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Sample records for hypoglossal nucleus normal

  1. Hypoglossal nucleus projections to the rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Mameli, O; Stanzani, S; Russo, A; Pellitteri, R; Spatuzza, M; Caria, M A; Mulliri, G; De Riu, P L

    2009-08-04

    We investigated in the rat whether hypoglossal innervation extended to facial muscles other than the extrinsic musculature of the mystacial pad. Results showed that hypoglossal neurons also innervate the masseter muscle. Dil injected into the XII nucleus showed hypoglossal axons in the ipsilateral main trunk of the trigeminal nerve. After Gasser's ganglion crossing, the axons entered into the infraorbital division of the trigeminal nerve and targeted the extrinsic muscles of the mystacial pad. They also spread into the masseter branch of the trigeminal nerve to target the polar portions of the masseter muscle spindles. Retrograde double labelling, performed by injecting Dil into the pad and True Blue into the ipsilateral masseter muscle, showed labelled hypoglossal neurons in the medio-dorsal portion of the XII nucleus. The majority of these neurons were small (15-20 microm diameter), showed fluorescence for Dil and projected to the mystacial pad. Other medium-size neurons (25 microm diameter) were instead labelled with True Blue and projected to the masseter muscle. Finally, in the same area, other small hypoglossal neurons showed double labelling and projected to both structures. Functional hypotheses on the role of these hypoglossal projections have been discussed.

  2. Bilateral innervation of syringeal muscles by the hypoglossal nucleus in the jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Naoki; Kamata, Naoki; Nagasawa, Miyuki; Sugita, Shoei

    2009-01-01

    Bird vocalizations are produced by contractions of syringeal muscles, which are controlled by the hypoglossal nucleus. In oscines, syringeal muscles are controlled by the hypoglossal nucleus ipsilaterally, whereas syringeal innervation is bilateral in non-oscines. We have determined the course of hypoglossal nerves in the jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos. Our results indicate a cross-over of the hypoglossal nerve from the left side to the right side on the trachea 7 mm rostral to theMusculus sternotrachealis. We also investigated the innervation of the syringeal muscles of jungle crows from the hypoglossal nucleus using the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) method. After HRP was injected into the syringeal muscles on each side, HRP-labeled cells were found bilaterally in the hypoglossal nerve. These results suggest that the syringeal muscles of jungle crows are innervated bilaterally from the hypoglossal nucleus, although these birds are categorized as oscines. PMID:19490396

  3. TDP-43 in the hypoglossal nucleus identifies amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Glenda M; Kiernan, Matthew C; Kril, Jillian J; Mito, Remika; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hasegawa, Masato; McCann, Heather; Bartley, Lauren; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Kwok, John B J; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R; Tan, Rachel H

    2016-07-15

    The hypoglossal nucleus was recently identified as a key brain region in which the presence of TDP-43 pathology could accurately discriminate TDP-43 proteinopathy cases with clinical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The objective of the present study was to assess the hypoglossal nucleus in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and determine whether TDP-43 in this region is associated with clinical ALS. Twenty-nine cases with neuropathological FTLD-TDP and clinical bvFTD that had not been previously assessed for hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology were included in this study. Of these 29 cases, 41% (n=12) had a dual diagnosis of bvFTD-ALS at presentation, all 100% (n=12) of which demonstrated hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology. Of the 59% (n=17) cohort that presented with pure bvFTD, 35% (n=6) were identified with hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology. Review of the case files of all pure bvFTD cases revealed evidence of possible or probable ALS in 5 of the 6 hypoglossal-positive cases (83%) towards the end of disease, and this was absent from all cases without such pathology. In conclusion, the present study validates grading the presence of TDP-43 in the hypoglossal nucleus for the pathological identification of bvFTD cases with clinical ALS, and extends this to include the identification of cases with possible ALS at end-stage.

  4. A quantitative study of subsurface cisterns and their relationships in normal and axotomized hypoglossal neurones.

    PubMed

    Sumner, B E

    1975-01-01

    A quantitative ultrastructural survey was made of subsurface cisterns and their association with overlying structures in the left hypoglossal nucleus of normal rats, and rats which had received left hypoglossal axotomies 7-84 days previously. Subsurface cisterns in normal rats occurred in some hypoglossal neurones, and, sporadically, in proximal dendrites. They were mostly subsynaptic, and often associated with Nissl substance; From 7-14 days postoperatively, when many somatic boutons temporarily lost contact with the perikaryal surface, and were replaced by a microglial sheath, the percentage of perikaryon with underlying cistern was significantly reduced. The Nissl substance was also dispersed at this stage, and not restored until 28 days postoperatively. At 21 days normal percentages of subsurface cistern were restored, but the cisterns were now mostly subastrocytic, an astrocytic sheath having replaced the microglial sheath. From 63 days onwards the cisterns were mostly subsynaptic again as boutons returned to the regenerating perikarya and the temporary astrocytic sheath disappeared. It is suggested that subsurface cisterns might alter the overlying perikaryal surface in some way during neuronal regeneration, causing certain boutons to adhere there.

  5. Chronic intermittent hypoxia affects endogenous serotonergic inputs and expression of synaptic proteins in rat hypoglossal nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xu; Lu, Huan; Hu, Lijuan; Gong, Wankun; Wang, Juan; Fu, Cuiping; Liu, Zilong; Li, Shanqun

    2017-01-01

    Evidence has shown that hypoxic episodes elicit hypoglossal neuroplasticity which depends on elevated serotonin (5-HT), in contrast to the rationale of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that deficient serotonergic input to HMs fails to keep airway patency. Therefore, understanding of the 5-HT dynamic changes at hypoglossal nucleus (HN) during chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) will be essential to central pathogenic mechanism and pharmacological therapy of OSA. Moreover, the effect of CIH on BDNF-TrkB signaling proteins was quantified in an attempt to elucidate cellular cascades/synaptic mechanisms following 5-HT alteration. Male rats were randomly exposed to normal air (control), intermittent hypoxia of 3 weeks (IH3) and 5 weeks (IH5) groups. Through electrical stimulation of dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN), we conducted amperometric technique with carbon fiber electrode in vivo to measure the real time release of 5-HT at XII nucleus. 5-HT2A receptors immunostaining measured by intensity and c-Fos quantified visually were both determined by immunohistochemistry. CIH significantly reduced endogenous serotonergic inputs from DRN to XII nucleus, shown as decreased peak value of 5-HT signals both in IH3 and IH5groups, whereas time to peak and half-life period of 5-HT were unaffected. Neither 5-HT2A receptors nor c-Fos expression in HN were significantly altered by CIH. Except for marked increase in phosphorylation of ERK in IH5 rats, BDNF-TrkB signaling and synaptophys consistently demonstrated downregulated levels. These results suggest that the deficiency of 5-HT and BDNF-dependent synaptic proteins in our CIH protocol contribute to the decompensated mechanism of OSA. PMID:28337282

  6. Immunoreactive Changes in the Hypoglossal Nucleus after Nerve Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-25

    Skene & Willard, 1981a,b). Levels of synthetic enzymes for neurotransmitter biosynthesis have been shown to be reduced after nerve injury (Ross et...significantly with maturity ( Skene & Willard, 1981b); GAPs have also been shown to increase after axotomy ( Skene & Willard, 1981a). In rat hypoglossal...proteins (Willard & Skene , 1981a,b; Redshaw and Bisby, 1984). Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a novel

  7. GABAA receptor antagonism at the hypoglossal motor nucleus increases genioglossus muscle activity in NREM but not REM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Janna L; Sood, Sandeep; Liu, Hattie; Park, Eileen; Nolan, Philip; Horner, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    The pharyngeal muscles, such as the genioglossus (GG) muscle of the tongue, are important for effective lung ventilation since they maintain an open airspace. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, however, recruits powerful neural mechanisms that can abolish GG activity, even during strong reflex respiratory stimulation by elevated CO2. In vitro studies have demonstrated the presence of GABAA receptors on hypoglossal motoneurons, and these and other data have led to the speculation that GABAA mechanisms may contribute to the suppression of hypoglossal motor outflow to the GG muscle in REM sleep. We have developed an animal model that allows us to chronically manipulate neurotransmission at the hypoglossal motor nucleus using microdialysis across natural sleep-wake states in rats. The present study tests the hypothesis that microdialysis perfusion of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline into the hypoglossal motor nucleus will prevent the suppression of GG muscle activity in REM sleep during both room-air and CO2-stimulated breathing. Ten rats were implanted with electroencephalogram and neck muscle electrodes to record sleep-wake states, and GG and diaphragm electrodes for respiratory muscle recording. Microdialysis probes were implanted into the hypoglossal motor nucleus for perfusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) or 100 μm bicuculline during room-air and CO2-stimulated breathing (7 % inspired CO2). GABAA receptor antagonism at the hypoglossal motor nucleus increased respiratory-related GG activity during both room-air (P = 0.01) and CO2-stimulated breathing (P = 0.007), indicating a background inhibitory GABA tone. However, the effects of bicuculline on GG activity depended on the prevailing sleep-wake state (P < 0.005), with bicuculline increasing GG activity in non-REM (NREM) sleep and wakefulness both in room air and hypercapnia (P < 0.01), but GG activity was effectively abolished in those REM periods without phasic twitches in the GG muscle. This

  8. Application of histamine or serotonin to the hypoglossal nucleus increases genioglossus muscle activity across the wake-sleep cycle.

    PubMed

    Neuzeret, Pierre-Charles; Sakai, Kazuya; Gormand, Frédéric; Petitjean, Thierry; Buda, Colette; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Parrot, Sandrine; Guidon, Gérard; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2009-03-01

    The decrease in genioglossus (GG) muscle activity during sleep, especially rapid eye movement (REM) or paradoxical sleep, can lead to airway occlusion and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The hypoglossal nucleus innervating the GG muscle is under the control of serotonergic, noradrenergic and histaminergic neurons that cease firing during paradoxical sleep. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect on GG muscle activity during different wake-sleep states of the microdialysis application of serotonin, histamine (HA) or noradrenaline (NE) to the hypoglossal nucleus in freely moving cats. Six adult cats were implanted with electroencephalogram, electro-oculogram and neck electromyogram electrodes to record wake-sleep states and with GG muscle and diaphragm electrodes to record respiratory muscle activity. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the hypoglossal nucleus for monoamine application. Changes in GG muscle activity were assessed by power spectrum analysis. In the baseline conditions, tonic GG muscle activity decreased progressively and significantly from wakefulness to slow-wave sleep and even further during slow-wave sleep with ponto-geniculo-occipital waves and paradoxical sleep. Application of serotonin or HA significantly increased GG muscle activity during the wake-sleep states when compared with controls. By contrast, NE had no excitatory effect. Our results indicate that both serotonin and HA have a potent excitatory action on GG muscle activity, suggesting multiple aminergic control of upper airway muscle activity during the wake-sleep cycle. These data might help in the development of pharmacological approaches for the treatment of OSA.

  9. The Effect of Tongue Exercise on Serotonergic Input to the Hypoglossal Nucleus in Young and Old Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Mary; Moeser, Adam E.; Thomas, Cathy F.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Leverson, Glen E.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Breathing and swallowing problems affect elderly people and may be related to age-associated tongue dysfunction. Hypoglossal motoneurons that innervate the tongue receive a robust, excitatory serotonergic (5HT) input and may be affected by aging. We used a rat model of aging and progressive resistance tongue exercise to determine whether…

  10. The Effect of Tongue Exercise on Serotonergic Input to the Hypoglossal Nucleus in Young and Old Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Mary; Moeser, Adam E.; Thomas, Cathy F.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Leverson, Glen E.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Breathing and swallowing problems affect elderly people and may be related to age-associated tongue dysfunction. Hypoglossal motoneurons that innervate the tongue receive a robust, excitatory serotonergic (5HT) input and may be affected by aging. We used a rat model of aging and progressive resistance tongue exercise to determine whether…

  11. Role of the trigeminal nerve in regrowth of hypoglossal motoneurons after hypoglossal-facial anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Ombretta; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Russo, Antonella; Stanzani, Stefania; Caria, Marcello Alessandro; De Riu, Pier Luigi

    2006-12-01

    Conclusion. Functional recovery of facial muscles following hypoglossal-facial anastomosis (HFA) may be dependent not only on sensory information, relayed via the trigeminal nuclei to the hypoglossal nucleus, but also on extratrigeminal fibers, originating from the hypoglossal nucleus that travel in the infraorbital nerve (ION). This fact helps to explain the ability of hypoglossal neurons, after HFA, to induce contractions of muscles originally innervated from other nervous structures. Objective. The aim of the study was to better understand the role of the trigeminal nerve in reinnervation of facial muscles by hypoglossal motoneurons following HFA. Materials and methods. Central afferences of the ION were analyzed in rats by labeling the exposed nerve with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), whereas central organization of the efferent projections to the vibrissal area was analyzed by labeling the whisker pad muscles of the rat with a 5% solution of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (Dil) in N,N-dimethylformamide. Results. The results show that extratrigeminal fibers, originating in the hypoglossal nucleus, travel along the ION. Retrograde tracing applied to ION or injected into the whisker pad showed labeled neurons in the Pr5 nucleus and all Sp5 trigeminal subnuclei. Small labeled neurons (10-15 microm diameter; 10-12 neurons per section), were also found in the hypoglossal nucleus.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of mouse hypoglossal motor neuron somatotopic map formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Wang, Jae Woong; Salin-Cantegrel, Adele; Dali, Rola; Stifani, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Somatic motor neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus innervate tongue muscles controlling vital functions such as chewing, swallowing and respiration. Formation of functional hypoglossal nerve circuits depends on the establishment of precise hypoglossal motor neuron maps correlating with specific tongue muscle innervations. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling mammalian hypoglossal motor neuron topographic map formation. Here we show that combinatorial expression of transcription factors Runx1, SCIP and FoxP1 defines separate mouse hypoglossal motor neuron groups with different topological, neurotransmitter and calcium-buffering phenotypes. Runx1 and SCIP are coexpressed in ventromedial hypoglossal motor neurons involved in control of tongue protrusion whereas FoxP1 is expressed in dorsomedial motor neurons associated with tongue retraction. Establishment of separate hypoglossal motor neuron maps depends in part on Runx1-mediated suppression of ventrolateral and dorsomedial motor neuron phenotypes and regulation of FoxP1 expression pattern. These findings suggest that combinatorial actions of Runx1, SCIP and FoxP1 are important for mouse hypoglossal nucleus somatotopic map formation.

  13. Embryonic anastomosis between hypoglossal nerves.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S; Sanz-Casado, J V; Jiménez-Collado, J

    2009-12-01

    This article presents two cases of anastomosis of hypoglossal nerves in the suprahyoid region in human embryos of CR length 10.75 and 17.5 mm. This variation was studied in two human specimens at this stage of development and compared with the normal arrangement of the hypoglossal nerves in embryos at the same stage. The anastomotic branches were of similar caliber to the main trunks. In both cases the anastomosis was located dorsal to the origin of the geniohyoid muscles and caudal to the genioglossus muscles, lying transversally over the cranial face of the body of the hyoid bone anlage. The anastomosis formed a suprahyoid nerve chiasm on the midline in the embryo of 10.75 mm CR length.

  14. Nicotinic receptors modulate the onset of reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction evoked by glutamate uptake block in the rat hypoglossal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Maria; Corsini, Silvia; Nistri, Andrea

    2017-02-03

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is considered to be a major process to initiate cell degeneration. Indeed, subsequent to excessive glutamate receptor stimulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial dysfunction are regarded as two major gateways leading to neuron death. These processes are mimicked in an in vitro model of rat brainstem slice when excitotoxicity is induced by DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA), a specific glutamate-uptake blocker that increases extracellular glutamate. Our recent study has demonstrated that brainstem hypoglossal motoneurons, which are very vulnerable to this damage, were neuroprotected from excitotoxicity with nicotine application through the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and subsequent inhibition of ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study examined if endogenous cholinergic activity exerted any protective effect in this pathophysiological model and how ROS production (estimated with rhodamine fluorescence) and mitochondrial dysfunction (measured as methyltetrazolium reduction) were time-related during the early phase of excitotoxicity (0-4h). nAChR antagonists did not modify TBOA-evoked ROS production (that was nearly doubled over control) or mitochondrial impairment (25% decline), suggesting that intrinsic nAChR activity was insufficient to contrast excitotoxicity and needed further stimulation with nicotine to become effective. ROS production always preceded mitochondrial dysfunction by about 2h. Nicotine prevented both ROS production and mitochondrial metabolic depression with a delayed action that alluded to a complex chain of events targeting these two lesional processes. The present data indicate a relatively wide time frame during which strong nAChR activation can arrest a runaway neurotoxic process leading to cell death.

  15. The Effects of Aging on Hypoglossal Motoneurons in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Emilie C.; Thompson, Jodi M.; Connor, Nadine P.; Behan, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Aging can result in a loss of neuronal cell bodies and a decrease in neuronal size in some regions of the brain and spinal cord. Motoneuron loss in the spinal cord is thought to contribute to the progressive decline in muscle mass and strength that occurs with age (sarcopenia). Swallowing disorders represent a large clinical problem in elderly persons; however, age-related alterations in cranial motoneurons that innervate muscles involved in swallowing have been understudied. We aimed to determine if age-related alterations occurred in the hypoglossal nucleus in the brainstem. If present, these changes might help explain alterations at the neuromuscular junction and changes in the contractile properties of tongue muscle that have been reported in older rats. We hypothesized that with increasing age, there would be a loss of motoneurons and a reduction in neuronal size and the number of primary dendrites associated with each hypoglossal motoneuron. Neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus were visualized with the neuronal marker NeuN in young (9–10 months), middle-aged (24–25 months), and old (32–33 months) male F344/BN rats. Hypoglossal motoneurons were retrograde labeled with injections of Cholera Toxin β into the genioglossus muscle of the tongue and visualized using immunocytochemistry. Results indicated that the number of primary dendrites of hypoglossal motoneurons decreased significantly with age, while no age-associated changes were found in the number or size of hypoglossal motoneurons. Loss of primary dendrites could reduce the number of synaptic inputs and thereby impair function. PMID:18716837

  16. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury. PMID:26889186

  17. Hypoglossal neuropraxia following endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, B; Walker, D

    1997-12-01

    A case of hypoglossal nerve neuropraxia following elective drainage of bilateral chronic subdural haematomas is described. We postulate that the cause of neuropraxia was inadvertent extubation of the trachea with the cuff inflated, leading to compression and stretch of the nerve against the greater horn of the hyoid bone. The literature on cranial nerve palsies following endotracheal intubation is reviewed.

  18. Laryngeal reinnervation with the hypoglossal nerve. I. Physiology, histochemistry, electromyography, and retrograde labeling in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Paniello, R C; West, S E; Lee, P

    2001-06-01

    This study was performed to determine whether the hypoglossal nerve (cranial nerve XI [XII]) would serve as a useful donor for laryngeal reinnervation by anastomosis to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Twenty hemilarynges in 10 dogs were studied prospectively after XII-RLN anastomosis (group A; n = 5), split XII-RLN anastomosis (group B; n = 3), XII-RLN anastomosis with a 2-cm interposition graft (group C; n = 2), no treatment (group D; n = 5), RLN section (group E; n = 2), or ansa cervicalis-RLN anastomosis (group F; n = 3). Spontaneous activity was observed monthly by infraglottic examination through permanent tracheostomies and was recorded by electromyography. Laryngeal adductory pressure and induced phonation were obtained by stimulating the RLN while passing a pressure transducer balloon or humidified air through the glottis. At sacrifice, the laryngeal muscles were stained for adenosine triphosphatase to determine the ratio of type I to type II fibers. Retrograde labeling of the brain stem was performed with horseradish peroxidase. Infraglottic examination at 6 months showed a full range of adductory motion in groups A and B during the swallow reflex, comparable with that in group D. Groups C and F showed good bulk and tone, but little spontaneous motion. Group E remained paralyzed. Stimulation of the transferred nerves caused more activity in groups A and B than in the other groups; groups C and F partially adducted at high levels. The laryngeal adductory pressure responses of groups A and B were similar to those of group D. The XII-reinnervated larynges were capable of producing normal induced phonation. Retrograde labeling of the RLN showed that the reinnervating axons originated only in the hypoglossal nucleus. Electromyography of the reinnervated adductor muscles confirmed spontaneous activity in the dogs (awake). Histochemical analysis confirmed slow-to-fast transformation of both the posterior and lateral cricoarytenoid muscles, indicating that

  19. Chemogenetic stimulation of the hypoglossal neurons improves upper airway patency

    PubMed Central

    Fleury Curado, Thomaz; Fishbein, Kenneth; Pho, Huy; Brennick, Michael; Dergacheva, Olga; Sennes, Luiz U.; Pham, Luu V.; Ladenheim, Ellen E.; Spencer, Richard; Mendelowitz, David; Schwartz, Alan R.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA leads to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of OSA has been linked to a defect in neuromuscular control of the pharynx. There is no effective pharmacotherapy for OSA. The objective of this study was to determine whether upper airway patency can be improved using chemogenetic approach by deploying designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drug (DREADD) in the hypoglossal motorneurons. DREADD (rAAV5-hSyn-hM3(Gq)-mCherry) and control virus (rAAV5-hSyn-EGFP) were stereotactically administered to the hypoglossal nucleus of C57BL/6J mice. In 6–8 weeks genioglossus EMG and dynamic MRI of the upper airway were performed before and after administration of the DREADD ligand clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) or vehicle (saline). In DREADD-treated mice, CNO activated the genioglossus muscle and markedly dilated the pharynx, whereas saline had no effect. Control virus treated mice showed no effect of CNO. Our results suggest that chemogenetic approach can be considered as a treatment option for OSA and other motorneuron disorders. PMID:28281681

  20. Contribution of the Runx1 transcription factor to axonal pathfinding and muscle innervation by hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masaaki; Hirabayashi, Mizuki; Ito, Ryota; Ozaki, Shigeru; Aizawa, Shin; Masuda, Tomoyuki; Senzaki, Kouji; Shiga, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The runt-related transcription factor Runx1 contributes to cell type specification and axonal targeting projections of the nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons. Runx1 is also expressed in the central nervous system, but little is known of its functions in brain development. At mouse embryonic day (E) 17.5, Runx1-positive neurons were detected in the ventrocaudal subdivision of the hypoglossal nucleus. Runx1-positive neurons lacked calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, whereas Runx1-negative neurons expressed CGRP. Expression of CGRP was not changed in Runx1-deficient mice at E17.5, suggesting that Runx1 alone does not suppress CGRP expression. Hypoglossal axon projections to the intrinsic vertical (V) and transverse (T) tongue muscles were sparser in Runx1-deficient mice at E17.5 compared to age-matched wild-type littermates. Concomitantly, vesicular acetylcholine transporter-positive axon terminals and acetylcholine receptor clusters were less dense in the V and T tongue muscles of Runx1-deficient mice. These abnormalities in axonal projection were not caused by a reduction in the total number hypoglossal neurons, failed synaptogenesis, or tongue muscles deficits. Our results implicate Runx1 in the targeting of ventrocaudal hypoglossal axons to specific tongue muscles. However, Runx1 deficiency did not alter neuronal survival or the expression of multiple motoneuron markers as in other neuronal populations. Thus, Runx1 appears to have distinct developmental functions in different brain regions.

  1. [Anatomical variations in the hypoglossal canal].

    PubMed

    De Francisco, M; Lemos, J L; Liberti, E A; Adamo, J; Jácomo, A L; Matson, E

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, 492 human dried skulls grouped according to sex and race (White and no White) were examined and the presence of a double hypoglossal canal was observed in 97 skulls. The statistical analysis allowed us to conclude that no significative difference exists in race X canal type; sex X canal type; race X side and sex X side interations.

  2. The retinal projection to the pregeniculate nucleus in normal and destriate monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cowey, A; Johnson, H; Stoerig, P

    2001-01-01

    Taking advantage of the segregation of different classes of ganglion cell fibres in the optic tract, we investigated the ganglion cell class that projects to the pregeniculate nucleus (PGN) in the normal macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta and Macaca fascicularis) and following long-standing removal of striate cortex in one hemisphere. Confining small pellets of horseradish peroxidase and biocytin into ventral or dorsal parts of the tract unilaterally, or placing several pellets throughout the tract, we labelled the retina retrogradely and the PGN anterogradely. Classification of ganglion cells according to soma size and dendritic morphology showed that implants in the dorsal part of the tract labelled predominantly, and perhaps exclusively, P beta cells, and produced dense anterograde label in the parvocellular lateral geniculate nucleus as well in the PGN. Labelling of the PGN was sparse or absent following implants into the ventral aspect of the tract, which labelled the magnocellular geniculate nucleus anterogradely and chiefly P alpha and P gamma cells retrogradely. The finding of a projection to the PGN from P beta cells has implications for the permanent selective sparing of a subpopulation of these cells after removal of striate cortex and their contribution to wavelength processing in blindsight.

  3. Evidence of neuroanatomical connection between the superior cervical ganglion and hypoglossal nerve in the hamster as revealed by tract-tracing and degeneration methods

    PubMed Central

    TSENG, CHI-YU; LUE, JUNE-HORNG; LEE, SHIH-HSIUNG; WEN, CHEN-YUAN; SHIEH, JENG-YUNG

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the existence of a sympathetic component in some cranial nerves including the hypoglossal nerve. In this study, the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tract-tracing retrograde technique and experimental degeneration method were used to elucidate the possible neuroanatomical relationship between the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) and the hypoglossal nerve of hamsters. About 10% of the SCG principal neurons were HRP positive following the tracer application to the trunk of hypoglossal nerve. Most of the HRP-labelled neurons were multipolar and were randomly distributed in the ganglion. When HRP was injected into the medial branch of the hypoglossal nerve, some of the SCG neurons were labelled, but they were not detected when HRP was injected into the lateral branch. The present findings suggest that postganglionic sympathetic fibres from the SCG may travel along the hypoglossal nerve trunk via its medial branch to terminate in visceral targets such as the intralingual glands. By electron microscopy, the HRP reaction product was localised in the neuronal somata and numerous unmyelinated fibres in the SCG. In addition, HRP-labelled axon profiles considered to be the collateral branches of the principal neurons contained numerous clear round and a few dense core vesicles. Besides the above, some HRP-labelled small myelinated fibres, considered to be visceral afferents, were also present. Results of experimental degeneration following the severance of the hypoglossal nerve showed the presence of degenerating neuronal elements both in the hypoglossal nucleus and the SCG. This confirms that the hypoglossal nerve contains sympathetic component from the SCG which may be involved in regulation of the autonomic function of the tongue. PMID:11327203

  4. [Hypoglossal nerve neuropraxia after shoulder hemiarthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Pariente, L; Camarena, P; Koo, M; Sabaté, A; Armengol, J

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of hypoglossal nerve damage after shoulder hemiarthroplasty with the patient in "beach chair" position, performed with general anesthesia with orotracheal intubation, and without complications. An ultrasound-guided interscalene block was previously performed in an alert patient. After the intervention, the patient showed clinical symptomatology compatible with paralysis of the right hypoglossal nerve that completely disappeared after 4 weeks. Mechanisms such as hyperextension of the neck during intubation, endotracheal tube cuff pressure, excessive hyperextension, or head lateralization during surgery have been described as causes of this neurological damage. We discuss the causes, the associated factors and suggest preventive measures. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis in the rabbits using laser welding.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Sun Goo; Kim, Dae Joong

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare laser nerve welding of hypoglossal-facial nerve to microsurgical suturing and a result of immediate and delayed repair, and to evaluate the effectiveness of laser nerve welding in reanimation of facial paralysis of the rabbit models. The first group of 5 rabbits underwent immediate hypoglossal-facial anastomosis (HFA) by microsurgical suturing and the second group of 5 rabbits by CO2 laser welding. The third group of 5 rabbits underwent delayed HFA by microsurgical suturing and the fourth group of 5 rabbits by laser nerve welding. The fifth group of 5 rabbits sustained intact hypoglossal and facial nerve as control. In all rabbits of the 4 different groups, cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) was injected in the epineurium distal to the anastomosis site on the postoperative sixth week and in normal hypoglossal nerve in the 5 rabbits of control group. Neurons labeled CTb of hypoglossal nuclei were positive immunohistochemically and the numbers were counted. In the immediate HFA groups, CTb positive neurons were 1416 +/- 118 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 1429 +/- 90 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). There was no significant difference (P = 0.75). In the delayed HFA groups, CTb positive neurons were 1503 +/- 66 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 1207 +/- 68 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). Difference was significant (P = 0.009). There was no significant difference between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the laser welding group (P = 0.208), but some significant difference was observed between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the microsurgical suturing group (P = 0.016). Injected CTb in intact hypoglossal neurons (n = 5) were labeled 1970 +/- 165. No dehiscence was seen on the laser welding site of nerve anastomosis in all the rabbits as re-exploration was done for injection of CTb. This study shows that regeneration of the anastomosed hypoglossal-facial nerve was affected similarly by either

  6. Differential involvement of perineuronal astrocytes and microglia in synaptic stripping after hypoglossal axotomy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, J; Nakanishi, H; Jinno, S

    2011-05-19

    Following peripheral axotomy, the presynaptic terminals are removed from lesioned neurons, that is synaptic stripping. To elucidate involvement of astrocytes and microglia in synaptic stripping, we herein examined the motoneuron perineuronal circumference after hypoglossal nerve transection. As reported previously, axotomy-induced slow cell death occurred in C57BL/6 mice but not in Wistar rats. Synaptophysin labeling in the hypoglossal nucleus exhibited a minor reduction in both species after axotomy. Slice patch recording showed that the mean frequency of miniature postsynaptic currents in axotomized motoneurons was significantly lower in rats than in mice. We then estimated the relative coverage of motoneuron perineuronal circumference by line profile analysis. In the synaptic environment, axotomy-induced intrusion of astrocytic processes was significantly more extensive in rats than in mice, whereas microglial intrusion into the synaptic space was significantly more severe in mice than in rats. Interestingly, in the extrasynaptic environment, the prevalence of contact between astrocytic processes and lesioned motoneurons was significantly increased in rats, while no significant axotomy-induced alterations in astrocytic contact were observed in mice. These findings indicate that astrocytic, but not microglial, reaction may primarily mediate some anti-apoptotic effects through synaptic stripping after hypoglossal nerve axotomy. In addition, enlargement of astrocytic processes in the extrasynaptic environment may also be involved in neuronal protection via the increased uptake of excessive glutamate.

  7. Smile reconstruction through bilateral muscular transplants neurotized by hypoglossal nerves.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Aubá, Cristina

    2011-05-01

    Free transplant of gracilis muscle is the criterion-standard technique in dynamic rehabilitation of long-standing facial paralysis in which the facial musculature is atrophied. When the facial nerve is not available because of a bilateral lesion, other sources are the masseteric, hypoglossal, or accessory nerves. Although the use of hypoglossal nerve has been relegated to the background because of the morbidity caused by its loss, there are special situations in which the hypoglossal nerve should be considered the first option as donor motor nerve. The present article discusses the case of a patient with dynamic reanimation of bilateral facial paralysis with free-muscle transfer neurotized to the hypoglossal nerve. End-to-side coaptation of gracilis motor nerve and hypoglossal motor nerve allows neurotization of the transplanted muscle with minimum repercussion in speech or swallowing and can provide an adequate spontaneous smile with time.

  8. Embryonic and larval development of the sonic motor nucleus in the oyster toadfish

    SciTech Connect

    Galeo, A.J.; Fine, M.L.; Stevenson, J.A.

    1987-07-01

    The sonic motor nucleus (SMN), a likely homologue of the hypoglossal nucleus, provides the final common pathway for sound production in the oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau). SMN neurons increase in size and number for 7-8 years postnatally, and the swimbladder-sonic muscle complex grows throughout life. This study describes the normal embryonic and larval development of the SMN from its initial differentiation on about day 19 through day 40, when the yolk sac is resorbed and the fish is free swimming. In contrast to the rapid development of CNS nuclei in mammals, the SMN gradually increased in maturity with more active growth at the beginning and end of the observation period and a relatively static period in the middle. Consistent with a hypoglossal homology, the SMN differentiated within the spinal cord, added cells rostrally, and eventually extended into the medulla. Immature neurons appeared to originate from precursor cells in the ventral portion of the ventricular zone of the central canal. Such cells were initially round with little cytoplasmic development and later added processes and Nissl substance. The number of neurons increased 10-fold from a median of 35 to 322 cells, and no evidence of cell death was observed. Soma area approximately doubled from 20.6 to 41.2 micron 2, and cell nucleus area followed a similar pattern. (/sup 3/H)-thymidine autoradiography demonstrated that neurons were added continuously throughout the nucleus during embryonic and larval development.

  9. Neuroglia in the inferior olivary nucleus during normal aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lasn, H; Winblad, B; Bogdanovic, N

    2006-01-01

    It is likely that neuronal loss occurs in certain brain regions in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) without any neurofibrillary pathology. In the human principle inferior olivary nucleus (PO), we have shown that neuronal loss is about 34% (Lasn et al. Journal of Alzheimer Disease, 2001; 3: 159-168), but the fate of the neuroglial cells is unknown. Since the unique network of neurons and neuroglial cells and their cohabitation are essential for normal functioning of CNS, we designed a study to estimate the total number of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in normally aged and AD brains. The study is based on 10 control and 11 AD post-mortem human brains. An unbiased stereological fractionator method was used. We found significant oligodendroglial cell loss (46%) in AD as compared to control brains, while the total number of astrocytes showed a tendency to decrease. It is likely that the ratio of oligodendroglial cells to neurons remains unchanged even in degenerative states, indicating that oligodendroglial cells parallel neuronal loss. Astroglial cells did not increase in total number, but the ratio to neurons was significantly increased due to the neuronal loss. Using a novel unbiased quantitative method, we were able to describe significant oligodendroglial loss in the PO but the pathogenic mechanism behind remains unknown.

  10. Retrograde Gene Delivery to Hypoglossal Motoneurons Using Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 9

    PubMed Central

    ElMallah, Mai K.; Falk, Darin J.; Lane, Michael A.; Conlon, Thomas J.; Lee, Kun-Ze; Shafi, Nadeem I.; Reier, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Retrograde viral transport (i.e., muscle to motoneuron) enables targeted gene delivery to specific motor pools. Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) robustly infects motoneurons, but the retrograde transport capabilities of AAV9 have not been systematically evaluated. Accordingly, we evaluated the retrograde transduction efficiency of AAV9 after direct tongue injection in 129SVE mice as well as a mouse model that displays neuromuscular pathology (Gaa−/−). Hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons were histologically evaluated 8 weeks after tongue injection with AAV9 encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) with expression driven by the chicken β-actin promoter (1×1011 vector genomes). On average, GFP expression was detected in 234±43 XII motoneurons 8 weeks after AAV9-GFP tongue injection. In contrast, tongue injection with a highly efficient retrograde anatomical tracer (cholera toxin β subunit, CT-β) resulted in infection of 818±88 XII motoneurons per mouse. The retrograde transduction efficiency of AAV9 was similar between the 129SVE mice and those with neuromuscular disease (Gaa−/−). Routine hematoxylin and eosin staining and cluster of differentiation (CD) immunostaining for T cells (CD3) indicated no persistent inflammation within the tongue or XII nucleus after AAV9 injection. Additional experiments indicated no adverse effects of AAV9 on the pattern of breathing. We conclude that AAV9 can retrogradely infect a significant portion of a given motoneuron pool in normal and dystrophic mice, and that its transduction efficiency is approximately 30% of what can be achieved with CT-β. PMID:22693957

  11. Hemi-hypoglossal nerve transfer for obstetric brachial plexus palsy: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Al-Thunyan, Abdullah; Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Al-Meshal, Obaid; Al-Husainan, Hanan; Al-Assaf, Assaf

    2015-03-01

    Use of the entire hypoglossal nerve for nerve transfer in obstetric palsy is not recommended because of major donor nerve morbidity in terms of feeding and speech problems. We used a hemi-hypoglossal nerve transfer for biceps reinnervation in obstetric palsy in 3 infants with multiple root avulsions. Two of the 3 infants recovered normal or near-normal elbow flexion. There was no donor nerve morbidity in terms of feeding. Speech was assessed at age 20 to 27 months and was appropriate for age, which indicates that early speech development (speech intelligibility and articulation) were not affected. However, phonological development (expected to develop by age 3 y) and full consonant development (expected to be complete by age 5 y) could not be assessed because all children were younger than age 3 years at final follow-up. Our results confirm the relative safety of using a hemi-hypoglossal nerve transfer in infants. The transfer deserves study in a larger series and with longer follow-up, particularly regarding speech development. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stimulation of contacts in ventral but not dorsal subthalamic nucleus normalizes response switching in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenhouse, Ian; Gould, Sherrie; Houser, Melissa; Aron, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Switching between responses is a key executive function known to rely on the frontal cortex and the basal ganglia. Here we aimed to establish with greater anatomical specificity whether such switching could be mediated via different possible frontal–basal-ganglia circuits. Accordingly, we stimulated dorsal vs. ventral contacts of electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's patients during switching performance, and also studied matched controls. The patients underwent three sessions: once with bilateral dorsal contact stimulation, once with bilateral ventral contact stimulation, and once Off stimulation. Patients Off stimulation showed abnormal patterns of switching, and stimulation of the ventral contacts but not the dorsal contacts normalized the pattern of behavior relative to controls. This provides some of the first evidence in humans that stimulation of dorsal vs. ventral STN DBS contacts has differential effects on executive function. As response switching is an executive function known to rely on prefrontal cortex, these results suggest that ventral contact stimulation affected an executive/associative cortico-basal ganglia circuit. PMID:23562963

  13. Increases in cytoplasmic dopamine compromise the normal resistance of the nucleus accumbens to methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2009-06-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages the dopamine (DA) neuronal system in a highly delimited manner. The brain structure most affected by METH is the caudate-putamen (CPu) where long-term DA depletion and microglial activation are most evident. Even damage within the CPu is remarkably heterogenous with lateral and ventral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared of the damage that accompanies binge METH intoxication. Increases in cytoplasmic DA produced by reserpine, L-DOPA or clorgyline prior to METH uncover damage in the NAc as evidenced by microglial activation and depletion of DA, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and the DA transporter. These effects do not occur in the NAc after treatment with METH alone. In contrast to the CPu where DA, TH, and DA transporter levels remain depleted chronically, DA nerve ending alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery over time. None of the treatments that enhance METH toxicity in the NAc and CPu lead to losses of TH protein or DA cell bodies in the substantia nigra or the ventral tegmentum. These data show that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of METH to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage by METH alone. The resistance of the NAc to METH-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of METH neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the important roles played by this brain structure.

  14. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL INDICATORS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN NORMAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Treyer, Marie; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted; Schiminovich, David; O'Dowd, Matt; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Charlot, Stephane; Heckman, Timothy; Martins, Lucimara; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2010-08-20

    We investigate the use of mid-infrared (MIR) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands, the continuum, and emission lines as probes of star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 100 'normal' and local (z {approx} 0.1) emission-line galaxies. The MIR spectra were obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph as part of the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey, which includes multi-wavelength photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and optical spectroscopy. The continuum and features were extracted using PAHFIT, a decomposition code which we find to yield PAH equivalent widths (EWs) up to {approx}30 times larger than the commonly used spline methods. Despite the lack of extreme objects in our sample (such as strong AGNs, low-metallicity galaxies, or ULIRGs), we find significant variations in PAH, continuum, and emission-line properties, and systematic trends between these MIR properties and optically derived physical properties, such as age, metallicity, and radiation field hardness. We revisit the diagnostic diagram relating PAH EWs and [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m/[O IV]25.9 {mu}m line ratios and find it to be in much better agreement with the standard optical SF/AGN classification than when spline decompositions are used, while also potentially revealing obscured AGNs. The luminosity of individual PAH components, of the continuum, and, with poorer statistics, of the neon emission lines and molecular hydrogen lines are found to be tightly correlated to the total infrared (TIR) luminosity, making individual MIR components good gauges of the total dust emission in SF galaxies. Like the TIR luminosity, these individual components can be used to estimate dust attenuation in the UV and in H{alpha} lines based on energy balance arguments. We also propose average scaling relations between these components and dust-corrected, H{alpha}-derived SF rates.

  15. Signaling mechanism underlying the histamine-modulated action of hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Long; Wu, Xu; Luo, Yan-Jia; Wang, Lu; Qu, Wei-Min; Li, Shan-Qun; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2016-04-01

    Histamine, an important modulator of the arousal states of the central nervous system, has been reported to contribute an excitatory drive at the hypoglossal motor nucleus to the genioglossus (GG) muscle, which is involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. However, the effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) and the underlying signaling mechanisms have remained elusive. Here, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were conducted using neonatal rat brain sections, which showed that histamine excited HMNs with an inward current under voltage-clamp and a depolarization membrane potential under current-clamp via histamine H1 receptors (H1Rs). The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 blocked H1Rs-mediated excitatory effects, but protein kinase A inhibitor and protein kinase C inhibitor did not, indicating that the signal transduction cascades underlying the excitatory action of histamine on HMNs were H1R/Gq/11 /phospholipase C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). The effects of histamine were also dependent on extracellular Na(+) and intracellular Ca(2+), which took place via activation of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers. These results identify the signaling molecules associated with the regulatory effect of histamine on HMNs. The findings of this study may provide new insights into therapeutic approaches in obstructive sleep apnea. We proposed the post-synaptic mechanisms underlying the modulation effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneuron. Histamine activates the H1Rs via PLC and IP3, increases Ca(2+) releases from intracellular stores, promotes Na(+) influx and Ca(2+) efflux via the NCXs, and then produces an inward current and depolarizes the neurons. Histamine modulates the excitability of HMNs with other neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin and orexin. We think that these findings should provide an important new direction for drug development for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

  16. A repertoire of rhythmic bursting produced by hypoglossal motoneurons in physiological and pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cifra, Alessandra; Nani, Francesca; Sharifullina, Elina; Nistri, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The brainstem nucleus hypoglossus contains motoneurons that provide the exclusive motor nerve supply to the tongue. In addition to voluntary tongue movements, tongue muscles rhythmically contract during a wide range of physiological activities, such as respiration, swallowing, chewing and sucking. Hypoglossal motoneurons are destroyed early in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease often associated with a deficit in the transport system of the neurotransmitter glutamate. The present study shows how periodic electrical discharges of motoneurons are mainly produced by a neuronal network that drives them into bursting mode via glutamatergic excitatory synapses. Burst activity is, however, modulated by the intrinsic properties of motoneurons that collectively synchronize their discharges via gap junctions to create ‘group bursters’. When glial uptake of glutamate is blocked, a distinct form of pathological bursting spontaneously emerges and leads to motoneuron death. Conversely, H2O2-induced oxidative stress strongly increases motoneuron excitability without eliciting bursting. Riluzole (the only drug currently licensed for the treatment of ALS) suppresses bursting of hypoglossal motoneurons caused by blockage of glutamate uptake and limits motoneuron death. These findings highlight how different patterns of electrical oscillations of brainstem motoneurons underpin not only certain physiological activities, but also motoneuron death induced by glutamate transporter impairment. PMID:19651651

  17. Nicotinic excitation of rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, N L; Bocchiaro, C M; Greene, R W; Feldman, J L

    2002-01-01

    Hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs), which innervate the tongue muscles, are involved in several important physiological functions, including the maintenance of upper airway patency. The neural mechanisms that affect HMN excitability are therefore important determinants of effective breathing. Obstructive sleep apnea is a disorder characterized by recurrent collapse of the upper airway that is likely due to decline of pharyngeal motoneuron activity during sleep. Because cholinergic neuronal activity is closely coupled to wake and sleep states, we tested the effects and pharmacology of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation on HMNs. We made intracellular recordings from HMNs in medullary slices from neonatal rats and found that local application of the nicotinic agonist, 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide, excited HMNs by a Ca(2+)-sensitive, and TTX-insensitive inward current that was blocked by dihydro-beta-erythroidine (IC(50): 19+/-3 nM), methyllycaconitine (IC(50): 32+/-7 nM), and mecamylamine (IC(50): 88+/-11 nM), but not by alpha-bungarotoxin (10 nM). This is consistent with responses being mediated by postsynaptic nAChRs that do not contain the alpha7 subunit. These results suggest that nAChR activation may contribute to central maintenance of upper airway patency and that the decline in firing rate of cholinergic neurons during sleep could potentially disfacilitate airway dilator muscle activity, contributing to airway obstruction.

  18. A Morphometric Examination of the Ultrastructure of Regenerating Hypoglossal Motoneurons from the Rat and Analysis of Thyroid Hormone Influence on Motoneuron Structure and Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-14

    from the rat. Hypoglossal nucleus volume and neuronal size were estimated from 50 micron sections. The volume and surface area of cell body organelles...diminished (pɘ.05). Significant neuronal enlargement (pɘ.05) was detected 13 and 21 days following axotomy. Subcellular alterations were most... neuronal enlargement was prolonged among the hyperthyroid animals. Enhanced nucleolar vacuolization, multiple nucleoli and nuclear filaments were

  19. The intercalatus nucleus of Staderini.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Rutilio Staderini was one of the leading Italian anatomists of the twentieth century, together with some scientists, such as Giulio Chiarugi, Giovanni Vitali, and others. He was also a member of a new generation of anatomists. They had continued the tradition of the most famous Italian scientists, which started from the Renaissance up until the nineteenth century. Although he carried out important studies of neuroanatomy and comparative anatomy, as well as embryology, his name is rarely remembered by most medical historians. His name is linked to the nucleus he discovered: the Staderini nucleus or intercalated nucleus, a collection of nerve cells in the medulla oblongata located lateral to the hypoglossal nucleus. This article focuses on the biography of the neuroanatomist as well as the nucleus that carries his name and his other research, especially on comparative anatomy and embryology.

  20. Color canals modification with canny edge detection and morphological reconstruction for cell nucleus segmentation and area measurement in normal Pap smear images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riana, Dwiza; Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti Octorina; Widyantoro, Dwi H.; Mengko, Tati Latifah R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a cell nucleus segmentation and area measurement of Pap smear images by means of modification of color canals with Canny edge detection and morphological reconstruction methods. Cell nucleus characterization plays an important role for classifying the degree of abnormality in cervical cancer. The aim of this work is to find the matched measurement method with the manual nucleus area measurement. In this work, we utilized pap smear single cell images from Herlev data bank in RGB mode. The cell images were selected from 90 normal class subjects that include: Normal Superficial, Normal Intermediate, and Normal Columnar classes. The nucleus of each cell image was cropped manually to localize from the cytoplasm. The color canals modification was performed on each cropped nucleus image by, first, separating each R, G, B, and grayscale canals, then implementing addition operation based on color canals (R+G+B, R+G, R+B, G+B, and grayscale). The Canny edge detection was applied on those modifications resulting in binary edge images. The nucleus segmentation was implemented on the edge images by performing region filling based on morphological reconstruction. The area property was calculated based on the segmented nucleus area. The nucleus area from the proposed method was verified to the existing manual measurement (ground truth) of the Herlev data bank. Based on thorough observation upon the selected color canals and Canny edge detection. It can be concluded that Canny edge detection with R+G+B canal is the most significant for all Normal classes (r 0,305, p-value 0.05). While for Normal Superficial and Normal Intermediate, Canny edge detection is significant for all RGB modifications with (r 0.414 - 0.817 range, , p-value 0.05), and for Normal Columnar, Canny edge detection is significant for R+B canal (r 0.505, p-value 0.05).

  1. Re-innervation of facial nerve territory using a composite hypoglossal nerve--muscle autograft--facial nerve bridge. An experimental model in sheep.

    PubMed

    Drew, S J; Fullarton, A C; Glasby, M A; Mountain, R E; Murray, J A

    1995-04-01

    The hypoglossal nerve has been used both entirely and in part to repair the facial nerve. Using the partial technique it may be difficult to obtain sufficient length and a free interposed graft is then required to extend the hypoglossal element. In six sheep the facial nerve was excised between its emergence from the stylomastoid foramen and its bifurcation in the parotid gland. The hypoglossal nerve was exposed and split longitudinally producing a limb which was reflected towards the distal stump of the facial nerve. This left a gap of 4-5 cm which was bridged with a freeze-thawed coaxially aligned skeletal muscle autograft. The sheep were examined at 8 months. Laser doppler blood-flow studies showed the blood-flow distal to the graft to be about 25% of that at an equivalent site on the normal side. Peak nerve conduction velocities were also reduced on the repaired side but stimulation of the proximal hypoglossal nerve was nevertheless capable of causing adequate contraction of both facial and tongue muscles. Histological comparison of the repaired facial nerves with equivalent sites on the normal side showed a reduction in mean axon and fibre diameters with normal myelin sheath thickness for the regenerated axon sizes. All of these features are to be expected in a regenerated nerve and are consistent with a good level of recovery of function.

  2. Facilitation of distinct inhibitory synaptic inputs by chemical anoxia in neurons in the oculomotor, facial and hypoglossal motor nuclei of the rat.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Satoshi; Kono, Yu; Nagase, Masashi; Mochio, Soichiro; Kato, Fusao

    2017-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord. Clinical studies have indicated that there is a distinct region-dependent difference in the vulnerability of motor neurons. For example, the motor neurons in the facial and hypoglossal nuclei are more susceptible to neuronal death than those in the oculomotor nucleus. To understand the mechanism underlying the differential susceptibility to cell death of the neurons in different motor nuclei, we compared the effects of chemical anoxia on the membrane currents and postsynaptic currents in different motor nuclei. The membrane currents were recorded from neurons in the oculomotor, facial and hypoglossal nuclei in brain slices of juvenile Wistar rats by using whole-cell recording in the presence of tetrodotoxin that prevents action potential-dependent synaptic transmission. NaCN consistently induced an inward current and a significant increase in the frequency of spontaneous synaptic inputs in neurons from these three nuclei. However, this increase in the synaptic input frequency was abolished by strychnine, a glycine receptor antagonist, but not by picrotoxin in neurons from the hypoglossal and facial nuclei, whereas that in neurons from the oculomotor nucleus was abolished by picrotoxin, but not by strychnine. Blocking ionotropic glutamate receptors did not significantly affect the NaCN-induced release facilitation in any of the three motor nuclei. These results suggest that anoxia selectively facilitates glycine release in the hypoglossal and facial nuclei and GABA release in the oculomotor nucleus. The region-dependent differences in the neurotransmitters involved in the anoxia-triggered release facilitation might provide a basis for the selective vulnerability of motor neurons in the neurodegeneration associated with ALS.

  3. [Chromosome territories in the interphase nucleus in normal or pathological condition].

    PubMed

    Lavrov, A V; Vol'dgorn, Ia I; Bochkov, N P

    2011-01-01

    The non-random arrangement of chromosomes in the interphase nucleus was observed for the first time in the late XIX century. However, considerable progress in studying chromosome territories became possible only in the end of the XX century mainly due to advances in microscopy and molecular biology. At present, chromosome territories are believed to play an important role in epigenetic regulation of genome activity during various cell processes including but not limited to cell cycle, differentiation, stress response. 3D structure of genome also plays an important role in pathogenesis of various hereditary diseases and cancer. This article describes main provisions of the chromosome territory theory and current trends toward further development of human genetics based on the new knowledge about the role of chromosome territories.

  4. Hypoglossal nerve transfer in obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Gerhard; Sauter, Ymte; Lacroix, Cyrielle L E; Slooff, Albert C J

    2006-01-01

    A cost-benefit analysis was performed of hypoglossal nerve transfer in six patients with obstetric brachial palsy taking into account the factors donor site morbidity and extent of recovery. Hypoglossal nerve transfer was employed in four children for elbow flexion only; in two patients for elbow flexion as well as for elbow extension. The transfer was part of an extended brachial plexus reconstruction for treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy. After a mean post-operative interval of 52 months (SD+/-8.1), two professional speech therapists investigated late donor site morbidity by analyzing elementary and communicative functions. The functional result for the arm was assessed using the Mallet scale and by performing a physical examination. Following hypoglossal nerve transfer, early donor site morbidity was significant causing great anxiety in the parents. Late donor site morbidity consisted of serious oral problems in a number of the children. They also showed clear associated movements in the arm during mouth/tongue activity. Recovery of powerful volitional elbow flexion was achieved in four cases only. We do not believe that the sacrifice of such an important function as exerted by the hypoglossal nerve is balanced by the gain demonstrated in our series.

  5. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation improves obstructive sleep apnea: 12-month outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kezirian, Eric J; Goding, George S; Malhotra, Atul; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Zammit, Gary; Wheatley, John R; Catcheside, Peter G; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R; Walsh, Jennifer H; Maddison, Kathleen J; Claman, David M; Huntley, Tod; Park, Steven Y; Campbell, Matthew C; Palme, Carsten E; Iber, Conrad; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Barnes, Maree

    2014-02-01

    Reduced upper airway muscle activity during sleep is a key contributor to obstructive sleep apnea pathogenesis. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation activates upper airway dilator muscles, including the genioglossus, and has the potential to reduce obstructive sleep apnea severity. The objective of this study was to examine the safety, feasibility and efficacy of a novel hypoglossal nerve stimulation system (HGNS; Apnex Medical, St Paul, MN, USA) in treating obstructive sleep apnea at 12 months following implantation. Thirty-one subjects (35% female, age 52.4 ± 9.4 years) with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and unable to tolerate positive airway pressure underwent surgical implantation and activation of the hypoglossal nerve stimulation system in a prospective single-arm interventional trial. Primary outcomes were changes in obstructive sleep apnea severity (apnea-hypopnea index, from in-laboratory polysomnogram) and sleep-related quality of life [Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ)]. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation was used on 86 ± 16% of nights for 5.4 ± 1.4 h per night. There was a significant improvement (P < 0.001) from baseline to 12 months in apnea-hypopnea index (45.4 ± 17.5 to 25.3 ± 20.6 events h(-1) ) and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire score (14.2 ± 2.0 to 17.0 ± 2.4), as well as other polysomnogram and symptom measures. Outcomes were stable compared with 6 months following implantation. Three serious device-related adverse events occurred: an infection requiring device removal; and two stimulation lead cuff dislodgements requiring replacement. There were no significant adverse events with onset later than 6 months following implantation. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation demonstrated favourable safety, feasibility and efficacy.

  6. Nuclear vertex constants and asymptotic normalization coefficients for the tritium nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2009-12-15

    The properties of the nuclear vertex constant for virtual triton decay to a deuteron and a neutron (T {sup {yields}} d + n) are investigated along with the properties of the asymptotic normalization coefficient defined for the triton wave function and related to this constant. These quantities are calculated numerically on the basis of an equation that relates the asymptotic normalization coefficient to the triton effective radius {rho}{sub T}, which was introduced in the present study. The values of G{sub T}{sup 2} = 1.244(68) fm and C{sub T}{sup 2} = 2.958(162) found from our calculations are in good agreement with experimental and theoretical estimates obtained for these quantities in other studies. Physical properties of the triton virtual state are also discussed.

  7. Opioid receptor mechanisms at the hypoglossal motor pool and effects on tongue muscle activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hajiha, Mohammad; DuBord, Marq-André; Liu, Hattie; Horner, Richard L

    2009-01-01

    Opioids can modulate breathing and predispose to respiratory depression by actions at various central nervous system sites, but the mechanisms operating at respiratory motor nuclei have not been studied. This study tests the hypotheses that (i) local delivery of the μ-opioid receptor agonist fentanyl into the hypoglossal motor nucleus (HMN) will suppress genioglossus activity in vivo, (ii) a component of this suppression is mediated by opioid-induced acetylcholine release acting at muscarinic receptors, and (iii) δ- and κ-opioid receptors also modulate genioglossus activity. Seventy-two isoflurane-anaesthetised, tracheotomised, spontaneously breathing rats were studied during microdialysis perfusion into the HMN of (i) fentanyl and naloxone (μ-opioid receptor antagonist), (ii) fentanyl with and without co-application of muscarinic receptor antagonists, and (iii) δ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists and antagonists. The results showed (i) that fentanyl at the HMN caused a suppression of genioglossus activity (P < 0.001) that reversed with naloxone (P < 0.001), (ii) that neither atropine nor scopolamine affected the fentanyl-induced suppression of genioglossus activity, and (iii) that δ-, but not κ-, opioid receptor stimulation also suppressed genioglossus activity (P= 0.036 and P= 0.402 respectively). We conclude that μ-opioid receptor stimulation suppresses motor output from a central respiratory motoneuronal pool that activates genioglossus muscle, and this suppression does not involve muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition. This μ-opioid receptor-induced suppression of tongue muscle activity by effects at the hypoglossal motor pool may underlie the clinical concern regarding adverse upper airway function with μ-opioid analgesics. The inhibitory effects of μ- and δ-opioid receptors at the HMN also indicate an influence of endogenous enkephalins and endorphins in respiratory motor control. PMID:19403616

  8. Activation of the Hypoglossal to Tongue Musculature Motor Pathway by Remote Control

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Garret A.; Fraigne, Jimmy J.; Torontali, Zoltan A.; Snow, Matthew B.; Lapierre, Jennifer L.; Liu, Hattie; Montandon, Gaspard; Peever, John H.; Horner, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Reduced tongue muscle tone precipitates obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and activation of the tongue musculature can lessen OSA. The hypoglossal motor nucleus (HMN) innervates the tongue muscles but there is no pharmacological agent currently able to selectively manipulate a channel (e.g., Kir2.4) that is highly restricted in its expression to cranial motor pools such as the HMN. To model the effect of manipulating such a restricted target, we introduced a “designer” receptor into the HMN and selectively modulated it with a “designer” drug. We used cre-dependent viral vectors (AAV8-hSyn-DIO-hM3Dq-mCherry) to transduce hypoglossal motoneurons of ChAT-Cre+ mice with hM3Dq (activating) receptors. We measured sleep and breathing in three conditions: (i) sham, (ii) after systemic administration of clozapine-N-oxide (CNO; 1 mg/kg) or (iii) vehicle. CNO activates hM3Dq receptors but is otherwise biologically inert. Systemic administration of CNO caused significant and sustained increases in tongue muscle activity in non-REM (261 ± 33% for 10 hrs) and REM sleep (217 ± 21% for 8 hrs), both P < 0.01 versus controls. Responses were specific and selective for the tongue with no effects on diaphragm or postural muscle activities, or sleep-wake states. These results support targeting a selective and restricted “druggable” target at the HMN (e.g., Kir2.4) to activate tongue motor activity during sleep. PMID:28383527

  9. TrkB Signaling in Dorsal Raphe Nucleus is Essential for Antidepressant Efficacy and Normal Aggression Behavior.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Megumi; Autry, Anita E; Mahgoub, Melissa; Suzuki, Kanzo; Monteggia, Lisa M

    2017-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high affinity receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), have important roles in neural plasticity and are required for antidepressant efficacy. Studies examining the role of BDNF-TrkB signaling in depression and antidepressant efficacy have largely focused on the limbic system, leaving it unclear whether this signaling is important in other brain regions. BDNF and TrkB are both highly expressed in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), a brain region that has been suggested to have a role in depression and antidepressant action, although it is unknown whether BDNF and TrkB in the dorsal raphe nucleus are involved in these processes. We combined the adeno-associated virus (AAV) with the Cre-loxP site-specific recombination system to selectively knock down either Bdnf or TrkB in the DRN. These mice were then characterized in several behavioral paradigms including measures of depression-related behavior and antidepressant efficacy. We show that knockdown of TrkB, but not Bdnf, in the DRN results in loss of antidepressant efficacy and increased aggression-related behavior. We also show that knockdown of TrkB or Bdnf in this brain region does not have an impact on weight, activity levels, anxiety, or depression-related behaviors. These data reveal a critical role for TrkB signaling in the DRN in mediating antidepressant responses and normal aggression behavior. The results also suggest a non-cell autonomous role for BDNF in the DRN in mediating antidepressant efficacy.

  10. Leptin normalizes photic synchronization in male ob/ob mice, via indirect effects on the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Grosbellet, Edith; Gourmelen, Sylviane; Pévet, Paul; Criscuolo, François; Challet, Etienne

    2015-03-01

    Mounting evidence indicates a strong link between metabolic diseases and circadian dysfunctions. The metabolic hormone leptin, substantially increased in dietary obesity, displays chronobiotic properties. Here we investigated whether leptin is involved in the alteration of timing associated with obesity, via direct or indirect effects on the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the site of the master clock. Photic synchronization was studied in obese ob/ob mice (deficient in leptin), either injected or not with high doses of recombinant murine leptin (5 mg/kg). This was performed first at a behavioral level, by shifting the light-dark cycle and inducing phase shifts by 30-minute light pulses and then at molecular levels (c-FOS and P-ERK1/2). Moreover, to characterize the targets mediating the chronomodulatory effects of leptin, we studied the induction of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (P-STAT3) in the SCN and in different structures projecting to the SCN, including the medial hypothalamus. Ob/ob mice showed altered photic synchronization, including augmented light-induced phase delays. Acute leptin treatment normalized the photic responses of the SCN at both the behavioral and molecular levels (decrease of light-induced c-FOS). Leptin-induced P-STAT3 was modulated by light in the arcuate nucleus and both the ventromedial and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei, whereas its expression was independent of the presence of leptin in the SCN. These results suggest an indirect action of leptin on the SCN, possibly mediated by the medial hypothalamus. Taken together, these results highlight a central role of leptin in the relationship between metabolic disturbances and circadian disruptions.

  11. Ceftriaxone normalizes nucleus accumbens synaptic transmission, glutamate transport and export following cocaine self-administration and extinction training

    PubMed Central

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; LaLumiere, Ryan T.; Reissner, Kathryn J.; Kalivas, Peter W.; Knackstedt, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Decreased basal glutamate levels are observed in the rat nucleus accumbens (NA) core following cocaine self-administration. This disruption of glutamate homeostasis arises from a reduction in the export of glutamate via system xC- and is accompanied by a decrease in expression of xCT, the catalytic subunit of system xC-. A second hallmark of disrupted homeostasis is a decrease in expression and function of the major glutamate transporter, GLT-1. We have previously shown that chronic treatment with the antibiotic ceftriaxone restores xCT and GLT-1 expression following cocaine self-administration and attenuates both cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement. Here we used a 3H-glutamate uptake assay and microdialysis to test the hypothesis that ceftriaxone restores the function of both GLT-1 and xCT (glutamate reuptake and export, respectively) in the NA core following cocaine self-administration. We also used electrophysiology to investigate the ability of ceftriaxone to normalize measures of synaptic plasticity following cocaine. We found that 5 days of ceftriaxone treatment following cocaine self-administration restores basal glutamate levels in the accumbens core, likely through an upregulation of system xC- function. We also found that ceftriaxone restores glutamate re-uptake and attenuates the increase in synaptically-released glutamate that accompanies cocaine-primed reinstatement. Ceftriaxone also reversed the cocaine-induced synaptic potentiation in the accumbens core, evidenced by normalized spontaneous EPSC amplitude and frequency and evoked EPSC amplitude. These data indicate that ceftriaxone normalizes multiple aspects of glutamate homeostasis following cocaine self-administration and thus holds the potential to reduce relapse in human cocaine addicts. PMID:22956831

  12. Ceftriaxone normalizes nucleus accumbens synaptic transmission, glutamate transport, and export following cocaine self-administration and extinction training.

    PubMed

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; LaLumiere, Ryan T; Reissner, Kathryn J; Kalivas, Peter W; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2012-09-05

    Decreased basal glutamate levels are observed in the rat nucleus accumbens (NA) core following cocaine self-administration. This disruption of glutamate homeostasis arises from a reduction in the export of glutamate via system x(C)(-) and is accompanied by a decrease in expression of xCT, the catalytic subunit of system x(C)(-). A second hallmark of disrupted homeostasis is a decrease in expression and function of the major glutamate transporter, GLT-1. We have previously shown that chronic treatment with the antibiotic ceftriaxone restores xCT and GLT-1 expression following cocaine self-administration and attenuates both cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement. Here we used a (3)H-glutamate uptake assay and microdialysis to test the hypothesis that ceftriaxone restores the function of both GLT-1 and xCT (glutamate reuptake and export, respectively) in the NA core following cocaine self-administration. We also used electrophysiology to investigate the ability of ceftriaxone to normalize measures of synaptic plasticity following cocaine. We found that 5 d of ceftriaxone treatment following cocaine self-administration restores basal glutamate levels in the accumbens core, likely through an upregulation of system x(C)(-) function. We also found that ceftriaxone restores glutamate reuptake and attenuates the increase in synaptically released glutamate that accompanies cocaine-primed reinstatement. Ceftriaxone also reversed the cocaine-induced synaptic potentiation in the accumbens core, evidenced by normalized spontaneous EPSC amplitude and frequency and evoked EPSC amplitude. These data indicate that ceftriaxone normalizes multiple aspects of glutamate homeostasis following cocaine self-administration and thus holds the potential to reduce relapse in human cocaine addicts.

