rapidly progressing glomerulonephritis, pulmonary involvement presenting as pulmonary renal syndrome is extremely rare. We report a case of hydralazine-induced vasculitis presenting as pulmonary renal syndrome with fatal outcome even after aggressive treatment. Numerous antibodies are associated with hydralazine including anti myeloperoxidase antibody, anti-nuclear antibody, anti-histone antibody, and anti-elastase antibody. Additionally, we also report the presence of anti-phospholipid antibodies specific to anti-cardiolipin, anti-beta2 glycoprotein, and anti-phosphatid that have not been previously reported. We conclude that early diagnosis and prompt discontinuation of the drug is necessary for the treatment of hydralazine-induced anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis.

  14. The diagnostic value of perivascular infiltrates in muscle biopsy specimens for the assessment of rheumatoid vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Voskuyl, A.; van Duinen, S. G; Zwinderman, A.; Breedveld, F.; Hazes, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the diagnostic value of perivascular infiltrates (PVI) in randomly obtained muscle biopsy specimens for the assessment of rheumatoid vasculitis (RV).
METHODS—The number and size of PVIs, defined as the presence of mononuclear or polymorphonuclear cells around ⩾ 50% of the circumference of a vessel wall, as well as the presence of fibrinoid necrosis were determined in frozen sections of muscle samples of RV patients with histologically confirmed vasculitis in fixed muscle tissue (n=12). The findings were compared with those observed in frozen sections of muscle biopsy specimens of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not suspected of vasculitis (n=14) and patients with osteoarthritis (OA) (n=11). The presence of PVIs and of fibrinoid necrosis were sought in four frozen sections of the muscle biopsy specimen.
RESULTS—PVIs were observed in 75% of the RV patients, which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the frequency found in RA (14%) or OA (18%) patients. PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers were found in 67% of the RV patients and in none of the RA and OA patients (p < 0.05). Fibrinoid necrosis was found in least one of four frozen section in 33% of the RV patients. There was a good intra-observer and inter-observer concordance on the presence of fibrinoid necrosis and of PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers.
CONCLUSIONS—The assessment of PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers in a muscle biopsy specimen is a specific and reliable test in discriminating RV from RA without vasculitis. The demonstration in muscle of PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers is more sensitive than that of fibrinoid necrosis in the diagnosis of RV.

 Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis; vasculitis; diagnosis; histology; perivascular infiltrates PMID:9613342

  15. Fiber optic LDF to monitor vascular dynamics of urticarial dermographism in pressure-tested patients before and after treatment with antihistamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikje, Natalja Skrebova; Arase, Seiji

    2008-02-01

    The local microcirculatory dynamics underlying phenomenon of urticarial dermographism (UD) are not yet sufficiently elucidated in dermatological patients. A fiber optic laser Doppler flowmeter (LDF) was used to monitor skin blood flow (SBF) changes on the back of the patients with UD before and after application of the series of pressure stimuli (9.8×10 4, 14.7×10 4, 19.6×10 4 and 24.5×10 4 Pa). All patients acted as self-controls to assess their disease activity by means of SBF values based on response to pressure stimuli before and after treatment with antihistamines, when compared to baseline SBF. Throughout 30 minutes evaluation inter-subject SBF values at pressure-tested sites were noticeably distinguished as high, moderate and low. By LDF we could differentiate the highest development of vascular dynamics after 5 minutes, coming back to normal within about 30 minutes in one group of patients, and the vascular dynamics reaching its maximum in 15 minutes, but with no fade after 30 minutes, in another group of patients. All treatment regimens in both groups of patients by LDF produced a measurable reduction already during 1-2 days of therapy, accompanied by a reduction in SBF baseline values in patients with severe and moderate symptoms of UD.

  16. B-cell-targeted therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus and ANCA-associated vasculitis: current progress.

    PubMed

    Md Yusof, Md Yuzaiful; Vital, Edward M J; Emery, Paul

    2013-08-01

    B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. There are various strategies for targeting B cells including depletion, inhibition of survival factors, activation and inhibition of co-stimulatory molecules. Controlled trials in systemic lupus erythematosus have shown positive results for belimumab, promising results for epratuzumab and negative results for rituximab. The failure of rituximab in controlled trials has been attributed to trial design, sample size and outcome measures rather than true inefficacy. In anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, rituximab is effective for remission induction and in relapsing disease. However, the optimal long-term re-treatment strategy remains to be determined. Over the next 5 years, evidence will be available regarding the clinical efficacy of these novel therapies, biomarkers and their long-term safety.

  17. Cutaneous Necrotizing Vasculitis and Leukopenia in a Cocaine User: Is Levamisole the Culprit?

    PubMed Central

    Zeineddine, Nabil; Felix, Richard; Goldstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole is an antihelminthic drug banned by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 because of its dangerous side effects. Over the past few years, it has been identified as an adulterant in cocaine and reported to cause cutaneous vasculitis in cocaine users. The health burden of levamisole is serious since it is estimated that over 5 million Americans use cocaine and that 70% of the cocaine used in the USA contains levamisole. In this paper we report the case of a 23-year-old female cocaine user that presented with purpuric rash and skin necrosis, found to have positive c-ANCA and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Her skin biopsy showed fibroconnective tissue with signs of necrosis, acute and chronic inflammation, and thrombus formation. She was diagnosed with levamisole-induced vasculitis and successfully treated with withdrawal of cocaine use and local wound care. PMID:27579207

  18. Systemic vasculitis and aneurysm formation in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCluggage, W G; Armstrong, D J; Maxwell, R J; Ellis, P K; McCluskey, D R

    1999-05-01

    A 24 year old male who suffered from the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome developed intra-abdominal bleeding on two occasions. Radiological investigations showed aneurysmal dilatation of branches of the hepatic and superior mesenteric arteries. The second abdominal bleed necessitated laparotomy and the bleeding was localised to the kidneys. Right nephrectomy was performed and histological examination showed a necrotising vasculitis, mainly involving medium and small sized renal blood vessels. Steroids, immunosuppressive treatment, and control of blood pressure resulted in resolution of the vasculitic process and prevented further haemorrhage. Vasculitis and aneurysm formation are rarely described complications of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and may account for the life threatening haemorrhage which occurs in this condition.

  19. Rituximab versus cyclophosphamide for ANCA-associated vasculitis with renal involvement.

    PubMed

    Geetha, Duvuru; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H; Merkel, Peter A; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Langford, Carol A; Hoffman, Gary S; Kallenberg, Cees G M; St Clair, E William; Fessler, Barri J; Ding, Linna; Tchao, Nadia K; Ikle, David; Jepson, Brett; Brunetta, Paul; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2015-04-01

    Rituximab (RTX) is non-inferior to cyclophosphamide (CYC) followed by azathioprine (AZA) for remission-induction in severe ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV), but renal outcomes are unknown. This is a post hoc analysis of patients enrolled in the Rituximab for ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (RAVE) Trial who had renal involvement (biopsy proven pauci-immune GN, red blood cell casts in the urine, and/or a rise in serum creatinine concentration attributed to vasculitis). Remission-induction regimens were RTX at 375 mg/m(2) × 4 or CYC at 2 mg/kg/d. CYC was replaced by AZA (2 mg/kg/d) after 3-6 months. Both groups received glucocorticoids. Complete remission (CR) was defined as Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score/Wegener's Granulomatosis (BVAS/WG)=0 off prednisone. Fifty-two percent (102 of 197) of the patients had renal involvement at entry. Of these patients, 51 were randomized to RTX, and 51 to CYC/AZA. Mean eGFR was lower in the RTX group (41 versus 50 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); P=0.05); 61% and 75% of patients treated with RTX and 63% and 76% of patients treated with CYC/AZA achieved CR by 6 and 18 months, respectively. No differences in remission rates or increases in eGFR at 18 months were evident when analysis was stratified by ANCA type, AAV diagnosis (granulomatosis with polyangiitis versus microscopic polyangiitis), or new diagnosis (versus relapsing disease) at entry. There were no differences between treatment groups in relapses at 6, 12, or 18 months. No differences in adverse events were observed. In conclusion, patients with AAV and renal involvement respond similarly to remission induction with RTX plus glucocorticoids or CYC plus glucocorticoids.

  20. Glomerular C3d as a novel prognostic marker for renal vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Villacorta, Javier; Diaz-Crespo, Francisco; Acevedo, Mercedes; Guerrero, Carmen; Campos-Martin, Yolanda; García-Díaz, Eugenio; Mollejo, Manuela; Fernandez-Juarez, Gema

    2016-10-01

    Pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis is the histologic substrate of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. Several studies in animal models have demonstrated the crucial role of complement activation in the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis, but only small series have analyzed the prognostic implications of complement glomerular deposits. This study aimed to assess the clinical and prognostic implications of C3d- and C4d-positive glomerular staining in renal vasculitis. Eighty-five patients with a diagnosis of pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis were included in the study. C3d and C4d were analyzed by immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal antibody. The primary predictors were glomerular C3d- and C4d-positive staining. The primary end point was the cumulative percentage of patients who developed end-stage renal disease. Glomerular staining for C3d and C4d was observed in 42 (49.4%) of 85 biopsies and 38 (44.7%) of 85 biopsies, respectively. C3d-positive staining was associated with the severity of renal impairment and with a lower response rate to treatment (P=.003 and P=.04, respectively). Renal survival at 2 and 5 years was 60.9% and 51.8% in C3d-positive patients compared with 87.7% and 78.9% in C3d-negative patients (P=.04). C4d-positive staining did not show any impact in renal outcome. When adjusted by renal function and other histologic parameters, C3d staining remained as an independent predictor for renal survival (hazard ratio, 2.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.7; P=.03). Therefore, this study demonstrates that C3d-positive glomerular staining is an independent risk factor for the development of end-stage renal disease in ANCA-associated renal vasculitis.

  1. Isolated periostitis as a manifestation of systemic vasculitis in a child: imaging features.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    2010-12-01

    We report a case of isolated periostitis associated with Takayasu arteritis in a 10-year-old boy presenting with calf pain. Radiographs revealed a localized, thick periosteal reaction with irregular margin in the proximal left fibula. MRI revealed irregular thickening with enhancement of the periosteum in the proximal fibula and heterogeneous enhancement along vascular bundles in the calf. Isolated periostitis is a rare skeletal manifestation of systemic vasculitis that could be misdiagnosed as neoplastic or traumatic periosteal reaction.

  2. Bioinspired engineering study of Plantae vascules for self-healing composite structures

    PubMed Central

    Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first conceptual study into creating a Plantae-inspired vascular network within a fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminate, which provides an ongoing self-healing functionality without incurring a mass penalty. Through the application of a ‘lost-wax’ technique, orthogonal hollow vascules, inspired by the ‘ray cell’ structures found in ring porous hardwoods, were successfully introduced within a carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy polymer composite laminate. The influence on fibre architecture and mechanical behaviour of single vascules (located on the laminate centreline) when aligned parallel and transverse to the local host ply was characterized experimentally using a compression-after-impact test methodology. Ultrasonic C-scanning and high-resolution micro-CT X-ray was undertaken to identify the influence of and interaction between the internal vasculature and impact damage. The results clearly show that damage morphology is influenced by vascule orientation and that a 10 J low-velocity impact damage event is sufficient to breach the vasculature; a prerequisite for any subsequent self-healing function. The residual compressive strength after a 10 J impact was found to be dependent upon vascule orientation. In general, residual compressive strength decreased to 70 per cent of undamaged strength when vasculature was aligned parallel to the local host ply and a value of 63 per cent when aligned transverse. This bioinspired engineering study has illustrated the potential that a vasculature concept has to offer in terms of providing a self-healing function with minimum mass penalty, without initiating premature failure within a composite structure. PMID:19955122

  3. Isoniazid Induced Cutaneous Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis in Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis (Pott’s Spine): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    V, Dharma Rao; Rampure, Dilip; S, Rama Rao

    2014-01-01

    Anti-tuberculosis drugs frequently result in cutaneous adverse reactions but Isoniazid is known to have least toxic potential for cutaneous reactions. We report a rare case of Isoniazid induced cutaneous leucocytoclastic vasculitis. A 64-year-old male was diagnosed to have Pott’s spine with multiple vertebral body involvement (D8-12 vertebrae). Subsequently, he was treated with first line anti-TB drugs i.e., Isoniazid, Rifampicin, Pyrazinamide and Ethambutol. On the fourth day of treatment with Anti Tuberculosis Treatment (ATT), the patient developed an erythematosus rash over right upper limb not associated with itching or pain, non-blanchable macules and papules over bilateral shins on lower limbs, petechiae on both forearms and hyper pigmented, scaly rash over right axilla and buttocks. The skin biopsy report was consistent with cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Although rare, Isoniazid among anti-tuberculosis drugs should be considered as potential cause of drug-induced cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis in the differential diagnosis of erythematosus rash with petechiae. PMID:25302231

  4. Histopathological Characteristics of Post-inflamed Coronary Arteries in Kawasaki Disease-like Vasculitis of Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Maiko; Tanaka, Hideo; Nakamura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2016-02-27

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis in infants that develops predominantly in the coronary arteries. Despite the clinically transient nature of active inflammation in childhood albeit rare complications (e.g., coronary artery aneurysm), KD has recently been suggested to increase the incidence of ischemic heart diseases in young adulthood. However, little is known about the histopathology of the coronary artery long after development of the acute KD vasculitis. To address this, we conducted histological studies of rabbit coronary arteries in adolescent phase after induction of the KD-like vasculitis induced by horse serum administration. After a transmural infiltration of inflammatory cells in acute phase at day 7, the artery exhibited a gradual decrease in the number of inflammatory cells and thickening of the intima during the chronic phase up to day 90, where proteoglycans were distinctly accumulated in the intima with abundant involvement of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells, most of which accompanied expression of VCAM-1 and NF-κB. Distinct from classical atherosclerosis, inflammatory cells, e.g., macrophages, were barely detected during the chronic phase. These observations indicate that the KD-like coronary arteritis is followed by intimal thickening via accumulation of proteoglycans and proliferation of α-SMA-positive cells, reflecting aberrant coronary artery remodeling. PMID:27006519

  5. [Pulmonary Nocardiosis due to Nocardia asiatica in a Patient with ANCA-associated Vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Suemori, Koichiro; Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Murakami, Shinobu; Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Ishizaki, Jun; Matsumoto, Takuya; Murakami, Yuichi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2015-07-01

    Nocardia asiatica is a rare causative organism responsible for opportunistic infection, and was first reported by Kageyama et al. in 2004. We report herein on a very rare case of N. asiatica infection in a 76-year old male patient with ANCA-associated vasculitis and a history of pulmonary tuberculosis. The patient developed pulmonary nocardiosis due to N. asiatica while receiving glucocorticoid therapy. Chest computed tomography demonstrated multiple granules and cavity formation mainly in the left lower lobe. From the images, we suspected opportunistic infection, possibly pulmonary tuberculosis or pulmonary damage due to ANCA-associated vasculitis. Nocardia sp. was detected from a bronchoalveolar lavage culture and N. asiatica was identified by 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequencing. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed no abnormality. Administration of Doripenem (1.5g/day) and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (4g/day) was started, and the patient's clinical and imaging findings promptly improved. Thereafter, he received sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (2g/day) and prednisolone (10 mg/day) as maintenance therapy for ANCA-associated vasculitis for more than one year, and there has since been no recurrence of the Nocardia infection. PMID:26554223

  6. EULAR/ERA-EDTA recommendations for the management of ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yates, M; Watts, R A; Bajema, I M; Cid, M C; Crestani, B; Hauser, T; Hellmich, B; Holle, J U; Laudien, M; Little, M A; Luqmani, R A; Mahr, A; Merkel, P A; Mills, J; Mooney, J; Segelmark, M; Tesar, V; Westman, K; Vaglio, A; Yalçındağ, N; Jayne, D R; Mukhtyar, C

    2016-09-01

    In this article, the 2009 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) have been updated. The 2009 recommendations were on the management of primary small and medium vessel vasculitis. The 2015 update has been developed by an international task force representing EULAR, the European Renal Association and the European Vasculitis Society (EUVAS). The recommendations are based upon evidence from systematic literature reviews, as well as expert opinion where appropriate. The evidence presented was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus-finding and voting process. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were derived and levels of agreement (strengths of recommendations) determined. In addition to the voting by the task force members, the relevance of the recommendations was assessed by an online voting survey among members of EUVAS. Fifteen recommendations were developed, covering general aspects, such as attaining remission and the need for shared decision making between clinicians and patients. More specific items relate to starting immunosuppressive therapy in combination with glucocorticoids to induce remission, followed by a period of remission maintenance; for remission induction in life-threatening or organ-threatening AAV, cyclophosphamide and rituximab are considered to have similar efficacy; plasma exchange which is recommended, where licensed, in the setting of rapidly progressive renal failure or severe diffuse pulmonary haemorrhage. These recommendations are intended for use by healthcare professionals, doctors in specialist training, medical students, pharmaceutical industries and drug regulatory organisations. PMID:27338776

  7. Possibly propylthiouracil-induced antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis manifested as blood coagulation disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yao; Li, Qi-Fu; Li, Rong; Yang, Shu-Min; Zhou, Guo-Qing; Wang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Propylthiouracil is the most common drug used to treat hyperthyroidism. However, this drug could cause a severe disease, antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV), which was usually misdiagnosed. Methods: We reported a 60-year-old woman of propylthiouracil-induced AAV manifested as blood coagulation disorders. The patient was admitted because of hyperthyroidism and leukopenia. At the time of hospitalization, she suffered from dry cough, erythema and knee joints ache, and gradually became febrile. And then BP decreased and PLT was reduced with coagulation disorders. ANCA: c-ANCA positive (1:100), p-ANCA positive (1:320), MPO-IgG positive, PR3-IgG positive, GBM-IgG negative. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein increased markedly. Chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) showed that scattered spots, patch and ground-glass opacity. Results: Finally, we made a terminal diagnosis of PTU-induced AAV possibly. After drug withdrawal and use of steroid, the patient recovered well and then accepted RAI therapy. As the patient was given imipenem-cilastatin before the reduction of PLT and coagulation disorders, we considered that the hematologic disorders might be caused by antibiotics or a clinical presentation of the vasculitis itself. Conclusion: Drug-induced vasculitis is relatively good prognosis, but early diagnosis and timely withdrawal of associated drugs are the key to the treatment. PMID:27741122

  8. Immunomodulation with eicosapentaenoic acid supports the treatment of autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirahashi, Junichi; Kawahata, Kimito; Arita, Makoto; Iwamoto, Ryo; Hishikawa, Keiichi; Honda, Mie; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Mototsugu; Okubo, Koshu; Kurosawa, Miho; Takase, Osamu; Nakakuki, Masanori; Saiga, Kan; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kawachi, Shoji; Tojo, Akihiro; Seki, George; Marumo, Takeshi; Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Fujita, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Small-vessel vasculitis is a life-threatening autoimmune disease that is frequently associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs). Conventional immunotherapy including steroids and cyclophosphamide can cause serious adverse events, limiting the efficacy and safety of treatment. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a key component of fish oil, is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid widely known to be cardioprotective and beneficial for vascular function. We report two elderly patients with systemic ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) in whom the administration of EPA in concert with steroids safely induced and maintained remission, without the use of additioal immunosuppressants. To explore the mechanisms by which EPA enhances the treatment of AAV, we employed SCG/Kj mice as a spontaneous murine model of AAV. Dietary enrichment with EPA significantly delayed the onset of crescentic glomerulonephritis and prolonged the overall survival. EPA-derived anti-inflammatory lipid mediators and their precursors were present in the kidney, plasma, spleen, and lungs in the EPA-treated mice. Furthermore, a decrease in ANCA production and CD4/CD8-double negative T cells, and an increase in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the lymph nodes of the kidney were observed in the EPA-treated mice. These clinical and experimental observations suggest that EPA can safely support and augment conventional therapy for treating autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis. PMID:25230773

  9. Cutaneous lymphocytic vasculitis: a definition, a review, and a proposed classification.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J A; Mihm, M C; LeBoit, P E

    1996-02-01

    Lymphocytic vasculitis is not widely accepted as a pathologic mechanism by dermatopathologists, and a comprehensive list of its causes cannot be found in the literature. This state of affairs stems largely from the lack of a rigorous definition. In this report, the authors review past efforts at coming to terms with lymphocytic vasculitis and why those efforts have fallen short. The authors propose that lymphocytic vasculitis can be separated from the ubiquitous perivascular dermatitides in routinely processed specimens by requiring the presence of either acute or chronic damage to the walls of small vessels (eg, fibrin deposition, lamination by pericytes). In the case of muscular vessels, the presence of lymphocytes within the vessel walls is sufficient, because diapedesis of lymphocytes does not occur in arteries or veins. Although lymphocytic infiltrates meeting this definition are uncommon, there are a number of conditions, with both typical and atypical lymphocytes, in which damage to vessels occurs. The authors review these conditions, outline possible pathogenetic mechanisms, ranging from delayed hypersensitivity reactions directed against endothelial cells to direct infection of these cells, and present classifications based on morphological changes and pathogenesis respectively. PMID:8834516

  10. Overview of vasculitis and vasculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis--something to think about.

    PubMed

    Radic, Mislav; Martinovic Kaliterna, Dusanka; Radic, Josipa

    2013-07-01

    The vasculature plays a crucial role in inflammation and atherosclerosis associated with the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis is associated with longstanding disease, has an important impact on a patient's quality of life and influences patient life expectancy. Seropositivity, specific human leukocyte antigen variations, antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides, and cigarette smoking are among the genetic and environmental predictors of rheumatoid vasculitis. Atherosclerosis is an early and common finding in rheumatoid arthritis and it correlates with disease duration, activity, and severity. Apart from conventional risk factors such as cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis-related risk factors including disease duration, severity and activity, rheumatoid factor and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides status, functional impairment, C-reactive protein, radiographic changes, presence of the shared epitope, and treatment modalities are all implicated in the development of accelerated atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is also considered an inflammatory disease; thus, it may share common pathogenic mechanisms with rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Advances in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with disease-modifying biologic and nonbiologic agents will probably continue to reduce the incidence of vasculitis. Since the goal of treatment for rheumatoid arthritis is to decrease inflammatory burden, successful treatment may theoretically reduce the risk of accelerated atherosclerosis.

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus associated with ANCA-associated vasculitis: an overlapping syndrome?

    PubMed

    Hervier, B; Hamidou, M; Haroche, J; Durant, C; Mathian, A; Amoura, Z

    2012-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and small-sized vessel vasculitis are usually two distinguishable autoimmune diseases. However, a vasculitis may be found in the course SLE but rarely corresponds to an ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). We report four cases of de novo SLE associated with AAV, our aim being to discuss the clinical significance of this association. We included four patients fulfilling the criteria for both SLE and AAV and followed in two different university hospitals between 1996 and 2009. In light of a 20-year literature review (25 described clinical cases), we discussed the etiopathogeny of such an association. All patients presented a severe renal involvement (creatininemia ranging from 120 to 370 μmol/l) and thrombopenia (ranging from 45,000 to 137,000 platelets/mm(3)). The other main clinical symptoms were arthritis (n = 3), serositis (n = 2) and intra-alveolar hemorrhage (n = 2). An inflammatory syndrome was noticed at diagnosis in all cases. ANCAs were MPO-ANCAs in all cases. Two out of these four patients were also diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome. The frequency of this association seems not fortuitous. Although the etiopathogenic mechanisms of such an association remain to be more precisely described, several clinical, histological and immunological features support the hypothesis of the existence of a SLE-AAV overlapping syndrome. Moreover, clinicians must be aware of such an overlapping syndrome, notably because its initial presentation can be very severe.

  12. Percutaneous Management of Occlusive Arterial Disease Associated with Vasculitis: A Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Both, M.; Jahnke, T.; Reinhold-Keller, E.; Reuter, M.; Grimm, J.; Biederer, J.; Brossmann, J.; Gross, W.L.; Heller, M.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, S.

    2003-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for occlusive arterial disease associated with vasculitis. Eleven patients(10 women, 1 man; ages 35-82 years) with the diagnosis of vasculitis of the large vessels underwent interventional treatment during intraarterial angiography. The causes included giant cell arteritis(n = 8) and Takayasu arteritis (n = 3).Thirty-three occlusive lesions (including brachiocephalic and renalarteries, and arteries of upper and lower extremities) were treated with balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement. Follow-up included clinical examination, angiography, and color duplex ultrasound.Technical success was 100% (25/25) for stenoses and 50% (4/8) for occlusive lesions, representing all lesions combined from different anatomic locations. Dissection (n = 3) and arterial rupture with retroperitoneal hematoma (n = 1) was found in three patients. During follow-up (mean 12 months), restenoses(n = 8) and re-restenoses (n = 1)occurred in 8 vascular areas. Three of these lesions were treated with repeated PTA (n = 4). The cumulative primary clinical success rate was 67.6%, cumulative secondary success rate 74.4%, and cumulative tertiary success rate 75.9%. Interventional therapy in systemic vasculitis provides promising results in technical success rates and followup. Angioplasty may result in arterial injury, but the rate of complications is low.

  13. Progressive outer retinal necrosis associated with occlusive vasculitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chien-Chi; Chen, San-Ni; Hwang, Jiunn-Feng; Lin, Chun-Ju; Chen, Huan-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    A 45-year-old man, a case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, received a highly active antiretroviral therapy at the outpatient service for 4 years without regular follow-up. He experienced progressively blurred vision for 6 months and a cutaneous zoster on his back 3 months ago. He was diagnosed with progressive outer retinal necrosis by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism using an aqueous humor sample, which revealed an existence of varicella zoster virus. He was given a combination of systemic, intravitreal antiviral and a highly active antiretroviral therapy. Occlusive vasculitis, an unusual finding for progressive outer retinal necrosis, developed in both eyes 1 week after the secondary intravitreal injection. Unfortunately, his vision deteriorated to no light perception in both eyes within 2 weeks. Progressive outer retinal necrosis is characterized clinically as showing minimal or no inflammation in the aqueous and vitreous humors, absence of retinal vasculitis, and patches of yellowish spots located deep in the retina. Physicians should pay attention to this rare case of progressive outer retinal necrosis associated occlusive vasculitis with very poor prognosis in spite of aggressive treatment.

  14. Granulomatous vasculitis in Crohn's disease: a clinicopathologic correlate of two unusual cases.

    PubMed

    Burns, Ariel M; Walsh, Noreen; Green, Peter J

    2010-10-01

    Cutaneous complications occur not uncommonly in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Gastrointestinal CD often shows non-caseating granulomas and a rare cutaneous finding in CD is a sterile granulomatous infiltrate not contiguous with the GI tract, termed extraintestinal CD (ECD). The clinical presentation of ECD is diverse. The most common histopathological presentation is a superficial and deep granulomatous infiltrate that often accompanies a mixed perivascular infiltrate. Here we report two patients with CD and skin lesions characterized on microscopy by granulomatous vasculitis. A 29-year-old female presented with papules and ulcerated nodules above the ankle. The biopsy showed dermal and superficial subcutaneous involvement by a vasocentric infiltrate of mononuclear and multinucleated histiocytes as well as mural fibrin deposition. A 35-year-old male presented with two tender indurated erythematous plaques with punched-out centers on the lower leg. Histopathologically, a granulomatous vasculitis of small and medium-sized vessels in the dermis and subcutis was evident. These two cases represent the rarely described phenomenon of cutaneous granulomatous vasculitis in CD. Previously reported examples of this entity are reviewed.

  15. A novel immunopathological association of IgG4-RD and vasculitis with Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Hiroto; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Furuta, Hiroto; Nishi, Masahiro; Yoshimasu, Takashi; Nishikawa, Akinori; Nakanishi, Masanori; Tsuchihashi, Shigeki; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Murata, Shin-ichi; Inoue, Gen; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Summary A 73-year-old man with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) suffered from purpura on the lower legs. He was diagnosed with IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) with serum IgG4 elevation and dacryo-sialadenitis confirmed histologically. Serum Th2 and Treg cytokines, interleukin 7 (IL7), IL8 and Th2 chemokine levels were elevated, while skewed Th1 balance was seen in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Therefore, preferential Th1 balance in HT appeared to be followed by IgG4-RD characterized with Th2 and Treg polarization. The commencement of steroid therapy dramatically exacerbated clinical manifestations including IgG4-RD-associated HT. The measurement of cytokine and chemokine levels as well as FACS analysis in the development of IgG4-RD seemed to be beneficial. In conclusion, an innovative association of HT, IgG4-RD and vasculitis was observed. This report also offers novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for IgG4-RD. Learning points Recently, a subtype of HT has been considered to be a thyroid manifestation of IgG4-RD, although the etiology of IgG4-RD is not established yet. Immunologically a close association between HT and vasculitis was reported. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is a rare skin presentation of IgG4-RD. In the current case, during the course of HT, IgG4-RD and leukocytoclastic vasculitis occurred; thus, innate immunity and acquired immunity seem to be involved in the development of IgG4-RD. The measurement of cytokine and chemokines appeared to be beneficial in the development of IgG4-RD. Remarkably, effectiveness of steroid therapy for HT suggested presence of IgG4-RD-associated HT. Therefore, this report highlights the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD and proposes novel therapeutic mechanisms. Clinicians should pay attention to the development of IgG4-RD and vasculitis during long course of HT. PMID:26966543

  16. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide stimulates production of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in ANCA associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Plinio R; Jeffs, Lisa; Nitschke, Jodie; Patel, Mittal; Sarvestani, Ghafar; Cassidy, John; Hissaria, Pravin; Gillis, David; Au Peh, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Background Wegener's Granulomatosis and Microscopic Polyangiitis are life-threatening systemic necrotizing vasculitides of unknown aetiology. The appearance of circulating antibodies to neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens (ANCA) is strongly associated with the development of the disease. A link between infection and disease has long been suspected, and the appearance of ANCA antibodies has been reported following bacterial and viral infections. The depletion of circulating B cells with monoclonal antibody therapy can induce remission, and this observation suggests a pathogenic role for B cells in this disease. As bacterial DNA is known to induce B cell proliferation and antibody production via TLR-9 stimulation, we have explored the possibility that unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, as found in bacterial and viral DNA, may play a role in stimulating circulating autoreactive B cells to produce ANCA in patients with vasculitis. Results We have confirmed that unmethylated CpG oligonucleotide is a potent stimulator of antibody production by PBMC in vitro. The stimulation of PBMC with CpG oligonucleutides resulted in the production of similar amounts of IgG in both ANCA+ patients and normal controls. In spite of this, PR3 ANCA+ patients synthesised significantly higher amount of IgG ANCA than normal controls. In MPO ANCA+ patients, there was a tendency for patients to produce higher amount of ANCA than controls, however, the difference did not reach significance. Furthermore, we were able to detect circulating MPO-reactive B cells by ELISpot assay from the peripheral blood of 2 MPO+ ANCA vasculitis patients. Together, this indicates that circulating anti-neutrophil autoreactive B cells are present in ANCA+ vasculitis patients, and they are capable of producing antibodies in response to CpG stimulation. Of note, CpG also induced the production of the relevant autoantibodies in patients with other types of autoimmune diseases. Conclusion Circulating ANCA autoreactive B

  17. [New aspects of MRI for diagnostics of large vessel vasculitis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Saam, T; Habs, M; Cyran, C C; Grimm, J; Pfefferkorn, T; Schüller, U; Reiser, M F; Nikolaou, K

    2010-10-01

    Vasculitis is a rare disease and clinical symptoms are often unspecific. Accurate and early diagnosis is mandatory in order to prevent complications, such as loss of vision or stroke. Imaging techniques can contribute to establishing a definite diagnosis and to evaluate disease activity and the extent of the disease in various vascular regions. Conventional imaging methods, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, as well as digital subtraction angiography allow the vessel lumen but not the vessel wall to be depicted. However, vasculitis is a disease which primarily affects the vessel wall, therefore conventional imaging modalities often fail to make a definite diagnosis. Recently black-blood high resolution MR in vivo imaging has been used to visualize cervical and intracranial vasculitis. This review article presents imaging protocols for intracranial and cervical black-blood MR imaging and clinical cases with large vessel vasculitis and vasculitis of the central nervous system. Furthermore the current literature, examples of the most common differential diagnoses of cervical and cranial arteriopathy and the potential of other imaging modalities, such as PET/CT and ultrasound will be discussed.

  18. [New aspects of MRI for diagnostics of large vessel vasculitis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Saam, T; Habs, M; Cyran, C C; Grimm, J; Pfefferkorn, T; Schüller, U; Reiser, M F; Nikolaou, K

    2010-10-01

    Vasculitis is a rare disease and clinical symptoms are often unspecific. Accurate and early diagnosis is mandatory in order to prevent complications, such as loss of vision or stroke. Imaging techniques can contribute to establishing a definite diagnosis and to evaluate disease activity and the extent of the disease in various vascular regions. Conventional imaging methods, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, as well as digital subtraction angiography allow the vessel lumen but not the vessel wall to be depicted. However, vasculitis is a disease which primarily affects the vessel wall, therefore conventional imaging modalities often fail to make a definite diagnosis. Recently black-blood high resolution MR in vivo imaging has been used to visualize cervical and intracranial vasculitis. This review article presents imaging protocols for intracranial and cervical black-blood MR imaging and clinical cases with large vessel vasculitis and vasculitis of the central nervous system. Furthermore the current literature, examples of the most common differential diagnoses of cervical and cranial arteriopathy and the potential of other imaging modalities, such as PET/CT and ultrasound will be discussed. PMID:20799025

  19. Histopathology of the Inner Ear in a Case With Recent Onset of Cogan's Syndrome: Evidence for Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Jung, David H; Nadol, Joseph B; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Merola, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    The association of sensorineural hearing loss and vertigo with inflammatory eye disease, usually interstitial keratitis, has been called Cogan's syndrome. The pathogenesis of Cogan's syndrome is unknown, but it has been assumed to be an immune mediated disorder with vasculitis. The histopathology of the inner ear in Cogan's syndrome has been described in 6 case reports. Although common pathologic findings in these reports include degeneration of the auditory and vestibular neuroepithelium, endolymphatic hydrops, fibrosis, and new bone formation, direct pathologic evidence of a vasculitis has not been published. A possible reason for this failure to identify vasculitis was a substantial delay (range, 4-40 years) between the onset of symptoms and examination of the otopathology. In the current case report, the patient had both auditory and vestibular symptoms and interstitial keratitis with a time delay of only 2 to 4 weeks between symptoms and death. Evidence of a vasculitis as a possible underlying etiology included H&E histopathology and anti-CD45 immunostaining of vessels both in the auditory and vestibular systems, supporting the hypothesis of a vasculitis as a mechanism in this disorder.

  20. Epitope Analysis of Anti-Myeloperoxidase Antibodies in Patients with ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Shen-Ju; Xu, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Objective Increasing evidences have suggested the pathogenic role of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) directing myeloperoxidase (MPO) in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). The current study aimed to analyze the association between the linear epitopes of MPO-ANCA and clinicopathological features of patients with AAV. Methods Six recombinant linear fragments, covering the whole length amino acid sequence of a single chain of MPO, were produced from E.coli. Sera from 77 patients with AAV were collected at presentation. 13 out of the 77 patients had co-existence of serum anti-GBM antibodies. Ten patients also had sequential sera during follow up. The epitope specificities were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the recombinant fragments as solid phase ligands. Results Sera from 45 of the 77 (58.4%) patients with AAV showed a positive reaction to one or more linear fragments of the MPO chain. The Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Scores and the sera creatinine were significantly higher in patients with positive binding to the light chain fragment than that in patients without the binding. The epitopes recognized by MPO-ANCA from patients with co-existence of serum anti-GBM antibodies were mainly located in the N-terminus of the heavy chain. In 5 out of the 6 patients, whose sera in relapse recognize linear fragments, the reactivity to linear fragments in relapse was similar to that of initial onset. Conclusion The epitope specificities of MPO-ANCA were associated with disease activity and some clinicopathological features in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:23577119

  1. The predictive value of kidney biopsy in renal vasculitis: a multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Crespo, Francisco; Villacorta, Javier; Acevedo, Mercedes; Cavero, Teresa; Guerrero, Carmen; García Díaz, Eugenio; Orradre, Juan Luis; Martinez, Miguel Angel; Praga, Manuel; Fernandez-Juarez, Gema

    2016-06-01

    The histopathologic classification of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis has been demonstrated to have prognostic value in small cohorts of patients with pauci-immune extracapillary glomerulonephritis. We aimed to validate this histologic subgrouping system in a large cohort of patients with renal vasculitis from 3 Spanish centers. The additional value of several histologic parameters for predicting renal outcome was investigated. A total of 151 biopsies of patients with renal vasculitis were reviewed and classified as follows: 41% crescentic, 24% mixed, 21% focal, and 14% sclerotic. The cumulative proportions of renal survival at 5 years were 83.2%, 81.2%, 60.5%, and 50.7% for the focal, mixed, crescentic, and sclerotic categories, respectively (P < .05). In the crescentic category, patients with less than 75% of glomeruli showing crescents had better survival at 1 and 5 years compared with those having greater than or equal to 75% of crescents (77.9% and 70.6% versus 51.3% and 45.6%; P = .02). When adjusted by renal function and other histologic parameters, the percentage of extracapillary proliferation and glomerulosclerosis remained as significant predictors for renal survival (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05; P = .001, and hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05; P = .002, respectively). In conclusion, patients with pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis experienced different outcomes depending on the percentage of crescents observed, so that extensive extracapillary proliferation was associated with the poorest renal survival. These findings validate the prognostic utility of the histologic classification scheme in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positive and negative patients and suggest a subdivision of crescentic category (<75% and ≥75% of crescents) based on the different survival rates observed among these subgroups.

  2. Dysregulation of Autoantigen Genes in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis Involves Alternative Transcripts and New Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    McInnis, Elizabeth A.; Badhwar, Anshul K.; Muthigi, Akhil; Lardinois, Olivier M.; Allred, S. Colby; Yang, Jiajin; Free, Meghan E.; Jennette, J. Charles; Preston, Gloria A.; Falk, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are two major autoantigens in patients with vasculitis with ANCA. The genes encoding these autoantigens are abnormally expressed in peripheral granulocytes of patients with active ANCA-associated vasculitis. This study provides evidence that this transcriptional dysregulation results in a variety of mRNA processing events from the PRTN3 gene locus. In addition to elevated levels of PR3 message, leukocyte RNA from patients contained PR3 transcripts with an alternative 3′ untranslated region. Furthermore, we detected usage of an alternative transcription start site within intron 1 of the PRTN3 gene locus that coincided with active disease (odds ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 8.4; P=0.01). This promoter may be developmentally regulated, because it was active in normal human bone marrow, multiple leukemia cell lines, MCF-7 cells, and subjects after GM-CSF treatment but not subjects with a neutrophil left shift. This transcript, which lacks exon 1 of PRTN3, encodes a 24-kD protein (p24PR3/MBN) with a sequence similar to that previously described for myeloblastin. Notably, PR3, p24PR3/MBN, and MPO were synthesized in cultured neutrophils from patients with active ANCA-associated vasculitis, indicating that increased transcription results in newly synthesized autoantigens in peripheral neutrophils of patients. The synthesis of p24PR3/MBN seems to expand the autoantigen repertoire, because immunoblots showed that sera from patients recognized p24PR3/MBN. These findings emphasize the importance of transcriptional dysregulation of the autoantigen in autoimmune disease. PMID:25060059

  3. Cocaine/levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis with retiform purpura and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Veronese, F.V.; Dode, R.S.O.; Friderichs, M.; Thomé, G.G.; da Silva, D.R.; Schaefer, P.G.; Sebben, V.C.; Nicolella, A.R.; Barros, E.J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine in recent years, emerging as a public health challenge worldwide. Levamisole-associated toxicity manifests clinically as a systemic vasculitis, consisting of cutaneous, hematological, and renal lesions, among others. Purpura retiform, cutaneous necrosis, intravascular thrombosis, neutropenia, and less commonly crescentic nephritis have been described in association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) and other autoantibodies. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old male who was a chronic cocaine user, and who presented spontaneous weight loss, arthralgia, and 3 weeks before admission purpuric skin lesions in the earlobes and in the anterior thighs. His laboratory tests on admission showed serum creatinine of 4.56 mg/dL, white blood count 3,800/μL, hemoglobin 7.3 g/dL, urinalysis with 51 white blood cells/μL and 960 red blood cells/μL, and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio 1.20. Serum ANCA testing was positive (>1:320), as well as serum anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Urine toxicology screen was positive for cocaine and levamisole, with 62.8% of cocaine, 32.2% of levamisole, and 5% of an unidentified substance. Skin and renal biopsies were diagnostic for leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, respectively. The patient showed a good clinical response to cocaine abstinence, and use of corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide. Last serum creatinine was 1.97 mg/dL, white blood cell count 7,420/μL, and hemoglobin level 10.8 g/dL. In levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis, the early institution of cocaine abstinence, concomitant with the use of immunosuppressive drugs in severe cases, may prevent permanent end organ damage and associate with better clinical outcomes. PMID:27119429

  4. Etiologies and prognostic factors of leukocytoclastic vasculitis with skin involvement: A retrospective study in 112 patients.

