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Sample records for hypogonadism

  1. Hypogonadism

    MedlinePlus

    ... common genetic disorders that cause primary hypogonadism are Turner syndrome (in women) and Klinefelter syndrome (in men). If ... Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism Infertility Klinefelter syndrome Osteoporosis - overview Prolactinoma Turner syndrome Review Date 8/7/2016 Updated by: Brent ...

  2. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Renato; Zylberstejn, Daniel Suslik; Esteves, Sandro C

    2013-01-01

    Impaired testicular function, i.e., hypogonadism, can result from a primary testicular disorder (hypergonadotropic) or occur secondary to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (hypogonadotropic). Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be congenital or acquired. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is divided into anosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (Kallmann syndrome) and congenital normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). The incidence of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is approximately 1-10:100,000 live births, and approximately 2/3 and 1/3 of cases are caused by Kallmann syndrome (KS) and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, respectively. Acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be caused by drugs, infiltrative or infectious pituitary lesions, hyperprolactinemia, encephalic trauma, pituitary/brain radiation, exhausting exercise, abusive alcohol or illicit drug intake, and systemic diseases such as hemochromatosis, sarcoidosis and histiocytosis X. The clinical characteristics of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are androgen deficiency and a lack/delay/stop of pubertal sexual maturation. Low blood testosterone levels and low pituitary hormone levels confirm the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosis. A prolonged stimulated intravenous GnRH test can be useful. In Kallmann syndrome, cerebral MRI can show an anomalous morphology or even absence of the olfactory bulb. Therapy for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism depends on the patient's desire for future fertility. Hormone replacement with testosterone is the classic treatment for hypogonadism. Androgen replacement is indicated for men who already have children or have no desire to induce pregnancy, and testosterone therapy is used to reverse the symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Conversely, GnRH or gonadotropin therapies are the best options for men wishing to have children. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is one of the rare conditions in which specific

  3. Emerging drugs for hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Daniel; Dobs, Adrian; Basaria, Shehzad

    2006-11-01

    Male hypogonadism is a common endocrine problem that affects men of all ages. Recently, there has been a surge in testosterone use among middle-aged and older men who in the past may have been considered to have borderline or even normal testosterone levels. This increasing use of testosterone therapy among men has paralleled the increasing improvements in the development of treatments for male hypogonadism that have been made over the past few decades. Current therapies using transdermal formulations and long-acting injectables such as testosterone undecanoate are quickly replacing the old injectable testosterone esters. In recent years, pharmaceutical sales and prescription data have readily shown a shift in the testosterone marketplace towards greater use of slightly more expensive treatments such as transdermal therapies, which are easier to administer and yield more physiological levels of testosterone. On the horizon are several new compounds in development, such as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMS), 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone, aromatase inhibitors, clomifene, dihydrotestosterone and human chorionic gonadotropin. Compounds such as SARMs are designed to selectively target androgen receptors in specific tissues (such as bone and muscles), in the hope of dispersing some of the side effects experienced on the prostate, which are presently associated with therapy of exogenous testosterone.

  4. Familial hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with alopecia.

    PubMed Central

    Slti, I S; Salem, Z

    1979-01-01

    In one family several male and female members had hypogonadism and frontoparietal alopecia, whereas other members with normal sexual development had normal scalp hair. Clinical and laboratory evaluation of three affected young men (two brothers and their cousin) revealed that the hypogonadism was the result of decreased serum concentrations of follicle stimulating and luteinizing hormones. There was no evidence of a deficiency of any other pituitary hormone. Long-term treatment of the three patients with human chorionic gonadotropin resulted in an increase in the serum testosterone concentration, the appearance of male secondary sex characteristics and an increase in the size of the external genitalia. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 4 PMID:466617

  5. Leydig cell aging and hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Beattie, M C; Adekola, L; Papadopoulos, V; Chen, H; Zirkin, B R

    2015-08-01

    Leydig cell testosterone (T) production is reduced with age, resulting in reduced serum T levels (hypogonadism). A number of cellular changes have been identified in the steroidogenic pathway of aged Leydig cells that are associated with reduced T formation, including reductions in luteinizing hormone (LH)-stimulated cAMP production, the cholesterol transport proteins steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein and translocator protein (TSPO), and downstream steroidogenic enzymes of the mitochondria and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Many of the changes in steroid formation that characterize aged Leydig cells can be elicited by the experimental alteration of the redox environment of young cells, suggesting that changes in the intracellular redox balance may cause reduced T production. Hypogonadism is estimated to affect about 5 million American men, including both aged and young. This condition has been linked to mood changes, worsening cognition, fatigue, depression, decreased lean body mass, reduced bone mineral density, increased visceral fat, metabolic syndrome, decreased libido, and sexual dysfunction. Exogenous T administration is now used widely to elevate serum T levels in hypogonadal men and thus to treat symptoms of hypogonadism. However, recent evidence suggests that men who take exogenous T may face increased risk of stroke, heart attack, and prostate tumorigenesis. Moreover, it is well established that administered T can have suppressive effects on LH, resulting in lower Leydig cell T production, reduced intratesticular T concentration, and reduced spermatogenesis. This makes exogenous T administration inappropriate for men who wish to father children. There are promising new approaches to increase serum T by directly stimulating Leydig cell T production rather than by exogenous T therapy, thus potentially avoiding some of its negative consequences.

  6. Treatment of Hypogonadism: Current and Future Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Arthi; Berkseth, Kathryn E.; Amory, John K.

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of hypogonadism in men is of great interest to both patients and providers. There are a number of testosterone formulations currently available and several additional formulations under development. In addition, there are some lesser-used alternative therapies for the management of male hypogonadism, which may have advantages for certain patient groups. The future of hypogonadism therapy may lie in the development of selective androgen receptor modulators that allow the benefits of androgens whilst minimizing unwanted side effects. PMID:28149506

  7. Hypogonadism and renal failure: An update.

    PubMed

    Thirumavalavan, Nannan; Wilken, Nathan A; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of both hypogonadism and renal failure is increasing. Hypogonadism in men with renal failure carries with it significant morbidity, including anemia and premature cardiovascular disease. It remains unclear whether testosterone therapy can affect the morbidity and mortality associated with renal failure. As such, in this review, we sought to evaluate the current literature addressing hypogonadism and testosterone replacement, specifically in men with renal failure. The articles chosen for this review were selected by performing a broad search using Pubmed, Embase and Scopus including the terms hypogonadism and renal failure from 1990 to the present. This review is based on both primary sources as well as review articles. Hypogonadism in renal failure has a multifactorial etiology, including co-morbid conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, old age and obesity. Renal failure can lead to decreased luteinizing hormone production and decreased prolactin clearance that could impair testosterone production. Given the increasing prevalence of hypogonadism and the potential morbidity associated with hypogonadism in men with renal failure, careful evaluation of serum testosterone would be valuable. Testosterone replacement therapy should be considered in men with symptomatic hypogonadism and renal failure, and may ameliorate some of the morbidity associated with renal failure. Patients with all stages of renal disease are at an increased risk of hypogonadism that could be associated with significant morbidity. Testosterone replacement therapy may reduce some of the morbidity of renal failure, although it carries risk.

  8. Approaches to male hypogonadism in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Kristi L.; Stewart, Felicia; Larson, Brandi M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Evidence suggests that providers are not adhering to current testosterone replacement therapy guidelines when treating male hypogonadism. Understanding the diagnosis and management of this condition is further complicated by conflicting recommendations among available guidelines. NPs must select and follow the best guideline recommendations available to optimally treat male hypogonadism. PMID:28085783

  9. Treatment of hypogonadism in males.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sara; Fuqua, John S; Lee, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of adolescent males with hypogonadism using testosterone is dependent on the underlying diagnosis as well as the patient's and family's preferences. Those with testicular failure, always a pathologic condition, begin lifelong therapy, while short-term therapy is often begun for those who have a delayed puberty. There is a wide variety of testosterone formulations available, with differences in adverse events sometimes associated with the method of administration. The goals of treatment involve stimulating physical puberty, including achievement of virilization, a normal muscle mass and bone mineral density for age, and improvement in psychosocial wellbeing. While androgen therapy results in physical changes of puberty, the potential for fertility must be considered for those with permanent gonadotropin deficiency. in this population, therapy with gonadotropins or gonadotropin releasing hormone may be effective. For those with testicular failure, fertility may be possible but requires assisted reproductive procedures.

  10. Cat eye syndrome with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Masukawa, H; Ozaki, T; Nogimori, T

    1998-10-01

    A 17-year-old male diagnosed as having Cat Eye Syndrome (CES) with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism showed short stature and no development of secondary sex characteristics. Exogeneous gonadotropin replacement therapy combining human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) was started. As a result, the short stature and androgen deficiency were relieved. The critical region of CES was tetrasomy of 22 pter-->q11. Abnormalities of other chromosomes which cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism may exist, thus further investigation is needed.

  11. The role of hypogonadism in Klinefelter Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Høst, Christian; Skakkebæk, Anne; Groth, Kristian A; Bojesen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) (47, XXY) is the most abundant sex-chromosome disorder, and is a common cause of infertility and hypogonadism in men. Most men with KS go through life without knowing the diagnosis, as only 25% are diagnosed and only a few of these before puberty. Apart from hypogonadism and azoospermia, most men with KS suffer from some degree of learning disability and may have various kinds of psychiatric problems. The effects of long-term hypogonadism may be difficult to discern from the gene dose effect of the extra X-chromosome. Whatever the cause, alterations in body composition, with more fat and less muscle mass and diminished bone mineral mass, as well as increased risk of metabolic consequences, such as type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome are all common in KS. These findings should be a concern as they are not simply laboratory findings; epidemiological studies in KS populations show an increased risk of both hospitalization and death from various diseases. Testosterone treatment should be offered to KS patients from early puberty, to secure a proper masculine development, nonetheless the evidence is weak or nonexisting, since no randomized controlled trials have ever been published. Here, we will review the current knowledge of hypogonadism in KS and the rationale for testosterone treatment and try to give our best recommendations for surveillance of this rather common, but often ignored, syndrome. PMID:24407186

  12. The role of hypogonadism in Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Høst, Christian; Skakkebæk, Anne; Groth, Kristian A; Bojesen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) (47, XXY) is the most abundant sex-chromosome disorder, and is a common cause of infertility and hypogonadism in men. Most men with KS go through life without knowing the diagnosis, as only 25% are diagnosed and only a few of these before puberty. Apart from hypogonadism and azoospermia, most men with KS suffer from some degree of learning disability and may have various kinds of psychiatric problems. The effects of long-term hypogonadism may be diffi cult to discern from the gene dose effect of the extra X-chromosome. Whatever the cause, alterations in body composition, with more fat and less muscle mass and diminished bone mineral mass, as well as increased risk of metabolic consequences, such as type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome are all common in KS. These findings should be a concern as they are not simply laboratory findings; epidemiological studies in KS populations show an increased risk of both hospitalization and death from various diseases. Testosterone treatment should be offered to KS patients from early puberty, to secure a proper masculine development, nonetheless the evidence is weak or nonexisting, since no randomized controlled trials have ever been published. Here, we will review the current knowledge of hypogonadism in KS and the rationale for testosterone treatment and try to give our best recommendations for surveillance of this rather common, but often ignored, syndrome.

