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Sample records for hypoferremia alters dopamine

  1. Alcohol-induced alterations in dopamine modulation of prefrontal activity.

    PubMed

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Chandler, L Judson

    2015-12-01

    Long-term alcohol use leads to persistent cognitive deficits that may be associated with maladaptive changes in the neurocircuitry that mediates executive functions. Impairments caused by these changes can persist well into abstinence and have a negative impact on quality of life and job performance, and can increase the probability of relapse. Many of the changes that affect cognitive function appear to involve dysregulation of the mesocortical dopamine system. This includes changes in dopamine release and alterations in dopamine receptor expression and function in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). This review summarizes the cellular effects of acute and chronic ethanol exposure on dopamine release and dopamine receptor function in the PFC with the goal of providing greater understanding of the effects of alcohol-use disorders on the dopamine system and how this relates to deficits in the executive function of the PFC. PMID:26558348

  2. Research Review: Dopamine Transfer Deficit: A Neurobiological Theory of Altered Reinforcement Mechanisms in ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripp, Gail; Wickens, Jeff R.

    2008-01-01

    This review considers the hypothesis that changes in dopamine signalling might account for altered sensitivity to positive reinforcement in children with ADHD. The existing evidence regarding dopamine cell activity in relation to positive reinforcement is reviewed. We focus on the anticipatory firing of dopamine cells brought about by a transfer…

  3. Research review: dopamine transfer deficit: a neurobiological theory of altered reinforcement mechanisms in ADHD.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Gail; Wickens, Jeff R

    2008-07-01

    This review considers the hypothesis that changes in dopamine signalling might account for altered sensitivity to positive reinforcement in children with ADHD. The existing evidence regarding dopamine cell activity in relation to positive reinforcement is reviewed. We focus on the anticipatory firing of dopamine cells brought about by a transfer of dopamine cell responses to cues that precede reinforcers. It is proposed that in children with ADHD there is diminished anticipatory dopamine cell firing, which we call the dopamine transfer deficit (DTD). The DTD theory leads to specific and testable predictions for human and animal research. The extent to which DTD explains symptoms of ADHD and effects of pharmacological interventions is discussed. We conclude by considering the neural changes underlying the etiology of DTD. PMID:18081766

  4. Research review: dopamine transfer deficit: a neurobiological theory of altered reinforcement mechanisms in ADHD.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Gail; Wickens, Jeff R

    2008-07-01

    This review considers the hypothesis that changes in dopamine signalling might account for altered sensitivity to positive reinforcement in children with ADHD. The existing evidence regarding dopamine cell activity in relation to positive reinforcement is reviewed. We focus on the anticipatory firing of dopamine cells brought about by a transfer of dopamine cell responses to cues that precede reinforcers. It is proposed that in children with ADHD there is diminished anticipatory dopamine cell firing, which we call the dopamine transfer deficit (DTD). The DTD theory leads to specific and testable predictions for human and animal research. The extent to which DTD explains symptoms of ADHD and effects of pharmacological interventions is discussed. We conclude by considering the neural changes underlying the etiology of DTD.

  5. Alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity by opiates and the subsequent effect of this alteration on opiate tolerance and dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether there is an alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity following opiate administration, and whether this alteration has any influence on the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Behavioral hypersensitivity to direct-acting dopamine agonists was observed in mice following acute or chronic morphine administration. Acute levorphanol administration also resulted in potentiation of dopamine agonist-induced behaviors. An increase in density of dopamine receptors, as measured by (/sup 3/H)butyrophenone binding accompanied the development of behavioral hypersensitivity. This increase was localized to the striatum, an area important in the mediation of dopamine-agonist induced behaviors. Naloxone or LiCl coadministered with the opiates prevented the development of hypersensitivity and the increase in density of dopamine receptors. Coadministration of lithium enhanced the development of acute and chronic tolerance. Lithium enhanced the development of dependence as determined by naloxone-induced hypothermia in chronically morphine-treated mice. Apomorphine enhanced naloxone-induced withdrawal in acutely dependent mice. This enhancement was blocked by coadministration of lithium with the opiates. These results suggest that dopamine receptor supersensitivity influences the degree of tolerance and dependence.

  6. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    PubMed Central

    Elwan, Mohamed A.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Caudle, W. Michael; Miller, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM–100 μM) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 μM) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 μM) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD. PMID:16005927

  7. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    SciTech Connect

    Elwan, Mohamed A.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Caudle, W. Michael; Miller, Gary W. . E-mail: gary.miller@emory.edu

    2006-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM-100 {mu}M) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 {mu}M) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 {mu}M) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD.

  8. Alterations in adult behavioral responses to cocaine and dopamine transporters following juvenile exposure to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Lisa; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Matuszewich, Leslie

    2011-01-20

    The present experiment assessed whether preadolescent exposure to methamphetamine would alter adult behavioral responses to cocaine and dopamine transporter immunoreactivity in the striatum of male and female rats. Juvenile rats were injected once daily with 0 or 2 mg/kg methamphetamine from postnatal days 21 to 35 and tested in adulthood. Male rats, but not female rats, exposed to methamphetamine showed an increase in responsiveness to cocaine in the open field and an increase in dopamine transporter immunoreactivity in the striatum. These findings suggest that early exposure to methamphetamine can lead to sex specific altered responses to psychostimulants in adulthood, which may contribute to later vulnerability to drug use.

  9. MATERNAL ATRAZINE (ATR) ALTERS HYPOTHALAMIC DOPAMINE (HYP-DA) AND SERUM PROLACTIN (SPRL) IN MALE PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maternal Atrazine (ATR) alters hypothalamic dopamine (HYP-DA) and serum prolactin (sPRL) in male pups. 1Christopher Langdale, 2Tammy Stoker and 2Ralph Cooper. 1 Dept. of Cell Biology, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. 2 Endocrinology ...

  10. Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters dopamine turnover in neonatal rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Cui, Xiaoying; Ko, Pauline; McGrath, John J; Burne, Thomas H J; Eyles, Darryl W

    2009-09-18

    There is growing evidence that low vitamin D impacts adversely on brain development. The current study investigated the impact of developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency on dopamine and serotonin metabolism in the neonatal rat brain. DVD-deficiency resulted in an altered dopaminergic metabolic profile in the forebrain, with a decrease in the conversion of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) to homovanillic acid (HVA). Correspondingly, expression of the enzyme required for this conversion, catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT), was decreased. These results suggest that DVD-deficiency influences dopamine turnover during development. PMID:19500655

  11. Dopamine denervation does not alter in vivo /sup 3/H-spiperone binding in rat striatum: implications for external imaging of dopamine receptors in Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.P. Jr.; Wooten, G.F.

    1986-04-01

    Striatal particulate preparations, both from rats with lesion-induced striatal dopamine (DA) loss and from some striatal dopamine (DA) loss and from some patients with Parkinson's disease, exhibit increased /sup 3/H-neuroleptic binding, which is interpreted to be the mechanism of denervation-induced behavioral supersensitivity to dopaminergic compounds. After intravenous /sup 3/H-spiperone (/sup 3/H-SP) administration to rats with unilateral nigral lesions, we found no differences in accumulation of total or particulate-bound /sup 3/H-SP in dopamine-denervated compared with intact striata. /sup 3/H-SP in vivo binds to less than 10% of striatal sites labeled by /sup 3/H-SP incubated with striatal particulate preparations in vitro. Quantitative autoradiography of /sup 3/H-SP binding to striatal sections in vitro also failed to reveal any effects of dopamine denervation. /sup 3/H-SP bound to striatal sites in vivo dissociates more slowly than that bound to striatal particulate preparations labeled in vitro. Striatal binding properties of /sup 3/H-SP administered in vivo are quite different from the same kinetic binding parameters estimated in vitro using crude membrane preparations of striatum. In addition, striatal binding of in vivo-administered 3H-SP is not affected by prior lesion of the substantia nigra, which results in profound ipsilateral striatal dopamine depletion. Thus, behavioral supersensitivity to dopaminergic compounds may not be associated with altered striatal binding properties for dopamine receptor ligands in vivo.

  12. Dopamine Release and Uptake Impairments and Behavioral Alterations Observed in Mice that Model Fragile X Mental Retardation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fulks, Jenny L; O'Bryhim, Bliss E; Wenzel, Sara K; Fowler, Stephen C; Vorontsova, Elena; Pinkston, Jonathan W; Ortiz, Andrea N; Johnson, Michael A

    2010-10-20

    In this study we evaluated the relationship between amphetamine-induced behavioral alterations and dopamine release and uptake characteristics in Fmr1 knockout (Fmr1 KO) mice, which model fragile X syndrome. The behavioral analyses, obtained at millisecond temporal resolution and 2 mm spatial resolution using a force-plate actometer, revealed that Fmr1 KO mice express a lower degree of focused stereotypy compared to wild type (WT) control mice after injection with 10 mg/kg (ip) amphetamine. To identify potentially related neurochemical mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, we measured electrically-evoked dopamine release and uptake using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in striatal brain slices. At 10 weeks of age, dopamine release per pulse, which is dopamine release corrected for differences in uptake, was unchanged. However, at 15 (the age of behavioral testing) and 20 weeks of age, dopamine per pulse and the maximum rate of dopamine uptake was diminished in Fmr1 KO mice compared to WT mice. Dopamine uptake measurements, obtained at different amphetamine concentrations, indicated that dopamine transporters in both genotypes have equal affinities for amphetamine. Moreover, dopamine release measurements from slices treated with quinpirole, a D2-family receptor agonist, rule out enhanced D2 autoreceptor sensitivity as a mechanism of release inhibition. However, dopamine release, uncorrected for uptake and normalized against the corresponding pre-drug release peaks, increased in Fmr1 KO mice, but not in WT mice. Collectively, these data are consistent with a scenario in which a decrease in extracellular dopamine levels in the striatum result in diminished expression of focused stereotypy in Fmr1 KO mice.

  13. Dopamine Release and Uptake Impairments and Behavioral Alterations Observed in Mice that Model Fragile X Mental Retardation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the relationship between amphetamine-induced behavioral alterations and dopamine release and uptake characteristics in Fmr1 knockout (Fmr1 KO) mice, which model fragile X syndrome. The behavioral analyses, obtained at millisecond temporal resolution and 2 mm spatial resolution using a force-plate actometer, revealed that Fmr1 KO mice express a lower degree of focused stereotypy compared with wild-type (WT) control mice after injection with 10 mg/kg (ip) amphetamine. To identify potentially related neurochemical mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, we measured electrically evoked dopamine release and uptake using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in striatal brain slices. At 10 weeks of age, dopamine release per pulse, which is dopamine release corrected for differences in uptake, was unchanged. However, at 15 (the age of behavioral testing) and 20 weeks of age, dopamine per pulse and the maximum rate of dopamine uptake was diminished in Fmr1 KO mice compared with WT mice. Dopamine uptake measurements, obtained at different amphetamine concentrations, indicated that dopamine transporters in both genotypes have equal affinities for amphetamine. Moreover, dopamine release measurements from slices treated with quinpirole, a D2-family receptor agonist, rule out enhanced D2 autoreceptor sensitivity as a mechanism of release inhibition. However, dopamine release, uncorrected for uptake and normalized against the corresponding predrug release peaks, increased in Fmr1 KO mice, but not in WT mice. Collectively, these data are consistent with a scenario in which a decrease in extracellular dopamine levels in the striatum result in diminished expression of focused stereotypy in Fmr1 KO mice. PMID:21116467

  14. LRRK2 overexpression alters glutamatergic presynaptic plasticity, striatal dopamine tone, postsynaptic signal transduction, motor activity and memory.

    PubMed

    Beccano-Kelly, Dayne A; Volta, Mattia; Munsie, Lise N; Paschall, Sarah A; Tatarnikov, Igor; Co, Kimberley; Chou, Patrick; Cao, Li-Ping; Bergeron, Sabrina; Mitchell, Emma; Han, Heather; Melrose, Heather L; Tapia, Lucia; Raymond, Lynn A; Farrer, Matthew J; Milnerwood, Austen J

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrrk2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder affecting 1-2% of those >65 years old. The neurophysiology of LRRK2 remains largely elusive, although protein loss suggests a role in glutamatergic synapse transmission and overexpression studies show altered dopamine release in aged mice. We show that glutamate transmission is unaltered onto striatal projection neurons (SPNs) of adult LRRK2 knockout mice and that adult animals exhibit no detectable cognitive or motor deficits. Basal synaptic transmission is also unaltered in SPNs of LRRK2 overexpressing mice, but they do exhibit clear alterations to D2-receptor-mediated short-term synaptic plasticity, behavioral hypoactivity and impaired recognition memory. These phenomena are associated with decreased striatal dopamine tone and abnormal dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32 kDa signal integration. The data suggest that LRRK2 acts at the nexus of dopamine and glutamate signaling in the adult striatum, where it regulates dopamine levels, presynaptic glutamate release via D2-dependent synaptic plasticity and dopamine-receptor signal transduction. PMID:25343991

  15. LRRK2 overexpression alters glutamatergic presynaptic plasticity, striatal dopamine tone, postsynaptic signal transduction, motor activity and memory.

    PubMed

    Beccano-Kelly, Dayne A; Volta, Mattia; Munsie, Lise N; Paschall, Sarah A; Tatarnikov, Igor; Co, Kimberley; Chou, Patrick; Cao, Li-Ping; Bergeron, Sabrina; Mitchell, Emma; Han, Heather; Melrose, Heather L; Tapia, Lucia; Raymond, Lynn A; Farrer, Matthew J; Milnerwood, Austen J

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrrk2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder affecting 1-2% of those >65 years old. The neurophysiology of LRRK2 remains largely elusive, although protein loss suggests a role in glutamatergic synapse transmission and overexpression studies show altered dopamine release in aged mice. We show that glutamate transmission is unaltered onto striatal projection neurons (SPNs) of adult LRRK2 knockout mice and that adult animals exhibit no detectable cognitive or motor deficits. Basal synaptic transmission is also unaltered in SPNs of LRRK2 overexpressing mice, but they do exhibit clear alterations to D2-receptor-mediated short-term synaptic plasticity, behavioral hypoactivity and impaired recognition memory. These phenomena are associated with decreased striatal dopamine tone and abnormal dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32 kDa signal integration. The data suggest that LRRK2 acts at the nexus of dopamine and glutamate signaling in the adult striatum, where it regulates dopamine levels, presynaptic glutamate release via D2-dependent synaptic plasticity and dopamine-receptor signal transduction.

  16. Postnatal manganese exposure alters dopamine transporter function in adult rats: Potential impact on nonassociative and associative processes.

    PubMed

    McDougall, S A; Reichel, C M; Farley, C M; Flesher, M M; Der-Ghazarian, T; Cortez, A M; Wacan, J J; Martinez, C E; Varela, F A; Butt, A E; Crawford, C A

    2008-06-23

    In the present study, we examined whether exposing rats to a high-dose regimen of manganese chloride (Mn) during the postnatal period would depress presynaptic dopamine functioning and alter nonassociative and associative behaviors. To this end, rats were given oral supplements of Mn (750 microg/day) on postnatal days (PD) 1-21. On PD 90, dopamine transporter (DAT) immunoreactivity and [3H]dopamine uptake were assayed in the striatum and nucleus accumbens, while in vivo microdialysis was used to measure dopamine efflux in the same brain regions. The effects of postnatal Mn exposure on nigrostriatal functioning were evaluated by assessing rotorod performance and amphetamine-induced stereotypy in adulthood. In terms of associative processes, both cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) and sucrose-reinforced operant responding were examined. Results showed that postnatal Mn exposure caused persistent declines in DAT protein expression and [3H]dopamine uptake in the striatum and nucleus accumbens, as well as long-term reductions in striatal dopamine efflux. Rotorod performance did not differ according to exposure condition, however Mn-exposed rats did exhibit substantially more amphetamine-induced stereotypy than vehicle controls. Mn exposure did not alter performance on any aspect of the CPP task (preference, extinction, or reinstatement testing), nor did Mn affect progressive ratio responding (a measure of motivation). Interestingly, acquisition of a fixed ratio task was impaired in Mn-exposed rats, suggesting a deficit in procedural learning. In sum, these results indicate that postnatal Mn exposure causes persistent declines in various indices of presynaptic dopaminergic functioning. Mn-induced alterations in striatal functioning may have long-term impact on associative and nonassociative behavior.

  17. Episodic neonatal hypoxia evokes executive dysfunction and regionally specific alterations in markers of dopamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Decker, M J; Hue, G E; Caudle, W M; Miller, G W; Keating, G L; Rye, D B

    2003-01-01

    Perinatal ischemic-anoxic and prolonged anoxic insults lead to impaired dopaminergic signaling and are hypothesized to contribute, at least in part, to the pathogenesis of disorders of minimal brain dysfunction such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. We hypothesized that subtle intermittent hypoxic insults, occurring during a period of critical brain development, are also pathogenic to dopaminergic signaling, thereby contributing to behavioral and executive dysfunction. Between postnatal days 7 and 11, rat pups were exposed to either 20-s bursts of isocapnic hypoxic gas, compressed air, or were left undisturbed with the dam. On postnatal days 23 pups were instrumented with electroencephalographic/electromyographic electrodes and sleep-wake architecture was characterized. Locomotor activity was assessed between postnatal days 35 and 38, learning, and working memory evaluated between postnatal days 53 and 64. Rats were killed on postnatal day 80 and tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter, dopamine transporter, and dopamine D1 receptors were quantified in the prefrontal cortex, primary sensorimotor cortex, and precommissural striatum by Western blot analyses. Post-hypoxic pups spent less time awake and more time in rapid-eye-movement sleep during the lights-on phase of the circadian cycle, were hyperlocomotive, and expressed impaired working memory. Striatal expression of vesicular monoamine transporter and D1 receptor proteins were increased in post-hypoxic rats, consistent with depressed dopaminergic signaling. These observations lead to the intriguing hypothesis that intermittent hypoxia occurring during a period of critical brain development evokes behavioral and neurochemical alterations that are long lasting, and consistent with disorders of minimal brain dysfunction. PMID:12614682

  18. Altered architecture and functional consequences of the mesolimbic dopamine system in cannabis dependence.

    PubMed

    Spiga, Saturnino; Lintas, Alessandra; Migliore, Michele; Diana, Marco

    2010-07-01

    Cannabinoid withdrawal produces a hypofunction of mesencephalic dopamine neurons that impinge upon medium spiny neurons (MSN) of the forebrain. After chronic treatment with two structurally different cannabinoid agonists, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and CP55 940 (CP) rats were withdrawn spontaneously and pharmacologically with the CB1 antagonist SR141716A (SR). In these two conditions, evaluation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons revealed significant morphometrical reductions in the ventrotegmental area but not substantia nigra pars compacta of withdrawn rats. Similarly, confocal analysis of Golgi-Cox-stained sections of the nucleus accumbens revealed a decrease in the shell, but not the core, of the spines' density of withdrawn rats. Administration of the CB1 antagonist SR to control rats, provoked structural abnormalities reminiscent of those observed in withdrawal conditions and support the regulatory role of cannabinoids in neurogenesis, axonal growth and synaptogenesis by acting as eu-proliferative signals through the CB1 receptors. Further, these measures were incorporated into a realistic computational model that predicts a strong reduction in the excitability of morphologically altered MSN, yielding a significant reduction in action potential output. These pieces of evidence support the tenet that withdrawal from addictive compounds alters functioning of the mesolimbic system and provide direct morphological evidence for functional abnormalities associated with cannabinoid dependence at the level of dopaminergic neurons and their postsynaptic counterpart and are coherent with recent hypothesis underscoring a hypodopaminergic state as a distinctive feature of the 'addicted brain'.

  19. Arsenic exposure in drinking water alters the dopamine system in the brains of C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjeong; Seo, Sangwook; Sung, Kyunghwa; Kim, Kisok

    2014-12-01

    Although exposure to arsenic (As) induces neurotoxic changes, there is a lack of data regarding its specific effects on neurotransmission, particularly dopaminergic neurotransmission. In this study, the dopamine content and expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptors (DRs) were examined in the striatum and cerebral cortex of the mouse brain following the administration of As (1-100 mg/L NaAsO2 in drinking water). After 3 weeks, significantly decreased TH expression and dopamine content, both in the striatum and the cerebral cortex of mice treated with 100 mg/L As, were observed when compared with controls. Although DR expression was similar in the cerebral cortex of As-treated mice, DRD1 to DRD4 expression significantly increased in the striatum of 100 mg/L As-exposed mice. These data indicate that altered dopaminergic neurotransmission may contribute to As-induced neurotoxic effects.

  20. Neonatal exposure to amphetamine alters social affiliation and central dopamine activity in adult male prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Fukushiro, D F; Olivera, A; Liu, Y; Wang, Z

    2015-10-29

    The prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) is a socially monogamous rodent species that forms pair bonds after mating. Recent data have shown that amphetamine (AMPH) is rewarding to prairie voles as it induces conditioned place preferences. Further, repeated treatment with AMPH impairs social bonding in adult prairie voles through a central dopamine (DA)-dependent mechanism. The present study examined the effects of neonatal exposure to AMPH on behavior and central DA activity in adult male prairie voles. Our data show that neonatal exposure to AMPH makes voles less social in an affiliation test during adulthood, but does not affect animals' locomotor activity and anxiety-like behavior. Neonatal exposure to AMPH also increases the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DA transporter (DAT) mRNA expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in the brain, indicating an increase in central DA activity. As DA has been implicated in AMPH effects on behavioral and cognitive functions, altered DA activity in the vole brain may contribute to the observed changes in social behavior.

  1. Neonatal exposure to amphetamine alters social affiliation and central dopamine activity in adult male prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Fukushiro, D F; Olivera, A; Liu, Y; Wang, Z

    2015-10-29

    The prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) is a socially monogamous rodent species that forms pair bonds after mating. Recent data have shown that amphetamine (AMPH) is rewarding to prairie voles as it induces conditioned place preferences. Further, repeated treatment with AMPH impairs social bonding in adult prairie voles through a central dopamine (DA)-dependent mechanism. The present study examined the effects of neonatal exposure to AMPH on behavior and central DA activity in adult male prairie voles. Our data show that neonatal exposure to AMPH makes voles less social in an affiliation test during adulthood, but does not affect animals' locomotor activity and anxiety-like behavior. Neonatal exposure to AMPH also increases the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DA transporter (DAT) mRNA expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in the brain, indicating an increase in central DA activity. As DA has been implicated in AMPH effects on behavioral and cognitive functions, altered DA activity in the vole brain may contribute to the observed changes in social behavior. PMID:26321240

  2. Alterations in the Striatal Dopamine System During Intravenous Methamphetamine Exposure: Effects of Contingent and Noncontingent Administration

    PubMed Central

    Laćan, Goran; Hadamitzky, Martin; Kuczenski, Ronald; Melega, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The continuing spread of methamphetamine (METH) abuse has stimulated research aimed at understanding consequences of its prolonged exposure. Alterations in nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system parameters have been characterized in experimental studies after discontinuation of long term METH but fewer studies have included similar assessments during METH exposure. Here, we report METH plasma pharmacokinetics and striatal DA system alterations in rat after noncontingent and contingent METH administration for 7.5 weeks. Escalating METH exposure was delivered by dynamic infusion (DI) that incorporated a ‘humanized’ plasma METH half life, or by intravenous self-administration (IVSA) that included binge intakes. Kinetic modeling of DI and IVSA for 24 h periods during the final week of METH exposure showed that plasma METH levels remained between 0.7–1.5 μM. Animals were sacrificed during their last METH administration for autoradiography assessment using [3H]ligands and D2 agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding. DA transporter binding was decreased (DI, 34%; IVSA, 15%) while vesicular monoamine transporter binding and substantia nigra DA cell numbers were unchanged. Decreases were measured for D2 receptor (DI and IVSA, 15–20%) and [35S]GTPγS binding (DI, 35%; IVSA, 18%). These similar patterns of DI and IVSA associated decreases in striatal DA markers reflect consequences of cumulative METH exposure and not the drug delivery method. For METH IVSA, individual differences were observed, yet each animal’s total intake was similar within and across three 24 h binges. IVSA rodent models may be useful for identifying molecular mechanisms that are associated with METH binges in humans. PMID:23417852

  3. Alterations in the striatal dopamine system during intravenous methamphetamine exposure: effects of contingent and noncontingent administration.

    PubMed

    Laćan, Goran; Hadamitzky, Martin; Kuczenski, Ronald; Melega, William P

    2013-08-01

    The continuing spread of methamphetamine (METH) abuse has stimulated research aimed at understanding consequences of its prolonged exposure. Alterations in nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system parameters have been characterized in experimental studies after discontinuation of long-term METH but fewer studies have included similar assessments during METH exposure. Here, we report METH plasma pharmacokinetics and striatal DA system alterations in rat after noncontingent and contingent METH administration for 7.5 weeks. Escalating METH exposure was delivered by dynamic infusion (DI) that incorporated a "humanized" plasma METH half life or by intravenous self-administration (IVSA) that included binge intakes. Kinetic modeling of DI and IVSA for 24 h periods during the final week of METH exposure showed that plasma METH levels remained between 0.7 and 1.5 µM. Animals were sacrificed during their last METH administration for autoradiography assessment using [³H]ligands and D2 agonist-induced [³⁵S]GTPγS binding. DA transporter binding was decreased (DI, 34%; IVSA, 15%) while vesicular monoamine transporter binding and substantia nigra DA cell numbers were unchanged. Decreases were measured for D2 receptor (DI and IVSA, 15-20%) and [³⁵S]GTPγS binding (DI, 35%; IVSA, 18%). These similar patterns of DI and IVSA associated decreases in striatal DA markers reflect consequences of cumulative METH exposure and not the drug delivery method. For METH IVSA, individual differences were observed, yet each animal's total intake was similar within and across three 24-h binges. IVSA rodent models may be useful for identifying molecular mechanisms that are associated with METH binges in humans.

  4. Cadherin 13: Human cis-Regulation and Selectively Altered Addiction Phenotypes and Cerebral Cortical Dopamine in Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Drgonova, Jana; Walther, Donna; Hartstein, G Luke; Bukhari, Mohammad O; Baumann, Michael H; Katz, Jonathan; Hall, F Scott; Arnold, Elizabeth R; Flax, Shaun; Riley, Anthony; Rivero, Olga; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Troncoso, Juan; Ranscht, Barbara; Uhl, George R

    2016-01-01

    The cadherin 13 (CDH13) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule likely to influence development and connections of brain circuits that modulate addiction, locomotion and cognition, including those that involve midbrain dopamine neurons. Human CDH13 mRNA expression differs by more than 80% in postmortem cerebral cortical samples from individuals with different CDH13 genotypes, supporting examination of mice with altered CDH13 expression as models for common human variation at this locus. Constitutive CDH13 knockout mice display evidence for changed cocaine reward: shifted dose response relationship in tests of cocaine-conditioned place preference using doses that do not alter cocaine-conditioned taste aversion. Reduced adult CDH13 expression in conditional knockouts also alters cocaine reward in ways that correlate with individual differences in cortical CDH13 mRNA levels. In control and comparison behavioral assessments, knockout mice display modestly quicker acquisition of rotarod and water maze tasks, with a trend toward faster acquisition of 5-choice serial reaction time tasks that otherwise displayed no genotype-related differences. They display significant differences in locomotion in some settings, with larger effects in males. In assessments of brain changes that might contribute to these behavioral differences, there are selective alterations of dopamine levels, dopamine/metabolite ratios, dopaminergic fiber densities and mRNA encoding the activity dependent transcription factor npas4 in cerebral cortex of knockout mice. These novel data and previously reported human associations of CDH13 variants with addiction, individual differences in responses to stimulant administration and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) phenotypes suggest that levels of CDH13 expression, through mechanisms likely to include effects on mesocortical dopamine, influence stimulant reward and may contribute modestly to cognitive and locomotor phenotypes relevant to ADHD.

  5. Chronic Back Pain Is Associated with Alterations in Dopamine Neurotransmission in the Ventral Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Martikainen, Ilkka K.; Nuechterlein, Emily B.; Peciña, Marta; Love, Tiffany M.; Cummiford, Chelsea M.; Green, Carmen R.; Stohler, Christian S.

    2015-01-01

    alterations in brain dopamine function that are associated with measures of pain sensitivity and affective state, but also with brain endogenous opioid system functional measures. These findings suggest that brain dopamine–opioid interactions are involved in the pathophysiology of chronic pain, which has potential therapeutic implications. Our results may also help to explain individual variation in susceptibility to opioid medication misuse and eventual addiction in the context of chronic pain. PMID:26156996

  6. Diabetic retinopathy alters light-induced clock gene expression and dopamine levels in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Bennis, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common consequences of diabetes that affects millions of working-age adults worldwide and leads to progressive degeneration of the retina, visual loss, and blindness. Diabetes is associated with circadian disruption of the central and peripheral circadian clocks, but the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are unknown. Using a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of diabetes, we investigated whether diabetes alters 1) the circadian regulation of clock genes in the retina and in the central clocks, 2) the light response of clock genes in the retina, and/or 3) light-driven retinal dopamine (DA), a major output marker of the retinal clock. Methods To quantify circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes, retinas and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from the same animals were collected every 4 h in circadian conditions, 12 weeks post-diabetes. Induction of Per1, Per2, and c-fos mRNAs was quantified in the retina after the administration of a pulse of monochromatic light (480 nm, 1.17×1014 photons/cm2/s, 15 min) at circadian time 16. Gene expression was assessed with real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR). Pooled retinas from the control and STZ-diabetic mice were collected 2 h after light ON and light OFF (Zeitgeber time (ZT)2 and ZT14), and DA and its metabolite were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results We found variable effects of diabetes on the expression of clock genes in the retina and only slight differences in phase and/or amplitude in the SCN. c-fos and Per1 induction by a 480 nm light pulse was abolished in diabetic animals at 12 weeks post-induction of diabetes in comparison with the control mice, suggesting a deficit in light-induced neuronal activation of the retinal clock. Finally, we quantified a 56% reduction in the total number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunopositive cells, associated with a decrease in DA levels during the subjective day (ZT2

  7. Altered Refractive Development in Mice With Reduced Levels of Retinal Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Michael A.; Park, Han na; Chakraborty, Ranjay; Landis, Erica G.; Sidhu, Curran; He, Li; Iuvone, P. Michael; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The neuromodulator dopamine (DA) has been implicated in the prevention of excessive ocular elongation and myopia in various animal models. This study used retina-specific DA knockout mice to investigate the role of retinal DA in refractive development and susceptibility to experimental myopia. Methods Measurements of refractive error, corneal curvature, and ocular biometrics were obtained as a function of age for both untreated and form-deprived (FD) groups of retina-specific tyrosine hydroxylase knockout (rTHKO) and control (Ctrl) mice. Retinas from each group were analyzed by HPLC for levels of DA and its primary metabolite (DOPAC). Results Under normal visual conditions, rTHKO mice showed significantly myopic refractions (F(1,188) = 7.602, P < 0.001) and steeper corneas (main effect of genotype F(1,180) = 5.1, P < 0.01) at 4 and 6 weeks of age compared with Ctrl mice. Retina-specific THKO mice also had thinner corneas (main effect of genotype F(1,181) = 37.17, P < 0.001), thinner retinas (F(6,181) = 6.07, P < 0.001), and shorter axial lengths (F(6,181) = 3.78, P < 0.01) than Ctrl mice. Retina-specific THKO retinas contained less than 15% of DA and DOPAC compared with Ctrl retinas, and the remaining DA had a significantly higher turnover, as indicated by DOPAC/DA ratios (Student's t-test, P < 0.05). Retina-specific THKO mice showed similar, yet more variable, responses to 6 weeks of FD compared with Ctrl mice. Conclusions Diminished retinal DA induced spontaneous myopia in mice raised under laboratory conditions without form deprivation. The relative myopic shift in rTHKO mice may be explained by steeper corneas, an unexpected finding. The chronic loss of DA did not significantly alter the FD myopia response in rTHKO mice.

  8. Abstinence from chronic cocaine self-administration alters striatal dopamine systems in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Thomas J R; Smith, Hilary R; Nader, Michael A; Porrino, Linda J

    2009-04-01

    Although dysregulation within the dopamine (DA) system is a hallmark feature of chronic cocaine exposure, the question of whether these alterations persist into abstinence remains largely unanswered. Nonhuman primates represent an ideal model in which to assess the effects of abstinence on the DA system following chronic cocaine exposure. In this study, male rhesus monkeys self-administered cocaine (0.3 mg/kg per injection, 30 reinforcers per session) under a fixed-interval 3-min schedule for 100 days followed by either 30 or 90 days abstinence. This duration of cocaine self-administration has been previously shown to decrease DA D2-like receptor densities and increase levels of D1-like receptors and DA transporters (DAT). Responding by control monkeys was maintained by food presentation under an identical protocol and the same abstinence periods. [(3)H]SCH 23390 binding to DA D1 receptors following 30 days of abstinence was significantly higher in all portions of the striatum, compared to control animals, whereas [(3)H]raclopride binding to DA D2 receptors was not different between groups. [(3)H]WIN 35 428 binding to DAT was also significantly higher throughout virtually all portions of the dorsal and ventral striatum following 30 days of abstinence. Following 90 days of abstinence, however, levels of DA D1 receptors and DAT were not different from control values. Although these results indicate that there is eventual recovery of the separate elements of the DA system, they also highlight the dynamic nature of these components during the initial phases of abstinence from chronic cocaine self-administration. PMID:18769473

  9. Altered Refractive Development in Mice With Reduced Levels of Retinal Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Michael A.; Park, Han na; Chakraborty, Ranjay; Landis, Erica G.; Sidhu, Curran; He, Li; Iuvone, P. Michael; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The neuromodulator dopamine (DA) has been implicated in the prevention of excessive ocular elongation and myopia in various animal models. This study used retina-specific DA knockout mice to investigate the role of retinal DA in refractive development and susceptibility to experimental myopia. Methods Measurements of refractive error, corneal curvature, and ocular biometrics were obtained as a function of age for both untreated and form-deprived (FD) groups of retina-specific tyrosine hydroxylase knockout (rTHKO) and control (Ctrl) mice. Retinas from each group were analyzed by HPLC for levels of DA and its primary metabolite (DOPAC). Results Under normal visual conditions, rTHKO mice showed significantly myopic refractions (F(1,188) = 7.602, P < 0.001) and steeper corneas (main effect of genotype F(1,180) = 5.1, P < 0.01) at 4 and 6 weeks of age compared with Ctrl mice. Retina-specific THKO mice also had thinner corneas (main effect of genotype F(1,181) = 37.17, P < 0.001), thinner retinas (F(6,181) = 6.07, P < 0.001), and shorter axial lengths (F(6,181) = 3.78, P < 0.01) than Ctrl mice. Retina-specific THKO retinas contained less than 15% of DA and DOPAC compared with Ctrl retinas, and the remaining DA had a significantly higher turnover, as indicated by DOPAC/DA ratios (Student's t-test, P < 0.05). Retina-specific THKO mice showed similar, yet more variable, responses to 6 weeks of FD compared with Ctrl mice. Conclusions Diminished retinal DA induced spontaneous myopia in mice raised under laboratory conditions without form deprivation. The relative myopic shift in rTHKO mice may be explained by steeper corneas, an unexpected finding. The chronic loss of DA did not significantly alter the FD myopia response in rTHKO mice. PMID:27750284

  10. Alterations in dopamine system function across the estrous cycle of the MAM rodent model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Perez, Stephanie M; Chen, Li; Lodge, Daniel J

    2014-09-01

    Clinical studies have reported differences in the incidence and severity of schizophrenia symptoms between male and female schizophrenia patients. Unfortunately, the cause of these differences is not currently known due, in part, to the fact that preclinical studies largely focus on male subjects. Dopamine neuron activity has been previously demonstrated to change across the estrous cycle, and may therefore be of relevance, as aberrant dopamine signaling is thought to underlie the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Here we examine dopamine neuron activity across the estrous cycle in the MAM rodent model of schizophrenia. We demonstrate that the elevation in dopamine neuron activity, consistently observed in male MAM-treated rats, is most prominent during estrus and attenuated in met-estrus. Furthermore, this appears to be mediated, in part, by progesterone in the ventral hippocampus, as increases in dopamine neuron population activity (observed in estrus) were normalized by the intra-hippocampal administration of the progesterone receptor antagonist, mifepristone (but not the estrogen receptor antagonists, fulvestrant). Taken together, these data suggest that changes in dopamine system function occur across the estrous cycle in MAM-treated rats and may contribute to the differences in symptomatology between male and female schizophrenia patients.

  11. Lipocalin 2 alleviates iron toxicity by facilitating hypoferremia of inflammation and limiting catalytic iron generation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xia; Yeoh, Beng San; Saha, Piu; Olvera, Rodrigo Aguilera; Singh, Vishal; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-06-01

    Iron is an essential transition metal ion for virtually all aerobic organisms, yet its dysregulation (iron overload or anemia) is a harbinger of many pathologic conditions. Hence, iron homeostasis is tightly regulated to prevent the generation of catalytic iron (CI) which can damage cellular biomolecules. In this study, we investigated the role of iron-binding/trafficking innate immune protein, lipocalin 2 (Lcn2, aka siderocalin) on iron and CI homeostasis using Lcn2 knockout (KO) mice and their WT littermates. Administration of iron either systemically or via dietary intake strikingly upregulated Lcn2 in the serum, urine, feces, and liver of WT mice. However, similarly-treated Lcn2KO mice displayed elevated CI, augmented lipid peroxidation and other indices of organ damage markers, implicating that Lcn2 responses may be protective against iron-induced toxicity. Herein, we also show a negative association between serum Lcn2 and CI in the murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. The inability of DSS-treated Lcn2KO mice to elicit hypoferremic response to acute colitis, implicates the involvement of Lcn2 in iron homeostasis during inflammation. Using bone marrow chimeras, we further show that Lcn2 derived from both immune and non-immune cells participates in CI regulation. Remarkably, exogenous rec-Lcn2 supplementation suppressed CI levels in Lcn2KO serum and urine. Collectively, our results suggest that Lcn2 may facilitate hypoferremia, suppress CI generation and prevent iron-mediated adverse effects. PMID:27007712

  12. History of cannabis use is not associated with alterations in striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Paul R A; Egerton, Alice; Watson, Ben; Reid, Alistair; Lappin, Julia; Howes, Oliver D; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2012-01-01

    Cannabis use in adolescence is emerging as a risk factor for the development of psychosis. In animal studies, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of cannabis, modulates striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission. Alterations in human striatal dopaminergic function have also been reported both in psychosis and in stimulant use. We sought to examine whether striatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor availability was altered in volunteers with a history of cannabis use using a database of previously acquired [(11)C]-raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Ten [(11)C]-raclopride scans from volunteers with a history of cannabis use were compared to ten control scans using a functional striatal subdivision region of interest (ROI) analysis. No significant differences in either overall striatal BP(ND) values or BP(ND) values in any functional striatal subdivision were found between the two groups. There was also no correlation between lifetime frequency of cannabis use and BP(ND) values. Limbic striatal BP(ND) values were ten percent lower in current nicotine cigarette smokers. These findings suggest that, unlike other drugs of abuse, a history of cannabis use is not associated with alterations in striatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor availability. PMID:21890594

  13. Blink Rate in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome: Preliminary Evidence for Altered Dopamine Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, J. E.; Symons, F. J.; Johnson, A.-M.; Hatton, D. D.; Boccia, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dopamine, a neurotransmitter involved in motor and cognitive functioning, can be non-invasively measured via observation of spontaneous blink rates. Blink rates have been studied in a number of clinical conditions including schizophrenia, autism, Parkinsons, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder with results implicating either…

  14. Behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal is altered after prefrontocortical dopamine depletion in rats: monoaminergic correlates.

    PubMed

    Espejo, E F; Serrano, M I; Caillé, S; Stinus, L

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the effects of prefrontocortical dopamine depletion on opiate withdrawal and prefrontocortical neurochemical changes elicited by morphine dependence and withdrawal. The dopaminergic content was also measured in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal, in order to detect reactive changes induced by prefrontocortical lesion. Withdrawal was induced by naloxone in morphine-dependent rats. Monoamine levels were analyzed post-mortem by high performance liquid cromatography. The results showed that chronic morphine dependence did not modify basal levels of monoamines in sham rats, revealing neuroadaptation of prefrontocortical dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin systems to chronic morphine. The neuroadaptive phenomenon remained after prefrontocortical lesion (> 79% dopamine depletion). On the other hand, a strong increase of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin contents in the medial prefrontal cortex of sham rats was detected during opiate withdrawal. However, in lesioned rats, the increase of prefrontocortical dopamine and serotonin content, but not that of noradrenaline, was much lower. In the nucleus accumbens, prefrontocortical lesion reactively enhanced the dopaminergic tone and, although opiate withdrawal reduced dopaminergic activity in both sham and lesioned rats, this reduction was less intense in the latter group. At a behavioral level, some symptoms of physical opiate withdrawal were exacerbated in lesioned rats (writhing, mastication, teeth-chattering, global score) and exploration was reduced. The findings hence indicate that: (i) prefrontocortical monoaminergic changes play a role in the behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal; (ii) the severity of some withdrawal signs are related to the dopaminergic and serotonergic tone of the medial prefrontal cortex rather than to the noradrenergic one, and (iii) an inverse relationship between mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems exists.

  15. Obesogenic diets may differentially alter dopamine control of sucrose and fructose intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, Carolyn E; Hajnal, Andras

    2011-07-25

    Chronic overeating of obesogenic diets can lead to obesity, reduced dopamine signaling, and increased consumption of added sugars to compensate for blunted reward. However, the specific role of diet composition yet remains unknown. To study this, Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed a high-energy diet with high fat and low carbohydrate content (HFHE), a fat-sugar combination high-energy diet (FCHE), or standard chow for 24 weeks. We found that both high-energy diets produced substantial body weight gain compared to chow-fed controls. To investigate dopamine control of short (2-h) intake of palatable sucrose or fructose solutions, rats were pretreated peripherally (IP) with equimolar doses (0-600 nmol/kg) of the dopamine D1 (SCH23390) and D2 (raclopride) subtype-specific receptor antagonists. The results showed an overall increase in the efficacy of D1 and D2 receptor antagonists on suppression of intake in obese rats compared to lean rats, with effects differing based on diets and test solutions. Specifically, SCH23390 potently reduced both sucrose and fructose intake in all groups; however, lower doses were more effective in HFHE rats. In contrast, raclopride was most effective at reducing fructose intake in the obese FCHE rats. Thus, it appears that obesity due to the consumption of combinations of dietary fat and sugar rather than extra calories from dietary fat alone may result in reduced D2 receptor signaling. Furthermore, such deficits seem to preferentially affect the control of fructose intake. These findings demonstrate for the first time a plausible interaction between diet composition and dopamine control of carbohydrate intake in diet-induced obese rats. It also provides additional evidence that sucrose and fructose intake is regulated differentially by the dopamine system.

  16. Hepcidin-Induced Iron Deficiency Is Related to Transient Anemia and Hypoferremia in Kawasaki Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Ling; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Li, Sung-Chou; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis that primarily affects children under the age of five years old. For sufferers of KD, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been found to successfully diminish the occurrence of coronary artery lesions. Anemia is commonly found in KD patients, and we have shown that in appropriately elevated hepcidin levels are related to decreased hemoglobin levels in these patients. In this study, we investigated the time period of anemia and iron metabolism during different stages of KD. A total of 100 patients with KD and 20 control subjects were enrolled in this study for red blood cell and hemoglobin analysis. Furthermore, plasma, urine hepcidin, and plasma IL-6 levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 20 KD patients and controls. Changes in hemoglobin, plasma iron levels, and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were also measured in patients with KD. Hemoglobin, iron levels, and TIBC were lower (p < 0.001, p = 0.009, and p < 0.001, respectively) while plasma IL-6 and hepcidin levels (both p < 0.001) were higher in patients with KD than in the controls prior to IVIG administration. Moreover, plasma hepcidin levels were positively and significantly correlated with urine hepcidin levels (p < 0.001) prior to IVIG administration. After IVIG treatment, plasma hepcidin and hemoglobin levels significantly decreased (both p < 0.001). Of particular note was a subsequent gradual increase in hemoglobin levels during the three weeks after IVIG treatment; nevertheless, the hemoglobin levels stayed lower in KD patients than in the controls (p = 0.045). These findings provide a longitudinal study of hemoglobin changes and among the first evidence that hepcidin induces transient anemia and hypoferremia during KD’s acute inflammatory phase. PMID:27187366

  17. Blocking serotonin but not dopamine reuptake alters neural processing during perceptual decision making.

    PubMed

    Costa, Vincent D; Kakalios, Laura C; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine and serotonin have opponent interactions on aspects of impulsivity. Therefore we wanted to test the hypothesis that dopamine and serotonin would have opposing effects on speed-accuracy trade offs in a perceptual decision making task. Unlike other behavioral measures of impulsivity, perceptual decision making allows us to determine whether decreasing premature responses, often interpreted as decreased impulsivity, corresponds to increased behavioral performance. We administered GBR-12909 (a dopamine transporter blocker), escitalopram (a serotonin transporter blocker), or saline in separate sessions to 3 rhesus macaques. We found that animals had slower reaction times (RTs) on escitalopram than on GBR-12909 or saline. However, they were also least accurate on escitalopram. Animals were faster, although nonsignificantly, on GBR than saline and had equivalent accuracy. Administration of GBR-12909 did cause animals to be faster in error trials than correct trials. Therefore, from the point of view of RTs the animals were less impulsive on escitalopram. However, the decreased accuracy of the monkeys shows that they were not able to make use of their slower response times to make more accurate decisions. Therefore, impulsivity was reduced on escitalopram, but at the expense of a slower information-processing rate in the perceptual inference task. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Blocking serotonin but not dopamine reuptake alters neural processing during perceptual decision making.

    PubMed

    Costa, Vincent D; Kakalios, Laura C; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine and serotonin have opponent interactions on aspects of impulsivity. Therefore we wanted to test the hypothesis that dopamine and serotonin would have opposing effects on speed-accuracy trade offs in a perceptual decision making task. Unlike other behavioral measures of impulsivity, perceptual decision making allows us to determine whether decreasing premature responses, often interpreted as decreased impulsivity, corresponds to increased behavioral performance. We administered GBR-12909 (a dopamine transporter blocker), escitalopram (a serotonin transporter blocker), or saline in separate sessions to 3 rhesus macaques. We found that animals had slower reaction times (RTs) on escitalopram than on GBR-12909 or saline. However, they were also least accurate on escitalopram. Animals were faster, although nonsignificantly, on GBR than saline and had equivalent accuracy. Administration of GBR-12909 did cause animals to be faster in error trials than correct trials. Therefore, from the point of view of RTs the animals were less impulsive on escitalopram. However, the decreased accuracy of the monkeys shows that they were not able to make use of their slower response times to make more accurate decisions. Therefore, impulsivity was reduced on escitalopram, but at the expense of a slower information-processing rate in the perceptual inference task. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27513807

  19. Blocking serotonin but not dopamine reuptake alters neural processing during perceptual decision making

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Vincent D.; Kakalios, Laura; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine and serotonin have opponent interactions on aspects of impulsivity. Therefore we wanted to test the hypothesis that dopamine and serotonin would have opposing effects on speed-accuracy trade-offs in a perceptual decision making task. Unlike other behavioral measures of impulsivity, perceptual decision making allows us to determine whether decreasing premature responses, often interpreted as decreased impulsivity, corresponds to increased behavioral performance. We administered GBR-12909 (a dopamine transporter blocker), escitalopram (a serotonin transporter blocker) or saline in separate sessions to three rhesus macaques. We found that animals had slower reaction times on escitalopram than on GBR-12909 or saline. However, they were also least accurate on escitalopram. Animals were faster, although non-significantly, on GBR than saline and had equivalent accuracy. Administration of GBR-12909 did cause animals to be faster in error trials than correct trials. Therefore, from the point of view of reaction times the animals were less impulsive on escitalopram. However, the decreased accuracy shows that they were not able to make use of the slower response time to make more accurate decisions. Therefore, impulsivity was reduced on escitalopram, but at the expense of information processing rate in the perceptual inference task. PMID:27513807

  20. Lesions of the habenula produce stress- and dopamine-dependent alterations in prepulse inhibition and locomotion.

    PubMed

    Heldt, Scott A; Ressler, Kerry J

    2006-02-16

    The habenula complex modulates the activity of dopamine and serotonin systems in the brain. An important question remains whether there is a link between habenula dysfunction and monoamine-related disorders, such as schizophrenia. In this study, we describe an interaction between habenula lesions and stress that produces long-lasting effects on behavior. Mice received control lesions or bilateral electrolytic lesions of the habenula and were tested for fear-potentiated startle and freezing measures of conditioned fear. They were also tested for prepulse inhibition (PPI) and locomotor activity in the presence or absence of a dopaminergic agonist (apomorphine) or an atypical antipsychotic with mixed dopamine/serotonin antagonist properties (clozapine). There were no detectable effects of habenula lesions on fear conditioning and no effects on PPI in the absence of stress. However, following conditioned fear stress, habenula-lesioned animals showed decreased PPI which normalized with clozapine. Lesioned animals also showed diminished activity at baseline, with hyperlocomotion following apomorphine. These data support the hypothesis that the habenula may be normally involved in stress-dependent regulation of monoamine systems.

  1. Increased dopamine D2 receptor activity in the striatum alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Sabine; Duda, Johanna; Schiemann, Julia; Poetschke, Christina; Schneider, Gaby; Kandel, Eric R; Liss, Birgit; Roeper, Jochen; Simpson, Eleanor H

    2015-03-24

    There is strong evidence that the core deficits of schizophrenia result from dysfunction of the dopamine (DA) system, but details of this dysfunction remain unclear. We previously reported a model of transgenic mice that selectively and reversibly overexpress DA D2 receptors (D2Rs) in the striatum (D2R-OE mice). D2R-OE mice display deficits in cognition and motivation that are strikingly similar to the deficits in cognition and motivation observed in patients with schizophrenia. Here, we show that in vivo, both the firing rate (tonic activity) and burst firing (phasic activity) of identified midbrain DA neurons are impaired in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but not in the substantia nigra (SN), of D2R-OE mice. Normalizing striatal D2R activity by switching off the transgene in adulthood recovered the reduction in tonic activity of VTA DA neurons, which is concordant with the rescue in motivation that we previously reported in our model. On the other hand, the reduction in burst activity was not rescued, which may be reflected in the observed persistence of cognitive deficits in D2R-OE mice. We have identified a potential molecular mechanism for the altered activity of DA VTA neurons in D2R-OE mice: a reduction in the expression of distinct NMDA receptor subunits selectively in identified mesolimbic DA VTA, but not nigrostriatal DA SN, neurons. These results suggest that functional deficits relevant for schizophrenia symptoms may involve differential regulation of selective DA pathways. PMID:25675529

  2. Terminal Dopamine Release Kinetics in the Accumbens Core and Shell Are Distinctly Altered after Withdrawal from Cocaine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Repeated self-administration of cocaine is associated with impairments in motivated behaviors as well as alterations in both dopamine (DA) release and neural signaling within the nucleus accumbens (NAc). These impairments are present even after several weeks of abstinence from drug taking, suggesting that the self-administration experience induces long-lasting neuroplastic alterations in the mesolimbic DA circuit. To understand these changes at the terminal level, rats were allowed to self-administer either cocaine intravenously (∼1 mg/kg per infusion) or water to a receptacle (control) in 2-h sessions over 14 days, followed by 30 days of enforced abstinence. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to record real-time DA release in either NAc core or shell after electrical stimulations of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in freely-moving animals. In controls, the kinetics of DA release in the core and shell strikingly differed, with shell displaying slower release and reuptake rates than core. However, cocaine experience differentially altered these signaling patterns by NAc subregion. In the shell, cocaine rats showed less sensitivity to the dynamic range of applied stimulations than controls. In the core, by contrast, cocaine rats displayed robustly reduced peak DA release given the same stimulation, while also showing slower release and reuptake kinetics. The differential effects of cocaine self-administration on terminal function between core and shell is consistent with a region-specific functional reorganization of the mesolimbic DA system after repeated exposure and may provide an anatomical substrate for altered cognitive function after chronic drug-taking and addiction. PMID:27752541

  3. Dopamine D3 Receptor Alterations in Cocaine-Dependent Humans Imaged with [11C](+)PHNO

    PubMed Central

    Matuskey, David; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Pittman, Brian; Williams, Wendol; Wanyiri, Jane; Gaiser, Edward; Lee, Dianne E.; Hannestad, Jonas; Lim, Keunpoong; Zheng, Minq-Qiang; Lin, Shu-fei; Labaree, David; Potenza, Marc N.; Carson, Richard E.; Malison, Robert T.; Ding, Yu-Shin

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence from animal models and postmortem human studies points to the importance of the dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in cocaine dependence (CD). The objective of this pilot study was to use the D3R-preferring radioligand [11C](+)PHNO to compare receptor availability in groups with and without CD. Methods Ten medically healthy, non-treatment seeking CD subjects (mean age 41±8) in early abstinence were compared to 10 healthy control (HC) subjects (mean age 41±6) with no history of cocaine or illicit substance abuse. Binding potential (BPND), a measure of available receptors, was determined with parametric images, computed using the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM2) with the cerebellum as the reference region. Results BPND in CD subjects was higher in D3R-rich areas including the substantia nigra ((SN) 29%; P=0.03), hypothalamus (28%; P=0.02) and amygdala (35%, P=0.03). No between-group differences were observed in the striatum or pallidum. BPND values in the SN (r = + 0.83; p =0.008) and pallidum (r = + 0.67; p = 0.03) correlated with years of cocaine use. Conclusions Between-group differences suggest an important role for dopaminergic transmission in the SN, hypothalamus and amygdala in CD. Such findings also highlight the potential relevance of D3R as a medication development target in CD. PMID:24717909

  4. Chronic levodopa treatment alters basal and dopamine agonist-stimulated cerebral glucose utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Engber, T.M.; Susel, Z.; Kuo, S.; Chase, T.N. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of chronic levodopa administration on the functional activity of the basal ganglia and its output regions was evaluated by means of the 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) autoradiographic technique in rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway. The rates of local cerebral glucose utilization were studied under basal conditions as well as in response to challenge with a selective D1 or D2 dopamine-receptor agonist. Levodopa (100 mg/kg/d, i.p.) was administered for 19 d either continuously via infusion with an osmotic pump or intermittently by twice-daily injections. Following a 3-d washout, glucose utilization was found to be decreased by both levodopa regimens in the nucleus accumbens; intermittent levodopa also decreased glucose utilization in the entopeduncular nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, ventrolateral thalamus, ventromedial thalamus, ventroposterolateral thalamus, and lateral habenula. In control (lesioned and treated chronically with saline) rats, the D1 agonist SKF 38393 (5 mg/kg, i.v.) increased 2-DG uptake in the substantia nigra pars reticulata and entopeduncular nucleus ipsilateral to the lesion by 84% and 56%, respectively. Both continuous and intermittent levodopa blunted the SKF 38393-induced elevation in glucose metabolism in the substantia nigra pars reticulata, while intermittent levodopa also attenuated the increase in the entopeduncular nucleus. The D2 agonist quinpirole (0.4 mg/kg, i.v.) did not increase glucose utilization in any brain region in control animals; following intermittent levodopa treatment, however, quinpirole increased 2-DG uptake by 64% in the subthalamic nucleus and by 39% in the deep layers of the superior colliculus on the ipsilateral side.

  5. A dopamine receptor d2-type agonist attenuates the ability of stress to alter sleep in mice.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, F; Ehlen, J C; Williams, N S; Montemarano, J J; Paul, K N

    2014-11-01

    Although sleep disruptions that accompany stress reduce quality of life and deteriorate health, the mechanisms through which stress alters sleep remain obscure. Psychological stress can alter sleep in a variety of ways, but it has been shown to be particularly influential on rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Prolactin (PRL), a sexually dimorphic, stress-sensitive hormone whose basal levels are higher in females, has somnogenic effects on REM sleep. In the current study, we examined the relationship between PRL secretion and REM sleep after restraint stress to determine whether: 1) the ability of stress to increase REM sleep is PRL-dependent, and 2) fluctuating PRL levels underlie sex differences in sleep responses to stress. Because dopamine D2 receptors in the pituitary gland are the primary regulator of PRL secretion, D2 receptor agonist, 1-[(6-allylergolin-8β-yl)-carbonyl]-1-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl]-3-ethylurea (cabergoline), was used to attenuate PRL levels in mice before 1 hour of restraint stress. Mice were implanted with electroencephalographic/electromyographic recording electrodes and received an ip injection of either 0.3-mg/kg cabergoline or vehicle before a control procedure of 1 hour of sleep deprivation by gentle handling during the light phase. Six days after the control procedure, mice received cabergoline or vehicle 15 minutes before 1 hour of restraint stress. Cabergoline blocked the ability of restraint stress to increase REM sleep amount in males but did not alter REM sleep amount after stress in females even though it reduced basal REM sleep amount in female controls. These data provide evidence that the ability for restraint stress to increase REM sleep is dependent on PRL and that sex differences in REM sleep amount may be driven by PRL.

  6. Alterations of Dopamine D2 Receptors and Related Receptor-Interacting Proteins in Schizophrenia: The Pivotal Position of Dopamine Supersensitivity Psychosis in Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yasunori; Kanahara, Nobuhisa; Iyo, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Although the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) has been a main target of antipsychotic pharmacotherapy for the treatment of schizophrenia, the standard treatment does not offer sufficient relief of symptoms to 20%–30% of patients suffering from this disorder. Moreover, over 80% of patients experience relapsed psychotic episodes within five years following treatment initiation. These data strongly suggest that the continuous blockade of DRD2 by antipsychotic(s) could eventually fail to control the psychosis in some point during long-term treatment, even if such treatment has successfully provided symptomatic improvement for the first-episode psychosis, or stability for the subsequent chronic stage. Dopamine supersensitivity psychosis (DSP) is historically known as a by-product of antipsychotic treatment in the manner of tardive dyskinesia or transient rebound psychosis. Numerous data in psychopharmacological studies suggest that the up-regulation of DRD2, caused by antipsychotic(s), is likely the mechanism underlying the development of the dopamine supersensitivity state. However, regardless of evolving notions of dopamine signaling, particularly dopamine release, signal transduction, and receptor recycling, most of this research has been conducted and discussed from the standpoint of disease etiology or action mechanism of the antipsychotic, not of DSP. Hence, the mechanism of the DRD2 up-regulation or mechanism evoking clinical DSP, both of which are caused by pharmacotherapy, remains unknown. Once patients experience a DSP episode, they become increasingly difficult to treat. Light was recently shed on a new aspect of DSP as a treatment-resistant factor. Clarification of the detailed mechanism of DSP is therefore crucial, and a preventive treatment strategy for DSP or treatment-resistant schizophrenia is urgently needed. PMID:26694375

  7. Menthol Alone Upregulates Midbrain nAChRs, Alters nAChR Subtype Stoichiometry, Alters Dopamine Neuron Firing Frequency, and Prevents Nicotine Reward

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Brandon J.; Wall, Teagan R.; Henley, Beverley M.; Kim, Charlene H.; Nichols, Weston A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Xiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    , menthol alone exerts several neurobiological changes. We are among the first to show that menthol, by itself, increases the number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the mouse brain. It does so at a dose that matches nicotine in its ability to increase nAChR number. At this same dose, menthol also alters midbrain dopamine neuron function and prevents nicotine reward-related behavior. Together, our data show that menthol is more than an “inert” flavor additive and is able to change the function of midbrain dopamine neurons that are part of the mesolimbic reward pathway. PMID:26961950

  8. The elevation of immunoreactive beta-endorphin in old male rats is related to alterations in dopamine and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Forman, L J; Cavalieri, T; Estilow, S; Tatarian, G T

    1990-01-01

    The concentration of immunoreactive beta-endorphin (IR-BE) in the anterior pituitary (AP) and the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary (NIL) was elevated in old as compared to young male rats. Treatment of old male rats with the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, did not affect the concentration of IR-BE in the AP and produced a significant reduction in the concentration of IR-BE in the NIL. By contrast, administration of the serotonergic neurotoxin, p-CPA, significantly diminished the concentration of IR-BE in the AP of old male rats, while the concentration of IR-BE in the NIL remained unchanged. Hypothalamic IR-BE was decreased in old male rats and was not influenced by administration of L-DOPA or p-CPA. Chromatographic analysis indicated that in the AP of old animals the amount of beta-endorphin relative to beta-lipotropin was increased and was diminished slightly by the treatments. Alterations in IR-BE in the NIL and hypothalamus were represented solely by beta-endorphin. These data suggest that in old male rats, a decrease in dopaminergic activity contributes to the increase in IR-BE levels in the NIL, and an increase in serotonergic function, at least in part, is responsible for the elevation in the level of IR-BE in the AP.

  9. Combinational losses of synucleins reveal their differential requirements for compensating age-dependent alterations in motor behavior and dopamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Connor-Robson, Natalie; Peters, Owen M; Millership, Steven; Ninkina, Natalia; Buchman, Vladimir L

    2016-10-01

    Synucleins are involved in multiple steps of the neurotransmitter turnover, but the largely normal synaptic function in young adult animals completely lacking synucleins suggests their roles are dispensable for execution of these processes. Instead, they may be utilized for boosting the efficiency of certain molecular mechanisms in presynaptic terminals, with a deficiency of synuclein proteins sensitizing to or exacerbating synaptic malfunction caused by accumulation of mild alterations, which are commonly associated with aging. Although functional redundancy within the family has been reported, it is unclear whether the remaining synucleins can fully compensate for the deficiency of a lost family member or whether some functions are specific for a particular member. We assessed several structural and functional characteristics of the nigrostriatal system of mice lacking members of the synuclein family in every possible combination and demonstrated that stabilization of the striatal dopamine level depends on the presence of α-synuclein and cannot be compensated by other family members, whereas β-synuclein is required for efficient maintenance of animal's balance and coordination in old age. PMID:27614017

  10. Relationships between locomotor activation and alterations in brain temperature during selective blockade and stimulation of dopamine transmission.

    PubMed

    Brown, P L; Bae, D; Kiyatkin, E A

    2007-03-01

    It is well known that the dopamine (DA) system plays an essential role in the organization and regulation of brain activational processes. Various environmental stimuli that induce locomotor activation also increase DA transmission, while DA antagonists decrease spontaneous locomotion. Our previous work supports close relationships between locomotor activation and brain and body temperature increases induced by salient environmental challenges or occurring during motivated behavior. While this correlation was also true for psychomotor stimulant drugs such as methamphetamine and MDMA, more complex relationships or even inverted correlations were found for other drugs that are known to increase DA transmission (i.e. heroin and cocaine). In the present study we examined brain, muscle and skin temperatures together with conventional locomotion during selective interruption of DA transmission induced by a mixture of D1 and D2 antagonists (SCH-23390 and eticlopride at 0.2 mg/kg, s.c.) and its selective activation by apomorphine (APO; 0.05 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.v.) in rats. While full DA receptor blockade decreased spontaneous locomotion, it significantly increased brain, muscle and skin temperatures, suggesting metabolic brain activation under conditions of vasodilatation (or weakening of normal vascular tone). In contrast, APO strongly decreased skin temperature but tended to decrease brain and muscle temperatures despite strong hyperlocomotion and stereotypy. The brain temperature response to APO was strongly dependent on basal brain temperature, with hypothermia at high basal temperatures and weak hyperthermia at low temperatures. While supporting the role of DA in locomotor activation, these data suggest more complex relationships between drug-induced alterations in DA transmission, behavioral activation and metabolic brain activation.

  11. SK3 K+ channel-deficient mice have enhanced dopamine and serotonin release and altered emotional behaviors.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, J P R; Weikop, P; Hansen, H H; Mikkelsen, J D; Redrobe, J P; Holst, D; Bond, C T; Adelman, J P; Christophersen, P; Mirza, N R

    2008-11-01

    SK3 K(+) channels influence neuronal excitability and are present in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) nuclei in the brain stem. We therefore hypothesized that SK3 channels affect 5-HT and DA neurotransmission and associated behaviors. To explore this, we used doxycycline-induced conditional SK3-deficient (T/T) mice. In microdialysis, T/T mice had elevated baseline levels of striatal extracellular DA and the metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid. While baseline hippocampal extracellular 5-HT was unchanged in T/T mice, the 5-HT response to the 5-HT transporter inhibitor citalopram was enhanced. Furthermore, baseline levels of the 5-HT metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were elevated in T/T mice. T/T mice performed equally to wild type (WT) in most sensory and motor tests, indicating that SK3 deficiency does not lead to gross impairments. In the forced swim and tail suspension tests, the T/T mice displayed reduced immobility compared with WT, indicative of an antidepressant-like phenotype. Female T/T mice were more anxious in the zero maze. In contrast, anxiety-like behaviors in the open-field and four-plate tests were unchanged in T/T mice of both sexes. Home cage diurnal activity was also unchanged in T/T mice. However, SK3 deficiency had a complex effect on activity responses to novelty: T/T mice showed decreased, increased or unchanged activity responses to novelty, depending on sex and context. In summary, we report that SK3 deficiency leads to enhanced DA and 5-HT neurotransmission accompanied by distinct alterations in emotional behaviors. PMID:18616612

  12. SLC6A3 coding variant Ala559Val found in two autism probands alters dopamine transporter function and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bowton, E; Saunders, C; Reddy, I A; Campbell, N G; Hamilton, P J; Henry, L K; Coon, H; Sakrikar, D; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J M; Blakely, R D; Sutcliffe, J; Matthies, H J G; Erreger, K; Galli, A

    2014-10-14

    Emerging evidence associates dysfunction in the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) with the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The human DAT (hDAT; SLC6A3) rare variant with an Ala to Val substitution at amino acid 559 (hDAT A559V) was previously reported in individuals with bipolar disorder or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have demonstrated that this variant is hyper-phosphorylated at the amino (N)-terminal serine (Ser) residues and promotes an anomalous DA efflux phenotype. Here, we report the novel identification of hDAT A559V in two unrelated ASD subjects and provide the first mechanistic description of its impaired trafficking phenotype. DAT surface expression is dynamically regulated by DAT substrates including the psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH), which causes hDAT trafficking away from the plasma membrane. The integrity of DAT trafficking directly impacts DA transport capacity and therefore dopaminergic neurotransmission. Here, we show that hDAT A559V is resistant to AMPH-induced cell surface redistribution. This unique trafficking phenotype is conferred by altered protein kinase C β (PKCβ) activity. Cells expressing hDAT A559V exhibit constitutively elevated PKCβ activity, inhibition of which restores the AMPH-induced hDAT A559V membrane redistribution. Mechanistically, we link the inability of hDAT A559V to traffic in response to AMPH to the phosphorylation of the five most distal DAT N-terminal Ser. Mutation of these N-terminal Ser to Ala restores AMPH-induced trafficking. Furthermore, hDAT A559V has a diminished ability to transport AMPH, and therefore lacks AMPH-induced DA efflux. Pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ or Ser to Ala substitution in the hDAT A559V background restores AMPH-induced DA efflux while promoting intracellular AMPH accumulation. Although hDAT A559V is a rare variant, it has been found in multiple probands with neuropsychiatric disorders associated with imbalances in DA neurotransmission

  13. Alterations in brain dopamine and serotonin metabolism during the development of tolerance to human beta-endorphin in rats.

    PubMed

    Van Loon, G R; De Souza, E B; Kim, C

    1978-12-01

    Repeated intracisternal injections of human beta-endorphin lead to development of tolerance with respect to the catalepsy, analgesia, and hypothermia which are seen following a single injection. The initial injection of beta-endorphin results in increases in the dopamine metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in neostriatum, as well as increases in the serotonin metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), in hypothalamus and brainstem and a decrease in 5-HIAA in hippocampus. In the present study, we report changes in metabolism of dopamine and serotonin in specific brain areas during the development of tolerance to beta-endorphin. Thus, the development of tolerance to beta-endorphin with respect to catalepsy, analgesia, and hypothermia may be mediated by development of tolerance to the effects of beta-endorphin on brain dopamine and serotonin release.