  13. Early Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Patients With Neuropsychological Impairment Are Associated With Increased Fractional Anisotropy in the Anterior Thalamic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chieh; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chi, Chia-Hsing; Liou, Michelle; Kuo, Duen-Pang; Kao, Hung-Wen; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Ma, Hsin I; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Wu, Yu-Te; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the reactive changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived diffusion metrics of the anterior thalamic nucleus (AN), a relaying center for the Papez circuit, in early idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) patients with memory impairment, as well as its correlation with the patients' neuropsychological performances. In total, 28 probable iNPH patients with symptom onset within 1 year and 17 control subjects were prospectively recruited between 2010 and 2013 for this institutional review board-approved study. Imaging studies including DTI and a neuropsychological assessment battery were performed in all subjects. Diffusion metrics were measured from the region of the AN using tract-deterministic seeding method by reconstructing the mammillo-thalamo-cingulate connections within the Papez circuit. Differences in diffusion metrics and memory assessment scores between the patient and control group were examined via the Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman correlation analyses were performed to examine associations between diffusion metrics of AN and neuropsychological tests within the patient group. We discovered that early iNPH patients exhibited marked elevations in fractional anisotropy, pure diffusion anisotropy, and axial diffusivity (all P < 0.01), as well as lower neuropsychological test scores including verbal and nonverbal memory (all P < 0.05) compared with normal control. Spearman rank correlation analyses did not disclose significant correlations between AN diffusion metrics and neuropsychological test scores in the patient group, whereas ranked scatter plots clearly demonstrated a dichotic sample distribution between patient and control samples. In summary, our study highlighted the potential compensatory role of the AN by increasing thalamocortical connectivity within the Papez circuit because memory function declines in early iNPH when early shunt treatment may potentially reverse the memory deficits.

  14. Early Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Patients With Neuropsychological Impairment Are Associated With Increased Fractional Anisotropy in the Anterior Thalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Chieh; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chi, Chia-Hsing; Liou, Michelle; Kuo, Duen-Pang; Kao, Hung-Wen; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Ma, Hsin I.; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Wu, Yu-Te; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we aimed to investigate the reactive changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived diffusion metrics of the anterior thalamic nucleus (AN), a relaying center for the Papez circuit, in early idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) patients with memory impairment, as well as its correlation with the patients’ neuropsychological performances. In total, 28 probable iNPH patients with symptom onset within 1 year and 17 control subjects were prospectively recruited between 2010 and 2013 for this institutional review board-approved study. Imaging studies including DTI and a neuropsychological assessment battery were performed in all subjects. Diffusion metrics were measured from the region of the AN using tract-deterministic seeding method by reconstructing the mammillo–thalamo–cingulate connections within the Papez circuit. Differences in diffusion metrics and memory assessment scores between the patient and control group were examined via the Mann–Whitney U test. Spearman correlation analyses were performed to examine associations between diffusion metrics of AN and neuropsychological tests within the patient group. We discovered that early iNPH patients exhibited marked elevations in fractional anisotropy, pure diffusion anisotropy, and axial diffusivity (all P < 0.01), as well as lower neuropsychological test scores including verbal and nonverbal memory (all P < 0.05) compared with normal control. Spearman rank correlation analyses did not disclose significant correlations between AN diffusion metrics and neuropsychological test scores in the patient group, whereas ranked scatter plots clearly demonstrated a dichotic sample distribution between patient and control samples. In summary, our study highlighted the potential compensatory role of the AN by increasing thalamocortical connectivity within the Papez circuit because memory function declines in early iNPH when early shunt treatment may potentially reverse the

  15. Surgical and conservative methods for restoring impaired motor function - facial nerve, spinal accessory nerve, hypoglossal nerve (not including vagal nerve or swallowing)

    PubMed Central

    Laskawi, R.; Rohrbach, S.

    2005-01-01

    The present review gives a survey of rehabilitative measures for disorders of the motor function of the mimetic muscles (facial nerve), and muscles innervated by the spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves. The dysfunction can present either as paralysis or hyperkinesis (hyperkinesia). Conservative and surgical treatment options aimed at restoring normal motor function and correcting the movement disorders are described. Static reanimation techniques are not dealt with. The final section describes the use of botulinum toxin in the therapy of dysphagia. PMID:22073058

  16. Skull base osteomyelitis presenting with an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kasfiki, Eirini Vasileiou; Kelly, Ciaran; Smith, John; Nicolaides, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This is the first case of skull base osteomyelitis presenting with isolated bilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy reported in the literature. A 75-year-old man presented with tongue paralysis without any other cranial nerve palsy. He was otherwise well apart from recently having a high prostate-specific antigen level recorded. Investigations for malignancy or cerebrovascular insult were negative with the diagnosis of skull base osteomyelitis confirmed using CT. Following treatment with intravenous antibiotics for 6 weeks, symptoms resolved. PMID:23853016

  17. Modulation of motor cortex neuronal activity and motor behavior during subthalamic nucleus stimulation in the normal primate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Luke A; Xu, Weidong; Baker, Kenneth B; Zhang, Jianyu; Vitek, Jerrold L

    2015-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a well-established surgical therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). An emerging hypothesis is that the therapeutic benefit of DBS is derived from direct modulation of primary motor cortex (M1), yet little is known about the influence of STN DBS on individual neurons in M1. We investigated the effect of STN DBS, delivered at discrete interval intensities (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100%) of corticospinal tract threshold (CSTT), on motor performance and M1 neuronal activity in a naive nonhuman primate. Motor performance during a food reach and retrieval task improved during low-intensity stimulation (20% CSTT) but worsened as intensity approached the threshold for activation of corticospinal fibers (80% and 100% CSTT). To assess cortical effects of STN DBS, spontaneous, extracellular neuronal activity was collected from M1 neurons before, during, and after DBS at the same CSTT stimulus intensities. STN DBS significantly modulated the firing of a majority of M1 neurons; however, the direction of effect varied with stimulus intensity such that, at 20% CSTT, most neurons were suppressed, whereas at the highest stimulus intensities the majority of neurons were activated. At a population level, firing rates increased as stimulus intensity increased. These results show that STN DBS influences both motor performance and M1 neuronal activity systematically according to stimulus intensity. In addition, the unanticipated reduction in reach times suggests that STN DBS, at stimulus intensities lower than typically used for treatment of PD motor signs, can enhance normal motor performance.

  18. "Physiologic ICSI": hyaluronic acid (HA) favors selection of spermatozoa without DNA fragmentation and with normal nucleus, resulting in improvement of embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Parmegiani, Lodovico; Cognigni, Graciela Estela; Bernardi, Silvia; Troilo, Enzo; Ciampaglia, Walter; Filicori, Marco

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the role of hyaluronic acid (HA) for sperm selection before intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Three prospective studies. Private assisted reproduction center in Italy. Study 1: 20 men. Study 2: 15 men. Study 3: 206 couples treated with ICSI on a limited number of oocytes per patient (1-3) in accordance with Italian IVF law. Study 1: determination of sperm DNA fragmentation of HA-bound spermatozoa versus spermatozoa in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Study 2: assessment of nuclear morphology of HA-bound spermatozoa versus spermatozoa in PVP. Study 3: randomized study comparing conventional PVP-ICSI to ICSI in which the spermatozoa are selected for their capacity to bind to HA (HA-ICSI). Study 1: sperm DNA fragmentation rate. Study 2: sperm nucleus normalcy rate according to motile sperm organellar morphology examination criteria. Study 3: fertilization, embryo quality and development, and implantation and pregnancy. Spematozoa bound to HA show a significant reduction in DNA fragmentation (study 1) and a significant improvement in nucleus normalcy (study 2) compared with spermatozoa immersed in PVP. Furthermore, injection of HA-bound spermatozoa (HA-ICSI) significantly improves embryo quality and development (study 3). Hyaluronic acid may optimize ICSI outcome by favoring selection of spermatozoa without DNA fragmentation and with normal nucleus. Furthermore, HA may also be used to speed up the selection of spermatozoa with normal nucleus during intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI). Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Postsynaptic Inhibition of Hypoglossal Motoneurons Produces Atonia of the Genioglossal Muscle During Rapid Eye Movement Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Simon J.; Chase, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Hypoglossal motoneurons were recorded intracellularly to determine whether postsynaptic inhibition or disfacilitation was responsible for atonia of the lingual muscles during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Design: Intracellular records were obtained of the action potentials and subthreshold membrane potential activity of antidromically identified hypoglossal motoneurons in cats during wakefulness, nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and REM sleep. A cuff electrode was placed around the hypoglossal nerve to antidromically activate hypoglossal motoneurons. The state-dependent changes in membrane potential, spontaneous discharge, postsynaptic potentials, and rheobase of hypoglossal motoneurons were determined. Analyses and Results: During quiet wakefulness and NREM sleep, hypoglossal motoneurons exhibited spontaneous repetitive discharge. In the transition from NREM sleep to REM sleep, repetitive discharge ceased and the membrane potential began to hyperpolarize; maximal hyperpolarization (10.5 mV) persisted throughout REM sleep. During REM sleep there was a significant increase in rheobase, which was accompanied by barrages of large-amplitude inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs), which were reversed following the intracellular injection of chloride ions. The latter result indicates that they were mediated by glycine; IPSPs were not present during wakefulness or NREM sleep. Conclusions: We conclude that hypoglossal motoneurons are postsynaptically inhibited during naturally occurring REM sleep; no evidence of disfacilitation was observed. The data also indicate that glycine receptor-mediated postsynaptic inhibition of hypoglossal motoneurons is crucial in promoting atonia of the lingual muscles during REM sleep. Citation: Fung SJ, Chase MH. Postsynaptic inhibition of hypoglossal motoneurons produces atonia of the genioglossal muscle during rapid eye movement sleep. SLEEP 2015;38(1):139–146. PMID:25325470

  20. Differential expression of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues and cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Weiguo; Fang, Dejian; Ye, Dongping; Zou, Longqiang; Shen, Yan; Dai, Libing; Xu, Jiake

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • ERK5 involved in NP cells. • ERK5 involved in NP tissue. • It was important modulator. - Abstract: Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and regulates a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, necrosis, apoptosis and degeneration. However, the expression of ERK5 and its role in degenerated human nucleus pulposus (NP) is hitherto unknown. In this study, we observed the differential expression of ERK5 in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues by using immunohistochemical staining and Western blot. Treatment of NP cells with Pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α decreased ERK5 gene expression as well as NP marker gene expression; including the type II collagen and aggrecan. Suppression of ERK5 gene expression in NP cells by ERK5 siRNA resulted in decreased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK5 activation by BIX02188 (5 μM) decreased the gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan in NP cells. Our results document the expression of ERK5 in degenerated nucleus pulposus tissues, and suggest a potential involvement of ERK5 in human degenerated nucleus pulposus.

  1. Müllerian inhibiting substance is anterogradely transported and does not attenuate avulsion-induced death of hypoglossal motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Andrew N.; Talbot, Caroline L.; Wang, Pei-Yu; MacLaughlin, David T.; Donahoe, Patricia K.; McLennan, Ian S.

    2013-01-01

    Müllerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS, Anti-Müllerian hormone) is a gonadal hormone that contributes to the subtle sex-biases in the nervous system. Mature neurons of both sexes also produce MIS, suggesting that MIS may be a paracrine regulator of adult neural networks. We report here that murine hypoglossal motor neurons produce MIS and its receptors, MISRII and bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1A (BMPR1A, ALK3), but differentially transport them, with only MIS being detectable in axons. The production of MIS and its receptors were rapidly down regulated after axonal damage, which is a characteristic of genes involved in mature neuronal function. MIS is a survival factor for embryonic spinal motor neurons, but the rate of cell loss after hypoglossal nerve avulsion was normal in Mis−/− mice and was not attenuated by intraventricular administration of MIS. These observations suggest that MIS may be involved in anterograde rather than autocrine or retrograde regulation of neurons. PMID:21195071

  2. Treating facial nerve palsy by true termino-lateral hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Sleilati, F H; Nasr, M W; Stephan, H A; Asmar, Z D; Hokayem, N E

    2010-11-01

    Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis is a time-proven technique for the repair of facial nerve palsy. Efforts have been made to reduce hypoglossal nerve injury, the main drawback of the technique. In this study, the anastomosis is a true termino-lateral neurorrhaphy with only an epineural window in the hypoglossal nerve sheath. A re-routing technique of the temporal facial nerve is also performed to allow a direct anastomosis to the hypoglossal nerve without the need for a jump graft. The first three results reported are very encouraging, with a satisfactory return of facial mimics and without any impairment of lingual function. Copyright © 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lesion of the Subfornical Organ attenuates Neuronal Activation of the Paraventricular Nucleus in response to Angiotensin II in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Jessica; Collister, John P

    2011-09-23

    The subfornical organ, one of the central circumventricular organs, has been shown to mediate many of the effects of circulating angiotensin II (AngII). Where these signals are processed downstream is not fully understood. The SFO does indeed project to prominent cardiovascular regulatory centers such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), of whose neurons are activated by central AngII. We reasoned that AngII sensed at the SFO would cause neuronal activation at downstream hypothalamic areas such as the median preoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus, and as such would be diminished in animals with lesions of the SFO. To test this hypothesis, groups of rats underwent either SFO lesion (SFOx) or sham operation. Five days later rats were instrumented with radiotelemetry transducers for monitoring of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and venous catheters for infusions. MAP and heart rate were measured continuously. After a 4 day control period, infusion of AngII (0.575 µg/kg/min) was begun for a period of 2 hours. Rats were then sacrificed and brains were processed for neuronal Fos expression. AngII produced Fos expression in the SFO, MnPO and PVN of sham rats. Fos expression was greatly attenuated in the PVN of SFOx rats. These results support our hypothesis, suggesting that AngII sensitive neurons of the SFO can mediate neuronal activation in the PVN.

  4. Nitric oxide activates hypoglossal motoneurons by cGMP-dependent inhibition of TASK channels and cGMP-independent activation of HCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Wenker, Ian C.; Benoit, Justin P.; Chen, Xinnian; Liu, Hattie; Horner, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule that regulates numerous physiological processes, including activity of respiratory motoneurons. However, molecular mechanism(s) underlying NO modulation of motoneurons remain obscure. Here, we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro recording techniques to examine NO modulation of motoneurons in the hypoglossal motor nucleus (HMN). Microperfusion of diethylamine (DEA; an NO donor) into the HMN of anesthetized adult rats increased genioglossus muscle activity. In the brain slice, whole cell current-clamp recordings from hypoglossal motoneurons showed that exposure to DEA depolarized membrane potential and increased responsiveness to depolarizing current injections. Under voltage-clamp conditions, we found that NO inhibited a Ba2+-sensitive background K+ conductance and activated a Cs+-sensitive hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih). When Ih was blocked with Cs+ or ZD-7288, the NO-sensitive K+ conductance exhibited properties similar to TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels, i.e., voltage independent, resistant to tetraethylammonium and 4-aminopyridine but inhibited by methanandamide. The soluble guanylyl cyclase blocker 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) and the PKG blocker KT-5823 both decreased NO modulation of this TASK-like conductance. To characterize modulation of Ih in relative isolation, we tested effects of NO in the presence of Ba2+ to block TASK channels. Under these conditions, NO activated both the instantaneous (Iinst) and time-dependent (Iss) components of Ih. Interestingly, at more hyperpolarized potentials NO preferentially increased Iinst. The effects of NO on Ih were retained in the presence of ODQ and blocked by the cysteine-specific oxidant N-ethylmaleimide. These results suggest that NO activates hypoglossal motoneurons by cGMP-dependent inhibition of a TASK-like current and S-nitrosylation-dependent activation of Ih. PMID:22131386

  5. Hypoglossal canal size in living hominoids and the evolution of human speech.

    PubMed

    Jungers, William L; Pokempner, Amy A; Kay, Richard F; Cartmill, Matt

    2003-08-01

    The relative size of the hypoglossal canal has been proposed as a useful diagnostic tool for the identification of human-like speech capabilities in the hominid fossil record. Relatively large hypoglossal canals (standardized to oral cavity size) were observed in humans and assumed to correspond to relatively large hypoglossal nerves, the cranial nerve that controls motor function of the tongue. It was suggested that the human pattern of tongue motor innervation and associated speech potential are very different from those of African apes and australopithecines; the modern human condition apparently appeared by the time of Middle Pleistocene Homo. A broader interspecific analysis of hypoglossal canal size in primates conducted in 1999 has rejected this diagnostic and inferences based upon it. In an attempt to resolve these differences of opinion, which we believe are based in part on biased size-adjustments and/or unwarranted assumptions, a new data set was collected and analyzed from 298 extant hominoid skulls, including orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, siamang, gibbons, and modern humans. Data on the absolute size of the hypoglossal nerve itself were also gathered from a small sample of humans and chimpanzee cadavers. A scale-free index of relative hypoglossal canal size (RHCS) was computed as 100 x (hypoglossal canal area(0.5)/oral cavity volume(0.333)). No significant sexual dimorphism in RHCS was discovered in any species of living hominoid, but there are significant interspecific differences in both absolute and relative sizes of the hypoglossal canal. In absolute terms, humans possess significantly larger canals than any other species except gorillas, but there is considerable overlap with chimpanzees. Humans are also characterized by large values of RHCS, but gibbons possess an even larger average mean for this index; siamang and bonobos overlap appreciably with humans in RHCS. The value of RHCS in Australopithecus afarensis is well within both

  6. Nucleus-nucleus potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Satchler, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The significance of a nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed. Information about such potentials obtained from scattering experiments is reviewed, including recent examples of so-called rainbow scattering that probe the potential at smaller distances. The evidence for interactions involving the nuclear spins is summarized, and their possible origin in couplings to non-elastic channels. Various models of the potentials are discussed.

  7. Elevated mRNA-levels of distinct mitochondrial and plasma membrane Ca2+ transporters in individual hypoglossal motor neurons of endstage SOD1 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Mühling, Tobias; Duda, Johanna; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Ludolph, Albert C.; Liss, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances in Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction have emerged as major pathogenic features in familial and sporadic forms of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a fatal degenerative motor neuron disease. However, the distinct molecular ALS-pathology remains unclear. Recently, an activity-dependent Ca2+ homeostasis deficit, selectively in highly vulnerable cholinergic motor neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus (hMNs) from a common ALS mouse model, the endstage superoxide dismutase SOD1G93A transgenic mouse, was described. This functional deficit was defined by a reduced hMN mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake capacity and elevated Ca2+ extrusion across the plasma membrane. To address the underlying molecular mechanisms, here we quantified mRNA-levels of respective potential mitochondrial and plasma membrane Ca2+ transporters in individual, choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) positive hMNs from wildtype (WT) and endstage SOD1G93A mice, by combining UV laser microdissection with RT-qPCR techniques, and specific data normalization. As ChAT cDNA levels as well as cDNA and genomic DNA levels of the mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase ND1 were not different between hMNs from WT and endstage SOD1G93A mice, these genes were used to normalize hMN-specific mRNA-levels of plasma membrane and mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters, respectively. We detected about 2-fold higher levels of the mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters MCU/MICU1, Letm1, and UCP2 in remaining hMNs from endstage SOD1G93A mice. These higher expression-levels of mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters in individual hMNs were not associated with a respective increase in number of mitochondrial genomes, as evident from hMN specific ND1 DNA quantification. Normalized mRNA-levels for the plasma membrane Na+/Ca2+ exchanger NCX1 were also about 2-fold higher in hMNs from SOD1G93A mice. Thus, pharmacological stimulation of Ca2+ transporters in highly vulnerable hMNs might offer a neuroprotective strategy for ALS. PMID:25452714

  8. REM sleep-like atonia of hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons is caused by loss of noradrenergic and serotonergic inputs.

    PubMed

    Fenik, Victor B; Davies, Richard O; Kubin, Leszek

    2005-11-15

    Studies of hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons that innervate the genioglossus muscle, an upper airway dilator, suggested that the suppression of upper airway motor tone during REM sleep is caused by withdrawal of excitation mediated by norepinephrine and serotonin. Our objectives were to determine whether antagonism of aminergic receptors located in the XII nucleus region can abolish the REM sleep-like atonia of XII motoneurons, and whether both serotonergic and noradrenergic antagonists are required to achieve this effect. REM sleep-like episodes were elicited in anesthetized rats by pontine carbachol injections before and at various times after microinjection of prazosin and methysergide combined, or of only one of the drugs, into the XII nucleus. Spontaneous XII nerve activity was significantly reduced, by 35 to 81%, by each antagonist alone and in combination, indicating that XII motoneurons were under both noradrenergic and serotonergic endogenous excitatory drives. During the 32 to 81 min after microinjections of both antagonists, pontine carbachol caused no depression of XII nerve activity, whereas other characteristic effects (activation of the hippocampal and cortical EEG, and slowing of the respiratory rate) remained intact. A partial recovery of the depressant effect of carbachol then occurred parallel to the recovery of spontaneous XII nerve activity from the depressant effect of the antagonists. Microinjections of either antagonist alone did not eliminate the depressant effect of carbachol. The REM sleep-like depression of XII motoneuronal activity induced by pontine carbachol can be fully accounted for by the combined withdrawal of noradrenergic and serotonergic effects on XII motoneurons.

  9. Suppression of jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes during swallowing in the cat.

    PubMed

    Ono, T; Ishiwata, Y; Kuroda, T; Nakamura, Y

    1999-11-01

    Jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes can be evoked by innocuous as well as noxious afferents from intra-oral structures. It has been reported that the amplitude of the jaw-opening reflex evoked by weak electrical stimulation of the upper lip is subject not only to tonic suppression but also to phase-linked modulation during mastication. In this study, we investigated whether the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes are modulated during swallowing. Data were obtained from 8 chloralose-anesthetized cats. Reflexes were monitored by electromyographic activities recorded from the anterior digastric, genioglossus, and styloglossus muscles and, after paralysis, by the efferent discharge in the digastric and hypoglossal nerves. Swallowing was elicited either by water dropped on the tongue or by repetitive stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. Jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes were evoked by stimulation of the lingual nerve, and the evoked afferent volley was recorded from the Gasserian ganglion so that the threshold of the lingual nerve could be determined. The following results were obtained: (1) The jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by stimulation of the low-threshold, but not high-threshold, lingual afferents were remarkably suppressed during swallowing; and (2) both the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by low-threshold lingual afferents were suppressed during fictive swallowing after the animals were paralyzed. We conclude that the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by low-threshold lingual afferents are suppressed during swallowing by a central motor program.

  10. Intrinsic excitability differs between murine hypoglossal and spinal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Tadros, M A; Fuglevand, A J; Brichta, A M; Callister, R J

    2016-05-01

    Motoneurons differ in the behaviors they control and their vulnerability to disease and aging. For example, brain stem motoneurons such as hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs) are involved in licking, suckling, swallowing, respiration, and vocalization. In contrast, spinal motoneurons (SMs) innervating the limbs are involved in postural and locomotor tasks requiring higher loads and lower movement velocities. Surprisingly, the properties of these two motoneuron pools have not been directly compared, even though studies on HMs predominate in the literature compared with SMs, especially for adult animals. Here we used whole cell patch-clamp recording to compare the electrophysiological properties of HMs and SMs in age-matched neonatal mice (P7-P10). Passive membrane properties were remarkably similar in HMs and SMs, and afterhyperpolarization properties did not differ markedly between the two populations. HMs had narrower action potentials (APs) and a faster upstroke on their APs compared with SMs. Furthermore, HMs discharged APs at higher frequencies in response to both step and ramp current injection than SMs. Therefore, while HMs and SMs have similar passive properties, they differ in their response to similar levels of depolarizing current. This suggests that each population possesses differing suites of ion channels that allow them to discharge at rates matched to the different mechanical properties of the muscle fibers that drive their distinct motor functions.

  11. Tongue muscle plasticity following hypoglossal nerve stimulation in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Jackson, Michelle A.; Kletzien, Heidi; Wang, Hao; Schaser, Allison J.; Leverson, Glen E.; Zealear, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Age-related decreases in tongue muscle mass and strength have been reported. It may be possible to prevent age-related tongue muscle changes using neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). Our hypothesis was that alterations in muscle contractile properties and myosin heavy chain composition would be found following NMES. Methods Fifty-four young, middle-aged and old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats were included. Twenty-four rats underwent bilateral electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves for 8 weeks and were compared with control or sham rats. Muscle contractile properties and myosin heavy chain (MHC) in the genioglossus (GG), styloglossus (SG) and hyoglossus (HG) muscles were examined. Results In comparison with unstimulated control rats, we found reduced muscle fatigue, increased contraction and half decay times and increased twitch and tetanic tension. Increased Type I MHC was found, except for GG in old and middle-aged rats. Discussion Transitions in tongue muscle contractile properties and phenotype were found following NMES. PMID:23169566

  12. α2-Adrenergic blockade rescues hypoglossal motor defense against obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Decreased noradrenergic excitation of hypoglossal motoneurons during sleep causing hypotonia of pharyngeal dilator muscles is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a widespread disease for which treatment options are limited. Previous OSA drug candidates targeting various excitatory/inhibitory receptors on hypoglossal motoneurons have proved unviable in reactivating these neurons, particularly during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. To identify a viable drug target, we show that the repurposed α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine potently reversed the depressant effect of REM sleep on baseline hypoglossal motoneuron activity (a first-line motor defense against OSA) in rats. Remarkably, yohimbine also restored the obstructive apnea–induced long-term facilitation of hypoglossal motoneuron activity (hLTF), a much-neglected form of noradrenergic-dependent neuroplasticity that could provide a second-line motor defense against OSA but was also depressed during REM sleep. Corroborating immunohistologic, optogenetic, and pharmacologic evidence confirmed that yohimbine’s beneficial effects on baseline hypoglossal motoneuron activity and hLTF were mediated mainly through activation of pontine A7 and A5 noradrenergic neurons. Our results suggest a 2-tier (impaired first- and second-line motor defense) mechanism of noradrenergic-dependent pathogenesis of OSA and a promising pharmacotherapy for rescuing both these intrinsic defenses against OSA through disinhibition of A7 and A5 neurons by α2-adrenergic blockade. PMID:28239660

  13. A rare case of persistent hypoglossal artery associated with contralateral proximal subclavian stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Giuseppina; Leone, Giuseppe; Aiello, Alessandra; La porta, Antonietta; Tedeschi, Enrico; Briganti, Francesco; Caranci, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The persistent hypoglossal artery is rare vascular anomalies. We report the case of a 50-year old man with right hypoglossal artery, ipsilateral hypoplasic internal carotid artery, associated with left proximal subclavian stenosis with subclavian steal syndrome. Power-Doppler-Ultra-Sonography spectral images obtained after the patient exercised the left arm showed mid-systolic deceleration with retrograde late-systolic velocities. A Computed Tomography Angiography demonstrated a proximal stenosis of the left SA, a mild right ICA hypoplasia and an anomalous artery arising from right ICA at C2–C3 level, entering the cranium via the hypoglossal canal and joining the basilar artery. Usually the presence of PHA may be completely asymptomatic, and detected as an incidental finding by CTA or MRA, but in our case its diagnosis is extremely important because it is often the only vessel supplying blood to the basilar trunk and posterior circulation. PMID:28352804

  14. Solid-Cystic Hypoglossal Nerve Schwannoma with Fluid-Fluid Level: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Kulamani; Shaha, Pramod Ramchand; Ilyas, Mohd. Abbas; Khairnar, Gaurav Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurinoma, neurilemmoma) are benign slow-growing encapsulated tumours originating from well-differentiated myelin-producing Schwann cells or nerve fiber sheet cells at the glial-Schwann cell junction. Hypoglossal nerve schwannoma mostly develops in the intracranial and extra-cranial segment or in both intracranial and extra-cranial segment forming a dumbbell shape tumour. The peripheral hypoglossal schwannomas are very rare. We present a case of right hypoglossal nerve schwannoma in a 46-year-old female who presented with headache and neck pain since 2 weeks with deviation of tongue to right side since 1 week. Patient was investigated with Computed Tomography (CT) scan of head and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of brain, which showed a dumb-bell shaped solid-cystic mass lesion with fluid-fluid level in right cerebello-pontine angle cistern. PMID:28208975

  15. Transient unilateral combined paresis of the hypoglossal nerve and lingual nerve following intubation anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Hulya; Besir, Ahmet; Cekic, Bahanur; Kosucu, Muge; Geze, Sukran

    2014-01-01

    Nerve damage may occur in the pharyngolaryngeal region during general anesthesia. The most frequently injured nerves are the hypoglossal, lingual and recurrent laryngeal. These injuries may arise in association with several factors, such as laryngoscopy, endotracheal intubation and tube insertion, cuff pressure, mask ventilation, the triple airway maneuver, the oropharyngeal airway, manner of intubation tube insertion, head and neck position and aspiration. Nerve injuries in this region may take the form of an isolated single nerve or of paresis of two nerves together in the form of hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (Tapia's syndrome). However, combined injury of the lingual and hypoglossal nerves following intubation anesthesia is a much rarer condition. The risk of this damage can be reduced with precautionary measures. We describe a case of combined unilateral nervus hypoglossus and nervus lingualis paresis developing after intubation anesthesia.

  16. Hypoglossal Neuropathology and Respiratory Activity in Pompe Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Milapjit S.; Elmallah, Mai K.; Falk, Darin J.; Lane, Michael A.; Reier, Paul J.; Byrne, Barry J.; Fuller, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Pompe disease is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with systemic deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Respiratory-related problems in Pompe disease include hypoventilation and upper airway dysfunction. Although these problems have generally been attributed to muscular pathology, recent work has highlighted the potential role of central nervous system (CNS) neuropathology in Pompe motor deficiencies. We used a murine model of Pompe disease to test the hypothesis that systemic GAA deficiency is associated with hypoglossal (XII) motoneuron pathology and altered XII motor output during breathing. Brainstem tissue was harvested from adult Gaa−/− mice and the periodic acid Schiff method was used to examine neuronal glycogen accumulation. Semi-thin (2 μm) plastic sections showed widespread medullary neuropathology with extensive cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron soma. We next recorded efferent XII bursting in anesthetized and ventilated Gaa−/− and B6/129 mice both before and after bilateral vagotomy. The coefficient of variation of respiratory cycle duration was greater in Gaa−/− compared to B6/129 mice (p < 0.01). Vagotomy caused a robust increase in XII inspiratory burst amplitude in B6/129 mice (239 ± 44% baseline; p < 0.01) but had little impact on burst amplitude in Gaa−/− mice (130 ± 23% baseline; p > 0.05). We conclude that CNS GAA deficiency results in substantial glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron cell bodies and altered XII motor output. Therapeutic strategies targeting the CNS may be required to fully correct respiratory-related deficits in Pompe disease. PMID:21747768

  17. Hypoglossal Nerve Stimulation Improves Obstructive Sleep Apnea: 12 Month Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kezirian, Eric J.; Goding, George S.; Malhotra, Atul; O'Donoghue, Fergal J.; Zammit, Gary; Wheatley, John R.; Catcheside, Peter G.; Smith, Philip L.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Walsh, Jennifer H.; Maddison, Kathleen J.; Claman, David M.; Huntley, Tod; Park, Steven Y.; Campbell, Matthew C.; Palme, Carsten E.; Iber, Conrad; Eastwood, Peter R.; Hillman, David R.; Barnes, Maree

    2013-01-01

    Reduced upper airway muscle activity during sleep is a key contributor to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) pathogenesis. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HGNS) activates upper airway dilator muscles, including the genioglossus, and has the potential to reduce OSA severity. The objective of this study was to examine the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of a novel HGNS system (HGNS®, Apnex Medical, Inc., St. Paul, MN) in treating OSA at 12 months following implantation. Thirty-one subjects (35% female, age 52·4±9·4 years) with moderate to severe OSA and unable to tolerate positive airway pressure underwent surgical implantation and activation of the HGNS system in a prospective single-arm interventional trial. Primary outcomes were changes in OSA severity (apnoea-hypopnoea index, AHI, from in-laboratory polysomnogram) and sleep-related quality of life (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire, FOSQ). HGNS was used on 86±16% of nights for 5·4±1·4 hours per night. There was a significant improvement (p < 0·001) from baseline to 12 months in AHI (45.4±17·5 to 25·3±20·6 events/h) and FOSQ score (14·2±2·0 to 17·0±2·4) as well as other polysomnogram and symptom measures. Outcomes were stable compared to 6 months following implantation. Three serious device-related adverse events occurred: an infection requiring device removal and two stimulation lead cuff dislodgements requiring replacement. There were no significant adverse events with onset later than 6 months following implantation. HGNS demonstrated favourable safety, feasibility, and efficacy. PMID:24033656

  18. A stereological study of the volume-weighted volume and of the relative volume of the nucleus of normal and preneoplastic hepatocytes in a trout model of hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marta; Monteiro, Rogério A F; Rocha, Eduardo

    2013-07-01

    The fish liver has been the main subject of the biomonitoring and laboratory studies dealing with environmental carcinogenesis. The foci of cellular alterations are accepted pre-neoplastic hepatic lesions, and histopathology is the primary tool for their characterization. Despite its potential, using stereology to study quantitatively nuclear features of those lesions has not been evaluated. Herein, we estimated the volume density and the volume-weighted volume of the nucleus of normal and preneoplastic hepatocytes, using stereology and the brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario) as model. In the hepatocarcinogenesis protocol the N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was used as initiator, and the 17-β estradiol (E2) as promoter. Three groups of 30 animals were considered: negative controls (non-exposed), initiator exposed and initiator plus promoter exposed. Estimates of both stereological parameters were significantly higher in preneoplastic hepatocytes, also showing an excellent discriminatory power when used to differentiate those hepatocytes from the normal ones. Besides, in the normal parenchyma the two parameters also differed among the three tested groups. The exposure to MNNG and/or to E2 leaded to modifications in the hepatocyte nuclei that could be unbiasedly quantified with two stereological parameters. We showed that quantitative nuclear morphology represents a valuable auxiliary tool in assessing hepatocarcinogenesis in fishes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Treating obstructive sleep apnea with hypoglossal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Peter R; Barnes, Maree; Walsh, Jennifer H; Maddison, Kathleen J; Hee, Geoffrey; Schwartz, Alan R; Smith, Philip L; Malhotra, Atul; McEvoy, R Douglas; Wheatley, John R; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Rochford, Peter D; Churchward, Tom; Campbell, Matthew C; Palme, Carsten E; Robinson, Sam; Goding, George S; Eckert, Danny J; Jordan, Amy S; Catcheside, Peter G; Tyler, Louise; Antic, Nick A; Worsnop, Christopher J; Kezirian, Eric J; Hillman, David R

    2011-11-01

    Reduced upper airway muscle activity during sleep is fundamental to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) pathogenesis. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HGNS) counteracts this problem, with potential to reduce OSA severity. To examine safety and efficacy of a novel HGNS system (HGNS, Apnex Medical, Inc.) in treating OSA. Twenty-one patients, 67% male, age (mean ± SD) 53.6 ± 9.2 years, with moderate to severe OSA and unable to tolerate continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Each participant underwent surgical implantation of the HGNS system in a prospective single-arm interventional trial. OSA severity was defined by apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) during in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) at baseline and 3 and 6 months post-implant. Therapy compliance was assessed by nightly hours of use. Symptoms were assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), Calgary Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). HGNS was used on 89% ± 15% of nights (n = 21). On these nights, it was used for 5.8 ± 1.6 h per night. Nineteen of 21 participants had baseline and 6-month PSGs. There was a significant improvement (all P < 0.05) from baseline to 6 months in: AHI (43.1 ± 17.5 to 19.5 ± 16.7), ESS (12.1 ± 4.7 to 8.1 ± 4.4), FOSQ (14.4 ± 2.0 to 16.7 ± 2.2), SAQLI (3.2 ± 1.0 to 4.9 ± 1.3), and BDI (15.8 ± 9.0 to 9.7 ± 7.6). Two serious device-related adverse events occurred: an infection requiring device removal and a stimulation lead cuff dislodgement requiring replacement. HGNS demonstrated favorable safety, efficacy, and compliance. Participants experienced a significant decrease in OSA severity and OSA-associated symptoms. NAME: Australian Clinical Study of the Apnex Medical HGNS System to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea. NCT01186926. URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01186926.

  20. Fibromyalgia Patients Had Normal Distraction Related Pain Inhibition but Cognitive Impairment Reflected in Caudate Nucleus and Hippocampus during the Stroop Color Word Test

    PubMed Central

    Martinsen, Sofia; Flodin, Pär; Berrebi, Jonathan; Löfgren, Monika; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Ingvar, Martin; Fransson, Peter; Kosek, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms causing cognitive problems in chronic pain patients are not well understood. We used the Stroop color word task (SCWT) to investigate distraction-induced analgesia, cognitive performance, and cerebral activation patterns in 29 fibromyalgia (FM) patients (mean age 49.8 years, range 25–64 years) and 31 healthy controls (HC) (mean age 46.3 years, range 20–63 years). In the first study, SCWT was used to investigate distraction-induced analgesia in FM patients. Two versions of the task were applied, one with only congruent color-word images and one with incongruent images. Pressure pain thresholds were assessed using a pressure algometer before, during, and following SCWT. In the second study, reaction times (RTs) were assessed and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate cerebral activation patterns in FM patients and HC during the SCWT. An event-related task mixing incongruent and congruent images was used. In study one, we found reduced pressure pain sensitivity during SCWT in both groups alike and no statistically significant differences were seen between the incongruent and congruent conditions. The study two revealed longer RTs during the incongruent compared to the congruent condition in both groups. FM patients had longer RTs than HC in both conditions. Furthermore, we found a significant interaction between group and congruency; that is, the group differences in RTs were more pronounced during the incongruent condition. This was reflected in a reduced activation of the caudate nucleus, lingual gyrus, temporal areas, and the hippocampus in FM patients compared to HC. In conclusion, we found normal pain inhibition during SWTC in FM patients. The cognitive difficulties seen in FM patients, reflected in longer RTs, were related to reduced activation of the caudate nucleus and hippocampus during incongruent SCWT, which most likely affected the mechanisms of cognitive learning in FM patients. PMID:25275449

  1. Fibromyalgia patients had normal distraction related pain inhibition but cognitive impairment reflected in caudate nucleus and hippocampus during the Stroop Color Word Test.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, Sofia; Flodin, Pär; Berrebi, Jonathan; Löfgren, Monika; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Ingvar, Martin; Fransson, Peter; Kosek, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms causing cognitive problems in chronic pain patients are not well understood. We used the Stroop color word task (SCWT) to investigate distraction-induced analgesia, cognitive performance, and cerebral activation patterns in 29 fibromyalgia (FM) patients (mean age 49.8 years, range 25-64 years) and 31 healthy controls (HC) (mean age 46.3 years, range 20-63 years). In the first study, SCWT was used to investigate distraction-induced analgesia in FM patients. Two versions of the task were applied, one with only congruent color-word images and one with incongruent images. Pressure pain thresholds were assessed using a pressure algometer before, during, and following SCWT. In the second study, reaction times (RTs) were assessed and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate cerebral activation patterns in FM patients and HC during the SCWT. An event-related task mixing incongruent and congruent images was used. In study one, we found reduced pressure pain sensitivity during SCWT in both groups alike and no statistically significant differences were seen between the incongruent and congruent conditions. The study two revealed longer RTs during the incongruent compared to the congruent condition in both groups. FM patients had longer RTs than HC in both conditions. Furthermore, we found a significant interaction between group and congruency; that is, the group differences in RTs were more pronounced during the incongruent condition. This was reflected in a reduced activation of the caudate nucleus, lingual gyrus, temporal areas, and the hippocampus in FM patients compared to HC. In conclusion, we found normal pain inhibition during SWTC in FM patients. The cognitive difficulties seen in FM patients, reflected in longer RTs, were related to reduced activation of the caudate nucleus and hippocampus during incongruent SCWT, which most likely affected the mechanisms of cognitive learning in FM patients.

  2. Tandem symptomatic internal carotid artery and persistent hypoglossal artery stenosis treated by endovascular stenting and flow reversal

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Jorge L; Jahshan, Shady; Dumont, Travis M; Kan, Peter; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2013-01-01

    Persistence of the hypoglossal artery into adulthood is a rare vascular anomaly and, when present, provides the predominant vascular supply to the posterior circulation. We describe a case of vertebrobasilar insufficiency associated with severe high-grade stenosis of the persistent hypoglossal artery and tandem stenosis of the proximal ipsilateral internal carotid artery, treated by an endovascular approach. The unique anatomical and technical challenges associated with this case are reviewed in detail. PMID:23709141

  3. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of a Wide-Neck Aneurysm of a Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, Sebastian Zander, Tobias; Rabellino, Martin; Maynar, Manuel

    2009-03-15

    Persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) represents the second most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis. The association of PPHA with intracranial aneurysms is not unusual. Treatment of aneurysms located on the PPHA itself is challenging due to the increased risk of ischemic complications secondary to the hypoglossal artery often being the sole contributor of flow to the posterior circulation. We report a case of a wide-neck aneurysm in a PPHA successfully treated using a stent-assisted coil embolization technique.

  4. Na(V)1.1 channels are critical for intercellular communication in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and for normal circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung; Yu, Frank H; Schwartz, Michael D; Linton, Jonathan D; Bosma, Martha M; Hurley, James B; Catterall, William A; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2012-02-07

    Na(V)1.1 is the primary voltage-gated Na(+) channel in several classes of GABAergic interneurons, and its reduced activity leads to reduced excitability and decreased GABAergic tone. Here, we show that Na(V)1.1 channels are expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Mice carrying a heterozygous loss of function mutation in the Scn1a gene (Scn1a(+/-)), which encodes the pore-forming α-subunit of the Na(V)1.1 channel, have longer circadian period than WT mice and lack light-induced phase shifts. In contrast, Scn1a(+/-) mice have exaggerated light-induced negative-masking behavior and normal electroretinogram, suggesting an intact retina light response. Scn1a(+/-) mice show normal light induction of c-Fos and mPer1 mRNA in ventral SCN but impaired gene expression responses in dorsal SCN. Electrical stimulation of the optic chiasm elicits reduced calcium transients and impaired ventro-dorsal communication in SCN neurons from Scn1a(+/-) mice, and this communication is barely detectable in the homozygous gene KO (Scn1a(-/-)). Enhancement of GABAergic transmission with tiagabine plus clonazepam partially rescues the effects of deletion of Na(V)1.1 on circadian period and phase shifting. Our report demonstrates that a specific voltage-gated Na(+) channel and its associated impairment of SCN interneuronal communication lead to major deficits in the function of the master circadian pacemaker. Heterozygous loss of Na(V)1.1 channels is the underlying cause for severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy; the circadian deficits that we report may contribute to sleep disorders in severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy patients.

  5. Ceftriaxone attenuates ethanol drinking and restores extracellular glutamate concentration through normalization of GLT-1 in nucleus accumbens of male alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujan C; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Hristov, Alexandar M; Sari, Youssef

    2015-10-01

    Alteration of glutamatergic-neurotransmission is a hallmark of alcohol dependence. We have previously reported that chronic ethanol-drinking downregulated glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) in nucleus accumbens (NAc) in male P rats in a manner that was reversed by ceftriaxone treatment. However, the effect of ceftriaxone on extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc after chronic ethanol-drinking has not yet been studied. In the present study, male P rats were treated with ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for five consecutive days following five-weeks of free choice ethanol (15% and 30%) drinking. In vivo microdialysis was performed to measure the extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc and the effect of blockade of GLT-1 with dihydrokainic acid (DHK) on extracellular glutamate in NAc of ceftriaxone-treated rats was determined. Ceftriaxone treatment attenuated ethanol intake as well as ethanol preference. Extracellular glutamate was significantly higher in NAc after five-weeks of ethanol drinking in saline-treated compared to water control rats. Ceftriaxone treatment blocked the increase extracellular glutamate produced by ethanol intake. Blockade of GLT-1 by DHK reversed the effects of ceftriaxone on glutamate and implicated the role of GLT-1 in the normalization of extracellular glutamate by ceftriaxone. In addition, GLT-1 protein was decreased in ethanol exposed animals and ceftriaxone treatment reversed this deficit. Ceftriaxone treatment also increased glutamine synthetase activity in NAc but not in PFC as compared to ethanol drinking saline-treated rats. Our present study demonstrates that ceftriaxone treatment prevents ethanol drinking in part through normalization of extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc of male P rats via GLT-1.

  6. Lateral medullary infarction with ipsilateral hemiparesis, lemniscal sensation loss and hypoglossal nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodi; Wang, Yuzhou

    2014-04-01

    Here, we present a rare case of a lateral medullary infarction with ipsilateral hemiparesis, lemniscal sensation loss and hypoglossal nerve palsy. In this case, we proved Opalski's hypothesis by diffusion tensor tractography that ipsilateral hemiparesis in a medullary infarction is due to the involvement of the decussated corticospinal tract. We found that the clinical triad of ipsilateral hemiparesis, lemniscal sensation loss and hypoglossal nerve palsy, which had been regarded as a variant of medial medullary syndrome, turned out to be caused by lateral lower medullary infarction. Therefore, this clinical triad does not imply the involvement of the anteromedial part of medulla oblongata, when it is hard to distinguish a massive lateral medullary infarction from a hemimedullary infarction merely from MR images. At last, we suggest that hyperreflexia and Babinski's sign may not be indispensable to the diagnosis of Opalski's syndrome and we propose that "hemimedullary infarction with ipsilateral hemiparesis" is intrinsically a variant of lateral medullary infarction.

  7. Unilateral compression neuropathy of the hypoglossal nerve due to head suspension orthosis in mitochondriopathy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Hess, Barbara

    2004-12-01

    An 85-year-old woman with multisystem mitochondriopathy experienced tension headache, cervical pain, torque head-posture, and vertigo since 1980 for which she was continuously wearing a head-suspension-orthosis- since 1990. Since 1996 she developed severe left-sided weakness and wasting of the tongue. Needle-EMG of the left genioglossus muscle revealed abnormal spontaneous activity and reduced interference-pattern. No morphological alterations in the anatomical course of the hypoglossal nerve were found. Severe, unilateral weakness and wasting of the tongue was interpreted due to chronic compression of the hypoglossal nerve by long-standing use of a head-suspension-orthosis for cervical pain from cervical muscle weakness and resulting spinal degeneration.

  8. Schwannoma of the descending loop of the hypoglossal nerve: Case report.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pizzardi, Giulia; Pasqua, Rocco; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Vietri, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Schwannomas of the descending loop of the hypoglossal nerve are very rare. They are slow-growing tumors that may masquerade a carotid body tumor. A 60-year-old female was referred for a latero-cervical mass appearing as a chemodectoma at CT-scan. At operation, a 2cm mass arising from the descending loop of the hypoglossal nerve was resected en bloc with the loop itself and a functional lymphadenectomy was associated. Post-operative course was uneventful and the patient is free from disease recurrence at one year follow-up. En bloc resection remains the real curative treatment of Schwannomas, ensuring unlimited freedom from disease, although causing functional impairment which may be significant. Nonetheless recurrence should be prevented as, beside requiring reintervention, it may harbor a malignant evolution towards sarcoma. Schwannomas of the descending lop of the hypoglossal nerve may masquerade a chemodectoma of the carotid bifurcation and can be curatively resected without any functional impairment. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Bell's palsy and partial hypoglossal to facial nerve transfer: Case presentation and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Páez, Miguel Domínguez; Masi, Gilda Di; Molina, Gonzalo; Fernández, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy) is a very common condition that affects active population. Despite its generally benign course, a minority of patients can remain with permanent and severe sequelae, including facial palsy or dyskinesia. Hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis is rarely used to reinnervate the mimic muscle in these patients. In this paper, we present a case where a direct partial hypoglossal to facial nerve transfer was used to reinnervate the upper and lower face. We also discuss the indications of this procedure. Case Description: A 53-year-old woman presenting a spontaneous complete (House and Brackmann grade 6) facial palsy on her left side showed no improvement after 13 months of conservative treatment. Electromyography (EMG) showed complete denervation of the mimic muscles. A direct partial hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis was performed, including dissection of the facial nerve at the fallopian canal. One year after the procedure, the patient showed House and Brackmann grade 3 function in her affected face. Conclusions: Partial hypoglossal–facial anastomosis with intratemporal drilling of the facial nerve is a viable technique in the rare cases in which severe Bell's palsy does not recover spontaneously. Only carefully selected patients can really benefit from this technique. PMID:22574255

  10. Alterations in hypoglossal motor neurons due to GAD67 and VGAT deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Matthew J; Kanjhan, Refik; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Noakes, Peter G; Bellingham, Mark C

    2017-03-01

    There is an emerging body of evidence that glycinergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs onto motor neurons (MNs) help regulate the final number of MNs and axonal muscle innervation patterns. Using mutant glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter (VGAT) deficient mice, we describe the effect that deficiencies of presynaptic GABAergic and/or glycinergic release have on the post-synaptic somato-dendritic structure of motor neurons, and the development of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to MNs. We use whole-cell patch clamp recording of synaptic currents in E18.5 hypoglossal MNs from brainstem slices, combined with dye-filling of these recorded cells with Neurobiotin™, high-resolution confocal imaging and 3-dimensional reconstructions. Hypoglossal MNs from GAD67- and VGAT-deficient mice display decreased inhibitory neurotransmission and increased excitatory synaptic inputs. These changes are associated with increased dendritic arbor length, increased complexity of dendritic branching, and increased density of spiny processes. Our results show that presynaptic release of inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitters are potent regulators of hypoglossal MN morphology and key regulators of synaptic inputs during this critical developmental time point. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A single hypoglossal nerve for bilateral smile reconstruction in Möbius syndrome.

    PubMed

    Amer, Tarek A

    2010-11-01

    Möbius syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by a variety of cranial nerve defects. Although there are several variants of Möbius syndrome depending on which cranial nerves are affected, the commonest form involves facial and abducens cranial nerve paralysis. Despite several strategies for bilateral smile reconstruction that have been advocated, the condition still presents a challenge to the plastic surgeon. The most acceptable method nowadays is bilateral free neurovascularized muscle transfer. The author represents a new method of using a single hypoglossal nerve to supply both free flaps in a Möbius patient. The procedure is done on 2 stages using both latissimus dorsi muscles and a single hypoglossal nerve. The patient regained a natural symmetric smile 12 months after the first stage. Despite hemilingual atrophy, no tongue morbidity was observed. The author concludes that despite the limitation of the study, the hypoglossal nerve is a good nerve source to supply both free flaps for smile reconstruction in Möbius syndrome.

  12. Ganglioneuromas involving the hypoglossal nerve and the vagus nerve in a child: Surgical difficulties.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Jaimanti; Mohammed, Abdul Wadood; Lele, Saudamini; Nada, Ritambra

    2016-02-01

    Ganglioneuromas are benign tumors that arise from the Schwann cells of the autonomic nervous system. They are usually seen in the posterior mediastinum and the paraspinal retroperitoneum in relation to the sympathetic chain. In the head and neck, they are usually related to the cervical sympathetic ganglia or to the ganglion nodosum of the vagus nerve or the hypoglossal nerve. We describe what we believe is the first reported case of multiple ganglioneuromas of the parapharyngeal space in which two separate cranial nerves were involved. The patient was a 10-year-old girl who presented with a 2-year history of a painless and slowly progressive swelling on the left side of her neck and a 1-year history hoarseness. She had no history of relevant trauma or surgery. Intraoperatively, we found two tumors in the left parapharyngeal space-one that had arisen from the hypoglossal nerve and the other from the vagus nerve. Both ganglioneuromas were surgically removed, but the affected nerves had to be sacrificed. Postoperatively, the patient exhibited hypoglossal nerve and vocal fold palsy, but she was asymptomatic. In addition to the case description, we discuss the difficulties we faced during surgical excision.

  13. Facial reanimation after facial nerve injury using hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis: the gruppo otologico experience.

    PubMed

    Tanbouzi Husseini, Sami; Kumar, David Victor; De Donato, Giuseppe; Almutair, Tamama; Sanna, Mario

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the results of facial nerve reanimation after facial nerve injury by means of hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis. Retrospective case review. Private neuro-otologic and cranial base quaternary referral center. Sixty patients underwent hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis for facial nerve reanimation between April 1987 and December 2010. Only forty patients completed a minimal follow up of 24 months at the time of evaluation and were included in the study population. Facial nerve paralysis was present for a mean duration of 11.3 months (range 2-42 months) and all the patients had a HB grade VI prior their surgery. Final facial nerve motor function. The most common cause of facial paralysis was vestibular Schwannoma surgery. All the patients achieved a postoperative HB grade III or IV after a mean follow-up time of 20 months. The facial movements were detected after a period that ranged from ranged from 5 to 9 months. Only 4 patients suffered from difficulties during eating and drinking and three of them had associated lower cranial nerve deficit. Despite the various techniques in facial reanimation following total facial nerve paralysis, the end to end of hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis remains one of the best treatments in cases of viable distal facial stump and nonatrophic musculature.

  14. Ultrasound findings of bilateral hypoplasia of the vertebral arteries associated with a persistent carotid-hypoglossal artery

    PubMed Central

    Janzen, Annette; Steinhuber, Christine Robert; Bogdahn, Ulrich Robert; Schuierer, Gerhard Robert; Schlachetzki, Felix

    2009-01-01

    We present a 31-year-old female who was admitted to our neurology department for vertigo, partial left-sided hemihypesthesia and nuchal headache of subacute onset. Colour-duplex ultrasound disclosed bilateral low flow with a high resistance flow pattern in both vertebral arteries in the V2 segments, while the basilar artery had normal flow. CT angiography and MRI ruled out any ischaemic cerebral infarct and disclosed a persistent hypoglossal artery (PHA) originating from the left internal carotid artery (ICA). The patient was eventually treated for cervicobrachialgia. Persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis such as PHA may account for an atypical stroke pattern in carotid disease, aneurysms and arterovenous malformations. In retrospect, PHA is amendable to colour-Duplex investigation due to an abnormal ICA flow and a discrepancy between the vertebral and basilar flow patterns. Ultrasound investigation of the vertebrobasilar system remains a challenge as variants appear frequently; hypoplasia of the vertebral arteries should thus be confirmed using CT or MR angiography. PMID:21686784

  15. Ultrasound findings of bilateral hypoplasia of the vertebral arteries associated with a persistent carotid-hypoglossal artery.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Annette; Steinhuber, Christine Robert; Bogdahn, Ulrich Robert; Schuierer, Gerhard Robert; Schlachetzki, Felix

    2009-01-01

    We present a 31-year-old female who was admitted to our neurology department for vertigo, partial left-sided hemihypesthesia and nuchal headache of subacute onset. Colour-duplex ultrasound disclosed bilateral low flow with a high resistance flow pattern in both vertebral arteries in the V2 segments, while the basilar artery had normal flow. CT angiography and MRI ruled out any ischaemic cerebral infarct and disclosed a persistent hypoglossal artery (PHA) originating from the left internal carotid artery (ICA). The patient was eventually treated for cervicobrachialgia. Persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis such as PHA may account for an atypical stroke pattern in carotid disease, aneurysms and arterovenous malformations. In retrospect, PHA is amendable to colour-Duplex investigation due to an abnormal ICA flow and a discrepancy between the vertebral and basilar flow patterns. Ultrasound investigation of the vertebrobasilar system remains a challenge as variants appear frequently; hypoplasia of the vertebral arteries should thus be confirmed using CT or MR angiography.

  16. The Kölliker-Fuse nucleus: a review of animal studies and the implications for cranial nerve function in humans.

    PubMed

    Browaldh, Nanna; Bautista, Tara G; Dutschmann, Mathias; Berkowitz, Robert G

    2016-11-01

    To review the scientific literature on the relationship between Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) and cranial nerve function in animal models, with view to evaluating the potential role of KF maturation in explaining age-related normal physiologic parameters and developmental and acquired impairment of cranial nerve function in humans. Medical databases (Medline and PubMed). Studies investigating evidence of KF activity responsible for a specific cranial nerve function that were based on manipulation of KF activity or the use of neural markers were included. Twenty studies were identified that involved the trigeminal (6 studies), vagus (9), and hypoglossal nerves (5). These pertained specifically to a role of the KF in mediating the dive reflex, laryngeal adductor control, swallowing function and upper airway tone. The KF acts as a mediator of a number of important functions that relate primarily to laryngeal closure, upper airway tone and swallowing. These areas are characterized by a variety of disorders that may present to the otolaryngologist, and hence the importance of understanding the role played by the KF in maintaining normal function.

  17. Minimally Invasive Approach to the Lingual and Hypoglossal Nerves in the Adult Rat.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Edward John; Phillips, Grady W; Gratton, Michael Anne; Long, John P; Varvares, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    Surgical manipulation of the sensory and motor nerves of the rat tongue is often employed in studies evaluating the oral cavity functions of mastication and deglutition. A noninvasive, atraumatic approach that will then facilitate sufficient manipulation of these structures is required. In this study, we detail an approach that consistently allows identification of the hypoglossal (motor) and lingual (sensory) nerves of the rat. Six Wistar rats (250-500 g) were anesthetized and dissected either as fresh tissue (N = 3) or following transcardial perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde (N = 3). Both fixed and non-fixed specimens of the rat head and neck were incised in the right submandibular region. The first animal in each group was used to gain a basic understanding of the regional muscular anatomy with reference to the hypoglossal and lingual nerves. Subsequent animals were used for the development of an efficient and minimally invasive approach to these nerves. The resultant approach begins as an incision through skin and platysma, followed by medial reflection of the digastric muscle. This allows visualization of the hypoglossal nerve in the region of the bifurcation of the common trunk into medial and lateral subdivisions. Next, the lingual nerve dissection is approached by reflection rostrally of the transversus mandibularis muscle and a caudal reflection of the mylohyoid muscle. This dissection reveals the geniohyoid muscle which when separated bluntly using forceps, exposes the lingual nerve. The anatomical approach described and illustrated herein will aid investigators in consistent identification of these two nerves as fundamental methods of their projects.

  18. End-to-side intrapetrous hypoglossal-facialanastomosis for reanimation of the face. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Stefano; Garozzo, Debora; Migliorini, Vittorino; Buffatti, Paolo

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to report on further experience with a new technique for reanimation of the facial nerve. This procedure allows a straight end-to-side hypoglossal-facial anastomosis without interruption of the 12th cranial nerve or the need for graft interposition. It is technically demanding and time consuming but offers an effective, reliable, and extraordinarily quick means of reinnervating the facial muscles, including the orbicularis oculi muscle, thus avoiding the need for a gold weight in the eyelid or a fascial sling.

  19. Developmental nicotine exposure enhances inhibitory synaptic transmission in motor neurons and interneurons critical for normal breathing

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Stuti J.; Wollman, Lila Buls; Harrison, Caitlyn M.; Pilarski, Jason Q.; Fregosi, Ralph F.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine exposure in utero negatively affects neuronal growth, differentiation and synaptogenesis. We used rhythmic brainstems slices and immunohistochemistry to determine how developmental nicotine exposure (DNE) alters inhibitory neurotransmission in two regions essential to normal breathing, the hypoglossal motor nucleus (XIIn) and preBötzinger complex (preBötC). We microinjected glycine or muscimol (GABAA agonist) into the XIIn or preBötC of rhythmic brainstem slices from neonatal rats while recording from XII nerve roots to obtain XII motoneuron population activity. Injection of glycine or muscimol into the XIIn reduced XII nerve burst amplitude, while injection into the preBötC altered nerve burst frequency. These responses were exaggerated in preparations from DNE animals. Quantitative immunohistochemistry revealed a significantly higher GABAA receptor density on XII motoneurons from DNE pups. There were no differences in GABAA receptor density in the preBötC, and there were no differences in glycine receptor expression in either region. Nicotine, in the absence of other chemicals in tobacco smoke, alters normal development of brainstem circuits that are critical for normal breathing. PMID:26097160

  20. Neuronal development in the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus of the duck under normal and hypothyroid states: I. A light microscopic morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Y; Narayanan, C H

    1987-01-01

    Light microscopic morphometric procedures were used in order to examine the effects of propylthiouracil (PTU) on the development of the mesencephalic nucleus of the trigeminal nerve in the duck. A single vascular injection of a 0.2% solution of PTU was administered at a dosage of 2 microliter/gm embryo weight on embryonic day nine (E9). Control embryos received a similar dose of Ringer's solution. The following parameters of cytodifferentiation of cells of the mesencephalic nucleus of V were studied: somal area profiles, nuclear area, and nuclear cytoplasmic ratios. In addition, the frequency of beak clapping was recorded from E16. Significant differences were observed in somal area profiles in the experimental group at E16 and E18 and in nuclear area profiles from E16 through hatching. Beak activity in the experimental embryos was drastically reduced. It is concluded that PTU induces a retardation in the differentiation of cells of the mesencephalic nucleus of V which may lead to behavior deficits as evidenced by reduction of beak activity. These observations provide a basis for the study of interactions between thyroid hormone and specific neuronal systems in the emergence of an adaptive function.

  1. Visualization of the spatial positioning of the SNRPN, UBE3A, and GABRB3 genes in the normal human nucleus by three-color 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Rie; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Wada, Takahito; Saitoh, Shinji; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Wakui, Keiko

    2012-08-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structure of the genome is organized non-randomly and plays a role in genomic function via epigenetic mechanisms in the eukaryotic nucleus. Here, we analyzed the spatial positioning of three target regions; the SNRPN, UBE3A, and GABRB3 genes on human chromosome 15q11.2-q12, a representative cluster of imprinted regions, in the interphase nuclei of B lymphoblastoid cell lines, peripheral blood cells, and skin fibroblasts derived from normal individuals to look for evidence of genomic organization and function. The positions of these genes were simultaneously visualized, and all inter-gene distances were calculated for each homologous chromosome in each nucleus after three-color 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization. None of the target genes were arranged linearly in most cells analyzed, and GABRB3 was positioned closer to SNRPN than UBE3A in a high proportion of cells in all cell types. This was in contrast to the genomic map in which GABRB3 was positioned closer to UBE3A than SNRPN. We compared the distances from SNRPN to UBE3A (SU) and from UBE3A to GABRB3 (UG) between alleles in each nucleus, 50 cells per subject. The results revealed that the gene-to-gene distance of one allele was longer than that of the other and that the SU ratio (longer/shorter SU distance between alleles) was larger than the UG ratio (longer/shorter UG distance between alleles). The UG distance was relatively stable between alleles; in contrast, the SU distance of one allele was obviously longer than the distance indicated by the genome size. The results therefore indicate that SNRPN, UBE3A, and GABRB3 have non-linear and non-random curved spatial positioning in the normal nucleus, with differences in the SU distance between alleles possibly representing epigenetic evidence of nuclear organization and gene expression.