  13. [Unexplained anaemia in men: be aware of hypogonadism].

    PubMed

    van de Meerendonk, Hendrik W P C; Mijnhout, G S Sophie; Groeneveld, Paul H P

    2012-01-01

    Unexplained anaemia is not uncommon. We present two male patients suffering from longstanding mild anaemia, for which no cause could be found. We performed an extensive analysis, but there were no signs of malignant disease, chronic inflammation, renal failure, hypothyroidism, myelodysplastic syndrome, haemolysis or nutritional deficiencies. However, both patients had symptoms of hypogonadism, confirmed by biochemical testing. The 56-year-old man known with metabolic syndrome turned out to have secondary hypogonadism without a pituitary tumour and the 75-year-old man had primary hypogonadism. After exclusion of prostate carcinoma, testosterone substitution therapy was started in both patients, which improved their haematocrits and sexual and general well-being substantially. Testosterone exerts anabolic effects in multiple organ systems; in bone marrow it potentiates the stimulatory effect of erythropoietin on erythropoiesis. Primary hypogonadism frequently occurs in elderly patients, while secondary hypogonadism is frequently seen in middle-aged men with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity.

  14. Osteoporosis in men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.S.; Klibanski, A.; Neer, R.M.; Greenspan, S.L.; Rosenthal, D.I.; Crowley, W.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    To assess the effect of testosterone deficiency on skeletal integrity in men, we determined bone density in 23 hypogonadal men with isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and compared those values with ones from controls. Cortical bone density, as assessed by single-photon absorptiometry of the nondominant radius, ranged from 0.57 to 0.86 g/cm2 (mean +/- SE, 0.71 +/- 0.02) in patients with fused epiphyses and from 0.57 to 0.67 g/cm2 (mean, 0.61 +/- 0.01) in patients with open epiphyses, both of which were significantly (p less than 0.001) lower than normal. Spinal trabecular bone density, as assessed by computed tomography, was similarly decreased (p less than 0.0001) and ranged from 42 to 177 mg K2HPO4/cm3 (mean, 112 +/- 7). Cortical bone density was at least 2 SD below normal in 16 of 23 men, and 8 men had spinal bone densities below the fracture threshold of 80 to 100 mg K2HPO4/cm3. Osteopenia was equally severe in men with immature and mature bone ages, suggesting that abnormal bone development plays an important role in the osteopenia of men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

  15. The treatment of late-onset hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Üçer, Oktay; Gümüş, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) in aging men is a clinical and biochemical syndrome caused by an age-related decline in testosterone. Despite published in guidelines and recommendations, uncertainty surrounds the profile of clinical symptoms as well as the biochemical threshold of diagnosis. The only evidence-based treatment of late-onset hypogonadism is testosterone replacement therapy. The actual available evidence of the long-term risks and outcomes of testosterone-replacement therapy remains very limited, and carefully designed placebo-controlled trials of testosterone administration to assess the risks and benefits of such a therapy are required. Until such evidence is available, testosterone treatment should be restricted to elderly men with very low testosterone levels in the presence of clinical symptoms, and the advantages and disadvantages need to be accurately assessed. Careful monitoring of potential side effects is necessary. The purpose of this review is to discuss what is known and what remains unclear with respect to the benefits and risks of testosterone replacement treatment. PMID:26328172

  16. Late-Onset Hypogonadism and Testosterone Replacement in Older Men.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Rajib K; Bhattacharya, Shelley B

    2015-11-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism is an underdiagnosed and easily treated condition defined by low serum testosterone levels in men older than 65 years. When treated, a significant improvement in quality of life may be reached in this rapidly rising sector of the population. During the evaluation, laboratory tests and a full medication review should be performed to exclude other illnesses or adverse effects from medications. The major goal of treatment in this population is treating the symptoms related to hypogonadism. There has not been clear evidence supporting universally giving older men with low serum testosterone levels and hypogonadal symptoms testosterone replacement therapy.

  17. The management of hypogonadism in aging male patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishwamitra; Perros, Petros

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the evaluation and management of hypogonadism in aging male patients in the light of recent guidelines. The benefits of treating severe hypogonadism resulting from identifiable pituitary or primary gonadal disease are well established. Milder forms of hypogonadism in the aging male, known as andropause, are common, and constitute an expanding area of clinical interest and research. Several studies indicate that testosterone replacement therapy may produce a wide range of benefits for men with hypogonadism, including improvement in libido, bone density, muscle mass, body composition, mood, and cognition. Currently available data are insufficient to permit a definitive verdict on the balance between risks and benefits of testosterone replacement therapy in aging males.

  18. Hypogonadism secondary to hyperprolactinaemia: successful treatment but adverse consequences.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, R P; Bujawansa, S; Qureshi, Z; Rimmer, M; Heald, A

    2012-05-01

    It is accepted that care must be taken in initiating testosterone replacement in hypogonadal individuals with historically low androgen levels. However less is reported about the influence of restoration of normal endogenous testosterone production on behaviour.Here we report how the adverse sequelae of successful treatment of hypogonadism secondary to hyperprolactinaemia, manifesting as irritability and low threshold to aggression, were managed through a joint approach between psychiatrist and physician.

  19. Hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Peric, Stojan; Nisic, Tanja; Milicev, Milena; Basta, Ivana; Marjanovic, Ivan; Peric, Marina; Lavrnic, Dragana; Rakocevic Stojanovic, Vidosava

    2013-10-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults. It affects many organs and systems besides muscle. Aim of this study was to assess frequency of erectile dysfunction (ED) and hypogonadism, the correlation between them and the impact of ED on quality of life (QoL) in patients with DM1. A series of 25 men (aged from 22 to 58 years) with a diagnosis of DM1 was analyzed. Muscular Impairment Rating Scale (MIRS) was used to assess severity of muscular involvement. Erectile function was assessed using the short form of the International Index of Erectile Function test (IIEF-5). Levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone were assessed. All patients completed the Serbian version of the SF-36 questionnaire as a measure of health-related QoL. ED was present in 18 (72%) of patients. Seven (28%) patients were euogonadic, 16 (64%) had compensated hypogonadism and 2 (8%) had primary hypogonadism. ED was somewhat more common in patients with hypogonadism (78% vs. 57%). Mental composite score of SF-36 was lower in patients with ED (p<0.05). Our results showed that 72% of men with DM1 had ED and hypogonadism. Studies with larger number of subjects are needed to resolve cascade of events that lays behind ED in DM1. Development of therapeutic strategies may have positive impact on QoL. Substitutive therapy with androgens may be benefitial.

  20. Sexuality and quality of life in congenital hypogonadisms.

    PubMed

    Garrido Oyarzún, María Fernanda; Castelo-Branco, Camil

    2016-12-01

    Turner syndrome and idiopathic congenital hypogonadism including Kallmann syndrome are conditions associated to a large number of widely known comorbidities that need a medical support forever. One of the characteristics shared by both conditions is the lack of sexual development that influencing the sexuality functioning and quality of life of the affected women. Few studies have been conducted to assess these topics, but they need to be considered in the treatment to all women with hypogonadism. This review on the major medical issues and psychological aspects, also focus in the present knowledge about sexual function and quality of life of women with Turner syndrome and idiopathic congenital hypogonadism, which aims to help in the comprehensive management of these patients.

  1. Hypogonadism and the risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Jacques; Al Snih, Soham; Raji, Mukaila A; Urban, Randall J; Sharma, Gulshan; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Lopez, David S; Baillargeon, Gwen; Kuo, Yong-Fang

    2016-12-01

    Testosterone deficiency has been linked with autoimmune disease and an increase in inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, no large-scale longitudinal studies have examined this association. We examined whether untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease in a large nationally representative cohort. Using one of the nation's largest commercial insurance databases, we conducted a retrospective cohort study in which we identified 123,460 men diagnosed with hypogonadism between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2014 and with no prior history of rheumatic autoimmune disease. We matched this cohort to 370,380 men without hypogonadism, at a 1 to 3 ratio, on age and index/diagnosis date. All patients were followed until December 31, 2014 or until they lost insurance coverage or were diagnosed with a rheumatic autoimmune disease. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs). Untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease (HR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.38), rheumatoid arthritis (HR = 1.31, 95 % CI = 1.22, 1.44), and lupus (HR = 1.58, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.94). These findings persisted using latency periods of 1 and 2 years. Hypogonadism was not associated with the control outcome, epilepsy (HR = 1.04, 95 % CI = 0.96, 1.15). Patients diagnosed with hypogonadism who were not treated with testosterone had an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. Future research should further examine this association, with particular attention to underlying mechanisms.

  2. Hypogonadism in DM1 and its relationship to erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Giovanni; Clemenzi, Alessandro; Bucci, Elisabetta; De Marco, Emanuela; Morino, Stefania; Di Pasquale, Antonella; Latino, Pamela; Ruga, Gilda; Lenzi, Andrea; Vanacore, Nicola; Radicioni, Antonio F

    2011-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is characterized by both a premature appearance of age-related phenotypes and multiple organ involvement, which affects skeletal and smooth muscle as well as the eye, heart, central nervous system, and endocrine system. Although erectile dysfunction (ED) is a frequent complaint in patients with DM1, it has not been investigated in great depth. Hypogonadism, which is reported to be one of the physical causes of ED in the general population, frequently occurs in DM1. We planned this case-control study to evaluate the relationship between hypogonadism, as defined by the sexual hormone profile (FSH, LH, testosterone (T) and prolactin) and ED, as assessed by means of an internationally validated self-administered questionnaire (IIEF). DM1 patients had significantly increased mean levels of both gonadotropins (FSH and LH) (p < 0.0001) and a reduced mean level of T (p < 0.0001) when compared to controls. Twelve patients were eugonadic (normal LH, T, and FSH), while 18 displayed hormonal evidence of hypogonadism, characterized by tubular failure (increased FSH) in all the subjects and associated with interstitial failure in 14 subjects: seven with primary hypogonadism (increased LH and reduced T) and seven with compensated hypogonadism (increased LH and normal T). Patients with hormonal evidence of interstitial failure had a larger CTG expansion (p = 0.008), longer disease duration (p = 0.013), higher grade of disease (p = 0.004) and lower erectile function score (p = 0.02) than eugonadic patients. Impotence occurred in 13/14 hypogonadic patients with interstitial failure and in 5/12 eugonadic patients (p = 0.017, OR = 18.2).