  14. Misassembly of full-length Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 protein is linked to altered dopamine homeostasis and behavioral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Trossbach, S V; Bader, V; Hecher, L; Pum, M E; Masoud, S T; Prikulis, I; Schäble, S; de Souza Silva, M A; Su, P; Boulat, B; Chwiesko, C; Poschmann, G; Stühler, K; Lohr, K M; Stout, K A; Oskamp, A; Godsave, S F; Müller-Schiffmann, A; Bilzer, T; Steiner, H; Peters, P J; Bauer, A; Sauvage, M; Ramsey, A J; Miller, G W; Liu, F; Seeman, P; Brandon, N J; Huston, J P; Korth, C

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a mental illness gene first identified in a Scottish pedigree. So far, DISC1-dependent phenotypes in animal models have been confined to expressing mutant DISC1. Here we investigated how pathology of full-length DISC1 protein could be a major mechanism in sporadic mental illness. We demonstrate that a novel transgenic rat model, modestly overexpressing the full-length DISC1 transgene, showed phenotypes consistent with a significant role of DISC1 misassembly in mental illness. The tgDISC1 rat displayed mainly perinuclear DISC1 aggregates in neurons. Furthermore, the tgDISC1 rat showed a robust signature of behavioral phenotypes that includes amphetamine supersensitivity, hyperexploratory behavior and rotarod deficits, all pointing to changes in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. To understand the etiology of the behavioral deficits, we undertook a series of molecular studies in the dorsal striatum of tgDISC1 rats. We observed an 80% increase in high-affinity DA D2 receptors, an increased translocation of the dopamine transporter to the plasma membrane and a corresponding increase in DA inflow as observed by cyclic voltammetry. A reciprocal relationship between DISC1 protein assembly and DA homeostasis was corroborated by in vitro studies. Elevated cytosolic dopamine caused an increase in DISC1 multimerization, insolubility and complexing with the dopamine transporter, suggesting a physiological mechanism linking DISC1 assembly and dopamine homeostasis. DISC1 protein pathology and its interaction with dopamine homeostasis is a novel cellular mechanism that is relevant for behavioral control and may have a role in mental illness. PMID:26754951

  15. PREFERENCE FOR DISTINCT FUNCTIONAL CONFORMATIONS OF THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER ALTERS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SUBJECTIVE EFFECTS OF COCAINE AND STIMULATION OF MESOLIMBIC DOPAMINE

    PubMed Central

    Kohut, Stephen J.; Hiranita, Takato; Hong, Soo-Kyung; Ebbs, Aaron L.; Tronci, Valeria; Green, Jennifer; Garcés-Ramírez, Linda; Chun, Lauren E.; Mereu, Maddalena; Newman, Amy H.; Katz, Jonathan L.; Tanda, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Background Subjective effects related to cocaine abuse are primarily mediated by blockade of the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT). The present study assessed the hypothesis that different conformational equilibria of the DAT regulate differences in extracellular DA induced by structurally diverse DA uptake inhibitors (DUI) and their cocaine-like subjective effects. Methods The relationship between cocaine-like subjective effects and stimulation of mesolimbic-DA levels by standard-DUIs (cocaine, methylphenidate, WIN35,428), and atypical-DUIs (benztropine analogs: AHN1-055, AHN2-005, JHW-007) was investigated using cocaine-discrimination and DA-microdialysis procedures in rats. Results All drugs stimulated DA-levels showing different time-courses and maximal effects. Standard-DUIs, which preferentially bind to the outward-facing DAT-conformation, fully substituted for cocaine, consistently producing those subjective effects at DA levels of 100-125% over basal values, regardless of dose or pretreatment time. The atypical-DUIs, with DAT binding minimally affected by DAT conformation, produced inconsistent cocaine-like subjective effects. Full effects were obtained, if at all, only at a few doses and pretreatment times, and at DA-levels 600-700% greater than basal values. Importantly, the linear, time-independent, relationship between cocaine-like subjective effects and stimulation of DA-levels, obtained with standard DUIs was not obtained with the atypical-DUIs. Conclusions These results suggest a time-related desensitization process underlying the reduced cocaine subjective effects of atypical-DUIs that may be differentially induced by the binding modalities identified using molecular approaches. Since the DAT is the target of several drugs for treating neuropsychiatric disorders, such as ADHD, these results help to identify safe and effective medications with minimal cocaine-like subjective effects that contribute to abuse liability. PMID:24853388

  16. Basal regulation of HPA and dopamine systems is altered differentially in males and females by prenatal alcohol exposure and chronic variable stress

    PubMed Central

    Uban, Kristina A.; Comeau, Wendy; Ellis, Linda A.; Galea, Liisa A. M.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) on central nervous system function include an increased prevalence of mental health problems, including substance use disorders (SUD). The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and dopamine systems have overlapping neurocircuitries and are both implicated in SUD. PAE alters both HPA and dopaminergic activity and regulation, resulting in increased HPA tone and an overall reduction in tonic dopamine activity. However, effects of PAE on the interaction between HPA and dopamine (DA) systems have not been investigated. The present study examined PAE effects on basal regulation of central stress and dopamine systems in key brain regions where these systems intersect. Adult Sprague-Dawley male and female offspring from prenatal alcohol-exposed (PAE), pairfed (PF), and ad libitum-fed control (C) groups were subjected to chronic variable stress (CVS) or remained as a no stress (non-CVS) control group. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA, as well as glucocorticoid and DA receptor (DA-R) expression were measured under basal conditions 24 hours following the end of CVS. We show, for the first time, that regulation of basal HPA and DA systems, and likely, HPA-DA interactions, are altered differentially in males and females by PAE and CVS. PAE augmented the typical attenuation in weight gain during CVS in males and caused increased weight loss in females. Increased basal corticosterone levels in control, but not PAE, females suggest that PAE alters the profile of basal hormone secretion throughout CVS. CVS downregulated basal CRH mRNA in the prefrontal cortex and throughout the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in PAE females but only in the posterior BNST of control females. PAE males and females exposed to CVS exhibited more widespread upregulation of basal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mRNA throughout the hippocampus, and an attenuated decrease in DA-R expression throughout the nucleus accumbens and striatum compared

  17. Selective alterations of brain dopamine D(2) receptor binding in cirrhotic patients: results of a (11)C-N-methylspiperone PET study.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuki; Kato, Akinobu; Sawara, Kei; Butterworth, Roger F; Sasaki, Toshiaki; Terasaki, Kazunori; Sera, Koichiro; Suzuki, Kazuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Alterations of the brain dopamine system have been implicated in the neurological complications of chronic liver failure. The present study was aimed at the measurement of dopamine D(2) binding sites in cirrhotic patients by positron emission tomography (PET) using (11)C-N-methylspiperone as ligand. The regions of interest (ROI) were designated on a three-dimensional stereotaxic ROI template (3DSRT). The pixel values of twelve ROIs corrected by the pixel value of the cerebellum after 80 min static scanning were used to quantitate changes in binding. D(2) binding sites were significantly decreased in the hippocampus and thalamus of cirrhotic patients and were positively correlated with serum bilirubin levels and Child-Pugh scores and were negatively correlated with prothrombin times (thalamus). Loss of D(2) sites was greater in thalamus and hippocampus of alcoholic cirrhotics compared to non-alcoholics. Statistically significant correlations were also observed between D(2) binding sites in hippocampus, thalamus and lenticular nuclei and history of overt encephalopathy. These findings suggest that D(2) receptor binding in some regions of brain in cirrhotic patients is influenced by factors such as the severity of liver damage and history of alcohol dependency or overt encephalopathy. Alterations of D(2) receptor sites indicative of dopaminergic synaptic dysfunction could play an important role in the pathogenesis of the cognitive and motor disturbances associated with chronic liver failure. PMID:18686022

  18. Long-term exposure to paraquat alters behavioral parameters and dopamine levels in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, Josiane W; Cognato, Giana P; Christoff, Raissa R; Roesler, Laura N; Leite, Carlos E; Kist, Luiza W; Bogo, Mauricio R; Vianna, Monica R; Bonan, Carla D

    2014-04-01

    Chronic exposure to paraquat (Pq), a toxic herbicide, can result in Parkinsonian symptoms. This study evaluated the effect of the systemic administration of Pq on locomotion, learning and memory, social interaction, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels, and dopamine transporter (DAT) gene expression in zebrafish. Adult zebrafish received an i.p. injection of either 10 mg/kg (Pq10) or 20 mg/kg (Pq20) of Pq every 3 days for a total of six injections. Locomotion and distance traveled decreased at 24 h after each injection in both treatment doses. In addition, both Pq10- and Pq20-treated animals exhibited differential effects on the absolute turn angle. Nonmotor behaviors were also evaluated, and no changes were observed in anxiety-related behaviors or social interactions in Pq-treated zebrafish. However, Pq-treated animals demonstrated impaired acquisition and consolidation of spatial memory in the Y-maze task. Interestingly, dopamine levels increased while DOPAC levels decreased in the zebrafish brain after both treatments. However, DAT expression decreased in the Pq10-treated group, and there was no change in the Pq20-treated group. The amount of TH protein showed no significant difference in the treated group. Our study establishes a new model to study Parkinson-associated symptoms in zebrafish that have been chronically treated with Pq.

  19. Cocaine exposure prior to pregnancy alters the psychomotor response to cocaine and transcriptional regulation of the dopamine D1 receptor in adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Aya; Constantinof, Andrea; Pan, Pauline; Kupferschmidt, Dave A; McGowan, Patrick O; Erb, Suzanne

    2014-05-15

    There is evidence that maternal experience prior to pregnancy can play an important role in behavioral, physiological, and genetic programming of offspring. Likewise, exposure to cocaine in utero can result in marked changes in central nervous system function of offspring. In this study, we examined whether exposure of rat dams to cocaine prior to pregnancy subsequently alters indices of behavior, physiology, and gene expression in offspring. Multiple outcome measures were examined in adult male offspring: (1) behavioral expression of cocaine-induced psychomotor activation; (2) levels of corticosterone in response to immobilization stress; and (3) expression of multiple genes, including dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1) and D2 (DRD2), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), in functionally relevant brain regions. Adult Sprague-Dawley females were exposed to cocaine (15-30 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 10 days, and were then mated to drug naïve males of the same strain. Separate groups of adult male offspring were tested for their acute psychomotor response to cocaine (0, 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.), corticosterone responsivity to 20 min of immobilization stress, and expression of multiple genes using quantitative PCR. Offspring of dams exposed to cocaine prior to conception exhibited increased psychomotor sensitivity to cocaine, and upregulated gene expression of DRD1 in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Neither stress-induced corticosterone levels nor gene expression of GR or CRF genes were altered. These data suggest that cocaine exposure before pregnancy can serve to enhance psychomotor sensitivity to cocaine in offspring, possibly via alterations in dopamine function that include upregulation of the DRD1. PMID:24583058

  20. Repeated cocaine enhances ventral hippocampal-stimulated dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens and alters ventral hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit expression

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jeffrey L.; Forster, Gina L.; Unterwald, Ellen M.

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is important for various reward-related cognitive processes including reinforcement learning. Repeated cocaine enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and phasic elevations of accumbal dopamine evoked by unconditioned stimuli are dependent on impulse flow from the ventral hippocampus. Therefore, sensitized hippocampal activity may be one mechanism by which drugs of abuse enhance limbic dopaminergic activity. In the present study, in vivo microdialysis in freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was used to investigate the effect of repeated cocaine on ventral hippocampus-mediated dopaminergic transmission within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens. Following seven daily injections of saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg, ip), unilateral infusion of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA, 0.5 μg) into the ventral hippocampus transiently increased both motoric activity and ipsilateral dopamine efflux in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens, and this effect was greater in rats that received repeated cocaine compared to controls that received repeated saline. In addition, repeated cocaine altered NMDA receptor subunit expression in the ventral hippocampus, reducing the NR2A:NR2B subunit ratio. Together, these results suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine produces maladaptive ventral hippocampal-nucleus accumbens communication, in part through changes in glutamate receptor composition. PMID:24832868

  1. D1 and D2 dopamine receptor antagonists decrease behavioral bout duration, without altering the bout's repeated behavioral components, in a naturalistic model of repetitive and compulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Kurt L; Rueda Morales, Rafael I

    2012-04-21

    Nest building behavior in the pregnant female rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a model for compulsive behavior in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). This behavior comprises a cycle of repeated, stereotyped components (collecting straw, entering nest box and depositing the straw there, returning to collect more straw), which itself is repeated 80+ times in a single bout that lasts approximately 50min. The bout, in turn, is repeated if necessary, according to the rabbit's perception of whether or not the nest is finished. We administered SCH23390 (5-100μg/kg; D1/D5 antagonist) or raclopride (0.05-1.0mg/kg; D2/D3 antagonist), subcutaneously to day 28 pregnant female rabbits, 30 or 60min before placing straw inside their home cage. At doses that minimally affected ambulatory behavior in open field (5-12.5μg/kg SCH23390, 0.5-1.0mg/kg raclopride), both antagonists dramatically reduced bout duration while not significantly affecting the initiation of straw carrying behavior, the sequential performance of the individual cycle components, maximum cycle frequency, or the total number of bouts performed. These results point to an important role for dopamine neurotransmission for the prolonged expression of a normal, repetitive and compulsive-like behavior. Moreover, the finding that dopamine receptor antagonists decrease the time spent engaged in repetitive behavior (without significantly altering the form of the repetitive behavior itself) suggests a possible explanation for why neuroleptics can be clinically effective for treating OCD.

  2. Dopamine receptor dysregulation in hippocampus of aged rats underlies chronic pulsatile L-Dopa treatment induced cognitive and emotional alterations.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Vito S; Luquín, Sonia; Jáuregui-Huerta, Fernando; Corona-Morales, Aleph A; Medina, Mauricio P; Ruíz-Velasco, Silvia; Zhang, Limei

    2014-07-01

    L-Dopa is the major symptomatic therapy for Parkinson's disease, which commonly occurs in elderly patients. However, the effects of chronic use on mood and cognition in old subjects remain elusive. In order to compare the effects of a chronic pulsatile L-Dopa treatment on emotional and cognitive functions in young (3 months) and old (18 months) intact rats, an L-Dopa/carbidopa treatment was administered every 12 h over 4 weeks. Rats were assessed for behavioural despair (repeated forced swimming test, RFST), anhedonia (sucrose preference test, SPT) and spatial learning (Morris water maze, MWM) in the late phase of treatment (T). Neuronal expression of Fos in the hippocampus at the early and late phases of T, as well as after MWM was studied. The density and ratio of dopamine D5r, D3r and D2r receptors were also evaluated in the hippocampus using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Young rats showed similar patterns during behavioural tests, whereas aged treated rats showed increased immobility counts in RFST, diminished sucrose liquid intake in SPT, and spatial learning impairment during MWM. Fos expression was significantly blunted in the aged treated group after MWM. The density of D5r, D3r and D2r was increased in both aged groups. The treatment reduced the ratio of D5r/D3r and D5r/D2r in both groups. Moreover, aged treated subjects had significant lower values of D5r/D3r and higher values of D5r/D2r when compared with young treated subjects. These results indicate that chronic L-Dopa treatment in itself could trigger emotional and cognitive dysfunctions in elderly subjects through dopamine receptor dysregulation.

  3. Mesolimbic dopamine signals the value of work.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Arif A; Pettibone, Jeffrey R; Mabrouk, Omar S; Hetrick, Vaughn L; Schmidt, Robert; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Kennedy, Robert T; Aragona, Brandon J; Berke, Joshua D

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine cell firing can encode errors in reward prediction, providing a learning signal to guide future behavior. Yet dopamine is also a key modulator of motivation, invigorating current behavior. Existing theories propose that fast (phasic) dopamine fluctuations support learning, whereas much slower (tonic) dopamine changes are involved in motivation. We examined dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens across multiple time scales, using complementary microdialysis and voltammetric methods during adaptive decision-making. We found that minute-by-minute dopamine levels covaried with reward rate and motivational vigor. Second-by-second dopamine release encoded an estimate of temporally discounted future reward (a value function). Changing dopamine immediately altered willingness to work and reinforced preceding action choices by encoding temporal-difference reward prediction errors. Our results indicate that dopamine conveys a single, rapidly evolving decision variable, the available reward for investment of effort, which is employed for both learning and motivational functions.

  4. Ethanol and acetaldehyde differentially alter extracellular dopamine and serotonin in Aldh2-knockout mouse dorsal striatum: A reverse microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mostofa; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Miki, Takanori; Tanaka, Naoko; Ito, Asuka; Ono, Junichiro; Takakura, Ayaka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) seem to be involved in several of the effects of ethanol (EtOH). Acetaldehyde (AcH), especially in the brain, induces effects that mimic those of EtOH. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of local perfusion of EtOH and AcH on extracellular DA and 5-HT in the dorsal striatum of Aldh2-knockout (Aldh2-KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Aldh2-KO mice were used as a model of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency in humans to examine the effects of AcH. Mice were perfused with Ringer's solution (control), EtOH (100, 200, or 500mM) and AcH (100, 200, or 500μM) into the dorsal striatum. Dialysate samples were collected every 5min, and then analyzed with HPLC coupled to an ECD. We found that local perfusion with 500mM EtOH increased extracellular levels of DA (p<0.05) in both Aldh2-KO and WT mice, while 5-HT levels remain unchanged. EtOH at a dose of 200mM also increased DA in WT mice, but this was limited to a 30-40-min time-point. In contrast, perfusion with 200 and 500μM AcH decreased both DA and 5-HT (p<0.05) in Aldh2-KO mice, but this decrease was not found in WT mice at any AcH dose, indicating an effect of AcH on DA and 5-HT levels. There were no genotype effects on the basal levels of DA and 5-HT. These results indicate that high EtOH can stimulate DA, whereas high AcH can depress both DA and 5-HT in the dorsal striatum of mice. PMID:26711020

  5. Persistent behavioral impairments and alterations of brain dopamine system after early postnatal administration of thimerosal in rats.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Mieszko; Duszczyk, Michalina; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Meyza, Ksenia; Majewska, Maria Dorota

    2011-09-30

    The neurotoxic organomercurial thimerosal (THIM), used for decades as vaccine preservative, is a suspected factor in the pathogenesis of some neurodevelopmental disorders. Previously we showed that neonatal administration of THIM at doses equivalent to those used in infant vaccines or higher, causes lasting alterations in the brain opioid system in rats. Here we investigated neonatal treatment with THIM (at doses 12, 240, 1440 and 3000 μg Hg/kg) on behaviors, which are characteristically altered in autism, such as locomotor activity, anxiety, social interactions, spatial learning, and on the brain dopaminergic system in Wistar rats of both sexes. Adult male and female rats, which were exposed to the entire range of THIM doses during the early postnatal life, manifested impairments of locomotor activity and increased anxiety/neophobia in the open field test. In animals of both sexes treated with the highest THIM dose, the frequency of prosocial interactions was reduced, while the frequency of asocial/antisocial interactions was increased in males, but decreased in females. Neonatal THIM treatment did not significantly affect spatial learning and memory. THIM-exposed rats also manifested reduced haloperidol-induced catalepsy, accompanied by a marked decline in the density of striatal D₂ receptors, measured by immunohistochemical staining, suggesting alterations to the brain dopaminergic system. Males were more sensitive than females to some neurodisruptive/neurotoxic actions of THIM. These data document that early postnatal THIM administration causes lasting neurobehavioral impairments and neurochemical alterations in the brain, dependent on dose and sex. If similar changes occur in THIM/mercurial-exposed children, they could contribute do neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:21549155

  6. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  7. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  8. Long-Term Citalopram Treatment Alters the Stress Responses of the Cortical Dopamine and Noradrenaline Systems: the Role of Cortical 5-HT1A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Fumi; Kishikawa, Yuki; Hanada, Yuuki; Yamada, Makiko; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Kawahara, Hiroshi; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cortical dopamine and noradrenaline are involved in the stress response. Citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has direct and indirect effects on the serotonergic system. Furthermore, long-term treatment with citalopram affects the dopamine and noradrenaline systems, which could contribute to the therapeutic action of antidepressants. Methods: The effects of long-term treatment with citalopram on the responses of the dopamine and noradrenaline systems in the rat prefrontal cortex to acute handling stress were evaluated using in vivo microdialysis. Results: Acute handling stress increased dopamine and noradrenaline levels in the prefrontal cortex. The dopamine and noradrenaline responses were suppressed by local infusion of a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 7-(Dipropylamino)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-ol;hydrobromide, into the prefrontal cortex. The dopamine response was abolished by long-term treatment with citalopram, and the abolished dopamine response was reversed by local infusion of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, (Z)-but-2-enedioic acid;N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-N-pyridin-2-ylcyclohexanecarboxamide into the prefrontal cortex. On the other hand, long-term treatment with citalopram reduced the basal noradrenaline levels (approximately 40% of the controls), but not the basal dopamine levels. The noradrenaline response was maintained despite the low basal noradrenaline levels. Signaling from the 5-HT1A receptors and α2-adrenoceptors was not involved in the decrease in the basal noradrenaline levels but partially affected the noradrenaline response. Conclusions: Chronic citalopram treatment differentially suppresses the dopamine and noradrenaline systems in the prefrontal cortex, and the dopamine stress response was preferentially controlled by upregulating 5-HT1A receptor signaling. Our findings provide insight into how antidepressants modulate the dopamine and noradrenaline systems to overcome acute stress. PMID

  9. Repeated stimulation of dopamine D1-like receptor and hyperactivation of mTOR signaling lead to generalized seizures, altered dentate gyrus plasticity, and memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Ceolin, Laura; Paucard, Alexia; Lerner-Natoli, Mireille; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2014-12-01

    The acute activation of the dopamine D1-like receptors (D1R) is involved in a plethora of functions ranging from increased locomotor activity to the facilitation of consolidation, storage, and retrieval of memories. Although much less characterized, epileptiform activities, usually triggered by disruption of the glutamate and GABA balance, have also been reported to involve the dopaminergic transmission. Using a combination of biochemical, immunohistochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral approaches we have investigated the consequences of repeated stimulation of D1R using the selective D1R-like agonist SKF81297. Here, we report that repeated systemic administration of SKF81297 induces kindled seizures in mice. These seizure episodes parallel the hyperactivation of the mTOR signaling in the hippocampus, leading to disrupted long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus (DG) and altered recognition memories. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin delays the development of SKF81297-induced kindled seizures, and rescues LTP in the DG and object recognition. Our results show that repeated stimulation of D1R is sufficient to induce generalized seizures leading to the overactivation of mTOR signaling, disrupted hippocampal plasticity, and impaired long-term recognition memories. This work highlights the interest of mTOR inhibitors as therapeutic strategies to reverse plasticity and cognitive deficits.

  10. Depressive-like behaviors alterations induced by intranigral MPTP, 6-OHDA, LPS and rotenone models of Parkinson's disease are predominantly associated with serotonin and dopamine.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Ronise M; Barbieiro, Janaína; Lima, Marcelo M S; Dombrowski, Patrícia A; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F

    2010-08-16

    Depression is a frequently encountered non-motor feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) and it can have a significant impact on patient's quality of life. Considering the differential pathophysiology of depression in PD, it prompts the idea that a degenerated nigrostriatal system plays a role in depressive-like behaviors, whilst animal models of PD are employed. Therefore, we addressed the question of whether dopamine (DA) depletion, promoted by the neurotoxins 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and rotenone are able to induce depressive-like behaviors and neurotransmitters alterations similarly that encountered in PD. To test this rationale, we performed intranigral injections of each neurotoxin, followed by motor behavior, depressive-like behaviors, histological and neurochemical tests. After the motor recovery period, MPTP, 6-OHDA and rotenone were able to produce anhedonia and behavioral despair. These altered behavioral responses were accompanied by reductions of striatal DA, homovanillic acid (HVA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) restricted to the 6-OHDA group. Additionally, decreases on the hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) content were detected for the MPTP, 6-OHDA and rotenone groups. Notably, strong correlations were detected among the groups when 5-HT and DA were correlated with swimming (r=+0.97; P=0.001) and immobility (r=-0.90; P=0.012), respectively. Our data indicate that MPTP, 6-OHDA and rotenone, but not LPS were able to produce depressive-like behaviors accompanied primarily by hippocampal 5-HT reductions. Moreover, DA and 5-HT strongly correlated with "emotional" impairments suggesting an important participation of these neurotransmitters in anhedonia and behavioral despair after nigral lesions promoted by the neurotoxins.

  11. Dopamine and corticotropin-releasing factor synergistically alter basolateral amygdala-to-medial prefrontal cortex synaptic transmission: functional switch after chronic cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Cabal, Luis; Liu, Jie; Pollandt, Sebastian; Schmidt, Kady; Shinnick-Gallagher, Patricia; Gallagher, Joel P

    2008-01-01

    Basolateral amygdala (BLA) neurons provide a major excitatory input to medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-layer V pyramidal neurons. Under stressful conditions, commonly associated with chronic cocaine abuse, altered BLA-to-mPFC synaptic transmission could lead to defective emotional information processing and decision making within the mPFC and result in misguided and inappropriate behaviors. We examined the effects of cocaine administered chronically in vivo on EPSCs recorded from a putative BLA-mPFC pathway in vitro and their modulation by dopamine (DA), corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), and their combination (DA plus CRF). In saline-treated animals, activation of D(1/5) receptors depressed BLA-mPFC EPSCs, whereas CRF1 receptor activation alone had no effect on EPSCs. Activating D(1/5) and CRF1 receptors in combination, however, worked synergistically through presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms to depress EPSCs to levels greater than D(1/5) receptor activation alone. After chronic cocaine administration, the function of DA(1/5) and CRF receptors switched from inhibitory to excitatory. In slices from cocaine-treated animals, putative BLA-mPFC EPSCs were depressed through a presynaptic mechanism. Now, activation of either D(1/5) or CRF2 receptors increased the cocaine-induced, depressed EPSCs. Additionally, simultaneous activation of presynaptic D(1/5) and CRF2 receptors led to further enhancement of EPSCs. These data indicate that CRF acting synergistically with DA normally potentiates D(1/5)-induced synaptic depression. However, after chronic cocaine, the combined synergistic actions of DA and CRF switched polarity to enhance facilitation of BLA-mPFC glutamatergic transmission. Also unmasked after acute withdrawal from chronic cocaine are endogenous, tonic-inhibitory D2-like and tonic-facilitatory CRF2 receptor actions. These multiple functional and receptor changes may underlie the altered, possibly aberrant, decision-making process after chronic cocaine.

  12. Dopamine regulates body size in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Takashi; Oami, Eitaro; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Ishiura, Shoichi; Suo, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The nervous system plays a critical role in the regulation of animal body sizes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, an amine neurotransmitter, dopamine, is required for the tactile perception of food and food-dependent behavioral changes, while its role in development is unknown. In this study, we show that dopamine negatively regulates body size through a D2-like dopamine receptor, DOP-3, in C. elegans. Dopamine alters body size without affecting food intake or developmental rate. We also found that dopamine promotes egg-laying, although the regulation of body size by dopamine was not solely caused by this effect. Furthermore, dopamine negatively regulates body size through the suppression of signaling by octopamine and Gq-coupled octopamine receptors, SER-3 and SER-6. Our results demonstrate that dopamine and octopamine regulate the body size of C. elegans and suggest a potential role for perception in addition to ingestion of food for growth. PMID:26921458

  13. Dopamine regulates body size in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Takashi; Oami, Eitaro; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Ishiura, Shoichi; Suo, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The nervous system plays a critical role in the regulation of animal body sizes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, an amine neurotransmitter, dopamine, is required for the tactile perception of food and food-dependent behavioral changes, while its role in development is unknown. In this study, we show that dopamine negatively regulates body size through a D2-like dopamine receptor, DOP-3, in C. elegans. Dopamine alters body size without affecting food intake or developmental rate. We also found that dopamine promotes egg-laying, although the regulation of body size by dopamine was not solely caused by this effect. Furthermore, dopamine negatively regulates body size through the suppression of signaling by octopamine and Gq-coupled octopamine receptors, SER-3 and SER-6. Our results demonstrate that dopamine and octopamine regulate the body size of C. elegans and suggest a potential role for perception in addition to ingestion of food for growth.

  14. Copper deficiency increases levels of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in ventromedial hypothalamus without altering feeding patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, K.E.; Castonguay, T.W.; Failla, M.L. Univ. of Maryland, College Park )

    1991-03-11

    Cu deficiency results in altered levels of catecholamines in peripheral tissues and specific regions of the CNS in rodents. Because catecholamines can affect feeding behavior, meal patterns of control and Cu deficient rats were compared using a computerized system. Cu deficiency was induced by feeding dams a low Cu diet beginning at 17d of pregnancy and weaning pups to the same diet. Between 4.5 and 6.5 wk-of-age, rats fed {minus}Cu diet ate fewer meals during the light period than did controls. However, total food intake and meal size during light and dark periods were similar for the two groups. At 6.5 wk-of-age, Cu deficiency was confirmed by stunted growth, low tissue Cu and enlarged hearts. Cardiac CA was increased 4.3-fold in Cu deficient rats, while the NE level in heart of Cu deficient rats was 54% that of control. The concentrations of both DA and NE were increased in ventromedial hypothalamus of Cu deficient rats. These results indicate that alterations in catecholamine status of ventromedial hypothalamus associated with severe Cu deficiency fail to markedly affect feeding behavior.

  15. Menthol Alone Upregulates Midbrain nAChRs, Alters nAChR Subtype Stoichiometry, Alters Dopamine Neuron Firing Frequency, and Prevents Nicotine Reward.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Brandon J; Wall, Teagan R; Henley, Beverley M; Kim, Charlene H; Nichols, Weston A; Moaddel, Ruin; Xiao, Cheng; Lester, Henry A

    2016-03-01

    Upregulation of β2 subunit-containing (β2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is implicated in several aspects of nicotine addiction, and menthol cigarette smokers tend to upregulate β2* nAChRs more than nonmenthol cigarette smokers. We investigated the effect of long-term menthol alone on midbrain neurons containing nAChRs. In midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons from mice containing fluorescent nAChR subunits, menthol alone increased the number of α4 and α6 nAChR subunits, but this upregulation did not occur in midbrain GABAergic neurons. Thus, chronic menthol produces a cell-type-selective upregulation of α4* nAChRs, complementing that of chronic nicotine alone, which upregulates α4 subunit-containing (α4*) nAChRs in GABAergic but not DA neurons. In mouse brain slices and cultured midbrain neurons, menthol reduced DA neuron firing frequency and altered DA neuron excitability following nAChR activation. Furthermore, menthol exposure before nicotine abolished nicotine reward-related behavior in mice. In neuroblastoma cells transfected with fluorescent nAChR subunits, exposure to 500 nm menthol alone also increased nAChR number and favored the formation of (α4)3(β2)2 nAChRs; this contrasts with the action of nicotine itself, which favors (α4)2(β2)3 nAChRs. Menthol alone also increases the number of α6β2 receptors that exclude the β3 subunit. Thus, menthol stabilizes lower-sensitivity α4* and α6 subunit-containing nAChRs, possibly by acting as a chemical chaperone. The abolition of nicotine reward-related behavior may be mediated through menthol's ability to stabilize lower-sensitivity nAChRs and alter DA neuron excitability. We conclude that menthol is more than a tobacco flavorant: administered alone chronically, it alters midbrain DA neurons of the nicotine reward-related pathway.

  16. Chronic treatment with extended release methylphenidate does not alter dopamine systems or increase vulnerability for cocaine self-administration: a study in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kathryn E; Pierre, Peter J; Daunais, James; Bennett, Allyson J; Martelle, Susan; Gage, H Donald; Swanson, James M; Nader, Michael A; Porrino, Linda J

    2012-11-01

    Despite the widespread use of stimulant medications for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, few studies have addressed their long-term effects on the developing brain or susceptibility to drug use in adolescence. Here, we determined the effects of chronic methylphenidate (MPH) treatment on brain dopamine (DA) systems, developmental milestones, and later vulnerability to substance abuse in juvenile nonhuman primates. Male rhesus monkeys (approximately 30 months old) were treated daily with either a sustained release formulation of MPH or placebo (N=8 per group). Doses were titrated to achieve initial drug blood serum levels within the therapeutic range in children and adjusted throughout the study to maintain target levels. Growth, including measures of crown-rump length and weight, was assessed before and after 1 year of treatment and after 3-5 months washout. In addition, positron emission tomography scans were performed to quantify binding availability of D2/D3 receptors and dopamine transporters (DATs). Distribution volume ratios were calculated to quantify binding of [¹⁸F]fluoroclebopride (DA D2/D3) and [¹⁸F]-(+)-N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-2β-propanoyl-3β-(4-chlorophenyl)tropane (DAT). Chronic MPH did not differentially alter the course of weight gain or other measures of growth, nor did it influence DAT or D2/D3 receptor availability after 1 year of treatment. However, after washout, the D2/D3 receptor availability of MPH-treated animals did not continue to decline at the same rate as control animals. Acquisition of intravenous cocaine self-administration was examined by first substituting saline for food reinforcement and then cocaine doses (0.001-0.1 mg/kg per injection) in ascending order. Each dose was available for at least five consecutive sessions. The lowest dose of cocaine that maintained response rates significantly higher than saline-contingent rates was operationally defined as acquisition of cocaine reinforcement. There

  17. Alterations in brain extracellular dopamine and glycine levels following combined administration of the glycine transporter type-1 inhibitor Org-24461 and risperidone.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Katalin; Marko, Bernadett; Zsilla, Gabriella; Matyus, Peter; Pallagi, Katalin; Szabo, Geza; Juranyi, Zsolt; Barkoczy, Jozsef; Levay, Gyorgy; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2010-12-01

    The most dominant hypotheses for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia have focused primarily upon hyperfunctional dopaminergic and hypofunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The therapeutic efficacy of all atypical antipsychotics is explained in part by antagonism of the dopaminergic neurotransmission, mainly by blockade of D(2) dopamine receptors. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction in schizophrenia can be reversed by glycine transporter type-1 (GlyT-1) inhibitors, which regulate glycine concentrations at the vicinity of NMDA receptors. Combined drug administration with D(2) dopamine receptor blockade and activation of hypofunctional NMDA receptors may be needed for a more effective treatment of positive and negative symptoms and the accompanied cognitive deficit in schizophrenia. To investigate this type of combined drug administration, rats were treated with the atypical antipsychotic risperidone together with the GlyT-1 inhibitor Org-24461. Brain microdialysis was applied in the striatum of conscious rats and determinations of extracellular dopamine, DOPAC, HVA, glycine, glutamate, and serine concentrations were carried out using HPLC/electrochemistry. Risperidone increased extracellular concentrations of dopamine but failed to influence those of glycine or glutamate measured in microdialysis samples. Org-24461 injection reduced extracellular dopamine concentrations and elevated extracellular glycine levels but the concentrations of serine and glutamate were not changed. When risperidone and Org-24461 were added in combination, a decrease in extracellular dopamine concentrations was accompanied with sustained elevation of extracellular glycine levels. Interestingly, the extracellular concentrations of glutamate were also enhanced. Our data indicate that coadministration of an antipsychotic with a GlyT-1 inhibitor may normalize hypofunctional NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission with reduced

  18. Dopamine and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Zandian, M

    2016-01-01

    We have suggested that reduced food intake increases the risk for anorexia nervosa by engaging mesolimbic dopamine neurons, thereby initially rewarding dieting. Recent fMRI studies have confirmed that dopamine neurons are activated in anorexia nervosa, but it is not clear whether this response is due to the disorder or to its resulting nutritional deficit. When the body senses the shortage of nutrients, it rapidly shifts behavior toward foraging for food as a normal physiological response and the mesolimbic dopamine neurons may be involved in that process. On the other hand, the altered dopamine status of anorexics has been suggested to result from a brain abnormality that underlies their complex emotional disorder. We suggest that the outcomes of the treatments that emerge from that perspective remain poor because they target the mental symptoms that are actually the consequences of the food deprivation that accompanies anorexia. On the other hand, a method that normalizes the disordered eating behavior of anorexics results in much better physiological, behavioral, and emotional outcomes.

  19. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge H; Giordano, Magda; Rodríguez, Verónica M

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system.

  20. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge H; Giordano, Magda; Rodríguez, Verónica M

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system. PMID:27375740

  1. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system. PMID:27375740

  2. Mesolimbic Dopamine Signals the Value of Work

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Arif A.; Pettibone, Jeffrey R.; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Hetrick, Vaughn L.; Schmidt, Robert; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Aragona, Brandon J.; Berke, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine cell firing can encode errors in reward prediction, providing a learning signal to guide future behavior. Yet dopamine is also a key modulator of motivation, invigorating current behavior. Existing theories propose that fast (“phasic”) dopamine fluctuations support learning, while much slower (“tonic”) dopamine changes are involved in motivation. We examined dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens across multiple time scales, using complementary microdialysis and voltammetric methods during adaptive decision-making. We first show that minute-by-minute dopamine levels covary with reward rate and motivational vigor. We then show that second-by-second dopamine release encodes an estimate of temporally-discounted future reward (a value function). We demonstrate that changing dopamine immediately alters willingness to work, and reinforces preceding action choices by encoding temporal-difference reward prediction errors. Our results indicate that dopamine conveys a single, rapidly-evolving decision variable, the available reward for investment of effort, that is employed for both learning and motivational functions. PMID:26595651

  3. Depressive behavior and alterations in receptors for dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the brain of the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM)-P10.

    PubMed

    Onodera, T; Watanabe, R; Tha, K K; Hayashi, Y; Murayama, T; Okuma, Y; Ono, C; Oketani, Y; Hosokawa, M; Nomura, Y

    2000-08-01

    The senescence accelerated mouse (SAM) is known as a murine model of aging. SAM consists of senescence accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) and senescence accelerated-resistant mouse (SAMR). Previous studies reported that SAMP10 exhibits age-related learning impairments and behavioral depression in a tail suspension test after 7 months. We investigated the changes in emotional behavior in a forced swimming test and in receptors for dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in SAMP10. SAMP10 at 8 months showed an increase of immobility in the test compared with SAMR1. Treatment with desipramine (25 mg/kg, i.p., 3 days) in SAMP10 caused a decrease in immobility. In the cortex from SAMP10, [3H]quinpirole binding to D2/D3 dopamine receptors increased significantly compared with control SAMR1. In the hippocampus from SAMP10, [3H]8-hydroxy DPAT binding to 5-HT1A receptor increased. In midbrains from SAMP10, bindings of [3H]quinpirole and [3H]8-hydroxy DPAT increased. [3H]SCH23390 binding to D1/D5 receptors and [3H]ketanserin binding to 5-HT2 receptor in brain regions examined in SAMP10 were similar to those in SAMR1. The present findings represent the first neurochemical evidence of an increase of D2/D3 and 5-HT1A receptors in SAMP10. SAMP10 may be a useful model of aging associated depressive behavior. PMID:11001177

  4. Genetic Disruption of Arc/Arg3.1 in Mice Causes Alterations in Dopamine and Neurobehavioral Phenotypes Related to Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Managò, Francesca; Mereu, Maddalena; Mastwal, Surjeet; Mastrogiacomo, Rosa; Scheggia, Diego; Emanuele, Marco; De Luca, Maria A; Weinberger, Daniel R; Wang, Kuan Hong; Papaleo, Francesco

    2016-08-23

    Human genetic studies have recently suggested that the postsynaptic activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) complex is a convergence signal for several genes implicated in schizophrenia. However, the functional significance of Arc in schizophrenia-related neurobehavioral phenotypes and brain circuits is unclear. Here, we find that, consistent with schizophrenia-related phenotypes, disruption of Arc in mice produces deficits in sensorimotor gating, cognitive functions, social behaviors, and amphetamine-induced psychomotor responses. Furthermore, genetic disruption of Arc leads to concomitant hypoactive mesocortical and hyperactive mesostriatal dopamine pathways. Application of a D1 agonist to the prefrontal cortex or a D2 antagonist in the ventral striatum rescues Arc-dependent cognitive or psychomotor abnormalities, respectively. Our findings demonstrate a role for Arc in the regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission and related behaviors. The results also provide initial biological support implicating Arc in dopaminergic and behavioral abnormalities related to schizophrenia. PMID:27524619

  5. Altered dendritic distribution of dopamine D2 receptors and reduction in mitochondrial number in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Megan L.; Chan, June; Mackie, Kenneth; Lupica, Carl R.; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2013-01-01

    The prelimbic prefrontal cortex (PL) is a brain region integral to complex behaviors that are highly influenced by cannabinoids and by dopamine D2 receptor (D2R)-mediated regulation of fast-firing parvalbumin-containing interneurons. We have recently shown that constitutive deletion of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) greatly reduces parvalbumin levels in these neurons. The effects of CB1R deletion on PL parvalbumin interneurons may be ascribed to loss of CB1R-mediated retrograde signaling on mesocortical dopamine transmission, and, in turn, altered expression and/or subcellular distribution of the D2R in the PL. Furthermore, diminished parvalbumin expression could indicate metabolic changes in fast-firing interneurons that may be reflected in changes in mitochondrial density in this population. We therefore comparatively examined electron microscopic dual labeling of the D2R and parvalbumin in CB1 (−/−) and CB1 (+/+) mice to test the hypothesis that absence of the CB1R produces changes in D2R localization and mitochondrial distribution in parvalbumin-containing interneurons of the PL. CB1 (−/−) mice had a significantly lower density of cytoplasmic D2R-immunogold particles in medium parvalbumin-labeled dendrites and a concomitant increase in the density of these particles in small dendrites. These dendrites received both excitatory and inhibitory-type synapses from unlabeled terminals and contained many mitochondria, whose numbers were significantly reduced in the CB1 (−/−) mice. Non-parvalbumin containing dendrites showed no between-group differences in either D2R distribution or mitochondrial number. These results suggest that cannabinoid signaling provides an important determinant of dendritic D2 receptor distribution and mitochondrial availability in fast-spiking interneurons. PMID:22592925

  6. Altered regional brain volumes in elderly carriers of a risk variant for drug abuse in the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2).

    PubMed

    Roussotte, Florence F; Jahanshad, Neda; Hibar, Derrek P; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Dopamine D2 receptors mediate the rewarding effects of many drugs of abuse. In humans, several polymorphisms in DRD2, the gene encoding these receptors, increase our genetic risk for developing addictive disorders. Here, we examined one of the most frequently studied candidate variant for addiction in DRD2 for association with brain structure. We tested whether this variant showed associations with regional brain volumes across two independent elderly cohorts, totaling 1,032 subjects. We first examined a large sample of 738 elderly participants with neuroimaging and genetic data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI1). We hypothesized that this addiction-related polymorphism would be associated with structural brain differences in regions previously implicated in familial vulnerability for drug dependence. Then, we assessed the generalizability of our findings by testing this polymorphism in a non-overlapping replication sample of 294 elderly subjects from a continuation of the first ADNI project (ADNI2) to minimize the risk of reporting false positive results. In both cohorts, the minor allele-previously linked with increased risk for addiction-was associated with larger volumes in various brain regions implicated in reward processing. These findings suggest that neuroanatomical phenotypes associated with familial vulnerability for drug dependence may be partially mediated by DRD2 genotype.

  7. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J.; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G. F.; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L.; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K.; Gill, Andrew C.; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  8. Altered levels of synapsin I, dopamine transporter, dynorphin A, and neuropeptide Y in the nucleus accumbens and striatum at post-puberty in rats treated neonatally with pregnenolone or DHEA.

    PubMed

    Muneoka, Katsumasa; Iwata, Masaaki; Shirayama, Yukihiko

    2009-10-01

    It is well documented that neonatal neurosteroid administration influences brain development. In our previous studies, administration of pregnenolone, the precursor of neurosteroids, during the neonatal period altered the activity of dopamine (DA) in the striatum. Furthermore, neonatal treatment with pregnenolone or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) increased synapse-related protein synapsin I as well as neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hippocampus. The present study examined the effects of neonatal treatment with pregnenolone or DHEA on synapsin I, DA transporter (DAT), dynorphin A, and NPY in the striatum and the core and shell of the nucleus accumbens at post-puberty. Administration of pregnenolone or DHEA during the neonatal period increased immunodensity of synapsin I in the dorsomedial or ventrolateral striatum. DAT immunodensity in the striatum and the nucleus accumbens core as well as dynorphin A immunodensity in the nucleus accumbens core were increased in DHEA-treated but not in pregnenolone-treated rats. In addition, the size, but not numbers, of NPY-positive cells in the nucleus accumbens core was increased in pregnenolone- and DHEA-treated rats. The results suggest that neurosteroid levels during the neonatal period have larger impact on synaptic formation, development of DA and NPY systems in the nigrostriatal rather than the mesolimbic pathway.

  9. Alterations in binding site density of dopamine transporter in the striatum, orbitofrontal cortex, and amygdala in early Parkinson's disease: compartment analysis for beta-CFT binding with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Y; Yoshikawa, E; Okada, H; Futatsubashi, M; Sekine, Y; Iyo, M; Sakamoto, M

    1999-05-01

    We investigated changes in the kinetics in the binding of the dopamine transporter probe 2-beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-[11C]fluorophenyl)tropane (beta-CFT) in living brain by compartmental analysis, using positron emission tomography in unmedicated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (Hoehn and Yahr stages I-II). With dynamic positron emission tomographic data from 90-minute acquisitions and metabolite-corrected arterial input functions, binding potentials (k3/k4) were calculated by using estimated rate constants (K1 - k4). In this analysis, the magnitude of the distribution volume (K1/k2) measured in the cerebellum, in which specific binding is negligible, was used as a constrained value for fitting in binding regions. Statistics showed that k3/k4 values in the striatum, the orbitofrontal cortex, and the amygdala were significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls, whereas there were no differences in K1/k2 ratios and structural volumes between the groups. Correlation analysis showed that the putaminal and orbitofrontal binding levels were correlated positively with motor and mentation scores, respectively, of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. These results indicated that not only the striatal but also the orbitofrontal and amygdalar presynaptic dopaminergic functions were altered in early PD. The reductions in these mesocortical/mesolimbic functions might contribute to the mental and behavioral impairment observed in PD.

  10. Redox reactivity of cerium oxide nanoparticles against dopamine.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Daniel; Bulbul, Gonca; Andreescu, Silvana

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between dopamine and the redox active cerium oxide nanoparticles, or nanoceria was studied using a suite of spectroscopic and surface characterization methods. Changes in the chemical reactivity and concentration of dopamine upon exposure to nanoceria was assessed in aqueous solutions and a human physiological fluid--human serum. The results indicate strong attachment of dopamine to the nanoparticle surface through oxidation followed by chemisorption of the oxidative product with formation of a charge transfer complex. Such oxidation/surface adsorption processes between nanoceria and dopamine lead to a reduction of the concentration of free dopamine in aqueous environments. These findings suggest that the redox reactivity of nanoceria may alter dopamine levels in biological systems exposed to these particles and indicate the need for a comprehensive assessment of the potential neurological consequences that might result from intended or unintended exposure to these particles. PMID:24461841

  11. Heterogeneity of dopamine neuron activity across traits and states

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, Michela; McCutcheon, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons fire irregularly, with interspersed clusters of high-frequency spikes, commonly called ‘bursts’. In this review we examine such heterogeneity in activity, and provide insight into how it can participate in psychiatric conditions such as drug addiction. We first describe several techniques used to evaluate dopamine neuron activity, and comment on the different measures that each provides. We next describe the activity of dopamine neurons in ‘basal’ conditions. Specifically, we discuss how the use of anesthesia and reduced preparations may alter aspects of dopamine cell activity, and how there is heterogeneity across species and regions. We also describe how dopamine cell firing changes throughout the peri-adolescent period and how dopamine neuron activity differs across the population. In the final section, we discuss how dopamine neuron activity changes in response to life events. First, we focus attention on drugs of abuse. Drugs themselves change firing activity through a variety of mechanisms, with effects on firing while drug is present differing from those seen after drug discontinuation. We then review how stimuli that are rewarding, aversive, or salient can evoke changes in firing rate and discharge pattern of dopamine neurons, and provide behavioral relevance of dopamine signaling. Finally, we discuss how stress can modulate dopamine neuron firing and how this may contribute to the role that stressful experiences play in psychiatric disorders such as addiction and depression. PMID:25084048

  12. Dopamine Receptors and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Coronel, Israel; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one of the major neurotransmitters and participates in a number of functions such as motor coordination, emotions, memory, reward mechanism, neuroendocrine regulation etc. DA exerts its effects through five DA receptors that are subdivided in 2 families: D1-like DA receptors (D1 and D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3 and D4). All DA receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in not only in physiological conditions but also pathological scenarios. Abnormalities in the DAergic system and its receptors in the basal ganglia structures are the basis Parkinson’s disease (PD), however DA also participates in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Under pathological conditions reorganization of DAergic system has been observed and most of the times, those changes occur as a mechanism of compensation, but in some cases contributes to worsening the alterations. Here we review the changes that occur on DA transmission and DA receptors (DARs) at both levels expression and signals transduction pathways as a result of neurotoxicity, inflammation and in neurodegenerative processes. The better understanding of the role of DA receptors in neuropathological conditions is crucial for development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat alterations related to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26425390

  13. Altered serotonin and dopamine transporter availabilities in brain of depressed patients upon treatment with escitalopram: A [123 I]β-CIT SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Rominger, A; Cumming, P; Brendel, M; Xiong, G; Zach, C; Karch, S; Tatsch, K; Bartenstein, P; la Fougère, C; Koch, W; Pogarell, O

    2015-06-01

    Altered SERT and DAT availabilities during treatment with escitalopram were investigated with [(123)I]2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (β-CIT) SPECT in a series of patients fulfilling the criteria for unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD). 27 patients (10m, 42±16y) with diagnosis of MDD were recruited for the study. All patients underwent neuropsychiatric testing for assessment of Hamilton Depression (HAM-D) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores. At baseline, [(123)I]β-CIT SPECT recordings were acquired 4h (SERT-weighted) and 20-24h p.i (DAT-weighted). Follow-up scans and neuropsychiatric testing were performed after six weeks of stable escitalopram medication. Voxel-wise parametric maps of specific/ non-specific ratios-1 (~BPND) were calculated. At baseline, DAT-weighted BPND was 5.06±0.81 in striatum and SERT-weighted BPND was 0.94±0.18 in thalamus. There were significant negative correlations with age for DAT in striatum (R=-0.60; p<0.01) and SERT in thalamus (R=-0.45; p<0.05). Under SSRI treatment there was an apparent 42% occupancy of SERT in thalamus (p<0.0001), whereas DAT availability increased significantly by 20% in striatum (p<0.001); higher apparent SERT occupancy in thalamus was associated with lesser DAT increase in striatum (R=-0.62; p<0.005). The low apparent SERT occupancy may be confounded by alterations in SERT expression during treatment. Thus, [(123)I]β-CIT SPECT revealed age-dependent declines in DAT and SERT availabilities in un-medicated MDD patients, comparable to that seen previously in healthy controls. At follow-up, the SSRI-evoked increase in DAT was less pronounced in the older patients, even though apparent SERT occupancy and clinical improvement were not age-dependent. Present findings may have implications for escitalopram dosage and side effect profile in younger MDD patients. PMID:25819144

  14. Dopamine, depression and antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Eric; Chenu, Franck; Renard, Caroline E; Bourin, Michel

    2004-12-01

    Abstract The relationship between depression and dopamine deficiency in the mesolimbic pathway has been hypothesized for many years. The experimental studies with animal models of depression and the human studies implicate the role of the dopamine system in depression. Not only do dopaminergic receptor agonists, but also antagonists such as olanzapine exhibit antidepressant effects associated with standard antidepressants in patients with treatment-resistant depression. This paradoxical result suggests that further investigations are necessary to understand the role played by dopamine in depression.

  15. Decoding dopamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Bibb, James A

    2005-07-29

    Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter that is important for many physiological functions including motor control, mood, and the reward pathway. In this issue of Cell, the laboratories of Marc Caron and Li-Huei Tsai identify two very different molecules--beta-arrestin 2 and Par-4, respectively--that unexpectedly are involved in dopamine signaling via the D2 receptor. These two new signaling pathways mediate the actions of dopamine on behavior and facilitate crosstalk between different signaling pathways that are activated by binding of dopamine to the D2 receptor.

  16. Basal ganglia circuit loops, dopamine and motivation: A review and enquiry.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Satoshi; Yang, Chen; Tan, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    Dopamine neurons located in the midbrain play a role in motivation that regulates approach behavior (approach motivation). In addition, activation and inactivation of dopamine neurons regulate mood and induce reward and aversion, respectively. Accumulating evidence suggests that such motivational role of dopamine neurons is not limited to those located in the ventral tegmental area, but also in the substantia nigra. The present paper reviews previous rodent work concerning dopamine's role in approach motivation and the connectivity of dopamine neurons, and proposes two working models: One concerns the relationship between extracellular dopamine concentration and approach motivation. High, moderate and low concentrations of extracellular dopamine induce euphoric, seeking and aversive states, respectively. The other concerns circuit loops involving the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, epithalamus, and midbrain through which dopaminergic activity alters approach motivation. These models should help to generate hypothesis-driven research and provide insights for understanding altered states associated with drugs of abuse and affective disorders. PMID:25907747

  17. Basal ganglia circuit loops, dopamine and motivation: A review and enquiry.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Satoshi; Yang, Chen; Tan, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    Dopamine neurons located in the midbrain play a role in motivation that regulates approach behavior (approach motivation). In addition, activation and inactivation of dopamine neurons regulate mood and induce reward and aversion, respectively. Accumulating evidence suggests that such motivational role of dopamine neurons is not limited to those located in the ventral tegmental area, but also in the substantia nigra. The present paper reviews previous rodent work concerning dopamine's role in approach motivation and the connectivity of dopamine neurons, and proposes two working models: One concerns the relationship between extracellular dopamine concentration and approach motivation. High, moderate and low concentrations of extracellular dopamine induce euphoric, seeking and aversive states, respectively. The other concerns circuit loops involving the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, epithalamus, and midbrain through which dopaminergic activity alters approach motivation. These models should help to generate hypothesis-driven research and provide insights for understanding altered states associated with drugs of abuse and affective disorders.

  18. How Addictive Drugs Disrupt Presynaptic Dopamine Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle that unites addictive drugs appears to be that each enhances synaptic dopamine by means that dissociate it from normal behavioral control, so that they act to reinforce their own acquisition. This occurs via the modulation of synaptic mechanisms involved in learning, including enhanced excitation or disinhibition of dopamine neuron activity, blockade of dopamine reuptake, and altering the state of the presynaptic terminal to enhance evoked over basal transmission. Amphetamines offer an exception to such modulation in that they combine multiple effects to produce non-exocytic stimulation-independent release of neurotransmitter via reverse transport independent from normal presynaptic function. Questions on the molecular actions of addictive drugs, prominently including the actions of alcohol and solvents, remain unresolved, but their ability to co-opt normal presynaptic functions helps to explain why treatment for addiction has been challenging. PMID:21338876

  19. Intrarenal dopamine inhibits progression of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Yao, Bing; Yang, Shilin; Yang, Haichun; Wang, Suwan; Fan, Xiaofeng; Yin, Huiyong; Fogo, Agnes B; Moeckel, Gilbert W; Harris, Raymond C

    2012-10-01

    The kidney has a local intrarenal dopaminergic system, and in the kidney, dopamine modulates renal hemodynamics, inhibits salt and fluid reabsorption, antagonizes the renin-angiotensin system, and inhibits oxidative stress. The current study examined the effects of alterations in the intrarenal dopaminergic system on kidney structure and function in models of type 1 diabetes. We studied catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT)(-/-) mice, which have increased renal dopamine production due to decreased dopamine metabolism, and renal transplantation was used to determine whether the effects seen with COMT deficiency were kidney-specific. To determine the effects of selective inhibition of intrarenal dopamine production, we used mice with proximal tubule deletion of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (ptAADC(-/-)). Compared with wild-type diabetic mice, COMT(-/-) mice had decreased hyperfiltration, decreased macula densa cyclooxygenase-2 expression, decreased albuminuria, decreased glomerulopathy, and inhibition of expression of markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. These differences were also seen in diabetic mice with a transplanted kidney from COMT(-/-) mice. In contrast, diabetic ptAADC(-/-) mice had increased nephropathy. Our study demonstrates an important role of the intrarenal dopaminergic system to modulate the development and progression of diabetic kidney injury and indicate that the decreased renal dopamine production may have important consequences in the underlying pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22688335

  20. Mesolimbic dopamine and its neuromodulators in obesity and binge eating.

    PubMed

    Naef, Lindsay; Pitman, Kimberley A; Borgland, Stephanie L

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic prevalence, and much research has focused on homeostatic and nonhomeostatic mechanisms underlying overconsumption of food. Mesocorticolimbic circuitry, including dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), is a key substrate for nonhomeostatic feeding. The goal of the present review is to compare changes in mesolimbic dopamine function in human obesity with diet-induced obesity in rodents. Additionally, we will review the literature to determine if dopamine signaling is altered with binge eating disorder in humans or binge eating modeled in rodents. Finally, we assess modulation of dopamine neurons by neuropeptides and peripheral peptidergic signals that occur with obesity or binge eating. We find that while decreased dopamine concentration is observed with obesity, there is inconsistency outside the human literature on the relationship between striatal D2 receptor expression and obesity. Finally, few studies have explored how orexigenic or anorexigenic peptides modulate dopamine neuronal activity or striatal dopamine in obese models. However, ghrelin modulation of dopamine neurons may be an important factor for driving binge feeding in rodents.

  1. Dopamine uptake dynamics are preserved under isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodnik, Zachary D; España, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-01

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is commonly used for measuring the kinetics of dopamine release and uptake. For experiments using an anesthetized preparation, urethane is preferentially used because it does not alter dopamine uptake kinetics compared to freely moving animals. Unfortunately, urethane is highly toxic, can induce premature death during experiments, and cannot be used for recovery surgeries. Isoflurane is an alternative anesthetic that is less toxic than urethane, produces a stable level of anesthesia over extended periods, and is often used for recovery surgeries. Despite these benefits, the effects of isoflurane on dopamine release and uptake have not been directly characterized. In the present studies, we assessed the utility of isoflurane for voltammetry experiments by testing dopamine signaling parameters under baseline conditions, after treatment with the dopamine uptake inhibitor cocaine, and after exposure to increasing concentrations of isoflurane. Our results indicate that surgical levels of isoflurane do not significantly alter terminal mechanisms of dopamine release and uptake over prolonged periods of time. Consequently, we propose that isoflurane is an acceptable anesthetic for voltammetry experiments, which in turn permits the design of studies in which dopamine signaling is examined under anesthesia prior to recovery and subsequent experimentation in the same animals. PMID:26321152

  2. The neurotropic parasite Toxoplasma gondii increases dopamine metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The common parasite Toxoplasma gondii induces behavioral alterations in its hosts including phenotypes increasing the likelihood of its transmission in rodents and reports of psychobehavioral alterations in humans. We have found that elevated levels of dopamine are associated with the encysted stage...

  3. Dopamine triggers heterosynaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masago; Otaka, Mami; Huang, Yanhua H; Neumann, Peter A; Winters, Bradley D; Grace, Anthony A; Schlüter, Oliver M; Dong, Yan

    2013-04-17

    As a classic neuromodulator, dopamine has long been thought to modulate, rather than trigger, synaptic plasticity. In contrast, our present results demonstrate that within the parallel projections of dopaminergic and GABAergic terminals from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens core (NAcCo), action-potential-activated release of dopamine heterosynaptically triggers LTD at GABAergic synapses, which is likely mediated by activating presynaptically located dopamine D1 class receptors and expressed by inhibiting presynaptic release of GABA. Moreover, this dopamine-mediated heterosynaptic LTD is abolished after withdrawal from cocaine exposure. These results suggest that action-potential-dependent dopamine release triggers very different cellular consequences from those induced by volume release or pharmacological manipulation. Activation of the ventral tegmental area to NAcCo projections is essential for emotional and motivational responses. This dopamine-mediated LTD allows a flexible output of NAcCo neurons, whereas disruption of this LTD may contribute to the rigid emotional and motivational state observed in addicts during cocaine withdrawal.

  4. Basal ganglia circuit loops, dopamine and motivation: A review and enquiry

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Satoshi; Yang, Chen; Tan, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine neurons located in the midbrain play a role in motivation that regulates approach behavior (approach motivation). In addition, activation and inactivation of dopamine neurons regulate mood and induce reward and aversion, respectively. Accumulating evidence suggests that such motivational role of dopamine neurons is not limited to those located in the ventral tegmental area, but also in the substantia nigra. The present paper reviews previous rodent work concerning dopamine’s role in approach motivation and the connectivity of dopamine neurons, and proposes two working models: One concerns the relationship between extracellular dopamine concentration and approach motivation. High, moderate and low concentrations of extracellular dopamine induce euphoric, seeking and aversive states, respectively. The other concerns circuit loops involving the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, epithalamus, and midbrain through which dopaminergic activity alters approach motivation. These models should help to generate hypothesis-driven research and provide insights for understanding altered states associated with drugs of abuse and affective disorders. PMID:25907747

  5. Reduced Presynaptic Dopamine Activity in Adolescent Dorsal Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Marguerite; Bondi, Corina; Torres, Gonzalo; Moghaddam, Bita

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence coincides with symptomatic onset of several psychiatric illnesses including schizophrenia and addiction. Excess limbic dopamine activity has been implicated in these vulnerabilities. We combined molecular and dynamic indices of dopamine neurotransmission to assess dopamine function in adolescent rats in two functionally distinct striatal subregions: nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum (DS). In adolescents, we find an overall reduction in dopamine availability selective to the DS. Dopamine release in the DS, but not in the NAc, was less responsive to amphetamine in adolescents compared to adults. The dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, nomifensine, similarly inhibited basal and amphetamine-induced dopamine release in either regions of both the age groups, suggesting that the reduced effectiveness of amphetamine is not due to differences in DAT function. Furthermore, DAT and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 expressions were similar in the DS and NAc of adolescent rats. In contrast, expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was reduced in the DS, but not in the NAc, of adolescents compared to adults. Behaviorally, adolescents were less sensitive to amphetamine but more sensitive to a TH inhibitor. These data indicate that, in contrast to the general notion that dopamine is hyperactive in adolescents, there is diminished presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescents that is selective to the DS and may result from attenuated TH activity. Given recent reports of altered dopamine activity in associative/dorsal striatum of individuals at a clinically high risk of psychosis, our data further support the idea that dorsal, as opposed to ventral, regions of the striatum are a locus of vulnerability for psychosis. PMID:23358239

  6. Reduced presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescent dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Marguerite; Bondi, Corina; Torres, Gonzalo; Moghaddam, Bita

    2013-06-01

    Adolescence coincides with symptomatic onset of several psychiatric illnesses including schizophrenia and addiction. Excess limbic dopamine activity has been implicated in these vulnerabilities. We combined molecular and dynamic indices of dopamine neurotransmission to assess dopamine function in adolescent rats in two functionally distinct striatal subregions: nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum (DS). In adolescents, we find an overall reduction in dopamine availability selective to the DS. Dopamine release in the DS, but not in the NAc, was less responsive to amphetamine in adolescents compared to adults. The dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, nomifensine, similarly inhibited basal and amphetamine-induced dopamine release in either regions of both the age groups, suggesting that the reduced effectiveness of amphetamine is not due to differences in DAT function. Furthermore, DAT and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 expressions were similar in the DS and NAc of adolescent rats. In contrast, expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was reduced in the DS, but not in the NAc, of adolescents compared to adults. Behaviorally, adolescents were less sensitive to amphetamine but more sensitive to a TH inhibitor. These data indicate that, in contrast to the general notion that dopamine is hyperactive in adolescents, there is diminished presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescents that is selective to the DS and may result from attenuated TH activity. Given recent reports of altered dopamine activity in associative/dorsal striatum of individuals at a clinically high risk of psychosis, our data further support the idea that dorsal, as opposed to ventral, regions of the striatum are a locus of vulnerability for psychosis.

  7. Ih Current Is Necessary to Maintain Normal Dopamine Fluctuations and Sleep Consolidation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo-Gomez, Alicia; Turiegano, Enrique; León, Yolanda; Molina, Isabel; Torroja, Laura; Canal, Inmaculada

    2012-01-01

    HCN channels are becoming pharmacological targets mainly in cardiac diseases. But apart from their well-known role in heart pacemaking, these channels are widely expressed in the nervous system where they contribute to the neuron firing pattern. Consequently, abolishing Ih current might have detrimental consequences in a big repertoire of behavioral traits. Several studies in mammals have identified the Ih current as an important determinant of the firing activity of dopaminergic neurons, and recent evidences link alterations in this current to various dopamine-related disorders. We used the model organism Drosophila melanogaster to investigate how lack of Ih current affects dopamine levels and the behavioral consequences in the sleep∶activity pattern. Unlike mammals, in Drosophila there is only one gene encoding HCN channels. We generated a deficiency of the DmIh core gene region and measured, by HPLC, levels of dopamine. Our data demonstrate daily variations of dopamine in wild-type fly heads. Lack of Ih current dramatically alters dopamine pattern, but different mechanisms seem to operate during light and dark conditions. Behaviorally, DmIh mutant flies display alterations in the rest∶activity pattern, and altered circadian rhythms. Our data strongly suggest that Ih current is necessary to prevent dopamine overproduction at dark, while light input allows cycling of dopamine in an Ih current dependent manner. Moreover, lack of Ih current results in behavioral defects that are consistent with altered dopamine levels. PMID:22574167

  8. Acute fasting increases somatodendritic dopamine release in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Roseberry, Aaron G

    2015-08-01

    Fasting and food restriction alter the activity of the mesolimbic dopamine system to affect multiple reward-related behaviors. Food restriction decreases baseline dopamine levels in efferent target sites and enhances dopamine release in response to rewards such as food and drugs. In addition to releasing dopamine from axon terminals, dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) also release dopamine from their soma and dendrites, and this somatodendritic dopamine release acts as an autoinhibitory signal to inhibit neighboring VTA dopamine neurons. It is unknown whether acute fasting also affects dopamine release, including the local inhibitory somatodendritic dopamine release in the VTA. In these studies, I have tested whether fasting affects the inhibitory somatodendritic dopamine release within the VTA by examining whether an acute 24-h fast affects the inhibitory postsynaptic current mediated by evoked somatodendritic dopamine release (D2R IPSC). Fasting increased the contribution of the first action potential to the overall D2R IPSC and increased the ratio of repeated D2R IPSCs evoked at short intervals. Fasting also reduced the effect of forskolin on the D2R IPSC and led to a significantly bigger decrease in the D2R IPSC in low extracellular calcium. Finally, fasting resulted in an increase in the D2R IPSCs when a more physiologically relevant train of D2R IPSCs was used. Taken together, these results indicate that fasting caused a change in the properties of somatodendritic dopamine release, possibly by increasing dopamine release, and that this increased release can be sustained under conditions where dopamine neurons are highly active.

  9. Dopamine transporters are involved in the onset of hypoxia-induced dopamine efflux in striatum as revealed by in vivo microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Orset, Cyrille; Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Cottet-Emard, Jean-Marie; Bérod, Anne; Pequignot, Jean-Marc; Denoroy, Luc

    2005-06-01

    Although many studies have revealed alterations in neurotransmission during ischaemia, few works have been devoted to the neurochemical effects of mild hypoxia, a situation encountered during life in altitude or in several pathologies. In that context, the present work was undertaken to determine the in vivo mechanisms underlying the striatal dopamine efflux induced by mild hypoxaemic hypoxia. For that purpose, the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid were simultaneously measured using brain microdialysis during acute hypoxic exposure (10% O(2), 1h) in awake rats. Hypoxia induced a +80% increase in dopamine. Application of the dopamine transporters inhibitor, nomifensine (10 microM), just before the hypoxia prevented the rise in dopamine during the early part of hypoxia; in contrast the application of nomifensine after the beginning of hypoxia, failed to alter the increase in dopamine. Application of the voltage-dependent Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin abolished the increase in dopamine, whether administered just before or after the beginning of hypoxia. These data show that the neurochemical mechanisms of the dopamine efflux may change over the course of the hypoxic exposure, dopamine transporters being involved only at the beginning of hypoxia.

  10. Nicotinic receptors regulate the dynamic range of dopamine release in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koranda, Jessica L; Cone, Jackson J; McGehee, Daniel S; Roitman, Mitchell F; Beeler, Jeff A; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed presynaptically on dopamine axon terminals, and their activation by endogenous acetylcholine from striatal cholinergic interneurons enhances dopamine release both independently of and in concert with dopamine neuron activity. Acute nAChR inactivation is believed to enhance the contrast between low- and high-frequency dopamine cell activity. Although these studies reveal a key role for acute activation and inactivation of nAChRs in striatal microcircuitry, it remains unknown if chronic inactivation/desensitization of nAChRs can alter dopamine release dynamics. Using in vivo cyclic voltammetry in anaesthetized mice, we examined whether chronic inactivation of nAChRs modulates dopamine release across a parametric range of stimulation, varying both frequency and pulse number. Deletion of β2*nAChRs and chronic nicotine exposure greatly diminished dopamine release across the entire range of stimulation parameters. In addition, we observed a facilitation of dopamine release at low frequency and pulse number in wild-type mice that is absent in the β2* knockout and chronic nicotine mice. These data suggest that deletion or chronic desensitization of nAChRs reduces the dynamic range of dopamine release in response to dopamine cell activity, decreasing rather than increasing contrast between high and low dopamine activity.

  11. The role of dopamine in schizophrenia from a neurobiological and evolutionary perspective: old fashioned, but still in vogue.

    PubMed

    Brisch, Ralf; Saniotis, Arthur; Wolf, Rainer; Bielau, Hendrik; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard; Braun, Katharina; Braun, Anna Katharina; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Kumaratilake, Jaliya; Kumaritlake, Jaliya; Henneberg, Maciej; Gos, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. The revised dopamine hypothesis states that dopamine abnormalities in the mesolimbic and prefrontal brain regions exist in schizophrenia. However, recent research has indicated that glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine, and serotonin alterations are also involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. This review provides an in-depth analysis of dopamine in animal models of schizophrenia and also focuses on dopamine and cognition. Furthermore, this review provides not only an overview of dopamine receptors and the antipsychotic effects of treatments targeting them but also an outline of dopamine and its interaction with other neurochemical models of schizophrenia. The roles of dopamine in the evolution of the human brain and human mental abilities, which are affected in schizophrenia patients, are also discussed.