  2. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation surgery for obstructive sleep apnoea: Our preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Peter; Garaycochea, Octavio; Álvarez-Gómez, Laura; Alcalde, Juan; Alegre, Manuel; Urrestarazu, Elena

    2017-07-26

    The objective of this communication is to describe our preliminary results in upper airway stimulation surgery via hypoglossal nerve stimulation implantation for obstructive sleep apnoea. We describe 4 cases and the outcomes of the surgery were analysed using the Epworth scale, apnoea-hypopnoea index, minimal O2 Sat, average O2 Sat and snoring intensity. In all cases a significant reduction in Epworth scale values and apnoea-hypopnoea index were obtained (P<.05). The minimum and average oxygen saturation had better values after the surgery, however, there was no statistically significant difference. The snoring severity measured subjectively changed from «intense» to «absent» in all cases. The preliminary results obtained with the upper airway stimulation surgery via hypoglossal nerve stimulation showed objective and subjective improvement after the implant activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  3. Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy After Airway Management for General Anesthesia: An Analysis of 69 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aalap C.; Barnes, Christopher; Spiekerman, Charles F.; Bollag, Laurent A.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy (HNP), or neurapraxia, a rare postoperative complication after airway management, causes ipsilateral tongue deviation, dysarthria, and dysphagia. We reviewed the pathophysiological causes of hypoglossal nerve injury and discuss the associated clinical and procedural characteristics of affected patients. Furthermore, we identified procedural factors potentially affecting HNP recovery duration and propose several measures that may reduce the risk of HNP. While HNP can occur after a variety of surgeries, most cases in the literature were reported after orthopedic and otolaryngology operations, typically in males. The diagnosis is frequently missed by the anesthesia care team in the recovery room due to the delayed symptomatic onset and often requires neurology and otolaryngology evaluations to exclude serious etiologies. Signs and symptoms are self-limited, with resolution occurring within 2 months in 50% of patients, and 80% resolving within 4 months. Currently, there are no specific preventive or therapeutic recommendations. We found 69 cases of HNP after procedural airway management reported in the literature from 1926–2013. PMID:25625257

  4. Microsurgical Anatomy of the Hypoglossal and C1 Nerves: Description of a Previously Undescribed Branch to the Atlanto-Occipital Joint.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Joe; Fisahn, Christian; Alonso, Fernando; DiLorenzo, Daniel; Grunert, Peter; Kline, Matthew T; Watanabe, Koichi; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-04-01

    Distal branches of the C1 nerve that travel with the hypoglossal nerve have been well investigated but relationships of C1 and the hypoglossal nerve near the skull base have not been described in detail. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate these small branches of the hypoglossal and first cervical nerves by anatomic dissection. Twelve sides from 6 cadaveric specimens were used in this study. To elucidate the relationship among the hypoglossal, vagus, and first and cervical nerve, the mandible was removed and these nerves were dissected under the surgical microscope. A small branch was found to always arise from the dorsal aspect of the hypoglossal nerve at the level of the transverse process of the atlas and joined small branches from the first and second cervical nerves. The hypoglossal and C1 nerves formed a nerve plexus, which gave rise to branches to the rectus capitis anterior and rectus capitis lateralis muscles and the atlanto-occipital joint. Improved knowledge of such articular branches might aid in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with pain derived from the atlanto-occipital joint. We believe this to be the first description of a branch of the hypoglossal nerve being involved in the innervation of this joint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nicotinic receptor activation contrasts pathophysiological bursting and neurodegeneration evoked by glutamate uptake block on rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Silvia; Tortora, Maria; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-11-15

    Impaired uptake of glutamate builds up the extracellular level of this excitatory transmitter to trigger rhythmic neuronal bursting and delayed cell death in the brainstem motor nucleus hypoglossus. This process is the expression of the excitotoxicity that underlies motoneuron degeneration in diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis affecting bulbar motoneurons. In a model of motoneuron excitotoxicity produced by pharmacological block of glutamate uptake in vitro, rhythmic bursting is suppressed by activation of neuronal nicotinic receptors with their conventional agonist nicotine. Emergence of bursting is facilitated by nicotinic receptor antagonists. Following excitotoxicity, nicotinic receptor activity decreases mitochondrial energy dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and production of toxic radicals. Globally, these phenomena synergize to provide motoneuron protection. Nicotinic receptors may represent a novel target to contrast pathological overactivity of brainstem motoneurons and therefore to prevent their metabolic distress and death. Excitotoxicity is thought to be one of the early processes in the onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because high levels of glutamate have been detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of such patients due to dysfunctional uptake of this transmitter that gradually damages brainstem and spinal motoneurons. To explore potential mechanisms to arrest ALS onset, we used an established in vitro model of rat brainstem slice preparation in which excitotoxicity is induced by the glutamate uptake blocker dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA). Because certain brain neurons may be neuroprotected via activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by nicotine, we investigated if nicotine could arrest excitotoxic damage to highly ALS-vulnerable hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs). On 50% of patch-clamped HMs, TBOA induced intense network bursts that were inhibited by 1-10 μm nicotine, whereas nAChR antagonists

  6. [EXPRESSION OF SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER IN THE DORSAL RAPHE NUCLEUS DURING THE EARLY POSTNATAL PERIOD IN NORMAL STATE AND UNDER PRENATAL DEFICIENCY OF THE SEROTONERGIC SYSTEM IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Khozhai, L I

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the serotonin transport membrane protein (5-NTT) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DNR) was investigated in laboratory Wistar rats during the early postnatal period. The results of the immunocytochemical study using primary antibodies--anti-Serotonin transporter antibody (AbCam, UK)--showed that during the first 3 postnatal weeks the intensity of 5-NTT expression in DNR of control animals changes. At the earliest postnatal times the main part of subnuclear neurons (dorsal, ventral and lateral ones) of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DNR-d, DNR-v, DNR-lat) was shown to intensely express 5-NTT. Sites of 5-NTT localization are found on the membrane surface of neuron bodies and processes in neuropile. The reduction in the number of neurons expressing 5-NTT and of its binding sites was observed on P10. At this time a redistribution of 5-NTT localization sites occurs: they are very few on neuron bodies and dendrites but are located rather densely on the plasma membrane of axons. The number of neurons expressing 5-NTT gradually increases with age and in neuropile the density of 5-NTT localization sites rises. It is shown that during the prenatal development the reduction of serotonin level in all parts of the DNR leads to a reduction in both the number of neurons expressing 5-NTT and sites of its localization in the early postnatal period, this trend continuing with age.

  7. Long-term resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy following occipital condyle fracture: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Masood, Zihan; Krueger, Bryan; Marciano, Rudy; Chen, David; Houseman, Cliff; Insinga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The authors present the case of a patient that demonstrates resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy (HNP) subsequent to occipital condyle fracture following a motor vehicle accident. Decompression of the hypoglossal nerve and craniocervical fixation led to satisfactory long-term (>5 years) outcome. There is a scarcity of literature in recognizing HNPs following trauma and a lack of pathophysiological understanding to both a delayed presentation and to resolution versus persistence. This is the first report demonstrating long-term resolution of hypoglossal nerve injury following trauma to the craniocervical junction.

  8. Long-term resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy following occipital condyle fracture: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Masood, Zihan; Krueger, Bryan; Marciano, Rudy; Chen, David; Houseman, Cliff; Insinga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The authors present the case of a patient that demonstrates resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy (HNP) subsequent to occipital condyle fracture following a motor vehicle accident. Decompression of the hypoglossal nerve and craniocervical fixation led to satisfactory long-term (>5 years) outcome. There is a scarcity of literature in recognizing HNPs following trauma and a lack of pathophysiological understanding to both a delayed presentation and to resolution versus persistence. This is the first report demonstrating long-term resolution of hypoglossal nerve injury following trauma to the craniocervical junction. PMID:28694600

  9. [A case of medial medullary infarction with persistent primitive hypoglossal artery].

    PubMed

    Jin, Kazutaka; Aihara, Naoto; Tsukamoto, Tetsuro

    2002-04-01

    A 66-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of vomiting, dizziness and vertigo. Neurological examination on admission revealed only upbeat nystagmus without cranial nerve symptoms, paresis, cerebellar signs or sensory disturbances. Magnetic resonance(MR) images demonstrated a new T 2 high intensity and T 1 iso-intensity signal lesion in the right upper medial medulla. This medial medullary infarction caused central vestibular dysfunction. MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) originating from the right internal carotid artery to the vertebrobasilar artery associated with the stenosis of the right internal carotid artery at the level of the cervical bifurcation. This is the first report of medullary infarction with persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis. We suspected this medullary infarction was caused by artery to artery embolism in the branch of the right vertebral artery through the PPHA distal originated from the stenosis of the right internal carotid artery.

  10. Persistent GABAA/C responses to gabazine, taurine and beta-alanine in rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    2016-08-25

    In hypoglossal motoneurons, a sustained anionic current, sensitive to a blocker of ρ-containing GABA receptors, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) and insensitive to bicuculline, was previously shown to be activated by gabazine. In order to better characterize the receptors involved, the sensitivity of this atypical response to pentobarbital (30μM), allopregnanolone (0.3μM) and midazolam (0.5μM) was first investigated. Pentobarbital potentiated the response, whereas the steroid and the benzodiazepine were ineffective. The results indicate the involvement of hybrid heteromeric receptors, including at least a GABA receptor ρ subunit and a γ subunit, accounting for the pentobarbital-sensitivity. The effects of the endogenous β amino acids, taurine and β-alanine, which are released under various pathological conditions and show neuroprotective properties, were then studied. In the presence of the glycine receptor blocker strychnine (1μM), both taurine (0.3-1mM) and β-alanine (0.3mM) activated sustained anionic currents, which were partly blocked by TPMPA (100μM). Thus, both β amino acids activated ρ-containing GABA receptors in hypoglossal motoneurons. Bicuculline (20μM) reduced responses to taurine and β-alanine, but small sustained responses persisted in the presence of both strychnine and bicuculline. Responses to β-alanine were slightly increased by allopregnanolone, indicating a contribution of the bicuculline- and neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors underlying tonic inhibition in these motoneurons. Since sustained activation of anionic channels inhibits most mature principal neurons, the ρ-containing GABA receptors permanently activated by taurine and β-alanine might contribute to some of their neuroprotective properties under damaging overexcitatory situations. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Outcome-dependent coactivation of lip and tongue primary somatosensory representation following hypoglossal-facial transfer after peripheral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Rottler, Philipp; Schroeder, Henry W S; Lotze, Martin

    2014-02-01

    A hypoglossal-facial transfer is a common surgical strategy for reanimating the face after persistent total hemifacial palsy. We were interested in how motor recovery is associated with cortical reorganization of lip and tongue representation in the primary sensorimotor cortex after the transfer. Therefore, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 13 patients who underwent a hypoglossal-facial transfer after unilateral peripheral facial palsy. To identify primary motor and somatosensory tongue and lip representation sites, we measured repetitive tongue and lip movements during fMRI. Electromyography (EMG) of the perioral muscles during tongue and lip movements and standardized evaluation of lip elevation served as outcome parameters. We found an association of cortical representation sites in the pre- and postcentral gyrus (decreased distance of lip and tongue representation) with symmetry of recovered lip movements (lip elevation) and coactivation of the lip during voluntary tongue movements (EMG-activity of the lip during tongue movements). Overall, our study shows that hypoglossal-facial transfer resulted in an outcome-dependent cortical reorganization with activation of the cortical tongue area for restituded movement of the lip. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Neutron–proton effective mass splitting in neutron-rich matter at normal density from analyzing nucleon–nucleus scattering data within an isospin dependent optical model

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xiao -Hua; Guo, Wen -Jun; Li, Bao -An; ...

    2015-04-01

    The neutron–proton effective mass splitting in asymmetric nucleonic matter of isospin asymmetry δ and normal density is found to be m*n-p≡(m*n – m*p)/m = (0.41 ± 0.15)δ from analyzing globally 1088 sets of reaction and angular differential cross sections of proton elastic scattering on 130 targets with beam energies from 0.783 MeV to 200 MeV, and 1161 sets of data of neutron elastic scattering on 104 targets with beam energies from 0.05 MeV to 200 MeV within an isospin dependent non-relativistic optical potential model. It sets a useful reference for testing model predictions on the momentum dependence of the nucleonmore » isovector potential necessary for understanding novel structures and reactions of rare isotopes.« less

  13. Neutron-proton effective mass splitting in neutron-rich matter at normal density from analyzing nucleon-nucleus scattering data within an isospin dependent optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Hua; Guo, Wen-Jun; Li, Bao-An; Chen, Lie-Wen; Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Newton, William G.

    2015-04-01

    The neutron-proton effective mass splitting in asymmetric nucleonic matter of isospin asymmetry δ and normal density is found to be mn-p* ≡ (mn* - mp*) / m = (0.41 ± 0.15) δ from analyzing globally 1088 sets of reaction and angular differential cross sections of proton elastic scattering on 130 targets with beam energies from 0.783 MeV to 200 MeV, and 1161 sets of data of neutron elastic scattering on 104 targets with beam energies from 0.05 MeV to 200 MeV within an isospin dependent non-relativistic optical potential model. It sets a useful reference for testing model predictions on the momentum dependence of the nucleon isovector potential necessary for understanding novel structures and reactions of rare isotopes.

  14. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated.

  15. Dilation of the oropharynx via selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingtao; Sahin, Mesut; Durand, Dominique M.

    2005-12-01

    The functional effects of selective hypoglossal nerve (HG) stimulation with a multi-contact peripheral nerve electrode were assessed using images of the upper airways and the tongue in anesthetized beagles. A biphasic pulse train of 50 Hz frequency and 2 s duration was applied through each one of the tripolar contact sets of the nerve electrode while the pharyngeal images were acquired into a computer. The stimulation current was limited to 20% above the activation threshold for maximum selectivity. The images showed that various contact sets could generate several different activation patterns of the tongue muscles resulting in medial and/or lateral dilation and closing of the airways at the tongue root. Some of these patterns translated into an increase in the oropharyngeal size while others did not have any effect. The pharyngeal sizes were not statistically different during stimulation either between the two different positions of the head (30° and 60°), or when the lateral contacts were compared with the medial ones. The contacts that had the least effect generated an average of 53 ± 15% pharyngeal dilation relative to the best contacts, indicating that the results are marginally sensitive to the contact position around the HG nerve trunk. These results suggest that selective HG nerve stimulation can be a useful technique to produce multiple tongue activation patterns that can dilate the pharynx. This may in turn increase the size of the patient population who can benefit from HG nerve stimulation as a treatment method for obstructive sleep apnea.

  16. Systemic Delivery of a Brain-Penetrant TrkB Antagonist Reduces Cocaine Self-Administration and Normalizes TrkB Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens and Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Verheij, Michel M M; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Caffino, Lucia; Giannotti, Giuseppe; Cazorla, Maxime; Fumagalli, Fabio; Riva, Marco A; Homberg, Judith R; Koob, George F; Contet, Candice

    2016-08-03

    Cocaine exposure alters brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the brain. BDNF signaling through TrkB receptors differentially modulates cocaine self-administration, depending on the brain regions involved. In the present study, we determined how brain-wide inhibition of TrkB signaling affects cocaine intake, the motivation for the drug, and reinstatement of drug taking after extinction. To overcome the inability of TrkB ligands to cross the blood-brain barrier, the TrkB antagonist cyclotraxin-B was fused to the nontoxic transduction domain of the tat protein from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (tat-cyclotraxin-B). Intravenous injection of tat-cyclotraxin-B dose-dependently reduced cocaine intake, motivation for cocaine (as measured under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement), and reinstatement of cocaine taking in rats allowed either short or long access to cocaine self-administration. In contrast, the treatment did not affect operant responding for a highly palatable sweet solution, demonstrating that the effects of tat-cyclotraxin-B are specific for cocaine reinforcement. Cocaine self-administration increased TrkB signaling and activated the downstream Akt pathway in the nucleus accumbens, and had opposite effects in the prefrontal cortex. Pretreatment with tat-cyclotraxin-B normalized protein levels in these two dopamine-innervated brain regions. Cocaine self-administration also increased TrkB signaling in the ventral tegmental area, where the dopaminergic projections originate, but pretreatment with tat-cyclotraxin-B did not alter this effect. Altogether, our data show that systemic administration of a brain-penetrant TrkB antagonist leads to brain region-specific effects and may be a potential pharmacological strategy for the treatment of cocaine addiction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through TrkB receptors plays a well established role in cocaine reinforcement. However, local manipulation of BDNF signaling

  17. Systemic Delivery of a Brain-Penetrant TrkB Antagonist Reduces Cocaine Self-Administration and Normalizes TrkB Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens and Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Caffino, Lucia; Giannotti, Giuseppe; Cazorla, Maxime; Fumagalli, Fabio; Riva, Marco A.; Homberg, Judith R.; Koob, George F.; Contet, Candice

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine exposure alters brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the brain. BDNF signaling through TrkB receptors differentially modulates cocaine self-administration, depending on the brain regions involved. In the present study, we determined how brain-wide inhibition of TrkB signaling affects cocaine intake, the motivation for the drug, and reinstatement of drug taking after extinction. To overcome the inability of TrkB ligands to cross the blood–brain barrier, the TrkB antagonist cyclotraxin-B was fused to the nontoxic transduction domain of the tat protein from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (tat-cyclotraxin-B). Intravenous injection of tat-cyclotraxin-B dose-dependently reduced cocaine intake, motivation for cocaine (as measured under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement), and reinstatement of cocaine taking in rats allowed either short or long access to cocaine self-administration. In contrast, the treatment did not affect operant responding for a highly palatable sweet solution, demonstrating that the effects of tat-cyclotraxin-B are specific for cocaine reinforcement. Cocaine self-administration increased TrkB signaling and activated the downstream Akt pathway in the nucleus accumbens, and had opposite effects in the prefrontal cortex. Pretreatment with tat-cyclotraxin-B normalized protein levels in these two dopamine-innervated brain regions. Cocaine self-administration also increased TrkB signaling in the ventral tegmental area, where the dopaminergic projections originate, but pretreatment with tat-cyclotraxin-B did not alter this effect. Altogether, our data show that systemic administration of a brain-penetrant TrkB antagonist leads to brain region-specific effects and may be a potential pharmacological strategy for the treatment of cocaine addiction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through TrkB receptors plays a well established role in cocaine reinforcement. However, local

  18. Ampakine CX717 potentiates intermittent hypoxia-induced hypoglossal long-term facilitation.

    PubMed

    Turner, S M; ElMallah, M K; Hoyt, A K; Greer, J J; Fuller, D D

    2016-09-01

    Glutamatergic currents play a fundamental role in regulating respiratory motor output and are partially mediated by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors throughout the premotor and motor respiratory circuitry. Ampakines are pharmacological compounds that enhance glutamatergic transmission by altering AMPA receptor channel kinetics. Here, we examined if ampakines alter the expression of respiratory long-term facilitation (LTF), a form of neuroplasticity manifested as a persistent increase in inspiratory activity following brief periods of reduced O2 [intermittent hypoxia (IH)]. Current synaptic models indicate enhanced effectiveness of glutamatergic synapses after IH, and we hypothesized that ampakine pretreatment would potentiate IH-induced LTF of respiratory activity. Inspiratory bursting was recorded from the hypoglossal nerve of anesthetized and mechanically ventilated mice. During baseline (BL) recording conditions, burst amplitude was stable for at least 90 min (98 ± 5% BL). Exposure to IH (3 × 1 min, 15% O2) resulted in a sustained increase in burst amplitude (218 ± 44% BL at 90 min following final bout of hypoxia). Mice given an intraperitoneal injection of ampakine CX717 (15 mg/kg) 10 min before IH showed enhanced LTF (500 ± 110% BL at 90 min). Post hoc analyses indicated that CX717 potentiated LTF only when initial baseline burst amplitude was low. We conclude that under appropriate conditions ampakine pretreatment can potentiate IH-induced respiratory LTF. These data suggest that ampakines may have therapeutic value in the context of hypoxia-based neurorehabilitation strategies, particularly in disorders with blunted respiratory motor output such as spinal cord injury.

  19. Respiratory motoneurons and pathological conditions: lessons from hypoglossal motoneurons challenged by excitotoxic or oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Cifra, Alessandra; Nani, Francesca; Nistri, Andrea

    2011-10-15

    Hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs) are respiration-related brainstem neurons that command rhythmic contraction of the tongue muscles in concert with the respiratory drive. In experimental conditions, HMs can exhibit a range of rhythmic patterns that may subserve different motor outputs and functions. Neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou-Gehrig disease) often damage HMs with distressing symptoms like dysarthria, dysphagia and breathing difficulty related to degeneration of respiratory motoneurons. While the cause of ALS remains unclear, early diagnosis remains an important goal for potential treatment because fully blown clinical symptoms appear with degeneration of about 30% motoneurons. Using a simple in vitro model of the rat brainstem to study the consequences of excitotoxicity or oxidative stress (believed to occur during the onset of ALS) on HMs, it is possible to observe distinct electrophysiological effects associated with HM experimental pathology. In fact, excitotoxicity caused by glutamate uptake block triggers sustained bursting and enhanced synaptic transmission, whereas oxidative stress generates slow depolarization, augmented repeated firing, and decreased synaptic transmission. In either case, only a subpopulation of HMs shows abnormal functional changes. Although these two insults induce separate functional signatures, the consequences on HMs after a few hours are similar and are preceded by activation of the stress transcription factor ATF-3. The deleterious action of excitotoxicity is inhibited by early administration of riluzole, a drug currently employed for the symptomatic treatment of ALS, demonstrating that this in vitro model can be useful for testing potential neuroprotective agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharyngeal airway wall mechanics using tagged magnetic resonance imaging during medial hypoglossal nerve stimulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Brennick, Michael J; Pickup, Stephen; Dougherty, Lawrence; Cater, Jacqueline R; Kuna, Samuel T

    2004-01-01

    hypoglossal nerve is predominantly due to ventral displacement of the ventral and lateral pharyngeal walls. PMID:15579543

  1. Nicotine protects rat hypoglossal motoneurons from excitotoxic death via downregulation of connexin 36

    PubMed Central

    Corsini, Silvia; Tortora, Maria; Rauti, Rossana; Nistri, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Motoneuron disease including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may be due, at an early stage, to deficit in the extracellular clearance of the excitatory transmitter glutamate. A model of glutamate-mediated excitotoxic cell death based on pharmacological inhibition of its uptake was used to investigate how activation of neuronal nicotinic receptors by nicotine may protect motoneurons. Hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs) in neonatal rat brainstem slices were exposed to the glutamate uptake blocker DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA) that evoked large Ca2+ transients time locked among nearby HMs, whose number fell by about 30% 4 h later. As nicotine or the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone suppressed bursting, we studied connexin 36 (Cx36), which constitutes gap junctions in neurons and found it largely expressed by HMs. Cx36 was downregulated when nicotine or carbenoxolone was co-applied with TBOA. Expression of Cx36 was preferentially observed in cytosolic rather than membrane fractions after nicotine and TBOA, suggesting protein redistribution with no change in synthesis. Nicotine raised the expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), a protective factor that binds the apoptotic-inducing factor (AIF) whose nuclear translocation is a cause of cell death. TBOA increased intracellular AIF, an effect blocked by nicotine. These results indicate that activation of neuronal nicotinic receptors is an early tool for protecting motoneurons from excitotoxicity and that this process is carried out via the combined decrease in Cx36 activity, overexpression of Hsp70 and fall in AIF translocation. Thus, retarding or inhibiting HM death may be experimentally achieved by targeting one of these processes leading to motoneuron death. PMID:28617431

  2. Current injection and receptor-mediated excitation produce similar maximal firing rates in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Hilary E; Fregosi, Ralph F; Fuglevand, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    The maximum firing rates of motoneurons (MNs), activated in response to synaptic drive, appear to be much lower than that elicited by current injection. It could be that the decrease in input resistance associated with increased synaptic activity (but not current injection) might blunt overall changes in membrane depolarization and thereby limit spike-frequency output. To test this idea, we recorded, in the same cells, maximal firing responses to current injection and to synaptic activation. We prepared 300 μm medullary slices in neonatal rats that contained hypoglossal MNs and used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to record their maximum firing rates in response to triangular-ramp current injections and to glutamate receptor-mediated excitation. Brief pressure pulses of high-concentration glutamate led to significant depolarization, high firing rates, and temporary cessation of spiking due to spike inactivation. In the same cells, we applied current clamp protocols that approximated the time course of membrane potential change associated with glutamate application and with peak current levels large enough to cause spike inactivation. Means (SD) of maximum firing rates obtained in response to glutamate application were nearly identical to those obtained in response to ramp current injection [glutamate 47.1 ± 12.0 impulses (imp)/s, current injection 47.5 ± 11.2 imp/s], even though input resistance was 40% less during glutamate application compared with current injection. Therefore, these data suggest that the reduction in input resistance associated with receptor-mediated excitation does not, by itself, limit the maximal firing rate responses in MNs. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. The relationship between lingual and hypoglossal nerve function and quality of life in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Elfring, T; Boliek, C A; Winget, M; Paulsen, C; Seikaly, H; Rieger, J M

    2014-02-01

    Sensorimotor impairment of the tongue has the potential to affect speech and swallowing. The purpose of this study was to critically examine the effects of nerve preservation and reinnervation after reconstruction of the base of tongue on patient-perceived outcomes of quality of life (QoL) related to speech and swallowing through completion of the EORTC QLQ-H&N35 standardised questionnaire. Thirty participants with a diagnosis of base of tongue cancer underwent primary resection and reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap, which may or may not have included nerve repair to the lingual nerve, hypoglossal nerve or both. Eight QoL domains sensitive to changes in motor and sensory nerve function were included in the analysis. Transected lingual and hypoglossal nerves were associated with difficulty in swallowing, social eating, dry mouth and social contact. There were fewer problems reported when these nerves were either repaired or left intact. There were no significant differences between patient nerve status and QoL outcomes for speech, sticky saliva and use of feeding tubes. This study was the first to examine the impact of sensory or motor nerve transection and reconstruction on health-related QoL outcomes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wosiek, B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions are presented. The data are discussed within the framework of standard super-position models and from the point-of-view of the possible formation of new states of matter in heavy ion collisions.

  5. Nerve cuff electrode using embedded magnets and its application to hypoglossal nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jungmin; Hye Wee, Jee; Hoan Park, Jeong; Park, Pona; Kim, Jeong-Whun; Kim, Sung June

    2016-12-01

    Objective. A novel nerve cuff electrode with embedded magnets was fabricated and developed. In this study, a pair of magnets was fully embedded and encapsulated in a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) substrate to utilize magnetic force in order to replace the conventional installing techniques of cuff electrodes. In vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the magnet-embedded nerve cuff electrode (MENCE). Lastly, several issues pertaining to the MENCE such as the cuff-to-nerve diameter ratio, the force of the magnets, and possible concerns were discussed in the discussion section. Approach. Electrochemical impedance spectrum and cyclic voltammetry assessments were conducted to measure the impedance and charge storage capacity of the cathodal phase (CSCc). The MENCE was installed onto the hypoglossal nerve (HN) of a rabbit and the movement of the genioglossus was recorded through C-arm fluoroscopy while the HN was stimulated by a pulsed current. Main results. The measured impedance was 0.638 ∠ -67.8° kΩ at 1 kHz and 5.27 ∠ -82.1° kΩ at 100 Hz. The average values of access resistance and cut-off frequency were 0.145 kΩ and 3.98 kHz, respectively. The CSCc of the electrode was measured as 1.69 mC cm-2 at the scan rate of 1 mV s-1. The movement of the genioglossus contraction was observed under a pulsed current with an amplitude level of 0.106 mA, a rate of 0.635 kHz, and a duration of 0.375 ms applied through the MENCE. Significance. A few methods to close and secure cuff electrodes have been researched, but they are associated with several drawbacks. To overcome these, we used magnetic force as a closing method of the cuff electrode. The MENCE can be precisely installed on a target nerve without any surgical techniques such as suturing or molding. Furthermore, it is convenient to remove the installed MENCE because it requires little force to detach one magnet from the other, enabling repeatable installation and removal. We

  6. Oocyte nucleus controls progression through meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Zbigniew; Hoffmann, Steffen; Tsurumi, Chizuko

    2005-05-15

    We analyzed progression through the meiotic maturation in oocytes manipulated to replace the prophase oocyte nucleus with the nucleus from a cumulus cell, a pachytene spermatocyte or the pronucleus from a fertilized egg. Removal of the oocyte nucleus led to a significant reduction in histone H1 kinase activity. Replacement of the oocyte nucleus by a pronucleus followed by culture resulted in premature pseudomeiotic division and occasional abnormal cytokinesis; however, histone H1 kinase activity was rescued, microtubules formed a bipolar spindle, and chromosomes were condensed. In addition to the anomalies observed after pronuclear transfer, those after transfer of the nucleus from a cumulus cell or spermatocyte included a dramatically impaired ability to form the bipolar spindle or to condense chromosomes, and histone H1 kinase activity was not rescued. Expression of a cyclin B-YFP in enucleated oocytes receiving the cumulus cell nucleus rescued histone H1 kinase activity, but spindle formation and chromosome condensation remained impaired, indicating a pleiotropic effect of oocyte nucleus removal. However, when the cumulus cell nucleus was first transformed into pronuclei (transfer into a metaphase II oocyte followed by activation), such pronuclei supported maturation after transfer into the oocyte in a manner similar to that of normal pronuclei. These results show that the oocyte nucleus contains specific components required for the control of progression through the meiotic maturation and that some of these components are also present in pronuclei.

  7. Effect of ghrelin receptor agonist and antagonist on the activity of arcuate nucleus tyrosine hydroxylase containing neurons in C57BL/6 male mice exposed to normal or high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Pirnik, Z; Majercikova, Z; Holubova, M; Pirnik, R; Zelezna, B; Maletinska, L; Kiss, A

    2014-08-01

    Catecholamines participate in the food intake regulation, however, there are no literature data available, dealing with the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons in response to stimulation or inhibition of GHS-R (growth hormone secretagogue receptor) in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). The present study was focused to reveal whether [Dpr(N-octanoyl) 3ghrelin], a stable GHS-R agonist, itself in doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg (s.c.) or in combination with GHS-R receptor antagonist ([DLys3]GHRP-6) in dose of 10 mg/kg (s.c.), may affect the activity of ARC TH-containing neurons in C57BL/6 male mice fed either with standard (SD) or high fat diet (HFD) that developed a diet-induced obesity (DIO). The data of the present study clearly indicate that both doses of GHS-R agonist stimulated food intake in SD mice and GHS-R antagonist significantly reduced GHS-R agonist orexinergic effect in SD mice and suppressed the voluntary food intake in HFD mice. Both doses of the GHS-R agonist stimulated Fos expression in ARC neurons in both diet groups of mice which was not abolished by GHS-R antagonist pretreatment. Moreover, both doses of the GHS-R agonist significantly influenced the activation of TH neurons in the ARC of SD mice. The GHS-R antagonist also significantly increased TH neurons activation after GHS-R agonist although this effect was less powerful in HFD mice. This is the first study demonstrating response of local ARC TH neurons to peripherally applied GHS-R agonist and antagonist. The present data point out that the response of TH neurons to GHS-R agonist and antagonist is different in normal and DIO mice and extend our knowledge about the further ARC neuronal phenotype responding to peripheral ghrelin. To bring insight into the understanding of the functional significance of the activated TH neurons in ARC, in the context of the ghrelin peripheral increase, further studies are required.

  8. The intermedius nucleus of the medulla: a potential site for the integration of cervical information and the generation of autonomic responses.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ian J; Deuchars, Susan A; Deuchars, Jim

    2009-11-01

    The intermedius nucleus of the medulla (InM) is a small perihypoglossal brainstem nucleus, which receives afferent information from the neck musculature and also descending inputs from the vestibular nuclei, the gustatory portion of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and cortical areas involved in movements of the tongue. The InM sends monosynaptic projections to both the NTS and the hypoglossal nucleus. It is likely that the InM acts to integrate information from the head and neck and relays this information on to the NTS where suitable autonomic responses can be generated, and also to the hypoglossal nucleus to influence movements of the tongue and upper airways. Central to the integratory role of the InM is its neurochemical diversity. Neurones within the InM utilise the amino acid transmitters glutamate, GABA and glycine. A proportion of these excitatory and inhibitory neurones also use nitric oxide as a neurotransmitter. Peptidergic transmitters have also been found within InM neurones, although as yet the extent of the pattern of co-localisation between peptidergic and amino acid transmitters in neurones has not been established. The calcium binding proteins calretinin and parvalbumin are found within the InM in partially overlapping populations. Parvalbumin and calretinin appear to have complementary distributions within the InM, with parvalbumin being predominantly found within GABAergic neurones and calretinin being predominantly found within glutamatergic neurones. Neurones in the InM receive inputs from glutamatergic sensory afferents. This glutamatergic transmission is conducted through both NMDA and AMPA ionotropic glutamate receptors. In summary the InM contains a mixed pool of neurones including glutamatergic and GABAergic in addition to peptidergic neurones. Neurones within the InM receive inputs from the upper cervical region, descending inputs from brain regions involved in tongue movements and those involved in the coordination of the

  9. Mechanics of the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus is the distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Until recently, it was often considered simply as a unique compartment containing the genetic information of the cell and associated machinery, without much attention to its structure and mechanical properties. This article provides compelling examples that illustrate how specific nuclear structures are associated with important cellular functions, and how defects in nuclear mechanics can cause a multitude of human diseases. During differentiation, embryonic stem cells modify their nuclear envelope composition and chromatin structure, resulting in stiffer nuclei that reflect decreased transcriptional plasticity. In contrast, neutrophils have evolved characteristic lobulated nuclei that increase their physical plasticity, enabling passage through narrow tissue spaces in their response to inflammation. Research on diverse cell types further demonstrates how induced nuclear deformations during cellular compression or stretch can modulate cellular function. Pathological examples of disturbed nuclear mechanics include the many diseases caused by mutations in the nuclear envelope proteins lamin A/C and associated proteins, as well as cancer cells that are often characterized by abnormal nuclear morphology. In this article, we will focus on determining the functional relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular (dys-)function, describing the molecular changes associated with physiological and pathological examples, the resulting defects in nuclear mechanics, and the effects on cellular function. New insights into the close relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular organization and function will yield a better understanding of normal biology and will offer new clues into therapeutic approaches to the various diseases associated with defective nuclear mechanics. PMID:23737203

  10. The vasopressin-induced excitation of hypoglossal and facial motoneurons in young rats is mediated by V1a but not V1b receptors, and is independent of intracellular calcium signalling.

    PubMed

    Reymond-Marron, I; Tribollet, E; Raggenbass, M

    2006-09-01

    As a hormone, vasopressin binds to three distinct receptors: V1a and V1b receptors, which induce phospholipase-Cbeta (PLCbeta) activation and Ca2+ mobilization; and V2 receptors, which are coupled to adenylyl cyclase. V1a and V1b receptors are also present in neurons. In particular, hypoglossal (XII) and facial (VII) motoneurons are excited following vasopressin-V1a receptor binding. The aim of the present study was double: (i) to determine whether V1b receptors contribute to the excitatory effect of vasopressin in XII and VII motoneurons; and (ii) to establish whether the action of vasopressin on motoneurons is mediated by Ca2+ signalling. Patch-clamp recordings were performed in brainstem slices of young rats. Vasopressin depolarized the membrane or generated an inward current. By contrast, [1-deamino-4-cyclohexylalanine] arginine vasopressin (d[Cha4]AVP), a V1b agonist, had no effect. The action of vasopressin was suppressed by Phaa-D-Tyr(Et)-Phe-Gln-Asn-Lys-Pro-Arg-NH2, a V1a antagonist, but not by SSR149415, a V1b antagonist. Thus, the vasopressin-induced excitation of brainstem motoneurons was exclusively mediated by V1a receptors. Light microscopic autoradiography failed to detect V1b binding sites in the facial nucleus. In motoneurons loaded with GTP-gamma-S, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, the effect of vasopressin was suppressed, indicating that neuronal V1a receptors are G-protein-coupled. Intracellular Ca2+ chelation suppressed a Ca2+-activated potassium current, but did not affect the vasopressin-evoked current. H7 and GF109203, inhibitors of protein kinase C, were without effect on the vasopressin-induced excitation. U73122 and D609, PLCbeta inhibitors, were also without effect. Thus, excitation of brainstem motoneurons by V1a receptor activation is probably mediated by a second messenger distinct from that associated with peripheral V1a receptors.

  11. Targeted delivery to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Pouton, Colin W; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Roth, Daniela M; Moseley, Gregory W; Jans, David A

    2007-08-10

    Macromolecules and supramolecular complexes are frequently required to enter and exit the nucleus during normal cell function, but access is restricted and exchange to and from the nucleus is tightly controlled. We describe the mechanisms which regulate nuclear import of endogenous molecules and indicate how viruses exploit these mechanisms during their life cycle. Opportunities exist to make use of natural pathways for delivery of therapeutic entities, in particular to develop safe and effective methods for gene therapy, although past attempts to design non-viral nuclear delivery systems have met with limited success. To increase the likelihood of success scientists will need an appreciation of the mechanisms by which viruses deliver their genomes to the nucleus, and will need a commitment to control the architecture of non-viral delivery systems at the molecular level. Effective delivery systems will require several attributes to facilitate endosomal escape, microtubular transport and uptake through the nuclear pore complex. The published literature provides a strong foundation for design of nuclear targeting systems. The challenge faced by delivery scientists is to assemble a system which is as effective as, for example, the adenovirus but which lacks its immunogenicity. This article reviews the relevant literature and indicates key areas for future research.

  12. A developmental study of glutamatergic neuron populations in the ventrobasal and the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus: Comparing Genetic Absence Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) and normal control wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Kirazlı, Özlem; Çavdar, Safiye; Yıldızel, Sercan; Onat, Filiz; Kaptanoğlu, Erkan

    2017-02-01

    An imbalance of GABAergic inhibition and glutamatergic excitation is suspected to be the cause of absence epileptic seizures. Absence seizures are known to be generated in thalamocortical circuitry. In the present study we used light microscopy immunohistochemistry to quantify the density of glutamate+ve neurons at two developmental stages (P10 and P60) in two thalamic nuclei, the ventrobasal (VB) and lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in Wistar rats and compared the results with similar data obtained from genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS). Rats were perfused transcardially with glutaraldehyde and paraformaldehyde fixative, then samples from VB and LGN were removed from each animal and sectioned. The glutamatergic neurons were labelled using light-microscopic glutamate immunohistochemistry. The disector method was used to quantify the glutamate+ve neurons in VB and LGN of GAERS and Wistar rats. The data were statistically analyzed. The distribution of the glutamate+ve neurons in the VB thalamic nucleus showed a significant reduction in the neuronal profiles per unit thalamic area from P10 to P60 in both Wistar and GAERS. The decrease was greater in the GAERS compared to the Wistar animals. However, in the LGN no reduction was observed either in the Wistar or in the GAERS. Comparing the density of glutamate+ve neurons in the VB thalamic nucleus of P10 of Wistar animals with of P10 GAERS showed statistically significant greater densities of these neurons in GAERS than in the Wistar rats. However no significant difference was present at P60 between the Wistar and GAERS animals. The disproportional decrease in GAERS may be related to the onset of absence seizures or may be related to neurogenesis of absence epilepsy.

  13. On the peculiar morphology and development of the hypoglossal, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves and hypobranchial muscles in the hagfish.

    PubMed

    Oisi, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Satoko; Ota, Kinya G; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate body is characterized by its dual segmental organization: pharyngeal arches in the head and somites in the trunk. Muscular and nervous system morphologies are also organized following these metameric patterns, with distinct differences between head and trunk; branchiomeric nerves innervating pharyngeal arches are superficial to spinal nerves innervating somite derivatives. Hypobranchial muscles originate from rostral somites and occupy the "neck" at the head-trunk interface. Hypobranchial muscles, unlike ventral trunk muscles in the lateral body wall, develop from myocytes that migrate ventrally to occupy a space that is ventrolateral to the pharynx and unassociated with coelomic cavities. Occipitospinal nerves innervating these muscles also extend ventrally, thereby crossing the vagus nerve laterally. In hagfishes, the basic morphological pattern of vertebrates is obliterated by the extreme caudal shift of the posterior part of the pharynx. The vagus nerve is found unusually medially, and occipitospinal nerves remain unfasciculated, appearing as metameric spinal nerves as in the posterior trunk region. Moreover, the hagfish exhibits an undifferentiated body plan, with the hypobranchial muscles not well dissociated from the abaxial muscles in the trunk. Comparative embryological observation showed that this hagfish-specific morphology is established by secondary modification of the common vertebrate embryonic pattern, and the hypobranchial muscle homologue can be found in the rostral part of the oblique muscle with pars decussata. The morphological pattern of the hagfish represents an extreme case of heterotopy that led to the formation of the typical hypoglossal nerve, and can be regarded as an autapomorphic trait of the hagfish lineage.

  14. Power spectral analysis of hypoglossal nerve activity during intermittent hypoxia-induced long-term facilitation in mice.

    PubMed

    ElMallah, Mai K; Stanley, David A; Lee, Kun-Ze; Turner, Sara M F; Streeter, Kristi A; Baekey, David M; Fuller, David D

    2016-03-01

    Power spectral analyses of electrical signals from respiratory nerves reveal prominent oscillations above the primary rate of breathing. Acute exposure to intermittent hypoxia can induce a form of neuroplasticity known as long-term facilitation (LTF), in which inspiratory burst amplitude is persistently elevated. Most evidence indicates that the mechanisms of LTF are postsynaptic and also that high-frequency oscillations within the power spectrum show coherence across different respiratory nerves. Since the most logical interpretation of this coherence is that a shared presynaptic mechanism is responsible, we hypothesized that high-frequency spectral content would be unchanged during LTF. Recordings of inspiratory hypoglossal (XII) activity were made from anesthetized, vagotomized, and ventilated 129/SVE mice. When arterial O2 saturation (SaO2) was maintained >96%, the XII power spectrum and burst amplitude were unchanged for 90 min. Three, 1-min hypoxic episodes (SaO2 = 50 ± 10%), however, caused a persistent (>60 min) and robust (>400% baseline) increase in burst amplitude. Spectral analyses revealed a rightward shift of the signal content during LTF, with sustained increases in content above ∼125 Hz following intermittent hypoxia and reductions in power at lower frequencies. Changes in the spectral content during LTF were qualitatively similar to what occurred during the acute hypoxic response. We conclude that high-frequency content increases during XII LTF in this experimental preparation; this may indicate that intermittent hypoxia-induced plasticity in the premotor network contributes to expression of XII LTF.

  15. Transient oxidative stress evokes early changes in the functional properties of neonatal rat hypoglossal motoneurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nani, Francesca; Cifra, Alessandra; Nistri, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    Oxidative stress of motoneurons is believed to be an important contributor to neurodegeneration underlying the familial (and perhaps even the sporadic) form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This concept has generated numerous rodent genetic models with inborn oxidative stress to mimic the clinical condition. ALS is, however, a predominantly sporadic disorder probably triggered by environmental causes. Thus, it is interesting to understand how wild-type motoneurons react to strong oxidative stress as this response might cast light on the presymptomatic disease stage. The present study used, as a model, hypoglossal motoneurons from the rat brainstem slice to investigate how hydrogen peroxide could affect synaptic transmission and intrinsic motoneuron excitability in relation to their survival. Hydrogen peroxide (1 mm; 30 min) induced inward current or membrane depolarization accompanied by an increase in input resistance, enhanced firing and depressed spontaneous synaptic events. Despite enhanced intracellular oxidative processes, there was no death of motoneurons, although most cells were immunopositive for activating transcription factor 3, a stress-related transcription factor. Voltage-clamp experiments indicated increased frequency of excitatory or inhibitory miniature events, and reduced voltage-gated persistent currents of motoneurons. The global effect of this transient oxidative challenge was to depress the input flow from the premotor interneurons to motoneurons that became more excitable due to a combination of enhanced input resistance and impaired spike afterhyperpolarization. Our data show previously unreported changes in motoneuron activity associated with cell distress caused by a transient oxidative insult.

  16. Riluzole is a potent drug to protect neonatal rat hypoglossal motoneurons in vitro from excitotoxicity due to glutamate uptake block.

    PubMed

    Cifra, Alessandra; Nani, Francesca; Nistri, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Excitotoxic damage to motoneurons is thought to be an important contribution to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a slowly developing degeneration of motoneurons that, in most cases of sporadic occurrence, is associated with impaired glial glutamate uptake. Riluzole is the only drug licensed for symptomatic ALS treatment and is proposed to delay disease progression. As riluzole is administered only after full ALS manifestation, it is unclear if its early use might actually prevent motoneuron damage. We explored this issue by using, as a simple in vitro model, hypoglossal motoneurons (a primary target of ALS) of the neonatal rat brainstem slice preparation exposed to excitotoxic stress due to glutamate uptake block by DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA). TBOA evoked sustained network bursting, early (1 h) enhancement of the S100B immunostaining of gray matter astrocytes, and activated the motoneuronal stress ATF-3 transcription factor; 4 h later, loss (30%) of motoneuron staining ensued and pyknosis appeared. Riluzole (5 μM; applied 15 min after TBOA) inhibited bursting, decreased the frequency of spontaneous glutamatergic events, reversed changes in S100B immunostaining and prevented late loss of motoneuron staining. These results show that excitotoxicity induced by glutamate uptake block developed slowly, and was sensed by glia and motoneurons with delayed cell death. Our data provide novel evidence for the neuroprotective action of riluzole on motoneurons and glia when applied early after an excitotoxic stimulus. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Simultaneous expression of glutathione, thioredoxin-1, and their reductases in nerve transected hypoglossal motor neurons of rat.

    PubMed

    Hama, Isuzu; Nakagomi, Saya; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2010-01-08

    Anti-oxidative stress responses are crucial for the survival of nerve-injured motor neurons. Herein, we examined changes in expression of glutathione reductase (GSHr), thioredoxins (TRX1 and TRX2), and thioredoxin reductases (TRXr1 and TRXr2), important constituents of anti-oxidative pathways, following rat hypoglossal nerve transection. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization demonstrated that GSHr, TRX1, and TRXr1 mRNAs were significantly up-regulated during the first few weeks in nerve-injured motor neurons, while TRX2 and TRXr2 mRNAs were unchanged throughout 8 weeks after nerve transection. The up-regulation of GSH, GSHr, TRX1, and TRXr1 proteins in injured neurons was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. Western blotting also demonstrated up-regulation of GSHr, TRX1, and TRXr1 in injured neurons. These data suggest that the two major redox systems, GSH/GSHr and TRX1/TRXr1, are simultaneously activated in injured neurons, and likely provide protection of injured neurons against oxidative stress.

  18. The Nucleus Introduced

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    2011-01-01

    Now is an opportune moment to address the confluence of cell biological form and function that is the nucleus. Its arrival is especially timely because the recognition that the nucleus is extremely dynamic has now been solidly established as a paradigm shift over the past two decades, and also because we now see on the horizon numerous ways in which organization itself, including gene location and possibly self-organizing bodies, underlies nuclear functions. PMID:20660024

  19. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Maung, Khin Maung; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.

    1989-01-01

    The derivations of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and Watson multiple scattering are given. A simple optical potential is found to be the first term of that series. The number density distribution models of the nucleus, harmonic well, and Woods-Saxon are used without t-matrix taken from the scattering experiments. The parameterized two-body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are presented. The eikonal approximation was chosen as our solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  20. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Buck, Warren W.; Maung, Khin M.

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of number density distributions of the nucleus, harmonic well and Woods-Saxon models, are used with the t-matrix that is taken from the scattering experiments to find a simple optical potential. The parameterized two body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are shown. The eikonal approximation was chosen as the solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  1. Onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2012-05-15

    The energy dependence of hadron production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions reveals anomalies-the kink, horn, and step. They were predicted as signals of the deconfinement phase transition and observed by the NA49 Collaboration in central PbPb collisions at the CERN SPS. This indicates the onset of the deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions at about 30 A GeV.

  2. Avian Nucleus Retroambigualis: Cell Types and Projections to Other Respiratory-Vocal Nuclei in the Brain of the Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    PubMed Central

    Wild, J.M.; Kubke, M.F.; Mooney, R.

    2008-01-01

    In songbirds song production requires the intricate coordination of vocal and respiratory muscles under the executive influence of the telencephalon, as for speech in humans. In songbirds the site of this coordination is suspected to be the nucleus retroambigualis (RAm), because it contains premotor neurons projecting upon both vocal motoneurons and spinal motoneurons innervating expiratory muscles, and because it receives descending inputs from the telencephalic vocal control nucleus robustus archopallialis (RA). Here we used tract-tracing techniques to provide a more comprehensive account of the projections of RAm and to identify the different populations of RAm neurons. We found that RAm comprises diverse projection neuron types, including: 1) bulbospinal neurons that project, primarily contralaterally, upon expiratory motoneurons; 2) a separate group of neurons that project, primarily ipsilaterally, upon vocal motoneurons in the tracheosyringeal part of the hypoglossal nucleus (XIIts); 3) neurons that project throughout the ipsilateral and contralateral RAm; 4) another group that sends reciprocal, ascending projections to all the brainstem sources of afferents to RAm, namely, nucleus parambigualis, the ventrolateral nucleus of the rostral medulla, nucleus infra-olivarus superior, ventrolateral parabrachial nucleus, and dorsomedial nucleus of the intercollicular complex; and 5) a group of relatively large neurons that project their axons into the vagus nerve. Three morphological classes of RAm cells were identified by intracellular labeling, the dendritic arbors of which were confined to RAm, as defined by the terminal field of RA axons. Together the ascending and descending projections of RAm confirm its pivotal role in the mediation of respiratory-vocal control. PMID:19067354

  3. Avian nucleus retroambigualis: cell types and projections to other respiratory-vocal nuclei in the brain of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata).

    PubMed

    Wild, J M; Kubke, M F; Mooney, R

    2009-02-20

    In songbirds song production requires the intricate coordination of vocal and respiratory muscles under the executive influence of the telencephalon, as for speech in humans. In songbirds the site of this coordination is suspected to be the nucleus retroambigualis (RAm), because it contains premotor neurons projecting upon both vocal motoneurons and spinal motoneurons innervating expiratory muscles, and because it receives descending inputs from the telencephalic vocal control nucleus robustus archopallialis (RA). Here we used tract-tracing techniques to provide a more comprehensive account of the projections of RAm and to identify the different populations of RAm neurons. We found that RAm comprises diverse projection neuron types, including: 1) bulbospinal neurons that project, primarily contralaterally, upon expiratory motoneurons; 2) a separate group of neurons that project, primarily ipsilaterally, upon vocal motoneurons in the tracheosyringeal part of the hypoglossal nucleus (XIIts); 3) neurons that project throughout the ipsilateral and contralateral RAm; 4) another group that sends reciprocal, ascending projections to all the brainstem sources of afferents to RAm, namely, nucleus parambigualis, the ventrolateral nucleus of the rostral medulla, nucleus infra-olivarus superior, ventrolateral parabrachial nucleus, and dorsomedial nucleus of the intercollicular complex; and 5) a group of relatively large neurons that project their axons into the vagus nerve. Three morphological classes of RAm cells were identified by intracellular labeling, the dendritic arbors of which were confined to RAm, as defined by the terminal field of RA axons. Together the ascending and descending projections of RAm confirm its pivotal role in the mediation of respiratory-vocal control.

  4. Antinucleon-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical results on anti p-nucleus interactions are reviewed. We focus on determinations of the anti p optical potential from elastic scattering, the use of (anti p, anti p') inelastic scattering to reveal aspects of the spin-isospin dependence of N anti N amplitudes, and some puzzling features of (anti p, anti n) charge exchange reactions on nuclei. 47 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Leukocyte nucleus segmentation and nucleus lobe counting.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yung-Kuan; Tsai, Meng-Hsiun; Huang, Der-Chen; Zheng, Zong-Han; Hung, Kun-Ding

    2010-11-12

    Leukocytes play an important role in the human immune system. The family of leukocytes is comprised of lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and neutrophils. Any infection or acute stress may increase or decrease the number of leukocytes. An increased percentage of neutrophils may be caused by an acute infection, while an increased percentage of lymphocytes can be caused by a chronic bacterial infection. It is important to realize an abnormal variation in the leukocytes. The five types of leukocytes can be distinguished by their cytoplasmic granules, staining properties of the granules, size of cell, the proportion of the nuclear to the cytoplasmic material, and the type of nucleolar lobes. The number of lobes increased when leukemia, chronic nephritis, liver disease, cancer, sepsis, and vitamin B12 or folate deficiency occurred. Clinical neutrophil hypersegmentation has been widely used as an indicator of B12 or folate deficiency.Biomedical technologists can currently recognize abnormal leukocytes using human eyes. However, the quality and efficiency of diagnosis may be compromised due to the limitations of the biomedical technologists' eyesight, strength, and medical knowledge. Therefore, the development of an automatic leukocyte recognition system is feasible and necessary. It is essential to extract the leukocyte region from a blood smear image in order to develop an automatic leukocyte recognition system. The number of lobes increased when leukemia, chronic nephritis, liver disease, cancer, sepsis, and vitamin B12 or folate deficiency occurred. Clinical neutrophil hypersegmentation has been widely used as an indicator of B12 or folate deficiency. The purpose of this paper is to contribute an automatic leukocyte nuclei image segmentation method for such recognition technology. The other goal of this paper is to develop the method of counting the number of lobes in a cell nucleus. The experimental results demonstrated impressive segmentation accuracy

  6. Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-11-07

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs.

  7. Nucleus from string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Morita, Takeshi

    2011-08-01

    In generic holographic QCD, we find that baryons are bound to form a nucleus, and that its radius obeys the empirically-known mass-number (A) dependence r∝A1/3 for large A. Our result is robust, since we use only a generic property of D-brane actions in string theory. We also show that nucleons are bound completely in a finite volume. Furthermore, employing a concrete holographic model (derived by Hashimoto, Iizuka, and Yi, describing a multibaryon system in the Sakai-Sugimoto model), the nuclear radius is evaluated as O(1)×A1/3[fm], which is consistent with experiments.

  8. Reality of comet nucleus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The prime problem of a comet mission must be to settle whether the cometary nucleus has an actual tangible material existence, or whether it arises from some optical effect present only at times within comets. The absence of any large particles in a comet seems to be demonstrated by certain meteor showers. A feature that would seem to indicate that a comet consists primarily of a swarm of particles is that the coma in general contracts as the comet approaches the sun, roughly in proportion within the distance, and then expands again as it recedes.

  9. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, H.; Garvey, G.; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  10. THE SPITZER MID-INFRARED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SURVEY. I. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF OBSCURED CANDIDATES AND NORMAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED IN THE MID-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, M.; Ridgway, S. E.; Gates, E. L.; Petric, A. O.; Sajina, A.; Urrutia, T.; Cox Drews, S.; Harrison, C.; Seymour, N.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a program of optical and near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up of candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected in the mid-infrared. This survey selects both normal and obscured AGNs closely matched in luminosity across a wide range, from Seyfert galaxies with bolometric luminosities L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} to highly luminous quasars (L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup 14} L {sub ☉}), all with redshifts ranging from 0 to 4.3. Samples of candidate AGNs were selected with mid-infrared color cuts at several different 24 μm flux density limits to ensure a range of luminosities at a given redshift. The survey consists of 786 candidate AGNs and quasars, of which 672 have spectroscopic redshifts and classifications. Of these, 137 (20%) are type 1 AGNs with blue continua, 294 (44%) are type 2 objects with extinctions A{sub V} ∼> 5 toward their AGNs, 96 (14%) are AGNs with lower extinctions (A{sub V} ∼ 1), and 145 (22%) have redshifts, but no clear signs of AGN activity in their spectra. Of the survey objects 50% have L {sub bol} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}, in the quasar regime. We present composite spectra for type 2 quasars and objects with no signs of AGN activity in their spectra. We also discuss the mid-infrared—emission-line luminosity correlation and present the results of cross correlations with serendipitous X-ray and radio sources. The results show that: (1) obscured objects dominate the overall AGN population, (2) mid-infrared selected AGN candidates exist which lack AGN signatures in their optical spectra but have AGN-like X-ray or radio counterparts, and (3) X-ray and optical classifications of obscured and unobscured AGNs often differ.

  11. Higgs-boson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Cross-section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two-photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two-photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  12. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  13. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  14. Higgs-boson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Cross-section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two-photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two-photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  15. Networking the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Indika; Scalzo, David; Tapscott, Stephen J; Kosak, Steven T; Groudine, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The nuclei of differentiating cells exhibit several fundamental principles of self-organization. They are composed of many dynamical units connected physically and functionally to each other—a complex network—and the different parts of the system are mutually adapted and produce a characteristic end state. A unique cell-specific signature emerges over time from complex interactions among constituent elements that delineate coordinate gene expression and chromosome topology. Each element itself consists of many interacting components, all dynamical in nature. Self-organizing systems can be simplified while retaining complex information using approaches that examine the relationship between elements, such as spatial relationships and transcriptional information. These relationships can be represented using well-defined networks. We hypothesize that during the process of differentiation, networks within the cell nucleus rewire according to simple rules, from which a higher level of order emerges. Studying the interaction within and among networks provides a useful framework for investigating the complex organization and dynamic function of the nucleus. PMID:20664641

  16. Meson multiplicity versus energy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, T. W.; Freier, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of meson multiplicity as a function of energy at energies up to 100 GeV/u in nucleus-nucleus collisions has been made, using cosmic-ray data in nuclear emulsion. The data are consistent with simple nucleon-nucleon superposition models. Multiplicity per interacting nucleon in AA collisions does not appear to differ significantly from pp collisions.

  17. Momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Ferdous; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    An optical model description, based on multiple scattering theory, of longitudinal momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The crucial role of the imaginary component of the nucleon-nucleon transition matrix in accounting for longitudinal momentum transfer is demonstrated. Results obtained with this model are compared with Intranuclear Cascade (INC) calculations, as well as with predictions from Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (VUU) and quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. Comparisons are also made with experimental data where available. These indicate that the present model is adequate to account for longitudinal momentum transfer in both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions over a wide range of energies.

  18. The Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    Exciting new broadband observations of the galactic nucleus have placed the heart of the Milky Way under intense scrutiny in recent years. This has been due in part to the growing interest from theorists motivated to study the physics of black hole accretion, magnetized gas dynamics, and unusual star formation. The center of our Galaxy is now known to harbor the most compelling supermassive black hole candidate, weighing in at 3-4 million solar masses. Its nearby environment is comprised of a molecular dusty ring, clusters of evolved and young stars, diffuse hot gas, ionized gas streamers, and several supernova remnants. This chapter will focus on the physical makeup of this dynamic region and the feasibility of actually imaging the black hole's shadow in the coming decade with mm interferometry.

  19. Restoring Segmental Biomechanics Through Nucleus Augmentation: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Matthew H; Cohen, Charles S; Ducheyne, Paul; Walsh, William R

    2016-12-01

    In vitro biomechanical laboratory study. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a mechanical treatment to create a degenerative motion segment and the ability of nucleus augmentation to restore biomechanics. In cases with an intact annulus fibrosus, the replacement or augmentation of the nucleus pulposus alone may provide a less invasive option to restore normal biomechanics and disk height when compared with spinal fusion or total disk replacement. Laboratory testing allows these changes to be fully characterized. However, without preexisting pathology, nucleus augmentation therapies are difficult to evaluate in vitro. The present study evaluated pure moment bending and compressive biomechanics in 3 states (n=6): (1) intact, (2) after creep loading and nucleus disruption to induce degenerative biomechanical changes, and (3) after nucleus augmentation through an injectable polymer (DiscCell). Neutral zone and ROM were increased in all modes of bending after the degenerative treatment. The most sensitive mode of bending was lateral bending, with intact ROM (20.0±2.9 degrees) increased to 22.3±2.6 degrees after degenerative treatment and reduced to 18.4±1.6 degrees after injection of the polymer. All bending ROM and NZ changes induced by the degenerative treatment were reversed by nucleus augmentation. This material was shown to be effective at altering motion segment biomechanics and restoring disk height during time zero tests. This technique may provide a model to examine the time zero performance of a nucleus augmentation device/material.

  20. Hyperon-nucleus potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dover, C. B.; Gal, A.

    We review models for the interaction of baryons ( N, Λ, Σ and Ξ) with nuclei, emphasizing the underlying meson exchange picture. Starting from a phenomenological one boson exchange model (the Nijmegen potential, as an example) which accounts for the available NN, ΛN and ΣN two-body scattering data, we show how to construct the effective baryon-nucleon interaction ( G-matrix). Employing the folding model, we then obtain the many-body potentials for bound states in terms of the nuclear density and the appropriate spin-isospin weighted G-matrices. The models we emphasize most impose SU(3) constraints on baryon-baryon coupling constants SU(3) is broken through the use of physical masses), although we also compare with rough estimates based on quark model relations between coupling constants. We stress the essential unity and economy of such models, in which nucleon and hyperon-nucleus potentials are intimately related via SU(3), and the connection between the two-body and many-body potentials is preserved. We decompose the nuclear potentials into central and spin-orbit parts, each of which is isospin dependent. For nucleons, the microscopic origin of the isospin dependent Lane potential V1 N is clarified. For Λ and Σ hyperons, the one boson exchange model with SU(3) constraints leads to one-body spin-orbit strengths VLSB which are relatively weak ( VLSΛ ≈ 1.5-2 MeV, VLSΣ ≈ 2.5-;3 MeV, compared to VLSN ≈ 7-9 MeV). We demonstrate the interplay between symmetric and antisymmetric two-body spin-orbit forces which give rise to these results, as well as the special role of K and K ∗ exchange for hyperons. We contrast these results with predictions based on the naive quark model. From S and P-wave two-body interactions, a Lane potential for the Σ of depth V1 Σ ≈ 50-60 MeV is predicted although this result is somewhat uncertain. For the Ξ, the nuclear potential is very different in various models for the two-body interaction based on SU(3) or the quark

  1. Unexpected doubly-magic nucleus.

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, R. V. F.; Physics

    2009-01-01

    Nuclei with a 'magic' number of both protons and neutrons, dubbed doubly magic, are particularly stable. The oxygen isotope {sup 24}O has been found to be one such nucleus - yet it lies just at the limit of stability.

  2. Surface albedo of cometary nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, T.; Mukai, S.

    A variation of the albedo on the illuminated disk of a comet nucleus is estimated, taking into account the multiple reflection of incident light due to small scale roughness. The dependences of the average albedo over the illuminated disk on the degree of roughness and on the complex refractive index of the surface materials are examined. The variation estimates are compared with measurements of the nucleus albedo of Comet Halley (Reitsema et al., 1987).

  3. Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs.Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell

  4. Sensitivity of cross sections for elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering to halo nucleus density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Sarantsev, V. V.

    2012-12-15

    In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions in exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li.

  5. [Smile "forced" smile versus "spontaneous": comparison of 3 techniques of reconstructive surgery of the face. Myoplasty temporal muscle, hypoglossal facial anastomosis and gracilis muscle free flap].

    PubMed

    Lheureux-Portmann, A; Lapalus-Curtoud, Q; Robert, M; Tankéré, F; Disant, F; Pasche, P; Lamas, G; Gatignol, P

    2013-01-01

    The facial palsy cause serious consequences for patients. Studies have also shown that in these patients, the inability to produce an appropriate and spontaneous smile would be a key factor of depression. When facial palsy is considered complete and the nerve cannot be repaired, the patient can benefit from palliative surgery to regain a better quality of life in the aesthetic, functional, and psychological aspects. The hypoglossal-facial anastomosis (AHF), temporal myoplasty (MAT) and gracilis transposition (TG) are the major surgeries currently used for this purpose. The aim of our study is to assess quantitatively and qualitatively the effects of each of these surgeries on the lip mobility and production of smile. From this perspective, we proposed a protocol of an evaluation of facial motricity, of quality of life, and more particularly on the quality and the analysis of the smile. The results underline that there is no significant difference in the recovery of the facial motricity according to the surgery. Only the slower, deferred deadline of recovery at the patients AHF and TG who have to wait several months, it is for the same levels as that of the patients' MAT. A premature and intensive rehabilitation such as the patients of our protocol benefited from it what is nevertheless essential to a good recovery whatever is the surgery.