  3. Pubertal induction in hypogonadism: Current approaches including use of gonadotrophins.

    PubMed

    Zacharin, Margaret

    2015-06-01

    Primary disorders of the gonad or those secondary to abnormalities of the hypothalamic pituitary axis result in hypogonadism. The range of health problems of childhood and adolescence that affect this axis has increased, as most children now survive chronic illness, but many have persisting deficits in gonadal function as a result of their underlying condition or its treatment. An integrated approach to hormone replacement is needed to optimize adult hormonal and bone health, and to offer opportunities for fertility induction and preservation that were not considered possible in the past. Timing of presentation ranges from birth, with disorders of sexual development, through adolescent pubertal failure, to adult fertility problems. This review addresses diagnosis and management of hypogonadism and focuses on new management strategies to address current concerns with fertility preservation. These include Turner syndrome, and fertility presevation prior to childhood cancer treatment. New strategies for male hormone replacement therapy that may impinge upon future fertility are emphasized.

  4. The Role of Estrogen Modulators in Male Hypogonadism and Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Rambhatla, Amarnath; Mills, Jesse N.; Rajfer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol, normally considered a female hormone, appears to play a significant role in men in a variety of physiologic functions, such as bone metabolism, cardiovascular health, and testicular function. As such, estradiol has been targeted by male reproductive and sexual medicine specialists to help treat conditions such as infertility and hypogonadism. The compounds that modulate estradiol levels in these clinical conditions are referred to as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). In a certain subset of infertile men, particularly those with hypogonadism, or those who have a low serum testosterone to estradiol ratio, there is some evidence suggesting that SERMs and AIs can reverse the low serum testosterone levels or the testosterone to estradiol imbalance and occasionally improve any associated infertile or subfertile state. This review focuses on the role these SERMs and AIs play in the aforementioned reproductive conditions. PMID:27601965

  5. Klinefelter Syndrome and medical treatment: hypogonadism and beyond.

    PubMed

    Chang, Simon; Skakkebæk, Anne; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS), though described more than 70 years ago, still imposes significant diagnostic challenges. Based on data from epidemiological studies, KS is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Although the pathophysiology and etiology behind these observations are as yet not well understood, a significant contribution of hypogonadism, central to the syndrome, is traditionally suspected. However, other unknown effects inherent to the syndrome also seem to modify the disease pattern. Herein we show that KS is under-diagnosed since only roughly 25% of patients are diagnosed and the mean age of diagnosis is during adult life. KS is associated with increased morbidity resulting in loss of 2-5 years in lifespan with increased mortality from different diseases and a poor socioeconomic profile. Small testes, hypergonadothrophic hypogonadism and cognitive impairment are usually found. The accompanying hypogonadism can lead to altered body composition and a risk of developing metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Cancer risk is generally not different from that observed in the background population, although specific cancers like breast cancer and extragonadal germ cell tumors are seen more frequently in KS. The mainstay of medical treatment is testosterone replacement therapy to both attenuate acute and long-term consequences of hypogonadism and possibly prevent the frequent comorbidity. We believe that the diagnostic challenges should be tackled more efficiently, while there is also a pressing need to generate better evidence for timing and the proper dose of testosterone replacement. We advocate for a multidisciplinary setup with the inclusion of pediatricians, speech therapists, general practitioners, psychologists, infertility specialists, urologists and endocrinologists.

  6. Hereditary ectodermal dysplasia, olivopontocerebellar degeneration, short stature, and hypogonadism.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, A R; Genel, M

    1981-01-01

    Two teenaged children born of normal parents in a consanguineous family had evidence of abnormal neurological, endocrine, and ectodermal development. They had mental retardation, hearing loss, ocular dysmetria, hyperreflexia, and ataxia consistent with olivopontocerebellar degeneration. They had hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and extremely short stature despite normal serum growth hormone and somatomedin-C. There was also hypodontia with peg shaped teeth and mid-face hypoplasia. This syndrome of hypoplasia of mid-lind structures appeared to be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Images PMID:7328612

  7. Update on Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Hypogonadal Men.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kevin Matthew Yen Bing; Alrabeeah, Khalid; Carrier, Serge

    2015-08-01

    Late-onset male hypogonadism has long been recognized as a treatable medical condition; however, misconceptions about the use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) have often led urologists away from its more mainstream use. This paper aims to bring the reader up-to-date on the current understanding of TRT, starting with when and who to treat. Various formulations of TRT, each with its own risks and benefits, are also detailed. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of the current literature's views into the various controversies of TRT including its impact on prostate health, sexual health, cardiovascular health, frailty, and mood is discussed.

  8. Cat-eye syndrome with isolated idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ryusuke; Shimizu, Chikara; Nagai, So; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Umetsu, Masaaki; Kimura, Yasunori; Atsumi, Toshiya; Yoshioka, Narihito; Kubo, Mitsumasa; Koike, Takao

    2005-10-01

    A 34-year-old Japanese man diagnosed as having cat-eye syndrome (CES) with isolated idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) was treated at our university. He showed preauricular pits/tags, downward slanting palpebral fissures, ocular hypertelorism, and strabismus. However, ocular coloboma and anal atresia, major characteristic features of CES, were negative. Chromosomal analysis revealed malformation in chromosome 22 and eunuchoid features and a low grade development of secondary sexual characteristics were also evident. Endocrinological examinations revealed that this patient was in a state of isolated IHH. Although CES with IHH is extremely rare, endocrine disorders should be given due attention.

  9. Kallman syndrome versus idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism at MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vogl, T.J.; Stemmler, J.; Bergman, C.; Balzer, J.O.; Felix, R.; Heye, B.; Schopohl, J.; Danek, A.

    1994-04-01

    To identify morphologic differences between Kallman syndrome (KS) and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) and establish a role for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in these disorders. Twenty-eight patients were compared with 10 eugonal male volunteers. Eighteen patients had KS (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with anosmia) and 10 had IHH. All participants underwent hormone analysis, a sniff-bottle smell test, and gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Changes in the hypothalamic-hypophyseal region and the rhinencephalon were evaluated. MR imaging revealed intracranial morphologic changes in all patients on plain T1-weighted sections. Seventeen patients with KS demonstrated aplasia of an olfactory bulb; one olfactory sulcus was absent in six, rudimentary in four, and normal in eight. Olfactory bulbs were present in all 10 IHH patients and three showed one slightly hypoplastic bulb. Ten patients with KS and three with IHH showed an enlarged paranasal sinus system. Further MR findings were similar. MR imaging demonstrates abnormalities of the rhinencephalon present in KS patients and occasionally absent in IHH patients. 18 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Basic consensus document on late-onset hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Becerra Fernández, Antonio; Enríquez Acosta, Luis

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important elements in men's live is the ability to engage in normal sexual activity; loss of this activity has always been considered especially important. The relationship between sexual activity, as well as other masculine characteristics, and the testicles has been well known since ancient times and has been related to the slow decrease in testosterone secretion with advanced age. Male hypogonadism is one of the most frequent and under-diagnosed endocrine diseases. Several terms have been proposed to refer to clinical situations caused by the age-related decline in male gonadal function; currently, the most widely accepted term is late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). LOH consists of a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advanced age (in men), characterized by typical symptoms and reduced serum testosterone concentrations, which can affect multiple organs and systems and reduce quality of life. This syndrome can be treated and the alterations produced can be reversed. To achieve this, a diagnostic protocol that approaches the multiple factors related to the risks and benefits of treatment is required.

  11. Transient hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in an amateur kickboxer after head trauma.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, F; Unluhizarci, K; Selcuklu, A; Casanueva, F F; Kelestimur, F

    2007-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a frequent health problem and increased prevalence of neurendocrine dysfunction in patients with TBI has been reported. Sports injuries and particularly boxing may result in pituitary dysfunction. However, transient hypogonadotropic hypogonadism after an acute head trauma due to boxing and/or kickboxing has not been defined yet. We describe the case of a 20-yr-old male amateur kickboxer who was admitted to hospital complaining of decreased libido and impotence 2 weeks after an intensive bout. Basal hormone levels were compatible with mild hyperprolactinemia and hypogonadotpopic hypogonadism. GH axis was evaluated by GHRH+GHRP-6 test and peak GH level was within normal reference range. Three months later his complaints improved and abnormalities in basal hormone levels normalized. He was also re-evaluated 9 months after the first evaluation; basal hormone levels were within normal ranges and he had no complaints. In conclusion acute head trauma due to kickboxing may cause transient gonadotropin deficiency. Therefore, screening the pituitary functions of sportsmen dealing with combative sports is crucial.

  12. Testosterone in men with hypogonadism and high cardiovascular risk, Pros.

    PubMed

    Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Vitale, Cristiana; Fini, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Although numerous randomized studies have shown that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) improves intermediate outcomes in patients at risk and in those with proven cardiovascular disease (CVD), results derived mainly from registries and observational studies have suggested an increased cardiovascular risk in elderly men receiving often supra-therapeutic doses of testosterone. Recent meta-analyses have shown that when testosterone has been used in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions, the effect on the disease has been either beneficial or neutral. Similar results have been reported in hypo- and eugonadal men. Contrasting results have been reported by two trials of testosterone treatment in frail elderly men. Reports from poorly analyzed databases have reported an increased risk of cardiovascular events with testosterone use. More recently, a population-based study showed no increased cardiovascular risk of testosterone replacement in hypogonadal men. Available data from controlled clinical trials suggest that the use of testosterone in elderly men does not increase cardiovascular risk nor the risk of events. Studies in men with CVD, angina, or heart failure report a benefit from testosterone replacement in men with or without hypogonadism. Therefore, at present, the cardiovascular benefits of TRT in elderly men outweigh the risks. This is particularly evident in those men with pre-existing CVD.