  12. The Role of Dopamine in Schizophrenia from a Neurobiological and Evolutionary Perspective: Old Fashioned, but Still in Vogue

    PubMed Central

    Brisch, Ralf; Saniotis, Arthur; Wolf, Rainer; Bielau, Hendrik; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard; Braun, Katharina; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Kumaratilake, Jaliya; Henneberg, Maciej; Gos, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. The revised dopamine hypothesis states that dopamine abnormalities in the mesolimbic and prefrontal brain regions exist in schizophrenia. However, recent research has indicated that glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine, and serotonin alterations are also involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. This review provides an in-depth analysis of dopamine in animal models of schizophrenia and also focuses on dopamine and cognition. Furthermore, this review provides not only an overview of dopamine receptors and the antipsychotic effects of treatments targeting them but also an outline of dopamine and its interaction with other neurochemical models of schizophrenia. The roles of dopamine in the evolution of the human brain and human mental abilities, which are affected in schizophrenia patients, are also discussed. PMID:24904434

  13. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  14. Amphetamine paradoxically augments exocytotic dopamine release and phasic dopamine signals.

    PubMed

    Daberkow, D P; Brown, H D; Bunner, K D; Kraniotis, S A; Doellman, M A; Ragozzino, M E; Garris, P A; Roitman, M F

    2013-01-01

    Drugs of abuse hijack brain-reward circuitry during the addiction process by augmenting action potential-dependent phasic dopamine release events associated with learning and goal-directed behavior. One prominent exception to this notion would appear to be amphetamine (AMPH) and related analogs, which are proposed instead to disrupt normal patterns of dopamine neurotransmission by depleting vesicular stores and promoting nonexocytotic dopamine efflux via reverse transport. This mechanism of AMPH action, though, is inconsistent with its therapeutic effects and addictive properties, which are thought to be reliant on phasic dopamine signaling. Here we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in freely moving rats to interrogate principal neurochemical responses to AMPH in the striatum and relate these changes to behavior. First, we showed that AMPH dose-dependently enhanced evoked dopamine responses to phasic-like current pulse trains for up to 2 h. Modeling the data revealed that AMPH inhibited dopamine uptake but also unexpectedly potentiated vesicular dopamine release. Second, we found that AMPH increased the amplitude, duration, and frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients, the naturally occurring, nonelectrically evoked, phasic increases in extracellular dopamine. Finally, using an operant sugar reward paradigm, we showed that low-dose AMPH augmented dopamine transients elicited by sugar-predictive cues. However, operant behavior failed at high-dose AMPH, which was due to phasic dopamine hyperactivity and the decoupling of dopamine transients from the reward predictive cue. These findings identify upregulation of exocytotic dopamine release as a key AMPH action in behaving animals and support a unified mechanism of abused drugs to activate phasic dopamine signaling. PMID:23303926

  15. Compensatory T-type Ca2+ channel activity alters D2-autoreceptor responses of Substantia nigra dopamine neurons from Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channel KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Poetschke, Christina; Dragicevic, Elena; Duda, Johanna; Benkert, Julia; Dougalis, Antonios; DeZio, Roberta; Snutch, Terrance P.; Striessnig, Joerg; Liss, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The preferential degeneration of Substantia nigra dopamine midbrain neurons (SN DA) causes the motor-symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), especially the Cav1.3-subtype, generate an activity-related oscillatory Ca2+ burden in SN DA neurons, contributing to their degeneration and PD. While LTCC-blockers are already in clinical trials as PD-therapy, age-dependent functional roles of Cav1.3 LTCCs in SN DA neurons remain unclear. Thus, we analysed juvenile and adult Cav1.3-deficient mice with electrophysiological and molecular techniques. To unmask compensatory effects, we compared Cav1.3 KO mice with pharmacological LTCC-inhibition. LTCC-function was not necessary for SN DA pacemaker-activity at either age, but rather contributed to their pacemaker-precision. Moreover, juvenile Cav1.3 KO but not WT mice displayed adult wildtype-like, sensitised inhibitory dopamine-D2-autoreceptor (D2-AR) responses that depended upon both, interaction of the neuronal calcium sensor NCS-1 with D2-ARs, and on voltage-gated T-type calcium channel (TTCC) activity. This functional KO-phenotype was accompanied by cell-specific up-regulation of NCS-1 and Cav3.1-TTCC mRNA. Furthermore, in wildtype we identified an age-dependent switch of TTCC-function from contributing to SN DA pacemaker-precision in juveniles to pacemaker-frequency in adults. This novel interplay of Cav1.3 L-type and Cav3.1 T-type channels, and their modulation of SN DA activity-pattern and D2-AR-sensitisation, provide new insights into flexible age- and calcium-dependent activity-control of SN DA neurons and its pharmacological modulation. PMID:26381090

  16. The impact of a parkinsonian lesion on dynamic striatal dopamine transmission depends on nicotinic receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Katie A.; Platt, Nicola J.; Cragg, Stephanie J.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine function is disturbed in Parkinson's disease (PD), but whether and how release of dopamine from surviving neurons is altered has long been debated. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on dopamine axons powerfully govern dopamine release and could be critical contributing factors. We revisited whether fundamental properties of dopamine transmission are changed in a parkinsonian brain and tested the potentially profound masking effects of nAChRs. Using real-time detection of dopamine in mouse striatum after a partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesion and under nAChR inhibition, we reveal that dopamine signals show diminished sensitivity to presynaptic activity. This effect manifested as diminished contrast between DA release evoked by the lowest versus highest frequencies. This reduced activity-dependence was underpinned by loss of short-term facilitation of dopamine release, consistent with an increase in release probability (Pr). With nAChRs active, the reduced activity-dependence of dopamine release after a parkinsonian lesion was masked. Consequently, moment-by-moment variation in activity of nAChRs may lead to dynamic co-variation in dopamine signal impairments in PD. PMID:26117304

  17. Dopamine-prolactin pathway potentially contributes to the schizophrenia and type 2 diabetes comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Gragnoli, C; Reeves, G M; Reazer, J; Postolache, T T

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are clinically associated, and common knowledge attributes this association to side effects of antipsychotic treatment. However, even drug-naive patients with SCZ are at increased risk for T2D. Dopamine dysfunction has a central role in SCZ. It is well-known that dopamine constitutively inhibits prolactin (PRL) secretion via the dopamine receptor 2 (DR2D). If dopamine is increased or if dopamine receptors hyperfunction, PRL may be reduced. During the first SCZ episode, low PRL levels are associated with worse symptoms. PRL is essential in human and social bonding, as well as it is implicated in glucose homeostasis. Dopamine dysfunction, beyond contributing to SCZ symptoms, may lead to altered appetite and T2D. To our knowledge, there are no studies of the genetics of the SCZ-T2D comorbidity focusing jointly on the dopamine and PRL pathway in the attempt to capture molecular heterogeneity correlated to possible disease manifestation heterogeneity. In this dopamine-PRL pathway-focused-hypothesis-driven review on the association of SCZ with T2D, we report a specific revision of what it is known about PRL and dopamine in relation to what we theorize is one of the missing links between the two disorders. We suggest that new studies are necessary to establish the genetic role of PRL and dopamine pathway in SCZ-T2D comorbidity. PMID:27093067

  18. The role of mesolimbic dopamine in the development and maintenance of ethanol reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Rueben A; Job, Martin O; Doyon, William M

    2004-08-01

    The neurobiological processes by which ethanol seeking and consumption are established and maintained are thought to involve areas of the brain that mediate motivated behavior, such as the mesolimbic dopamine system. The mesolimbic dopamine system is comprised of cells that originate in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and project to several forebrain regions, including a prominent terminal area, the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). The NAcc has been subdivided into core and shell subregions. Both areas receive converging excitatory input from the cortex and amygdala and dopamine input from the VTA, with the accumbal medium spiny neuron situated to integrate the signals. Although forced ethanol administration enhances dopamine activity in the NAcc, conclusions regarding the role of mesolimbic dopamine in ethanol reinforcement cannot be made from these experiments. Behavioral experiments consistently show that pharmacological manipulations of the dopamine transmission in the NAcc alter responding for ethanol, although ethanol reinforcement is maintained after lesions of the accumbal dopamine system. Additionally, extracellular dopamine increases in the NAcc during operant self-administration of ethanol, which is consistent with a role of dopamine in ethanol reinforcement. Behavioral studies that distinguish appetitive responding from ethanol consumption show that dopamine is important in ethanol-seeking behavior, whereas neurochemical studies suggest that accumbal dopamine is also important during ethanol consumption before pharmacological effects occur. Cellular studies suggest that ethanol alters synaptic plasticity in the mesolimbic system, possibly through dopaminergic mechanisms, and this may underlie the development of ethanol reinforcement. Thus, anatomical, pharmacological, neurochemical, cellular, and behavioral studies are more clearly defining the role of mesolimbic dopamine in ethanol reinforcement.

  19. Prenatal L-DOPA exposure produces lasting changes in brain dopamine content, cocaine-induced dopamine release and cocaine conditioned place preference

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jia-Qian; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Zhihui; McCarthy, Deirdre; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M.; Tropea, Thomas F.; Kosofsky, Barry E.; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine, its receptors and transporter are present in the brain beginning from early in the embryonic period. Dopamine receptor activation can influence developmental events including neurogenesis, neuronal migration and differentiation raising the possibility that dopamine imbalance in the fetal brain can alter development of the brain and behavior. We examined whether elevated dopamine levels during gestation can produce persisting changes in brain dopamine content and dopamine-mediated behaviors. We administered L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) in drinking water to timed-pregnant CD1 mice from the 11th day of gestation until the day of parturition. The prenatal L-DOPA exposure led to significantly lower cocaine conditioned place preference, a behavioral test of reward, at postnatal day 60 (P60). However, in vivo microdialysis measurements showed significant increases in cocaine-induced dopamine release in the caudate putamen of P26 and P60 mice exposed to L-DOPA prenatally, ruling out attenuated dopamine release in the caudate putamen as a contributor to decreased conditioned place preference. Although dopamine release was induced in the nucleus accumbens of prenatally L-DOPA exposed mice at P60 by cocaine, the dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens was not significantly different between the L-DOPA and control groups. However, basal dopamine release was significantly higher in the prenatally L-DOPA exposed mice at P60 suggesting that the L-DOPA exposed mice may require a higher dose of cocaine for induction of cocaine place preference than the controls. The prenatal L-DOPA exposure did not alter cocaine-induced locomotor response, suggesting dissociation between the effects of prenatal L-DOPA exposure on conditioned place preference and locomotor activity. Tissue concentration of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum and ventral midbrain were significantly affected by the L-DOPA exposure as well as by developmental changes over the P14 to P60

  20. MicroRNA-9 and microRNA-326 regulate human dopamine D2 receptor expression, and the microRNA-mediated expression regulation is altered by a genetic variant.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sandra; Leites, Catherine; He, Deli; Schwartz, Daniel; Moy, Winton; Shi, Jianxin; Duan, Jubao

    2014-05-01

    The human dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Most antipsychotic drugs influence dopaminergic transmission through blocking dopamine receptors, primarily DRD2. We report here the post-transcriptional regulation of DRD2 expression by two brain-expressed microRNAs (miRs), miR-326 and miR-9, in an ex vivo mode, and show the relevance of miR-mediated DRD2 expression regulation in human dopaminergic neurons and in developing human brains. Both miRs targeted the 3'-UTR (untranslated region) of DRD2 in NT2 (neuron-committed teratocarcinoma, which endogenously expresses DRD2) and CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cell lines, decreasing luciferase activity measured by a luciferase reporter gene assay. miR-326 overexpression reduced DRD2 mRNA and DRD2 receptor synthesis. Both antisense miR-326 and antisense miR-9 increased DRD2 protein abundance, suggesting an endogenous repression of DRD2 expression by both miRs. Furthermore, a genetic variant (rs1130354) within the DRD2 3'-UTR miR-targeting site interferes with miR-326-mediated repression of DRD2 expression. Finally, co-expression analysis identified an inverse correlation of DRD2 expression with both miR-326 and miR-9 in differentiating dopaminergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and in developing human brain regions implicated in schizophrenia. Our study provides empirical evidence suggesting that miR-326 and miR-9 may regulate dopaminergic signaling, and miR-326 and miR-9 may be considered as potential drug targets for the treatment of disorders involving abnormal DRD2 function, such as schizophrenia.

  1. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor binding following dopamine depletion in subjects at Ultra High Risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bloemen, Oswald J N; de Koning, Mariken B; Gleich, Tobias; Meijer, Julia; de Haan, Lieuwe; Linszen, Don H; Booij, Jan; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse A M J

    2013-02-01

    Altered striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission is thought to be fundamental to schizophrenia. Increased presynaptic dopaminergic activity ([18F]-DOPA PET) may predate the onset of psychotic symptoms and correlates to clinical symptoms in subjects at Ultra High Risk (UHR) for developing psychosis. Postsynaptic dopaminergic neurotransmission has not been investigated yet in UHR patients. We hypothesized that synaptic dopamine concentration would be increased in UHR patients, and that synaptic dopamine concentration would be related to symptom severity. 14 UHR patients and 15 age and IQ matched controls completed an [123I]-IBZM SPECT scan at baseline and again after dopamine depletion with alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT). We measured changes in radiotracer binding potential, compared these between UHR patients and controls, and correlated these to symptom severity. The UHR group as a whole did not differ significantly from controls. AMPT significantly reduced symptom severity in the UHR group (p=0.014). Higher synaptic dopamine concentration predicted larger reduction of positive symptoms following depletion in the UHR group (p=0.01). In UHR patients, positive symptoms responded to dopamine depletion, comparable to observations in schizophrenia, suggesting a similar mechanism. Higher synaptic dopamine concentration was associated with more severe positive symptoms and a greater reduction of these symptoms following depletion.

  2. Kappa-Opioid Receptor Signaling in the Striatum as a Potential Modulator of Dopamine Transmission in Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Trifilieff, Pierre; Martinez, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is accompanied by a decrease in striatal dopamine signaling, measured as a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor binding as well as blunted dopamine release in the striatum. These alterations in dopamine transmission have clinical relevance, and have been shown to correlate with cocaine-seeking behavior and response to treatment for cocaine dependence. However, the mechanisms contributing to the hypodopaminergic state in cocaine addiction remain unknown. Here we review the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies showing alterations in D2 receptor binding potential and dopamine transmission in cocaine abusers and their significance in cocaine-seeking behavior. Based on animal and human studies, we propose that the kappa receptor/dynorphin system, because of its impact on dopamine transmission and upregulation following cocaine exposure, could contribute to the hypodopaminergic state reported in cocaine addiction, and could thus be a relevant target for treatment development. PMID:23760592

  3. Updating dopamine reward signals.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2013-04-01

    Recent work has advanced our knowledge of phasic dopamine reward prediction error signals. The error signal is bidirectional, reflects well the higher order prediction error described by temporal difference learning models, is compatible with model-free and model-based reinforcement learning, reports the subjective rather than physical reward value during temporal discounting and reflects subjective stimulus perception rather than physical stimulus aspects. Dopamine activations are primarily driven by reward, and to some extent risk, whereas punishment and salience have only limited activating effects when appropriate controls are respected. The signal is homogeneous in terms of time course but heterogeneous in many other aspects. It is essential for synaptic plasticity and a range of behavioural learning situations.

  4. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  5. DOPAMINE AND FOOD ADDICTION: LEXICON BADLY NEEDED

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Mercè

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, the concept of food addiction has become a common feature in the scientific literature, as well as the popular press. Nevertheless, the use of the term “addiction” to describe pathological aspects of food intake in humans remains controversial, and even among those who affirm the validity of the concept, there is considerable disagreement about its utility for explaining the increasing prevalence of obesity throughout much of the world. An examination of the literature on food addiction indicates that mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine systems often are cited as mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of food addiction. However, in reviewing this literature, it is important to have a detailed consideration of the complex nature of dopaminergic involvement in motivational processes. For example, although it is often stated that mesolimbic dopamine mediates “reward”, there is no standard or consistent technical meaning of this term. Moreover, there is a persistent tendency to link dopamine transmission with pleasure or hedonia, as opposed to other aspects of motivation or learning. The present paper provides a critical discussion of some aspects of the food addiction literature, viewed through the lens of recent findings and current theoretical views of dopaminergic involvement in food motivation. Furthermore, compulsive food intake and binge eating will be considered from an evolutionary perspective, in terms of the motivational subsystems that are involved in adaptive patterns of food consumption and seeking behaviors, and a consideration of how these could be altered in pathological conditions. PMID:23177385

  6. Reduced Insulin Sensitivity Is Related to Less Endogenous Dopamine at D2/3 Receptors in the Ventral Striatum of Healthy Nonobese Humans

    PubMed Central

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Borlido, Carol; Hahn, Margaret; Feng, Zhe; Fervaha, Gagan; Gerretsen, Philip; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Wilson, Alan; Remington, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Background: Food addiction is a debated topic in neuroscience. Evidence suggests diabetes is related to reduced basal dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens, similar to persons with drug addiction. It is unknown whether insulin sensitivity is related to endogenous dopamine levels in the ventral striatum of humans. We examined this using the agonist dopamine D2/3 receptor radiotracer [11C]-(+)-PHNO and an acute dopamine depletion challenge. In a separate sample of healthy persons, we examined whether dopamine depletion could alter insulin sensitivity. Methods: Insulin sensitivity was estimated for each subject from fasting plasma glucose and insulin using the Homeostasis Model Assessment II. Eleven healthy nonobese and nondiabetic persons (3 female) provided a baseline [11C]-(+)-PHNO scan, 9 of which provided a scan under dopamine depletion, allowing estimates of endogenous dopamine at dopamine D2/3 receptor. Dopamine depletion was achieved via alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (64mg/kg, P.O.). In 25 healthy persons (9 female), fasting plasma and glucose was acquired before and after dopamine depletion. Results: Endogenous dopamine at ventral striatum dopamine D2/3 receptor was positively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r(7)=.84, P=.005) and negatively correlated with insulin levels (r(7)=-.85, P=.004). Glucose levels were not correlated with endogenous dopamine at ventral striatum dopamine D2/3 receptor (r(7)=-.49, P=.18). Consistently, acute dopamine depletion in healthy persons significantly decreased insulin sensitivity (t(24)=2.82, P=.01), increased insulin levels (t(24)=-2.62, P=.01), and did not change glucose levels (t(24)=-0.93, P=.36). Conclusion: In healthy individuals, diminished insulin sensitivity is related to less endogenous dopamine at dopamine D2/3 receptor in the ventral striatum. Moreover, acute dopamine depletion reduces insulin sensitivity. These findings may have important implications for neuropsychiatric populations with metabolic

  7. Dopamine modulates the kinetics of ion channels gated by excitatory amino acids in retinal horizontal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, A G; Schmidt, K F; Dowling, J E

    1990-01-01

    Upon exposure to dopamine, cultured teleost retinal horizontal cells become more responsive to the putative photoreceptor neurotransmitter L-glutamate and to its analog kainate. We have recorded unitary and whole-cell currents to determine the mechanism by which dopamine enhances ion channels activated by these agents. In single-channel recordings from cell-attached patches with agonist in the patch pipette, the frequency of 5- to 10-pS unitary events, but not their amplitude, increased by as much as 150% after application of dopamine to the rest of the cell. The duration of channel openings also increased somewhat, by 20-30%. In whole-cell experiments, agonists with and without dopamine were applied to voltage-clamped horizontal cells by slow superfusion. Analysis of whole-cell current variance as a function of mean current indicated that dopamine increased the probability of channel opening for a give agonist concentration without changing the amount of current passed by an individual channel. For kainate, noise analysis additionally demonstrated that dopamine did not alter the number of functional channels. Dopamine also increased a slow spectral component of whole-cell currents elicited by kainate or glutamate, suggesting a change in the open-time kinetics of the channels. This effect was more pronounced for currents induced by glutamate than for those induced by kainate. We conclude that dopamine potentiates the activity of horizontal cell glutamate receptors by altering the kinetics of the ion channel to favor the open state. PMID:1689053

  8. Regional Variation in Phasic Dopamine Release during Alcohol and Sucrose Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While dopamine input to the dorsal striatum is well-known to be critical for action selection, including alcohol-motivated behaviors, it is unknown whether changes in phasic dopamine accompany these behaviors. Long-term alcohol abuse is believed to promote alterations in the neurocircuitry of reward learning in both ventral and dorsal striatum, potentially through increasing dopamine release. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, we measured phasic dopamine release in the dorsal and ventral striatum during alcoholic and nonalcoholic reward-seeking behavior and reward-related cues in rats trained on a variable-interval schedule of reinforcement. We observed robust phasic dopamine release in the dorsolateral striatum after reinforced lever presses and inconsistent dopamine release in the dorsomedial striatum. Contrary to our expectations, alcohol did not enhance dopamine release in rats drinking alcoholic rewards. Cue-induced dopamine release was also observed in the nucleus accumbens core of rats drinking the reward solutions. These data demonstrate that alcoholic and nonalcoholic reward self-administration on a variable-interval schedule of reinforcement in rats is accompanied by phasic dopamine release time-locked to reinforcement in the dorsolateral striatum and the nucleus accumbens, but not the dorsomedial striatum. PMID:25493956

  9. Elevations of nucleus accumbens dopamine and DOPAC levels during intravenous heroin self-administration.

    PubMed

    Wise, R A; Leone, P; Rivest, R; Leeb, K

    1995-10-01

    Extracellular dopamine and DOPAC (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) levels in nucleus accumbens were sampled by microdialysis and quantified with high-performance liquid chromatography during intravenous heroin self-administration sessions in rats. Dopamine levels in 10 and 20 min samples were elevated following the first injection of each session, reaching a plateau of elevation within the first two or three injections and falling back toward baseline only when drug access was terminated. Elevations were in the range of 150-300% when unit dosages of 0.05-0.2 mg/kg were given. Increasing the work requirement from FR-1 to FR-10 did not appear to alter the degree of elevation of dopamine levels, and dopamine levels fell during extinction while lever-pressing rates increased 20-fold. While animals compensated for unit dose changes between 0.05 and 0.2 mg/kg/injection, adjusting their response rate such that the same hourly drug intake and the same asymptotic dopamine levels were maintained across these conditions, at 0.4 mg/kg/injection hourly drug intake and asymptotic dopamine levels were elevated beyond the levels sustained by the lower doses. These findings confirm that self-administered doses of intravenous heroin are sufficient to activate the mesolimbic dopamine system and suggest that significant heroin "craving" can emerge when dopamine levels are still moderately elevated, long before the development of dopamine depletion associated with opiate withdrawal.

  10. Interaction of dopamine, female pheromones, locomotion and sex behavior in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wicker-Thomas, Claude; Hamann, Mickael

    2008-01-01

    The regulation of female hydrocarbons and courtship behavior by dopamine and their relationship with locomotion, were investigated in Drosophila melanogaster. Ddc mutants and wild-type female flies treated with tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitors (alpha-methyltyrosine or 3-iodotyrosine) had fewer diene hydrocarbons (female pheromones) and there was a total (Ddc), partial (alpha-methyltyrosine) or no (3-iodotyrosine) rescue of hydrocarbon pattern after dopamine ingestion. There was a correlation between female pheromone level and male courtship intensity for these dopamine-depleted or rescued flies. Female locomotion was decreased in flies treated with tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitors and restored by dopamine, showing that decreased mobility of the female has little importance on male courtship. However, male courtship was inhibited by an increased mobility of dopamine-supplemented females. Tanning, which is altered in dopamine-deficient flies and in tan and ebony mutants, seemed to have no significant influence on female pheromones. Females with increased quantities of dopamine (by ingestion) exhibited larger quantities of pheromones. However, Catsup mutants did not, probably as a result of defects in the epidermis. The Dat mutation, which resulted in more dopamine being produced in the brain, showed no pheromone modification. Together, these data show a complex interaction between dopamine, female hydrocarbons, locomotion and male courtship behavior.

  11. Dopamine induces the accumulation of insoluble prion protein and affects autophagic flux

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Marcio H. M.; Peres, Italo T.; Santos, Tiago G.; Martins, Vilma R.; Icimoto, Marcelo Y.; Lee, Kil S.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of protein aggregates is a histopathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, but in most cases the aggregation occurs without defined mutations or clinical histories, suggesting that certain endogenous metabolites can promote aggregation of specific proteins. One example that supports this hypothesis is dopamine and its metabolites. Dopamine metabolism generates several oxidative metabolites that induce aggregation of α-synuclein, and represents the main etiology of Parkinson's diseases. Because dopamine and its metabolites are unstable and can be highly reactive, we investigated whether these molecules can also affect other proteins that are prone to aggregate, such as cellular prion protein (PrPC). In this study, we showed that dopamine treatment of neuronal cells reduced the number of viable cells and increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as demonstrated in previous studies. Overall PrPC expression level was not altered by dopamine treatment, but its unglycosylated form was consistently reduced at 100 μM of dopamine. At the same concentration, the level of phosphorylated mTOR and 4EBP1 was also reduced. Moreover, dopamine treatment decreased the solubility of PrPC, and increased its accumulation in autophagosomal compartments with concomitant induction of LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1 levels. In vitro oxidation of dopamine promoted formation of high-order oligomers of recombinant prion protein. These results suggest that dopamine metabolites alter the conformation of PrPC, which in turn is sorted to degradation pathway, causing autophagosome overload and attenuation of protein synthesis. Accumulation of PrPC aggregates is an important feature of prion diseases. Thus, this study brings new insight into the dopamine metabolism as a source of endogenous metabolites capable of altering PrPC solubility and its subcellular localization. PMID:25698927

  12. Differential interactions of desipramine with amphetamine and methamphetamine: evidence that amphetamine releases dopamine from noradrenergic neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Shoblock, James R; Maisonneuve, Isabelle M; Glick, Stanley D

    2004-07-01

    Amphetamine is more effective than methamphetamine at raising dopamine levels in the prefrontal cortex. The current study tested the hypothesis that norepinephrine transporters are involved in this difference. Using microdialysis, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin were measured in the rat prefrontal cortex after administration of methamphetamine or amphetamine, with and without perfusion of desipramine. Amphetamine raised norepinephrine levels more than methamphetamine did. Desipramine raised dopamine and serotonin levels but did not alter metabolite levels. Desipramine attenuated the increase in dopamine by amphetamine while increasing the dopamine released by methamphetamine. These data suggest that methamphetamine and amphetamine differ in altering prefrontal cortical dopamine levels and in interacting with norepinephrine transporters. It is proposed that amphetamine releases dopamine in the prefrontal cortex primarily through norepinephrine transporters, whereas methamphetamine interacts minimally with norepinephrine transporters.

  13. Conformational changes in dopamine transporter intracellular regions upon cocaine binding and dopamine translocation

    PubMed Central

    Dehnes, Yvette; Shan, Jufang; Beuming, Thijs; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT), a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, mediates the reuptake of dopamine at the synaptic cleft. DAT is the primary target for psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. We previously demonstrated that cocaine binding and dopamine transport alter the accessibility of Cys342 in the third intracellular loop (IL3). To study the conformational changes associated with the functional mechanism of the transporter, we made cysteine substitution mutants, one at a time, from Phe332 to Ser351 in IL3 of the background DAT construct, X7C, in which 7 endogenous cysteines were mutated. The accessibility of the 20 engineered cysteines to polar charged sulfhydryl reagents was studied in the absence and presence of cocaine or dopamine. Of the 11 positions that reacted with methanethiosulfonate ethyl ammonium, as evidenced by inhibition of ligand binding, 5 were protected against this inhibition by cocaine and dopamine (S333C, S334C, N336C, M342C and T349C), indicating that reagent accessibility is affected by conformational changes associated with inhibitor and substrate binding. In some of the cysteine mutants, transport activity is disrupted, but can be rescued by the presence of zinc, most likely because the distribution between inward- and outward-facing conformations is restored by zinc binding. The experimental data were interpreted in the context of molecular models of DAT in both the inward- and outward-facing conformations. Differences in the solvent accessible surface area for individual IL3 residues calculated for these states correlate well with the experimental accessibility data, and suggest that protection by ligand binding results from the stabilization of the outward-facing configuration. Changes in the residue interaction networks observed from the molecular dynamics simulations also revealed the critical roles of several positions during the conformational transitions. We conclude that the IL3 region of DAT

  14. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Herrera, Samantha; Pérez-Sánchez, Gilberto; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Flores-Gutierrez, Enrique Octavio; Quintero-Fabián, Saray

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA), a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS), has modulatory functions at the systemic level. The peripheral and central nervous systems have independent dopaminergic system (DAS) that share mechanisms and molecular machinery. In the past century, experimental evidence has accumulated on the proteins knowledge that is involved in the synthesis, reuptake, and transportation of DA in leukocytes and the differential expression of the D1-like (D1R and D5R) and D2-like receptors (D2R, D3R, and D4R). The expression of these components depends on the state of cellular activation and the concentration and time of exposure to DA. Receptors that are expressed in leukocytes are linked to signaling pathways that are mediated by changes in cAMP concentration, which in turn triggers changes in phenotype and cellular function. According to the leukocyte lineage, the effects of DA are associated with such processes as respiratory burst, cytokine and antibody secretion, chemotaxis, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. In clinical conditions such as schizophrenia, Parkinson disease, Tourette syndrome, and multiple sclerosis (MS), there are evident alterations during immune responses in leukocytes, in which changes in DA receptor density have been observed. Several groups have proposed that these findings are useful in establishing clinical status and clinical markers. PMID:27795960

  15. Mice that are resistant to diet-induced weight loss have greater food anticipatory activity and altered melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) and dopamine receptor 2 (D2) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vaanholt, Lobke M; Mitchell, Sharon E; Sinclair, Rachel E; Speakman, John R

    2015-07-01

    Diet-induced weight loss varies considerably between individuals, but the mechanisms driving these individual differences remain largely unknown. Here we investigated whether key neuropeptides involved in the regulation of energy balance or reward systems were differentially expressed in mice that were prone or resistant to caloric restriction (CR) induced weight loss. Mice (n=30 males and n=34 females) were fed 70% of their own baseline ad libitum intake for 25days, after which their brains were collected and expression of various neuropeptides were investigated and compared between the 10 male and 10 female mice that showed the greatest (high weight loss, HWL) or lowest weight loss (LWL) (n=40 in total). HWL mice showed a differential neuropeptide profile to LWL in both sexes, characterised by increased expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), leptin receptor (ObRb), and melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R) in the arcuate nucleus. No changes in the expression of fat mass and obesity related gene (FTO) or suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (Socs3) were observed. Levels of dopamine D2 receptor were decreased in the nucleus accumbens in HWL compared to LWL mice. HWL mice showed a stronger increase in food anticipatory activity (FAA) in response to CR than LWL mice. These results indicate that the mice prone to diet-induced weight loss experienced greater hunger, potentially driving their elevated FAA.

  16. Effects of adolescent social defeat on adult amphetamine-induced locomotion and corticoaccumbal dopamine release in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Andrew R.; Forster, Gina L.; Novick, Andrew M.; Roberts, Christina L.; Watt, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Maturation of mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems occurs during adolescence, and exposure to social stress during this period results in behavioral dysfunction including substance abuse disorders. Adult male rats exposed to repeated social defeat in adolescence exhibit reduced basal dopamine tissue content in the medial prefrontal cortex, altered dopamine tissue content in corticoaccumbal dopamine regions following acute amphetamine, and increased amphetamine conditioned place preference following repeated amphetamine treatment. Such changes may reflect altered amphetamine-induced extracellular dopamine release in the corticoaccumbal regions. Therefore, we used in vivo microdialysis to measure extracellular dopamine simultaneously within the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens core of previously defeated rats and controls, in response to either acute or repeated (7 daily injections) of amphetamine (1.0 mg/kg). Locomotion responses to acute / repeated amphetamine were also assessed the day prior to taking dopamine measurements. Adolescent defeat potentiated adult locomotion responses to acute amphetamine, which was negatively correlated with attenuated amphetamine-induced dopamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex, but there was no difference in amphetamine-induced accumbal dopamine release. However, both locomotion and corticoaccumbal dopamine responses to repeated amphetamine were equivalent between previously defeated rats and controls. These data suggest adolescent defeat enhances behavioral responses to initial amphetamine exposure as a function of diminished prefrontal cortex dopamine activity, which may be sufficient to promote subsequently enhanced seeking of drug-associated cues. Interestingly, repeated amphetamine treatment appears to normalize amphetamine-elicited locomotion and cortical dopamine responses observed in adult rats exposed to adolescent social defeat, providing implications for treating stress-induced dopamine dysfunction

  17. Striatal dopamine, reward, and decision making in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Lorenz; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Heinz, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Elevated striatal dopamine function is one of the best-established findings in schizophrenia. In this review, we discuss causes and consequences of this striata! dopamine alteration. We first summarize earlier findings regarding striatal reward processing and anticipation using functional neuroimaging. Secondly, we present a series of recent studies that are exemplary for a particular research approach: a combination of theory-driven reinforcement learning and decision-making tasks in combination with computational modeling and functional neuroimaging. We discuss why this approach represents a promising tool to understand underlying mechanisms of symptom dimensions by dissecting the contribution of multiple behavioral control systems working in parallel. We also discuss how it can advance our understanding of the neurobiological implementation of such functions. Thirdly, we review evidence regarding the topography of dopamine dysfunction within the striatum. Finally, we present conclusions and outline important aspects to be considered in future studies.

  18. Developmental origins of brain disorders: roles for dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Money, Kelli M.; Stanwood, Gregg D.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, such as dopamine, participate in a wide range of behavioral and cognitive functions in the adult brain, including movement, cognition, and reward. Dopamine-mediated signaling plays a fundamental neurodevelopmental role in forebrain differentiation and circuit formation. These developmental effects, such as modulation of neuronal migration and dendritic growth, occur before synaptogenesis and demonstrate novel roles for dopaminergic signaling beyond neuromodulation at the synapse. Pharmacologic and genetic disruptions demonstrate that these effects are brain region- and receptor subtype-specific. For example, the striatum and frontal cortex exhibit abnormal neuronal structure and function following prenatal disruption of dopamine receptor signaling. Alterations in these processes are implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, and emerging studies of neurodevelopmental disruptions may shed light on the pathophysiology of abnormal neuronal circuitry in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24391541

  19. Striatal dopamine, reward, and decision making in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Lorenz; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Heinz, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Elevated striatal dopamine function is one of the best-established findings in schizophrenia. In this review, we discuss causes and consequences of this striata! dopamine alteration. We first summarize earlier findings regarding striatal reward processing and anticipation using functional neuroimaging. Secondly, we present a series of recent studies that are exemplary for a particular research approach: a combination of theory-driven reinforcement learning and decision-making tasks in combination with computational modeling and functional neuroimaging. We discuss why this approach represents a promising tool to understand underlying mechanisms of symptom dimensions by dissecting the contribution of multiple behavioral control systems working in parallel. We also discuss how it can advance our understanding of the neurobiological implementation of such functions. Thirdly, we review evidence regarding the topography of dopamine dysfunction within the striatum. Finally, we present conclusions and outline important aspects to be considered in future studies. PMID:27069382

  20. Striatal dopamine, reward, and decision making in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Deserno, Lorenz; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Heinz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Elevated striatal dopamine function is one of the best-established findings in schizophrenia. In this review, we discuss causes and consequences of this striata! dopamine alteration. We first summarize earlier findings regarding striatal reward processing and anticipation using functional neuroimaging. Secondly, we present a series of recent studies that are exemplary for a particular research approach: a combination of theory-driven reinforcement learning and decision-making tasks in combination with computational modeling and functional neuroimaging. We discuss why this approach represents a promising tool to understand underlying mechanisms of symptom dimensions by dissecting the contribution of multiple behavioral control systems working in parallel. We also discuss how it can advance our understanding of the neurobiological implementation of such functions. Thirdly, we review evidence regarding the topography of dopamine dysfunction within the striatum. Finally, we present conclusions and outline important aspects to be considered in future studies. PMID:27069382

  1. Increased dopamine level enhances male-male courtship in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Dartevelle, Laurence; Yuan, Chunyan; Wei, Hongping; Wang, Ying; Ferveur, Jean-François; Guo, Aike

    2008-05-21

    Sexual behavior between males is observed in many species, but the biological factors involved are poorly known. In mammals, manipulation of dopamine has revealed the role of this neuromodulator on male sexual behavior. We used genetic and pharmacological approaches to manipulate the dopamine level in dopaminergic cells in Drosophila and investigated the consequence of this manipulation on male-male courtship behavior. Males with increased dopamine level showed enhanced propensity to court other males but did not change their courtship toward virgin females, general olfactory response, general gustatory response, or locomotor activity. Our results indicate that the high intensity of male-male interaction shown by these manipulated males was related to their altered sensory perception of other males.

  2. Increased dopamine level enhances male-male courtship in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Dartevelle, Laurence; Yuan, Chunyan; Wei, Hongping; Wang, Ying; Ferveur, Jean-François; Guo, Aike

    2008-05-21

    Sexual behavior between males is observed in many species, but the biological factors involved are poorly known. In mammals, manipulation of dopamine has revealed the role of this neuromodulator on male sexual behavior. We used genetic and pharmacological approaches to manipulate the dopamine level in dopaminergic cells in Drosophila and investigated the consequence of this manipulation on male-male courtship behavior. Males with increased dopamine level showed enhanced propensity to court other males but did not change their courtship toward virgin females, general olfactory response, general gustatory response, or locomotor activity. Our results indicate that the high intensity of male-male interaction shown by these manipulated males was related to their altered sensory perception of other males. PMID:18495888

  3. Activation of dopamine neurons is critical for aversive conditioning and prevention of generalized anxiety.

    PubMed

    Zweifel, Larry S; Fadok, Jonathan P; Argilli, Emmanuela; Garelick, Michael G; Jones, Graham L; Dickerson, Tavis M K; Allen, James M; Mizumori, Sheri J Y; Bonci, Antonello; Palmiter, Richard D

    2011-05-01

    Generalized anxiety is thought to result, in part, from impairments in contingency awareness during conditioning to cues that predict aversive or fearful outcomes. Dopamine neurons of the ventral midbrain exhibit heterogeneous responses to aversive stimuli that are thought to provide a critical modulatory signal to facilitate orientation to environmental changes and assignment of motivational value to unexpected events. Here we describe a mouse model in which activation of dopamine neurons in response to an aversive stimulus is attenuated by conditional genetic inactivation of functional NMDA receptors on dopamine neurons. We discovered that altering the magnitude of excitatory responses by dopamine neurons in response to an aversive stimulus was associated with impaired conditioning to a cue that predicts an aversive outcome. Impaired conditioning by these mice was associated with the development of a persistent, generalized anxiety-like phenotype. These data are consistent with a role for dopamine in facilitating contingency awareness that is critical for the prevention of generalized anxiety.

  4. Trans-blood brain barrier delivery of dopamine-loaded nanoparticles reverses functional deficits in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Pahuja, Richa; Seth, Kavita; Shukla, Anshi; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Saxena, Prem Narain; Arun, Jharna; Chaudhari, Bhushan Pradosh; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Sheelendra Pratap; Shukla, Rakesh; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2015-05-26

    Sustained and safe delivery of dopamine across the blood brain barrier (BBB) is a major hurdle for successful therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder. Therefore, in the present study we designed neurotransmitter dopamine-loaded PLGA nanoparticles (DA NPs) to deliver dopamine to the brain. These nanoparticles slowly and constantly released dopamine, showed reduced clearance of dopamine in plasma, reduced quinone adduct formation, and decreased dopamine autoxidation. DA NPs were internalized in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells and dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum, regions affected in PD. Treatment with DA NPs did not cause reduction in cell viability and morphological deterioration in SH-SY5Y, as compared to bulk dopamine-treated cells, which showed reduced viability. Herein, we report that these NPs were able to cross the BBB and capillary endothelium in the striatum and substantia nigra in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD. Systemic intravenous administration of DA NPs caused significantly increased levels of dopamine and its metabolites and reduced dopamine-D2 receptor supersensitivity in the striatum of parkinsonian rats. Further, DA NPs significantly recovered neurobehavioral abnormalities in 6-OHDA-induced parkinsonian rats. Dopamine delivered through NPs did not cause additional generation of ROS, dopaminergic neuron degeneration, and ultrastructural changes in the striatum and substantia nigra as compared to 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Interestingly, dopamine delivery through nanoformulation neither caused alterations in the heart rate and blood pressure nor showed any abrupt pathological change in the brain and other peripheral organs. These results suggest that NPs delivered dopamine into the brain, reduced dopamine autoxidation-mediated toxicity, and ultimately reversed neurochemical and neurobehavioral deficits in parkinsonian rats.

  5. Occupancy of dopamine D2/3 receptors in rat brain by endogenous dopamine measured with the agonist positron emission tomography radioligand [11C]MNPA.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Nicholas; Zoghbi, Sami S; Skinbjerg, Mette; Liow, Jeih-San; Hong, Jinsoo; Sibley, David R; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer; Innis, Robert B

    2008-10-01

    Estimates of dopamine D(2/3) receptor occupancy by endogenous dopamine using positron emission tomography (PET) in animals have varied almost threefold. This variability may have been caused by incomplete depletion of dopamine or by the use of antagonist radioligands, which appear less sensitive than agonist radioligands to changes in endogenous dopamine. PET scans were performed in rats with the agonist PET radioligand [(11)C]MNPA ([O-methyl-(11)C]2-methoxy-N-propylnorapomorphine). [(11)C]MNPA was injected as a bolus plus constant infusion to achieve steady-state concentration in the body and equilibrium receptor binding in the brain. Radioligand binding was compared at baseline and after treatment with reserpine plus alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, which cause approximately 95% depletion of endogenous dopamine. Depletion of dopamine increased radioligand binding in striatum but had little effect in cerebellum. Striatal [(11)C]MNPA binding potential was 0.93 +/- 0.12 at baseline and increased to 1.99 +/- 0.25 after dopamine depletion. Occupancy of D(2/3) receptors by endogenous dopamine at baseline was calculated to be approximately 53%. Striatal binding was displaceable with raclopride, but not with BP 897 (a selective D(3) compound), thus confirming the D(2) receptor specificity of [(11)C]MNPA binding. Radioactivity extracted from rat brain contained only 8-10% radiometabolites and was insignificantly altered by administration of reserpine plus alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine. Hence, dopamine depletion did not increase the PET measurements via an effect on radiotracer metabolism. Our in vivo estimate of dopamine's occupancy of D(2/3) receptors at baseline is higher than that previously reported using antagonist radioligands and PET, but is similar to that reported using agonist radioligands and ex vivo measurements.

  6. Inhibition of Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells by D1-type Dopamine Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Yuki; Rodríguez, Carolina Varela; Ogata, Genki; Partida, Gloria J.; Oi, Hanako; Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Lee, Sherwin C.; Colado, Anselmo Felipe; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The spike output of neural pathways can be regulated by modulating output neuron excitability and/or their synaptic inputs. Dopaminergic interneurons synapse onto cells that route signals to mammalian retinal ganglion cells, but it is unknown whether dopamine can activate receptors in these ganglion cells and, if it does, how this affects their excitability. Here, we show D1a-receptor-like immunoreactivity in ganglion cells identified in adult rats by retrogradely transported dextran, and that dopamine, D1-type receptor agonists, and cAMP analogs inhibit spiking in ganglion cells dissociated from adult rats. These ligands curtailed repetitive spiking during constant current injections, and reduced the number and rate of rise of spikes elicited by fluctuating current injections without significantly altering the timing of the remaining spikes. Consistent with mediation by D1-type receptors, SCH-23390 reversed the effects of dopamine on spikes. Contrary to a recent report, spike inhibition by dopamine was not precluded by blocking Ih. Consistent with the reduced rate of spike rise, dopamine reduced voltage-gated Na+ current (INa) amplitude and tetrodotoxin, at doses that reduced INa as moderately as dopamine, also inhibited spiking. These results provide the first direct evidence that D1-type dopamine receptor activation can alter mammalian retinal ganglion cell excitability, and demonstrate that dopamine can modulate spikes in these cells by a mechanism different from the pre- and postsynaptic means proposed by previous studies. To our knowledge, our results also provide the first evidence that dopamine receptor activation can reduce excitability without altering the temporal precision of spike firing. PMID:19940196

  7. Disruption of dopamine neuron activity pattern regulation through selective expression of a human KCNN3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Soden, Marta E; Jones, Graham L; Sanford, Christina A; Chung, Amanda S; Güler, Ali D; Chavkin, Charles; Luján, Rafael; Zweifel, Larry S

    2013-11-20

    The calcium-activated small conductance potassium channel SK3 plays an essential role in the regulation of dopamine neuron activity patterns. Here we demonstrate that expression of a human disease-related SK3 mutation (hSK3Δ) in dopamine neurons of mice disrupts the balance between tonic and phasic dopamine neuron activity. Expression of hSK3Δ suppressed endogenous SK currents, reducing coupling between SK channels and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and increasing permissiveness for burst firing. Consistent with enhanced excitability of dopamine neurons, hSK3Δ increased evoked calcium signals in dopamine neurons in vivo and potentiated evoked dopamine release. Specific expression of hSK3Δ led to deficits in attention and sensory gating and heightened sensitivity to a psychomimetic drug. Sensory-motor alterations and psychomimetic sensitivity were recapitulated in a mouse model of transient, reversible dopamine neuron activation. These results demonstrate the cell-autonomous effects of a human ion channel mutation on dopamine neuron physiology and the impact of activity pattern disruption on behavior. PMID:24206670

  8. Disruption of dopamine neuron activity pattern regulation through selective expression of a human KCNN3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Soden, Marta E; Jones, Graham L; Sanford, Christina A; Chung, Amanda S; Güler, Ali D; Chavkin, Charles; Luján, Rafael; Zweifel, Larry S

    2013-11-20

    The calcium-activated small conductance potassium channel SK3 plays an essential role in the regulation of dopamine neuron activity patterns. Here we demonstrate that expression of a human disease-related SK3 mutation (hSK3Δ) in dopamine neurons of mice disrupts the balance between tonic and phasic dopamine neuron activity. Expression of hSK3Δ suppressed endogenous SK currents, reducing coupling between SK channels and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and increasing permissiveness for burst firing. Consistent with enhanced excitability of dopamine neurons, hSK3Δ increased evoked calcium signals in dopamine neurons in vivo and potentiated evoked dopamine release. Specific expression of hSK3Δ led to deficits in attention and sensory gating and heightened sensitivity to a psychomimetic drug. Sensory-motor alterations and psychomimetic sensitivity were recapitulated in a mouse model of transient, reversible dopamine neuron activation. These results demonstrate the cell-autonomous effects of a human ion channel mutation on dopamine neuron physiology and the impact of activity pattern disruption on behavior.

  9. Dopamine D3 autoreceptor inhibition enhances cocaine potency at the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Molly M; Siciliano, Cody A; Jones, Sara R

    2016-09-01

    Cocaine is a commonly abused central nervous system stimulant that enhances dopamine (DA) neurotransmission through its ability to block dopamine transporters (DATs). Recent evidence suggests there may be an interaction between DATs and D2/D3 autoreceptors that modulates cocaine's effects. The purpose of this study was to explore how D2/D3 autoreceptors modulate the ability of cocaine to inhibit DA uptake through DATs on pre-synaptic DA terminals. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices containing the nucleus accumbens core from male and female C57BL/6J mice, we first sought to examine the effects of global autoreceptor blockade using the non-selective D2/D3 autoreceptor antagonist, raclopride. We found that the ability of cocaine to inhibit DA uptake was increased by raclopride and that this effect was consistent across sexes. Furthermore, using D2 (L-741,626) or D3 (SB-277011-A) autoreceptor selective antagonists, we discovered that blockade of D3, but not D2, autoreceptors was responsible for the increased cocaine potency. Alterations in cocaine potency were attributable to alterations in uptake inhibition, rather than cocaine effects on vesicular DA release, suggesting that these results may be a product of a functional D3/DAT interaction apart from the canonical inhibitory actions of D3 autoreceptors on DA release. In addition, application of D2 (sumanirole) and D3 (PD 128907) autoreceptor-specific agonists had inverse effects, whereby D2 autoreceptor activation decreased cocaine potency and D3 autoreceptor activation had no effect. Together, these data show that DA autoreceptors dynamically regulate cocaine potency at the DAT, which is important for understanding cocaine's rewarding and addictive properties. We propose a model whereby presynaptic dopamine autoreceptors dynamically modulate cocaine potency through two separate mechanisms. We demonstrate that D2 agonists decrease cocaine potency, whereas D3 antagonists increase cocaine potency

  10. Altered neurotransmission in the mesolimbic reward system of Girk mice.

    PubMed

    Arora, Devinder; Haluk, Desirae M; Kourrich, Saïd; Pravetoni, Marco; Fernández-Alacid, Laura; Nicolau, Joel C; Luján, Rafael; Wickman, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    Mice lacking the Girk2 subunit of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ (Girk) channels exhibit dopamine-dependent hyperactivity and elevated responses to drugs that stimulate dopamine neurotransmission. The dopamine-dependent phenotypes seen in Girk2(-/-) mice could reflect increased intrinsic excitability of or diminished inhibitory feedback to midbrain dopamine neurons, or secondary adaptations triggered by Girk2 ablation. We addressed these possibilities by evaluating Girk(-/-) mice in behavioral, electrophysiological, and cell biological assays centered on the mesolimbic dopamine system. Despite differences in the contribution of Girk1 and Girk2 subunits to Girk signaling in midbrain dopamine neurons, Girk1(-/-) and Girk2(-/-) mice exhibited comparable baseline hyperactivities and enhanced responses to cocaine. Girk ablation also correlated with altered afferent input to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. Dopamine neurons from Girk1(-/-) and Girk2(-/-) mice exhibited elevated glutamatergic neurotransmission, paralleled by increased synaptic levels of alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate glutamate receptors. In addition, synapse density, alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor levels, and glutamatergic neurotransmission were elevated in medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens from Girk1(-/-) and Girk2(-/-) mice. We conclude that dopamine-dependent phenotypes in Girk2(-/-) mice are not solely attributable to a loss of Girk signaling in dopamine neurons, and likely involve secondary adaptations facilitating glutamatergic signaling in the mesolimbic reward system. PMID:20557431

  11. Dopamine reward prediction error coding.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-03-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards-an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware.

  12. Dopamine reward prediction error coding

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards—an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware. PMID:27069377

  13. Differential dopamine function in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Daniel S; MacKie, Palmer J; Kareken, David A; Hutchins, Gary D; Chumin, Evgeny J; Christian, Bradley T; Yoder, Karmen K

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 30 % of Americans suffer from chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia (FM), which can cause debilitating pain. Many pain-killing drugs prescribed for chronic pain disorders are highly addictive, have limited clinical efficacy, and do not treat the cognitive symptoms reported by many patients. The neurobiological substrates of chronic pain are largely unknown, but evidence points to altered dopaminergic transmission in aberrant pain perception. We sought to characterize the dopamine (DA) system in individuals with FM. Positron emission tomography (PET) with [(18)F]fallypride (FAL) was used to assess changes in DA during a working memory challenge relative to a baseline task, and to test for associations between baseline D2/D3 availability and experimental pain measures. Twelve female subjects with FM and 11 female controls completed study procedures. Subjects received one FAL PET scan while performing a "2-back" task, and one while performing a "0-back" (attentional control, "baseline") task. FM subjects had lower baseline FAL binding potential (BP) in several cortical regions relative to controls, including anterior cingulate cortex. In FM subjects, self-reported spontaneous pain negatively correlated with FAL BP in the left orbitofrontal cortex and parahippocampal gyrus. Baseline BP was significantly negatively correlated with experimental pain sensitivity and tolerance in both FM and CON subjects, although spatial patterns of these associations differed between groups. The data suggest that abnormal DA function may be associated with differential processing of pain perception in FM. Further studies are needed to explore the functional significance of DA in nociception and cognitive processing in chronic pain.

  14. Dopamine, affordance and active inference.

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl J; Shiner, Tamara; FitzGerald, Thomas; Galea, Joseph M; Adams, Rick; Brown, Harriet; Dolan, Raymond J; Moran, Rosalyn; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Bestmann, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal) cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (predictions) about cues that have affordance. In this paper, we focus on the consequences of changing tonic levels of dopamine firing using simulations of cued sequential movements. Crucially, the predictions driving movements are based upon a hierarchical generative model that infers the context in which movements are made. This means that we can confuse agents by changing the context (order) in which cues are presented. These simulations provide a (Bayes-optimal) model of contextual uncertainty and set switching that can be quantified in terms of behavioural and electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, one can simulate dopaminergic lesions (by changing the precision of prediction errors) to produce pathological behaviours that are reminiscent of those seen in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We use these simulations to demonstrate how a single functional role for dopamine at the synaptic level can manifest in different ways at the behavioural level.

  15. Enduring increases in anxiety-like behavior and rapid nucleus accumbens dopamine signaling in socially isolated rats

    PubMed Central

    Yorgason, Jordan T.; España, Rodrigo A.; Konstantopoulos, Joanne K.; Weiner, Jeffrey L.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    Social isolation (SI) rearing, a model of early life stress, results in profound behavioral alterations, including increased anxiety-like behavior, impaired sensorimotor gating and increased self-administration of addictive substances. These changes are accompanied by alterations in mesolimbic dopamine function, such as increased dopamine and metabolite tissue content, increased dopamine responses to cues and psychostimulants, and increased dopamine neuron burst firing. Using voltammetric techniques, we examined the effects of SI rearing on dopamine transporter activity, vesicular release and dopamine D2-type autoreceptor activity in the nucleus accumbens core. Long–Evans rats were housed in group (GH; 4/cage) or SI (1/cage) conditions from weaning into early adulthood [postnatal day (PD) 28–77]. After this initial housing period, rats were assessed on the elevated plus-maze for an anxiety-like phenotype, and then slice voltammetry experiments were performed. To study the enduring effects of SI rearing on anxiety-like behavior and dopamine terminal function, another cohort of similarly reared rats was isolated for an additional 4 months (until PD 174) and then tested. Our findings demonstrate that SI rearing results in lasting increases in anxiety-like behavior, dopamine release and dopamine transporter activity, but not D2 activity. Interestingly, GH-reared rats that were isolated as adults did not develop the anxiety-like behavior or dopamine changes seen in SI-reared rats. Together, our data suggest that early life stress results in an anxiety-like phenotype, with lasting increases in dopamine terminal function. PMID:23294165

  16. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, AC; Cassis, LA; Bardo, MT; Dwoskin, LP

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. DESIGN To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. METHODS Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. RESULTS Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. CONCLUSION Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The

  17. Adaptations of Presynaptic Dopamine Terminals Induced by Psychostimulant Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A great deal of research has focused on investigating neurobiological alterations induced by chronic psychostimulant use in an effort to describe, understand, and treat the pathology of psychostimulant addiction. It has been known for several decades that dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is integrally involved in the selection and execution of motivated and goal-directed behaviors, and that psychostimulants act on this system to exert many of their effects. As such, a large body of work has focused on defining the consequences of psychostimulant use on dopamine signaling in the striatum as it relates to addictive behaviors. Here, we review presynaptic dopamine terminal alterations observed following self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine, as well as possible mechanisms by which these alterations occur and their impact on the progression of addiction. PMID:25491345

  18. Stimulation of movement in a quiescent, hibernation-like form of Caenorhabditis elegans by dopamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Gaglia, Marta Maria; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2009-06-01

    One of the characteristics of animals in hibernation is reduced behavioral activity. The Caenorhabditis elegans dauer state is a hibernation-like state of diapause that displays a dramatic reduction in spontaneous locomotion. A similar dauer-like quiescent state is produced in adults by relatively strong mutations in the insulin/IGF-1 receptor homolog daf-2. In this study, we show that mutations affecting the neurotransmitter dopamine, which regulates voluntary movement in many organisms, can stimulate movement in dauers and dauer-like quiescent adults. Surprisingly, the movement of quiescent animals is stimulated by conditions that reduce dopamine signaling and also by conditions predicted to increase dopamine signaling. Reducing dopamine signaling is likely to stimulate movement by activating a foraging response also seen in nondauers after withdrawal of food. In contrast, the stimulation of movement by increased dopamine is much more pronounced in quiescent daf-2(-) dauer and dauer-like adult animals than in nondauaer animals. This altered response to dopamine is primarily attributable to activity of the FOXO (forkhead box O) transcription factor DAF-16 in neurons. We suggest that dauers and dauer-like quiescent adults may have underlying changes in the dopamine system that enable them to respond differently to environmental stimulation.

  19. The MsrA knockout mouse exhibits abnormal behavior and brain dopamine levels

    PubMed Central

    Oien, Derek B.; Osterhaus, Greg L.; Latif, Shaheen A.; Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Fulks, Jenny; Johnson, Michael; Fowler, Stephen C.; Moskovitz, Jackob

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress can cause methionine oxidation that has been implicated in various proteins malfunctions, if not adequately reduced by the methionine sulfoxide reductase system. Recent evidence has found oxidized methionine residues in neurodegenerative conditions. Previously, we have described elevated levels of brain pathologies and an abnormal walking pattern in the methionine sulfoxide reductase A knockout (MsrA−/−) mouse. Here we show that MsrA−/− mice have compromised complex task learning capabilities relative to wild-type mice. Likewise, MsrA−/− mice exhibit lower locomotor activity and altered gait that exacerbated with age. Furthermore, MsrA−/− mice were less responsive to amphetamine treatment. Consequently, brain dopamine levels were determined. Surprisingly, relative to wild-type mice, MsrA−/− brains contained significantly higher levels of dopamine up to 12 months of age, while lower level of dopamine was observed at 16 months of age. Moreover, striatal regions of MsrA−/− mice showed an increase of dopamine release parallel to observed dopamine levels. Similarly, the expression pattern of tyrosine hydroxylase activating protein correlated with the age-dependent dopamine levels. Thus, it is suggested that dopamine regulation and signaling pathway are impaired in MsrA−/− mice, which may contribute to their abnormal bio-behavior. These observations may be relevant to age-related neurological diseases associated with oxidative stress. PMID:18466776

  20. MsrA knockout mouse exhibits abnormal behavior and brain dopamine levels.

    PubMed

    Oien, Derek B; Osterhaus, Greg L; Latif, Shaheen A; Pinkston, Jonathan W; Fulks, Jenny; Johnson, Michael; Fowler, Stephen C; Moskovitz, Jackob

    2008-07-15

    Oxidative stress can cause methionine oxidation that has been implicated in various proteins malfunctions, if not adequately reduced by the methionine sulfoxide reductase system. Recent evidence has found oxidized methionine residues in neurodegenerative conditions. Previously, we have described elevated levels of brain pathologies and an abnormal walking pattern in the methionine sulfoxide reductase A knockout (MsrA(-/-)) mouse. Here we show that MsrA(-/-) mice have compromised complex task learning capabilities relative to wild-type mice. Likewise, MsrA(-/-) mice exhibit lower locomotor activity and altered gait that exacerbated with age. Furthermore, MsrA(-/-) mice were less responsive to amphetamine treatment. Consequently, brain dopamine levels were determined. Surprisingly, relative to wild-type mice, MsrA(-/-) brains contained significantly higher levels of dopamine up to 12 months of age, while lower levels of dopamine were observed at 16 months of age. Moreover, striatal regions of MsrA(-/-) mice showed an increase of dopamine release parallel to observed dopamine levels. Similarly, the expression pattern of tyrosine hydroxylase activating protein correlated with the age-dependent dopamine levels. Thus, it is suggested that dopamine regulation and signaling pathways are impaired in MsrA(-/-) mice, which may contribute to their abnormal behavior. These observations may be relevant to age-related neurological diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  1. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Thomas H. B.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signaling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behavior. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings. PMID:26581305

  2. Dopamine neurons modulate neural encoding and expression of depression-related behaviour.

    PubMed

    Tye, Kay M; Mirzabekov, Julie J; Warden, Melissa R; Ferenczi, Emily A; Tsai, Hsing-Chen; Finkelstein, Joel; Kim, Sung-Yon; Adhikari, Avishek; Thompson, Kimberly R; Andalman, Aaron S; Gunaydin, Lisa A; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl

    2013-01-24

    Major depression is characterized by diverse debilitating symptoms that include hopelessness and anhedonia. Dopamine neurons involved in reward and motivation are among many neural populations that have been hypothesized to be relevant, and certain antidepressant treatments, including medications and brain stimulation therapies, can influence the complex dopamine system. Until now it has not been possible to test this hypothesis directly, even in animal models, as existing therapeutic interventions are unable to specifically target dopamine neurons. Here we investigated directly the causal contributions of defined dopamine neurons to multidimensional depression-like phenotypes induced by chronic mild stress, by integrating behavioural, pharmacological, optogenetic and electrophysiological methods in freely moving rodents. We found that bidirectional control (inhibition or excitation) of specified midbrain dopamine neurons immediately and bidirectionally modulates (induces or relieves) multiple independent depression symptoms caused by chronic stress. By probing the circuit implementation of these effects, we observed that optogenetic recruitment of these dopamine neurons potently alters the neural encoding of depression-related behaviours in the downstream nucleus accumbens of freely moving rodents, suggesting that processes affecting depression symptoms may involve alterations in the neural encoding of action in limbic circuitry.

  3. Dopamine neurons modulate neural encoding and expression of depression-related behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Ferenczi, Emily A.; Tsai, Hsing-Chen; Finkelstein, Joel; Kim, Sung-Yon; Adhikari, Avishek; Thompson, Kimberly R.; Andalman, Aaron S.; Gunaydin, Lisa A.; Witten, Ilana B.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Major depression is characterized by diverse debilitating symptoms that include hopelessness and anhedonia1. Dopamine neurons involved in reward and motivation2–9 are among many neural populations that have been hypothesized to be relevant10, and certain antidepressant treatments, including medications and brain stimulation therapies, can influence the complex dopamine system. Until now it has not been possible to test this hypothesis directly, even in animal models, as existing therapeutic interventions are unable to specifically target dopamine neurons. Here we investigated directly the causal contributions of defined dopamine neurons to multidimensional depression-like phenotypes induced by chronic mild stress, by integrating behavioural, pharmacological, optogenetic and electrophysiological methods in freely moving rodents. We found that bidirectional control (inhibition or excitation) of specified midbrain dopamine neurons immediately and bidirectionally modulates (induces or relieves) multiple independent depression symptoms caused by chronic stress. By probing the circuit implementation of these effects, we observed that optogenetic recruitment of these dopamine neurons potently alters the neural encoding of depression-related behaviours in the downstream nucleus accumbens of freely moving rodents, suggesting that processes affecting depression symptoms may involve alterations in the neural encoding of action in limbic circuitry. PMID:23235822

  4. Suppression of serum gonadal steroids in rats by chronic treatment with dopamine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rehavi, M; Attali, G; Gil-Ad, I; Weizman, A

    2000-05-01

    The impact of chronic administration (3 weeks) of dopamine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors on serum gonadal steroid hormones and prolactin was studied in intact male and female rats. Both the dopamine and the serotonin reuptake inhibitors lowered serum estradiol and progesterone levels in the female rats. The dopamine transporter blockers suppressed testosterone serum levels in the male rats, whereas serotonin reuptake inhibitors induced only a non-significant reduction (30%) of this hormone. In contrast to the decrease in gonadal steroids, none of the serotonin or the dopamine reuptake blockers altered prolactin serum levels in either the male or female rats. It seems that the effect of these agents on ovarian and testicular hormones is related to the impact of the monoamine reuptake inhibitors on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  5. Increased desensitization of dopamine D₂ receptor-mediated response in the ventral tegmental area in the absence of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, R; Foster, J D; Metaxas, A; Ledent, C; Hourani, S M O; Kitchen, I; Chen, Y

    2011-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptors interact to provide additional regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitter signaling. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are expressed at a high density in striatal neurons, where they closely interact with dopamine D₂ receptors and modulate effects of dopamine and responses to psychostimulants. A(2A) receptors are expressed at much lower densities in other forebrain neurons but play a more prominent yet opposing role to striatal receptors in response to psychostimulants in mice. It is, therefore, possible that A(2A) receptors expressed at low levels elsewhere in the brain may also regulate neurotransmitter systems and modulate neuronal functions. Dopamine D₂ receptors play an important role in autoinhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dopamine release in other brain areas. Here, we examined the effect of A(2A) receptor deletion on D₂ receptor-mediated inhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons in the VTA. Spontaneous activity of dopamine neurons was recorded in midbrain slices, and concentration-dependent effects of the dopamine D₂ receptor agonist, quinpirole, was compared between wild-type and A(2A) knockout mice. The potency of quinpirole applied in single concentrations and the expression of D₂ receptors were not altered in the VTA of the knockout mice. However, quinpirole applied in stepwise escalating concentrations caused significantly reduced maximal inhibition in A(2A) knockout mice, indicating an enhanced agonist-induced desensitization of D₂ receptors in the absence of A(2A) receptors. The A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS21680, did not exert any effect on dopamine neuron firing or response to quinpirole, revealing a novel non-pharmacological interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors and dopaminergic neurotransmission in midbrain dopamine neurons. Altered D₂ receptor desensitization may result in changes in dopamine neuron firing rate and pattern and dopamine

  6. Effects of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on dopamine-mediated locomotor activity and dopamine D2 receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Daré, Elisabetta; Fetissov, Serguei; Hökfelt, Tomas; Hall, Håkan; Ogren, Sven Ove; Ceccatelli, Sandra

    2003-05-01

    In the present study we have investigated the neurotoxic effects of the exposure to a low dose (0.5 mg/kg/day) of methylmercury (MeHg) on the developing nervous system. Pregnant rats were treated with MeHg from day 7 of pregnancy to day 7 of lactation. At postnatal day 20 the offspring did not display prominent functional cerebellar alterations, as evaluated by the Rotarod performance. Motor activity (locomotion, rearing and motility) was tested in the 21-day-old rats after administration of apomorphine, an agonist of D(1), D(2), and D(3) dopamine receptors. A low dose of apomorphine (0.1 mg/kg) induced a significantly stronger increase in motility and locomotion in MeHg-treated rats as compared to controls. The same effect was also observed in rats injected with 1 mg/kg apomorphine. No changes were observed in rearing at either doses of the dopamine receptor agonist. The data suggest that changes in dopaminergic transmission are induced by exposure to MeHg in early life. The expression of the striatal dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptors was examined by in situ hybridization in the striatum of the 21-day-old rats. The analysis did not reveal any significant changes at the mRNA level. Ligand autoradiography experiments showed a significant reduction in dopamine D(2) receptor binding in the caudate putamen of MeHg-treated rats. Spatial learning ability was tested in 2-month-old rats using the Morris swim maze test. Changes in retention were shown in MeHg-treated rats, indicating that MeHg induced memory alterations. Taken together, these findings show that exposure to a very low dose of MeHg during development exerts neurotoxic effects on the dopaminergic system and that alterations of brain functions persist in adult life.