    PubMed

    Bouiller, Kévin; Audia, Sylvain; Devilliers, Hervé; Collet, Evelyne; Aubriot, Marie Hélène; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Berthier, Sabine; Bonniaud, Philippe; Chavanet, Pascal; Besancenot, Jean-François; Vabres, Pierre; Martin, Laurent; Samson, Maxime; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    In this study, outcomes of patients with leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) were analyzed focusing on clinical, histopathology and laboratory findings, relapses, and survival.Data from patients with cutaneous vasculitis diagnosed between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, at Dijon University Hospital (France) were retrospectively reviewed. LCV was defined as perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate, endothelial cell nuclear swelling, extravasation of red blood cells, and/or fibrin deposition in vessels. Patients were classified according to the 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conference. Relapses were defined as the recurrence of vasculitis symptoms after a period of remission >1 month. Time to relapse and/or death was calculated from the date of diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate (Cox model) analyses were performed.A total of 112 patients (57 males and 55 females), with a mean age of 60 ± 19 (18-98) years, were analyzed. Overall follow-up was 61 ± 38 months. At diagnosis, all patients had skin lesions, purpura being the most common (n = 83). Lesions were associated with systemic involvement in 55 (51%) patients. Only 41 (36.6%) patients received specific treatment: glucocorticoids in 29 of 41 (70.7%) and immunosuppressants in 9 of 41 (22%). Sixty-two patients (55%) had LCV due to underlying causes, 29 (25.9%) had single-organ cutaneous small vessel vasculitis (SoCSVV), and 21 (18.8%) had unclassifiable LCV. Twenty patients of the cohort (18%) experienced relapse, 14 ± 13 (1-40) months after the diagnosis of LCV. None of the 29 patients with SoCSVV relapsed. Independent risk factors for relapse were vascular thrombosis in the biopsy [hazard ratio (HR) = 4.9; P = 0.017], peripheral neuropathy (HR = 9.8; P = 0.001), hepatitis (HR = 3.1; P = 0.004), and positive antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA, HR = 5.9 P = 0.005). In contrast, SoCSVV was a protective factor for relapse (HR = 0.12; P = 0.043).The 1-, 3-, and 6-year overall survival rates were

  5. Studies of epitope restriction on myeloperoxidase (MPO), an important antigen in systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    SHORT, A K; LOCKWOOD, C M

    1997-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are important components of the inflammatory response in patients with systemic vasculitis. Their role in the pathogenesis of these conditions remains incompletely defined. Several antigens have been identified, and MPO is one of the most important. To gain more understanding of the immune mechanisms involved, we were keen to see if the antibody response to MPO was restricted, or whether there was a general loss of tolerance to the whole surface of the molecule. To study the epitopes we employed both ELISA and biosensor technology, and were able to demonstrate restriction both in the number and localization of the epitopes being recognized. PMID:9367412

  6. PTU-associated cutaneous vasculitis with ANCA anti-MPO and anti-PR3 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, E M G; Hartkamp, A; Kaasjager, H A H

    2003-09-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented at our clinic with symmetrical, tender, palpable purpuric lesions on her lower legs and buttocks after restarting PTU therapy for relapsing Graves' disease. PTU-induced vasculitis was diagnosed with remarkable ANCA anti-MPO and anti-PR3 antibody positivity. The purpuric skin lesions resolved immediately after discontinuation of the drug and the ANCA titres lowered. In the presence of activated neutrophils, PTU could induce a high cytotoxity and injure the vessel walls. Treatment of choice is discontinuation of the drug. Sometimes more aggressive therapy as cyclophosphamide or plasmapheresis is warranted.

  7. Severe meningeal fibrinoid vasculitis associated with Theileria taurotragi infection in two short-horned Zebu cattle.

    PubMed

    Biasibetti, Elena; Sferra, Chiara; Lynen, Godelieve; Di Giulio, Giuseppe; De Meneghi, Daniele; Tomassone, Laura; Valenza, Federico; Capucchio, Maria Teresa

    2016-08-01

    The Authors describe a severe vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis of the meningeal arteries observed in two brains of indigenous short-horn zebu (Bos indicus) cattle, with bovine cerebral theileriosis (BCT) caused by a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan, Theileria taurotragi, from Northern Tanzania. In the Author's opinion, the role of T. taurotragi infection in the angiocentric and angiodestructive detected features remains to be evaluated. A possible immunopathologic cancerous mechanism, secondary to the lymphoid deregulation, could be involved. This report suggests further studies to better characterize the lymphoid cell involvement in the pathogenesis of the meningeal vascular lesions by T. taurotragi. PMID:27145963

  8. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis presenting with bilateral renal vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Michael Gregory

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis presenting with bilateral renal vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli in a patient who also had a lupus anticoagulant and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Although the link between venous thrombosis and ANCA vasculitis is well established, the coexistence of renal vein thrombosis is unusual. Furthermore, despite the positive ANCA, he was initially negative for antibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase-3 (PR3), illustrating that a positive ANCA may be significant despite a negative test for antibodies to MPO and PR3. PMID:26069771

  9. Recurrence of ANCA-associated vasculitis in a patient with kidney trasplant.

    PubMed

    García Cosmes, Pedro; Fraile Gómez, Pilar; Lewczuk, Kamil; Rodríguez González, Marta; Ruiz Ferreras, Elena; Tabernero Fernández, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Renal disease secondary to vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) can lead to chronic renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy. In these patients, kidney transplantation offers excellent long-term rates of allograft and patient survival; consequently, they can be trasplanted when the clinical disease activity has remitted. However, the risk of disease relapses in the renal allograft remains, although at lower rates due to modern immunosuppressive regimens. We describe the case of a male patient with extracapillary glomerulonephritis type III C-ANCA (+) who developed a recurrence in the renal allograft 8 years after transplantation. Intensive immunosupression with plasmapheresis controlled the disease.

  10. Hemorrhagic Occlusive Retinal Vasculitis After First Eye Cataract Surgery Without Subsequent Second Eye Involvement.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Nicole; Savini, Giacomo; Barboni, Piero; Ducoli, Pietro; Ciardella, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    A case of monocular postoperative hemorrhagic occlusive retinal vasculitis (HORV) after uncomplicated bilateral cataract surgery is described. HORV is a severe syndrome that leads to painless visual loss after uncomplicated cataract surgery. The same surgical procedure was adopted in both eyes except for the use of intracameral vancomycin, which was injected only in the eye that developed HORV. Diffuse retinal ischemia with vascular sheathing and intraretinal hemorrhages were detected during the fourth postoperative day. Despite treatment, the patient developed severe neovascular glaucoma. This case supports the causative role of vancomycin in the pathogenesis of HORV and suggests avoiding it for chemoprophylaxis. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:764-766.]. PMID:27548454

  11. Complement C3 is expressed by mast cells in cutaneous vasculitis and is degraded by chymase.

    PubMed

    Lipitsä, Tiina; Naukkarinen, Anita; Laitala, Joel; Harvima, Ilkka T

    2016-10-01

    The complement factor C3 and chymase released from tryptase(+), chymase(+) mast cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. To study whether mast cells contain C3 in vasculitis and whether chymase interacts with C3, cryosections from vasculitis biopsies were double-stained histochemically for C3c in tryptase(+) mast cells, as well as for chymase and vessel wall C3c, or they were treated with 5 µg/ml rh-chymase for 24 h followed by immunofluorescence (IF) analysis of C3c, IgG, IgM and IgA. The effect of rh-chymase on purified human C3, C3a and IgG was studied using SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and LAD2 mast cell cultures. The results show that 34.2 ± 17.9, 37.4 ± 15.5 and 43.4 ± 18.6 % (mean ± SD) of the mast cells express C3c immunoreactivity in the healthy skin, initial petechial (IP) and palpable purpura (PP) lesions, respectively. About 9.4-12.1 % of the chymase(+) mast cells were in apparent contact with C3c(+) vessels in IP and PP. The treatment of cryosections with rh-chymase decreased the IF staining of C3c, but not that of immunoglobulins. In SDS-PAGE, 1-10 µg/ml rh-chymase degraded the alpha- and beta-chains of C3, but did not degrade IgG. Unexpectedly, the rh-chymase treatment of C3 produced fragments that resulted in the release of tryptase and histamine from LAD2 cells. However, rh-chymase degraded C3a and consequently inhibited C3a activity on LAD2. In conclusion, mast cells can be one source for C3 in the early and late phases of vasculitis pathogenesis. However, rh-chymase degraded native C3, vessel wall C3c, and biologically active C3a. Therefore, chymase may control C3-related pathology. PMID:27465068

  12. Possible implication of disordered neutrophil extracellular traps in the pathogenesis of MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Daigo; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2013-10-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are characterized by the presence of extracellular DNA fibers studded with antimicrobial proteins, including myeloperoxidase (MPO). Although NETs play an important role in the innate immune system, the scattered extracellular enzymes, such as MPO, pose risks to the host. Therefore, NETs are strictly regulated by DNase I in the serum, which prevents them from persisting. Recent studies have demonstrated that dysregulation of NETs could be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, we interpret the association of disordered NETs with autoimmune diseases, especially propylthiouracil-induced MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:23224024

  13. Retinal vasculitis and ocular vitreous metastasis following complete response to PD-1 inhibition in a patient with metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Manusow, Joshua S; Khoja, Leila; Pesin, Nataly; Joshua, Anthony M; Mandelcorn, Efrem D

    2014-01-01

    We report on a 36-year-old woman treated with the anti PD-1 antibody Pembrolizumab for metastatic cutaneous melanoma in the first line setting. She achieved a complete response and then relapsed with metastases to the vitreous cavity with an associated angiographically determined retinal vasculitis. Vitreous metastasis without choroidal involvement is unusual and may be due to individual cell extravasation, vitreous hemorrhage containing malignant cells, or direct spread through the optic nerve. This finding highlights the need for immune sanctuary sites to be monitored in the presence of PD-1 inhibition and we hypothesize that the use of PD-1 inhibitor potentiated the patient's angiographically determined retinal vasculitis. PMID:25516805

  14. Long-term efficacy and safety of tocilizumab in giant cell arteritis and large vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jobie; Steel, Lauren; Borg, Frances; Dasgupta, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a chronic systemic vasculitis affecting large-sized and medium-sized vessels. Glucocorticoids are currently the mainstay of treatment for GCA and associated large vessel vasculitis (LVV) but are associated with frequent adverse events. Methotrexate has only demonstrated a modest benefit while anti-TNF biological agents (infliximab and etanercept) have been inefficacious. Elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine, has been associated with GCA. Tocilizumab (TCZ), a humanised antihuman IL-6 receptor antibody, has been used successfully in several reports as a treatment for GCA and LVV. We report the potentially long-term successful use of TCZ in 8 cases of refractory LVV. All of our patients achieved a good clinical response to TCZ and C reactive protein reduced from an average of 70.3 to 2.5. In all cases, the glucocorticoid dose was reduced, from an average of 24.6 mg prednisolone prior to TCZ treatment to 4.7 mg, indicating that TCZ may enable a reduction in glucocorticoid-associated adverse events. However, regular TCZ administration was needed for disease control in most cases. TCZ was discontinued in one case due to the development of an empyema indicating the need for careful monitoring of infection when using this treatment. PMID:26819753

  15. A longitudinal study of clinical and immunological findings in 52 patients with relapsing retinal vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, M R; Graham, E; Kasp, E; Sanders, M D; Dumonde, D C

    1988-01-01

    Fifty-two patients with retinal vasculitis--26 with idiopathic disease and 26 with associated systemic inflammatory disease--were followed up for periods ranging from six months to 12 years. The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between relapse of uveitis, visual outcome, and the occurrence of circulating immune complexes (CIC) and antiretinal antibodies. In a total of 69 relapses, CIC were increased in one-third of patients and antiretinal antibodies in one-half. In those 34 patients who expressed antiretinal antibodies 27 (79%) of the relapses were characterised by antiretinal antibodies in the absence of raised CIC levels (p less than 0.01). These findings support our previous hypothesis that CIC may have a protective role in autoimmune retinal vasculitis and that antiretinal autoimmunity is of pathogenetic importance in relapse. In individual patients the visual outcome was not related to the number of relapses or to the CIC-autoantibody pattern, suggesting the operation of additional features which merit identification. PMID:3390420

  16. The role of IgM rheumatoid factor in experimental immune vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, M; Tesar, J T

    1979-01-01

    The effect of IgM rhematoid factor (RF) on reversepassive cutaneous Arthus reaction in rats was studied. The RF was obtained from the serum cryoglobulin of a patient with symptoms of purpura, arthralgia and digital gangrene. The cryoglobulins was of IgG-IgM type and when given i.v it induced a prompt hypocomplementaemia in experimental animals. The purified RF also induced low serum complement levels when injected i.v. along with complexes of non-complement-fixing, aggregated IgG. A reverse passive Arthus reaction was induced by intradermal injection of IgG anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA), followed by an i.v. dose of antigen (Ag). The cutaneous inflammatory reaction was aggravated by simultaneous administration of IgM RF intradermally, but not by IgM without antibody (Ab) properties. Intradermal injection of low concentrations of non-complement-fixing IgG anti-BSA, along with normal human IgM, followed by i.v. injection of BSA, resulted in a complete lack of cutaneous inflammation. At higher Ab concentrations there was only a mild inflammation. However, when IgM RF was substituted for normal IgM and injected with non-complement-fixing anti-BSA, an effective reverse passive cutaneous Arthus reaction and vasculitis was induced. The inflammatory response was greatly suppressed by decomplementation of animals by cobra venom factor. This study provides evidence favouring an inflammatory, complement-dependent role for RF in vasculitis. PMID:157238

  17. [Systemic necrotizing vasculitis presenting as gangrene combined with diabetes insipidus: a case report].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Liu, Yu-lan

    2015-12-18

    The male patient reported here presented as gangrene and central diabetes insipidus (CDI), who had characteristics of vasculitis. The patient complained about polydipsia and polyuria half a year ago, and then developed tingling, pain and blackish discoloration of some fingers and toes 3 month ago. He also had Raynaud's phenomenon. After admission, his laboratory examination showed the rise of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, immunoglobulin, β2-glycoprotein I and the activity of rheumatoid factors, lupus anticoagulant test. his pituitary gland showed loss of posterior signal on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, his vasopressin test was active. However, there was no sufficient evidence to diagnose any specific disease; as a consequence the patient was diagnosed as idiopathic systemic necrotizing vasculitis (SNV). For SNV, the patient was treated with glucocorticoid 40 mg/d and impact therapy of cyclophosphamide 0.4 g every 2 weeks. He also received symptomatic treatment for gangrene and CDI. Cutaneous involvement leading to gangrene was widely reported in SNV, however pituitary involvement in SNV leading to CDI was rare. The prognosis of this patient was poor.

  18. Spontaneous coronary artery thrombosis in the setting of active lupus mesenteric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Sundaram, V; Tam, M; Parikh, S A

    2015-07-01

    A 33-year-old male with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with acute abdominal pain and was found to have lupus mesenteric vasculitis on imaging and during exploratory laparotomy. Post laparotomy he continued to have persistent nausea and dyspepsia and an electrocardiogram showed evidence of an inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Emergency cardiac catheterization showed evidence of thrombotic right coronary artery occlusion. His coronaries were otherwise normal with no evidence of underlying coronary artery disease. Extensive workup with trans-esophageal echo, serologies for antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) and bubble study was negative. This effectively ruled out Libman-Sacks endocarditis, APS-induced arterial thrombus and paradoxical emboli as potential causes of his STEMI. By exclusion of other causes, the etiology of his STEMI was felt to be secondary to in-situ coronary artery thrombosis in the setting of active SLE. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with SLE presenting with both lupus mesenteric vasculitis and in-situ coronary arterial thrombosis in the absence of APS.

  19. An unexpected cause of acute kidney injury in a patient with ANCA associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Wajid M; Nori, Uday S; Nadasdy, Tibor; Satoskar, Anjali A

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic kidney biopsies sometimes yield clinically unsuspected diagnoses. We present a case of a 69-year-old woman with established ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) of 4 years duration who was in clinical remission following cytotoxic therapy and was on maintenance immunosuppression. She presented to the hospital with acute kidney injury (AKI), symptoms suggestive of a systemic vasculitis, and in addition had hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis. A relapse in the AAV was suspected but a diagnostic kidney biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, patchy interstitial inflammation, and calcium phosphate deposits. It was found that the patient recently started consuming large doses of over-the-counter calcium-containing antacids and vitamin Dcontaining multivitamin supplements. Cessation of these drugs led to improvement of renal function to baseline. This case highlights several teaching points: (1) the kidney biopsy can prove to be critically important even in cases where there appears to be a more obvious clinical diagnosis, (2) AK due to calcium-alkali syndrome has characteristic histopathological changes, and (3) that the triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and AKI is exclusively associated with the ingestion of excessive quantities of calcium-containing antacids. The physician should keep this in mind, and pro-actively seek pertinent medication history from the patient. A brief review of calcium-alkali syndrome is given.

  20. An unexpected cause of acute kidney injury in a patient with ANCA associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Wajid M; Nori, Uday S; Nadasdy, Tibor; Satoskar, Anjali A

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic kidney biopsies sometimes yield clinically unsuspected diagnoses. We present a case of a 69-year-old woman with established ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) of 4 years duration who was in clinical remission following cytotoxic therapy and was on maintenance immunosuppression. She presented to the hospital with acute kidney injury (AKI), symptoms suggestive of a systemic vasculitis, and in addition had hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis. A relapse in the AAV was suspected but a diagnostic kidney biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, patchy interstitial inflammation, and calcium phosphate deposits. It was found that the patient recently started consuming large doses of over-the-counter calcium-containing antacids and vitamin Dcontaining multivitamin supplements. Cessation of these drugs led to improvement of renal function to baseline. This case highlights several teaching points: (1) the kidney biopsy can prove to be critically important even in cases where there appears to be a more obvious clinical diagnosis, (2) AK due to calcium-alkali syndrome has characteristic histopathological changes, and (3) that the triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and AKI is exclusively associated with the ingestion of excessive quantities of calcium-containing antacids. The physician should keep this in mind, and pro-actively seek pertinent medication history from the patient. A brief review of calcium-alkali syndrome is given. PMID:26932179

  1. Amyloid goiter presented as a subacute thyroiditis-like symptom in a patient with hypersensitivity vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Y; Ohta, M; Yokoyama, H; Takamura, T; Kobayashi, K I

    1998-06-01

    We present a 25-year-old woman with amyloid goiter due to hypersensitivity vasculitis, who developed transient thyrotoxicosis resembling subacute thyroiditis. She received prednisolone (20 mg/ day) for three years for hypersensitivity vasculitis, and was diagnosed as having secondary amyloidosis by biopsies of the stomach, rectum and kidneys. She noticed neck swelling with severe right neck tenderness, palpitation, hyperhidrosis and weight loss. An elastic firm diffuse goiter was palpable, and the upper pole of the right lobe was extremely tender. Her serum free T4 and T3 levels were high, and the serum TSH was suppressed to subnormal. She was positive for serum C-reactive protein. Anti-thyroidal autoantibodies were all negative. Her thyrotoxicosis subsided spontaneously within one week. Serum titers of antibodies to various viruses were unchanged during the clinical course for two weeks, but she was positive for HLA B35. Examination of a needle-biopsy specimen of the thyroid gland showed extensive amyloid deposition and no evidence of subacute thyroiditis. We considered her transient thyrotoxicosis to be associated with amyloid goiter. The clinical course of this case was similar to the subacute thyroiditis-like syndrome, first described by Ikenoue et al. When patients with primary or secondary amyloidosis have symptoms and signs of subacute thyroiditis, but develop an unusual course, amyloid goiter should be considered. PMID:9790279

  2. A Case of Polyarteritis Nodosa Associated with Vertebral Artery Vasculitis Treated Successfully with Tocilizumab and Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kae; Rajderkar, Dhanashree A.; Modica, Renee F.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric polyarteritis nodosa is rare systemic necrotizing arteritis involving small- and medium-sized muscular arteries characterized by aneurysmal dilatations involving the vessel wall. Aneurysms associated with polyarteritis nodosa are common in visceral arteries; however intracranial aneurysms have also been reported and can be associated with central nervous system symptoms, significant morbidity, and mortality. To our knowledge extracranial involvement of the vertebral arteries has not been reported but has the potential to be deleterious due to fact that they supply the central nervous system vasculature. We present a case of a 3-year-old Haitian boy with polyarteritis nodosa that presented with extracranial vessel involvement of his vertebral arteries. After thorough diagnostic imaging, including a bone scan, ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Angiography, and Computed Tomography Angiography, he was noted to have vertebral artery vasculitis, periostitis, subacute epididymoorchitis, arthritis, and myositis. He met diagnostic criteria for polyarteritis nodosa and was treated with cyclophosphamide, methylprednisolone, and tocilizumab, which resulted in improvement of his inflammatory markers, radiographic findings, and physical symptoms after treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of vertebral artery vasculitis in polyarteritis nodosa as well as successful treatment of the condition using the combination cyclophosphamide and tocilizumab for this condition. PMID:27018080

  3. Rare type of pancreatitis as the first presentation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Tomoya; Adachi, Takeya; Tabeya, Tetsuya; Nakagaki, Suguru; Yabana, Takashi; Goto, Akira; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Kasai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A pancreatic tumor was suspected on the abdominal ultrasound of a 72-year-old man. Abdominal computed tomography showed pancreatic enlargement as well as a diffuse, poorly enhanced area in the pancreas; endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed to provide a definitive diagnosis. Based on the trend of improvement of the pancreatic enlargement, the treatment plan involved follow-up examinations. Later, he was hospitalized with an alveolar hemorrhage and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis; he tested positive for myeloperoxidase-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and was diagnosed with ANCA-related vasculitis, specifically microscopic polyangiitis. It appears that factors such as thrombus formation caused by the vasculitis in the early stages of ANCA-related vasculitis cause abnormal distribution of the pancreatic blood flow, resulting in non-uniform pancreatitis. Pancreatic lesions in ANCA-related vasculitis are very rare. Only a few cases have been reported previously. Therefore, we report our case and a review of the literature. PMID:26900301

  4. Rupture of a hepatic artery aneurysm and renal infarction: 2 complications of fibromuscular dysplasia that mimic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Jones, H J; Staud, R; Williams, R C

    1998-10-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is one of the most important mimics of vasculitis. FMD is more prevalent in women and may cause infarcts of organ systems including the brain, intestines, and extremities. These acute clinical presentations often raise the suspicion of vasculitis and therefore rheumatologists will be asked to evaluate these patients. One of the frequent manifestations of FMD is renal artery involvement. Angiographic evaluation often shows a "string of beads" appearance of the renal arteries but sometimes only tapering of the vascular lumen or cutoffs may be seen. In contrast, hepatic artery involvement with FMD occurs much less frequently and may initially present with life threatening intraabdominal bleeding. Celiac angiograms of these patients often show aneurysms, a presentation similar to vasculitis. Only a high level of suspicion for FMD and careful evaluation of clinical facts will lead to correct diagnosis. This will prevent the wrong diagnosis of vasculitis and subsequent treatment with potentially toxic medications. We present 2 cases of FMD involving the renal and hepatic arteries that illustrate this diagnostic challenge.

  5. Reactivity against Complementary Proteinase-3 Is Not Increased in Patients with PR3-ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Tadema, Henko; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Heeringa, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) associated vasculitides (AAV) is unknown, but the association between infections and autoimmunity has been studied extensively. In 2004, a novel theory was proposed that could link infection and autoimmunity. This ‘theory of autoantigen complementarity’ was based on the serendipitous finding of antibodies against complementary-PR3 (cPR3) in patients with PR3-ANCA-associated vasculitis. cPR3 demonstrated homology to several bacterial proteins, and it was hypothesized that PR3-ANCA develop in response to anti-cPR3 antibodies, as a consequence of the anti-idiotypic network. These data have not been confirmed in other patient cohorts. We investigated the presence of anti-cPR3 antibodies in a Dutch cohort of PR3-ANCA-associated vasculitis patients. Anti-cPR3 reactivity was determined in serum using ELISA. Two separate batches of cPR3 were used to determine reactivity in two separate cohorts of PR3-ANCA-associated vasculitis patients. We found that anti-cPR3-reactivity was not increased in our PR3-ANCA-associated vasculitis patients, in comparison to control groups. Further research will be necessary to prove the concept of autoantigen complementarity in autoimmune diseases. PMID:21437233

  6. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2015-06-24

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit.

  7. Hypersensitivity Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

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  8. Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) in patients with propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced ANCA positive vasculitis are associated with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, F; Zhao, M-H; Zhang, Y-K; Zhang, Y; Wang, H-Y

    2005-03-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that propylthiouracil (PTU) could induce ANCA positive vasculitis. However, our previous work has suggested that only one-fifth of the PTU-induced ANCA positive patients had clinical vasculitis and so the mechanism is not clear. Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various vasculitides, including primary ANCA positive systemic vasculitis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence of AECA and their possible role in the pathogenesis of patients with PTU-induced ANCA positive vasculitis. Sera from 11 patients with PTU-induced ANCA positive vasculitis at both active and quiescent phases, and sera from 10 patients with PTU-induced ANCA but without clinical vasculitis, were studied. Sera from 30 healthy blood donors were collected as normal controls. Soluble proteins from 1% Triton-100 extracted in vitro cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells were used as antigens and an immunoblotting technique was performed to determine the presence of AECA, and their specific target antigens were identified. In patients with PTU-induced ANCA positive vasculitis, 10 of the 11 patients in an active phase of disease were serum IgG-AECA positive and six protein bands of endothelial antigens could be blotted (61 kD, 69 kD, 77 kD, 85 kD, 91 kD and 97 kD). However, in the quiescent phase, seven of the 10 positive sera turned negative. None of the ANCA positive but vasculitis negative patients or normal controls were AECA positive. In conclusion, AECA could be found in sera from patients with PTU-induced ANCA positive vasculitis and were associated more closely with vasculitic disease activity.

  9. Circulating monoclonal IgM lambda cryoglobulin with collagen type I affinity in vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Clemmensen, I; Jensen, B A; Hølund, B; Kappelgaard, E; Neilsen, H

    1986-01-01

    A previously fit 66-years-old male primarily presented symptoms compatible with Henock-Schönlein's purpura, from which he seemingly recovered. Shortly hereafter he relapsed with an IgM lambda essential monoclonal cryoglobulinemia type I, presenting a systemic, necrotizing vasculitis, with low titer of circulating immune complexes and complement consumption. Glucocorticoid treatment and plasmapheresis did not prevent an ultimately lethal course. An indirect immunoperoxidase technique showed that the cryo-IgM bound to the interstitial connective tissue corresponding to the localization of collagen type I. In addition it bound to affinity purified human procollagen type I. These results indicate, that the IgM lambda of the proband was an autoantibody with collagen type I specificity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3098468

  10. Severe gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus disease in two patients with renal vasculitis after immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kian-Guan; Teo, Su-Hooi; Lim, Cynthia; Loh, Alwin; Chidambaram, Viswanath; Choo, Jason

    2016-09-01

    Although the use of current immunosuppressive regimens has significantly improved the outcomes of autoimmune renal diseases, infectious complications remain an important clinical concern. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been shown to be one of the major causes of mortality in this group of patients. We report two cases of renal vasculitis (Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)) that developed into severe gastrointestinal CMV disease and manifested with massive small bowel bleeding, resulting in an eventual fatal outcome for one of the patients. Risk factors, pathogenesis, role of immunosuppression in the development of CMV infection, and antiviral treatment are discussed in this review. These cases highlight the need for further research to evaluate the complex mechanisms between immunosuppression and CMV occurrence as well as the role of antiviral prophylaxis in high-risk patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapies.
. PMID:27443566

  11. Treatment of vasculitis and dermatitis in a 59-yr-old Nile hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius).

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Maria; Reeder, Chris

    2012-09-01

    A 59-yr-old female Nile hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) was diagnosed and treated for severe dermatitis. Lesions included large areas of depigmentation, erosions, and ulcerations on glabrous skin areas, limbs, and perineal region. Histopathologic lesions included a markedly edematous, focally eroded, ulcerative to necrotic epidermis; foci of keratinocyte apoptosis; and a mixed suppurative dermatitis. Most of the dermal vessels had variable hyalinized walls with plump endothelial cells and frequent intramural neutrophils, and some vessels had vascular thrombi consistent with vasculitis. Culture of the lesions yielded beta-hemolytic Streptococcus, Morganella morgannii, and Enterococcus sp. The hippopotamus was successfully treated with sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, amoxicillin, and pentoxifylline for more than 2 mo, and the condition did not recur over the subsequent 16 mo.

  12. Recent advances in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, B.; John, G. T.; O’Callaghan, C.; Ranganathan, D.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is an uncommon inflammatory disease of small to medium-sized vessels that frequently presents with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and renal failure though it can affect any organ system. If untreated, the vast majority of patients will die within a year. Current treatments improve prognosis but affected patients remain at a substantially higher risk of death and adverse outcomes. We review the classification of the disease, our understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology, and propose future directions for research. We also evaluate the evidence supporting established treatment regimens and the progress of clinical trials for newer treatments to inform the design of future studies. PMID:27051131

  13. Treatment of vasculitis and dermatitis in a 59-yr-old Nile hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius).

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Maria; Reeder, Chris

    2012-09-01

    A 59-yr-old female Nile hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) was diagnosed and treated for severe dermatitis. Lesions included large areas of depigmentation, erosions, and ulcerations on glabrous skin areas, limbs, and perineal region. Histopathologic lesions included a markedly edematous, focally eroded, ulcerative to necrotic epidermis; foci of keratinocyte apoptosis; and a mixed suppurative dermatitis. Most of the dermal vessels had variable hyalinized walls with plump endothelial cells and frequent intramural neutrophils, and some vessels had vascular thrombi consistent with vasculitis. Culture of the lesions yielded beta-hemolytic Streptococcus, Morganella morgannii, and Enterococcus sp. The hippopotamus was successfully treated with sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, amoxicillin, and pentoxifylline for more than 2 mo, and the condition did not recur over the subsequent 16 mo. PMID:23082536

  14. Induction treatment of previously undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis in a renal transplant patient with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Graham-Brown, M. P. M.; Aljayyousi, R.; Baines, R. J.; Burton, J. O.; Brunskill, N. J.; Furness, P.; Topham, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old female transplant patient with undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and renal allograft dysfunction who achieved disease remission with restoration of transplant function following induction therapy with rituximab. There are currently no trial data looking at the use of rituximab for induction of remission of renal transplant patients with AAV. Although recurrence of AAV following renal transplantation is rare, such patients have invariably had multiple previous exposures to induction and maintenance immunosuppressive regimens, often limiting treatment options post-transplantation. In this case, rituximab was well tolerated with no side effects, and was successful in salvaging transplant function. Optimal treatment regimens for relapsed AAV in the transplant population are not known, and clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of rituximab at inducing and maintaining disease remission in relapsed AAV following transplantation. PMID:27699052

  15. Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculopathy: A Case Report Demonstrating Vasculitis using Black-Blood MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jay; Poonawala, Husain; Keay, Susan K; Serulle, Yafell; Steven, Andrew; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Cole, John W

    2016-01-01

    Infections are rare but important causes of stroke. Among these, varicella zoster virus has been known to cause ischemic stroke. During an attack of herpes zoster ophthalmicus, it has been hypothesized that the virus replicates in the trigeminal ganglion and travels via the trigeminal nerve centrally to cause cerebral vasculopathy. Here we present a case of a 69 year-old Caucasian immunocompromised woman who suffered recurrent ischemic infarcts within the same vascular distribution following an episode of zoster ophthalmicus three months prior. An imaging technique termed black-blood magnetic resonance imaging was utilized to aid in the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis. The case is used to provide a literature review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of cerebral varicella zoster vasculopathy. In situations where an isolated unilateral cerebral vasculopathy is identified, neurologists are urged to consider varicella zoster as a treatable etiologic agent, as untreated vasculopathy can lead to further strokes. PMID:27065314

  16. Induction treatment of previously undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis in a renal transplant patient with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Graham-Brown, M. P. M.; Aljayyousi, R.; Baines, R. J.; Burton, J. O.; Brunskill, N. J.; Furness, P.; Topham, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old female transplant patient with undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and renal allograft dysfunction who achieved disease remission with restoration of transplant function following induction therapy with rituximab. There are currently no trial data looking at the use of rituximab for induction of remission of renal transplant patients with AAV. Although recurrence of AAV following renal transplantation is rare, such patients have invariably had multiple previous exposures to induction and maintenance immunosuppressive regimens, often limiting treatment options post-transplantation. In this case, rituximab was well tolerated with no side effects, and was successful in salvaging transplant function. Optimal treatment regimens for relapsed AAV in the transplant population are not known, and clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of rituximab at inducing and maintaining disease remission in relapsed AAV following transplantation.

  17. Is rituximab effective for induction of remission in ANCA-associated vasculitis?

    PubMed

    Rain, Carmen; Yáñez, Tatiana; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-08-13

    Adding rituximab to the treatment with corticosteroids has been proposed as a therapeutic alternative for inducing remission in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, especially when fertility is a concern, or when there is contraindication or intolerance to cyclophosphamide. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including three pertinent randomized controlled trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded rituximab may slightly increase induction of remission rate, but it may also increase the risk of infection. It is not clear whether it increases the risk of cancer, or whether increases or decreases mortality because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  18. Necrotizing vasculitis of the skin and uterine cervix associated with minocycline therapy for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Schrodt, B J; Kulp-Shorten, C L; Callen, J P

    1999-05-01

    In recent years, minocycline has become a commonly used agent for the treatment of acne vulgaris and rosacea. With this increased use have come reports of severe and in some cases life-threatening toxicity, often occurring in otherwise healthy young women after prolonged courses of minocycline. These adverse reactions include hepatotoxicity, drug-induced lupus erythematosus, eosinophilic pneumonitis, and hypersensitivity syndrome. We describe a 35-year-old woman who had necrotizing vasculitis of the skin and uterine cervix after 2 years of minocycline therapy for acne vulgaris. Skin and cervical biopsies revealed acute inflammation involving through-and-through necrosis of vessel walls with thrombosis, focal fibrinoid change, and a perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrate. The disease fully resolved within 3 months of discontinuance of the minocycline therapy. Patients should be informed of these rare but potentially serious adverse effects before the initiation of minocycline therapy. Early recognition of these complications can result in complete resolution.

  19. Necrotizing vasculitis in a case of disseminated neonatal herpes simplex infection.

    PubMed

    Phinney, P R; Fligiel, S; Bryson, Y J; Porter, D D

    1982-02-01

    A term newborn suffered disseminated herpes simplex virus (HSV) type II infection five days after cesarean section delivery for fetal distress. The mother had no history or evidence of herpetic lesions; the father had a history of genital herpetic lesions. The infant's terminal course was dominated by disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) with hepatic and renal failure. Microscopic examination revealed a necrotizing vasculitis of small and medium-sized lung and peripancreatic arteries. Nuclear inclusions characteristic of HSV were found in these arteries, as well as in the adrenal parenchyma, spleen, and lymph node; electron microscopy confirmed replication of virus within the arterial endothelial cells. The mechanism of arterial damage in severe herpetic infection contrasts with the immune-complex mechanism postulated for other viral vasculitides. Direct, virally induced arterial damage resulting in exposure of collagen may set the stage of DiC, a commonly fatal complication of this disease.

  20. Segmental mediolytic arteriopathy of the splenic and hepatic arteries mimicking systemic necrotizing vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Chan, R J; Goodman, T A; Aretz, T H; Lie, J T

    1998-05-01

    Segmental mediolytic arteriopathy, a rare, noninflammatory arterial disease, is fundamentally a variant of fibromuscular dysplasia. The characteristic angiographic findings of segmental mediolytic arteriopathy include the "string of beads" and microaneurysms which are indistinguishable from those of vasculitis, and the correct diagnosis can be made only after histopathologic evaluation of the arterial lesions. Thrombosis, arterial wall hemorrhage, and dissection are among the complications of segmental mediolytic arteriopathy. We describe herein a patient with segmental mediolytic arteriopathy who presented with hemoperitoneum. The patient underwent urgent surgical repair of a ruptured hepatic artery aneurysm. The postoperative visceral arteriography findings led to a clinical diagnosis of polyarteritis nodosa, and immunosuppressive therapy was initiated. This treatment was stopped as soon as the correct biopsy diagnosis of segmental mediolytic arteriopathy was obtained through outside consultation. The patient recovered without drug treatment and was spared the potentially life-threatening complications of immunosuppression.

  1. Childhood systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, and rheumatic fever and neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, P

    1995-09-01

    Studies on the long-term outcome of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus not only give us survival figures but also uncover flaws in our treatment strategies and reveal both disease-associated and other factors that affect prognosis. Among the latter, compliance with treatment and socioeconomic factors are noteworthy. The pathogenesis of neonatal lupus is under active investigation, and new approaches are being developed. This review also draws attention to a number of vasculitis syndromes that are common in adults but very rarely reported in children. Poststreptococcal reactive arthritis has been described as a new entity; however, such patients should probably receive the same attention as patients with rheumatic fever to avoid recurrences of the disease and cardiac sequelae.

  2. Primary and secondary central nervous system vasculitis: clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, neuroimaging, and treatment analysis.

    PubMed

    Vera-Lastra, Olga; Sepúlveda-Delgado, Jesús; Cruz-Domínguez, María del Pilar; Medina, Gabriela; Casarrubias-Ramírez, Moisés; Molina-Carrión, Luis E; Pineda-Galindo, Luis F; Olvera-Acevedo, Arturo; Hernández-Gonzalez, Claudia; Jara, Luis J

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to compare the initial clinical, laboratory, and imaging features in primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) vs secondary central nervous system vasculitis (SCNSV) and follow up after treatment with intravenous cyclophosphamide (IV-CYC) plus glucocorticosteroids (GCS): methylprednisolone (MP). Neurological, laboratory, and neuroimaging findings were analyzed in PCNSV and SCNSV patients. Cerebral biopsy (CB) was performed in nine patients. Both groups received at onset MP plus IV-CYC for 6 months, followed by bimonthly IV-CYC plus prednisone (PND) for 12 months. All patients were followed during 36 months. Thirty patients were included (12 PCNSV and 18 SCNSV). Focal and non-focal neurological manifestations were similar in both groups, headache being the most frequent manifestation in both groups. Fatigue, myalgias, arthralgias, neuropathy, low leukocytes and platelets, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), low complement, and rheumatoid factor were more frequent in SCNSV (p < 0.05). In cerebrospinal fluid, pleocytosis and proteins were higher in PCNSV (p < 0.05). Periventricular and subcortical hyperintense lesions were observed in cranial magnetic resonance imaging in both vasculitides. Cerebral angiography and angioresonance showed narrowing of vasculature in all patients in both groups. CB showed gliosis and lymphocytic infiltration within and around the walls in four patients and granulomatous infiltration in the other patients. After treatment, the Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed a higher relapse-free survival in PCNSV (p < 0.05). Neurological manifestations and neuroimaging findings were similar in both groups of vasculitides, but general symptoms, joint, musculoskeletal, and peripheral neuropathy were preponderant in SCNSV. After treatment with IV-CYC and GCS, patients with PCNSV

  3. Anti-plasminogen antibodies compromise fibrinolysis and associate with renal histology in ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Berden, Annelies E; Nolan, Sarah L; Morris, Hannah L; Bertina, Rogier M; Erasmus, Dianhdra D; Hagen, E Christiaan; Hayes, Donal P; van Tilburg, Nico H; Bruijn, Jan A; Savage, Caroline O S; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Hewins, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Antibodies recognizing plasminogen, a key component of the fibrinolytic system, associate with venous thrombotic events in PR3-ANCA vasculitis. Here, we investigated the prevalence and function of anti-plasminogen antibodies in independent UK and Dutch cohorts of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). We screened Ig isolated from patients (AAV-IgG) and healthy controls by ELISA. Eighteen of 74 (24%) UK and 10/38 (26%) Dutch patients with AAV had anti-plasminogen antibodies compared with 0/50 and 1/61 (2%) of controls. We detected anti-plasminogen antibodies in both PR3-ANCA- and MPO-ANCA-positive patients. In addition, we identified anti-tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) antibodies in 13/74 (18%) patients, and these antibodies were more common among patients with anti-plasminogen antibodies (P = 0.011). Eighteen of 74 AAV-IgG (but no control IgG) retarded fibrinolysis in vitro, and this associated with anti-plasminogen and/or anti-tPA antibody positivity. Only 4/18 AAV-IgG retarded fibrinolysis without harboring these antibodies; dual-positive samples retarded fibrinolysis to the greatest extent. Patients with anti-plasminogen antibodies had significantly higher percentages of glomeruli with fibrinoid necrosis (P < 0.05) and cellular crescents (P < 0.001) and had more severely reduced renal function than patients without these antibodies. In conclusion, anti-plasminogen and anti-tPA antibodies occur in AAV and associate with functional inhibition of fibrinolysis in vitro. Seropositivity for anti-plasminogen antibodies correlates with hallmark renal histologic lesions and reduced renal function. Conceivably, therapies that enhance fibrinolysis might benefit a subset of AAV patients.