  13. Recommendations on the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of hypogonadism in men

    PubMed Central

    Lunenfeld, Bruno; Zitzmann, Michael; Arver, Stefan; Kalinchenko, Svetlana; Tishova, Yuliya; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Hypogonadism or Testosterone Deficiency (TD) in adult men as defined by low levels of serum testosterone accompanied by characteristic symptoms and/or signs as detailed further on can be found in long-recognized clinical entities such as Klinefelter syndrome, Kallmann syndrome, pituitary or testicular disorders, as well as in men with idiopathic, metabolic or iatrogenic conditions that result in testosterone deficiency. These recommendations do not encompass the full range of pathologies leading to hypogonadism (testosterone deficiency), but instead focus on the clinical spectrum of hypogonadism related to metabolic and idiopathic disorders that contribute to the majority of cases that occur in adult men. PMID:25657080

  14. Influence of testosterone gel treatment on spermatogenesis in men with hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    George, Mskhalaya; Yulia, Tishova; Svetlana, Kalinchenko

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of androgen deficiency in reproductive-aged men is increasing and needs new approach to long-term hypogonadism treatment that can preserve fertility. An open non-controlled pilot study included 18 men with eugonadotropic hypogonadism, who received transdermal testosterone gel treatment for 3 months. Sperm analysis was made before treatment and after 3 month of testosterone therapy. Testosterone level was normalized in all patients, but no negative effect was observed on spermatogenesis. Testosterone gel therapy may be a therapy of choice in hypogonadal men of reproductive age but further studies are needed.

  15. Sex differences in visuospatial abilities persist during induced hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Guerrieri, Gioia M.; Wakim, Paul G.; Keenan, P.A.; Schenkel, Linda A; Berlin, Kate; Gibson, Carolyn J.; Rubinow, David R.; Schmidt, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite well-established sex differences in the performance on tests of several cognitive domains (e.g., visuospatial ability), few studies in humans have evaluated if these sex differences are evident both in the presence of circulating sex hormones and during sex steroid hormonal suppression. Sex differences identified in the relative absence of circulating levels of estradiol and testosterone suggest that differences in brain structure or function exist independent of current hormonal environment and are more likely a reflection of differing developmental exposures and/or genetic substrates. Objective To evaluate cognitive performance in healthy eugonadal men and women before and again during GnRH agonist-induced hypogonadism. Methods Men (n = 16) and women (n = 15) without medical or psychiatric illness were matched for IQ. Cognitive tests were performed at baseline (when eugonadal) and after 68 weeks of GnRH agonist-induced gonadal suppression. The test batteries included measures of verbal and spatial memory, spatial ability, verbal fluency, motor speed/dexterity, and attention/concentration. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures models. Results During both eugonadism and hypogonadism, men performed significantly better than women on several measures of visuospatial performance including mental rotation, line orientation, Money Road Map, Porteus maze, and complex figure drawing. Although some test performances showed an effect of hormone treatment, the majority of these differences reflected an improved performance during hypogonadism compared with baseline (and probably reflected practice effects). Conclusion The well-documented male advantage in visuospatial performance, which we observed during eugonadal conditions, was maintained in the context of short-term suppression of gonadal function in both men and women. These findings suggest that, in humans, sex differences in visuospatial performance are not merely dependent on differences in

  16. Hypogonadism alters cecal and fecal microbiota in male mice.

    PubMed

    Harada, Naoki; Hanaoka, Ryo; Hanada, Kazuki; Izawa, Takeshi; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Ryoichi

    2016-11-01

    Low testosterone levels increase the risk for cardiovascular disease in men and lead to shorter life spans. Our recent study showed that androgen deprivation via castration altered fecal microbiota and exacerbated risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including obesity, impaired fasting glucose, excess hepatic triglyceride accumulation, and thigh muscle weight loss only in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed male mice. However, when mice were administered antibiotics that disrupted the gut microbiota, castration did not increase cardiovascular risks or decrease the ratio of dried feces to food intake. Here, we show that changes in cecal microbiota (e.g., an increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and number of Lactobacillus species) were consistent with changes in feces and that there was a decreased cecal content secondary to castration in HFD mice. Castration increased rectal body temperature and plasma adiponectin, irrespective of diet. Changes in the gut microbiome may provide novel insight into hypogonadism-induced cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Hypogonadism alters cecal and fecal microbiota in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Naoki; Hanaoka, Ryo; Hanada, Kazuki; Izawa, Takeshi; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low testosterone levels increase the risk for cardiovascular disease in men and lead to shorter life spans. Our recent study showed that androgen deprivation via castration altered fecal microbiota and exacerbated risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including obesity, impaired fasting glucose, excess hepatic triglyceride accumulation, and thigh muscle weight loss only in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed male mice. However, when mice were administered antibiotics that disrupted the gut microbiota, castration did not increase cardiovascular risks or decrease the ratio of dried feces to food intake. Here, we show that changes in cecal microbiota (e.g., an increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and number of Lactobacillus species) were consistent with changes in feces and that there was a decreased cecal content secondary to castration in HFD mice. Castration increased rectal body temperature and plasma adiponectin, irrespective of diet. Changes in the gut microbiome may provide novel insight into hypogonadism-induced cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27656762

  18. Dietary Adjuncts for Improving Testosterone Levels in Hypogonadal Males.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Jason R; Pan, Michael; Arent, Shawn; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-11-01

    An increasing number of men are being diagnosed with hypogonadism. While many benefit from testosterone supplementation therapy, others who do not meet the criteria for hormone supplementation have turned to dietary adjuncts as a way or gaining improvements in libido, energy, and physical performance. These oral adjunct medications include controlled substances such as androstenedione, androstenediol as well as other "over-the-counter" options like DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) and herbal remedies like Tribulus terrestris This review will focus on the use of these adjunct medications in isolation, or in combination with testosterone supplementation therapy as well as the biochemical nature of the supplements, the results of scientific trials as well as the side effects that limit their use. At the end of this review, physicians will have an improved understanding of the popular testosterone adjuncts being used currently as well as the availability of these substances and how they are used.

  19. Central Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism: Genetic Complexity of a Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Central hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is an emerging pathological condition frequently associated with overweight, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and midline defects. The genetic mechanisms involve mutations in at least twenty-four genes regulating GnRH neuronal migration, secretion, and activity. So far, the mechanisms underlying CHH, both in prepubertal and in adulthood onset forms, remain unknown in most of the cases. Indeed, all detected gene variants may explain a small proportion of the affected patients (43%), indicating that other genes or epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the onset of CHH. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on genetic background of CHH, organizing the large amount of data present in the literature in a clear and concise manner, to produce a useful guide available for researchers and clinicians. PMID:25254043

  20. Spino-Cerebellar Degeneration, Hormonal Disorder, Hypogonadism, Deaf Mutism and Mental Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvester, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    Post mortem examinations were done on two adult siblings (one female and one male) who had been clinically described as suffering from mental handicap, deaf mutism, ataxia, hypogonadism, and hormonal disorders. (DB)

  1. Male Hypogonadism and Osteoporosis: The Effects, Clinical Consequences, and Treatment of Testosterone Deficiency in Bone Health

    PubMed Central

    Houdek, Devon

    2017-01-01

    It is well recognized that bone loss accelerates in hypogonadal states, with female menopause being the classic example of sex hormones affecting the regulation of bone metabolism. Underrepresented is our knowledge of the clinical and metabolic consequences of overt male hypogonadism, as well as the more subtle age-related decline in testosterone on bone quality. While menopause and estrogen deficiency are well-known risk factors for osteoporosis in women, the effects of age-related testosterone decline in men on bone health are less well known. Much of our knowledge comes from observational studies and retrospective analysis on small groups of men with variable causes of primary or secondary hypogonadism and mild to overt testosterone deficiencies. This review aims to present the current knowledge of the consequences of adult male hypogonadism on bone metabolism. The direct and indirect effects of testosterone on bone cells will be explored as well as the important differences in male osteoporosis and assessment as compared to that in females. The clinical consequence of both primary and secondary hypogonadism, as well as testosterone decline in older males, on bone density and fracture risk in men will be summarized. Finally, the therapeutic options and their efficacy in male osteoporosis and hypogonadism will be discussed.

  2. A study to evaluate the prevalence of hypogonadism in Indian males with Type-2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Parminder; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Sharma, S. K.; Majumdar, Anirban; Shah, Parag; Sahay, Rakesh; Ayyar, S. Vageesh; Phatale, Hemant; Batra, Chandar M.; Syed, Raeesuddin; Shetty, Pradeep

    2017-01-01

    Background: A high prevalence of hypogonadism in men with Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been reported worldwide. Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of hypogonadism in Indian males with T2DM and assess the primary and secondary hypogonadism along with androgen deficiency. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 900 men with T2DM were evaluated using androgen deficiency in aging male questionnaire. They were screened for demographic characteristics, gonadal hormone levels, lipid profile, and glycosylated hemoglobin. Results: The prevalence of hypogonadism in T2DM patients was found to be 20.7% (186 out of 900). Hypogonadism was of testicular origin (primary) in 48/186 (25.8%) patients, of pituitary or hypothalamic origin (secondary) in 14/186 (7.53%), and remaining 124/186 (66.67%) patients were found to have low testosterone with the inappropriate normal level of luteinizing hormone and Follicle-stimulating hormone. 451/900 (50.1%) patients were only symptomatic but had normal testosterone levels. Further 263 patients out 900 were asymptomatic, of which 51/900 (5.7%) patients had low levels of testosterone and 212/900 (23.5%) patients had normal testosterone level without symptoms. There were no deaths or other serious adverse events except mild pyrexia which was not related to the study. Conclusion: Hypogonadism diagnosis, at times, might not be validated with the help of androgen deficiency questionnaire or symptoms only. Given the large number of patients of T2DM in India, the incidence of hypogonadism is more in diabetic patients as compared to the general population. Hence, implementation of screening programs in diabetic patients is necessary to understand and detect individuals with low serum total testosterone at any early stage and to supplement testosterone accordingly. PMID:28217500

  3. Male hypogonadism: an extended classification based on a developmental, endocrine physiology-based approach.

    PubMed

    Rey, R A; Grinspon, R P; Gottlieb, S; Pasqualini, T; Knoblovits, P; Aszpis, S; Pacenza, N; Stewart Usher, J; Bergadá, I; Campo, S M