  7. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sam V; Limbocker, Ryan A; Gehringer, Rachel C; Divis, Jenny L; Osterhaus, Gregory L; Newby, Maxwell D; Sofis, Michael J; Jarmolowicz, David P; Newman, Brooke D; Mathews, Tiffany A; Johnson, Michael A

    2016-06-15

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as "chemobrain", is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  8. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as “chemobrain”, is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  9. Mesocortical Dopamine Phenotypes in Mice Lacking the Sonic Hedgehog Receptor Cdon.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Grant, Alanna; Meti, Nicholas; Adye-White, Lauren; Torres-Berrío, Angelica; Rioux, Veronique; Lévesque, Martin; Charron, Frederic; Flores, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Motivated behaviors and many psychopathologies typically involve changes in dopamine release from the projections of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and/or the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). The morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) specifies fates of midbrain dopamine neurons, but VTA-specific effects of Shh signaling are also being uncovered. In this study, we assessed the role of the Shh receptor Cdon in the development of VTA and SNc dopamine neurons. We find that Cdon is expressed in the proliferating progenitor zone of the embryonic ventral midbrain and that the number of proliferating cells in this region is increased in mouse Cdon(-/-) embryos. Consistent with a role of Shh in the regulation of neuronal proliferation in this region, we find that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons is increased in the VTA of Cdon(-/-) mice at birth and that this effect endures into adulthood. In contrast, the number of TH-positive neurons in the SNc is not altered in Cdon(-/-) mice at either age. Moreover, adult Cdon(-/-) mice have a greater number of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dopamine presynaptic sites, and increased baseline concentrations of dopamine and dopamine metabolites selectively in this region. Finally, consistent with increased dopamine function in the mPFC, we find that adult Cdon(-/-) mice fail to exhibit behavioral plasticity upon repeated amphetamine treatment. Based on these data, we suggest that Cdon plays an important role encoding the diversity of dopamine neurons in the midbrain, influencing both the development of the mesocortical dopamine pathway and behavioral outputs that involve this neural circuitry. PMID:27419218

  10. Mesocortical Dopamine Phenotypes in Mice Lacking the Sonic Hedgehog Receptor Cdon

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Alanna; Meti, Nicholas; Adye-White, Lauren; Rioux, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Motivated behaviors and many psychopathologies typically involve changes in dopamine release from the projections of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and/or the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). The morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) specifies fates of midbrain dopamine neurons, but VTA-specific effects of Shh signaling are also being uncovered. In this study, we assessed the role of the Shh receptor Cdon in the development of VTA and SNc dopamine neurons. We find that Cdon is expressed in the proliferating progenitor zone of the embryonic ventral midbrain and that the number of proliferating cells in this region is increased in mouse Cdon−/− embryos. Consistent with a role of Shh in the regulation of neuronal proliferation in this region, we find that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons is increased in the VTA of Cdon−/− mice at birth and that this effect endures into adulthood. In contrast, the number of TH-positive neurons in the SNc is not altered in Cdon−/− mice at either age. Moreover, adult Cdon−/− mice have a greater number of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dopamine presynaptic sites, and increased baseline concentrations of dopamine and dopamine metabolites selectively in this region. Finally, consistent with increased dopamine function in the mPFC, we find that adult Cdon−/− mice fail to exhibit behavioral plasticity upon repeated amphetamine treatment. Based on these data, we suggest that Cdon plays an important role encoding the diversity of dopamine neurons in the midbrain, influencing both the development of the mesocortical dopamine pathway and behavioral outputs that involve this neural circuitry. PMID:27419218

  11. Mitochondrial proteomics investigation of a cellular model of impaired dopamine homeostasis, an early step in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alberio, Tiziana; Bondi, Heather; Colombo, Flavia; Alloggio, Isabella; Pieroni, Luisa; Urbani, Andrea; Fasano, Mauro

    2014-06-01

    Impaired dopamine homeostasis is an early event in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species consequent to dopamine oxidation leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and eventually cell death. Alterations in the mitochondrial proteome due to dopamine exposure were investigated in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. The combination of two orthogonal proteomic approaches, two-dimensional electrophoresis and shotgun proteomics (proteomeXchange dataset PXD000838), was used to highlight the specific pathways perturbed by the increase of intracellular dopamine, in comparison with those perturbed by a specific mitochondrial toxin (4-methylphenylpyridinium, MPP(+)), a neurotoxin causing Parkinsonism-like symptoms in animal models. Proteins altered by MPP(+) did not completely overlap with those affected by dopamine treatment. In particular, the MPP(+) target complex I component NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur protein 3 was not affected by dopamine together with 26 other proteins. The comparison of proteomics approaches highlighted the fragmentation of some mitochondrial proteins, suggesting an alteration of the mitochondrial protease activity. Pathway and disease association analysis of the proteins affected by dopamine revealed the overrepresentation of the Parkinson's disease and the parkin-ubiquitin proteasomal system pathways and of gene ontologies associated with generation of precursor metabolites and energy, response to topologically incorrect proteins and programmed cell death. These alterations may be globally interpreted in part as the result of a direct effect of dopamine on mitochondria (e.g. alteration of the mitochondrial protease activity) and in part as the effect on mitochondria of a general activation of cellular processes (e.g. regulation of programmed cell death). PMID:24675778

  12. Neurobehavioral Evidence for Changes in Dopamine System Activity During Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Wahlstrom, Dustin; White, Tonya; Luciana, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Human adolescence has been characterized by increases in risk-taking, emotional lability, and deficient patterns of behavioral regulation. These behaviors have often been attributed to changes in brain structure that occur during this developmental period, notably alterations in gray and white matter that impact synaptic architecture in frontal, limbic, and striatal regions. In this review, we provide a rationale for considering that these behaviors may be due to changes in dopamine system activity, particularly overactivity, during adolescence relative to either childhood or adulthood. This rationale relies on animal data due to limitations in assessing neurochemical activity more directly in juveniles. Accordingly, we also present a strategy that incorporates molecular genetic techniques to infer the status of the underlying tone of the dopamine system across developmental groups. Implications for the understanding of adolescent behavioral development are discussed. PMID:20026110

  13. Effects of dopamine D2-like receptor agonists in mice trained to discriminate cocaine from saline: influence of feeding condition

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Gregory T.; Jackson, Jonathan A.; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    In rats, the discriminative stimulus effects of direct- and indirect-acting dopamine receptor agonists are mediated by multiple dopamine receptor subtypes and the relative contribution of dopamine D2 and D3 receptors to these effects varies as a function of feeding condition. In these studies, free-fed and food-restricted mice were trained to discriminate 10.0 mg/kg cocaine using a two-lever discrimination procedure in which responding was maintained by food. Both groups of mice acquired the discrimination; however, free-fed mice responded at lower rates than food-restricted mice. Dopamine D3 receptor agonists, pramipexole and quinpirole, increased cocaine-appropriate responding (>85%) in food-restricted, but not in free-fed mice. The dopamine D2 receptor agonist, sumanirole, and the nonselective dopamine receptor agonist, apomorphine, failed to increase cocaine-appropriate responding in either group. Free-fed mice were more sensitive than food-restricted mice to the rate-decreasing effects of dopamine receptor agonists and these effects could not be overcome by increasing the magnitude of reinforcement. Because feeding condition did not alter quinpirole-induced hypothermia, it is unlikely that differences in the discriminative stimulus or rate-decreasing effects of dopamine D2-like receptor agonists were due to differences in the pharmacokinetic properties of the drugs. Although these results suggest that the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine are mediated by both dopamine D2 and D3 receptors in food-restricted mice, the increased sensitivity of free-fed mice to the rate-decreasing effects of dopamine D2-like receptor agonists limited conclusions about the impact of feeding conditions on the relative contribution of dopamine D2 and D3 receptors to the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine. PMID:24561049

  14. De novo mutation in the dopamine transporter gene associates dopamine dysfunction with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Peter J.; Campbell, Nicholas G.; Sharma, Shruti; Erreger, Kevin; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Saunders, Christine; Belovich, Andrea N.; Sahai, Michelle A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Gether, Ulrik; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Matthies, Heinrich J.G.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Galli, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    De novo genetic variation is an important class of risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Recently, whole exome sequencing of ASD families has identified a novel de novo missense mutation in the human dopamine (DA) transporter (hDAT) gene, which results in a Thr to Met substitution at site 356 (hDAT T356M). The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a presynaptic membrane protein that regulates dopaminergic tone in the central nervous system by mediating the high-affinity re-uptake of synaptically released DA, making it a crucial regulator of DA homeostasis. Here, we report the first functional, structural, and behavioral characterization of an ASD-associated de novo mutation in the hDAT. We demonstrate that the hDAT T356M displays anomalous function, characterized as a persistent reverse transport of DA (substrate efflux). Importantly, in the bacterial homolog leucine transporter, substitution of A289 (the homologous site to T356) with a Met promotes an outward-facing conformation upon substrate binding. In the substrate-bound state, an outward-facing transporter conformation is a required for substrate efflux. In Drosophila melanogaster, expression of hDAT T356M in DA neurons lacking Drosophila DAT leads to hyperlocomotion, a trait associated with DA dysfunction and ASD. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that alterations in DA homeostasis, mediated by aberrant DAT function, may confer risk for ASD and related neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:23979605

  15. Altering prolactin concentrations in sows.

    PubMed

    Farmer, C

    2016-07-01

    Prolactin has a multiplicity of actions, but it is of particular importance in gestating and lactating animals. In sows, it is involved in the control of mammary development and also holds essential roles in the lactogenic and galactopoietic processes. Furthermore, low circulating concentrations of prolactin are associated with the agalactia syndrome. The crucial role of prolactin makes it important to understand the various factors that can alter its secretion. Regulation of prolactin secretion is largely under the negative control of dopamine, and dopamine agonists consistently decrease prolactin concentrations in sows. On the other hand, injections of dopamine antagonists can enhance circulating prolactin concentrations. Besides pharmacologic agents, many other factors can also alter prolactin concentrations in sows. The use of Chinese-derived breeds, for instance, leads to increased prolactin concentrations in lactating sows compared with standard European white breeds. Numerous husbandry and feeding practices also have a potential impact on prolactin concentrations in sows. Factors, such as provision of nest-building material prepartum, housing at farrowing, high ambient temperature, stress, transient weaning, exogenous thyrotropin-releasing factor, exogenous growth hormone-releasing factor, nursing frequency, prolonged photoperiod, fasting, increased protein and/or energy intake, altered energy sources, feeding high-fiber diets, sorghum ergot or plant extracts, were all studied with respect to their prolactinemic properties. Although some of these practices do indeed affect circulating prolactin concentrations, none leads to changes as drastic as those brought about by dopamine agonists or antagonists. It appears that the numerous factors regulating prolactin concentrations in sows are still not fully elucidated, and that studies to develop novel applicable ways of increasing prolactin concentrations in sows are warranted.

  16. Dopamine dynamics associated with, and resulting from, schedule-induced alcohol self-administration: Analyses in dopamine transporter knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Mittleman, Guy; Call, Stanford B.; Cockroft, Jody L.; Goldowitz, Dan; Matthews, Douglas B.; Blaha, Charles D.

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical evidence suggest an association between alcoholism and the primary regulator of extracellular dopamine concentrations, the dopamine transporter (DAT). However, the nature of this association is unclear. We determined if ten days of voluntary alcohol self-administration followed by withdrawal could directly alter DAT function, or if genetically-mediated changes in DAT function and/or availability could influence vulnerability to alcohol abuse. Heterozygous (DAT+/-) and homozygous mutant (DAT-/-) and wildtype (DAT+/+) mice were allowed to consume 5% alcohol in a schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) task. In vivo fixed potential amperometry in anesthetized mice was used to (1) identify functional characteristics of mesoaccumbens dopamine neurons related to genotype, including dopamine autoreceptor (DAR) sensitivity, DAT efficiency, and DAT capacity, (2) determine if any of these characteristics correlated with alcohol drinking observed in DAT+/+ and DAT+/- animals, and (3) determine if SIP-alcohol self-administration altered DAR sensitivity, DAT efficiency, and DAT capacity by comparing these characteristics in wildtype (DAT+/+) mice that were SIP-alcohol naïve, with those that had undergone SIP-alcohol testing. DAT-/- mice consumed significantly less alcohol during testing and this behavioral difference was related to significant differences in DAR sensitivity, DAT efficiency, and DAT capacity. These functional characteristics were correlated to varying degrees with g/kg alcohol consumption in DAT+/+ and DAT+/- mice. DAR sensitivity was consistently reduced and DAT efficiency was enhanced in SIP-alcohol experienced DAT+/+ mice in comparison to naïve animals. These results indicate that DAR sensitivity is reduced by SIP-alcohol consumption and that DAT efficiency is modified by genotype as well as SIP-alcohol exposure. DAT capacity appeared to be strictly associated with SIP-alcohol consumption. PMID:21354763

  17. Dysregulation of D₂-mediated dopamine transmission in monkeys after chronic escalating methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Groman, Stephanie M; Lee, Buyean; Seu, Emanuele; James, Alex S; Feiler, Karen; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D; Jentsch, J David

    2012-04-25

    Compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking are important substance-abuse behaviors that have been linked to alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission and to impaired inhibitory control. Evidence supports the notions that abnormal D₂ receptor-mediated dopamine transmission and inhibitory control may be heritable risk factors for addictions, and that they also reflect drug-induced neuroadaptations. To provide a mechanistic explanation for the drug-induced emergence of inhibitory-control deficits, this study examined how a chronic, escalating-dose regimen of methamphetamine administration affected dopaminergic neurochemistry and cognition in monkeys. Dopamine D₂-like receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) availability and reversal-learning performance were measured before and after exposure to methamphetamine (or saline), and brain dopamine levels were assayed at the conclusion of the study. Exposure to methamphetamine reduced dopamine D₂-like receptor and DAT availability and produced transient, selective impairments in the reversal of a stimulus-outcome association. Furthermore, individual differences in the change in D₂-like receptor availability in the striatum were related to the change in response to positive feedback. These data provide evidence that chronic, escalating-dose methamphetamine administration alters the dopamine system in a manner similar to that observed in methamphetamine-dependent humans. They also implicate alterations in positive-feedback sensitivity associated with D₂-like receptor dysfunction as the mechanism by which inhibitory control deficits emerge in stimulant-dependent individuals. Finally, a significant degree of neurochemical and behavioral variation in response to methamphetamine was detected, indicating that individual differences affect the degree to which drugs of abuse alter these processes. Identification of these factors ultimately may assist in the development of individualized treatments for substance dependence.

  18. Increased brain dopamine and dopamine receptors in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, A.V.; Iversen, L.L.; Rossor, M.; Spokes, E.; Bird, E.; Arregui, A.; Creese, I.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    In postmortem samples of caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens from 48 schizophrenic patients, there were significant increases in both the maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) and the apparent dissociation constant (KD) for tritiated spiperone. The increase in apparent KD probably reflects the presence of residual neuroleptic drugs, but changes in Bmax for tritiated spiperone reflect genuine changes in receptor numbers. The increases in receptors were seen only in patients in whom neuroleptic medication had been maintained until the time of death, indicating that they may be entirely iatrogenic. Dopamine measurements for a larger series of schizophrenic and control cases (n greater than 60) show significantly increased concentrations in both the nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus. The changes in dopamine were not obviously related to neuroleptic medication and, unlike the receptor changes, were most severe in younger patients.

  19. The effects of dopamine on root growth and enzyme activity in soybean seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, Bruno Boni; Gomes, Bruno Ribeiro; Siqueira-Soares, Rita de Cássia; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of dopamine, an allelochemical exuded from the velvetbean (Mucuna pruriens L DC. var utilis), on the growth and cell viability of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) roots. We analyzed the effects of dopamine on superoxide dismutase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and cell wall-bound peroxidase activities as well as its effects on lignin contents in the roots. Three-day-old seedlings were cultivated in half-strength Hoagland nutrient solution (pH 6.0), without or with 0.25 to 1.0 mM dopamine, in a growth chamber (25°C, 12L:12D photoperiod, irradiance of 280 μmol m−2 s−1) for 24 h. In general, the length, fresh weight and dry weight of roots, cell viability, PAL and POD activities decreased, while SOD activities increased after dopamine treatment. The content of lignin was not altered. The data demonstrate the susceptibility of soybean to dopamine and reinforce the role of this catecholamine as a strong allelochemical. The results also suggest that dopamine-induced inhibition in soybean roots is not related to the production of lignin, but may be related to damage caused by reactive oxygen species. PMID:23838960

  20. Dissociable effects of dopamine on learning and performance within sensorimotor striatum.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Daniel K; Stoetzner, Colin; Abraham, Rohit; Pettibone, Jeff; DeMarco, Kayla; Berke, Joshua D

    2014-06-01

    Striatal dopamine is an important modulator of current behavior, as seen in the rapid and dramatic effects of dopamine replacement therapy in Parkinson Disease (PD). Yet there is also extensive evidence that dopamine acts as a learning signal, modulating synaptic plasticity within striatum to affect future behavior. Disentangling these "performance" and "learning" functions is important for designing effective, long-term PD treatments. We conducted a series of unilateral drug manipulations and dopamine terminal lesions in the dorsolateral striatum of rats highly-trained to perform brief instructed head/neck movements (two-alternative forced choice task). Reaction times and accuracy were measured longitudinally to determine if task behavior changed immediately, progressed over time, and/or persisted after drug withdrawal. Enhanced dopamine signaling with amphetamine caused an immediate, nonprogressive, and bilateral decrease in reaction times (RT). The altered RT distributions were consistent with reduced distance to threshold in the linear approach to threshold with ergodic rate (LATER) model of decision-making. Conversely, the dopamine antagonist flupenthixol caused experience-dependent, persistent changes in RT and accuracy indicative of a "learning" effect. These RT distributions were consistent with a slowed rate of approach to decision threshold. Our results show that dopaminergic signaling makes dissociable contributions to current and future behavior even within a single striatal subregion, and provide important clues for both models of normal decision-making and the design of novel drug therapies in PD.

  1. Hydroxide ion-mediated synthesis of monodisperse dopamine-melanin nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soojeong; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2015-11-15

    Dopamine-melanin nanospheres are promising materials for photoprotection, structural coloration, and thermoregulation due to their unusual optical and chemical properties. Here, we report the experimental parameters which influence size of dopamine-melanin nanospheres and uniformity. Dopamine precursors are oxidatively polymerized in basic aqueous medium. Therefore, concentration of hydroxide ions significantly influences reaction rate and size of nanospheres. To investigate the effect of hydroxide ions, we adjust three different parameters which affect pH of medium: concentration of sodium hydroxide and dopamine hydrochloride, and reaction temperature. At constant temperature, concentration of hydroxide ions is linearly proportional to initial reaction rates which determine the number of nuclei for nanosphere growth. Temperature alters not only initial reaction rate but also diffusivity of molecules, leading to deviation from the relation between the reaction rate and the number of nuclei. The diameter of dopamine-melanin nanospheres can be readily controlled in a range of 80-490nm through adjusting concentration of dopamine precursor, while maintaining uniform-size distribution and dispersion stability. The synthesized nanospheres are analyzed to confirm the chemical structure, which is composed of approximately 6 indole units. Moreover, surface and chemical properties of the nanospheres are characterized to provide valuable information for surface modification and application. PMID:26210098

  2. Hydroxide ion-mediated synthesis of monodisperse dopamine-melanin nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soojeong; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2015-11-15

    Dopamine-melanin nanospheres are promising materials for photoprotection, structural coloration, and thermoregulation due to their unusual optical and chemical properties. Here, we report the experimental parameters which influence size of dopamine-melanin nanospheres and uniformity. Dopamine precursors are oxidatively polymerized in basic aqueous medium. Therefore, concentration of hydroxide ions significantly influences reaction rate and size of nanospheres. To investigate the effect of hydroxide ions, we adjust three different parameters which affect pH of medium: concentration of sodium hydroxide and dopamine hydrochloride, and reaction temperature. At constant temperature, concentration of hydroxide ions is linearly proportional to initial reaction rates which determine the number of nuclei for nanosphere growth. Temperature alters not only initial reaction rate but also diffusivity of molecules, leading to deviation from the relation between the reaction rate and the number of nuclei. The diameter of dopamine-melanin nanospheres can be readily controlled in a range of 80-490nm through adjusting concentration of dopamine precursor, while maintaining uniform-size distribution and dispersion stability. The synthesized nanospheres are analyzed to confirm the chemical structure, which is composed of approximately 6 indole units. Moreover, surface and chemical properties of the nanospheres are characterized to provide valuable information for surface modification and application.

  3. mRNA expression of dopamine receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes of computer game addicts.

    PubMed

    Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarei, Seyed Zeinolabedin; Sadat-Shirazi, Mitra-Sadat; Eghbali, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Excessive playing of computer games like some other behaviors could lead to addiction. Addictive behaviors may induce their reinforcing effects through stimulation of the brain dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway. The status of dopamine receptors in the brain may be parallel to their homologous receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Here, we have investigated the mRNA expression of dopamine D3, D4 and D5 receptors in PBLs of computer game addicts (n = 20) in comparison to normal subjects (n = 20), using a real-time PCR method. The results showed that the expression level of D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts were not statistically different from the control group. However, the expression of the mRNA of D5 dopamine receptor was significantly down-regulated in PBLs of computer game addicts and reached 0.42 the amount of the control group. It is concluded that unlike with drug addiction, the expression levels of the D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts are not altered compared to the control group. However, reduced level of the D5 dopamine receptor in computer game addicts may serve as a peripheral marker in studies where the confounding effects of abused drugs are unwanted.

  4. The effects of dopamine on root growth and enzyme activity in soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Bruno Boni; Gomes, Bruno Ribeiro; Siqueira-Soares, Rita de Cássia; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of dopamine, an allelochemical exuded from the velvetbean (Mucuna pruriens L DC. var utilis), on the growth and cell viability of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) roots. We analyzed the effects of dopamine on superoxide dismutase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and cell wall-bound peroxidase activities as well as its effects on lignin contents in the roots. Three-day-old seedlings were cultivated in half-strength Hoagland nutrient solution (pH 6.0), without or with 0.25 to 1.0 mM dopamine, in a growth chamber (25°C, 12L:12D photoperiod, irradiance of 280 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) for 24 h. In general, the length, fresh weight and dry weight of roots, cell viability, PAL and POD activities decreased, while SOD activities increased after dopamine treatment. The content of lignin was not altered. The data demonstrate the susceptibility of soybean to dopamine and reinforce the role of this catecholamine as a strong allelochemical. The results also suggest that dopamine-induced inhibition in soybean roots is not related to the production of lignin, but may be related to damage caused by reactive oxygen species. PMID:23838960

  5. The Behavioral Pharmacology of Effort-Related Choice Behavior: Dopamine, Adenosine and beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Merce; Nunes, Eric J.; Randall, Patrick A.; Pardo, Marta

    2012-01-01

    For many years, it has been suggested that drugs that interfere with dopamine (DA) transmission alter the "rewarding" impact of primary reinforcers such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding…

  6. Autoimmunity against dopamine receptors in neuropsychiatric and movement disorders: a review of Sydenham chorea and beyond.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, M W; Cox, C J

    2016-01-01

    Antineuronal autoantibodies are associated with the involuntary movement disorder Sydenham chorea (SC) and paediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) which are characterized by the acute onset of tics and/or obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). In SC and PANDAS, autoantibodies signal human neuronal cells and activate calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Animal models immunized with group A streptococcal antigens demonstrate autoantibodies against dopamine receptors and concomitantly altered behaviours. Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) derived from SC target and signal the dopamine D2L (long) receptor (D2R). Antibodies against D2R were elevated over normal levels in SC and acute-onset PANDAS with small choreiform movements, but were not elevated over normal levels in PANDAS-like chronic tics and OCD. The expression of human SC-derived anti-D2R autoantibody V gene in B cells and serum of transgenic mice demonstrated that the human autoantibody targets dopaminergic neurones in the basal ganglia and other types of neurones in the cortex. Here, we review current evidence supporting the hypothesis that antineuronal antibodies, specifically against dopamine receptors, follow streptococcal exposures and may target dopamine receptors and alter central dopamine pathways leading to movement and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26454143

  7. Dopamine and aging: intersecting facets.

    PubMed

    Rollo, C David

    2009-04-01

    Aging encompasses life itself so understanding requires frameworks that forge unity amidst complexity. The free radical theory of aging is one example. The original focus on damage was augmented recently by appreciation that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are essential to normal signaling and cell function. This paradigm is currently undergoing an explosive expansion fueled by the discovery that regulatory organization is a merry-go-round of redox cycling seamlessly fused to endogenous clocks. This might best be described as an "Electroplasmic Cycle." This is certainly applicable to dopaminergic neurons with their exceptional metabolic, electrical and rhythmic properties. Here I review normal aging of dopamine systems to highlight them as a valuable model. I then examine the possible integration of free radical and ion channel theories of aging. Finally, I incorporate clocks and explore the multifaceted implications of electroplasmic cycles with special emphasis on dopamine.

  8. Dopamine, uncertainty and TD learning

    PubMed Central

    Niv, Yael; Duff, Michael O; Dayan, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that the phasic activities of dopaminergic neurons in the primate midbrain represent a temporal difference (TD) error in predictions of future reward, with increases above and decreases below baseline consequent on positive and negative prediction errors, respectively. However, dopamine cells have very low baseline activity, which implies that the representation of these two sorts of error is asymmetric. We explore the implications of this seemingly innocuous asymmetry for the interpretation of dopaminergic firing patterns in experiments with probabilistic rewards which bring about persistent prediction errors. In particular, we show that when averaging the non-stationary prediction errors across trials, a ramping in the activity of the dopamine neurons should be apparent, whose magnitude is dependent on the learning rate. This exact phenomenon was observed in a recent experiment, though being interpreted there in antipodal terms as a within-trial encoding of uncertainty. PMID:15953384

  9. Gestational lead exposure selectively decreases retinal dopamine amacrine cells and dopamine content in adult mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Donald A.; Hamilton, W. Ryan; Johnson, Jerry E.; Xiao, Weimin; Chaney, Shawntay; Mukherjee, Shradha; Miller, Diane B.; O'Callaghan, James P.

    2011-11-15

    -Right-Pointing-Pointer Gestational lead exposure dose-dependently decreased the number of TH-immunoreactive dopaminergic amacrine cells Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gestational lead exposure selectively decreased dopaminergic, but not GABAergic, glycinergic or cholinergic, amacrine cells Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gestational lead exposure dose-dependently decreased retinal dopamine content, its metabolites and dopamine utilization Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A decrease in dopamine can alter ERG amplitudes, circadian rhythms, dark/light adaptation and spatial contrast sensitivity.

  10. Dopamine modulates excitability of basolateral amygdala neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kröner, Sven; Rosenkranz, J Amiel; Grace, Anthony A; Barrionuevo, German

    2005-03-01

    The amygdala plays a role in affective behaviors, which are modulated by the dopamine (DA) innervation of the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA). Although in vivo studies indicate that activation of DA receptors alters BLA neuronal activity, it is unclear whether DA exerts direct effects on BLA neurons or whether it acts via indirect effects on BLA afferents. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in rat brain slices, we investigated the site and mechanisms through which DA regulates the excitability of BLA neurons. Dopamine enhanced the excitability of BLA projection neurons in response to somatic current injections via a postsynaptic effect. Dopamine D1 receptor activation increased excitability and evoked firing, whereas D2 receptor activation increased input resistance. Current- and voltage-clamp experiments in projection neurons showed that D1 receptor activation enhanced excitability by modulating a 4-aminopyridine- and alpha-dendrotoxin-sensitive, slowly inactivating K+ current. Furthermore, DA and D1 receptor activation increased evoked firing in fast-spiking BLA interneurons. Consistent with a postsynaptic modulation of interneuron excitability, DA also increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents recorded in projection neurons without changing release of GABA. These data demonstrate that DA exerts direct effects on BLA projection neurons and indirect actions via modulation of interneurons that may work in concert to enhance the neuronal response to large, suprathreshold inputs, while suppressing weaker inputs. PMID:15537813

  11. Dopamine receptors – IUPHAR Review 13

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  12. Striatal dopamine D2-like receptor correlation patterns with human obesity and opportunistic eating behavior

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Juen; Simmons, W. Kyle; Herscovitch, Peter; Martin, Alex; Hall, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is believed to be driven by a food environment that promotes consumption of inexpensive, convenient, high-calorie, palatable foods. Individual differences in obesity susceptibility or resistance to weight loss may arise due to alterations in the neurocircuitry supporting food reward and eating habits. In particular, dopamine signaling in the ventromedial striatum is thought to encode food reward and motivation, whereas dopamine in the dorsal and lateral striatum orchestrates the development of eating habits. We measured striatal dopamine D2-like receptor binding potential (D2BP) using positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]fallypride in 43 human subjects with body mass indices (BMI) ranging from 18–45 kg/m2. Opportunistic eating behavior and BMI were both positively associated with D2BP in the dorsal and lateral striatum, whereas BMI was negatively associated with D2BP in the ventromedial striatum. These results suggest that obese people have alterations in dopamine neurocircuitry that may increase their susceptibility to opportunistic overeating while at the same time making food intake less rewarding, less goal-directed, and more habitual. Whether or not the observed neurocircuitry alterations pre-existed or occurred as a result of obesity development, they may perpetuate obesity given the omnipresence of palatable foods and their associated cues. PMID:25199919

  13. Prefrontal dopamine in associative learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Puig, M V; Antzoulatos, E G; Miller, E K

    2014-12-12

    Learning to associate specific objects or actions with rewards and remembering the associations are everyday tasks crucial for our flexible adaptation to the environment. These higher-order cognitive processes depend on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and frontostriatal circuits that connect areas in the frontal lobe with the striatum in the basal ganglia. Both structures are densely innervated by dopamine (DA) afferents that originate in the midbrain. Although the activity of DA neurons is thought to be important for learning, the exact role of DA transmission in frontostriatal circuits during learning-related tasks is still unresolved. Moreover, the neural substrates of this modulation are poorly understood. Here, we review our recent work in monkeys utilizing local pharmacology of DA agents in the PFC to investigate the cellular mechanisms of DA modulation of associative learning and memory. We show that blocking both D1 and D2 receptors in the lateral PFC impairs learning of new stimulus-response associations and cognitive flexibility, but not the memory of highly familiar associations. In addition, D2 receptors may also contribute to motivation. The learning deficits correlated with reductions of neural information about the associations in PFC neurons, alterations in global excitability and spike synchronization, and exaggerated alpha and beta neural oscillations. Our findings provide new insights into how DA transmission modulates associative learning and memory processes in frontostriatal systems. PMID:25241063

  14. "Is dopamine involved in Alzheimer's disease?".

    PubMed

    Martorana, Alessandro; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and dementia. Recent advances indicate that AD pathogenesis appears more complex than its mere neuropathology. Changes in synaptic plasticity, neuronal disarray and cell death are pathways commonly recognized as pathogenic mechanisms of AD. It is thought that the altered metabolism of certain membrane proteins may lead to the production of amyloid (Aβ) oligomers that are characterized by an highly toxic effect on neurotransmission pathways, such as those mediated by Acetylcholine. The interaction of Aβ oligomers with these neurotansmitters systems would in turn induce cell dysfunction, neurotransmitters signaling imbalance and finally lead to the appearance of neurological signs. In this perspective, it is still debated how and if these mechanisms may also engage the dopaminergic system in AD. Recent experimental work revealed that the dopaminergic system may well be involved in the occurrence of cognitive decline, often being predictive of rapidly progressive forms of AD. However, a clear idea on the role of the dopamine system in AD is still missing. Here we review the more recent evidences supporting the notion that the dopaminergic dysfunction has a pathogenic role in cognitive decline symptoms of AD. PMID:25309431

  15. Dopamine: burning the candle at both ends.

    PubMed

    Pearson, John M; Platt, Michael L

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine neurons are well known for signaling reward-prediction errors. In this issue, Matsumoto and Takada (2013) show that some dopamine neurons also signal salient events during progression through a visual search task requiring working memory and sustained attention. PMID:24011998

  16. Synapsins differentially control dopamine and serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Kile, Brian M; Guillot, Thomas S; Venton, B Jill; Wetsel, William C; Augustine, George J; Wightman, R Mark

    2010-07-21

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knock-out (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released. PMID:20660258

  17. Dose-dependent changes in the synaptic strength on dopamine neurons and locomotor activity after cocaine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wanat, M.J.; Bonci, A.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in synaptic strength on ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons are thought to play a critical role in the development of addiction-related behaviors. However, it is unknown how a single injection of cocaine at different doses affects locomotor activity, behavioral sensitization, and glutamatergic synaptic strength on VTA dopamine neurons in mice. We observed that behavioral sensitization to a challenge cocaine injection scaled with the dose of cocaine received one day prior. Interestingly, the locomotor activity after the initial exposure to different doses of cocaine corresponded to the changes in glutamatergic strength on VTA dopamine neurons. These results in mice suggest that a single exposure to cocaine dose-dependently affects excitatory synapses on VTA dopamine neurons, and that this acute synaptic alteration is directly associated with the locomotor responses to cocaine and not to behavioral sensitization. PMID:18655120

  18. Molecular Mechanism of Dopamine Transport by Human Dopamine Transporter.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine transporters (DATs) control neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) homeostasis by reuptake of excess DA, assisted by sodium and chloride ions. The recent resolution of DAT structure (dDAT) from Drosophila permits us for the first time to directly view the sequence of events involved in DA reuptake in human DAT (hDAT) using homology modeling and full-atomic microseconds accelerated simulations. Major observations are spontaneous closure of extracellular gates prompted by DA binding; stabilization of a holo-occluded intermediate; disruption of N82-N353 hydrogen bond and exposure to intracellular (IC) water triggered by Na2 dislocation; redistribution of a network of salt bridges at the IC surface in the inward-facing state; concerted tilting of IC-exposed helices to enable the release of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions; and DA release after protonation of D79. The observed time-resolved interactions confirm the conserved dynamics of LeuT-fold family, while providing insights into the mechanistic role of specific residues in hDAT.

  19. THE MYSTERIOUS MOTIVATIONAL FUNCTIONS OF MESOLIMBIC DOPAMINE

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Mercè

    2012-01-01

    Summary Nucleus accumbens dopamine is known to play a role in motivational processes, and dysfunctions of mesolimbic dopamine may contribute to motivational symptoms of depression and other disorders, as well as features of substance abuse. Although it has become traditional to label dopamine neurons as “reward” neurons, this is an over-generalization, and it is important to distinguish between aspects of motivation that are differentially affected by dopaminergic manipulations. For example, accumbens dopamine does not mediate primary food motivation or appetite, but is involved in appetitive and aversive motivational processes including behavioral activation, exertion of effort, approach behavior, sustained task engagement, Pavlovian processes and instrumental learning. In this review, we discuss the complex roles of dopamine in behavioral functions related to motivation. PMID:23141060

  20. Striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors modulate methamphetamine-induced cortical Fos expression.

    PubMed

    Gross, N B; Marshall, J F

    2009-07-21

    Methamphetamine (mAMPH) is a psychostimulant drug that increases extracellular levels of monoamines throughout the brain. It has previously been observed that a single injection of mAMPH increases immediate early gene (IEG) expression in both the striatum and cerebral cortex. Moreover, this effect is modulated by dopamine and glutamate receptors since systemic administration of dopamine or glutamate antagonists has been found to alter mAMPH-induced striatal and cortical IEG expression. However, because dopamine and glutamate receptors are found in extra-striatal as well as striatal brain regions, studies employing systemic injection of dopamine or glutamate antagonists fail to localize the effects of mAMPH-induced activation. In the present experiments, the roles of striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors in mAMPH-induced gene expression in the striatum and cerebral cortex were examined. The nuclear expression of Fos, the protein product of the IEG c-fos, was quantified in both the striatum and the cortex of animals receiving intrastriatal dopamine or glutamate antagonist administration. Intrastriatal infusion of dopamine (D1 or D2) or glutamate [N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)] antagonists affected not only mAMPH-induced striatal, but also cortical, Fos expression. Overall, the effects of the antagonists occurred dose-dependently, in both the infused and non-infused hemispheres, with greater influences occurring in the infused hemisphere. Finally, unilateral intrastriatal infusion of dopamine or glutamate antagonists changed the behavior of the rats from characteristic mAMPH-induced stereotypy to rotation ipsilateral to the infusion. These results demonstrate that mAMPH's actions on striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors modulate the widespread cortical activation induced by mAMPH. It is hypothesized that dopamine release from nigrostriatal terminals modulates activity within striatal efferent

  1. Amphetamine and methamphetamine reduce striatal dopamine transporter function without concurrent dopamine transporter relocalization.

    PubMed

    German, Christopher L; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2012-10-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH) alter dopamine transporter (DAT) function. In vitro heterologous cell line and synaptosome studies demonstrate AMPH-induced DAT internalization, implicating relocalization in reduced DAT uptake following drug exposure. However, few studies have evaluated DAT localization following in vivo AMPH/METH administration. To determine DAT subcellular localization following drug administration, a centrifugation technique was developed to isolate striatal synaptosomal membrane and vesicle fractions. DAT was distributed between the synaptosomal membrane (60%) and endosomal vesicles (40%), and in vitro application of the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate to striatal synaptosomes caused DAT internalization into the vesicle fractions. In contrast, neither single nor repeated in vivo AMPH and/or METH administrations altered DAT localization 5, 15, 30, or 60 min post-treatment, despite reduced DAT uptake. Importantly, repeated METH injections uniformly decreased total DAT immunoreactivity within all fractions 7 days post-treatment. These findings suggest that factors other than internalization can contribute to the observed acute and persistent DAT dysfunction and dopaminergic deficits following in vivo AMPH or METH administration.

  2. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by ..cap alpha..-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S/sub 2/ episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system.

  3. Amphetamine in adolescence disrupts the development of medial prefrontal cortex dopamine connectivity in a DCC-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lauren M; Makowski, Carolina S; Yogendran, Sandra V; Kiessling, Silke; Cermakian, Nicolas; Flores, Cecilia

    2015-03-13

    Initiation of drug use during adolescence is a strong predictor of both the incidence and severity of addiction throughout the lifetime. Intriguingly, adolescence is a period of dynamic refinement in the organization of neuronal connectivity, in particular medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dopamine circuitry. The guidance cue receptor, DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), is highly expressed by dopamine neurons and orchestrates their innervation to the mPFC during adolescence. Furthermore, we have shown that amphetamine in adolescence regulates DCC expression in dopamine neurons. Drugs in adolescence may therefore induce their enduring behavioral effects via DCC-mediated disruption in mPFC dopamine development. In this study, we investigated the impact of repeated exposure to amphetamine during adolescence on both the development of mPFC dopamine connectivity and on salience attribution to drug context in adulthood. We compare these effects to those induced by adult exposure to an identical amphetamine regimen. Finally, we determine whether DCC signaling within dopamine neurons is necessary for these events. Exposure to amphetamine in adolescence, but not in adulthood, leads to an increase in the span of dopamine innervation to the mPFC, but a reduction of presynaptic sites present on these axons. Amphetamine treatment in adolescence, but not in adulthood, also produces an increase in salience attribution to a previously drug-paired context in adulthood. Remarkably, DCC signaling within dopamine neurons is required for both of these effects. Drugs of abuse in adolescence may therefore induce their detrimental behavioral consequences by disrupting mesocortical dopamine development through alterations in the DCC signaling cascade.

  4. Amphetamine in adolescence disrupts the development of medial prefrontal cortex dopamine connectivity in a DCC-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lauren M; Makowski, Carolina S; Yogendran, Sandra V; Kiessling, Silke; Cermakian, Nicolas; Flores, Cecilia

    2015-04-01

    Initiation of drug use during adolescence is a strong predictor of both the incidence and severity of addiction throughout the lifetime. Intriguingly, adolescence is a period of dynamic refinement in the organization of neuronal connectivity, in particular medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dopamine circuitry. The guidance cue receptor, DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), is highly expressed by dopamine neurons and orchestrates their innervation to the mPFC during adolescence. Furthermore, we have shown that amphetamine in adolescence regulates DCC expression in dopamine neurons. Drugs in adolescence may therefore induce their enduring behavioral effects via DCC-mediated disruption in mPFC dopamine development. In this study, we investigated the impact of repeated exposure to amphetamine during adolescence on both the development of mPFC dopamine connectivity and on salience attribution to drug context in adulthood. We compare these effects to those induced by adult exposure to an identical amphetamine regimen. Finally, we determine whether DCC signaling within dopamine neurons is necessary for these events. Exposure to amphetamine in adolescence, but not in adulthood, leads to an increase in the span of dopamine innervation to the mPFC, but a reduction of presynaptic sites present on these axons. Amphetamine treatment in adolescence, but not in adulthood, also produces an increase in salience attribution to a previously drug-paired context in adulthood. Remarkably, DCC signaling within dopamine neurons is required for both of these effects. Drugs of abuse in adolescence may therefore induce their detrimental behavioral consequences by disrupting mesocortical dopamine development through alterations in the DCC signaling cascade. PMID:25336209

  5. The Michelin red guide of the brain: role of dopamine in goal-oriented navigation

    PubMed Central

    Retailleau, Aude; Boraud, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Spatial learning has been recognized over the years to be under the control of the hippocampus and related temporal lobe structures. Hippocampal damage often causes severe impairments in the ability to learn and remember a location in space defined by distal visual cues. Such cognitive disabilities are found in Parkinsonian patients. We recently investigated the role of dopamine in navigation in the 6-Hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA) rat, a model of Parkinson’s disease (PD) commonly used to investigate the pathophysiology of dopamine depletion (Retailleau et al., 2013). We demonstrated that dopamine (DA) is essential to spatial learning as its depletion results in spatial impairments. Our results showed that the behavioral effect of DA depletion is correlated with modification of the neural encoding of spatial features and decision making processes in hippocampus. However, the origin of these alterations in the neural processing of the spatial information needs to be clarified. It could result from a local effect: dopamine depletion disturbs directly the processing of relevant spatial information at hippocampal level. Alternatively, it could result from a more distributed network effect: dopamine depletion elsewhere in the brain (entorhinal cortex, striatum, etc.) modifies the way hippocampus processes spatial information. Recent experimental evidence in rodents, demonstrated indeed, that other brain areas are involved in the acquisition of spatial information. Amongst these, the cortex—basal ganglia (BG) loop is known to be involved in reinforcement learning and has been identified as an important contributor to spatial learning. In particular, it has been shown that altered activity of the BG striatal complex can impair the ability to perform spatial learning tasks. The present review provides a glimpse of the findings obtained over the past decade that support a dialog between these two structures during spatial learning under DA control. PMID:24672436

  6. Illumination controls differentiation of dopamine neurons regulating behaviour.

    PubMed

    Dulcis, Davide; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2008-11-13

    Specification of the appropriate neurotransmitter is a crucial step in neuronal differentiation because it enables signalling among populations of neurons. Experimental manipulations demonstrate that both autonomous and activity-dependent genetic programs contribute to this process during development, but whether natural environmental stimuli specify transmitter expression in a neuronal population is unknown. We investigated neurons of the ventral suprachiasmatic nucleus that regulate neuroendocrine pituitary function in response to light in teleosts, amphibia and primates. Here we show that altering light exposure, which changes the sensory input to the circuit controlling adaptation of skin pigmentation to background, changes the number of neurons expressing dopamine in larvae of the amphibian Xenopus laevis in a circuit-specific and activity-dependent manner. Neurons newly expressing dopamine then regulate changes in camouflage colouration in response to illumination. Thus, physiological activity alters the numbers of behaviourally relevant amine-transmitter-expressing neurons in the brain at postembryonic stages of development. The results may be pertinent to changes in cognitive states that are regulated by biogenic amines. PMID:19005547

  7. Response contingency directs long-term cocaine-induced neuroplasticity in prefrontal and striatal dopamine terminals.

    PubMed

    Wiskerke, Joost; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M; De Vries, Taco J

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to addictive substances such as cocaine is well-known to alter brain organisation. Cocaine-induced neuroadaptations depend on several factors, including drug administration paradigm. To date, studies addressing the consequences of cocaine exposure on dopamine transmission have either not been designed to investigate the role of response contingency or focused only on short-term neuroplasticity. We demonstrate a key role of response contingency in directing long-term cocaine-induced neuroplasticity throughout projection areas of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. We found enhanced electrically-evoked [(3)H]dopamine release from superfused brain slices of nucleus accumbens shell and core, dorsal striatum and medial prefrontal cortex three weeks after cessation of cocaine self-administration. In yoked cocaine rats receiving the same amount of cocaine passively, sensitised dopamine terminal reactivity was only observed in the nucleus accumbens core. Control sucrose self-administration experiments demonstrated that the observed neuroadaptations were not the result of instrumental learning per se. Thus, long-term withdrawal from cocaine self-administration is associated with widespread sensitisation of dopamine terminals throughout frontostriatal circuitries. PMID:27593624

  8. Methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity and behavioral sensitization: are dopamine d3 receptors involved?

    PubMed

    Jones, C D; Bartee, J A; Leite-Browning, M L; Blackshear, M A

    2007-05-15

    Drug sensitization is a behavioral phenomenon that occurs following repeated administration of methamphetamine (METH) and similar CNS stimulants. The mechanism of drug sensitization is unknown, but is believed to be due to downregulation of dopamine D3 receptors. It is hypothesized that repeated administration of dopamine D3 agonists results in downregulation of D3 receptors in methamphetamine-induced (METH-IND) sensitization. Furthermore, repeated administration of dopamine D3 antagonists and METH cause upregulation of D3 receptors and block METH-IND sensitization. The objective of this study was to determine the role of D3 receptors in METH-IND sensitization. To test these hypotheses, male mice received chronic injections (i.p.) of 2 mg/kg of the dopamine D3 agonist, PD128907 plus 0.5 mg/kg of METH or 8 mg/kg of D3 antagonist, U99194A and 0.5 mg\\kg of METH daily for 7-days. Drugs were withdrawn on day 8, and METH-IND sensitization was determined on day 18. Locomotor activity was measured for 75 minutes immediately after METH administration in an activity monitor. Acute administration of PD128907 decreased METH-IND locomotion, p < 0. 01, and acute U99194A increased it. However, chronic administration of these drugs did not alter the locomotor effects of METH (p > 0.05). These findings support in-part the hypothesis that dopamine D3 receptors are downregulated in METH-IND sensitization.

  9. Polypharmacology of dopamine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Butini, S; Nikolic, K; Kassel, S; Brückmann, H; Filipic, S; Agbaba, D; Gemma, S; Brogi, S; Brindisi, M; Campiani, G; Stark, H

    2016-07-01

    Most neurological diseases have a multifactorial nature and the number of molecular mechanisms discovered as underpinning these diseases is continuously evolving. The old concept of developing selective agents for a single target does not fit with the medical need of most neurological diseases. The development of designed multiple ligands holds great promises and appears as the next step in drug development for the treatment of these multifactorial diseases. Dopamine and its five receptor subtypes are intimately involved in numerous neurological disorders. Dopamine receptor ligands display a high degree of cross interactions with many other targets including G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes and ion channels. For brain disorders like Parkinsońs disease, schizophrenia and depression the dopaminergic system, being intertwined with many other signaling systems, plays a key role in pathogenesis and therapy. The concept of designed multiple ligands and polypharmacology, which perfectly meets the therapeutic needs for these brain disorders, is herein discussed as a general ligand-based concept while focusing on dopaminergic agents and receptor subtypes in particular. PMID:27234980

  10. Does the dopamine hypothesis explain schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Lau, Chi-Ieong; Wang, Han-Cheng; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Liu, Mu-En

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine hypothesis has been the cornerstone in the research and clinical practice of schizophrenia. With the initial emphasis on the role of excessive dopamine, the hypothesis has evolved to a concept of combining prefrontal hypodopaminergia and striatal hyperdopaminergia, and subsequently to the present aberrant salience hypothesis. This article provides a brief overview of the development and evidence of the dopamine hypothesis. It will argue that the current model of aberrant salience explains psychosis in schizophrenia and provides a plausible linkage between the pharmacological and cognitive aspects of the disease. Despite the privileged role of dopamine hypothesis in psychosis, its pathophysiological rather than etiological basis, its limitations in defining symptoms other than psychosis, as well as the evidence of other neurotransmitters such as glutamate and adenosine, prompt us to a wider perspective of the disease. Finally, dopamine does explain the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, but not necessarily the cause per se. Rather, dopamine acts as the common final pathway of a wide variety of predisposing factors, either environmental, genetic, or both, that lead to the disease. Other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate and adenosine, may also collaborate with dopamine to give rise to the entire picture of schizophrenia. PMID:23843581

  11. Dopamine receptor partial agonists and addiction.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fabricio A; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2015-04-01

    Many drugs abused by humans acutely facilitate, either directly or indirectly, dopamine neurotransmission in the mesolimbic pathway. As a consequence dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists have been widely investigated as putative pharmacological therapies for addiction. This general strategy, however, has had only limited success due in part to poor treatment adherence and efficacy and the significant adverse effects of dopaminergic medications. In this perspective, we discuss the potential therapeutic use of dopamine receptor partial agonists in addiction, developed initially as antipsychotic agents. Recent research indicates that the dopamine D2 receptor partial agonists, such as aripiprazole, also shows useful ancillary efficacy in several animal models of psychostimulant and opioid addiction. Notably, these findings suggest that unlike full dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists these compounds have low abuse liability and are generally well tolerated. Indeed, partial dopamine agonists attenuate the rewarding properties of opioids without interfering with their analgesic effects. Herein we discuss the utility and potential of dopamine receptor partial agonists as treatments for both stimulant and non-stimulant drug addiction.

  12. Dopamine receptors in human gastrointestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Mason, G.A.; Walker, C.H.; Valenzuela, J.E.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine is a putative enteric neurotransmitter that has been implicated in exocrine secretory and motility functions of the gastrointestinal tract of several mammalian species including man. This study was designed to determine the presence of dopamine binding sites in human gastric and duodenal mucosa and to describe certain biochemical characteristics of these enteric receptor sites. The binding assay was performed in triplicate with tissue homogenates obtained from healthy volunteers of both sexes using /sup 3/H-dopamine as a ligand. The extent of nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled dopamine. Scatchard analysis performed with increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H-dopamine (20-500 nM) revealed a single class of saturable dopamine binding sites in gastric and duodenal mucosa. The results of this report demonstrate the presence of specific dopamine receptors in human gastric and duodenal mucosa. These biochemical data suggest that molecular abnormalities of these receptor sites may be operative in the pathogenesis of important gastrointestinal disorders. 33 references, 2 figures.

  13. Neuroimaging of the dopamine/reward system in adolescent drug use.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Monique; Luciana, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Adolescence is characterized by heightened risk-taking, including substance misuse. These behavioral patterns are influenced by ontogenic changes in neurotransmitter systems, particularly the dopamine system, which is fundamentally involved in the neural coding of reward and motivated approach behavior. During adolescence, this system evidences a peak in activity. At the same time, the dopamine (DA) system is neuroplastically altered by substance abuse, impacting subsequent function. Here, we describe properties of the dopamine system that change with typical adolescent development and that are altered with substance abuse. Much of this work has been gleaned from animal models due to limitations in measuring dopamine in pediatric samples. Structural and functional neuroimaging techniques have been used to examine structures that are heavily DA-innervated; they measure morphological and functional changes with age and with drug exposure. Presenting marijuana abuse as an exemplar, we consider recent findings that support an adolescent peak in DA-driven reward-seeking behavior and related deviations in motivational systems that are associated with marijuana abuse/dependence. Clinicians are advised that (1) chronic adolescent marijuana use may lead to deficiencies in incentive motivation, (2) that this state is due to marijuana's interactions with the developing DA system, and (3) that treatment strategies should be directed to remediating resultant deficiencies in goal-directed activity. PMID:26095977

  14. Neuroimaging of the Dopamine/Reward System in Adolescent Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Monique; Luciana, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is characterized by heightened risk-taking, including substance misuse. These behavioral patterns are influenced by ontogenic changes in neurotransmitter systems, particularly the dopamine system, which is fundamentally involved in the neural coding of reward and motivated approach behavior. During adolescence, this system evidences a peak in activity. At the same time, the dopamine system is neuroplastically altered by substance abuse, impacting subsequent function. Here, we describe properties of the dopamine system that change with typical adolescent development and that are altered with substance abuse. Much of this work has been gleaned from animal models due to limitations in measuring dopamine in pediatric samples. Structural and functional neuroimaging techniques have been used to examine structures that are heavily DA-innervated; they measure morphological and functional changes with age and with drug exposure. Presenting marijuana abuse as an exemplar, we consider recent findings that support an adolescent peak in DA-driven reward-seeking behavior and related deviations in motivational systems that are associated with marijuana abuse/dependence. Clinicians are advised that (1) chronic adolescent marijuana use may lead to deficiencies in incentive motivation, (2) that this state is due to marijuana’s interactions with the developing DA system, and (3) that treatment strategies should be directed to remediating resultant deficiencies in goal-directed activity. PMID:26095977

  15. Unilateral Lesion of Dopamine Neurons Induces Grooming Asymmetry in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Assunta; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Hervé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Grooming behaviour is the most common innate behaviour in animals. In rodents, it consists of sequences of movements organized in four phases, executed symmetrically on both sides of the animal and creating a syntactic chain of behavioural events. The grooming syntax can be altered by stress and novelty, as well as by several mutations and brain lesions. Grooming behaviour is known to be affected by alterations of the dopamine system, including dopamine receptor modulation, dopamine alteration in genetically modified animals, and after brain lesion. While a lot is known about the initiation and syntactic modifications of this refined sequence of movements, effects of unilateral lesion of dopamine neurons are unclear particularly regarding the symmetry of syntactic chains. In the present work we studied grooming in mice unilaterally lesioned in the medial forebrain bundle by 6-hydroxydopamine. We found a reduction in completion of grooming bouts, associated with reduction in number of transitions between grooming phases. The data also revealed the development of asymmetry in grooming behaviour, with reduced tendency to groom the contralateral side to the lesion. Symmetry was recovered following treatment with L-DOPA. Thus, the present work shows that unilateral lesion of dopamine neurons reduces self-grooming behaviour by affecting duration and numbers of events. It produces premature discontinuation of grooming chains but the sequence syntax remains correct. This deficient grooming could be considered as an intrinsic symptom of Parkinson's disease in animal models and could present some similarities with abnormalities of motor movement sequencing seen in patients. Our study also suggests grooming analysis as an additional method to screen parkinsonism in animal models.

  16. Predictive reward signal of dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Schultz, W

    1998-07-01

    The effects of lesions, receptor blocking, electrical self-stimulation, and drugs of abuse suggest that midbrain dopamine systems are involved in processing reward information and learning approach behavior. Most dopamine neurons show phasic activations after primary liquid and food rewards and conditioned, reward-predicting visual and auditory stimuli. They show biphasic, activation-depression responses after stimuli that resemble reward-predicting stimuli or are novel or particularly salient. However, only few phasic activations follow aversive stimuli. Thus dopamine neurons label environmental stimuli with appetitive value, predict and detect rewards and signal alerting and motivating events. By failing to discriminate between different rewards, dopamine neurons appear to emit an alerting message about the surprising presence or absence of rewards. All responses to rewards and reward-predicting stimuli depend on event predictability. Dopamine neurons are activated by rewarding events that are better than predicted, remain uninfluenced by events that are as good as predicted, and are depressed by events that are worse than predicted. By signaling rewards according to a prediction error, dopamine responses have the formal characteristics of a teaching signal postulated by reinforcement learning theories. Dopamine responses transfer during learning from primary rewards to reward-predicting stimuli. This may contribute to neuronal mechanisms underlying the retrograde action of rewards, one of the main puzzles in reinforcement learning. The impulse response releases a short pulse of dopamine onto many dendrites, thus broadcasting a rather global reinforcement signal to postsynaptic neurons. This signal may improve approach behavior by providing advance reward information before the behavior occurs, and may contribute to learning by modifying synaptic transmission. The dopamine reward signal is supplemented by activity in neurons in striatum, frontal cortex, and

  17. Human dopamine receptor and its uses

    DOEpatents

    Civelli, Olivier; Van Tol, Hubert Henri-Marie

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward the isolation, characterization and pharmacological use of the human D4 dopamine receptor. The nucleotide sequence of the gene corresponding to this receptor and alleleic variant thereof are provided by the invention. The invention also includes recombinant eukaryotic expression constructs capable of expressing the human D4 dopamine receptor in cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells. The invention provides cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells which synthesize the human D4 dopamine receptor, and methods for characterizing novel psychotropic compounds using such cultures.

  18. Interleukin 1 administration in mice produces hypoferremia despite neutropenia.

    PubMed Central

    Gordeuk, V R; Prithviraj, P; Dolinar, T; Brittenham, G M

    1988-01-01

    To determine whether the hypoferremic response to inflammation requires neutrophils, we administered human recombinant IL-1 to mice made neutropenic with cyclophosphamide. With single intraperitoneal injections of IL-1 the plasma iron concentrations decreased significantly in mice with either normal neutrophil counts or neutropenia. After single injections transferrin concentrations were not significantly changed, but the decrease in serum iron lowered mean transferrin saturations from a baseline of 45 to 24-30% in nonneutropenic mice, and from 99 to 70-77% in neutropenic mice. Similar changes were observed after intraperitoneal injections of Escherichia coli. 4-d continuous infusions of IL-1 also led to reductions in serum iron concentrations, but transferrin concentrations doubled. The combination of a decrease in serum iron and an increase in transferrin concentration after chronic infusion in neutropenic mice led to a greater decline in mean transferrin saturations, from a baseline of 110 to 25%. In mice not given cyclophosphamide, chronic IL-1 infusion was associated with a reduction in mean hemoglobin concentrations from 14.7 to 13.5 g/dl, consistent with restricted availability of iron for erythropoiesis associated with low saturation of transferrin. We conclude that IL-1 can decrease the serum iron despite profound peripheral neutropenia and that transferrin in a positive acute phase reactant in the mouse. PMID:3264289

  19. Adolescent Alcohol Exposure Amplifies the Incentive Value of Reward-Predictive Cues Through Potentiation of Phasic Dopamine Signaling.

    PubMed

    Spoelder, Marcia; Tsutsui, Kimberly T; Lesscher, Heidi M B; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Clark, Jeremy J

    2015-12-01

    Adolescent alcohol use remains a major public health concern due in part to well-established findings implicating the age of onset in alcohol use in the development of alcohol use disorders and persistent decision-making deficits in adults. We have previously demonstrated that moderate adolescent alcohol consumption in rats promotes suboptimal decision making and an associated perturbation in mesolimbic dopamine transmission in adulthood. Dopamine-dependent incentive learning processes are an integral component of value-based decision making and a fundamental element to many theoretical accounts of addiction. Thus we tested the hypothesis that adolescent alcohol use selectively alters incentive learning processes through perturbation of mesolimbic dopamine systems. To assess incentive learning, behavioral and neurochemical measurements were made during the acquisition, maintenance, extinction, and reacquisition of a Pavlovian conditioned approach procedure in adult rats with a history of adolescent alcohol consumption. We show that moderate adolescent alcohol consumption potentiates stimulus-evoked phasic dopamine transmission, measured in vivo by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, in adulthood and biases individuals toward a dopamine-dependent incentive learning strategy. Moreover, we demonstrate that animals exposed to alcohol in adolescence are more sensitive to an unexpected variation in reward outcomes. This pattern of phasic dopamine signaling and the associated bias in learning may provide a mechanism for the well-documented vulnerability of individuals with early-life alcohol use for alcohol use disorders in adulthood.

  20. Adolescent Alcohol Exposure Amplifies the Incentive Value of Reward-Predictive Cues Through Potentiation of Phasic Dopamine Signaling.

    PubMed

    Spoelder, Marcia; Tsutsui, Kimberly T; Lesscher, Heidi M B; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Clark, Jeremy J

    2015-12-01

    Adolescent alcohol use remains a major public health concern due in part to well-established findings implicating the age of onset in alcohol use in the development of alcohol use disorders and persistent decision-making deficits in adults. We have previously demonstrated that moderate adolescent alcohol consumption in rats promotes suboptimal decision making and an associated perturbation in mesolimbic dopamine transmission in adulthood. Dopamine-dependent incentive learning processes are an integral component of value-based decision making and a fundamental element to many theoretical accounts of addiction. Thus we tested the hypothesis that adolescent alcohol use selectively alters incentive learning processes through perturbation of mesolimbic dopamine systems. To assess incentive learning, behavioral and neurochemical measurements were made during the acquisition, maintenance, extinction, and reacquisition of a Pavlovian conditioned approach procedure in adult rats with a history of adolescent alcohol consumption. We show that moderate adolescent alcohol consumption potentiates stimulus-evoked phasic dopamine transmission, measured in vivo by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, in adulthood and biases individuals toward a dopamine-dependent incentive learning strategy. Moreover, we demonstrate that animals exposed to alcohol in adolescence are more sensitive to an unexpected variation in reward outcomes. This pattern of phasic dopamine signaling and the associated bias in learning may provide a mechanism for the well-documented vulnerability of individuals with early-life alcohol use for alcohol use disorders in adulthood. PMID:25971592

  1. Glutamate neurons within the midbrain dopamine regions.

    PubMed

    Morales, M; Root, D H

    2014-12-12

    Midbrain dopamine systems play important roles in Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. The participation of midbrain dopamine systems in diverse clinical contexts suggests these systems are highly complex. Midbrain dopamine regions contain at least three neuronal phenotypes: dopaminergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic. Here, we review the locations, subtypes, and functions of glutamatergic neurons within midbrain dopamine regions. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2) mRNA-expressing neurons are observed within each midbrain dopamine system. Within rat retrorubral field (RRF), large populations of VGluT2 neurons are observed throughout its anteroposterior extent. Within rat substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC), VGluT2 neurons are observed centrally and caudally, and are most dense within the laterodorsal subdivision. RRF and SNC rat VGluT2 neurons lack tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), making them an entirely distinct population of neurons from dopaminergic neurons. The rat ventral tegmental area (VTA) contains the most heterogeneous populations of VGluT2 neurons. VGluT2 neurons are found in each VTA subnucleus but are most dense within the anterior midline subnuclei. Some subpopulations of rat VGluT2 neurons co-express TH or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), but most of the VGluT2 neurons lack TH or GAD. Different subsets of rat VGluT2-TH neurons exist based on the presence or absence of vesicular monoamine transporter 2, dopamine transporter, or D2 dopamine receptor. Thus, the capacity by which VGluT2-TH neurons may release dopamine will differ based on their capacity to accumulate vesicular dopamine, uptake extracellular dopamine, or be autoregulated by dopamine. Rat VTA VGluT2 neurons exhibit intrinsic VTA projections and extrinsic projections to the accumbens and to the prefrontal cortex. Mouse VTA VGluT2 neurons project to accumbens shell, prefrontal cortex, ventral pallidum, amygdala, and lateral habenula. Given their molecular

  2. Role of the D3 dopamine receptor in nicotine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura N; Bachus, Susan E; McDonald, Craig G; Smith, Robert F

    2015-08-01

    Adolescent cigarette use is associated with reduced quitting success and continued smoking in adulthood. Interestingly, polymorphisms of the dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) gene have been associated with smoking behavior, and the receptor is expressed in an age- and brain region-dependent manner that suggests relevance to addiction. Here, we investigate the possible role of dopamine-related receptors, including DRD3 and an intriguing splice variant known as D3nf, in nicotine-induced sensitization. In adolescent and adult male rats, we examined (1) alterations occurring in dopamine receptor-related mRNAs (DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and D3nf) at two time points during a sensitizing regimen of nicotine and (2) whether DRD3 antagonism either during the initial treatment (induction) or at a later challenge exposure (expression) is able to block nicotine sensitization. Nicotine-induced changes were seen for DRD3 and D3nf mRNAs in the nucleus accumbens shell early in repeated exposure in both age groups. DRD3 antagonism only blocked the induction of sensitization in adolescents and did not block the expression of sensitization in either age group. Adolescents and adults showed opposite DRD1 mRNA responses to nicotine treatment, while no age- and nicotine-related changes in DRD2 mRNA were observed. These data reveal important age-dependent regulation of DRD1- and DRD3-related mRNAs during the course of nicotine exposure. Furthermore, they highlight a requirement for DRD3 signaling in the development of adolescent nicotine sensitization, suggesting it may represent an appropriate target in the prevention of nicotine dependence initiated at this age.

  3. LRRK2 BAC transgenic rats develop progressive, L-DOPA-responsive motor impairment, and deficits in dopamine circuit function

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Max; Alegre-Abarrategui, Javier; Potgieter, Dawid; Kaufmann, Anna-Kristin; Exley, Richard; Deltheil, Thierry; Threlfell, Sarah; Connor-Robson, Natalie; Brimblecombe, Katherine; Wallings, Rebecca; Cioroch, Milena; Bannerman, David M.; Bolam, J. Paul; Magill, Peter J.; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Dodson, Paul D.; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) lead to late-onset, autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease, characterized by the degeneration of dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta, a deficit in dopamine neurotransmission and the development of motor and non-motor symptoms. The most prevalent Parkinson's disease LRRK2 mutations are located in the kinase (G2019S) and GTPase (R1441C) encoding domains of LRRK2. To better understand the sequence of events that lead to progressive neurophysiological deficits in vulnerable neurons and circuits in Parkinson's disease, we have generated LRRK2 bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic rats expressing either G2019S or R1441C mutant, or wild-type LRRK2, from the complete human LRRK2 genomic locus, including endogenous promoter and regulatory regions. Aged (18–21 months) G2019S and R1441C mutant transgenic rats exhibit L-DOPA-responsive motor dysfunction, impaired striatal dopamine release as determined by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, and cognitive deficits. In addition, in vivo recordings of identified substantia nigra pars compacta dopamine neurons in R1441C LRRK2 transgenic rats reveal an age-dependent reduction in burst firing, which likely results in further reductions to striatal dopamine release. These alterations to dopamine circuit function occur in the absence of neurodegeneration or abnormal protein accumulation within the substantia nigra pars compacta, suggesting that nigrostriatal dopamine dysfunction precedes detectable protein aggregation and cell death in the development of Parkinson's disease. In conclusion, our longitudinal deep-phenotyping provides novel insights into how the genetic burden arising from human mutant LRRK2 manifests as early pathophysiological changes to dopamine circuit function and highlights a potential model for testing Parkinson's therapeutics. PMID:26744332

  4. Acute and sustained effects of methylphenidate on cognition and presynaptic dopamine metabolism: an [18F]FDOPA PET study.

    PubMed

    Schabram, Ina; Henkel, Karsten; Mohammadkhani Shali, Siamak; Dietrich, Claudia; Schmaljohann, Jörn; Winz, Oliver; Prinz, Susanne; Rademacher, Lena; Neumaier, Bernd; Felzen, Marc; Kumakura, Yoshitaka; Cumming, Paul; Mottaghy, Felix M; Gründer, Gerhard; Vernaleken, Ingo

    2014-10-29

    Methylphenidate (MPH) inhibits the reuptake of dopamine and noradrenaline. PET studies with MPH challenge show increased competition at postsynaptic D2/3-receptors, thus indirectly revealing presynaptic dopamine release. We used [(18)F]fluorodopamine ([(18)F]FDOPA)-PET in conjunction with the inlet-outlet model (IOM) of Kumakura et al. (2007) to investigate acute and long-term changes in dopamine synthesis capacity and turnover in nigrostriatal fibers of healthy subjects with MPH challenge. Twenty healthy human females underwent two dynamic [(18)F]FDOPA PET scans (124 min; slow bolus-injection; arterial blood sampling), with one scan in untreated baseline condition and the other after MPH administration (0.5 mg/kg, p.o.), in randomized order. Subjects underwent cognitive testing at each PET session. Time activity curves were obtained for ventral putamen and caudate and were analyzed according to the IOM to obtain the regional net-uptake of [(18)F]FDOPA (K; dopamine synthesis capacity) as well as the [(18)F]fluorodopamine washout rate (kloss, index of dopamine turnover). MPH substantially decreased kloss in putamen (-22%; p = 0.003). In the reversed treatment order group (MPH/no drug), K was increased by 18% at no drug follow-up. The magnitude of K at the no drug baseline correlated with cognitive parameters. Furthermore, individual kloss changes correlated with altered cognitive performance under MPH. [(18)F]FDOPA PET in combination with the IOM detects an MPH-evoked decrease in striatal dopamine turnover, in accordance with the known acute pharmacodynamics of MPH. Furthermore, the scan-ordering effect on K suggested that a single MPH challenge persistently increased striatal dopamine synthesis capacity. Attenuation of dopamine turnover by MPH is linked to enhanced cognitive performance in healthy females.

  5. [Central venous infusion of dopamine. Changes in dose during central venous pressure measurement].

    PubMed

    Guiglio, C; Haro, D; Muchada, R

    1993-01-01

    The changes in the doses of dopamine administered at a steady rate which occur during central venous pressure (CVP) measurement were studied. A workbench model with a single lumen central venous catheter was devised with which a mathematical model was constructed to calculate the alterations due to changes in different variables: central venous pressure, dopamine dose, collateral infusions. The average time for CVP measurement was 2 min. The volume of 5% glucose solution filling the manometer was 2.3 ml. The dopamine bolus generated by CVP measurement was equivalent to a dose of 85 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1. The delay required for a return to the initial dose was 2 h 42 min. Changes in CVP led to inversely proportional changes in dopamine dose. These also depended on the level to which the measuring tube was filled before carrying out the measurement. High initial rates of dopamine infusion required shorter times for a return to initial dopamine doses. The bolus and time for recovery were also inversely proportional to the volume of infusion fluids given at a steady rate on the same venous line. This model was tested in a patient suffering from bacterial pneumonia and septic shock (60 years, 55 kg). CVP measurement resulted in a bolus dose of 17 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1, leading to a 43% decrease in aortic flow rate and 60% in the ejection volume. After about 25 min, heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure had returned to their initial values, although aortic flow rate remained 30% below initial values. This problem is also met with other drugs, such as heparin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8338258

  6. Contribution of vesicular and cytosolic dopamine to the increased striatal dopamine efflux elicited by intrastriatal injection of SKF38393.