  4. Increased cellularity and expression of adhesion molecules in muscle biopsy specimens from patients with rheumatoid arthritis with clinical suspicion of vasculitis, but negative routine histology

    PubMed Central

    Verschueren, P.; Voskuyl, A.; Smeets, T; Zwinderman, K.; Breedveld, F.; Tak, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Histological analysis of random quadriceps muscle biopsy specimens can be used to detect vasculitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study aimed at determining the immunohistological features in patients with clinical suspicion of rheumatoid vasculitis, but without a transmural infiltrate or fibrinoid necrosis of the vessel wall on routine histology.
METHODS—Three groups of patients with RA were studied: (a) without clinical signs of vasculitis (n=6); (b) with recent onset of extra-articular features and a clinical suspicion of vasculitis but normal routine histology (n=11); and (c) with recent onset of extra-articular features and vasculitis, histologically proved either in muscle or other biopsy specimens (n=14). A control group of patients with osteoarthritis was also included (n=5). Frozen sections from quadriceps muscle biopsy specimens were analysed with monoclonal antibodies to detect CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and HLA-DR. The slides were evaluated using a semiquantitative scoring system (0-4).
RESULTS—The mean scores gradually increased from group 1 to 3, leading to significant differences between groups 1 and 2, but not between groups 2 and 3 for most markers (p< 0.05). Thus the pathological changes were similar for the two groups with clinical signs of vasculitis, even when the conventional histological evaluation was negative. Higher immunohistological scores were associated with perivascular infiltrates on routine histology.
CONCLUSION—The pathophysiological events leading to vasculitis are reflected by the changes in the quadriceps muscle biopsy specimens. The data indicate that the sensitivity of examination of muscle biopsy specimens for the diagnosis of rheumatoid vasculitis can be increased by the use of new criteria.

 PMID:10913056

  5. Inhibition of oxidation activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) by propylthiouracil (PTU) and anti-MPO antibodies from patients with PTU-induced vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Hua; Chen, Min; Gao, Ying; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2007-02-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) could induce antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis. This study aimed to investigate the inhibitory effects on MPO oxidation activity by PTU and MPO-ANCA from patients with primary microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and PTU-induced vasculitis. IgG preparations were purified from MPO-ANCA-positive sera from seven patients with PTU-induced vasculitis and ten patients with primary MPA. The oxidation activity of MPO was measured in the presence of PTU and MPO-ANCA-positive IgG preparations from patients with PTU-induced vasculitis and primary MPA respectively. PTU could competitively inhibit the oxidation activity of MPO dose dependently. MPO-ANCA-positive IgG preparations from 6/7 patients with PTU-induced vasculitis and only 3/10 from patients with primary MPA could inhibit the MPO activity in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusions, the oxidation activity of MPO could be inhibited by PTU and PTU-induced MPO-ANCA in a dose-dependent manner, which might be involved in the pathogenesis PTU-induced vasculitis.

  6. Long-term Prognosis of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Negative Renal Vasculitis: Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi-Yeon; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin-Young; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have reported on the long-term prognosis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-negative renal vasculitis. Between April 2003 and December 2013, 48 patients were diagnosed with renal vasculitis. Their ANCA status was tested using indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up duration of 933.5 (257.5–2,079.0) days, 41.7% of patients progressed to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and 43.8% died from any cause. Of 48 patients, 6 and 42 were ANCA-negative and positive, respectively. The rate of ESRD within 3 months was higher in ANCA-negative patients than in ANCA-positive patients (P = 0.038). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed shorter renal survival than did ANCA-positive patients (log-rank P = 0.033). In univariate Cox-proportional hazard regression analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed increased risk of ESRD, with a hazard ratio 3.190 (95% confidence interval, 1.028–9.895, P = 0.045). However, the effect of ANCA status on renal survival was not statistically significant in multivariate analysis. Finally, ANCA status did not significantly affect patient survival. In conclusion, long-term patient and renal survival of ANCA-negative renal vasculitis patients did not differ from those of ANCA-positive renal vasculitis patients. Therefore, different treatment strategy depending on ANCA status might be unnecessary. PMID:27051237

  7. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare pulmonary infection complicated by cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a woman with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T L; Baca, V; Stalling, S S; Natalie, A A; Veldkamp, P J

    2014-06-01

    A 53-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of anorexia nervosa developed a bilateral lower extremity rash comprised of palpable red to violaceous, sub-centimeter papular lesions that increased in quantity rapidly. She also noted a 2-month history of non-productive cough. Imaging modalities revealed a thin-walled cavitary lesion in the right lung apex and scattered nodular opacities. Acid fast bacilli (AFB) were found in sputum and subsequently identified by culture as Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). Punch biopsies of her skin lesions yielded a histological diagnosis of small-to-medium vessel vasculitis. Stains and cultures for organisms were negative. Her skin lesions resolved quickly after the initiation of antimicrobial therapy for MAI. Hypersensitivity vasculitis associated with an atypical mycobacterial infection is unusual. The postulated underlying mechanism is the deposit of immune complexes and not the bacillus itself. While cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis (CLV) due to MAI is certainly a rare entity, it should be entertained in patients with vasculitic skin lesions and a concomitant pulmonary disease. PMID:24363210

  8. Static and fatigue tensile properties of cross-ply laminates containing vascules for self-healing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luterbacher, R.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of including hollow channels (vascules) within cross-ply laminates on static tensile properties and fatigue performance is investigated. No change in mechanical properties or damage formation is observed when a single vascule is included in the 0/90 interface, representing 0.5% of the cross sectional area within the specimen. During tensile loading, matrix cracks develop in the 90° layers leading to a reduction of stiffness and strength (defined as the loss of linearity) and a healing agent is injected through the vascules in order to heal them and mitigate the caused degradation. Two different healing agents, a commercial low viscosity epoxy resin (RT151, Resintech) and a toughened epoxy blend (bespoke, in-house formulation) have been used to successfully recover stiffness under static loading conditions. The RT151 system recovered 75% of the initial failure strength, whereas the toughened epoxy blend achieved a recovery of 67%. Under fatigue conditions, post healing, a rapid decay of stiffness was observed as the healed damage re-opened within the first 2500 cycles. This was caused by the high fatigue loading intensity, which was near the static failure strength of the healing resin. However, the potential for ameliorating (via self-healing or autonomous repair) more diffuse transverse matrix damage via a vascular network has been shown.

  9. Arterial distensibility in children and teenagers: normal evolution and the effect of childhood vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Y; Brogan, P; Pilla, C; Dillon, M; Redington, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: Polyarteritis nodosa is a necrotising vasculitis of the medium sized and small muscular arteries. The inflammatory and subsequent reparative processes may alter the arterial mechanical properties. The effect of vasculitic damage on arterial distensibility has never been explored however. Aim: To determine the normal values and the effect of childhood vasculitis on arterial distensibility in children and teenagers. Methods: Distensibility of the brachioradial arterial segment was studied using pulse wave velocity (PWV ∝1/√distensibility), in 13 children with polyarteritis nodosa at a median age of 11.8 (range 4.9–16) years. As a control group, 155 healthy schoolchildren (6–18 years, 81 boys) were studied. PWV was assessed using a photoplethysmographic technique; blood pressure was measured by an automatic sphygmomanometer (Dinamap). Data from patients were expressed as z scores adjusted for age and compared to a population mean of 0 by a single sample t test. Determinants of PWV in normal children were assessed by univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results: Age, height, weight, and systolic blood pressure correlated individually with the brachioradial PWV. Multivariate analysis identified age as the only independent determinant. Ten of the patients were in clinical remission, while three had evidence of disease activity at the time of study. The PWV in the patient group as a whole was significantly greater than those in healthy children (mean z score +0.99). Raised C reactive protein concentration (>2 mg/dl) in the three patients with active disease was associated with a higher PWV when compared to those in remission (z score +2.78 v +0.45). The diastolic blood pressure of the patients was higher than those of the controls (z score +1.04) while the systolic pressure was similar (z score -0.36). Conclusions: PWV in the brachioradial arterial segment increases gradually during childhood independent of body weight, height, mass

  10. Current and novel biomarkers in anti-neutrophil cytoplasm-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Draibe, Juliana Bordignon; Fulladosa, Xavier; Cruzado, Josep Maria; Torras, Joan; Salama, Alan David

    2016-08-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is characterized by a variable disease course, with up to 50% of patients having one relapse within 5 years and many progressing to end-stage organ damage despite modern treatment strategies. Moreover, complications arising from treatment dominate the causes of mortality and morbidity both early and late during disease, especially in the elderly and those with severe renal involvement, and there is additional uncertainty as to how long treatment should be continued. There is, therefore, an urgent clinical need to identify robust biomarkers to better predict treatment responses, risk of disease relapse and eventual complete clinical and immunological quiescence. To date, no such biomarkers exist, but better understanding of disease pathogenesis and the underlying immune dysfunction has provided some potential candidates linked to the discovery of new antibodies, different leukocyte activation states, the role of the alternative complement pathway and markers of vascular activation. With all promising new biomarkers, there is the need to rapidly replicate and validate early findings using large biobanks of samples that could be brought together by leaders in the field.

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma with HHV8 infection and ANCA-associated vasculitis in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; Rais, Lamia; Mebazza, Amel; Azzouz, Haifa; Beji, Somaya; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Zouaghi, Karim; Zitouna, Moncef; Osmane, Amel Ben; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2013-11-01

    The association between Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and human herpes virus eight (HHV-8) infection is rarely reported in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We report here the rare association of KS, HHV-8 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection as well as syphilis in a HD patient. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who presented with microscopic polyangiitis with alveolar hemorrhage and pauci-immune necrosing and crescentic glomerulonephritis as well as renal failure requiring HD. Biological tests showed positive HCV and syphilis tests. The patient was treated by HD and intravenous pulse, followed by oral corticosteroids and six cyclophosphamide monthly pulses with remission of the alveolar hemorrhage, but without renal functional recovery as the patient remained HD dependent. Five months after the first treatment administration, she developed extensive purpuric lesions on her lower limbs, abdomen face and neck. A skin biopsy showed KS. The HHV-8 test was positive, with positive polymerase chain reaction-HHV8 in the serum and skin. After immunosuppression withdrawal, the KS skin lesions regressed rapidly without relapse after 12 months of follow-up, but alveolar hemorrhage relapsed after 16 months of follow-up. Our case showed that the immunosuppressed state related to multiple factors such as aging, vasculitis, HHV-8, HCV, syphilis, immunosuppressive therapy and HD may all have contributed to the development of KS in our patient. PMID:24231484

  12. Anti-endothelial cell antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Heurkens, A H; Hiemstra, P S; Lafeber, G J; Daha, M R; Breedveld, F C

    1989-01-01

    IgG antibodies reactive with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were found in 19 out of 28 patients with rheumatoid vasculitis (RV), in four out of 24 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in seven out of 10 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but not in healthy donors. In four patients with RV who were followed longitudinally, regression of vasculitic episodes coincided with decreasing titres of anti-endothelial antibodies (AEA). Binding activity to endothelial cells was observed in intact IgG and F(ab')2 fragments of IgG. AEA activity was unrelated to antibodies against nuclear, blood group or major histocompatibility complex antigens and did not involve immune complexes. AEA activity was not specific for endothelial cells since the AEA-positive sera and the IgG fractions prepared from these sera also reacted with fibroblasts. Adsorption of positive sera and corresponding IgG fractions with endothelial cells decreased the IgG binding reactivity on both fibroblasts and endothelial cells. These findings show that RV patients have IgG-AEA, and suggest that these antibodies may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:2805426

  13. [Clinical practice guideline for ANCA-associated vasculitis with renal involvement].

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Vanina; Fayad, Alicia; González, Gabriela; Smuclir Quevedo, Alejandra; Robaina Sindín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a group of systemic conditions characterized by inflammation and necrosis in small and medium vessels. AAV with different levels of disease severity could respond to different therapeutics protocols. Early diagnosis and treatment could significantly improve the outcome of the disease. The objective was to investigate the quality evidence in different therapeutical protocols proposed to AAV with renal involvement in pediatrics and adults patients and evaluate the ANCA applicability in AAV diagnosis and outcome. Using methodological search filters, we identified literature in Medline, Embase, Lilacs and Cochrane Trials Register published between 1997 and July 2015. From 4236 articles, 59 were included. The quality of evidence was assessed using the check list designed by the Cochrane Renal Group. The strength of recommendation was determinated by Levels of Evidence (Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine). On the basis of current evidence, 20 recommendations were elaborated for the treatment and monitoring of patients with AAV with renal involvement in several clinical scenarios, in order to provide physicians a rational approach in daily clinical practice. PMID:26738202

  14. Presumed reactive polyarthritis and granulomatous vasculitis in a Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla).

    PubMed

    MacLean, Robert; Beaufrère, Hugues; Heggem-Perry, Brittany; Field, Cara; Garner, Michael

    2013-12-01

    A 1.5-year-old female Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla) was presented and managed for a polyarthritis of the intertarsal and tarsophalangeal articulations. Results of aerobic bacterial cultures, Mycoplasma species culture, and polymerase chain reaction testing of articular fluid did not identify any causative organisms. Results of radiographs and cytologic examination of articular fluid were consistent with an inflammatory, nonerosive polyarthritis. The arthritis did not improve with systemic anti-inflammatory and antibiotic treatment and with joint lavage. A large necrotic granulomatous mass was detected on the right shoulder area from which Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species were isolated as opportunistic pathogens. Two days after surgical resection of the mass, the distal polyarthritis resolved. Histopathologic examination of the mass was consistent with granulomatous vasculitis with abscess formation of unknown origin. In this crane, the unresponsiveness to standard therapy, the presence of an infected and inflammatory mass, and the resolution of the polyarthritis after the resection of the mass strongly supported a diagnosis of reactive immune-mediated nonerosive polyarthritis. Analysis of this case suggests that immune-mediated idiopathic arthritis should be a differential diagnosis of distal polyarthritis in cranes and that an inciting source remote from the joints should be investigated in case of lack of response to standard therapy. PMID:24640933

  15. The Role of Catheter Angiography in the Diagnosis of Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Edgell, Randall C.; Sarhan, Ahmed E.; Soomro, Jazba; Einertson, Collin; Kemp, Joanna; Shirani, Peyman; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; Coppens, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Background Central nervous system vasculitis (CNSV) is a rare disorder, the pathophysiology of which is not fully understood. It involves a combination of inflammation and thrombosis. CNSV is most commonly associated with headache, gradual changes in mental status, and focal neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires the effective use of history, laboratory testing, imaging, and biopsy. Catheter angiography can be a powerful tool in the diagnosis when common and low-frequency angiographic manifestations of CNSV are considered. We review these manifestations and their place in the diagnostic algorithm of CNSV. Summary We reviewed the PubMed database for case series of CNSV that included 5 or more patients. Demographic and angiographic findings were collected. Angiographic findings were dichotomized between common and low-frequency findings. A system for incorporating these findings into clinical decision-making is proposed. Key Message CNSV is a diagnostic challenge due to the absence of a true gold standard test. In the absence of such a test, catheter angiography remains a central piece of the diagnostic puzzle when appropriately employed and interpreted. PMID:27781050

  16. Possible intrinsic association of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis coexisting with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huifang; Xiong, Jiachuan; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Ying; Nie, Ling; Wang, Yiqin; Zhao, Jinghong

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a life-threatening condition that causes renal failure. Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells in the blood that can also cause renal failure. The two diseases have high morbidity and mortality rates in the elderly, with a poor prognosis. A 64-year-old female presented to Xinqiao Hospital (Chonqing, China) with fatigue and a poor appetite that had been apparent for 6 weeks. Laboratory tests revealed a serum creatinine level of 10.31 mg/dl, a cytoplasmic ANCA titer of 1:10, a positive result for myeloperoxidase and a serum globulin level of 3.96 g/dl. A renal biopsy revealed crescent glomerulonephritis, combined with the rapid progression of renal function. Based on these observations (ANCA titer, crescent glomerulonephritis and rapid progression of renal function) a diagnosis of AAV was established. MM was confirmed by serum immunofixation electrophoresis combined with bone marrow aspiration. The present study discusses what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of AAV coexisting with MM in order to highlight it as a clinical concern. PMID:27602144

  17. Kaposi's sarcoma with HHV8 infection and ANCA-associated vasculitis in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; Rais, Lamia; Mebazza, Amel; Azzouz, Haifa; Beji, Somaya; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Zouaghi, Karim; Zitouna, Moncef; Osmane, Amel Ben; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2013-11-01

    The association between Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and human herpes virus eight (HHV-8) infection is rarely reported in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We report here the rare association of KS, HHV-8 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection as well as syphilis in a HD patient. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who presented with microscopic polyangiitis with alveolar hemorrhage and pauci-immune necrosing and crescentic glomerulonephritis as well as renal failure requiring HD. Biological tests showed positive HCV and syphilis tests. The patient was treated by HD and intravenous pulse, followed by oral corticosteroids and six cyclophosphamide monthly pulses with remission of the alveolar hemorrhage, but without renal functional recovery as the patient remained HD dependent. Five months after the first treatment administration, she developed extensive purpuric lesions on her lower limbs, abdomen face and neck. A skin biopsy showed KS. The HHV-8 test was positive, with positive polymerase chain reaction-HHV8 in the serum and skin. After immunosuppression withdrawal, the KS skin lesions regressed rapidly without relapse after 12 months of follow-up, but alveolar hemorrhage relapsed after 16 months of follow-up. Our case showed that the immunosuppressed state related to multiple factors such as aging, vasculitis, HHV-8, HCV, syphilis, immunosuppressive therapy and HD may all have contributed to the development of KS in our patient.

  18. Current and novel biomarkers in anti-neutrophil cytoplasm-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Draibe, Juliana Bordignon; Fulladosa, Xavier; Cruzado, Josep Maria; Torras, Joan; Salama, Alan David

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is characterized by a variable disease course, with up to 50% of patients having one relapse within 5 years and many progressing to end-stage organ damage despite modern treatment strategies. Moreover, complications arising from treatment dominate the causes of mortality and morbidity both early and late during disease, especially in the elderly and those with severe renal involvement, and there is additional uncertainty as to how long treatment should be continued. There is, therefore, an urgent clinical need to identify robust biomarkers to better predict treatment responses, risk of disease relapse and eventual complete clinical and immunological quiescence. To date, no such biomarkers exist, but better understanding of disease pathogenesis and the underlying immune dysfunction has provided some potential candidates linked to the discovery of new antibodies, different leukocyte activation states, the role of the alternative complement pathway and markers of vascular activation. With all promising new biomarkers, there is the need to rapidly replicate and validate early findings using large biobanks of samples that could be brought together by leaders in the field. PMID:27478594

  19. [Pulmonary vasculitis as a clinical mask of HCV infection: efficiency of interferon-free antiviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Stelmakh, V V; Kozlov, V K; Sukhanov, D S; Skipsky, I M

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a clinical case of pulmonary vasculitis caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV). Its diagnosis was established on the basis of in-depth laboratory testing and an investigation of the molecular biological markers of viremia (polymerase chain reaction--PCR--HCV RNA) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. By taking into account of extrahepatic HCV replication and contraindications to interferon therapy, the female patient was given an interferon-free antiviral therapy cycle using an interferonogenic inductor in combination with ribavirin. Pathogenic therapy (methylpred and ursodeoxycholic acid) was additionally performed. An interferon-free regimen of cycloferon + ribavirin led to sustained remission of HCV infection running with its systemic manifestations. The therapy could improve the function of not only the liver, but also the lung. In suspected extrahepatic HCV infections, an investigation of molecular biological markers for viremia (HCV RNA PCR) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells is an essential diagnostic technique. Interferonogenic inductors, cycloferon in particular, should be used in combination with ribavirin when a chronic hepatitis C patient with the extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection has contraindications to conventional therapy with recombinant interferon-α. PMID:25715495

  20. Protective effects of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase in immune complex-induced vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, M. S.; Moncada, S.; Ward, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    1. The ability of analogues of L-arginine (N-iminoethyl-L-ornithine (L-NIO), NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA)) to protect against inflammatory injury induced by activated neutrophils was investigated in rats following intradermal or intrapulmonary deposition of immune complexes. 2. The descending order of potency for protective effects of these analogues was: L-NIO > L-NMMA > L-NNA = L-NAME. The approximate IC50 value for L-NIO in the dermal vasculitis model was 65 microM. For all other compounds, the IC50 values were > 5 mM. 3. The protective effect of L-NIO in the skin was reversed in a dose-dependent manner by the presence of L-arginine, but not by D-arginine. L-Arginine also reversed the protective effects of L-NIO in immune complex-induced lung injury. 4. The protective effects of L-NIO were not associated with reductions in neutrophil accumulation, as measured by extraction from tissues of myeloperoxidase. 5. These data demonstrate that L-NIO has the most potent protective effects against immune complex-induced vascular injury induced by activated macrophages. Furthermore, they indicate that this injury is dependent upon the generation of nitric oxide. PMID:1281719

  1. Proteinase 3 on apoptotic cells disrupts immune silencing in autoimmune vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Arnaud; Martin, Katherine R.; Bonnefoy, Francis; Saas, Philippe; Mocek, Julie; Alkan, Manal; Terrier, Benjamin; Kerstein, Anja; Tamassia, Nicola; Satyanarayanan, Senthil Kumaran; Ariel, Amiram; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Guillevin, Loïc; Cassatella, Marco A.; Mueller, Antje; Thieblemont, Nathalie; Lamprecht, Peter; Mouthon, Luc; Perruche, Sylvain; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis that is associated with granulomatous inflammation and the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) directed against proteinase 3 (PR3). We previously determined that PR3 on the surface of apoptotic neutrophils interferes with induction of antiinflammatory mechanisms following phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that enzymatically active membrane-associated PR3 on apoptotic cells triggered secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including granulocyte CSF (G-CSF) and chemokines. This response required the IL-1R1/MyD88 signaling pathway and was dependent on the synthesis of NO, as macrophages from animals lacking these pathways did not exhibit a PR3-associated proinflammatory response. The PR3-induced microenvironment facilitated recruitment of inflammatory cells, such as macrophages, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), and neutrophils, which were observed in close proximity within granulomatous lesions in the lungs of GPA patients. In different murine models of apoptotic cell injection, the PR3-induced microenvironment instructed pDC-driven Th9/Th2 cell generation. Concomitant injection of anti-PR3 ANCAs with PR3-expressing apoptotic cells induced a Th17 response, revealing a GPA-specific mechanism of immune polarization. Accordingly, circulating CD4+ T cells from GPA patients had a skewed distribution of Th9/Th2/Th17. These results reveal that PR3 disrupts immune silencing associated with clearance of apoptotic neutrophils and provide insight into how PR3 and PR3-targeting ANCAs promote GPA pathophysiology. PMID:26436651

  2. Nomenclature and classification of vasculitis: lessons learned from granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis)

    PubMed Central

    Jennette, J C

    2011-01-01

    Names influence how something is perceived. Diagnostic terms (diagnoses) are the names of diseases that are usually derived either from some distinctive characteristic of the disease or include an eponym recognizing someone who elucidated the disease. No matter how logical and appropriate a name may be, if it is not usable and used it is of no lasting value. This brief commentary focuses on the nomenclature of systemic vasculitides, and uses as a prime example Wegener's granulomatosis, which has been renamed recently ‘granulomatosis with polyangiitis’, in part because of concerns about the suitability of Friedrich Wegener as the source of an eponym. The most distinctive pathological feature of Wegener's granulomatosis is multi-focal necrotizing inflammation that has long been called granulomatosis. The systemic variant of Wegener's granulomatosis also is characterized by inflammation in many different vessels or different types, i.e. polyangiitis. Thus, granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a very appropriate alternative term for Wegener's granulomatosis. This term also is in accord with the name for a closely related vasculitis, i.e. microscopic polyangiitis. Terms that indicate aetiology and pathogenesis, when known, are useful to include in names for diseases (diagnoses). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA) or proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) are implicated in the cause of granulomatosis with polyangiitis and thus also should be specified in the diagnosis (e.g. PR3-ANCA-positive granulomatosis with polyangiitis or MPO-ANCA-positive microscopic polyangiitis). As our understanding of the clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and aetiology of vasculitides change over time, the names and approaches for diagnosing these diseases will change accordingly. PMID:21447122

  3. Multidrug-related leukocytoclastic vasculitis raising suspicion of sexual homicide-things are not always what they seem.

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Lucia; Krocker, Klaus; Sautter, Julia; Tsokos, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ambiguous findings during external examination of a deceased in combination with dubious autopsy findings can raise doubts concerning the manner and cause of death. We report the case of a 35-year-old female deceased who had suffered from a borderline personality and depressive disorder with suicidal ideation. At the death scene, the body showed massive facial swelling accompanied by complete reddening of the skin of the face, with patchy skin abrasions on the forehead and neck, and purple bruise-like discolorations distributed symmetrically over both shoulders, elbows, hands, hips, knees, lower legs, and feet, raising the suspicion of underlying massive external blunt force injury. Police investigators strongly suspected sexual homicide. At autopsy, dissection in layers revealed massive subcutaneous hemorrhages as the cause of the reddish skin discolorations. Toxicological analyses showed fatal levels of lamotrigine with additional proof of zopiclone, zolpidem, diphenhydramine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, pregabalin, tramadol, and modafinil in venous blood. Histologically, both the macroscopically impressive purple skin changes with underlying bleeding into the subcutaneous tissue and the skin abrasions were due to leukocytoclastic vasculitis, a form of acute hypersensitivity vasculitis that was a reaction to the multiple therapeutic drugs that the woman had taken shortly before death. The manner of death was classified as suicide, and sexual homicide was ruled out. PMID:25957602

  4. Henoch-Schönlein purpura from vasculitis to intestinal perforation: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Lerkvaleekul, Butsabong; Treepongkaruna, Suporn; Saisawat, Pawaree; Thanachatchairattana, Pornsri; Angkathunyakul, Napat; Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan; Vilaiyuk, Soamarat

    2016-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is generally a self-limited vasculitis disease and has a good prognosis. We report a 4-year-old Thai boy who presented with palpable purpura, abdominal colicky pain, seizure, and eventually developed intestinal ischemia and perforation despite adequate treatment, including corticosteroid and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Imaging modalities, including ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, could not detect intestinal ischemia prior to perforation. In this patient, we also postulated that vasculitis-induced mucosal ischemia was a cause of the ulcer, leading to intestinal perforation, and high-dose corticosteroid could have been a contributing factor since the histopathology revealed depletion of lymphoid follicles. Intestinal perforation in HSP is rare, but life-threatening. Close monitoring and thorough clinical evaluation are essential to detect bowel ischemia before perforation, particularly in HSP patients who have hematochezia, persistent localized abdominal tenderness and guarding. In highly suspicious cases, exploratory laparotomy may be needed for the definite diagnosis and prevention of further complications. PMID:27468201

  5. The Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in Large-Vessel Vasculitis: Appropriateness of Current Classification Criteria?

    PubMed Central

    Balink, H.; Bennink, R. J.; van Eck-Smit, B. L. F.; Verberne, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with clinical suspicion of large-vessel vasculitis (LVV) may present with nonspecific signs and symptoms and increased inflammatory parameters and may remain without diagnosis after routine diagnostic procedures. Both the nonspecificity of the radiopharmaceutical 18F-FDG and the synergy of integrating functional and anatomical images with PET/CT offer substantial benefit in the diagnostic work-up of patients with clinical suspicion for LVV. A negative temporal artery biopsy, an ultrasonography without an arterial halo, or a MRI without aortic wall thickening or oedema do not exclude the presence of LVV and should therefore not exclude the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT when LVV is clinically suspected. This overview further discusses the notion that there is substantial underdiagnosis of LVV. Late diagnosis of LVV may lead to surgery or angioplasty in occlusive forms and is often accompanied by serious aortic complications and a fatal outcome. In contrast to the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria for vasculitis, based on late LVV effects like arterial stenosis and/or occlusion, 18F-FDG PET/CT sheds new light on the classification of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis (TA). The combination of these observations makes the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the assessment of patients suspected for having LVV promising. PMID:25328890

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi Causes Paralyzing Systemic Necrotizing Vasculitis Driven by Pathogen-Specific Type I Immunity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roffê, Ester; Marino, Ana Paula M. P.; Weaver, Joseph; Wan, Wuzhou; de Araújo, Fernanda F.; Hoffman, Victoria; Santiago, Helton C.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious agents are often considered potential triggers of chronic inflammatory disease, including autoimmunity; however, direct evidence is usually lacking. Here we show that following control of acute infection of mice with the myotropic Colombiana strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, parasites persisted in tissue at low levels associated with development of systemic necrotizing vasculitis. Lesions occurred in many but not all organs and tissues, with skeletal muscle arteries being the most severely affected, and were associated with myositis, atrophy, paresis/paralysis, and death. Histopathology showed fibrinoid vascular necrosis, rare amastigote nests within skeletal muscle myocytes, and massive leukocyte infiltrates composed mainly of inflammatory monocytes, F4/80+ macrophages, and T. cruzi tetramer-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes capable of producing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) but not interleukin-17 (IL-17). T. cruzi-specific IgG was detected in sera from infected mice, but antibody deposits and neutrophilic inflammation were not features of the lesions. Thus, T. cruzi infection of mice may be a specific infectious trigger of paralyzing systemic necrotizing vasculitis most severely affecting skeletal muscle, driven by pathogen-specific type I immune responses. PMID:26857570

  7. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David A.; Frevert, Charles W.; Nelson, Danielle D.; Morrison, W. Ivan; Knowles, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  8. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsay M; Schneider, David A; Frevert, Charles W; Nelson, Danielle D; Morrison, W Ivan; Knowles, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  9. Multidrug-related leukocytoclastic vasculitis raising suspicion of sexual homicide-things are not always what they seem.

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Lucia; Krocker, Klaus; Sautter, Julia; Tsokos, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ambiguous findings during external examination of a deceased in combination with dubious autopsy findings can raise doubts concerning the manner and cause of death. We report the case of a 35-year-old female deceased who had suffered from a borderline personality and depressive disorder with suicidal ideation. At the death scene, the body showed massive facial swelling accompanied by complete reddening of the skin of the face, with patchy skin abrasions on the forehead and neck, and purple bruise-like discolorations distributed symmetrically over both shoulders, elbows, hands, hips, knees, lower legs, and feet, raising the suspicion of underlying massive external blunt force injury. Police investigators strongly suspected sexual homicide. At autopsy, dissection in layers revealed massive subcutaneous hemorrhages as the cause of the reddish skin discolorations. Toxicological analyses showed fatal levels of lamotrigine with additional proof of zopiclone, zolpidem, diphenhydramine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, pregabalin, tramadol, and modafinil in venous blood. Histologically, both the macroscopically impressive purple skin changes with underlying bleeding into the subcutaneous tissue and the skin abrasions were due to leukocytoclastic vasculitis, a form of acute hypersensitivity vasculitis that was a reaction to the multiple therapeutic drugs that the woman had taken shortly before death. The manner of death was classified as suicide, and sexual homicide was ruled out.

  10. Rifampicin-induced antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guiyi; Zeng, Xuemei; Sandford, Andrew J; He, Jian-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a pauci-immune necrotizing vasculitis that involves small vessels. Herein, we report an extremely rare case of rifampicin (RFP)-induced AAV. A 42-yearold female was transferred to the West China Hospital due to cough with phlegm for 3 months, fever for 1 month, and fatigue for 2 weeks. The patient was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and received anti-TB treatment with isoniazid, RFP, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide (PZA) at her local hospital. After 5 days of anti-TB treatment, her creatinine level rose to 420.2 μmol/L from a normal level prior to anti-TB treatment. Serum proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA was positive. After discontinuing the anti-TB drugs and administering protective renal treatment, her renal function improved, whereas PR3-ANCA remained positive. With RFP rechallenge after transfer to our hospital, the patient developed oliguria. Her urine volume increased gradually after RFP was discontinued 3 days later. Therefore, RFPinduced AAV was suspected. Eventually, the patient received prednisone and anti-TB therapy, including isoniazid, ethambutol, PZA, and moxifloxacin. After 2 months, PZA was discontinued. During 6 months of normal, and PR3-ANCA became negative at 4 months. This outcome is characteristic of RFP-induced AAV. PMID:27569735

  11. Henoch-Schönlein purpura from vasculitis to intestinal perforation: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lerkvaleekul, Butsabong; Treepongkaruna, Suporn; Saisawat, Pawaree; Thanachatchairattana, Pornsri; Angkathunyakul, Napat; Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan; Vilaiyuk, Soamarat

    2016-07-14

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is generally a self-limited vasculitis disease and has a good prognosis. We report a 4-year-old Thai boy who presented with palpable purpura, abdominal colicky pain, seizure, and eventually developed intestinal ischemia and perforation despite adequate treatment, including corticosteroid and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Imaging modalities, including ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, could not detect intestinal ischemia prior to perforation. In this patient, we also postulated that vasculitis-induced mucosal ischemia was a cause of the ulcer, leading to intestinal perforation, and high-dose corticosteroid could have been a contributing factor since the histopathology revealed depletion of lymphoid follicles. Intestinal perforation in HSP is rare, but life-threatening. Close monitoring and thorough clinical evaluation are essential to detect bowel ischemia before perforation, particularly in HSP patients who have hematochezia, persistent localized abdominal tenderness and guarding. In highly suspicious cases, exploratory laparotomy may be needed for the definite diagnosis and prevention of further complications. PMID:27468201

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi Causes Paralyzing Systemic Necrotizing Vasculitis Driven by Pathogen-Specific Type I Immunity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Roffê, Ester; Marino, Ana Paula M P; Weaver, Joseph; Wan, Wuzhou; de Araújo, Fernanda F; Hoffman, Victoria; Santiago, Helton C; Murphy, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Infectious agents are often considered potential triggers of chronic inflammatory disease, including autoimmunity; however, direct evidence is usually lacking. Here we show that following control of acute infection of mice with the myotropic Colombiana strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, parasites persisted in tissue at low levels associated with development of systemic necrotizing vasculitis. Lesions occurred in many but not all organs and tissues, with skeletal muscle arteries being the most severely affected, and were associated with myositis, atrophy, paresis/paralysis, and death. Histopathology showed fibrinoid vascular necrosis, rare amastigote nests within skeletal muscle myocytes, and massive leukocyte infiltrates composed mainly of inflammatory monocytes, F4/80(+)macrophages, and T. cruzi tetramer-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes capable of producing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) but not interleukin-17 (IL-17). T. cruzi-specific IgG was detected in sera from infected mice, but antibody deposits and neutrophilic inflammation were not features of the lesions. Thus,T. cruzi infection of mice may be a specific infectious trigger of paralyzing systemic necrotizing vasculitis most severely affecting skeletal muscle, driven by pathogen-specific type I immune responses. PMID:26857570

  13. An Update of the Mayo Clinic Cohort of Patients With Adult Primary Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Salvarani, Carlo; Brown, Robert D.; Christianson, Teresa; Miller, Dylan V.; Giannini, Caterina; Huston, John; Hunder, Gene G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) is an uncommon condition in which lesions are limited to vessels of the brain and spinal cord. Because the clinical manifestations are not specific, the diagnosis is often difficult, and permanent disability and death are frequent outcomes. This study is based on a cohort of 163 consecutive patients with PCNSV who were examined at the Mayo Clinic over a 29-year period from 1983 to 2011. The aim of the study was to define the characteristics of these patients, which represents the largest series in adults reported to date. A total of 105 patients were diagnosed by angiographic findings and 58 by biopsy results. The patients diagnosed by biopsy more frequently had at presentation cognitive dysfunction, greater cerebrospinal fluid total protein concentrations, less frequent cerebral infarcts, and more frequent leptomeningeal gadolinium-enhanced lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with less mortality and disability at last follow-up. The patients diagnosed by angiograms more frequently had at presentation hemiparesis or a persistent neurologic deficit or stroke, more frequent infarcts on MRI and an increased mortality. These differences were mainly related to the different size of the vessels involved in the 2 groups. Although most patients responded to therapy with glucocorticoids alone or in conjunction with cyclophosphamide and tended to improve during the follow-up period, an overall increased mortality rate was observed. Relapses occurred in one-quarter of the patients and were less frequent in patients treated with prednisone and cyclophosphamide compared with those treated with prednisone alone. The mortality rate and degree of disability at last follow-up were greater in those with increasing age, cerebral infarctions on MRI, angiographic large vessel involvement, and diagnosis made by angiography alone, but were lower in those with gadolinium-enhanced lesions on MRI and in those with

  14. Resistance to re-challenge in the Brown Norway rat model of vasculitis is not always complete and may reveal separate effector and regulatory populations

    PubMed Central

    Vinen, C S; Turner, D R; Oliveira, D B G

    2004-01-01

    Administration of mercuric chloride to Brown Norway rats results in T helper type 2 (Th2)- dominated autoimmunity characterized by high immunoglobulin E (IgE) concentrations, the production of multiple IgG autoantibodies, including those to glomerular basement membrane (GBM), arthritis and caecal vasculitis. After 14 days animals immunoregulate and auto-immunity resolves even if mercuric chloride injections are continued. In a third phase, if animals are re-challenged with mercuric chloride 6 weeks later, they show only attenuated autoimmunity with lower anti-GBM antibody concentrations and arthritis scores. Resistance to the induction of anti-GBM antibodies can also be achieved following an initial challenge with low-dose (one-tenth standard dose) mercuric chloride. We have now studied this resistant phase in more detail. We have shown, first, that following an initial full-dose mercuric chloride challenge, resistance also affects susceptibility to caecal vasculitis. Second, following an initial full-dose mercuric chloride challenge, the IgE response upon re-challenge is initially accelerated but subsequently enters a resistant phase and third, following an initial challenge with low-dose mercuric chloride, resistance is also seen to the induction of caecal vasculitis but is not seen in IgE serology (where results suggest competing effector and regulatory cell populations). Studying such regulatory phases in animal models of autoimmunity may be of benefit in the future in designing new therapies for human vasculitis. PMID:15379988

  15. The onset of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis immediately after methimazole was switched to propylthiouracil in a woman with Graves' disease who wished to become pregnant.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Moritsugu; Seki, Toshiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Ishihara, Toru; Komatsu, Masamichi; Tajiri, Sakurako; Yanagi, Hidetaka; Nishina, Makoto; Noh, Jaeduk Yoshimura; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Takagi, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) is recommended as a first-line antithyroid drug (ATD) during first trimester organogenesis in pregnancy because recent evidence suggests that methimazole (MMI) may be associated with congenital anomalies. However, PTU more commonly causes myeloperoxidase (MPO)-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, which usually occurs during prolonged treatment, compared with MMI. We report a case of MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis in a 35-year-old woman with Graves'disease. Although her thyroid function could be maintained euthyroid by MMI, her ATD was switched to PTU because she wished to become pregnant. The patient presented with flu-like symptoms 8 days after starting PTU and developed hemoptysis and dyspnea at 22 days. Her MPO-ANCA titer was 21 ELISA units (EUs) before PTU treatment but increased to 259 EUs at 22 days after PTU treatment. Her clinical condition improved with the discontinuation of PTU and with immunosuppressive therapy. This case indicated that MPO-ANCA vasculitis occurred within several weeks after the initiation of PTU and that this side effect could be caused by the change from MMI to PTU. Thus, our clinical observation suggests that patients treated with PTU should be carefully monitored for MPO-ANCA titers and variable manifestations of MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis regardless of the period of administration.