    2013-01-01

    Normal testicular physiology results from the integrated function of the tubular and interstitial compartments. Serum markers of interstitial tissue function are testosterone and insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3), whereas tubular function can be assessed by sperm count, morphology and motility, and serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and inhibin B. The classical definition of male hypogonadism refers to testicular failure associated with androgen deficiency, without considering potential deficiencies in germ and Sertoli cells. Furthermore, the classical definition does not consider the fact that low basal serum testosterone cannot be equated to hypogonadism in childhood, because Leydig cells are normally quiescent. A broader clinical definition of hypogonadism that could be applied to male patients in different periods of life requires a comprehensive consideration of the physiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis and its disturbances along development. Here we propose an extended classification of male hypogonadism based on the pathophysiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in different periods of life. The clinical and biochemical features of male hypogonadism vary according to the following: (i) the level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis primarily affected: central, primary or combined; (ii) the testicular cell population initially impaired: whole testis dysfunction or dissociated testicular dysfunction, and: (iii) the period of life when the gonadal function begins to fail: foetal-onset or postnatal-onset. The evaluation of basal testicular function in infancy and childhood relies mainly on the assessment of Sertoli cell markers (AMH and inhibin B). Hypergonadotropism should not be considered a sine qua non condition for the diagnosis of primary hypogonadism in childhood. Finally, the lack of elevation of gonadotropins in adolescents or adults with primary gonadal failure is indicative of a combined hypogonadism involving

  4. Testosterone treatment of hypogonadal men participating in competitive sports.

    PubMed

    Gooren, L J; Behre, H M

    2008-06-01

    Testosterone has a steeply dose-dependent effect on muscle mass and strength irrespective of gonadal status. So, for reasons of fairness, people who engage in competitive sports should not administer exogenous testosterone raising their blood testosterone levels beyond the range of normal. There is a ban on exogenous androgens for men and women in sports, but an exception has been made for men with androgen deficiency due to pituitary or testicular disease. Men who receive testosterone administration for the indication hypogonadism have an interest in the use of testosterone preparations generating blood testosterone levels within the normal range of healthy, eugonadal men. On the grounds of a positive correlation between blood testosterone concentrations muscle and volume/strength, they are best served with a parenteral testosterone preparation, rather than transdermal testosterone, but they should not run the risk of being excluded from competition because of supraphysiological testosterone levels. The latter is a realistic risk with the traditional parenteral testosterone esters. The new parenteral testosterone undecanoate preparation offers much better perspectives. Its pharmacokinetics have been investigated in detail and there is a fair degree of predictability of resulting blood testosterone levels with use of this preparation.

  5. Clomiphene citrate treatment for late onset hypogonadism: rise and fall

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Marcelo; Souper, Renato; Hartmann, Jonathan; Alvarez, Matías; Fuentes, Ignacio; Guarda, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Previous series have demonstrated that Clomiphene Citrate (CC) is an effective treatment to increase Total Testosterone (TT) in Late Onset Hypogonadism (LOH) patients. However, what happens to TT levels after ending CC treatment is still debatable. The objective of this study is to evaluate TT levels 3 months after the discontinuation of CC in patients with LOH who were previously successfully treated with the same drug. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with LOH that were successfully treated (achieved TT levels >11nmol/l) with CC 50mgs daily for 50 days were prospectively recruited in our Andrological outpatient clinic. CC was then stopped for 3 months and TT levels were measured at the end of this period. Results: Mean TT level before discontinuation of CC was 22.7±8.1nmol/L (mean±SD). Three months after discontinuation, mean TT level significantly decreased in all patients, 10.2±3.9nmol/l (p<0.01). Twenty-one patients (78%) decreased TT levels under 11nmol/L. Six patients (22%) had TT levels that remained within the normal recommended range (≥11nmol/l). No statistical significant differences were observed between both groups. Conclusion: In the short term LOH does not seem to be a reversible condition in most patients after CC treatment. More studies with longer follow-up are needed to evaluate the kinetics of TT in LOH. PMID:27622282

  6. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: implications of absent mini-puberty.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Andrew A; Jayasena, Channa N; Quinton, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The phenomenon known as "mini-puberty" refers to activation of the neonatal hypothalamo-pituitary axis causing serum concentrations of gonadotrophins and testosterone (T) to approach adult male levels. This early neonatal period is a key proliferative window for testicular germ cells and immature Sertoli cells. Although failure to spontaneously initiate (adolescent) puberty is the most evident consequence of a defective gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretory network, absent mini-puberty is also likely to have a major impact on the reproductive phenotype of men with congenital hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (CHH). Furthermore, the phase of male mini-puberty represents a key window-of-opportunity to identify congenital GnRH deficiency (either isolated CHH, or as part of combined pituitary hormone deficiency) in childhood. Among male neonates exhibiting "red flag" indicators for CHH (i.e. maldescended testes with or without cryptorchidism) a single serum sample (between 4-8 weeks of life) can pinpoint congenital GnRH deficiency far more rapidly and with much greater accuracy than dynamic tests performed in later childhood or adolescence. Potential consequences for missing absent mini-puberty in a male neonate include the lack of monitoring of pubertal progression/lack of progression, and the missed opportunity for early therapeutic intervention. This article will review our current understanding of the mechanisms and clinical consequences of mini-puberty. Furthermore, evidence for the optimal clinical management of patients with absent mini-puberty will be discussed.

  7. ENU mutagenesis in mice identifies candidate genes for hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jeffrey; Hurley, Lisa A; Harris, Rebecca M; Finlayson, Courtney; Tong, Minghan; Fisher, Lisa A; Moran, Jennifer L; Beier, David R; Mason, Christopher; Jameson, J Larry

    2012-06-01

    Genome-wide mutagenesis was performed in mice to identify candidate genes for male infertility, for which the predominant causes remain idiopathic. Mice were mutagenized using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), bred, and screened for phenotypes associated with the male urogenital system. Fifteen heritable lines were isolated and chromosomal loci were assigned using low-density genome-wide SNP arrays. Ten of the 15 lines were pursued further using higher-resolution SNP analysis to narrow the candidate gene regions. Exon sequencing of candidate genes identified mutations in mice with cystic kidneys (Bicc1), cryptorchidism (Rxfp2), restricted germ cell deficiency (Plk4), and severe germ cell deficiency (Prdm9). In two other lines with severe hypogonadism, candidate sequencing failed to identify mutations, suggesting defects in genes with previously undocumented roles in gonadal function. These genomic intervals were sequenced in their entirety and a candidate mutation was identified in SnrpE in one of the two lines. The line harboring the SnrpE variant retains substantial spermatogenesis despite small testis size, an unusual phenotype. In addition to the reproductive defects, heritable phenotypes were observed in mice with ataxia (Myo5a), tremors (Pmp22), growth retardation (unknown gene), and hydrocephalus (unknown gene). These results demonstrate that the ENU screen is an effective tool for identifying potential causes of male infertility.

  8. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism in Subjects with DAX1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Unmesh; Harris, Rebecca M.; Jameson, J. Larry

    2011-01-01

    DAX1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1; also known as NROB1, nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1) encodes a nuclear receptor that is expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells, steroidogenic tissues (gonads, adrenals), the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), and pituitary gonadotropes. Humans with DAX1 mutations develop an X-linked syndrome referred to as adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC). These boys typically present in infancy with adrenal failure but later fail to undergo puberty because of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HHG). The adrenal failure reflects a developmental abnormality in the transition of the fetal to adult zone, resulting in glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency. The etiology of HHG involves a combined and variable deficiency of hypothalamic GnRH secretion and/or pituitary responsiveness to GnRH resulting in low LH, FSH and testosterone. Treatment with exogenous gonadotropins generally does not induce spermatogenesis. Animal models indicate that DAX1 also plays a critical role in testis development and function. As a nuclear receptor, DAX1 has been shown to function as a transcriptional repressor, particularly of pathways regulated by other nuclear receptors, such as steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1). In addition to reproductive tissues, DAX1 is also expressed at high levels in ES cells and plays a role in the maintenance of pluripotentiality. Here we review the clinical manifestations associated with DAX1 mutations as well as the evolving information about its function based on animal models and in vitro studies. PMID:21672607

  9. Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Kallmann Syndrome: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The proper development and coordination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis are essential for normal reproductive competence. The key factor that regulates the function of the HPG axis is gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Timely release of GnRH is critical for the onset of puberty and subsequent sexual maturation. Misregulation in this system can result in delayed or absent puberty and infertility. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and Kallmann syndrome (KS) are genetic disorders that are rooted in a GnRH deficiency but often accompanied by a variety of non-reproductive phenotypes such as the loss of the sense of smell and defects of the skeleton, eye, ear, kidney, and heart. Recent progress in DNA sequencing technology has produced a wealth of information regarding the genetic makeup of CHH and KS patients and revealed the resilient yet complex nature of the human reproductive neuroendocrine system. Further research on the molecular basis of the disease and the diverse signal pathways involved will aid in improving the diagnosis, treatment, and management of CHH and KS patients as well as in developing more precise genetic screening and counseling regime. PMID:26790381

  10. Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Caused by Inactivating Mutations in SRA1

    PubMed Central

    Kotan, Leman Damla; Cooper, Charlton; Darcan, Şükran; Carr, Ian M.; Özen, Samim; Yan, Yi; Hamedani, Mohammad K.; Gürbüz, Fatih; Mengen, Eda; Turan, İhsan; Ulubay, Ayça; Akkuş, Gamze; Yüksel, Bilgin; Topaloğlu, A. Kemal; Leygue, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: What initiates the pubertal process in humans and other mammals is still unknown. We hypothesized that gene(s) taking roles in triggering human puberty may be identified by studying a cohort of idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). Methods: A cohort of IHH cases was studied based on autozygosity mapping coupled with whole exome sequencing. Results: Our studies revealed three independent families in which IHH/delayed puberty is associated with inactivating SRA1 variants. SRA1 was the first gene to be identified to function through its protein as well as noncoding functional ribonucleic acid products. These products act as co-regulators of nuclear receptors including sex steroid receptors as well as SF-1 and LRH-1, the master regulators of steroidogenesis. Functional studies with a mutant SRA1 construct showed a reduced co-activation of ligand-dependent activity of the estrogen receptor alpha, as assessed by luciferase reporter assay in HeLa cells. Conclusion: Our findings strongly suggest that SRA1 gene function is required for initiation of puberty in humans. Furthermore, SRA1 with its alternative products and functionality may provide a potential explanation for the versatility and complexity of the pubertal process. PMID:27086651