    PubMed

    Saigusa, Tadashi; Aono, Yuri; Sekino, Reiko; Uchida, Takuya; Takada, Koji; Oi, Yoshiyuki; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Cools, Alexander R

    2009-12-10

    Like dexamphetamine, SKF38393 induces an increase in striatal dopamine efflux which is insensitive for tetrodotoxin, Ca(2+) independent and prevented by a dopamine transporter inhibitor. The dexamphetamine-induced striatal dopamine efflux originates from both the reserpine-sensitive vesicular dopamine pool and the alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive cytosolic dopamine pool. Given the similarities between dexamphetamine and SKF38393, we hypothesized that both types of pool also contribute to the striatally applied SKF38393-induced dopamine efflux. Using in vivo microdialysis technique, we analysed the contribution of these pools to the SKF38393-induced striatal dopamine efflux in freely moving rats. The increase of dopamine efflux induced by 1.5 microg SKF38393 was largely prevented by either reserpine (5mg/kg i.p., given 24h earlier) or alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (250 mg/kg i.p., given 2h earlier), showing that both the vesicular dopamine pool and the cytosolic dopamine pool contribute to the SKF38393-induced increase in striatal dopamine efflux. The sum of the amounts of dopamine that was sensitive to either reserpine or alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, was greater than 100%, namely 137.6% of the basal dopamine level and 143.9% of the SKF38393-induced dopamine level, suggesting that striatally applied SKF38393 promotes the redistribution of dopamine from vesicles to the cytosol, and vice versa. The finding that the combined treatment of reserpine and alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine only inhibited the SKF38393-induced striatal dopamine efflux till 86.0% of the control, is ascribed to the notion that SKF38393 can also inhibit the re-uptake of dopamine. The latter conclusion has far-reaching consequences for studies in which the effects of SKF38393 are simply ascribed to its dopamine D1 receptor stimulation capacity.

  7. A new dopamine-β-hydroxylase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Andén, N. -E.; Fuxe, K.

    1971-01-01

    1. The dopamine-β-hydroxylase inhibitor bis(4-methyl-1-homopiperazinyl-thiocarbonyl) disulphide (FLA-63; 25 mg/kg i.p.) caused within 4 h a 65% loss of noradrenaline throughout the intact rat spinal cord and also cranial to a transection of the cut spinal cord. Caudal to the lesion, there was only an insignificant depletion of 17% indicating the importance of nerve impulses for the disappearance of noradrenaline. 2. Dopamine accumulated in the spinal cord after treatment with FLA-63 although the amounts were not sufficient to replace the missing noradrenaline. Even after treatment with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), the catecholamine store was incompletely replenished by dopamine. 3. After a large depletion of the noradrenaline stores, induced by repeated doses of FLA-63 or by reserpine plus FLA-63, the L-DOPA-induced increase in flexor reflex activity of the hind limbs of spinal rats was inhibited much more than after pretreatment with α-methyl-tyrosine or reserpine. FLA-63 blocked the formation of noradrenaline but not of dopamine from L-DOPA. 4. The increase in flexor reflex activity induced by the noradrenaline receptor stimulating agent clonidine was not changed by FLA-63, indicating that the noradrenaline receptor sensitivity was not influenced. 5. After depletion of the noradrenaline stores, the small formation of noradrenaline from L-DOPA may be of greater functional significance for the noradrenaline receptor stimulation than the greater formation of dopamine, but the dopamine formed also has a slight action. With intact noradrenaline stores, displacement of endogenous noradrenaline by newly formed dopamine contributes, at least after monoamine oxidase inhibition, to the increase in the flexor reflex activity caused by L-DOPA. PMID:4339882

  8. Dopamine, Behavioral Economics, and Effort

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M.; Nunes, Eric J.; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders. PMID:19826615

  9. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort.

    PubMed

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M; Nunes, Eric J; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders. PMID:19826615

  10. Addiction: Beyond dopamine reward circuitry

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.

    2011-09-13

    Dopamine (DA) is considered crucial for the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, but its role in addiction is much less clear. This review focuses on studies that used PET to characterize the brain DA system in addicted subjects. These studies have corroborated in humans the relevance of drug-induced fast DA increases in striatum [including nucleus accumbens (NAc)] in their rewarding effects but have unexpectedly shown that in addicted subjects, drug-induced DA increases (as well as their subjective reinforcing effects) are markedly blunted compared with controls. In contrast, addicted subjects show significant DA increases in striatum in response to drug-conditioned cues that are associated with self-reports of drug craving and appear to be of a greater magnitude than the DA responses to the drug. We postulate that the discrepancy between the expectation for the drug effects (conditioned responses) and the blunted pharmacological effects maintains drug taking in an attempt to achieve the expected reward. Also, whether tested during early or protracted withdrawal, addicted subjects show lower levels of D2 receptors in striatum (including NAc), which are associated with decreases in baseline activity in frontal brain regions implicated in salience attribution (orbitofrontal cortex) and inhibitory control (anterior cingulate gyrus), whose disruption results in compulsivity and impulsivity. These results point to an imbalance between dopaminergic circuits that underlie reward and conditioning and those that underlie executive function (emotional control and decision making), which we postulate contributes to the compulsive drug use and loss of control in addiction.

  11. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort.

    PubMed

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M; Nunes, Eric J; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders.

  12. Genetic disruption of dopamine production results in pituitary adenomas and severe prolactinemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dopamine release from tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons into the median eminence activates dopamine-D2 receptors in the pituitary gland where it inhibits lactotroph function. We have previously described genetic dopamine-deficient mouse models which lack the ability to synthesize dopamine. Because...

  13. Reward and aversion in a heterogeneous midbrain dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Lammel, Stephan; Lim, Byung Kook; Malenka, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is a heterogeneous brain structure that serves a central role in motivation and reward processing. Abnormalities in the function of VTA dopamine (DA) neurons and the targets they influence are implicated in several prominent neuropsychiatric disorders including addiction and depression. Recent studies suggest that the midbrain DA system is composed of anatomically and functionally heterogeneous DA subpopulations with different axonal projections. These findings may explain a number of previously confusing observations that suggested a role for DA in processing both rewarding as well as aversive events. Here we will focus on recent advances in understanding the neural circuits mediating reward and aversion in the VTA and how stress as well as drugs of abuse, in particular cocaine, alter circuit function within a heterogeneous midbrain DA system. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  14. Reward and aversion in a heterogeneous midbrain dopamine system

    PubMed Central

    Lammel, Stephan; Lim, Byung Kook; Malenka, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is a heterogeneous brain structure that serves a central role in motivation and reward processing. Abnormalities in the function of VTA dopamine (DA) neurons and the targets they influence are implicated in several prominent neuropsychiatric disorders including addiction and depression. Recent studies suggest that the midbrain DA system is composed of anatomically and functionally heterogeneous DA subpopulations with different axonal projections. These findings may explain a number of previously confusing observations that suggested a role for DA in processing both rewarding as well as aversive events. Here we will focus on recent advances in understanding the neural circuits mediating reward and aversion in the VTA and how stress as well as drugs of abuse, in particular cocaine, alter circuit function within a heterogeneous midbrain DA system. PMID:23578393

  15. Persistent cognitive dysfunction after traumatic brain injury: A dopamine hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bales, James W.; Wagner, Amy K.; Kline, Anthony E.; Dixon, C. Edward

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a significant cause of death and disability in industrialized countries. Of particular importance to patients the chronic effect that TBI has on cognitive function. Therapeutic strategies have been difficult to evaluate because of the complexity of injuries and variety of patient presentations within a TBI population. However, pharmacotherapies targeting dopamine (DA) have consistently shown benefits in attention, behavioral outcome, executive function, and memory. Still it remains unclear what aspect of TBI pathology is targeted by DA therapies and what time-course of treatment is most beneficial for patient outcomes. Fortunately, ongoing research in animal models has begun to elucidate the pathophysiology of DA alterations after TBI. The purpose of this review is to discuss clinical and experimental research examining DAergic therapies after TBI, which will in turn elucidate the importance of DA for cognitive function/dysfunction after TBI as well as highlight the areas that require further study. PMID:19580914

  16. In vitro binding assays using (3)H nisoxetine and (3)H WIN 35,428 reveal selective effects of gonadectomy and hormone replacement in adult male rats on norepinephrine but not dopamine transporter sites in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Meyers, B; Kritzer, M F

    2009-03-01

    The prefrontal cortices mediate cognitive functions that critically depend on local dopamine levels. In male rats, many prefrontal tasks where performance is disrupted by changes in dopamine signaling are also impaired by gonadectomy, a manipulation that increases cortical dopamine concentration, prefrontal dopamine axon density and possibly extracellular prefrontal dopamine levels as well. Because these actions could be responsible for the impairing effects of gonadectomy on prefrontal function, the question of how they might arise comes to the fore. Accordingly, the present studies asked whether dopamine levels might be increased via a hormone sensitivity of transporter-mediated dopamine uptake. Specifically, (3)H WIN 35,428 and (3)H nisoxetine, ligands selective for the dopamine (DAT)- and norepinephrine transporter (NET) respectively, were used in in vitro binding assays to ask whether gonadectomy altered transporter affinity (Kd) and/or binding site number (Bmax) in prefrontal cortex, sensorimotor cortex and/or caudate. Assays performed on tissues dissected from sham-operated, gonadectomized and gonadectomized rats supplemented with testosterone propionate or estradiol for 4 or 28 days revealed no significant group differences or obvious trends in Kd or Bmax for DAT binding or in measures of Bmax for NET binding. However, affinity constants for (3)H nisoxetine were found to be significantly higher in sensorimotor and/or prefrontal cortex of rats gonadectomized and gonadectomized and supplemented with estradiol for 4 or 28 days but similar to control in gonadectomized rats given testosterone. Because the NET contributes substantially to extracellular prefrontal dopamine clearance, these androgen-mediated effects could influence prefrontal dopamine levels and might thus be relevant for observed effects of gonadectomy on dopamine-dependent prefrontal behaviors. A hormone sensitivity of the NET could also have bearing on the prefrontal dopamine dysfunction seen in

  17. Reducing Ventral Tegmental Dopamine D2 Receptor Expression Selectively Boosts Incentive Motivation

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Johannes W; Roelofs, Theresia J M; Mol, Frédérique M U; Hillen, Anne E J; Meijboom, Katharina E; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; van der Eerden, Harrie A M; Garner, Keith M; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Adan, Roger A H

    2015-01-01

    Altered mesolimbic dopamine signaling has been widely implicated in addictive behavior. For the most part, this work has focused on dopamine within the striatum, but there is emerging evidence for a role of the auto-inhibitory, somatodendritic dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in addiction. Thus, decreased midbrain D2R expression has been implicated in addiction in humans. Moreover, knockout of the gene encoding the D2R receptor (Drd2) in dopamine neurons has been shown to enhance the locomotor response to cocaine in mice. Therefore, we here tested the hypothesis that decreasing D2R expression in the VTA of adult rats, using shRNA knockdown, promotes addiction-like behavior in rats responding for cocaine or palatable food. Rats with decreased VTA D2R expression showed markedly increased motivation for both sucrose and cocaine under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement, but the acquisition or maintenance of cocaine self-administration were not affected. They also displayed enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor activity, but no change in basal locomotion. This robust increase in incentive motivation was behaviorally specific, as we did not observe any differences in fixed ratio responding, extinction responding, reinstatement or conditioned suppression of cocaine, and sucrose seeking. We conclude that VTA D2R knockdown results in increased incentive motivation, but does not directly promote other aspects of addiction-like behavior. PMID:25735756

  18. A dopamine-modulated neural circuit regulating aversive taste memory in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Masek, Pavel; Worden, Kurtresha; Aso, Yoshinori; Rubin, Gerald M; Keene, Alex C

    2015-06-01

    Taste memories allow animals to modulate feeding behavior in accordance with past experience and avoid the consumption of potentially harmful food [1]. We have developed a single-fly taste memory assay to functionally interrogate the neural circuitry encoding taste memories [2]. Here, we screen a collection of Split-GAL4 lines that label small populations of neurons associated with the fly memory center-the mushroom bodies (MBs) [3]. Genetic silencing of PPL1 dopamine neurons disrupts conditioned, but not naive, feeding behavior, suggesting these neurons are selectively involved in the conditioned taste response. We identify two PPL1 subpopulations that innervate the MB α lobe and are essential for aversive taste memory. Thermogenetic activation of these dopamine neurons during training induces memory, indicating these neurons are sufficient for the reinforcing properties of bitter tastant to the MBs. Silencing of either the intrinsic MB neurons or the output neurons from the α lobe disrupts taste conditioning. Thermogenetic manipulation of these output neurons alters naive feeding response, suggesting that dopamine neurons modulate the threshold of response to appetitive tastants. Taken together, these findings detail a neural mechanism underlying the formation of taste memory and provide a functional model for dopamine-dependent plasticity in Drosophila.

  19. Reducing Ventral Tegmental Dopamine D2 Receptor Expression Selectively Boosts Incentive Motivation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Johannes W; Roelofs, Theresia J M; Mol, Frédérique M U; Hillen, Anne E J; Meijboom, Katharina E; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; van der Eerden, Harrie A M; Garner, Keith M; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Adan, Roger A H

    2015-08-01

    Altered mesolimbic dopamine signaling has been widely implicated in addictive behavior. For the most part, this work has focused on dopamine within the striatum, but there is emerging evidence for a role of the auto-inhibitory, somatodendritic dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in addiction. Thus, decreased midbrain D2R expression has been implicated in addiction in humans. Moreover, knockout of the gene encoding the D2R receptor (Drd2) in dopamine neurons has been shown to enhance the locomotor response to cocaine in mice. Therefore, we here tested the hypothesis that decreasing D2R expression in the VTA of adult rats, using shRNA knockdown, promotes addiction-like behavior in rats responding for cocaine or palatable food. Rats with decreased VTA D2R expression showed markedly increased motivation for both sucrose and cocaine under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement, but the acquisition or maintenance of cocaine self-administration were not affected. They also displayed enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor activity, but no change in basal locomotion. This robust increase in incentive motivation was behaviorally specific, as we did not observe any differences in fixed ratio responding, extinction responding, reinstatement or conditioned suppression of cocaine, and sucrose seeking. We conclude that VTA D2R knockdown results in increased incentive motivation, but does not directly promote other aspects of addiction-like behavior.

  20. Effect of exercise on dopamine neuron survival in prenatally stressed rats

    PubMed Central

    Mabandla, Musa V.; Kellaway, Lauriston A.; Daniels, William M. U.

    2010-01-01

    Prenatal stress has been associated with increased vulnerability to psychiatric disturbances including schizophrenia, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism. Elevated maternal circulating stress hormones alter development of neural circuits in the fetal brain and cause long-term changes in behaviour. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether mild prenatal stress increases the vulnerability of dopamine neurons in adulthood. A low dose of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 5 μg/4 μl saline) was unilaterally infused into the medial forebrain bundle of nerve fibres in the rat brain in order to create a partial lesion of dopamine neurons which was sufficient to cause subtle behavioural deficits associated with early onset of Parkinson’s disease without complete destruction of dopamine neurons. Voluntary exercise appeared to have a neuroprotective effect resulting in an improvement in motor control and decreased asymmetry in the use of left and right forelimbs to explore a novel environment as well as decreased asymmetry of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased dopamine cell loss in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Prenatal stress appeared to enhance the toxic effect of 6-OHDA possibly by reducing the compensatory adaptations to exercise. PMID:19844780

  1. 'Dopamine-first' mechanism enables the rational engineering of the norcoclaurine synthase aldehyde activity profile.

    PubMed

    Lichman, Benjamin R; Gershater, Markus C; Lamming, Eleanor D; Pesnot, Thomas; Sula, Altin; Keep, Nicholas H; Hailes, Helen C; Ward, John M

    2015-03-01

    Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) (EC 4.2.1.78) catalyzes the Pictet-Spengler condensation of dopamine and an aldehyde, forming a substituted (S)-tetrahydroisoquinoline, a pharmaceutically important moiety. This unique activity has led to NCS being used for both in vitro biocatalysis and in vivo recombinant metabolism. Future engineering of NCS activity to enable the synthesis of diverse tetrahydroisoquinolines is dependent on an understanding of the NCS mechanism and kinetics. We assess two proposed mechanisms for NCS activity: (a) one based on the holo X-ray crystal structure and (b) the 'dopamine-first' mechanism based on computational docking. Thalictrum flavum NCS variant activities support the dopamine-first mechanism. Suppression of the non-enzymatic background reaction reveals novel kinetic parameters for NCS, showing it to act with low catalytic efficiency. This kinetic behaviour can account for the ineffectiveness of recombinant NCS in in vivo systems, and also suggests NCS may have an in planta role as a metabolic gatekeeper. The amino acid substitution L76A, situated in the proposed aldehyde binding site, results in the alteration of the enzyme's aldehyde activity profile. This both verifies the dopamine-first mechanism and demonstrates the potential for the rational engineering of NCS activity. PMID:25620686

  2. Loss of Dopamine D2 Receptors Increases Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Disruption to dopamine homeostasis during brain development has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. Inappropriate expression or activity of GABAergic interneurons are common features of many of these disorders. We discovered a persistent upregulation of GAD67+ and parvalbumin+ neurons within the anterior cingulate cortex of dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice, while other GABAergic interneuron markers were unaffected. Interneuron distribution and number were not altered in the striatum or in the dopamine-poor somatosensory cortex. The changes were already present by postnatal day 14, indicating a developmental etiology. D2eGFP BAC transgenic mice demonstrated the presence of D2 receptor expression within a subset of parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons, suggesting the possibility of a direct cellular mechanism through which D2 receptor stimulation regulates interneuron differentiation or survival. D2 receptor knockout mice also exhibited decreased depressive-like behavior compared with wild-type controls in the tail suspension test. These data indicate that dopamine signaling modulates interneuron number and emotional behavior and that developmental D2 receptor loss or blockade could reveal a potential mechanism for the prodromal basis of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25393953

  3. Reducing Ventral Tegmental Dopamine D2 Receptor Expression Selectively Boosts Incentive Motivation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Johannes W; Roelofs, Theresia J M; Mol, Frédérique M U; Hillen, Anne E J; Meijboom, Katharina E; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; van der Eerden, Harrie A M; Garner, Keith M; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Adan, Roger A H

    2015-08-01

    Altered mesolimbic dopamine signaling has been widely implicated in addictive behavior. For the most part, this work has focused on dopamine within the striatum, but there is emerging evidence for a role of the auto-inhibitory, somatodendritic dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in addiction. Thus, decreased midbrain D2R expression has been implicated in addiction in humans. Moreover, knockout of the gene encoding the D2R receptor (Drd2) in dopamine neurons has been shown to enhance the locomotor response to cocaine in mice. Therefore, we here tested the hypothesis that decreasing D2R expression in the VTA of adult rats, using shRNA knockdown, promotes addiction-like behavior in rats responding for cocaine or palatable food. Rats with decreased VTA D2R expression showed markedly increased motivation for both sucrose and cocaine under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement, but the acquisition or maintenance of cocaine self-administration were not affected. They also displayed enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor activity, but no change in basal locomotion. This robust increase in incentive motivation was behaviorally specific, as we did not observe any differences in fixed ratio responding, extinction responding, reinstatement or conditioned suppression of cocaine, and sucrose seeking. We conclude that VTA D2R knockdown results in increased incentive motivation, but does not directly promote other aspects of addiction-like behavior. PMID:25735756

  4. Dopamine-first’ mechanism enables the rational engineering of the norcoclaurine synthase aldehyde activity profile

    PubMed Central

    Lichman, Benjamin R; Gershater, Markus C; Lamming, Eleanor D; Pesnot, Thomas; Sula, Altin; Keep, Nicholas H; Hailes, Helen C; Ward, John M

    2015-01-01

    Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) (EC 4.2.1.78) catalyzes the Pictet–Spengler condensation of dopamine and an aldehyde, forming a substituted (S)-tetrahydroisoquinoline, a pharmaceutically important moiety. This unique activity has led to NCS being used for both in vitro biocatalysis and in vivo recombinant metabolism. Future engineering of NCS activity to enable the synthesis of diverse tetrahydroisoquinolines is dependent on an understanding of the NCS mechanism and kinetics. We assess two proposed mechanisms for NCS activity: (a) one based on the holo X-ray crystal structure and (b) the ‘dopamine-first’ mechanism based on computational docking. Thalictrum flavum NCS variant activities support the dopamine-first mechanism. Suppression of the non-enzymatic background reaction reveals novel kinetic parameters for NCS, showing it to act with low catalytic efficiency. This kinetic behaviour can account for the ineffectiveness of recombinant NCS in in vivo systems, and also suggests NCS may have an in planta role as a metabolic gatekeeper. The amino acid substitution L76A, situated in the proposed aldehyde binding site, results in the alteration of the enzyme's aldehyde activity profile. This both verifies the dopamine-first mechanism and demonstrates the potential for the rational engineering of NCS activity. PMID:25620686

  5. Dopamine Inactivation Efficacy Related to Functional DAT1 and COMT Variants Influences Motor Response Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Stephan; Rellum, Thomas; Freitag, Christine; Resch, Franz; Rietschel, Marcella; Treutlein, Jens; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Brandeis, Daniel; Banaschewski, Tobias; Laucht, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Background Dopamine plays an important role in orienting, response anticipation and movement evaluation. Thus, we examined the influence of functional variants related to dopamine inactivation in the dopamine transporter (DAT1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase genes (COMT) on the time-course of motor processing in a contingent negative variation (CNV) task. Methods 64-channel EEG recordings were obtained from 195 healthy adolescents of a community-based sample during a continuous performance task (A-X version). Early and late CNV as well as motor postimperative negative variation were assessed. Adolescents were genotyped for the COMT Val158Met and two DAT1 polymorphisms (variable number tandem repeats in the 3′-untranslated region and in intron 8). Results The results revealed a significant interaction between COMT and DAT1, indicating that COMT exerted stronger effects on lateralized motor post-processing (centro-parietal motor postimperative negative variation) in homozygous carriers of a DAT1 haplotype increasing DAT1 expression. Source analysis showed that the time interval 500–1000 ms after the motor response was specifically affected in contrast to preceding movement anticipation and programming stages, which were not altered. Conclusions Motor slow negative waves allow the genomic imaging of dopamine inactivation effects on cortical motor post-processing during response evaluation. This is the first report to point towards epistatic effects in the motor system during response evaluation, i.e. during the post-processing of an already executed movement rather than during movement programming. PMID:22649558

  6. Distinct Effects of Nalmefene on Dopamine Uptake Rates and Kappa Opioid Receptor Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Following Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jamie H; Karkhanis, Anushree N; Steiniger-Brach, Björn; Jones, Sara R

    2016-01-01

    The development of pharmacotherapeutics that reduce relapse to alcohol drinking in patients with alcohol dependence is of considerable research interest. Preclinical data support a role for nucleus accumbens (NAc) κ opioid receptors (KOR) in chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure-induced increases in ethanol intake. Nalmefene, a high-affinity KOR partial agonist, reduces drinking in at-risk patients and relapse drinking in rodents, potentially due to its effects on NAc KORs. However, the effects of nalmefene on accumbal dopamine transmission and KOR function are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of nalmefene on dopamine transmission and KORs using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc brain slices from male C57BL/6J mice following five weeks of CIE or air exposure. Nalmefene concentration-dependently reduced dopamine release similarly in air and CIE groups, suggesting that dynorphin tone may not be present in brain slices. Further, nalmefene attenuated dopamine uptake rates to a greater extent in brain slices from CIE-exposed mice, suggesting that dopamine transporter-KOR interactions may be fundamentally altered following CIE. Additionally, nalmefene reversed the dopamine-decreasing effects of a maximal concentration of a KOR agonist selectively in brain slices of CIE-exposed mice. It is possible that nalmefene may attenuate withdrawal-induced increases in ethanol consumption by modulation of dopamine transmission through KORs. PMID:27472317

  7. Distinct Effects of Nalmefene on Dopamine Uptake Rates and Kappa Opioid Receptor Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Following Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jamie H; Karkhanis, Anushree N; Steiniger-Brach, Björn; Jones, Sara R

    2016-07-27

    The development of pharmacotherapeutics that reduce relapse to alcohol drinking in patients with alcohol dependence is of considerable research interest. Preclinical data support a role for nucleus accumbens (NAc) κ opioid receptors (KOR) in chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure-induced increases in ethanol intake. Nalmefene, a high-affinity KOR partial agonist, reduces drinking in at-risk patients and relapse drinking in rodents, potentially due to its effects on NAc KORs. However, the effects of nalmefene on accumbal dopamine transmission and KOR function are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of nalmefene on dopamine transmission and KORs using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc brain slices from male C57BL/6J mice following five weeks of CIE or air exposure. Nalmefene concentration-dependently reduced dopamine release similarly in air and CIE groups, suggesting that dynorphin tone may not be present in brain slices. Further, nalmefene attenuated dopamine uptake rates to a greater extent in brain slices from CIE-exposed mice, suggesting that dopamine transporter-KOR interactions may be fundamentally altered following CIE. Additionally, nalmefene reversed the dopamine-decreasing effects of a maximal concentration of a KOR agonist selectively in brain slices of CIE-exposed mice. It is possible that nalmefene may attenuate withdrawal-induced increases in ethanol consumption by modulation of dopamine transmission through KORs.

  8. Distinct Effects of Nalmefene on Dopamine Uptake Rates and Kappa Opioid Receptor Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Following Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jamie H.; Karkhanis, Anushree N.; Steiniger-Brach, Björn; Jones, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of pharmacotherapeutics that reduce relapse to alcohol drinking in patients with alcohol dependence is of considerable research interest. Preclinical data support a role for nucleus accumbens (NAc) κ opioid receptors (KOR) in chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure-induced increases in ethanol intake. Nalmefene, a high-affinity KOR partial agonist, reduces drinking in at-risk patients and relapse drinking in rodents, potentially due to its effects on NAc KORs. However, the effects of nalmefene on accumbal dopamine transmission and KOR function are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of nalmefene on dopamine transmission and KORs using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc brain slices from male C57BL/6J mice following five weeks of CIE or air exposure. Nalmefene concentration-dependently reduced dopamine release similarly in air and CIE groups, suggesting that dynorphin tone may not be present in brain slices. Further, nalmefene attenuated dopamine uptake rates to a greater extent in brain slices from CIE-exposed mice, suggesting that dopamine transporter-KOR interactions may be fundamentally altered following CIE. Additionally, nalmefene reversed the dopamine-decreasing effects of a maximal concentration of a KOR agonist selectively in brain slices of CIE-exposed mice. It is possible that nalmefene may attenuate withdrawal-induced increases in ethanol consumption by modulation of dopamine transmission through KORs. PMID:27472317

  9. Neuroeconomics: a formal test of dopamine's role in reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, Eric E J

    2014-04-14

    Over the last two decades, dopamine and reinforcement learning have been increasingly linked. Using a novel, axiomatic approach, a recent study shows that dopamine meets the necessary and sufficient conditions required by the theory to encode a reward prediction error.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... CONGENITAL Sources for This Page Cubells JF, Zabetian CP. Human genetics of plasma dopamine beta-hydroxylase activity: ... GeneReview: Dopamine Beta-Hydroxylase Deficiency Kim CH, Zabetian CP, Cubells JF, Cho S, Biaggioni I, Cohen BM, Robertson ...

  11. Brain May Compensate for Dopamine Neuron Loss Early in Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Science News Brain May Compensate for Dopamine Neuron Loss Early in Parkinson’s - May 09 2014 Scientists ... at least 25 percent of the brain’s dopamine neurons already have been lost. So why do symptoms ...

  12. Dopamine Gene Profiling to Predict Impulse Control and Effects of Dopamine Agonist Ropinirole.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Hayley J; Stinear, Cathy M; Ren, April; Coxon, James P; Kao, Justin; Macdonald, Lorraine; Snow, Barry; Cramer, Steven C; Byblow, Winston D

    2016-07-01

    Dopamine agonists can impair inhibitory control and cause impulse control disorders for those with Parkinson disease (PD), although mechanistically this is not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that the extent of such drug effects on impulse control is related to specific dopamine gene polymorphisms. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study aimed to examine the effect of single doses of 0.5 and 1.0 mg of the dopamine agonist ropinirole on impulse control in healthy adults of typical age for PD onset. Impulse control was measured by stop signal RT on a response inhibition task and by an index of impulsive decision-making on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task. A dopamine genetic risk score quantified basal dopamine neurotransmission from the influence of five genes: catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine transporter, and those encoding receptors D1, D2, and D3. With placebo, impulse control was better for the high versus low genetic risk score groups. Ropinirole modulated impulse control in a manner dependent on genetic risk score. For the lower score group, both doses improved response inhibition (decreased stop signal RT) whereas the lower dose reduced impulsiveness in decision-making. Conversely, the higher score group showed a trend for worsened response inhibition on the lower dose whereas both doses increased impulsiveness in decision-making. The implications of the present findings are that genotyping can be used to predict impulse control and whether it will improve or worsen with the administration of dopamine agonists. PMID:26942320

  13. The enduring centrality of dopamine in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia: in vivo evidence from the prodrome to the first psychotic episode.

    PubMed

    Bonoldi, Ilaria; Howes, O D

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine has been thought to be central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia for the last four decades. However, the last decade or so has seen a considerable advance in understanding of dopamine's role in the neurobiology of schizophrenia. This has been informed by advances in neuroimaging, preclinical models, and the study of the prodrome to schizophrenia. Studies using these approaches have identified that the major locus of dopaminergic dysfunction is presynaptic, characterized by elevated dopamine synthesis and release capacity. Moreover, this is seen in the prodrome to the illness, is linked to the symptoms, and increases with the onset of frank symptoms. It has also become clear that there is no marked alteration in dopamine transporter or D2/3 receptor availability in schizophrenia in general, and, similarly, there do not seem to be D2/3 receptor alterations in people at high clinical risk of psychosis. These findings highlight the enduring role of dopamine in the onset of schizophrenia. They suggest that presynaptic dopamine dysregulation underlies the onset of psychosis and are in line with an integrative model accounting for many of the genetic and environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. PMID:24054146

  14. Plasma dopamine: regulation and significance.

    PubMed

    Van Loon, G R

    1983-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) normally circulates in plasma. The plasma concentration of the free form of DA is approximately equivalent to that of epinephrine (E) and 20% that of norepinephrine (NE). The free form constitutes less than 2% of total plasma DA, and the remainder exists predominantly as sulfate or glucuronide conjugates. DA is found in adrenal medulla and cortex, peripheral nerves, sympathetic ganglia, carotid body, and kidney, but quantitatively the origin of circulating DA remains poorly understood. Plasma concentrations of free DA increase in association with events that increase sympathetic tone, although to a much lesser degree than seen for NE or E. Thus, upright posture, bicycle exercise, a variety of emotional and physical stresses, and hypoglycemia may be associated with increases in plasma free DA. Plasma DA decreases during the course of dietary sodium depletion in humans, in contrast to the plasma NE response, and consistent with a physiological role for DA in the regulation of aldosterone secretion. Plasma DA increases after administration of its precursor L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, together with the decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa. Plasma NE and (in some studies) plasma DA decrease after administration of the DA receptor agonist bromocriptine. In contrast, plasma DA and one of its major metabolites, homovanillic acid, increase after administration of the DA receptor antagonist haloperidol. Administration of the endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin into the brain increases central sympathetic outflow, thus increasing plasma DA concentration, although to a lesser extent than for NE or E. Disordered basal concentrations of DA in plasma or disordered responses of plasma DA have been reported in a number of disease states. Clear understanding of physiological roles of DA in plasma and of its pathophysiology awaits definition. PMID:6413258

  15. Dopamine, vesicular transporters, and dopamine receptor expression in rat major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Traini, Enea; Mancini, Manuele; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Mahdi, Syed Sarosh; Amenta, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    The localization of dopamine stores and the expression and localization of dopamine (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT) type-1 and -2 and of dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptor subtypes were investigated in rat submandibular, sublingual, and parotid salivary glands by HPLC with electrochemical detection, as well as immunochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Male Wistar rats of 2 mo of age were used. The highest dopamine levels were measured in the parotid gland, followed by the submandibular and sublingual glands. Western blot analysis revealed DAT, VMAT-1, VMAT-2, and dopamine receptors immunoreactivity in membrane preparations obtained from the three glands investigated. Immunostaining for dopamine and transporters was developed within striated ducts. Salivary glands processed for dopamine receptors immunohistochemistry developed an immunoreaction primarily in striated and excretory ducts. In the submandibular gland, acinar cells displayed strong immunoreactivity for the D2 receptor, while cells of the convoluted granular tubules were negative for both D1-like and D2-like receptors. Parotid glands acinar cells displayed the highest immunoreactivity for both D1 and D2 receptors compared with other salivary glands. The above localization of dopamine and dopaminergic markers investigated did not correspond closely with neuron-specific enolase (NSE) localization. This indicates that at least in part, catecholamine stores and dopaminergic markers are independent from glandular innervation. These findings suggest that rat major salivary glands express a dopaminergic system probably involved in salivary secretion. The stronger immunoreactivity for dopamine transporters and receptors in striated duct cells suggests that the dopaminergic system could regulate not only quality, but also volume and ionic concentration of saliva.

  16. Role of purinergic P2X4 receptors in regulating striatal dopamine homeostasis and dependent behaviors.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Sheraz; Shah, Vivek; Garcia, Damaris; Asatryan, Liana; Jakowec, Michael W; Davies, Daryl L

    2016-10-01

    Purinergic P2X4 receptors (P2X4Rs) belong to the P2X superfamily of ion channels regulated by ATP. We recently demonstrated that P2X4R knockout (KO) mice exhibited deficits in sensorimotor gating, social interaction, and ethanol drinking behavior. Dopamine (DA) dysfunction may underlie these behavioral changes, but there is no direct evidence for P2X4Rs' role in DA neurotransmission. To test this hypothesis, we measured markers of DA function and dependent behaviors in P2X4R KO mice. P2X4R KO mice exhibited altered density of pre-synaptic markers including tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter; post-synaptic markers including dopamine receptors and phosphorylation of downstream targets including dopamine and cyclic-AMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa and cyclic-AMP-response element binding protein in different parts of the striatum. Ivermectin, an allosteric modulator of P2X4Rs, significantly affected dopamine and cyclic AMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa and extracellular regulated kinase1/2 phosphorylation in the striatum. Sensorimotor gating deficits in P2X4R KO mice were rescued by DA antagonists. Using the 6-hydroxydopamine model of DA depletion, P2X4R KO mice exhibited an attenuated levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced motor behavior, whereas ivermectin enhanced this behavior. Collectively, these findings identified an important role for P2X4Rs in maintaining DA homeostasis and illustrate how this association is important for CNS functions including motor control and sensorimotor gating. We propose that P2X4 receptors (P2X4Rs) regulate dopamine (DA) homeostasis and associated behaviors. Pre-synaptic and post-synaptic DA markers were significantly altered in the dorsal and ventral striatum of P2X4R KO mice, implicating altered DA neurotransmission. Sensorimotor gating deficits in P2X4R KO mice were rescued by DA antagonists. Ivermectin (IVM), a positive modulator of P2X4Rs, enhanced levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced motor behavior. These studies highlight potential

  17. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Rodriguez, Alexandra; Zhang, Lifen; Zhou, Fuwen; Gong, Suzhen; Gu, Howard; De Biasi, Mariella; Zhou, Fu-Ming; Dani, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine's ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic) stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors. PMID:25237305

  18. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Rodriguez, Alexandra; Zhang, Lifen; Zhou, Fuwen; Gong, Suzhen; Gu, Howard; De Biasi, Mariella; Zhou, Fu-Ming; Dani, John A

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine's ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic) stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors. PMID:25237305

  19. Theoretical determinations of ionization potentials of dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. F.; Yu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Adiabatic and vertical ionization potentials (IPs) of nine conformers of dopamine in the gas phase are determined using density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91 methods and high level ab initio HF method with 6-311++G** basis set, respectively. And the nine stable cationic states have been found in the ionization process of dopamine. Vertical ionization potentials of nine conformers of dopamine are calculated using the older outer-valence Green's function (OVGF) calculations at 6-311++G** basis set. Vibrational frequencies and infrared spectrum intensities of G1b and G1b+ at B3LYP/6-311++G** level are discussed.

  20. Effects of Pharmacologic Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Inhibition on Cocaine-Induced Reinstatement and Dopamine Neurochemistry in Squirrel Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Debra A.; Kimmel, Heather L.; Manvich, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Karl T.; Weinshenker, David

    2014-01-01

    Disulfiram has shown promise as a pharmacotherapy for cocaine dependence in clinical settings, although it has many targets, and the behavioral and molecular mechanisms underlying its efficacy are unclear. One of many biochemical actions of disulfiram is inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), the enzyme that converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic neurons. Thus, disulfiram simultaneously reduces NE and elevates DA tissue levels in the brain. In rats, both disulfiram and the selective DBH inhibitor nepicastat block cocaine-primed reinstatement, a paradigm which is thought to model some aspects of drug relapse. This is consistent with some clinical results and supports the use of DBH inhibitors for the treatment of cocaine dependence. The present study was conducted to confirm and extend these results in nonhuman primates. Squirrel monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine were pretreated with disulfiram or nepicastat prior to cocaine-induced reinstatement sessions. Neither DBH inhibitor altered cocaine-induced reinstatement. Unexpectedly, nepicastat administered alone induced a modest reinstatement effect in squirrel monkeys, but not in rats. To investigate the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the behavioral results, the effects of DBH inhibition on extracellular DA were analyzed in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) using in vivo microdialysis in squirrel monkeys. Both DBH inhibitors attenuated cocaine-induced DA overflow in the NAc. Hence, the attenuation of cocaine-induced changes in accumbal DA neurochemistry was not associated with altered cocaine-seeking behavior. Overall, the reported behavioral effects of DBH inhibition in rodent models of relapse did not extend to nonhuman primates under the conditions used in the current studies. PMID:24817036

  1. No evidence of association between structural polymorphism at the dopamine D3 receptor locus and alcoholism in the Japanese

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Susumu; Muramatsu, Taro; Matsushita, Sachio; Murayama, Masanobu

    1996-07-26

    Dopaminergic systems mediate reward mechanisms and are involved in reinforcing self-administration of dependence-forming substances, including alcohol. Studies have reported that polymorphisms of the dopamine D2 receptor, whose structure and function are similar to those of the dopamine D3 receptor, increase the susceptibility to alcoholism. The observations led to the examination of the possible association between a structural polymorphism of the D3 receptor gene and alcoholism. Genotyping results, employing a PCR-RFLP method, showed no difference in allele and genotype frequencies of the D3 BalI polymorphism (Ser{sup 9}/Gly{sup 9}) between Japanese alcoholics and controls. Moreover, these frequencies were not altered in alcoholics with inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2), a well-defined negative risk factor for alcoholism. These results strongly suggest that the dopamine D3 receptor is not associated with alcoholism. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. A hyperbranched dopamine-containing PEG-based polymer for the inhibition of α-synuclein fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Breydo, Leonid; Newland, Ben; Zhang, Hong; Rosser, Anne; Werner, Carsten; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Wang, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of α-synuclein is believed to play an important role in Parkinson's disease and in other neurodegenerative maladies. Small molecule inhibitors of this process are among the most promising drug candidates for neurodegenerative diseases. Dendrimers have also been studied for anti-fibrillation applications but they can be difficult and expensive to synthetize. Here we show that RAFT polymerization can be used to produce a hyperbranched polyethylene glycol structure via a one-pot reaction. This polymer included a dopamine moiety, a known inhibitor of α-synuclein fibril formation. Dopamine within the polymer structure was capable of aggregation inhibition, although not to the same degree as free dopamine. This result opens up new avenues for the use of controlled radical polymerizations as a means of preparing hyperbranched polymers for anti-fibrillation activity, but shows that the incorporation of functional groups from known small molecules within polymers may alter their biological activity. PMID:26707645

  3. PET evaluation of the dopamine system of the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Gatley, S. |

    1996-07-01

    Dopamine plays a pivotal role in the regulation and control of movement, motivation and cognition. It also is closely linked to reward, reinforcement and addiction. Abnormalities in brain dopamine are associated with many neurological and psychiatric disorders including Parkinson`s disease, schizophrenia and substance abuse. This close association between dopamine and neurological and psychiatric diseases and with substance abuse make it an important topic in research in the neurosciences and an important molecular target in drug development. PET enables the direct measurement of components of the dopamine system in the living human brain. It relies on radiotracers which label dopamine receptors, dopamine transporters, precursors of dopamine or compounds which have specificity for the enzymes which degrade dopamine. Additionally, by using tracers that provide information on regional brain metabolism or blood flow as well as neurochemically specific pharmacological interventions, PET can be used to assess the functional consequences of change in brain dopamine activity. PET dopamine measurements have been used to investigate the normal human brain and its involvement in psychiatric and neurological diseases. It has also been used in psychopharmacological research to investigate dopamine drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson`s disease and of schizophrenia as well as to investigate the effects of drugs of abuse on the dopamine system. Since various functional and neurochemical parameters can be studied in the same subject, PET enables investigation of the functional integrity of the dopamine system in the human brain and investigation of the interactions of dopamine with other neurotransmitters. This paper summarizes the different tracers and experimental strategies developed to evaluate the various elements of the dopamine system in the human brain with PET and their applications to clinical research. 254 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Effect of psilocin on extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the mesoaccumbens and mesocortical pathway in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Yuichi; Abe, Kenji; Katagiri, Nobuyuki; Kambe, Toshie; Saitoh, Toshiaki; Utsunomiya, Iku; Horiguchi, Yoshie; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2015-01-01

    Psilocin (3-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]-1H-indol-4-ol) is a hallucinogenic component of the Mexican mushroom Psilocybe mexicana and a skeletal serotonin (5-HT) analogue. Psilocin is the active metabolite of psilocybin (3-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]-1H-indol-4-yl dihydrogen phosphate). In the present study, we examined the effects of systemically administered psilocin on extracellular dopamine and 5-HT concentrations in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens, and medial prefrontal cortex of the dopaminergic pathway in awake rats using in vivo microdialysis. Intraperitoneal administration of psilocin (5, 10 mg/kg) significantly increased extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. Psilocin did not affect the extracellular 5-HT level in the nucleus accumbens. Conversely, systemic administration of psilocin (10 mg/kg) significantly increased extracellular 5-HT levels in the medial prefrontal cortex of rats, but dopamine was decreased in this region. However, neither extracellular dopamine nor 5-HT levels in the VTA were altered by administration of psilocin. Behaviorally, psilocin significantly increased the number of head twitches. Thus, psilocin affects the dopaminergic system in the nucleus accumbens. In the serotonergic system, psilocin contribute to a crucial effect in the medial prefrontal cortex. The present data suggest that psilocin increased both the extracellular dopamine and 5-HT concentrations in the mesoaccumbens and/or mesocortical pathway. PMID:25342005

  5. Effect of psilocin on extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the mesoaccumbens and mesocortical pathway in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Yuichi; Abe, Kenji; Katagiri, Nobuyuki; Kambe, Toshie; Saitoh, Toshiaki; Utsunomiya, Iku; Horiguchi, Yoshie; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2015-01-01

    Psilocin (3-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]-1H-indol-4-ol) is a hallucinogenic component of the Mexican mushroom Psilocybe mexicana and a skeletal serotonin (5-HT) analogue. Psilocin is the active metabolite of psilocybin (3-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]-1H-indol-4-yl dihydrogen phosphate). In the present study, we examined the effects of systemically administered psilocin on extracellular dopamine and 5-HT concentrations in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens, and medial prefrontal cortex of the dopaminergic pathway in awake rats using in vivo microdialysis. Intraperitoneal administration of psilocin (5, 10 mg/kg) significantly increased extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. Psilocin did not affect the extracellular 5-HT level in the nucleus accumbens. Conversely, systemic administration of psilocin (10 mg/kg) significantly increased extracellular 5-HT levels in the medial prefrontal cortex of rats, but dopamine was decreased in this region. However, neither extracellular dopamine nor 5-HT levels in the VTA were altered by administration of psilocin. Behaviorally, psilocin significantly increased the number of head twitches. Thus, psilocin affects the dopaminergic system in the nucleus accumbens. In the serotonergic system, psilocin contribute to a crucial effect in the medial prefrontal cortex. The present data suggest that psilocin increased both the extracellular dopamine and 5-HT concentrations in the mesoaccumbens and/or mesocortical pathway.

  6. Putamen–midbrain functional connectivity is related to striatal dopamine transporter availability in patients with Lewy body diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, A.; Gomperts, S.N.; Johnson, K.A.; Growdon, J.H.; Van Dijk, K.R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior work has shown that functional connectivity between the midbrain and putamen is altered in patients with impairments in the dopamine system. This study examines whether individual differences in midbrain–striatal connectivity are proportional to the integrity of the dopamine system in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss (Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies). We assessed functional connectivity of the putamen during resting state fMRI and dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in the striatum using 11C-Altropane PET in twenty patients. In line with the hypothesis that functional connectivity between the midbrain and the putamen reflects the integrity of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system, putamen–midbrain functional connectivity was significantly correlated with striatal DAT availability even after stringent control for effects of head motion. DAT availability did not relate to functional connectivity between the caudate and thalamus/prefrontal areas. As such, resting state functional connectivity in the midbrain–striatal pathway may provide a useful indicator of underlying pathology in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss. PMID:26137443

  7. Selective behavioral responses to male song are affected by the dopamine agonist GBR-12909 in female European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Pawlisch, Benjamin A; Riters, Lauren V

    2010-09-24

    Female songbirds use attributes of male song to select mates. Different types of male song differ in incentive value (or the ability to attract females). Dopamine plays a role in incentive value and reward; however, little is known about its role in selective female behavioral responses to male courtship signals. We examined the effects of the indirect dopamine agonist (dopamine reuptake inhibitor) GBR-12909 on female songbird responses to male song stimuli. Female European starlings were played recordings of long starling song (presumed high incentive value), short starling song (presumed lower incentive value), or purple martin song (lowest incentive value). Vehicle-treated females investigated nest boxes playing starling song more than purple martin song. However, GBR-12909 disrupted preferential responses to the starling song stimuli. GBR-12909 also increased cFOS immunolabeling in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) at the same dose that disrupted female selective responses to male starling song. The results suggest that dopamine receptors play an important role in female selective responses to biologically meaningful stimuli and that the VMH may be influenced by dopamine to alter female responses to male song. PMID:20633541

  8. Putamen-midbrain functional connectivity is related to striatal dopamine transporter availability in patients with Lewy body diseases.

    PubMed

    Rieckmann, A; Gomperts, S N; Johnson, K A; Growdon, J H; Van Dijk, K R A

    2015-01-01

    Prior work has shown that functional connectivity between the midbrain and putamen is altered in patients with impairments in the dopamine system. This study examines whether individual differences in midbrain-striatal connectivity are proportional to the integrity of the dopamine system in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss (Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies). We assessed functional connectivity of the putamen during resting state fMRI and dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in the striatum using 11C-Altropane PET in twenty patients. In line with the hypothesis that functional connectivity between the midbrain and the putamen reflects the integrity of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system, putamen-midbrain functional connectivity was significantly correlated with striatal DAT availability even after stringent control for effects of head motion. DAT availability did not relate to functional connectivity between the caudate and thalamus/prefrontal areas. As such, resting state functional connectivity in the midbrain-striatal pathway may provide a useful indicator of underlying pathology in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss.

  9. DRD4 dopamine receptor genotype and CSF monoamine metabolites in Finnish alcoholics and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.D.; Dean, M.; Goldman, D.

    1995-06-19

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is thus far unique among neurotransmitter receptors in having a highly polymorphic gene structure that has been reported to produce altered receptor functioning. These allelic variations are caused by a 48-bp segment in exon III of the coding region which may be repeated from 2-10 times. Varying the numbers of repeated segments changes the length, structure, and, possibly, the functional efficiency of the receptor, which makes this gene an intriguing candidate for variations in dopamine-related behaviors, such as alcoholism and drug abuse. Thus far, these DRD4 alleles have been investigated for association with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Parkinson`s disease, and chronic alcoholism, and all have been largely negative for a direct association. We evaluated the DRD4 genotype in 226 Finish adult males, 113 of whom were alcoholics, many of the early onset type with features of impulsivity and antisocial traits. Genotype frequencies were compared to 113 Finnish controls who were free of alcohol abuse, substance abuse, and major mental illness. In 70 alcoholics and 20 controls, we measured CSF homovanillic acid (HVA), the major metabolite of dopamine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). No association was found between a particular DRD4 dopamine receptor allele and alcoholism. CSF concentrations of the monoamine metabolites showed no significant difference among the DRD4 genotypes. This study of the DRD4 dopamine receptor in alcoholics is the first to be conducted in a clinically and ethnically homogeneous population and to relate the DRD4 genotype to CSF monoamine concentrations. The results indicate that there is no association of the DRD4 receptor with alcoholism. 52 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Chromatographic analysis of dopamine metabolism in a Parkinsonian model.

    PubMed

    Baranyi, Mária; Milusheva, Elisaveta; Vizi, E Sylvester; Sperlágh, Beáta

    2006-07-01

    The present study examined the metabolism of released dopamine from rat striatum upon chronic rotenone exposure. The sample separation was carried out by two-dimensional, reversed-phase and ion pair reversed-phase chromatography using on-line solid phase extraction enrichment. Reduced dopamine content and decreased extracellular level of [(3)H] and endogenous dopamine evoked by electrical stimulation indicated the injury of dopaminergic pathway. Sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons were increased to oxidative stress with enhanced release of dopamine and formation of oxidized metabolite dopamine quinone (DAQ). Utilizing multidimensional detection, EC at -100 mV reduction potential, the method has been applied for identification of DAQ and aminochrome (DAC).

  11. Quadruplex Integrated DNA (QuID) Nanosensors for Monitoring Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Jennifer M.; Skipwith, Christopher G.; Clark, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine is widely innervated throughout the brain and critical for many cognitive and motor functions. Imbalances or loss in dopamine transmission underlie various psychiatric disorders and degenerative diseases. Research involving cellular studies and disease states would benefit from a tool for measuring dopamine transmission. Here we show a Quadruplex Integrated DNA (QuID) nanosensor platform for selective and dynamic detection of dopamine. This nanosensor exploits DNA technology and enzyme recognition systems to optically image dopamine levels. The DNA quadruplex architecture is designed to be compatible in physically constrained environments (110 nm) with high flexibility, homogeneity, and a lower detection limit of 110 µM. PMID:26287196

  12. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S S; Wainer, Irving W; Cheer, Joseph F; Frost, Douglas O; Huang, Xi-Ping; Gould, Todd D

    2016-10-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine's antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine's side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1-D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine's enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. PMID:27469513

  13. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S. S.; Wainer, Irving W.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Frost, Douglas O.; Huang, Xi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine’s antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine’s side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1–D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine’s enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. PMID

  14. Relationship between methamphetamine-induced dopamine release, hyperthermia, self-injurious behaviour and long term dopamine depletion in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Halladay, Alycia K; Kusnecov, Alexander; Michna, Lauri; Kita, Taizo; Hara, Chiaki; Wagner, George C

    2003-07-01

    Differential sensitivity to neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine on striatal dopaminergic neurones between C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice has been established. In the present studies, the interaction of methamphetamine-induced dopamine release, self-injurious behaviour, the neural immune response, and the long-term (3 day) dopamine depletion were examined in these strains after administration of 8 mg/kg methamphetamine. BALB/c mice showed increased hyperthermia compared to the C57BL/6 strain, as well as induction of interleukin-1beta. Additionally, homovanillic acid (HVA) levels, as well as HVA/DA turnover ratios were elevated in the striatum and frontal cortex of BALB/c mice, both compared to untreated mice and to the C57BL/6 strain after a single injection of methamphetamine. Pretreatment with acetaminophen eliminated the methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia in BALB/c mice and reduced body temperature in C57BL/6 mice. However, acetaminophen pretreatment did not affect any parameters of dopaminergic toxicity in the striatum or frontal cortex of the BALB/c strain following repeated methamphetamine injections. Furthermore, acetaminophen pretreatment did not alter the incidence of self-injurious behaviour in BALB/c mice. Therefore, hyperthermia and methamphetamine-induced toxicity appear to be independent phenomena while self-injurious behaviour may provide a better predictor of toxicity, which, in turn, may be related to dopamine release.

  15. Regulation of Dopamine Uptake by Vasoactive Peptides in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Gironacci, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the key role of renal dopamine in tubular sodium handling, we hypothesized that c-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and Ang-(1-7) may regulate renal dopamine availability in tubular cells, contributing to Na+, K+-ATPase inhibition. Present results show that CNP did not affect either 3H-dopamine uptake in renal tissue or Na+, K+-ATPase activity; meanwhile, Ang-(1-7) was able to increase 3H-dopamine uptake and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity in renal cortex. Ang-(1-7) and dopamine together decreased further Na+, K+-ATPase activity showing an additive effect on the sodium pump. In addition, hydrocortisone reversed Ang-(1-7)-dopamine overinhibition on the enzyme, suggesting that this inhibition is closely related to Ang-(1-7) stimulation on renal dopamine uptake. Both anantin and cANP (4-23-amide) did not modify CNP effects on 3H-dopamine uptake by tubular cells. The Mas receptor antagonist, A-779, blocked the increase elicited by Ang-(1-7) on 3H-dopamine uptake. The stimulatory uptake induced by Ang-(1-7) was even more pronounced in the presence of losartan, suggesting an inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on AT1 receptors on 3H-dopamine uptake. By increasing dopamine bioavailability in tubular cells, Ang-(1-7) enhances Na+, K+-ATPase activity inhibition, contributing to its natriuretic and diuretic effects.

  16. Dopamine-melanin nanofilms for biomimetic structural coloration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong-Fei; Hong, Jong-Dal

    2015-02-01

    This article describes the formation of dopamine-melanin thin films (50-200 nm thick) at an air/dopamine solution interface under static conditions. Beneath these films, spherical melanin granules formed in bulk liquid phase. The thickness of dopamine-melanin films at the interface relied mainly on the concentration of dopamine solution and the reaction time. A plausible mechanism underlining dopamine-melanin thin film formation was proposed based on the hydrophobicity of dopamine-melanin aggregates and the mass transport of the aggregates to the air/solution interface as a result of convective flow. The thickness of the interfacial films increased linearly with the dopamine concentration and the reaction time. The dopamine-melanin thin film and granules (formed in bulk liquid phase) with a double-layered structure were transferred onto a solid substrate to mimic the (keratin layer)/(melanin granules) structure present in bird plumage, thereby preparing full dopamine-melanin thin-film reflectors. The reflected color of the thin-film reflectors depended on the film thickness, which could be adjusted according to the dopamine concentration. The reflectance of the resulted reflectors exhibited a maximal reflectance value of 8-11%, comparable to that of bird plumage (∼11%). This study provides a useful, simple, and low-cost approach to the fabrication of biomimetic thin-film reflectors using full dopamine-melanin materials.

  17. Regulation of Dopamine Uptake by Vasoactive Peptides in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Gironacci, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the key role of renal dopamine in tubular sodium handling, we hypothesized that c-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and Ang-(1-7) may regulate renal dopamine availability in tubular cells, contributing to Na+, K+-ATPase inhibition. Present results show that CNP did not affect either 3H-dopamine uptake in renal tissue or Na+, K+-ATPase activity; meanwhile, Ang-(1-7) was able to increase 3H-dopamine uptake and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity in renal cortex. Ang-(1-7) and dopamine together decreased further Na+, K+-ATPase activity showing an additive effect on the sodium pump. In addition, hydrocortisone reversed Ang-(1-7)-dopamine overinhibition on the enzyme, suggesting that this inhibition is closely related to Ang-(1-7) stimulation on renal dopamine uptake. Both anantin and cANP (4-23-amide) did not modify CNP effects on 3H-dopamine uptake by tubular cells. The Mas receptor antagonist, A-779, blocked the increase elicited by Ang-(1-7) on 3H-dopamine uptake. The stimulatory uptake induced by Ang-(1-7) was even more pronounced in the presence of losartan, suggesting an inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on AT1 receptors on 3H-dopamine uptake. By increasing dopamine bioavailability in tubular cells, Ang-(1-7) enhances Na+, K+-ATPase activity inhibition, contributing to its natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27635280

  18. Regulation of Dopamine Uptake by Vasoactive Peptides in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Rukavina Mikusic, N L; Kouyoumdzian, N M; Rouvier, E; Gironacci, M M; Toblli, J E; Fernández, B E; Choi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Considering the key role of renal dopamine in tubular sodium handling, we hypothesized that c-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and Ang-(1-7) may regulate renal dopamine availability in tubular cells, contributing to Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibition. Present results show that CNP did not affect either (3)H-dopamine uptake in renal tissue or Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity; meanwhile, Ang-(1-7) was able to increase (3)H-dopamine uptake and decreased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in renal cortex. Ang-(1-7) and dopamine together decreased further Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity showing an additive effect on the sodium pump. In addition, hydrocortisone reversed Ang-(1-7)-dopamine overinhibition on the enzyme, suggesting that this inhibition is closely related to Ang-(1-7) stimulation on renal dopamine uptake. Both anantin and cANP (4-23-amide) did not modify CNP effects on (3)H-dopamine uptake by tubular cells. The Mas receptor antagonist, A-779, blocked the increase elicited by Ang-(1-7) on (3)H-dopamine uptake. The stimulatory uptake induced by Ang-(1-7) was even more pronounced in the presence of losartan, suggesting an inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on AT1 receptors on (3)H-dopamine uptake. By increasing dopamine bioavailability in tubular cells, Ang-(1-7) enhances Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity inhibition, contributing to its natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27635280

  19. The role of dopamine receptors in the neurotoxicity of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ares-Santos, S; Granado, N; Moratalla, R

    2013-05-01

    Methamphetamine is a synthetic drug consumed by millions of users despite its neurotoxic effects in the brain, leading to loss of dopaminergic fibres and cell bodies. Moreover, clinical reports suggest that methamphetamine abusers are predisposed to Parkinson's disease. Therefore, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms involved in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Dopamine receptors may be a plausible target to prevent this neurotoxicity. Genetic inactivation of dopamine D1 or D2 receptors protects against the loss of dopaminergic fibres in the striatum and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Protection by D1 receptor inactivation is due to blockade of hypothermia, reduced dopamine content and turnover and increased stored vesicular dopamine in D1R(-/-) mice. However, the neuroprotective impact of D2 receptor inactivation is partially dependent on an effect on body temperature, as well as on the blockade of dopamine reuptake by decreased dopamine transporter activity, which results in reduced intracytosolic dopamine levels in D2R(-/-) mice.

  20. How does angiotensin II increase cardiac dopamine-beta-hydroxylation?

    PubMed

    Chevillard, C; Duchene, N; Alexandre, J M

    1975-03-01

    The potent accelerating effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on caridac dopamine beta-hydroxylation was studied on slices of rat heart. Ang II did not affect the kinetics of beta-hydroxylation but it increased the axonal uptake of dopamine, and, concomitant with the acceleration of biosynthesis, it enhanced the accumulation of dopamine into tissue. Puromycin, in contrast to actinomycin D, antagonized the stimulation of dopamine beta-hydroxylation by Ang II, but did not suppress the rise in cardiac dopamine. Therefore, to promote the acceleration of dopamine beta-hydroxylation, (i) the rise in tissue dopamine available for conversion appeared to be insufficient, (ii) the formation of new proteins by activation of traduction seemed to constitute the basic mechanism of Ang II action.

  1. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons.

    PubMed

    Grattan, David R; Akopian, Armen N

    2016-04-26

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016) report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits.

  2. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Grattan, David R.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016) report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits. PMID:27119847

  3. Impulsivity, Stimulant Abuse, and Dopamine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    London, E D

    2016-01-01

    The nonmedical use of amphetamine-type stimulants is a worldwide problem, with substantial medical and social consequences. Nonetheless, the identification of a pharmacological treatment for amphetamine use disorder remains elusive. Stimulant users exhibit neurochemical evidence of dopamine-system dysfunction as well as impulsive behaviors that may interfere with the success of treatments for their addiction. This review focuses on the potential role of dopaminergic neurotransmission in impulsivity, both in healthy individuals and chronic stimulant users who meet criteria for methamphetamine dependence. Presented are findings related to the potential contributions of signaling through dopamine D1- and D2-type receptors to self-control impulsivity in methamphetamine- dependent users. The information available points to signaling through striatal D2-type dopamine receptors as a potential therapeutic target for stimulant use disorders, but medications that target D2-type dopamine receptors have not been successful in treating stimulant-use disorders, possibly because D2-type receptors are downregulated. Other means to augment D2-type receptor signaling are therefore under consideration, and one promising approach is the addition of exercise training as an adjunct to behavioral treatment for addiction. PMID:27288074

  4. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons.

    PubMed

    Grattan, David R; Akopian, Armen N

    2016-04-26

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016) report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits. PMID:27119847

  5. Dopamine responsiveness is regulated by targeted sorting of D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Selena E; Enquist, Johan; Hopf, Frederic W; Lee, Josephine H; Gladher, Fredrik; Kharazia, Viktor; Waldhoer, Maria; Mailliard, William S; Armstrong, Randall; Bonci, Antonello; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2005-08-01

    Aberrant dopaminergic signaling is a critical determinant in multiple psychiatric disorders, and in many disease states, dopamine receptor number is altered. Here we identify a molecular mechanism that selectively targets D2 receptors for degradation after their activation by dopamine. The degradative fate of D2 receptors is determined by an interaction with G protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP). As a consequence of this GASP interaction, D2 responses in rat brain fail to resensitize after agonist treatment. Disruption of the D2-GASP interaction facilitates recovery of D2 responses, suggesting that modulation of the D2-GASP interaction is important for the functional down-regulation of D2 receptors.

  6. Dopamine receptor DOP-4 modulates habituation to repetitive photoactivation of a C. elegans polymodal nociceptor.

    PubMed

    Ardiel, Evan L; Giles, Andrew C; Yu, Alex J; Lindsay, Theodore H; Lockery, Shawn R; Rankin, Catharine H

    2016-10-01

    Habituation is a highly conserved phenomenon that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Invertebrate model systems, like Caenorhabditis elegans, can be a powerful tool for investigating this fundamental process. Here we established a high-throughput learning assay that used real-time computer vision software for behavioral tracking and optogenetics for stimulation of the C. elegans polymodal nociceptor, ASH. Photoactivation of ASH with ChR2 elicited backward locomotion and repetitive stimulation altered aspects of the response in a manner consistent with habituation. Recording photocurrents in ASH, we observed no evidence for light adaptation of ChR2. Furthermore, we ruled out fatigue by demonstrating that sensory input from the touch cells could dishabituate the ASH avoidance circuit. Food and dopamine signaling slowed habituation downstream from ASH excitation via D1-like dopamine receptor, DOP-4. This assay allows for large-scale genetic and drug screens investigating mechanisms of nociception modulation. PMID:27634141

  7. Dual ameliorative effects of Ningdong granule on dopamine in rat models of Tourette's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Li, Anyuan

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key neuromodulator in the brain that supports motor and cognitive functions. Here, we use apomorphine (Apo) and 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) to develop two rat models of Tourette's syndrome (TS), a common neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by stereotyped repetitive involuntary tics. The models enabled the assessment of unique ameliorative effects of Ningdong granule (NDG), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) preparation dedicated to the treatment of TS, on the striatal DA content of rats. By using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we found that long-term administration of NDG could, at least partially, restore the striatal dopamine alterations, either by increasing them after IDPN treatment or by decreasing them after Apo treatment. Taken together, our data indicated that NDG could ameliorate the abnormal striatal DA content dually, and the unique therapeutic property may be meaningful for the treatment of TS. PMID:25592875

  8. Linkage analysis of schizophrenia with five dopamine receptor genes in nine pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Byerley, W.; Holik, J.; Hoff, M.; Myles-Worsley, M.; Plaetke, R. ); Lannfelt, L. ); Sokoloff, P.; Schwartz, J.C. ); Waldo, M.; Freedman, R. )

    1993-02-01

    Alterations in dopamine neurotransmission have been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia for nearly 2 decades. Recently, the genes for five dopamine receptors have been cloned and characterized, and genetic and physical map information has become available. Using these five loci as candidate genes, the authors have tested for genetic linkage to schizophrenia in nine multigenerational families which include multiple affected individuals. In addition to testing conservative disease models, the have used a neurophysiological indicator variable, the P50 auditory evoked response. Deficits in gating of the P50 response have been shown to segregate with schizophrenia in this sample and may identify carriers of gene(s) predisposing for schizophrenia. Linkage results were consistently negative, indicating that a defect at any of the actual receptor sites is unlikely to be a major contributor to schizophrenia in the nine families studied. 47 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. Dopamine receptor DOP-4 modulates habituation to repetitive photoactivation of a C. elegans polymodal nociceptor.

    PubMed

    Ardiel, Evan L; Giles, Andrew C; Yu, Alex J; Lindsay, Theodore H; Lockery, Shawn R; Rankin, Catharine H

    2016-10-01

    Habituation is a highly conserved phenomenon that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Invertebrate model systems, like Caenorhabditis elegans, can be a powerful tool for investigating this fundamental process. Here we established a high-throughput learning assay that used real-time computer vision software for behavioral tracking and optogenetics for stimulation of the C. elegans polymodal nociceptor, ASH. Photoactivation of ASH with ChR2 elicited backward locomotion and repetitive stimulation altered aspects of the response in a manner consistent with habituation. Recording photocurrents in ASH, we observed no evidence for light adaptation of ChR2. Furthermore, we ruled out fatigue by demonstrating that sensory input from the touch cells could dishabituate the ASH avoidance circuit. Food and dopamine signaling slowed habituation downstream from ASH excitation via D1-like dopamine receptor, DOP-4. This assay allows for large-scale genetic and drug screens investigating mechanisms of nociception modulation.

  10. Differential subcellular distribution of rat brain dopamine receptors and subtype-specific redistribution induced by cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Voulalas, Pamela J.; Schetz, John; Undieh, Ashiwel S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the subcellular distribution of dopamine D1, D2 and D5 receptor subtypes in rat frontal cortex, and examined whether psychostimulant-induced elevation of synaptic dopamine could alter the receptor distribution. Differential detergent solubilization and density gradient centrifugation were used to separate various subcellular fractions, followed by semi-quantitative determination of the relative abundance of specific receptor proteins in each fraction. D1 receptors were predominantly localized to detergent-resistant membranes, and a portion of these receptors also floated on sucrose gradients. These properties are characteristic of proteins found in lipid rafts and caveolae. D2 receptors exhibited variable distribution between cytoplasmic, detergent-soluble and detergent-resistant membrane fractions, yet were not present in buoyant membranes. Most D5 receptor immunoreactivity was distributed into the cytoplasmic fraction, failing to sediment at forces up to 300,000g, while the remainder was localized to detergent-soluble membranes in cortex. D5 receptors were undetectable in detergent-resistant fractions or raft-like subdomains. Following daily cocaine administration for seven days, a significant portion of D1 receptors translocated from detergent-resistant membranes to detergent-soluble membranes and the cytoplasmic fraction. The distributions of D5 and D2 receptor subtypes were not significantly altered by cocaine treatment. These data imply that D5 receptors are predominantly cytoplasmic, D2 receptors are diffusely distributed within the cell, whereas D1 receptors are mostly localized to lipid rafts within the rat frontal cortex. Dopamine receptor subtype localization is susceptible to modulation by pharmacological manipulations that elevate synaptic dopamine, however the functional implications of such drug-induced receptor warrant further investigation. PMID:21236347

  11. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cockroach brain: evidence for a distinct dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, G.L.; Gole, J.W.D.; Notman, H.J.; Downer, R.G.H.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine increases cyclic AMP production in crude membrane preparations of cockroach brain with plateaus in cyclic AMP production occurring between 1-10 ..mu..M and 10 mM. Maximal production of cyclic AMP is 2.25 fold greater than that of control values. Octopamine also increases cyclic AMP production with a Ka of 1.4 ..mu..M and maximal production 3.5 fold greater than that of control. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not increase cyclic AMP production. The effects of octopamine and dopamine are fully additive. The vertebrate dopamine agonists ADTN and epinine stimulate the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) with Ka values of 4.5 and 0.6 ..mu..M respectively and with maximal effectiveness 1.7 fold greater than that of control. The selective D/sub 2/-dopamine agonist LY-171555 stimulates cyclic AMP production to a similar extent with a Ka of 50 ..mu..M. Other dopamine agonists have no stimulatory effects. With the exception of mianserin, /sup 3/H-piflutixol is displaced from brain membranes by dopamine antagonists with an order of potency similar to that observed for the inhibition of dopamine-sensitive AC. The results indicate that the octopamine- and dopamine-sensitive AC in cockroach brain can be distinguished pharmacologically and the dopamine receptors coupled to AC have pharmacological characteristics distinct from vertebrate D/sup 1/- and D/sup 2/-dopamine receptors. 33 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Selective Hyposmia in Parkinson Disease: Association with Hippocampal Dopamine Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Gedela, Satyanarayana; Herath, Priyantha; Constantine, Gregory M.; Moore, Robert Y.