  6. Pre- and postsynaptic modulations of hypoglossal motoneurons by α-adrenoceptor activation in wild-type and Mecp2−/Y mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Cui, Ningren; Zhong, Weiwei; Jin, Xin; Wu, Zhongying

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglossal motoneurons (HNs) control tongue movement and play a role in maintenance of upper airway patency. Defects in these neurons may contribute to the development of sleep apnea and other cranial motor disorders including Rett syndrome (RTT). HNs are modulated by norepinephrine (NE) through α-adrenoceptors. Although postsynaptic mechanisms are known to play a role in this effect, how NE modulates the synaptic transmissions of HNs remains poorly understood. More importantly, the NE system is defective in RTT, while how the defect affects HNs is unknown. Believing that information of NE modulation of HNs may help the understanding of RTT and the design of new therapeutical interventions to motor defects in the disease, we performed these studies in which glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents and intrinsic membrane properties were examined in wild-type and Mecp2−/Y mice, a mouse of model of RTT. We found that activation of α1-adrenoceptor facilitated glycinergic synaptic transmission and excited HNs. These effects were mediated by both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. The latter effect involved an inhibition of barium-sensitive G protein-dependent K+ currents. The pre- and postsynaptic modulations of the HNs by α1-adrenoceptors were not only retained in Mecp2-null mice but also markedly enhanced, which appears to be a compensatory mechanism for the deficiencies in NE and GABAergic synaptic transmission. The existence of the endogenous compensatory mechanism is an encouraging finding, as it may allow therapeutical modalities to alleviate motoneuronal defects in RTT. PMID:23986203

  7. Pre- and postsynaptic modulations of hypoglossal motoneurons by α-adrenoceptor activation in wild-type and Mecp2(-/Y) mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Cui, Ningren; Zhong, Weiwei; Jin, Xin; Wu, Zhongying; Jiang, Chun

    2013-11-15

    Hypoglossal motoneurons (HNs) control tongue movement and play a role in maintenance of upper airway patency. Defects in these neurons may contribute to the development of sleep apnea and other cranial motor disorders including Rett syndrome (RTT). HNs are modulated by norepinephrine (NE) through α-adrenoceptors. Although postsynaptic mechanisms are known to play a role in this effect, how NE modulates the synaptic transmissions of HNs remains poorly understood. More importantly, the NE system is defective in RTT, while how the defect affects HNs is unknown. Believing that information of NE modulation of HNs may help the understanding of RTT and the design of new therapeutical interventions to motor defects in the disease, we performed these studies in which glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents and intrinsic membrane properties were examined in wild-type and Mecp2(-/Y) mice, a mouse of model of RTT. We found that activation of α1-adrenoceptor facilitated glycinergic synaptic transmission and excited HNs. These effects were mediated by both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. The latter effect involved an inhibition of barium-sensitive G protein-dependent K(+) currents. The pre- and postsynaptic modulations of the HNs by α1-adrenoceptors were not only retained in Mecp2-null mice but also markedly enhanced, which appears to be a compensatory mechanism for the deficiencies in NE and GABAergic synaptic transmission. The existence of the endogenous compensatory mechanism is an encouraging finding, as it may allow therapeutical modalities to alleviate motoneuronal defects in RTT.

  8. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years

    PubMed Central

    Toffola, Elena Dalla; Pavese, Chiara; Cecini, Miriam; Petrucci, Lucia; Ricotti, Susanna; Bejor, Maurizio; Salimbeni, Grazia; Biglioli, Federico; Klersy, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our study evaluates the grade and timing of recovery in 30 patients with complete facial paralysis (House-Brackmann grade VI) treated with hypoglossal-facial nerve (XII-VII) anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program, consisting of exercises in facial muscle activation mediated by tongue movement and synkinesis control with mirror feedback. Reinnervation after XII-VII anastomosis occurred in 29 patients, on average 5.4 months after surgery. Three years after the anastomosis, 23.3% of patients had grade II, 53.3% grade III, 20% grade IV and 3.3% grade VI ratings on the House-Brackmann scale. Time to reinnervation was associated with the final House-Brackmann grade. Our study demonstrates that patients undergoing XII-VII anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program display a significant recovery of facial symmetry and movement. The recovery continues for at least three years after the anastomosis, meaning that prolonged follow-up of these patients is advisable. PMID:25473738

  9. A comprehensive review with potential significance during skull base and neck operations, Part II: glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves and cervical spinal nerves 1-4.

    PubMed

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Chern, Joshua J; Rizk, Elias B; Loukas, Marios; Miller, Joseph H; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate on the skull base and upper neck regions in order to avoid inadvertent traction or transection. We review the literature regarding the anatomy, function, and clinical implications of the complex neural networks formed by interconnections between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves. A review of germane anatomic and clinical literature was performed. The review is organized into two parts. Part I discusses the anastomoses between the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves or their branches and other nerve trunks or branches in the vicinity. Part II deals with the anastomoses between the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and their branches or between these nerves and the first four cervical spinal nerves; the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to these neural plexuses is also briefly reviewed. Part II is presented in this article. Extensive and variable neural anastomoses exist between the lower cranial nerves and between the upper cervical nerves in such a way that these nerves with their extra-axial communications can be collectively considered a plexus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Morphology of multiple-nucleus brightest cluster galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, T.R.

    1988-02-01

    The morphology of high SNR CCD images of 16 multiple-nucleus brightest cluster galaxies is studied using an algorithm that models images of the systems as the line-of-sight superposition of normal elliptical galaxies. The algorithm is applied initially to the classic multiple-nucleus cD galaxy in A2199. Evidence is found suggestive of deep interpenetrating high-speed encounters by its secondaries. The interactions effects studied include noncentric isophotes, brightness profile effects, excess light around primary galaxies, and dynamical friction wakes. The results show that in many cases multiple systems are interacting systems. 42 references.

  11. The morphology of multiple-nucleus brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Tod R.

    1988-01-01

    The morphology of high SNR CCD images of 16 multiple-nucleus brightest cluster galaxies is studied using an algorithm that models images of the systems as the line-of-sight superposition of normal elliptical galaxies. The algorithm is applied initially to the classic multiple-nucleus cD galaxy in A2199. Evidence is found suggestive of deep interpenetrating high-speed encounters by its secondaries. The interactions effects studied include noncentric isophotes, brightness profile effects, excess light around primary galaxies, and dynamical friction wakes. The results show that in many cases multiple systems are interacting systems.

  12. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner.

  13. Finite Element Study of a Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Nucleus Replacement Device

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Jessica S.; Francis, W. Loren; Eliason, Travis D.; Bredbenner, Todd L.; Stemper, Brian D.; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.; Nicolella, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleus replacement technologies are a minimally invasive alternative to spinal fusion and total disc replacement that have the potential to reduce pain and restore motion for patients with degenerative disc disease. Finite element modeling can be used to determine the biomechanics associated with nucleus replacement technologies. The current study focuses on a new nucleus replacement device designed as a conforming silicone implant with an internal void. A validated finite element model of the human lumbar L3–L4 motion segment was developed and used to investigate the influence of the nucleus replacement device on spine biomechanics. In addition, the effect of device design changes on biomechanics was determined. A 3D, L3–L4 finite element model was constructed from medical imaging data. Models were created with the normal intact nucleus, the nucleus replacement device, and a solid silicone implant. Probabilistic analysis was performed on the normal model to provide quantitative validation metrics. Sensitivity analysis was performed on the silicone Shore A durometer of the device. Models were loaded under axial compression followed by flexion/extension, lateral bending, or axial rotation. Compressive displacement, endplate stresses, reaction moment, and annulus stresses were determined and compared between the different models. The novel nucleus replacement device resulted in similar compressive displacement, endplate stress, and annulus stress and slightly higher reaction moment compared with the normal nucleus. The solid implant resulted in decreased displacement, increased endplate stress, decreased annulus stress, and decreased reaction moment compared with the novel device. With increasing silicone durometer, compressive displacement decreased, endplate stress increased, reaction moment increased, and annulus stress decreased. Finite element analysis was used to show that the novel nucleus replacement device results in similar biomechanics compared with

  14. Finite Element Study of a Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Nucleus Replacement Device.

    PubMed

    Coogan, Jessica S; Francis, W Loren; Eliason, Travis D; Bredbenner, Todd L; Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Nicolella, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Nucleus replacement technologies are a minimally invasive alternative to spinal fusion and total disc replacement that have the potential to reduce pain and restore motion for patients with degenerative disc disease. Finite element modeling can be used to determine the biomechanics associated with nucleus replacement technologies. The current study focuses on a new nucleus replacement device designed as a conforming silicone implant with an internal void. A validated finite element model of the human lumbar L3-L4 motion segment was developed and used to investigate the influence of the nucleus replacement device on spine biomechanics. In addition, the effect of device design changes on biomechanics was determined. A 3D, L3-L4 finite element model was constructed from medical imaging data. Models were created with the normal intact nucleus, the nucleus replacement device, and a solid silicone implant. Probabilistic analysis was performed on the normal model to provide quantitative validation metrics. Sensitivity analysis was performed on the silicone Shore A durometer of the device. Models were loaded under axial compression followed by flexion/extension, lateral bending, or axial rotation. Compressive displacement, endplate stresses, reaction moment, and annulus stresses were determined and compared between the different models. The novel nucleus replacement device resulted in similar compressive displacement, endplate stress, and annulus stress and slightly higher reaction moment compared with the normal nucleus. The solid implant resulted in decreased displacement, increased endplate stress, decreased annulus stress, and decreased reaction moment compared with the novel device. With increasing silicone durometer, compressive displacement decreased, endplate stress increased, reaction moment increased, and annulus stress decreased. Finite element analysis was used to show that the novel nucleus replacement device results in similar biomechanics compared with the

  15. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  16. Stimulation of the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus Modulates Cardiorespiratory Responses via Oxytocinergic Innervation of Neurons in Pre-Bötzinger Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mack, S.O.; Wu, M.; Kc, P.; Haxhiu, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Previously we reported that oxytocin (OT)-containing neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) project to the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) region and phrenic motoneurons innervating the diaphragm (D). The aim of these studies was to determine pathways involved in PVN stimulation-induced changes in upper airway and chest wall pumping muscle activity. In addition, we determined the role of OT-containing neurons in the PVN in mediating increased respiratory output elicited by PVN stimulation. Neuroanatomical experiments, using pseudorabies virus (PRV) as a transneuronal tracer in C8 spinalectomized animals showed that PVN neurons project to hypoglossal motoneurons innervating the genioglossus (GG) muscle. Furthermore, microinjection of the PVN with bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, significantly increased (P<0.05) peak electromyographic activity of GG (GGEMG) and of DEMG, frequency discharge, and arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate. Prior injection of oxytocin antagonist [d-(CH2)5, Tyr(Me)2,Orn8]-vasotocin(OVT) intracisternally or blockade of oxytocin receptors in the preBötC region with oxytocin antagonist L-368,899, diminished GGEMG and DEMG responses and blunted the increase in BP and heart rate to PVN stimulation. These data show that PVN stimulation affects central regulatory mechanisms via the preBötC region controlling both respiratory and cardiovascular functions. The parallel changes induced by PVN stimulation were mediated mainly through an OT-OT receptor signaling pathway. PMID:16857863

  17. The midbrain precommand nucleus of the mormyrid electromotor network.

    PubMed

    von der Emde, G; Sena, L G; Niso, R; Grant, K

    2000-07-15

    The functional role of the midbrain precommand nucleus (PCN) of the electromotor system was explored in the weakly electric mormyrid fish Gnathonemus petersii, using extracellular recording of field potentials, single unit activity, and microstimulation in vivo. Electromotor-related field potentials in PCN are linked in a one-to-one manner and with a fixed time relationship to the electric organ discharge (EOD) command cycle, but occur later than EOD command activity in the medulla. It is suggested that PCN electromotor-related field potentials arise from two sources: (1) antidromically, by backpropagation across electrotonic synapses between PCN axons and command nucleus neurons, and (2) as corollary discharge-driven feedback arriving from the command nucleus indirectly, via multisynaptic pathways. PCN neurons can be activated by electrosensory input, but this does not necessarily activate the whole motor command chain. Microstimulation of PCN modulates the endogenous pattern of electromotor command in a way that can mimic the structure of certain stereotyped behavioral patterns. PCN activity is regulated, and to a certain extent synchronized, by corollary discharge feedback inhibition. However, PCN does not generally function as a synchronized pacemaker driving the electromotor command chain. We propose that PCN neurons integrate information of various origins and individually relay this to the command nucleus in the medulla. Some may also have intrinsic, although normally nonsynchronized, pacemaker properties. This descending activity, integrated in the electromotor command nucleus, will play an important modulatory role in the central pattern generator decision process.

  18. Low energy antiproton nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sainio, M.E.; Ashford, V.; Sakitt, M.; Skelly, J.; Debbe, R.; Fickinger, W.; Marino, R.; Robinson, D.K.

    1984-05-01

    We have studied antiproton quasielastic scattering on Al, Cu, and Pb for two incident momenta, 514 and 633 MeV/c. Combining these data with other existing anti p nucleus data, we have performed a global analysis using a nonrelativistic optical potential of the Woods-Saxon form.

  19. Comet Odyssey: Comet Nucleus Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, P. R.; Smythe, W. D.; Spitz, S. J.; Bernard, D. E.; Bailey, R. W.

    2004-11-01

    Comet Odyssey is a comet nucleus orbiter mission, proposed to NASA's Discovery program in 2004. The goal of the mission is to completely characterize a cometary nucleus, both physically and compositionally, as can only be done during an extended rendezvous and not with a fast flyby. Comet Odyssey will launch in October 2009 on a Delta II 7925 and use a solar-electric powered spacecraft to effect a rendezvous with periodic comet 46P/Wirtanen in October 2013. Arrival is 96 days after perihelion at a heliocentric distance of 1.61 AU. Comet Odyssey's science payload includes narrow- and wide-angle CCD cameras, an infrared thermal imager, a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, an XRD/XRF dust compositional analyzer, and a dust counter and accumulation sensors. The Comet Odyssey spacecraft implementation uses a high heritage approach of flight proven and redundant hardware. The 3-engine ion propulsion subsystem is derived from that on Dawn but includes the capability for multi-engine thrusting. Comet Odyssey will approach the Wirtanen nucleus and make repeated slow flybys through the active cometary coma for a period of three months. It will then be placed in a ˜100-km radius orbit around the nucleus, with a plan to eventually orbit at 40-km altitude or less. From that altitude the narrow-angle camera will map the entire nucleus surface at 1 meter/pixel and the thermal imager will map at 19 meter/pixel. The orbital portion of the nominal mission will last 4.5 months, following the comet outward from the Sun to 3.3 AU as the comet evolves from an active to a quiescent state. En route to P/Wirtanen, the Comet Odyssey spacecraft will perform a close flyby of the 200-km diameter, G-type, main belt asteroid 19 Fortuna in January 2012 and make appropriate remote sensing observations.

  20. Higgs and Particle Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe

    We apply a diagrammatic approach to study Higgs boson, a color-neutral heavy particle, pro- duction in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the saturation framework without quantum evolution. We assume the strong coupling constant much smaller than one. Due to the heavy mass and colorless nature of Higgs particle, final state interactions are absent in our calculation. In order to treat the two nuclei dynamically symmetric, we use the Coulomb gauge which gives the appropriate light cone gauge for each nucleus. To further eliminate initial state interactions we choose specific prescriptions in the light cone propagators. We start the calculation from only two nucleons in each nucleus and then demonstrate how to generalize the calculation to higher orders diagrammatically. We simplify the diagrams by the Slavnov-Taylor-Ward identities. The resulting cross section is factorized into a product of two Weizsacker-Williams gluon distributions of the two nuclei when the transverse momentum of the produced scalar particle is around the saturation momentum. To our knowledge this is the first process where an exact analytic formula has been formed for a physical process, involving momenta on the order of the saturation momentum, in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the quasi-classical approximation. Since we have performed the calculation in an unconventional gauge choice, we further confirm our results in Feynman gauge where the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution is interpreted as a transverse momentum broadening of a hard gluons traversing a nuclear medium. The transverse momentum factorization manifests itself in light cone gauge but not so clearly in Feynman gauge. In saturation physics there are two different unintegrated gluon distributions usually encountered in the literature: the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution and the dipole gluon distribution. The first gluon distribution is constructed by solving classical Yang-Mills equation of motion in the Mc

  1. The nucleus of the Cygnus A galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergaard, M.; Barthel, P. D.

    1993-02-01

    New obtained high resolution optical images of the prototypical luminous radio galaxy Cygnus A (3C 405) indicate an inhomogeneous distribution of obscuring dust and, in combination with previous data, three types of radiation (stellar and blue featureless continuum as well as luminous line emission) in its central regions. The alleged double nucleus finds its origin in heavy obscuration coupled to excess line emission in the central regions of an otherwise normal giant elliptical galaxy. A strongly reddened nuclear component, coincident with the Cygnus A radio core, is found to emit faint but concentrated narrow line emission. All data appear consistent with identification of Cygnus A as a radio-loud quasar having its radio axis oriented at about 35 deg from the sky plane. The presumed dust torus obscuring the quasar continuum is inferred to be smaller than 800 parsec.

  2. Single nucleon emission in relativistic nucleus-nucleus reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for nucleon emission via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work investigates the hypothesis that these discrepancies have arisen due to uncertainties about how to deduce the experimental electromagnetic cross section from the total measured cross section. An optical-model calculation of single neutron removal is added to electromagnetic cross sections and compared to the total experimental cross sections. Good agreement is found thereby resolving some of the earlier noted discrepancies. A detailed comparison to the recent work of Benesh, Cook, and Vary is made for both the impact parameter and the nuclear cross section. Good agreement is obtained giving an independent confirmation of the parameterized formulas developed by those authors.

  3. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yongying; Wang Ning; Li Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-04-15

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca, {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, and {sup 126}Sn+{sup 130}Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depths of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of the fusion barrier is also investigated. The fusion pocket becomes shallow for a heavy fusion system and almost disappears for heavy nearly symmetric systems, and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  4. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A. Sarkar, S.; Singh, G.

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  5. Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

  6. Hummingbird Comet Nucleus Analysis Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel; Carle, Glenn C.; Lasher, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    Hummingbird is a highly focused scientific mission, proposed to NASA s Discovery Program, designed to address the highest priority questions in cometary science-that of the chemical composition of the cometary nucleus. After rendezvous with the comet, Hummingbird would first methodically image and map the comet, then collect and analyze dust, ice and gases from the cometary atmosphere to enrich characterization of the comet and support landing site selection. Then, like its namesake, Hummingbird would carefully descend to a pre-selected surface site obtaining a high-resolution image, gather a surface material sample, acquire surface temperature and then immediately return to orbit for detailed chemical and elemental analyses followed by a high resolution post-sampling image of the site. Hummingbird s analytical laboratory contains instrumentation for a comprehensive molecular and elemental analysis of the cometary nucleus as well as an innovative surface sample acquisition device.

  7. Checkerboard Theory of the Nucleus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2006-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) is a 2D model of the nucleus that proposes that the synchronization of the 2 outer rotating quarks in the nucleons accounts for magnetic moment of the nucleons and that the magnetic flux from the nucleons couples (weaves) into the 2D checker board array structures and this magnetic coupling in addition to electrostatic forces of the rotating and stationary quarks accounts for the apparent strong nuclear force. The symmetry of the He nucleus helps explain why this 2D structure is so stable. This model explain the mass of the proton and neutron, along with their magnetic moments and their absolute and relative sizes in terms of the above structure and predict the masses of two newly proposed quarks ^(1): the ``up'' and the ``dn'' quarks. Since the masses of the ``up'' and ``dn'' quark determined by the CBM (237.31 MeV and 42.392 MeV respectively) did not fit within the standard model as candidates for u and d, a new model (New Physics) had to be invented. This new particle physics model predicts that nature has 5 generations not 3. (1). T.M. Lach, Checkerboard Structure of the Nucleus, Infinite Energy, Vol. 5, issue 30, (2000). (2). T.M. Lach, Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/0008026, @http://xxx.lanl.gov/

  8. Normal clotting.

    PubMed

    Moran, Theresa A; Viele, Carol S

    2005-11-01

    To review the normal coagulation process and the mechanisms that lead to abnormal clotting. Primary and tertiary literature and the authors' clinical experience. The process of coagulation is complex and can be easily misunderstood. It is important to be familiar with normal coagulation before one can comprehend the coagulopathies associated with malignancies. A thorough understanding of the coagulation process is a critical prerequisite to caring for patients with clotting disorders. Once the normal clotting process is understood, the abnormal becomes easier to recognize and the cancer-associated dysfunctions more readily identified.

  9. Classifiers for centrality determination in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altsybeev, Igor; Kovalenko, Vladimir

    2017-03-01

    Centrality, as a geometrical property of the collision, is crucial for the physical interpretation of nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus experimental data. However, it cannot be directly accessed in event-by-event data analysis. Common methods for centrality estimation in A-A and p-A collisions usually rely on a single detector (either on the signal in zero-degree calorimeters or on the multiplicity in some semi-central rapidity range). In the present work, we made an attempt to develop an approach for centrality determination that is based on machine-learning techniques and utilizes information from several detector subsystems simultaneously. Different event classifiers are suggested and evaluated for their selectivity power in terms of the number of nucleons-participants and the impact parameter of the collision. Finer centrality resolution may allow to reduce impact from so-called volume fluctuations on physical observables being studied in heavy-ion experiments like ALICE at the LHC and fixed target experiment NA61/SHINE on SPS.

  10. Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T.

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  11. The anatomical perspective of human occipital condyle in relation to the hypoglossal canal, condylar canal, and jugular foramen and its surgical significance

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ranjana; Kumar, Shalini; Rai, Arpita Mahajan; Mansoor, Iqra; Mehra, Raj D

    2016-01-01

    Background: The transcondylar approach (TCA) has gained importance in recent era which enables shorter and direct route to access the lesions ventral to the brainstem. The important step in this approach is resection of the occipital condyle (OC). The detailed knowledge of bony anatomy of OC and its relation to the hypoglossal canal (HC), condylar canal (CC), and jugular foramen (JF) is very important to avoid any iatrogenic injury during craniovertebral surgeries. The aim of the present study is to conduct a morphometric and morphological study and note the variations of the OC and the structures surrounding it in North Indian population. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 100 OC. Morphometric measurements of OC and the distances of HC and JF from the posterior end of OC were noted. In addition, the extent of the HC and JF in relation to OC, presence or absence of CC, shape of the OC, and its articular facet were also noted. Results: The incidence of short OC was seen in 13% skulls. The most common shape of OC was oval or rhomboid. Even though the articular facet was convex in majority of skulls but flat (10%) and concave (1%) were also observed. The external and internal distance of HC from the posterior end of OC was13.83 mm and 10.66 mm on the right side and 15.02 mm and 11.89 mm on the left side. The OC was related in its middle 1/3 to the HC in 15% skulls and to the whole extent of JF in 3% skulls. Thirty-four percent skulls displayed the septa in the HC. The CC was present bilaterally in 38% skulls and unilaterally in 40% skulls. Conclusion: The OC and related structures such as HC, CC, and JF are likely to have variations in respect to morphometry and morphology. This study may prove helpful to neurosurgeons operating in this field, especially during TCA where neurovascular structures emerging from these canals and foramen are more vulnerable to injury. PMID:27891034

  12. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Piecemeal Microautophagy of the Nucleus Requires the Core Macroautophagy Genes

    PubMed Central

    Krick, R.; Muehe, Y.; Prick, T.; Bremer, S.; Schlotterhose, P.; Eskelinen, E.-L.; Millen, J.; Goldfarb, D. S.

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy is a diverse family of processes that transport cytoplasm and organelles into the lysosome/vacuole lumen for degradation. During macroautophagy cargo is packaged in autophagosomes that fuse with the lysosome/vacuole. During microautophagy cargo is directly engulfed by the lysosome/vacuole membrane. Piecemeal microautophagy of the nucleus (PMN) occurs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae at nucleus-vacuole (NV) junctions and results in the pinching-off and release into the vacuole of nonessential portions of the nucleus. Previous studies concluded macroautophagy ATG genes are not absolutely required for PMN. Here we report using two biochemical assays that PMN is efficiently inhibited in atg mutant cells: PMN blebs are produced, but vesicles are rarely released into the vacuole lumen. Electron microscopy of arrested PMN structures in atg7, atg8, and atg9 mutant cells suggests that NV-junction–associated micronuclei may normally be released from the nucleus before their complete enclosure by the vacuole membrane. In this regard PMN is similar to the microautophagy of peroxisomes (micropexophagy), where the side of the peroxisome opposite the engulfing vacuole is capped by a structure called the “micropexophagy-specific membrane apparatus” (MIPA). The MIPA contains Atg proteins and facilitates terminal enclosure and fusion steps. PMN does not require the complete vacuole homotypic fusion genes. We conclude that a spectrum of ATG genes is required for the terminal vacuole enclosure and fusion stages of PMN. PMID:18701704

  14. Evidence for a motor somatotopy in the cerebellar dentate nucleus--an FMRI study in humans.

    PubMed

    Küper, Michael; Thürling, Markus; Stefanescu, Roxana; Maderwald, Stefan; Roths, Johannes; Elles, Hans G; Ladd, Mark E; Diedrichsen, Jörn; Timmann, Dagmar

    2012-11-01

    Previous anatomical studies in monkeys have shown that forelimb motor representation is located caudal to hindlimb representation within the dorso-rostral dentate nucleus. Here we investigate human dentate nucleus motor somatotopy by means of ultra-highfield (7 T) functional magnetic brain imaging (fMRI). Twenty five young healthy males participated in the study. Simple finger and foot movement tasks were performed to identify dentate nucleus motor areas. Recently developed normalization procedures for group analyses were used for the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar dentate nucleus. Cortical activations were in good accordance with the known somatotopy of the human cerebellar cortex. Dentate nucleus activations following motor tasks were found in particular in the ipsilateral dorso-rostral nucleus. Activations were also present in other parts of the nucleus including the contralateral side, and there was some overlap between the body part representations. Within the ipsilateral dorso-rostral dentate, finger activations were located caudally compared to foot movement-related activations in fMRI group analysis. Likewise, the centre of gravity (COG) for the finger activation was more caudal than the COG of the foot activation across participants. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) on the x, y, and z coordinates of the COG indicated that this difference was significant (P = 0.043). These results indicate that in humans, the lower and upper limbs are arranged rostro-caudally in the dorsal aspect of the dentate nucleus, which is consistent with studies in non-human primates.

  15. Absence of jet quenching in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loizides, Constantin; Morsch, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Medium effects on the production of high-pT particles in nucleus-nucleus (AA) collisions are generally quantified by the nuclear modification factor (RAA), defined to be unity in absence of nuclear effects. Modeling particle production including a nucleon-nucleon impact parameter dependence, we demonstrate that RAA at midrapidity in peripheral AA collisions can be significantly affected by event selection and geometry biases. Even without jet quenching and shadowing, these biases cause an apparent suppression for RAA in peripheral collisions, and are relevant for all types of hard probes and all collision energies. Our studies indicate that calculations of jet quenching in peripheral AA collisions should account for the biases, or else they will overestimate the relevance of parton energy loss. Similarly, expectations of parton energy loss in light-heavy collision systems based on comparison with apparent suppression seen in peripheral RAA should be revised. Our interpretation of the peripheral RAA data would unify observations for lighter collision systems or lower energies where significant values of elliptic flow are observed despite the absence of strong jet quenching.

  16. Nucleus morphology of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitsema, H. J.; Delamere, W. A.; Huebner, W. F.; Keller, H. U.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Wilhelm, K.; Schmidt, H. U.; Whipple, Fred L.

    1986-01-01

    Images obtained by the Halley multicolor camera were used to determine the projected size and shape of the nucleus. The location of the terminator and numerous surface features were determined. There is good correlation between the brightest surface features and the dust jets; however, many bright features are seen which are not associated with jets. Most of the observed features are circular and appear to be related to surface elevation. The angularity of the terminator gives an indication of the three-dimensional structure of the face which was observed.

  17. Exceptionally bright, compact starburst nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Margon, B.; Anderson, S.F.; Mateo, M.; Fich, M.; Massey, P.

    1988-11-01

    Observations are reported of a remarkably bright (V about 13) starburst nucleus, 0833 + 652, which has been detected at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths. Despite an observed flux at each of these wavelengths which is comparable to that of NGC 7714, often considered the 'prototypical' example of the starburst phenomenon, 0833 + 652 appears to be a previously uncataloged object. Its ease of detectability throughout the electromagnetic spectrum should make it useful for a variety of problems in the study of compact emission-line galaxies. 30 references.

  18. How viruses access the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sarah; Au, Shelly; Panté, Nelly

    2011-09-01

    Many viruses depend on nuclear proteins for replication. Therefore, their viral genome must enter the nucleus of the host cell. In this review we briefly summarize the principles of nucleocytoplasmic transport, and then describe the diverse strategies used by viruses to deliver their genomes into the host nucleus. Some of the emerging mechanisms include: (1) nuclear entry during mitosis, when the nuclear envelope is disassembled, (2) viral genome release in the cytoplasm followed by entry of the genome through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), (3) capsid docking at the cytoplasmic side of the NPC, followed by genome release, (4) nuclear entry of intact capsids through the NPC, followed by genome release, and (5) nuclear entry via virus-induced disruption of the nuclear envelope. Which mechanism a particular virus uses depends on the size and structure of the virus, as well as the cellular cues used by the virus to trigger capsid disassembly and genome release. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Regulation of Signaling and Cellular Fate through Modulation of Nuclear Protein Import. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comet nucleus sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A comet nucleus sample return mission in terms of its relevant science objectives, candidate mission concepts, key design/technology requirements, and programmatic issues is discussed. The primary objective was to collect a sample of undisturbed comet material from beneath the surface of an active comet and to preserve its chemical and, if possible, its physical integrity and return it to Earth in a minimally altered state. The secondary objectives are to: (1) characterize the comet to a level consistent with a rendezvous mission; (2) monitor the comet dynamics through perihelion and aphelion with a long lived lander; and (3) determine the subsurface properties of the nucleus in an area local to the sampled core. A set of candidate comets is discussed. The hazards which the spacecraft would encounter in the vicinity of the comet are also discussed. The encounter strategy, the sampling hardware, the thermal control of the pristine comet material during the return to Earth, and the flight performance of various spacecraft systems and the cost estimates of such a mission are presented.

  20. Multivariate normality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Falls, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Sets of experimentally determined or routinely observed data provide information about the past, present and, hopefully, future sets of similarly produced data. An infinite set of statistical models exists which may be used to describe the data sets. The normal distribution is one model. If it serves at all, it serves well. If a data set, or a transformation of the set, representative of a larger population can be described by the normal distribution, then valid statistical inferences can be drawn. There are several tests which may be applied to a data set to determine whether the univariate normal model adequately describes the set. The chi-square test based on Pearson's work in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is often used. Like all tests, it has some weaknesses which are discussed in elementary texts. Extension of the chi-square test to the multivariate normal model is provided. Tables and graphs permit easier application of the test in the higher dimensions. Several examples, using recorded data, illustrate the procedures. Tests of maximum absolute differences, mean sum of squares of residuals, runs and changes of sign are included in these tests. Dimensions one through five with selected sample sizes 11 to 101 are used to illustrate the statistical tests developed.

  1. Theoretical antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, W. W.; Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections for intermediate to high energies are calculated using an ion-ion optical model. Good agreement with experiment (within 15 percent) is obtained in this same model for (bar p)-nucleus cross sections at laboratory energies up to 15 GeV. We describe a technique for estimating antinucleus-nucleus cross sections from NN data and suggest that further cosmic ray studies to search for antideuterons and other antinuclei be undertaken.

  2. Projections from the cochlear nucleus to the superior paraolivary nucleus in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Schofield, B R

    1995-09-11

    Axonal tracing techniques were used to study the projection from the cochlear nucleus to the superior paraolivary nucleus in guinea pigs. Different tracers were used to identify the cell types that give rise to the projections, the morphology of their axons, and the cell types that they contact in the superior paraolivary nucleus. Injections of Fluoro-Gold or peroxidase-labeled-WGA and HRP into the superior paraolivary nucleus labeled multipolar cells and octopus cells bilaterally in the ventral cochlear nucleus, mainly on the contralateral side. Injections of PHAL into the ventral cochlear nucleus labeled two types of axons in the superior paraolivary nucleus. Thin axons branch infrequently and give rise primarily to small, en passant boutons. Thick axons have larger boutons, many of which are terminal boutons that arise from short collaterals. Thin axons appear to originate from multipolar cells, whereas thick axons probably originate from octopus cells. Both types are found bilaterally after an injection into the ventral cochlear nucleus on one side. Individual thick or thin axons may contact multiple cell types in the superior paraolivary nucleus. Individual cells in the superior paraolivary nucleus can receive convergent input from both thick and thin axons. Combined anterograde and retrograde transport of different fluorescent tracers was used to identify the projections of the cells in the superior paraolivary nucleus that receive inputs from the ventral cochlear nucleus. Cells in the superior paraolivary nucleus that projected to the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus or to the ipsilateral inferior colliculus appeared to be contacted by axons that were labeled by anterograde transport from the contralateral ventral cochlear nucleus. Thus the projections to the superior paraolivary nucleus are in a position to affect the activity in both ascending and descending auditory pathways.

  3. Projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huazheng; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2015-01-01

    The mouse precuneiform nucleus has been proposed as the midbrain locomotion center, a function ascribed to its caudal neighbor, cuneiform nucleus, in the rat, cat and other species. The present study investigated the projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus in the mouse using retrograde tracer injections (fluoro-gold) into the precuneiform nucleus and anterograde tracer injections (biotinylated dextran amine) into the central amygdaloid nucleus. The entire central amygdaloid nucleus except the rostral pole had retrogradely labeled neurons, especially in the middle portion where labeled neurons were densely packed. Anterogradely labeled amygdaloid fibers approached the precuneiform nucleus from the area ventrolateral to it and terminated in the entire precuneiform nucleus. Labeled fibers were also found in laminae 5 and 6 in the upper cervical cord on the ipsilateral side. The present study is the first demonstration of projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus. This projection may underpin the role of the precuneiform nucleus in the modulation of the cardiovascular activity.

  4. Hypoglossal nerve palsy: 245 cases.

    PubMed

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Benn E; Temkit, Mohamed; Reddy, Srivan Nagi

    2016-12-01

    Apart from a case series of 100 subjects in 1996 and several small cohorts, there have been no large retrospective series of cranial nerve XII (CN XII) palsy. From 1984 to 2014, 245 cases of CN XII palsy were identified via retrospective chart review using historical and exam findings that confirmed the diagnosis. In addition to clinical characteristics, univariate and multivariate models were investigated to predict neoplastic CN XII palsy. Major etiologic categories included: postoperative (29.3%), idiopathic (15.1%), primary neoplastic (14.2%), metastatic malignancy (13.0%), inflammatory (7.3%), radiation (6.1%), and traumatic (4.1%). A multivariate model revealed male gender and a personal history of cancer as predictive of neoplastic CN XII palsy. The most frequent etiologies and disease categories of CN XII palsy were identified, and male gender and personal history of cancer were found to be predictive of a neoplastic cause of CN XII palsy. Muscle Nerve 54: 1050-1054, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nucleus Accumbens Invulnerability to Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Donald M.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Thomas, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages neurons and nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. Emerging studies of human Meth addicts using both postmortem analyses of brain tissue and noninvasive imaging studies of intact brains have confirmed that Meth causes persistent structural abnormalities. Animal and human studies have also defined a number of significant functional problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders associated with long-term Meth abuse. This review summarizes the salient features of Meth-induced neurotoxicity with a focus on the dopamine (DA) neuronal system. DA nerve endings in the caudate-putamen (CPu) are damaged by Meth in a highly delimited manner. Even within the CPu, damage is remarkably heterogeneous, with ventral and lateral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared the damage that accompanies binge Meth intoxication, but relatively subtle changes in the disposition of DA in its nerve endings can lead to dramatic increases in Meth-induced toxicity in the CPu and overcome the normal resistance of the NAc to damage. In contrast to the CPu, where DA neuronal deficiencies are persistent, alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery. Animal models have been indispensable in studies of the causes and consequences of Meth neurotoxicity and in the development of new therapies. This research has shown that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of Meth to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage. The resistance of the NAc to Meth-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of Meth neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the numerous important roles played by this brain structure. PMID:23382149

  6. Nucleus accumbens invulnerability to methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Donald M; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Thomas, David M

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages neurons and nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. Emerging studies of human Meth addicts using both postmortem analyses of brain tissue and noninvasive imaging studies of intact brains have confirmed that Meth causes persistent structural abnormalities. Animal and human studies have also defined a number of significant functional problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders associated with long-term Meth abuse. This review summarizes the salient features of Meth-induced neurotoxicity with a focus on the dopamine (DA) neuronal system. DA nerve endings in the caudate-putamen (CPu) are damaged by Meth in a highly delimited manner. Even within the CPu, damage is remarkably heterogeneous, with ventral and lateral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared the damage that accompanies binge Meth intoxication, but relatively subtle changes in the disposition of DA in its nerve endings can lead to dramatic increases in Meth-induced toxicity in the CPu and overcome the normal resistance of the NAc to damage. In contrast to the CPu, where DA neuronal deficiencies are persistent, alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery. Animal models have been indispensable in studies of the causes and consequences of Meth neurotoxicity and in the development of new therapies. This research has shown that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of Meth to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage. The resistance of the NAc to Meth-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of Meth neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the numerous important roles played by this brain structure.

  7. The nature of the cometary nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    The basic properties of the cometary nucleus are reviewed. Consideration is given to the absence of depth differentiation, the icy conglomerate nature, the possible existence of a halo of icy grains around the nuclear region, the nucleus size and albedo, the mass, the rotation rate, and the chemical composition (elemental and molecular).

  8. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells. PMID:24445418

  9. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G V

    2014-01-21

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells.

  10. Correlation and fluctuations in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsin Khan, M.; Ahmad, N.; Kamal, A.; Masoodi, A. A.; Irfan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Correlation and fluctuations are now well accepted analysis techniques in heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies. At the current stage of RHIC exploration, matter in bulk and many of the physics questions about the final stage of collisions are addressed with the help of correlation techniques. In the present work after a general introduction to the underlying formalism to the exotic phenomena of correlation and fluctuations, discussion on various parameters disentangling dynamical fluctuations is presented. Analysis to investigate dynamical fluctuations and correlation is carried out in terms of F q - and G q -moments. A study of various other parameters involving multiplicity and pseudorapidity of relativistic charged particles produced in high energy nuclear interactions reveals the presence of correlation and fluctuations in particle production in these collisions. The experimental data on 14.5A GeV/c 28Si-nucleus interactions has been analyzed. A parallel analysis of correlation free data generated using MC-RAND Monte Carlo code, UrQMD data and for the HIJING generated events has also been carried out.

  11. BIMA CO Observations of the Starburst Nucleus of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jianjun; Lo, K. Y.

    1995-04-01

    Observations with 2.5" (38 pc) resolution of the CO (J=1-0) emission from the starburst nucleus of M82, obtained with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) 6-element millimeter-wave array, have revealed unresolved (< 30 pc) structure in the CO emission with very high brightness temperature (up to 34 K). The new observations have also resolved the previously identified double lobe and central peak in the integrated CO intensity into many peaks that are all due to ``velocity crowding" of several velocity components. Most of the CO emitting gas could be located in molecular spiral arms at 125 pc and 390 pc from the nucleus. Outflow motion (approximately 230 km/s) of part of the molecular gas normal to the plane is also indicated. The new observations suggest that the starbursts took place within molecular spiral arms at some distance from the nucleus. The starbursts may in fact have propagated inwards. Given the substantial amount of dense molecular gas still present in the M82 starburst region, it is not clear why the starburst activity appears to have subsided.

  12. Presynaptic and extrasynaptic regulation of posterior nucleus of thalamus.

    PubMed

    Park, Anthony; Li, Ying; Masri, Radi; Keller, Asaf

    2017-03-22

    The posterior nucleus of thalamus (PO) is a higher-order nucleus involved in sensorimotor processing, including nociception. An important characteristic of PO is its wide range of activity profiles that vary across states of arousal, thought to underlie differences in somatosensory perception subject to attention and degree of consciousness. Further, PO loses the ability to down-regulate its activity level in some forms of chronic pain, suggesting that regulatory mechanisms underlying the normal modulation of PO activity may be pathologically altered. Yet, the mechanisms responsible for regulating such a wide dynamic range of activity are unknown. Here, we test a series of hypotheses regarding the function of several presynaptic receptors on both GABAergic and glutamatergic afferents targeting PO in mouse, using acute slice electrophysiology. We found that presynaptic GABAB receptors are present on both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals in PO, but only those on GABAergic terminals are tonically active. We also found that release from GABAergic terminals, but not glutamatergic terminals, is suppressed by cholinergic activation, and that a subpopulation of GABAergic terminals is regulated by cannabinoids. Finally, we discovered the presence of tonic currents mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in PO that are heterogeneously distributed across the nucleus. Thus, we demonstrate that multiple regulatory mechanisms concurrently exist in PO, and we propose that regulation of inhibition, rather than excitation, is the more consequential mechanism by which PO activity can be regulated.

  13. Music and the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2015-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA.

  14. The mediodorsal thalamic nucleus and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Alelú-Paz, Raúl; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    The mediodorsal nucleus of the human thalamus is in a crucial position that allows it to establish connections with diverse cerebral structures, particularly the prefrontal cortex. The present review examines existing neurobiologic studies of the brains of people with and without schizophrenia that indicate a possible involvement of the mediodorsal nucleus in this psychiatric disorder. Studies at synaptic and cellular levels of the neurobiology of the mediodorsal nucleus, together with a better anatomic understanding of this diencephalic structure owing to neuroimaging studies, should help to establish a more deep and solid pathophysiologic model of schizophrenia. PMID:18982171

  15. Dynamic risk control by human nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Sosa, Fernando; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier Jesus; Galarza, Ana; Avecillas, Josue; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Angel; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Reneses, Blanca; Barcia, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Real-world decisions about reward often involve a complex counterbalance of risk and value. Although the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the underlying neural substrate, its criticality to human behaviour remains an open question, best addressed with interventional methodology that probes the behavioural consequences of focal neural modulation. Combining a psychometric index of risky decision-making with transient electrical modulation of the nucleus accumbens, here we reveal profound, highly dynamic alteration of the relation between probability of reward and choice during therapeutic deep brain stimulation in four patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. Short-lived phasic electrical stimulation of the region of the nucleus accumbens dynamically altered risk behaviour, transiently shifting the psychometric function towards more risky decisions only for the duration of stimulation. A critical, on-line role of human nucleus accumbens in dynamic risk control is thereby established. PMID:26428667

  16. Microtubules move the nucleus to quiescence.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Damien; Sagot, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus is a cellular compartment that hosts several macro-molecular machines displaying a highly complex spatial organization. This tight architectural orchestration determines not only DNA replication and repair but also regulates gene expression. In budding yeast microtubules play a key role in structuring the nucleus since they condition the Rabl arrangement in G1 and chromosome partitioning during mitosis through their attachment to centromeres via the kinetochore proteins. Recently, we have shown that upon quiescence entry, intranuclear microtubules emanating from the spindle pole body elongate to form a highly stable bundle that spans the entire nucleus. Here, we examine some molecular mechanisms that may underlie the formation of this structure. As the intranuclear microtubule bundle causes a profound re-organization of the yeast nucleus and is required for cell survival during quiescence, we discuss the possibility that the assembly of such a structure participates in quiescence establishment.

  17. Dynamic risk control by human nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Nachev, Parashkev; Lopez-Sosa, Fernando; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier Jesus; Galarza, Ana; Avecillas, Josue; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Angel; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Reneses, Blanca; Barcia, Juan Antonio; Strange, Bryan

    2015-12-01

    Real-world decisions about reward often involve a complex counterbalance of risk and value. Although the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the underlying neural substrate, its criticality to human behaviour remains an open question, best addressed with interventional methodology that probes the behavioural consequences of focal neural modulation. Combining a psychometric index of risky decision-making with transient electrical modulation of the nucleus accumbens, here we reveal profound, highly dynamic alteration of the relation between probability of reward and choice during therapeutic deep brain stimulation in four patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. Short-lived phasic electrical stimulation of the region of the nucleus accumbens dynamically altered risk behaviour, transiently shifting the psychometric function towards more risky decisions only for the duration of stimulation. A critical, on-line role of human nucleus accumbens in dynamic risk control is thereby established.

  18. Cardiovascular responses to chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in the rat: role of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Tetsuya; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of cardiovascular responses to chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) was studied in urethane-anesthetized adult male Wistar rats. At the baseline mean arterial pressure (BLMAP) close to normal, ARCN stimulation elicited decreases in MAP and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). The decreases in MAP elicited by ARCN stimulation were attenuated by either gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), neuropeptide Y (NPY), or beta-endorphin receptor blockade in the ipsilateral hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Combined blockade of GABA-A, NPY1 and opioid receptors in the ipsilateral PVN converted the decreases in MAP and SNA to increases in these variables. Conversion of inhibitory effects on the MAP and SNA to excitatory effects following ARCN stimulation was also observed when the BLMAP was decreased to below normal levels by an infusion of sodium nitroprusside. The pressor and tachycardic responses to ARCN stimulation at below normal BLMAP were attenuated by blockade of melanocortin 3/4 (MC3/4) receptors in the ipsilateral PVN. Unilateral blockade of GABA-A receptors in the ARCN increased the BLMAP and heart rate (HR) revealing tonic inhibition of the excitatory neurons in the ARCN. ARCN stimulation elicited tachycardia regardless of the level of BLMAP. ARCN neurons projecting to the PVN were immunoreactive for glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), NPY, and beta-endorphin. These results indicated that: 1) at normal BLMAP, decreases in MAP and SNA induced by ARCN stimulation were mediated via GABA-A, NPY1 and opioid receptors in the PVN, 2) lowering of BLMAP converted decreases in MAP following ARCN stimulation to increases in MAP, and 3) at below normal BLMAP, increases in MAP and HR induced by ARCN stimulation were mediated via MC3/4 receptors in the PVN. These results provide a base for future studies to explore the role of ARCN in cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Raman microspectroscopy of nucleus and cytoplasm for human colon cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjing; Wang, Hongbo; Du, Jingjing; Jing, Chuanyong

    2017-11-15

    Subcellular Raman analysis is a promising clinic tool for cancer diagnosis, but constrained by the difficulty of deciphering subcellular spectra in actual human tissues. We report a label-free subcellular Raman analysis for use in cancer diagnosis that integrates subcellular signature spectra by subtracting cytoplasm from nucleus spectra (Nuc.-Cyt.) with a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model. Raman mapping with the classical least-squares (CLS) model allowed direct visualization of the distribution of the cytoplasm and nucleus. The PLS-DA model was employed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of five types of spectral datasets, including non-selective, nucleus, cytoplasm, ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm (Nuc./Cyt.), and nucleus minus cytoplasm (Nuc.-Cyt.), resulting in diagnostic sensitivity of 88.3%, 84.0%, 98.4%, 84.5%, and 98.9%, respectively. Discriminating between normal and cancerous cells of actual human tissues through subcellular Raman markers is feasible, especially when using the nucleus-cytoplasm difference spectra. The subcellular Raman approach had good stability, and had excellent diagnostic performance for rectal as well as colon tissues. The insights gained from this study shed new light on the general applicability of subcellular Raman analysis in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Electron microscopic analysis of synaptic inputs from the median preoptic nucleus and adjacent regions to the supraoptic nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, W E; Tian, M; Wong, H

    1996-09-16

    The median preoptic nucleus (MnPo) is critical for normal fluid balance, mediating osmotically evoked drinking and neurohypophysial hormone secretion. The influence of the MnPo on vasopressin and oxytocin release is in part through direct connections to the supraoptic and paraventricular nucleus. In the present investigation the synaptic contacts between the MnPo and supraoptic neurons were investigated in rats by ultrastructural examination of terminals labeled anterogradely with the tracers Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin or biotinylated dextran. At the light microscopic level, labeled fibers within the supraoptic nucleus branched frequently, were punctuated by varicosities, and were distributed throughout the nucleus without preference for the known distributions of oxytocin and vasopressin neurons. At the ultrastructural level, synapses were associated with many of these varicosities. The ratio of labeled axodendritic to axosomatic synapses encountered was roughly consistent with a uniform innervation of dendrites and somata. The great majority of synapses were characterized by symmetrical contacts. Similar results were found for a few injections made in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, just rostral to the MnPo, and in the immediately adjacent periventricular preoptic area. Coupled with other recent anatomical and electrophysiological evidence, these results suggest there is a strong monosynaptic pathway from structures along the ventral lamina terminalis to the supraoptic nucleus.

  1. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  2. BFKL Pomeron calculus: solution to equations for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the saturation domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Carlos; Levin, Eugene; Meneses, Rodrigo

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we solve the equation for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the BFKL Pomeron calculus, suggested by Braun [1-3]. We find these solutions analytically at high energies as well as numerically in the entire region of energies inside the saturation region. The semi-classical approximation is used to select out the infinite set of the parasite solutions. The nucleus-nucleus cross sections at high energy are estimated and compared with the Glauber-Gribov approach. It turns out that the exact formula gives the estimates that are very close to the ones based on Glauber-Gribov formula which is important for the practical applications.

  3. Intermuscular coherence in Parkinson's disease: effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Marsden, J; Limousin-Dowsey, P; Fraix, V; Pollak, P; Odin, P; Brown, P

    2001-05-08

    It remains unclear how high frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improves parkinsonism. We hypothesized that stimulation may affect the organization of the cortical drive to voluntarily activated muscle. Normally this is characterized by oscillations at 15-30 Hz, manifest in coherence between muscles in the same frequency band. We therefore investigated the effects of STN stimulation on electromyographic (EMG) activity in co-contracting distal arm muscles in nine subjects with Parkinson's disease off drugs. Without stimulation, coherence between EMG signals was diminished at 15-30 Hz compared with nine controls. STN stimulation increased coherence in the 15-30 Hz band, so that it approached that in healthy subjects. The results suggest that STN stimulation facilitates the normal cortical drive to muscles.

  4. A spatiotemporal analysis of gait freezing and the impact of pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Thevathasan, Wesley; Cole, Michael H; Graepel, Cara L; Hyam, Jonathan A; Jenkinson, Ned; Brittain, John-Stuart; Coyne, Terry J; Silburn, Peter A; Aziz, Tipu Z; Kerr, Graham; Brown, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Gait freezing is an episodic arrest of locomotion due to an inability to take normal steps. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation is an emerging therapy proposed to improve gait freezing, even where refractory to medication. However, the efficacy and precise effects of pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation on Parkinsonian gait disturbance are not established. The clinical application of this new therapy is controversial and it is unknown if bilateral stimulation is more effective than unilateral. Here, in a double-blinded study using objective spatiotemporal gait analysis, we assessed the impact of unilateral and bilateral pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation on triggered episodes of gait freezing and on background deficits of unconstrained gait in Parkinson's disease. Under experimental conditions, while OFF medication, Parkinsonian patients with severe gait freezing implanted with pedunculopontine nucleus stimulators below the pontomesencephalic junction were assessed during three conditions; off stimulation, unilateral stimulation and bilateral stimulation. Results were compared to Parkinsonian patients without gait freezing matched for disease severity and healthy controls. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation improved objective measures of gait freezing, with bilateral stimulation more effective than unilateral. During unconstrained walking, Parkinsonian patients who experience gait freezing had reduced step length and increased step length variability compared to patients without gait freezing; however, these deficits were unchanged by pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation. Chronic pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation improved Freezing of Gait Questionnaire scores, reflecting a reduction of the freezing encountered in patients' usual environments and medication states. This study provides objective, double-blinded evidence that in a specific subgroup of Parkinsonian patients, stimulation of a caudal pedunculopontine nucleus region selectively improves gait

  5. A spatiotemporal analysis of gait freezing and the impact of pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael H.; Graepel, Cara L.; Hyam, Jonathan A.; Jenkinson, Ned; Brittain, John-Stuart; Coyne, Terry J.; Silburn, Peter A.; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Kerr, Graham; Brown, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gait freezing is an episodic arrest of locomotion due to an inability to take normal steps. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation is an emerging therapy proposed to improve gait freezing, even where refractory to medication. However, the efficacy and precise effects of pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation on Parkinsonian gait disturbance are not established. The clinical application of this new therapy is controversial and it is unknown if bilateral stimulation is more effective than unilateral. Here, in a double-blinded study using objective spatiotemporal gait analysis, we assessed the impact of unilateral and bilateral pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation on triggered episodes of gait freezing and on background deficits of unconstrained gait in Parkinson’s disease. Under experimental conditions, while OFF medication, Parkinsonian patients with severe gait freezing implanted with pedunculopontine nucleus stimulators below the pontomesencephalic junction were assessed during three conditions; off stimulation, unilateral stimulation and bilateral stimulation. Results were compared to Parkinsonian patients without gait freezing matched for disease severity and healthy controls. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation improved objective measures of gait freezing, with bilateral stimulation more effective than unilateral. During unconstrained walking, Parkinsonian patients who experience gait freezing had reduced step length and increased step length variability compared to patients without gait freezing; however, these deficits were unchanged by pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation. Chronic pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation improved Freezing of Gait Questionnaire scores, reflecting a reduction of the freezing encountered in patients’ usual environments and medication states. This study provides objective, double-blinded evidence that in a specific subgroup of Parkinsonian patients, stimulation of a caudal pedunculopontine nucleus region selectively improves gait

  6. The Acasta Gneiss - a Hadean cratonic nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, P.; Scherer, E. E.; Maltese, A.; Bast, R.; Bleeker, W.; Mezger, K.

    2016-12-01

    The known terrestrial rock record lacks undisputed, chemically intact Hadean crust. Direct evidence from this eon has been restricted to zircon grains within younger rocks [1]. The Acasta Gneiss Complex (AGC; NT, CA) has yielded zircon with Hadean domains [e.g., 2,3], but the time at which AGC rocks became closed chemical systems is unclear [4,5]. Determining this `time of last disturbance' (tld) would provide a minimum protolith age, and is crucial for using radiogenic isotope compositions of bulk rocks to trace crust-mantle evolution. Recent studies mostly focused on the `low-strain' eastern AGC [e.g., 6, 7], which records an evolving, early-mid Archean cratonic nucleus [7]. We also studied the `high-strain' banded gneiss in the western AGC, which hosts >4 Ga zircon domains [2,3], too. Our focusing lay on adjoining, lithologically distinct bands [8] of two distinct chemical groups: A) Mafic, chondrite-normalized LaN/YbN ≦20, slightly HFSE- depleted, and B) TTG-like, LaN/YbN up to 145, markedly HFSE-depleted. Six adjacent bands yield a well-defined 4 Ga Sm-Nd isochron with a ɛNd4Ga of +2 and ɛHf4Ga values from +1 to +6. Within-band Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf systematics imply younger mineral re-equilibration [9]. We interpret the 4 Ga Sm-Nd isochron to date the physical juxtaposition of bands in the gneiss unit and to define tld among bands for elements less mobile and diffusive than Sm and Nd. Contrasting Sm-Nd results from the same unit [10] likely are due to sampling at too fine a scale. Digestion of metamict pre-tld zircon likely caused the scatter in Lu-Hf. Both decay systems hint at the existence of a possibly local, strongly depleted Hadean mantle domain. The TTG-like bands are 0.4 Gyr older than similar rocks in the `low-strain' eastern AGC [7]. The AGC was thus an evolved cratonic nucleus already at 4 Ga, possibly with a depleted lithospheric keel. [1] Cavosie et al. (2004) Prec. Res. 135, 251-279 [2] Bowring & Williams (1999) CMP 134, 3-16 [3] Iizuka et al

  7. Dynamical evolution of comet nucleus rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D. J.; Sidorenko, V. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.

    2001-11-01

    The rotational dynamics of outgassing cometary nuclei are investigated analytically using dynamical systems theory. We develop a general theory for the averaged evolution of a comet nucleus rotation state assuming that the nucleus is a spheroid (either prolate or oblate) and that the outgassing torques are a function of solar insolation and heliocentric distance. The resulting solutions are a function of the comet outgassing properties, its heliocentric orbit, and the assumed distribution of active regions on its surface. We find that the long-term evolution of the comet nucleus rotation is a strong function of the distribution of active regions over its surface. Specifically, we find that a comet nucleus with a uniformly active surface will tend towards a rotation state with a nutation angle of ~ 55 degrees and an angular momentum perpendicular to the sun-perihelion direction. Conversely, a comet nucleus with an isolated active region will tend towards a zero nutation angle with its symmetry axis and angular momentum aligned parallel to the sun-perihelion direction. For active surface regions between these extremes we find 4 qualitatively different dynamical outcomes. In all cases, the theory predicts that the comet nucleus angular momentum will have a secular increase, a phenomenon that could contribute to nucleus splitting of active comets. These results can be used to discriminate between competing theories of comet outgassing based on a nucelus' rotation state. They also allow for a range of plausible a priori constraints to be placed on a comet's rotation state to aid in the interpretation of its outgassing structure. This work was supported by the NASA JURRISS program under Grant NAG5-8715. AIN, AAV and VVS acknowledge support from Russian Foundation for Basic research via Grants 00-01-00538 and 00-01-0174 respectively. DJS acknowledges support from the PG&G program via Grant NAG5-9017.

  8. High density QCD and nucleus-nucleus scattering deeply in the saturation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormilitzin, Andrey; Levin, Eugene; Miller, Jeremy S.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we solve the equations that describe nucleus-nucleus scattering, in high density QCD, in the framework of the BFKL Pomeron Calculus. We found that (i) the contribution of short distances to the opacity for nucleus-nucleus scattering dies at high energies, (ii) the opacity tends to unity at high energy, and (iii) the main contribution that survives comes from soft (long distance) processes for large values of the impact parameter. The corrections to the opacity Ω(Y,b)=1 were calculated and it turns out that they have a completely different form, namely ( 1-Ω→exp(-Const √{Y} )) than the opacity that stems from the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, which is ( 1-Ω→exp(-Const Y)). We reproduce the formula for the nucleus-nucleus cross section that is commonly used in the description of nucleus-nucleus scattering, and there is no reason why it should be correct in the Glauber-Gribov approach.

  9. Target nucleus in relativistic nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gutbrod, H.H.; Warwick, A.I.; Wieman, H.

    1982-03-01

    Both the fireball model and hydrodynamical model predict, in a central collision, a fast energy dissipation in the early diving stage of the projectile into the target nucleus. In the final state both models show total incident energy largely dispersed over the whole target nucleus. In a quantitative comparison with the data for the Intranuclear Cascade Calculations, however, the 90/sup 0/ double differential cross section seems to be flatter than the calculated one. If the slope is reflecting the temperature in the system then the data are having apparently a higher temperature than the cascade would predict. This report suggests and discusses a picture of the reaction mechanism where the light projectile (e.g. Ne) gets stopped very early in the large target nucleus (e.g. Au or U) forming a small fireball at approximately half the beam rapidity, which decays inside the target nucleus, heating it up and causing thee whole system to expand. The expansion cools the system and big clusters can condense out if the total energy and thus entropy in the system is not too high to prevent it. Such a qualitative picture of a reaction mechanism emerges when we consider the information obtained about relativistic nuclear collisions from measurements of the remnants of a large target nucleus struck by a smaller projectile (Ne + Au) and relate it to the complementary information from earlier measurements of fast light reaction products. (WHK)

  10. Cell Biology of the Caenorhabditis elegans Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Fix, Orna; Askjaer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the Caenorhabditis elegans nucleus have provided fascinating insight to the organization and activities of eukaryotic cells. Being the organelle that holds the genetic blueprint of the cell, the nucleus is critical for basically every aspect of cell biology. The stereotypical development of C. elegans from a one cell-stage embryo to a fertile hermaphrodite with 959 somatic nuclei has allowed the identification of mutants with specific alterations in gene expression programs, nuclear morphology, or nuclear positioning. Moreover, the early C. elegans embryo is an excellent model to dissect the mitotic processes of nuclear disassembly and reformation with high spatiotemporal resolution. We review here several features of the C. elegans nucleus, including its composition, structure, and dynamics. We also discuss the spatial organization of chromatin and regulation of gene expression and how this depends on tight control of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Finally, the extensive connections of the nucleus with the cytoskeleton and their implications during development are described. Most processes of the C. elegans nucleus are evolutionarily conserved, highlighting the relevance of this powerful and versatile model organism to human biology. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons. PMID:21738832

  12. Control of nucleus positioning in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Maria; Terret, Marie-Emilie; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2017-08-12

    The position of the nucleus in a cell can instruct morphogenesis in some cases, conveying spatial and temporal information and abnormal nuclear positioning can lead to disease. In oocytes from worm, sea urchin, frog and some fish, nucleus position regulates embryo development, it marks the animal pole and in Drosophila it defines the future dorso-ventral axis of the embryo and of the adult body plan. However, in mammals, the oocyte nucleus is centrally located and does not instruct any future embryo axis. Yet an off-center nucleus correlates with poor outcome for mouse and human oocyte development. This is surprising since oocytes further undergo two extremely asymmetric divisions in terms of the size of the daughter cells (enabling polar body extrusion), requiring an off-centering of their chromosomes. In this review we address not only the bio-physical mechanism controlling nucleus positioning via an actin-mediated pressure gradient, but we also speculate on potential biological relevance of nuclear positioning in mammalian oocytes and early embryos. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. The dynamic landscape of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher M; Bellini, Michel

    2010-01-01

    While the cell nucleus was described for the first time almost two centuries ago, our modern view of the nuclear architecture is primarily based on studies from the last two decades. This surprising late start coincides with the development of new, powerful strategies to probe for the spatial organization of nuclear activities in both fixed and live cells. As a result, three major principles have emerged: first, the nucleus is not just a bag filled with nucleic acids and proteins. Rather, many distinct functional domains, including the chromosomes, resides within the confines of the nuclear envelope. Second, all these nuclear domains are highly dynamic, with molecules exchanging rapidly between them and the surrounding nucleoplasm. Finally, the motion of molecules within the nucleoplasm appears to be mostly driven by random diffusion. Here, the emerging roles of several subnuclear domains are discussed in the context of the dynamic functions of the cell nucleus.

  14. Organisation of the human dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Koutcherov, Yuri; Mai, Juergen K; Ashwell, Ken W; Paxinos, George

    2004-01-19

    This study used acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry to reveal the organization of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DM) in the human. Topographically, the human DM is similar to DM in the monkey and rat. It is wedged between the paraventricular nucleus, dorsally, and the ventromedial nucleus, ventrally. Laterally, DM borders the lateral hypothalamic area while medially it approaches the 3rd ventricle. The AChE staining distinguished two subcompartments of the human DM: the larger diffuse and the smaller compact DM. The subcompartmental organization of the human DM appears homologous to that found in the monkey and less complex than that reported in rats. Understanding of the organization of DM creates meaningful anatomical reference for physiological and pharmacological studies in the human hypothalamus.

  15. Circadian modulation of osmoregulated firing in rat supraoptic nucleus neurones.

    PubMed

    Trudel, E; Bourque, C W

    2012-04-01

    The antidiuretic hormone vasopressin (VP) promotes water reabsorption from the kidney and levels of circulating VP are normally related linearly to plasma osmolality, aiming to maintain the latter close to a predetermined set point. Interestingly, VP levels rise also in the absence of an increase in osmolality during late sleep in various mammals, including rats and humans. This circadian rhythm is functionally important because the absence of a late night VP surge results in polyuria and disrupts sleep in humans. Previous work has indicated that the VP surge may be caused by facilitation of the central processes mediating the osmotic control of VP release, and the mechanism by which this occurs was recently studied in angled slices of rat hypothalamus that preserve intact network interactions between the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; the biological clock), the organum vasculosum lamina terminalis (OVLT; the central osmosensory nucleus) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON; which contains VP-releasing neurohypophysial neurones). These studies confirmed that the electrical activity of SCN clock neurones is higher during the middle sleep period (MSP) than during the late sleep period (LSP). Moreover, they revealed that the excitation of SON neurones caused by hyperosmotic stimulation of the OVLT was greater during the LSP than during the MSP. Activation of clock neurones by repetitive electrical stimulation, or by injection of glutamate into the SCN, caused a presynaptic inhibition of glutamatergic synapses made between the axon terminals of OVLT neurones and SON neurones. Consistent with this effect, activation of clock neurones with glutamate also reduced the excitation of SON neurones caused by hyperosmotic stimulation of the OVLT. These results suggest that clock neurones in the SCN can mediate an increase in VP release through a disinhibition of excitatory synapses between the OVLT and the SON during the LSP. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2012

  16. UNCOVERING THE NUCLEUS CANDIDATE FOR NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Günthardt, G. I.; Camperi, J. A.; Agüero, M. P.; Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Schirmer, M.; Bosch, G. E-mail: camperi@oac.uncor.edu E-mail: rdiaz@gemini.edu E-mail: mschirmer@gemini.edu

    2015-11-15

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H{sub 2} rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  17. Nucleus model for periodic Comet Tempel 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1991-01-01

    Observational data obtained primarily during 1988 are analyzed and synthesized to develop a comprehensive physical model for the nucleus of Periodic Comet Tempel 2, one of the best studied members of Jupiter's family of short-period comets. It is confirmed that a previous investigation provided reliable information on the comet's spin-axis orientation, which implies and obliquity of 54 degrees of the orbit plane to the equatorial plane and which appears to have varied little - if at all - with time. This conclusion is critical for fitting a triaxial ellipsoid to approximate the figure of the nucleus.