  11. Hypogonadism in a male-to-female transsexual with super obesity.

    PubMed

    Ayanian, S; Irwig, M S

    2013-08-01

    The global obesity epidemic is having a profound impact on the health of populations. From a reproductive standpoint, obesity has been associated with infertility and hypogonadism. We present the case of a 29-year-old male-to-female transsexual with super obesity (body mass index >50) who was found to have profound hypogonadism with total and free testosterone levels in the normal female reference range. There is virtually no literature on the hormonal sequelae of obesity in transsexual people. The patient was prescribed an aromatase inhibitor, letrozole 2.5 mg twice daily for 2 weeks, to determine the role of oestrogen in the hypogonadism. The aromatase inhibitor reduced the serum oestradiol concentration from 125 to 6.9 pm. There were dramatic corresponding rises in total testosterone (2.8 to 10.7 nm), luteinising hormone (4.1 to 20.5 mIU ml(-1) ) and follicle stimulating hormone (1.8 to 15.3 mIU ml(-1) ). This diagnostic test demonstrated the important role of oestrogen in mediating the hypogonadism. After the testing, the patient was started on oestrogen therapy after a careful discussion of the benefits versus risks of oestrogen therapy. We anticipate that similar cases of hypogonadism in male-to-female transsexuals will likely become more common in an era of increased obesity rates.

  12. When is a varicocele repair indicated: the dilemma of hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Dabaja, Ali A; Goldstein, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In the past, the indications for varicocelectomy are primarily for infertility with abnormal semen parameters, testicular hypotrophy/atrophy in adolescents, and/or pain. The surgical treatment of varicocele for hypogonadism is controversial and debated. Recently, multiple reports in the literature have suggested that varicocele is associated with hypogonadism and varicocele repair can increase testosterone levels. Men with hypogonadal symptoms should have at least two serum testosterone levels. Microsurgical varicocelectomy may be beneficial for men with clinically palpable varicoceles with documented hypogonadism. In this review, we summarize the most recent literature linking varicocele to hypogonadism and sexual dysfunction and the impact of repair on serum testosterone levels. We performed a search of the published English literature. The key words used were “varicocele and hypogonadism” and “varicocele surgery and testosterone.” We included published studies after 1998. We, also, evaluated the effect of surgery on the changes in the serum testosterone level regardless of the indication for the varicocele repair. PMID:26696437

  13. Hypogonadism and testosterone replacement therapy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is a common problem in the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and renal transplant population. It has widespread systemic effects and has been linked with mortality in dialysis patients and at the time of renal transplant. The etiology is likely multifactorial and most patients are afflicted by various comorbidities that can contribute to hypogonadism. Clinical manifestations are mostly nonspecific. We review the approach to the diagnosis of hypogonadism, focusing on both laboratory values and clinical signs and symptoms. We review treatment with testosterone replacement in this population and highlight various studies that tend to have small sample sizes. Though these studies provide insight into testosterone replacement, the need for larger studies is emphasized to better understand the effects and safety of therapy. PMID:28078220

  14. Bone Mineral Density in Adolescent Girls with Hypogonadotropic and Hypergonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Baran, Rıza Taner; Baran, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Deficiency of sex steroids has a negative impact on bone mineral content. In studies conducted on postmenopausal women and animal studies, elevated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were found to be correlated with a decrease in bone mineralization and osteoporosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) in adolescent girls with hypogonadotropic and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and also to investigate the correlation between FSH level and BMD. Methods: The study group included 33 adolescent girls with hypogonadism (14 with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and 19 with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism). FSH, luteinizing hormone, estradiol levels, and BMD (using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) were measured. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the chronological age and bone age of the two patient groups, namely, with hypogonadotropic and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. There was also no significant difference between BMD z-score values obtained from measurements from the spine and the femur neck of patients in the two groups (p-values were 0.841 and 0.281, respectively). In the hypergonadotropic group, a moderately negative correlation was detected between FSH level and BMD z-score measured from the femur neck (ρ=-0.69, p=0.001), whilst no correlation was observed between FSH levels and height adjusted BMD-z scores measured from the spine (ρ=0.17, p=0.493). FSH level was not found to be an independent variable affecting BMD z-score. Conclusion: BMD z-scores were detected to be similar in adolescent girls with hypogonadotropic and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and FSH levels were not found to have a clinically relevant impact on BMD. PMID:27087454

  15. An adolescent with 48,XXYY syndrome with hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder and renal malformations.

    PubMed

    Katulanda, Prasad; Rajapakse, J Rasika D K; Kariyawasam, Jayani; Jayasekara, Rohan; Dissanayake, Vajira H W

    2012-09-01

    48,XXYY is a rare sex chromosome aneuploidy affecting 1 in 18,000 to 50,000 male births. They present with developmental delay, hypogonadism, gynecomastia, intention tremors, and a spectrum of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. At one time this condition was considered a variant of Klinefelter syndrome. In clinically suspected cases, 48,XXYY syndrome can be diagnosed by chromosome culture and karyotyping. This patient presented with hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, and renal malformatons. Klinefelter syndrome was clinically suspected. The karyotype confirmed the diagnosis of 48,XXYY syndrome. This is the first reported case of 48,XXYY syndrome from Sri Lanka.

  16. Adult-onset hypogonadism: evaluation and role of testosterone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Davidiuk, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency (TD) has become a growing concern in the field of men’s sexual health, with an increasing number of men presenting for evaluation of this condition. Given the increasing demand for testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), a panel of experts met in August of 2015 to discuss the treatment of men who present for evaluation in the setting of low or normal gonadotropin levels and the associated signs and symptoms of hypogonadism. This constellation of factors can be associated with elements of both primary and secondary hypogonadism. Because this syndrome commonly occurs in men who are middle-aged and older, it was termed adult-onset hypogonadism (AOH). AOH can be defined by the following elements: low levels of testosterone, associated signs and symptoms of hypogonadism, and low or normal gonadotropin levels. Although there are significant benefits of TRT for patients with AOH, candidates also need to understand the potential risks. Patients undergoing TRT will need to be monitored regularly because there are potential complications that can develop with long-term use. This review is aimed at providing a deeper understanding of AOH, discussing the benefits and risks of TRT, and outlining each modality of TRT in use for AOH. PMID:28078213

  17. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Short Stature in Patients with Diabetes Due to Neurogenin 3 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Gómez, José Luis; Gleisner, Andrea; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Biallelic mutations in NEUROG3 are known to cause early-onset malabsorptive diarrhea due to congenital anendocrinosis and diabetes mellitus at a variable age. No other endocrine disorders have been described so far. We report four patients with homozygous NEUROG3 mutations who presented with short stature and failed to show any signs of pubertal development. Case Description: Four patients (two males, two females) were diagnosed with homozygous mutations in NEUROG3 on the basis of congenital malabsorptive diarrhea and diabetes. All four had severe short stature and failed to develop secondary sexual characteristics at an appropriate age, despite some having normal body mass index. The absence of gonadal function persisted into the third decade in one patient. Upon testing, both basal and stimulated LH and FSH levels were low, with the remaining pituitary hormones within the normal range. Magnetic resonance imaging scans of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis did not reveal structural abnormalities. A diagnosis of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism was made, and replacement therapy with sex hormones was started. Conclusions: The high reproducibility of this novel phenotype suggests that central hypogonadism and short stature are common findings in patients with mutations in NEUROG3. Growth rate needs to be carefully monitored in these patients, who also should be routinely screened for hypogonadism when they reach the appropriate age. NEUROG3 mutations expand on the growing number of genetic causes of acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:27533310

  18. Stem cell therapy for the treatment of Leydig cell dysfunction in primary hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Peak, Taylor C; Haney, Nora M; Wang, William; DeLay, Kenneth J; Hellstrom, Wayne J

    2016-01-01

    The production of testosterone occurs within the Leydig cells of the testes. When production fails at this level from either congenital, acquired, or systemic disorders, the result is primary hypogonadism. While numerous testosterone formulations have been developed, none are yet fully capable of replicating the physiological patterns of testosterone secretion. Multiple stem cell therapies to restore androgenic function of the testes are under investigation. Leydig cells derived from bone marrow, adipose tissue, umbilical cord, and the testes have shown promise for future therapy for primary hypogonadism. In particular, the discovery and utilization of a group of progenitor stem cells within the testes, known as stem Leydig cells (SLCs), has led not only to a better understanding of testicular development, but of treatment as well. When combining this with an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to Leydig cell dysfunction, researchers and physicians will be able to develop stem cell therapies that target the specific step in the steroidogenic process that is deficient. The current preclinical studies highlight the complex nature of regenerating this steroidogenic process and the problems remain unresolved. In summary, there appears to be two current directions for stem cell therapy in male primary hypogonadism. The first method involves differentiating adult Leydig cells from stem cells of various origins from bone marrow, adipose, or embryonic sources. The second method involves isolating, identifying, and transplanting stem Leydig cells into testicular tissue. Theoretically, in-vivo re-activation of SLCs in men with primary hypogonadism due to age would be another alternative method to treat hypogonadism while eliminating the need for transplantation. PMID:27822338

  19. Outcomes of long-term testosterone replacement in older hypogonadal males: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, R R; Kaiser, F E; Morley, J E

    1997-11-01

    To determine the complications, toxicities, and compliance of long term testosterone replacement in hypogonadal males, we retrospectively assessed 45 elderly hypogonadal men receiving testosterone replacement therapy and 27 hypogonadal men taking testosterone. Hypogonadism was defined as a bioavailable testosterone serum concentration of 72 ng/dL or less. Both groups received baseline physical examinations and blood tests. The testosterone-treated group received 200 mg testosterone enanthate or cypionate im every 2 weeks, and follow-up examinations and blood samplings were performed every 3 months. The control group had a single follow-up blood test and physical examination. There was no significant difference in the initial blood tests in the two groups. At 2 yr follow-up, only the hematocrit showed a statistically significant increase in the testosterone-treated group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). A decrease in the urea nitrogen to creatinine ratio and an increase in the prostate-specific antigen concentration was not statistically significant. Eleven (24%) of the testosterone-treated subjects developed polycythemia sufficient to require phlebotomy or the temporary withholding of testosterone, one third of which occurred less than 1 yr after starting testosterone treatment. There was no significant difference in the incidence of new illness in the two groups during the 2-yr follow-up. Although self-assessment of libido was dramatically improved in the testosterone-treated group (P < 0.0001), approximately one third of the subjects discontinued therapy. In conclusion, testosterone replacement therapy appears to be well tolerated by over 84% of the subjects. Long term testosterone replacement to date appears to be a safe and effective means of treating hypogonadal elderly males, provided that frequent follow-up blood tests and examinations are performed.