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and has been attributed to early pathological deposition of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in primary olfactory centers. However, olfactory deficits do not always worsen over time despite progression of disease raising the possibility of additional pathobiological mechanisms contributing to olfactory functions in PD, such as changes in olfactory neurotransmitter functions. Neurotransmitter changes, such as altered dopaminergic status, may also better explain the selective nature of odor identification deficits in PD. Proper odor identification depends on higher order structures, such as the hippocampus, for olfactory cognitive or memory processing. Using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), we previously identified 3 odors (banana, licorice, dill pickle, labeled as UPSIT-3) that PD subjects most frequently failed to recognize compared to age- and gender matched controls. We also identified 6 odors that were equally successfully identified by controls and PD subjects (NPD-Olf6). A ratio of UPSIT-3 divided by NPD-Olf6 scores provides another descriptor of selective hyposmia in PD (“olfactory ratio”). In this study we investigated the pathophysiology of hyposmia in PD using dopamine transporter (DAT) PET. Twenty-nine PD patients (Hoehn and Yahr stages I-III; 7f/22m; age 60.2±10.8) underwent olfactory testing using the UPSIT and [11C]β-CFT DAT PET. DAT binding potentials (BP) were assessed in the hippocampus, amygdala, ventral and dorsal striatum. We found that correlation coefficients between total UPSIT scores and regional brain DAT BP were highest for the hippocampus (Rs=0.54, P=0.002) and lower for the amygdala (Rs=0.44, P=0.02), ventral (Rs=0.48, P=0.008) and dorsal striatum (Rs=0.39, P=0.03). Correlations were most significant for the selective hyposmia measures and hippocampal DAT: UPSIT-3 (Rs=0.65, P=0.0001) and the olfactory ratio (Rs=0.74, P<0.0001). We

  13. Dopamine Receptors in Human Adipocytes: Expression and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Borcherding, Dana C.; Hugo, Eric R.; Idelman, Gila; De Silva, Anuradha; Richtand, Nathan W.; Loftus, Jean; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Dopamine (DA) binds to five receptors (DAR), classified by their ability to increase (D1R-like) or decrease (D2R-like) cAMP. In humans, most DA circulates as dopamine sulfate (DA-S), which can be de-conjugated to bioactive DA by arylsulfatase A (ARSA). The objective was to examine expression of DAR and ARSA in human adipose tissue and determine whether DA regulates prolactin (PRL) and adipokine expression and release. Methods DAR were analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting in explants, primary adipocytes and two human adipocyte cell lines, LS14 and SW872. ARSA expression and activity were determined by qPCR and enzymatic assay. PRL expression and release were determined by luciferase reporter and Nb2 bioassay. Analysis of cAMP, cGMP, leptin, adiponectin and interleukin 6 (IL-6) was done by ELISA. Activation of MAPK and PI3 kinase/Akt was determined by Western blotting. Results DAR are variably expressed at the mRNA and protein levels in adipose tissue and adipocytes during adipogenesis. ARSA activity in adipocyte increases after differentiation. DA at nM concentrations suppresses cAMP, stimulates cGMP, and activates MAPK in adipocytes. Acting via D2R-like receptors, DA and DA-S inhibit PRL gene expression and release. Acting via D1R/D5R receptors, DA suppresses leptin and stimulates adiponectin and IL-6 release. Conclusions This is the first report that human adipocytes express functional DAR and ARSA, suggesting a regulatory role for peripheral DA in adipose functions. We speculate that the propensity of some DAR-activating antipsychotics to increase weight and alter metabolic homeostasis is due, in part, to their direct action on adipose tissue. PMID:21966540

  14. Involvement of hypothalamic dopamine in the regulation of prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Reymond, M J; Porter, J C

    1985-01-01

    The neuroendocrine control of prolactin (PRL) secretion is known to be a multifactorial process, but dopamine (DA) secreted by the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neurons of the hypothalamus is believed to exert a predominant inhibitory control on the secretion of PRL. The secretory activity of the TIDA neurons, including the rate of biosynthesis of DA and the rate of release of the neurohormone into hypophysial portal blood, can be readily evaluated in the rat. In most conditions in which an altered secretion of PRL has been documented, an altered secretory activity of the TIDA neurons has been found. When an acute reduction in the secretion of DA is observed, an increased secretion of PRL is associated, with an inverse relationship between DA and PRL concentrations in hypophysial portal and systemic blood, respectively. However, the secretion of PRL can be regulated by PRL itself through stimulation of the secretory activity of the TIDA neurons, and consequently hyperprolactinemia can be observed concomitantly with a sustained high secretion of DA, as seen after treatment with estrogen. The short loop feedback of PRL secretion seems to be impaired in the aging rat, since a sustained reduced hypothalamic secretion of DA is observed in spite of long-term hyperprolactinemia.

  15. Optical suppression of drug-evoked phasic dopamine release.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, James E; Cone, Jackson J; Sinon, Christopher G; Fortin, Samantha M; Kantak, Pranish A; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Stuber, Garret D; Roitman, Mitchell F

    2014-01-01

    Brief fluctuations in dopamine concentration (dopamine transients) play a key role in behavior towards rewards, including drugs of abuse. Drug-evoked dopamine transients may result from actions at both dopamine cell bodies and dopamine terminals. Inhibitory opsins can be targeted to dopamine neurons permitting their firing activity to be suppressed. However, as dopamine transients can become uncoupled from firing, it is unknown whether optogenetic hyperpolarization at the level of the soma is able to suppress dopamine transients. Here, we used in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to record transients evoked by cocaine and raclopride in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of urethane-anesthetized rats. We targeted halorhodopsin (NpHR) specifically to dopamine cells by injecting Cre-inducible virus into ventral tegmental area (VTA) of transgenic rats that expressed Cre recombinase under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-Cre(+) rats). Consistent with previous work, co-administration of cocaine and raclopride led to the generation of dopamine transients in NAc shell. Illumination of VTA with laser strongly suppressed the frequency of transients in NpHR-expressing rats, but not in control rats. Laser did not have any effect on amplitude of transients. Thus, optogenetics can effectively reduce the occurrence of drug-evoked transients and is therefore a suitable approach for studying the functional role of such transients in drug-associated behavior.

  16. Stimulant-induced psychosis, the dopamine theory of schizophrenia, and the habenula.

    PubMed

    Ellison, G

    1994-05-01

    While one of the original underpinnings of the dopamine theory of schizophrenia was the paranoid psychosis which often develops during the binges or speed runs of chronic amphetamine addicts (and, more recently, in cocaine addicts), neurochemical studies of such drug abusers or from animals given continuous stimulants in an effort to model stimulant psychoses have not played a major role in the further evolution of this theory. One clear persisting alteration produced by continuous amphetamine is a neurotoxicity to dopaminergic innervations in caudate. Yet continuous cocaine administration apparently does not induce a similar neurotoxicity and this makes this effect a poor candidate for an underpinning of stimulant psychoses. However, it has recently been found that both continuous amphetamine and cocaine induce a strong pattern of degeneration which is highly confined to the lateral habenula and its principal output pathway, fasciculus retroflexus. This finding has led to a reconsideration of the role of these structures in psychoses. The habenula, as the chief relay nucleus of the descending dorsal diencephalic system (consisting of stria medullaris, habenula and fasciculus retroflexus), is an important link between limbic and striatal forebrain and lower diencephalic and mesencephalic centers. Studies of glucose utilization have consistently shown the habenula to be highly sensitive to dopamine agonists and antagonists. Lesions of habenula produce a wide variety of behavioral alterations. The dorsal diencephalic system has major and predominantly inhibitory connections onto dopamine-containing cells and it mediates part of the negative feedback from dopamine receptors onto dopamine cell bodies. It represents one of the major inputs in brain to the raphe nuclei and has anatomical and functional connections to modulate important functions such as sensory gating through thalamus, pain gating through central gray and raphe and motor stereotypies and reward

  17. Repeated aripiprazole treatment causes dopamine D2 receptor up-regulation and dopamine supersensitivity in young rats.

    PubMed

    Varela, Fausto A; Der-Ghazarian, Taleen; Lee, Ryan J; Charntikov, Sergios; Crawford, Cynthia A; McDougall, Sanders A

    2014-04-01

    Aripiprazole is a second-generation antipsychotic that is increasingly being prescribed to children and adolescents. Despite this trend, little preclinical research has been done on the neural and behavioral actions of aripiprazole during early development. In the present study, young male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with vehicle, haloperidol (1 mg/kg), or aripiprazole (10 mg/kg) once daily on postnatal days (PD) 10-20. After 1, 4, or 8 days (i.e. on PD 21, PD 24, or PD 28), amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and stereotypy, as well as dorsal striatal D2 receptor levels, were measured in separate groups of rats. Pretreating young rats with aripiprazole or haloperidol increased D2 binding sites in the dorsal striatum. Consistent with these results, dopamine supersensitivity was apparent when aripiprazole- and haloperidol-pretreated rats were given a test day injection of amphetamine (2 or 4 mg/kg). Increased D2 receptor levels and altered behavioral responding persisted for at least 8 days after conclusion of the pretreatment regimen. Contrary to what has been reported in adults, repeated aripiprazole treatment caused D2 receptor up-regulation and persistent alterations of amphetamine-induced behavior in young rats. These findings are consistent with human clinical studies showing that children and adolescents are more prone than adults to aripiprazole-induced side effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms.

  18. Enhanced Dopamine Release by Dopamine Transport Inhibitors Described by a Restricted Diffusion Model and Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Alexander F; Spivak, Charles E; Lupica, Carl R

    2016-06-15

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon fiber electrodes is widely used to rapidly monitor changes in dopamine (DA) levels in vitro and in vivo. Current analytical approaches utilize parameters such as peak oxidation current amplitude and decay times to estimate release and uptake processes, respectively. However, peak amplitude changes are often observed with uptake inhibitors, thereby confounding the interpretation of these parameters. To overcome this limitation, we demonstrate that a simple five-parameter, two-compartment model mathematically describes DA signals as a balance of release (r/ke) and uptake (ku), summed with adsorption (kads and kdes) of DA to the carbon electrode surface. Using nonlinear regression, we demonstrate that our model precisely describes measured DA signals obtained in brain slice recordings. The parameters extracted from these curves were then validated using pharmacological manipulations that selectively alter vesicular release or DA transporter (DAT)-mediated uptake. Manipulation of DA release through altering the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio or adding tetrodotoxin reduced the release parameter with no effect on the uptake parameter. DAT inhibitors methylenedioxypyrovalerone, cocaine, and nomifensine significantly reduced uptake and increased vesicular DA release. In contrast, a low concentration of amphetamine reduced uptake but had no effect on DA release. Finally, the kappa opioid receptor agonist U50,488 significantly reduced vesicular DA release but had no effect on uptake. Together, these data demonstrate a novel analytical approach to distinguish the effects of manipulations on DA release or uptake that can be used to interpret FSCV data. PMID:27018734

  19. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    DOE PAGES

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15).more » In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals.« less

  20. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of

  1. Dopamine and Full-Field Illumination Activate D1 and D2–D5-Type Receptors in Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Genki; Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Partida, Gloria J.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine can regulate signal generation and transmission by activating multiple receptors and signaling cascades, especially in striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex. Dopamine modulates an even larger variety of cellular properties in retina, yet has been reported to do so by only D1 receptor-driven cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) increases or D2 receptor-driven cAMP decreases. Here, we test the possibility that dopamine operates differently on retinal ganglion cells, because the ganglion cell layer binds D1 and D2 receptor ligands, and displays changes in signaling components other than cAMP under illumination that should release dopamine. In adult rat retinal ganglion cells, based on patch-clamp recordings, Ca2+ imaging, and immunohistochemistry, we find that 1) spike firing is inhibited by dopamine and SKF 83959 (an agonist that does not activate homomeric D1 receptors or alter cAMP levels in other systems); 2) D1 and D2 receptor antagonists (SCH 23390, eticlopride, raclopride) counteract these effects; 3) these antagonists also block light-induced rises in cAMP, light-induced activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and dopamine-induced Ca2+ influx; and 4) the Ca2+ rise is markedly reduced by removing extracellular Ca2+ and by an IP3 receptor antagonist (2-APB). These results provide the first evidence that dopamine activates a receptor in adult mammalian retinal neurons that is distinct from classical D1 and D2 receptors, and that dopamine can activate mechanisms in addition to cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase to modulate retinal ganglion cell excitability. PMID:22678972

  2. Decreased spontaneous activity in AMPK α2 muscle specific kinase dead mice is not caused by changes in brain dopamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Møller, Lisbeth L V; Sylow, Lykke; Gøtzsche, Casper R; Serup, Annette K; Christiansen, Søren H; Weikop, Pia; Kiens, Bente; Woldbye, David P D; Richter, Erik A

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that physical activity has several health benefits, yet many people do not exercise. Dopamine levels in the striatum of the brain are thought to be important for the motivation to exercise. Conversely, we hypothesized that muscle quality can affect the motivation to exercise through alterations of the brain dopamine levels specifically in the striatal region. To test this hypothesis, transgenic mice overexpressing an inactivatable dominant negative α2 AMPK construct (AMPK α2 KD) in muscles and littermate wildtype (WT) mice were tested. AMPK α2 KD mice have impaired running capacity and display reduced voluntary wheel running activity. Striatal content of dopamine and its metabolites were measured under basal physiological conditions and after cocaine-induced dopamine efflux from the ventral striatum by in vivo microdialysis. Moreover, cocaine-induced locomotor activity was tested in an open field test. Furthermore, we investigated maximal running capacity and voluntary running over a period of 19days. AMPK α2 KD mice ran 30% less in daily distance compared to WT. Furthermore, AMPK α2 KD mice showed significantly decreased locomotor activity in the open field test compared to WT when treated with saline or cocaine, respectively, but the increase induced by cocaine was similar in AMPK α2 KD and WT mice. The efflux of dopamine in ventral striatum after cocaine treatment increased similarly by 2.5-fold in the two genotypes, and basal levels of dopamine and its metabolites DOPAC and HVA were also similar between genotypes. These findings show that decreased AMPK activity in muscle leads to decreased voluntary activity which is not due to secondary abnormalities in dopamine levels in the ventral striatum or sensitivity to cocaine. Thus, decreased voluntary activity in AMPK muscle deficient mice is most likely unrelated to regulation of brain dopamine content and metabolism. PMID:27306083

  3. Supersensitive Kappa Opioid Receptors Promotes Ethanol Withdrawal-Related Behaviors and Reduce Dopamine Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jamie H.; Karkhanis, Anushree N.; Chen, Rong; Gioia, Dominic; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Becker, Howard C.; McCool, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic ethanol exposure reduces dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens, which may contribute to the negative affective symptoms associated with ethanol withdrawal. Kappa opioid receptors have been implicated in withdrawal-induced excessive drinking and anxiety-like behaviors and are known to inhibit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. The effects of chronic ethanol exposure on kappa opioid receptor-mediated changes in dopamine transmission at the level of the dopamine terminal and withdrawal-related behaviors were examined. Methods: Five weeks of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure in male C57BL/6 mice were used to examine the role of kappa opioid receptors in chronic ethanol-induced increases in ethanol intake and marble burying, a measure of anxiety/compulsive-like behavior. Drinking and marble burying were evaluated before and after chronic intermittent ethanol exposure, with and without kappa opioid receptor blockade by nor-binaltorphimine (10mg/kg i.p.). Functional alterations in kappa opioid receptors were assessed using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices containing the nucleus accumbens. Results: Chronic intermittent ethanol-exposed mice showed increased ethanol drinking and marble burying compared with controls, which was attenuated with kappa opioid receptor blockade. Chronic intermittent ethanol-induced increases in behavior were replicated with kappa opioid receptor activation in naïve mice. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry revealed that chronic intermittent ethanol reduced accumbal dopamine release and increased uptake rates, promoting a hypodopaminergic state of this region. Kappa opioid receptor activation with U50,488H concentration-dependently decreased dopamine release in both groups; however, this effect was greater in chronic intermittent ethanol-treated mice, indicating kappa opioid receptor supersensitivity in this group. Conclusions: These data suggest that the chronic intermittent ethanol-induced increase

  4. A Genetic Polymorphism of the Human Dopamine Transporter Determines the Impact of Sleep Deprivation on Brain Responses to Rewards and Punishments.

    PubMed

    Greer, Stephanie M; Goldstein, Andrea N; Knutson, Brian; Walker, Matthew P

    2016-06-01

    Despite an emerging link between alterations in motivated behavior and a lack of sleep, the impact of sleep deprivation on human brain mechanisms of reward and punishment remain largely unknown, as does the role of trait dopamine activity in modulating such effects in the mesolimbic system. Combining fMRI with an established incentive paradigm and individual genotyping, here, we test the hypothesis that trait differences in the human dopamine transporter (DAT) gene-associated with altered synaptic dopamine signalling-govern the impact of sleep deprivation on neural sensitivity to impending monetary gains and losses. Consistent with this framework, markedly different striatal reward responses were observed following sleep loss depending on the DAT functional polymorphisms. Only participants carrying a copy of the nine-repeat DAT allele-linked to higher phasic dopamine activity-expressed amplified striatal response during anticipation of monetary gain following sleep deprivation. Moreover, participants homozygous for the ten-repeat DAT allele-linked to lower phasic dopamine activity-selectively demonstrated an increase in sensitivity to monetary loss within anterior insula following sleep loss. Together, these data reveal a mechanistic dependency on human of trait dopaminergic function in determining the interaction between sleep deprivation and neural processing of rewards and punishments. Such findings have clinical implications in disorders where the DAT genetic polymorphism presents a known risk factor with comorbid sleep disruption, including attention hyperactive deficit disorder and substance abuse. PMID:26918589

  5. Axiomatic methods, dopamine and reward prediction error.

    PubMed

    Caplin, Andrew; Dean, Mark

    2008-04-01

    The phasic firing rate of midbrain dopamine neurons has been shown to respond both to the receipt of rewarding stimuli, and the degree to which such stimuli are anticipated by the recipient. This has led to the hypothesis that these neurons encode reward prediction error (RPE)-the difference between how rewarding an event is, and how rewarding it was expected to be. However, the RPE model is one of a number of competing explanations for dopamine activity that have proved hard to disentangle, mainly because they are couched in terms of latent, or unobservable, variables. This article describes techniques for dealing with latent variables common in economics and decision theory, and reviews work that uses these techniques to provide simple, non-parametric tests of the RPE hypothesis, allowing clear differentiation between competing explanations.

  6. Dopamine and the regulation of cognition and attention.

    PubMed

    Nieoullon, André

    2002-05-01

    Dopamine (DA) acts as a key neurotransmitter in the brain. Numerous studies have shown its regulatory role for motor and limbic functions. However, in the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), alterations of executive functions also suggest a role for DA in regulating cognitive functions. Some other diseases, which can also involve DA dysfunction, such as schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, as shown from the ameliorative action of dopaminergic antagonists and agonists, respectively, also show alteration of cognitive functions. Experimental studies showed that selective lesions of the dopaminergic neurons in rats or primates can actually provide cognitive deficits, especially when the mesocorticolimbic component of the dopaminergic systems is altered. Data from the experiments also showed significant alteration in attentional processes, thus raising the question of direct involvement of DA in regulating attention. Since the dopaminergic influence is mainly exerted over the frontal lobe and basal ganglia, it has been suggested that cognitive deficits express alteration in these subcortical brain structures closely linked to cortical areas, more than simple deficit in dopaminergic transmission. This point is still a matter of debate but, undoubtedly, DA acts as a powerful regulator of different aspects of cognitive brain functions. In this respect, normalizing DA transmission will contribute to improve the cognitive deficits not only related to neurologic or psychiatric diseases, but also in normal aging. Ontogenic and phylogenetic analysis of dopaminergic systems can provide evidences for a role of DA in the development of cognitive general capacities. DA can have a trophic action during maturation, which may influence the later cortical specification, particularly of pre-frontal cortical areas. Moreover, the characteristic extension of the dopaminergic cortical innervation in the rostro-caudal direction during the last

  7. Dopamine neurons share common response function for reward prediction error

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju; Bukwich, Michael; Uchida, Naoshige

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to signal reward prediction error, or the difference between actual and predicted reward. How dopamine neurons jointly encode this information, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that different neurons specialize in different aspects of prediction error; another is that each neuron calculates prediction error in the same way. We recorded from optogenetically-identified dopamine neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area (VTA) while mice performed classical conditioning tasks. Our tasks allowed us to determine the full prediction error functions of dopamine neurons and compare them to each other. We found striking homogeneity among individual dopamine neurons: their responses to both unexpected and expected rewards followed the same function, just scaled up or down. As a result, we could describe both individual and population responses using just two parameters. Such uniformity ensures robust information coding, allowing each dopamine neuron to contribute fully to the prediction error signal. PMID:26854803

  8. Dopamine in motivational control: rewarding, aversive, and alerting

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg-Martin, Ethan S.; Matsumoto, Masayuki; Hikosaka, Okihide

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Midbrain dopamine neurons are well known for their strong responses to rewards and their critical role in positive motivation. It has become increasingly clear, however, that dopamine neurons also transmit signals related to salient but non-rewarding experiences such as aversive and alerting events. Here we review recent advances in understanding the reward and non-reward functions of dopamine. Based on this data, we propose that dopamine neurons come in multiple types that are connected with distinct brain networks and have distinct roles in motivational control. Some dopamine neurons encode motivational value, supporting brain networks for seeking, evaluation, and value learning. Others encode motivational salience, supporting brain networks for orienting, cognition, and general motivation. Both types of dopamine neurons are augmented by an alerting signal involved in rapid detection of potentially important sensory cues. We hypothesize that these dopaminergic pathways for value, salience, and alerting cooperate to support adaptive behavior. PMID:21144997

  9. Dopamine neurons share common response function for reward prediction error.

    PubMed

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju; Bukwich, Michael; Uchida, Naoshige

    2016-03-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to signal reward prediction error, or the difference between actual and predicted reward. How dopamine neurons jointly encode this information, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that different neurons specialize in different aspects of prediction error; another is that each neuron calculates prediction error in the same way. We recorded from optogenetically identified dopamine neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area (VTA) while mice performed classical conditioning tasks. Our tasks allowed us to determine the full prediction error functions of dopamine neurons and compare them to each other. We found marked homogeneity among individual dopamine neurons: their responses to both unexpected and expected rewards followed the same function, just scaled up or down. As a result, we were able to describe both individual and population responses using just two parameters. Such uniformity ensures robust information coding, allowing each dopamine neuron to contribute fully to the prediction error signal. PMID:26854803

  10. Dopamine neurons share common response function for reward prediction error.

    PubMed

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju; Bukwich, Michael; Uchida, Naoshige

    2016-03-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to signal reward prediction error, or the difference between actual and predicted reward. How dopamine neurons jointly encode this information, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that different neurons specialize in different aspects of prediction error; another is that each neuron calculates prediction error in the same way. We recorded from optogenetically identified dopamine neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area (VTA) while mice performed classical conditioning tasks. Our tasks allowed us to determine the full prediction error functions of dopamine neurons and compare them to each other. We found marked homogeneity among individual dopamine neurons: their responses to both unexpected and expected rewards followed the same function, just scaled up or down. As a result, we were able to describe both individual and population responses using just two parameters. Such uniformity ensures robust information coding, allowing each dopamine neuron to contribute fully to the prediction error signal.

  11. Structural studies of dopamine. beta. -hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    Dopamine ..beta..-hydroxylase catalyzes the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, a ..beta..-hydroxylation reaction, utilizing ascorbic acid as reducing agent and molecular oxygen as cosubstrate. Modifications of the previously published purification procedure for D..beta..H have produced findings which show that (1) enzyme is inactivated by ascorbate autooxidation during the isolation procedure, (2) active as well as inactive D..beta..H co-purify throughout the entire purification procedure and (3) beef liver catalase totally protects against this time dependent inactivation. The stoichiometry of copper binding to the active sites of D..beta..H has been investigated using /sup 19/F-NMR and radioactive binding experiments. The data unequivocally show that homogeneous D..beta..H (isolated in the presence of catalase) specifically binds up to approx.8 copper atoms per enzyme tetramer. Distance determinations done using NMR relaxation rate theory show that anion activators of the catalytic reaction are bound at a fairly far distance from the Cu/sup 2 +/ centers. Spin-echo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy indicates that at least one, possibly two, histidines are bound as equatorial ligands to each Cu/sup 2 +/ ion. The combined data indicate that highly purified dopamine ..beta..-hydroxylase contains a 2 copper atom active site, composed of magnetically non-interacting metal centers. Active site components are distant from the Cu/sup 2 +/ centers, suggesting a possible movement of active site residues or components after reduction of enzyme bound copper in order to achieve the insertion of 1 atom of oxygen into the benzylic C-H bond of dopamine.

  12. Linking unfounded beliefs to genetic dopamine availability

    PubMed Central

    Schmack, Katharina; Rössler, Hannes; Sekutowicz, Maria; Brandl, Eva J.; Müller, Daniel J.; Petrovic, Predrag; Sterzer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Unfounded convictions involving beliefs in the paranormal, grandiosity ideas or suspicious thoughts are endorsed at varying degrees among the general population. Here, we investigated the neurobiopsychological basis of the observed inter-individual variability in the propensity toward unfounded beliefs. One hundred two healthy individuals were genotyped for four polymorphisms in the COMT gene (rs6269, rs4633, rs4818, and rs4680, also known as val158met) that define common functional haplotypes with substantial impact on synaptic dopamine degradation, completed a questionnaire measuring unfounded beliefs, and took part in a behavioral experiment assessing perceptual inference. We found that greater dopamine availability was associated with a stronger propensity toward unfounded beliefs, and that this effect was statistically mediated by an enhanced influence of expectations on perceptual inference. Our results indicate that genetic differences in dopaminergic neurotransmission account for inter-individual differences in perceptual inference linked to the formation and maintenance of unfounded beliefs. Thus, dopamine might be critically involved in the processes underlying one's interpretation of the relationship between the self and the world. PMID:26483654

  13. Action Initiation Shapes Mesolimbic Dopamine Encoding of Future Rewards

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Emilie C.J.; Grima, Laura L.; Magill, Peter J.; Bogacz, Rafal; Brown, Peter; Walton, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely held that dopamine signaling encodes predictions of future rewards and such predictions are regularly used to drive behavior, but the relationship between these two is poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate in rats that nucleus accumbens dopamine following a reward-predicting cue is attenuated unless movement is correctly initiated. These results demonstrate that dopamine release in this region is contingent upon correct action initiation and not just reward prediction. PMID:26642087

  14. Dopamine Does Double Duty in Motivating Cognitive Effort.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Andrew; Braver, Todd S

    2016-02-17

    Cognitive control is subjectively costly, suggesting that engagement is modulated in relationship to incentive state. Dopamine appears to play key roles. In particular, dopamine may mediate cognitive effort by two broad classes of functions: (1) modulating the functional parameters of working memory circuits subserving effortful cognition, and (2) mediating value-learning and decision-making about effortful cognitive action. Here, we tie together these two lines of research, proposing how dopamine serves "double duty", translating incentive information into cognitive motivation. PMID:26889810

  15. The dopamine transporter: role in neurotoxicity and human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bannon, Michael J. . E-mail: mbannon@med.wayne.edu

    2005-05-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane transport protein expressed exclusively within a small subset of CNS neurons. It plays a crucial role in controlling dopamine-mediated neurotransmission and a number of associated behaviors. This review focuses on recent data elucidating the role of the dopamine transporter in neurotoxicity and a number of CNS disorders, including Parkinson disease, drug abuse, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

  16. Differential influence of dopamine transport rate on the potencies of cocaine, amphetamine, and methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Siciliano, Cody A; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-21

    Dopamine transporter (DAT) levels vary across brain regions and individuals, and are altered by drug history and disease states; however, the impact of altered DAT expression on psychostimulant effects in brain has not been systematically explored. Using fast scan cyclic voltammetry, we measured the effects of elevated DAT levels on presynaptic dopamine parameters as well as the uptake inhibition potency of the blockers cocaine and methylphenidate (MPH) and the releaser amphetamine (AMPH) in the nucleus accumbens core. Here we found that increases in DAT levels, resulting from either genetic overexpression or MPH self-administration, caused markedly increased maximal rates of uptake (Vmax) that were positively correlated with the uptake inhibition potency of AMPH and MPH, but not cocaine. AMPH and MPH were particularly sensitive to DAT changes, with a 100% increase in Vmax resulting in a 200% increase in potency. The relationship between Vmax and MPH potency was the same as that for AMPH, but was different from that for cocaine, indicating that MPH more closely resembles a releaser with regard to uptake inhibition. Conversely, the effects of MPH on stimulated dopamine release were similar to those of cocaine, with inverted U-shaped increases in release over a concentration-response curve. This was strikingly different from the release profile of AMPH, which showed only reductions at high concentrations, indicating that MPH is not a pure releaser. These data indicate that although MPH is a DAT blocker, its uptake-inhibitory actions are affected by DAT changes in a similar manner to releasers. Together, these data show that fluctuations in DAT levels alter the potency of releasers and MPH but not blockers and suggest an integral role of the DAT in the addictive potential of AMPH and related compounds. PMID:25474655

  17. Differential Influence of Dopamine Transport Rate on the Potencies of Cocaine, Amphetamine, and Methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine transporter (DAT) levels vary across brain regions and individuals, and are altered by drug history and disease states; however, the impact of altered DAT expression on psychostimulant effects in brain has not been systematically explored. Using fast scan cyclic voltammetry, we measured the effects of elevated DAT levels on presynaptic dopamine parameters as well as the uptake inhibition potency of the blockers cocaine and methylphenidate (MPH) and the releaser amphetamine (AMPH) in the nucleus accumbens core. Here we found that increases in DAT levels, resulting from either genetic overexpression or MPH self-administration, caused markedly increased maximal rates of uptake (Vmax) that were positively correlated with the uptake inhibition potency of AMPH and MPH, but not cocaine. AMPH and MPH were particularly sensitive to DAT changes, with a 100% increase in Vmax resulting in a 200% increase in potency. The relationship between Vmax and MPH potency was the same as that for AMPH, but was different from that for cocaine, indicating that MPH more closely resembles a releaser with regard to uptake inhibition. Conversely, the effects of MPH on stimulated dopamine release were similar to those of cocaine, with inverted U-shaped increases in release over a concentration–response curve. This was strikingly different from the release profile of AMPH, which showed only reductions at high concentrations, indicating that MPH is not a pure releaser. These data indicate that although MPH is a DAT blocker, its uptake-inhibitory actions are affected by DAT changes in a similar manner to releasers. Together, these data show that fluctuations in DAT levels alter the potency of releasers and MPH but not blockers and suggest an integral role of the DAT in the addictive potential of AMPH and related compounds. PMID:25474655

  18. Restricted feeding with scheduled sucrose access results in an upregulation of the rat dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Bello, Nicholas T; Sweigart, Kristi L; Lakoski, Joan M; Norgren, Ralph; Hajnal, Andras

    2003-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the mesoaccumbens dopamine system undergoes neurochemical alterations as a result of restricted feeding conditions with access to sugars. This effect appears to be similar to the neuroadaptation resulting from drugs of abuse and may underlay some pathological feeding behaviors. To further investigate the cellular mechanisms of these alterations, the present study used quantitative autoradiography and in situ hybridization to assess dopamine membrane transporter (DAT) protein density and mRNA expression in restricted-fed and free-fed adult male rats. The restricted feeding regimen consisted of daily limited access to either a normally preferred sucrose solution (0.3 M) or a less preferred chow in a scheduled (i.e., contingent) fashion for 7 days. Restricted-fed rats with the contingent sucrose access lost less body weight, ate more total food, and drank more fluid than free-fed, contingent food, or noncontingent controls. In addition, these animals had selectively higher DAT binding in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. This increase in protein binding also was accompanied by an increase in DAT mRNA levels in the ventral tegmental area. In contrast to the restricted-fed groups, no differential effect in DAT regulation was observed across free-fed groups. The observed alteration in behavior and DAT regulation suggest that neuroadaptation in the mesoaccumbens dopamine system develops in response to repeated feeding on palatable foods under dietary constraints. This supports the notion that similar cellular changes may be involved in restrictive eating disorders and bingeing.

  19. Atypical Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors that Provide Clues About Cocaine's Mechanism at the Dopamine Transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck Newman, Amy; Katz, Jonathan L.

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) has been a primary target for cocaine abuse/addiction medication discovery. However predicted addiction liability and limited clinical evaluation has provided a formidable challenge for development of these agents for human use. The unique and atypical pharmacological profile of the benztropine (BZT) class of dopamine uptake inhibitors, in preclinical models of cocaine effects and abuse, has encouraged further development of these agents. Moreover, in vivo studies have challenged the original DAT hypothesis and demonstrated that DAT occupancy and subsequent increases in dopamine produced by BZT analogues are significantly delayed and long lasting, as compared to cocaine. These important and distinctive elements are critical to the lack of abuse liability among BZT analogues, and improve their potential for development as treatments for cocaine abuse and possibly other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  20. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine pretreatment attenuates methamphetamine-induced dopamine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kita, Taizo; Saraya, Tutomu; Konishi, Noboru; Matsunari, Yasunori; Shimada, Keiji; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; O'Hara, Kiichi; Wagner, George C; Nakashima, Toshikatsu

    2003-02-01

    The effects of pretreatment with MPTP (1-methyl4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) on the acute and long-term effects of methamphetamine on striatal dopamine were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Four subcutaneous injections of a non-toxic dose of MPTP (8 mg/kg, at 2 hr intervals) were followed three days later by a toxic regimen of methamphetamine (four injections of 4 mg/kg, at 2 hr intervals) and mice were sacrificed immediately or three days later. Control mice received saline in place of the MPTP or methamphetamine and mice were observed for acute changes in body temperature, self-injurious behaviour, and striatal dopamine metabolites, or long-term changes in striatal dopamine levels, tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity and glial fibrillary acidic protein. It was observed that pretreatment with MPTP protected mice against the acute increase in body temperature caused by the methamphetamine but, at the same time, delayed the occurrence of self-injurious behaviour following the repeated injections of methamphetamine. Likewise, pretreatment with MPTP attenuated the long-term depletion of striatal dopamine induced by the methamphetamine as well as the large increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein and the reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. The MPTP-treatment itself did not alter any of these neurotoxic markers. Finally, the acute decrease in 3,4-dihydroxyphenyacetic acid levels and increased ratio of 3-methoxytyramine/dopamine observed 60 min. after a single injection of methamphetamine (4 mg/kg) were also attenuated in MPTP-treated mice. These results are discussed in the context of the hypothesis that the low-dose treatment with MPTP may modify exchange diffusion across the striatal cell membrane thereby altering the acute and long-lasting effects of methamphetamine.

  1. Understanding the redox coupling between quantum dots and the neurotransmitter dopamine in hybrid self-assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xin; Makarov, Nikolay S.; Wang, Wentao; Palui, Goutam; Robel, Istvan; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2015-03-01

    Interactions between luminescent fluorophores and redox active molecules often involve complex charge transfer processes, and have great ramifications in biology. Dopamine is a redox active neurotransmitter involved in a range of brain activities. We used steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence along with transient absorption bleach measurements, to probe the effects of changing the QD size and valence on the rate of photoluminescence quenching in QD-dopamine conjugates, when the pH of the medium was varied. In particular, we measured substantially larger quenching efficiencies, combined with more pronounced shortening in the PL lifetime decay when smaller size QDs and/or alkaline pH were used. Moreover, we found that changes in the nanocrystal size alter both the electron and hole relaxation of photoexcited QDs but with very different extents. For instance, a more pronounced change in the hole relaxation was recorded in alkaline buffers and for green-emitting QDs compared to their red-emitting counterparts. We attributed these results to the more favorable electron transfer pathway from the reduced form of the complex to the valence band of the QD. This process benefits from the combination of lower oxidation potential and larger energy mismatch in alkaline buffers and for green-emitting QDs. In comparison, the effects on the rate of electron transfer from excited QDs to dopamine are less affected by QD size. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms that drive charge transfer interactions and the ensuing quenching of QD emission in such assemblies.

  2. Dopamine quinone modifies and decreases the abundance of the mitochondrial selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase 4.

    PubMed

    Hauser, David N; Dukes, April A; Mortimer, Amanda D; Hastings, Teresa G

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Dopaminergic neurons may be more sensitive to these stressors because they contain dopamine (DA), a molecule that oxidizes to the electrophilic dopamine quinone (DAQ) which can covalently bind nucleophilic amino acid residues such as cysteine. The identification of proteins that are sensitive to covalent modification and functional alteration by DAQ is of great interest. We have hypothesized that selenoproteins, which contain a highly nucleophilic selenocysteine residue and often play vital roles in the maintenance of neuronal viability, are likely targets for the DAQ. Here we report the findings of our studies on the effect of DA oxidation and DAQ on the mitochondrial antioxidant selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4). Purified GPx4 could be covalently modified by DAQ, and the addition of DAQ to rat testes lysate resulted in dose-dependent decreases in GPx4 activity and monomeric protein levels. Exposing intact rat brain mitochondria to DAQ resulted in similar decreases in GPx4 activity and monomeric protein levels as well as detection of multiple forms of DA-conjugated GPx4 protein. Evidence of both GPx4 degradation and polymerization was observed following DAQ exposure. Finally, we observed a dose-dependent loss of mitochondrial GPx4 in differentiated PC12 cells treated with dopamine. Our findings suggest that a decrease in mitochondrial GPx4 monomer and a functional loss of activity may be a contributing factor to the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:23816523

  3. Striatal dopamine modulates song spectral but not temporal features through D1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Leblois, Arthur; Perkel, David J

    2012-01-01

    The activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and their projection to the basal ganglia (BG) are thought to play a critical role in the acquisition of motor skills through reinforcement learning, as well as in the expression of learned motor behaviors. The precise role of BG dopamine in mediating and modulating motor performance and learning, however, remains unclear. In songbirds, a specialized portion of the BG is responsible for song learning and plasticity. Previously we found that dopamine acts on D1 receptors in Area X to modulate the BG output signal and thereby trigger changes in song variability. Here, we investigate the effect of D1 receptor blockade in the BG on song behavior in the zebra finch. We report that this manipulation abolishes social context-dependent changes in variability not only in harmonic stacks, but also in other types of syllables. However, song timing seems not to be modulated by this BG dopamine signal. Indeed, injections of a D1 antagonist in the BG altered neither song duration, nor the change of song duration with social context. Finally, D1 receptor activation in the BG was not necessary for the modulation of other features of song such as the number of introductory notes or motif repetitions. Together, our results suggest that activation of D1 receptors in the BG is necessary for the modulation of fine acoustic features of song with social context while it is not involved in the regulation of song timing and structure at a larger time scale. PMID:22594943

  4. Presynaptic recording of quanta from midbrain dopamine neurons and modulation of the quantal size.

    PubMed

    Pothos, E N; Davila, V; Sulzer, D

    1998-06-01

    The observation of quantal release from central catecholamine neurons has proven elusive because of the absence of evoked rapid postsynaptic currents. We adapted amperometric methods to observe quantal release directly from axonal varicosities of midbrain dopamine neurons that predominantly contain small synaptic vesicles. Quantal events were elicited by high K+ or alpha-latrotoxin, required extracellular Ca2+, and were abolished by reserpine. The events indicated the release of 3000 molecules over 200 microsec, much smaller and faster events than quanta associated with large dense-core vesicles previously recorded in vertebrate preparations. The number of dopamine molecules per quantum increased as a population to 380% of controls after glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) exposure and to 350% of controls after exposure to the dopamine precursor L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA). These results introduce a means to measure directly the number of transmitter molecules released from small synaptic vesicles of CNS neurons. Moreover, quantal size was not an invariant parameter in CNS neurons but could be modulated by neurotrophic factors and altered neurotransmitter synthesis.

  5. Dopamine release in rat striatum - Physiological coupling to tyrosine supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    During, Matthew J.; Acworth, Ian N.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor dopamine release in rat striatal extracellular fluid following the intraperitoneal administration of dopamine's precursor amino acid, L-tyrosine. Dopamine concentrations in dialysates increased transiently after tyrosine (50-100 mg/kg) administration. Pretreatment with haloperidol or the partial lesioning of nigrostriatal neurons enhanced the effect of tyrosine on dopamine release, and haloperidol also prolonged this effect. These data suggest that nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are responsive to changes in precursor availability under basal conditions, but that receptor-mediated feedback mechanisms limit the magnitude and duration of this effect.

  6. Cloning of the cocaine-sensitive bovine dopamine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Usdin, T.B.; Chen, C.; Brownstein, M.J.; Hoffman, B.J. ); Mezey, E. )

    1991-12-15

    A cDNA encoding the dopamine transporter from bovine brain substantia nigra was identified on the basis of its structural homology to other, recently cloned, neurotransmitter transporters. The sequence of the 693-amino acid protein is quite similar to those of the rat {gamma}-aminobutyric acid, human norepinephrine, and rat serotonin transporters. Dopamine transporter mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in the substantia nigra but not in the locus coeruleus, raphe, caudate, or other brain areas. ({sup 3}H)Dopamine accumulation in tissue culture cells transfected with the cDNA was inhibited by amphetamine, cocaine, and specific inhibitors of dopamine transports, including GBR12909.

  7. Reinforcement signalling in Drosophila; dopamine does it all after all.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Scott

    2013-06-01

    Reinforcement systems are believed to drive synaptic plasticity within neural circuits that store memories. Recent evidence from the fruit fly suggests that anatomically distinct dopaminergic neurons ultimately provide the key instructive signals for both appetitive and aversive learning. This dual role for dopamine overturns the previous model that octopamine signalled reward and dopamine punishment. More importantly, this anatomically segregated double role for dopamine in reward and aversion mirrors that emerging in mammals. Therefore, an antagonistic organization of distinct reinforcing dopaminegic neurons is a conserved feature of brains. It now seems crucial to understand how the dopaminergic neurons are controlled and what the released dopamine does to the underlying circuits to convey opposite valence.

  8. An early methamphetamine challenge suppresses the maturation of dopamine fibres in the nucleus accumbens of gerbils: on the significance of rearing conditions.

    PubMed

    Neddens, J; Lesting, J; Dawirs, R R; Teuchert-Noodt, G

    2002-02-01

    The effect of a single early methamphetamine (MA) challenge on postnatal maturation of the nucleus accumbens (NAC) was studied. Therefore, male gerbils received a single dose of MA (50 mg/kg, i.p.) on postnatal day 14. At the age of postnatal day 90, dopamine fibres were stained immunocytochemically and innervation density was determined in several test fields along the rostrocaudal extent of both core and shell of the NAC. Since we already know that the differential environment can alter ontogeny of dopamine innervation in the prefrontal cortex of gerbils, in the present study we investigated whether probable drug effects may be influenced by rearing conditions. For that purpose, animals were bred and reared either isolated in standard laboratory cages or grouped in an object-filled environment. The results showed that a single early MA challenge significantly alters maturation of dopamine fibre innervation in both subregions of the NAC. In seminaturally reared gerbils the drug challenge caused dopamine fibre densities which were about 54% below those of saline-treated controls in both the shell and core. However, in animals from restricted rearing this MA-induced effect was more pronounced in the core (-43%) but not significant in the shell (-14%). In conclusion, an early MA challenge caused a significant restraint of adult dopamine fibre density developing in the NAC postnatally. Additionally, rearing conditions significantly interfered with drug-induced alterations in maturation of dopaminergic innervation pattern of the NAC. The present results are discussed with recent findings on MA-induced impairment of prefrontal dopamine innervation and further reactive morphogenetic effects caused by the drug. In this respect, functional interactions between the prefrontal cortex and NAC are specifically considered.

  9. Absence of NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons attenuates dopamine release but not conditioned approach during Pavlovian conditioning.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jones G; Zweifel, Larry S; Clark, Jeremy J; Evans, Scott B; Phillips, Paul E M; Palmiter, Richard D

    2010-07-27

    During Pavlovian conditioning, phasic dopamine (DA) responses emerge to reward-predictive stimuli as the subject learns to anticipate reward delivery. This observation has led to the hypothesis that phasic dopamine signaling is important for learning. To assess the ability of mice to develop anticipatory behavior and to characterize the contribution of dopamine, we used a food-reinforced Pavlovian conditioning paradigm. As mice learned the cue-reward association, they increased their head entries to the food receptacle in a pattern that was consistent with conditioned anticipatory behavior. D1-receptor knockout (D1R-KO) mice had impaired acquisition, and systemic administration of a D1R antagonist blocked both the acquisition and expression of conditioned approach in wild-type mice. To assess the specific contribution of phasic dopamine transmission, we tested mice lacking NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) exclusively in dopamine neurons (NR1-KO mice). Surprisingly, NR1-KO mice learned at the same rate as their littermate controls. To evaluate the contribution of NMDARs to phasic dopamine release in this paradigm, we performed fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens of awake mice. Despite having significantly attenuated phasic dopamine release following reward delivery, KO mice developed cue-evoked dopamine release at the same rate as controls. We conclude that NMDARs in dopamine neurons enhance but are not critical for phasic dopamine release to behaviorally relevant stimuli; furthermore, their contribution to phasic dopamine signaling is not necessary for the development of cue-evoked dopamine or anticipatory activity in a D1R-dependent Pavlovian conditioning paradigm.

  10. Presence and Function of Dopamine Transporter (DAT) in Stallion Sperm: Dopamine Modulates Sperm Motility and Acrosomal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Alejandra A.; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility. PMID:25402186

  11. Dopamine Replacement Therapy, Learning and Reward Prediction in Parkinson's Disease: Implications for Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ferrazzoli, Davide; Carter, Adrian; Ustun, Fatma S; Palamara, Grazia; Ortelli, Paola; Maestri, Roberto; Yücel, Murat; Frazzitta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The principal feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the impaired ability to acquire and express habitual-automatic actions due to the loss of dopamine in the dorsolateral striatum, the region of the basal ganglia associated with the control of habitual behavior. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) compensates for the lack of dopamine, representing the standard treatment for different motor symptoms of PD (such as rigidity, bradykinesia and resting tremor). On the other hand, rehabilitation treatments, exploiting the use of cognitive strategies, feedbacks and external cues, permit to "learn to bypass" the defective basal ganglia (using the dorsolateral area of the prefrontal cortex) allowing the patients to perform correct movements under executive-volitional control. Therefore, DRT and rehabilitation seem to be two complementary and synergistic approaches. Learning and reward are central in rehabilitation: both of these mechanisms are the basis for the success of any rehabilitative treatment. Anyway, it is known that "learning resources" and reward could be negatively influenced from dopaminergic drugs. Furthermore, DRT causes different well-known complications: among these, dyskinesias, motor fluctuations, and dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) are intimately linked with the alteration in the learning and reward mechanisms and could impact seriously on the rehabilitative outcomes. These considerations highlight the need for careful titration of DRT to produce the desired improvement in motor symptoms while minimizing the associated detrimental effects. This is important in order to maximize the motor re-learning based on repetition, reward and practice during rehabilitation. In this scenario, we review the knowledge concerning the interactions between DRT, learning and reward, examine the most impactful DRT side effects and provide suggestions for optimizing rehabilitation in PD. PMID:27378872

  12. Changes in dopamine transporter binding in nucleus accumbens following chronic self-administration cocaine: heroin combinations.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Lindsey P; McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Childers, Steven R; Hemby, Scott E

    2014-10-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin (speedball) has been shown to exert synergistic effects on dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), as observed by significant increases in extracellular dopamine levels and compensatory elevations in the maximal reuptake rate of dopamine. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether chronic self-administration of cocaine, heroin or a combination of cocaine:heroin led to compensatory changes in the abundance and/or affinity of high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [(125) I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125) I]RTI-55) in rat NAc membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to two-site binding models, allowing calculation of dissociation constant (Kd ) and binding density (Bmax ) values corresponding to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Scatchard analysis of the saturation binding curves clearly demonstrate the presence of high- and low- affinity binding sites in the NAc, with low-affinity sites comprising 85 to 94% of the binding sites. DAT binding analyses revealed that self-administration of cocaine and a cocaine:heroin combination increased the affinity of the low-affinity site for the cocaine congener RTI-55 compared to saline. These results indicate that the alterations observed following chronic speedball self-administration are likely due to the cocaine component alone; thus further studies are necessary to elaborate upon the synergistic effect of cocaine:heroin combinations on the dopamine system in the NAc. PMID:24916769

  13. Dopamine Replacement Therapy, Learning and Reward Prediction in Parkinson’s Disease: Implications for Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrazzoli, Davide; Carter, Adrian; Ustun, Fatma S.; Palamara, Grazia; Ortelli, Paola; Maestri, Roberto; Yücel, Murat; Frazzitta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The principal feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the impaired ability to acquire and express habitual-automatic actions due to the loss of dopamine in the dorsolateral striatum, the region of the basal ganglia associated with the control of habitual behavior. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) compensates for the lack of dopamine, representing the standard treatment for different motor symptoms of PD (such as rigidity, bradykinesia and resting tremor). On the other hand, rehabilitation treatments, exploiting the use of cognitive strategies, feedbacks and external cues, permit to “learn to bypass” the defective basal ganglia (using the dorsolateral area of the prefrontal cortex) allowing the patients to perform correct movements under executive-volitional control. Therefore, DRT and rehabilitation seem to be two complementary and synergistic approaches. Learning and reward are central in rehabilitation: both of these mechanisms are the basis for the success of any rehabilitative treatment. Anyway, it is known that “learning resources” and reward could be negatively influenced from dopaminergic drugs. Furthermore, DRT causes different well-known complications: among these, dyskinesias, motor fluctuations, and dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) are intimately linked with the alteration in the learning and reward mechanisms and could impact seriously on the rehabilitative outcomes. These considerations highlight the need for careful titration of DRT to produce the desired improvement in motor symptoms while minimizing the associated detrimental effects. This is important in order to maximize the motor re-learning based on repetition, reward and practice during rehabilitation. In this scenario, we review the knowledge concerning the interactions between DRT, learning and reward, examine the most impactful DRT side effects and provide suggestions for optimizing rehabilitation in PD. PMID:27378872

  14. Reduced dopamine transporter expression in the amygdala of subjects diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Markota, Matej; Sin, Jessica; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Jonilionis, Rebecca; Berretta, Sabina

    2014-09-01

    A disruption of dopaminergic transmission in the amygdala of subjects with schizophrenia was proposed as a main contributor to pathophysiological and clinical manifestations of this disorder. We tested the hypothesis that the expression of the dopamine transporter (DAT) is decreased in the amygdala of subjects with schizophrenia. In normal control, schizophrenic subjects and bipolar disorder subjects, we measured numerical density of axon varicosities immunoreactive (IR) for DAT in the lateral (LN), basal, accessory basal (ABN), and cortical (CO) nuclei and intercalated cell masses (ITCM) of the amygdala. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-IR and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH)-IR varicosities were measured to test for potential loss of varicosities and serotonin transporter (5HTT)-IR for involvement of the serotoninergic system. Among several potential confounding variables tested, particular emphasis was placed on exposure to therapeutic drugs. In schizophrenic subjects, DAT-IR varicosities were decreased in LN (P = .0002), ABN (P = .013), and CO (P = .0001) in comparison with controls, and in comparison with bipolar disorder subjects in LN (P = .004) and CO (P = .002). DBH-IR varicosities were decreased in ABN (P = .008) and ITCM (P = .017), compared with controls. TH- and 5HTT-IR varicosities were not altered. No changes were detected in bipolar disorder. Taken together with TH and DBH findings, reductions of DAT-IR varicosities point to decreased DAT expression in dopaminergic terminals in the amygdala of subjects with schizophrenia. This DAT decrease may disrupt dopamine uptake, leading to increased dopaminergic synaptic transmission and spillage into the extracellular space with activation of extrasynaptic dopamine receptors. Concurrent decrease of noradrenaline in the ABN may disrupt memory consolidation.

  15. Dopamine D1 Receptors Regulate the Light Dependent Development of Retinal Synaptic Responses

    PubMed Central

    He, Quanhua; Xu, Hong-ping; Wang, Ping; Tian, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Retinal synaptic connections and function are developmentally regulated. Retinal synaptic activity plays critical roles in the development of retinal synaptic circuitry. Dopamine receptors have been thought to play important roles in the activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in central nervous system. The primary goal of this study is to determine whether dopamine D1 receptor regulates the activity-dependent development of retinal light responsiveness. Accordingly, we recorded electroretinogram from wild type mice and mice with genetic deletion of D1 dopamine receptor (D1−/− mice) raised under cyclic light conditions and constant darkness. Our results demonstrated that D1−/− mice have reduced amplitudes of all three major components of electroretinogram in adulthood. When the relative strength of the responses is considered, the D1−/− mice have selective reduction of the amplitudes of a-wave and oscillatory potentials evoked by low-intermediate intensities of lights. During postnatal development, D1−/− mice have increased amplitude of b-wave at the time of eye-opening but reduced developmental increase of the amplitude of b-wave after eye opening. Light deprivation from birth significantly reduced the amplitudes of b-wave and oscillatory potentials, increased the outer retinal light response gain and altered the light response kinetics of both a- and b-waves of wild type mice. In D1−/− mice, the effect of dark rearing on the amplitude of oscillatory potentials was diminished and dark rearing induced effects on the response gain of outer retina and the kinetics of a-wave were reversed. These results demonstrated roles of dopamine D1 receptor in the activity-dependent functional development of mouse retina. PMID:24260267

  16. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2-mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures.

    PubMed

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  17. Central actions of a novel and selective dopamine antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Receptors for the neurotransmitter dopamine traditionally have been divided into two subgroups: the D/sub 1/ class, which is linked to the stimulation of adenylate cyclase-activity, and the D/sub 2/ class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D/sub 2/ class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D/sub 2/ dopamine receptor that mediates the physiological and behavioral actions of dopamine in the intact animal. However, the benzazepine SCH23390 is a dopamine antagonist which has potent behavioral actions while displaying apparent neurochemical selectivity for the D/sub 1/ class of dopamine receptors. The purpose of this dissertation was to (1) confirm and characterize this selectivity, and (2) test certain hypothesis related to possible modes of action of SCH233390. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase by SCH23390 occurred via an action at the dopamine receptor only. A radiolabeled analog of SCH23390 displayed the receptor binding properties of a specific high-affinity ligand, and regional receptor densities were highly correlated with dopamine levels. The subcellular distribution of (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding did not correspond completely with that of dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase. The neurochemical potency of SCH23390 as a D/sub 1/ receptor antagonist was preserved following parental administration. A variety of dopamine agonists and antagonists displayed a high correlation between their abilities to compete for (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding in vitro and to act at an adenylate cyclase-linked receptor. Finally, the relative affinities of dopamine and SCH23390 for both D/sub 1/ receptors and (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding sites were comparable. It is concluded that the behavioral effects of SCH23390 are mediated by actions at D/sub 1/ dopamine receptors only, and that the physiological importance of this class of receptors should be reevaluated.

  18. Responses of in vivo renal microvessels to dopamine.

    PubMed

    Steinhausen, M; Weis, S; Fleming, J; Dussel, R; Parekh, N

    1986-09-01

    The split hydronephrotic kidney preparation was used to directly observe the effects of locally applied dopamine on the in vivo diameters of renal vessels. Dopamine (1 X 10(-6) to 3 X 10(-5) M) produced a concentration-dependent dilation of the arcuate and interlobular arteries and afferent arterioles. Efferent arterioles near the glomeruli also dilated to dopamine but the dilation was less than that of the preglomerular vessels. Higher dopamine concentrations (3 X 10(-4) and 1 X 10(-3) M) produced more variable effects, with a tendency for the arcuate and interlobular arteries and the afferent and efferent arterioles away from the glomeruli to decrease in diameter. After pretreatment with haloperidol, dopamine (1 X 10(-6) to 1 X 10(-4) M) did not dilate any pre- or postglomerular vascular segment, but the tendency for pre- and postglomerular constrictions with higher dopamine concentrations were not abolished. Pretreatment with phentolamine and propranolol enhanced the dilator response of the pre- and postglomerular vessels (except the afferent arterioles near glomeruli and efferent arterioles near welling points) to dopamine (3 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-4) M), and abolished the reductions in diameter produced by the high dopamine levels. These data indicate that the dilator effect of dopamine is mediated by interactions with specific dopaminergic receptors, while alpha and beta adrenergic receptors appear to mediate a constrictor influence observed with high dopamine concentrations. The overall effect of dopamine on the renal vessel diameters thus appears to depend on the balance of dilator and constrictor stimuli mediated by multiple receptors.

  19. Quantum-dot/dopamine bioconjugates function as redox coupled assemblies for in vitro and intracellular pH sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Stewart, Michael H.; Trammell, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Delehanty, James B.; Mei, Bing C.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2010-08-01

    The use of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for bioimaging and sensing has progressively matured over the past decade. QDs are highly sensitive to charge-transfer processes, which can alter their optical properties. Here, we demonstrate that QD-dopamine-peptide bioconjugates can function as charge-transfer coupled pH sensors. Dopamine is normally characterized by two intrinsic redox properties: a Nernstian dependence of formal potential on pH and oxidation of hydroquinone to quinone by O2 at basic pH. We show that the latter quinone can function as an electron acceptor quenching QD photoluminescence in a manner that depends directly on pH. We characterize the pH-dependent QD quenching using both electrochemistry and spectroscopy. QD-dopamine conjugates were also used as pH sensors that measured changes in cytoplasmic pH as cells underwent drug-induced alkalosis. A detailed mechanism describing the QD quenching processes that is consistent with dopamine's inherent redox chemistry is presented.

  20. Dopamine D₁-D₂ receptor heteromer regulates signaling cascades involved in addiction: potential relevance to adolescent drug susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Melissa L; O'Dowd, Brian F; George, Susan R

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period that has been associated with heightened sensitivity to psychostimulant-induced reward, thus placing adolescents at increased risk to develop drug addiction. Although alterations in dopamine-induced synaptic plasticity are perhaps the most critical factor in mediating addiction processes, developmental differences in the cell signaling mechanisms that contribute to synaptic plasticity, and their contribution to adolescent reward sensitivity, has been grossly understudied. The most abundant dopamine receptors, the D1 and D2 receptors, as well as the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer, exhibit age-dependent and brain region-specific changes in their expression and function and are responsible for regulating cell signaling pathways known to significantly contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms underlying addiction. The D1-D2 receptor heteromer, for instance, has been associated with calcium calmodulin kinase IIα, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) signaling, three proteins highly implicated in the regulation of glutamate transmission and synaptic plasticity and which regulate addiction to amphetamine, opioids and cocaine. Therefore, in this review the importance of these signaling proteins as potential mediators of addiction susceptibility in adolescence will be highlighted, and the therapeutic potential of the D1-D2 receptor heteromer in addiction will be discussed. It is the overall goal of this review to draw attention to the research gap in dopamine-induced cell signaling in the adolescent brain--knowledge that would provide much-needed insights into adolescent addiction vulnerability. PMID:24820626

  1. Origins of altered reinforcement effects in ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Espen Borgå; Killeen, Peter R; Russell, Vivienne A; Tripp, Gail; Wickens, Jeff R; Tannock, Rosemary; Williams, Jonathan; Sagvolden, Terje

    2009-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), characterized by hyperactivity, impulsiveness and deficient sustained attention, is one of the most common and persistent behavioral disorders of childhood. ADHD is associated with catecholamine dysfunction. The catecholamines are important for response selection and memory formation, and dopamine in particular is important for reinforcement of successful behavior. The convergence of dopaminergic mesolimbic and glutamatergic corticostriatal synapses upon individual neostriatal neurons provides a favorable substrate for a three-factor synaptic modification rule underlying acquisition of associations between stimuli in a particular context, responses, and reinforcers. The change in associative strength as a function of delay between key stimuli or responses, and reinforcement, is known as the delay of reinforcement gradient. The gradient is altered by vicissitudes of attention, intrusions of irrelevant events, lapses of memory, and fluctuations in dopamine function. Theoretical and experimental analyses of these moderating factors will help to determine just how reinforcement processes are altered in ADHD. Such analyses can only help to improve treatment strategies for ADHD. PMID:19226460

  2. Serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors are the same size in membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Brann, M.R.

    1985-12-31

    Target size analysis was used to compare the sizes of serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors in rat brain membranes. The sizes of these receptors were standardized by comparison with the muscarinic receptor, a receptor of known size. The number of serotonin-S2 receptors labeled with (3H)ketanserin or (3H)spiperone in frontal cortex decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and receptor affinity was not affected. The number of dopamine-D2 receptors labeled with (3H)spiperone in striatum also decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and D2 and S2 receptors were equally sensitive to radiation. In both striatum and frontal cortex, the number of muscarinic receptors labeled with (3H)QNB decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and were much less sensitive to radiation than S2 and D2 receptors. These data indicate that in rat brain membranes, S2 and D2 receptors are of similar size, and both molecules are much larger than the muscarinic receptor.

  3. The role of autophagy on the survival of dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Isidoro, Ciro; Biagioni, Francesca; Giorgi, Filippo Sean; Fulceri, Federica; Paparelli, Antonio; Fornai, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy is the mechanism through which cells degrade oxidized membranes-organelles and mis/unfolded proteins, in this latter function cooperating with the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UP system). Although autophagy has been known for a long time, its involvement in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases has been investigated only recently. The most fascinating data are very recent and show an impressive connection between proteins that are mutated in different forms of familial Parkinson's Disease (PD) and the critical role that these proteins play in the physiology of the Autophagy (ATG) pathway. This evidence is supported by neuropathological data showing at the ultrastructural level, the occurrence of an altered ATG in the dopamine (DA) neurons of the Substantia Nigra of patients affected by PD. Accordingly, by using experimental models of PD the involvement of ATG is documented as well. In particular, administration of the DA neurotoxin methamphetamine produces damage to DA-containing cells which is exacerbated and results in neuronal cell death when the ATG pathway is inhibited, thus confirming ATG as a critical pathway for the survival of DA neurons. In the present manuscript, after describing the general molecular and cellular features of ATG, we give a short overview of the most relevant aspects concerning the involvement of ATG in the pathogenesis of PD. We further propose that the ATG and the UP systems might converge in the formation of a so-called "autophagoproteasome" which might represent an early ultrastructure witnessing the presence of an ongoing degeneration within DA cells.

  4. An Overview of the Association between Schizotypy and Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Christine; Ettinger, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Schizotypy refers to a constellation of personality traits that are believed to mirror the subclinical expression of schizophrenia in the general population. Evidence from pharmacological studies indicates that dopamine (DA) is involved in the etiology of schizophrenia. Based on the assumption of a continuum between schizophrenia and schizotypy, researchers have begun investigating the association between DA and schizotypy using a wide range of methods. In this article, we review published studies on this association from the following areas of work: (1) experimental investigations of the interactive effects of dopaminergic challenges and schizotypy on cognition, motor control, and behavior (2), dopaminergically supported cognitive functions (3), studies of associations between schizotypy and polymorphisms in genes involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission, and (4) molecular imaging studies of the association between schizotypy and markers of the DA system. Together, data from these lines of evidence suggest that DA is important to the expression and experience of schizotypy and associated behavioral biases. An important observation is that the experimental designs, methods, and manipulations used in this research are highly heterogeneous. Future studies are required to replicate individual observations, to enlighten the link between DA and different schizotypy dimensions (positive, negative, cognitive disorganization), and to guide the search for solid DA-sensitive behavioral markers. Such studies are important in order to clarify inconsistencies between studies. More work is also needed to identify differences between dopaminergic alterations in schizotypy compared to the dysfunctions observed in schizophrenia. PMID:25566103

  5. Dopamine regulates stimulus generalization in the human hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kahnt, Thorsten; Tobler, Philippe N

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generalize previously learned information to novel situations is fundamental for adaptive behavior. However, too wide or too narrow generalization is linked to neuropsychiatric disorders. Previous research suggests that interactions between the dopaminergic system and the hippocampus may play a role in generalization, but whether and how the degree of generalization can be modulated via these pathways is currently unknown. Here, we addressed this question in humans using pharmacology, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and computational modeling. Blocking dopamine D2-receptors (D2R) altered generalization behavior as revealed by an increased kurtosis of the generalization gradient, and a decreased width of model-derived generalization parameters. Moreover, D2R-blockade modulated similarity-based responses in the hippocampus and decreased midbrain-hippocampal connectivity, which in turn correlated with individual differences in generalization. These results suggest that dopaminergic activity in the hippocampus may relate to the degree of generalization and highlight a potential target for treatment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12678.001 PMID:26830462

  6. Dopamine in socioecological and evolutionary perspectives: implications for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yoshie; Lee, Young-A; Goto, Yukiori

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) transmission in brain areas such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays important roles in cognitive and affective function. As such, DA deficits have been implicated in a number of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Accumulating evidence suggests that DA is also involved in social behavior of animals and humans. Although most animals organize and live in social groups, how the DA system functions in such social groups of animals, and its dysfunction causes compromises in the groups has remained less understood. Here we propose that alterations of DA signaling and associated genetic variants and behavioral phenotypes, which have been normally considered as “deficits” in investigation at an individual level, may not necessarily yield disadvantages, but even work advantageously, depending on social contexts in groups. This hypothesis could provide a novel insight into our understanding of the biological mechanisms of psychiatric disorders, and a potential explanation that disadvantageous phenotypes associated with DA deficits in psychiatric disorders have remained in humans through evolution. PMID:26136653

  7. Dopamine dysfunction in borderline personality disorder: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Friedel, Robert O

    2004-06-01

    Research on the biological basis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has focused primarily on the serotonin model of impulsive aggression. However, there is evidence that dopamine (DA) dysfunction may also be associated with BPD. Pertinent research and review articles, identified by Medline searches of relevant topics, books, references from bibliographies, and conference proceedings from 1975 to 2003, were reviewed. Evidence of DA dysfunction in BPD derives from the efficacy of traditional and atypical antipsychotic agents in BPD, and from provocative challenges with amphetamine and methylphenidate of subjects with the disorder. In addition, human and animal studies indicate that DA activity plays an important role in emotion information processing, impulse control, and cognition. The results of this review suggest that DA dysfunction is associated with three dimensions of BPD, that is, emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, and cognitive-perceptual impairment. The main limitation of this hypothesis is that the evidence reviewed is circumstantial. There is no study that directly demonstrates DA dysfunction in BPD. In addition, the therapeutic effects of antipsychotic agents observed in BPD may be mediated by non-DA mechanisms of action. If the stated hypothesis is correct, DA dysfunction in BPD may result from genetic, developmental, or environmental factors directly affecting specific DA pathways. Alternatively, DA dysfunction in BPD may be a compensatory response to alterations in the primary neural systems that control emotion, impulse control, and cognition, and that are mediated by the brain's main neurotransmitters, glutamate, and GABA, or in one or more other neuromodulatory pathways such as serotonin, acetylcholine, and norepinephrine.

  8. “Is dopamine involved in Alzheimer's disease?”

    PubMed Central

    Martorana, Alessandro; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and dementia. Recent advances indicate that AD pathogenesis appears more complex than its mere neuropathology. Changes in synaptic plasticity, neuronal disarray and cell death are pathways commonly recognized as pathogenic mechanisms of AD. It is thought that the altered metabolism of certain membrane proteins may lead to the production of amyloid (Aβ) oligomers that are characterized by an highly toxic effect on neurotransmission pathways, such as those mediated by Acetylcholine. The interaction of Aβ oligomers with these neurotansmitters systems would in turn induce cell dysfunction, neurotransmitters signaling imbalance and finally lead to the appearance of neurological signs. In this perspective, it is still debated how and if these mechanisms may also engage the dopaminergic system in AD. Recent experimental work revealed that the dopaminergic system may well be involved in the occurrence of cognitive decline, often being predictive of rapidly progressive forms of AD. However, a clear idea on the role of the dopamine system in AD is still missing. Here we review the more recent evidences supporting the notion that the dopaminergic dysfunction has a pathogenic role in cognitive decline symptoms of AD. PMID:25309431

  9. Opening the black box: dopamine, predictions, and learning

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju; Uchida, Naoshige

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to promote learning by signaling prediction errors, that is, the difference between actual and expected outcomes. Whether these signals are sufficient for associative learning, however, remains untested. A recent study used optogenetics in a classic behavioral paradigm to confirm the role of dopamine prediction errors in learning. PMID:23830895

  10. Time, Not Size, Matters for Striatal Reward Predictions to Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Burke, Christopher J; Tobler, Philippe N

    2016-07-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons encode reward prediction errors. In this issue of Neuron, Takahashi et al. (2016) show that the ventral striatum provides dopamine neurons with prediction information specific to the timing, but not the quantity, of reward, suggesting a surprisingly nuanced neural implementation of reward prediction errors. PMID:27387646

  11. Decreased brain dopamine cell numbers in human cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Little, Karley Y; Ramssen, Eric; Welchko, Ryan; Volberg, Vitaly; Roland, Courtney J; Cassin, Bader

    2009-08-15

    Cocaine use diminishes striatal and midbrain dopamine neuronal components in both post-mortem and in vivo human experiments. The diffuse nature of these declines suggests the possibility that cocaine use might cause a loss of dopamine neurons in humans. Previous rodent studies have not detected cocaine-induced dopamine cell damage. The present experiment involved counting midbrain dopamine neurons utilizing both melanin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Well-preserved blocks ranging from +38 mm obex to +45 mm obex were examined in 10 cocaine users and 9 controls. Sections were also examined for signs of acute pathological injury by counting activated macrophages and microglia. Melanized cells at six midbrain levels were significantly reduced in cocaine users by both drug exposures. The estimated total number of melanized dopamine cells in the anterior midbrain was significantly reduced in cocaine users by 16%. Results with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity were less conclusive because of variability in staining. Both activated macrophages and activated microglia were significantly increased among cocaine users. Cocaine exposure may have neurotoxic effects on dopamine neurons in humans. The infiltration of phagocytic cells suggests that the lower number of dopamine cells found in cocaine users was a relatively recent effect. The loss of dopamine cells could contribute to and intensify cocaine dependence, as well as anhedonic and depressive symptoms, in some cocaine users. Further efforts at clarifying the pathophysiological mechanisms involved may help explain treatment refractoriness, and identify targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19233481

  12. Imaging dopamine receptors in the human brain by position tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, R.F.; Wong, D.F.; Langstrom, B.; Duelfer, T.; Frost, J.J.; Ravert, H.T.; Links, J.M.; Rosenbloom, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors may be involved in a number of neuropsychiatric disease states. The ligand 3-N-(/sup 11/C)methylspiperone, which preferentially binds to dopamine receptors in vivo, was used to image the receptors by positron emission tomography scanning in baboons and in humans. This technique holds promise for noninvasive clinical studies of dopamine receptors in humans.