  18. Uncovering the Nucleus Candidate for NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Agüero, M. P.; Camperi, J. A.; Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Bosch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2015-11-01

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H2 rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  19. Compound Nucleus Contributions to the Optical Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I. J.; Dietrich, F. S.; Escher, J. E.; Dupuis, M.

    2008-04-17

    An ab-initio calculation of the optical potential for neutron-nucleus scattering has been performed by explicitly coupling the elastic channel to all the particle-hole (p-h) excitation states in the target. These p-h states may be regarded as doorway states through which the flux flows to more complicated configurations, and (in the end) to long-lived compound nucleus resonances. The random-phase approximation (RPA) provides the linear combinations of p-h states that include the residual interactions within the target, and we show preliminary results for elastic flux loss using both p-h and RPA descriptions of target excitations.

  20. The Effects of Disease Models of Nuclear Actin Polymerization on the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A.; Yuen, Michaela; Parilla, Megan; Cooper, Sandra T.; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-01-01

    Actin plays a crucial role in regulating multiple processes within the nucleus, including transcription and chromatin organization. However, the polymerization state of nuclear actin remains controversial, and there is no evidence for persistent actin filaments in a normal interphase nucleus. Further, several disease pathologies are characterized by polymerization of nuclear actin into stable filaments or rods. These include filaments that stain with phalloidin, resulting from point mutations in skeletal α-actin, detected in the human skeletal disease intranuclear rod myopathy, and cofilin/actin rods that form in response to cellular stressors like heatshock. To further elucidate the effects of these pathological actin structures, we examined the nucleus in both cell culture models as well as isolated human tissues. We find these actin structures alter the distribution of both RNA polymerase II and chromatin. Our data suggest that nuclear actin filaments result in disruption of nuclear organization, which may contribute to the disease pathology. PMID:27774069

  1. A thalamic input to the nucleus accumbens mediates opiate dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingjie; Wienecke, Carl F.R.; Nachtrab, Gregory; Chen, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    Chronic opiate use induces opiate dependence, which is characterized by extremely unpleasant physical and emotional feelings after drug use is terminated. Both rewarding effects of drug and the desire to avoid withdrawal symptoms motivate continued drug use1-3, and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is important for orchestrating both processes4,5. While multiple inputs to the NAc regulate reward6-9, little is known about the NAc circuitry underlying withdrawal. Here we identify the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) as a prominent input to the NAc mediating the expression of opiate withdrawal induced physical signs and aversive memory. Activity in the PVT to NAc pathway is necessary and sufficient to mediate behavioral aversion. Selectively silencing this pathway abolishes aversive symptoms in two different mouse models of opiate withdrawal. Chronic morphine exposure selectively potentiates excitatory transmission between the PVT and D2-receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (D2-MSNs) via synaptic insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Notably, in vivo optogenetic depotentiation restores normal transmission at PVT→D2-MSNs synapses and robustly suppresses morphine withdrawal symptoms. These results link morphine-evoked pathway- and cell type-specific plasticity in the PVT→NAc circuit to opiate dependence, and suggest that reprogramming this circuit holds promise for treating opiate addiction. PMID:26840481

  2. Shape of Caudate Nucleus and Its Cognitive Correlates in Neuroleptic-Naive Schizotypal Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, James J.; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Nestor, Paul G.; Estepar, Raul S.J.; Dickey, Chandlee C.; Voglmaier, Martina M.; Seidman, Larry J.; Kikinis, Ron; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; McCarley, Robert W.; Shenton, Martha E.

    2009-01-01

    Background We measured the shape of the head of the caudate nucleus with a new approach based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) subjects in whom we previously reported decreased caudate nucleus volume. We believe MRI shape analysis complements traditional MRI volume measurements. Methods Magnetic resonance imaging scans were used to measure the shape of the caudate nucleus in 15 right-handed male subjects with SPD, who had no prior neuroleptic exposure, and in 14 matched normal comparison subjects. With MRI processing tools, we measured the head of the caudate nucleus using a shape index, which measured how much a given shape deviates from a sphere. Results In relation to comparison subjects, neuroleptic never-medicated SPD subjects had significantly higher (more “edgy”) head of the caudate shape index scores, lateralized to the right side. Additionally, for SPD subjects, higher right and left head of the caudate SI scores correlated significantly with poorer neuropsychological performance on tasks of visuospatial memory and auditory/verbal working memory, respectively. Conclusions These data confirm the value of measuring shape, as well as volume, of brain regions of interest and support the association of intrinsic pathology in the caudate nucleus, unrelated to neuroleptic medication, with cognitive abnormalities in the schizophrenia spectrum. PMID:14732598

  3. Shape and Size of the Fission Yeast Nucleus are governed by Equilibrium Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Gerald; Huber, Greg; Miller, Jonathan; Sazer, Shelley

    2006-03-01

    Nuclear morphogenesis in the asexual reproduction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) consists of two stages: (i) volume-doubling growth, in which a round nucleus inflates uniformly, and (ii) division, in which the nucleus undergoes shape changes from round to oblong to peanut to dumbbell before it resolves into two smaller, round daughter nuclei, driven by the formation and elongation of a microtubule-based spindle within the nucleus. The combined volume of the daughter nuclei immediately after division is the same as the volume of the single nucleus at the onset of division. Consequently, the nuclear envelope (NE) area must increase by 26% during division. We are developing a model in order to determine the mechanics governing these shape and size changes. It is based on current knowledge of the nuclear structure, insight from normal and abnormal nuclei, and concepts from the mechanics governing lipid-bilayer membranes. We predict that (a) the NE prefers to be flat, (b) the NE is under tension, (c) the nucleus has an internal pressure, (d) nuclear growth is governed by the Law of Laplace, and (e) some abnormal nuclei behave like vesicles with encapsulated microtubules.

  4. Influence of the nucleus area distribution on the survival fraction after charged particles broad beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wéra, A-C; Barazzuol, L; Jeynes, J C G; Merchant, M J; Suzuki, M; Kirkby, K J

    2014-08-07

    It is well known that broad beam irradiation with heavy ions leads to variation in the number of hit(s) received by each cell as the distribution of particles follows the Poisson statistics. Although the nucleus area will determine the number of hit(s) received for a given dose, variation amongst its irradiated cell population is generally not considered. In this work, we investigate the effect of the nucleus area's distribution on the survival fraction. More specifically, this work aims to explain the deviation, or tail, which might be observed in the survival fraction at high irradiation doses. For this purpose, the nucleus area distribution was added to the beam Poisson statistics and the Linear-Quadratic model in order to fit the experimental data. As shown in this study, nucleus size variation, and the associated Poisson statistics, can lead to an upward survival trend after broad beam irradiation. The influence of the distribution parameters (mean area and standard deviation) was studied using a normal distribution, along with the Linear-Quadratic model parameters (α and β). Finally, the model proposed here was successfully tested to the survival fraction of LN18 cells irradiated with a 85 keV µm(- 1) carbon ion broad beam for which the distribution in the area of the nucleus had been determined.

  5. Pion-nucleon scattering and pion production in nucleon-nucleon and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    Lecture notes are presented on the following: (1) basic aspects of ..pi..N interactions (properties of pions and nucleons, SU(3) and SU(6) classification phenomenology of ..pi..N scattering ((3.3) resonance; phase shift analysis, and bag model approach to ..pi..N); (2) pion production and absorption in the two nucleon system (NN ..-->.. NN..pi.. (isobar model) and ..pi..d reversible NN (existence of dibaryon resonances)); (3) pion absorption in complex nuclei (multiparticle aspects and cascade calculations); and (4) pion production with nuclear targets including (a) nucleon-nucleus, (b) nucleus-nucleus (Fermi-averaged 2-body vs thermodynamic models), and (c) ..pi pi.. interoferometry.

  6. TWO-PHOTON PHYSICS IN NUCLEUS-NUCLEUS COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NYSTRAND,J.

    1998-09-10

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ions carry strong electromagnetic and nuclear fields. Interactions between these fields in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions can probe many interesting physics topics. This presentation will focus on coherent two-photon and photonuclear processes at RHIC. The rates for these interactions will be high. The coherent coupling of all the protons in the nucleus enhances the equivalent photon flux by a factor Z{sup 2} up to an energy of {approx} 3 GeV. The plans for studying coherent interactions with the STAR experiment will be discussed. Experimental techniques for separating signal from background will be presented.

  7. Two-photon physics in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Nystrand, J.; Klein, S.

    1998-09-01

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ions carry strong electromagnetic and nuclear fields. Interactions between these fields in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions can probe many interesting physics topics. This presentation will focus on coherent two-photon and photonuclear processes at RHIC. The rates for these interactions will be high. The coherent coupling of all the protons in the nucleus enhances the equivalent photon flux by a factor Z{sup 2} up to an energy of {approx} 3 GeV. The plans for studying coherent interactions with the STAR experiment will be discussed. Experimental techniques for separating signal from background will be presented.

  8. Fermi-motion effect on the intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, G. W.; Kong, W. Y.; Han, T. F.; Li, X. C.; Ma, J. B.; Sheng, Z. Q.; Shi, G. Z.; Tian, F.; Wang, J.; Zhang, C.

    2016-11-01

    The Glauber model is modified with the Fermi-motion effect in the calculation of elastic differential cross-sections and momentum distributions of a fragment from mother nucleus. Different reaction systems at low energies are calculated with the modified Glauber model. It is found that calculations including the Fermi-motion provide a better prescription relating the model to a proper nuclear density distribution by comparing with the experimental data. On the basis of the studies, the influence of the correction on the extracted nuclear radius is quantified. The results further confirm the importance of the Fermi-motion in the nucleus-nucleus collision reactions at low energies.

  9. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2015-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated extended standard model predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3 and that Nucleus is 2 dimensional. The CBM theory began with an insight into the structure of the He nucleus around the year 1989. Details of how this theory evolved which took many years, and is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references One independent check of this model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light (around the ``dn'' quark in the center of the proton) turns out to be exactly one de Broglie wavelength something determined after the mass and speed of the up quark were determined by other means. This theory explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments and this along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. When this theory was first presented at Argonne in 1996, it was the first time that anyone had predicted the quarks orbited inside the proton at relativistic speeds and it was met with skepticism.

  10. The Nucleus and the Simple Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Brian J.

    1982-01-01

    The 150th anniversary of the naming of the nucleus by Robert Brown in 1831 was commemorated by re-creating some of his most important observations using two of his microscopes. Comments on Brown's career and the microtechnique employed during his time are provided. (Author/JN)

  11. Oral alprazolam acutely increases nucleus accumbens perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Pinkham, Amy E.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Valdez, Jeffrey; Smith, Mark A.; Detre, John A.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepines treat anxiety, but can also produce euphoric effects, contributing to abuse. Using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, we provide the first direct evidence in humans that alprazolam (Xanax) acutely increases perfusion in the nucleus accumbens, a key reward-processing region linked to addiction. PMID:23070072

  12. THE ROLE OF THE NUCLEUS IN OXIDATION.

    PubMed

    Osterhout, W J

    1917-10-12

    Injury produces in the leaf-cells of the Indian Pipe (Monotropa uniflora) a darkening which is due to oxidation. The oxidation is much more rapid in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm and the facts indicate that this is also the case with the oxidation of the uninjured cell.

  13. Nucleon-nucleus interactions from JACEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Results on hadron-nucleus interactions from the Japanese-American Cooperation Emulsion Experiment experiment are presented. Angular distributions for charged particles, and angular and transverse momentum spectra for photons have been measured for a sample of events with sigma epsilon sub gamma. Results on central rapidity density and transverse energy flow are discussed.

  14. Nucleus-associated actin in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Berdieva, Mariia; Bogolyubov, Dmitry; Podlipaeva, Yuliya; Goodkov, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The presence, spatial distribution and forms of intranuclear and nucleus-associated cytoplasmic actin were studied in Amoeba proteus with immunocytochemical approaches. Labeling with different anti-actin antibodies and staining with TRITC-phalloidin and fluorescent deoxyribonuclease I were used. We showed that actin is abundant within the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm of A. proteus cells. According to DNase I experiments, the predominant form of intranuclear actin is G-actin which is associated with chromatin strands. Besides, unpolymerized actin was shown to participate in organization of a prominent actin layer adjacent to the outer surface of nuclear envelope. No significant amount of F-actin was found in the nucleus. At the same time, the amoeba nucleus is enclosed in a basket-like structure formed by circumnuclear actin filaments and bundles connected with global cytoplasmic actin cytoskeleton. A supposed architectural function of actin filaments was studied by treatment with actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin A. It disassembled the circumnuclear actin system, but did not affect the intranuclear chromatin structure. The results obtained for amoeba cells support the modern concept that actin is involved in fundamental nuclear processes that have evolved in the cells of multicellular organisms.

  15. New developments in nucleus pulposus replacement technology.

    PubMed

    Carl, Allen; Ledet, Eric; Yuan, Hansen; Sharan, Alok

    2004-01-01

    Attempts to alleviate the pain attributed to degeneration of the nucleus pulposus using replacement or reinforcement techniques dating back to the 1950s are reviewed. The various materials and their insertion techniques are discussed as are results available from early clinical experiences. These techniques are in evolution and clinical outcomes will be necessary to establish the efficacy of these approaches.

  16. Partial anxiolytic action of morphine sulphate following microinjection into the central nucleus of the amygdala in rats.

    PubMed

    File, S E; Rodgers, R J

    1979-09-01

    In the social interaction test of anxiety, bilateral microinjections of morphine sulphate (10 microgram) into the central nucleus of the amygdala counteracted the reduction in social interaction normally seen when the test arena is unfamiliar to rats. However, these injections did not counteract the decrease in social interaction that is observed as illuminance of the arena is increased. Morphine injections into the medial site depressed social interaction below the levels shown by control animals. In the open field test, morphine produced a facilitation of peripheral activity when injected into the central nucleus whilst a decrease in rearing was observed following similar injections into the medial nucleus. Overall, these data indicate a partial anxiolytic action of morphine in the central amygdaloid nucleus. Results are discussed in relation to possible differences in opioid peptide innervation of these two amygdaloid nuclei.

  17. The Double Nucleus and Central Black Hole of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John; Bender, Ralf

    1999-09-01

    parameters are tweaked so that the orbital eccentricity is made larger and the orientation of the orbits is made to point more nearly at us. (3) The model rotation curve is asymmetric; at perfect resolution, V is 60 km s-1 higher on the P2 side than on the P1 side. At σ*=0.27", we observe an asymmetry of 54+/-4 km s-1 after bulge subtraction. We regard this as confirmation of the model's essential idea that stellar orbits are eccentric and coherently aligned. (4) The model predicts that P1 and P2 should have the same stellar population. We confirm this: P1 is more similar to P2 than it is to the bulge or to a globular cluster or to M32. This makes it unlikely that P1 consists of accreted stars. (5) Our observation that there is cold light on both sides of the center implies, if the nucleus is an eccentric disk, that some stars have escaped from the P1-P2 alignment and have phase-mixed around the galaxy's center. The dispersion peak coincides with a cluster of ultraviolet-bright stars seen in Hubble Space Telescope images. We propose that the BH is in this cluster. Its center is displaced by 0.068"+/-0.010" from the bulge center. If we put a 3.3×107 Msolar dark object in the UV cluster and adopt the dynamically determined mass-to-light ratio of the stars, then the center of mass (COM) of the bulge, nucleus, and dark object coincides with the bulge center to within 0.017"+/-0.016". The COM also agrees with the velocity center of the bulge and outer nucleus. Therefore, the asymmetry of the stars in the double nucleus supports our suggestion that the BH is in the UV cluster. If the stars have a normal mass-to-light ratio, then the location of the COM also confirms the mass of the BH, largely independent of dynamical models. Tremaine's model implies that any dark cluster alternative to a BH is less than 0.13"+/-0.03"=0.49 pc in radius. The observed mass-to-light ratio is M/LV~=300 in a cylinder of radius r=0.13" and M/LV~=2200 in a sphere of radius r=0.13". This is much larger

  18. The dentate nucleus in Friedreich's ataxia: the role of iron-responsive proteins.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, Arnulf H; Michael, Susan C; Knutson, Mitchell D; Haile, David J; Qian, Jiang; Levi, Sonia; Santambrogio, Paolo; Garrick, Michael D; Lamarche, Jacques B

    2007-08-01

    Frataxin deficiency in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) causes cardiac, endocrine, and nervous system manifestations. Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein, and adequate amounts are essential for cellular iron homeostasis. The main histological lesion in the brain of FRDA patients is neuronal atrophy and a peculiar proliferation of synaptic terminals in the dentate nucleus termed grumose degeneration. This cerebellar nucleus may be especially susceptible to FRDA because it contains abundant iron. We examined total iron and selected iron-responsive proteins in the dentate nucleus of nine patients with FRDA and nine normal controls by biochemical and microscopic techniques. Total iron (1.53 +/- 0.53 mumol/g wet weight) and ferritin (206.9 +/- 46.6 mug/g wet weight) in FRDA did not significantly differ from normal controls (iron: 1.78 +/- 0.88 mumol/g; ferritin: 210.9 +/- 9.0 mug/g) but Western blots exhibited a shift to light ferritin subunits. Immunocytochemistry of the dentate nucleus revealed loss of juxtaneuronal ferritin-containing oligodendroglia and prominent ferritin immunoreactivity in microglia and astrocytes. Mitochondrial ferritin was not detectable by immunocytochemistry. Stains for the divalent metal transporter 1 confirmed neuronal loss while endothelial cells reacting with antibodies to transferrin receptor 1 protein showed crowding of blood vessels due to collapse of the normal neuropil. Regions of grumose degeneration were strongly reactive for ferroportin. Purkinje cell bodies, their dendrites and axons, were also ferroportin-positive, and it is likely that grumose degeneration is the morphological manifestation of mitochondrial iron dysmetabolism in the terminals of corticonuclear fibers. Neuronal loss in the dentate nucleus is the likely result of trans-synaptic degeneration.

  19. The independent evolution of the enlargement of the principal sensory nucleus of the trigeminal nerve in three different groups of birds.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristián; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Wylie, Douglas R

    2009-01-01

    In vertebrates, sensory specializations are usually correlated with increases in the brain areas associated with that specialization. This correlation is called the 'principle of proper mass' whereby the size of a neural structure is a reflection of the complexity of the behavior that it subserves. In recent years, several comparative studies have revealed examples of this principle in the visual and auditory system of birds, but somatosensory specializations have largely been ignored. Many species rely heavily on tactile information during feeding. Input from the beak, tongue and face, conveyed via the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and hypoglossal nerves, is first processed in the brain by the principal sensory nucleus of the trigeminal nerve (PrV) in the brainstem. Previous studies report that PrV is enlarged in some species that rely heavily on tactile input when feeding, but no extensive comparative studies have been performed. In this study, we assessed the volume of PrV in 73 species of birds to present a detailed analysis of the relative size variation of PrV using both conventional and phylogenetically based statistics. Overall, our results indicate that three distinct groups of birds have a hypertrophied PrV: waterfowl (Anseriformes), beak-probing shorebirds (Charadriiformes), and parrots (Psittaciformes). These three groups have different sensory requirements from the orofacial region. For example, beak-probing shorebirds use pressure information from the tip of the beak to find buried prey in soft substrates, whereas waterfowl, especially filter-feeding ducks, use information from the beak, palate, and tongue when feeding. Parrots likely require increased sensitivity in the tongue to manipulate food items. Thus, despite all sharing an enlarged PrV and feeding behaviors dependent on tactile input, each group has different requirements that have led to the independent evolution of a large PrV. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Average transverse momentum and energy density in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Emulsion chambers were used to measure the transverse momenta of photons or pi(0) mesons produced in high-energy cosmic-ray nucleus-nucleus collisions. A group of events having large average transverse momenta has been found which apparently exceeds the expected limiting values. Analysis of the events at early interaction times, of the order of 1 fm/c, indicates that the observed transverse momentum increases with both rapidity density and energy density.

  1. Average transverse momentum and energy density in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Emulsion chambers were used to measure the transverse momenta of photons or pi(0) mesons produced in high-energy cosmic-ray nucleus-nucleus collisions. A group of events having large average transverse momenta has been found which apparently exceeds the expected limiting values. Analysis of the events at early interaction times, of the order of 1 fm/c, indicates that the observed transverse momentum increases with both rapidity density and energy density.

  2. Results on ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions from balloon-borne emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W.; Meegan, C. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of balloon-borne emulsion-chamber measurements on high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei (Burnett et al., 1983) are summarized in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Special consideration is given to seven nucleus-nucleus interaction events at energy in excess of 1 TeV/A with multiplicity greater than 400, and to Fe interactions (53 with CHO, 10 with emulsion, and 14 with Pb) at 20-60 GeV/A.

  3. Relaxographic studies of aging normal human lenses.

    PubMed

    Bettelheim, Frederick A; Lizak, Martin J; Zigler, J Samuel

    2002-12-01

    Ten excised normal human lenses of various ages were studied. Seven sections of each lens, from anterior outer cortex to posterior outer cortex were imaged and the T(1) (spin-lattice) and T(2) (spin-spin) relaxation data on each section were collected. T(1) and T(2) relaxation were analysed by fitting pixel intensity to one term exponential expressions. Both T(1) and T(2) relaxation times showed minimal values in the nuclear region and maxima at the two outer cortexes. The pre-exponential terms of the fittings of both T(1) and T(2) relaxation,M(1) and M(2), were normalized in order to eliminate instrumental variations over a 2 year period. M(2) had a maximum in the nucleus and minima in the two cortexes. M(1) exhibited minimal value in the nucleus and maxima at the two cortexes. The positional dependence of T(2) relaxation times as well as that of M(2) indicated that they represent the behavior of the bound water in the lens. The positional dependence of M(1) suggests that this relaxation represents the total water that has a minimal value in the nucleus. The T(2) relaxation time decreases with increase in the age of the lens at each location. The slope of the change in T(2) relaxation time with age is greatest in the outer cortexes and diminishes as one proceeds to the nucleus. T(1) relaxation times and M(1) do not show significant change with age. This and the age dependence of the other relaxographic parameters imply that the aging of the lens involves major changes in its hydration properties that are more accentuated in the cortexes. The interpretation of these changes is in agreement with the syneretic theory of lens aging.

  4. MRI study of caudate nucleus volume and its cognitive correlates in neuroleptic-naive patients with schizotypal personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Levitt, James J; McCarley, Robert W; Dickey, Chandlee C; Voglmaier, Martina M; Niznikiewicz, Margaret A; Seidman, Larry J; Hirayasu, Yoshio; Ciszewski, Aleksandra A; Kikinis, Ron; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Shenton, Martha E

    2002-07-01

    "Cognitive" circuits anatomically link the frontal lobe to subcortical structures; therefore, pathology in any of the core components of these circuits, such as in the caudate nucleus, may result in neurobehavioral syndromes similar to those of the frontal lobe. Neuroleptic medication, however, affects the size of the caudate nucleus. For this reason, individuals diagnosed with schizotypal personality disorder offer an ideal group for the measurement of the caudate nucleus because they may be genetically related to individuals with schizophrenia but do not require neuroleptic treatment because of their less severe symptoms. Magnetic resonance imagining (MRI) scans obtained on a 1.5-T magnet with 1.5-mm contiguous slices were used to measure the caudate nucleus and lateral ventricles in 15 right-handed male subjects with schizotypal personality disorder who had no previous neuroleptic exposure and in 14 normal comparison subjects. Subjects were group matched for parental socioeconomic status, handedness, and gender. First, the authors found significantly lower left and right absolute (13.1%, 13.2%) and relative (9.1%, 9.2%) caudate nucleus volumes in never-medicated subjects with schizotypal personality disorder than in normal subjects. Second, they found significant, inverse correlations between caudate nucleus volume and the severity of perseveration in two distinct working memory tasks in these neuroleptic-naive subjects with schizotypal personality disorder. These data are consistent with the findings of reduced caudate nucleus volume reported in studies of neuroleptic-naive patients experiencing their first episode of schizophrenia and support the association of intrinsic pathology in the caudate nucleus with abnormalities in working memory in the schizophrenia spectrum.

  5. Ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus in guinea pigs: cytoarchitecture and inputs from the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Schofield, B R; Cant, N B

    1997-03-17

    Cytoarchitectonic criteria were used to distinguish three subdivisions of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus in guinea pigs. Axonal tracing techniques were used to examine the projections from the cochlear nucleus to each subdivision. Based on the cell types they contain and their patterns of input, we distinguished ventral, dorsal, and anterior subdivisions of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus. All three subdivisions receive bilateral inputs from the cochlear nucleus, with contralateral inputs greatly outnumbering ipsilateral inputs. However, the relative density of the inputs varies: the ventral subdivision receives the densest projection, whereas the anterior subdivision receives the sparsest projection. Further differences are apparent in the morphology of the afferent axons. Following an injection of Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin into the ventral cochlear nucleus, most of the axons on the contralateral side and all of the axons on the ipsilateral side are thin. Thick axons are present only in the ventral subdivision contralateral to the injection site. The evidence from both anterograde and retrograde tracing studies suggests that the thick axons originate from octopus cells, whereas the thin axons arise from multipolar cells and spherical bushy cells. The differences in constituent cell types and in patterns of inputs suggest that each of the three subdivisions of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus makes a distinct contribution to the analysis of acoustic signals.

  6. The Neutrophil Nucleus and Its Role in Neutrophilic Function.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Leonardo Olivieri; Aquino, Elaine Nascimento; Neves, Anne Caroline Dias; Fontes, Wagner

    2015-09-01

    The cell nucleus plays a key role in differentiation processes in eukaryotic cells. It is not the nucleus in particular, but the organization of the genes and their remodeling that provides the data for the adjustments to be made according to the medium. The neutrophil nucleus has a different morphology. It is a multi-lobed nucleus where some researchers argue no longer function. However, studies indicate that it is very probable the occurrence of chromatin remodeling during activation steps. It may be that the human neutrophil nucleus also contributes to the mobility of neutrophils through thin tissue spaces. Questions like these will be discussed in this small review. The topics include morphology of human neutrophil nucleus, maturation process and modifications of the neutrophil nucleus, neutrophil activation and chromatin modifications, causes and consequences of multi-lobulated segmented morphology, and importance of the nucleus in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Why do we have a caudate nucleus?

    PubMed

    Villablanca, Jaime R

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the physiological role of the caudate nucleus, we combine here our laboratory data on cats with reports of patients with selective damage to this nucleus. Cats with bilateral removal of the caudate nuclei showed a stereotyped behavior consisting of persistently approaching and then following a person, another cat, or any object, and attempting to contact the target. Simultaneously, the animals exhibited a friendly disposition and persistent docility together with purring and forelimbs treading/kneading. The magnitude and duration of this behavior was proportional to the extent of the removal reaching a maximum after ablations of 65% or more of the caudate tissue. These cats were hyperactive but they had lost the feline elegance of movements. Additional features of acaudate cats were: (1) postural and accuracy deficits (plus perseveration) in paw usage tasks including bar pressing for food reward; (2) cognitive and perceptual impairments on a T-maze battery of tasks and on the bar pressing tasks; (3) blockage or blunting of the species-specific behavioral response to a single injection of morphine; Unilateral caudate nucleus removal did not produce global behavioral effects, but only deficit in the contralateral paw contact placing reaction and paw usage/bar pressing. Moreover and surprisingly, we found hypertrophy of the ipsilateral caudate nucleus following prenatal focal neocortical removal. The findings in human were also behavioral (not neurological) and also occurred with unilateral caudate damage. The main manifestations consisted of loss of drive (apathy), obsessive-compulsive behavior, cognitive deficits, stimulus-bound perseverative behavior, and hyperactivity. Based on all of the above data we propose that the specific function of the caudate nucleus is to control approach-attachment behavior, ranging from plain approach to a target, to romantic love. This putative function would account well for the caudate involvement in the

  8. Collateral projections from the lateral parabrachial nucleus to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus and the central amygdaloid nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shao-Hua; Yin, Jun-Bin; Sun, Yi; Bai, Yang; Zhou, Kai-Xiang; Zhao, Wen-Jun; Wang, Wei; Dong, Yu-Lin; Li, Yun-Qing

    2016-08-26

    Combined the retrograde double tracing with immunofluorescence histochemical staining, we examined the neurons in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB) sent collateral projections to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) and central amygdaloid nucleus (CeA) and their roles in the nociceptive transmission in the rat. After the injection of Fluoro-gold (FG) into the PVT and tetramethylrhodamine-dextran (TMR) into the CeA, respectively, FG/TMR double-labeled neurons were observed in the LPB. The percentages of FG/TMR double-labeled neurons to the total number of FG- or TMR-labeled neurons were 6.18% and 9.09%, respectively. Almost all of the FG/TMR double-labeled neurons (95%) exhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunoreactivity. In the condition of neuropathic pain, 94% of these neurons showed FOS immunoreactivity. The present data indicates that some of CGRP-expressing neurons in the LPB may transmit nociceptive information toward the PVT and CeA by way of axon collaterals.

  9. Genetic inactivation of glutamate neurons in the rat sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus recapitulates REM sleep behaviour disorder.

    PubMed

    Valencia Garcia, Sara; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Lazarus, Michael; Grassi, Daniela; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2017-02-01

    SEE SCHENCK AND MAHOWALD DOI101093/AWW329 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by the enactment of violent dreams during paradoxical (REM) sleep in the absence of normal muscle atonia. Accumulating clinical and experimental data suggest that REM sleep behaviour disorder might be due to the neurodegeneration of glutamate neurons involved in paradoxical sleep and located within the pontine sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus. The purpose of the present work was thus to functionally determine first, the role of glutamate sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons in paradoxical sleep and second, whether their genetic inactivation is sufficient for recapitulating REM sleep behaviour disorder in rats. For this goal, we first injected two retrograde tracers in the intralaminar thalamus and ventral medulla to disentangle neuronal circuits in which sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus is involved; second we infused bilaterally in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus adeno-associated viruses carrying short hairpin RNAs targeting Slc17a6 mRNA [which encodes vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2)] to chronically impair glutamate synaptic transmission in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons. At the neuroanatomical level, sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons specifically activated during paradoxical sleep hypersomnia send descending efferents to glycine/GABA neurons within the ventral medulla, but not ascending projections to the intralaminar thalamus. These data suggest a crucial role of sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons rather in muscle atonia than in paradoxical sleep generation. In line with this hypothesis, 30 days after adeno-associated virus injections into sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus rats display a decrease of 30% of paradoxical sleep daily quantities, and a significant increase of muscle tone during paradoxical sleep concomitant to a tremendous increase of abnormal motor dream

  10. Bilateral lesions of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus disrupt nursing behavior in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Miguel; Aguilar-Roblero, Raúl; González-Mariscal, Gabriela

    2017-09-01

    Doe rabbits nurse the litter only once a day, for around 3 min, with circa 24-h periodicity. To explore the participation of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in regulating this behavior, we lesioned it bilaterally with kainic acid on lactation day 7. Bilateral lesions, comprising less than 50% of the total PVN volume, abolished nursing behavior (4/8 does) or severely disrupted its normal periodicity (4/8 does). In the latter case, duration of nursing bouts was normal. Body weight, food and water intake were not significantly affected by bilateral PVN lesions. Unilateral lesions of the PVN or lesions located outside this nucleus did not significantly alter nursing periodicity or any other behavioral parameter. Results indicate an important role of the PVN for (i) maintaining maternal behavior, and (ii) the periodic display of nursing across lactation in rabbits. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Quantitative differences among EMG activities of muscles innervated by subpopulations of hypoglossal and upper spinal motoneurons during non-REM sleep - REM sleep transitions: a window on neural processes in the sleeping brain.

    PubMed

    Rukhadze, I; Kamani, H; Kubin, L

    2011-12-01

    In the rat, a species widely used to study the neural mechanisms of sleep and motor control, lingual electromyographic activity (EMG) is minimal during non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and then phasic twitches gradually increase after the onset of REM sleep. To better characterize the central neural processes underlying this pattern, we quantified EMG of muscles innervated by distinct subpopulations of hypoglossal motoneurons and nuchal (N) EMG during transitions from non-REM sleep to REM sleep. In 8 chronically instrumented rats, we recorded cortical EEG, EMG at sites near the base of the tongue where genioglossal and intrinsic muscle fibers predominate (GG-I), EMG of the geniohyoid (GH) muscle, and N EMG. Sleep-wake states were identified and EMGs quantified relative to their mean levels in wakefulness in successive 10 s epochs. During non-REM sleep, the average EMG levels differed among the three muscles, with the order being N>GH>GG-I. During REM sleep, due to different magnitudes of phasic twitches, the order was reversed to GG-I>GH>N. GG-I and GH exhibited a gradual increase of twitching that peaked at 70-120 s after the onset of REM sleep and then declined if the REM sleep episode lasted longer. We propose that a common phasic excitatory generator impinges on motoneuron pools that innervate different muscles, but twitching magnitudes are different due to different levels of tonic motoneuronal hyperpolarization. We also propose that REM sleep episodes of average durations are terminated by intense activity of the central generator of phasic events, whereas long REM sleep episodes end as a result of a gradual waning of the tonic disfacilitatory and inhibitory processes.

  12. Quantitative differences among EMG activities of muscles innervated by subpopulations of hypoglossal and upper spinal motoneurons during non-REM sleep - REM sleep transitions: a window on neural processes in the sleeping brain

    PubMed Central

    RUKHADZE, I.; KAMANI, H.; KUBIN, L.

    2017-01-01

    In the rat, a species widely used to study the neural mechanisms of sleep and motor control, lingual electromyographic activity (EMG) is minimal during non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and then phasic twitches gradually increase after the onset of REM sleep. To better characterize the central neural processes underlying this pattern, we quantified EMG of muscles innervated by distinct subpopulations of hypoglossal motoneurons and nuchal (N) EMG during transitions from non-REM sleep to REM sleep. In 8 chronically instrumented rats, we recorded cortical EEG, EMG at sites near the base of the tongue where genioglossal and intrinsic muscle fibers predominate (GG-I), EMG of the geniohyoid (GH) muscle, and N EMG. Sleep-wake states were identified and EMGs quantified relative to their mean levels in wakefulness in successive 10 s epochs. During non-REM sleep, the average EMG levels differed among the three muscles, with the order being N > GH > GG-I. During REM sleep, due to different magnitudes of phasic twitches, the order was reversed to GG-I > GH > N. GG-I and GH exhibited a gradual increase of twitching that peaked at 70–120 s after the onset of REM sleep and then declined if the REM sleep episode lasted longer. We propose that a common phasic excitatory generator impinges on motoneuron pools that innervate different muscles, but twitching magnitudes are different due to different levels of tonic motoneuronal hyperpolarization. We also propose that REM sleep episodes of average durations are terminated by intense activity of the central generator of phasic events, whereas long REM sleep episodes end as a result of a gradual waning of the tonic disfacilitatory and inhibitory processes. PMID:22205596

  13. Feasibility of multichannel human cochlear nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Luetje, C M; Whittaker, C K; Geier, L; Mediavilla, S J; Shallop, J K

    1992-01-01

    Bipolar electrical stimulation of the brainstem cochlear nucleus (CN) following acoustic tumor removal in an only-hearing ear can provide beneficial hearing. However, the benefits of multichannel stimulation have yet to be defined. Following removal of a second acoustic tumor in a patient with neurofibromatosis 2, a Nucleus mini-22 channel implant device was inserted with the electrode array tip from the foramen of Luschka cephalad along the root entry zone of the eighth nerve, secured by a single suture superficially in the brain stem. Initial stimulation on the sixth postoperative day indicated that electrodes 18 to 22 were capable of CN stimulation without seventh nerve stimulation. Presumed electrode migration precluded further CN stimulation 1 month later. This report illustrates the feasibility of brainstem CN stimulation with an existing multichannel system.

  14. Cell Nucleus-Targeting Zwitterionic Carbon Dots

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Shin, Eeseul; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2015-01-01

    An innovative nucleus-targeting zwitterionic carbon dot (CD) vehicle has been developed for anticancer drug delivery and optical monitoring. The zwitterionic functional groups of the CDs introduced by a simple one-step synthesis using β-alanine as a passivating and zwitterionic ligand allow cytoplasmic uptake and subsequent nuclear translocation of the CDs. Moreover, multicolor fluorescence improves the accuracy of the CDs as an optical code. The CD-based drug delivery system constructed by non-covalent grafting of doxorubicin, exhibits superior antitumor efficacy owing to enhanced nuclear delivery in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo, resulting in highly effective tumor growth inhibition. Since the zwitterionic CDs are highly biocompatible and effectively translocated into the nucleus, it provides a compelling solution to a multifunctional nanoparticle for substantially enhanced nuclear uptake of drugs and optical monitoring of translocation. PMID:26689549

  15. Core-nucleus distortation in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    We are completing a study of the effects of the spherical distortion of the {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} nucleus by the {Lambda} in a hypernucleus. The response of the core was determined by an appropriately chosen energy-density functional which depends, in particular, on the nuclear compressibility. The forcing action of the A is determined by the nuclear density dependence of the {Lambda} binding in nuclear matter which is obtained from our work on the {Lambda} single-particle energies. Because of the strongly repulsive {Lambda}NN forces, this {Lambda} binding {open_quotes}saturates{close_quotes} at a density close to the central density of nuclei, and results in a reduced core-nucleus distortion much less than would otherwise be obtained. The effects of the core distortion then turn out to be very small even for quite light hypernuclei. This result justifies the assumption that spherical core nuclei are effectively undistorted in a hypernucleus.

  16. Gustatory Reward and the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Norgren, R.; Hajnal, A.; Mungarndee, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    The concept of reward is central to psychology, but remains a cipher for neuroscience. Considerable evidence implicates dopamine in the process of reward and much of the data derives from the nucleus accumbens. Gustatory stimuli are widely used for animal studies of reward, but the connections between the taste and reward systems are unknown. In a series of experiments, our laboratory has addressed this issue using functional neurochemistry and neuroanatomy. First, using microdialysis probes, we demonstrated that sapid sucrose releases dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. The effect is dependent on oral stimulation and concentration. We subsequently determined that this response was independent of the thalamocortical gustatory system, but substantially blunted by damage to the parabrachial limbic taste projection. Further experiments using c-fos histochemistry confirmed that the limbic pathway was the prime carrier for the gustatory afferent activity that drives accumbens dopamine release. PMID:16822531

  17. Finite nucleus effects on relativistic energy corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Faegri, Knut, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of using a finite nucleus model in quantum-chemical calculations is examined. Relativistic corrections from the first order Foldy-Wouthuysen terms are affected indirectly by the change in wavefunction, but also directly as a result of revised expressions for the Darwin and spin-orbit terms due to the change in nuclear potential. A calculation for the Rn atom indicates that the mass-velocity and Darwin corrections are much more sensitive to the finite nucleus than the non-relativistic total energy, but that the total contribution for these two terms is quite stable provided the revised form of the Darwin term is used. The spin-orbit interaction is not greatly affected by the choice of nuclear model.

  18. Cell Nucleus-Targeting Zwitterionic Carbon Dots.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Shin, Eeseul; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2015-12-22

    An innovative nucleus-targeting zwitterionic carbon dot (CD) vehicle has been developed for anticancer drug delivery and optical monitoring. The zwitterionic functional groups of the CDs introduced by a simple one-step synthesis using β-alanine as a passivating and zwitterionic ligand allow cytoplasmic uptake and subsequent nuclear translocation of the CDs. Moreover, multicolor fluorescence improves the accuracy of the CDs as an optical code. The CD-based drug delivery system constructed by non-covalent grafting of doxorubicin, exhibits superior antitumor efficacy owing to enhanced nuclear delivery in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo, resulting in highly effective tumor growth inhibition. Since the zwitterionic CDs are highly biocompatible and effectively translocated into the nucleus, it provides a compelling solution to a multifunctional nanoparticle for substantially enhanced nuclear uptake of drugs and optical monitoring of translocation.

  19. Physical Properties of Cometary Nucleus Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David; Hillman, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In this proposal we aim to study the physical properties of the Centaurs and the dead comets, these being the precursors to, and the remnants from, the active cometary nuclei. The nuclei themselves are very difficult to study, because of the contaminating effects of near-nucleus coma. Systematic investigation of the nuclei both before they enter the zone of strong sublimation and after they have depleted their near-surface volatiles should neatly bracket the properties of these objects, revealing evolutionary effects.

  20. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70°C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  1. Pygmy dipole response in 238U nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, Ekber; Kuliev, Ali Akbar; Quliyev, Huseynqulu

    2017-02-01

    The presence of the El pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in the actinide nucleus 238U was shown via QRPA. Below the particle threshold energy, 24 excitation states were calculated. The calculations, is demonstrating the presence of a PDR with evidence for K splitting. The calculations further suggest that the PDR in 238U is predominantly K=0. The obtained results show universality of the PDR in atomic nuclei.

  2. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  3. Antinucleon-nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.; Millener, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    A general overview of the utility of antinucleon (anti N)-nucleus inelastic scattering studies is presented, emphasizing both the sensitivity of the cross sections to various components of the N anti N transition amplitudes and the prospects for the exploration of some novel aspects of nuclear structure. We start with an examination of the relation between NN and N anti N potentials, focusing on the coherences predicted for the central, spin-orbit and tensor components, and how these may be revealed by measurements of two-body spin observables. We next discuss the role of the nucleus as a spin and isospin filter, and show how, by a judicious choice of final state quantum numbers (natural or unnatural parity states, isospin transfer ..delta..T = 0 or 1) and momentum transfer q, one can isolate different components of the N anti N transition amplitude. Various models for the N anti N interaction which give reasonable fits to the available two-body data are shown to lead to strikingly different predictions for certain spin-flip nuclear transitions. We suggest several possible directions for future anti N-nucleus inelastic scattering experiments, for instance the study of spin observables which would be accessible with polarized anti N beams, charge exchange reactions, and higher resolution studies of the (anti p, anti p') reaction. We compare the antinucleon and the nucleon as a probe of nuclear modes of excitation. 40 refs., 13 figs.

  4. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  5. How to build a yeast nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hua; Arbona, Jean-Michel; Zimmer, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Biological functions including gene expression and DNA repair are affected by the 3D architecture of the genome, but the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Notably, it remains unclear to what extent nuclear architecture is driven by generic physical properties of polymers or by specific factors such as proteins binding particular DNA sequences. The budding yeast nucleus has been intensely studied by imaging and biochemical techniques, resulting in a large quantitative data set on locus positions and DNA contact frequencies. We recently described a quantitative model of the interphase yeast nucleus in which chromosomes are represented as passively moving polymer chains. This model ignores the DNA sequence information except for specific constraints at the centromeres, telomeres, and the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Despite its simplicity, the model accounts for a large majority of experimental data, including absolute and relative locus positions and contact frequency patterns at chromosomal and subchromosomal scales. Here, we also illustrate the model's ability to reproduce observed features of chromatin movements. Our results strongly suggest that the dynamic large-scale architecture of the yeast nucleus is dominated by statistical properties of randomly moving polymers with a few sequence-specific constraints, rather than by a large number of DNA-specific factors or epigenetic modifications. In addition, we show that our model accounts for recently measured variations in homologous recombination efficiency, illustrating its potential for quantitatively understanding functional consequences of nuclear architecture.

  6. Theoretical predictions for the nucleus 296118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiczewski, A.

    2016-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for the α -decay chain of the nucleus 296118 are performed. The synthesis of this nucleus is being attempted in experiments running in Dubna. The α -decay energies Qα, and the α -decay and spontaneous-fission half-lives, Tα and Tsf, are studied. The analysis of the α decay is based on a phenomenological model using only three parameters. The calculations are performed in nine variants using masses obtained within nine nuclear-mass models describing masses of the heaviest nuclei. The experimental Qα energies, known from earlier experiments for the potential daughter, 292Lv, and grand-daughter, 288Fl, nuclei are reproduced with an average of the absolute values of the discrepancies: from 0.13 to 1.52 MeV within the considered variants. Measured half-lives Tα are reconstructed within average ratios: from 1.7 to 1054. Within all variants considered, the half-life Tα of the nucleus 296118 is obtained larger than needed (around 1 μ s ) for its observation.

  7. Functional morphology of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Y; Okamura, H; Tanaka, M; Tamada, Y; Hayashi, S; Iijima, N; Matsuda, T; Munekawa, K; Takamatsu, T; Hisa, Y; Shigeyoshi, Y; Amaya, F

    1999-07-01

    In mammals, the biological clock (circadian oscillator) is situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a small bilaterally paired structure just above the optic chiasm. Circadian rhythms of sleep-wakefulness and hormone release disappear when the SCN is destroyed, and transplantation of fetal or neonatal SCN into an arrhythmic host restores rhythmicity. There are several kinds of peptide-synthesizing neurons in the SCN, with vasoactive intestinal peptide, arginine vasopressin, and somatostatine neurons being most prominent. Those peptides and their mRNA show diurnal rhythmicity and may or may not be affected by light stimuli. Major neuronal inputs from retinal ganglion cells as well as other inputs such as those from the lateral geniculate nucleus and raphe nucleus are very important for entrainment and shift of circadian rhythms. In this review, we describe morphological and functional interactions between neurons and glial elements and their development. We also consider the expression of immediate-early genes in the SCN after light stimulation during subjective night and their role in the mechanism of signal transduction. The reciprocal interaction between the SCN and melatonin, which is synthesized in the pineal body under the influence of polysynaptic inputs from the SCN, is also considered. Finally, morphological and functional characteristics of clock genes, particularly mPers, which are considered to promote circadian rhythm, are reviewed. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  8. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-06-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  9. Canine acute cervical myelopathy: Hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusion or intraspinal discal cysts?

    PubMed

    Falzone, Cristian

    2017-04-01

    To differentiate between hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusion and ventral intraspinal discal cysts in dogs. Prospective case series. Twenty dogs with acute onset of cervical myelopathy due to hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusion or ventral intraspinal discal cysts. Clinical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings, outcome after surgical treatment, cytologic and histologic findings of compressive material were taken into account. Comparisons and considerations were done between findings reported herein and what was previously described as suspected hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusion and intraspinal cysts. All dogs were presented with acute onset of cervical myelopathy. MR imaging showed compressive cervical myelopathy at C2-C3 (n = 1), C3-C4 (n = 6), C4-C5 (n = 8), and C5-C6 (n = 5) intervertebral disc spaces, due to extradural material suggestive of either partially hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusion or intraspinal discal cyst, with T2 hyperintense and T1 iso-hypointense signal and variable contrast enhancement after gadolinium injection. All dogs were treated surgically by ventral slot (n = 15) or dorsolateral hemilaminectomy (n = 5). All dogs had a favorable outcome and regained a normal gait. The extradural material collected at surgery varied from liquid to more obvious gelatinous material. Cytologic or histologic examination of the material revealed similar findings for all dogs, compatible with partially degenerated nucleus pulposus. Dogs with acute onset of compressive cervical myelopathy due to extradural material resembling human intraspinal cysts on MR images are most likely to have extrusion of partially degenerated nucleus pulposus and should be treated accordingly. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  10. Is {sup 276}U a doubly magic nucleus?

    SciTech Connect

    Liliani, N. Sulaksono, A.

    2016-04-19

    We investigate a possible new doubly magic heavy nucleus by using a relativistic mean-field (RMF) model with the addition of a cross interaction term of omega-rho mesons and an electromagnetic exchange term. We propose that {sup 276}U is a doubly magic nucleus. The evidence for {sup 276}U being a doubly magic nucleus is shown through the two-nucleon gaps, the single-particle energies, and the neutron skin thickness of the nucleus. We have also found that the prediction of {sup 276}U as a doubly magic nucleus by the RMF model is not affected by the inclusion of isoscalar-isovector and electromagnetic exchange couplings.

  11. Dynamical evolution of comet nucleus rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D. J.; Sidorenko, V. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.

    2002-09-01

    The rotational dynamics of outgassing cometary nuclei are investigated analytically. We develop a general theory for the evolution of a comet nucleus' rotation state using averaging theory and assuming that the outgassing torques are a function of solar insolation and heliocentric distance. The resulting solutions are a function of the nucleus inertia ellipsoid, its outgassing properties, its heliocentric orbit, and the assumed distribution of active regions on its surface. We find that the long-term evolution of the comet nucleus rotation is a strong function of the distribution of active regions over its surface. In particular, we find that nuclei with nearly axisymmetric inertia ellipsoids and a uniformly active surface will tend towards a rotation state that has a nutation angle of ~ 55 degrees and its angular momentum perpendicular to the sun-perihelion direction. If such a comet nucleus has only one isolated active region, it will tend towards a zero nutation angle with its approximate symmetry axis and rotational angular momentum aligned parallel to the sun-perihelion direction. In the general case for an inertia ellipsoid that is not close to being axisymmetric we find a much richer set of possible steady-state solutions that are stable, ranging from rotation about the maximum moment of the inertia axis, to SAM and LAM non-principal axis rotation states. The resulting stable rotation states are a strong function of outgassing activity distribution, which we show using a simplified model of the comet Halley nucleus. Also, we demonstrate that comet Borrely observations are consistent with a stable rotation state. Our results can be used to discriminate between competing theories of comet outgassing based on a nucelus' rotation state. They also allow for a range of plausible a priori constraints to be placed on a comet's rotation state to aid in the interpretation of its outgassing structure. This work was supported by the NASA JURRISS program under Grant NAG5

  12. Differential Gene Expression in the Developing Lateral Geniculate Nucleus and Medial Geniculate Nucleus Reveals Novel Roles for Zic4 and Foxp2 in Visual and Auditory Pathway Development

    PubMed Central

    Horng, Sam; Kreiman, Gabriel; Ellsworth, Charlene; Page, Damon; Blank, Marissa; Millen, Kathleen; Sur, Mriganka

    2010-01-01

    Primary sensory nuclei of the thalamus process and relay parallel channels of sensory input into the cortex. The developmental processes by which these nuclei acquire distinct functional roles are not well understood. To identify novel groups of genes with a potential role in differentiating two adjacent sensory nuclei, we performed a microarray screen comparing perinatal gene expression in the principal auditory relay nucleus, the medial geniculate nucleus (MGN), and principal visual relay nucleus, the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). We discovered and confirmed groups of highly ranked, differentially expressed genes with qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization. A functional role for Zic4, a transcription factor highly enriched in the LGN, was investigated using Zic4-null mice, which were found to have changes in topographic patterning of retinogeniculate projections. Foxp2, a transcriptional repressor expressed strongly in the MGN, was found to be positively regulated by activity in the MGN. These findings identify roles for two differentially expressed genes, Zic4 and Foxp2, in visual and auditory pathway development. Finally, to test whether modality-specific patterns of gene expression are influenced by extrinsic patterns of input, we performed an additional microarray screen comparing the normal MGN to “rewired” MGN, in which normal auditory afferents are ablated and novel retinal inputs innervate the MGN. Data from this screen indicate that rewired MGN acquires some patterns of gene expression that are present in the developing LGN, including an upregulation of Zic4 expression, as well as novel patterns of expression which may represent unique processes of cross-modal plasticity. PMID:19864579

  13. Cardiac damage after lesions of the nucleus tractus solitarii

    PubMed Central

    Nayate, Ameya; Moore, Steven A.; Weiss, Robert; Taktakishvili, Otar M.; Lin, Li-Hsien; Talman, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Humans with central lesions that augment sympathetic nerve activity are predisposed to cardiac arrhythmias, myocardial lesions, and sudden death. Previously, we showed that selectively killing neurons with neurokinin-1 receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) of rats attenuated the baroreflex and, in some animals, led to sudden unexplained death within ∼2 wk. Interruption of arterial baroreflexes is known to increase sympathetic activity. Here we tested the hypothesis that lesions in the NTS lead to fatal cardiac arrhythmias and myocardial lesions. We studied electrocardiograms, echocardiograms, blood pressure, and heart rate in 14 adult male rats after bilateral microinjection into the NTS of stabilized substance P conjugated to the toxin saporin and compared the variables in five sham control rats and in five animals with toxin injected outside the NTS. Only injection of toxin into the NTS led to increased lability of arterial blood pressure, a sign of baroreflex interruption. Two animals treated with toxin died suddenly. All animals engaged in normal activity until, in two, rapid development of asystole and death over 6–8 min. Cardiac function when examined by echocardiography was normal, but pathologic examination of the heart revealed diffuse microscopic areas of acute coagulation necrosis in the myocardium in five animals, focal subacute necrosis in two animals, and both changes in one animal. This study supports the hypothesis that NTS lesions interrupting the baroreflex may induce cardiac arrhythmias and myocardial changes similar to those seen in humans with central lesions and may lead to sudden cardiac death. PMID:19020288

  14. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  15. Sickle hemoglobin gelation. Reaction order and critical nucleus size.

    PubMed Central

    Behe, M J; Englander, S W

    1978-01-01

    Sickle hemoglobin (Hb S) gelation displays kinetics consistent with a rate-limiting nucleation step. The approximate size of the critical nucleus can be inferred from the order of the reaction with respect to Hb S activity, but determination of the reaction order is complicated by the fact that Hb S activity is substantially different from Hb S concentration at the high protein concentrations required for gelation. Equilibrium and kinetic experiments on Hb S gelation were designed to evaluate the relative activity coefficient of Hb S as a function of concentration. These experiments used non-Hb S proteins to mimic, and thus evaluate, the effect on activity coefficients of increasing Hb S concentration. At Hb S concentrations near 20% the change in Hb S activity coefficient generates two-thirds of the apparent dependence of nucleation rate on Hb S concentration. When this effect is explicitly accounted for, the nucleation reaction is seen to be approximately 10th-order with respect to effective number concentration of Hb S. The closeness of the reaction order to the number of strands in models of Hb S fibers suggests a nucleus close to the size of one turn of the Hb S fiber. These experiments introduce a new approach to the study of Hb S gelation, the equal activity isotherm, used here also to show that Hb S.Hb A (normal adult hemoglobin) hybrids do incorporate into growing nuclei and stable microtubules but that A.S hybridization is neutral with respect to promotion of Hb S nucleation and the sol-gel equilibrium. PMID:667302

  16. Visible and infrared study of comet 2P/Encke's nucleus during its 2013 apparition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Y.; Mueller, B.; Samarasinha, N.; Woodney, L.; Abell, P.

    2014-07-01

    The 2013 apparition of comet 2P/Encke provided an opportunity to study the comet while it was relatively close to the Earth. The comet passed 0.48 au from the Earth on October 17, the closest such passage since 2003 and until 2030. We initiated a visible and infrared observational campaign for the apparition with the goal of further characterizing the physical, thermal, and rotational properties of the P/Encke nucleus. While thermal-emission data on the nucleus have been obtained in the past (e.g. [1--4]), observations in 2013 timed to coincide with an equator-on view afforded us the chance to have a rarely-seen vantage point of the nucleus. Low-resolution spectra over wavelengths from 0.7 to 2.5 μ m were obtained over four nights (UT Sept. 26, 28, 30, Oct. 1) that span all of the nucleus rotational longitudes. The spectra were acquired at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) using its SpeX instrument, and they sample reflected sunlight at the short wavelengths and Wien-side thermal emission at the long wavelengths. We will present results on thermal inertia and albedo from a preliminary analysis of these data. We have shown through observations over the past 13 years that the rotation period of P/Encke's nucleus changes by about 4 minutes per orbit [5,6]. Furthermore, the typical lightcurve has the normal two-humped shape but with humps that have vastly different amplitudes (e.g., [7]). Thus, the equator-on view gave us the chance to further investigate P/Encke's rotation state and shape. We obtained visible-wavelength photometry of the nucleus in the R band at NASA/IRTF with the MORIS instrument on the aforementioned dates, at the NOAO Kitt Peak 2.1-meter telescope over UT Sept. 11, 12, 13, and 14, and at the CSUSB Murrillo Family Observatory 0.5-meter telescope over several dates in Sept. and Oct. [8]. The MORIS data in particular gave us the rotational context and absolute flux calibration for the spectra. We will present new, preliminary constraints on

  17. The effect of the relative nuclear size on the nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erofeeva, I. N.; Murzin, V. S.; Sivoklokov, S. Y.; Smirnova, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental data on the interactions of light nuclei (d, He(4), C(12)) at the momentum 4.2 GeV/cA with the carbon nuclei were taken in the 2-m propane bubble chamber. The distributions in the number of interacting nucleons, the spectra of protons, the mean energies of secondary pions and protons, the mean fractions of energy transferred to the pion and nucleon components are presented. The results of the investigation of the mechanism of nucleus-nucleus interactions can be used to calculate the nuclear cascades in the atmosphere.

  18. Pion and Kaon Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes require accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Codes require cross sections to be written in terms of lab frame variables and it is important to be able to verify models against experimental data in the lab frame. Several models are compared to lab frame data. It is found that models based on algebraic parameterizations are unable to describe intermediate energy differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parameterizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the lab frame, are able to account for the data.

  19. Electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions relating to space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the papers within this report deal with electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions which are of concern in the space radiation program. In particular, the removal of one and two nucleons via both electromagnetic and strong interaction processes has been extensively investigated. The theory of relativistic Coulomb fission has also been developed. Several papers on quark models also appear. Finally, note that the theoretical methods developed in this work have been directly applied to the task of radiation protection of astronauts. This has been done by parameterizing the theoretical formalism in such a fashion that it can be used in cosmic ray transport codes.

  20. Subthreshold pion production from nucleus-nucleus collisions around 100 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalá, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.

    1993-12-01

    Several global variables were tested with the aim to determine the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions producing pions at incident energies around 100 MeV/nucleon. The experimental set-up includes the MEDEA multidetector, part of which is used as a π 0 spectrometer, and an additional hodoscope of plastic scintillators to cover very forward angles. A statistical model was used to generate both inclusive and pion-triggered events. Selection of well measured events was made through the measured total parallel momentum. Among the different global variables which were tested, the average parallel velocity was seen to give the best correlation with the impact parameter.

  1. Jet Tomography of High-Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at Next-to-Leading Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitev, Ivan; Zhang, Ben-Wei

    2010-04-01

    We demonstrate that jet observables are highly sensitive to the characteristics of the vacuum and the in-medium QCD parton showers and propose techniques that exploit this sensitivity to constrain the mechanism of quark and gluon energy loss in strongly interacting plasmas. As a first example, we calculate the inclusive jet cross section in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions to O(αs3). Theoretical predictions for the medium-induced jet broadening and the suppression of the jet production rate due to cold and hot nuclear matter effects in Au+Au and Cu+Cu reactions at RHIC are presented.

  2. Jet tomography of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions at next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Vitev, Ivan; Zhang, Ben - Wei

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that jet observables are highly sensitive to the characteristics of the vacuum and the in-medium QCD parton showers and propose techniques that exploit this sensitivity to constrain the mechanism of quark and gluon energy loss in strongly-interacting plasmas. As a first example, we calculate the inclusive jet cross section in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions to {Omicron}({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}). Theoretical predictions for the medium-induced jet broadening and the suppression of the jet production rate due to cold and hot nuclear matter effects in Au+Au and Cu+Cu reactions at RHIC are presented.

  3. Development of silicon pixels for strangeness detection in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Antinori, F. |; Barberis, D.; Beker, H.; Beusch, W.; Campbell, M.; Cantatore, E.; Catanesi, M.G.; Chesi, E.; Darbo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Elia, D.; Heijne, E.H.M.; Helstrup, H.; Jacholkowski, A.; Klempt, W.; Knudson, K.; Kralik, I.; Lassalle, J.C.; Lenti, V.; Lopez, L.; Luptak, M.; Martinengo, P.; Meddi, F.; Middelkamp, P.; Presented by...

    1995-07-20

    Silicon microdetectors and in particular the novel silicon pixel detectors open up the way for a comprehensive study of strangeness detection in nucleus-nucleus collisions. We outline the philosophy behind this approach, describe an application in the pixel-based heavy-ion experiment WA97, and give some preliminary results on the performance of four silicon pixels planes in the 1994 Pb beam run of WA97. We conclude with an outlook on some possible future applications of silicon pixels. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. Observation of direct hadronic pairs in nucleus-nucleus collisions in JACEE emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of high energy ( or = 1 TeV/amu) nucleus-nucleus collisions observed in Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment (JACEE) emulsion chambers, nonrandom spatial association of produced charged particles, mostly hadronic pairs, are observed. Similar narrow pairs are observed in about 100 events at much low energy (20 to 60 GeV/amu). Analysis shows that 30 to 50% of Pair abundances are understood by the Hambury-Brown-Twiss effect, and the remainder seems to require other explanations.

  5. Pion cross section parametrizations for intermediate energy, nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Norbury, John W.

    2009-03-15

    Space radiation and cosmic ray transport codes require simple and accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy, nucleus-nucleus collisions. Several arithmetic parametrization models for pion production are compared to laboratory frame data. It is found that models based on high energy parametrizations are unable to describe intermediate energy, differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parametrizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the laboratory frame, are able to account for the data. Heavy ion transport codes that require algebraic cross section formulas can therefore use arithmetic parametrizations at high energy, but should use thermal model parametrizations at intermediate energy.

  6. Analysis of nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies and random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nazmitdinov, R. G.; Shahaliev, E. I.; Suleymanov, M. K.; Tomsovic, S.

    2009-05-15

    We propose a novel statistical approach to the analysis of experimental data obtained in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies which borrows from methods developed within the context of random matrix theory. It is applied to the detection of correlations in a system of secondary particles. We find good agreement between the results obtained in this way and a standard analysis based on the method of effective mass spectra and two-pair correlation function often used in high energy physics. The method introduced here is free from unwanted background contributions.

  7. Surface Photometric Variation of Comet Borrelly's Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; McFadden, L. A.

    2004-11-01

    Comet Borrelly was visited by Deep Space 1 in Sept. 2001 (Soderblom et al. 2004) The images of comet Borrelly's nucleus show large brightness variation over the surface even after the effect of shape is taken into account (Oberst et al. 2004, Kirk et al. 2004). It is not yet known whether this variation is caused by albedo variation (Oberst et al. 2004, Buratti et al. 2004) or the variation of other physical properties such as surface roughness (Kirk et al. 2004) or solar phase function. In our analysis, the disk-resolved images from the DS1 spacecraft (Soderblom et al. 2004) were used, coupled with the shape model of Borrelly's nucleus developed from stereo imaging (Oberst et al. 2004, Kirk et al. 2004), to fit the bidirectional reflectance as a function of local illumination and viewing geometry for individual terrains as defined by Britt et al. (2004). Results show that the surface reflectance variation is, contrary to previous interpretations, most likely due to the combination of albedo variation (a factor of 1.5) and the variation of the asymmetry factor (g) of the single-particle phase function. We find the roughness parameter (theta_bar) is <25o over the surface. The surface on Borrelly's nucleus can be highly back-scattering (g <= -0.7) for mottled terrain, and close to isotropic scattering (g -0.15) for smooth terrain, with single scattering albedo ranging from 0.05 to 0.07. This work is supported by NASA grant NNG04GA92G.

  8. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2014-03-01

    The Lach Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated ESM predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3. The heaviest generation in the Extended Standard Model (ESM) has a t' quark of mass 65 GeV and a b' quark of 42.4 GeV. The lepton in this generation has a mass of 27 GeV. Part of this theory evolved because it appears that the quarks and lepton of each generation have masses related by the geometric mean. The Geometric mean of 65 and 27 is 42. Charge is conserved (+2/3 and -1 is -1/3). Details of how this theory evolved is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references [T.M. Lach, Checkerboard Structure of the Nucleus, Infinite Energy, Vol. 5, issue 30, (2000); T.M. Lach, Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/0008026, @http://xxx.lanl.gov/] One independent check of this CB model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light around the ``dn'' quark in the center turns out to be exactly one DeBroglie wavelength. This explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments. This along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. One would expect a t'-anti t' meson of mass of about 130 GeV.