  20. Testosterone replacement therapy can increase circulating endothelial progenitor cell number in men with late onset hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Liao, C-H; Wu, Y-N; Lin, F-Y; Tsai, W-K; Liu, S-P; Chiang, H-S

    2013-07-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are bone marrow-derived cells required for endothelial repair. A low EPC number can be considered as an independent predictor of endothelial dysfunction and future cardiovascular events. Recent evidence shows that patients with hypogonadal symptoms without other confounding risk factors have a low number of circulating progenitor cells (PCs) and EPCs, thus highlighting the role of testosterone in the proliferation and differentiation of EPCs. Here, we investigate if testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) can increase circulating EPC number in men with late onset hypogonadism. Forty-six men (age range, 40-73 years; mean age, 58.3 years) with hypogonadal symptoms were recruited, and 29 men with serum total testosterone (TT) levels less than 350 ng/dL received TRT using transdermal testosterone gel (Androgel; 1% testosterone at 5 g/day) for 12 months. Circulating EPC numbers (per 100 000 monocytes) were calculated using flow cytometry. There was no significant association between serum TT levels and the number of circulating EPCs before TRT. Compared with the number of mean circulating EPCs at baseline (9.5 ± 6.2), the number was significantly higher after 3 months (16.6 ± 11.1, p = 0.027), 6 months (20.3 ± 15.3, p = 0.006) and 12 months (27.2 ± 15.5, p = 0.017) of TRT. Thus, we conclude that serum TT levels before TRT are not significantly associated with the number of circulating EPCs in men with late onset hypogonadism. However, TRT can increase the number of circulating EPCs, which implies the benefit of TRT on endothelial function in hypogonadal men.

  1. A Case of Primary Hypogonadism with Features of Albright’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Moushumi; Mukhopadhyay, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: McCune Albright syndrome is rare with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 100,000 to 1 in 1,000,000 persons. The classical clinical triad consists of fibrous dysplasia of the bone, café-au-lait skin spots and precocious puberty. However, in rare cases, there may be primary hypogonadism and amenorrhea. Case Presentation: An eighteen-year-old female presented with amenorrhea. She had a short stature, round face, thick neck, and short fourth metacarpals and metatarsals. The secondary sexual characters were absent. Serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid concentrations were normal, but gonadotropin hormones were very low. X-ray examination revealed short fourth and fifth metacarpals, short left metatarsal, and short fibula. Conclusion: These local bony abnormalities along with the biochemical findings helped us to diagnose this case as an unusual presentation of primary hypogonadism with features of McCune Albright’s syndrome where there was amenorrhea rather than preocious puberty. PMID:27478774

  2. Osteopenia and bone fractures in a man with anorexia nervosa and hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Rigotti, N.A.; Neer, R.M.; Jameson, L.

    1986-07-18

    Women with anorexia nervosa have reduced skeletal mass. Both anorexia and osteopenia are less common in men. We describe a 22-year-old man with anorexia nervosa and severe osteopenia involving both cortical and trabecular bone who developed a pelvic fracture and multiple vertebral compression fractures. He was found to have secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism that was reversible with weight gain. This case illustrates the need to consider osteopenia as a potential complication of anorexia nervosa in males as well as females.

  3. Effects of Male Hypogonadism on Regional Adipose Tissue Fatty Acid Storage and Lipogenic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Santosa, Sylvia; Jensen, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone has long been known to affect body fat distribution, although the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We investigated the effects of chronic hypogonadism in men on adipose tissue fatty acid (FA) storage and FA storage factors. Twelve men with chronic hypogonadism and 13 control men matched for age and body composition: 1) underwent measures of body composition with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and an abdominal CT scan; 2) consumed an experimental meal containing [3H]triolein to determine the fate of meal FA (biopsy-measured adipose storage vs. oxidation); 3) received infusions of [U-13C]palmitate and [1-14C]palmitate to measure rates of direct free (F)FA storage (adipose biopsies). Adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase, acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), and diacylglycerol acetyl-transferase (DGAT) activities, as well as, CD36 content were measured to understand the mechanism by which alterations in fat storage occur in response to testosterone deficiency. Results of the study showed that hypogonadal men stored a greater proportion of both dietary FA and FFA in lower body subcutaneous fat than did eugonadal men (both p<0.05). Femoral adipose tissue ACS activity was significantly greater in hypogonadal than eugonadal men, whereas CD36 and DGAT were not different between the two groups. The relationships between these proteins and FA storage varied somewhat between the two groups. We conclude that chronic effects of testosterone deficiency has effects on leg adipose tissue ACS activity which may relate to greater lower body FA storage. These results provide further insight into the role of androgens in body fat distribution and adipose tissue metabolism in humans. PMID:22363653

  4. Malouf Syndrome with Hypergonadotropic Hypogonadism and Cardiomyopathy: Two-Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Şilfeler, Dilek Benk; Karateke, Atilla; Keskin Kurt, Raziye; Aldemir, Özgür; Buğra Nacar, Alper; Baloğlu, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Malouf syndrome is a very rarely encountered syndrome which was first diagnosed in 1985 upon the examination of two sisters, with findings of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, dilated cardiomyopathy, blepharoptosis, and broad nasal base. Later on, Narahara diagnosed another sporadic case with the same findings. A survey of relevant literature leads us to three women cases in total. Here we present two cases of Malouf syndrome and literature review. PMID:25544917

  5. Two sibs with chorioretinal dystrophy, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, and cerebellar ataxia: Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Rump, R; Hamel, B C; Pinckers, A J; van Dop, P A

    1997-01-01

    We describe two sibs with chorioretinal dystrophy, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, and cerebellar ataxia, Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome, a rare but distinct pleiotropic single gene disorder with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The cases presented illustrate that this syndrome is still poorly recognised. We provide a review and analysis of previously reported cases and the differential diagnosis, which might aid in the identification of additional cases. Images PMID:9321767

  6. Hormone replacement therapy in morphine-induced hypogonadic male chronic pain patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In male patients suffering from chronic pain, opioid administration induces severe hypogonadism, leading to impaired physical and psychological conditions such as fatigue, anaemia and depression. Hormone replacement therapy is rarely considered for these hypogonadic patients, notwithstanding the various pharmacological solutions available. Methods To treat hypogonadism and to evaluate the consequent endocrine, physical and psychological changes in male chronic pain patients treated with morphine (epidural route), we tested the administration of testosterone via a gel formulation for one year. Hormonal (total testosterone, estradiol, free testosterone, DHT, cortisol), pain (VAS and other pain questionnaires), andrological (Ageing Males' Symptoms Scale - AMS) and psychological (POMS, CES-D and SF-36) parameters were evaluated at baseline (T0) and after 3, 6 and 12 months (T3, T6, T12 respectively). Results The daily administration of testosterone increased total and free testosterone and DHT at T3, and the levels remained high until T12. Pain rating indexes (QUID) progressively improved from T3 to T12 while the other pain parameters (VAS, Area%) remained unchanged. The AMS sexual dimension and SF-36 Mental Index displayed a significant improvement over time. Conclusions In conclusion, our results suggest that a constant, long-term supply of testosterone can induce a general improvement of the male chronic pain patient's quality of life, an important clinical aspect of pain management. PMID:21332999

  7. Hypogonadism in males with chronic kidney disease: another cause of resistance to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents?

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter; Bárány, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Anemia, inflammation, resistance to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) and hypogonadism (testosterone deficiency) are highly prevalent conditions, which heralds poor prognosis, in chronic kidney disease (CKD). It has been speculated that testosterone stimulates erythropoiesis via production of hematopoietic growth factors and possibly improvement of iron bioavailability. Where as inflammation stimulates synthesis of the liver-derived iron regulatory protein hepcidin, a recent study suggests that testosterone inhibits hepcidin synthesis, thus offering a possible novel mechanism for testosterone-induced erythropoiesis. As any agent that lowers hepcidin may be an effective strategy to normalize iron homeostasis and overcome renal anemia, testosterone deficiency should be considered in this patient group. Indeed, a recent study in males with CKD showed that hypogonadism may be an additional cause of anemia and reduced ESA responsiveness. Thus, a randomized controlled trial is needed to test the possibility that restoration of testosterone levels in hypogonadal CKD males may translate into lower prevalence of anemia, better ESA responsiveness and better quality of life.

  8. Hypothesis: kisspeptin mediates male hypogonadism in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    George, Jyothis T; Millar, Robert P; Anderson, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Hypogonadism occurs commonly in men with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and severe obesity. Current evidence points to a decreased secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus and thereby decreased secretion of gonadotropins from the pituitary gland as a central feature of the pathophysiology in these men. Hyperglycaemia, inflammation, leptin and oestrogen-related feedback have been proposed to make aetiological contributions to the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism of T2DM. However, the neuroendocrine signals that link these factors with modulation of GnRH neurons have yet to be identified. Kisspeptins play a central role in the modulation of GnRH secretion and, thus, downstream regulation of gonadotropins and testosterone secretion in men. Inactivating mutations of the kisspeptin receptor have been shown to cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in man, whilst an activating mutation is associated with precocious puberty. Data from studies in experimental animals link kisspeptin expression with individual factors known to regulate GnRH secretion, including hyperglycaemia, inflammation, leptin and oestrogen. We therefore hypothesise that decreased endogenous kisspeptin secretion is the common central pathway that links metabolic and endocrine factors in the pathology of testosterone deficiency seen in men with obesity and T2DM. We propose that the kisspeptin system plays a central role in integrating a range of metabolic inputs, thus constituting the link between energy status with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and put forward potential clinical studies to test the hypothesis.