  16. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis Superimposed on Infection-related Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shuichi; Mizuno, Shige; Okachi, Shotaro; Aso, Hiromichi; Wakahara, Keiko; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Ito, Satoru; Kozaki, Yohei; Katsuno, Takayuki; Maruyama, Shoichi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection and received no treatment. Disease progression was evident one year later with the development of myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) titers and systemic symptoms of a fever, polyarthritis, purpura, and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Her symptoms did not improve with antibiotic treatment. A renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis with immunodeposition. According to these findings, she was diagnosed with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) superimposed on infection-related glomerulonephritis (IRGN). Although there was a risk of aggravating an underlying infection, the combination therapy of corticosteroid and antibiotics improved AAV, IRGN, and even the lung radiological findings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AAV and IRGN secondary to pulmonary MAC infection. PMID:27580547

  17. [A case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with short duration from the onset of asthma to diagnosis of vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Fuse, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman was hospitalized because of bronchial asthma and a high myeloperoxidase antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) level. She had suffered from rhinitis from one year before hospitalization, body weight loss from three months before, and asthma from one month before. On admission, she complained of dyspnea and body weight loss of over 6 kg. On laboratory tests, high MPO-ANCA and urinary abnormalities were found. On the next day, a renal biopsy was performed and histology showed necrotizing vasculitis with cellular crescents. Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) was diagnosed on the basis of the clinical course and histological findings. Prednisolone therapy induced rapid symptom remission, which was achieved within one month from the onset of asthma to the diagnosis of CSS. Early diagnosis and early care led to a good prognosis.

  18. Higher Serum Angiotensinogen Is an Indicator of IgA Vasculitis with Nephritis Revealed by Comparative Proteomes Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Jiangwei; Zhao, Peiwei; Yue, Xin; Yu, Chunhua; Laing, Xiaohui; Zhao, YuLan

    2015-01-01

    IgA vasculitis (IgAV), previously named as Henoch–Schönlein purpura, is the most common systematic vasculitis with unknown etiology. Lack of appropriate study system and/or animal model limits the understanding of its molecular pathogenesis and hinders the identification of targets for rational therapy, especially for its long-term complication, IgAV nephritis (IgAVN). In this study, we applied comparative analysis of serum proteomes to obtain an insight about disease pathogenesis. This study has utilized high sensitivity nanoscale ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) to investigate the alterations in serum proteomic profiles in patients with IgAV (n=6), IgAVN (n=6) and healthy subjects (n=7). The differentially expressed proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis by PANTHER and DAVID software. We identified 107 differentially expressed proteins among three different groups, and functional analysis suggested that, in addition to earlier reported pathways, such as acute phase response, immune response, complement and blood coagulation pathways, hemostasis and Wnt signaling pathway were probably involved in pathogenesis of IgAV. A few differentially abundant proteins identified, such as C4a, serum amyloid A, angiotensinogen, and kininogen 1, were further validated by ELISA. More importantly, we found that angiotensinogen concentration is correlated with IgAVN and could be used as a potential marker for the progression of IgAV. This is the first report of analyzing the proteomic alterations in IgAV patients and the differentially proteins identified in this study may enhance understanding of the pathology of IgAV and a few of them may be used to monitor disease progression. PMID:26098644

  19. Immune complexes activate human endothelium involving the cell-signaling HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of lupus vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenping; Jiao, Yulian; Cui, Bin; Gao, Xuejun; Xia, Yu; Zhao, Yueran

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the formation of immune complexes (ICs), which contain a complex mixture of autoantigens nucleic acids, nucleic acids-associated proteins and corresponding autoantibodies. In SLE, ICs are deposited in multiple organs. Vasculopathy and vasculitis in SLE are typical complications and are associated with deposition of ICs on endothelium, endothelial activation and inflammatory cell infiltration. However, the effects of ICs on endothelial cells and the mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time that ICs upregulated cell surface expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), increased the secretion of the chemokines interleukin 8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), the proinflammatoy cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and promoted the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB p65 in human endothelial cells (P<0.05). ICs also increased transendothelial migration of monocytes (P<0.05). One of the mechanisms underlying these activating effects of ICs on human endothelial cells involves cell signaling by high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1)-RAGE axis, as these effects can be partially blocked by HMGB1 A-box, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), SB203580, PD98059, Bay 117082 (P<0.05) and co-treatment with these agents (P<0.05). In conclusion, ICs elicit proinflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and alter their function involving cellular signaling via the HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of SLE vasculitis. PMID:23628898

  20. Neutrophilic Dermatoses in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis: A French Multicenter Study of 17 Cases and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    de Boysson, Hubert; Martin Silva, Nicolas; de Moreuil, Claire; Néel, Antoine; de Menthon, Mathilde; Meyer, Olivier; Launay, David; Pagnoux, Christian; Guillevin, Loïc; Puéchal, Xavier; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2016-03-01

    A few reports suggest combination of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and neutrophilic dermatoses (ND). We aimed to describe the main characteristics of patients presenting with both AAV and ND in a French cohort and through a systematic literature review, and to discuss the possible common pathogenic process involved. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with both conditions. Patients were selected via the French Internal Medicine Society (SNFMI) and the French Vasculitis Study Group (FVSG). A literature review focusing on a combination of both conditions, concentrated only on publications with well-established diagnoses and individual detailed data. Seventeen patients diagnosed with AAV and ND were identified in this cohort. Twelve patients had granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 4 had microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and one had eosinophilic GPA (EGPA). Eight patients, all with GPA, displayed pyoderma gangrenosum (PG). Sweet's syndrome was observed in 6 patients (4 with MPA, one with GPA and one with EGPA) and erythema elevatum diutinum in the other three (2 with GPA and 1 with MPA). The literature review identified 33 additional patients with both conditions, including 26 with GPA. Altogether, of the 50 patients (17 from our study and 33 from the literature review), 33 (66%) patients presented with PG associated with GPA in 29 cases (89%). Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment in conjunction with an immunosuppressive agent in most cases. Outcomes were good and a total of 15 patients experienced a relapse. Patients who relapsed were more likely to have ear, nose and throat manifestation than patients who did not [12/15 (80%) relapsing patients vs. 15/35 (43%) non-relapsing patients; p = 0.03)]. In our stud, the most frequent association concerned GPA and PG. ND should be considered and specifically researched within the spectrum of cutaneous manifestations observed in AAV.

  1. Immune complexes activate human endothelium involving the cell-signaling HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of lupus vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenping; Jiao, Yulian; Cui, Bin; Gao, Xuejun; Xia, Yu; Zhao, Yueran

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the formation of immune complexes (ICs), which contain a complex mixture of autoantigens nucleic acids, nucleic acids-associated proteins and corresponding autoantibodies. In SLE, ICs are deposited in multiple organs. Vasculopathy and vasculitis in SLE are typical complications and are associated with deposition of ICs on endothelium, endothelial activation and inflammatory cell infiltration. However, the effects of ICs on endothelial cells and the mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time that ICs upregulated cell surface expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), increased the secretion of the chemokines interleukin 8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), the proinflammatoy cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and promoted the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB p65 in human endothelial cells (P<0.05). ICs also increased transendothelial migration of monocytes (P<0.05). One of the mechanisms underlying these activating effects of ICs on human endothelial cells involves cell signaling by high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1)-RAGE axis, as these effects can be partially blocked by HMGB1 A-box, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), SB203580, PD98059, Bay 117082 (P<0.05) and co-treatment with these agents (P<0.05). In conclusion, ICs elicit proinflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and alter their function involving cellular signaling via the HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of SLE vasculitis.

  2. Successful Treatment of Dual-Positive Anti-Myeloperoxidase and Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibody Vasculitis with Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinxian; Wu, Ling; Huang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Yan; Yu, Jinquan; Yang, Jin; Fang, Huiqiong; Zhang, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis and anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease are two separate diseases, while sometimes they can coexist together. The exact mechanisms are not clear, but due to the rapid progression and poor prognosis, prompt and aggressive treatment is usually required. We treated with steroids combined with cyclophosphamide and rituximab an 84-year-old man with ANCA-associated vasculitis and anti-GBM disease who had prior pulmonary fibrosis and a coexisting anterosuperior mediastinal mass. Conventional therapy including steroids, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide failed to attenuate the anti-GBM disease, yet he responded to an alternative treatment of rituximab. This case suggests the efficacy of steroids and immunosuppressant for the treatment of a dual-positive case with an anterosuperior mediastinal mass. PMID:26889474

  3. Rituximab: Recommendations of the French Vasculitis Study Group (FVSG) for induction and maintenance treatments of adult, antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated necrotizing vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Charles, Pierre; Bienvenu, Boris; Bonnotte, Bernard; Gobert, Pierre; Godmer, Pascal; Hachulla, Éric; Hamidou, Mohamed; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Karras, Alexandre; Lega, Jean-Christophe; Le Quellec, Alain; Mahr, Alfred D; Mouthon, Luc; Papo, Thomas; Puéchal, Xavier; Pugnet, Gregory; Samson, Maxime; Sibilia, Jean; Terrier, Benjamin; Vandergheynst, Frederick; Guillevin, Loïc

    2013-10-01

    Increasing rituximab prescription for ANCA-associated necrotizing vasculitides justifies the publication of recommendations for clinicians. Rituximab is approved in the United States to induce and maintain remission. In Europe, rituximab was recently approved for remission induction. However, governmental agencies' approvals cannot replace clinical practice guidelines. Herein, the French Vasculitis Study Group Recommendations Committee, comprised of physicians with extensive experience in the treatment of vasculitides, presents its consensus guidelines based on literature analysis, the results of prospective therapeutic trials and personal experience.

  4. Levamisole-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis and neutropenia in a patient with cocaine use: An extensive case with necrosis of skin, soft tissue, and cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Levamisole-induced vasculitis is a relatively new entity in people who use cocaine. We describe a 44-year-old woman with a history of cocaine use who presented with a complaint of a painful rash of 2-3 month’s duration on her extremities, cheeks, nose, and earlobes. She had not experienced fever, weight loss, alopecia, dry eyes, oral ulcers, photosensitivity, or arthralgia. Examination revealed tender purpuric eruptions with central necrosis on her nose, cheeks, earlobes, and extremities. Laboratory investigations revealed neutropenia, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), presence of lupus anticoagulant, low complement component 3 (C3), and presence of perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (p-ANCA). A urine toxicology screen was positive for cocaine, and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry was positive for levamisole. Skin biopsy showed leukocytoclastic vasculitis and small vessel thrombosis. Necrotic lesions of the nose led to its self-amputation. Large bullae on the lower extremities ruptured, leading to wound infection and extensive necrosis that required multiple surgical debridements. When necrosis progressed despite debridement, bilateral above-knee amputation of the legs was performed. Once new lesions stopped appearing, the patient was discharged home. Two months later, she had a recurrence related to cocaine use. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of levamisole-induced vasculitis that required above-knee amputation. PMID:23186390

  5. Propylthiouracil-Induced Vasculitis With Alveolar Hemorrhage Confirmed by Clinical, Laboratory, Computed Tomography, and Bronchoscopy Findings: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Xiaoqing; Sun, Shihai; Guo, Weina; Li, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Zhongliang; Han, Jie; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Propylthiouracil (PTU) is commonly used to treat hyperthyroidism and can induce antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. Although this is a rare side effect, ANCA-associated vasculitis can progress to severe disease if its diagnosis and treatment are delayed, leading to a poor prognosis. Case Presentation A 43-year-old woman with Graves’ disease developed pulmonary vasculitis and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with ANCA against myeloperoxidase and proteinase-3 that was confirmed by computed tomography (CT) and bronchoscopy and treated with PTU. The symptoms and signs of alveolar hemorrhage were rapidly resolved after PTU withdrawal and treatment with corticosteroids. After 6 months of follow-up, the patient maintained complete ANCA-negative clinical remission status, as confirmed by normal CT and bronchoscopy findings. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of bronchoscopic comparison of PTU-induced DAH before and after steroid treatment. Conclusions Patients treated with PTU should be closely monitored and followed up, even if the drug has been used for several years. When patients develop progressive dyspnea with alveolar opacities on chest imaging that cannot be explained otherwise, alveolar hemorrhage should be an important differential diagnosis while investigating the case. Early diagnosis and prompt discontinuation of the PTU treatment are essential for improving patient outcomes. PMID:27257510

  6. Tissue microscopic changes and artifacts in multi-phase post-mortem computed tomography angiography in a hospital setting: a fatal case of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Caroline; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Marcheix, Bertrand; Rousseau, Hervé; Telmon, Norbert; Rougé, Daniel; Dedouit, Fabrice

    2014-09-01

    A 27-year-old man suddenly died in hospital of acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to severe systemic vasculitis. Multi-phase post-mortem computed tomography angiography followed by scientific autopsy of the thoracic and abdominal cavity and histology was performed, illustrating the advantages and drawbacks of such techniques. Imaging enabled us to examine the cranium, as the family refused cerebral dissection. MPMCTA revealed absence of opacification of the left middle cerebral artery. But parenchymal findings of thoracic and abdominal organs were still difficult to interpret after both imaging and macroscopic examination during the autopsy. Microscopic examination provided the definitive diagnosis of cause of death. Analysis revealed systemic vasculitis of the lung complicated by diffuse alveolar, mediastinal, splenic and retroperitoneal lesions. We were unable to determine the type of vasculitis, whether polyarteritis nodosa or microscopic polyangiitis, because of artifactual glomerular collapse. We observed some structural changes in tissue secondary to contrast agent injection, affecting the vascular system and renal parenchyma in particular. Such artifacts must be known in order to avoid misinterpreting them as pathological findings. MPMCTA and conventional autopsy are two complementary techniques showing both their specific advantages and limits which have to be known in order to choose the appropriate technique. One limit of both techniques is the detection of microscopic findings which can only be obtained by additional histological examination. This case report underlines this fact and demonstrates that caution is required in some cases if microscopic analyses are carried out after contrast agent injection.

  7. Clinical presentation and outcome prediction of clinical, serological, and histopathological classification schemes in ANCA-associated vasculitis with renal involvement.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Sánchez, Bertha M; Mejía-Vilet, Juan M; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E; Loyola-Rodríguez, Georgina; Uribe-Uribe, Norma O; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Several classification schemes have been developed for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), with actual debate focusing on their clinical and prognostic performance. Sixty-two patients with renal biopsy-proven AAV from a single center in Mexico City diagnosed between 2004 and 2013 were analyzed and classified under clinical (granulomatosis with polyangiitis [GPA], microscopic polyangiitis [MPA], renal limited vasculitis [RLV]), serological (proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies [PR3-ANCA], myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies [MPO-ANCA], ANCA negative), and histopathological (focal, crescenteric, mixed-type, sclerosing) categories. Clinical presentation parameters were compared at baseline between classification groups, and the predictive value of different classification categories for disease and renal remission, relapse, renal, and patient survival was analyzed. Serological classification predicted relapse rate (PR3-ANCA hazard ratio for relapse 2.93, 1.20-7.17, p = 0.019). There were no differences in disease or renal remission, renal, or patient survival between clinical and serological categories. Histopathological classification predicted response to therapy, with a poorer renal remission rate for sclerosing group and those with less than 25 % normal glomeruli; in addition, it adequately delimited 24-month glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) evolution, but it did not predict renal nor patient survival. On multivariate models, renal replacement therapy (RRT) requirement (HR 8.07, CI 1.75-37.4, p = 0.008) and proteinuria (HR 1.49, CI 1.03-2.14, p = 0.034) at presentation predicted renal survival, while age (HR 1.10, CI 1.01-1.21, p = 0.041) and infective events during the induction phase (HR 4.72, 1.01-22.1, p = 0.049) negatively influenced patient survival. At present, ANCA-based serological classification may predict AAV relapses, but neither clinical nor serological

  8. A case of polyarteritis nodosa complicated by left central retinal artery occlusion, ischemic optic neuropathy, and retinal vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Emad, Y; Basaffar, S; Ragab, Y; Zeinhom, F; Gheita, T

    2007-05-01

    A 23-year-old single female patient developed constitutional manifestations in the form of fever, weight loss, anorexia, malaise, fatigue, and generalized aches in January 1995, 2 weeks after an attack of German measles. This was followed by painful, reddish, macular skin lesions over both legs which healed by dark pigmentation (leucocytoclastic vasculitis), mononeuritis multiplex, and Raynaud's phenomena of both hands and feet. Angiography of lower limbs was done to visualize the arterial tree of both lower limbs and revealed typical beading of distal arterial branches, a diagnosis compatible with polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). At that time, the patient received prednisone (45 mg/day) and azatioprin (100 mg/day) and responded well to treatment. In a second presentation in June 2005, the patient developed sudden attack of loss of vision in her left eye. Ophthalmological examination of the patient revealed evidence of left central retinal artery occlusion, ischemic optic neuropathy. The patient received methyl prednisolone, 1 g IV infusion, daily infusion for three consecutive days followed by oral prednisolone, 30 mg/day. The patient received pulse cyclophosphamide IV infusion (0.6 g/m2) on the fourth day. One week after receiving therapy, the patient progressed from having light perception to counting of fingers from a distance of 1 m.

  9. A case report of Epstein–Barr virus-associated retinal vasculitis: successful treatment using only acyclovir therapy

    PubMed Central

    Keorochana, Narumon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a presumed case of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-associated retinal vasculitis in a 42-year-old female with sudden unilateral vision loss and successful treatment with acyclovir therapy. Diagnostic vitreous biopsy of the right eye was performed to test for EBV and other known infectious causes of retinitis and evaluate vitreous cells and serological testing. Vitreous polymerase chain reaction viral DNA testing result was positive for EBV but negative for herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, and cytomegalovirus. Serologic testing was negative for toxoplasma gondii, syphilis, tuberculosis, and HIV. Histopathologic analysis of vitreous cells revealed atypical lymphocytes. Fluorescein angiography showed disk leakage, occluded retinal artery, peripheral vascular leakage, and ischemic area of the right eye. Intravenous acyclovir, 10 mg/kg/d, was prescribed for 14 days followed by oral acyclovir for 3 months. All lesions have become quiet. EBV may be a cause of retinal disease, and intravenous acyclovir is a successful treatment choice. PMID:27524923

  10. A case report of Epstein-Barr virus-associated retinal vasculitis: successful treatment using only acyclovir therapy.

    PubMed

    Keorochana, Narumon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a presumed case of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated retinal vasculitis in a 42-year-old female with sudden unilateral vision loss and successful treatment with acyclovir therapy. Diagnostic vitreous biopsy of the right eye was performed to test for EBV and other known infectious causes of retinitis and evaluate vitreous cells and serological testing. Vitreous polymerase chain reaction viral DNA testing result was positive for EBV but negative for herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, and cytomegalovirus. Serologic testing was negative for toxoplasma gondii, syphilis, tuberculosis, and HIV. Histopathologic analysis of vitreous cells revealed atypical lymphocytes. Fluorescein angiography showed disk leakage, occluded retinal artery, peripheral vascular leakage, and ischemic area of the right eye. Intravenous acyclovir, 10 mg/kg/d, was prescribed for 14 days followed by oral acyclovir for 3 months. All lesions have become quiet. EBV may be a cause of retinal disease, and intravenous acyclovir is a successful treatment choice. PMID:27524923

  11. ANCA-positive vasculitis induced by levamisole-adulterated cocaine and nephrotic syndrome: The kidney as an unusual target

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez Díaz, Hortensia; Marińo Callejo, Ana Isabel; García Rodríguez, José Francisco; Rodríguez Pazos, Laura; Gómez Buela, Inmaculada; Bermejo Barrera, Ana María

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 36 Final Diagnosis: Levamisole-induced vasculopathy Symptoms: Purpuric skin lesions Medication: Levamisole Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Internal Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Levamisole has been detected in seized cocaine samples and a levamisole-induced vasculopathy (LIV) has been described, mainly focused on skin. Case Report: A 36-year-old Caucasian man with history of antibodies to hepatitis C infection (negative hepatitis C virus RNA and negative HIV serology), smoking, and intravenous use of cocaine and brown heroin, presented to the hospital with purpuric skin lesions on extremities and earlobes. One month before the current presentation, a skin punch biopsy of one of these lesions was performed, showing histopathologic findings suggestive of mixed cryoglobulinemia. Laboratory testing revealed leukopenia, renal failure, and nephrotic syndrome. Antimyeloperoxidase antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (MPO-ANCA) were positive. The previous skin punch biopsy was revised and demonstrated pathologic findings consistent with leukocytoclastic vasculitis. An analysis of a cocaine sample for personal use, provided by the patient, was performed using mass spectrometry-gas chromatography and levamisole was detected. Three boluses of intravenous methylprednisolone were administered, followed by oral prednisone 1 mg/Kg per day. Skin lesions and renal function improved. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report of nephrotic syndrome induced by levamisole-adulterated cocaine, proven by cocaine sample toxicology. Lack of renal biopsy is a limitation of this report. PMID:24478818

  12. PUPPP (Pruritic Urticarial Papules Plaques of Pregnancy)

    MedlinePlus

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  13. Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis with hypocomplementemia has a higher incidence of serious organ damage and a poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Shoichi; Iwamoto, Naoki; Umeda, Masataka; Nishino, Ayako; Nakashima, Yoshikazu; Koga, Tomohiro; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Hirai, Yasuko; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Sato, Shuntaro; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    A relationship between antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) and complement has been shown, and complement has an important role in the pathogenesis of AAV. The clinical characteristics of AAV with hypocomplementemia still remain unclear.We conducted an observational study of 81 patients with AAV (median onset age 71 years; 58% female). Using medical records, we analyzed the patients' baseline variables, laboratory data, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic outcomes after treatments including episodes of relapses, initiation of dialysis, and death. We defined hypocomplementemia as the state in which at least one of the following was lower than the lower limit of the normal range: complement 3 (C3), complement 4 (C4), and total complement activity (CH50).Sixteen patients (20%) had hypocomplementemia at their diagnosis of AAV. Compared to the AAV patients without hypocomplementemia (n = 65), those with hypocomplementemia had significantly higher rates of the occurrence of skin lesions (8 [50%] vs. 8 [12%], P = 0.002), diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) (6 [38%] vs. 5 [8%], P = 0.006), and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) (3 [19%] vs. 0 [0%], P = 0.007). The AAV patients with hypocomplementemia had significantly lower platelet levels (16.5 × 10 vs. 24.9 × 10 cells/μL, P = 0.023) compared to those without hypocomplementemia. More positive immune complex deposits in renal biopsy specimens were seen in the AAV patients with hypocomplementemia than in those without hypocomplementemia (4 [80%] vs. 2 [18%], P = 0.036). Assessed by a log-rank test, hypocomplementemia at disease onset was significantly associated with death (P = 0.033).Hypocomplementemia in AAV at the disease onset was a risk factor for the serious organ damage, and a life prognostic factor. It is thus very important to pay attention to the levels of complement at the diagnosis of AAV. PMID:27631255

  14. Decreased Numbers of Blood Dendritic Cells and Defective Function of Regulatory T Cells in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rimbert, Marie; Hamidou, Mohamed; Braudeau, Cécile; Puéchal, Xavier; Teixeira, Luis; Caillon, Hélène; Néel, Antoine; Audrain, Marie; Guillevin, Loic; Josien, Régis

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DC) and regulatory cells (Treg) play pivotal roles in controlling both normal and autoimmune adaptive immune responses. DC are the main antigen-presenting cells to T cells, and they also control Treg functions. In this study, we examined the frequency and phenotype of DC subsets, and the frequency and function of Treg from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Methodology/Principal Findings Blood samples from 19 untreated patients with AAV during flares and before any immunosuppressive treatment were analyzed, along with 15 AAV patients in remission and 18 age-matched healthy controls. DC and Treg numbers, and phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry, and in vitro suppressive function of Treg was determined by co-culture assay. When compared to healthy volunteers, absolute numbers of conventional and plasmacytoid DC were decreased in AAV patients. During the acute phase this decrease was significantly more pronounced and was associated with an increased DC expression of CD62L. Absolute numbers of Treg (CD4+CD25highCD127low/− Tcells) were moderately decreased in patients. FOXP3 and CD39 were expressed at similar levels on Treg from patients as compared to controls. The suppressive function of Treg from AAV patients was dramatically decreased as compared to controls, and this defect was more pronounced during flares than remission. This Treg functional deficiency occurred in the absence of obvious Th17 deviation. Conclusion In conclusion, these data show that AAV flares are associated with both a decrease number and altered phenotype of circulating DC and point to a role for Treg functional deficiency in the pathogenesis of AAV. PMID:21494636

  15. Mycophenolate mofetil in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis: a prospective pharmacokinetics and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, B; Gatault, P; Darrouzain, F; Barbet, C; Degenne, D; François, M; Szymanski, P; Rabot, N; Golea, G; Diot, E; Maillot, F; Lebranchu, Y; Nivet, H; Paintaud, G; Halimi, J-M; Guillevin, L; Büchler, M

    2014-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) treatment strategy is based on immunosuppressive agents. Little information is available concerning mycophenolic acid (MPA) and the area under the curve (AUC) in patients treated for AAV. We evaluated the variations in pharmacokinetics for MPA in patients with AAV and the relationship between MPA-AUC and markers of the disease. MPA blood concentrations were measured through the enzyme-multiplied immunotechnique (C(0), C(30), C(1), C(2), C(3), C(4), C(6) and C(9)) to determine the AUC. Eighteen patients were included in the study. The median (range) MPA AUC(0-12) was 50·55 (30·9-105·4) mg/h/l. The highest coefficient of determination between MPA AUC and single concentrations was observed with C(3) (P < 0·0001) and C(2) (P < 0·0001) and with C(4) (P < 0·0005) or C(0) (P < 0·001). Using linear regression, the best estimation of MPA AUC was provided by a model including C(30), C(2) and C(4): AUC = 8·5 + 0·77 C(30) + 4·0 C(2) + 1·7 C(4) (P < 0·0001). Moreover, there was a significant relationship between MPA AUC(0-12) and lymphocyte count (P < 0·01), especially CD19 (P < 0·005), CD8 (P < 0·05) and CD56 (P < 0·05). Our results confirm the interindividual variability of MPA AUC in patients treated with MMF in AAV and support a personalized therapy according to blood levels of MPA.

  16. Establishment of a vascular endothelial cell-reactive type II NKT cell clone from a rat model of autoimmune vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Chihiro; Waki, Masashi; Kawakami, Ai; Yamaguchi, Madoka; Tomaru, Utano; Sasaki, Naomi; Masuda, Sakiko; Matsui, Yuki; Iwasaki, Sari; Baba, Tomohisa; Kasahara, Masanori; Yoshiki, Takashi; Paletta, Daniel; Herrmann, Thomas; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2015-02-01

    We previously generated a rat model that spontaneously developed small vessel vasculitis (SVV). In this study, a T cell clone reactive with rat vascular endothelial cells (REC) was established and named VASC-1. Intravenous injection of VASC-1 induced SVV in normal recipients. VASC-1 was a TCRαβ/CD3-positive CD4/CD8 double-negative T cell clone with expression of NKG2D. The cytokine mRNA profile under unstimulated condition was positive for IL-4 and IFN-γ but negative for IL-2 and IL-10. After interaction with REC, the mRNA expression of IL-2, IL-5 and IL-6 was induced in VASC-1, which was inhibited by blocking of CD1d on the REC surface. Although the protein levels of these cytokines seemed to be lower than the detection limit in the culture medium, IFN-γ was detectable. The production of IFN-γ from the VASC-1 stimulated with LPS-pre-treated REC was inhibited by the CD1d blockade on the REC. These findings indicated VASC-1 as an NKT cell clone. The NKT cell pool includes two major subsets, namely types I and II. Type I NKT cells are characterized by expression of semi-invariant TCRs and the potential to bind to marine sponge-derived α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) loaded on CD1d; whereas, type II NKT cells do not manifest these characteristics. VASC-1 exhibited a usage of TCR other than the type I invariant TCR α chain and did not bind to α-GalCer-loaded CD1d; therefore, it was determined as a type II NKT cell clone. The collective evidence suggested that REC-reactive type II NKT cells could be involved in the pathogenesis of SVV in rats.

  17. Increased Expression of Toll-Like Receptors by Monocytes and Natural Killer Cells in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Tadema, Henko; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Heeringa, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of receptors that sense pathogen associated patterns such as bacterial cell wall proteins. Bacterial infections are associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). Here, we assessed the expression of TLRs 2, 4, and 9 by peripheral blood leukocytes from patients with AAV, and investigated TLR mediated responses ex vivo. Methods Expression of TLRs was determined in 38 AAV patients (32 remission, 6 active disease), and 20 healthy controls (HC). Membrane expression of TLRs 2, 4, and 9, and intracellular expression of TLR9 by B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, NK cells, monocytes and granulocytes was assessed using 9-color flowcytometry. Whole blood from 13 patients and 7 HC was stimulated ex vivo with TLR 2, 4 and 9 ligands and production of cytokines was analyzed. Results In patients, we observed increased proportions of TLR expressing NK cells. Furthermore, patient monocytes expressed higher levels of TLR2 compared to HC, and in a subset of patients an increased proportion of TLR4+ monocytes was observed. Monocytes from nasal carriers of Staphylococcus aureus expressed increased levels of intracellular TLR9. Membrane expression of TLRs by B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, and granulocytes was comparable between AAV patients and HC. Patients with active disease did not show differential TLR expression compared to patients in remission. Ex vivo responses to TLR ligands did not differ significantly between patients and HC. Conclusions In AAV, monocytes and NK cells display increased TLR expression. Increased TLR expression by these leukocytes, probably resulting from increased activation, could play a role in disease (re)activation. PMID:21915309

  18. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis Overlap Syndrome in Patients With Biopsy-Proven Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Jarrot, Pierre-Andre; Chiche, Laurent; Hervier, Baptiste; Daniel, Laurent; Vuiblet, Vincent; Bardin, Nathalie; Bertin, Daniel; Terrier, Benjamin; Amoura, Zahir; Andrés, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Eric; Hamidou, Mohamed; Pennaforte, Jean-Loup; Halfon, Philippe; Daugas, Eric; Dussol, Bertrand; Puéchal, Xavier; Kaplanski, Gilles; Jourde-Chiche, Noemie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to report the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)/antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) overlap syndrome. A nationwide survey was conducted to identify cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. Data were collected from SLE and AAV French research groups. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of both SLE and AAV according to international classification criteria and biopsy-proven GN between 1995 and 2014. Additional cases were identified through a systematic literature review. A cohort of consecutive biopsy-proven GN was used to study the prevalence of overlapping antibodies and/or overlap syndrome. The national survey identified 8 cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. All patients were female; median age was 40 years. AAV occurred before SLE (n = 3), after (n = 3), or concomitantly (n = 2). Six patients had rapidly progressive GN and 3/8 had alveolar hemorrhage. All patients had antinuclear antibodies (ANA); 7/8 had p-ANCA antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies. Renal biopsies showed lupus nephritis (LN) or pauci-immune GN. Remission was obtained in 4/8 patients. A literature review identified 31 additional cases with a similarly severe presentation. In the GN cohort, ANCA positivity was found in 30% of LN, ANA positivity in 52% of pauci-immune GN, with no correlation with pathological findings. The estimated prevalence for SLE/AAV overlap syndrome was 2/101 (2%). In patients with GN, SLE/AAV overlap syndrome may occur but with a low prevalence. Most patients have an aggressive renal presentation, with usually both ANA and anti-MPO antibodies. Further studies are needed to assess shared pathogenesis and therapeutic options. PMID:27258503

  19. T lymphocyte responses to anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) antigens are present in patients with ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis and persist during disease remission

    PubMed Central

    King, W J; Brooks, C J; Holder, R; Hughes, P; Adu, D; Savage, C O S

    1998-01-01

    ANCA with specificity for myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3) are present in patients with systemic vasculitis. The aim of this work was to determine whether such patients have T cell responses to these antigens and whether these responses are related to disease activity. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 45 patients and 19 controls were cultured with ANCA antigens and proliferation measured. The antigens used were heat-inactivated (HI) MPO, HI PR3, native (non-HI) PR3, HI whole α-granules, and 25 overlapping peptides covering the entire PR3 sequence. Significant responses to both whole PR3 preparations were seen from patient and control groups, and to the α-granules from the patient group. Patients responded at all stages of disease: active, remitting, treated or untreated. Only two patients responded significantly to MPO. Responses were significantly higher with the patient group than the control group to all four whole ANCA antigens. Responses to those PR3 peptides containing epitopes known to be recognized by ANCA were detected from one patient. Thus, these studies demonstrate that T cells from vasculitis patients can proliferate to PR3 and occasionally to associated ANCA antigens. Further, responses may persist even after disease remission has been achieved. PMID:9649227

  20. Fibroblasts express OvHV-2 capsid protein in vasculitis lesions of American bison (Bison bison) with experimental sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Danielle D; Taus, Naomi S; Schneider, David A; Cunha, Cristina W; Davis, William C; Brown, Wendy C; Li, Hong; O'Toole, Donal; Oaks, J Lindsay

    2013-10-25

    American bison (Bison bison) are particularly susceptible to developing fatal sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) caused by ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2), a γ-herpesvirus in the Macavirus genus. This generally fatal disease is characterized by lymphoproliferation, vasculitis, and mucosal ulceration in American bison, domestic cattle (Bos taurus), and other clinically susceptible species which are considered non-adapted, dead-end hosts. The pathogenesis and cellular tropism of OvHV-2 infection have not been fully defined. An earlier study detected OvHV-2 open reading frame 25 (ORF25) transcripts encoding the viral major capsid protein in tissues of bison with SA-MCF, and levels of viral transcript expression positively correlated with lesion severity. To further define the cellular tropism and replication of OvHV-2 infection in vascular lesions of bison, immunofluorescence studies were performed to identify cell type(s) expressing ORF25 protein within tissues. Cytoplasmic and not nuclear ORF25 protein was demonstrated in predominantly perivascular fibroblasts in six bison with experimentally-induced SA-MCF, and there was no evidence of immunoreactivity in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, or infiltrating leukocytes. The cytoplasmic distribution of viral major capsid protein suggests that viral replication in perivascular fibroblasts may be abortive in this dead-end host. These findings provide a novel foundation for defining the pathogenesis of vasculitis in non-adapted hosts with SA-MCF.

  1. Intermediate monocytes in ANCA vasculitis: increased surface expression of ANCA autoantigens and IL-1β secretion in response to anti-MPO antibodies

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Eóin C.; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Rutgers, Abraham; Huitema, Minke G.; O’Reilly, Vincent P.; Coughlan, Alice M.; Harrington, Mark; Heeringa, Peter; Little, Mark A.; Hickey, Fionnuala B.

    2015-01-01

    ANCA vasculitis encompasses several autoimmune conditions characterised by destruction of small vessels, inflammation of the respiratory tract and glomerulonephritis. Most patients harbour autoantibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3). Clinical and experimental data suggest that pathogenesis is driven by ANCA-mediated activation of neutrophils and monocytes. We investigated a potential role for distinct monocyte subsets. We found that the relative proportion of intermediate monocytes is increased in patients versus control individuals, and both MPO and PR3 are preferentially expressed on these cells. We demonstrate that MPO and PR3 are expressed independently of each other on monocytes and that PR3 is not associated with CD177. MPO expression correlates with that of Fc receptor CD16 on intermediate monocytes. Monocyte subsets respond differently to antibodies directed against MPO and PR3, with anti-MPO but not anti-PR3 leading to increased IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 production. In concordance with the observed higher surface expression of MPO on intermediate monocytes, this subset produces the highest quantity of IL-1β in response to anti-MPO stimulation. These data suggest that monocytes, specifically, the intermediate subset, may play a role in ANCA vasculitis, and also indicate that substantial differences exist between the effect of anti-MPO and anti-PR3 antibodies on these cells. PMID:26149790

  2. CD8+/perforin+/WC1- gammadelta T cells, CD8+ alphabeta T cells, infiltrate vasculitis lesions of American bison (Bison bison) with experimental sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) caused by ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) is a fatal disease associated with lymphoproliferation, lymphocytic vasculitis, and mucosal ulceration in clinically susceptible species. SA-MCF is an important threat to American bison (Bison bison) due to th...

  3. Types of Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... This Content: NEXT >> Updated: September 23, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  4. Observational Study of the Genetic Architecture of Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Other Specified Inflammatory Disorders of Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue; Pyoderma Gangrenosum; Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp; Sweet's Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Bowel-associated Dermatosis-arthritis Syndrome; Pustular Psoriasis; Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis; Keratoderma Blenorrhagicum; Sneddon-Wilkinson Disease; IgA Pemphigus; Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds; Infantile Acropustulosis; Transient Neonatal Pustulosis; Neutrophilic Eccrine Hidradenitis; Rheumatoid Neutrophilic Dermatitis; Neutrophilic Urticaria; Still's Disease; Erythema Marginatum; Unclassified Periodic Fever Syndromes / Autoinflammatory Syndromes; Dermatitis Herpetiformis; Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis; Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Inflammatory Epidermolysis Bullosa Aquisita; Neutrophilic Dermatosis of the Dorsal Hands (Pustular Vasculitis); Small Vessel Vasculitis Including Urticarial Vasculitis; Erythema Elevatum Diutinum; Medium Vessel Vasculitis

  5. No strong association between alleles of tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and corneal melting associated with systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    McKibbin, M; Clark, B; Lee, H; Isaacs, J; Gooi, H; Morrell, A

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate polymorphism within the tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) promoter region and within the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) gene in a group of patients with vasculitis associated corneal melting.
METHODS—The polymorphic regions at position -308 on the TNF-α promoter region and in intron 2 of the IL-1Ra gene were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The resultant products were separated by electrophoresis on agarose gels and visualised by ethidium bromide staining. Genotype and allele frequencies for the 20 patients were compared with healthy controls from the same geographical area.
RESULTS—The allele frequencies in the patient and control groups respectively for the TNF-α and IL-1Ra sites studied were as follows: TNF1, 82.5% and 80.2%; TNF2, 17.5% and 19.8%; IL-1Ra*1, 82.5% and 78.3%; IL-1Ra*2, 15% and 20%; IL-1Ra*3 2.5% and 1.5%. Although there was a trend for the IL1Ra*2 allele to be more common in the control group, no allele was found to have a statistically significantly association with the patient group: TNF1 p = 0.89; TNF2 p = 0.89; IL-1Ra*1 p = 0.65; IL-1Ra*2 p = 0.68; IL-1Ra*3 p= 0.50.
CONCLUSIONS—The results suggest that the polymorphic alleles of TNF-α and IL-1Ra studied play little or no part in the susceptibility to corneal melting among these patients with systemic vasculitis.

 PMID:10729297

  6. Emergency testing for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies combined with a dialog-based policy between clinician and biologist: effectiveness for the diagnosis of ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sayegh, Johnny; Poli, Caroline; Chevailler, Alain; Subra, Jean-François; Beloncle, François; Deguigne, Pierre Antoine; Beauvillain, Céline; Augusto, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    A prompt immunosuppressive treatment initiation is crucial in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) to minimize organ injury. The aim of the present work was to analyze the accuracy of emergency ANCA screening to identify rapidly patients with AAV. In our Institution, emergency ANCA screening is based on a telephone call between a Clinician and a Biologist. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) for ANCA detection was performed using a commercial kit (Euroimmun(®) Granulocyte Mosaic 12). Positive serums for c- or p-ANCA at IIF are subsequently screened for antigenic specificity (MPO or PR3) by an immunodot technique (immunodot, D-Tek(®).) Positive samples with atypical c- or p-ANCA pattern at IIF are subsequently screened for antigenic specificity by ELISA. Data were retrieved from patients' medical records and confronted to emergency ANCA screening results. Between 2005 and 2012, 114 patients were screened. IIF was positive in 27.2% of patients, but c-/p-ANCA anti-MPO/-PR3 was detected in 13.2% of patients. The sensibility and specificity of IIF combined with immunodot for newly diagnosed AAV were 83.3 and 100%, respectively. Ten patients were newly diagnosed with AAV. In these patients, a specific AAV treatment was initiated less than 24 h following ANCA screening. Emergency ANCA screening based on a clinical gating policy was relevant to identify patients with AAV diagnosis, and was associated with a rapid treatment initiation. PMID:25343851

  7. Granulomatous slack skin - seven years follow-up of a case with features of "parapsoriasis en plaques", muscle involvement, granulomatous vasculitis, and necrobiotic changes.

    PubMed

    ChiriŢă, Aurel Doru; Mărgăritescu, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatous slack skin (GSS) represents an extremely rare variant of mycosis fungoides with only 70 cases reported in the literature to date. It is characterized clinically by the occurrence of bulky, pendulous skinfolds, usually located in flexural areas and histologically by an infiltrate composed of small neoplastic T-lymphocytes joined by granulomatous inflammation with scattered multinucleated giant cells containing nuclei arranged in a wreath-like fashion. Since its first description, very rare cases of GSS with muscle involvement, large vessels involvement, or necrobiotic changes have been reported. We present an extraordinary case of GSS with all these unusual features developing in the lesions of the same patient. The long follow-up of seven years allowed us to document the evolution of each lesion. Some lesions appeared and evolved in a manner very reminiscent of those of "parapsoriasis en plaques", others were classical GSS lesions, and still others developed large ulcerated lesions. These ulcerated lesions consistently failed to respond to conventional wound therapy, skin directed therapy [retinoids + psoralen combined with ultraviolet A (PUVA)-therapy], and interferon-alpha therapy. Remarkably, the ulcers completely healed when systemic corticosteroids were added. We hence postulate that the ulcers appeared because of large vessel vasculitis rather than tumoral direct destruction. PMID:27516031

  8. The influence of culture conditions on vasculitis and anaphylactoid shock induced by fungal pathogen Candida albicans cell wall extract in mice.