  9. Distinct roles of oxidative stress and antioxidants in the nucleus dorsalis and red nucleus following spinal cord hemisection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei; Yip, George Wai-Cheong; Gan, Le-Ting; Ng, Yee-Kong

    2005-09-07

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration after the acute central nervous system injury. We reported previously that increased nitric oxide (NO) production following spinal cord hemisection tends to lead to neurodegeneration in neurons of the nucleus dorsalis (ND) that normally lacks expression of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in opposition to those in the red nucleus (RN) that constitutively expresses nNOS. We wondered whether oxidative stress could be a mechanism underlying this NO involved neurodegeneration. In the present study, we examined oxidative damage evaluated by the presence of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and iron accumulation and expression of putative antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in neurons of the ND and RN after spinal cord hemisection. We found that HNE expression was induced in neurons of the ipsilateral ND from 1 to 14 days following spinal cord hemisection. Concomitantly, iron staining was seen from 7 to 14 days after lesion. HO-1, however, was only transiently induced in ipsilateral ND neurons between 3 and 7 days after lesion. In contrast to the ND neurons, HNE was undetectable and iron level was unaltered in the RN neurons after spinal cord hemisection. HO-1, SOD-Cu/Zn and SOD-Mn were constitutively expressed in RN neurons, and lesion to the spinal cord did not change their expression. These results suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the degeneration of the lesioned ND neurons; whereas constitutive antioxidant enzymes may protect the RN neurons from oxidative damage.

  10. Dust activity of Comet Halley's nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, H. U.; Delamere, W. A.; Huebner, W. F.; Reitsema, H.; Schmidt, H. U.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Whipple, Fred L.; Wilhelm, K.

    1986-01-01

    Images obtained by the Halley multicolor camera using the clear filter with a pass band from 300 to 1000 nm were used to study dust activity in the comet nucleus. Comparisons with ground based observations confirm that dust production towards the Sun increases in activity relative to the southern background source while the Giotto spacecraft was approaching. This is in agreement with the assumption that the sunward activity becomes stronger when the source rotates towards the Sun. Estimated dust column density is 90 billion/sqm, with optical thickness less than or = 0.3. Surface reflectivity is less than 1%, indicating a very rough surface with large fractions of shadowed areas.

  11. Rethinking temperature sensitivity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Norman F

    2011-08-01

    A report by Buhr et al. (2010) proposed that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is resistant to phase shifts induced by heat pulses and to entrainment by temperature cycles. These findings are inconsistent with those from studies by other laboratories in which the SCN readily phase shifts in response to heat pulses. I propose that their negative findings are not due to the SCN being temperature insensitive but are based on an explant culture preparation that does not fully express the properties of the SCN that are present in other in vitro preparations.

  12. Galaxy NGC 1448 with Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-07

    NGC 1448, a galaxy with an active galactic nucleus, is seen in this image combining data from the Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey in the optical range and NuSTAR in the X-ray range. This galaxy contains an example of a supermassive black hole hidden by gas and dust. X-ray emissions from NGC 1448, as seen by NuSTAR and Chandra, suggests for the first time that, like IC 3639 in PIA21087, there must be a thick layer of gas and dust hiding the active black hole in this galaxy from our line of sight. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21086

  13. Dust activity of Comet Halley's nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, H. U.; Delamere, W. A.; Huebner, W. F.; Reitsema, H.; Schmidt, H. U.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Whipple, Fred L.; Wilhelm, K.

    1986-01-01

    Images obtained by the Halley multicolor camera using the clear filter with a pass band from 300 to 1000 nm were used to study dust activity in the comet nucleus. Comparisons with ground based observations confirm that dust production towards the Sun increases in activity relative to the southern background source while the Giotto spacecraft was approaching. This is in agreement with the assumption that the sunward activity becomes stronger when the source rotates towards the Sun. Estimated dust column density is 90 billion/sqm, with optical thickness less than or = 0.3. Surface reflectivity is less than 1%, indicating a very rough surface with large fractions of shadowed areas.

  14. The bare nucleus of comet Neujmin 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campins, Humberto; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Mcfadden, Lucy-Ann

    1987-01-01

    Simultaneous visible and infrared observations of comet P/Neujmin 1 1984c are presented which show that the comet has a large (mean radius 10 km), dark (geometric albedo 2-3 percent) nucleus with a surface which is mostly inert material but which still shows a low level of gaseous activity. This is the first physical evidence that cometary nuclei can leave behind an inert body after the coma activity ceases. No asteroid or asteroid class has been found to match the reflectance and albedo of this comet except possibly some D asteroids.

  15. [The perichromatin compartment of the cell nucleus].

    PubMed

    Bogoliubov, D S

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the data on the structure and composition of the perichromatin compartment, a special border area between the condensed chromatin and the interchromatin space of the cell nucleus, are discussed in the light of the concept of nuclear functions in complex nuclear architectonics. Morphological features, molecular composition and functions of main extrachromosomal structures of the perichromatin compartment, perichromatin fibrils (PFs) and perichromatin granules (PGs) including nuclear stress-bodies (nSBs) that are derivates of the PGs under heat shock, are presented. A special attention was paid to the features of the molecular compositions of PFs and PGs in different cell types and at different physiological conditions.

  16. Visual field topography and binocular responses in frog's nucleus isthmi.

    PubMed

    Wang, S R; Yan, K; Wang, Y T

    1981-09-01

    Visual responses of 125 units have been extracellularly recorded with glass micropipettes from the left nucleus isthmi in the frog Rana nigromaculata, and 101 electrode tip positions marked with cobalt staining to reconstruct a visual field map in the nucleus. 80% of the units recorded show ON-OFF responses to a stationary spot of light and many are directionally selective in response to black or white targets moving through their receptive fields. All the cobalt-marked spots are within the nucleus, indicating that the nucleus isthmus proper is a restricted part of the frog visual system. There is a visual field map in the nucleus. The entire contralateral hemifield and the nasal 40 degrees of the ipsilateral hemifield project on the nucleus topographically. A cell-free band inside the nucleus is a boundary line separating the contralateral hemifield from the ipsilateral one. Dorsal to it is the contralateral field representation. The upper visual field projects on the rostral half of the nucleus and the central and medio-ventral portion of its caudal half. The lower field is represented on the dorsal and lateral part of the caudal half. Fifteen binocular units have been found from the nucleus, 13 of which are dominantly activated by the contralateral eye, the other two are almost equally excited by either eye. These binocular units are mainly situated in the medulla of the rostral half of the nucleus isthmus.

  17. The shape of the human lens nucleus with accommodation.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Erik; Dubbelman, Michiel; van der Heijde, Rob; Heethaar, Rob

    2007-07-31

    Knowledge about geometric properties such as shape and volume and Poisson's ratio of the nucleus can be used in the mechanical and optical modeling of the accommodation process. Therefore, Scheimpflug imaging was used to determine the shape of the human lens nucleus during accommodation in five subjects. To describe the shape of the nucleus, we fitted a parametric model of the cross-sectional geometry to the gradient of the Scheimpflug images using the Hough transform. The geometric model made it possible to estimate the anterior and the posterior central radius, central thickness, equatorial diameter, and cross-sectional area of the nucleus. Assuming that the nucleus is rotationally symmetric, the volume of the nucleus can be estimated by integrating around the circumference. For all five subjects, the results show that during accommodation the nucleus became more convex and that the central thickness increased whereas the equatorial diameter decreased. This decrease in equatorial diameter of the nucleus with accommodation is in accordance with the Helmholtz accommodation theory. Finally, the volume of the nucleus (on average 35 mm(3)) showed no significant change during accommodation in any of the subjects, presumably due to the fact that the human nucleus consists of incompressible material with a Poisson's ratio that is near .5.

  18. Paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus: axonal projections to the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Geerling, Joel C.; Shin, Jung-Won; Chimenti, Peter C.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    The paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) contains many neurons that innervate the brainstem, but information regarding their target sites remains incomplete. Here, we labeled neurons in the rat PVH with an anterograde axonal tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL) and studied their descending projections in reference to specific neuronal subpopulations throughout the brainstem. While many of their target sites were identified previously, numerous new observations were made. Major findings include: (1) In the midbrain, the PVH projects lightly to the ventral tegmental area, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter, reticular formation, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, and dorsal raphe nucleus. (2) In the dorsal pons, the PVH projects heavily to the pre-locus coeruleus, yet very little to the catecholamine neurons in the locus coeruleus, and selectively targets the viscerosensory subregions of the parabrachial nucleus; (3) In the ventral medulla, the superior salivatory nucleus, retrotrapezoid nucleus, compact and external formations of the nucleus ambiguus, A1 and caudal C1 catecholamine neurons, and caudal pressor area receive dense axonal projections, generally exceeding the PVH projection to the rostral C1 region; (4) The medial nucleus of the solitary tract (including A2 noradrenergic and aldosterone-sensitive neurons) receives the most extensive projections of the PVH, substantially more than the dorsal vagal nucleus or area postrema. Our findings suggest that the PVH may modulate a range of homeostatic functions, including cerebral and ocular blood flow, corneal and nasal hydration, ingestive behavior, sodium intake, and glucose metabolism, as well as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and respiratory activities. PMID:20187136

  19. Nuclear mean field and double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao T.; Phuc, Nguyen Hoang; Loan, Doan Thi; Loc, Bui Minh

    2016-09-01

    Realistic density dependent CDM3Yn versions of the M3Y interaction have been used in an extended Hartree-Fock (HF) calculation of nuclear matter (NM), with the nucleon single-particle potential determined from the total NM energy based on the Hugenholtz-van Hove theorem that gives rise naturally to a rearrangement term (RT). Using the RT of the single-nucleon potential obtained exactly at different NM densities, the density and energy dependence of the CDM3Yn interactions was modified to account properly for both the RT and observed energy dependence of the nucleon optical potential. Based on a local density approximation, the double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential has been extended to take into account consistently the rearrangement effect and energy dependence of the nuclear mean-field potential, using the modified CDM3Yn interactions. The extended double-folding model was applied to study the elastic 12C+12C and 16O+12C scattering at the refractive energies, where the Airy structure of the nuclear rainbow has been well established. The RT was found to affect significantly the real nucleus-nucleus optical potential at small internuclear distances, giving a potential strength close to that implied by the realistic optical model description of the Airy oscillation.

  20. Prestress mediates force propagation into the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shaohua; Chen Jianxin; Butler, James P.; Wang Ning . E-mail: nwang@hsph.harvard.edu

    2005-04-08

    Several reports show that the nucleus is 10 times stiffer than the cytoplasm. Hence, it is not clear if intra-nuclear structures can be directly deformed by a load of physiologic magnitudes. If a physiologic load could not directly deform intra-nuclear structures, then signaling inside the nucleus would occur only via the mechanisms of diffusion or translocation. Using a synchronous detection approach, we quantified displacements of nucleolar structures in cultured airway smooth muscle cells in response to a localized physiologic load ({approx}0.4 {mu}m surface deformation) via integrin receptors. The nucleolus exhibited significant displacements. Nucleolar structures also exhibited significant deformation, with the dominant strain being the bulk strain. Increasing the pre-existing tensile stress (prestress) in the cytoskeleton significantly increased the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus (defined as nucleolus displacement per surface deformation) whereas decreasing the prestress significantly lowered the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus. Abolishing the stress fibers/actin bundles by plating the cells on poly-L-lysine-coated dishes dramatically inhibited stress propagation to the nucleolus. These results demonstrate that the prestress in the cytoskeleton is crucial in mediating stress propagation to the nucleolus, with implications for direct mechanical regulation of nuclear activities and functions.

  1. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Modulates Thalamic Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weidong; Russo, Gary S.; Hashimoto, Takao; Zhang, Jianyu; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective tool for the treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. The mechanism by which STN DBS elicits its beneficial effect, however, remains unclear. We previously reported STN stimulation increased the rate and produced a more regular and periodic pattern of neuronal activity in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi). Here we extend our observations to neurons in the pallidal (ventralis lateralis pars oralis (VLo) and ventralis anterior (VA)) and cerebellar (ventralis lateralis posterior pars oralis (VPLo)) receiving areas of the motor thalamus during STN DBS. Stimulation parameters that produced improvement in rigidity and bradykinesia resulted in changes in the pattern and power of oscillatory activity of neuronal activity that were similar in both regions of the motor thalamus. Neurons in both VA/VLo and VPLo tended to become more periodic and regular with a shift in oscillatory activity from low to high frequencies. Burst activity was reduced in VA/VLo, but was not significantly changed in VPLo. There was also a significant shift in the population of VA/VLo neurons that were inhibited during STN DBS, while VPLo neurons tended to be activated. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that STN DBS increases output from the nucleus and produces a change in the pattern and periodicity of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia thalamic network, and that these changes include cerebellar pathways likely via activation of adjacent cerebello-thalamic fiber bundles. PMID:19005057

  2. Remote fitting in Nucleus cochlear implant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wesarg, Thomas; Wasowski, Arkadiusz; Skarzynski, Henryk; Ramos, Angel; Falcon Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Kyriafinis, George; Junge, Friederike; Novakovich, Allan; Mauch, Herbert; Laszig, Roland

    2010-12-01

    Remote programming is a viable alternative to face-to-face programming. The procedure can be regarded as safe, time and cost saving, and clinically feasible. The aim of this study was to determine the suitability of commercially available video conferencing technology and remote control software for remote programming of sound processors in Nucleus cochlear implant recipients by assessing the feasibility, efficiency, risks, and benefits of remote programming compared to face-to-face programming. This was a randomized, prospective study. Seventy Nucleus implant recipients were recruited for a random sequence comparison of one remote and one local programming session each. The time required for local or remote programming was measured and resulting MAP T and C levels were compared. The recipient provided feedback on the local and remote programming session. The audiologist and monitoring clinician were asked for their feedback on remote programming. Remote programming sessions were successfully finished for 69 recipients. No significant differences between T and C levels obtained by local and remote programming were found. The audiologists and monitoring clinicians agreed that the remote programming system provided an acceptable level of performance after most sessions. More than 50 participating recipients considered remote programming an efficient alternative to face-to-face-programming.

  3. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Robert G.; Thompson, Roger C.; Starchville, Thomas F., Jr.; Adams, C.; Aldo, A.; Dobson, K.; Flotta, C.; Gagliardino, J.; Lear, M.; Mcmillan, C.

    1992-01-01

    During the 1991-92 academic year, the Pennsylvania State University has developed three sample return missions: one to the nucleus of comet Wild 2, one to the asteroid Eros, and one to three asteroids located in the Main Belt. The primary objective of the comet nucleus sample return mission is to rendezvous with a short period comet and acquire a 10 kg sample for return to Earth. Upon rendezvous with the comet, a tethered coring and sampler drill will contact the surface and extract a two-meter core sample from the target site. Before the spacecraft returns to Earth, a monitoring penetrator containing scientific instruments will be deployed for gathering long-term data about the comet. A single asteroid sample return mission to the asteroid 433 Eros (chosen for proximity and launch opportunities) will extract a sample from the asteroid surface for return to Earth. To limit overall mission cost, most of the mission design uses current technologies, except the sampler drill design. The multiple asteroid sample return mission could best be characterized through its use of future technology including an optical communications system, a nuclear power reactor, and a low-thrust propulsion system. A low-thrust trajectory optimization code (QuickTop 2) obtained from the NASA LeRC helped in planning the size of major subsystem components, as well as the trajectory between targets.

  4. On M31's Double Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The recent HST discovery of a double nucleus in M31 brings into prominence the question how long, a second core can survive within the nuclear regions of a galaxy. Physical conditions in the nuclear regions of a typical galaxy help a second core survive, so it can orbit for a long time. possibly for thousands of orbits. Given the nearly uniform mass density in a core, tidal forces within a core radius are compressive in all directions and help the core survive the buffeting it takes as it orbits near the center of the galaxy. We use numerical experiments to illustrate these physical principles. Our method allows the full power of the experiments to be concentrated on the nuclear regions. Spatial resolution of about 0.2 pc comfortably resolves detail within the 1.4 parsec core radius of the second, but brighter core (P1) in M31. We use these physical principles to discuss M31's double nucleus, but they apply to other galaxies as well. and in other astronomical situations such as dumbbell galaxies. galaxies orbiting near the center of a galaxy cluster, and subclustering in galaxy clusters. The experiments also illustrate that galaxy encounters and merging are quite sensitive to external tidal forces, such as those produced by the gravitational potential in a group or cluster of galaxies.

  5. Spectrin repeat proteins in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Young, Kevin G; Kothary, Rashmi

    2005-02-01

    Spectrin repeat sequences are among the more common repeat elements identified in proteins, typically occurring in large structural proteins. Examples of spectrin repeat-containing proteins include dystrophin, alpha-actinin and spectrin itself--all proteins with well-demonstrated roles of establishing and maintaining cell structure. Over the past decade, it has become clear that, although these proteins display a cytoplasmic and plasma membrane distribution, several are also found both at the nuclear envelope, and within the intranuclear space. In this review, we provide an overview of recent work regarding various spectrin repeat-containing structural proteins in the nucleus. As well, we hypothesize about the regulation of their nuclear localization and possible nuclear functions based on domain architecture, known interacting proteins and evolutionary relationships. Given their large size, and their potential for interacting with multiple proteins and with chromatin, spectrin repeat-containing proteins represent strong candidates for important organizational proteins within the nucleus. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the BioEssays website (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0265-9247/suppmat/index.html).

  6. Silencing of estrogen receptor α in the ventromedial nucleus of hypothalamus leads to metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Musatov, Sergei; Chen, Walter; Pfaff, Donald W.; Mobbs, Charles V.; Yang, Xue-Jun; Clegg, Deborah J.; Kaplitt, Michael G.; Ogawa, Sonoko

    2007-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure by estrogens. Although it is well documented that a disruption of ERα signaling in ERα knockout (ERKO) mice leads to an obese phenotype, the sites of estrogen action and mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still largely unknown. In the present study, we exploited RNA interference mediated by adeno-associated viral vectors to achieve focused silencing of ERα in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, a key center of energy homeostasis. After suppression of ERα expression in this nucleus, female mice and rats developed a phenotype characteristic for metabolic syndrome and marked by obesity, hyperphagia, impaired tolerance to glucose, and reduced energy expenditure. This phenotype persisted despite normal ERα levels elsewhere in the brain. Although an increase in food intake preceded weight gain, our data suggest that a leading factor of obesity in this model is likely a decline in energy expenditure with all three major constituents being affected, including voluntary activity, basal metabolic rate, and diet-induced thermogenesis. Together, these findings indicate that ERα in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus neurons plays an essential role in the control of energy balance and the maintenance of normal body weight. PMID:17284595

  7. Odyssey Comet Nucleus Orbiter: The Next Step in Cometary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.; Nilsen, E. N.; Smythe, W. D.; Marriott, J.; Reinert, R.

    2001-01-01

    Cometary nuclei are the most primitive bodies in the solar system, containing a cosmo-chemical record of the primordial solar nebula. Flyby missions to comets, such as those that encountered Comet Halley in 1986, provide a glimpse at this record. However, to study a cometary nucleus in detail requires a rendezvous mission, i.e., a nucleus orbiter. Only an orbiter provides the ability to map the entire nucleus surface at high resolution, to study the complex chemistry in the cometary coma and its variation with time, and to determine the mass and bulk density of the nucleus, key parameters in understanding how small bodies first formed in the solar nebula. A nucleus orbiter also provides the opportunity to sense the nucleus surface in preparation for more ambitious landing and sample return missions in the future. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. A search for ϕ meson nucleus bound state using antiproton annihilation on nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, H.; Bühler, P.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; Guaraldo, C.; Hartmann, O.; Hicks, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Muto, R.; Naruki, M.; Niiyama, M.; Noumi, H.; Okada, S.; Vidal, A. Romero; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakuma, F.; Sawada, S.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, K.; Tsukada, K.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Yokkaichi, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    The mass shift of the vector mesons in nuclei is known to be a powerful tool for investigating the mechanism of generating hadron mass from the QCD vacuum. The mechanism is known to be the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. In 2007, KEK-PS E325 experiment reported about 3.4 % mass reduction of the ϕ meson in medium-heavy nuclei (Cu). This result is possibly one of the indications of the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei, however, unfortunately it is hard to make strong conclusions from the data. One of the ways to conclude the strength of the ϕ meson mass shift in nuclei will be by trying to produce only slowly moving ϕ mesons where the maximum nuclear matter effect can be probed. The observed mass reduction of the ϕ meson in the nucleus can be translated as the existence of an attractive force between ϕ meson and nucleus. Thus, one of the extreme conditions that can be achieved in the laboratory is indeed the formation of a ϕ-nucleus bound state, where the ϕ meson is "trapped" in the nucleus. The purpose of the experiment is to search for a ϕ-nucleus bound state and measure the binding energy of the system. We will demonstrate that a completely background-free missing-mass spectrum can be obtained efficiently by (bar{p}, φ) spectroscopy together with K + Λ tagging, using the primary reaction channel bar{p} p rightarrow φ φ. This paper gives an overview of the physics motivation and the detector concept, and explains the direction of the initial research and development effort.

  9. A search for ϕ meson nucleus bound state using antiproton annihilation on nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, H.; Bühler, P.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; Guaraldo, C.; Hartmann, O.; Hicks, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Muto, R.; Naruki, M.; Niiyama, M.; Noumi, H.; Okada, S.; Vidal, A. Romero; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakuma, F.; Sawada, S.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, K.; Tsukada, K.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Yokkaichi, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    2012-12-01

    The mass shift of the vector mesons in nuclei is known to be a powerful tool for investigating the mechanism of generating hadron mass from the QCD vacuum. The mechanism is known to be the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. In 2007, KEK-PS E325 experiment reported about 3.4 % mass reduction of the ϕ meson in medium-heavy nuclei (Cu). This result is possibly one of the indications of the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei, however, unfortunately it is hard to make strong conclusions from the data. One of the ways to conclude the strength of the ϕ meson mass shift in nuclei will be by trying to produce only slowly moving ϕ mesons where the maximum nuclear matter effect can be probed. The observed mass reduction of the ϕ meson in the nucleus can be translated as the existence of an attractive force between ϕ meson and nucleus. Thus, one of the extreme conditions that can be achieved in the laboratory is indeed the formation of a ϕ-nucleus bound state, where the ϕ meson is "trapped" in the nucleus. The purpose of the experiment is to search for a ϕ-nucleus bound state and measure the binding energy of the system. We will demonstrate that a completely background-free missing-mass spectrum can be obtained efficiently by (bar{p}, φ) spectroscopy together with K + Λ tagging, using the primary reaction channel bar{p} p rightarrow φ φ. This paper gives an overview of the physics motivation and the detector concept, and explains the direction of the initial research and development effort.

  10. In vitro and in silico investigations of disc nucleus replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reitmaier, Sandra; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Bashkuev, Maxim; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Gloria, Antonio; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Currently, numerous hydrogels are under examination as potential nucleus replacements. The clinical success, however, depends on how well the mechanical function of the host structure is restored. This study aimed to evaluate the extent to and mechanisms by which surgery for nucleus replacements influence the mechanical behaviour of the disc. The effects of an annulus defect with and without nucleus replacement on disc height and nucleus pressure were measured using 24 ovine motion segments. The following cases were considered: intact; annulus incision repaired by suture and glue; annulus incision with removal and re-implantation of nucleus tissue repaired by suture and glue or plug. To identify the likely mechanisms observed in vitro, a finite-element model of a human disc (L4–L5) was employed. Both studies were subjected to physiological cycles of compression and recovery. A repaired annulus defect did not influence the disc behaviour in vitro, whereas additional nucleus removal and replacement substantially decreased disc stiffness and nucleus pressure. Model predictions demonstrated the substantial effects of reductions in replaced nucleus water content, bulk modulus and osmotic potential on disc height loss and pressure, similar to measurements. In these events, the compression load transfer in the disc markedly altered by substantially increasing the load on the annulus when compared with the nucleus. The success of hydrogels for nucleus replacements is not only dependent on the implant material itself but also on the restoration of the environment perturbed during surgery. The substantial effects on the disc response of disruptions owing to nucleus replacements can be simulated by reduced nucleus water content, elastic modulus and osmotic potential. PMID:22337630

  11. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  12. In vitro and in silico investigations of disc nucleus replacement.

    PubMed

    Reitmaier, Sandra; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Bashkuev, Maxim; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Gloria, Antonio; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2012-08-07

    Currently, numerous hydrogels are under examination as potential nucleus replacements. The clinical success, however, depends on how well the mechanical function of the host structure is restored. This study aimed to evaluate the extent to and mechanisms by which surgery for nucleus replacements influence the mechanical behaviour of the disc. The effects of an annulus defect with and without nucleus replacement on disc height and nucleus pressure were measured using 24 ovine motion segments. The following cases were considered: intact; annulus incision repaired by suture and glue; annulus incision with removal and re-implantation of nucleus tissue repaired by suture and glue or plug. To identify the likely mechanisms observed in vitro, a finite-element model of a human disc (L4-L5) was employed. Both studies were subjected to physiological cycles of compression and recovery. A repaired annulus defect did not influence the disc behaviour in vitro, whereas additional nucleus removal and replacement substantially decreased disc stiffness and nucleus pressure. Model predictions demonstrated the substantial effects of reductions in replaced nucleus water content, bulk modulus and osmotic potential on disc height loss and pressure, similar to measurements. In these events, the compression load transfer in the disc markedly altered by substantially increasing the load on the annulus when compared with the nucleus. The success of hydrogels for nucleus replacements is not only dependent on the implant material itself but also on the restoration of the environment perturbed during surgery. The substantial effects on the disc response of disruptions owing to nucleus replacements can be simulated by reduced nucleus water content, elastic modulus and osmotic potential.

  13. The effects of osmotic stress on the structure and function of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Finan, John D; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-02-15

    Osmotic stress is a potent regulator of the normal function of cells that are exposed to osmotically active environments under physiologic or pathologic conditions. The ability of cells to alter gene expression and metabolic activity in response to changes in the osmotic environment provides an additional regulatory mechanism for a diverse array of tissues and organs in the human body. In addition to the activation of various osmotically- or volume-activated ion channels, osmotic stress may also act on the genome via a direct biophysical pathway. Changes in extracellular osmolality alter cell volume, and therefore, the concentration of intracellular macromolecules. In turn, intracellular macromolecule concentration is a key physical parameter affecting the spatial organization and pressurization of the nucleus. Hyper-osmotic stress shrinks the nucleus and causes it to assume a convoluted shape, whereas hypo-osmotic stress swells the nucleus to a size that is limited by stretch of the nuclear lamina and induces a smooth, round shape of the nucleus. These behaviors are consistent with a model of the nucleus as a charged core/shell structure pressurized by uneven partition of macromolecules between the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm. These osmotically-induced alterations in the internal structure and arrangement of chromatin, as well as potential changes in the nuclear membrane and pores are hypothesized to influence gene transcription and/or nucleocytoplasmic transport. A further understanding of the biophysical and biochemical mechanisms involved in these processes would have important ramifications for a range of fields including differentiation, migration, mechanotransduction, DNA repair, and tumorigenesis.

  14. Synaptic interactions between perifornical lateral hypothalamic area, locus coeruleus nucleus and the oral pontine reticular nucleus are implicated in the stage succession during sleep-wakefulness cycle.

    PubMed

    Tortorella, Silvia; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita L; Núñez, Angel; Garzón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The perifornical area in the posterior lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH) has been implicated in several physiological functions including the sleep-wakefulness regulation. The PeFLH area contains several cell types including those expressing orexins (Orx; also known as hypocretins), mainly located in the PeF nucleus. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the synaptic interactions between Orx neurons located in the PeFLH area and different brainstem neurons involved in the generation of wakefulness and sleep stages such as the locus coeruleus (LC) nucleus (contributing to wakefulness) and the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) nucleus (contributing to REM sleep). Anatomical data demonstrated the existence of a neuronal network involving the PeFLH area, LC, and the PnO nuclei that would control the sleep-wake cycle. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that PeFLH area had an excitatory effect on LC neurons. PeFLH stimulation increased the firing rate of LC neurons and induced an activation of the EEG. The excitatory effect evoked by PeFLH stimulation in LC neurons was blocked by the injection of the Orx-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 into the LC. Similar electrical stimulation of the PeFLH area evoked an inhibition of PnO neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors because the effect was blocked by bicuculline application into the PnO. Our data also revealed that the LC and PnO nuclei exerted a feedback control on neuronal activity of PeFLH area. Electrical stimulation of LC facilitated firing activity of PeFLH neurons by activation of catecholaminergic receptors whereas PnO stimulation inhibited PeFLH neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors. In conclusion, Orx neurons of the PeFLH area seem to be an important organizer of the wakefulness and sleep stages in order to maintain a normal succession of stages during the sleep-wakefulness cycle.

  15. Synaptic interactions between perifornical lateral hypothalamic area, locus coeruleus nucleus and the oral pontine reticular nucleus are implicated in the stage succession during sleep-wakefulness cycle

    PubMed Central

    Tortorella, Silvia; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita L.; Núñez, Angel; Garzón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The perifornical area in the posterior lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH) has been implicated in several physiological functions including the sleep-wakefulness regulation. The PeFLH area contains several cell types including those expressing orexins (Orx; also known as hypocretins), mainly located in the PeF nucleus. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the synaptic interactions between Orx neurons located in the PeFLH area and different brainstem neurons involved in the generation of wakefulness and sleep stages such as the locus coeruleus (LC) nucleus (contributing to wakefulness) and the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) nucleus (contributing to REM sleep). Anatomical data demonstrated the existence of a neuronal network involving the PeFLH area, LC, and the PnO nuclei that would control the sleep-wake cycle. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that PeFLH area had an excitatory effect on LC neurons. PeFLH stimulation increased the firing rate of LC neurons and induced an activation of the EEG. The excitatory effect evoked by PeFLH stimulation in LC neurons was blocked by the injection of the Orx-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 into the LC. Similar electrical stimulation of the PeFLH area evoked an inhibition of PnO neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors because the effect was blocked by bicuculline application into the PnO. Our data also revealed that the LC and PnO nuclei exerted a feedback control on neuronal activity of PeFLH area. Electrical stimulation of LC facilitated firing activity of PeFLH neurons by activation of catecholaminergic receptors whereas PnO stimulation inhibited PeFLH neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors. In conclusion, Orx neurons of the PeFLH area seem to be an important organizer of the wakefulness and sleep stages in order to maintain a normal succession of stages during the sleep-wakefulness cycle. PMID:24311996

  16. The critical complex in nucleation is not the nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Don H.; Esen, Etop; Appleby, Mary R.

    1988-01-01

    A theory of nucleation is presented which combines features of classical nucleation. In this theory, the nucleus is a cluster of finite size with a sharp interface and spinodal decomposition, in which a fluctuation in density or composition generates the critical complex and nucleus. Thus, the nucleus is a product of nucleation. Schematic models for the classical and the proposed routes to nucleation are compared, focusing on the relation between pressure and volume in the models. In the proposed model, the critical complex, or critical state, is between the parent state and the nucleus.

  17. Nucleus properties of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meech, Karen J.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Mueller, Beatrice E. A.; Dicksion, Matthew W.; Li, Heide R.

    1993-01-01

    Time series photometric measurements are presented of Comet P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 at a heliocentric distance of 5.886 AU when the comet possessed an extensive coma. The light curve shows a modulation caused by the rotation of the nucleus. The rotation period is considerably shorter than the 5 day period found by Whipple (1980), and we find substantial evidence that the nucleus may be in a complex spin state characterized by two periods 14.0 and 32.3 hr. Models of the rate at which the rotational light curve range decreases as a function of the amount of coma in the aperture have determined that the projected maximum to minimum axis ratio of the comet is 2.6 and that the product of the albedo times the rotationally averaged nucleus radius size is 9.54 +/- 0.3 sq km. Assuming a minimum geometric albedo of pR = 0.04, the maximum projected average nucleus radius is 15.44 +/-0.2 km, which is only 44 percent of the size estimated by Roemer (1966). However, using the albedo determined by Cruikshank & Brown (1983) of p = 0.13, the nucleus radius is only RN = 8.6 +/-0.l km. Because of the unknown nucleus orientation, these will be upper limits to the nucleus size. It appears that the nucleus of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 is not the large nucleus that it has been believed to be for nearly 40 yr.

  18. J/ψ production and suppression in high-energy proton-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yan -Qing; Venugopalan, Raju; Zhang, Hong -Fei

    2015-10-02

    In this study, we apply a color glass condensate+nonrelativistic QCD (CGC+NRQCD) framework to compute J/ψ production in deuteron-nucleus collisions at RHIC and proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC. Our results match smoothly at high p⊥ to a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD+NRQCD computation. Excellent agreement is obtained for p⊥ spectra at the RHIC and LHC for central and forward rapidities, as well as for the normalized ratio RpA of these results to spectra in proton-proton collisions. In particular, we observe that the RpA data are strongly bounded by our computations of the same for each of the individual NRQCD channels; this result provides strong evidence that our description is robust against uncertainties in initial conditions and hadronization mechanisms.

  19. J/ψ production and suppression in high-energy proton-nucleus collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Yan -Qing; Venugopalan, Raju; Zhang, Hong -Fei

    2015-10-02

    In this study, we apply a color glass condensate+nonrelativistic QCD (CGC+NRQCD) framework to compute J/ψ production in deuteron-nucleus collisions at RHIC and proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC. Our results match smoothly at high p⊥ to a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD+NRQCD computation. Excellent agreement is obtained for p⊥ spectra at the RHIC and LHC for central and forward rapidities, as well as for the normalized ratio RpA of these results to spectra in proton-proton collisions. In particular, we observe that the RpA data are strongly bounded by our computations of the same for each of the individual NRQCD channels; this resultmore » provides strong evidence that our description is robust against uncertainties in initial conditions and hadronization mechanisms.« less

  20. Thalamic neglect. Possible role of the medial thalamus and nucleus reticularis in behavior.

    PubMed

    Watson, R T; Valenstein, E; Heilman, K M

    1981-08-01

    A patient had an ischemic infarction of the right medial thalamus, with a resultant contralateral neglect syndrome. We propose that the medial thalamic nuclei, particularly centromedian and parafascicularis (CMPF), are normally involved in the arousal-activation process by which an organism can be aroused by and respond to novel or important stimuli. Specifically, we propose that (1) the mesencephalic reticular formation subserves tonic arousal to novel or painful stimuli by inhibiting the nucleus reticularis thalami (NR) and (2) that selective attention is mediated by cortical input to NR. The CMPF is closely associated with motor systems (basal ganglia, ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus [VL], and frontal lobes). A pathway involving CMPF, the frontal cortex, and the portion of NR associated with VL may be important in preparing the tonically aroused organism for action. Unilateral lesions of CMPF therefore induce an asymmetric hypokinesia, and bilateral lesions may induce akinetic mutism.

  1. Advocating for Normal Birth With Normal Clothes

    PubMed Central

    Waller-Wise, Renece

    2007-01-01

    Childbirth educators need to be aware that the clothes they wear when teaching classes send a nonverbal message to class participants. Regardless of who wears the clothing or what is worn, clothes send a message; thus, both the advantages and disadvantages related to clothing choice should be considered. Ultimately, the message should reflect the values of supporting normal birth. For childbirth educators who are allowed to choose their own apparel to wear in their classes, street clothes may be the benchmark for which to strive. This article discusses the many nonverbal messages that clothes convey and provides support for the choice of street clothes as the dress for the professional childbirth educator; thus, “normal clothes to promote normal birth.” PMID:18408807

  2. Nature of multiple-nucleus cluster galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, D.

    1984-05-01

    In models for the evolution of galaxy clusters which include dynamical friction with the dark binding matter, the distribution of galaxies becomes more concentrated to the cluster center with time. In a cluster like Coma, this evolution could increase by a factor of approximately 3 the probability of finding a galaxy very close to the cluster center, without decreasing the typical velocity of such a galaxy significantly below the cluster mean. Such an enhancement is roughly what is needed to explain the large number of first-ranked cluster galaxies which are observed to have extra ''nuclei''; it is also consistent with the high velocities typically measured for these ''nuclei.'' Unlike the cannibalism model, this model predicts that the majority of multiple-nucleus systems are transient phenomena, and not galaxies in the process of merging.

  3. Nucleus of Comet P/Arend-Rigaux

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, T.Y.; Knacke, R.F.

    1986-07-01

    Photometry data at 1-20 microns taken of Comet P/Arend-Rigaux are reported. The observations were carried out to test the possibility of observing the nuclei of low activity, nearly extinct comets at visible and IR wavelengths. The data were collected in February 1985 using the NASA 3 m IR telescope on Mauna Kea. The comet was at 1.67 AU heliocentric distance at the time. Attempts were made to detect rotation of the core on the bases of variations in the J, H and K light curves. The images obtained were those of a rotating nucleus with a radius of 4.0-6.2 km surrounded by a faint coma. The comet had a geometric albedo of 0.01-0.03 and a near-IR red slope that exhibited no evidence of the presence of ice. 32 references.

  4. Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sherwood (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples, held in Milpitas, California, January 16-18, 1989. Conveners are Sherwood Chang (NASA Ames Research Center) and Larry Nyquist (NASA Johnson Space Center). Program Committee members are Thomas Ahrens (ex-officio; California Institute of Technology), Lou Allamandola (NASA Ames Research Center), David Blake (NASA Ames Research Center), Donald Brownlee (University of Washington, Seattle), Theodore E. Bunch (NASA Ames Research Center), Humberto Campins (Planetary Science Institute), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames Research Center), Eberhard Griin (Max-Plank-Institut fiir Kemphysik), Martha Hanner (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Alan Harris (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John Kerrid-e (University of Califomia, Los Angeles), Yves Langevin (University of Paris), Gerhard Schwehm (ESTEC), and Paul Weissman (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Logistics and administrative support for the workshop were provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute Projects Office.

  5. In situ hybridization of suprachiasmatic nucleus slices.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2007-01-01

    The progress in the understanding of the molecular machinery of mammalian circadian clocks, in combination with the well-established role of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) as a master circadian clock, has provided an invaluable system for the study of the molecular basis of circadian rhythmicity. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques that label specific clock-gene mRNAs within the SCN, researchers can now elucidate the core molecular oscillatory mechanisms underlying specific circadian physiological and behavioral phenotypes. In this chapter, two methods for ISH within the SCN are described. The first method is based on the fluorescent labeling of mRNA and is suitable for confocal microscopy analysis and double labeling techniques. The second method is based on the radioactive labeling of mRNA and is more sensitive and more adequate for the relative quantification of mRNA species.

  6. Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sherwood

    1997-12-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples, held in Milpitas, California, January 16-18, 1989. Conveners are Sherwood Chang (NASA Ames Research Center) and Larry Nyquist (NASA Johnson Space Center). Program Committee members are Thomas Ahrens (ex-officio; California Institute of Technology), Lou Allamandola (NASA Ames Research Center), David Blake (NASA Ames Research Center), Donald Brownlee (University of Washington, Seattle), Theodore E. Bunch (NASA Ames Research Center), Humberto Campins (Planetary Science Institute), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames Research Center), Eberhard Griin (Max-Plank-Institut fiir Kemphysik), Martha Hanner (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Alan Harris (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John Kerrid-e (University of Califomia, Los Angeles), Yves Langevin (University of Paris), Gerhard Schwehm (ESTEC), and Paul Weissman (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Logistics and administrative support for the workshop were provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute Projects Office.

  7. Shaping the nucleus: factors and forces.

    PubMed

    Walters, Alison D; Bommakanti, Ananth; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2012-09-01

    Take a look at a textbook illustration of a cell and you will immediately be able to locate the nucleus, which is often drawn as a spherical or ovoid shaped structure. But not all cells have such nuclei. In fact, some disease states are diagnosed by the presence of nuclei that have an abnormal shape or size. What defines nuclear shape and nuclear size, and how does nuclear geometry affect nuclear function? While the answer to the latter question remains largely unknown, significant progress has been made towards understanding the former. In this review, we provide an overview of the factors and forces that affect nuclear shape and size, discuss the relationship between ER structure and nuclear morphology, and speculate on the possible connection between nuclear size and its shape. We also note the many interesting questions that remain to be explored. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Φ -meson-nucleus bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos-Martínez, J. J.; Tsushima, K.; Krein, G.; Thomas, A. W.

    2017-09-01

    ϕ -meson-nucleus bound state energies and absorption widths are calculated for seven selected nuclei by solving the Klein-Gordon equation with complex optical potentials. Essential input for the calculations, namely the medium-modified K and K ¯ meson masses, as well as the density distributions in nuclei, are obtained from the quark-meson coupling model. The attractive potential for the ϕ meson in the nuclear medium originates from the in-medium enhanced K K ¯ loop in the ϕ -meson self-energy. The results suggest that the ϕ meson should form bound states with all the nuclei considered. However, the identification of the signal for these predicted bound states will need careful investigation because of their sizable absorption widths.

  9. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  10. Nonlinear osmotic properties of the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Finan, John D.; Chalut, Kevin J.; Wax, Adam; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-01-01

    Summary In the absence of active volume regulation processes, cell volume is inversely proportional to osmolarity, as predicted by the Boyle Van’t Hoff relation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nuclear volume has a similar relationship with extracellular osmolarity in articular chondrocytes, cells that are exposed to changes in the osmotic environment in vivo, and furthermore, we explored the mechanism of the relationships between osmolarity and nuclear size and shape. Nuclear size was quantified using two independent techniques, confocal laser scanning microscopy and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry. Nuclear volume was osmotically-sensitive but this relationship was not linear, showing a decline in the osmotic sensitivity in the hypo-osmotic range. Nuclear shape was also influenced by extracellular osmolarity, becoming smoother as the osmolarity decreased. The osmotically-induced changes in nuclear size paralleled the changes in nuclear shape, suggesting that shape and volume are interdependent. The osmotic sensitivity of shape and volume persisted after disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Isolated nuclei contracted in response to physiologic changes in macromolecule concentration but not in response to physiologic changes in ion concentration, suggesting solute size has an important influence on the osmotic pressurization of the nucleus. This finding in turn implies that the diffusion barrier that causes osmotic effects is not a semi-permeable membrane, but rather due to size constraints that prevent large solute molecules from entering small spaces in the nucleus. As nuclear morphology has been associated previously with cell phenotype, these findings may provide new insight into the role of mechanical and osmotic signals in regulating cell physiology. PMID:19107599

  11. Parabrachial nucleus involvement in multiple system atrophy☆

    PubMed Central

    Benarroch, E.E.; Schmeichel, A.M.; Low, P.A.; Parisi, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is associated with respiratory dysfunction, including sleep apnea, respiratory dysrhythmia, and laryngeal stridor. Neurons of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) control respiratory rhythmogenesis and airway resistance. Objectives The objective of this study is to determine whether there was involvement of putative respiratory regions of the PBN in MSA. Methods We examined the pons at autopsy in 10 cases with neuropathologically confirmed MSA and 8 age-matched controls. Sections obtained throughout the pons were processed for calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) and Nissl staining to identify the lateral crescent of the lateral PBN (LPB) and the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (K-F), which are involved in respiratory control. Cell counts were performed using stereology. Results There was loss of CGRP neurons in the PBN in MSA (total estimated cell counts for the external LPB cluster was 12,584 ± 1146 in controls and 5917 ± 389 in MSA, p < 0.0001); for the external medial PBN (MPB) cluster it was 15,081 ± 1758 in controls and 7842 ± 466 in MSA, p < 0.001. There was also neuronal loss in putative respiratory regions of the PBN, including the lateral crescent of the LPB (13,039 ± 1326 in controls and 4164 ± 872 in MSA, p < 0.0001); and K-F (5120 ± 495 in controls and 999 ± 308 in MSA, p < 0.0001). Conclusions There is involvement of both CGRP and putative respiratory cell groups in the PBN in MSA. Whereas the clinical implications of CGRP cell loss are still undetermined, involvement of the LPB and K-F may contribute to respiratory dysfunction in this disorder. PMID:23665165

  12. INORGANIC CATIONS IN THE CELL NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Tres, Laura L.; Kierszenbaum, A. L.; Tandler, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Earlier reports indicated the presence of significant amounts of inorganic salts in the nucleus. In the present study the possibility that this might be related to the transcription process was tested on seminiferous epithelium of the adult mouse, using potassium pyroantimonate as a fixative. The results indicated that a correlation exists between the inorganic cations comprising the pyroantimonate-precipitable fraction and the RNA synthetic activity. During meiotic prophase an accumulation of cation-antimonate precipitates occurs dispersed through the middle pachytene nuclei, the stage in which RNA synthesis reaches a maximum. At other stages (zygotene to diplotene), where RNA synthesis falls to a low level, that pattern is not seen; cation-antimonate deposits are restricted to a few masses in areas apparently free of chromatin. The condensed sex chromosomes, the heterochromatin of the "basal knobs," the axial elements, and the synaptonemal complexes are devoid of antimonate deposits during the meiotic prophase. The Sertoli cells, active in RNA synthesis in both nucleoplasm and nucleolus, show cation-antimonate deposits at these sites. In the nucleoplasm some "patches" of precipitates appear coincident with clusters of interchromatin granules; in the nucleolus the inorganic cations are mainly located in the fibrillar and/or amorphous areas, whereas relatively few are shown by the granular component. The condensed chromatin bodies associated with the nucleolus were always free of antimonate precipitates. It is suggested that the observed sites of inorganic cation accumulation within the nucleus may at least partially indicate the presence of RNA polymerases, the activity of which is dependent on divalent cations. PMID:4112542

  13. Nonlinear osmotic properties of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Finan, John D; Chalut, Kevin J; Wax, Adam; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-03-01

    In the absence of active volume regulation processes, cell volume is inversely proportional to osmolarity, as predicted by the Boyle Van't Hoff relation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nuclear volume has a similar relationship with extracellular osmolarity in articular chondrocytes, cells that are exposed to changes in the osmotic environment in vivo. Furthermore, we explored the mechanism of the relationships between osmolarity and nuclear size and shape. Nuclear size was quantified using two independent techniques, confocal laser scanning microscopy and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry. Nuclear volume was osmotically sensitive but this relationship was not linear, showing a decline in the osmotic sensitivity in the hypo-osmotic range. Nuclear shape was also influenced by extracellular osmolarity, becoming smoother as the osmolarity decreased. The osmotically induced changes in nuclear size paralleled the changes in nuclear shape, suggesting that shape and volume are interdependent. The osmotic sensitivity of shape and volume persisted after disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Isolated nuclei contracted in response to physiologic changes in macromolecule concentration but not in response to physiologic changes in ion concentration, suggesting solute size has an important influence on the osmotic pressurization of the nucleus. This finding in turn implies that the diffusion barrier that causes osmotic effects is not a semi-permeable membrane, but rather due to size constraints that prevent large solute molecules from entering small spaces in the nucleus. As nuclear morphology has been associated previously with cell phenotype, these findings may provide new insight into the role of mechanical and osmotic signals in regulating cell physiology.

  14. Novel associated hydrogels for nucleus pulposus replacement.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jonathan; Lowman, Anthony; Marcolongo, Michele

    2003-12-15

    Hydrogels of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) blends may provide a material suitable for replacement of the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc. This research examined the stability of these hydrogels under simulated physiological conditions. Polymer dissolution and stability were characterized over 120 days immersion, chemical surface analysis over 56 days immersion, and tensile mechanical behavior over 56 days immersion. Rubber elasticity theory was used by combining mechanical results with swelling data to calculate network characteristics such as the molecular weight between physical crosslinks and density of crosslinks. Properties were examined as a function of PVA/PVP composition as well as PVA molecular weight and PVP molecular weight. Results indicated that PVA/PVP blends prepared with moderate amounts of PVP (0.5-5%) resulted in a polymer network stabilized through interchain hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups on PVA chains and carbonyl groups on PVP chains. Most notably, a significant decrease in percentage of polymer mass loss was seen for blends prepared with 143K molecular weight PVA. Surface chemical analysis revealed that PVP unincorporated in the network structure suffered significant dissolution out of the polymer network and into solution. The molecular weight of PVA and PVP were shown to have a significant influence on the blends' network properties. Gels prepared with lower molecular weight PVA resulted in a more stable blend containing a higher density of crosslinks. However, blends prepared with a higher molecular weight PVA showed superior polymer network stability in dissolution studies. The blend that had the best combination of network stability under physiological conditions and a relatively tight, stable, and crosslinked network was prepared with 99% PVA (143K) and 1% PVP (40K). This material is proposed as an implant material for replacement of the degenerated nucleus pulposus.

  15. pH-activated size reduction of large compound nanoparticles for in vivo nucleus-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanbin; Li, Chunyan; Li, Fuyou; Chen, Daoyong

    2016-04-01

    Nucleus-targeted drug delivery is a promising strategy for anticancer therapy, but in vivo nucleus-targeted drug delivery has been challenging. Limited by the channel size of the nucleopore, vehicles that enter the nucleus via the nucleopore actively should be small and decorated with nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, the small vehicle size may promote leakage of vehicles into normal tissues, and the positively-charged NLS can lead to strong non-specific interactions in vivo. In the present study, we demonstrate an in vivo nucleus-targeted drug delivery using large compound nanoparticles with detachable PEG shell. The nanoparticles are composed of PEG-benzoic imine-oligo-l-lysine/iridium(III) metallodrug complex and formed in a kinetically-controlled fashion. Under physiological conditions (pH 7.4), the nanoparticles are large (ca. 150 nm) and protected by an inert PEG shell. When internalized into intracellular acidic endo/lysosomes of cancer cells, the nanoparticles dissociate into smaller ones (ca. 40 nm) and the PEG chains detach due to the cleavage of the benzoic imine bond at low pH. The small nanoparticles, with exposure of the oligo-l-lysine after the detachment of the PEG shield, then translocate into the nucleus via the nucleopore due to the small size and nuclear localization ability of the oligo-l-lysine. Importantly, the small particles could significantly release the contained drug into the nucleus, leading to ca. 20-fold higher cytotoxicity compared to the native drug in vitro. Further in vivo application of the nucleus-targeting nano-system in a nude-mice model showed significant tumor inhibition and remarkable life-span elongation.

  16. The egg nucleus regulates the behavior of sperm nuclei as well as cycling of MPF in physiologically polyspermic newt eggs.

    PubMed

    Iwao, Y; Sakamoto, N; Takahara, K; Yamashita, M; Nagahama, Y

    1993-11-01

    The possible role of the egg nucleus in regulating the behavior of sperm nuclei and the cycling of maturation-promoting factor (MPF) was investigated in the physiologically polyspermic eggs of the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster. Many sperm entered all areas of the egg, but only one sperm pronucleus, the principal sperm pronucleus, moved to the center of the animal hemisphere to form a zygote nucleus with the egg pronucleus. All sperm and egg pronuclei synthesized DNA, but the zygote nucleus completed the synthesis of DNA 0.5-1 hr earlier than the accessory sperm nuclei. Entrance into M phase by the accessory sperm nuclei was delayed to a greater and greater extent with increasing distance of these nuclei from the zygote nucleus. When DNA in the egg nucleus was damaged by uv irradiation, not only were both prophase and M phase in the zygote nucleus prolonged, but also the MPF cycle was delayed. Some accessory sperm nuclei in the animal hemisphere escaped degeneration to form additional bipolar spindles, so that delayed multipolar cleavage occurred. The MPF activity in the vegetal hemisphere was less than 25% of that found in the animal hemisphere at M phase in normally fertilized eggs. The levels of immunologically detectable proteins that contained the sequence PSTAIR in vegetal hemispheres were less than 25% of those in animal hemispheres. These results indicate that the egg nucleus of the Cynops egg is involved in the control of the activation of MPF and that the accessory sperm nuclei in the vegetal hemisphere degenerate as a result of the lack of components that are indispensable for entry into M phase.

  17. Morphological differences in the lateral geniculate nucleus associated with dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo-Chica, Mónica; Hegarty, John P.; Schneider, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a common learning disability characterized by normal intelligence but difficulty in skills associated with reading, writing and spelling. One of the most prominent, albeit controversial, theories of dyslexia is the magnocellular theory, which suggests that malfunction of the magnocellular system in the brain is responsible for the behavioral deficits. We sought to test the basis of this theory by directly measuring the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), the only location in the brain where the magnocellular and parvocellular streams are spatially disjoint. Using high-resolution proton-density weighted MRI scans, we precisely measured the anatomical boundaries of the LGN in 13 subjects with dyslexia (five female) and 13 controls (three female), all 22–26 years old. The left LGN was significantly smaller in volume in subjects with dyslexia and also differed in shape; no differences were observed in the right LGN. The functional significance of this asymmetry is unknown, but these results are consistent with the magnocellular theory and support theories of dyslexia that involve differences in the early visual system. PMID:26082892

  18. Cellular Mechanosensing: Getting to the nucleus of it all

    PubMed Central

    Fedorchak, Gregory R.; Kaminski, Ashley; Lammerding, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical forces by activating specific genes and signaling pathways that allow the cells to adapt to their physical environment. Examples include muscle growth in response to exercise, bone remodeling based on their mechanical load, or endothelial cells aligning under fluid shear stress. While the involved downstream signaling pathways and mechanoresponsive genes are generally well characterized, many of the molecular mechanisms of the initiating ‘mechanosensing’ remain still elusive. In this review, we discuss recent findings and accumulating evidence suggesting that the cell nucleus plays a crucial role in cellular mechanotransduction, including processing incoming mechanoresponsive signals and even directly responding to mechanical forces. Consequently, mutations in the involved proteins or changes in nuclear envelope composition can directly impact mechanotransduction signaling and contribute to the development and progression of a variety of human diseases, including muscular dystrophy, cancer, and the focus of this review, dilated cardiomyopathy. Improved insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying nuclear mechanotransduction, brought in part by the emergence of new technologies to study intracellular mechanics at high spatial and temporal resolution, will not only result in a better understanding of cellular mechanosensing in normal cells but may also lead to the development of novel therapies in the many diseases linked to defects in nuclear envelope proteins. PMID:25008017

  19. Projections to the rostral reticular thalamic nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, J; Cooper, J D; Phillipson, O T

    1990-01-01

    Afferent pathways to the rostral reticular thalamic nucleus (Rt) in the rat were studied using anterograde and retrograde lectin tracing techniques, with sensitive immunocytochemical methods. The analysis was carried out to further investigate previously described subregions of the reticular thalamic nucleus, which are related to subdivisions of the dorsal thalamus, in the paraventricular and midline nuclei and three segments of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus. Cortical inputs to the rostral reticular nucleus were found from lamina VI of cingulate, orbital and infralimbic cortex. These projected with a clear topography to lateral, intermediate and medial reticular nucleus respectively. Thalamic inputs were found from lateral and central segments of the mediodorsal nucleus to the lateral and intermediate rostral reticular nucleus respectively and heavy paraventricular thalamic inputs were found to the medial reticular nucleus. In the basal forebrain, afferents were found from the vertical and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band, substantia innominata, ventral pallidum and medial globus pallidus. Brainstem projections were identified from ventrolateral periaqueductal grey and adjacent sites in the mesencephalic reticular formation, laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, pedunculopontine nucleus, medial pretectum and ventral tegmental area. The results suggest a general similarity in the organisation of some brainstem Rt afferents in rat and cat, but also show previously unsuspected inputs. Furthermore, there appear to be at least two functional subdivisions of rostral Rt which is reflected by their connections with cortex and thalamus. The studies also extend recent findings that the ventral striatum, via inputs from the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, is included in the circuitry of the rostral Rt, providing further evidence that basal ganglia may function in concert with Rt. Evidence is also outlined with regard to the possibility that rostral Rt plays a significant

  20. Pedunculopontine nucleus evoked potentials from subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Bogdan; Tsang, Eric; Mazzella, Filomena; Hamani, Clement; Moro, Elena; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lozano, Andres M; Chen, Robert

    2013-12-01

    The effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on the pedunculopontine nucleus area (PPNR) evoked activities were examined in two patients with Parkinson's disease. The patients had previously undergone bilateral STN deep brain stimulation (DBS) and subsequently received unilateral DBS electrodes in the PPNR. Evoked potentials were recorded from the local field potentials (LFP) from the PPNR with STN stimulation at different frequencies and bipolar contacts. Ipsilateral and contralateral short latency (<2ms) PPNR responses were evoked from left but not from right STN stimulation. In both patients, STN stimulation evoked contralateral PPNR responses at medium latencies between 41 and 45ms. Cortical evoked potentials to single pulse STN stimulation were observed at latencies between 18 and 27ms. These results demonstrate a functional connection between the STN and the PPNR. It likely involves direct projections between the STN and PPNR or polysynaptic pathways with thalamic or cortical relays.

  1. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions and the MINERvA Neutrino Nucleus Scattering Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfín, Jorge G.

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering have been studied in the frame-work of a χ2 analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs)1. A set of iron PDFs have been extracted which are then used to compute xBj-dependent and Q2-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. Upon comparing our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for l±-iron scattering we find that, except for very high xBj, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering. The MINERvA neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab, will systematically study neutrino nuclear effects off of He, C, Fe and Pb for a more thorough A-dependent study of nuclear PDFs and these correction factors.

  2. Experimental evidence and the Landau-Zener promotion in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cindro, N.; Freeman, R.M.; Haas, F.

    1986-04-01

    Recent data from C+O collisions are analyzed in terms of the Landau-Zener promotion in nuclei. Evidence for the presence of this mechanism in nuclear collisions is of considerable interest, since it provides a signature of single-particle orbitals in molecular-type potentials and, at the same time, paves the way to a microscopic understanding of the collision dynamics, in particular of the energy dissipation rate. The analyzed data are of two types: integrated cross sections and angular distributions of inelastically scattered particles. The first set of data shows structure qualitatively consistent with recent calculations of the Landau-Zener effect; for this set of data no other reasonable explanation is presently available. The second set of data, while consistent with the presence of the Landau-Zener promotion, is examined in terms of other possible explanations too. The combined data show evidence favoring the presence of the Landau-Zener promotion in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  3. Fluctuation analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed for identifying enhanced fluctuations in the angular distributions of secondary particles produced from relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The method is applied under the assumption that the masses of the produced particles are small compared to their linear momenta. The importance of particles rests in the fact that enhanced fluctuations in the rapidity distributions is considered to be an experimental signal for the creation of the quark-gluon-plasma (QGP), a state of nuclear matter predicted from the quantum chromodynamics theory (QCD). In the approach, Monte Carlo simulations are employed that make use of a portable random member generator that allow the calculations to be performed on a desk-top computer. The method is illustrated with data taken from high altitude emulsion exposures and is immediately applicable to similar data from accelerator-based emulsion exposures.

  4. The Nucleus Accumbens and Ketamine Treatment in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Chadi G; Jackowski, Andrea; Salas, Ramiro; Gupta, Swapnil; Sato, João R; Mao, Xiangling; Coplan, Jeremy D; Shungu, Dikoma C; Mathew, Sanjay J

    2017-03-29

    Animal models of depression repeatedly showed stress-induced nucleus accumbens (NAc) hypertrophy. Recently, ketamine was found to normalize this stress-induced NAc structural growth. Here, we investigated NAc structural abnormalities in major depressive disorder (MDD) in two cohorts. Cohort A included a cross-sectional sample of 34 MDD and 26 healthy control (HC) subjects, with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to estimate NAc volumes. Proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) was used to divide MDD subjects into two subgroups: glutamate-based depression (GBD) and non-GBD. A separate longitudinal sample (cohort B) included 16 MDD patients who underwent MRI at baseline then 24 h following intravenous infusion of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg). In cohort A, we found larger left NAc volume in MDD compared to controls (Cohen's d=1.05), but no significant enlargement in the right NAc (d=0.44). Follow-up analyses revealed significant subgrouping effects on the left (d⩾1.48) and right NAc (d⩾0.95) with larger bilateral NAc in non-GBD compared to GBD and HC. NAc volumes were not different between GBD and HC. In cohort B, ketamine treatment reduced left NAc, but increased left hippocampal, volumes in patients achieving remission. The cross-sectional data provided the first evidence of enlarged NAc in patients with MDD. These NAc abnormalities were limited to patients with non-GBD. The pilot longitudinal data revealed a pattern of normalization of left NAc and hippocampal volumes particularly in patients who achieved remission following ketamine treatment, an intriguing preliminary finding that awaits replication.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 29 March 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.49.

  5. Activated ErbB3 Translocates to the Nucleus via Clathrin-independent Endocytosis, Which Is Associated with Proliferating Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Reif, Raymond; Adawy, Alshaimaa; Vartak, Nachiket; Schröder, Jutta; Günther, Georgia; Ghallab, Ahmed; Schmidt, Marcus; Schormann, Wiebke; Hengstler, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family (RTK) have been shown to be present in the nucleus of cells; however, the mechanisms underlying their trafficking to the nucleus, and their relevance once there are poorly understood. In the present study, we focus on the RTK ErbB3 and elucidate the mechanisms regulating its trafficking. We show that heregulin-stimulation induces trafficking of phosphorylated ErbB3 from the plasma membrane to the nucleus via a clathrin-independent mechanism. Nuclear import of ErbB3 occurs via importin β1, which drives the receptor through the nuclear pore complex. In the nucleus, ErbB3 interacts with transcription complexes, and thereby has a role in transcriptional regulation. Our results also demonstrate that ErbB3 nuclear localization is transient as it is exported out of the nucleus by the nuclear receptor protein crm-1. Analysis of normal, regenerating tissues, and tumors showed that ErbB3 nuclear translocation is a common event in proliferating tissues. PMID:26719328

  6. New quasibound states of the compound nucleus in α -particle capture by the nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maydanyuk, Sergei P.; Zhang, Peng-Ming; Zou, Li-Ping

    2017-07-01

    We generalize the theory of nuclear decay and capture of Gamow that is based on tunneling through the barrier and internal oscillations inside the nucleus. In our formalism an additional factor is obtained, which describes distribution of the wave function of the the α particle inside the nuclear region. We discover new most stable states (called quasibound states) of the compound nucleus (CN) formed during the capture of α particle by the nucleus. With a simple example, we explain why these states cannot appear in traditional calculations of the α capture cross sections based on monotonic penetrabilities of a barrier, but they appear in a complete description of the evolution of the CN. Our result is obtained by a complete description of the CN evolution, which has the advantages of (1) a clear picture of the formation of the CN and its disintegration, (2) a detailed quantum description of the CN, (3) tests of the calculated amplitudes based on quantum mechanics (not realized in other approaches), and (4) high accuracy of calculations (not achieved in other approaches). These peculiarities are shown with the capture reaction of α +44Ca . We predict quasibound energy levels and determine fusion probabilities for this reaction. The difference between our approach and theory of quasistationary states with complex energies applied for the α capture is also discussed. We show (1) that theory does not provide calculations for the cross section of α capture (according to modern models of the α capture), in contrast with our formalism, and (2) these two approaches describe different states of the α capture (for the same α -nucleus potential).

  7. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingling; Luo, Qing; Sun, Jinghui; Song, Guanbin

    2016-10-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration.

  8. Study of multiplicity correlations in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohery, M.; Sultan, E. M.; Baz, Shadiah S.

    2015-06-01

    In the present paper, some results on the correlations of the nucleus-nucleus interactions, at high energy, between different particle multiplicities are reported. The correlations between the multiplicities of the different charged particles emitted in the interactions of 22Ne and 28Si nuclei with emulsion at (4.1-4.5)A GeV/c have been studied. The correlations of the compound multiplicity nc, defined as the sum of both numbers of the shower particles ns and grey particles ng, have been investigated. The experimental data have been compared with the corresponding theoretical ones, calculated according to the modified cascade evaporation model (MCEM). An agreement has already been fairly obtained between the experimental values and the calculated ones. The dependence of the average compound multiplicity, on the numbers of shower, grey, black and heavy particles is obvious and the values of the slope have been found to be independent of the projectile nucleus. On the other hand, the variation of the average shower, grey, black and heavy particles is found to increase linearly with the compound particles. A strong correlation has been observed between the number of produced shower particles and the number of compound particles. Moreover, the value of the average compound multiplicity is found to increase with the increase of the projectile mass. Finally, an attempt has also been made to study the scaling of the compound multiplicity distribution showing that the compound multiplicity distribution is nearly consistent with the KNO scaling behavior.