  13. Dopamine receptor genes: new tools for molecular psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Niznik, H B; Van Tol, H H

    1992-01-01

    For over a decade it has been generally assumed that all the pharmacological and biochemical actions of dopamine within the central nervous system and periphery were mediated by two distinct dopamine receptors. These receptors, termed D1 and D2, were defined as those coupled to the stimulation or inhibition of adenylate cyclase, respectively, and by their selectivity and avidity for various drugs and compounds. The concept that two dopamine receptors were sufficient to account for all the effects mediated by dopamine was an oversimplification. Recent molecular biological studies have identified five distinct genes which encode at least eight functional dopamine receptors. The members of the expanded dopamine receptor family, however, can still be codifed by way of the original D1 and D2 receptor dichotomy. These include two genes encoding dopamine D1-like receptors (D1 [D1A]/D5 [D1B]) and three genes encoding D2-like receptors (D2/D3/D4). We review here our recent work on the cloning and characterization of some of the members of the dopamine receptor gene family (D1, D2, D4, D5), their relationship to neuropsychiatric disorders and their potential role in antipsychotic drug action. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1450188

  14. Opening the black box: dopamine, predictions, and learning.

    PubMed

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju; Uchida, Naoshige

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to promote learning by signaling prediction errors, that is, the difference between actual and expected outcomes. Whether these signals are sufficient for associative learning, however, remains untested. A recent study used optogenetics in a classic behavioral paradigm to confirm the role of dopamine prediction errors in learning.

  15. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits.

    PubMed

    Masoud, S T; Vecchio, L M; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, M M; Nguyen, L T; Bermejo, M K; Kile, B; Sotnikova, T D; Siesser, W B; Gainetdinov, R R; Wightman, R M; Caron, M G; Richardson, J R; Miller, G W; Ramsey, A J; Cyr, M; Salahpour, A

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown whether increasing dopamine transporter activity will be detrimental to dopamine neurons that are inherently capable of storing and degrading dopamine. To address this issue, we characterized transgenic mice that over-express the dopamine transporter selectively in dopamine neurons. We report that dopamine transporter over-expressing (DAT-tg) mice display spontaneous loss of midbrain dopamine neurons that is accompanied by increases in oxidative stress markers, 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine and 5-S-cysteinyl-DOPAC. In addition, metabolite-to-dopamine ratios are increased and VMAT2 protein expression is decreased in the striatum of these animals. Furthermore, DAT-tg mice also show fine motor deficits on challenging beam traversal that are reversed with l-DOPA treatment. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that even in neurons that routinely handle dopamine, increased uptake of this neurotransmitter through the dopamine transporter results in oxidative damage, neuronal loss and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits. In addition, DAT over-expressing animals are highly sensitive to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of increased dopamine uptake in these transgenic mice could shed light on the unique vulnerability of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease.

  16. Dopamine modulates egalitarian behavior in humans.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Ignacio; Zhu, Lusha; Set, Eric; Kayser, Andrew; Hsu, Ming

    2015-03-30

    Egalitarian motives form a powerful force in promoting prosocial behavior and enabling large-scale cooperation in the human species [1]. At the neural level, there is substantial, albeit correlational, evidence suggesting a link between dopamine and such behavior [2, 3]. However, important questions remain about the specific role of dopamine in setting or modulating behavioral sensitivity to prosocial concerns. Here, using a combination of pharmacological tools and economic games, we provide critical evidence for a causal involvement of dopamine in human egalitarian tendencies. Specifically, using the brain penetrant catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitor tolcapone [4, 5], we investigated the causal relationship between dopaminergic mechanisms and two prosocial concerns at the core of a number of widely used economic games: (1) the extent to which individuals directly value the material payoffs of others, i.e., generosity, and (2) the extent to which they are averse to differences between their own payoffs and those of others, i.e., inequity. We found that dopaminergic augmentation via COMT inhibition increased egalitarian tendencies in participants who played an extended version of the dictator game [6]. Strikingly, computational modeling of choice behavior [7] revealed that tolcapone exerted selective effects on inequity aversion, and not on other computational components such as the extent to which individuals directly value the material payoffs of others. Together, these data shed light on the causal relationship between neurochemical systems and human prosocial behavior and have potential implications for our understanding of the complex array of social impairments accompanying neuropsychiatric disorders involving dopaminergic dysregulation. PMID:25802148

  17. Effect of parasitic infection on dopamine biosynthesis in dopaminergic cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, H.L.; Alsaady, I.; Howell, G.; Prandovszky, E.; Peers, C.; Robinson, P.; McConkey, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the neurotropic agent Toxoplasma gondii alters rodent behavior and can result in neuropsychiatric symptoms in humans. Little is understood regarding the effects of infection on host neural processes but alterations to dopaminergic neurotransmission are implicated. We have previously reported elevated levels of dopamine (DA) in infected dopaminergic cells however the involvement of the host enzymes and fate of the produced DA were not defined. In order to clarify the effects of infection on host DA biosynthetic enzymes and DA packaging we examined enzyme levels and activity and DA accumulation and release in T. gondii-infected neurosecretory cells. Although the levels of the host tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DOPA decarboxylase and AADC (DDC) did not change significantly in infected cultures, DDC was found within the parasitophorous vacuole (PV), the vacuolar compartment where the parasites reside, as well as in the host cytosol in infected dopaminergic cells. Strikingly, DDC was found within the intracellular parasite cysts in infected brain tissue. This finding could provide some explanation for observations of DA within tissue cysts in infected brain as a parasite-encoded enzyme with TH activity was also localized within tissue cysts. In contrast, cellular DA packaging appeared unchanged in single-cell microamperometry experiments and only a fraction of the increased DA was accessible to high potassium-induced release. This study provides some understanding of how this parasite produces elevated DA within dopaminergic cells without the toxic ramifications of free cytosolic DA. The mechanism for synthesis and packaging of DA by T. gondii-infected dopaminergic cells may have important implications for the effects of chronic T. gondii infection on humans and animals. PMID:26297895

  18. Influence of lead on repetitive behavior and dopamine metabolism in a mouse model of iron overload.

    PubMed

    Chang, JuOae; Kueon, Chojin; Kim, Jonghan

    2014-12-01

    Exposures to lead (Pb) are associated with neurological problems including psychiatric disorders and impaired learning and memory. Pb can be absorbed by iron transporters, which are up-regulated in hereditary hemochromatosis, an iron overload disorder in which increased iron deposition in various parenchymal organs promote metal-induced oxidative damage. While dysfunction in HFE (High Fe) gene is the major cause of hemochromatosis, the transport and toxicity of Pb in Hfe-related hemochromatosis are largely unknown. To elucidate the relationship between HFE gene dysfunction and Pb absorption, H67D knock-in Hfe-mutant and wild-type mice were given drinking water containing Pb 1.6 mg/ml ad libitum for 6 weeks and examined for behavioral phenotypes using the nestlet-shredding and marble-burying tests. Latency to nestlet-shredding in Pb-treated wild-type mice was prolonged compared with non-exposed wild-types (p < 0.001), whereas Pb exposure did not alter shredding latency in Hfe-mutant mice. In the marble-burying test, Hfe-mutant mice showed an increased number of marbles buried compared with wild-type mice (p = 0.002), indicating more repetitive behavior upon Hfe mutation. Importantly, Pb-exposed wild-type mice buried more marbles than non-exposed wild-types, whereas the number of marbles buried by Hfe-mutant mice did not change whether or not exposed to Pb. These results suggest that Hfe mutation could normalize Pb-induced behavioral alteration. To explore the mechanism of repetitive behavior caused by Pb, western blot analysis was conducted for proteins involved in brain dopamine metabolism. The levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter increased upon Pb exposure in both genotypes, whereas Hfe-mutant mice displayed down-regulation of the dopamine transporter and dopamine D1 receptor with D2 receptor elevated. Taken together, our data support the idea that both Pb exposure and Hfe mutation increase repetitive behavior in mice and further suggest that

  19. Dopamine and epistemic curiosity in music listening.

    PubMed

    Omigie, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the cognitive, affective, and reward processes that take place during music listening is the aim of a growing number of researchers. Several authors have used the Bayesian brain framework and existing models of reward to interpret neural activity observed during musical listening. The claims from Friston and colleagues regarding the role of dopamine, as well as the demonstration that salience-seeking behavior naturally emerges from minimizing free energy, will be of potential interest to those seeking to understand the general principles underlying our motivation to hear music. PMID:26073880

  20. A descending dopamine pathway conserved from basal vertebrates to mammals

    PubMed Central

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Cone, Jackson J.; Alpert, Michael H.; Goetz, Laurent; Auclair, François; Dubé, Catherine; Parent, Martin; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Alford, Simon; Dubuc, Réjean

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are classically known to modulate locomotion indirectly through ascending projections to the basal ganglia that project down to brainstem locomotor networks. Their loss in Parkinson’s disease is devastating. In lampreys, we recently showed that brainstem networks also receive direct descending dopaminergic inputs that potentiate locomotor output. Here, we provide evidence that this descending dopaminergic pathway is conserved to higher vertebrates, including mammals. In salamanders, dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum or brainstem locomotor networks were partly intermingled. Stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked dopamine release in brainstem locomotor networks and concurrent reticulospinal activity. In rats, some dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum also innervated the pedunculopontine nucleus, a known locomotor center, and stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked pedunculopontine dopamine release in vivo. Finally, we found dopaminergic fibers in the human pedunculopontine nucleus. The conservation of a descending dopaminergic pathway across vertebrates warrants re-evaluating dopamine’s role in locomotion. PMID:27071118

  1. Dopamine encoding of Pavlovian incentive stimuli diminishes with extended training.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jeremy J; Collins, Anne L; Sanford, Christina Akers; Phillips, Paul E M

    2013-02-20

    Dopamine is highly implicated both as a teaching signal in reinforcement learning and in motivating actions to obtain rewards. However, theoretical disconnects remain between the temporal encoding properties of dopamine neurons and the behavioral consequences of its release. Here, we demonstrate in rats that dopamine evoked by Pavlovian cues increases during acquisition, but dissociates from stable conditioned appetitive behavior as this signal returns to preconditioning levels with extended training. Experimental manipulation of the statistical parameters of the behavioral paradigm revealed that this attenuation of cue-evoked dopamine release during the postasymptotic period was attributable to acquired knowledge of the temporal structure of the task. In parallel, conditioned behavior became less dopamine dependent after extended training. Thus, the current work demonstrates that as the presentation of reward-predictive stimuli becomes anticipated through the acquisition of task information, there is a shift in the neurobiological substrates that mediate the motivational properties of these incentive stimuli. PMID:23426680

  2. Arithmetic and local circuitry underlying dopamine prediction errors

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, Neir; Bukwich, Michael; Rao, Vinod; Hemmelder, Vivian; Tian, Ju; Uchida, Naoshige

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to facilitate learning by comparing actual and expected reward1,2. Despite two decades of investigation, little is known about how this comparison is made. To determine how dopamine neurons calculate prediction error, we combined optogenetic manipulations with extracellular recordings in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) while mice engaged in classical conditioning. By manipulating the temporal expectation of reward, we demonstrate that dopamine neurons perform subtraction, a computation that is ideal for reinforcement learning but rarely observed in the brain. Furthermore, selectively exciting and inhibiting neighbouring GABA neurons in the VTA reveals that these neurons are a source of subtraction: they inhibit dopamine neurons when reward is expected, causally contributing to prediction error calculations. Finally, bilaterally stimulating VTA GABA neurons dramatically reduces anticipatory licking to conditioned odours, consistent with an important role for these neurons in reinforcement learning. Together, our results uncover the arithmetic and local circuitry underlying dopamine prediction errors. PMID:26322583

  3. Label-free dopamine imaging in live rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Bidyut; Banerjee, Arkarup; Das, Anand Kant; Nag, Suman; Kaushalya, Sanjeev Kumar; Tripathy, Umakanta; Shameem, Mohammad; Shukla, Shubha; Maiti, Sudipta

    2014-05-21

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission has been investigated extensively, yet direct optical probing of dopamine has not been possible in live cells. Here we image intracellular dopamine with sub-micrometer three-dimensional resolution by harnessing its intrinsic mid-ultraviolet (UV) autofluorescence. Two-photon excitation with visible light (540 nm) in conjunction with a non-epifluorescent detection scheme is used to circumvent the UV toxicity and the UV transmission problems. The method is established by imaging dopamine in a dopaminergic cell line and in control cells (glia), and is validated by mass spectrometry. We further show that individual dopamine vesicles/vesicular clusters can be imaged in cultured rat brain slices, thereby providing a direct visualization of the intracellular events preceding dopamine release induced by depolarization or amphetamine exposure. Our technique opens up a previously inaccessible mid-ultraviolet spectral regime (excitation ~270 nm, emission < 320 nm) for label-free imaging of native molecules in live tissue.

  4. Label-Free Dopamine Imaging in Live Rat Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission has been investigated extensively, yet direct optical probing of dopamine has not been possible in live cells. Here we image intracellular dopamine with sub-micrometer three-dimensional resolution by harnessing its intrinsic mid-ultraviolet (UV) autofluorescence. Two-photon excitation with visible light (540 nm) in conjunction with a non-epifluorescent detection scheme is used to circumvent the UV toxicity and the UV transmission problems. The method is established by imaging dopamine in a dopaminergic cell line and in control cells (glia), and is validated by mass spectrometry. We further show that individual dopamine vesicles/vesicular clusters can be imaged in cultured rat brain slices, thereby providing a direct visualization of the intracellular events preceding dopamine release induced by depolarization or amphetamine exposure. Our technique opens up a previously inaccessible mid-ultraviolet spectral regime (excitation ∼ 270 nm, emission < 320 nm) for label-free imaging of native molecules in live tissue. PMID:24661118

  5. Arithmetic and local circuitry underlying dopamine prediction errors.

    PubMed

    Eshel, Neir; Bukwich, Michael; Rao, Vinod; Hemmelder, Vivian; Tian, Ju; Uchida, Naoshige

    2015-09-10

    Dopamine neurons are thought to facilitate learning by comparing actual and expected reward. Despite two decades of investigation, little is known about how this comparison is made. To determine how dopamine neurons calculate prediction error, we combined optogenetic manipulations with extracellular recordings in the ventral tegmental area while mice engaged in classical conditioning. Here we demonstrate, by manipulating the temporal expectation of reward, that dopamine neurons perform subtraction, a computation that is ideal for reinforcement learning but rarely observed in the brain. Furthermore, selectively exciting and inhibiting neighbouring GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) neurons in the ventral tegmental area reveals that these neurons are a source of subtraction: they inhibit dopamine neurons when reward is expected, causally contributing to prediction-error calculations. Finally, bilaterally stimulating ventral tegmental area GABA neurons dramatically reduces anticipatory licking to conditioned odours, consistent with an important role for these neurons in reinforcement learning. Together, our results uncover the arithmetic and local circuitry underlying dopamine prediction errors.

  6. A causal link between prediction errors, dopamine neurons and learning.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Elizabeth E; Keiflin, Ronald; Boivin, Josiah R; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Janak, Patricia H

    2013-07-01

    Situations in which rewards are unexpectedly obtained or withheld represent opportunities for new learning. Often, this learning includes identifying cues that predict reward availability. Unexpected rewards strongly activate midbrain dopamine neurons. This phasic signal is proposed to support learning about antecedent cues by signaling discrepancies between actual and expected outcomes, termed a reward prediction error. However, it is unknown whether dopamine neuron prediction error signaling and cue-reward learning are causally linked. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated dopamine neuron activity in rats in two behavioral procedures, associative blocking and extinction, that illustrate the essential function of prediction errors in learning. We observed that optogenetic activation of dopamine neurons concurrent with reward delivery, mimicking a prediction error, was sufficient to cause long-lasting increases in cue-elicited reward-seeking behavior. Our findings establish a causal role for temporally precise dopamine neuron signaling in cue-reward learning, bridging a critical gap between experimental evidence and influential theoretical frameworks.

  7. BASAL GANGLIA PATHOLOGY IN SCHIZOPHRENIA: DOPAMINE CONNECTIONS and ANOMALIES

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Costas, Emma; Melendez-Ferro, Miguel; Roberts, Rosalinda C.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness that affects 1% of the world population. The disease usually manifests itself in early adulthood with hallucinations, delusions, cognitive and emotional disturbances and disorganized thought and behavior. Dopamine was the first neurotransmitter to be implicated in the disease, and though no longer the only suspect in schizophrenia pathophysiology, it obviously plays an important role. The basal ganglia are the site of most of the dopamine neurons in the brain and the target of antipsychotic drugs. In this review we will start with an overview of basal ganglia anatomy emphasizing dopamine circuitry. Then, we will review the major deficits in dopamine function in schizophrenia, emphasizing the role of excessive dopamine in the basal ganglia and the link to psychosis. PMID:20089137

  8. Effects of cysteamine on dopamine-mediated behaviors: evidence for dopamine-somatostatin interactions in the striatum

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Iverson, M.T.; Radke, J.M.; Vincent, S.R.

    1986-06-01

    The effects of prior treatment with cysteamine, a drug which appears to deplete selectively the neuropeptide somatostatin, on apomorphine-induced stereotypy and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and conditioned place preferences were investigated. Twelve hours following systemic cysteamine injections apomorphine-induced stereotypy was attenuated and striatal somatostatin levels were reduced by half. Systemic cysteamine also decreased the motor stimulant effects of amphetamine, without influencing the rewarding properties as determined by the conditioned place preference procedure. Direct injections of cysteamine into the nucleus accumbens also decreased the locomotor response to amphetamine, and produced a local reduction in somatostatin levels in the accumbens. Cysteamine did not appear to alter monoamine turnover in the striatum after either systemic or intra-accumbens injections. These results suggest that somatostatin in the nucleus accumbens and caudate-putamen modulates the motor, but not the reinforcing properties of dopaminergic drugs, possibly via an action postsynaptic to dopamine-releasing terminals. Furthermore, it is evident from these results that cysteamine is an important tool with which to study the central actions of somatostatin.

  9. Dopamine and lipophilic derivates protect cardiomyocytes against cold preservation injury.

    PubMed

    Vettel, Christiane; Hottenrott, Maximilia C; Spindler, Rahel; Benck, Urs; Schnuelle, Peter; Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Krämer, Bernhard K; Hoeger, Simone; El-Armouche, Ali; Wieland, Thomas; Yard, Benito A

    2014-01-01

    Donor heart allografts are extremely susceptible to prolonged static cold storage. Because donor treatment with low-dose dopamine improves clinical outcome after heart transplantation, we tested the hypothesis that dopamine and its lipophilic derivate, N-octanoyl dopamine (NOD), protect cardiomyocytes from cold storage injury. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were treated with dopamine or NOD or left untreated and subsequently subjected to static cold storage (8-12 hours). Dopamine- and NOD-treated cardiomyocytes displayed a better viability compared with untreated cells after hypothermia. In untreated cardiomyocytes, cell damage was reflected by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and a decrease in intracellular ATP. NOD was approximately 20-fold more potent than dopamine. Similarly to cardiomyocytes in vitro, rat hearts perfused with NOD before explantation showed significantly lower LDH release after static cold storage. ATP regeneration and spontaneous contractions after cold storage and rewarming only occurred in treated cardiomyocytes. Hypothermia severely attenuated isoprenaline-induced cAMP formation in control but not in dopamine- or NOD-treated cells. Esterified derivates of NOD with redox potential and lipophilic side chains reduced cell damage during cold storage similarly to NOD. In contrast to dopamine, neither NOD nor its derivates induced a significant β-adrenoceptor-mediated elevation of cellular cAMP levels. The β1-adrenoceptor antagonist atenolol and D1/D2 receptor antagonist fluphenazine had no impact on the protective effect of NOD or dopamine. We conclude that dopamine as well as NOD treatment mitigates cold preservation injury to cardiomyocytes. The beneficial effects are independent of β-adrenoceptor or dopaminergic receptor stimulation but correlate with redox potential and lipophilic properties.

  10. Cre recombinase-mediated restoration of nigrostriatal dopamine in dopamine-deficient mice reverses hypophagia and bradykinesia.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Thomas S; Perez, Francisco A; Scouras, Alex D; Stoll, Elizabeth A; Gale, Samuel D; Luquet, Serge; Phillips, Paul E M; Kremer, Eric J; Palmiter, Richard D

    2006-06-01

    A line of dopamine-deficient (DD) mice was generated to allow selective restoration of normal dopamine signaling to specific brain regions. These DD floxed stop (DDfs) mice have a nonfunctional Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) gene because of insertion of a NeoR gene flanked by lox P sites targeted to the first intron of the Th gene. DDfs mice have trace brain dopamine content, severe hypoactivity, and aphagia, and they die without intervention. However, they can be maintained by daily treatment with l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa). Injection of a canine adenovirus (CAV-2) engineered to express Cre recombinase into the central caudate putamen restores normal Th gene expression to the midbrain dopamine neurons that project there because CAV-2 efficiently transduces axon terminals and is retrogradely transported to neuronal cell bodies. Bilateral injection of Cre recombinase into the central caudate putamen restores feeding and normalizes locomotion in DDfs mice. Analysis of feeding behavior by using lickometer cages revealed that virally rescued DDfs mice are hyperphagic and have modified meal structures compared with control mice. The virally rescued DDfs mice are also hyperactive at night, have reduced motor coordination, and are thigmotactic compared with controls. These results highlight the critical role for dopamine signaling in the dorsal striatum for most dopamine-dependent behaviors but suggest that dopamine signaling in other brain regions is important to fine-tune these behaviors. This approach offers numerous advantages compared with previous models aimed at examining dopamine signaling in discrete dopaminergic circuits.

  11. Alterations in central monoamine systems after postnatal lead acetate treatment in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Luthman, J. Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO ); Lindqvist, E.; Olson, L. ); Gerhardt, G.A.; Hoffer, B.H. )

    1994-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of postnatal lead exposure on central monoamine systems. Newborn male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 1 or 8 mg/kg lead acetate intraperitoneally for 20 days postnatally. Two groups of control rats received sodium acetate, or sodium acetate in oversized litters to compensate for lead-induced malnutrition in the high lead dose group, while nontreated animals also served as controls. At Day 21 or 51 regional tissue levels of monoamines were determined using HPLC techniques. No major changes were seen after the lead exposures in the levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin, or metabolites of dopamine and serotonin, when compared to respective control groups. On the other hand, in the control group given sodium acetate in oversized litters some alterations of the monoamine levels were observed in frontal cortex and striatum at Day 21 compared to controls. At Day 51, the striatal homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels were higher in the low lead dose group compared to those in the controls, No other changes in the monoamine levels were seen at Day 51. At 50-70 days postnatally, potassium-stimulated dopamine overflow was studied in striatum with in vivo chronoamperometry. In the high lead dose group the amplitudes of signals were lower in both the dorsal and ventral striatum compared to the controls, while no difference was seen in the clearance time of dopamine. The capacity of the dopamine terminals to respond to repeated stimulation was not affected by the lead exposure. Thus, the steady-state levels of monoamines were essentially unaltered after postnatal lead exposure in rats, while functional aspects of striatal dopamine transmission were affected after exposure to the higher dose of lead. These findings support the hypothesis that lead-induced changes in motor skills and exploratory behavior may be related to altered dopamine neurotransmission. 77 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylethanol (Hydroxytyrosol) Mitigates the Increase in Spontaneous Oxidation of Dopamine During Monoamine Oxidase Inhibition in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Sullivan, Patti; Holmes, Courtney; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2016-09-01

    The catecholaldehyde hypothesis predicts that monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition should slow the progression of Parkinson's disease, by decreasing production of the autotoxic dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL). Inhibiting MAO, however, diverts the fate of cytoplasmic dopamine toward potentially harmful spontaneous oxidation products, indicated by increased 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine (Cys-DA) levels. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylethanol (hydroxytyrosol) is an abundant anti-oxidant phenol in constituents of the Mediterranean diet. Whether hydroxytyrosol alters enzymatic or spontaneous oxidation of dopamine has been unknown. Rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells were incubated with hydroxytyrosol (10 µM, 180 min) alone or with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline (1 nM) or the MAO-B inhibitors rasagiline or selegiline (0.5 µM). Hydroxytyrosol decreased levels of DOPAL by 30 % and Cys-DA by 49 % (p < 0.0001 each). Co-incubation with hydroxytyrosol prevented the increases in Cys-DA seen with all 3 MAO inhibitors. Hydroxytyrosol therefore inhibits both enzymatic and spontaneous oxidation of endogenous dopamine and mitigates the increase in spontaneous oxidation during MAO inhibition. PMID:27220335

  13. [Spatial memory and regulation of brain adenylyl cyclase by serotonin and dopamine in rat with streptozotocin diabetes].

    PubMed

    Sukhov, I B; Chistyakova, O V; Shipilov, V N; Doilnitsyn, A M; Shpakov, A O

    2015-03-01

    The most common complication of diabetes mellitus of the type 1 (DM1) is a cognitive deficiency, which develops as a result of neurodegenerative changes in the brain. The aim of this work was to study the learning and spatial memory in rats with streptozotocin DM1 with different duration (1.5 and 6 months), as well as the activity of adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) sensitive to agonists of the serotonin and the dopamine receptors in the brain of diabetic rats. Our experiments demonstrated that rats with 1.5-months DM1 has no changes in spatial memory which were evaluated in a Morris water maze whereas in rats with 6-months DM1 the spatial memory and learning ability were decreased. The alterations of the regulation of adenylyl cyclase by agonists of types 1 and 6 serotonin receptors and type 2 dopamine receptors were found in both the 1.5- and 6-months DM1 which indicates their importance in the development of cognitive deficiency. Abnormalities in the. brain ACSS can be considered as key factors in the etiology and pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunctions in DM1. Hypothesized that cognitive deficiency occurs only in the later stages of DM1 due to alterations in the serotonin and dopamine signaling systems of the brain.

  14. Risk preference following adolescent alcohol use is associated with corrupted encoding of costs but not rewards by mesolimbic dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Nasrallah, Nicholas A.; Clark, Jeremy J.; Collins, Annie L.; Akers, Christina A.; Phillips, Paul E.; Bernstein, Ilene L.

    2011-01-01

    Several emerging theories of addiction have described how abused substances exploit vulnerabilities in decision-making processes. These vulnerabilities have been proposed to result from pharmacologically corrupted neural mechanisms of normal brain valuation systems. High alcohol intake in rats during adolescence has been shown to increase risk preference, leading to suboptimal performance on a decision-making task when tested in adulthood. Understanding how alcohol use corrupts decision making in this way has significant clinical implications. However, the underlying mechanism by which alcohol use increases risk preference remains unclear. To address this central issue, we assessed dopamine neurotransmission with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry during reward valuation and risk-based decision making in rats with and without a history of adolescent alcohol intake. We specifically targeted the mesolimbic dopamine system, the site of action for virtually all abused substances. This system, which continuously develops during the adolescent period, is central to both reward processing and risk-based decision making. We report that a history of adolescent alcohol use alters dopamine signaling to risk but not to reward. Thus, a corruption of cost encoding suggests that adolescent alcohol use leads to long-term changes in decision making by altering the valuation of risk. PMID:21402915

  15. Risk preference following adolescent alcohol use is associated with corrupted encoding of costs but not rewards by mesolimbic dopamine.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Nicholas A; Clark, Jeremy J; Collins, Annie L; Akers, Christina A; Phillips, Paul E; Bernstein, Ilene L

    2011-03-29

    Several emerging theories of addiction have described how abused substances exploit vulnerabilities in decision-making processes. These vulnerabilities have been proposed to result from pharmacologically corrupted neural mechanisms of normal brain valuation systems. High alcohol intake in rats during adolescence has been shown to increase risk preference, leading to suboptimal performance on a decision-making task when tested in adulthood. Understanding how alcohol use corrupts decision making in this way has significant clinical implications. However, the underlying mechanism by which alcohol use increases risk preference remains unclear. To address this central issue, we assessed dopamine neurotransmission with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry during reward valuation and risk-based decision making in rats with and without a history of adolescent alcohol intake. We specifically targeted the mesolimbic dopamine system, the site of action for virtually all abused substances. This system, which continuously develops during the adolescent period, is central to both reward processing and risk-based decision making. We report that a history of adolescent alcohol use alters dopamine signaling to risk but not to reward. Thus, a corruption of cost encoding suggests that adolescent alcohol use leads to long-term changes in decision making by altering the valuation of risk.

  16. The effects of systemically administered taurine and N-pivaloyltaurine on striatal extracellular dopamine and taurine in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Salimäki, J; Scriba, G; Piepponen, T P; Rautolahti, N; Ahtee, L

    2003-08-01

    The second most abundant cerebral amino acid, taurine, is widely consumed in the so-called "energy drinks". Therefore, its possible actions on the brain are of great interest. In the present experiments taurine was given intraperitoneally to rats in order to study if it can be administered systemically in large enough amounts to alter cerebral dopaminergic transmission or to induce hypothermia. In addition, the effects of subcutaneously administered lipophilic taurine analogue, N-pivaloyltaurine, were studied. The extracellular striatal taurine and dopamine concentrations were estimated using in vivo microdialysis in awake and freely moving rats, and the rectal temperatures were measured. Taurine at the total dose of 45 mmol/kg i.p. led to a maximally 8-fold increased striatal extracellular taurine concentration, induced a long-lasting hypothermia, and significantly reduced the striatal extracellular dopamine concentration. The latter effect was strengthened by co-treatment with reuptake inhibitor nomifensine. N-pivaloyltaurine (15 mmol/kg in total, s.c.) only slightly elevated the striatal extracellular taurine concentration, failed to alter the rectal temperature, and in contrast to taurine somewhat elevated the striatal extracellular dopamine concentration suggesting a different mechanism or locus of action from that of taurine. Finally, our experiments using brain microdialysis confirmed the earlier findings that taurine is slowly eliminated from the brain. The results clearly indicate that systemically given taurine enters the brain in concentrations that induce pharmacological effects. PMID:12898127

  17. Neurotransmission in Parkinson's disease: beyond dopamine.

    PubMed

    Barone, P

    2010-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is most frequently associated with characteristic motor symptoms that are known to arise with degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. However, patients with this disease also experience a multitude of non-motor symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, apathy, anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment, dementia, olfactory dysfunction, pain, sweating and constipation, some of which can be at least as debilitating as the movement disorders and have a major impact on patients' quality of life. Many of these non-motor symptoms may be evident prior to the onset of motor dysfunction. The neuropathology of PD has shown that complex, interconnected neuronal systems, regulated by a number of different neurotransmitters in addition to dopamine, are involved in the aetiology of motor and non-motor symptoms. This review focuses on the non-dopaminergic neurotransmission systems associated with PD with particular reference to the effect that their modulation and interaction with dopamine has on the non-motor symptoms of the disease. PD treatments that focus on the dopaminergic system alone are unable to alleviate both motor and non-motor symptoms, particularly those that develop at early stages of the disease. The development of agents that interact with several of the affected neurotransmission systems could prove invaluable for the treatment of this disease.

  18. [Scans without Evidence of Dopamine Deficit (SWEDDs)].

    PubMed

    Mukai, Yohei; Murata, Miho

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine transporter (DaT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and [18F]fluoro-L-DOPA ([18F]DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) facilitate the investigation of dopaminergic hypofunction in neurodegenerative diseases. DaT SPECT and [18F]DOPA PET have been adopted as survey tools in clinical trials. In a large study on Parkinson's disease, 4-15% of subjects clinically diagnosed with early-stage Parkinson's disease had normal dopaminergic functional imaging scans. These are called Scans without Evidence of Dopamine Deficit (SWEDDs), and are considered to represent a state different from Parkinson's disease. Neurological diseases that exhibit parkinsonism and have normal dopaminergic cells in the nigrostriatal system (e.g., essential tremor, psychogenic parkinsonism, DOPA-responsive dystonia, vascular parkinsonism, drug-induced parkinsonism, manganism, brain tumor, myoclonus-dystonia (DYT11), and fragile X syndrome) might be diagnosed with SWEDDs. True bradykinesia with fatigue or decrement may be useful for distinguishing between Parkinson's disease and SWEDDs. However, because SWEDDs encompass many diseases, their properties may not be uniform. In this review, we discuss DaT SPECT, the concept of SWEDDs, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26764301

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 activate striatal dopamine and serotonin metabolism and related behaviors: interactions with amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Martin-Iverson, M T; Todd, K G; Altar, C A

    1994-03-01

    To investigate behavioral and neurochemical effects of neurotrophic factors in vivo, rats received continuous 14 d infusions of either brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), or vehicle unilaterally into the substantia nigra. BDNF and NT-3 decreased body weights, an effect that was sustained over the infusion period. BDNF elevated daytime and nocturnal locomotion compared with infusions of vehicle or NT-3. At 2 weeks, a systemic injection of amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg, s.c.) increased the frequencies and durations of rotations contraversive to the side of BDNF and NT-3 infusions. Both factors attenuated amphetamine-induced locomotion without affecting amphetamine-induced stereotyped behaviors such as sniffing, head movements, and snout contact with cage surfaces. Only BDNF induced backward walking, and this response was augmented by amphetamine. BDNF, but not NT-3, increased dopamine turnover in the striatum ipsilateral to the infusion relative to the contralateral striatum. Both trophic factors decreased dopamine turnover in the infused substantia nigra relative to the contralateral hemisphere and increased 5-HT turnover in the striatum of both sides. Contraversive rotations were positively correlated with dopamine content decreases and 5-HT turnover increases in the striatum ipsilateral to the infused substantia nigra. Backward walking was positively correlated with increased dopamine and 5-HT turnover in the striatum of the infused hemisphere. Supranigral infusions of BDNF and NT-3 alter circadian rhythms, spontaneous motor activity, body weights, and amphetamine-induced behaviors including locomotion and contraversive rotations. These behavioral effects of the neurotrophins are consistent with a concomitant activation of dopamine and 5-HT systems in vivo.

  20. Elevated dopamine concentration in light-adapted zebrafish retinas is correlated with increased dopamine synthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Connaughton, Victoria P; Wetzell, Bradley; Arneson, Lynne S; DeLucia, Vittoria; Riley, Anthony L

    2015-10-01

    Probing zebrafish (Danio rerio) retinal cryostat sections, collected either 8 h into the light or dark cycle, with an antibody against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) identified a single population of immunopositive cells in the inner retina. However, the observed labeling patterns were not identical in both sets of tissues - label intensity was brighter in light-adapted tissue. This difference was quantified by probing western blots of retinal homogenates with the same TH antibody, which showed that TH expression increased by 42% in light-adapted tissue. High-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection revealed that the concentrations of both dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) are also elevated in light-adapted zebrafish retinal tissue. Dopamine levels increased by 14% and DOPAC levels increased by 25% when measured in retinal homogenates harvested during the light cycle. These results indicate that dopamine levels in zebrafish retina are significantly increased in light-adapted tissue. The increase in dopamine content is correlated with an increase in both TH and DOPAC, suggesting that changes in dopamine concentration are due to light-adaptive changes in the synthesis, release and metabolism of dopamine. Dopamine concentration is elevated in lighted-adapted zebrafish retinas. This increase is correlated with an increase in both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DOPAC (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid), suggesting that changes in dopamine concentration are due to light-adaptive changes in the synthesis, release and metabolism of dopamine. This is applicable to studies examining retinal mutants, the role of dopamine in disease or visual system development.

  1. Stimulus-Dependent Dopamine Release in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikstrom, Sverker; Soderlund, Goran

    2007-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is related to an attenuated and dysfunctional dopamine system. Normally, a high extracellular dopamine level yields a tonic dopaminergic input that down-regulates stimuli-evoked phasic dopamine responses through autoreceptors. Abnormally low tonic extracellular dopamine in ADHD up-regulates the…

  2. Dopamine abnormalities in the neocortex of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Luisa; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Mújica, Mario; Cisneros-Franco, José Miguel; López-Gómez, Mario; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Frías-Soria, Christian Lizette; Segovia-Vila, José; Borsodi, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate different variables of the dopaminergic system in the temporal cortex of surgically treated patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) associated with mesial sclerosis (MTLE, n=12) or with cerebral tumor or lesion (n=8). In addition, we sought to identify dopaminergic abnormalities in those patients with epilepsy that had comorbid anxiety and depression. Specifically, we investigated changes in dopamine and its metabolites, D1 and D2 receptors, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter. Results obtained from patients with epilepsy were compared with those found in experiments using autopsy material. The neocortex of patients with MTLE demonstrated high D1 expression (1680%, p<0.05) and binding (layers I-II, 31%, p<0.05; layers V-VI, 28%, p<0.05), and decreased D2 expression (77%, p<0.05). The neocortex of patients with TLE secondary to cerebral tumor or lesion showed high expression of D1 receptors (1100%, p<0.05), and D2-like induced activation of G proteins (layers I-II, 503%; layers III-IV, 557%; layers V-VI, 964%, p<0.05). Both epileptic groups presented elevated binding to the dopamine transporter and low tissue content of dopamine and its metabolites. Analysis revealed the following correlations: a) D1 receptor binding correlated negatively with seizure onset age and seizure frequency, and positively with duration of epilepsy; b) D2 receptor binding correlated positively with age of seizure onset and negatively with duration of epilepsy; c) dopamine transporter binding correlated positively with duration of epilepsy and frequency of seizures; d) D2-like induced activation of G proteins correlated positively with the age of patients. When compared with autopsies and patients with anxiety and depression, patients without neuropsychiatric disorders showed high D2-like induced activation of G proteins, an effect that correlated positively with age of patient and seizure onset age, and negatively with duration of

  3. 5-(2-Aminopropyl)benzofuran and phenazepam demonstrate the possibility of dependence by increasing dopamine levels in the brain.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hye Jin; Lee, Kwang-Wook; Eom, Jang-Hyeon; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2016-10-01

    Although 5-(2-aminopropyl)benzofuran (5-APB) and 7-bromo-5-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one (phenazepam) are being used as recreational drugs, research on their dependence liability or mechanisms of action is lacking. The present study aimed to evaluate the behavioral effects and dependence liability of these drugs using conditioned place preference and self-administration paradigms in rodents. Additionally, biochemical techniques were used to assess the substance-induced alterations in synaptosome-released dopamine. While both of the tested substances elicited increases in conditioned place preference and dopamine, neither of them facilitated self-administration, suggesting that 5-APB and phenazepam have rewarding effects, rather than reinforcing effects. PMID:27502147

  4. Maternal Immune Activation Disrupts Dopamine System in the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Luchicchi, Antonio; Lecca, Salvatore; Melis, Miriam; De Felice, Marta; Cadeddu, Francesca; Frau, Roberto; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Fadda, Paola; Devoto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background: In utero exposure to maternal viral infections is associated with a higher incidence of psychiatric disorders with a supposed neurodevelopmental origin, including schizophrenia. Hence, immune response factors exert a negative impact on brain maturation that predisposes the offspring to the emergence of pathological phenotypes later in life. Although ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons and their target regions play essential roles in the pathophysiology of psychoses, it remains to be fully elucidated how dopamine activity and functionality are disrupted in maternal immune activation models of schizophrenia. Methods: Here, we used an immune-mediated neurodevelopmental disruption model based on prenatal administration of the polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid in rats, which mimics a viral infection and recapitulates behavioral abnormalities relevant to psychiatric disorders in the offspring. Extracellular dopamine levels were measured by brain microdialysis in both the nucleus accumbens shell and the medial prefrontal cortex, whereas dopamine neurons in ventral tegmental area were studied by in vivo electrophysiology. Results: Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid-treated animals, at adulthood, displayed deficits in sensorimotor gating, memory, and social interaction and increased baseline extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens, but not in the prefrontal cortex. In polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid rats, dopamine neurons showed reduced spontaneously firing rate and population activity. Conclusions: These results confirm that maternal immune activation severely impairs dopamine system and that the polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid model can be considered a proper animal model of a psychiatric condition that fulfills a multidimensional set of validity criteria predictive of a human pathology. PMID:26819283

  5. Dopamine modulates metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Taro; Tomita, Jun; Kume, Shoen; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shi(ts) induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine), which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation.

  6. Dopamine receptor signaling and current and future antipsychotic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Kevin N.; Mailman, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    All currently efficacious antipsychotic drugs have as part of their mechanism the ability to attenuate some or all of their signaling through the dopamine D2 receptor. More recently, the dopamine D1 receptor has been hypothesized to be a promising target for the treatment of negative and/or cognitive aspects of schizophrenia that are not improved by current antipsychotics. Although cAMP has been presumed to be the primary messenger for signaling through the dopamine receptors, the last decade has unveiled a complexity that has provided exciting avenues for the future discovery of antipsychotic drugs (APDs). We review the signaling mechanisms of currently approved APDs at dopamine D2 receptors, and note that aripiprazole is a compound that is clearly differentiated from other approved drugs. Although aripiprazole has been postulated to cause dopamine stabilization due to its partial D2 agonist properties, a body of literature suggests that an alternate mechanism, functional selectivity, is of primary importance. Finally, we review the signaling at dopamine D1 receptors, and the idea that drugs that activate D1 receptors may have use as APDs for improving negative and cognitive symptoms. We address the current state of drug discovery in the D1 area, and its relationship to novel signaling mechanisms. Our conclusion is that although the first APD targeting dopamine receptors was discovered more than a half-century ago, recent research advances offer the possibility that novel and/or improved drugs will emerge in the next decade. PMID:23129328

  7. Dopamine modulates novelty seeking behavior during decision making.

    PubMed

    Costa, Vincent D; Tran, Valery L; Turchi, Janita; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2014-10-01

    Novelty seeking refers to the tendency of humans and animals to explore novel and unfamiliar stimuli and environments. The idea that dopamine modulates novelty seeking is supported by evidence that novel stimuli excite dopamine neurons and activate brain regions receiving dopaminergic input. In addition, dopamine is shown to drive exploratory behavior in novel environments. It is not clear whether dopamine promotes novelty seeking when it is framed as the decision to explore novel options versus the exploitation of familiar options. To test this hypothesis, we administered systemic injections of saline or GBR-12909, a selective dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, to monkeys and assessed their novelty seeking behavior during a probabilistic decision making task. The task involved pseudorandom introductions of novel choice options. This allowed monkeys the opportunity to explore novel options or to exploit familiar options that they had already sampled. We found that DAT blockade increased the monkeys' preference for novel options. A reinforcement learning (RL) model fit to the monkeys' choice data showed that increased novelty seeking after DAT blockade was driven by an increase in the initial value the monkeys assigned to novel options. However, blocking DAT did not modulate the rate at which the monkeys learned which cues were most predictive of reward or their tendency to exploit that knowledge. These data demonstrate that dopamine enhances novelty-driven value and imply that excessive novelty seeking-characteristic of impulsivity and behavioral addictions-might be caused by increases in dopamine, stemming from less reuptake.

  8. Prefrontal cortical dopamine transmission is decreased in alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Narendran, Rajesh; Mason, Neale Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L.; Douaihy, Antoine B.; Frankle, W. Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Objective Basic studies have demonstrated that optimal levels of prefrontal cortical dopamine are critical to various executive functions such working memory, attention, inhibitory control and risk/reward decisions--all of which are impaired in addictive disorders such as alcoholism. Based on this and imaging studies in alcoholics that have demonstrated less dopamine in the striatum, we hypothesized decreased dopamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex in alcoholism. To test this hypothesis, we used amphetamine and [11C]FLB 457 positron emission tomography (PET) to measure cortical dopamine transmission in a group of 21 recently abstinent alcoholics and matched healthy controls. Methods [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (BPND) was measured in subjects with kinetic analysis using the arterial input function both before and after 0.5 mg kg−1 of d-amphetamine. Results Amphetamine-induced displacement of [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (Δ BPND) was significantly smaller in the cortical regions in alcoholics compared to healthy controls. Cortical regions that demonstrated lower dopamine transmission in alcoholics included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Conclusions The results of this study for the first time unambiguously demonstrate decreased dopamine transmission in the cortex in alcoholism. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical relevance of decreased cortical dopamine as to whether it is related to impaired executive function, relapse, and outcome in alcoholism. PMID:24874293

  9. Dopamine alleviates salt-induced stress in Malus hupehensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Sun, Xiangkai; Chang, Cong; Jia, Dongfeng; Wei, Zhiwei; Li, Cuiying; Ma, Fengwang

    2015-04-01

    Dopamine mediates many physiological processes in plants. We investigated its role in regulating growth, ion homeostasis and the response to salinity in Malus hupehensis Rehd. Both hydroponics and field-pot experiments were conducted under saline conditions. Salt-stressed plants had reduced growth and a marked decline in their net photosynthetic rates, values for Fv /Fm and chlorophyll contents. However, pretreatment with 100 or 200 μM dopamine significantly alleviated this inhibition and enabled plants to maintain their photosynthetic capacity. In addition to changing stomatal behavior, supplementation with dopamine positively influenced the uptake of K, N, P, S, Cu and Mn ions but had an inhibitory effect on Na and Cl uptake, the balance of which is responsible for managing the response to salinity by Malus plants. Dopamine pretreatment also controlled the burst of hydrogen peroxide, possibly through direct scavenging and by enhancing the activities of antioxidative enzymes and the capacity of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. We also investigated whether dopamine might regulate salt overly sensitive pathway genes under salinity. Here, MdHKT1, MdNHX1 and MdSOS1 were greatly upregulated in roots and leaves, which possibly contributed to the maintenance of ion homeostasis and, thus, improved salinity resistance in plants exposed earlier to exogenous dopamine. These results support our conclusion that dopamine alleviates salt-induced stress not only at the level of antioxidant defense but also by regulating other mechanisms of ion homeostasis.

  10. Effect of dopamine on viability of BHK-21 cells.

    PubMed

    Moshkov, D A; Abramova, M B; Shubina, V S; Lavrovskaya, V P; Pavlik, L L; Lezhnev, E I

    2010-09-01

    We studied the effects of dopamine added to culture medium on survival of floating or adherent BHK-21 cells differing by organization of actin cytoskeleton. The viability of floating cells more drastically decreased with increasing dopamine concentration and duration of exposure than that of adherent cells. The cells worse adhered to the substrate and formed a monolayer. The formed monolayer degrades, cell borders become blurred, cells, polygonal in the control, are rounded. Preliminary blockade of dopamine receptors with haloperidol, inessential for cell survival and morphology, does not prevent the destructive effect of dopamine on the cells. Ultrastructural study revealed increased density of filamentous actin threads in deep compartments of cell cytoplasm after dopamine treatment, this increase being more pronounced in cells grown in suspension. Bearing in mind the polymerizing effect of dopamine on globular actin in vitro and the fact that the content of this protein in floating cells is higher than in adherent cells, we can conclude that the decrease in viability of BHK-21 cells is caused by interaction of dopamine with cytoplasmic globular actin. PMID:21246101

  11. The primate thalamus is a key target for brain dopamine.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Miguel Angel; García-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Rico, Beatriz; Cavada, Carmen

    2005-06-29

    The thalamus relays information to the cerebral cortex from subcortical centers or other cortices; in addition, it projects to the striatum and amygdala. The thalamic relay function is subject to modulation, so the flow of information to the target regions may change depending on behavioral demands. Modulation of thalamic relay by dopamine is not currently acknowledged, perhaps because dopamine innervation is reportedly scant in the rodent thalamus. We show that dopaminergic axons profusely target the human and macaque monkey thalamus using immunolabeling with three markers of the dopaminergic phenotype (tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine, and the dopamine transporter). The dopamine innervation is especially prominent in specific association, limbic, and motor thalamic nuclei, where the densities of dopaminergic axons are as high as or higher than in the cortical area with the densest dopamine innervation. We also identified the dopaminergic neurons projecting to the macaque thalamus using retrograde tract-tracing combined with immunohistochemistry. The origin of thalamic dopamine is multiple, and thus more complex, than in any other dopaminergic system defined to date: dopaminergic neurons of the hypothalamus, periaqueductal gray matter, ventral mesencephalon, and the lateral parabrachial nucleus project bilaterally to the monkey thalamus. We propose a novel dopaminergic system that targets the primate thalamus and is independent from the previously defined nigrostriatal, mesocortical, and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems. Investigating this "thalamic dopaminergic system" should further our understanding of higher brain functions and conditions such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and drug addiction.

  12. The nature of interactions involving prefrontal and striatal dopamine systems.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, L S

    1997-01-01

    A number of converging lines of evidence from work in rodents suggest that dopamine (DA) function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatal terminal fields may be linked, possibly in an 'inverse' manner, whereby a change in prefrontal dopamine transmission in one direction occasions an opposite change in dopamine function in striatal territories. The present article considers the possible functional importance of this concept in the light of recent neuroanatomical data and new data from our own laboratory indicating that, at the neurochemical level, the basic finding of an inverse relationship between dopamine function in prefrontal and striatal regions also holds good in the non-human primate. The main conclusion is that the simple idea of an inverse relationship between prefrontal and striatal dopamine systems emphasizing presynaptic release mechanisms is unlikely to underlie, solely, the full repertoire of functional interactions. Whilst there is evidence consistent with dynamic interactions between prefrontal and striatal dopamine release under some circumstances, specifically, during the early phases of aversive learning, a complete account of possible interactions between prefrontal and striatal dopamine systems requires consideration of additional factors. Such factors include: (1) the precise nature of the psychological function investigated, (2) the possibility of acute, localized changes in striatal postsynaptic function secondary to changes in presynaptic function and (3) the possibility of manipulations of prefrontal cortex leading to adaptive changes in striatal function, at a diffuse, neural systems level.

  13. Cannabinoid receptor activation shifts temporally engendered patterns of dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Erik B; Cachope, Roger; Fitoussi, Aurelie; Tsutsui, Kimberly; Wu, Sharon; Gallegos, Jacqueline A; Cheer, Joseph F

    2014-05-01

    The ability to discern temporally pertinent environmental events is essential for the generation of adaptive behavior in conventional tasks, and our overall survival. Cannabinoids are thought to disrupt temporally controlled behaviors by interfering with dedicated brain timing networks. Cannabinoids also increase dopamine release within the mesolimbic system, a neural pathway generally implicated in timing behavior. Timing can be assessed using fixed-interval (FI) schedules, which reinforce behavior on the basis of time. To date, it remains unknown how cannabinoids modulate dopamine release when responding under FI conditions, and for that matter, how subsecond dopamine release is related to time in these tasks. In the present study, we hypothesized that cannabinoids would accelerate timing behavior in an FI task while concurrently augmenting a temporally relevant pattern of dopamine release. To assess this possibility, we measured subsecond dopamine concentrations in the nucleus accumbens while mice responded for food under the influence of the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 in an FI task. Our data reveal that accumbal dopamine concentrations decrease proportionally to interval duration--suggesting that dopamine encodes time in FI tasks. We further demonstrate that WIN 55,212-2 dose-dependently increases dopamine release and accelerates a temporal behavioral response pattern in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner--suggesting that cannabinoid receptor activation modifies timing behavior, in part, by augmenting time-engendered patterns of dopamine release. Additional investigation uncovered a specific role for endogenous cannabinoid tone in timing behavior, as elevations in 2-arachidonoylglycerol, but not anandamide, significantly accelerated the temporal response pattern in a manner akin to WIN 55,212-2. PMID:24345819

  14. Metformin Prevents Nigrostriatal Dopamine Degeneration Independent of AMPK Activation in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Jacqueline A.; Lemus, Moyra B.; Santos, Vanessa V.; Deo, Minh; Davies, Jeffrey S.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Elsworth, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is a widely prescribed drug used to treat type-2 diabetes, although recent studies show it has wide ranging effects to treat other diseases. Animal and retrospective human studies indicate that Metformin treatment is neuroprotective in Parkinson’s Disease (PD), although the neuroprotective mechanism is unknown, numerous studies suggest the beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis may be through AMPK activation. In this study we tested whether or not AMPK activation in dopamine neurons was required for the neuroprotective effects of Metformin in PD. We generated transgenic mice in which AMPK activity in dopamine neurons was ablated by removing AMPK beta 1 and beta 2 subunits from dopamine transporter expressing neurons. These AMPK WT and KO mice were then chronically exposed to Metformin in the drinking water then exposed to MPTP, the mouse model of PD. Chronic Metformin treatment significantly attenuated the MPTP-induced loss of Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) neuronal number and volume and TH protein concentration in the nigrostriatal pathway. Additionally, Metformin treatment prevented the MPTP-induced elevation of the DOPAC:DA ratio regardless of genotype. Metformin also prevented MPTP induced gliosis in the Substantia Nigra. These neuroprotective actions were independent of genotype and occurred in both AMPK WT and AMPK KO mice. Overall, our studies suggest that Metformin’s neuroprotective effects are not due to AMPK activation in dopaminergic neurons and that more research is required to determine how metformin acts to restrict the development of PD. PMID:27467571

  15. Acrylamide increases dopamine levels by affecting dopamine transport and metabolism related genes in the striatal dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoqi; Guo, Xiongxiong; Xiong, Fei; Cheng, Guihong; Lu, Qing; Yan, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Dopaminergic system dysfunction is proved to be a possible mechanism in acrylamide (ACR) -induced neurotoxicity. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) has an increasingly important role in the dopaminergic system. Thus, the goal of this study is to evaluate effects of ACR on dopamine and its metabolite levels, dopamine transport and metabolic gene expression in dopaminergic neurons. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed orally with ACR at 0 (saline), 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg/day for 20 days. Splayed hind limbs, reduced tail flick time and abnormal gait which preceded other neurologic parameters were observed in the above rats. ACR significantly increased dopamine levels, decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) contents in an area dependent manner in rat striatum. Immunohistochemical staining of the striatum revealed that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells significantly increased, while monoamine oxidase (MAO) positive cells were drastically reduced, which was consistent with changes in their mRNA and protein expressions. In addition, dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression levels were both down-regulated in the striatum. These results suggest that dopamine levels increase significantly in response to ACR, presumably due to changes in the dopamine transport and metabolism related genes expression in the striatal dopaminergic neurons.

  16. Role of Histidine 547 of Human Dopamine Transporter in Molecular Interaction with HIV-1 Tat and Dopamine Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yaxia; Quizon, Pamela M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yao, Jianzhuang; Zhu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat plays an important role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) by disrupting neurotransmission including dopamine uptake by human dopamine transporter (hDAT). Previous studies have demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat directly binds to hDAT and some amino-acid mutations that attenuate the hDAT-Tat binding also significantly decreased dopamine uptake activity of hDAT. This combined computational-experimental study demonstrates that histidine-547 (H547) of hDAT plays a crucial role in the hDAT-Tat binding and dopamine uptake by hDAT, and that the H547A mutation can not only considerably attenuate Tat-induced inhibition of dopamine uptake, but also significantly increase the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake. The finding of such an unusual hDAT mutant capable of both increasing the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake and disrupting the hDAT-Tat binding may provide an exciting knowledge basis for development of novel concepts for therapeutic treatment of the HAND. PMID:27250920

  17. Dopamine function in Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, W L

    2000-06-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a disorder of purine metabolism resulting from mutations in the gene for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase on the X chromosome. It is characterized by hyperuricemia and all of its consequences, as in gout; but in addition, patients have impressive disease of the central nervous system. This includes spasticity, involuntary movements, and retardation of motor development. The behavioral phenotype is best remembered by self-injurious biting behavior with attendant destruction of tissue. The connection between aberrant metabolism of purines and these neurologic and behavioral features of the disease is not clear. Increasing evidence points to imbalance of neurotransmitters. There is increased excretion of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the urine. There are decreased quantities and activities of a number of dopaminergic functions. Positron emission tomography scanning has indicated deficiency in the dopamine transporter.

  18. Prefrontal cortical dopamine from an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-A; Goto, Yukiori

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we propose the hypothesis that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) acquired neotenic development as a consequence of mesocortical dopamine (DA) innervation, which in turn drove evolution of the PFC into becoming a complex functional system. Accordingly, from the evolutionary perspective, decreased DA signaling in the PFC associated with such adverse conditions as chronic stress may be considered as an environmental adaptation strategy. Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder may also be understood as environmental adaptation or a by-product of such a process that has emerged through evolution in humans. To investigate the evolutionary perspective of DA signaling in the PFC, domestic animals such as dogs may be a useful model. PMID:25617024

  19. Dopamine signaling in reward-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Baik, Ja-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) regulates emotional and motivational behavior through the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway. Changes in DA mesolimbic neurotransmission have been found to modify behavioral responses to various environmental stimuli associated with reward behaviors. Psychostimulants, drugs of abuse, and natural reward such as food can cause substantial synaptic modifications to the mesolimbic DA system. Recent studies using optogenetics and DREADDs, together with neuron-specific or circuit-specific genetic manipulations have improved our understanding of DA signaling in the reward circuit, and provided a means to identify the neural substrates of complex behaviors such as drug addiction and eating disorders. This review focuses on the role of the DA system in drug addiction and food motivation, with an overview of the role of D1 and D2 receptors in the control of reward-associated behaviors.

  20. Dissecting the diversity of midbrain dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Roeper, Jochen

    2013-06-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons are essential for controlling key functions of the brain, such as voluntary movement, reward processing, and working memory. The largest populations of midbrain DA neurons are localized in two neighboring nuclei, the substantia nigra (SN) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Regardless of their different axonal projections to subcortical and cortical targets, midbrain DA neurons have traditionally been regarded as a relatively homogeneous group of neurons, with a stereotypical set of intrinsic electrophysiological properties and in vivo pattern of activity. In this review, I highlight recent data supporting an unexpected degree of diversity among these midbrain DA neurons in the mammalian brain, ranging from their developmental lineages and different synaptic connectivity to their electrophysiological properties and behavioral functions.

  1. Two dopamine receptors: biochemistry, physiology and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Stoof, J C; Kebabian, J W

    1984-12-01

    In 1979, two categories of dopamine (DA) receptors (designated as D-1 and D-2) were identified on the basis of the ability of a limited number of agonists and antagonists to discriminate between these two entities. In the past 5 years agonists and antagonists selective for each category of receptor have been identified. Using these selective drugs it has been possible to attribute the effects of DA upon physiological and biochemical processes to the stimulation of either a D-1 or a D-2 receptor. Thus, DA-induced enhancement of both hormone release from bovine parathyroid gland and firing of neurosecretory cells in the CNS of Lymnaea stagnalis has been attributed to stimulation of a D-1 receptor. Likewise, the DA-induced inhibition of the release of prolactin and alpha-MSH from the pituitary gland, as well as of acetylcholine, DA and beta-endorphin from brain, the DA-induced inhibition of chemo-sensory discharge in rabbit carotid body and the DA-induced hyperpolarization of neurosecretory cells in the CNS of Lymnaea stagnalis have been attributed to stimulation of a D-2 receptor. Independently two categories of DA receptors (designated as DA-1 and DA-2) were identified in the cardiovascular system. Stimulation of a DA-1 receptor increases the vascular cyclic AMP content and causes a relaxation of vascular smooth muscle in renal blood vessels, whereas stimulation of a DA-2 receptor inhibits the release of norepinephrine from certain postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Recent studies with the newly developed drugs discriminating between D-1 and D-2 receptors suggest however that the independently developed schemata for classification of dopamine receptors in either the central nervous and endocrine systems or the cardiovascular system are similar although maybe not completely identical. PMID:6390056

  2. CNS Dopamine Transmission Mediated by Noradrenergic Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Caroline C.; Greene, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The pre-synaptic source of dopamine in the CA1 field of dorsal hippocampus is uncertain due to an anatomical mismatch between dopaminergic terminals and receptors. We show, in an in vitro slice preparation from C57BL6 male mice, that a dopamine (DA) D1 receptor (D1R) mediated enhancement in glutamate synaptic transmission occurs following release of endogenous DA with amphetamine exposure. It is assumed DA is released from terminals innervating from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) even though DA transporter (DAT) positive fibers are absent in hippocampus, a region with abundant D1Rs. It has been suggested this results from a lack of DAT expression on VTA terminals rather than a lack of these terminals per se. Neither a knockdown of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in the VTA by THsiRNA, delivered locally, by adeno-associated viral vector, nor localized pharmacological blockade of DAT to prevent amphetamine uptake into DA terminals, has any effect on the D1R synaptic, enhancement response to amphetamine. However, either a decrease in TH expression in the locus coeruleus (LC) or a blockade of the norepinephrine (NE) transporter prevents the DA mediated response, indicating LC terminals can release both NE and DA. These findings suggest noradrenergic fibers may be the primary source of DA release in hippocampus and corresponding DA mediated increase in synaptic transmission. Accordingly, these data imply the LC may have a role in DA transmission in the CNS in response to drugs of abuse, and potentially, under physiological conditions. PMID:22553014

  3. Dopamine Increases a Value-Independent Gambling Propensity.

    PubMed

    Rigoli, Francesco; Rutledge, Robb B; Chew, Benjamin; Ousdal, Olga T; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J

    2016-10-01

    Although the impact of dopamine on reward learning is well documented, its influence on other aspects of behavior remains the subject of much ongoing work. Dopaminergic drugs are known to increase risk-taking behavior, but the underlying mechanisms for this effect are not clear. We probed dopamine's role by examining the effect of its precursor L-DOPA on the choices of healthy human participants in an experimental paradigm that allowed particular components of risk to be distinguished. We show that choice behavior depended on a baseline (ie, value-independent) gambling propensity, a gambling preference scaling with the amount/variance, and a value normalization factor. Boosting dopamine levels specifically increased just the value-independent baseline gambling propensity, leaving the other components unaffected. Our results indicate that the influence of dopamine on choice behavior involves a specific modulation of the attractiveness of risky options-a finding with implications for understanding a range of reward-related psychopathologies including addiction.

  4. Formation and occurrence of dopamine-derived betacyanins.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Schmidt, J; Wray, V; Schliemann, W

    2001-03-01

    In light of the fact that the main betaxanthin (miraxanthin V) and the major betacyanin (2-descarboxy-betanidin) in hairy root cultures of yellow beet (Beta vulgaris L.) are both dopamine-derived, the occurrence of similar structures for the minor betacyanins was also suggested. By HPLC comparison with the betacyanins obtained by dopamine administration to beet seedlings, enzymatic hydrolysis, LCMS and 1H NMR analyses, the minor betacyanins from hairy roots were identified as 2-descarboxy-betanin and its 6'-O-malonyl derivative. A short-term dopamine administration experiment with fodder beet seedlings revealed that the condensation step between 2-descarboxy-cyclo-Dopa and betalamic acid is the decisive reaction, followed by glucosylation and acylation. From these data a pathway for the biosynthesis of dopamine-derived betalains is proposed. Furthermore, the occurrence of these compounds in various cell and hairy root cultures as well as beet plants (Fodder and Garden Beet Group) is shown.

  5. Regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking by intracellular amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Kahlig, Kristopher M; Lute, Brandon J; Wei, Yuqiang; Loland, Claus J; Gether, Ulrik; Javitch, Jonathan A; Galli, Aurelio

    2006-08-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) mediates the removal of released DA. DAT is the major molecular target responsible for the rewarding properties and abuse potential of the psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH). AMPH has been shown to reduce the number of DATs at the cell surface, and this AMPH-induced cell surface DAT redistribution may result in long-lasting changes in DA homeostasis. The molecular mechanism by which AMPH induces trafficking is not clear. Because AMPH is a substrate, we do not know whether extracellular AMPH stimulates trafficking through its interaction with DAT and subsequent alteration in DAT function, thereby triggering intracellular signaling or whether AMPH must be transported and then act intracellularly. In agreement with our previous studies, extracellular AMPH caused cytosolic redistribution of the wild-type human DAT (WT-hDAT). However, AMPH did not induce cytosolic redistribution in an uptake-impaired hDAT (Y335A-hDAT) that still binds AMPH. The divalent cation zinc (Zn(2+)) inhibits WT-hDAT activity, but it restores Y335A-hDAT uptake. Coadministration of Zn(2+) and AMPH consistently reduced WT-hDAT trafficking but stimulated cytosolic redistribution of Y335A-hDAT. Furthermore, direct intracellular application of AMPH, via a whole-cell patch pipette, stimulated the trafficking of Y335A-hDAT. Taken together, these data suggest that the DAT transport cycle is not required for AMPH-induced down-regulation and that an increase of intracellular AMPH is an essential component of DAT redistribution.

  6. The Role of Dopamine in Reinforcement: Changes in Reinforcement Sensitivity Induced by D[subscript 1]-Type, D[subscript 2]-Type, and Nonselective Dopamine Receptor Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratcher, Natalie A.; Farmer-Dougan, Valeri; Dougan, James D.; Heidenreich, Byron A.; Garris, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    Dose-dependent changes in sensitivity to reinforcement were found when rats were treated with low, moderate, and high doses of the partial dopamine D[subscript 1]-type receptor agonist SKF38393 and with the nonselective dopamine agonist apomorphine, but did not change when rats were treated with similar doses of the selective dopamine D[subscript…

  7. Glucocerebrosidase gene therapy prevents α-synucleinopathy of midbrain dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Emily M; Smith, Gaynor A; Park, Eric; Cao, Hongmei; Brown, Eilish; Hayes, Melissa A; Beagan, Jonathan; McLean, Jesse R; Izen, Sarah C; Perez-Torres, Eduardo; Hallett, Penelope J; Isacson, Ole

    2015-10-01

    Diminished lysosomal function can lead to abnormal cellular accumulation of specific proteins, including α-synuclein, contributing to disease pathogenesis of vulnerable neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) and related α-synucleinopathies. GBA1 encodes for the lysosomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase (GCase), and mutations in GBA1 are a prominent genetic risk factor for PD. Previous studies showed that in sporadic PD, and in normal aging, GCase brain activity is reduced and levels of corresponding glycolipid substrates are increased. The present study tested whether increasing GCase through AAV-GBA1 intra-cerebral gene delivery in two PD rodent models would reduce the accumulation of α-synuclein and protect midbrain dopamine neurons from α-synuclein-mediated neuronal damage. In the first model, transgenic mice overexpressing wildtype α-synuclein throughout the brain (ASO mice) were used, and in the second model, a rat model of selective dopamine neuron degeneration was induced by AAV-A53T mutant α-synuclein. In ASO mice, intra-cerebral AAV-GBA1 injections into several brain regions increased GCase activity and reduced the accumulation of α-synuclein in the substantia nigra and striatum. In rats, co-injection of AAV-GBA1 with AAV-A53T α-synuclein into the substantia nigra prevented α-synuclein-mediated degeneration of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons by 6 months. These neuroprotective effects were associated with altered protein expression of markers of autophagy. These experiments demonstrate, for the first time, the neuroprotective effects of increasing GCase against dopaminergic neuron degeneration, and support the development of therapeutics targeting GCase or other lysosomal genes to improve neuronal handling of α-synuclein.