    PubMed

    Tada, Rui; Nagi-Miura, Noriko; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito

    2008-05-01

    To explore whether Candida cell wall mannan is responsible for induction of vasculitis similar to Kawasaki syndrome and anaphylactoid shock in mice, we examined the biological effects of various mannan structures from Candida cell wall extracts prepared using various culture conditions. Intraperitoneal injection of 3 of 4 Candida cell wall extracts dramatically induced coronary arteritis and acute anaphylactoid shock in mice; only the cell wall extract derived from YPD medium culture at 27 degrees C had no toxic effect. It is of note that these biological effects depended on culture conditions around the cells such as culture temperature and media. These conditions lead to the structural rearrangement of cell wall mannan as confirmed by reactivity against antisera and NMR spectroscopy. Since the expression of beta-1,2-linked mannan varies dramatically between biologically active and inactive mannan, beta-1,2-linked mannan might negatively affect Candida cell wall extract-induced coronary arteritis and acute anaphylactoid shock in mice. Our findings indicate that Candida cell wall mannan might contribute to coronary arteritis and acute shock, and that an alteration of mannan structure could be responsible for Candida pathogenicity. PMID:18065191

  9. IgA- and SIgA anti-PR3 antibodies in serum versus organ involvement and disease activity in PR3-ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sandin, C; Eriksson, P; Segelmark, M; Skogh, T; Kastbom, A

    2016-05-01

    Circulating immunoglobulin (Ig)A class anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) directed against proteinase 3 (PR3) have been reported in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) with mucosal involvement. However, secretory IgA (SIgA) PR3-ANCA has not been reported previously. In this study we compared serum levels of SIgA PR3-ANCA and IgA PR3-ANCA with IgG PR3-ANCA in relation to disease characteristics. Among 73 patients with AAV and PR3-ANCA at diagnosis, 84% tested positive for IgG PR3-ANCA, 47% for IgA-ANCA and 36% for SIgA PR3-ANCA at the time of sampling for the present study. IgA and IgG PR3-ANCA were represented similarly among patients with different organ manifestations, i.e. upper airway, lung or kidney at time of sampling. However, SIgA PR3-ANCA was significantly less represented among patients with upper airway involvement. During active disease, the proportions of IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA-positive patients were significantly higher compared to inactive disease. Eight patients were sampled prospectively during 24 months from onset of active disease. In these patients, IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA turned negative more often after remission induction compared to IgG PR3-ANCA. Our findings suggest that serum IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA are related more closely to disease activity in AAV compared to IgG PR3-ANCA. Further studies are required to reveal if this has implications for disease activity monitoring. The mean number of PR3-ANCA isotypes increased along with disease activity, suggesting a global B cell activation during active disease.

  10. Restricted Diffusion of Pus in the Subarachnoid Space: MRSA Meningo-Vasculitis and Progressive Brainstem Ischemic Strokes – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rose, David Z.; Parra-Herran, Carlos; Petito, Carol K.; Post, M. Judith D.

    2010-01-01

    Extra-axial restriction on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is an unusual finding on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Intra-axial restriction on DWI, however, is common, and can represent brain parenchymal infarction, tumor, abscess, or toxic-metabolic process. The infrequency of extra-axial DWI restriction and the paucity of clinico-pathological correlation in the literature limit its differential diagnosis. Scant case reports suggest that extra-axial DWI restriction could be a lymphoma, neurenteric cyst, or, in one patient, subdural empyema [1,2,3]. We postulate that pus formation must be excluded first, because it can provoke an aggressive meningo-vasculitis with rapidly fatal, intra-axial infarctions. Our patient was a 45-year-old man, presenting to our hospital with left facial droop and right (contralateral) arm and leg weakness. Initial MRI revealed DWI restriction in the left lateral pons, consistent with a classic Millard-Gubler stroke. Also noted was a subtle, extra-axial area of curvilinear diffusion restriction in the left cerebellar-pontine angle's subarachnoid space. Days later, the patient had a headache, and repeat MRI revealed extension of the two DWI lesions – both the intra-axial pontine infarction and the extra-axial area of restricted diffusion in the subarachnoid space. The patient became comatose, a third MRI revealed more extensive DWI restrictions, and he expired despite aggressive care. Autopsy revealed massive brainstem infarcts, a thick lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, copious Gram-Positive cocci (likely MRSA) and arteries partially occluded with fibrointimal proliferation. This emphasizes the concept that extra-axial DWI restriction can represent pus development in the subarachnoid space – a radiographic marker to identify a patient at risk for demise due to septic, meningo-vasculitic infarctions. PMID:21045937

  11. Neutrophil-Related Gene Expression And Low-Density Granulocytes Associated with Disease Activity and Response to Treatment in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Peter C.; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Xu, Lijing; Lim, Noha; Gao, Zhong; Asare, Adam L.; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H.; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert F.; Langford, Carol A.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.; St Clair, E. William; Tchao, Nadia K.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Phippard, Deborah J.; Merkel, Peter A.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Monach, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To discover biomarkers involved in the pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and determine if low-density granulocytes (LDGs) contribute to gene expression signatures in AAV. Methods The source of clinical data and linked biospecimens was a randomized controlled treatment trial in AAV. RNA-sequencing of whole blood from patients with AAV was performed during active disease at the baseline visit (BL) and during remission 6 months later (6M). Gene expression was compared between patients who met versus did not meet the primary trial outcome of clinical remission at 6M (responders vs. nonresponders). Measurement of neutrophil-related gene expression was confirmed in PBMCs to validate findings in whole blood. A negative selection strategy isolated LDGs from PBMC fractions. Results Differential expression between responders (n=77) and nonresponders (n=35) was detected in 2,346 transcripts at BL visit (p<0.05). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering demonstrated a cluster of granulocyte-related genes, including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3). A granulocyte multi-gene composite score was significantly higher in nonresponders than responders (p<0.01) and during active disease compared to remission (p<0.01). This signature strongly overlapped an LDG signature identified previously in lupus (FDRGSEA<0.01). Transcription of PR3 measured in PBMCs was associated with active disease and treatment response (p<0.01). LDGs isolated from patients with AAV spontaneously formed neutrophil extracellular traps containing PR3 and MPO. Conclusions In AAV an increased expression of a granulocyte gene signature is associated with disease activity and decreased response to treatment. The source of this signature is likely LDGs, a potentially pathogenic cell type in AAV. PMID:25891759

  12. Reduced CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and interleukin-10(+) regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-05-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs ), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD27(+) Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5(+) subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells and IL-10(+) B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10(+) and CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5(+) subset of CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5(+) B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5(neg) B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs . The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production.

  13. Reduced CD5+CD24hiCD38hi and interleukin-10+ regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19+CD24hiCD38hi and CD19+CD24hiCD27+ Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5+ subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine–phosphate–guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5+CD24hiCD38hi B cells and IL-10+ B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10+ and CD5+CD24hiCD38hi B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5+ subset of CD24hiCD38hi B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5+ B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5neg B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs. The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production. PMID:25376552

  14. Reduced CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and interleukin-10(+) regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-05-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs ), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD27(+) Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5(+) subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells and IL-10(+) B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10(+) and CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5(+) subset of CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5(+) B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5(neg) B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs . The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production. PMID:25376552

  15. CD8(+)/perforin(+)/WC1(-) gammadelta T cells, not CD8(+) alphabeta T cells, infiltrate vasculitis lesions of American bison (Bison bison) with experimental sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Danielle D; Davis, William C; Brown, Wendy C; Li, Hong; O'Toole, Donal; Oaks, J Lindsay

    2010-08-15

    Sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) caused by ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2), a gamma-herpesvirus in the Macavirus genus, is a fatal disease associated with lymphoproliferation, lymphocytic vasculitis, and mucosal ulceration in clinically susceptible species. SA-MCF is an important threat to American bison (Bison bison) due to their high susceptibility to this disease. Currently, the pathogenesis of disease in SA-MCF is poorly understood, and the immunophenotype of lymphocytes that infiltrate the vascular lesions of bison and cattle with SA-MCF has been only partially defined. Previous single-color immunohistochemistry studies have demonstrated that CD8(+) cells and CD4(+) cells predominate within vascular infiltrates in cattle and bison. The CD8(+) cells detected in the vascular lesions of cattle and bison were assumed to be cytotoxic alphabeta T lymphocytes. However, polychromatic immunophenotyping analyses in this study showed that CD8(+)/perforin(+) gammadelta T cells, CD4(+)/perforin(-) alphabeta T cells, and B cells infiltrate vascular lesions in the urinary bladder, kidney, and liver of six bison with experimentally-induced SA-MCF. CD8(+) alphabeta T cells and WC1(+) gammadelta T cell cells were only infrequently and inconsistently identified. This study confirmed our hypothesis that the predominant CD8(+) lymphocytes infiltrating the vascular lesions of bison with SA-MCF are cytotoxic lymphocytes of the innate immune system, not CD8(+) alphabeta T cells. Results of the present study support the previous suggestions that MCF is fundamentally a disease of immune dysregulation.

  16. Recent advances in understanding and treating vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Koster, Matthew J.; Warrington, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAVs) are near universally fatal conditions if untreated. Although effective therapeutic options are available for these diseases, treatment regimens are associated with both short- and long-term adverse effects. The recent identification of effective B-cell-targeted therapy with an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody has transformed the treatment landscape of AAV. Questions, nevertheless, remain regarding the appropriate timing, dose, frequency, duration, and long-term effects of treatment. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the current information, recent advances, ongoing clinical trials, and future treatment possibilities in AAV. PMID:27347395

  17. An acute vasculitis resembling polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Unsal, E; Uğuz, A; Cevik, N

    1998-01-01

    Peripheral vascular disease are structural and functional abnormalities of the peripheral blood vessels that produce blood flow irregularities. The signs and symptoms relate either to ischemia or inflammation of the involved vessels, or to both. A previously healthy 4.5-year-old girl was referred to our hospital with bruises on fingers and toes. She had no history of environmental causes, including drug intake. Symptoms of abdominal pain, fever, and a swollen face preceded the symptoms of her extremities. On physical examination, her blood pressure, which could be obtained only on the things, was high. There were no pulses on the upper extremities or on either the a. dorsalis pedis or the a. tibialis anterior dextra. There was massive necrosis on fingers which led to dry gangrene. A rise in acute phase reactants accompanied the physical findings, and a segmental obstruction was found proximally to a. brachiales, and distally to a. radialis dextra and a. dorsalis pedis dextra on digital subtraction angiography (DSA). High-dose methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide, salicylates and dipyridamole were given; as these medications did not relieve the symptoms, a thoracal sympathatectomy was performed. The peripheral circulation improved, but a demarcation zone developed on the fingertips, leading to amputation.

  18. Updates in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Pagnoux, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides are small-vessel vasculitides that include granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener’s granulomatosis), microscopic polyangiitis, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg–Strauss syndrome). Renal-limited ANCA-associated vasculitides can be considered the fourth entity. Despite their rarity and still unknown cause(s), research pertaining to ANCA-associated vasculitides has been very active over the past decades. The pathogenic role of antimyeloperoxidase ANCA (MPO-ANCA) has been supported using several animal models, but that of antiproteinase 3 ANCA (PR3-ANCA) has not been as strongly demonstrated. Moreover, some MPO-ANCA subsets, which are directed against a few specific MPO epitopes, have recently been found to be better associated with disease activity, but a different method than the one presently used in routine detection is required to detect them. B cells possibly play a major role in the pathogenesis because they produce ANCAs, as well as neutrophil abnormalities and imbalances in different T-cell subtypes [T helper (Th)1, Th2, Th17, regulatory cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ CD25+ forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells] and/or cytokine–chemokine networks. The alternative complement pathway is also involved, and its blockade has been shown to prevent renal disease in an MPO-ANCA murine model. Other recent studies suggested strongest genetic associations by ANCA type rather than by clinical diagnosis. The induction treatment for severe granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis is relatively well codified but does not (yet) really differ by precise diagnosis or ANCA type. It comprises glucocorticoids combined with another immunosuppressant, cyclophosphamide or rituximab. The choice between the two immunosuppressants must consider the comorbidities, past exposure to cyclophosphamide for relapsers, plans for pregnancy, and also the cost of rituximab. Once remission is achieved, maintenance strategy following cyclophosphamide-based induction relies on less toxic agents such as azathioprine or methotrexate. The optimal maintenance strategy following rituximab-based induction therapy remains to be determined. Preliminary results on rituximab for maintenance therapy appear promising. Efforts are still under way to determine the optimal duration of maintenance therapy, ideally tailored according to the characteristics of each patient and the previous treatment received. PMID:27733943

  19. Overexpression of p16(INK4a) in Mastocytosis (Urticarial Pigmentosa).

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Jun; Doi, Kazuko; Nakahara, Makiko; Nakahara, Takeshi; Kaku, Yumiko; Nishio, Kiichiro; Kan, Nagisa; Sato, Yuki; Nagata, Shoko; Nakao, Asako; Yoshida, Maiko; Uchi, Hiroshi; Furue, Masutaka

    2016-01-01

    The expression of p16(INK4a) has been reported to induce cell-cycle arrest and cellular senescence. The p16(INK4a) expression has never been examined in human mast cells and mastocytosis. We immunohistologically examined the expression of p16(INK4a) and tryptase in 5 normal human skin and 4 mastocytosis. In normal mast cells, only 5.9 ± 3.4 (mean ± standard deviation) % of tryptase-positive mast cells coexpressed p16(INK4a). However, significantly higher percentage (86.0 ± 14.1%) of tryptase-positive tumor cells was immunoreactive to p16(INK4a) in all of 4 mastocytosis. The p16(INK4a) overexpression may induce the senescence of neoplastic mast cells to undergo spontaneous regression of mastocytosis. PMID:27333655

  20. Undifferentiated vasculitis or an evolving systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease?

    PubMed

    Fatimah, Nafeesah; Ussaid, Ahmad; Rasheed, Aflak

    2016-08-01

    Undifferentiated connective tissue diseases usually present with arthralgias, sicca symptoms, Raynaud's phenomenon and leucopenia. This case presents the atypical presentation of an undifferentiated connective tissue disease with extensive cutaneous involvement of fingers and toes leading to gangrene with absence of typical rheumatological symptoms. The autoimmune profile showed positive ANA and anti-Ro/SS-A. Thromboembolism was ruled out on the basis of transthoracic and transesophageal echo. She was treated with I/V corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide that halted the disease progression. PMID:27574560

  1. Undifferentiated vasculitis or an evolving systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease?

    PubMed Central

    Fatimah, Nafeesah; Ussaid, Ahmad; Rasheed, Aflak

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated connective tissue diseases usually present with arthralgias, sicca symptoms, Raynaud's phenomenon and leucopenia. This case presents the atypical presentation of an undifferentiated connective tissue disease with extensive cutaneous involvement of fingers and toes leading to gangrene with absence of typical rheumatological symptoms. The autoimmune profile showed positive ANA and anti-Ro/SS-A. Thromboembolism was ruled out on the basis of transthoracic and transesophageal echo. She was treated with I/V corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide that halted the disease progression. PMID:27574560

  2. Feline infectious peritonitis. An immune-mediated coronaviral vasculitis.

    PubMed

    August, J R

    1984-09-01

    Mainly through studies inducing experimental infection of susceptible cats, significant advances have recently been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis of FIP. Much of this knowledge should not presently be directly extrapolated to field cases of FIP, because the route of infection and challenge dose and strain of virus may be significantly different. Advances in the prevention and treatment of FIP will depend greatly on clarification of the exact nature of the several coronaviruses affecting cats and the role of cell-mediated immunity in resistance to FIPV.

  3. The lung in systemic vasculitis: radiological patterns and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Feragalli, Beatrice; Mantini, Cesare; Sperandeo, Marco; Galluzzo, Michele; Belcaro, Giovanni; Tartaro, Armando; Cotroneo, Antonio R

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory system may be involved in all systemic vasculitides, although with a variable frequency. The aim of our review is to describe radiographic and high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of pulmonary vasculitides and to correlate radiological findings with pathological results. Lung disease is a common feature of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitides, including granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's), eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) and microscopic polyangiitis. Pulmonary involvement is less frequent in immune-complex-mediated small-vessel vasculitides, such as Behçet's disease and Goodpasture's syndrome. Pulmonary involvement associated to large-vessel (gigantocellular arteritis and Takayasu's disease) or medium-vessel (nodose polyarteritis and Kawasaki's disease) vasculitides is extremely rare. The present review describes the main clinical and radiological features of pulmonary vasculitides with major purpose to correlate HRCT findings (solitary or multiple nodules, cavitary lesions, micronodules with centrilobular or peribronchial distribution, airspace consolidations, "crazy paving", tracheobronchial involvement, interstitial disease) with pathological results paying particular attention to the description of acute life-threatening manifestations. A thorough medical history, careful clinical examination and the knowledge of radiological patterns are mandatory for a correct and early diagnosis. PMID:26876879

  4. Vasculitis Syndromes of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... disturbances, such as double vision, blurred vision, or blindness seizures, convulsions stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA, ... years and is rarely fatal. Abrupt but reversible blindness is the most dramatic complication of temporal arteritis. ...

  5. Bullous reactions to bed bug bites reflect cutaneous vasculitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates bullous cutaneous reactions and sequential histopathology in an individual sensitized to bed bug bites in an effort to better understand the allergic response and histology associated with these bites. There was a progression of the inflammatory response across time ranging from...

  6. Peripheral Vasculitis, Intermediate Uveitis and Interferon Use in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kinyas, Şeref; Esgin, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. A 40-year-old female patient with a 12-year history of MS was admitted to our clinic with blurred vision and floaters in her right eye for about 1 month. Here, we share the findings and the management of intermediate uveitis and retinal periphlebitis in an MS case being treated with interferon beta-1a for 7 years. PMID:27800257

  7. [If you go looking for trouble you'll find it. Urticarial reactions to insects of our local areas].

    PubMed

    Maitre, Sylvie; Kaeser, Amelie; Di Lucca, Julie; Spertini, François; Ribi, Camillo

    2016-04-01

    Itchy skin rashes are a frequent reason to seek medical advice. The symptoms may be caused by hypersensitivity reactions to arthropod bites, waterborne parasites or setae from moth caterpillars and are sometimes mistaken for spontaneous urticaria or eczema. Some of these pests are resurging in Switzerland and elsewhere and increasingly responsible for emergency consultation. In this article we review itchy skin rashes caused by bed bugs, scabies, lice, cercariae, Pyemotes spp, caterpillars and harvest mites, which may be confounded with urticaria and allergic contact dermatitis. We detail here clinical manifestations, topographical distribution of skin lesions, epidemiology, treatment and preventive measures. PMID:27197324

  8. Chronic urticaria.

    PubMed Central

    Burrall, B. A.; Halpern, G. M.; Huntley, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    Urticaria affects 15% to 20% of the population once or more during a lifetime. Chronic urticaria is a frequent recurrent eruption over a period greater than 6 weeks; the cause remains a mystery in more than 75% of cases. Urticaria and angioedema may be produced by immunologic or nonimmunologic means. Urticarial vasculitis, contact urticaria, mastocytosis, physical urticarias, dermatographism, cholinergic urticaria, localized heat urticaria, cold urticaria, aquagenic urticaria, and vibratory angioedema all require specific evaluation and treatment. Chronic idiopathic urticaria is usually controlled by antihistamines; depending on the circadian rhythm of the eruption, sedative or nonsedative antihistamines are prescribed. Some patients will require a combination of H1 and H2 antagonists, or even parenteral corticosteroids. PMID:1970697

  9. Comorbidity and pathogenic links of chronic spontaneous urticaria and systemic lupus erythematosus--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kolkhir, P; Pogorelov, D; Olisova, O; Maurer, M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is a common mast cell-driven disease characterized by the development of wheals (hives), angioedema (AE), or both for > 6 weeks. It is thought that autoimmunity is a common cause of CSU, which is often associated with autoimmune thyroiditis, whereas the link to other autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has not been carefully explored. Here, we systematically reviewed the existing literature for information on the prevalence of CSU in SLE (and vice versa) and we examined the possible clinical and pathogenetic relationship between CSU and SLE. The prevalence of CSU and CSU-like rash in SLE was investigated by 42 independent studies and comorbidity in adult patients reportedly ranged from 0% to 21.9% and 0.4% to 27.5%, respectively (urticarial vasculitis: 0-20%). In children with SLE, CSU was reported in 0-1.2% and CSU-like rash in 4.5-12% (urticarial vasculitis: 0-2.2%). In contrast, little information is available on the prevalence of SLE in patients with CSU, and more studies are needed to determine the rate of comorbidity. Recent insights on IgG- and IgE-mediated autoreactivity suggest similarities in the pathogenesis of CSU and SLE linking inflammation and autoimmunity with the activation of the complement and coagulation system. Future studies of patients with either or both conditions could help to better define common pathomechanisms in CSU and SLE and to develop novel targeted treatment options for patients with CSU and SLE. PMID:26545308

  10. Skin Conditions during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... during pregnancy? • What is pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (PUPPP)? • What is prurigo of pregnancy? • ... itchy skin. What is pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (PUPPP)? In this condition, small, red ...

  11. Alert cell strategy in SIRS-induced vasculitis: sepsis and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis refers to systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure resulting from infection. Inflammatory receptors (e.g., Toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerization domain) recognize bacterial components as inflammatory ligands. These are expressed not only in leukocytes but also in major organs and vascular endothelial cells. "Alert cell" is defined as the cell that expresses the inflammatory receptor and intracellular signaling system to produce inflammatory mediators such as inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, nitric oxide, and prostanoids in organs and the vasculature. NF-κB and AP-1, which are the transcriptional factors of these inflammatory molecules, are important regulators of multiple organ failure in sepsis and systemic inflammation. The vascular endothelial injury would induce multiple organ failure as tissue ischemia and organ death. Drug discovery targeted at alert cells holds a promise for therapy of inflammation including sepsis.

  12. Rituximab as maintenance therapy for ANCA associated vasculitis: how, when and why?

    PubMed

    Alba, Marco A; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe

    2016-01-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV) are chronic autoimmune diseases characterized by inflammation and destruction of small vessels. Rituximab is now licensed for use as a remission-induction agent in the treatment of these disorders. During recent years, several non-controlled studies have suggested that rituximab may be of value in maintaining disease remission in AAV. In these series, 3 techniques have been tried: "watch-and-wait", repeated cycles in fixed intervals, or administration based on proposed biomarkers. More importantly, the results of the MAINRITSAN trial showed that this anti-CD20 agent is superior to azathioprine for preventing major relapses in AAV. This review summarizes current information regarding the effectiveness, timing, dosing, duration and safety of rituximab as a valid option for remission maintenance. PMID:26255570

  13. High-Resolution Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Lachanis, Stefanos; Magoufis, Georgios; Safouris, Apostolos; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Stamboulis, Elefterios

    2016-06-01

    Varicella-zoster virus vasculopathy is a rare but potentially treatable condition. Diagnosis has been based on angiography, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. High-resolution vessel wall MRI may aid to the diagnosis by differentiating inflammation from other vessel wall pathologies. We present the characteristic MRI findings of this condition in a young patient presenting with ischemic stroke.

  14. Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome presenting with severe vasculitis successfully treated with imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Fraticelli, Paolo; Kafyeke, Alain; Mattioli, Massimo; Martino, Giuseppe Pio; Murri, Marta; Gabrielli, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a rare disorder characterized by peripheral eosinophilia exceeding 1500/mm3, a chronic course, absence of secondary causes, and signs and symptoms of eosinophil-mediated tissue injury. One of the best-characterized forms of HES is the one associated with FIP1L1-PDGFRA gene rearrangement, which was recently demonstrated as responsive to treatment with the small molecule kinase inhibitor drug, imatinib mesylate. Here, we describe the case of a 51-year-old male, whose symptoms satisfied the clinical criteria for HES with cutaneous and cardiac involvement and who also presented with vasculitic brain lesions and retroperitoneal bleeding. Molecular testing, including fluorescence in situ hybridization, of bone marrow and peripheral blood showed no evidence of PDGFR rearrangements. The patient was initially treated with high-dose steroid therapy and then with hydroxyurea, but proved unresponsive to both. Upon subsequent initiation of imatinib mesilate, the patient showed a dramatic improvement in eosinophil count and progressed rapidly through clinical recovery. Long-term follow-up confirmed the efficacy of treatment with low-dose imatinib and with no need of supplemental steroid treatment, notwithstanding the absence of PDGFR rearrangement. PMID:27803915

  15. [Case of trimethoprim-induced hyperkalemia complicating ANCA-associated vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Shishido, Takashi; Ryuzaki, Munekazu; Futatsugi, Koji; Takimoto, Chie; Kobayashi, Emi; Handa, Michiko; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    A 76-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of severe anemia. Routine screening revealed a sigmoid adenocarcinoma, and he underwent sigmoidectomy. Post-operatively, he developed rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. He was positive for myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. A renal biopsy revealed idiopathic crescentic glomerulonephritis of the pauci-immune type. He was treated with methylprednisolone semi-pulse therapy with clinical improvement. After the steroid pulse therapy, he was given oral prednisolone, 40 mg per day, and oral trimethoprim (TMP), 160 mg, and sulfamethoxazole (SMX), 800 mg twice weekly for chemoprophylaxis against pneumocystis pneumonia. One month after the initiation of TMP/SMX, he developed hyperkalemia and hyponatremia. His transtubular K gradient was low, and urinary potassium excretion was decreased. On the other hand, plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone concentrations were within normal limits. These results suggested that TMP acted similarly to a potassium-sparing diuretic amiloride and reduced renal potassium excretion. Administration of calcium polystyrene sulfonate resulted in correction of the hyperkalemia without discontinuation of TMP/SMX. We emphasize that patients with impaired renal function are at the significant risk of developing trimethoprim-induced hyperkalemia even with chemoprophylaxis.

  16. Coping with Vasculitis and Contributing to Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a patient’s disease, there are no clear biomarkers identified at this time. Find Out More National ... and symptoms, imaging findings, and blood and tissue biomarkers associated with pathogenesis and disease outcomes. Another goal ...

  17. Paravascular pathways contribute to vasculitis and neuroinflammation after subarachnoid hemorrhage independently of glymphatic control

    PubMed Central

    Luo, C; Yao, X; Li, J; He, B; Liu, Q; Ren, H; Liang, F; Li, M; Lin, H; Peng, J; Yuan, T F; Pei, Z; Su, H

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease with high mortality. The mechanisms underlying its pathological complications have not been fully identified. Here, we investigate the potential involvement of the glymphatic system in the neuropathology of SAH. We demonstrate that blood components rapidly enter the paravascular space following SAH and penetrate into the perivascular parenchyma throughout the brain, causing disastrous events such as cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, microcirculation dysfunction and widespread perivascular neuroinflammation. Clearance of the paravascular pathway with tissue-type plasminogen activator ameliorates the behavioral deficits and alleviates histological injury of SAH. Interestingly, AQP4−/− mice showed no improvements in neurological deficits and neuroinflammation at day 7 after SAH compared with WT control mice. In conclusion, our study proves that the paravascular pathway dynamically mediates the pathological complications following acute SAH independently of glymphatic control. PMID:27031957

  18. Geoepidemiology of systemic vasculitis: comparison of the incidence in two regions of Europe

    PubMed Central

    Watts, R; Gonzalez-Gay, M; Lane, S; Garcia-Porrua, C; Bentham, G; Scott, D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The aetiopathogenesis of the primary systemic vasculitides (PSV) is unknown but includes both environmental and genetic factors. The development of classification criteria/definitions for PSV allows comparison of the epidemiology between different regions.
METHODS—The same methods and the American College of Rheumatology (1990) criteria or Chapel Hill definitions were used to compare the epidemiology of Wegener's granulomatosis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, microscopic polyangiitis, and polyarteritis nodosa in Norwich (east England population 413 500) and Lugo (northwest Spain population 204 100). Patients with PSV were identified between 1 January 1988 and 31 December 1998.
RESULTS—Overall, the incidence of PSV in adults was almost equal in Norwich (18.9/million) and Spain (18.3/million). The incidence of Wegener's granulomatosis in Norwich (10.6/million) was greater than in Spain (4.9/million). There was a marked age-specific increase in incidence in Norwich with a peak age 65-74 years (52.9/million), but a virtually equal age distribution between ages 45 and 74 in Lugo (34.1/million). There was no significant increase with time in either population, or evidence of cyclical changes in incidence.
CONCLUSION—These data support the suggestion that environmental factors may be important in the pathogenesis of PSV.

 PMID:11156552

  19. Large vessel vasculitis without temporal artery involvement: isolated form of giant cell arteritis?

    PubMed

    Lambert, M; Weber, A; Boland, B; De Plaen, J F; Donckier, J

    1996-03-01

    Diffuse arterial involvement in giant cell arteritis (GCA) is well recognized. By contrast, GCA clinically isolated to large vessels without cephalic, rheumatologic or systemic symptoms represents a much rarer manifestation of the disease. We report the cases of 4 elderly women presenting with a diffuse and symptomatic occlusive disease without the typical signs of temporal arteritis, in whom biological, angiographic or pathological findings were suggestive of GCA. Medium to high dose oral corticosteroids were given to the 4 patients, in combination with various revascularization procedures, allowing a fair clinical response. Large vessel arteritis should be considered in elderly women with diffuse non-atherosclerotic occlusive disease and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, even if typical features of GCA are lacking. In those cases, a long-term treatment with corticosteroids is mandatory, but surgical or angioplastic revascularization is often required. PMID:8777852

  20. Serum from patients with systemic vasculitis induces alternatively activated macrophage M2c polarization.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Susanne M; Linge, Carl Petrus; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Lood, Christian; Johansson, Asa; Ohlsson, Sophie; Lundqvist, Andrea; Bengtsson, Anders A; Carlsson, Fredric; Hellmark, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitides (AAV) are conditions defined by an autoimmune small vessel inflammation. Dying neutrophils are found around the inflamed vessels and the balance between infiltrating neutrophils and macrophages is important to prevent autoimmunity. Here we investigate how sera from AAV patients may regulate macrophage polarization and function. Macrophages from healthy individuals were differentiated into M0, M1, M2a, M2b or M2c macrophages using a standardized protocol, and phenotyped according to their expression surface markers and cytokine production. These phenotypes were compared with those of macrophages stimulated with serum from AAV patients or healthy controls. While the healthy control sera induced a M0 macrophage, AAV serum promoted polarization towards the M2c subtype. No sera induced M1, M2a or M2b macrophages. The M2c subtype showed increased phagocytosis capacity compared with the other subtypes. The M2c polarization found in AAV is consistent with previous reports of increased levels of M2c-associated cytokines.

  1. The kidneys and ANCA-associated vasculitis: from pathogenesis to diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Rowaiye, Olumide Olatubosun; Kusztal, Mariusz; Klinger, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) are a group of pauci-immune small vessel vasculitides that often affect the kidneys manifesting as rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Although the exact pathogenesis of AAV is not fully known, evidence from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies all point to the involvement of ANCA in the pathogenesis of AAV. In this review, we highlight the contributory roles played by various factors (e.g. genetics, environment, B and T-regulatory cells, toll-like receptors, etc.) in the pathogenesis of AAV. Furthermore, we discuss renal involvement in AAV in terms of clinical features and the various histopathological classification patterns, which are also known to be of prognostic importance. We also present information on useful imaging techniques for localizing kidney and other organ system involvement in AAV, and also on novel laboratory methods and assays useful for rapid and more specific determination of patients' ANCA status. Finally, we demonstrate evidence on novel serum biomarkers that have been shown to correlate with disease activity in AAV. PMID:26034600

  2. Mechanisms of complement-mediated clearance of bacteria from the murine lung.

    PubMed

    Heidbrink, P J; Toews, G B; Gross, G N; Pierce, A K

    1982-05-01

    Complement factors enhance host defense against bacterial challenges by attracting phagocytic cells to the site of the inoculum and by opsonizing bacteria for phagocytic ingestion. The relative contribution of these 2 mechanisms to in vivo clearance of bacteria from the lung has not been described. Hypocomplementemic and normal animals were challenged with various bacteria. Clearance of bacteria was studied by quantitative lung culture. Phagocytic response was determined by bronchoalveolar lavage. Staphylococci were cleared by macrophages without regard to the complement status of the host. Hypocomplementemic animals cleared pneumococci less efficiently than did control animals. This defect correlated with decreased neutrophil recruitment. Pseudomonas was not cleared in hypocomplementemic animals, but there was no difference in the number or type of phagocytes. This implies that an opsonic rather thn a chemotactic defect was responsible. These data suggest that the mechanism of complement-mediated defense against bacterial challenge varies with the type of pathogen present.

  3. East coast fever caused by Theileria parva is characterized by macrophage activation associated with vasculitis and respiratory failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infect...

  4. Intestinal Behçet's Disease: A True Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Merely an Intestinal Complication of Systemic Vasculitis?

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk Hwan; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic inflammatory disorder of an unknown etiology and shows a chronic recurrent clinical course. When the disease involves the alimentary tract, it is called intestinal BD because of its clinical importance. Intestinal BD is more frequently reported in East Asian countries than in Western or Middle Eastern countries. While any part of the gastrointestinal tract can be involved, the most common location of intestinal BD is the ileocecal area. A few, large, deep ulcerations with discrete border are characteristic endoscopic findings of intestinal BD. Currently, there is no single gold standard test or pathognomonic finding of intestinal BD. However, recently developed novel diagnostic criteria and a disease activity index have helped in assessing intestinal BD. As intestinal BD shares a lot of characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease, including genetic background, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic strategies, distinguishing between the two diseases in clinical practice is quite difficult. However, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibody shows a considerable efficacy similar to inflammatory bowel disease cases. It is important to distinguish and treat those two disease entities separately from the standpoint of precise medicine. Clinicians should require comprehensive knowledge regarding the similarities and differences between intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease for making an accurate clinical decision.

  5. The Association between Silica Exposure and Development of ANCA-Associated Vasculitis: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Puerta, Jose A.; Gedmintas, Lydia; Costenbader, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Crystalline silica is among the environmental exposures associated with increased risk of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Silica exposure has also been related to the development of ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV), but past studies appear to conflict as to the presence and magnitude of the associated risks of disease. We aimed to conduct a systematic review of the existing studies and meta-analysis of their results. Methods We searched EMBASE, MEDLINE and international scientific conference abstract databases for studies examining the association of silica exposure with AAV. Studies in English, French, or Spanish were included and those examining the association of silica with ANCA-positivity alone were excluded. We assessed study quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. We meta-analyzed the results using random effects models and tested for heterogeneity. We performed sensitivity and subgroup analyses, examining studies that adjusted for smoking and occupational risk factors as well as studies that analyzed by subtypes of AAV. Results We identified 158 potential manuscripts and 3 abstracts related to silica exposure and risk of AAV. 147 were excluded after abstract review and 14 underwent detailed evaluation of full manuscript/abstract. After further application of exclusion criteria, 6 studies (all case-controls) remained. The studies had moderate heterogeneity in selection of cases and controls, exposure assessment, disease definition and controlling for potential confounders. We found an overall significant summary effect estimate of silica “ever exposure” with development of AAV (summary OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.51- 4.36), with moderate heterogeneity (I2=48.40%). ORs were similar for studies examining only MPA (OR 3.95, CI 95% 1.89-8.24), compared to those only studying GPA (OR 3.56, CI 95% 1.85-6.82). Conclusion Despite moderate heterogeneity among studies, the totality of the evidence after meta-analysis points to an association between silica exposure and risk for developing AAV. PMID:23820041

  6. Intestinal Behçet's Disease: A True Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Merely an Intestinal Complication of Systemic Vasculitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic inflammatory disorder of an unknown etiology and shows a chronic recurrent clinical course. When the disease involves the alimentary tract, it is called intestinal BD because of its clinical importance. Intestinal BD is more frequently reported in East Asian countries than in Western or Middle Eastern countries. While any part of the gastrointestinal tract can be involved, the most common location of intestinal BD is the ileocecal area. A few, large, deep ulcerations with discrete border are characteristic endoscopic findings of intestinal BD. Currently, there is no single gold standard test or pathognomonic finding of intestinal BD. However, recently developed novel diagnostic criteria and a disease activity index have helped in assessing intestinal BD. As intestinal BD shares a lot of characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease, including genetic background, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic strategies, distinguishing between the two diseases in clinical practice is quite difficult. However, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibody shows a considerable efficacy similar to inflammatory bowel disease cases. It is important to distinguish and treat those two disease entities separately from the standpoint of precise medicine. Clinicians should require comprehensive knowledge regarding the similarities and differences between intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease for making an accurate clinical decision. PMID:26632379

  7. Clinical characteristics of cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Szczęch, Justyna; Rutka, Maja; Samotij, Dominik; Zalewska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lupus erythematosus (LE) shows a wide variety of clinical manifestations, skin involvement being one of the most important. Aim To analyze the clinical presentation of cutaneous variants of lupus erythematosus in terms of skin lesion spectrum and extracutaneous involvement. Material and methods A total of 64 patients with cutaneous LE (CLE) were included. The study was based on the “Core Set Questionnaire” developed by the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE). Clinical severity of skin lesions was evaluated with the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI). All results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results Fifteen (23.4%) patients had an acute CLE (ACLE), 26 (40.6%) subacute CLE (SCLE) and 21 (32.8%) chronic CLE (CCLE). Two (3.2%) individuals only demonstrated urticarial vasculitis as a cutaneous manifestation of LE and these patients were excluded. Patients with ACLE were characterized by the earliest onset of the disease (mean age of 31.9 ±15.0 years; p < 0.001). On average, 4.8 ±1.8 criteria of systemic LE were found in the ACLE group compared to 2.7 ±1.3 criteria in SCLE and 2.5 ±1.5 criteria in CCLE (p < 0.001). The highest activity of skin lesions according to CLASI was found in the SCLE group (p = 0.002). On the other hand, the most severe skin damage was observed in CCLE (p < 0.01). Conclusions Each variant of CLE differs significantly from the others in respect of various aspects of clinical manifestations. Due to a number of different variants of LE skin lesions, a unified classification of CLE still remains a challenge. PMID:26985173

  8. Vasculitides and the Complement System: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Ballanti, Eleonora; Triggianese, Paola; Perricone, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Systemic vasculitides are a group of rare diseases characterized by inflammation of the arterial or venous vessel wall, causing stenosis or thrombosis. Clinical symptoms may be limited to skin or to other organs or may include multiple manifestations as systemic conditions. The pathogenesis is related to the presence of leukocytes in the vessels and to the IC deposition, which implies the activation of the complement system (CS) and then the swelling and damage of vessel mural structures. The complement system (CS) is involved in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, including systemic vasculitides. This enzymatic system is a part of the innate immune system, and its function is linked to the modulation of the adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. Its activation is also critical for the development of natural antibodies and T cell response and for the regulation of autoreactive B cells. Complement triggering contributes to inflammation-driven tissue injury, which occurs during the ischemia/reperfusion processes, vasculitides, nephritis, arthritis, and many others diseases. In systemic vasculitides, a group of uncommon diseases characterized by blood vessel inflammation, the contribution of CS in the development of inflammatory damage has been demonstrated. Treatment is mainly based on clinical manifestations and severity of organ involvement. Evidences on the efficacy of traditional immunosuppressive therapies have been collected as well as data from clinical trials that involve the modulation of the CS. In particular in small-medium-vessel vasculitides, the CS represents an attractive target. Herein, we reviewed the pathogenetic role of CS in these systemic vasculitides as urticarial vasculitis, ANCA-associated vasculitides, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, cryoglobulinaemic vasculitides, Henoch-Schönlein purpura/IgA nephropathy, and Kawasaki disease and therefore its potential therapeutic use in this context.

  9. Cutaneous allergy to insulin: could statins and ACE inhibitors play a role? A case report.

    PubMed

    Pitrola, D; MacIver, C; Mallipedhi, A; Udiawar, M; Price, D E; Stephens, J W

    2014-04-01

    Insulin allergy is rare. Both statins and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may cause local urticarial skin reactions and have been implicated to precipitate local reactions to insulin. We describe a case of a localised urticarial allergic reaction related to insulin use in a patient co-prescribed an ACE inhibitor and statin. PMID:24534533

  10. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK)-mediated autoimmunity: lessons to learn from ANCA vasculitis and pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, Athanasios; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Liaskos, Christos; Smyk, Daniel S; Billinis, Charalambos; Blank, Miri; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2013-03-01

    Evidence is beginning to accumulate that p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling pathway plays an important role in the regulation of cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. The exact mechanisms and the degree by which the p38 MAPK pathway participates in the immune-mediated induction of diseases have started to emerge. This review discusses the recent advances in the molecular dissection of the p38 MAPK pathway and the findings generated by reports investigating its role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and autoimmune hepatitis. Application of newly-developed protocols based on sensitive flow cytometric detection has proven to be a useful tool in the investigation of the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK within different peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations and may help us to better understand the enigmatic role of this signaling cascade in the induction of autoimmunity as well as its role in immunosuppressive-induced remission. Special attention is paid to reported data proposing a specific role for autoantibody-induced activation of p38 MAPK-mediated immunopathology in the pathogenesis of autoimmune blistering diseases and anti-neutrophilic antibody-mediated vasculitides.