  9. [Unilateral abolition of parkinsonian rigidity after subthalamic nucleus hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yamada, A; Takeuchi, H; Miki, H

    1992-08-01

    A 63-year-old man with parkinsonism suddenly developed a right hemiballism, and the CT showed a hematoma of the left subthalamic nucleus. After the ballistic movement had disappeared, muscular rigidity improved on the right. This case suggests that excessive output from the subthalamic nucleus to the internal segment of globus pallidus plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of parkinsonian rigidity.

  10. Glutamatergic projection from the nucleus incertus to the septohippocampal system.

    PubMed

    Cervera-Ferri, Ana; Rahmani, Yasamin; Martínez-Bellver, Sergio; Teruel-Martí, Vicent; Martínez-Ricós, Joana

    2012-05-31

    Recent findings support a relevant role of the nucleus incertus in the control of the hippocampal activity through the modulation of theta rhythm. Previous studies from our group have shown that this nucleus is a critical relay between reticularis pontis oralis and the medial septum/diagonal band, regarded as the main activator and the pacemaker of the hippocampal oscillations, respectively. Besides, the nucleus incertus is highly linked to activated states related to the arousal response. The neurotransmission of the nucleus incertus, however, remains uncertain. Only GABA and the neuromodulator relaxin 3 are usually considered to be involved in its contribution to the septohippocampal system. In this work, we have analyzed the existence of an excitatory projection from the nucleus incertus to the medial septum. We have found a group of glutamatergic neurons in the nucleus incertus projecting to the medial septum. Moreover, we were able to describe a segregated distribution of calbindin and calretinin neurons. While calretinin expression was restricted to the nucleus incertus pars compacta, calbindin positive neurons where observed both in the pars dissipata and the pars compacta of the nucleus. The present work provides innovative data supporting an excitatory component in the pontoseptal pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  12. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  13. Near-nucleus photometry of comets using archived NEAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Michael D.; Bambery, Raymond J.; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Kollipara, Priya

    2007-06-01

    Though optimized to discover and track fast moving Near-Earth Objects (NEOs), the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) survey dataset can be mined to obtain information on the comet population observed serendipitously during the asteroid survey. We have completed analysis of over 400 CCD images of comets obtained during the autonomous operations of two 1.2-m telescopes: the first on the summit of Haleakala on the Hawaiian island of Maui and the second on Palomar Mountain in southern California. Photometric calibrations of each frame were derived using background catalog stars and the near-nucleus comet photometry measured. We measured dust production and normalized magnitudes for the coma and nucleus in order to explore cometary activity and comet size-frequency distributions. Our data over an approximately two-year time frame (2001 August-2003 February) include 52 comets: 12 periodic, 19 numbered, and 21 non-periodic, obtained over a wide range of viewing geometries and helio/geocentric distances. Nuclear magnitudes were estimated for a subset of comets observed. We found that for low-activity comets ( Afρ<100 cm) our model gave reasonable estimates for nuclear size and magnitude. The slope of the cumulative luminosity function of our sample of low-activity comets was 0.33 ± 0.04, consistent with the slope we measured for the Jupiter-family cometary nuclei collected by Fernández et al. [Fernández, J.A., Tancredi, G., Rickman, H., Licandro, J., 1999. Astron. Astrophys. 392, 327-340] of 0.38 ± 0.02. Our slopes of the cumulative size distribution α=1.50±0.08 agree well with the slopes measured by Whitman et al. [Whitman, K., Morbidelli, A., Jedicke, R., 2006. Icarus 183, 101-114], Meech et al. [Meech, K.J., Hainaut, O.R., Marsden, B.G., 2004. Icarus 170, 463-491], Lowry et al. [Lowry, S.C., Fitzsimmons, A., Collander-Brown, S., 2003. Astron. Astrophys. 397, 329-343], and Weissman and Lowry [Weissman, P.R., Lowry, S.C., 2003. Lunar Planet. Sci. 34. Abstract 34].

  14. Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, R.B.; Severin, C.M.

    1982-01-10

    Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DMN) of the rat were demonstrated with axonal transport techniques. Potential sources for projections to the DMN were first identified by injecting the nucleus with HRP and examining the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cortex for retrogradely labeled neurons. Areas consistently labeled were then injected with a tritiated radioisotope, the tissue processed for autoradiography, and the DMN examined for anterograde labeling. Afferent projections to the medial and/or lateral parts of the DMN were found to originate from a number of spinal, bulbar, and cortical centers. Rostral brain centers projecting to both medial and lateral parts of the DMN include the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory cortex, the entopeduncular nucleus, and zona incerta. at the level of the midbrain, the ipsilateral substantia nigra and contralateral DMN likewise project to the DMN. Furthermore, the ipsilateral superior colliculus projects to the DMN, involving mainly the lateral part of the nucleus. Afferents from caudal centers include bilateral projections from the sensory nucleus of the trigeminal complex and the nucleus medulla oblongata centralis, as well as from the contralateral dentate nucleus. The projections from the trigeminal complex and nucleus medullae oblongatae centralis terminate in the intermediate and medial parts of the DMN, whereas projections from the contralateral dentate nucleus terminate mainly in its lateral part. In general, the afferent connections of the DMN arise from diverse areas of the brain. Although most of these projections distribute throughout the entire extent of the DMN, some of them project mainly to either medial or lateral parts of the nucleus, thus suggesting that the organization of the DMN is comparable, at least in part, to that of the reticular formation of the pons and medulla, a region in which hodological differences between medial and lateral subdivisions are known to exist.

  15. The effect of nucleus basalis magnocellularis deep brain stimulation on memory function in a rat model of dementia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Eun; Jeong, Da Un; Lee, Jihyeon; Chang, Won Seok; Chang, Jin Woo

    2016-01-12

    Deep brain stimulation has recently been considered a potential therapy in improving memory function. It has been shown that a change of neurotransmitters has an effect on memory function. However, much about the exact underlying neural mechanism is not yet completely understood. We therefore examined changes in neurotransmitter systems and spatial memory caused by stimulation of nucleus basalis magnocellularis in a rat model of dementia. We divided rats into four groups: Normal, Lesion, Implantation, and Stimulation. We used 192 IgG-saporin for degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neuron related with learning and memory and it was injected into all rats except for the normal group. An electrode was ipsilaterally inserted in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis of all rats of the implantation and stimulation group, and the stimulation group received the electrical stimulation. Features were verified by the Morris water maze, immunochemistry and western blotting. All groups showed similar performances during Morris water maze training. During the probe trial, performance of the lesion and implantation group decreased. However, the stimulation group showed an equivalent performance to the normal group. In the lesion and implantation group, expression of glutamate acid decarboxylase65&67 decreased in the medial prefrontal cortex and expression of glutamate transporters increased in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. However, expression of the stimulation group showed similar levels as the normal group. The results suggest that nucleus basalis magnocellularis stimulation enhances consolidation and retrieval of visuospatial memory related to changes of glutamate acid decarboxylase65&67 and glutamate transporter.

  16. Nucleon emission via electromagnetic excitation in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Re-analysis of the Weizsacker-Williams method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous analyses of the comparison of Weizsacker-Williams (WW) theory to experiment for nucleon emission via electromagnetic (EM) excitations in nucleus-nucleus collisions were not definitive because of different assumptions concerning the value of the minimum impact parameter. This situation is corrected by providing criteria that allows definitive statements to be made concerning agreement or disagreement between WW theory and experiment.

  17. Glycine immunoreactivity of multipolar neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Doucet, J R; Ross, A T; Gillespie, M B; Ryugo, D K

    1999-06-14

    Certain distinct populations of neurons in the dorsal cochlear nucleus are inhibited by a neural source that is responsive to a wide range of acoustic frequencies. In this study, we examined the glycine immunoreactivity of two types of ventral cochlear nucleus neurons (planar and radiate) in the rat which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and thus, might be responsible for this inhibition. Previously, we proposed that planar neurons provided a tonotopic and narrowly tuned input to the DCN, whereas radiate neurons provided a broadly tuned input and thus, were strong candidates as the source of broadband inhibition (Doucet and Ryugo [1997] J. Comp. Neurol. 385:245-264). We tested this idea by combining retrograde labeling and glycine immunohistochemical protocols. Planar and radiate neurons were first retrogradely labeled by injecting biotinylated dextran amine into a restricted region of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. The labeled cells were visualized using streptavidin conjugated to indocarbocyanine (Cy3), a fluorescent marker. Sections that contained planar or radiate neurons were then processed for glycine immunocytochemistry using diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. Immunostaining of planar neurons was light, comparable to that of excitatory neurons (pyramidal neurons in the DCN), whereas immunostaining of radiate neurons was dark, comparable to that of glycinergic neurons (cartwheel cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus and principal cells in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radiate neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus subserve the wideband inhibition observed in the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

  18. Biotinidase reveals the morphogenetic sequence in cochlea and cochlear nucleus of mice.

    PubMed

    Brumwell, Craig L; Hossain, Waheeda A; Morest, D Kent; Wolf, Barry

    2005-11-01

    Hearing loss affects children with biotinidase deficiency, an inherited metabolic disorder in the recycling of biotin. The deficit appears shortly after birth during development of the auditory system. Using a mouse model, we sought to discover where and when biotinidase is expressed in the normal development of the cochlea and cochlear nucleus. In the process, we reconstructed the normal morphogenetic sequences of the constituent cells. Immunolabeling for biotinidase was localized to neurons and other cells of the adult and immature mouse, including the embryonic precursors of these regions dating from the stage of the otocyst. Its distribution was compared to the particular morphological changes occurring at each developmental stage. Biotinidase was localized in cells and their processes at the critical stages in their proliferation, migration, structural differentiation, and innervation, covering the entire span of their development. The prevalence of immunostaining peaked in the adult animal, including hair cells and ganglion cells of the cochlea and neurons of the cochlear nucleus. The findings suggest that biotinidase plays a role in the normal development of the auditory system. Besides the pattern of localization of biotinidase, this study provides the first systematic account of each developmental stage in a mammalian auditory system.

  19. Expression of gastrointestinal nesfatin-1 and gastric emptying in ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus- and ventrolateral hypothalamic nucleus-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zi-Bin; Deng, Run-Jun; Sun, Gui-Rong; Wei, Liang-Zhou; Kong, Xin-Juan; Ding, Xue-Li; Jing, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ping; Ge, Yin-Lin

    2014-06-14

    To determine the expression levels of gastrointestinal nesfatin-1 in ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH)-lesioned (obese) and ventrolateral hypothalamic nucleus (VLH)-lesioned (lean) rats that exhibit an imbalance in their energy metabolism and gastric mobility. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a VMH-lesioned group, a VLH-lesioned group, and their respective sham-operated groups. The animals had free access to food and water, and their diets and weights were monitored after surgery. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining were used to analyse the levels of NUCB2 mRNA and nesfatin-1 immunoreactive (IR) cells in the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and colon, respectively. Gastric emptying was also assessed using a modified phenol red-methylcellulose recovery method. The VMH-lesioned rats fed normal chow exhibited markedly greater food intake and body weight gain, whereas the VLH-lesioned rats exhibited markedly lower food intake and body weight gain. NUCB2/nesfatin-1 IR cells were localised in the lower third and middle portion of the gastric mucosal gland and in the submucous layer of the enteric tract. Compared with their respective controls, gastric emptying was enhanced in the VMH-lesioned rats (85.94% ± 2.27%), whereas the VLH lesions exhibited inhibitory effects on gastric emptying (29.12% ± 1.62%). In the VMH-lesioned rats, the levels of NUCB2 mRNA and nesfatin-1 protein were significantly increased in the stomach and duodenum and reduced in the small intestine. In addition, the levels of NUCB2 mRNA and nesfatin-1 protein in the VLH-lesioned rats were decreased in the stomach, duodenum, and small intestine. Our study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 level in the stomach and duodenum is positively correlated with body mass. Additionally, there is a positive relationship between gastric emptying and body mass. The results of this study indicate that gastrointestinal nesfatin-1 may play a significant role in gastric

  20. Experimental investigation of a linear-chain structure in the nucleus 14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Abe, K.; Nakao, T.; Suhara, T.; Iwasa, N.; Kim, A.; Kim, D. H.; Cha, S. M.; Kwag, M. S.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Imai, N.; Kitamura, N.; Lee, P.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, K. B.; Akers, C.; Jung, H. S.; Duy, N. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Lee, C. S.

    2017-03-01

    It is a well-known fact that a cluster of nucleons can be formed in the interior of an atomic nucleus, and such clusters may occupy molecular-like orbitals, showing characteristics similar to normal molecules consisting of atoms. Chemical molecules having a linear alignment are commonly seen in nature, such as carbon dioxide. A similar linear alignment of the nuclear clusters, referred to as linear-chain cluster state (LCCS), has been studied since the 1950s, however, up to now there is no clear experimental evidence demonstrating the existence of such a state. Recently, it was proposed that an excess of neutrons may offer just such a stabilizing mechanism, revitalizing interest in the nuclear LCCS, specifically with predictions for their emergence in neutron-rich carbon isotopes. Here we present the experimental observation of α-cluster states in the radioactive 14C nucleus. Using the 10Be + α resonant scattering method with a radioactive beam, we observed a series of levels which completely agree with theoretically predicted levels having an explicit linear-chain cluster configuration. We regard this as the first strong indication of the linear-chain clustered nucleus.

  1. Tonotopic Organization of Vertical Cells in the Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus of the CBA/J Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Muniak, Michael A.; Ryugo, David K.

    2013-01-01

    The systematic and topographic representation of frequency is a first principle of organization throughout the auditory system. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) receives direct tonotopic projections from the auditory nerve (AN) as well as secondary and descending projections from other sources. Among the recipients of AN input in the DCN are vertical cells (also called tuberculoventral cells), glycinergic interneurons thought to provide on- or near-best frequency feedforward inhibition to principal cells in the DCN and various cells in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN). Differing lines of physiological and anatomical evidence suggest that vertical cells and their projections are organized with respect to frequency, but this has not been conclusively demonstrated in the intact mammalian brain. To address this issue, we retrogradely labeled vertical cells via physiologically targeted injections in the AVCN of the CBA/J mouse. Results from multiple cases were merged with a normalized 3D template of the cochlear nucleus (Muniak et al., 2013) to quantitatively demonstrate that the arrangement of vertical cells is tonotopic and aligned to the innervation pattern of the AN. These results suggest that vertical cells are well positioned for providing immediate, frequency specific inhibition onto cells of the DCN and AVCN to facilitate spectral processing. PMID:23982998

  2. Arx is required for specification of the zona incerta and reticular nucleus of the thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Sunnen, C. Nicole; Simonet, Jacqueline C.; Marsh, Eric D.; Golden, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the aristaless-related homeobox (ARX) gene result in a spectrum of structural and functional nervous system disorders including lissencephaly, movement disorders, intellectual disabilities, and epilepsy. Some patients also have symptoms indicative of hypothalamic dysfunction, however, little is known about the role of ARX in diencephalic development. To begin evaluating diencephalic defects we examined the expression of a panel of known genes and gene products that label specific diencephalic nuclei in two different Arx mutant mouse lines. Male mice engineered to have a polyalanine expansion mutation (Arx(GCG)7/Y) revealed no expression differences in any diencephalic nucleus when compared to wildtype littermates. In contrast, mice null for Arx (Arx−/Y) lost expression of specific markers of the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and zona incerta (ZI), while retaining expression in other thalamic nuclei and in the hypothalamus. Tyrosine hydroxylase, a marker of the ZI’s dopaminergic A13 sub-nucleus, was among those lost, suggesting a requirement for Arx in normal TRN and ZI development, and for A13 dopaminergic fate, specifically. Since the ZI and A13 regions make connections to several hypothalamic nuclei, such mis-specification may contribute to the “hypothalamic dysfunction” observed in some patients. PMID:24487799

  3. Stress Modulation of Opposing Circuits in the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Sarah E; Rainnie, Donald G

    2016-01-01

    The anterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) has been recognized as a critical structure in regulating trait anxiety, contextual fear memory, and appetitive behavior, and is known to be sensitive to stress manipulations. As one of the most complex structures in the central nervous system, the intrinsic circuitry of the BNST is largely unknown; however, recent technological developments have allowed researchers to begin to untangle the internal connections of the nucleus. This research has revealed the possibility of two opposing circuits, one anxiolytic and one anxiogenic, within the BNST, the relative strength of which determines the behavioral outcome. The balance of these pathways is critical in maintaining a normal physiological and behavioral state; however, stress and drugs of abuse can differentially affect the opposing circuitry within the nucleus to shift the balance to a pathological state. In this review, we will examine how stress interacts with the neuromodulators, corticotropin-releasing factor, norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin to affect the circuitry of the BNST as well as how synaptic plasticity in the BNST is modulated by stress, resulting in long-lasting changes in the circuit and behavioral state. PMID:26096838

  4. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  5. Nuclear lamins: major factors in the structural organization and function of the nucleus and chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Dechat, Thomas; Pfleghaar, Katrin; Sengupta, Kaushik; Shimi, Takeshi; Shumaker, Dale K.; Solimando, Liliana; Goldman, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years it has become evident that the intermediate filament proteins, the types A and B nuclear lamins, not only provide a structural framework for the nucleus, but are also essential for many aspects of normal nuclear function. Insights into lamin-related functions have been derived from studies of the remarkably large number of disease-causing mutations in the human lamin A gene. This review provides an up-to-date overview of the functions of nuclear lamins, emphasizing their roles in epigenetics, chromatin organization, DNA replication, transcription, and DNA repair. In addition, we discuss recent evidence supporting the importance of lamins in viral infections. PMID:18381888

  6. Distinct roles of dopamine and subthalamic nucleus in learning and probabilistic decision making

    PubMed Central

    Bogacz, Rafal; Javed, Shazia; Mooney, Lucy K.; Murphy, Gillian; Keeley, Sophie; Whone, Alan L.

    2012-01-01

    Even simple behaviour requires us to make decisions based on combining multiple pieces of learned and new information. Making such decisions requires both learning the optimal response to each given stimulus as well as combining probabilistic information from multiple stimuli before selecting a response. Computational theories of decision making predict that learning individual stimulus–response associations and rapid combination of information from multiple stimuli are dependent on different components of basal ganglia circuitry. In particular, learning and retention of memory, required for optimal response choice, are significantly reliant on dopamine, whereas integrating information probabilistically is critically dependent upon functioning of the glutamatergic subthalamic nucleus (computing the ‘normalization term’ in Bayes’ theorem). Here, we test these theories by investigating 22 patients with Parkinson’s disease either treated with deep brain stimulation to the subthalamic nucleus and dopaminergic therapy or managed with dopaminergic therapy alone. We use computerized tasks that probe three cognitive functions—information acquisition (learning), memory over a delay and information integration when multiple pieces of sequentially presented information have to be combined. Patients performed the tasks ON or OFF deep brain stimulation and/or ON or OFF dopaminergic therapy. Consistent with the computational theories, we show that stopping dopaminergic therapy impairs memory for probabilistic information over a delay, whereas deep brain stimulation to the region of the subthalamic nucleus disrupts decision making when multiple pieces of acquired information must be combined. Furthermore, we found that when participants needed to update their decision on the basis of the last piece of information presented in the decision-making task, patients with deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus region did not slow down appropriately to revise their

  7. Distinct roles of dopamine and subthalamic nucleus in learning and probabilistic decision making.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, Elizabeth J; Bogacz, Rafal; Javed, Shazia; Mooney, Lucy K; Murphy, Gillian; Keeley, Sophie; Whone, Alan L

    2012-12-01

    Even simple behaviour requires us to make decisions based on combining multiple pieces of learned and new information. Making such decisions requires both learning the optimal response to each given stimulus as well as combining probabilistic information from multiple stimuli before selecting a response. Computational theories of decision making predict that learning individual stimulus-response associations and rapid combination of information from multiple stimuli are dependent on different components of basal ganglia circuitry. In particular, learning and retention of memory, required for optimal response choice, are significantly reliant on dopamine, whereas integrating information probabilistically is critically dependent upon functioning of the glutamatergic subthalamic nucleus (computing the 'normalization term' in Bayes' theorem). Here, we test these theories by investigating 22 patients with Parkinson's disease either treated with deep brain stimulation to the subthalamic nucleus and dopaminergic therapy or managed with dopaminergic therapy alone. We use computerized tasks that probe three cognitive functions-information acquisition (learning), memory over a delay and information integration when multiple pieces of sequentially presented information have to be combined. Patients performed the tasks ON or OFF deep brain stimulation and/or ON or OFF dopaminergic therapy. Consistent with the computational theories, we show that stopping dopaminergic therapy impairs memory for probabilistic information over a delay, whereas deep brain stimulation to the region of the subthalamic nucleus disrupts decision making when multiple pieces of acquired information must be combined. Furthermore, we found that when participants needed to update their decision on the basis of the last piece of information presented in the decision-making task, patients with deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus region did not slow down appropriately to revise their plan, a

  8. SUNrises on the International Plant Nucleus Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Graumann, Katja; Bass, Hank W.; Parry, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear periphery is a dynamic, structured environment, whose precise functions are essential for global processes—from nuclear, to cellular, to organismal. Its main components—the nuclear envelope (NE) with inner and outer nuclear membranes (INM and ONM), nuclear pore complexes (NPC), associated cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal components as well as chromatin are conserved across eukaryotes (Fig. 1). In metazoans in particular, the structure and functions of nuclear periphery components are intensely researched partly because of their involvement in various human diseases. While far less is known about these in plants, the last few years have seen a significant increase in research activity in this area. Plant biologists are not only catching up with the animal field, but recent findings are pushing our advances in this field globally. In recognition of this developing field, the Annual Society of Experimental Biology Meeting in Salzburg kindly hosted a session co-organized by Katja Graumann and David E. Evans (Oxford Brookes University) highlighting new insights into plant nuclear envelope proteins and their interactions. This session brought together leading researchers with expertise in topics such as epigenetics, meiosis, nuclear pore structure and functions, nucleoskeleton and nuclear envelope composition. An open and friendly exchange of ideas was fundamental to the success of the meeting, which resulted in founding the International Plant Nucleus Consortium. This review highlights new developments in plant nuclear envelope research presented at the conference and their importance for the wider understanding of metazoan, yeast and plant nuclear envelope functions and properties. PMID:23324458

  9. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, John H.; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St. John, Peter C.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bales, Benjamin B.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2016-04-04

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  10. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Abel, John H.; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St. John, Peter C.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bales, Benjamin B.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure. PMID:27044085

  11. Calretinin Neurons in the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert Y

    2016-08-01

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a circadian pacemaker, is present in all mammalian brains. It has a complex organization of peptide-containing neurons that is similar among species, but calcium-binding proteins are expressed variably. Neurons containing calretinin have been described in the SCN in a number of species but not with association to circadian function. The objective of the present study is to characterize a calretinin neuron (CAR) group in the rat anterior hypothalamus anatomically and functionally with a detailed description of its location and a quantitative analysis of neuronal calretinin immunoreactivity at 3 times of day, 0600, 1400, and 1900 h, from animals in either light-dark or constant dark conditions. CAR neurons occupy a region in the dorsal and lateral SCN with a circadian rhythm in CAR immunoreactivity with a peak at 0600 h and a rhythm in cytoplasmic CAR distribution with a peak at 1400 h. CAR neurons should be viewed as an anatomical and functional component of the rat SCN that expands the definition from observations with cell stains. CAR neurons are likely to modulate temporal regulation of calcium in synaptic transmission.

  12. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Stephanie M.; Trujillo, Andrew J.; Glover, Gary H.; Knutson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as “neurofeedback.” In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive arousal affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function. PMID:24705203

  13. Development of the human dentate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Mihajlovic, P; Zecevic, N

    1986-01-01

    The developing human dentate nucleus (DN) was studied in a series of specimens of various pre- and postnatal ages ranging from 8 gestational weeks (gw) to 10 years, in Golgi-impregnated and Nissl-stained material. The DN emerges from the cerebellar white matter at around 16 gestational weeks (gw) as a thick band of cells (600-700 micron in width) that gradually attenuates to a final width of 150-250 micron as it undergoes extensive infolding beginning around 24 gw. The highly convoluted configuration of the adult DN is recognizable by 35 gw. Around 16 gw, two basic classes of DN neurons can be identified. Differentiation of these neurons is especially intensive during the mid-gestational period (20-25 gw). At this time the size of cell bodies increases, dendrites branch profusely and acquire spines. A second, slower phase of maturation consisting of addition of secondary and tertiary branches, continues into the postnatal period. At all prenatal ages examined, dentate neurons are morphologically more mature than the Purkinje cells in the overlying cortex. DN neurons of premature infants did not show cytomorphological differences when compared with babies born at term.

  14. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Greer, Stephanie M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Glover, Gary H; Knutson, Brian

    2014-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as "neurofeedback." In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive aroused affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function.

  15. Normal Shock Vortex Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Figure 9: Breakdown map for normal-shock vortex-interaction. References [1] O. Thomer, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Numerical Simulation of Normal...and Oblique-Shock Vortex Interaction, ZAMM Band 80, Sub. 1, pp. 181-184, 2000. [2] O. Thomer, E. Krause, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Computational

  16. Normalized medical information visualization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-de-Madariaga, Ricardo; Muñoz, Adolfo; Somolinos, Roberto; Castro, Antonio; Velázquez, Iker; Moreno, Oscar; García-Pacheco, José L; Pascual, Mario; Salvador, Carlos H

    2015-01-01

    A new mark-up programming language is introduced in order to facilitate and improve the visualization of ISO/EN 13606 dual model-based normalized medical information. This is the first time that visualization of normalized medical information is addressed and the programming language is intended to be used by medical non-IT professionals.

  17. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be absorbed as part of the normal circulatory process. This allows the brain ventricles to return to their normal size. Regular follow-up care by a physician is important in order to identify subtle changes that might indicate problems with the shunt. × Treatment Treatment for NPH involves ...

  18. Mechanical behavior of the human lumbar intervertebral disc with polymeric hydrogel nucleus implant: An experimental and finite element study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Abhijeet Bhaskar

    The origin of the lower back pain is often the degenerated lumbar intervertebral disc (IVD). We are proposing replacement of the degenerated nucleus by a PVA/PVP polymeric hydrogel implant. We hypothesize that a polymeric hydrogel nucleus implant can restore the normal biomechanics of the denucleated IVD by mimicking the natural load transfer phenomenon as in case of the intact IVD. Lumbar IVDs (n = 15) were harvested from human cadavers. In the first part, specimens were tested in four different conditions for compression: Intact, bone in plug, denucleated and Implanted. Hydrogel nucleus implants were chosen to have line-to-line fit in the created nuclear cavity. In the second part, nucleus implant material (modulus) and geometric (height and diameter) parameters were varied and specimens (n = 9) were tested. Nucleus implants with line-to-line fit significantly restored (88%) the compressive stiffness of the denucleated IVD. The synergistic effect between the implant and the intact annulus resulted in the nonlinear increase in implanted IVD stiffness, where Poisson effect of the hydrogel played major role. Nucleus implant parameters were observed to have a significant effect on the compressive stiffness. All implants with modulus in the tested range restored the compressive stiffness. The undersize implants resulted in incomplete restoration while oversize implants resulted in complete restoration compared to the BI condition. Finite element models (FEM) were developed to simulate the actual test conditions and validated against the experimental results for all conditions. The annulus (defined as hyperelastic, isotropic) mainly determined the nonlinear response of the IVD. Validated FEMs predicted 120--3000 kPa as a feasible range for nucleus implant modulus. FEMs also predicted that overdiameter implant would be more effective than overheight implant in terms of stiffness restoration. Underdiameter implants, initially allowed inward deformation of the annulus and

  19. Did Struve observe the nucleus of Halley's comet in 1835?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Axel D.

    During its apparition in 1835 Halley's comet reached its minimum distance from the earth (0.187 au) on 13 October in the constellation of Ursa Major. Telescopic visual observations were made, e.g., by F.W. Bessel at Königsberg and by F.G.W. Struve at Dorpat (Tartu). In particular a drawing made by Struve on 8 October of what he calls the `nucleus' and describes as a small, slightly yellowish glowing piece of coal of elongated shape bears such a striking resemblance to the images of Halley's nucleus obtained in 1986 by the Giotto spacecraft that it merits further examination: Could Struve, who had been using a 24.4 cm refractor at 254-fold magnification, possibly have observed the real nucleus? Closer examination shows that neither Struve's maximum possible resolution (0.13 arc seconds or 23 km at the comet), nor his measured size of the nucleus (160 x 400 km), nor his verbal description of the nucleus (as a bright object) support this idea: It rather seems that the term `nucleus' was used at the time for the brightest, innermost part of the coma. It is concluded that, nevertheless, Struve quite correctly envisaged the structure of the innermost coma, and to a considerable degree of accuracy anticipated the correct shape and structure of the nucleus (elongated, 1:2) and its localized sources of outstreaming gas.

  20. Development of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Zhu, Hua; Zhou, Xiangtian; Qu, Jia; Ashwell, K W S; Paxinos, G

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve plays an integral part in the control of visceral function. The aim of the present study was to correlate structural and chemical changes in the developing nucleus with available data concerning functional maturation of human viscera and reflexes. The fetal development (ages 9 to 26 weeks) of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve has been examined with the aid of Nissl staining and immunocytochemistry for calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase. By 13 weeks, the dorsal vagal nucleus emerges as a distinct structure with at least two subnuclei visible in Nissl stained preparations. By 15 weeks, three subnuclei (dorsal intermediate, centrointermediate and ventrointermediate) were clearly discernible at the open medulla level with caudal and caudointermediate subnuclei visible at the level of the area postrema. All subnuclei known to exist in the adult were visible by 21 weeks and cytoarchitectonic differentiation of the nucleus was largely completed by 25 weeks. The adult distribution pattern of calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons was also largely completed by 21 weeks, although morphological differentiation of labeled neurons continued until the last age examined (26 weeks). The structural development of the dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve appears to occur in parallel with functional maturation of the cardiovascular and gastric movements, which the nucleus controls.

  1. Inputs to the ventrolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Won; Geerling, Joel C.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2009-01-01

    The ventrolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTvl) receives direct input from two specific subpopulations of neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). It is heavily innervated by aldosterone-sensitive NTS neurons, which are selectively activated by sodium depletion, and by the A2 noradrenergic neurons, which are activated by visceral, immune- and stress-related stimuli. Here, we used a retrograde neuronal tracer to identify other brain sites that innervate the BSTvl. Five general brain regions contained retrogradely labeled neurons: cerebral cortex (infralimbic and insular regions), rostral forebrain structures (subfornical organ, organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, taenia tecta, nucleus accumbens, lateral septum, endopiriform nucleus, dorsal BST, substantia innominata, and most prominently the amygdala – primarily its basomedial and central subnuclei), thalamus (central medial, intermediodorsal, reuniens, and most prominently the paraventricular thalamic nucleus), hypothalamus (medial preoptic area, perifornical, arcuate, dorsomedial, parasubthalamic, and posterior hypothalamic nuclei), and brainstem (periaqueductal gray matter, dorsal and central superior raphe nuclei, parabrachial nucleus, pre-locus coeruleus region, NTS, and A1 noradrenergic neurons in the caudal ventrolateral medulla). In the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus, some retrogradely-labeled neurons contained either agouti-related peptide or cocaine-amphetamine regulated transcript. Of the numerous retrogradely labeled neurons in the perifornical hypothalamic area, few contained melanin concentrating hormone or orexin. In the brainstem, many retrogradely labeled neurons were either serotoninergic or catecholaminergic. In summary, the BSTvl receives inputs from a variety of brain sites implicated in hunger, salt and water intake, stress, arousal, and reward. PMID:18853414

  2. Angiotensin receptor binding and pressor effects in cat subretrofacial nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A.M.; Dampney, R.A.L.; Mendelsohn, F.A.O. Univ. of Sydney )

    1988-11-01

    Central administration of angiotensin II (ANG II) increases arterial blood pressure via increased sympathetic activity. The authors have examined the possibility that one site of action of ANG II is the subretrofacial (SRF) nucleus in the rostral ventrolateral medulla, since this nucleus is known to play a critical role in the tonic and phasic control of arterial pressure. In vitro autoradiography, employing {sup 125}I-labeled (Sar{sup 1}, Ile{sup 8})ANG II as radioligand, was used to localize binding sites for ANG-II in the cat ventrolateral medulla. A high density of ANG II-receptor binding sites was found confined to the SRF nucleus. In a second group of experiments in anesthetized cats, microinjections of ANG II, in doses ranging from 10 to 50 pmol, were made into histologically identified sites within and outside the SRF nucleus. Microinjections into the nucleus resulted in a dose-dependent increase in arterial pressure, which was abolished by systemic administration of the ganglion-blocking drug hexamethonium bromide. In contrast, microinjections just outside the SRF nucleus had no effect on arterial pressure. It is concluded that activation of ANG II-receptor binding sites within the SRF nucleus leads to an increase in arterial pressure via increased sympathetic efferent activity.

  3. The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Modulates the Sensitivity of Arcuate Nucleus to Hypoglycemia in the Male Rat.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Moro Chao, D; León-Mercado, L; Foppen, E; Guzmán-Ruiz, M; Basualdo, M C; Escobar, C; Buijs, R M

    2016-09-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and arcuate nucleus (ARC) have reciprocal connections; catabolic metabolic information activates the ARC and inhibits SCN neuronal activity. Little is known about the influence of the SCN on the ARC. Here, we investigated whether the SCN modulated the sensitivity of the ARC to catabolic metabolic conditions. ARC neuronal activity, as determined by c-Fos immunoreactivity, was increased after a hypoglycemic stimulus by 2-deoxyglucose (2DG). The highest ARC neuronal activity after 2DG was found at the end of the light period (zeitgeber 11, ZT11) with a lower activity in the beginning of the light period (zeitgeber 2, ZT2), suggesting the involvement of the SCN. The higher activation of ARC neurons after 2DG at ZT11 was associated with higher 2DG induced blood glucose levels as compared with ZT2. Unilateral SCN-lesioned animals, gave a mainly ipsilateral activation of ARC neurons at the lesioned side, suggesting an inhibitory role of the SCN on ARC neurons. The 2DG-induced counterregulatory glucose response correlated with increased ARC neuronal activity and was significantly higher in unilateral SCN-lesioned animals. Finally, the ARC as site where 2DG may, at least partly, induce a counterregulatory response was confirmed by local microdialysis of 2DG. 2DG administration in the ARC produced a higher increase in circulating glucose compared with 2DG administration in surrounding areas such as the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH). We conclude that the SCN uses neuronal pathways to the ARC to gate sensory metabolic information to the brain, regulating ARC glucose sensitivity and counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemic conditions.

  4. Mechanical properties of the cell nucleus and the effect of emerin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rowat, A C; Lammerding, J; Ipsen, J H

    2006-12-15

    Nuclear structure and mechanics are gaining recognition as important factors that affect gene expression, development, and differentiation in normal function and disease, yet the physical mechanisms that govern nuclear mechanical stability remain unclear. Here we examined the physical properties of the cell nucleus by imaging fluorescently labeled components of the inner nucleus (chromatin and nucleoli) and the nuclear envelope (lamins and membranes) in nuclei deformed by micropipette aspiration (confocal imaged microdeformation). We investigated nuclei, both isolated and in intact, living cells, and found that nuclear volume significantly decreased by 60-70% during aspiration. While nuclear membranes exhibited blebbing and fluid characteristics during aspiration, the nuclear lamina exhibited behavior of a solid-elastic shell. Under large deformations of GFP-lamin A-labeled nuclei, we observed a decay of fluorescence intensity into the tip of the deformed tongue that we interpreted in terms of nonlinear, two-dimensional elasticity theory. Here we applied this method to study nuclear envelope stability in disease and found that mouse embryo fibroblasts lacking the inner nuclear membrane protein, emerin, had a significantly decreased ratio of the area expansion to shear moduli (K/mu) compared to wild-type cells (2.1 +/- 0.2 versus 5.1 +/- 1.3). These data suggest that altered nuclear envelope elasticity caused by loss of emerin could contribute to increased nuclear fragility in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy patients with mutations in the emerin gene. Based on our experimental results and theoretical considerations, we present a model describing how the nucleus is stabilized in the pipette. Such a model is essential for interpreting the results of any micropipette study of the nucleus and porous materials in general.

  5. Paraventricular nucleus Sim1 neuron ablation mediated obesity is resistant to high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Xi, Dong; Roizen, Jeff; Lai, Meizan; Gandhi, Nilay; Kublaoui, Bassil

    2013-01-01

    Single minded 1 (SIM1) is a transcription factor involved in brain patterning and control of energy balance. In humans, haploinsufficiency of SIM1 causes early-onset obesity. Mice deficient in the homologous gene, SIM1, also exhibit early onset obesity and increased sensitivity to a high fat diet. SIM1 is expressed in several areas of the brain implicated in control of energy balance including the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), the supraoptic nucleus (SON), the medial amygdala and nucleus of the lateral olfactory tract. We have previously shown that mice with global Sim1 neuron ablation exhibit obesity with hyperphagia as the primary defect. The PVN has a critical role in feeding and in high-fat appetite, thus, we sought to determine the effect of Sim1 neuron ablation limited to the PVN. We achieved PVN-SIM1 limited ablation through stereotactic injection of diphtheria toxin into the PVN of Sim1Cre-iDTR mice. The specificity of this ablation was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR of the PVN, supraoptic nucleus and the amygdala. Mice with PVN Sim1 neuron ablation, similar to mice with global Sim1 neuron ablation, exhibit early onset obesity with hyperphagia as the primary defect. However, PVN-Sim1 neuron ablated mice have a decreased response to fasting-induced hyperphagia. Consistent with this decrement, PVN-Sim1 neuron ablated mice have a decreased hyperphagic response to PVN injection of agouti-related peptide (AgRP). When PVN-Sim1 neuron ablated mice are placed on a high fat diet, surprisingly, their intake decreases and they actually lose weight. When allowed ad lib access to high fat diet and normal chow simultaneously, PVN-Sim1 neuron ablated mice exhibit overall decreased intake. That is, in PVN-Sim1 neuron ablated mice, access to fat suppresses overall appetite.

  6. Mechanical Properties of the Cell Nucleus and the Effect of Emerin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rowat, A. C.; Lammerding, J.; Ipsen, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear structure and mechanics are gaining recognition as important factors that affect gene expression, development, and differentiation in normal function and disease, yet the physical mechanisms that govern nuclear mechanical stability remain unclear. Here we examined the physical properties of the cell nucleus by imaging fluorescently labeled components of the inner nucleus (chromatin and nucleoli) and the nuclear envelope (lamins and membranes) in nuclei deformed by micropipette aspiration (confocal imaged microdeformation). We investigated nuclei, both isolated and in intact, living cells, and found that nuclear volume significantly decreased by 60–70% during aspiration. While nuclear membranes exhibited blebbing and fluid characteristics during aspiration, the nuclear lamina exhibited behavior of a solid-elastic shell. Under large deformations of GFP-lamin A-labeled nuclei, we observed a decay of fluorescence intensity into the tip of the deformed tongue that we interpreted in terms of nonlinear, two-dimensional elasticity theory. Here we applied this method to study nuclear envelope stability in disease and found that mouse embryo fibroblasts lacking the inner nuclear membrane protein, emerin, had a significantly decreased ratio of the area expansion to shear moduli (K/μ) compared to wild-type cells (2.1 ± 0.2 versus 5.1 ± 1.3). These data suggest that altered nuclear envelope elasticity caused by loss of emerin could contribute to increased nuclear fragility in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy patients with mutations in the emerin gene. Based on our experimental results and theoretical considerations, we present a model describing how the nucleus is stabilized in the pipette. Such a model is essential for interpreting the results of any micropipette study of the nucleus and porous materials in general. PMID:16997877

  7. Multiple pion and kaon production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions: measurements versus specific models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guptaroy, P.; de, Bh.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bhattacharyya, D. P.

    The pion and kaon rapidity densities and the nature of kaon-pion ratios offer two very prominent and crucial physical observables on which modestly sufficient data for heavy nucleus collisions are available to date. In the light of two sets of models - one purely phenomenological and the other with a modest degree of a dynamical basis - we try to examine the state of agreement between calculations and experimental results obtainable from the past and the latest measurements. Impact and implications of all these would also finally be spelt out.

  8. Determination of electron-nucleus collisions geometry with forward neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, L.; Aschenauer, E.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-12-29

    There are a large number of physics programs one can explore in electron-nucleus collisions at a future electron-ion collider. Collision geometry is very important in these studies, while the measurement for an event-by-event geometric control is rarely discussed in the prior deep-inelastic scattering experiments off a nucleus. This paper seeks to provide some detailed studies on the potential of tagging collision geometries through forward neutron multiplicity measurements with a zero degree calorimeter. As a result, this type of geometry handle, if achieved, can be extremely beneficial in constraining nuclear effects for the electron-nucleus program at an electron-ion collider.

  9. Nucleus of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock (1983 VII)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Optical, radar, infrared, UV, and microwave-continuum observations of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcok were obtained in May 1983, the week of the comet's close approach to earth. The comet has a nucleus dimension and a rotation period which are similar to those of Comet Halley, but a different morphological signature (a persisting sunward fan-shaped coma). Time variations are noted in the projected nucleus cross section. Results suggest significant limb-darkening effects in the relevant domains of radio waves, and that the comet's interior must be extremely cold. It is found that the thermal-infrared fluxes from the inner coma of the comet are dominated by the nucleus.

  10. Ice nucleus activity measurements of solid rocket motor exhaust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The ice Nucleus activity of exhaust particles generated from combustion of Space Shuttle propellant in small rocket motors has been measured. The activity at -20 C was substantially lower than that of aerosols generated by unpressurized combustion of propellant samples in previous studies. The activity decays rapidly with time and is decreased further in the presence of moist air. These tests corroborate the low effectivity ice nucleus measurement results obtained in the exhaust ground cloud of the Space Shuttle. Such low ice nucleus activity implies that Space Shuttle induced inadvertent weather modification via an ice phase process is extremely unlikely.

  11. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S.  R.; Chang, E.; Cohen, S.  D.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H. -W.; Orginos, K.; Parreño, A.; Savage, M.  J.

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  12. Projections of nucleus angularis and nucleus laminaris to the lateral lemniscal nuclear complex of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T T; Konishi, M

    1988-08-08

    Interaural phase and intensity are cues by which the barn owl determines, respectively, the azimuth and elevation of a sound source. Physiological studies indicate that phase and intensity are processed independently in the auditory brainstem of the barn owl. The phases of spectral components of a sound are encoded in nucleus magnocellularis (NM), one of the two cochlear nuclei. NM projects solely and bilaterally to nucleus laminaris (NL), wherein interaural phase difference is computed. The other cochlear nucleus, nucleus angularis (NA), encodes the amplitudes of spectral components of sounds. We report here the projections of NA and NL to the lateral lemniscal nuclei of the barn owl. The lateral lemniscal complex comprises nucleus olivaris superior (SO); nucleus lemnisci lateralis, pars ventralis (LLv); and nucleus ventralis lemnisci lateralis (VLV). At caudal levels, VLV may be divided into a posterior (VLVp) and an anterior (VLVa) subdivision on cytoarchitectonic grounds. At rostral levels, the cytoarchitectural differences diminish and the boundaries between the two subdivisions become obscured. Likewise, our data from anterograde tracing studies suggest that at caudal levels the terminal fields of NA and NL remain confined to VLVp and VLVa, respectively. They merge, however, at rostral levels. The data also suggest that NL projects to the medial portion of the ipsilateral SO and that NA projects bilaterally to all parts of SO and LLv. Studies with the retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase confirm these projections.

  13. Smallest Black Hole in Galactic Nucleus Detected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    A team of astronomers have reported the detection of the smallest black hole (BH) ever observed in a galactic nucleus. The BH is hosted in the center of dwarf galaxy RGG 118, and it weighs in at 50,000 solar masses, according to observations made by Vivienne Baldassare of University of Michigan and her collaborators. Small Discoveries: Why is the discovery of a small nuclear BH important? Some open questions that this could help answer are: - Do the very smallest dwarf galaxies have BHs at their centers too? Though we believe that there's a giant BH at the center of every galaxy, we aren't sure how far down the size scale this holds true. - What is the formation mechanism for BHs at the center of galaxies? - What's the behavior of the M-sigma relation at the low-mass end? The M-sigma relation is an observed correlation between the mass of a galaxy's central BH and the velocity dispersion of the stars in the galaxy. This relation is incredibly useful for determining properties of distant BHs and their galaxies empirically, but little data is available to constrain the low-mass end of the relation. M-sigma relation, plotting systems with dynamically-measured black hole masses. RGG 118 is plotted as the pink star. The solid and dashed lines represent various determinations of scaling relations. Credit: Baldassare et al. 2015. Identifying a Black Hole: RGG 118 was identified as a candidate host for an accreting, nuclear BH from the catalog of dwarf galaxies observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Baldassare and her team followed up with high-resolution spectroscopy from the Clay telescope in Chile and Chandra x-ray observations. Using these observations, the team determined that RGG 118 plays host to a massive BH at its center based on three clues: 1) narrow emission line ratios, which is a signature of accretion onto a massive BH, 2) the presence of broad emission lines, indicating that gas is rotating around a central BH, and 3) the existence of an X-ray point

  14. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Agakishiev, H.; Tang, A.; et al.

    2011-04-24

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus ({sup 4}He), also known as the anti-{alpha} ({alpha}), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the {alpha}-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B < -1 have been observed only as rare products of interactions at particle accelerators, where the rate of antinucleus production in high-energy collisions decreases by a factor of about 1,000 with each additional antinucleon. Here we report the observation of {sup 4}He, the heaviest observed antinucleus to date. In total, 18 {sup 4}He counts were detected at the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in 10{sup 9} recorded gold-on-gold (Au+Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, providing an indication of the production rate of even heavier antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of {sup 4}He in cosmic radiation.

  15. HUBBLE DETECTION OF COMET NUCLEUS AT FRINGE OF SOLAR SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is sample data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope that illustrates the detection of comets in the Kuiper Belt, a region of space beyond the orbit of the planet Neptune. This pair of images, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows one of the candidate Kuiper Belt objects found with Hubble. Believed to be an icy comet nucleus several miles across, the object is so distant and faint that Hubble's search is the equivalent of finding the proverbial needle-in-haystack. Each photo is a 5-hour exposure of a piece of sky carefully selected such that it is nearly devoid of background stars and galaxies that could mask the elusive comet. The left image, taken on August 22, 1994, shows the candidate comet object (inside circle) embedded in the background. The right picture, take of the same region one hour forty-five minutes later shows the object has apparently moved in the predicted direction and rate of motion for a kuiper belt member. The dotted line on the images is a possible orbit that this Kuiper belt comet is following. A star (lower right corner) and a galaxy (upper right corner) provide a static background reference. In addition, other objects in the picture have not moved during this time, indicating they are outside our solar system. Through this search technique astronomers have identified 29 candidate comet nuclei belonging to an estimated population of 200 million particles orbiting the edge of our solar system. The Kupier Belt was theorized 40 years ago, and its larger members detected several years ago. However, Hubble has found the underlying population of normal comet-sized bodies. Credit: A. Cochran (University of Texas) and NASA

  16. HUBBLE DETECTION OF COMET NUCLEUS AT FRINGE OF SOLAR SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is sample data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope that illustrates the detection of comets in the Kuiper Belt, a region of space beyond the orbit of the planet Neptune. This pair of images, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows one of the candidate Kuiper Belt objects found with Hubble. Believed to be an icy comet nucleus several miles across, the object is so distant and faint that Hubble's search is the equivalent of finding the proverbial needle-in-haystack. Each photo is a 5-hour exposure of a piece of sky carefully selected such that it is nearly devoid of background stars and galaxies that could mask the elusive comet. The left image, taken on August 22, 1994, shows the candidate comet object (inside circle) embedded in the background. The right picture, take of the same region one hour forty-five minutes later shows the object has apparently moved in the predicted direction and rate of motion for a kuiper belt member. The dotted line on the images is a possible orbit that this Kuiper belt comet is following. A star (lower right corner) and a galaxy (upper right corner) provide a static background reference. In addition, other objects in the picture have not moved during this time, indicating they are outside our solar system. Through this search technique astronomers have identified 29 candidate comet nuclei belonging to an estimated population of 200 million particles orbiting the edge of our solar system. The Kupier Belt was theorized 40 years ago, and its larger members detected several years ago. However, Hubble has found the underlying population of normal comet-sized bodies. Credit: A. Cochran (University of Texas) and NASA

  17. Normality in Analytical Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Although C.G. Jung’s interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault’s criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung’s work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault’s own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung’s disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity. PMID:25379262

  18. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  19. Normal, Functional, and Unhealthy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Donald A.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the various meanings of the words "normal,""functional," and "healthy," and suggests greater caution and guidelines for the use of these words to avoid ambiguity and erroneous implications. (Author)

  20. Glossary of normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Knipe, R. J.; Sanderson, D. J.

    2000-03-01

    Increased interest in normal faults and extended terranes has led to the development of an increasingly complex terminology. The most important terms are defined in this paper, with original references being given wherever possible, along with examples of current usage.

  1. Pion production at 180/sup 0/ in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chessin, S.A.

    1983-05-01

    A survey experiment of pion production at 180/sup 0/ in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. Beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 2.1 GeV/A protons, alphas, and carbon were used, as well as proton beams of 0.80 GeV, 3.5 GeV, and 4.89 GeV, and argon beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 1.83 GeV/A. This is the first such experiment to use the heavier beams. Targets used ranged from carbon to lead. An in-depth review of the literature, both experimental and theoretical, is also presented. The systematics of the data are discussed, and comparisons are made both with prior experiments and with the predictions of the models reviewed. The cross sections appear consistent with a simple single nucleon-nucleon collision picture, without the need for collective or other exotic effects. Suggestions for future work are made.

  2. Major diencephalic inputs to the hippocampus: supramammillary nucleus and nucleus reuniens. Circuitry and function.

    PubMed

    Vertes, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampus receives two major external inputs from the diencephalon, that is, from the supramammillary nucleus (SUM) and nucleus reuniens (RE) of the midline thalamus. These two afferents systems project to separate, nonoverlapping, regions of the hippocampus. Specifically, the SUM distributes to the dentate gyrus (DG) and to CA2 of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, whereas RE projects to CA1 of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and to the subiculum. SUM and RE fibers to the hippocampus participate in common as well as in separate functions. Both systems would appear to amplify signals from other sources to their respective hippocampal targets. SUM amplifies signals from the entorhinal cortex (EC) to DG, whereas RE may amplify them from CA3 (and EC) to CA1 of the hippocampus. This "amplification" may serve to promote the transfer, encoding, and possibly storage of information from EC to DG and from CA3 and EC to CA1. Regarding their unique actions on the hippocampus, the SUM is a vital part of an ascending brainstem to hippocampal system generating the theta rhythm of the hippocampus, whereas RE importantly routes information from the medial prefrontal cortex to the hippocampus to thereby mediate functions involving both structures. In summary, although, to date, SUM and RE afferents to the hippocampus have not been extensively explored, the SUM and RE exert a profound influence on the hippocampus in processes of learning and memory. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Major diencephalic inputs to the hippocampus: supramammillary nucleus and nucleus reuniens. Circuitry and function

    PubMed Central

    Vertes, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus receives two major external inputs from the diencephalon, that is, from the supramammillary nucleus (SUM) and nucleus reuniens (RE) of the midline thalamus. These two afferents systems project to separate, nonoverlapping, regions of the hippocampus. Specifically, the SUM distributes to the dentate gyrus (DG) and to CA2 of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, whereas RE projects to CA1 of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and to the subiculum. SUM and RE fibers to the hippocampus participate in common as well as in separate functions. Both systems would appear to amplify signals from other sources to their respective hippocampal targets. SUM amplifies signals from the entorhinal cortex (EC) to DG, whereas RE may amplify them from CA3 (and EC) to CA1 of the hippocampus. This “amplification” may serve to promote the transfer, encoding, and possibly storage of information from EC to DG and from CA3 and EC to CA1. Regarding their unique actions on the hippocampus, the SUM is a vital part of an ascending brainstem to hippocampal system generating the theta rhythm of the hippocampus, whereas RE importantly routes information from the medial prefrontal cortex to the hippocampus to thereby mediate functions involving both structures. In summary, although, to date, SUM and RE afferents to the hippocampus have not been extensively explored, the SUM and RE exert a profound influence on the hippocampus in processes of learning and memory. PMID:26072237

  4. Statistical analysis of secondary particle distributions in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The use is described of several statistical techniques to characterize structure in the angular distributions of secondary particles from nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 24 to 61 GeV/nucleon. The objective of this work was to determine whether there are correlations between emitted particle intensity and angle that may be used to support the existence of the quark gluon plasma. The techniques include chi-square null hypothesis tests, the method of discrete Fourier transform analysis, and fluctuation analysis. We have also used the method of composite unit vectors to test for azimuthal asymmetry in a data set of 63 JACEE-3 events. Each method is presented in a manner that provides the reader with some practical detail regarding its application. Of those events with relatively high statistics, Fe approaches 0 at 55 GeV/nucleon was found to possess an azimuthal distribution with a highly non-random structure. No evidence of non-statistical fluctuations was found in the pseudo-rapidity distributions of the events studied. It is seen that the most effective application of these methods relies upon the availability of many events or single events that possess very high multiplicities.

  5. Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent ``fusion by diffusion'' model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Wilczyński, J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section σcap(l), the fusion probability Pfus(l), and the survival probability Psurv(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of Pfus(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of Pfus(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

  6. Interaction between hypothalamic dorsomedial nucleus and the suprachiasmatic nucleus determines intensity of food anticipatory behavior

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Galvan, Guadalupe; Yi, Chun-Xia; van der Vliet, Jan; Jhamandas, Jack H.; Panula, Pertti; Angeles-Castellanos, Manuel; del Carmen Basualdo, María; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2011-01-01

    Food anticipatory behavior (FAA) is induced by limiting access to food for a few hours daily. Animals anticipate this scheduled meal event even without the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock. Consequently, a food-entrained oscillator has been proposed to be responsible for meal time estimation. Recent studies suggested the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) as the site for this food-entrained oscillator, which has led to considerable controversy in the literature. Herein we demonstrate by means of c-Fos immunohistochemistry that the neuronal activity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which signals the rest phase in nocturnal animals, is reduced when animals anticipate the scheduled food and, simultaneously, neuronal activity within the DMH increases. Using retrograde tracing and confocal analysis, we show that inhibition of SCN neuronal activity is the consequence of activation of GABA-containing neurons in the DMH that project to the SCN. Next, we show that DMH lesions result in a loss or diminution of FAA, simultaneous with increased activity in the SCN. A subsequent lesion of the SCN restored FAA. We conclude that in intact animals, FAA may only occur when the DMH inhibits the activity of the SCN, thus permitting locomotor activity. As a result, FAA originates from a neuronal network comprising an interaction between the DMH and SCN. Moreover, this study shows that the DMH–SCN interaction may serve as an intrahypothalamic system to gate activity instead of rest overriding circadian predetermined temporal patterns. PMID:21402951

  7. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Interaction with the Arcuate Nucleus; Essential for Organizing Physiological Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is generally considered the master clock, independently driving all circadian rhythms. We recently demonstrated the SCN receives metabolic and cardiovascular feedback adeptly altering its neuronal activity. In the present study, we show that microcuts effectively removing SCN-arcuate nucleus (ARC) interconnectivity in Wistar rats result in a loss of rhythmicity in locomotor activity, corticosterone levels, and body temperature in constant dark (DD) conditions. Elimination of these reciprocal connections did not affect SCN clock gene rhythmicity but did cause the ARC to desynchronize. Moreover, unilateral SCN lesions with contralateral retrochiasmatic microcuts resulted in identical arrhythmicity, proving that for the expression of physiological rhythms this reciprocal SCN-ARC interaction is essential. The unaltered SCN c-Fos expression following glucose administration in disconnected animals as compared to a significant decrease in controls demonstrates the importance of the ARC as metabolic modulator of SCN neuronal activity. Together, these results indicate that the SCN is more than an autonomous clock, and forms an essential component of a larger network controlling homeostasis. The present novel findings illustrate how an imbalance between SCN and ARC communication through circadian disruption could be involved in the etiology of metabolic disorders. PMID:28374011

  8. Interaction between hypothalamic dorsomedial nucleus and the suprachiasmatic nucleus determines intensity of food anticipatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Galvan, Guadalupe; Yi, Chun-Xia; van der Vliet, Jan; Jhamandas, Jack H; Panula, Pertti; Angeles-Castellanos, Manuel; Del Carmen Basualdo, María; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2011-04-05

    Food anticipatory behavior (FAA) is induced by limiting access to food for a few hours daily. Animals anticipate this scheduled meal event even without the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock. Consequently, a food-entrained oscillator has been proposed to be responsible for meal time estimation. Recent studies suggested the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) as the site for this food-entrained oscillator, which has led to considerable controversy in the literature. Herein we demonstrate by means of c-Fos immunohistochemistry that the neuronal activity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which signals the rest phase in nocturnal animals, is reduced when animals anticipate the scheduled food and, simultaneously, neuronal activity within the DMH increases. Using retrograde tracing and confocal analysis, we show that inhibition of SCN neuronal activity is the consequence of activation of GABA-containing neurons in the DMH that project to the SCN. Next, we show that DMH lesions result in a loss or diminution of FAA, simultaneous with increased activity in the SCN. A subsequent lesion of the SCN restored FAA. We conclude that in intact animals, FAA may only occur when the DMH inhibits the activity of the SCN, thus permitting locomotor activity. As a result, FAA originates from a neuronal network comprising an interaction between the DMH and SCN. Moreover, this study shows that the DMH-SCN interaction may serve as an intrahypothalamic system to gate activity instead of rest overriding circadian predetermined temporal patterns.

  9. Constraining in-medium nucleon-nucleon interactions via nucleus-nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammarruca, Francesca; White, Larz

    2010-11-01

    The nuclear equation of state is a broadly useful tool. Besides being the main input of stellar structure calculations, it allows a direct connection to the physics of nuclei. For instance, an energy functional (such as a mass formula), together with the energy/particle in nuclear matter, can be used to predict nuclear energies and radii [1]. The single-particle properties are also a key point to link infinite nuclear matter and actual nuclei. The parameters of the single-particle potential, in particular the effective mass, enter the calculations of, for instance, in-medium effective cross sections. From the well-known Glauber reaction theory, the total nucleus-nucleus reaction cross section is expressed in terms of the nuclear transparency, which, in turn, depends on the overlap of the nuclear density distributions and the elementary nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections. We explore the sensitivity of the reaction calculation to medium modifications of the NN cross sections to estimate the likelihood of constraining the latter through nuclear reactions. Ultimately, we wish to incorporate isospin asymmetry in the reaction model, having in mind connections with rare isotopes. [1] F. Sammarruca, arXiv:1002.00146 [nucl-th]; International Journal of Modern Physics, in press.

  10. Multiple-scattering effects in nucleus-nucleus reactions with Glauber theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Shinya; Ebata, Shuichiro; Horiuchi, Wataru; Kimura, Masaaki

    2014-09-01

    A study of new unstable nuclei has become possible in new radioactive beam facilities. In order to understand the relationship between reaction observables and nuclear structure, we need reaction theory which exactly reflects the nuclear structure. The Glauber theory is a powerful tool of analyzing high energy nuclear reactions. The theory describes the multiple scattering processes, whereas the optical limit approximation (OLA), which is widely used, ignores those processes. Those effects are expected to play an important role in the nuclear collision involving unstable nuclei (see for example Phys. Rev. C 54, 1843 (1996)). Here we apply the Glauber theory to nucleus-nucleus reactions. The wave functions are generated by the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method and are expressed in a Slater determinant that allows us to evaluate the complete Glauber amplitude easily. We calculate total reaction cross sections, elastic cross sections and differential elastic cross sections for 16~24O, 40~70Ca, 56,58Ni, 100~140Sn, 190~214Pb on proton, 4He, 12C targets and compare with experimental data. The Glauber theory gives much better description than the OLA, especially at larger scattering angles.

  11. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2017-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyüz-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions 16 O + 70 Ge and 28 Si + 100 Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data.

  12. Deconvolving the Nucleus of Centaurus A Using Chandra PSF Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karovska, Margarita

    2000-01-01

    Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is a giant early-type galaxy containing the nearest (at 3.5 Mpc) radio-bright Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). Cen A was observed with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) on the Chandra X-ray Observatory on several occasions since the launch in July 1999. The high-angular resolution (less than 0.5 arcsecond) Chandra/HRC images reveal X ray multi-scale structures in this object with unprecedented detail and clarity, including the bright nucleus believed to be associated with a supermassive black hole. We explored the spatial extent of the Cen A nucleus using deconvolution techniques on the full resolution Chandra images. Model point spread functions (PSFs) were derived from the standard Chandra raytrace PSF library as well as unresolved point sources observed with Chandra. The deconvolved images show that the Cen A nucleus is resolved and asymmetric. We discuss several possible causes of this extended emission and of the asymmetries.

  13. Cloud condensation nucleus-sulfate mass relationship and cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously published, simultaneous measurements of cloud condensation nucleus number concentration and sulfate mass concentration suggest a nonlinear relationship between the two variables. This nonlinearity reduces the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in the sulfur cycle.

  14. Low-energy antinucleon-nucleus interaction revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    2015-08-01

    Annihilation cross sections of antiprotons and antineutrons on the proton between 50 and 400 MeV/c show Coulomb focusing below 200 MeV/c and almost no charge-dependence above 200 MeV/c. Similar comparisons for heavier targets are not possible for lack of overlap between nuclear targets studied with and beams. Interpolating between -nucleus annihilation cross sections with the help of an optical potential to compare with -nucleus annihilation cross sections reveal unexpected features of Coulomb interactions in the latter. Direct comparisons between -nucleus and -nucleus annihilations at very low energies could be possible if cross sections are measured on the same targets and at the same energies as the available cross sections for . Such measurements may be feasible in the foreseeable future.

  15. Cloud condensation nucleus-sulfate mass relationship and cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously published, simultaneous measurements of cloud condensation nucleus number concentration and sulfate mass concentration suggest a nonlinear relationship between the two variables. This nonlinearity reduces the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in the sulfur cycle.

  16. Deconvolving the Nucleus of Centaurus A Using Chandra PSF Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karovska, Margarita

    2000-01-01

    Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is a giant early-type galaxy containing the nearest (at 3.5 Mpc) radio-bright Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). Cen A was observed with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) on the Chandra X-ray Observatory on several occasions since the launch in July 1999. The high-angular resolution (less than 0.5 arcsecond) Chandra/HRC images reveal X ray multi-scale structures in this object with unprecedented detail and clarity, including the bright nucleus believed to be associated with a supermassive black hole. We explored the spatial extent of the Cen A nucleus using deconvolution techniques on the full resolution Chandra images. Model point spread functions (PSFs) were derived from the standard Chandra raytrace PSF library as well as unresolved point sources observed with Chandra. The deconvolved images show that the Cen A nucleus is resolved and asymmetric. We discuss several possible causes of this extended emission and of the asymmetries.

  17. 3D Protein Dynamics in the Cell Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand P; Galland, Rémi; Finch-Edmondson, Megan L; Grenci, Gianluca; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Studer, Vincent; Viasnoff, Virgile; Saunders, Timothy E

    2017-01-10

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the cell nucleus plays an important role in protein dynamics and in regulating gene expression. However, protein dynamics within the 3D nucleus are poorly understood. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a novel combination of 1) single-objective based light-sheet microscopy, 2) photoconvertible proteins, and 3) fluorescence correlation microscopy, to quantitatively measure 3D protein dynamics in the nucleus. We are able to acquire >3400 autocorrelation functions at multiple spatial positions within a nucleus, without significant photobleaching, allowing us to make reliable estimates of diffusion dynamics. Using this tool, we demonstrate spatial heterogeneity in Polymerase II dynamics in live U2OS cells. Further, we provide detailed measurements of human-Yes-associated protein diffusion dynamics in a human gastric cancer epithelial cell line.