  8. Dopamine cross-sensitization between psychostimulant drugs and stress in healthy male volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Booij, L; Welfeld, K; Leyton, M; Dagher, A; Boileau, I; Sibon, I; Baker, G B; Diksic, M; Soucy, J-P; Pruessner, J C; Cawley-Fiset, E; Casey, K F; Benkelfat, C

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the stress response system is a potential etiological factor in the development of and relapse to multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. Previously we reported that repeated intermittent d-amphetamine administration can lead to progressively greater dopamine release, thereby providing evidence of drug-induced neurochemical sensitization. Here, we test the hypothesis that repeated exposure to d-amphetamine increases dopaminergic responses to stress; that is, produces cross-sensitization. Using positron emission tomography, we measured in 17 healthy male volunteers (mean±s.d.=22.1±3.4 years) [11C]raclopride binding responses to a validated psychosocial stress task before and 2 weeks after a regimen of repeated d-amphetamine (3 × 0.3 mg kg−1, by mouth; n=8) or placebo (3 × lactose, by mouth; n=9). Mood and physiological measurements were recorded throughout each session. Before the d-amphetamine regimen, exposure to the stress task increased behavioral and physiological indices of stress (anxiety, heart rate, cortisol, all P⩽0.05). Following the d-amphetamine regimen, the stress-induced cortisol responses were augmented (P<0.04), and voxel-based analyses showed larger stress-induced decreases in [11C]raclopride non-displaceable binding potential across the striatum. In the placebo group, re-exposure to stress led to smaller clusters of decreased [11C]raclopride binding, primarily in the sensorimotor striatum (P<0.05). Together, this study provides evidence for drug × stress cross-sensitization; moreover, random exposure to stimulants and/or stress cumulatively, while enhancing dopamine release in striatal areas, may contribute to a lowered set point for psychopathologies in which altered dopamine neurotransmission is invoked. PMID:26905412

  9. Effects of oral exposure to mining waste on in vivo dopamine release from rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, V M; Dufour, L; Carrizales, L; Díaz-Barriga, F; Jiménez-Capdeville, M E

    1998-08-01

    Several single components of mining waste (arsenic, manganese, lead, cadmium) to which humans are exposed at the mining area of Villa de la Paz, Mexico, are known to provoke alterations of striatal dopaminergic parameters. In this study we used an animal model to examine neurochemical changes resulting from exposure to a metal mixture. We used microdialysis to compare in vivo dopamine release from adult rats subchronically exposed to a mining waste by oral route with those from a control group and from a sodium arsenite group (25 mg/kg/day). We found that arsenic and manganese do accumulate in rat brain after 2 weeks of oral exposure. The mining waste group showed significantly decreased basal levels of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC; 66.7 +/- 7.53 pg/ microl) when compared to a control group (113.7 +/- 14.3 pg/ microl). Although basal dopamine release rates were comparable among groups, when the system was challenged with a long-standing depolarization through high-potassium perfusion, animals exposed to mining waste were not able to sustain an increased dopamine release in response to depolarization (mining waste group 5.5 +/- 0.5 pg/ microl versus control group 21.7 +/- 5.8 pg/ microl). Also, DOPAC and homovanillic acid levels were significantly lower in exposed animals than in controls during stimulation with high potassium. The arsenite group showed a similar tendency to that from the mining waste group. In vivo microdialysis provides relevant data about the effects of a chemical mixture. Our results indicate that this mining waste may represent a health risk for the exposed population.

  10. Dopamine in the nucleus accumbens modulates the memory of social defeat in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Gray, C.L.; Norvelle, A.; Larkin, T.; Huhman, K.L..

    2015-01-01

    Conditioned defeat (CD) is a behavioral response that occurs in Syrian hamsters after they experience social defeat. Subsequently, defeated hamsters no longer produce territorial aggression but instead exhibit heightened levels of avoidance and submission, even when confronted with a smaller, non-aggressive intruder. Dopamine in the nucleus accumbens is hypothesized to act as a signal of salience for both rewarding and aversive stimuli to promote memory formation and appropriate behavioral responses to significant events. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that dopamine in the nucleus accumbens modulates the acquisition and expression of behavioral responses to social defeat. In Exp. 1, bilateral infusion of the non-specific D1/D2 receptor antagonist cis(z)flupenthixol (3.75 μg/150 nl saline) into the nucleus accumbens 5 min prior to defeat training significantly reduced submissive and defensive behavior expressed 24 hr later in response to a non-aggressive intruder. In Exp. 2, infusion of 3.75 μg cis(z)flupenthixol 5 min before conditioned defeat testing with a non-aggressive intruder significantly increased aggressive behavior in drug-infused subjects. In Exp. 3, we found that the effect of cis(z)flupenthixol on aggression was specific to defeated animals as infusion of drug into the nucleus accumbens of non-defeated animals did not significantly alter their behavior in response to a non-aggressive intruder. These data demonstrate that dopamine in the nucleus accumbens modulates both acquisition and expression of social stress-induced behavioral changes and suggest that the nucleus accumbens plays an important role in the suppression of aggression that is observed after social defeat. PMID:25721736

  11. Effects of oral exposure to mining waste on in vivo dopamine release from rat striatum.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, V M; Dufour, L; Carrizales, L; Díaz-Barriga, F; Jiménez-Capdeville, M E

    1998-01-01

    Several single components of mining waste (arsenic, manganese, lead, cadmium) to which humans are exposed at the mining area of Villa de la Paz, Mexico, are known to provoke alterations of striatal dopaminergic parameters. In this study we used an animal model to examine neurochemical changes resulting from exposure to a metal mixture. We used microdialysis to compare in vivo dopamine release from adult rats subchronically exposed to a mining waste by oral route with those from a control group and from a sodium arsenite group (25 mg/kg/day). We found that arsenic and manganese do accumulate in rat brain after 2 weeks of oral exposure. The mining waste group showed significantly decreased basal levels of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC; 66.7 +/- 7.53 pg/ microl) when compared to a control group (113.7 +/- 14.3 pg/ microl). Although basal dopamine release rates were comparable among groups, when the system was challenged with a long-standing depolarization through high-potassium perfusion, animals exposed to mining waste were not able to sustain an increased dopamine release in response to depolarization (mining waste group 5.5 +/- 0.5 pg/ microl versus control group 21.7 +/- 5.8 pg/ microl). Also, DOPAC and homovanillic acid levels were significantly lower in exposed animals than in controls during stimulation with high potassium. The arsenite group showed a similar tendency to that from the mining waste group. In vivo microdialysis provides relevant data about the effects of a chemical mixture. Our results indicate that this mining waste may represent a health risk for the exposed population. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681976

  12. The Dopamine Hypothesis of Drug Addiction and Its Potential Therapeutic Value

    PubMed Central

    Diana, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) transmission is deeply affected by drugs of abuse, and alterations in DA function are involved in the various phases of drug addiction and potentially exploitable therapeutically. In particular, basic studies have documented a reduction in the electrophysiological activity of DA neurons in alcohol, opiate, cannabinoid, and other drug-dependent rats. Further, DA release in the Nucleus accumbens (Nacc) is decreased in virtually all drug-dependent rodents. In parallel, these studies are supported by increments in intracranial self stimulation (ICSS) thresholds during withdrawal from alcohol, nicotine, opiates, and other drugs of abuse, thereby suggesting a hypofunction of the neural substrate of ICSS. Accordingly, morphological evaluations fed into realistic computational analysis of the medium spiny neuron of the Nacc, post-synaptic counterpart of DA terminals, show profound changes in structure and function of the entire mesolimbic system. In line with these findings, human imaging studies have shown a reduction of dopamine receptors accompanied by a lesser release of endogenous DA in the ventral striatum of cocaine, heroin, and alcohol-dependent subjects, thereby offering visual proof of the “dopamine-impoverished” addicted human brain. The lasting reduction in physiological activity of the DA system leads to the idea that an increment in its activity, to restore pre-drug levels, may yield significant clinical improvements (reduction of craving, relapse, and drug-seeking/taking). In theory, it may be achieved pharmacologically and/or with novel interventions such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Its anatomo-physiological rationale as a possible therapeutic aid in alcoholics and other addicts will be described and proposed as a theoretical framework to be subjected to experimental testing in human addicts. PMID:22144966

  13. Copper deficiency in neonatal mice alters brain catecholamine levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.R.; Prohaska, J.R. )

    1991-03-15

    Copper (Cu) deficiency was investigated in Swiss albino mice to develop a model that alters brain catecholamine metabolism without serious growth impairment. Cu deficiency was induced by feeding a diet low in Cu to dams beginning either 7 days (d) prior, 4d prior, 4d after, or on the day of parturition. All 4-week-old male Cu-deficient ({minus}Cu) offspring were anemic and exhibited biochemical characteristics of Cu deficiency when compared to their respective +Cu control mice. However, the best model, which resulted in altered catecholamine metabolism characterized by elevation of dopamine (DA) and depression in norepinephrine (NE) in brain, heart, and spleen, was when treatment began 4d prior to birth. Body and brain weight were not altered. However, levels of Cu in brain and liver of {minus}Cu mice were markedly reduced to 21% and 31% of those measured in +Cu controls, respectively. Furthermore, brain NE and DA concentrations of {minus}Cu mice were 72% and 132% of those quantified in +Cu offspring, respectively. A plausible explanation is that dietary Cu deficiency results in lower activity of brain dopamine-{beta}-monooxygenase, the Cu dependent enzyme that catalyzes conversion of DA to NE. It is not yet known if these changes in Ne and DA pool size altered the quantity or characteristics of the neuronal catecholamine receptors, and more importantly, whether or not the observed changes are reversible by nutritional intervention.

  14. Dopamine metabolism in characterised neurones of Planorbis corneus.

    PubMed

    Osborne, N N; Priggemeier, E; Neuhoff, V

    1975-06-13

    A sensitive chromatographic procedure was used to study the metabolism of [14C]tyrosine, [3H]DOPA and [3H]dopamine in 3 defined cell-types situated in the nervous system of Planorbis corneus. One of the cell-types contains dopamine (GDC), the other serotonin (GSC) and the other neither amine (GC). The GDCs metabolise [14C]tyrosine to form DOPA and dopamine while the other two cells lack this ability. In contrast, the GDCs and the GSC, but not the GCs, metabolise [3H]DOPA to form dopamine. In addition the GDCs incorporate radioactivity from [3H]DOPA into DOPAC, homovanillic acid and methoxytyramine. After incubation of cells in [3H]dopamine, only the GDCs metabolise it to form DOPAC, homovanillic acid and methoxytyramine. In no instance did the GDCs form significant amounts of noradrenaline from the incorporated radioactive substances. These results, together with data on the amine histochemistry of the individual cell-types following pretretment of animals with drugs known to affect specific enzymes in the synthesis of amine transmitter substances, clearly demonstrate that the GDCs alone have the enzymes requisite for the biosynthesis and catabolism of dopamine, but not noradrenaline.

  15. Selective modulation of excitatory and inhibitory microcircuits by dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wen-Jun; Goldman-Rakic, Patricia S.

    2003-03-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in the working memory functions of the prefrontal cortex, functions that are impacted in age-related memory decline, drug abuse, and a wide variety of disorders, including schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. We have previously reported that dopamine depresses excitatory transmission between pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex. Here, using paired recordings, we have investigated dopaminergic modulation of excitatory transmission from pyramidal neurons to fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. In contrast to its effect on recurrent excitation, dopamine was without effect on excitatory transmission to FS interneurons. However, dopamine has directly enhanced the excitability of the FS interneurons to the extent that even a single excitatory postsynaptic potential could initiate spiking with great temporal precision in some of them. These results indicate that dopamine's effects on excitatory transmission are target-specific and that the axon terminals of pyramidal neurons can be selectively regulated at the level of individual synapses. Thus, dopamine's net inhibitory effect on cortical function is remarkably constrained by the nature of the microcircuit elements on which it acts.

  16. Extrasynaptic release of GABA and dopamine by retinal dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, Hajime; Contini, Massimo; Raviola, Elio

    2015-01-01

    In the mouse retina, dopaminergic amacrine (DA) cells synthesize both dopamine and GABA. Both transmitters are released extrasynaptically and act on neighbouring and distant retinal neurons by volume transmission. In simultaneous recordings of dopamine and GABA release from isolated perikarya of DA cells, a proportion of the events of dopamine and GABA exocytosis were simultaneous, suggesting co-release. In addition, DA cells establish GABAergic synapses onto AII amacrine cells, the neurons that transfer rod bipolar signals to cone bipolars. GABAA but not dopamine receptors are clustered in the postsynaptic membrane. Therefore, dopamine, irrespective of its site of release—synaptic or extrasynaptic—exclusively acts by volume transmission. Dopamine is released upon illumination and sets the gain of retinal neurons for vision in bright light. The GABA released at DA cells' synapses probably prevents signals from the saturated rods from entering the cone pathway when the dark-adapted retina is exposed to bright illumination. The GABA released extrasynaptically by DA and other amacrine cells may set a ‘GABAergic tone’ in the inner plexiform layer and thus counteract the effects of a spillover of glutamate released at the bipolar cell synapses of adjacent OFF and ON strata, thus preserving segregation of signals between ON and OFF pathways. PMID:26009765

  17. Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol induces dopamine release in the human striatum.

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; van Berckel, Bart N M; Boellaard, Ronald; Zuurman, Lineke; Schuit, Robert C; Windhorst, Albert D; van Gerven, Joop M A; Ramsey, Nick F; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Kahn, René S

    2009-02-01

    The influence of cannabis on mental health receives growing scientific and political attention. An increasing demand for treatment of cannabis dependence has refueled the discussion about the addictive potential of cannabis. A key feature of all addictive drugs is the ability to increase synaptic dopamine levels in the striatum, a mechanism involved in their rewarding and motivating effects. However, it is currently unknown if cannabis can stimulate striatal dopamine neurotransmission in humans. Here we show that Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component in cannabis, induces dopamine release in the human striatum. Using the dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor tracer [(11)C]raclopride and positron emission tomography in seven healthy subjects, we demonstrate that THC inhalation reduces [(11)C]raclopride binding in the ventral striatum and the precommissural dorsal putamen but not in other striatal subregions. This is consistent with an increase in dopamine levels in these regions. These results suggest that THC shares a potentially addictive property with other drugs of abuse. Further, it implies that the endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in regulating striatal dopamine release. This allows new directions in research on the effects of THC in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. PMID:18754005

  18. Subsecond regulation of striatal dopamine release by presynaptic KATP channels

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jyoti C.; Witkovsky, Paul; Coetzee, William A.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels are composed of pore-forming subunits, typically Kir6.2 in neurons, and regulatory sulfonylurea receptor subunits. In dorsal striatum, activity-dependent H2O2 produced from glutamatergic AMPA-receptor activation inhibits dopamine release via KATP channels. Sources of modulatory H2O2 include medium spiny neurons, but not dopaminergic axons. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in guinea-pig striatal slices and immunohistochemistry, we determined the time window for H2O2/KATP-channel-mediated inhibition and assessed whether modulatory KATP channels are on dopaminergic axons. Comparison of paired-pulse suppression of dopamine release in the absence and presence of glibenclamide, a KATP-channel blocker, or mercaptosuccinate, a glutathione peroxidase inhibitor that enhances endogenous H2O2 levels, revealed a time window for inhibition of 500 to 1000 ms after stimulation. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated localization of Kir6.2 KATP-channel subunits on dopaminergic axons. Consistent with the presence of functional KATP channels on dopaminergic axons, KATP-channel openers, diazoxide and cromakalim, suppressed single-pulse evoked dopamine release. Although cholinergic interneurons that tonically regulate dopamine release also express KATP channels, diazoxide did not induce the enhanced frequency responsiveness of dopamine release seen with nicotinic-receptor blockade. Together, these studies reveal subsecond regulation of striatal dopamine release by endogenous H2O2 acting at KATP channels on dopaminergic axons, including a role in paired-pulse suppression. PMID:21689107

  19. Differential tonic influence of lateral habenula on prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Lecourtier, Lucas; Defrancesco, Alicia; Moghaddam, Bita

    2008-04-01

    Conditions of increased cognitive or emotional demand activate dopamine release in a regionally selective manner. Whereas the brief millisecond response of dopamine neurons to salient stimuli suggests that dopamine's influence on behaviour may be limited to signalling certain cues, the prolonged availability of dopamine in regions such as the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens is consistent with the well described role of dopamine in maintaining motivation states, associative learning and working memory. The behaviourally elicited terminal release of dopamine is generally attributed to increased excitatory drive on dopamine neurons. Our findings here, however, indicate that this increase may involve active removal of a tonic inhibitory control on dopamine neurons exerted by the lateral habenula (LHb). Inhibition of LHb in behaving animals transiently increased dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens and dorsolateral striatum. The inhibitory influence was more pronounced in the nucleus accumbens and striatum than in the prefrontal cortex. This pattern of regional dopamine activation after LHb inhibition mimicked conditions of reward availability but not increased cognitive demand. Electrical or chemical stimulation of LHb produced minimal reduction of extracellular dopamine, suggesting that in an awake brain the inhibition associated with tonic LHb activity represents a near-maximal influence on dopamine neurotransmission. These data indicate that LHb may be critical for functional differences in dopamine neurons by preferentially modulating dopamine neurons that project to the nucleus accumbens over those neurons that primarily project to the prefrontal cortex.

  20. Glutamate and Dopamine Transmission from Midbrain Dopamine Neurons Share Similar Release Properties But Are Differentially Affected by Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Adrover, Martín F.; Shin, Jung Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic transmission between ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critically involved in reward-motivated behaviors and thought to be altered in addiction. In addition to dopamine (DA), glutamate is packaged and released by a subset of mesolimbic DA neurons, eliciting EPSCs onto medium spiny neurons in NAc. Little is known about the properties and modulation of glutamate release from DA midbrain terminals and the effect of cocaine. Using an optogenetic approach to selectively activate midbrain DA fibers, we compared the properties and modulation of DA transients and EPSCs measured using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and whole-cell recordings in mouse brain slices. DA transients and EPSCs were inhibited by DA receptor D2R agonist and showed a marked paired-pulse depression that required 2 min for full recovery. Cocaine depressed EPSCs amplitude by 50% but enhanced the overall DA transmission from midbrain DA neurons. AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs were equally inhibited by cocaine, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism of action. Pharmacological blockage and genetic deletion of D2R in DA neurons prevented the cocaine-induced inhibition of EPSCs and caused a larger increase in DA transient peak, confirming the involvement of presynaptic D2R. These findings demonstrate that acute cocaine inhibits DA and glutamate release from midbrain DA neurons via presynaptic D2R but has differential overall effects on their transmissions in the NAc. We postulate that cocaine, by blocking DA reuptake, prolongs DA transients and facilitates the feedback inhibition of DA and glutamate release from these terminals. PMID:24573277

  1. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Cognitive Control Functions of Performance Monitoring and Conflict Processing: An Event-Related Potential (ERP) Study

    PubMed Central

    Primosch, Mark; Leyton, Marco; Steffensen, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Studies using medications and psychiatric populations implicate dopamine in cognitive control and performance monitoring processes. However, side effects associated with medication or studying psychiatric groups may confound the relationship between dopamine and cognitive control. To circumvent such possibilities, we utilized a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design wherein participants were administered a nutritionally-balanced amino acid mixture (BAL) and an amino acid mixture deficient in the dopamine precursors tyrosine (TYR) and phenylalanine (PHE) on two separate occasions. Order of sessions was randomly assigned. Cognitive control and performance monitoring were assessed using response times (RT), error rates, the N450, an event-related potential (ERP) index of conflict monitoring, the conflict slow potential (conflict SP), an ERP index of conflict resolution, and the error-related negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe), ERPs associated with performance monitoring. Participants were twelve males who completed a Stroop color-word task while ERPs were collected four hours following acute PHE and TYR depletion (APTD) or balanced (BAL) mixture ingestion in two separate sessions. N450 and conflict SP ERP amplitudes significantly differentiated congruent from incongruent trials, but did not differ as a function of APTD or BAL mixture ingestion. Similarly, ERN and Pe amplitudes showed significant differences between error and correct trials that were not different between APTD and BAL conditions. Findings indicate that acute dopamine precursor depletion does not significantly alter cognitive control and performance monitoring ERPs. Current results do not preclude the role of dopamine in these processes, but suggest that multiple methods for dopamine-related hypothesis testing are needed. PMID:26492082

  2. Eating High Fat Chow Decreases Dopamine Clearance in Adolescent and Adult Male Rats but Selectively Enhances the Locomotor Stimulating Effects of Cocaine in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Baladi, Michelle G.; Horton, Rebecca E.; Owens, William A.; Daws, Lynette C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Feeding conditions can influence dopamine neurotransmission and impact behavioral and neurochemical effects of drugs acting on dopamine systems. This study examined whether eating high fat chow alters the locomotor effects of cocaine and dopamine transporter activity in adolescent (postnatal day 25) and adult (postnatal day 75) male Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods: Dose-response curves for cocaine-induced locomotor activity were generated in rats with free access to either standard or high fat chow or restricted access to high fat chow (body weight matched to rats eating standard chow). Results: Compared with eating standard chow, eating high fat chow increased the sensitivity of adolescent, but not adult, rats to the acute effects of cocaine. When tested once per week, sensitization to the locomotor effects of cocaine was enhanced in adolescent rats eating high fat chow compared with adolescent rats eating standard chow. Sensitization to cocaine was not different among feeding conditions in adults. When adolescent rats that previously ate high fat chow ate standard chow, sensitivity to cocaine returned to normal. As measured by chronoamperometry, dopamine clearance rate in striatum was decreased in both adolescent and adult rats eating high fat chow compared with age-matched rats eating standard chow. Conclusions: These results suggest that high fat diet-induced reductions in dopamine clearance rate do not always correspond to increased sensitivity to the locomotor effects of cocaine, suggesting that mechanisms other than dopamine transporter might play a role. Moreover, in adolescent but not adult rats, eating high fat chow increases sensitivity to cocaine and enhances the sensitization that develops to cocaine. PMID:25805560

  3. Dopamine imbalance in Huntington's disease: a mechanism for the lack of behavioral flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jane Y.; Wang, Elizabeth A.; Cepeda, Carlos; Levine, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) plays an essential role in the control of coordinated movements. Alterations in DA balance in the striatum lead to pathological conditions such as Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases (HD). HD is a progressive, invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a genetic mutation producing an expansion of glutamine repeats and is characterized by abnormal dance-like movements (chorea). The principal pathology is the loss of striatal and cortical projection neurons. Changes in brain DA content and receptor number contribute to abnormal movements and cognitive deficits in HD. In particular, during the early hyperkinetic stage of HD, DA levels are increased whereas expression of DA receptors is reduced. In contrast, in the late akinetic stage, DA levels are significantly decreased and resemble those of a Parkinsonian state. Time-dependent changes in DA transmission parallel biphasic changes in glutamate synaptic transmission and may enhance alterations in glutamate receptor-mediated synaptic activity. In this review, we focus on neuronal electrophysiological mechanisms that may lead to some of the motor and cognitive symptoms of HD and how they relate to dysfunction in DA neurotransmission. Based on clinical and experimental findings, we propose that some of the behavioral alterations in HD, including reduced behavioral flexibility, may be caused by altered DA modulatory function. Thus, restoring DA balance alone or in conjunction with glutamate receptor antagonists could be a viable therapeutic approach. PMID:23847463

  4. A heterocyclic compound CE-103 inhibits dopamine reuptake and modulates dopamine transporter and dopamine D1-D3 containing receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Sase, Ajinkya; Aher, Yogesh D; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Ganesan, Minu Karthika; Sase, Sunetra; Holy, Marion; Höger, Harald; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Ecker, Gerhard F; Langer, Thierry; Sitte, Harald H; Leban, Johann; Lubec, Gert

    2016-03-01

    A series of compounds have been reported to enhance memory via the DA system and herein a heterocyclic compound was tested for working memory (WM) enhancement. 2-((benzhydrylsulfinyl)methyl)thiazole (CE-103) was synthesized in a six-step synthesis. Binding of CE-103 to the dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters and dopamine reuptake inhibition was tested as well as blood brain permeation and a screen for GPCR targets. 60 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six groups: CE-103 treated 1-10 mg/kg body weight, trained (TDI) and yoked (YDI) and vehicle treated, trained (TVI) and yoked (YVI) rats. Daily single intraperitoneal injections for a period of 10 days were administered and rats were tested in a radial arm maze (RAM). Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT) and complexes containing the D1-3 dopamine receptor subunits were determined. CE-103 was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 14.73 μM). From day eight the compound was decreasing WM errors in the RAM significantly at both doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. In the trained CE-103-treated group levels of the complex containing the phosphorylated dopamine transporter (pDAT) as well as D1R were decreased while levels of complexes containing D2R and D3R were significantly increased. CE-103 was shown to enhance spatial WM and DA reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1-3 receptors is proposed as a possible mechanism of action. PMID:26407764

  5. Dopamine and T cells: dopamine receptors and potent effects on T cells, dopamine production in T cells, and abnormalities in the dopaminergic system in T cells in autoimmune, neurological and psychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Levite, M

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine, a principal neurotransmitter, deserves upgrading to 'NeuroImmunotransmitter' thanks to its multiple, direct and powerful effects on most/all immune cells. Dopamine by itself is a potent activator of resting effector T cells (Teffs), via two independent ways: direct Teffs activation, and indirect Teffs activation by suppression of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The review covers the following findings: (i) T cells express functional dopamine receptors (DRs) D1R-D5R, but their level and function are dynamic and context-sensitive, (ii) DR membranal protein levels do not necessarily correlate with DR mRNA levels, (iii) different T cell types/subtypes have different DR levels and composition and different responses to dopamine, (iv) autoimmune and pro-inflammatory T cells and T cell leukaemia/lymphoma also express functional DRs, (v) dopamine (~10(-8) M) activates resting/naive Teffs (CD8(+) >CD4(+) ), (vi) dopamine affects Th1/Th2/Th17 differentiation, (vii) dopamine inhibits already activated Teffs (i.e. T cells that have been already activated by either antigen, mitogen, anti-CD3 antibodies cytokines or other molecules), (viii) dopamine inhibits activated Tregs in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, dopamine 'suppresses the suppressors' and releases the inhibition they exert on Teffs, (ix) dopamine affects intracellular signalling molecules and cascades in T cells (e.g. ERK, Lck, Fyn, NF-κB, KLF2), (x) T cells produce dopamine (Tregs>Teffs), can release dopamine, mainly after activation (by antigen, mitogen, anti-CD3 antibodies, PKC activators or other), uptake extracellular dopamine, and most probably need dopamine, (xi) dopamine is important for antigen-specific interactions between T cells and dendritic cells, (xii) in few autoimmune diseases (e.g. multiple sclerosis/SLE/rheumatoid arthritis), and neurological/psychiatric diseases (e.g. Parkinson disease, Alzheimer's disease, Schizophrenia and Tourette), patient's T cells seem to have abnormal DRs

  6. STRESS-INDUCED CHANGES IN EXTRACELLULAR DOPAMINE AND SEROTONIN IN THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX AND DORSAL HIPPOCAMPUS OF PRENATALLY MALNOURISHED RATS

    PubMed Central

    Mokler, David J.; Torres, Olga I.; Galler, Janina R.; Morgane, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal protein malnutrition continues to be a significant problem in the world today. Exposure to prenatal protein malnutrition increases the risk of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders in adulthood including depression, schizophrenia and attentional deficit disorder. In the present experiment we have examined the effects of stress on extracellular serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of rats exposed in utero to protein malnutrition. The medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus were chosen as two limbic forebrain regions involved in learning and memory, attention and the stress response. Extracellular 5-HT and dopamine were determined in the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats using dual probe in vivo microdialysis. Basal extracellular 5-HT did not differ between malnourished and well-nourished controls in either the medial prefrontal cortex or the dorsal hippocampus. Basal extracellular dopamine was significantly decreased in the medial prefrontal cortex of malnourished animals. Restraint stress (20 m) produced a significant rise in extracellular dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex of well-nourished rats but did not alter release in malnourished rats. In malnourished rats, stress produced an increase in 5-HT in the hippocampus, whereas stress produced a decrease in 5-HT in the hippocampus of well-nourished rats. These data demonstrate that prenatal protein malnutrition alters dopaminergic neurotransmission in the medial prefrontal cortex as well as altering the dopaminergic and serotonergic response to stress. These changes may provide part of the bases for alterations in malnourished animals’ response to stress. PMID:17368432

  7. Dopamine neurons in culture express VGLUT2 explaining their capacity to release glutamate at synapses in addition to dopamine.

    PubMed

    Dal Bo, Gregory; St-Gelais, Fannie; Danik, Marc; Williams, Sylvain; Cotton, Mathieu; Trudeau, Louis-Eric

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurons have been suggested to use glutamate as a cotransmitter. To identify the basis of such a phenotype, we have examined the expression of the three recently identified vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) in postnatal rat dopamine neurons in culture. We found that the majority of isolated dopamine neurons express VGLUT2, but not VGLUT1 or 3. In comparison, serotonin neurons express only VGLUT3. Single-cell RT-PCR experiments confirmed the presence of VGLUT2 mRNA in dopamine neurons. Arguing for phenotypic heterogeneity among axon terminals, we find that only a proportion of terminals established by dopamine neurons are VGLUT2-positive. Taken together, our results provide a basis for the ability of dopamine neurons to release glutamate as a cotransmitter. A detailed analysis of the conditions under which DA neurons gain or loose a glutamatergic phenotype may provide novel insight into pathophysiological processes that underlie diseases such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and drug dependence. PMID:15009640

  8. Expression of dopamine D2 receptor in PC-12 cells and regulation of membrane conductances by dopamine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W H; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1997-10-01

    PC-12 cells depolarize during hypoxia and release dopamine. The hypoxia-induced depolarization is due to inhibition of an O2-sensitive K+ current. The role of dopamine released during hypoxia is uncertain, but it could act as an autocrine to modulate membrane conductance during hypoxia. The current study was undertaken to investigate this possibility. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis revealed that the D2 isoform of the dopamine receptor is expressed in rat PC-12 cells. Exogenously applied dopamine and the D2 agonist quinpirole elicited inhibition of a voltage-dependent K+ current (I(K)) that was prevented by sulpiride, a D2 receptor antagonist. Dopamine and quinpirole applied during hypoxia potentiated the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on I(K). We also found that quinpirole caused reversible inhibition of a voltage-dependent Ca2+ current (I(Ca)) and attenuation of the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxia. Our results indicate that dopamine released from PC-12 cells during hypoxia acts via a D2 receptor to "autoregulate" I(K) and I(Ca). PMID:9357757

  9. Injectable dopamine-modified poly(ethylene glycol) nanocomposite hydrogel with enhanced adhesive property and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Meng, Hao; Konst, Shari; Sarmiento, Ryan; Rajachar, Rupak; Lee, Bruce P

    2014-10-01

    A synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive protein, dopamine-modified four-armed poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-D4), was combined with a synthetic nanosilicate, Laponite (Na(0.7+)(Mg5.5Li0.3Si8)O20(OH)4)(0.7-)), to form an injectable naoncomposite tissue adhesive hydrogel. Incorporation of up to 2 wt % Laponite significantly reduced the cure time while enhancing the bulk mechanical and adhesive properties of the adhesive due to strong interfacial binding between dopamine and Laponite. The addition of Laponite did not alter the degradation rate and cytocompatibility of PEG-D4 adhesive. On the basis of subcutaneous implantation in rat, PEG-D4 nanocomposite hydrogels elicited minimal inflammatory response and exhibited an enhanced level of cellular infiltration as compared to Laponite-free samples. The addition of Laponite is potentially a simple and effective method for promoting bioactivity in a bioinert, synthetic PEG-based adhesive while simultaneously enhancing its mechanical and adhesive properties. PMID:25222290

  10. Ventral Subiculum Stimulation Promotes Persistent Hyperactivity of Dopamine Neurons and Facilitates Behavioral Effects of Cocaine.

    PubMed

    Glangetas, Christelle; Fois, Giulia R; Jalabert, Marion; Lecca, Salvatore; Valentinova, Kristina; Meye, Frank J; Diana, Marco; Faure, Philippe; Mameli, Manuel; Caille, Stéphanie; Georges, François

    2015-12-15

    The ventral subiculum (vSUB) plays a key role in addiction, and identifying the neuronal circuits and synaptic mechanisms by which vSUB alters the excitability of dopamine neurons is a necessary step to understand the motor changes induced by cocaine. Here, we report that high-frequency stimulation of the vSUB (HFSvSUB) over-activates ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons in vivo and triggers long-lasting modifications of synaptic transmission measured ex vivo. This potentiation is caused by NMDA-dependent plastic changes occurring in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). Finally, we report that the modification of the BNST-VTA neural circuits induced by HFSvSUB potentiates locomotor activity induced by a sub-threshold dose of cocaine. Our findings unravel a neuronal circuit encoding behavioral effects of cocaine in rats and highlight the importance of adaptive modifications in the BNST, a structure that influences motivated behavior as well as maladaptive behaviors associated with addiction. PMID:26628379

  11. Dopamine transporter gene susceptibility to methylation is associated with impulsivity in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Abigail Z.; Zaitoun, Ismail; Henriques, Jeffrey B.; Converse, Alexander K.; Murali, Dhanabalan; Epstein, Miles L.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity, the predisposition to act without regard for negative consequences, is a characteristic of several psychiatric disorders and is thought to result in part from genetic variation in the untranslated region of the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene. As the exact link between genetic mutations and impulsivity has not been established, we used oculomotor behavior to characterize rhesus monkeys as impulsive or calm and genetic/epigenetic analysis and positron emission tomography (PET) to correlate phenotype to DAT genotype, DAT gene methylation, and DAT availability. We found three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 3′-UTR of the DAT gene, one of which provided a potential site for methylation in the impulsive group. Bisulfite analysis showed that the DNA of the impulsive but not the calm subjects was methylated at one SNP. Because genetic/epigenetic modifications could lead to differences in protein expression, we measured DAT availability using [18F]2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-(2-fluoroethyl)-nortropane ([18F]FECNT) PET and found higher DAT availability in the internal globus pallidus, an output nucleus of the basal ganglia, of the impulsive group. Higher DAT availability lowers dopamine levels, potentially altering neuronal circuits involved in the initiation of action, thus contributing to the impulsive phenotype. The association between increased methylation in the DAT gene and greater DAT availability suggests that mutations to the regulatory portion of the DAT gene lead to a susceptibility to epigenetic modification resulting in a discrete behavioral phenotype. PMID:25122707

  12. Repeated resveratrol treatment attenuates methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity and [3H]dopamine overflow in rodents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dennis K; Oelrichs, Clark E; Sage, Andrew S; Sun, Grace Y; Simonyi, Agnes

    2013-10-25

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) has been investigated for its potential as a prophylactic against degenerative diseases. It is a sirtulin activator that has recently been shown to regulate dopaminergic systems that contribute to the behavioral effects of methamphetamine and cocaine. The present study examined the impact of resveratrol on stimulant neuropsychopharmacology in rodents. Acute resveratrol treatment (20-40mg/kg) was ineffective to alter methamphetamine (0.5mg/kg)-induced hyperactivity in mice. Rodents received resveratrol once-daily for seven days to determine the effect of repeated polyphenolic treatment. Repeated resveratrol treatment (1-20mg/kg) decreased methamphetamine (0.5mg/kg)-induced hyperactivity in mice. Methamphetamine's (0.1-60μM) efficacy to evoke [(3)H]overflow from rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine was also attenuated by repeated resveratrol (1mg/kg) treatment. Repeated resveratrol treatment (10-20mg/kg) did not affect cocaine-induced hyperactivity in mice. Overall, these data suggest that resveratrol appears to have metaplastic and prophylactic activity to minimize the effects of methamphetamine to increase locomotor activity and evoke dopamine release. These data encourage future research to further investigate the relationship between polyphenolics and psychostimulant abuse and dependence.

  13. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Treatment with Dopamine Agonist and Subsequent Pregnancy with a Satisfactory Outcome.

    PubMed

    Melo, Maria Adélia Medeiros E; Carvalho, Jordão Sousa; Feitosa, Francisco Edson de Lucena; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Peixoto, Alberto Borges; Costa Carvalho, Francisco Herlânio; Carvalho, Regina Coeli Marques

    2016-06-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms of peripartum cardiomyopathy are not yet completely defined, although there is a strong association with various factors that are already known, including pre-eclampsia. Peripartum cardiomyopathy treatment follows the same recommendations as heart failure with systolic dysfunction. Clinical and experimental studies suggest that products of prolactin degradation can induce this cardiomyopathy. The pharmacological suppression of prolactin production by D2 dopamine receptor agonists bromocriptine and cabergoline has demonstrated satisfactory results in the therapeutic response to the treatment. Here we present a case of an adolescent patient in her first gestation with peripartum cardiomyopathy that evolved to the normalized left ventricular function after cabergoline administration, which was used as an adjuvant in cardiac dysfunction treatment. Subsequently, despite a short interval between pregnancies, the patient exhibited satisfactory progress throughout the entire gestation or puerperium in a new pregnancy without any cardiac alterations. Dopamine agonists that are orally used and are affordable in most tertiary centers, particularly in developing countries, should be considered when treating peripartum cardiomyopathy cases. PMID:27399926

  14. Dopamine D3 Receptors Inhibit Hippocampal Gamma Oscillations by Disturbing CA3 Pyramidal Cell Firing Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Lemercier, Clément E.; Schulz, Steffen B.; Heidmann, Karin E.; Kovács, Richard; Gerevich, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Cortical gamma oscillations are associated with cognitive processes and are altered in several neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. Since dopamine D3 receptors are possible targets in treatment of these conditions, it is of great importance to understand their role in modulation of gamma oscillations. The effect of D3 receptors on gamma oscillations and the underlying cellular mechanisms were investigated by extracellular local field potential and simultaneous intracellular sharp micro-electrode recordings in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in vitro. D3 receptors decreased the power and broadened the bandwidth of gamma oscillations induced by acetylcholine or kainate. Blockade of the D3 receptors resulted in faster synchronization of the oscillations, suggesting that endogenous dopamine in the hippocampus slows down the dynamics of gamma oscillations by activation of D3 receptors. Investigating the underlying cellular mechanisms for these effects showed that D3 receptor activation decreased the rate of action potentials (APs) during gamma oscillations and reduced the precision of the AP phase coupling to the gamma cycle in CA3 pyramidal cells. The results may offer an explanation how selective activation of D3 receptors may impair cognition and how, in converse, D3 antagonists may exert pro-cognitive and antipsychotic effects. PMID:26779018

  15. Striatal Dopamine D2/3 Receptor Availability in Treatment Resistant Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ruhé, Eric H. G.; van Wingen, Guido A.; Booij, Jan; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Several studies demonstrated improvement of depressive symptoms in treatment resistant depression (TRD) after administering dopamine agonists which suggest abnormal dopaminergic neurotransmission in TRD. However, the role of dopaminergic signaling through measurement of striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) binding has not been investigated in TRD subjects. We used [123I]IBZM single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to investigate striatal D2/3R binding in TRD. We included 6 severe TRD patients, 11 severe TRD patients on antipsychotics (TRD AP group) and 15 matched healthy controls. Results showed no significant difference (p = 0.75) in striatal D2/3R availability was found between TRD patients and healthy controls. In the TRD AP group D2/3R availability was significantly decreased (reflecting occupancy of D2/3Rs by antipsychotics) relative to TRD patients and healthy controls (p<0.001) but there were no differences in clinical symptoms between TRD AP and TRD patients. This preliminary study therefore does not provide evidence for large differences in D2/3 availability in severe TRD patients and suggests this TRD subgroup is not characterized by altered dopaminergic transmission. Atypical antipsychotics appear to have no clinical benefit in severe TRD patients who remain depressed, despite their strong occupancy of D2/3Rs. PMID:25411966

  16. Predicting childhood effortful control from interactions between early parenting quality and children's dopamine transporter gene haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Sulik, Michael J; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Stover, Daryn A; Verrelli, Brian C

    2016-02-01

    Children's observed effortful control (EC) at 30, 42, and 54 months (n = 145) was predicted from the interaction between mothers' observed parenting with their 30-month-olds and three variants of the solute carrier family C6, member 3 (SLC6A3) dopamine transporter gene (single nucleotide polymorphisms in intron8 and intron13, and a 40 base pair variable number tandem repeat [VNTR] in the 3'-untranslated region [UTR]), as well as haplotypes of these variants. Significant moderating effects were found. Children without the intron8-A/intron13-G, intron8-A/3'-UTR VNTR-10, or intron13-G/3'-UTR VNTR-10 haplotypes (i.e., haplotypes associated with the reduced SLC6A3 gene expression and thus lower dopamine functioning) appeared to demonstrate altered levels of EC as a function of maternal parenting quality, whereas children with these haplotypes demonstrated a similar EC level regardless of the parenting quality. Children with these haplotypes demonstrated a trade-off, such that they showed higher EC, relative to their counterparts without these haplotypes, when exposed to less supportive maternal parenting. The findings revealed a diathesis-stress pattern and suggested that different SLC6A3 haplotypes, but not single variants, might represent different levels of young children's sensitivity/responsivity to early parenting. PMID:25924976

  17. Predicting childhood effortful control from interactions between early parenting quality and children's dopamine transporter gene haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Sulik, Michael J; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Stover, Daryn A; Verrelli, Brian C

    2016-02-01

    Children's observed effortful control (EC) at 30, 42, and 54 months (n = 145) was predicted from the interaction between mothers' observed parenting with their 30-month-olds and three variants of the solute carrier family C6, member 3 (SLC6A3) dopamine transporter gene (single nucleotide polymorphisms in intron8 and intron13, and a 40 base pair variable number tandem repeat [VNTR] in the 3'-untranslated region [UTR]), as well as haplotypes of these variants. Significant moderating effects were found. Children without the intron8-A/intron13-G, intron8-A/3'-UTR VNTR-10, or intron13-G/3'-UTR VNTR-10 haplotypes (i.e., haplotypes associated with the reduced SLC6A3 gene expression and thus lower dopamine functioning) appeared to demonstrate altered levels of EC as a function of maternal parenting quality, whereas children with these haplotypes demonstrated a similar EC level regardless of the parenting quality. Children with these haplotypes demonstrated a trade-off, such that they showed higher EC, relative to their counterparts without these haplotypes, when exposed to less supportive maternal parenting. The findings revealed a diathesis-stress pattern and suggested that different SLC6A3 haplotypes, but not single variants, might represent different levels of young children's sensitivity/responsivity to early parenting.

  18. VGLUT2 in dopamine neurons is required for psychostimulant-induced behavioral activation

    PubMed Central

    Birgner, Carolina; Nordenankar, Karin; Lundblad, Martin; Mendez, José Alfredo; Smith, Casey; le Grevès, Madeleine; Galter, Dagmar; Olson, Lars; Fredriksson, Anders; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Kullander, Klas; Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa

    2009-01-01

    The “One neuron-one neurotransmitter” concept has been challenged frequently during the last three decades, and the coexistence of neurotransmitters in individual neurons is now regarded as a common phenomenon. The functional significance of neurotransmitter coexistence is, however, less well understood. Several studies have shown that a subpopulation of dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) expresses the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) and has been suggested to use glutamate as a cotransmitter. The VTA dopamine neurons project to limbic structures including the nucleus accumbens, and are involved in mediating the motivational and locomotor activating effects of psychostimulants. To determine the functional role of glutamate cotransmission by these neurons, we deleted VGLUT2 in DA neurons by using a conditional gene-targeting approach in mice. A DAT-Cre/Vglut2Lox mouse line (Vglut2f/f;DAT-Cre mice) was produced and analyzed by in vivo amperometry as well as by several behavioral paradigms. Although basal motor function was normal in the Vglut2f/f;DAT-Cre mice, their risk-taking behavior was altered. Interestingly, in both home-cage and novel environments, the gene targeted mice showed a greatly blunted locomotor response to the psychostimulant amphetamine, which acts via the midbrain DA system. Our results show that VGLUT2 expression in DA neurons is required for normal emotional reactivity as well as for psychostimulant-mediated behavioral activation. PMID:20018672

  19. Role of Dopamine 2 Receptor in Impaired Drug-Cue Extinction in Adolescent Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zbukvic, Isabel C.; Ganella, Despina E.; Perry, Christina J.; Madsen, Heather B.; Bye, Christopher R.; Lawrence, Andrew J.; Kim, Jee Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent drug users display resistance to treatment such as cue exposure therapy (CET), as well as increased liability to relapse. The basis of CET is extinction learning, which involves dopamine signaling in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). This system undergoes dramatic alterations during adolescence. Therefore, we investigated extinction of a cocaine-associated cue in adolescent and adult rats. While cocaine self-administration and lever-alone extinction were not different between the two ages, we observed that cue extinction reduced cue-induced reinstatement in adult but not adolescent rats. Infusion of the selective dopamine 2 receptor (D2R)-like agonist quinpirole into the infralimbic cortex (IL) of the mPFC prior to cue extinction significantly reduced cue-induced reinstatement in adolescents. This effect was replicated by acute systemic treatment with the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole (Abilify), a partial D2R-like agonist. These data suggest that adolescents may be more susceptible to relapse due to a deficit in cue extinction learning, and highlight the significance of D2R signaling in the IL for cue extinction during adolescence. These findings inspire new tactics for improving adolescent CET, with aripiprazole representing an exciting potential pharmacological adjunct for behavioral therapy. PMID:26946126

  20. Proline-directed phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Gorentla, Balachandra K.; Moritz, Amy E.; Foster, James D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) on N-terminal serines and unidentified threonines occurs concomitantly with PKC- and substrate-induced alterations in transporter activity, subcellular distribution, and dopamine efflux, but the residues phosphorylated and identities of protein kinases and phosphatases involved are not known. As one approach to investigating these issues we recombinantly expressed the N-terminal tail of rat DAT (NDAT) and examined its phosphorylation and dephosphorylation properties in vitro. We found that NDAT could be phosphorylated to significant levels by PKCα, PKA, PKG, and CaMKII, which catalyzed serine phosphorylation, and ERK1, JNK, and p38, which catalyzed threonine phosphorylation. We identified Thr53, present in a membrane proximal proline-directed kinase motif as the NDAT site phosphorylated in vitro by ERK1, JNK and p38, and confirmed by peptide mapping and mutagenesis that Thr53 is phosphorylated in vivo. Dephosphorylation studies showed that protein phosphatase 1 catalyzed near-complete in vitro dephosphorylation of PKCα-phosphorylated NDAT, similar to its in vivo and in vitro effects on native DAT. These findings demonstrate the ability of multiple enzymes to directly recognize the DAT N-terminal domain and for kinases to act at multiple distinct sites. The strong correspondence between NDAT and rDAT phosphorylation characteristics suggests the potential for the enzymes that are active on NDAT in vitro to act on DAT in vivo and indicates the usefulness of NDAT for guiding future DAT phosphorylation analyses. PMID:19146407

  1. Role of the basolateral amygdala dopamine receptors in arachidonylcyclopropylamide-induced fear learning deficits.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Hajian, Maryam; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-01-01

    There is much evidence suggesting that the mesoamygdala dopaminergic (DAergic) system plays a crucial role in the formation and expression of fear conditioning, with both D1 and D2 receptors being involved. In addition, cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) signaling modulates DAergic pathways. The present study sought to determine the involvement of basolateral amygdala (BLA) dopamine receptors in arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA)-induced fear learning deficits. Context- and tone-dependent fear conditioning in adult male NMRI mice was evaluated. Pre-training intraperitoneal administration of ACPA (0.1 mg/kg) decreased the percentage of freezing in context- or tone-dependent fear conditioning, suggesting an acquisition impairment. Pre-training intra-BLA microinjection of a subthreshold dose of SKF38393 (D1-like receptor agonist), SCH23390 (D1-like receptor antagonist), quinpirole (D2-like receptor agonist), or sulpiride (D2-like receptor antagonist) did not alter the context-dependent fear learning deficit induced by ACPA, while SKF38393 or quinpirole restored ACPA effect on tone-dependent fear learning. Moreover, SKF38393 (1 μg/mouse), SCH23390 (0.04 and 0.08 μg/mouse), or quinpirole (0.1 μg/mouse) all impaired context-dependent fear learning. It is concluded that D1 or D2 dopamine (DA) receptor activation restores tone- but not context-dependent fear learning deficit induced by CB1 activation using ACPA.

  2. The risky business of dopamine agonists in Parkinson disease and impulse control disorders.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Daniel O; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Jessup, Charles K; Harrison, Madaline B; Wooten, G Frederick; Wylie, Scott A

    2011-08-01

    Risk-taking behavior is characterized by pursuit of reward in spite of potential negative consequences. Dopamine neurotransmission along the mesocorticolimbic pathway is a potential modulator of risk behavior. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), impulse control disorder (ICD) can result from dopaminergic medication use, particularly dopamine agonists (DAA). Behaviors associated with ICD include hypersexuality as well as compulsive gambling, shopping, and eating, and these behaviors are potentially linked to alterations to risk processing. Using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task, we assessed the role of agonist therapy on risk-taking behavior in PD patients with (n = 22) and without (n = 19) active ICD symptoms. Patients performed the task both "on" and "off" DAA. DAA increased risk-taking in PD patients with active ICD symptoms, but it did not affect risk behavior of PD controls. DAA dose was also important in explaining risk behavior. Both groups similarly reduced their risk-taking in high compared to low risk conditions and following the occurrence of a negative consequence, suggesting that ICD patients do not necessarily differ in their abilities to process and adjust to some aspects of negative consequences. Our findings suggest dopaminergic augmentation of risk-taking behavior as a potential contributing mechanism for the emergence of ICD in PD patients. PMID:21604834

  3. Injectable Dopamine-Modified Poly(ethylene glycol) Nanocomposite Hydrogel with Enhanced Adhesive Property and Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive protein, dopamine-modified four-armed poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-D4), was combined with a synthetic nanosilicate, Laponite (Na0.7+(Mg5.5Li0.3Si8)O20(OH)4)0.7–), to form an injectable naoncomposite tissue adhesive hydrogel. Incorporation of up to 2 wt % Laponite significantly reduced the cure time while enhancing the bulk mechanical and adhesive properties of the adhesive due to strong interfacial binding between dopamine and Laponite. The addition of Laponite did not alter the degradation rate and cytocompatibility of PEG-D4 adhesive. On the basis of subcutaneous implantation in rat, PEG-D4 nanocomposite hydrogels elicited minimal inflammatory response and exhibited an enhanced level of cellular infiltration as compared to Laponite-free samples. The addition of Laponite is potentially a simple and effective method for promoting bioactivity in a bioinert, synthetic PEG-based adhesive while simultaneously enhancing its mechanical and adhesive properties. PMID:25222290

  4. Visualizing dopamine released from living cells using a nanoplasmonic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, W. W.; Wang, S. P.; Li, J.; Peng, T. H.; Xu, Y.; Wang, K.; Shi, J. Y.; Fan, C. H.; Li, D.

    2015-09-01

    We report the development of an ultrasensitive nanoplasmonic probe for discriminative detection and imaging of dopamine released from living cells. The sensing mechanism is based on the dopamine-induced seeded-growth of Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) that leads to the shift of the plasmon band. This platform allows for the detection of dopamine with a detection limit down to 0.25 pM within 1 min. This nanoplasmonic assay is further applied to visualize the release of dopamine from living rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells under ATP-stimulation with dark-field microscopy (DFM). The DFM results together with real time fluorescence imaging of PC12 cells stained with the Fluo calcium indicator, suggested that ATP stimulated-release of dopamine is concomitant with the Ca2+ influx, and the influx of Ca2+ is through ATP-activated channels instead of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGC).We report the development of an ultrasensitive nanoplasmonic probe for discriminative detection and imaging of dopamine released from living cells. The sensing mechanism is based on the dopamine-induced seeded-growth of Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) that leads to the shift of the plasmon band. This platform allows for the detection of dopamine with a detection limit down to 0.25 pM within 1 min. This nanoplasmonic assay is further applied to visualize the release of dopamine from living rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells under ATP-stimulation with dark-field microscopy (DFM). The DFM results together with real time fluorescence imaging of PC12 cells stained with the Fluo calcium indicator, suggested that ATP stimulated-release of dopamine is concomitant with the Ca2+ influx, and the influx of Ca2+ is through ATP-activated channels instead of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGC). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1-S4 and Table S1. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04433b

  5. The binding sites for benztropines and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap.

    PubMed

    Bisgaard, Heidi; Larsen, M Andreas B; Mazier, Sonia; Beuming, Thijs; Newman, Amy Hauck; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei; Loland, Claus J; Gether, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Analogs of benztropines (BZTs) are potent inhibitors of the dopamine transporter (DAT) but are less effective than cocaine as behavioral stimulants. As a result, there have been efforts to evaluate these compounds as leads for potential medication for cocaine addiction. Here we use computational modeling together with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the binding site for BZTs in DAT. Docking into molecular models based on the structure of the bacterial homolog LeuT supported a BZT binding site that overlaps with the substrate-binding pocket. In agreement, mutations of residues within the pocket, including(2) Val152(3.46) to Ala or Ile, Ser422(8.60) to Ala and Asn157(3.51) to Cys or Ala, resulted in decreased affinity for BZT and the analog JHW007, as assessed in [(3)H]dopamine uptake inhibition assays and/or [(3)H]CFT competition binding assay. A putative polar interaction of one of the phenyl ring fluorine substituents in JHW007 with Asn157(3.51) was used as a criterion for determining likely binding poses and establish a structural context for the mutagenesis findings. The analysis positioned the other fluorine-substituted phenyl ring of JHW007 in close proximity to Ala479(10.51)/Ala480(10.52) in transmembrane segment (TM) 10. The lack of such an interaction for BZT led to a more tilted orientation, as compared to JHW007, bringing one of the phenyl rings even closer to Ala479(10.51)/Ala480(10.52). Mutation of Ala479(10.51) and Ala480(10.52) to valines supported these predictions with a larger decrease in the affinity for BZT than for JHW007. Summarized, our data suggest that BZTs display a classical competitive binding mode with binding sites overlapping those of cocaine and dopamine.

  6. The binding sites for benztropines and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    PubMed Central

    Bisgaard, Heidi; Larsen, M. Andreas B.; Mazier, Sonia; Beuming, Thijs; Newman, Amy Hauck; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei; Loland, Claus J.; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Analogues of benztropines (BZTs) are potent inhibitors of the dopamine transporter (DAT) but are less effective than cocaine as behavioral stimulants. As a result, there have been efforts to evaluate these compounds as leads for potential medication for cocaine addiction. Here we use computational modeling together with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the binding site for BZTs in DAT. Docking into molecular models based on the structure of the bacterial homologue LeuT supported a BZT binding site that overlaps with the substrate binding pocket. In agreement, mutations of residues within the pocket, including Val1523.46* to Ala or Ile, Ser4228.60 to Ala and Asn1573.51 to Cys or Ala, resulted in decreased affinity for BZT and the analog JHW007, as assessed in [3H]dopamine uptake inhibition assays and/or [3H]CFT competition binding assay. A putative polar interaction of one of the phenyl ring fluorine substituents in JHW007 with Asn1573.51 was used as a criterion for determining likely binding poses and establish a structural context for the mutagenesis findings. The analysis positioned the other fluorine substituted phenyl ring of JHW007 in close proximity to Ala47910.51/Ala48010.52 in transmembrane segment (TM) 10. The lack of such an interaction for BZT led to a more tilted orientation, as compared to JHW007, bringing one of the phenyl rings even closer to Ala47910.51/Ala48010.52. Mutation of Ala47910.51 and Ala48010.52 to valines supported these predictions with a larger decrease in the affinity for BZT than for JHW007. Summarized, our data suggest that BZTs display a classical competitive binding mode with binding sites overlapping those of cocaine and dopamine. PMID:20816875

  7. Neuroprotective potential of Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside A against dopamine receptor dysfunction in the cerebral cortex of neonatal hypoglycaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Roshni Baby; Joy, Shilpa; Ajayan, M S; Paulose, C S

    2013-11-01

    Neonatal hypoglycaemia initiates a series of events leading to neuronal death, even if glucose and glycogen stores return to normal. Disturbances in the cortical dopaminergic function affect memory and cognition. We recommend Bacopa monnieri extract or Bacoside A to treat neonatal hypoglycaemia. We investigated the alterations in dopaminergic functions by studying the Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor subtypes. Receptor-binding studies revealed a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in dopamine D1 receptor number in the hypoglycaemic condition, suggesting cognitive dysfunction. cAMP content was significantly (p < 0.001) downregulated in hypoglycaemic neonatal rats indicating the reduction in cell signalling of the dopamine D1 receptors. It is attributed to the deficits in spatial learning and memory. Hypoglycaemic neonatal rats treated with Bacopa extract alone and Bacoside A ameliorated the dopaminergic and cAMP imbalance as effectively as the glucose therapy. The upregulated Bax expression in the present study indicates the high cell death in hypoglycaemic neonatal rats. Enzyme assay of SOD confirmed cortical cell death due to free radical accumulation. The gene expression of SOD in the cortex was significantly downregulated (p < 0.001). Bacopa treatment showed a significant reversal in the altered gene expression parameters (p < 0.001) of Bax and SOD. Our results suggest that in the rat experimental model of neonatal hypoglycaemia, Bacopa extract improved alterations in D1, D2 receptor expression, cAMP signalling and cell death resulting from oxidative stress. This is an important area of study given the significant motor and cognitive impairment that may arise from neonatal hypoglycaemia if proper treatment is not implemented.

  8. Differential effects of oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine on the responses of D2/D3 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Emery, Michael A; Bates, M L Shawn; Wellman, Paul J; Eitan, Shoshana

    2015-05-01

    Oxycodone and hydrocodone are opioids which are widely used for pain management and are also commonly misused and abused. The exposure to opioid analgesics has been associated with altered responses of D2-like dopamine receptors (D2DRs). Our recent results suggest that various opioids will differentially modulate the responses of D2DRs. The D2DRs are known to be involved in the pathology of addiction and other mental illnesses, indicating the need to improve our understanding of the effects of opioid analgesics on the responses of the D2DRs. Thus, in this study, we first established equianalgesic oral doses of oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine using the tail withdrawal assay. Then, mice were orally administered (gavage) with the various opioids or saline once daily for 6 days. Twenty-four hours later, the mice were tested for their locomotor response to quinpirole, a D2/D3 dopamine receptor agonist. Mice pretreated with oxycodone showed significantly greater locomotor supersensitivity to quinpirole than did morphine-pretreated mice, while hydrocodone-pretreated mice showed sensitivity in between that of mice treated with morphine and oxycodone. This finding suggests that various opioids differentially modulate the responses of D2DRs. It provides further evidence supporting of the notion that various opioids carry differential risks to the dopamine reward system. PMID:25617530

  9. Neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions lead to opposing changes in the levels of dopamine receptors and their messenger RNAs.

    PubMed

    Frohna, P A; Neal-Beliveau, B S; Joyce, J N

    1995-09-01

    . Together, the D1 receptor and D1 messenger RNA findings suggest that the normal relationship between levels of D1 receptor transcript and D1 receptor protein is permanently altered following the early loss of dopamine. In contrast, the results indicate that dopamine plays a minor role in the early postnatal development of the D2 receptor protein and transcript. These findings suggest that dopamine may be involved in the coordinated expression of some dopamine receptors and their corresponding messenger RNAs during development. PMID:7477961

  10. Dopamine and serotonin signaling during two sensitive developmental periods differentially impact adult aggressive and affective behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qinghui; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Mahadevia, Darshini; Huang, Yung-Yu; Balsam, Daniel; Mann, J John; Gingrich, Jay A; Ansorge, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologic blockade of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) or serotonin transporter (5-HTT) has antidepressant and anxiolytic efficacy in adulthood. Yet, genetically conferred MAOA or 5-HTT hypo-activity is associated with altered aggression and increased anxiety/depression. Here we test the hypothesis that increased monoamine signaling during development causes these paradoxical aggressive and affective phenotypes. We find that pharmacologic MAOA blockade during early postnatal development (P2-P21) but not during peri-adolescence (P22-41) increases anxiety- and depression-like behavior in adult (> P90) mice, mimicking the effect of P2-21 5-HTT inhibition. Moreover, MAOA blockade during peri-adolescence, but not P2-21 or P182-201, increases adult aggressive behavior, and 5-HTT blockade from P22-P41 reduced adult aggression. Blockade of the dopamine transporter, but not the norepinephrine transporter, during P22-41 also increases adult aggressive behavior. Thus, P2-21 is a sensitive period during which 5-HT modulates adult anxiety/depression-like behavior, and P22-41 is a sensitive period during which DA and 5-HT bi-directionally modulate adult aggression. Permanently altered DAergic function as a consequence of increased P22-P41 monoamine signaling might underlie altered aggression. In support of this hypothesis, we find altered aggression correlating positively with locomotor response to amphetamine challenge in adulthood. Proving that altered DA function and aggression are causally linked, we demonstrate that optogenetic activation of VTA DAergic neurons increases aggression. It therefore appears that genetic and pharmacologic factors impacting dopamine and serotonin signaling during sensitive developmental periods can modulate adult monoaminergic function and thereby alter risk for aggressive and emotional dysfunction. PMID:24589889

  11. D-A and D-2 dopamine receptor function in the rabbit retina: a model for the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Studies were done investigating the effect of the synaptic concentration of the transmitter DA, modified by changes in the frequency of electrical field stimulation and by the DA uptake inhibitor nomifensine, on the modulation of /sup 3/H-DA release by D-2 DA autoreceptors and by melatonin receptor sites. At lower synaptic concentrations of the transmitter dopamine, D-2 DA receptor agonists were more potent, while antagonists were more potent when the synaptic concentration of transmitter was higher. The potency of melatonin to inhibit DA release was not altered by the frequency of field stimulation of by frequency-dependent changes in the synaptic concentration of the transmitter.

  12. Dopamine Function and the Efficiency of Human Movement

    PubMed Central

    Gepshtein, Sergei; Li, Xiaoyan; Snider, Joseph; Plank, Markus; Lee, Dongpyo; Poizner, Howard

    2016-01-01

    To sustain successful behavior in dynamic environments, active organisms must be able to learn from the consequences of their actions and predict action outcomes. One of the most important discoveries in systems neuroscience over the last 15 years has been about the key role of the neurotransmitter dopamine in mediating such active behavior. Dopamine cell firing was found to encode differences between the expected and obtained outcomes of actions. Although activity of dopamine cells does not specify movements themselves, a recent study in humans has suggested that tonic levels of dopamine in the dorsal striatum may in part enable normal movement by encoding sensitivity to the energy cost of a movement, providing an implicit “motor motivational” signal for movement. We investigated the motivational hypothesis of dopamine by studying motor performance of patients with Parkinson disease who have marked dopamine depletion in the dorsal striatum and compared their performance with that of elderly healthy adults. All participants performed rapid sequential movements to visual targets associated with different risk and different energy costs, countered or assisted by gravity. In conditions of low energy cost, patients performed surprisingly well, similar to prescriptions of an ideal planner and healthy participants. As energy costs increased, however, performance of patients with Parkinson disease dropped markedly below the prescriptions for action by an ideal planner and below performance of healthy elderly participants. The results indicate that the ability for efficient planning depends on the energy cost of action and that the effect of energy cost on action is mediated by dopamine. PMID:24144250

  13. Increased dopamine tone during meditation-induced change of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, Troels W; Bertelsen, Camilla; Piccini, Paola; Brooks, David; Alving, Jørgen; Lou, Hans C

    2002-04-01

    This is the first in vivo demonstration of an association between endogenous neurotransmitter release and conscious experience. Using 11C-raclopride PET we demonstrated increased endogenous dopamine release in the ventral striatum during Yoga Nidra meditation. Yoga Nidra is characterized by a depressed level of desire for action, associated with decreased blood flow in prefrontal, cerebellar and subcortical regions, structures thought to be organized in open loops subserving executive control. In the striatum, dopamine modulates excitatory glutamatergic synapses of the projections from the frontal cortex to striatal neurons, which in turn project back to the frontal cortex via the pallidum and ventral thalamus. The present study was designed to investigate whether endogenous dopamine release increases during loss of executive control in meditation. Participants underwent two 11C-raclopride PET scans: one while attending to speech with eyes closed, and one during active meditation. The tracer competes with endogenous dopamine for access to dopamine D2 receptors predominantly found in the basal ganglia. During meditation, 11C-raclopride binding in ventral striatum decreased by 7.9%. This corresponds to a 65% increase in endogenous dopamine release. The reduced raclopride binding correlated significantly with a concomitant increase in EEG theta activity, a characteristic feature of meditation. All participants reported a decreased desire for action during meditation, along with heightened sensory imagery. The level of gratification and the depth of relaxation did not differ between the attention and meditation conditions. Here we show increased striatal dopamine release during meditation associated with the experience of reduced readiness for action. It is suggested that being in the conscious state of meditation causes a suppression of cortico-striatal glutamatergic transmission. To our knowledge this is the first time in vivo evidence has been provided for

  14. Dopamine and Effort-Based Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Kurniawan, Irma Triasih; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Dolan, Ray J.

    2011-01-01

    Motivational theories of choice focus on the influence of goal values and strength of reinforcement to explain behavior. By contrast relatively little is known concerning how the cost of an action, such as effort expended, contributes to a decision to act. Effort-based decision making addresses how we make an action choice based on an integration of action and goal values. Here we review behavioral and neurobiological data regarding the representation of effort as action cost, and how this impacts on decision making. Although organisms expend effort to obtain a desired reward there is a striking sensitivity to the amount of effort required, such that the net preference for an action decreases as effort cost increases. We discuss the contribution of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) toward overcoming response costs and in enhancing an animal's motivation toward effortful actions. We also consider the contribution of brain structures, including the basal ganglia and anterior cingulate cortex, in the internal generation of action involving a translation of reward expectation into effortful action. PMID:21734862

  15. Biophysically realistic minimal model of dopamine neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprisan, Sorinel

    2008-03-01

    We proposed and studied a new biophysically relevant computational model of dopaminergic neurons. Midbrain dopamine neurons are involved in motivation and the control of movement, and have been implicated in various pathologies such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and drug abuse. The model we developed is a single-compartment Hodgkin-Huxley (HH)-type parallel conductance membrane model. The model captures the essential mechanisms underlying the slow oscillatory potentials and plateau potential oscillations. The main currents involved are: 1) a voltage-dependent fast calcium current, 2) a small conductance potassium current that is modulated by the cytosolic concentration of calcium, and 3) a slow voltage-activated potassium current. We developed multidimensional bifurcation diagrams and extracted the effective domains of sustained oscillations. The model includes a calcium balance due to the fundamental importance of calcium influx as proved by simultaneous electrophysiological and calcium imaging procedure. Although there are significant evidences to suggest a partially electrogenic calcium pump, all previous models considered only elecrtogenic pumps. We investigated the effect of the electrogenic calcium pump on the bifurcation diagram of the model and compared our findings against the experimental results.

  16. Somatodendritic dopamine release: recent mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Margaret E.; Patel, Jyoti C.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key transmitter in motor, reward and cogitative pathways, with DA dysfunction implicated in disorders including Parkinson's disease and addiction. Located in midbrain, DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta project via the medial forebrain bundle to the dorsal striatum (caudate putamen), and DA neurons in the adjacent ventral tegmental area project to the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens) and prefrontal cortex. In addition to classical vesicular release from axons, midbrain DA neurons exhibit DA release from their cell bodies and dendrites. Somatodendritic DA release leads to activation of D2 DA autoreceptors on DA neurons that inhibit their firing via G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ channels. This helps determine patterns of DA signalling at distant axonal release sites. Somatodendritically released DA also acts via volume transmission to extrasynaptic receptors that modulate local transmitter release and neuronal activity in the midbrain. Thus, somatodendritic release is a pivotal intrinsic feature of DA neurons that must be well defined in order to fully understand the physiology and pathophysiology of DA pathways. Here, we review recent mechanistic aspects of somatodendritic DA release, with particular emphasis on the Ca2+ dependence of release and the potential role of exocytotic proteins. PMID:26009764

  17. Sustained N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction remodels the dopamine system and impairs phasic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mark J.; Milenkovic, Marija; Liu, Shuai; Mielnik, Catharine A.; Beerepoot, Pieter; John, Carrie E.; España, Rodrigo A.; Sotnikova, Tatyana D.; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Borgland, Stephanie L.; Jones, Sara R.; Ramsey, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction has been proposed as a contributing factor to symptoms of schizophrenia. However, it is unclear how sustained NMDAR hypofunction throughout development affects other neurotransmitter systems that have been implicated in the disease. Dopamine neuron biochemistry and activity were examined to determine whether sustained NMDAR hypofunction causes a state of hyperdopaminergia. We report that a global, genetic reduction in NMDARs led to a remodeling of dopamine neurons, substantially affecting two key regulators of dopamine homeostasis, i.e. tyrosine hydroxylase and the dopamine transporter. In NR1 knockdown mice, dopamine synthesis and release were attenuated, and dopamine clearance was increased. Although these changes would have the effect of reducing dopamine transmission, we demonstrated that a state of hyperdopaminergia existed in these mice because dopamine D2 autoreceptors were desensitized. In support of this conclusion, NR1 knockdown dopamine neurons have higher tonic firing rates. Although the tonic firing rates are higher, phasic signaling is impaired, and dopamine overflow cannot be achieved with exogenous high-frequency stimulation that models phasic firing. Through the examination of several parameters of dopamine neurotransmission, we provide evidence that chronic NMDAR hypofunction leads to a state of elevated synaptic dopamine. Compensatory mechanisms to attenuate hyperdopaminergia also impact the ability to generate dopamine surges through phasic firing. PMID:24754704

  18. Changes in dopamine transporter binding in nucleus accumbens following chronic self-administration of cocaine:heroin combinations

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Lindsey P.; McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Childers, Steven R.; Hemby, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin (speedball) has been shown to exert synergistic effects on dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), as observed by significant increases in extracellular dopamine levels and compensatory elevations in the maximal reuptake rate (Vmax) of dopamine. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether chronic self-administration of cocaine, heroin or a combination of cocaine:heroin led to compensatory changes in the abundance and/or affinity of high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [125I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([125I]RTI-55) in rat NAc membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to two-site binding models, allowing calculation of dissociation constant (Kd) and binding density (Bmax) values corresponding to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Scatchard analysis of the saturation binding curves clearly demonstrate the presence of high- and low- affinity binding sites in the NAc, with low-affinity sites comprising 85 to 94% of the binding sites. DAT binding analyses revealed that self-administration of cocaine and a cocaine:heroin combination increased the affinity of the low-affinity site for the cocaine congener RTI-55 compared to saline. These results indicate that the