  11. ESR

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to: Anemia Cancers such as lymphoma or multiple myeloma Kidney disease Pregnancy Thyroid disease The immune system ... Heart failure - overview Hypersensitivity vasculitis Macroglobulinemia of Waldenstrom Multiple ... vasculitis Polycythemia - newborn Polycythemia vera Polymyalgia ...

  12. Spontaneous retroperitoneal bleeding from renal microaneurysms and pancreatic pseudocyst in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Melamed, N; Molad, Y

    2006-01-01

    Visceral vasculitis and pancreatic pseudocyst are rare manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We describe a patient with SLE who presented with spontaneous bilateral perinephric and retroperitoneal haematoma secondary to polyarteritis nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis of the renal arteries, which subsequently evolved into systemic vasculitis with pancreatic pseudocyst formation.

  13. Solar urticaria. Determinations of action and inhibition spectra.

    PubMed

    Hasei, K; Ichihashi, M

    1982-05-01

    A 42-year-old woman acquired solar urticaria approximately ten minutes after exposure to sunlight. Urticaria developed from visible light emitted from a projector lamp after a similar time lag. Monochromatic rays between 400 and 500 nm induced immediate urticaria by irradiation, with four times the minimal urticarial dose. Urticaria that was induced by monochromatic rays of the projector lamp was completely inhibited by immediate reirradiation of test sites with light waves longer that 530 nm. Radiant heat exposure from an electric hair dryer at 50 degrees C had no suppressive effects on the development of urticarial lesions.

  14. [Histaminergic angioedema and chronic urticaria].

    PubMed

    Hacard, Florence; Nosbaum, Audrey; Bensaid, Benoit; Nicolas, Jean-François; Augey, Frédéric; Goujon, Catherine; Bérard, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Most angioedemas are histaminergic and correspond to deep urticarial swelling. Recurrent histaminergic angioedema led to the diagnosis of chronic urticaria, even when there are no superficial associated hives. Chronic urticaria is a benign disease, and autoimmune in 40 % of cases. The occurrence of angioedema in chronic urticaria is not a sign of severity. The occurrence of angioedema in chronic urticaria is associated with a longer duration of urticarial disease. NSAIDs and/or systemic corticotherapy are classic triggers of angioedema in chronic urticaria. In the absence of clinical endpoints, there is no need to make further assessment in chronic urticaria good responders to antihistamines.

  15. Allergic reaction to polyethylene glycol in a painter.

    PubMed

    Antolin-Amerigo, D; Sánchez-González, M J; Barbarroja-Escudero, J; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, M; Álvarez-Perea, A; Alvarez-Mon, M

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of a male painter who visited our outpatient clinic after developing a distinct skin reaction 15 min after the ingestion of a laxative solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) prior to colonoscopy. He described suffering from the same skin reaction when he was previously exposed to paints that contained PEG-4000. An exposure challenge test with pure PEG-4000, simulating his workplace conditions, elicited a generalized urticarial reaction. Allergy to PEG should be considered in painters who develop urticarial or other systemic symptoms after handling PEG-containing products.

  16. Solar urticaria. Determinations of action and inhibition spectra.

    PubMed

    Hasei, K; Ichihashi, M

    1982-05-01

    A 42-year-old woman acquired solar urticaria approximately ten minutes after exposure to sunlight. Urticaria developed from visible light emitted from a projector lamp after a similar time lag. Monochromatic rays between 400 and 500 nm induced immediate urticaria by irradiation, with four times the minimal urticarial dose. Urticaria that was induced by monochromatic rays of the projector lamp was completely inhibited by immediate reirradiation of test sites with light waves longer that 530 nm. Radiant heat exposure from an electric hair dryer at 50 degrees C had no suppressive effects on the development of urticarial lesions. PMID:7082028

  17. Increased serum levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in patients with microscopic polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanemitsu, Hirohito; Matsunawa, Mizuho; Wakabayashi, Kuninobu; Sato, Michihito; Takahashi, Ryo; Odai, Tsuyoshi; Isozaki, Takeo; Yajima, Nobuyuki; Miwa, Yusuke; Kasama, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is involved in the disease activity of systemic vasculitis. Methods Patients with systemic vasculitis were divided into three groups based on the size of the affected vessels. Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) was considered as small vessel vasculitis (SVV), polyarteritis nodosa as medium-sized vessel vasculitis (MVV), and giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis as large vessel vasculitis (LVV). Sera from patients with systemic vasculitis and healthy individuals were collected, and MIF levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Disease activity of vasculitis was assessed using the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS). Results Serum MIF levels were significantly higher in the vasculitis patients than in healthy individuals. Among the vasculitis patients, MIF levels were significantly higher in patients in the SVV group (median; 4161.7 pg/ml) than in the other groups (MVV; 1443.2 pg/ml and LVV; 1576.7 pg/ml). In patients with MPA, a positive correlation was observed between serum MIF levels and CRP levels and disease activity (BVAS). Notably, serum MIF levels were significantly diminished after clinical improvement. Conclusions Our findings suggest that MIF may have an important role in small vessel vasculopathy and serve as a useful serologic marker of MPA disease activity.

  18. Thrombosis in vasculitic disorders-clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ofrat Beyar; Brenner, Benjamin; Horowitz, Netanel A

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation and coagulation are known to affect each other in many ways. Vasculitis represents a group of disorders where blood vessels (small, medium, large or variable) are infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Accumulating evidence in the literature suggests both clinical and physiological association between vasculitis and thrombosis. Vasculitis-associated thrombosis involves arteries and veins, and a tight connection has been reported between the activity of vasculitis and the appearance of thrombosis. Pathophysiology of these relations is complex and not completely understood. While thrombophilic factors are associated with vasculitis, it remains unclear whether a true association with clinical thrombosis is present. Furthermore, several factors leading to hemostasis, endothelial injury and induction of microparticles were described as possibly accounting for thrombosis. Management of thrombosis in vasculitis patients is challenging and should be further assessed in randomized controlled studies. The current review describes clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management of thrombosis associated with different vasculitides.

  19. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types. PMID:25829955

  20. Pregnancy and Medically Assisted Conception in Rare Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-23

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Psoriatic Arthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Antiphospholipid Syndrome; Sjogren Syndrome; Scleroderma; Myositis; Vasculitis; Mastocytosis; Various Autoimmune and/or Systemic and/or Rare Diseases

  1. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Blaes, Franz

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types.

  2. Fingers that change color

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions can cause fingers or toes to change color: Buerger disease Chilblains. Painful inflammation of small blood vessels. Cryoglobulinemia Frostbite Necrotizing vasculitis Peripheral artery disease ...

  3. [Jellyfish and poison-producing animals that endanger swimmers].

    PubMed

    Litschauer-Poursadrollah, M; Mayer, D E; Hemmer, W; Jarisch, R

    2010-05-01

    Exposure to fresh water as well as to sea water can cause unpleasant consequences. The water of lakes or biotopes may be the reason for severe itching reactions on exposed skin, caused by cercariae. Exposure to seawater may lead to skin affections including itching or burning urticarial lesions as well as life threatening reactions. The causes for these reactions are especially species of jellyfish.

  4. Topical chlormethine hydrochloride causing bullous reaction.

    PubMed

    Ngai, Ka Yan; Chan, Ho Yin; Ng, Fu

    2009-09-01

    We describe a woman misusing chlormethine hydrochloride lotion for vitiligo with dermatological complications of local urticarial and bullous reactions. Presentations, complications, and management of topical chlormethine hydrochloride overdose are discussed. Surface decontamination and follow-up for potential complications are major treatments.

  5. Generalized acquired cutis laxa type 1: a case report and brief review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Piyush; Savant, Sushil S; Das, Anupam

    2016-03-16

    Cutis laxa, clinically characterized by loose and pendulous skin related to loss of elastic tissue, is a rare heterogeneous condition. It is classified into congenital and acquired types. We report a case of generalized acquired cutis laxa type 1 in a young man following pruritic urticarial plaques. We have done a brief review of literature.

  6. Cryoglobulinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the VF E-News HERE A A A Youtube LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Takayasu’s Arteritis Webinar + Vasculitis Behcet’s ... Book Vasculitis Terms A – Z VF Medical Consultants YouTube Education Videos YouTube Education Videos produced by Alliance ...

  7. The many faces of Merlin: IgG4-associated pulmonary-renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Ben; Lioen, Pieter; Meijers, Björn; Lerut, Evelyne; Meersschaert, Joke; Blockmans, Daniel; Claes, Kathleen

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary-renal syndrome is a common and serious disorder with a broad differential diagnosis. We describe a case of a middle-aged man presenting with interstitial pulmonary disease and severe renal impairment caused by a hypocomplementemic immune-complex-mediated interstitial nephritis. Serum levels of IgG4 were elevated, and renal biopsy specimens revealed the presence of interstitial IgG4(+) plasma cells. There was a rapid improvement of both pulmonary and renal abnormalities after the initiation of corticosteroids. To our knowledge, this report is the first to show interstitial pulmonary disease in association with interstitial kidney disease as the predominant and presenting symptoms of IgG4-related disease. PMID:21896524

  8. Caterpillar dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, K; Freeman, S

    1997-11-01

    A 3-year-old girl presented with recurrent urticarial eruptions presumed due to infestation of her garden with Euproctis edwardsi, Euproctis edwardsi, the mistletoe browntail moth is a variety of hairy caterpillar widely distributed in south-eastern Australia. They are often called 'woolly bears' by children. These caterpillars possess barbed hairs that fragment readily and are difficult to extract from the skin in one piece. Itching urticarial wheals and papular eruptions can follow contact with the caterpillars or their detached hairs. The hairlets may be identified by microscopy from skin scrapings and can be removed by tape stripping or with the aid of fine forceps. The skin lesions are treated symptomatically with calamine lotion, sodium bicarbonate solution and antihistamines. Infestation with Euproctis edwardsi can be minimized by removal of mistletoe from eucalyptus trees and by spraying affected areas with white oil or carbaryl 0.1%.

  9. Caterpillar dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, K; Freeman, S

    1997-11-01

    A 3-year-old girl presented with recurrent urticarial eruptions presumed due to infestation of her garden with Euproctis edwardsi, Euproctis edwardsi, the mistletoe browntail moth is a variety of hairy caterpillar widely distributed in south-eastern Australia. They are often called 'woolly bears' by children. These caterpillars possess barbed hairs that fragment readily and are difficult to extract from the skin in one piece. Itching urticarial wheals and papular eruptions can follow contact with the caterpillars or their detached hairs. The hairlets may be identified by microscopy from skin scrapings and can be removed by tape stripping or with the aid of fine forceps. The skin lesions are treated symptomatically with calamine lotion, sodium bicarbonate solution and antihistamines. Infestation with Euproctis edwardsi can be minimized by removal of mistletoe from eucalyptus trees and by spraying affected areas with white oil or carbaryl 0.1%. PMID:9431713

  10. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C.-Y.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension. PMID:20150337

  11. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-Y; Trask, R S; Bond, I P

    2010-08-01

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension.

  12. Mast cells respond to urticating extract from lepidoptera larva Morpheis ehrenbergii in the rat.

    PubMed

    Galicia-Curiel, María Fernanda; Quintanar, J Luis; Jiménez, Mariela; Salinas, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells and histamine participate in toxic effects of hairs from some caterpillars. This study reports that a crude extract of Morpheis ehrenbergii caterpillar hairs induces in vitro mast cells activation, triggers the release of histamine and causes a rapid urticarial reaction in the rat skin. Heating of the extract abolishes the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that the use of antihistamines may improve the adverse skin reactions caused by the Mexican caterpillar M. ehrenbergii.

  13. Urticaria and dermographism in patients with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Ayabe, Liliane Akemi; Brandt, Hebert Roberto Clivati; Romiti, Ricardo; Maruta, Celina W

    2012-08-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients typically present with arthralgia, fever, lymphadenopathy and a transient salmon maculopapular rash. Only approximately 25 cases of AOSD with urticaria were described in the literature. In this article, the authors report three additional cases of AOSD with urticarial and dermographic lesions who had a good clinical response to glucocorticoid and antihistamines. A review of the literature concerning this issue is also herein written.

  14. Erythema elevatum diutinum in association with IgA monoclonal gammopathy: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Patnala, Guru Prasad; Sunandini, Anila P.; Rayavarapu, Rama; Yandapalli, Padmasri Somala

    2016-01-01

    Erythema elevatum diutinum (EED) is a rare form of vasculitis characterized clinically by red-violet brown papules, plaques, and nodules mainly involving the extensor surfaces; histologically by leukocytoclastic vasculitis in early lesions, and fibrosis and cholesterolosis in late lesions. EED has been associated with many systemic disorders including infections, autoimmune disorders, and both benign and malignant hematological disorders. As it is a rare form of vasculitis and only 250 cases reported till date, we report a case of EED in association with IgA monoclonal gammopathy with partial response to dapsone treatment. PMID:27559509

  15. Hydralazine-induced pauci-immune glomerulonephritis: intriguing case series with misleading diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Babar, Faizan; Posner, Jeffery N.; Obah, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine has been used since the 1950s for the management of hypertension. Evidence for hydralazine-associated vasculitis dates to pre-ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) era. This abstract describes two cases of ANCA-positive pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (GN) in challenging scenarios where diagnosis was misconstrued. A comprehensive literature review was done to understand the pathogenesis of drug-induced pauci-immune GN. We have described key diagnostic features that are helpful in distinguishing idiopathic ANCA vasculitis from drug-induced vasculitis. Additionally, we have also described different treatments meant to provide therapy options with the least side effects. PMID:27124161

  16. Protein urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems, such as a bladder tumor or infection Multiple myeloma Risks There are no risks with this test. ... uremic syndrome Interstitial nephritis Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis Membranous nephropathy Multiple myeloma Necrotizing vasculitis Polycystic kidney disease Renal vein thrombosis ...

  17. Henoch-Schönlein purpura

    MedlinePlus

    Ardoin SP, Fels E. Vasculitis syndromes. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton B, St. Geme J, Schor N, Behrman ... Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 161. Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM. Henoch-Schöenlein purpura. In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, ...

  18. Takayasu's arteritis with skin manifestations in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease: coincidence or concurrence?

    PubMed

    Baqir, Misbah; Usman, Mohammed Haris Umer; Adenwalla, Humaira N; Aziz, Saqib; Noor, Fazle; ul- Islam, Tasbir; Ahmed, Mansoor; Hotiana, Mateen

    2007-06-01

    We report a case of Crohn's disease that was associated with marked dermatologic manifestations depicting necrotizing vasculitis around the ankles. On further evaluation, this patient was found to have aortic narrowing, which fit the criteria for Takayasu's arteritis.

  19. ANCA / MPO / PR3 Antibodies Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vasculitis .) Help distinguish between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn disease (CD), two common types of inflammatory bowel disease ( ... the health practitioner is attempting to distinguish between Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. Symptoms of an IBD may ...

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Anti-Pandemic H1N1 Vaccination in Rheumatic Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-06-25

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE); Dermatomyositis (DM); DMixed Connective Tissue Disease; Systemic Vasculitis; Systemic Sclerosis (SSc); Sjögren's Syndrome; Antiphospholipid Syndrome; Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Juvenile SLE; Juvenile DM

  1. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  2. Histological findings after brown recluse spider envenomation.

    PubMed

    Elston, D M; Eggers, J S; Schmidt, W E; Storrow, A B; Doe, R H; McGlasson, D; Fischer, J R

    2000-06-01

    Histologic specimens from 41 rabbits were studied for changes resulting from the manual injection of brown recluse spider venom. Major findings included a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, coagulative tissue necrosis, and vasculitis. All specimens demonstrated a well-delineated zone of eosinophilic staining recognizable as "mummified" coagulative necrosis of the epidermis and dermis. A dense band of neutrophils bordered the zone of necrosis. Immediately adjacent to the neutrophilic band, small vessel vasculitis was a universal finding. Degranulated eosinophils and neutrophils and macrophages filled with eosinophilic granules were common. Inflammatory foci were often centered on groups of lipocytes within the dermis. Large vessel vasculitis resembling that seen in polyarteritis nodosa was present deep to 7 of the 40 eschars. Large vessel vasculitis may contribute to the large zones of necrosis seen after some brown recluse spider bites. Eosinophils may play a role in tissue damage after envenomation.

  3. Spontaneous ureteral rupture in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Pennebaker, J.B.; Harisdangkul, V.; Songcharoen, S.

    1983-08-01

    A patient with known systemic lupus erythematosus had fever and symptoms of a lower urinary tract infection. Bone scintigraphy showed left ureteral perforation and necrosis with no demonstrable nephrolithiasis. It is speculated that this episode was due to lupus vasculitis.

  4. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    MedlinePlus

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), previously known as Wegener's granulomatosis, is a rare disease. It is a type of vasculitis, or inflammation of the ... trachea (windpipe), lungs, and kidneys. The cause of GPA is unknown. It can affect people at any ...

  5. The CARRA Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Mixed Connective Tissue Disease; Juvenile Ankylosing Spondylitis; Juvenile Dermatomyositis; Localized Scleroderma; Systemic Sclerosis; Vasculitis; Sarcoid; Fibromyalgia, Primary; Auto-inflammatory Disease; Idiopathic Uveitis Idiopathic

  6. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves vasculitis, which is inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  7. Isolated Aortitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve blocked arteries. Care of aortitis requires periodic surveillance of the aorta and large arteries. Vasculitis experts and expert vascular surgeons are important part of the multi-specialty care team. Frequent visits and follow imaging ...

  8. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the removal of a small piece of muscle tissue for examination. ... dystrophy Myopathic changes (destruction of the muscle) Necrosis (tissue death) of muscle Necrotizing vasculitis Traumatic muscle damage Polymyositis Additional conditions ...

  9. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  10. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis and facial palsy: Literature review and insight in the autoimmune pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Greco, Antonio; Granata, Guido; Manno, Alessandra; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Angeletti, Diletta; Didona, Dario; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is an autoimmune systemic necrotizing small-vessel vasculitis associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Oto-neurological manifestations of ANCA-associated vasculitis according to PR3-ANCA positivity and MPO-ANCA positivity are usually reported. Facial nerve palsy is usually reported during the clinical course of the disease but it might appear as the presenting sign of GPA. Necrotizing vasculitis of the facial nerve 'vasa nervorum' is nowadays the most widely accepted etiopathogenetic theory to explain facial damage in GPA patients. A central role for PR3-ANCA in the pathophysiology of vasculitis in GPA patients with oto-neurological manifestation is reported. GPA requires prompt, effective management of the acute and chronic manifestations. Once the diagnosis of GPA has been established, clinicians should devise an appropriate treatment strategy for each individual patient, based on current clinical evidence, treatment guidelines and recommendations.

  11. Microscopic Polyangiitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... include purplish bumps and spots pictured below (palpable purpura). These areas range in size from several millimeters ... Syndrome (EGPA) Cryoglobulinemia Giant Cell Arteritis Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Microscopic Polyangiitis Polyarteritis Nodosa Rheumatoid Vasculitis Takayasu’s Arteritis ...

  12. Polyarteritis Nodosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... are very common in PAN and may include purpura, livedo reticularis, ulcers, nodules or gangrene. Skin involvement ... the skin (where vasculitis may appear as palpable purpura, livedo reticularis, digital gangrene, or tender nodules), or ...

  13. Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis, formerly Churg-Strauss Syndrome (EGPA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diffuse interstitial lung disease (rarely) Skin Rashes Palpable purpura Nodules (above or below the skin), often at ... Syndrome (EGPA) Cryoglobulinemia Giant Cell Arteritis Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Microscopic Polyangiitis Polyarteritis Nodosa Rheumatoid Vasculitis Takayasu’s Arteritis ...

  14. Polyarteritis nodosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the French Vasculitis Study Group Database. Arthritis Rheum . 2010;62(2):616-626. PMID: 20112401 www. ... study of one hundred twenty-four patients. Arthritis Rheum . 2010;62(4):1186-1197. PMID: 20131268 www. ...

  15. Takayasu's arteritis with skin manifestations in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease: coincidence or concurrence?

    PubMed

    Baqir, Misbah; Usman, Mohammed Haris Umer; Adenwalla, Humaira N; Aziz, Saqib; Noor, Fazle; ul- Islam, Tasbir; Ahmed, Mansoor; Hotiana, Mateen

    2007-06-01

    We report a case of Crohn's disease that was associated with marked dermatologic manifestations depicting necrotizing vasculitis around the ankles. On further evaluation, this patient was found to have aortic narrowing, which fit the criteria for Takayasu's arteritis. PMID:16555017

  16. Juvenile polyarteritis nodosa associated with toxoplasmosis presenting as Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Başaran, Özge; Çakar, Nilgün; Gür, Gökçe; Kocabaş, Abdullah; Gülhan, Belgin; Çaycı, Fatma Şemsa; Çelikel, Banu Acar

    2014-04-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a vasculitis characterized by inflammatory necrosis of medium-sized arteries. Juvenile PAN and Kawasaki disease (KD) both cause vasculitis of the medium-sized arteries, and share common features. They have overlapping clinical features. Treatment should be managed according to the severity of symptoms and persistence of clinical manifestations. Herein is described the case of a 14-year-old boy first diagnosed with KD, who then fulfilled the criteria for juvenile PAN due to the development of severe myalgia, persistent fever, polyneuropathy and coronary arterial dilatation. He also had acute toxoplasmosis at the onset of vasculitis symptoms. The final diagnosis was of juvenile PAN associated with toxoplasmosis infection. Toxoplasma infection can be considered as an etiological agent for PAN and other vasculitis syndromes. Awareness of toxoplasmosis-related PAN facilitates early diagnosis, and instigation of appropriate treatment.

  17. [Comprehensive ultrasound diagnosis of orbital tumors and preudotumors].

    PubMed

    Aznabaev, M T; Gabdrakhmanova, A F; Gaĭsina, G F

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive ultrasound examination was made in 37 patients with orbital tumors and pseudotumors. The basic differential diagnostic sonographic and Doppler signs were defined in capillary hemangioma, vasculitis at the stage of infiltration and malignancies of the orbit.

  18. Necrotizing ANCA-Positive Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Culture-Negative Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Van Haare Heijmeijer, Sophie; Wilmes, Dunja; Aydin, Selda; Clerckx, Caroline; Labriola, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) and small-vessel vasculitis may have similar clinical features, including glomerulonephritis. Furthermore the association between IE and ANCA positivity is well documented, making differential diagnosis between IE- and ANCA-associated vasculitis particularly difficult, especially in case of culture-negative IE. We report on one patient with glomerulonephritis secondary to culture-negative IE caused by Bartonella henselae which illustrates this diagnostic difficulty. PMID:26819786

  19. Renal findings in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical aspects of 132 necropsies.

    PubMed

    Boers, M; Croonen, A M; Dijkmans, B A; Breedveld, F C; Eulderink, F; Cats, A; Weening, J J

    1987-09-01

    Renal abnormalities in 132 necropsied patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. Clinical findings before death included extra-articular manifestations of the disease (86% of patients), systemic vasculitis (6%), and uraemia (23%). Necropsy findings included nephrosclerosis (90%), systemic vasculitis (14%) with kidney involvement in 8%, amyloidosis (11%), membranous glomerulopathy (8%), and focal glomerular disease (8%). Association with clinical data suggests that both rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid disease may play a part in the cause of these abnormalities. PMID:3675007

  20. Popliteal artery thrombosis in a patient with Cogan syndrome: Treatment with thrombolysis and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Bastug, Demir E.; Dominic, Anthony; Ortiz, Orlando; DiBartolomeo, Anthony G.; Kotzan, Jeffrey M.; Abraham, F. Matthew

    1997-01-15

    A 31-year-old woman with Cogan syndrome (a rare form of systemic vasculitis) was evaluated for a cold, painful left foot with diminished pulses. Arteriography demonstrated thrombosis of the left popliteal artery with evidence of vasculitis. Thrombolytic therapy was begun with initial success but eventual rethrombosis. After reinitiating thrombolytic therapy combined with intraarterial vasodilator therapy, successful angioplasty was performed with sustained results, at 6-month follow-up.

  1. Henoch-Schönlein purpura with c-ANCA antibody in an adult*

    PubMed Central

    Torraca, Pedro de Freitas Silva; de Castro, Bruna Corrêa; Hans Filho, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the vasculitis associated with deposits of immunoglobulin A in small vessels. Its association with cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies is possible, but rare. This vasculitis is uncommon in adults and the main clinic manifestations are purpuric lesions in lower limbs with gastrointestinal symptoms and renal involvement. The present work describes a rare case of Henoch-Schönlein purpura in an adult with cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

  2. A 34 Year Old Man with Purple Discoloration and Paresthesia

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodian, Reihaneh; Haghighi, Anoosheh; Vakili, Masoud; Shahriari-Ahmadi, Ali; Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Arabi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Secondary systemic vasculitis and nonbacterial endocarditis are rare events. We report a case presented with different manifestations of underlying malignancy such as systemic vasculitis, non bacterial endocarditis and DIC (disseminated intravascular coagulopathy). Efforts to find the source of malignancy was unsuccessful and due to patient's unwillingness for further evaluation, finally under the diagnosis of metastatic disease of unknown primary, patient is receiving cyclic chemotherapy. PMID:24505550

  3. Hydralazine-induced pulmonary-renal syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Ankur; Yokogawa, Naoto; Raja, Haroon; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Desai, Priyank; Zanotti-Cavazzoni, Sergio L; Rajaram, Sri-Sujanthy

    2012-07-01

    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus differs in its manifestation from drug-induced vasculitis. The former is associated with characteristic symptoms that improve following discontinuation, whereas the latter is predominantly an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positive small vessel vasculitis involving the kidneys, skin, and lungs. We present a case of advanced disease in an elderly Caucasian woman requiring corticosteroids, and immunosuppressive therapy, who was on hydralazine for >2 years.

  4. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course.

  5. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course. PMID:27001769

  6. Respiratory disease in systemic lupus erythematosus: correlation with results of laboratory tests and histological appearance of muscle biopsy specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S A; Hopkinson, N D; Kinnear, W J; Watson, L; Powell, R J; Johnston, I D

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In systemic lupus erythematosus, certain laboratory tests and evidence from muscle biopsy specimens of lymphocytic vasculitis reflect disease activity. A study was designed to determine if such indices predict respiratory lesions, and in particular whether the presence of vasculitis in quadriceps muscle reflects respiratory muscle function. METHODS: Twenty seven 27 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were studied, ten of whom were consecutive untreated patients and 17 having clinically active disease and being treated. They were prospectively evaluated on the basis of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, lymphocyte count, C3 degradation products, quadriceps muscle biopsy, spirometry, lung volumes, carbon monoxide transfer factor, and mouth pressure during a maximal sniff. RESULTS: Lung function test results were abnormal in 12 patients. Vital capacity was reduced in seven, carbon monoxide transfer factor capacity in five, and mouth pressure was low (< 70% predicted) in ten. Lymphocytic vasculitis was seen in the muscle biopsy specimens of ten patients. No correlation was found between laboratory tests and lung function or mouth pressure, or between the presence of lymphocytic vasculitis and mouth pressure. In untreated patients, those with lymphocytic vasculitis had lower spirometric values. CONCLUSIONS: In systemic lupus erythematosus, evidence from muscle biopsy specimens of lymphocytic vasculitis is not predictive of impaired inspiratory muscle function as measured by mouth pressure. In untreated patients there were relationships between some laboratory test results and respiratory function, but this was not the case for the whole group. In systemic lupus erythematosus, laboratory tests and evidence from muscle biopsy specimens of lymphocytic vasculitis are therefore unlikely to be helpful in the assessment of respiratory disease. Images PMID:1465755

  7. Cutaneous Larva Migrans in Early Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Siddalingappa, Karjigi; Murthy, Sambasiviah Chidambara; Herakal, Kallappa; Kusuma, Marganahalli Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans or creeping eruptions is a cutaneous dermatosis caused by hookworm larvae, Ancylostoma braziliense. A 2-month-old female child presented with a progressive rash over the left buttock of 4 days duration. Cutaneous examination showed an urticarial papule progressing to erythematous, tortuous, thread-like tract extending a few centimeters from papule over the left gluteal region. A clinical diagnosis of cutaneous larva migrans was considered. Treatment with albendazole led to complete resolution, confirming the diagnosis. This is to the best of our knowledge, the youngest age at which this condition is being reported. PMID:26538729

  8. Lichen planus pemphigoides associated with pregnancy mimicking pemphigoid gestationis.

    PubMed

    Rullán, Jennifer; Diaz, Nicole C; Vazquez-Botet, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    Lichen planus pemphigoides (LPP) is a rare condition characterized by tense blisters that arise on lesions of lichen planus (LP) and on unaffected skin. We present the case of a 25-year-old pregnant woman at 12 weeks' gestation who developed an acute bullous eruption after 5 months of worsening LP. Similarities to pemphigoid gestationis (PG) included lesions around the periumbilical area and multiple urticarial erythematous papules and plaques in addition to linear C3 and IgM deposition along the basement membrane zone (BMZ) on direct immunofluorescence (DIF). PMID:27416093

  9. Is There any Relationship Between Extra-Pulmonary Manifestations of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection and Atopy/Respiratory Allergy in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of respiratory infections in children, but sometimes extra-pulmonary diseases can be observed. The immunological mechanisms involved in these extra-respiratory complications are unknown. Here, we report a small case series of Mycoplasma-related diseases including 5 children who developed: i) aseptic meningitis; ii) urticarial rash and pericardial effusion; iii) pleural effusion with severe eosinophilia; iv) Stevens-Johnson syndrome; v) multiform erythema. Interestingly, all children were moderately to highly atopic, as a common immunologic feature. PMID:27114818

  10. Acebrophylline-induced angioedema.

    PubMed

    Kuriachan, Sanitha; Amberkar, Mohan Babu V; Mohan, Manu K; Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar; Kishore, Meenakumari Kamal

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman visited her physician complaining of acute breathlessness and productive cough. Her medications included budesonide and formoterol for asthma, fixed-dose combination aspirin 150 mg + clopidogrel 75 mg + atorvastatin 20 mg for ischemic heart disease. History revealed that she had allergic rhinitis and was hypersensitive to penicillins. The patient was prescribed acebrophylline (ABP). Six hours after ABP therapy she presented with generalized urticarial lesions, swelling of hands, feet, lips and face, suggestive of angioedema. ABP was stopped immediately, and the patient was treated symptomatically. This case was categorized as probable as per standard causality assessment scale.

  11. Follicular mucinosis and mycosis-fungoides-like drug eruption due to leuprolide acetate: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Shalin, Sara C; Brantley, Julie; Diwan, A Hafeez

    2012-11-01

    Leuprolide acetate represents a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, used as part of the treatment of prostate cancer. We report an unusual case of disseminated urticarial rash following leuprolide injection in a 67-year-old man that histopathologically and immunohistochemically resembled mycosis-fungoides, including the presence of follicular mucinosis and eosinophils in the follicles. This histopathologic pattern has not been previously described as a drug reaction pattern due to leuprolide, and it underscores the importance of correlation with the clinical impression to arrive at a correct diagnosis.

  12. ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO “KISSING BUG” BITES

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Norman; Green, Thomas W.

    1963-01-01

    In addition to local allergic skin reactions to the bite of the kissing bug, Triatoma protracta, the systemic reactions can vary from a mild urticarial reaction to a severe anaphylactoid reaction consisting of shock, generalized angioneurotic edema and laryngeal edema. The diagnosis can be established by the clinical history, the finding of an engorged kissing bug, the presence of typical local and systemic signs, and finally, a positive reaction to a skin test with an extract of the bug. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:13938346

  13. Contact urticaria from rubber gloves: an occupational skin disorder for health care workers.

    PubMed

    Tanglertsampan, C; Patrakarn, S; Vassansiri, E

    1998-01-01

    Rubber allergy is an important occupational health problem for an increasing number of patients. It may produce a type I urticarial reaction, or more commonly, a type IV delayed eczematous dermatitis. The risk groups include health care workers, rubber industry workers, and children with spina bifida (meningomyelocele) and urogenital abnormalities. In this report, we describe a physician with a relevant history who was found to have type I hypersensitivity to rubber by prick test and use test. Our aim is to increase awareness among physicians, discuss diagnosis and management, and review the literature. PMID:9470325

  14. Acebrophylline-induced angioedema.

    PubMed

    Kuriachan, Sanitha; Amberkar, Mohan Babu V; Mohan, Manu K; Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar; Kishore, Meenakumari Kamal

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman visited her physician complaining of acute breathlessness and productive cough. Her medications included budesonide and formoterol for asthma, fixed-dose combination aspirin 150 mg + clopidogrel 75 mg + atorvastatin 20 mg for ischemic heart disease. History revealed that she had allergic rhinitis and was hypersensitive to penicillins. The patient was prescribed acebrophylline (ABP). Six hours after ABP therapy she presented with generalized urticarial lesions, swelling of hands, feet, lips and face, suggestive of angioedema. ABP was stopped immediately, and the patient was treated symptomatically. This case was categorized as probable as per standard causality assessment scale. PMID:25878387

  15. [Mosquito allergy].

    PubMed

    Brummer-Korvenkontio, Henrikki; Reunala, Timo

    2013-01-01

    Virtually all Finns are sensitized to mosquito bites already during childhood. Skin reactions caused by mosquito bites vary from rapidly appearing urticarial wheals to persistent itching papules. Allergic shock is fortunately extremely rare. The symptoms are strongest in early summer. Immediate symptoms result from proteins that get into the skin along with mosquito saliva and induce the production of IgE class antibodies by the body. The originating mechanism of delayed symptoms is unclear. Both immediate and delayed symptoms of mosquito allergy can be relieved with antihistamine drugs.

  16. The kiss of death: a severe allergic reaction to a shellfish induced by a good-night kiss.

    PubMed

    Steensma, David P

    2003-02-01

    True (IgE-mediated) allergic reactions to crustaceans are relatively common and can be serious. A young woman with a clinical history of multiple urticarial reactions after touching shrimp and lobster dishes was seen in an emergency department of a Mayo Clinic-affiliated hospital for an anaphylactic reaction that developed immediately after she kissed her boyfriend. The boyfriend had eaten several shrimp just before the kiss. It is important to warn susceptible patients that food does not actually have to be eaten to trigger an allergic reaction; touching the offending food and kissing or touching someone who has recently eaten the food can be enough to cause a major reaction.

  17. Inflammatory and noninflammatory vascular disease causing hemobilia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Charles J; Kim, Yong-Gil; Lee, Seung Geun; Lee, Chang-Keun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Koo, Bon-San; Yoo, Bin

    2011-04-01

    Typical angiographic finding of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) shows aneurysms in small- and medium-size arteries, which can assist in diagnosis. Mimics of vasculitis share similar angiographic and clinical manifestations with PAN, making diagnosis confusing. We report 2 patients admitted with hemobilia, one of whom had vasculitis and case of the other mimicked vasculitis.The first patient was an 18-year-old man with epigastric pain. On serial workup, hemobilia with multiple hepatic artery aneurysms was diagnosed and embolized. Later, PAN was confirmed on pathologic examination of gallbladder after cholecystectomy.Second patient was an 18-year-old woman also with epigastric pain. Serial workup revealed multiple microaneurysms of the hepatic artery without bleeding, but 4 days later, fistula between hepatic artery and bile duct was found, and embolization was performed. She was readmitted 1 month later because of hemorrhage of gallbladder, and pathologic examination of gallbladder showed evidence of fibromuscular dysplasia.Clinicians should be aware of mimics of vasculitis when diagnosing gastrointestinal involvement of vasculitis.

  18. Levamisole-contaminated cocaine: a hairy affair.

    PubMed

    van der Veer, Tjeerd; Pennings, Ed; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Korswagen, Lindy-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Levamisole-contaminated cocaine can induce severe systemic vasculitis. The diagnosis can be challenging, especially when substance abuse is uncertain. We present the case of a 42-year-old woman suffering from vasculitis due to levamisole-contaminated cocaine, who persistently denied substance abuse. Symptoms included ulcerating skin lesions, arthralgia and myalgia, and the occurrence of an ileal intussusception. The definitive diagnosis was made using hair testing for toxins. She recovered through cocaine abstinence, but re-exposure resulted in a severe relapse with glomerulonephritis. Importantly, at time of the relapse, the patient became positive for both myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and proteinase 3-ANCA. Cocaine-levamisole-induced vasculitis poses a great clinical challenge. The proper diagnostic strategy and therapy is still controversial. We highlight our diagnostic and therapeutic considerations, including hair testing for definitive proof of exposure. PMID:26311010

  19. Budd-chiari syndrome and renal arterial neurysms due to behcet disease: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Batur, Abdussamet; Dorum, Meltem; Yüksekkaya, Hasan Ali; Koc, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis of unknown etiology with a chronic relapsing course. Vasculitis in Behcet's disease with predominant vascular involvement is the only vasculitis that affects both arteries and veins of any size. Involvement of the renal artery and inferior vena cava is rare among the arteries and veins, respectively. When disease affect the veins, it is in the form of thrombosis. Arterial complications include aneurysms, stenosis and occlusions. Both rupture of arterial aneurysm and occlusion of suprahepatic veins, causing Budd-Chiari syndrome, are associated with a high mortality rate. Vascular involvement is more common in male patients than in female patients. Men and patients with a younger age of onset present with a more severe prognosis. In this case report, we describe a very rare cause of intrarenal arterial aneurysm's rupture with previous Budd-Chiari syndrome due to Behcet's disease and successful angiographic embolization of actively bleeding aneurysm. PMID:26491527

  20. Churg-Strauss Syndrome following PTU Treatment.

    PubMed

    Quax, R A M; Swaak, A J G; Baggen, M G A

    2009-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) is a frequently prescribed drug in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. The use of PTU is, however, accompanied by numerous potentially serious side effects including vasculitis. PTU-related vasculitides can present as haematuria, pulmonary haemorrhage, or cutaneous lesion together with aspecific symptoms such as fever, myalgia, arthralgia, and fatigue. Cerebral involvement is seldom observed. We present a 49-year-old female with Graves' disease and asthma, who developed paresis of the proximal extremities, eosinophilia, pulmonary, and cutaneous lesions following treatment with PTU. A cerebral vasculitis consistent with Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) was suspected. Although cerebral involvement is seldom observed with PTU treatment, cerebral vasculitis should be considered in patients developing CNS symptoms.

  1. Unusual presentation of a multiple sclerosis case involving central retinal artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; R. Nowilaty, Sawsan

    2014-01-01

    The term intermediate uveitis (IU) refers to a subgroup of uveitis in which the vitreous is the site of greatest inflammation. Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have a greater frequency of IU compared with the general population. The IU associated with MS is characterized by the presence of pars planitis (occasionally accompanied by anterior uveitis) and the presence of peripheral retinal vasculitis in the form of periphlebitis (venous sheathing) in 6–26% of patients. We present a patient with an unusual initial presentation of MS involving central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) in the right eye (RE). Although retinal vascular changes are asymptomatic in the majority of MS patients, the spectrum of impairment ranges from simple peripheral retina periphlebitis to the presence of peripheral occlusive retinal vasculitis in 6.5% of patients. This atypical case may represent an extreme of the spectrum of retinal vasculitis associated with demyelinating disease. PMID:25892937

  2. Rupture of a hepatic artery aneurysm caused by Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    den Bakker, M A; Tangkau, P L; Steffens, T W; Tjiam, S L; van der Loo, E M

    1997-01-01

    Among vasculitis syndromes Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is characterized by involvement of the upper and lower airways and kidneys. The associated vasculitis involves small and medium sized arteries and veins. Aneurysm formation and a segmental pattern of involvement of larger arteries is not typically seen in WG--a presentation more in keeping with polyarteritis nodosa. We report on a patient hospitalized with classical manifestations of WG who died suddenly of hypovolemic shock caused by intraperitoneal hemorrhage resulting from rupture of a hepatic artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was caused by involvement of the hepatic artery in the disease process. To our knowledge aneurysmatic dilatation of the hepatic artery due to WG has not been previously described. This case illustrates an unusual disease course in WG and the overlap which exists in classical vasculitis syndromes.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and follow-up of giant cell arteritis: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gračanin, Ana Gudelj; Ćurić, Josip; Lončarević, Jelena; Morović-Vergles, Jadranka

    2015-01-01

    A female patient with giant cell vasculitis of the abdominal aorta and its branches and strongly suspected of having extrapulmonary tuberculosis is presented. The diagnoses were based on the clinical picture, laboratory findings, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. MRI is highly useful in cases where echosonography and/or vascular biopsy for histopathological analyses are not possible. A combination of giant cell vasculitis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis is extremely rare, and therefore, choosing the right treatment presents a considerable challenge. MRI performed after 6-month antituberculous therapy and 1-year glucocorticoid plus methotrexate therapy showed normal wall of the aorta and its branches, which was consistent with clinical and laboratory remission. Patients with large vessel vasculitis require regular follow-up by MRI.