  18. Radiometric observations of the nucleus of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamere, W. A.; Reitsema, H. J.; Huebner, W. F.; Schmidt, H. U.; Keller, H. U.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Wilhelm, K.; Whipple, Fred L.

    1986-01-01

    Images obtained by the Halley multicolor camera (HMC) were used to determine the surface brightness of the nucleus. Radiometric values of jet-free areas of the surface are presented and a range of possible surface brightness values are derived. These direct measures are compared with brightnesses derived from the size of the nucleus, as determined from HMC images, and ground-based observations obtained before the onset of coma activity.

  19. The Galactic nucleus: A unique region in the Galactic ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genzel, Reinhard; Poglitsch, Albrecht

    1995-01-01

    The nucleus is a unique region in the Galactic ecosystem. It is also superb laboratory of modern astrophysics where astronomers can study, at unprecedented spatial resolution and across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, physical processes that may also happen at the cores of other galaxies. Infrared observations from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory have made important contributions to unraveling the mysteries of the Galactic nucleus and this review highlights some of these measurements, as well as recent results regarding the central parsec.

  20. Truncal ataxia from infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun; Ryoo, Sookyung; Moon, So Young; Seo, Sand Won; Na, Duk L

    2012-08-01

    Truncal ataxia in medullary infarction may be caused by involvement of the lateral part of the medulla; however, truncal ataxia in infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has received comparatively little attention. We report a patient with truncal ataxia due to medial medullary infarction located in the ION. A lesion in the ION could produce a contralateral truncal ataxia due to increased inhibitory input to the contralesional vestibular nucleus from the contralesional flocculus.

  1. Under Pressure: Mechanical Stress Management in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Belaadi, Néjma; Aureille, Julien; Guilluy, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cells are constantly adjusting to the mechanical properties of their surroundings, operating a complex mechanochemical feedback, which hinges on mechanotransduction mechanisms. Whereas adhesion structures have been shown to play a central role in mechanotransduction, it now emerges that the nucleus may act as a mechanosensitive structure. Here, we review recent advances demonstrating that mechanical stress emanating from the cytoskeleton can activate pathways in the nucleus which eventually impact both its structure and the transcriptional machinery. PMID:27314389

  2. Colour, albedo and nucleus size of Halley's comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Tholen, D. J.; Hartmann, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    Photometry of Halley's comet in the B, J, V, and K broadband filters during a time when the coma was very weak and presumed to contribute negligibly to the broadband photometry is reported. The V-J and J-K colors suggest that the color of the nucleus of Halley's comet is similar to that of the D-type asteroids, which in turn suggests that the surface of the nucleus has an albedo less than 0.1.

  3. Mission CaMKIIγ: shuttle calmodulin from membrane to nucleus.

    PubMed

    Malik, Zulfiqar A; Stein, Ivar S; Navedo, Manuel F; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-10-09

    Neuronal plasticity depends on plasma membrane Ca(2+) influx, resulting in activity-dependent gene transcription. Calmodulin (CaM) activated by Ca(2+) initiates the nuclear events, but how CaM makes its way to the nucleus has remained elusive. Ma et al. now show that CaMKIIγ transports CaM from cell surface Ca(2+) channels to the nucleus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Glutamate and dopamine in nucleus accumbens core and shell: sequence learning versus performance.

    PubMed

    Bauter, M R; Brockel, B J; Pankevich, D E; Virgolini, M B; Cory-Slechta, D A

    2003-03-01

    This study sought to determine whether neurochemical changes associated with chronic postweaning lead (Pb) exposure, namely, enhanced dopamine (DA) activity and/or blockade of NMDA function in nucleus accumbens (NAC), underlie the learning impairments also associated with this Pb regimen, and whether core or shell subregions of nucleus accumbens would be more important to such effects. If so, then mimicking these neurochemical changes in normal (control) rats should reproduce these Pb-induced learning impairments. For this purpose, the effects of DA (20-80 microg), the non-competitive NMDA antagonist MK-801 (1.0-2.5 microg) or DA+MK-801 (40+1.0, 80+2.5 microg) were infused in core or shell of nucleus accumbens in normal rats and effects on a multiple schedule of repeated learning (RL) and performance (P) evaluated. In core, MK-801 mimicked the effects of Pb exposure, selectively reducing RL accuracy with no corresponding changes in P accuracy, an effect derived from an increased frequency of perseverative errors. DA produced non-specific changes, reducing accuracy levels in RL and P components. Accuracy and rate effects of DA could be reversed by concurrent administration of the higher MK-801 dose. In shell, MK-801, primarily the lower dose, reduced accuracy in both the RL and P components, while DA did not produce any systematic effects. Collectively, these results point to a greater importance of core as compared to shell in the mediation of learning of spatial sequences, and suggest that inhibition of glutamatergic NMDA function may play a critical role in the selective learning impairments associated with chronic low level Pb exposure.

  5. Apparent diffusion coefficient normalization of normal liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Gao, Jia-Yin; Li, Jin-Ning; Yang, Da-Wei; Chen, Min; Zhou, Cheng; Yang, Zheng-Han

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been reported to be a helpful biomarker for detection and characterization of lesion. In view of the importance of ADC measurement reproducibility, the aim of this study was to probe the variability of the healthy hepatic ADC values measured at 3 MR scanners from different vendors and with different field strengths, and to investigate the reproducibility of normalized ADC (nADC) value with the spleen as the reference organ. Thirty enrolled healthy volunteers received DWI with GE 1.5T, Siemens 1.5T, and Philips 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) systems on liver and spleen (session 1) and were imaged again after 10 to 14 days using only GE 1.5T MR and Philips 3.0T MR systems (session 2). Interscan agreement and reproducibility of ADC measurements of liver and the calculated nADC values (ADCliver/ADCspleen) were statistically evaluated between 2 sessions. In session 1, ADC and nADC values of liver were evaluated for the scanner-related variability by 2-way analysis of variance and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) of ADCs and nADCs of liver were calculated for both 1.5 and 3.0-T MR system. Interscan agreement and reproducibility of ADC measurements of liver and related nADCs between 2 sessions were found to be satisfactory with ICC values of 0.773 to 0.905. In session 1, the liver nADCs obtained from different scanners were consistent (P = 0.112) without any significant difference in multiple comparison (P = 0.117 to >0.99) by using 2-way analysis of variance with post-hoc analysis of Bonferroni method, although the liver ADCs varied significantly (P < 0.001). nADCs measured by 3 scanners were in good interscanner agreements with ICCs of 0.685 to 0.776. The mean CV of nADCs of both 1.5T MR scanners (9.6%) was similar to that of 3.0T MR scanner (8.9%). ADCs measured at 3 MR scanners with different field strengths and vendors

  6. Spinal cord neuron inputs to the cuneate nucleus that partially survive dorsal column lesions: A pathway that could contribute to recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Chi; DiCarlo, Gabriella E; Gharbawie, Omar A; Qi, Hui-Xin; Kaas, Jon H

    2015-10-01

    Dorsal column lesions at a high cervical level deprive the cuneate nucleus and much of the somatosensory system of its major cutaneous inputs. Over weeks of recovery, much of the hand representations in the contralateral cortex are reactivated. One possibility for such cortical reactivation by hand afferents is that preserved second-order spinal cord neurons reach the cuneate nucleus through pathways that circumvent the dorsal column lesions, contributing to cortical reactivation in an increasingly effective manner over time. To evaluate this possibility, we first injected anatomical tracers into the cuneate nucleus and plotted the distributions of labeled spinal cord neurons and fibers in control monkeys. Large numbers of neurons in the dorsal horn of the cervical spinal cord were labeled, especially ipsilaterally in lamina IV. Labeled fibers were distributed in the cuneate fasciculus and lateral funiculus. In three other squirrel monkeys, unilateral dorsal column lesions were placed at the cervical segment 4 level and tracers were injected into the ipsilateral cuneate nucleus. Two weeks later, a largely unresponsive hand representation in contralateral somatosensory cortex confirmed the effectiveness of the dorsal column lesion. However, tracer injections in the cuneate nucleus labeled only about 5% of the normal number of dorsal horn neurons, mainly in lamina IV, below the level of lesions. Our results revealed a small second-order pathway to the cuneate nucleus that survives high cervical dorsal column lesions by traveling in the lateral funiculus. This could be important for cortical reactivation by hand afferents, and recovery of hand use.

  7. Spinal cord neuron inputs to the cuneate nucleus that partially survive dorsal column lesions: a pathway that could contribute to recovery after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chia-Chi; DiCarlo, Gabriella E.; Gharbawie, Omar A.; Qi, Hui-Xin; Kaas, Jon H.

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal column lesions at a high cervical level deprive the cuneate nucleus and much of the somatosensory system of its major cutaneous inputs. Over weeks of recovery, much of the hand representations in the contralateral cortex are reactivated. One possibility for such cortical reactivation by hand afferents is that preserved second-order spinal cord neurons reach the cuneate nucleus through pathways that circumvent the dorsal column lesions, contributing to cortical reactivation in an increasingly effective manner over time. To evaluate this possibility, we first injected anatomical tracers into the cuneate nucleus and plotted the distributions of labeled spinal cord neurons and fibers in control monkeys. Large numbers of neurons in the dorsal horn of the cervical spinal cord were labeled, especially unilaterally in lamina IV. Labeled fibers were distributed in the cuneate fasciculus and lateral funiculus. In three other squirrel monkeys, unilateral dorsal column lesions were placed at the cervical segment 4 (C4) level and tracers were injected into the ipsilateral cuneate nucleus. Two weeks later, a largely unresponsive hand representation in contralateral somatosensory cortex confirmed the effectiveness of the dorsal column lesion. However, tracer injections in the cuneate nucleus labeled only about 5% of the normal number of dorsal horn neurons, mainly in lamina IV, below the level of lesions. Our results revealed a small second-order pathway to the cuneate nucleus that survives high cervical dorsal column lesions by traveling in the lateral funiculus. This could be important for cortical reactivation by hand afferents, and recovery of hand use. PMID:25845707

  8. Glucokinase activity in the arcuate nucleus regulates glucose intake

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed; Richardson, Errol; Ma, Yue; Holton, Christopher; De Backer, Ivan; Buckley, Niki; Dhillo, Waljit; Bewick, Gavin; Zhang, Shuai; Carling, David; Bloom, Steve; Gardiner, James

    2014-01-01

    The brain relies on a constant supply of glucose, its primary fuel, for optimal function. A taste-independent mechanism within the CNS that promotes glucose delivery to the brain has been postulated to maintain glucose homeostasis; however, evidence for such a mechanism is lacking. Here, we determined that glucokinase activity within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is involved in regulation of dietary glucose intake. In fasted rats, glucokinase activity was specifically increased in the arcuate nucleus but not other regions of the hypothalamus. Moreover, pharmacologic and genetic activation of glucokinase in the arcuate nucleus of rodent models increased glucose ingestion, while decreased arcuate nucleus glucokinase activity reduced glucose intake. Pharmacologic targeting of potential downstream glucokinase effectors revealed that ATP-sensitive potassium channel and P/Q calcium channel activity are required for glucokinase-mediated glucose intake. Additionally, altered glucokinase activity affected release of the orexigenic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y in response to glucose. Together, our results suggest that glucokinase activity in the arcuate nucleus specifically regulates glucose intake and that appetite for glucose is an important driver of overall food intake. Arcuate nucleus glucokinase activation may represent a CNS mechanism that underlies the oft-described phenomena of the “sweet tooth” and carbohydrate craving. PMID:25485685

  9. A FIBER APPARATUS IN THE NUCLEUS OF THE YEAST CELL

    PubMed Central

    Robinow, C. F.; Marak, J.

    1966-01-01

    The structure and mode of division of the nucleus of budding yeast cells have been studied by phase-contrast microscopy during life and by ordinary microscopy after Helly fixation. The components of the nucleus were differentially stained by the Feulgen procedure, with Giemsa solution after hydrolysis, and with iron alum haematoxylin. New information was obtained in cells fixed in Helly's by directly staining them with 0.005% acid fuchsin in 1% acetic acid in water. Electron micrographs have been made of sections of cells that were first fixed with 3% glutaraldehyde, then divested of their walls with snail juice, and postfixed with osmium tetroxide. Light and electron microscopy have given concordant information about the organization of the yeast nucleus. A peripheral segment of the nucleus is occupied by relatively dense matter (the "peripheral cluster" of Mundkur) which is Feulgen negative. The greater part of the nucleus is filled with fine-grained Feulgen-positive matter of low density in which chromosomes could not be identified. Chromosomes become visible in this region under the light microscope at meiosis. In the chromatin lies a short fiber with strong affinity for acid fuchsin. The nucleus divides by elongation and constriction, and during this process the fiber becomes long and thin. Electron microscopy has resolved it into a bundle of dark-edged 150 to 180 A filaments which extends between "centriolar plaques" that are attached to the nuclear envelope. PMID:5331666

  10. International Halley Watch: Discipline specialists for near-nucleus studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, S.; Sekanina, Z.; Rahe, J.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the Near-Nucleus Studies Net is to study the processes taking place in the near-nucleus environment as they relate to the nature of nucleus. This is accomplisghed by measuring the spatial and temporal distribution of dust, gases and ions in the coma on high resolution images taken from many observatories around the world. By modeling the motions of discrete dust features in Comet Halley, it is often possible to determine the locations of the emission sources on the surface and learn about the nucleus structure. In addition to the general goals shared by all IHW nets, the scientific goals of the net has been to determine (1)the gross surface structure of the nucleus, (2)the nucleus spin vector, (3)the distribution and evolution of jet sources and (4)the interrelationships between the gas, dust and ion components of the coma. An additional Comet Giacobini-Zinner watch was carried out by the NNSN in support of the NASA International Cometary Explorer flyby.

  11. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neuropeptide Expression in Patients with Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wamelen, Daniel J.; Aziz, N. Ahmad; Anink, Jasper J.; van Steenhoven, Robin; Angeloni, Debora; Fraschini, Franco; Jockers, Ralf; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To study whether sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) arise from dysfunction of the body's master clock, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Design: Postmortem cohort study. Patients: Eight patients with HD and eight control subjects matched for sex, age, clock time and month of death, postmortem delay, and fixation time of paraffin-embedded hypothalamic tissue. Measurements and Results: Using postmortem paraffin-embedded tissue, we assessed the functional integrity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in patients with HD and control subjects by determining the expression of two major regulatory neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin. Additionally, we studied melatonin 1 and 2 receptor expression. Compared with control subjects, the suprachiasmatic nucleus contained 85% fewer neurons immunoreactive for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and 33% fewer neurons for arginine vasopressin in patients with HD (P = 0.002 and P = 0.027). The total amount of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin messenger RNA was unchanged. No change was observed in the number of melatonin 1 or 2 receptor immunoreactive neurons. Conclusions: These findings indicate posttranscriptional neuropeptide changes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of patients with HD, and suggest that sleep and circadian rhythm disorders in these patients may at least partly arise from suprachiasmatic nucleus dysfunction. Citation: van Wamelen DJ; Aziz NA; Anink JJ; van Steenhoven R; Angeloni D; Fraschini F; Jockers R; Roos RAC; Swaab DF. Suprachiasmatic nucleus neuropeptide expression in patients with Huntington's disease. SLEEP 2013;36(1):117–125. PMID:23288978

  12. Cytoarchitecture and saccular innervation of nucleus y in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Frederickson, C J; Trune, D R

    1986-10-15

    The cytoarchitecture and saccular innervation of the mouse nucleus y were investigated by using Golgi, Nissl, and myelin stains and anterograde axonal transport of horseradish peroxidase. Nucleus y was found to be a compact group of cells in a small fiber-free region dorsal to the restiform body. Qualitative and morphometric analyses showed that most (75%) of the nucleus y neurons could not be reliably subdivided into morphologic subgroups, but varied continuously in soma size (15-25 microns), shape (fusiform to stellate), and number of dendrites (two to four), and had sparsely branched dendrites with an average of 3 to 4 spines per 10 microns of length. Three groups of cells that were identified morphometrically accounted for 10% (type I: large stellate cells), 9% (type II: long-dendrite cells), and 6% (type III: elongated soma cells) of the y neurons. Vestibular nerve axons transporting horseradish peroxidase after injury at their origin in the saccular neuroepithelium were found to form a dense terminal meshwork that was virtually co-extensive with the cytoarchitectonic boundaries of nucleus y. Nucleus y was distinguished from the overlying infracerebellar nucleus on the basis of anatomical, cytoarchitectural, and hodological features.

  13. 3200 Phaethon, Asteroid or Comet Nucleus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Benkhoff, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    Physico-chemical modeling is central to understand the important physical processes in small solar system bodies. We have developed a computer simulation, SUISEI, that includes the physico-chemical processes relevant to comets within a global modeling framework. Our goals are to gain valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of cometary nuclei so we can better understand observations and in situ measurements. SUISEI includes a 3-D model of gas and heat transport in porous sub-surface layers in the interior of the nucleus.We present results on the application of SUISEI to the near-Sun object, Phaethon. Discovered in 1983 and classified as an asteroid, it has recently exhibited an active dust coma. Phaethon has long been associated as the source of the Geminids meteor shower so the dust activity provides a clear link to the meteor shower. The observed dust activity would traditionally lead to Phaethon being also classified as a comet (e.g., 2060-95P/Chiron, 133P/Elst-Pizarro). This is unusual since the orbit of Phaethon has a perihelion of 0.14 AU, resulting in surface temperatures of more than 1025K, much too hot for water ice or other volatiles to exist near the surface and drive the activity. This situation and others such as the “Active Asteroids” necessitates a revision of how we understand and classify these small asteroid-comet transition objects.We conclude the following for Phaethon:1. It is likely to contain relatively pristine volatiles in its interior despite repeated near perihelion passages of 0.14 AU during its history in its present orbit,2. Steady water gas fluxes at perihelion and throughout its orbit are insufficient to entrain the currently observed dust production,3. Thermal gradients into the surface as well as those caused by diurnal rotation are consistent with the mechanism of dust release due to thermal fracture,4. The initial large gas release during the first perihelion passage may be sufficient to produce enough dust to explain

  14. Biophysical assays to probe the mechanical properties of the interphase cell nucleus: substrate strain application and microneedle manipulation.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Maria L; Zwerger, Monika; Lammerding, Jan

    2011-09-14

    complement this assay and can yield additional information on intracellular force transmission between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. Studying nuclear mechanics in intact living cells preserves the normal intracellular architecture and avoids potential artifacts that can arise when working with isolated nuclei. Furthermore, substrate strain application presents a good model for the physiological stress experienced by cells in muscle or other tissues (e.g., vascular smooth muscle cells exposed to vessel strain). Lastly, while these tools have been developed primarily to study nuclear mechanics, they can also be applied to investigate the function of cytoskeletal proteins and mechanotransduction signaling.

  15. Vowel posture normalization.

    PubMed

    Hashi, M; Westbury, J R; Honda, K

    1998-10-01

    A simple normalization procedure was applied to point-parametrized articulatory data to yield quantitative speaker-general descriptions of "average" vowel postures. Articulatory data from 20 English and 8 Japanese speakers, drawn from existing x-ray microbeam database corpora, were included in the analysis. The purpose of the normalization procedure was to minimize the effects of differences in vocal tract size and shape on average postures derived from the raw data. The procedure resulted in a general reduction of cross-speaker variance in the y dimension of the normalized space, within both language groups. This result can be traced to a systematic source of variance in the y dimension of the raw data (i.e., palatal height) "successfully removed" from the normalized data. The procedure did not result in a comparable, general reduction in cross-speaker variance in the x dimension. This negative result can be traced partly to the new observation that some speakers within the English sample habitually placed their tongues in a fronted position for all vowels, whereas other speakers habitually placed their tongues in a rearward position. Methods for evaluating articulatory normalization schemes, and possible sources of interspeaker variability in vowel postures, are discussed.

  16. Quantifying surface normal estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert B.; Oxley, Mark E.; Eismann, Michael T.; Goda, Matthew E.

    2006-05-01

    An inverse algorithm for surface normal estimation from thermal polarimetric imagery was developed and used to quantify the requirements on a priori information. Building on existing knowledge that calculates the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and the angle of polarization (AOP) for a given surface normal in a forward model (from an object's characteristics to calculation of the DOLP and AOP), this research quantifies the impact of a priori information with the development of an inverse algorithm to estimate surface normals from thermal polarimetric emissions in long-wave infrared (LWIR). The inverse algorithm assumes a polarized infrared focal plane array capturing LWIR intensity images which are then converted to Stokes vectors. Next, the DOLP and AOP are calculated from the Stokes vectors. Last, the viewing angles, θ v, to the surface normals are estimated assuming perfect material information about the imaged scene. A sensitivity analysis is presented to quantitatively describe the a priori information's impact on the amount of error in the estimation of surface normals, and a bound is determined given perfect information about an object. Simulations explored the impact of surface roughness (σ) and the real component (n) of a dielectric's complex index of refraction across a range of viewing angles (θ v) for a given wavelength of observation.

  17. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic-production processes due to two-photon exchange in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Feynman diagrams for two-photon exchange are evaluated using quantum electrodynamics. The total cross section and stopping power for projectile and target nuclei of identical charge are found to be significant for heavy nuclei above a few GeV per nucleon-incident energy.

  18. Changes in immunoreactivity to calcium-binding proteins in the anterior olfactory nucleus of the rat after neonatal olfactory deprivation.

    PubMed

    Barbado, M V; Briñón, J G; Weruaga, E; Porteros, A; Arévalo, R; Aijón, J; Alonso, J R

    2002-09-01

    The effects of olfactory deprivation on the density of neuronal populations expressing the calcium-binding proteins calbindin D-28k, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the anterior olfactory nucleus of the rat were studied immunohistochemically in 60-day-old rats subjected to unilateral naris closure on the day of birth. The neuronal populations were characterized morphologically and topologically, and the density of each cell type was calculated in each subdivision of the anterior olfactory nucleus at seven rostrocaudal levels. Data were gathered into three groups: data from either the ipsilateral or contralateral anterior olfactory nucleus of experimental animals and data from control animals. Statistical analysis indicated that disruption of the normal afferent activity to one olfactory bulb affects the expression of the calcium-binding proteins investigated in the anterior olfactory nucleus, as revealed by variations in the density of certain neuronal populations. The observed effects were very heterogeneous and could not be related to any specific neuronal type, location, or to the expression of a given calcium-binding protein. Nevertheless, as a general rule the most affected neuronal populations were those expressing calbindin D-28k located in the rostral subdivisions. These subdivisions are the latest to develop in mammals and are those that receive the largest amount of inputs from the olfactory bulb.

  19. Spatial organization of RNA polymerase II inside a mammalian cell nucleus revealed by reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ziqing W.; Roy, Rahul; Gebhardt, J. Christof M.; Suter, David M.; Chapman, Alec R.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2014-01-01

    Superresolution microscopy based on single-molecule centroid determination has been widely applied to cellular imaging in recent years. However, quantitative imaging of the mammalian nucleus has been challenging due to the lack of 3D optical sectioning methods for normal-sized cells, as well as the inability to accurately count the absolute copy numbers of biomolecules in highly dense structures. Here we report a reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy method capable of imaging inside the mammalian nucleus with superior signal-to-background ratio as well as molecular counting with single-copy accuracy. Using reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy, we probed the spatial organization of transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) molecules and quantified their global extent of clustering inside the mammalian nucleus. Spatiotemporal clustering analysis that leverages on the blinking photophysics of specific organic dyes showed that the majority (>70%) of the transcription foci originate from single RNAP II molecules, and no significant clustering between RNAP II molecules was detected within the length scale of the reported diameter of “transcription factories.” Colocalization measurements of RNAP II molecules equally labeled by two spectrally distinct dyes confirmed the primarily unclustered distribution, arguing against a prevalent existence of transcription factories in the mammalian nucleus as previously proposed. The methods developed in our study pave the way for quantitative mapping and stoichiometric characterization of key biomolecular species deep inside mammalian cells. PMID:24379392

  20. Neuronal activity correlated with checking behaviour in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Burbaud, Pierre; Clair, Anne-Hélène; Langbour, Nicolas; Fernandez-Vidal, Sara; Goillandeau, Michel; Michelet, Thomas; Bardinet, Eric; Chéreau, Isabelle; Durif, Franck; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stephan; Fontaine, Denys; Magnié-Mauro, Marie-Noelle; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Bataille, Benoît; Millet, Bruno; Vérin, Marc; Baup, Nicolas; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Cornu, Philippe; Pelissolo, Antoine; Arbus, Christophe; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Yelnik, Jérôme; Welter, Marie-Laure; Mallet, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Doubt, and its behavioural correlate, checking, is a normal phenomenon of human cognition that is dramatically exacerbated in obsessive-compulsive disorder. We recently showed that deep brain stimulation in the associative-limbic area of the subthalamic nucleus, a central core of the basal ganglia, improved obsessive-compulsive disorder. To understand the physiological bases of symptoms in such patients, we recorded the activity of individual neurons in the therapeutic target during surgery while subjects performed a cognitive task that gave them the possibility of unrestricted repetitive checking after they had made a choice. We postulated that the activity of neurons in this region could be influenced by doubt and checking behaviour. Among the 63/87 task-related neurons recorded in 10 patients, 60% responded to various combinations of instructions, delay, movement or feedback, thus highlighting their role in the integration of different types of information. In addition, task-related activity directed towards decision-making increased during trials with checking in comparison with those without checking. These results suggest that the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus plays a role in doubt-related repetitive thoughts. Overall, our results not only provide new insight into the role of the subthalamic nucleus in human cognition but also support the fact that subthalamic nucleus modulation by deep brain stimulation reduced compulsive behaviour in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  1. The nucleus of M81 - Simultaneous 2.3 and 8.3 GHz Mark III VLBI observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartel, N.; Shapiro, I. I.; Corey, B. E.; Marcaide, J. M.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Cappallo, R. J.; Graham, D. A.; Romney, J. D.; Preston, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Mark III very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations have been made of the nucleus in the normal galaxy M81 (NGC 3031) simultaneously at 2.3 and 8.3 GHz, and it was found that nearly 100% of the flux density of the nuclear region originates in an elongated radio core with linear dimensions 1000-4000 AU, dependent on frequency. This galactic nucleus is the most compact observed in any extragalactic source. The position coincides with that of the nucleus at optical and X-ray wavelengths within the larger uncertainties of the latter two. The position angle of the major axis of the M81 nucleus is within 3 deg of 75 deg at 2.3 GHz and within 6 deg of 50 deg at 8.3 GHz and is frequency dependent at the 4 sigma level. These values straddle the 62 deg position angle of the projection on the sky of the rotation axis of the galaxy. The spectrum of the core is slightly inverted, and the length of its major axis decreases with frequency. These results are consistent with the emission's being incoherent electron synchrotron radiation from an inhomogeneous region with an optical depth varying along the rotation axis of the galaxy.

  2. The effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on monoamine outflow in the nucleus accumbens shell in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Susanne; Gasca, Fernando; Richter, Lars; Leipscher, Ulrike; Trillenberg, Peter; Moser, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Evidence exists that modulation of neuronal activity in nucleus accumbens shell region may re-establish normal function in various neuropsychiatric conditions such as drug-withdrawal, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression and chronic pain. Here, we study the effects of acute repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on monoamine outflow in the nucleus accumbens shell in awake and freely moving rats using in vivo microdialysis. To scale the biochemical results to the induced electric field in the rat brain, we obtained a realistic simulation of the stimulation scenario using a finite element model. Applying 20 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in 6 trains of 50 stimuli with 280 μs pulse width at a magnetic field strength of 130% of the individual motor threshold, dopamine as well as serotonin outflow in the nucleus accumbens shell significantly increased compared to sham stimulation. Since the electric field decays rapidly with depth in the rat brain, we can conclude that the modulation in neurotransmitter outflow from the nucleus accumbens shell is presumably a remote effect of cortical stimulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Computational prediction of Mycoplasma hominis proteins targeting in nucleus of host cell and their implication in prostate cancer etiology.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahanavaj; Zakariah, Mohammed; Palaniappan, Sellappan

    2016-08-01

    Cancer has long been assumed to be a genetic disease. However, recent evidence supports the enigmatic connection of bacterial infection with the growth and development of various types of cancers. The cause and mechanism of the growth and development of prostate cancer due to Mycoplasma hominis remain unclear. Prostate cancer cells are infected and colonized by enteroinvasive M. hominis, which controls several factors that can affect prostate cancer growth in susceptible persons. We investigated M. hominis proteins targeting the nucleus of host cells and their implications in prostate cancer etiology. Many vital processes are controlled in the nucleus, where the proteins targeting M. hominis may have various potential implications. A total of 29/563 M. hominis proteins were predicted to target the nucleus of host cells. These include numerous proteins with the capability to alter normal growth activities. In conclusion, our results emphasize that various proteins of M. hominis targeted the nucleus of host cells and were involved in prostate cancer etiology through different mechanisms and strategies.

  4. Spatial organization of RNA polymerase II inside a mammalian cell nucleus revealed by reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziqing W; Roy, Rahul; Gebhardt, J Christof M; Suter, David M; Chapman, Alec R; Xie, X Sunney

    2014-01-14

    Superresolution microscopy based on single-molecule centroid determination has been widely applied to cellular imaging in recent years. However, quantitative imaging of the mammalian nucleus has been challenging due to the lack of 3D optical sectioning methods for normal-sized cells, as well as the inability to accurately count the absolute copy numbers of biomolecules in highly dense structures. Here we report a reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy method capable of imaging inside the mammalian nucleus with superior signal-to-background ratio as well as molecular counting with single-copy accuracy. Using reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy, we probed the spatial organization of transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) molecules and quantified their global extent of clustering inside the mammalian nucleus. Spatiotemporal clustering analysis that leverages on the blinking photophysics of specific organic dyes showed that the majority (>70%) of the transcription foci originate from single RNAP II molecules, and no significant clustering between RNAP II molecules was detected within the length scale of the reported diameter of "transcription factories." Colocalization measurements of RNAP II molecules equally labeled by two spectrally distinct dyes confirmed the primarily unclustered distribution, arguing against a prevalent existence of transcription factories in the mammalian nucleus as previously proposed. The methods developed in our study pave the way for quantitative mapping and stoichiometric characterization of key biomolecular species deep inside mammalian cells.

  5. Plastid-Nucleus Distance Alters the Behavior of Stromules

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Jessica L.; Kantek, Matthias; Schattat, Martin H.

    2017-01-01

    Plastids send “retrograde” signals to the nucleus to deliver information regarding their physiological status. One open question concerning this signal transfer is how the signal bridges the cytoplasm. Based on individual reports of plastid derived tubular membrane extensions connecting to nuclei, these so-called stromules have been suggested to function as communication routes between plastids and nuclei in response to biotic stress. However, based on the data currently available it is unclear whether interactions between stromules and nuclei are truly intentional or observed as a result of an inflated stromule frequency throughout the cell, and are thus a random event. The source of this uncertainty stems from missing information regarding the relative distribution of all plastids and stromules within a given cell. A comprehensive analysis of the upper epidermis of Arabidopsis thaliana rosette leaves was performed via a combination of still images and time-lapse movies of stromule formation in the context of the whole cell. This analysis could definitively confirm that stromule formation is not evenly distributed. Stromules are significantly more frequent within 8 μm of the nucleus, and approximately 90% of said stromules formed facing the nucleus. Time-lapse movies revealed that this enrichment of stromules is achieved via a 10-fold higher frequency of stromule initiation events within this 8 μm zone compared to the cell periphery. Following the movement of plastids and nuclei it became evident that movement and formation of stromules is correlated to nucleus movement. Observations suggest that stromules “connecting” to the nucleus are not necessarily the result of plastids sensing the nucleus and reaching out toward it, but are rather pulled out of the surface of nucleus associated plastids during opposing movement of these two organelles. This finding does not exclude the possibility that stromules could be transferring signals to the nucleus

  6. The interfascicular trigeminal nucleus: a precerebellar nucleus in the mouse defined by retrograde neuronal tracing and genetic fate mapping.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuhong; Tvrdik, Petr; Makki, Nadja; Machold, Robert; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2013-02-15

    We have found a previously unreported precerebellar nucleus located among the emerging fibers of the motor root of the trigeminal nerve in the mouse, which we have called the interfascicular trigeminal nucleus (IF5). This nucleus had previously been named the tensor tympani part of the motor trigeminal nucleus (5TT) in rodent brain atlases, because it was thought to be a subset of small motor neurons of the motor trigeminal nucleus innervating the tensor tympani muscle. However, following injection of retrograde tracer in the cerebellum, the labeled neurons in IF5 were found to be choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) negative, indicating that they are not motor neurons. The cells of IF5 are strongly labeled in mice from Wnt1Cre and Atoh1 CreER lineage fate mapping, in common with the major precerebellar nuclei that arise from the rhombic lip and that issue mossy fibers. Analysis of sections from mouse Hoxa3, Hoxb1, and Egr2 Cre labeled lineages shows that the neurons of IF5 arise from rhombomeres caudal to rhombomere 4, most likely from rhombomeres 6-8. We conclude that IF5 is a significant precerebellar nucleus in the mouse that shares developmental gene expression characteristics with mossy fiber precerebellar nuclei that arise from the caudal rhombic lip.

  7. The turtle thalamic anterior entopeduncular nucleus shares connectional and neurochemical characteristics with the mammalian thalamic reticular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kenigfest, Natalia; Belekhova, Margarita; Repérant, Jacques; Rio, Jean Paul; Ward, Roger; Vesselkin, Nikolai

    2005-10-01

    Neurochemical and key connectional characteristics of the anterior entopeduncular nucleus (Enta) of the turtle (Testudo horsfieldi) were studied by axonal tracing techniques and immunohistochemistry of parvalbumin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). We showed that the Enta, which is located within the dorsal peduncle of the lateral forebrain bundle (Pedd), has roughly topographically organized reciprocal connections with the dorsal thalamic visual nuclei, the nucleus rotundus (Rot) and dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (GLd). The Enta receives projections from visual telencephalic areas, the anterior dorsal ventricular ridge and dorsolateral cortex/pallial thickening. Most Enta neurons contained GABA and parvalbumin, and some of them were retrogradely labeled when the tracer was injected into the visual dorsal thalamic nuclei. Further experiments using double immunofluorescence revealed colocalization of GAD and parvalbumin in the vast majority of Enta neurons, and many of these cells showed retrograde labeling with Fluoro-gold injected into the Rot and/or GLd. According to these data, the Enta may be considered as a structural substrate for recurrent inhibition of the visual thalamic nuclei. Based on morphological and neurochemical similarity of the turtle Enta, caiman Pedd nucleus, the superior reticular nucleus in birds, and the thalamic reticular nucleus in mammals, we suggest that these structures represent a characteristic component which is common to the thalamic organization in amniotes.

  8. Some morphological features of a visual thalamic nucleus in a reptile: observations on nucleus rotundus in Caiman crocodilus.

    PubMed

    Pritz, M B

    1997-01-01

    The morphology of nucleus rotundus, a visual thalamic nucleus, was investigated in one species of reptiles. Caiman crocodilus, using Nisst stained material in transverse, sagittal, and horizontal planes. The topographical location of nucleus rotundus and its relationship to surrounding thalamic nuclear groups are described. Nucleus rotundus in Caiman can be subdivided into three areas: (1) an outer shell; (2) an inner core; and (3) a cell poor zone located between the shell and core. Most rotundal core neurons were round, fusiform, triangular, pear-shaped, or elliptical. Core neurons were not distributed evenly throughout the nucleus but, in many instances, were arranged in clusters composed of two to ten neurons. Quantitative measurements of area, perimeter, and eccentricity (greatest width/greatest length), which served as an index of cell roundness, were made on rotundal core neuron profiles in transverse, sagittal, and horizontal planes of section. Qualitative and quantitative observations were not appreciably different regardless of the plane of orientation. Both qualitative and quantitative data suggest that relay cells located in the core of nucleus rotundus are not a homogeneous population of neurons but comprise several subtypes.

  9. Neuron Numbers in the Hypothalamus of the Normal Aging Rhesus Monkey: Stability Across the Adult Lifespan and Between the Sexes

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D.E.; Killiany, R.J.; Rosene, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Normal aging is accompanied by changes in hypothalamic functions including autonomic and endocrine functions and circadian rhythms. The rhesus monkey provides an excellent model of normal aging without the potential confounds of incipient Alzheimer's disease inherent in human populations. This study examined the hypothalamus of 51 rhesus monkeys (23 male, 18 female, 6.5–31 years old) using design-based stereology to obtain unbiased estimates of neuron and glia numbers and the Cavalieri method to estimate volumes for eight reference spaces: total unilateral hypothalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), supraoptic nucleus (SON), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), dorsomedial nucleus (DM), ventromedial nucleus (VM), medial mammillary nucleus (MMN), and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). The results demonstrated no age-related difference in neuron number, glia number, or volume in any area in either sex except the PVN of male monkeys, which showed a significant increase in both neuron and glia numbers with age. Comparison of males and females for sexual dimorphisms revealed no significant differences in neuron number. However, males had more glia overall as well as in the SCN, DM, and LHA and had a larger hypothalamic volume overall and in the SCN, SON, VM, DM, and MMN. These results demonstrate that hypothalamic neuron loss cannot account for age-related deficits in hypothalamic function and provides further evidence of the absence of neurode-generation and cell death in the normal aging rhesus monkey. PMID:21935936

  10. Homologous upregulation of sst2 somatostatin receptor expression in the rat arcuate nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Turner, J; Guo, F; Videau, C; Epelbaum, J; Beaudet, A

    2001-07-01

    In vitro studies using various cell systems have provided conflicting results regarding homologous regulation of somatostatin (SRIH) receptors, and information on whether SRIH regulates the expression of its own receptors in vivo is lacking. In the present study we examined, by in situ hybridization, the effects of pretreatment with the sst2-preferring SRIH analog, octreotide, in vivo, on mRNA levels of two SRIH receptor subtypes, sst1 and sst2, in rat brain and pituitary. (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding was also measured in these regions. Three hours after the iv injection of 50 microg octreotide to conscious adult male rats, there was a 46% increase (p < 0.01) in the labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus compared to normal saline-pretreated controls, but not in any of the other brain regions examined. Computer-assisted image analysis revealed that 3 h exposure to octreotide significantly (p < 0.01) augmented both the number and labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus, compared to those in saline-treated controls. By contrast, within the anterior pituitary gland, in vivo exposure to octreotide did not affect the expression of sst2 mRNA. No changes in sst1 mRNA-expressing cells were observed after octreotide treatment in any of the regions measured, indicating that the observed effects were homologous, i.e. specific of the receptor subtype stimulated. Octreotide pretreatment was also without effect on the density of (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding in either the arcuate nucleus or pituitary. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that SRIH preexposure in vivo upregulates the expression of a subtype of its own receptors, sst2, within the central nervous system. They further suggest that pretreatment with SRIH in vivo does not cause sst2 receptor desensitization in arcuate nucleus and pituitary. Such homologous regulatory mechanisms may play an important role in the neuroendocrine control

  11. Subcellular localization of Bic-D::GFP is linked to an asymmetric oocyte nucleus.

    PubMed

    Paré, C; Suter, B

    2000-06-01

    Bicaudal-D (Bic-D) is essential for the establishment of oocyte fate and subsequently for polarity formation within the developing Drosophila oocyte. To find out where in the germ cells Bic-D performs its various functions we made transgenic flies expressing a chimeric Bic-D::GFP fusion protein. Once Bic-D::GFP preferentially accumulates in the oocyte, it shows an initial anterior localization in germarial region 2. In the subsequent egg chamber stages 1-6 Bic-D::GFP preferentially accumulates between the oocyte nucleus and the posterior cortex in a focus that is consistently aligned with a crater-like indentation in the oocyte nucleus. After stage 6 Bic-D::GFP fluorescent signal is predominantly found between the oocyte nucleus and the dorso-anterior cortex. During the different phases several genes have been found to be required for the establishment of the new Bic-D::GFP distribution patterns. Dynein heavy chain (Dhc), spindle (spn) genes and maelstrom (mael) are required for the re-localization of the Bic-D::GFP focus from its anterior to its posterior oocyte position. Genes predicted to encode proteins that interact with RNA (egalitarian and orb) are required for the normal subcellular distribution of Bic-D::GFP in the germarium, and another potential RNA binding protein, spn-E, is required for proper transport of Bic-D::GFP from the nurse cells to the oocyte in later oogenesis stages. The results indicate that Bic-D requires the activity of mRNA binding proteins and a negative-end directed microtubule motor to localize to the appropriate cellular domains. Asymmetric subcellular accumulation of Bic-D and the polarization of the oocyte nucleus may reflect the function of this localization machinery in vectorial mRNA localization and in tethering of the oocyte nucleus. The subcellular polarity defined by the Bic-D focus and the nuclear polarity marks some of the first steps in antero-posterior and subsequently in dorso-ventral polarity formation.

  12. Are Children "Normal"?

    PubMed

    Black, Dan A; Kolesnikova, Natalia; Sanders, Seth G; Taylor, Lowell J

    2013-03-01

    We examine Becker's (1960) contention that children are "normal." For the cross section of non-Hispanic white married couples in the U.S., we show that when we restrict comparisons to similarly-educated women living in similarly-expensive locations, completed fertility is positively correlated with the husband's income. The empirical evidence is consistent with children being "normal." In an effort to show causal effects, we analyze the localized impact on fertility of the mid-1970s increase in world energy prices - an exogenous shock that substantially increased men's incomes in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Empirical evidence for that population indicates that fertility increases in men's income.

  13. Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent 'fusion by diffusion' model

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J.

    2011-05-15

    We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section {sigma}{sub cap}(l), the fusion probability P{sub fus}(l), and the survival probability P{sub surv}(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of P{sub fus}(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of P{sub fus}(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

  14. Dynamics of strange, charm and high momentum hadrons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Greiner, C.; Stöcker, H.

    2004-07-01

    We investigate hadron production and attenuation of hadrons with strange and charm quarks (or antiquarks) as well as high transverse momentum hadrons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions from 2 A GeV to 21.3 A TeV within two independent transport approaches (UrQMD and HSD). Both transport models are based on quark, diquark, string and hadronic degrees of freedom, but do not include any explicit phase transition to a quark-gluon plasma. From our dynamical calculations we find that both models do not describe the maximum in the K+/ π+ ratio at 20-30 A GeV in central Au+Au collisions found experimentally, though the excitation functions of strange mesons are reproduced well in HSD and UrQMD. Furthermore, the transport calculations show that the charmonium recreation by D+ D¯→J/Ψ+ meson reactions is comparable to the dissociation by ‘comoving’ mesons at RHIC energies contrary to SPS energies. This leads to the final result that the total J/ Ψ suppression as a function of centrality at RHIC should be less than the suppression seen at SPS energies where the ‘comover’ dissociation is substantial and the backward channels play no role. Furthermore, our transport calculations-in comparison to experimental data on transverse momentum spectra from pp, d+Au and Au+Au reactions-show that pre-hadronic effects are responsible for both the hardening of the hadron spectra for low transverse momenta (Cronin effect) as well as the suppression of high pT hadrons. The mutual interactions of formed hadrons are found to be negligible in central Au+Au collisions at s=200 GeV for p T≥6 GeV/c and the sizeable suppression seen experimentally is attributed to a large extent to the interactions of ‘leading’ pre-hadrons with the dense environment.

  15. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  16. The subthalamic nucleus influences visuospatial attention in humans.

    PubMed

    Schmalbach, Barbara; Günther, Veronika; Raethjen, Jan; Wailke, Stefanie; Falk, Daniela; Deuschl, Günther; Witt, Karsten

    2014-03-01

    Spatial attention is a lateralized feature of the human brain. Whereas the role of cortical areas of the nondominant hemisphere on spatial attention has been investigated in detail, the impact of the BG, and more precisely the subthalamic nucleus, on signs and symptoms of spatial attention is not well understood. Here we used unilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus to reversibly, specifically, and intraindividually modify the neuronal BG outflow and its consequences on signs and symptoms of visuospatial attention in patients suffering from Parkinson disease. We tested 13 patients with Parkinson disease and chronic deep brain stimulation in three stimulation settings: unilateral right and left deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus as well as bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. In all three stimulation settings, the patients viewed a set of pictures while an eye-tracker system recorded eye movements. During the exploration of the visual stimuli, we analyzed the time spent in each visual hemispace, as well as the number, duration, amplitude, peak velocity, acceleration peak, and speed of saccades. In the unilateral left-sided stimulation setting, patients show a shorter ipsilateral exploration time of the extrapersonal space, whereas number, duration, and speed of saccades did not differ between the different stimulation settings. These results demonstrated reduced visuospatial attention toward the side contralateral to the right subthalamic nucleus that was not being stimulated in a unilateral left-sided stimulation. Turning on the right stimulator, the reduced visuospatial attention vanished. These results support the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus in modulating spatial attention. Therefore, the subthalamic nucleus is part of the subcortical network that subserves spatial attention.

  17. The red nucleus and the rubrospinal projection in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huazheng; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2012-04-01

    We studied the organization and spinal projection of the mouse red nucleus with a range of techniques (Nissl stain, immunofluorescence, retrograde tracer injections into the spinal cord, anterograde tracer injections into the red nucleus, and in situ hybridization) and counted the number of neurons in the red nucleus (3,200.9 ± 230.8). We found that the rubrospinal neurons were mainly located in the parvicellular region of the red nucleus, more lateral in the rostral part and more medial in the caudal part. Labeled neurons were least common in the rostral and caudal most parts of the red nucleus. Neurons projecting to the cervical cord were predominantly dorsomedially placed and neurons projecting to the lumbar cord were predominantly ventrolaterally placed. Immunofluorescence staining with SMI-32 antibody showed that ~60% of SMI-32-positive neurons were cervical cord-projecting neurons and 24% were lumbar cord-projecting neurons. SMI-32-positive neurons were mainly located in the caudomedial part of the red nucleus. A study of vGluT2 expression showed that the number and location of glutamatergic neurons matched with those of the rubrospinal neurons. In the anterograde tracing experiments, rubrospinal fibers travelled in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus, between the lateral spinal nucleus and the calretinin-positive fibers of the lateral funiculus. Rubrospinal fibers terminated in contralateral laminae 5, 6, and the dorsal part of lamina 7 at all spinal cord levels. A few fibers could be seen next to the neurons in the dorsolateral part of lamina 9 at levels of C8-T1 (hand motor neurons) and L5-L6 (foot motor neurons), which is consistent with a view that rubrospinal fibers may play a role in distal limb movement in rodents.

  18. The nucleus "k" of Meessen and Olszewski efferents to the cerebellar paramedian lobule: a retrograde tracing histochemical (HRP) study in the rabbit and the cat.

    PubMed

    Grottel, K; Zimny, R; Jakielska, D

    1986-01-01

    The group "k" of Meessen and Olszewski (1949) was identified in the brain stems of normal rabbits and cats. In the rabbit, a topographical subdivision of the group "k" into the well defined cell aggregations k1, k2 and k3 was found. In the cat, the nucleus corporis pontobulbaris was subdivised into a posterodorsal and a anteroventral part. The former was located ventrally to the motor and principal sensory trigeminal nuclei, the latter was wedgeshaped and situated more anteriorly at the lateroventral margin of the pons. In 9 rabbits and 7 cats the neurons of origin for cerebellar paramedian lobule afferents were identified with retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase within the nucleus "k" and nucleus corporis pontobulbaris, respectively. In both species, most projections to the paramedian lobule were seen as originating ipsilaterally with only a small contralateral component. The study suggests that there are certain segregated projections of the nucleus "k" or the nucleus corporis pontobulbaris to the cortex of the anterior and posterior parts of the paramedian lobule, with some valid species differences. In the cat, the whole projection was found to originate in the more anterior and ventral parts of the nucleus "k" (nucleus corporis pontobulbaris). The posterior part of the paramedian lobule in the rabbit receives afferents from the homolateral subdivisions k3 and, to a minor degree, from k2; while in the cat, afferents are bilateral with an ipsilateral preponderance and originate from the posterior cellular group of the nucleus corporis pontobulbaris dispersed among and medially to the exiting motor root of the trigeminal nerve. The anterior part of the paramedian lobule afferents in the rabbit originates bilaterally within subdivision k1, to a minor degree ipsilaterally in the dorsal region of subdivision k3, and occasionally in subdivision k2, whereas in the cat afferents originate from the anterior and posterior levels of the corpus pontobulbaris

  19. Normals to a Parabola

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    Given a parabola in the standard form y[superscript 2] = 4ax, corresponding to three points on the parabola, such that the normals at these three points P, Q, R concur at a point M = (h, k), the equation of the circumscribing circle through the three points P, Q, and R provides a tremendous opportunity to illustrate "The Art of Algebraic…

  20. Normal Birth: Two Stories

    PubMed Central

    Scaer, Roberta M.

    2002-01-01

    The author shares two stories: one of a normal birth that took place in a hospital with a nurse-midwife in attendance and another of a home birth unexpectedly shared by many colleagues. Both are told with the goal to inform, inspire, and educate. PMID:17273292

  1. Normals to a Parabola

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    Given a parabola in the standard form y[superscript 2] = 4ax, corresponding to three points on the parabola, such that the normals at these three points P, Q, R concur at a point M = (h, k), the equation of the circumscribing circle through the three points P, Q, and R provides a tremendous opportunity to illustrate "The Art of Algebraic…

  2. Statokinesigram normalization method.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, José Magalhães

    2017-02-01

    Stabilometry is a technique that aims to study the body sway of human subjects, employing a force platform. The signal obtained from this technique refers to the position of the foot base ground-reaction vector, known as the center of pressure (CoP). The parameters calculated from the signal are used to quantify the displacement of the CoP over time; there is a large variability, both between and within subjects, which prevents the definition of normative values. The intersubject variability is related to differences between subjects in terms of their anthropometry, in conjunction with their muscle activation patterns (biomechanics); and the intrasubject variability can be caused by a learning effect or fatigue. Age and foot placement on the platform are also known to influence variability. Normalization is the main method used to decrease this variability and to bring distributions of adjusted values into alignment. In 1996, O'Malley proposed three normalization techniques to eliminate the effect of age and anthropometric factors from temporal-distance parameters of gait. These techniques were adopted to normalize the stabilometric signal by some authors. This paper proposes a new method of normalization of stabilometric signals to be applied in balance studies. The method was applied to a data set collected in a previous study, and the results of normalized and nonnormalized signals were compared. The results showed that the new method, if used in a well-designed experiment, can eliminate undesirable correlations between the analyzed parameters and the subjects' characteristics and show only the experimental conditions' effects.

  3. Calculated dynamical evolution of the nucleus of comet Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    The nucleus of comet Hartley 2 has a relatively regular dumbbell shape with unequal heads. The narrow part of elongated shape contains a relatively smooth region whose covering material is highly different in its shallow structure compared to other parts of this celestial body. The surface of crudely spherical parts of the nucleus is different from the surface of the "neck", which implies a hypothesis that the shape of the nucleus of Hartley 2 is indicative of destruction of this celestial body occurring in our days. The nucleus rotates around its axis passing through the center of mass, and centrifugal forces arise. This process is hindered by gravitation between parts of the nucleus and gradual slowing of rotation due to body lengthening because of the increase in the moment of inertia (proportional to R2) and due to friction losses in the neck material. We posed the task to determine centrifugal and gravitational forces in the neck (and, respectively, the strains of stretching and compression), the moment of inertia of the body and supply of its rotational energy E, the volume of the nucleus and its average density, and the position of the barycenter and center of rotation. It can be assumed that these forces cause slow but progressive lengthening of the neck which should eventually result in fragmentation of the nucleus. Centrifugal forces can be found as a result of summation of forces produced by parts of the body. According to the calculation model, the total stretching forces in the section passing through the narrowest cut of the neck are 1.21E6 N. The corresponding compression forces in the section passing through the narrow section are 1.04E6 N. The comparison of these values indicates a paradoxical result: stretching strains dominate in the neck, while compressions are dominant in the section passing through the common center of mass. The excess of stretching strains in the neck is 11%. The inference is as follows: the right part of the neck and the

  4. Differential CT diagnosis of extruded nucleus pulposus

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.; Grogan, J.P.

    1983-07-01

    The detection and differential diagnosis of extruded (free) disk fragments by CT has not been described in detail. We reviewed the lumbar CT scans of 57 patients with extruded disk fragments and of 31 patients in whom the CT appearance of disk fragments was simulated by other processes. An extruded disk fragment commonly appears on CT scans as an epidural mass that must be distinguished from either an epidural tumor or an anomalous root sheath. A normal posterior disk margin does not exclude a disk herniation when the nuclear fragment is extruded. Free disk fragments can be differentiated from root-sheath anomalies and tumors in most cases by measuring tissue densities and analyzing adjacent bone.

  5. Nuclisome--targeting the tumor cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Gedda, Lars; Edwards, Katarina

    2012-06-01

    The Nuclisome concept builds on a novel two-step targeting strategy with the aim to deliver short-range Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides to nuclear DNA of tumor cells. The concept is based on the use of Nuclisome-particles, i.e., tumor-targeted PEG-stabilized liposomes loaded with a unique DNA-intercalating compound that enables specific and effective delivery of radionuclides to DNA. The specific and potent two-step targeting leads to eradication of tumor cells while toxicity to normal organs is reduced to a minimum. Results of in vitro and in vivo studies point towards the Nuclisome concept as a promising strategy for the treatment of small tumor masses and, in particular, for the elimination of spread single cells and micrometastases.

  6. Development of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Kristy M; Parker, Keith L; Tobet, Stuart

    2006-07-01

    The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) is important in the regulation of female sexual behavior, feeding, energy balance, and cardiovascular function. It is a highly conserved nucleus across species and a good model for studying neuronal organization into nuclei. Expression of various transcription factors, receptors, and neurotransmitters are important for the development of this nucleus and for mapping the position of identified cells within the nucleus. The VMH is subdivided into regions, all of which may project to specific locations to carry out various functions. For example, the ventrolateral quadrant contains a subset of neurons that highly express estrogen receptors. These neurons specifically are involved in the lordosis response pathway through projections to other estrogen receptor containing regions. In development, neurons that form the VMH generate from the proliferative zone surrounding the third ventricle. Neurons then migrate along radial glial fibers to final positions within the nucleus. Migration and positioning of neurons is an important step in setting up connections to and from the VMH and hence in its function. As compared to other developing brain regions, cell death may play a minor role in sculpting the VMH. We review the processes involved in forming a functional nuclear group and some of the factors known to be involved particularly focusing on the positioning of identified neurons within the VMH.

  7. Coordinated Dynamics of RNA Splicing Speckles in the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Kota, Krishna P; Alam, Samer G; Nickerson, Jeffrey A; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-06-01

    Despite being densely packed with chromatin, nuclear bodies and a nucleoskeletal network, the nucleus is a remarkably dynamic organelle. Chromatin loops form and relax, RNA transcripts and transcription factors move diffusively, and nuclear bodies move. We show here that RNA splicing speckled domains (splicing speckles) fluctuate in constrained nuclear volumes and remodel their shapes. Small speckles move in a directed way toward larger speckles with which they fuse. This directed movement is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels or inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. The random movement of speckles is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels, moderately reduced after inhibition of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling and modestly increased upon inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. To define the paths through which speckles can translocate in the nucleus, we generated a pressure gradient to create flows in the nucleus. In response to the pressure gradient, speckles moved along curvilinear paths in the nucleus. Collectively, our results demonstrate a new type of ATP-dependent motion in the nucleus. We present a model where recycling splicing factors return as part of small sub-speckles from distal sites of RNA processing to larger splicing speckles by a directed ATP-driven mechanism through interchromatin spaces.

  8. Growth dynamics of the developing lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Williams, A L; Jeffery, G

    2001-02-12

    Segregated binocular maps in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) develop from stages where they initially completely overlap. Here, we show that segregation occurs at different rates across the depth of the nucleus and that the volume of the ipsilateral projection does not decrease significantly during this period, rather LGN volume expands markedly and its shape changes. Hence, we have examined the differential growth of the ferret LGN during the process of segregation by using novel shape modelling techniques. These have facilitated quantification of its three-dimensional structure at successive developmental stages as well as the definition of growth vectors which illustrate shape change. This has been undertaken in direct representations of the LGN and those normalised for size and orientation. Spatiotemporal aspects of shape change have then been compared with different measurements of its cellular population. Initial stages of segregation are associated with a large expansion of the rostrocaudal axis of the nucleus along which segregation takes place, and an expansion of caudal regions that will eventually contain the binocular representation. Later stages are associated with dorsoventral expansions and a consolidation of the rostrocaudal axis. The pace of shape change peaks toward the end of the period of segregation when the nucleus has adopted approximately 50% of its adult shape. After segregation, nuclear growth is mainly isotropic. The mature shape of the nucleus is achieved before it reaches its full size and while cell density and cell sizes are still changing.

  9. Cochlear nucleus whole mount explants promote the differentiation of neuronal stem cells from the cochlear nucleus in co-culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Jürgens, Lukas; Völker, Christine; Frenz, Silke; Scherzad, Agmal; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Jablonka, Sibylle; Mlynski, Robert; Radeloff, Andreas; Hagen, Rudolf

    2015-08-07

    The cochlear nucleus is the first brainstem nucleus to receive sensory input from the cochlea. Depriving this nucleus of auditory input leads to cellular and molecular disorganization which may potentially be counteracted by the activation or application of stem cells. Neuronal stem cells (NSCs) have recently been identified in the neonatal cochlear nucleus and a persistent neurogenic niche was demonstrated in this brainstem nucleus until adulthood. The present work investigates whether the neurogenic environment of the cochlear nucleus can promote the survival of engrafted NSCs and whether cochlear nucleus-derived NSCs can differentiate into neurons and glia in brain tissue. Therefore, cochlear nucleus whole-mount explants were co-cultured with NSCs extracted from either the cochlear nucleus or the hippocampus and compared to a second environment using whole-mount explants from the hippocampus. Factors that are known to induce neuronal differentiation were also investigated in these NSC-explant experiments. NSCs derived from the cochlear nucleus engrafted in the brain tissue and differentiated into all cells of the neuronal lineage. Hippocampal NSCs also immigrated in cochlear nucleus explants and differentiated into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Laminin expression was up-regulated in the cochlear nucleus whole-mounts and regulated the in vitro differentiation of NSCs from the cochlear nucleus. These experiments confirm a neurogenic environment in the cochlear nucleus and the capacity of cochlear nucleus-derived NSCs to differentiate into neurons and glia. Consequently, the presented results provide a first step for the possible application of stem cells to repair the disorganization of the cochlear nucleus, which occurs after hearing loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential molecular profiles of astrocytes in degeneration and re-innervation after sensory deafferentation of the adult rat cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Fredrich, Michaela; Zeber, Anne C; Hildebrandt, Heika; Illing, Robert-Benjamin

    2013-07-01

    Ablating the cochlea causes total sensory deafferentation of the cochlear nucleus. Over the first postoperative week, degeneration of the auditory nerve and its synaptic terminals in the cochlear nucleus temporally overlaps with its re-innervation by axon collaterals of medial olivocochlear neurons. At the same time, astrocytes increase in size and density. We investigated the time courses of the expression of ezrin, polysialic acid, matrix metalloprotease-9 and matrix metalloprotease-2 within these astrocytes during the first week following cochlear ablation. All four proteins are known to participate in degeneration, regeneration, or both, following injury of the central nervous system. In a next step, stereotaxic injections of kainic acid were made into the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body prior to cochlear ablation to destroy the neurons that re-innervate the deafferented cochlear nucleus by axon collaterals developing growth-associated protein 43 immunoreactivity. This experimental design allowed us to distinguish between molecular processes associated with degeneration and those associated with re-innervation. Under these conditions, astrocytic growth and proliferation showed an unchanged deafferentation-induced pattern. Similarly, the distribution and amount of ezrin and matrix metalloprotease-9 in astrocytes after cochlear ablation developed in the same way as under cochlear ablation alone. In sharp contrast, the astrocytic expression of polysialic acid and matrix metalloprotease-2 normally invoked by cochlear ablation collapsed when re-innervation of the cochlear nucleus was inhibited by lesioning medial olivocochlear neurons with kainic acid. In conclusion, re-innervation, including axonal growth and synaptogenesis, seems to prompt astrocytes to recompose their molecular profile, paving the way for tissue reorganisation after nerve degeneration and loss of synaptic contacts.

  11. Normal-reflection image

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Fehler, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Common-angle wave-equation migration using the double-square-root is generally less accurate than the common-shot migration because the wavefield continuation equation for thc former involves additional approximations compared to that for the latter. We present a common-angle wave-equation migration that has the same accuracy as common-shot wave-equation migration. An image obtained from common-angle migration is a four- to five-dimensional output volume for 3D cases. We propose a normal-reflection imaging condition for common-angle migration to produce a 3D output volume for 3D migration. The image is closely related to the normal-reflection coefficients at interfaces. This imaging condition will allow amplitude-preserving migration to generate an image with clear physical meaning.

  12. Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Basant R.; Lippa, Carol F.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a potentially reversible neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by a triad of dementia, gait, and urinary disturbance. Advancements in diagnosis and treatment have aided in properly identifying and improving symptoms in patients. However, a large proportion of iNPH patients remain either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Using PubMed search engine of keywords “normal pressure hydrocephalus,” “diagnosis,” “shunt treatment,” “biomarkers,” “gait disturbances,” “cognitive function,” “neuropsychology,” “imaging,” and “pathogenesis,” articles were obtained for this review. The majority of the articles were retrieved from the past 10 years. The purpose of this review article is to aid general practitioners in further understanding current findings on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of iNPH. PMID:28138494

  13. Studies of normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Catlin, F I

    1984-01-01

    Auditory function changes continually from birth to old age. A variety of methods to assess hearing have evolved since the invention of the audiometer. Types of measurement include: electrical response in the central nervous system, cochlear acuity and speech responses. While some of these tests correlate fairly well with each other, their ability to represent overall hearing function is questionable. Other attempts to improve the assessment of hearing have been made in the area of self-appraisal, but these, too, have significant limitations. Most self-report and peer appraisal questionnaires have been established by studies of hearing-impaired populations. Norms for these techniques in normal-hearing populations need to be established. There is still room for valid tests of everyday communication. What we have in measurement procedures does not achieve this goal. Research studies of today will hopefully produce better definition of normal auditory function.

  14. Teaching Normal Birth Interactively

    PubMed Central

    Hotelling, Barbara A.

    2004-01-01

    In this column, the author provides examples of teaching strategies that childbirth educators may utilize to illustrate each of the six care practices supported by Lamaze International to promote normal birth: labor begins on its own, freedom of movement throughout labor, continuous labor support, no routine interventions, non-supine (e.g., upright or side-lying) positions for birth, and no separation of mother and baby with unlimited opportunity for breastfeeding. PMID:17273389

  15. Neuroethics beyond Normal.

    PubMed

    Shook, John R; Giordano, James

    2016-01-01

    An integrated and principled neuroethics offers ethical guidelines able to transcend conventional and medical reliance on normality standards. Elsewhere we have proposed four principles for wise guidance on human transformations. Principles like these are already urgently needed, as bio- and cyberenhancements are rapidly emerging. Context matters. Neither "treatments" nor "enhancements" are objectively identifiable apart from performance expectations, social contexts, and civic orders. Lessons learned from disability studies about enablement and inclusion suggest a fresh way to categorize modifications to the body and its performance. The term "enhancement" should be broken apart to permit recognition of enablements and augmentations, and kinds of radical augmentation for specialized performance. Augmentations affecting the self, self-worth, and self-identity of persons require heightened ethical scrutiny. Reversibility becomes the core problem, not the easy answer, as augmented persons may not cooperate with either decommissioning or displacement into unaccommodating societies. We conclude by indicating how our four principles of self-creativity, nonobsolescence, empowerment, and citizenship establish a neuroethics beyond normal that is better prepared for a future in which humans and their societies are going so far beyond normal.