  4. Clinical management of infectious cerebral vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Carod Artal, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of infections (virus, bacteria, parasite and fungi) may cause cerebral vasculitides. Headache, seizures, encephalopathy and stroke are common forms of presentation. Infection and inflammation of intracranial vessels may cause pathological vascular remodelling, vascular occlusion and ischemia. Vasculitis in chronic meningitis may cause ischemic infarctions, and is associated with poor outcome. Appropriate neuroimaging (CT-angiography, MR-angiography, conventional 4-vessel angiography) and laboratory testing (specific antibodies in blood and CSF, CSF culture and microscopy) and even brain biopsy are needed to quickly establish the aetiology. Enhancement of contrast, wall thickening and lumen narrowing are radiological signs pointing to an infectious vasculitis origin. Although corticosteroids and prophylactic antiplatelet therapy have been used in infectious cerebral vasculitis, there are no randomized clinical trials that have evaluated their efficacy and safety. Stable mycotic aneurysms can be treated with specific antimicrobial therapy. Endovascular therapy and intracranial surgery are reserved for ruptured aneurysms or enlarging unruptured aneurysms. PMID:26689107

  5. [A case of left occipital lobe hemorrhage in a patient with progressive systemic sclerosis: evaluation of cerebral angiography and histology].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, H; Kubo, Y; Otawara, Y; Kudo, A; Tomitsuka, N; Yoshida, K; Ogawa, A; Kurose, K; Suzuki, M; Chiba, S

    2000-11-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system is uncommon in progressive systemic sclerosis, with only 2 reported cases associated with intracerebral hemorrhage detected by neuroimaging. A 55-year-old woman with a 10-year history of scleroderma presented with left occipital lobe hemorrhage manifesting as headache and vomiting. She had no signs of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia. CT and MRI, on admission, showed left occipital lobe hemorrhage with ventricular rupture and acute left subdural hematoma. Serial cerebral angiography was performed on day 0, day 7 and day 14, and found no evidence of aneurysm, arteriovenous multiformation or tumor stain in the left occipital lobe. However, the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries showed increasing segmental narrowing suggestive of vasculitis. Histological examination of a section from the brain cortex adjacent to the hemorrhage revealed no evidence of vasculitis, fibrinoid degeneration or amyloid deposition. Focal vasculitis may have occurred secondary to the homorrhagic lesion.

  6. Fibrin(ogen) mediates acute inflammatory responses to biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Although "biocompatible" polymeric elastomers are generally nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and chemically inert, implants made of these materials may trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Early interactions between implants and inflammatory cells are probably mediated by a layer of host proteins on the material surface. To evaluate the importance of this protein layer, we studied acute inflammatory responses of mice to samples of polyester terephthalate film (PET) that were implanted intraperitoneally for short periods. Material preincubated with albumin is "passivated," accumulating very few adherent neutrophils or macrophages, whereas uncoated or plasma- coated PET attracts large numbers of phagocytes. Neither IgG adsorption nor surface complement activation is necessary for this acute inflammation; phagocyte accumulation on uncoated implants is normal in hypogammaglobulinemic mice and in severely hypocomplementemic mice. Rather, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to be critical: (a) PET coated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma attracts as few phagocytes as does albumin-coated material; (b) in contrast, PET preincubated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma containing physiologic amounts of fibrinogen elicits "normal" phagocyte recruitment; (c) most importantly, hypofibrinogenemic mice do not mount an inflammatory response to implanted PET unless the material is coated with fibrinogen or the animals are injected with fibrinogen before implantation. Thus, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to initiate the acute inflammatory response to an implanted polymer, suggesting an interesting nexus between two major iatrogenic effects of biomaterials: clotting and inflammation. PMID:8245787

  7. The first case of Henoch-Schonlein purpura associated with rosuvastatin: colonic involvement coexisting with small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Korcan Aysun; Erfan, Gamze; Oznur, Meltem; Erdogan, Cuneyt

    2014-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a systemic vasculitis affecting small vessels. It is the most common systemic vasculitis in children, and is rare in adults. Serious gastrointestinal complications are more common in childhood. Infections and drugs are the most prominent factors in the aetiology. Wall thickening in segments of the small intestine is commonly seen in imaging studies in gastrointestinal system (GIS) involvement. Simultaneous involvement of small intestine and colon is rare. An HSP case involving small intestine and colon in an adult patient due to the use of rosuvastatin, an antihyperlipidaemic agent, is presented, and is first of its kind reported in the literature.

  8. Neuro-Behçet's disease presenting with tumour-like lesions and responding to rituximab.

    PubMed

    Jade, J; Chung, K; Arendse, M; Hussain, Z; White, D

    2016-10-01

    We describe a patient with neuro-Behçets disease (NBD) that presented with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure including papilloedema. MRI revealed tumour-like lesions which, on biopsy, confirmed an active vasculitis. Treatment was commenced with prednisone and cyclophosphamide which proved unsuccessful with enlargement of the cerebral mass lesions. Infliximab and mycophenolate were trialled also without benefit. The patient required ventriculoperitoneal shunts to relieve the symptoms of hydrocephalus. Rituximab was then commenced with significant symptomatic and imaging improvement. The case is unique, in our experience, in the need for shunting to relieve the symptoms of hydrocephalus related to vasculitis.

  9. Behçet's disease diagnosed after acute HIV infection: viral replication activating underlying autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Clay; Kinney, Rebecca; Gilles, Ryan; Blue, Sky

    2015-05-01

    Behçet's disease is an autoimmune systemic vasculitis that can occur after exposure to infectious agents. Behçet's disease also has been associated with HIV infection, including de novo development of this condition during chronic HIV infection and resolution of Behçet's disease symptoms following initiation of antiretroviral therapy. We describe a patient who presented with systemic vasculitis with skin and mucous membrane ulcerations in the setting of acute HIV infection, who was eventually diagnosed with Behçet's disease, demonstrating a possible link between acute HIV infection, immune activation and development of autoimmunity.

  10. A hidden giant: Wallenberg syndrome and aortal wall thickening as an atypical presentation of a giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Stengl, Katharina Luisa; Buchert, Ralph; Bauknecht, Hans; Sobesky, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 73-year-old woman with a brainstem stroke presenting as Wallenberg syndrome. By transoesophageal echocardiography and combined 18F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission and CT (18F-FDG PET/CT), the diagnosis of large artery vasculitis owing to giant cell arteritis was confirmed. In the absence of classical clinical signs, the examination of the large extracranial vessels by ultrasound and 18F-FDG PET/CT played the key role in detecting a widespread vasculitis. PMID:23456154

  11. Neuro-Behçet's disease presenting with tumour-like lesions and responding to rituximab.

    PubMed

    Jade, J; Chung, K; Arendse, M; Hussain, Z; White, D

    2016-10-01

    We describe a patient with neuro-Behçets disease (NBD) that presented with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure including papilloedema. MRI revealed tumour-like lesions which, on biopsy, confirmed an active vasculitis. Treatment was commenced with prednisone and cyclophosphamide which proved unsuccessful with enlargement of the cerebral mass lesions. Infliximab and mycophenolate were trialled also without benefit. The patient required ventriculoperitoneal shunts to relieve the symptoms of hydrocephalus. Rituximab was then commenced with significant symptomatic and imaging improvement. The case is unique, in our experience, in the need for shunting to relieve the symptoms of hydrocephalus related to vasculitis. PMID:27320374

  12. Churg-Strauss syndrome presenting with conjunctival and eyelid masses: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ameli, F; Phang, K S; Masir, N

    2011-12-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome, a small and medium vessel vasculitis, was first described by Churg and Strauss in 1951. It is characterised by the presence of asthma, prominent tissue and blood eosinophilia, systemic vasculitis, and pulmonary and systemic necrotising allergic granulomas. Involvement of the skin, heart and gastrointestinal tract is well documented, but ocular presentation is unusual. We describe a 40-year-old lady who presented with recurrent upper eyelid swelling due to conjunctival lesions. Although she has chronic asthma, Churg-Strauss syndrome was never suspected. The diagnosis of Churg-Strauss syndrome was only made following histological examination of the conjunctival lesions. PMID:22390118

  13. Aortocarotid bypass for hemispheric hypoperfusion in a child.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Nader; Fullerton, Heather; Karl, Tom R; Lawton, Michael T

    2008-04-01

    Large-vessel vasculitis syndromes in the pediatric population are rare and highly morbid. The authors here report on the microsurgical revascularization of a unique case of presumed vasculitis with aortitis and severe obliterative arteriopathy in a 10-month-old child with symptomatic hemispheric hypoperfusion. Using a cryopreserved saphenous vein, this unilateral aortocarotid bypass restored normal intracranial perfusion bilaterally and led to a resolution of the patient's ischemic symptoms. The aortocarotid bypass is clinically effective and technically feasible in young children when a saphenous vein allograft is used. The bypass graft is amenable to angioplasty with or without stenting if delayed stenosis becomes an issue later in life.

  14. Drug-Induced Glomerular Disease: Immune-Mediated Injury

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Glen S.; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced autoimmune disease was initially described decades ago, with reports of vasculitis and a lupus-like syndrome in patients taking hydralazine, procainamide, and sulfadiazine. Over the years, multiple other agents have been linked to immune-mediated glomerular disease, often with associated autoantibody formation. Certain clinical and laboratory features may distinguish these entities from their idiopathic counterparts, and making this distinction is important in the diagnosis and management of these patients. Here, drug-induced, ANCA-associated vasculitis, drug-induced lupus, and drug-associated membranous nephropathy are reviewed. PMID:26092827

  15. Chronic skin lichenification as unusual presentation of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangitis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sbrana, F; Loggini, B; Galimberti, S; Coceani, M; Latorre, M; Seccia, V; L'Abbate, S; Mosca, M; Pasanisi, E M; Baldini, C

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangitis (EGPA) is an uncommon ANCA-associated systemic small-vessel necrotizing vasculitis. At times, EGPA presenting manifestations can be very different from the usually recognized disease patterns. We report a 52-year-old female patient with 3 years history of itching. During the time occurred a chronic skin lichenification on her legs and gradually developed a full-blown ANCA-MPO positive EGPA in combination with blood hypereosinophilia, eosinophilic vasculitis at skin biopsy, subclinical asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:27606476

  16. [Thrombotic vasculopathy probably associated with cocaine contaminated with levamisole: report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Velasco, María Abril; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia; Rodríguez-Carreón, Angélica; Díaz-Lozano, Marisol; Sánchez-Armendáriz, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The vasculities are complex diseases. Their cutaneous manifestations are very important and often mirror several pathologies. Cocaine use has been related to both, vasculitis and thrombotic vasculopathy and pseudovasculitis. A new syndrome has been described in association with its adulteration with levamisole. It can be very serious, leading patients to death. This is relevant as levamisole-adultered cocaine seems to be increasingly offered to consumers. Our goal is to report the first two cases in Mexico, which faces an important raise in cocaine use, emphasizing that a high suspicion based on certain characteristics allows for early recognition and adequate treatment.

  17. Obvious optic disc swelling in a patient with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Tadanobu; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Heike, Toshio; Takahashi, Kanji

    2013-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a group of rare hereditary autoinflammatory diseases caused by mutations of the NLRP3 gene, and leads to excessive production of the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-lβ. A 35-year-old male presented with recurrent symptoms of urticarial-like rash, periodic fever, arthralgia, headache, and eye redness. His best-corrected visual acuity was 1.0 OD and 0.9 OS. Slit-lamp examination showed conjunctival and episcleral injection in both eyes. Ophthalmoscopy revealed obvious bilateral optic disc swelling and retinal vascular sheathing around the optic discs. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography also showed obvious optic disc swelling. Steroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs did not improve these symptoms. Genetic testing detected a heterozygous mutation of c.907G>A. Thus, the patient was genetically confirmed with CAPS. Visual acuity did not decrease for 3 years, although the optic discs became white in color. CAPS should therefore be distinguished from other disorders when examining optic disc swelling and/or uveitis patients with urticarial-like rash and periodic fever. PMID:23966762

  18. Urinary retention secondary to acute vasculitic penile swelling in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Nicholas; Black, John; Gupta, Ashish

    2016-03-01

    Acute urinary retention secondary to vasculitic penile swelling in children is extremely rare. Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a self-limiting IgA-mediated cutaneous vasculitis, which can cause soft tissue edema. Acute urinary retention requires urgent intervention to prevent obstructive uropathy. Suprapubic catheterization provides an effective management strategy in the emergency setting. PMID:27014447

  19. Panniculitis caused by Mycobacterium monacense mimicking erythema induratum: a case in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Romero, J J; Herrera, P; Cartelle, M; Barba, P; Tello, S; Zurita, J

    2016-03-01

    We report the first case of recently characterized species M. monacense associated with chronic nodular vasculitis, infecting a young woman. This case represents the first isolation of M. monacense from Ecuador. The isolate was identified by conventional and molecular techniques. PMID:26933504

  20. Pancreatic mass as an initial manifestation of polyarteritis nodosa: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Ippei; Kaneko, Takeshi; Sawayanagi, Tomoki; Watahiki, Youichi; Kuroda, Makoto

    2015-01-21

    Classic polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) that targets medium-sized muscular arteries and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), characterized by inflammation of small-caliber vessels and the presence of circulating myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (MPO-ANCA), are distinct clinicopathological entities of systemic vasculitis. A 66-year-old woman presented with fever, cholestasis and positive MPO-ANCA. Radiological examination showed a pancreatic mass compressing the bile duct. Therefore, we performed pancreatoduodenectomy. Histopathological examination revealed that necrotizing vasculitis predominantly affecting the medium-sized vessels, spared arterioles or capillaries in the pancreas, a finding consistent with PAN. Unexpectedly, renal biopsy revealed small-caliber vasculitis and glomerulonephritis, supporting MPA. The initial manifestation of a pancreatic mass associated with vasculitis has only been reported in 7 articles. Its diagnosis is challenging because no reliable clinico-radiological findings have been observed. Clinicians should be aware of such cases and early diagnosis followed by immunosuppression is mandatory. Our findings may reflect a polyangiitis overlap syndrome coexisting between pancreatic PAN and renal MPA.

  1. [Two cases of cryptococcal meningitis revealed by an ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Kouame-Assouan, A E; Cowppli-Bony, P; Aka-Anghui Diarra, E; Assi, B; Doumbia, M; Diallo, L; Adjien, K C; Akani, E; Sonan, T; Diagana, M; Boa, Y E; Kouassi, B

    2007-02-01

    The usual clinical expression of neuromeningeal cryptococcosis is a meningoencephalitis. We report two cases of neurocryptococcosis which have been revealed by an unusual clinical aspect: an ischemic stroke with a vasculitis mechanism. The two patients had a positive reaction for the HIV and we discussed the responsibility of the HIV or the Cryptococcus in the occurrence of the cerebral infarct.

  2. Pancreatic mass as an initial manifestation of polyarteritis nodosa: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Ippei; Kaneko, Takeshi; Sawayanagi, Tomoki; Watahiki, Youichi; Kuroda, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Classic polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) that targets medium-sized muscular arteries and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), characterized by inflammation of small-caliber vessels and the presence of circulating myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (MPO-ANCA), are distinct clinicopathological entities of systemic vasculitis. A 66-year-old woman presented with fever, cholestasis and positive MPO-ANCA. Radiological examination showed a pancreatic mass compressing the bile duct. Therefore, we performed pancreatoduodenectomy. Histopathological examination revealed that necrotizing vasculitis predominantly affecting the medium-sized vessels, spared arterioles or capillaries in the pancreas, a finding consistent with PAN. Unexpectedly, renal biopsy revealed small-caliber vasculitis and glomerulonephritis, supporting MPA. The initial manifestation of a pancreatic mass associated with vasculitis has only been reported in 7 articles. Its diagnosis is challenging because no reliable clinico-radiological findings have been observed. Clinicians should be aware of such cases and early diagnosis followed by immunosuppression is mandatory. Our findings may reflect a polyangiitis overlap syndrome coexisting between pancreatic PAN and renal MPA. PMID:25624739

  3. Phenomics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Healthy Volunteer; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus/Antiphospholipid Syndrome; FMF; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes /TNF-receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome; Vasculitis; Uveitis; Myositis; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Rectocolitis; Type 1 Diabetes; Unclassified IAD Knee and/or Hip Arthritis, Muscular Dystrophy

  4. Giant aneurysm of the left anterior descending coronary artery in a pediatric patient with Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Cook, Amanda L; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Williams, Derek A; Hines, Michael H

    2010-07-01

    Behcet's disease is a rare autoimmune vasculitis characterized by oral aphthosis, genital ulcers, and ocular and cutaneous lesions. Vascular involvement usually affects the veins more commonly than the arteries, and coronary arterial involvement is extremely rare. We report an adolescent with Behcet's disease who developed a large pseudoaneurysm of the left anterior descending coronary artery requiring a coronary arterial bypass graft.

  5. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Life Threatening Autoimmune Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch; Graft Versus Host Disease; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Hypersensitivity Vasculitis; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Giant Cell Arteritis; Pure Red Cell Aplasia; Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Autoimmune Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Takayasu Arteritis

  6. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Netanel; Ben-Itzhak, Ofer; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    In a patient with systemic multiorgan disease with overlapping features, the differential diagnosis included infectious diseases, malignancies, and systemic autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. We present an unusual case of a young male with B cell lymphoma who presented with symptoms mimicking systemic vasculitis and review the existing literature. PMID:27293945

  7. IgA nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... glomerulonephritis ). Risk factors include: A personal or family history of IgA nephropathy or Henoch Schonlein purpura , a form of vasculitis that affects many parts of the body White or Asian ethnicity IgA nephropathy can occur in people of ...

  8. Tonsillectomy to Effectively Treat a Patient with Behçet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nanke, Yuki; Kobasigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yoda, Keiko; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Kotake, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a polysymptomatic and recurrent systemic vasculitis with a chronic course and unknown cause. We herein report a 27-year-old woman who had suffered from a recurrent fever and tonsillitis for nearly ten years with BD for who tonsillectomy was effective. PMID:26935374

  9. Adalimumab-associated antiphospholipid syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Iman; Kur, Jason

    2013-07-01

    This study aims for the presentation of the first reported case of adalimumab-associated antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and review of the literature on adalimumab-induced vasculitis and APS. A case of APS associated with adalimumab use in a 67-year-old woman is reported. The English medical literature was reviewed for antitumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents and their association with APS and vasculitis. Adalimumab is a fully humanized monoclonal antibody targeted against TNF alpha that is widely used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease. Literature review reveals several cases of anti-TNF-induced vasculitis including cases associated with adalimumab. We report the first case of adalimumab-induced APS in a 67-year-old woman who developed APS and vasculitis associated with de novo positive anti-cardiolipin (aCL) antibody following the third dose of adalimumab therapy for the treatment of spondyloarthropathy. This is the first case demonstrating that a short course of adalimumab therapy may induce immunoglobulin M aCL autoantibodies leading to APS. With the growing use of anti-TNF medications in immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases, adalimumab and other anti-TNF medications should be considered as a possible explanation for APS.

  10. [Ischemic colitis after renal transplantation:etiology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Alperovich, G; Idiarte, L; Besasso, O; Avagnina, A

    2003-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is a well-recognized complication occurring in renal transplant recipients. It has often been associated with cytomegalovirus (CMV) vasculitis. However, the diagnosis of this pathology in the absence of CMV suggests that other etiological factors might be involved. Drugs inducing mesenteric vasoconstriction, such as non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclosporine could be related to this entity.

  11. Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... part of the NIH-funded Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network, scientists participating in the Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium are ... skin diseases; the training of basic and clinical scientists to carry out this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress ...

  12. [The morphological characteristics of the lung lesions in straighteners working with brass-bronze alloys].

    PubMed

    Voznesenskiĭ, N K; Khorobrykh, V G; Chicherina, E N

    1995-01-01

    Morphologic study of lung specimens obtained during diagnostic thoractomy in 6 workers engaged in smelting brass-bronze alloys showed changes typical of exogenous fibrosing alveolitis, namely, terminal bronchiolitis with pseudopolypous growth in the submucous layer, vasculitis (predominantly arteritis) paralleled by secondary recalibration of vessels, arteriolar and venular shunting, and microcirculatory disorders.

  13. Polyangitis overlap syndrome: a fatal case combined with adult Henoch-Schönlein purpura and polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuo; Abe, Hiroyuki; Mishima, Tomoko; Ogura, Go; Suzuki, Toshimitsu

    2003-08-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a rather common disease characterized by systemic hypersensitivity vasculitis in the skin and other visceral organs. It has a favorable prognosis unless it is complicated by severe glomerular disease. We report a distinctive fatal case of systemic vasculitis combined with HSP and polyarteritis nodosa (PN) in a 56-year-old man who died of progressive renal failure one month after the onset of the disease. He complained of arthralgia, purpura of both lower extremities, nasal bleeding and tarry stool, and acute renal failure was noted at the time of admission to hospital. A skin biopsy from the purpura lesion exhibited leucocytoclastic vasculitis with IgA deposition, and HSP was considered. However, renal failure progressed rapidly and subsequently was complicated by acute myocardial infarction. Postmortem examination revealed PN type necrotizing vasculitis in the kidneys, heart and mesentery resulting in acute multiple infarctions of these organs. We think the current case was a polyangitis overlap syndrome. It is important to suspect the polyangitis overlap syndrome positively when progressive acute renal failure is seen in a patient with HSP and to begin appropriate therapy immediately.

  14. Hepatic artery mycotic aneurysm of tubercular aetiology.

    PubMed

    Beeresha; Ghotekar, L H; Dutta, T K; Verma, S K; Elangovan, S

    2000-02-01

    Hepatic artery aneurysm caused by tuberculosis is extremely rare, the commonest being atherosclerosis and vasculitis. A 13 year boy admitted with suspected disseminated tuberculosis had a hepatic bruit. Patient died of aneurysmal rupture before antemortem etiological diagnosis could be established. Postmortem examination revealed widespread tubercular lesions in the chest and abdomen and hepatic artery aneurysm.

  15. Unusual clinic presentation of polyarteritis nodosa: involvement of axillary and brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, Ismail; Koyuncu, Sumeyra; Mavili, Ertugrul; Unal, Aydin; Tokmak, Turgut Tursem; Cilan, Havva; Kavuncuoglu, Feridun; Oymak, Oktay; Utas, Cengiz

    2011-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a necrotizing inflammatory vasculitis of small- and medium-sized muscular arteries. Multiple organs, especially the kidney, skin, peripheric nerves, striated muscles, and intestine, are affected. In this case report, a patient with renal and hepatic involvement and axillary and brachial artery aneurysm resulting in shoulder hematoma and pain due to underlying PAN is presented.

  16. Pathologic features of naturally occurring juvenile polyarteritis in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Snyder, P W; Kazacos, E A; Scott-Moncrieff, J C; HogenEsch, H; Carlton, W W; Glickman, L T; Felsburg, P J

    1995-07-01

    Eighteen young Beagle dogs (eight males and 10 females), ages 6-40 months, with canine juvenile polyarteritis syndrome (CJPS), a naturally occurring vasculitis and perivasculitis of unknown etiology, were necropsied, and their tissues were examined by histopathologic and histochemical methods. The condition is characterized by recurring episodes of an acute onset of fever (> 40 C) and neck pain that persist for 3-7 days. The major histopathologic alterations were a systemic vasculitis and perivasculitis. During the febrile, painful period of CJPS, the vascular lesions ranged from a histiocytic-lymphocytic periarterial infiltration to transmural arterial inflammation with concomitant fibrinoid necrosis and vascular thrombosis. Massive periarterial accumulations of inflammatory cells were common and often extended into adjacent tissues. The small- to medium-sized muscular arteries of the heart, cranial mediastinum, and cervical spinal meninges were consistently involved. Vasculitis occasionally occurred in other organ systems. The vascular lesions in dogs examined during clinically normal periods consisted of intimal and medial fibrosis, ruptured elastic laminae, and mild perivasculitis; these lesions were probably related to previous episodes of vasculitis. Eight dogs that had experienced repeated acute episodes also developed splenic, hepatic, and renal amyloidosis. The clinical signs, laboratory abnormalities, and the vascular lesions suggest that the condition may be immune-system mediated. CJPS may serve as a naturally occurring animal model of human immune-system-mediated vasculitides such as polyarteritis nodosa, infantile polyarteritis, and Kawasaki disease.

  17. Cardiovascular lesions in collagen-vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferrans, V J; Rodríguez, E R

    1985-01-01

    In this review, the cardiac lesions which develop in association with the various collagen-vascular diseases are described. In rheumatoid arthritis, the most frequent lesions are: fibrous obliterative pericarditis, with pericardial deposits of calcium, fibrin, cholesterol, and rheumatoid granulomas; granulomatous or nonspecific myocarditis; valvulitis, vasculitis, and amyloid deposits. In ankylosing spondylitis, the lesions involve mainly the valves (aortic and mitral valves) and the aorta. In systemic lupus erythematosus, the predominant cardiovascular lesions are: pericarditis, Libman-Sacks endocarditis, nonspecific myocarditis, vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis, and acceleration of atherosclerosis. In scleroderma, the main cardiac lesion is fibrosis with only scanty inflammatory cells; pericarditis and nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis also occur. In dermatomyositis/polymyositis, fibrous or fibrinous pericarditis can occur, as well as myocarditis with infiltrates of lymphocytes and plasma cells and with degeneration and necrosis of myocytes; valvulitis is uncommon except when the disease is related to mucinous adenocarcinoma. In polyarteritis nodosa, various stages of necrotizing vasculitis involve all layers of the arterial walls; foci of myocardial necrosis of various sizes can occur in association with these lesions; cardiac hypertrophy related to hypertension and pericarditis related to uremia, may also be found. In Wegener's granulomatosis, pericarditis, inflammatory infiltrates, necrotizing granulomas, and vasculitis have been observed in the heart.

  18. A case of Takayasu's arteritis with pulsatile neck mass

    PubMed Central

    Karimifar, Mansoor; Karimifar, Mozhgan; Salimi, Fereshteh; Behjati, Mohaddeseh

    2011-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA), also known as pulseless disease or occlusive thromboaortopathy, is a form of vasculitis of unknown cause that chiefly affects the aorta and its major branches, most frequently in young women. We describe an 18-year-old female with a soft and pulsatile mass in the left side of her neck. PMID:22973373

  19. Anthrax vaccine associated deaths in miniature horses.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, Bruce K

    2015-04-01

    During a widespread anthrax outbreak in Canada, miniature horses were vaccinated using a live spore anthrax vaccine. Several of these horses died from an apparent immune-mediated vasculitis temporally associated with this vaccination. During the course of the outbreak, other miniature horses from different regions with a similar vaccination history, clinical signs, and necropsy findings were found.

  20. Palpable purpura with an unexpected outcome.

    PubMed

    Friesgaard Christensen, Anne; Clemmensen, Ole; Junker, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Scurvy is a potentially lethal condition caused by inadequate vitamin C intake. Hypovitaminosis of vitamin C causes vessel fragility and follicular hyperkeratosis that can lead to palpable purpuric skin lesions. In this case report, we aim to remind readers that scurvy still occurs in Western countries and that the clinical presentation may resemble vasculitis. PMID:23956916

  1. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia and Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matteson, E L; Ike, R W

    1990-05-01

    A 52-year-old man developed a systemic illness with fever, malaise, cough, dry eyes and mouth. Investigation revealed bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia associated with retinal vasculitis, hepatic and renal involvement, lymphocytic sialoadenitis and symptoms of the sicca complex. High dose steroid treatment resulted in resolution of his symptoms and prolonged remission. PMID:2359080

  2. Hepatitis B virus-related polyarteritis nodosa presenting with multiple lung nodules and cavitary lesions.

    PubMed

    Naniwa, Taio; Maeda, Tomoyo; Shimizu, Shigeki; Ito, Rei

    2010-07-01

    The patient presented here is a 59-year-old Japanese man with active chronic hepatitis B with precore and core promoter mutated virus, presenting with high fever, bloody sputum, and multiple lung nodules with excavation. Surgical biopsy of the lung nodule showed necrotizing vasculitis affecting pulmonary arteries without granulomatous changes. The pulmonary manifestations of this patient resembled Wegener granulomatosis. However, the pathologic findings showing nongranulomatous necrotizing vasculitis involving the small pulmonary arteries, presence of circulating immune complex, absence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, and excellent response to the combination therapy of corticosteroid and an anti-hepatitis B virus agent, entecavir, led us to the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus-related polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). Radiographic evidence of lung nodules or cavitations seen in systemic vasculitis patients has been considered a sign suggestive of granulomatous disease and a diagnostic surrogate marker for necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis, but a clinical relevance to hepatitis B virus-related PAN has not been reported before this case. PMID:20605819

  3. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adolescents include: Hemolytic uremic syndrome Henoch-Schönlein purpura IgA nephropathy Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis Common causes in ... Heart failure - overview Hemolytic-uremic syndrome Henoch-Schönlein purpura Hepatitis High blood pressure Hypersensitivity vasculitis IgA nephropathy ...

  4. Henoch-Schonlein Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Vasculitis / Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Fast Facts First Description Who gets Henoch-Schönlein ... to serious kidney involvement. Who gets Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (the “typical” patient)? Usually, HSP affects a child ...

  5. Comparison of PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA Epitope Specificity upon Disease Relapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND Relapse is a major clinical problem in ANCA vasculitis that causes increased morbidity and mortality. Compared to MPO-ANCA patients, patients with PR3-ANCA run a significantly increased risk of experiencing relapses. We hypothesized that a relapsing patient is produ...

  6. Churg-Strauss syndrome presenting as scar reactivation: histopathologic features and an illustration of 'locus minoris resistentiae'.

    PubMed

    Gee, Sarah N; Harris, Anna C; Zimarowski, Mary Jane

    2013-05-01

    We report a 33-year-old female with cutaneous involvement by Churg-Strauss syndrome confined to surgical scars that were obtained 13 years before. She presented to the emergency department with 2-day history of fever, night sweats, right-sided weakness, hoarseness and worsening asthma symptoms. She was found to have an eosinophilia and two sub-5-mm pulmonary nodules. The patient also reported that the scars on her right thumb, inner wrist and back had been swollen, red and painful for 2 days. Examination revealed tender, erythematous, well-healed edematous scars studded with small skin colored papules. She had no clinical findings that were classic for cutaneous vasculitis. A skin biopsy of a scar revealed perivascular and palisading granulomatous inflammation consisting of histiocytes and neutrophils with leukocytoclasia. Focal vascular injury was identified. Scattered tissue eosinophils were seen. Special stains were negative for infection. Thereafter, she was started on intravenous steroids, at which point the fever, pulmonary and cutaneous symptoms subsided. Although scar sarcoidosis is a well-described phenomenon, granulomatous inflammation and vasculitis seen in Churg-Strauss syndrome exclusively manifesting in well-healed surgical scars highlights the unique features seen in this case and draws attention to the concept of locus minoris resistentiae. This case also highlights how a skin biopsy in the setting of suspected systemic vasculitis can confirm the presence of vasculitis and/or granulomatous inflammation and obviate the need for more invasive, higher risk procedures such as lung biopsy. PMID:23414289

  7. Behcet's Disease: New Concepts in Cardiovascular Involvements and Future Direction for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Owlia, M. B.; Mehrpoor, G.

    2012-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is the only systemic vasculitis involving both arteries and vein in any sizes. It frequently encounters in rheumatology clinics. It has some major morbidities and even fatal outcomes in some cases. The aim of this paper is to analyze the main concepts on pathophysiology and treatment options in BD, focusing on cardiovascular aspects, thrombosis, and potential future treatment. PMID:22530146

  8. State of the Art in the Treatment of Systemic Vasculitides

    PubMed Central

    Luqmani, Raashid Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are associated with small vessel vasculitides (AASV) affecting the lungs and kidneys. Structured clinical assessment using the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score and Vasculitis Damage Index should form the basis of a treatment plan and be used to document progress, including relapse. Severe disease with organ or life threatening manifestations needs cyclophosphamide or rituximab, plus high dose glucocorticoids, followed by lower dose steroid plus azathioprine, or methotrexate. Additional plasmapheresis is effective for very severe disease, reducing dialysis dependence from 60 to 40% in the first year, but with no effect on mortality or long-term renal function, probably due to established renal damage. In milder forms of ANCA-associated vasculitis, methotrexate, leflunomide, or mycophenolate mofetil are effective. Mortality depends on initial severity: 25% in patients with renal failure or severe lung hemorrhage; 6% for generalized non-life threatening AASV but rising to 30–40% at 5 years. Mortality from GPA is four times higher than the background population. Early deaths are due to active vasculitis and infection. Subsequent deaths are more often due to cardiovascular events, infection, and cancer. We need to improve the long-term outcome, by controlling disease activity but also preventing damage and drug toxicity. By contrast, in large vessel vasculitis where mortality is much less but morbidity potentially greater, such as giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis, therapeutic options are limited. High dose glucocorticoid results in significant toxicity in over 80%. Advances in understanding the biology of the vasculitides are improving therapies. Novel, mechanism based therapies such as rituximab in AASV, mepolizumab in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and tocilizumab in GCA, but the lack of reliable biomarkers remains a challenge to progress in these chronic relapsing diseases. PMID

  9. Urticaria. An updated review.

    PubMed

    Monroe, E W; Jones, H E

    1977-01-01

    Urticaria can result from many different stimuli, and numerous factors, both immunologic and nonimmunologic, are involved in its pathogenesis. Most commonly considered of immunologic mechanisms is the type I hypersensitivity state mediated by IgE. Another immunologic mechanism involves the activation of the complement cascade, which produces anaphylatoxins that can release histamine. Immunologic, nonimmunologic, genetic, and modulating factors converge on mast cells and basophils to release mediators capable of producing urticarial lesions. In addition to the clinical and laboratory diagnosis and treatment regimens, we review such mediators as histamine, kinins, serotonin, slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis, prostaglandins, acetylcholine, fibrin degradation products, and anaphylatoxins that increase vascular permeability and can thereby produce wheals. Special consideration is given to histamine and the factors that regulate is secretory release from mast cells and basophils, including the modulating role of intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate.

  10. Final report on the safety assessment of Ammonium, Potassium, and Sodium Persulfate.

    PubMed

    Pang, S; Fiume, M Z

    2001-01-01

    incidence of urticarial reactions was performed with 17.5% Ammonium, Potassium, and Sodium Persulfate under occlusive patches. At this concentration and exposure conditions, a mixture of these Persulfates was not sensitizing, and application of Ammonium, Potassium, and Sodium Persulfate did not result in an urticarial reaction. In normal use (i.e., not occluded and rinsed off), it was expected that a concentration greater than 17.5% would also be safe. Given the clinical reports of urticarial reactions, however, manufacturers and formulators should be aware of the potential for urticarial reactions at concentrations of Persulfates greater than 17.5%. Based on the available data, the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that Ammonium, Potassium, and Sodium Persulfate are safe as used as oxidizing agents in hair colorants and lighteners designed for brief discontinuous use followed by thorough rinsing from the hair and skin. PMID:11766134

  11. Allergy to Prolene Sutures in a Dural Graft for Chiari Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Cajigas, Iahn; Burks, S. Shelby; Gernsback, Joanna; Fine, Lauren; Moshiree, Baharak; Levi, Allan D.

    2015-01-01

    Allergy to Prolene suture is exceedingly rare with only 5 cases reported in the literature. There have been no such cases associated with neurosurgical procedures. Diagnosis is nearly always delayed in spite of persistent symptomatology. A 27-year-old girl with suspected Ehlers-Danlos, connective tissue disorder, underwent posterior fossa decompression for Chiari Type 1 malformation. One year later, the patient presented with urticarial rash from the neck to chest. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood testing, magnetic resonance imaging, and intraoperative exploration did not suggest allergic reaction. Eventually skin testing proved specific Prolene allergy. After suture material was removed, the patient no longer complained of pruritus or rash. This single case highlights the important entity of allergic reaction to suture material, namely, Prolene, which can present in a delayed basis. Symptomatology can be vague but has typical allergic characteristics. Multidisciplinary approach is helpful with confirmatory skin testing as a vital part of the workup. PMID:26798347

  12. Caterpillars and moths: Part II. Dermatologic manifestations of encounters with Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Hossler, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    Caterpillars and moths (order Lepidoptera) are uncommonly recognized causes of adverse cutaneous reactions, such as localized stings, papular dermatitis, and urticarial wheals. These reactions are typically mild and self-limited; however, in South America, the sting of Lonomia caterpillars can cause a potentially fatal hemorrhagic diathesis related to massive fibrinolysis. In addition, ocular inflammation and prominent arthralgias have been reported to be caused by caterpillar exposures. Therapies for mucocutaneous reactions to Lepidoptera are largely empiric, with the exception of antivenin against Lonomia obliqua envenomation. Part II of this two-part series on caterpillars and moths reviews the varied symptoms caused by Lepidopteran exposures, reviews the differential diagnosis, and discusses appropriate treatment algorithms.

  13. Persulfate hair bleach reactions. Cutaneous and respiratory manifestations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, A A; Dooms-Goossens, A

    1976-10-01

    Ammonium persulfate is widely used to "boost" peroxide hair bleaches. These persulfates can produce a variety of cutaneous and respiratory responses, including allergic eczematous contact dermatitis, irritant dermatitis, localized edema, generalized urticaria, rhinitis, asthma, and syncope. Some of these reactions appear to be truly allergic while others appear to be due to the release of histamine on a nonallergic basis. Patch tests may be performed with 2% to 5% aqueous solution of ammonium persulfate. Scratch tests may result in asthma and syncope. In some patients, merely rubbing a saturated solution of ammonium persulfate into the skin will evoke a large urticarial wheal. Hairdressers should be made aware that these ammonium persulfate hair bleach preparations may provoke severe reactions and should seek medical attention if the client complains of severe itching, tingling, a burning sensation, hives, dizziness, or weakness.

  14. Chronic strongyloidiasis in World War II Far East ex-prisoners of war.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, L L

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-two of 142 (37%) American ex-prisoners of war that worked on the Burma-Thailand Railroad during World War II were found to have previously unrecognized symptomatic Strongyloides stercoralis infections. A characteristic urticarial creeping skin eruption on the abdomen, buttocks and thighs occurred in 92%. Infection was also associated with pruritus ani, abdominal pain, indigestion, heartburn, and diarrhea. Demonstration of larvae in ether-formalin stool concentrates in these chronic low density infections required 5 hours of microscopy per case to detect 90% of positive cases. Therapy with thiabendazole resulted in a clinical cure in 93% and a microscopic cure in 100%; but was associated with frequent side effects. Chronic strongyloidiasis should be considered in veterans of Far East conflicts and in others with intimate soil contact in rural Strongyloides stercoralis-endemic areas who present with recurrent creeping skin eruption, abdominal pain, and eosinophilia. PMID:6696184

  15. Studies of the quenching phenomenon in delayed contact hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Basketter, D A; Allenby, C F

    1991-09-01

    Studies in guinea pig and man have shown that eugenol can quench non-specifically contact urticarial responses, whereas limonene seems largely ineffective. In a comprehensive series of studies, there was little evidence of quenching of delayed contact hypersensitivity reactions to cinnamic aldehyde or citral, including in 'pre-quenched' material supplied by a perfume/flavour company, and in a similar mixture prepared in this laboratory, in the guinea pig model. In addition, there was no evidence of the quenching by eugenol of allergic reactions to cinnamic aldehyde in a panel of human subjects with a proven history of cinnamic-aldehyde-induced allergic contact dermatitis. Overall, the results lend little credibility to earlier literature reports of quenching phenomena in delayed contact hypersensitivity responses.

  16. Cytomegalic hepatitis in a patient receiving omalizumab.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, R; Valente, C; Ferreira, E; Serra, J E; da Cunha, J Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is a double stranded DNA virus that can be present in nearly all organs and body fluids. The primary infection is usually asymptomatic in the immunocompetent host and it is common among adolescents and young adults. The symptomatic form appears, in the majority of cases, as a mononucleosis syndrome with full recovery without specific treatment. We report a case of a 25 years old woman who presented with hepatitis due to CMV infection and history of omalizumab administration one month earlier. This recombinant monoclonal antibody is used to control refractory asthma and chronic spontaneous urticarial as it inhibits human IgE. Despite that, the long course of the disease lead us to initiate treatment with valganciclovir. The improvement after that was rapid and complete. PMID:27583207

  17. Allergy to Prolene Sutures in a Dural Graft for Chiari Decompression.

    PubMed

    Cajigas, Iahn; Burks, S Shelby; Gernsback, Joanna; Fine, Lauren; Moshiree, Baharak; Levi, Allan D

    2015-01-01

    Allergy to Prolene suture is exceedingly rare with only 5 cases reported in the literature. There have been no such cases associated with neurosurgical procedures. Diagnosis is nearly always delayed in spite of persistent symptomatology. A 27-year-old girl with suspected Ehlers-Danlos, connective tissue disorder, underwent posterior fossa decompression for Chiari Type 1 malformation. One year later, the patient presented with urticarial rash from the neck to chest. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood testing, magnetic resonance imaging, and intraoperative exploration did not suggest allergic reaction. Eventually skin testing proved specific Prolene allergy. After suture material was removed, the patient no longer complained of pruritus or rash. This single case highlights the important entity of allergic reaction to suture material, namely, Prolene, which can present in a delayed basis. Symptomatology can be vague but has typical allergic characteristics. Multidisciplinary approach is helpful with confirmatory skin testing as a vital part of the workup. PMID:26798347

  18. Early detection of circulating anodic antigen (CAA) in a case of acute schistosomiasis mansoni with Katayama fever.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, S G; Ravn, J; Haagensen, I

    1992-01-01

    A 34-year-old male developed acute Katayama fever with fever, diarrhoea, joint pains, headache, urticarial rash and eosinophilia 18 days after falling into and spending 15 min in the water during water-skiing in the outlet of the Volta river. Low anti-schistosomal antibody titres were found by the immunofluorescence assay after 4 weeks, and the first Schistosoma mansoni eggs were found in faeces after 6 weeks. Both symptoms and eosinophilia increased the first days after treatment with oxamniquine, after which he improved gradually. Examination of frozen sera by the newly developed Magnetic Beads Antigen Capture-EIA (MBAC-EIA) later demonstrated a peak in schistosomal circulating anodic antigen (CAA) levels of diagnostic significance already 4 weeks after he was infected. PMID:1411323

  19. Acute lymphocytic leukemia with eosinophilia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoqi; Liu, Hong; Sun, Feng; Gu, Ling; Wang, Shukui

    2012-10-01

    We present a 61-year-old man with marked peripheral blood eosinophilia, feature of hypereosinophilic syndrome, that later evolved into acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL-L2). Initially the patient suffered from significant complications related to eosinophilic toxicity, including large urticarial hyperpigmented plaques, myocardial infarction, and eosinophilic pneumonia. He was treated with high dose of steroids resulting in a rapid suppression of the eosinophilia. Two weeks later, the eosinophilia had relapsed, so a bone marrow aspiration was performed. Cytomorphological examination of the bone marrow showed typical ALL features, while flow cytometric analysis revealed an My+pre-B-ALL immunophenotype, and chromosome analysis of bone marrow showed a normal karyotype. He received chemotherapy according to the standard protocol for ALL and died from refractory respiratory failure and congestive heart failure immediately after antileukemic therapy. We review the literature and compare the demographics, clinical features, and outcomes of several cases and reported studies.

  20. Eosinophilic ascites: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hesham; Joseph, Moby

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic ascites is a rare feature of eosinophilic gastroenteritis. We would like to highlight this increasingly recognised diagnosis in a case of unexplained ascites. We present a challenging case of a woman aged 25 years who presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, generalised abdominal pain and swelling 8-week following delivery of her first baby. Her symptoms were primarily aggravated by eating, and she had also noticed postprandial itching and self-limiting generalised rash. She had a strong history of atopy. Physical examination revealed abdominal tenderness and distension with shifting dullness. Urticarial skin rash was noted on the face, neck, chest and abdomen. Routine biochemistry was normal apart from peripheral eosinophilia. Imaging confirmed moderate ascites. Diagnostic paracentesis showed exudative ascites with numerous eosinophils. Histology of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract showed infiltration of the oesophageogastroduodenal and rectosigmoid mucosa with eosinophils. The patient significantly improved following a course of steroids and six-food elimination diet. PMID:27600059

  1. Early detection of circulating anodic antigen (CAA) in a case of acute schistosomiasis mansoni with Katayama fever.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, S G; Ravn, J; Haagensen, I

    1992-01-01

    A 34-year-old male developed acute Katayama fever with fever, diarrhoea, joint pains, headache, urticarial rash and eosinophilia 18 days after falling into and spending 15 min in the water during water-skiing in the outlet of the Volta river. Low anti-schistosomal antibody titres were found by the immunofluorescence assay after 4 weeks, and the first Schistosoma mansoni eggs were found in faeces after 6 weeks. Both symptoms and eosinophilia increased the first days after treatment with oxamniquine, after which he improved gradually. Examination of frozen sera by the newly developed Magnetic Beads Antigen Capture-EIA (MBAC-EIA) later demonstrated a peak in schistosomal circulating anodic antigen (CAA) levels of diagnostic significance already 4 weeks after he was infected.

  2. The evolving global epidemiology, syndromic classification, management, and prevention of caterpillar envenoming.

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H

    2005-03-01

    Caterpillars are the wormlike, larval forms of butterflies and moths of the insect order Lepidoptera. Next to flies, lepidopterans are the most abundant arthropods with more than 165,000 species worldwide, and with most species posing no human threats. However, caterpillar species from approximately 12 families of moths or butterflies worldwide can inflict serious human injuries ranging from urticarial dermatitis and atopic asthma to osteochondritis, consumption coagulopathy, renal failure, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Unlike bees and wasps, envenoming or stinging caterpillars do not possess stingers or modified ovipositors attached to venom glands, but instead bear highly specialized external nettling or urticating hairs and breakaway spines or setae to defend against attacks by predators and enemies. Since the 1970s, there have been increasing reports of mass dermatolgic, pulmonary, and systemic reactions following caterpillar encounters throughout the world. PMID:15772333

  3. Management of heparin allergy during pregnancy with danaparoid.

    PubMed

    Harrison, S J; Rafferty, I; McColl, M D

    2001-03-01

    We report a patient who presented with a left proximal deep vein thrombosis at 25 + 5 weeks gestation. She developed a severe urticarial rash 3 weeks following initiation of therapy with Enoxaparin. The patient was heterozygous for the factor V Leiden mutation. She was treated with subcutaneous twice-daily danaparoid (Orgaran) for the remainder of the pregnancy, achieving anti-Xa levels in the therapeutic range 0.5-1.0 IU/ml. Delivery was at term by caesarean section 2 days after spontaneous rupture of membranes and failure to progress in labour. Danaparoid was withheld during this time. Danaparoid was restarted 3 h post delivery and the patient anticoagulated with warfarin in the post-partum period. There was no recurrence of thrombosis or bleeding events during therapy with danaparoid. No anti-Xa activity was demonstrated in breast milk. PMID:11302479

  4. The first account of a bite by the New Zealand native spider Trite planiceps (Araneae: Salticidae).

    PubMed

    Derraik, José G B; Sirvid, Phil J; Rademaker, Marius

    2010-05-14

    New Zealand has very few arthropods that pose a threat to human health. While most New Zealand spiders are considered harmless, the bite effects of most species are unknown. Here, we describe a case of a bite by a native spider, in which a young man was bitten after rolling over in his bed. The spider was collected and identified as Trite planiceps (Salticidae, black headed jumping spider), a native species commonly encountered around homes. The initial reaction was a relatively painful, sting-like, sensation, followed by the appearance of two red puncture marks and an urticarial wheal. Symptoms eventually disappeared after 72 hours, and he has had no further dermatological problems. Trite planiceps is considered to be a rather docile spider with regard to humans, but even a docile species may still bite defensively as a last resort. Notes on this species and on treatment of spider bites are provided. PMID:20581919

  5. Contact urticaria to the MCU-2A/P gas mask.

    PubMed

    Elmer, K B; George, R M

    1999-05-01

    A case of contact urticaria to the silicone rubber in the MCU-2A/P gas mask is presented. Contact urticaria is a type I hypersensitivity reaction mediated by immunoglobulin E that usually manifests as localized erythema, edema, pruritus, and urticarial plaques. It can also cause systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. Allergic reactions to silicone rubber have been increasingly reported and are of importance in medical and military personnel. The implication of such a diagnosis in an active duty military member is significant because the individual cannot be worldwide-qualified. The correct diagnosis of allergic skin reactions to personal protective gear is critical to maintaining a strong fighting force and protecting military personnel from potentially life-threatening allergic reactions.

  6. Persulfate hair bleach reactions. Cutaneous and respiratory manifestations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, A A; Dooms-Goossens, A

    1976-10-01

    Ammonium persulfate is widely used to "boost" peroxide hair bleaches. These persulfates can produce a variety of cutaneous and respiratory responses, including allergic eczematous contact dermatitis, irritant dermatitis, localized edema, generalized urticaria, rhinitis, asthma, and syncope. Some of these reactions appear to be truly allergic while others appear to be due to the release of histamine on a nonallergic basis. Patch tests may be performed with 2% to 5% aqueous solution of ammonium persulfate. Scratch tests may result in asthma and syncope. In some patients, merely rubbing a saturated solution of ammonium persulfate into the skin will evoke a large urticarial wheal. Hairdressers should be made aware that these ammonium persulfate hair bleach preparations may provoke severe reactions and should seek medical attention if the client complains of severe itching, tingling, a burning sensation, hives, dizziness, or weakness. PMID:962335

  7. Dermatomyositis as a paraneoplastic phenomenon in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Ilyas; Barton, Desmond

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman diagnosed with papillary serous ovarian cancer had Klean-Prep and MRI contrast preoperatively. Afterwards, she developed swelling and an urticarial rash around her eye as she proceeded to have planned debulking surgery. Postoperatively the swelling and rash had spread over her face, neck, back and chest. Dermatology advised a possible allergy to Klean-Prep and MRI contrast. Subsequently over the next few months, the patient became severely debilitated from proximal myopathy of the upper and lower limbs, suffered severe pain restricting mobility and small bowel obstruction. Medical oncologist reviewed the patient, clinically diagnosed dermatomyositis and initiated treatment with high-dose intravenous steroids, resulting in remission of the patient's condition. The main purpose of this study is to describe the severity, diagnostic challenges and underline the clinical significance of dermatomyositis manifestations as a paraneoplastic effect in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:27402586

  8. Chylous Ascites: A Rare Adverse Effect of Methimazole Treatment for Grave's Disease—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Schneider, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman was admitted due to an urticarial rash that was attributed to recent onset of methimazole treatment for a diagnosis of Grave's disease. The patient had no prior significant medical history and used no medications, including over-the-counter or herbal medications. Her sister had Grave's disease. On admission, the patient received corticosteroids with improvement in her rash. On the second day of the hospitalization, the patient complained of abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a large amount of new onset ascites. Peritoneal tap yielded a milky fluid with high triglyceride level (12.2 mmol/L or 1080 mg/dL), consistent with chylous ascites. After discontinuation of the methimazole, the ascites disappeared. The patient later underwent therapeutic thyroidectomy, after which all features of thyrotoxicosis had improved. PMID:26366308

  9. Scombroid Poisoning: A Practical Approach.

    PubMed

    Guergué-Díaz de Cerio, O; Barrutia-Borque, A; Gardeazabal-García, J

    2016-09-01

    Scombroid poisoning is a common cause of food poisoning worldwide. It is caused by ingestion of oily fish contaminated with bacteria that trigger the formation of high concentrations of histamine. Scombroid poisoning manifests mainly as a skin complaint (flushing that spreads downward and/or an erythematous urticarial rash affecting the face and upper trunk). Although the clinical course is usually self-limiting and benign, vascular compromise, bronchospasm, and arrhythmias have been described. It is important to establish a differential diagnosis that includes conditions such as fish allergy. Oral antihistamines are the mainstay of treatment. Scombroid poisoning is best prevented by refrigerating fish properly. The practical review of scombroid poisoning provided here is intended for dermatologists. PMID:27133773

  10. Adverse events occurring after smallpox vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lane, J Michael; Goldstein, Joel

    2003-07-01

    We reviewed the literature on adverse events reported to occur after smallpox vaccination. Nearly one-half of the United States population is vaccinia-naïve and may be at risk for development of serious adverse events. We describe the clinical features of postvaccinial central nervous system disease, progressive vaccinia, eczema vaccinatum, accidental implantations, "generalized vaccinia," and the common erythematous and/or urticarial rashes. In the 1960s, death occurred approximately once in every million primary vaccinations, with fatalities resulting from progressive vaccinia, postvaccinial encephalitis, and eczema vaccinatum. Death in revaccinees occurred less commonly and almost entirely from progressive vaccinia. In today's population, death rates might be higher because of the increased prevalence of immune deficiency and atopic dermatitis.

  11. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus presenting in childhood: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Berry, Tammy; Walsh, Erica; Berry, Ryan; DeSantis, Emily; Smidt, Aimee C

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old African American, Hispanic boy presented with well-defined, violaceous, annular dermal plaques without scale over the upper extremities, face, lower extremities, and buttocks. The clinical presentation and laboratory studies were consistent with a diagnosis of subacute cutaneous lupus erythematous (SCLE). SCLE presenting in childhood is exceedingly rare, with only eight cases previously reported. It is important to clinically differentiate SCLE from other eruptions more common to children, such as atopic dermatitis, urticarial drug eruptions, and psoriasis vulgaris, because progression to systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) may occur. SLE needs to be closely followed. We present the first case (to our knowledge) of SCLE in a child of African American or Hispanic descent and provide a table of other documented pediatric presentations of SCLE for comparison.

  12. Hymenoptera Anaphylaxis and C-kit Mutations: An Unexpected Association.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2015-08-01

    Clinical manifestations of mastocytosis in adults comprise signs and symptoms linked to mast cell (MC) activation, including anaphylaxis. Depending on MC burden, adults can be diagnosed with systemic mastocytosis, when the WHO criteria are fulfilled, or with other clonal MC disorders, characterized by MC mediator symptoms and demonstration of activating KIT mutations and/or expression of CD25 on MCs. There is a specific link between mastocytosis and hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA): the reported frequency of HVA in mastocytosis is 20-50 % and raises to 60-80 % in patients affected by indolent systemic mastocytosis without skin lesions. The presentation of HVA characterized by severe hypotension in the absence of urticarial or angioedema is typical in patient with an underlying MC disorder, even in the presence of normal baseline serum tryptase levels.

  13. Scombroid Poisoning: A Practical Approach.

    PubMed

    Guergué-Díaz de Cerio, O; Barrutia-Borque, A; Gardeazabal-García, J

    2016-09-01

    Scombroid poisoning is a common cause of food poisoning worldwide. It is caused by ingestion of oily fish contaminated with bacteria that trigger the formation of high concentrations of histamine. Scombroid poisoning manifests mainly as a skin complaint (flushing that spreads downward and/or an erythematous urticarial rash affecting the face and upper trunk). Although the clinical course is usually self-limiting and benign, vascular compromise, bronchospasm, and arrhythmias have been described. It is important to establish a differential diagnosis that includes conditions such as fish allergy. Oral antihistamines are the mainstay of treatment. Scombroid poisoning is best prevented by refrigerating fish properly. The practical review of scombroid poisoning provided here is intended for dermatologists.

  14. [Allergy to shrimp. A contribution to reactions after ingestion of seafood and fishes].

    PubMed

    Schmid, M H; Wüthrich, B

    1997-08-01

    Adverse reactions to seafood are common and may cause many types of symptoms that are difficult to define. The nature of these reactions are variable including allergic and toxic reactions as well as infectious diseases. The differentiation between these entities is essential in choosing therapy. We describe 9 patients with IgE mediated allergic reactions due to crustaceans and fish diagnosed from case history, clinical findings, skin tests and specific IgE antibodies. Most symptoms of a IgE mediated allergic reaction appear within 30 minutes after ingestion. Characteristics clinical features may include an urticarial rash, gastrointestinal symptoms and even anaphylaxis. In this case immediate therapy with intravenous glucocorticoids, antihistamine and perhaps subcutaneous epinephrine is required.

  15. Identification of Helicobacter pylori in skin biopsy of prurigo pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Missall, Tricia A; Pruden, Samuel; Nelson, Christine; Fohn, Laurel; Vidal, Claudia I; Hurley, M Yadira

    2012-06-01

    A 23-year-old Chinese man presented with a 3-year history of a pruritic eruption. On examination, pink urticarial papules associated with hyperpigmented reticulated patches were noted on his neck, back, and upper chest. Histopathology revealed vacuolar interface dermatitis and numerous gram-negative rods within a dilated hair follicle. The organisms were reactive with anti-Helicobacter pylori immunohistochemisty. The histologic findings and clinical presentation support the diagnosis of prurigo pigmentosa. Additional testing demonstrated a positive urease breath test and serum H. pylori IgG antibodies. The patient was referred to gastroenterology and treated with appropriate antibiotics. After treatment, esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed chronic gastritis without evidence of H. pylori infection and his skin showed reticulated hyperpigmented patches without evidence of active inflammatory papules. Although previous reports have associated prurigo pigmentosa to H. Pylori gastritis, this is the first report of H. pylori organisms identified in a skin biopsy of prurigo pigmentosa.

  16. Redefined clinical features and diagnostic criteria in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ferre, Elise M.N.; Rose, Stacey R.; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Burbelo, Peter D.; Romito, Kimberly R.; Niemela, Julie E.; Rosen, Lindsey B.; Break, Timothy J.; Gu, Wenjuan; Hunsberger, Sally; Browne, Sarah K.; Hsu, Amy P.; Rampertaap, Shakuntala; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Collar, Amanda L.; Kong, Heidi H.; Chascsa, David; Simcox, Thomas; Pham, Angela; Bondici, Anamaria; Natarajan, Mukil; Monsale, Joseph; Kleiner, David E.; Quezado, Martha; Alevizos, Ilias; Moutsopoulos, Niki M.; Yockey, Lynne; Frein, Cathleen; Soldatos, Ariane; Calvo, Katherine R.; Adjemian, Jennifer; Similuk, Morgan N.; Lang, David M.; Stone, Kelly D.; Uzel, Gulbu; Bishop, Rachel J.; Holland, Steven M.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Heller, Theo; Winer, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder typically caused by homozygous AIRE mutations. It classically presents with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis and autoimmunity that primarily targets endocrine tissues; hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency are most common. Developing any two of these classic triad manifestations establishes the diagnosis. Although widely recognized in Europe, where nonendocrine autoimmune manifestations are uncommon, APECED is less defined in patients from the Western Hemisphere. We enrolled 35 consecutive American APECED patients (33 from the US) in a prospective observational natural history study and systematically examined their genetic, clinical, autoantibody, and immunological characteristics. Most patients were compound heterozygous; the most common AIRE mutation was c.967_979del13. All but one patient had anti–IFN-ω autoantibodies, including 4 of 5 patients without biallelic AIRE mutations. Urticarial eruption, hepatitis, gastritis, intestinal dysfunction, pneumonitis, and Sjögren’s-like syndrome, uncommon entities in European APECED cohorts, affected 40%–80% of American cases. Development of a classic diagnostic dyad was delayed at mean 7.38 years. Eighty percent of patients developed a median of 3 non-triad manifestations before a diagnostic dyad. Only 20% of patients had their first two manifestations among the classic triad. Urticarial eruption, intestinal dysfunction, and enamel hypoplasia were prominent among early manifestations. Patients exhibited expanded peripheral CD4+ T cells and CD21loCD38lo B lymphocytes. In summary, American APECED patients develop a diverse syndrome, with dramatic enrichment in organ-specific nonendocrine manifestations starting early in life, compared with European patients. Incorporation of these new manifestations into American diagnostic criteria would accelerate diagnosis by approximately 4 years and

  17. Do neutrophil extracellular traps contribute to the heightened risk of thrombosis in inflammatory diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ashish N; Kazzaz, Nayef M; Knight, Jason S

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic events, both arterial and venous, are a major health concern worldwide. Further, autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome, predispose to thrombosis, and thereby push the risk for these morbid events even higher. In recent years, neutrophils have been identified as important players in both arterial and venous thrombosis. Specifically, chromatin-based structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) play a key role in activating the coagulation cascade, recruiting platelets, and serving as scaffolding upon which the thrombus can be assembled. At the same time, neutrophils and NETs are emerging as important mediators of pathogenic inflammation in the aforementioned autoimmune diseases. Here, we first review the general role of NETs in thrombosis. We then posit that exaggerated NET release contributes to the prothrombotic diatheses of systemic lupus erythematosus, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:26730289

  18. Skin Findings in a Patient with Sjogren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    Hypergammaglobulinemic purpura (HGP) is a syndrome constellating recurrent purpura, hypergammaglobulinemia, positive rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-Ro/La antibodies, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). We present a case of a 29-year-old female who was diagnosed with Sjogren's syndrome four years prior to presenting with rash on her lower extremities for a period of 6 months. Skin biopsy at the initial visit was consistent with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and was initiated on treatment for it. Her rash evolved into 2–5 mm scattered purpurae while she was on the treatment and a repeat biopsy showed extravasation of RBCs, a sparse mononuclear infiltrate with deposition of plasma cells, and no evidence of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, thus showing a transition from neutrophilic to mononuclear inflammatory vascular disease which is a rare occurrence. Hypergammaglobulinemic purpura sometimes turns out to be a challenging disease to manage and requires an integrated effort from the primary care doctors, rheumatologist, and dermatologist.

  19. F-18 FDG PET/CT Findings of a Patient with Takayasu Arteritis Before and After Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sağer, Sait; Yılmaz, Sabire; Özhan, Meftune; Halaç, Metin; Ergül, Nurhan; Çiftci, Hediye; Çermik, T. Fikret

    2012-01-01

    Vasculitis is defined as inflammation and necrosis with leukocytic infiltration of the blood vessel wall. Takayasu arteritis is a chronic inflammatory arteritis that primarily involves the aorta and its main branches. A 64-year-old female patient with a 2-month history of fever of unknown origin was presented to our clinic for F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging. Baseline PET/CT images demonstrated intense F-18 FDG uptake in the aorta, bilateral subclavian and brachiocephalic arteries consistent with Takayasu arteritis. After 2 months of immunosuppressive therapy, she was asymptomatic and follow-up FDG PET/CT scan showed almost complete disappearance of large vessels’ F-18 FDG uptake. FDG PET/CT is a sensitive technique for assessing presence of large-vessel vasculitis such as Takayasu arteritis, extent of large-vessel inflammation and disease activity after therapy. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23486556

  20. Giant Cell Arteritis: An Atypical Presentation Diagnosed with the Use of MRI Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common primary systemic vasculitis in western countries in individuals over the age of 50. It is typically characterised by the granulomatous involvement of large and medium sized blood vessels branching of the aorta with particular tendencies for involving the extracranial branches of the carotid artery. Generally the diagnosis is straightforward when characteristic symptoms such as headache, jaw claudication, or other ischemic complications are present. Atypical presentations of GCA without “overt” cranial ischemic manifestations have become increasingly recognised but we report for the first time a case of GCA presenting as mild upper abdominal pain and generalized weakness in the context of hyponatremia as the presenting manifestation of vasculitis that was subsequently diagnosed by MRI scanning. This case adds to the literature and emphasises the importance of MRI in the evaluation of GCA patients without “classic” cranial ischemic symptoms. PMID:27493825

  1. Neurorickettsioses: A Rare Presentation with Stroke in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    K, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    Acute stroke-like presentations due to rickettsial infections have been sparsely reported in literature. We report a young patient who presented with high grade fever and acute encephalopathy with right hemiplegia. CT head showed left cerebral, bilateral thalamic and midbrain infarcts. The stroke in young work-up for conventional and non-conventional risk factors including few infections known to cause cerebral vasculitis was negative. He did not respond to empirical antimalarials and antibiotics. With a high index of suspicion of his ‘febrile cerebrovasculitis’ like presentation, serological test for rickettsia was done and found to be positive. He responded to doxycycline. This case expands the spectrum of presentation of neurorickettsioses and highlights the importance of considering rickettsial vasculitis as one of the potentially treatable causes of infections causing stroke. PMID:25478386

  2. Giant Cell Arteritis which Developed after the Administration of Granulocyte-colony Stimulating Factor for Cyclic Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Ikenaga, Jin; Koga, Tomohiro; Michitsuji, Toru; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Fukui, Shoichi; Nishino, Ayako; Nakasima, Yoshikazu; Kawashiri, Sin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Hirai, Yasuko; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman diagnosed with cyclic neutropenia 5 years previously had been treated with recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). She developed fever, tenderness and distension of temporal arteries after the treatment with G-CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography revealed wall thickening of the temporal arteries. She was therefore diagnosed with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Small vessel vasculitis has been reported as a complication of G-CSF. However, the development of large vessel vasculitis after G-CSF treatment is quite rare. To our knowledge, the present case is the first report of GCA suspected to be associated with coexisting cyclic neutropenia and G-CSF treatment. PMID:27523011

  3. [Clinical picture of pure corneal ulcers of different localizations].

    PubMed

    Tarasova, L N; Kudriashova, Iu I

    1999-01-01

    Pure corneal ulcers can be localized at the periphery and in the center. Peripheral ulcers are bilateral in 66% and multifocal in 48% cases. They are combined with local vasculitis of perilimbic vessels of the conjunctiva. In 84% cases the disease occurred in patients with connective tissue and articular diseases. Clinical picture of the peripheral corneal ulcer differs from Mourene's phagodenic ulcer. Central corneal ulcers are bilateral in 40% patients, are associated with primary and secondary "dry eye" syndrome in Sjogren's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic vasculitis, Behçet's disease, and in 18% patients with cicatricial deformation of the conjunctiva after Stevens-Johnson's syndrome, trachoma, and chemical burns of the eyes. Pure corneal ulcers run a chronic relapsing course, complicated in one-fourth of patients by corneal perforation and secondary infections.

  4. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer.

  5. Defect of a complement receptor 3 epitope in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Witte, T; Dumoulin, F L; Gessner, J E; Schubert, J; Götze, O; Neumann, C; Todd, R F; Deicher, H; Schmidt, R E

    1993-01-01

    Complement receptor 3 (CR3) is expressed on cells of the reticuloendothelial system and involved in the clearance of immune complexes. In this article a patient with a deficiency of the C3bi binding site of this receptor is described. Clinically this patient exhibited predominantly cutaneous manifestations of a systemic lupus erythematosus with an immune vasculitis and panniculitis. The deficiency of the CR3 epitope was demonstrated using flow cytometry. The functional relevance of this defect was demonstrated in a rosetting assay with C3bi-loaded erythrocytes. C3bi binding was found to be significantly decreased. Furthermore, there was an impairment of phagocytosis of opsonized Escherichia coli. The CR3 defect is not due to an autoantibody but is assumed to have a genetic basis. These data suggest that the defect of the CR3 may be involved in the pathogenesis of the immune vasculitis in this patient. Images PMID:7690773

  6. Skin Findings in a Patient with Sjogren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    Hypergammaglobulinemic purpura (HGP) is a syndrome constellating recurrent purpura, hypergammaglobulinemia, positive rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-Ro/La antibodies, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). We present a case of a 29-year-old female who was diagnosed with Sjogren's syndrome four years prior to presenting with rash on her lower extremities for a period of 6 months. Skin biopsy at the initial visit was consistent with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and was initiated on treatment for it. Her rash evolved into 2–5 mm scattered purpurae while she was on the treatment and a repeat biopsy showed extravasation of RBCs, a sparse mononuclear infiltrate with deposition of plasma cells, and no evidence of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, thus showing a transition from neutrophilic to mononuclear inflammatory vascular disease which is a rare occurrence. Hypergammaglobulinemic purpura sometimes turns out to be a challenging disease to manage and requires an integrated effort from the primary care doctors, rheumatologist, and dermatologist. PMID:27672471

  7. Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy With Contralateral Uveitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ayyildiz, Onder; Ayyildiz, Simel; Durukan, Ali Hakan; Sobaci, Gungor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Progressive hemifacial atrophy, known as Parry-Romberg syndrome (PRS), was first described by Parry in 1825. There is a progressive atrophy of facial tissues including skin, bones and muscles. Ophthalmic disorders are common and include keratitis, uveitis, cataract, ipsilateral enophthalmos, optic neuritis, retinal vasculitis and scleral melting. Case Presentation: We describe a patient with progressive hemifacial atrophy at right facial side who developed granulomatous uveitis and periferic retinal vasculitis in his left eye. We started topical and systemic steroid therapy. Uveitic reaction had regressed almost entirely after a 3-month steroid treatment. Conclusions: The individuals should have multidisciplinary approach for the variety of disorders to maintain the appropriate treatment for a better appearance of the patients. PMID:26473067

  8. Henoch Schonlein purpura associated with bee sting: case report.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Olortegui, José; Álvarez-Vargas, Mayita; Durand-Vergara, Juan; Díaz-Lozano, Marisol; Gálvez-Olortegui, Tomas; Armas-Ramírez, Indira; Hilario-Vargas, Julio

    2015-10-30

    Henoch Schonlein purpura (HSP) is a common childhood vasculitis, characterized by a non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura and systemic features. It can be triggered by conditions like infections and insect bites. We present the case of a six-year-old girl with palpable maculopapular lesions on the lower limbs, itching, mild pain, swelling of feet, limitation of limb mobility, and a history of bee sting. Thigh skin biopsy was performed, with a report of leucocytoclastic vasculitis, and was diagnosed as HSP. She was prescribed bed rest, and was given oral hydration. The patient outcome was favorable and was discharged after five days. This is the fifth report of a HSP case associated with a bee sting with an uncomplicated course, which is in contrast to previous case reports.

  9. Skin Findings in a Patient with Sjogren's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boddu, Prajwal; Mohammed, Abdul S; Khandelwal, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    Hypergammaglobulinemic purpura (HGP) is a syndrome constellating recurrent purpura, hypergammaglobulinemia, positive rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-Ro/La antibodies, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). We present a case of a 29-year-old female who was diagnosed with Sjogren's syndrome four years prior to presenting with rash on her lower extremities for a period of 6 months. Skin biopsy at the initial visit was consistent with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and was initiated on treatment for it. Her rash evolved into 2-5 mm scattered purpurae while she was on the treatment and a repeat biopsy showed extravasation of RBCs, a sparse mononuclear infiltrate with deposition of plasma cells, and no evidence of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, thus showing a transition from neutrophilic to mononuclear inflammatory vascular disease which is a rare occurrence. Hypergammaglobulinemic purpura sometimes turns out to be a challenging disease to manage and requires an integrated effort from the primary care doctors, rheumatologist, and dermatologist. PMID:27672471

  10. A Clinical Picture of the Visual Outcome in Adamantiades-Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Figus, Michele; Posarelli, Chiara; Albert, Timothy G.; Talarico, Rosaria; Nardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Adamantiades-Behçet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis with multiorgan involvement. Ocular disorders occur often in this syndrome typically in the form of a relapsing-remitting panuveitis and vasculitis and can lead to blindness as one of its most disabling complications if left untreated. There are known risk factors related with the worst visual prognosis, which require early and intensive treatment in order to obtain a rapid suppression of inflammation and to prevent future relapses. The management strategy to avoid vision loss and blindness currently involves the use of local and systemic drugs including steroids and immunosuppressive and biologic agents. This review aims to demonstrate how the introduction and the use of biologic agents improves the visual outcome of patients with Adamantiades-Behçet's disease. PMID:26558256

  11. Erythema elevatum diutinum and hypothyroidism: coincidence or causal relationship?*

    PubMed Central

    Cirvidiu, Denise Camargo; Elias, Beatriz Lopes Ferraz; Jorge, Juliana Chaib Ferraira; Lira, Márcia Lanzoni de Alvarenga; Mandelbaum, Samuel Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Erythema elevatum diutinum is a rare chronic leukocytoclastic vasculitis of unknown etiology. It is believed to be due to deposition of immune complexes in the vessels. Clinically it is manifested as erythematous violaceous papules and nodules, isolated or confluent with hardened consistency, symmetrical, usually located on the extensor surface of the extremities, particularly over the joints. Diagnosis is based on clinical and histological findings. We report the case of a woman, 71 years old, with erythematous violaceous nodules on the hands, elbows, back and legs, beginning two years ago, with pain and itching. Histopathological analysis revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis, confirming the clinical suspicion. Laboratory tests revealed hypothyroidism. We report the case because of its rarity, with subsequent review of the literature. PMID:26375227

  12. What's in a name?

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Kai; Morgan, Michael L; Almarzouqi, Sumayya; Lee, Andrew G; Newman, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes mellitus presented with new onset left-sided hemiparesis, left-sided neglect, and left-sided incongruous, denser inferiorly, homonymous hemianopsia. Magnetic resonance image of the brain showed prominent swelling of the right frontal, parietal, and occipital lobes greater than on the left with significant change in the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal in the gray matter. Perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies titers were elevated, and skin biopsy demonstrating leukocytoclastic vasculitis. He showed marked clinical and radiographic improvement in association with recovery of vascular abnormalities after the initiation of prednisone, pulse therapy with methylprednisolone, and methotrexate. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of neuro-ophthalmic manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis-related vasculitis causing homonymous hemianopsia. PMID:26212152

  13. Henoch Schonlein purpura associated with bee sting: case report.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Olortegui, José; Álvarez-Vargas, Mayita; Durand-Vergara, Juan; Díaz-Lozano, Marisol; Gálvez-Olortegui, Tomas; Armas-Ramírez, Indira; Hilario-Vargas, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Henoch Schonlein purpura (HSP) is a common childhood vasculitis, characterized by a non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura and systemic features. It can be triggered by conditions like infections and insect bites. We present the case of a six-year-old girl with palpable maculopapular lesions on the lower limbs, itching, mild pain, swelling of feet, limitation of limb mobility, and a history of bee sting. Thigh skin biopsy was performed, with a report of leucocytoclastic vasculitis, and was diagnosed as HSP. She was prescribed bed rest, and was given oral hydration. The patient outcome was favorable and was discharged after five days. This is the fifth report of a HSP case associated with a bee sting with an uncomplicated course, which is in contrast to previous case reports. PMID:26610057

  14. [The ulcerative form of skin sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A N; Samtsov, A V

    1990-01-01

    A female patient suffering from the ulcerative form of skin sarcoidosis is described and the literature dealing with this problem is reviewed. Peculiar features of this case are described: ulceration of the nodes, which is an extremely rare phenomenon; no involvement of other organs, lungs included, was detectable, which is not typical of ulcerative sarcoidosis; small-nodular elements are parallelled by nodes (Boeck's small-nodular sarcoid and Darier-Roussy's subcutaneous sarcoids) in this patient, this evidencing an uniform pathologic process in the skin and subcutaneous fat. Ulceration in this patient is explained by the development of allergic vasculitis of the immediate hypersensitivity type (leukocytoclastic vasculitis and manifest increase of the level of circulating immune complexes). Prednisolone therapy has resulted in an excellent clinical effect.

  15. Spontaneous rupture of hepatic artery aneurysm associated with polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Parent, Brodie A; Cho, Sung W; Buck, David G; Nalesnik, Michael A; Gamblin, T Clark

    2010-12-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a vasculitis, which often involves small and medium sized visceral arteries. This condition may result in multifocal aneurismal formation and end-organ damage. Uncommonly, PAN may present with rupture of hepatic artery aneurysms. Here, we report a rare case of a ruptured intrahepatic aneurysm associated with PAN. A 79-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain had CT scan of the abdomen, which revealed hematoma in the right hepatic lobe. Visceral angiogram confirmed pseudo-aneurysm of a right hepatic arterial branch, and this was managed with endovascular coil embolization. The diagnosis of PAN was made and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. We also performed a literature review to define this condition's demographics, clinical presentations, and appropriate management. The review revealed 17 published cases of ruptured PAN-related intrahepatic aneurysms. We conclude that unexplained findings of visceral arterial aneurysms should prompt investigations for vasculitis as the etiology.

  16. Polyarteritis nodosa, presenting as life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sheldon C; Olliff, Simon P; McCafferty, Ian; Wigmore, Stephen J; Mirza, Darius F

    2008-02-01

    This unique case reports the first recorded episode in the medical literature of vasculitis post-liver transplantation, presenting as life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage. A 52-year-old Caucasian woman underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for autoimmune cirrhosis complicated by hepatoma and portal vein thrombosis. Late hepatic artery thrombosis led to a second liver graft. Following recovery from an episode of acute rejection, the patient presented with large volume hematemesis, melena, and hemochezia (passage of fresh blood from the rectum). Following upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy and surgery, angiography illustrated the presence of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), which was successfully treated with high-dose steroid therapy. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is an unusual presentation of vasculitis, especially PAN. The occurrence of this phenomenon post-OLT, in the presence of immunosuppression is previously unreported.

  17. Successful treatment of pediatric systemic polyarteritis nodosa with cholestatic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Han-Jung; Choi, Yong-Jun; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Ye, Young-Min; Park, Hae-Sim; Suh, Chang-Hee

    2007-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a rare vasculitis in children. We report a case of 5-year-old boy with systemic PAN and cholestatic hepatitis. He had fever, abdominal pain, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Angiography revealed multiple microaneurysms in the renal, hepatic, and superior mesenteric arteries. Clinical manifestations improved slowly after immunosuppressive therapy, but liver enzyme and bilirubin levels elevated gradually. Liver biopsy findings revealed marked centrizonal canalicular cholestasis, bile duct damage, and intact hepatocyte, but there was no evidence of viral hepatitis or vasculitis. Levels of liver enzymes and bilirubin improved after two cycles of cyclophosphamide therapy. We thought that the possible etiology of elevated liver enzyme and bilirubin levels might be a manifestation of PAN.

  18. Mass-forming primary angiitis of central nervous system with Rosai-Dorfmann disease-like massive histiocytosis with emperipolesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Ik; Kim, Soo Hee; Cho, Hwa Jin; Kim, Hannah; Chung, Chun-Kee; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-08-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is a vasculitis restricted to the CNS without systemic involvement. We report a case of PACNS that was radiologically tumor-mimicking, and pathologically similar to the Rosai-Dorfmann disease. A 20-year-old woman presented with a focal facial motor seizure. Magnetic resonance image revealed heterogeneously enhanced well-demarcated solitary cerebral mass in the posterior frontal lobe. Histopathologically, the lesion showed lymphoplasmacytic vasculitis with massive parenchymal infiltration of large histiocytes with emperipolesis. Diffuse ischemic change, necrosis, hemorrhage of the brain parenchyma with neuronophagia, and extensive reactive gliosis by gemistocytic astrocytes were accompanying microscopic features. The patient was doing well for 3 years after complete resection of the lesion, except for occasional occurrence of alcohol- or sleep deprivation-associated seizure. We describe this unique case to provide evidence that mass formation can be developed in PACNS by accompanying parenchymal lymphohistiocytic infiltration, necrosis, and marked reactive gliosis.

  19. Infective endocarditis mimics ANCA associated glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Reza Ardalan, Mohammad; Trillini, Matias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sub-acute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) rarely presents with features of a small vessel vasculitis. Patients with SBE can also develop multiple serological abnormalities including ANCA. In this report, we present a case of infective endocarditis mimicked ANCA associated glomerulonephritis. Case presentation: A 57-year old male with a clinical picture of rapidly progressive renal failure (RPGN) and positive seology for PR3-ANCA (C-ANCA) was referred to our hospital. The renal histology findings were compatible with focal and segmental glomerular necrosis. After receiving corticosteroid therapy, the patient became febrile and his general condition worsened. Cardiac ultrasound echocardiographic study disclosed multiple large vegetations on the aortic valve. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and valvular surgery, the patient’s condition improved and his serum creatinine reached 1.7 mg/d. Conclusion: Misdiagnosis of SBE as ANCA-associated vasculitis and an inappropriate immunosuppressive therapy can have catastrophic consequences. PMID:24009921

  20. Acute inpatient presentation of scurvy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Allison M; Hughey, Lauren C

    2010-10-01

    Scurvy is a well-known disease of vitamin C deficiency that still occurs in industrialized countries. The clinical manifestations of follicular hyperkeratosis, perifollicular petechiae, corkscrew hairs, and easy bruising are due to defective collagen synthesis and can be mistaken for small vessel vasculitis. Populations at risk for development of scurvy include elderly patients, alcohol and drug users, individuals who follow restrictive diets or have eating disorders, patients with malabsorption, and individuals with mental illness. We report an acute case of scurvy presenting in the inpatient/hospital setting with clinical findings initially thought to represent vasculitis. A high index of suspicion for scurvy must be kept in the appropriate clinical context, and a thorough medical history and physical examination are vital to make the diagnosis.