  9. The role of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in the development of male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Saboor Aftab, S A; Kumar, S; Barber, T M

    2013-03-01

    Obesity, secondary (hypogonadotrophic) hypogonadism (SH), sleep disorders [such as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA)] and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in men have complex interlinks both with respect to mutual aetiopathogenesis as well as therapeutics. Correction of the attendant hypogonadism in obese men may serve to break this link and have beneficial effects beyond restoration of normal sexual function. Male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism (MOSH) should be regarded as a distinct clinical entity and subtype of SH. A high index of suspicion for the presence of MOSH must be maintained by clinicians when assessing obese men. The pathogenesis of MOSH remains incompletely understood. Furthermore, the optimal management of MOSH and its associated sequelae will require long-term prospective studies that in turn will inform the development of future clinical guidelines for this important and prevalent condition.

  10. Impact on lipoprotein profile after long-term testosterone replacement in hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Berg, G; Schreier, L; Geloso, G; Otero, P; Nagelberg, A; Levalle, O

    2002-02-01

    Testosterone serum levels may influence the lipoprotein metabolism and possibly atherogenic risk. Our aim was to investigate the effects of long-term testosterone supplementation in hypogonadal men on multiple lipoprotein markers. 18 Hypogonadal men were studied before and after 3, 6, and 18 (n = 7) months of treatment with testosterone enanthate. During treatment, serum testosterone and estradiol increased, reaching normal levels (p < 0.0001 and 0.003, respectively). This was associated with a decrease in HDL cholesterol (from 1.40 +/- 0.10 mmol/l to 1.22 +/- 0.08 mmol/l, p < 0.001) after six months at the expense of HDL2 cholesterol (p < 0.01), as well as apoprotein A1 (from 139 +/- 3.4 mg/dl to 126 +/- 3.0 mg/dl, p < 0.005). Hepatic lipase activity increased (p < 0.05) and correlated positively with testosterone (r = 0.56, p < 0.02) and negatively with HDL cholesterol (r = - 0.58, p < 0.02). Total and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and apoprotein B did not increase. Among the seven patients who completed 18 months of treatment, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL and HDL cholesterol, as well as total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio values did not differ from baseline while apoprotein A1 (p < 0.03) and HDL cholesterol (p < 0.015) remained decreased and hepatic lipase unchanged. Restoration of testosterone levels in hypogonadal men in this study did not reveal unfavorable changes based on total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol/apoprotein B ratios, which are both atherogenic risk markers. Whether the changes in light of lipoprotein metabolism will adversely influence cardiovascular risk over time remains to be determined.

  11. Modeling Testosterone Circadian Rhythm in Hypogonadal Males: Effect of Age and Circannual Variations.

    PubMed

    González-Sales, Mario; Barrière, Olivier; Tremblay, Pierre-Olivier; Nekka, Fahima; Desrochers, Julie; Tanguay, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the baseline circadian rhythm of testosterone levels in hypogonadal men. A total of 859 baseline profiles of testosterone from hypogonadal men were included in this analysis. The circadian rhythm of the testosterone was described by a stretched cosine function. Model parameters were estimated using NONMEM(®) 7.3. The effect of different covariates on the testosterone levels was investigated. Model evaluation was performed using non-parametric bootstrap and predictive checks. A stretched cosine function deeply improved the data goodness of fit compared to the standard trigonometric function (p < 0.001; ΔOFV = -204). The effect of the age and the semester, defined as winter and spring versus summer and fall, were significantly associated with the baseline levels of testosterone (p < 0.001, ΔOFV = -15.6, and p < 0.001, ΔOFV = -47.0). Model evaluation procedures such as diagnostic plots, visual predictive check, and non-parametric bootstrap evidenced that the proposed stretched cosine function was able to model the time course of the diurnal testosterone levels in hypogonadal males with accuracy and precision. The circadian rhythm of the testosterone levels was better predicted by the proposed stretched cosine function than a standard cosine function. Testosterone levels decreased by 5.74 ng/dL (2.4%) every 10 years and were 19.3 ng/dL (8.1%) higher during winter and spring compared to summer and fall.

  12. Hypogonadism and Sex Steroid Replacement Therapy in Girls with Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gawlik, Aneta; Hankus, Magdalena; Such, Kamila; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka; Madej, Paweł; Borkowska, Marzena; Zachurzok, Agnieszka; Malecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2016-12-01

    Turner syndrome is the most common example of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism resulting from gonadal dysgenesis. Most patients present delayed, or even absent, puberty. Premature ovarian failure can be expected even if spontaneous menarche occurs. Laboratory markers of gonadal dysgenesis are well known. The choice of optimal hormone replacement therapy in children and adolescents remains controversial, particularly regarding the age at which therapy should be initiated, and the dose and route of estrogen administration. On the basis of a review of the literature, we present the most acceptable schedule of sex steroid replacement therapy in younger patients with Turner syndrome.

  13. Prevalence of hypogonadism in male Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with and without coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Madhu, S. V.; Aslam, M.; Aiman, A. J.; Siddiqui, A.; Dwivedi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The present study is carried out to investigate hypogonadism using serum testosterone levels in male Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects with and without coronary artery disease (CAD). Subjects and Methods: A total of 150 age and body mass index-matched male subjects in the age group of 30–70 years were recruited in three groups; Group A - subjects with normal glucose tolerance, Group B - T2DM subjects without CAD, and Group C - T2DM subjects with CAD (n = 50 each group). Subjects with CAD were diagnosed on the basis of electrocardiogram, treadmill testing, stress echocardiography, or coronary angiography. Total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), bioavailable testosterone, calculated FT and glycemic parameters were measured and compared between all the three study groups. One-way ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey's test and Pearson's coefficient of correlation tests were used for analysis. Results: Hypogonadism (TT <3 ng/ml) was observed in 40% (20/50) of subjects in Group C and 32% (16/50) of subjects in Group B as compared to only 14% (7/50) of subjects in Group A (Groups A vs. B; P = 0.055, Groups A vs. C; P = 0.006 and Groups B vs. C; P = 0.53). Group C subjects had significantly lower levels of TT (3.55 ± 1.46 ng/ml vs. 4.73 ± 2.17 ng/ml, P = 0.005), calculated FT (0.062 ± 0.0255 pg/ml vs. 0.0951 ± 0.0508 pg/ml, P ≤ 0.001), and bioavailable testosterone (1.48 ± 0.65 ng/ml vs. 2.18 ± 1.20 ng/ml, P ≤ 0.001) compared to control Group A subjects. There was no significant difference in any of the testosterone parameters between Groups A and B. Furthermore, an overall positive correlation was found between hypogonadism and CAD (r = 0.177, P = 0.030, n = 150). Conclusion: We observed hypogonadism as indicated by low testosterone levels in a significant proportion of male T2DM subjects with CAD. PMID:28217495

  14. Management of Hypogonadism in Cardiovascular Patients: What Are the Implications of Testosterone Therapy on Cardiovascular Morbidity?

    PubMed

    Tanna, Monique S; Schwartzbard, Arthur; Berger, Jeffery S; Underberg, James; Gianos, Eugenia; Weintraub, Howard S

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy is recommended for men with clinical androgen deficiency with decades of evidence supporting its use for treatment of sexual, physical, and psychological consequences of male hypogonadism. In this updated review, the authors discuss the implications of testosterone deficiency and conflicting evidence regarding testosterone replacement therapy and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Based on mounting evidence, the authors conclude that testosterone therapy can be safely considered in men with appropriately diagnosed clinical androgen deficiency and concurrent cardiovascular risk factors and even manifest cardiovascular disease after a thorough discussion of potential risks and with guideline-recommended safety monitoring.

  15. Kisspeptin levels in idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosed male patients and its relation with glucose-insulin dynamic.

    PubMed

    Öztin, Hasan; Çağıltay, Eylem; Çağlayan, Sinan; Kaplan, Mustafa; Akpak, Yaşam Kemal; Karaca, Nilay; Tığlıoğlu, Mesut

    2016-12-01

    Male hypogonadism is defined as the deficiency of testosterone or sperm production synthesized by testicles or the deficiency of both. The reasons for hypogonadism may be primary, meaning testicular or secondary, meaning hypothalamohypophyseal. In hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), there is indeficiency in gonadotropic hormones due to hypothalamic or hypophyseal reasons. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is an important stimulant in releasing follicular stimulant hormone (FSH), mainly luteinizing hormone (LH). GnRH omitted is under the effect of many hormonal or stimulating factors. Kisspeptin is present in many places of the body, mostly in hypothalamic anteroventral periventricular nucleus and arcuate nucleus. Kisspeptin has a suppressor effect on the metastasis of many tumors such as breast cancer and malign melanoma metastases, and is called "metastin" for this reason. Kisspeptin is a strong stimulant of GnRH. In idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) etiology, there is gonadotropic hormone release indeficiency which cannot be clearly described. A total of 30 male hypogonatropic hypogonadism diagnosed patients over 30 years of age who have applied to Haydarpasa Education Hospital Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases Service were included in the study. Compared to the control group, the effect of kisspeptin on male patients with hypogonatropic hypogonadism and on insulin resistance developing in hypogonadism patients was investigated in our study. A statistically significant difference was detected between average kisspeptin measurements of the groups (p < 0.01). Kisspeptin measurement of the cases in the patient group were detected significantly high. No statistically significant relation was detected among kisspeptin and LH/FSH levels. Although a positive low relation was detected between kisspeptin measurements of patient group cases and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) measurements, this relation was statistically

  16. Anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism--towards a unified hypothesis of anabolic steroid action.

    PubMed

    Tan, R S; Scally, M C

    2009-06-01

    Anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH) is the functional incompetence of the testes with subnormal or impaired production of testosterone and/or spermatozoa due to administration of androgens or anabolic steroids. Anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS), both prescription and nonprescription, use is a cause of ASIH. Current AAS use includes prescribing for wasting associated conditions. Nonprescription AAS use is also believed to lead to AAS dependency or addiction. Together these two uses account for more than four million males taking AAS in one form or another for a limited duration. While both of these uses deal with the effects of AAS administration they do not account for the period after AAS cessation. The signs and symptoms of ASIH directly impact the observation of an increase in muscle mass and muscle strength from AAS administration and also reflect what is believed to demonstrate AAS dependency. More significantly, AAS prescribing after cessation adds the comorbid condition of hypogonadism to their already existing chronic illness. ASIH is critical towards any future planned use of AAS or similar compound to effect positive changes in muscle mass and muscle strength as well as an understanding for what has been termed anabolic steroid dependency. The further understanding and treatments that mitigate or prevent ASIH could contribute to androgen therapies for wasting associated diseases and stopping nonprescription AAS use. This paper proposes a unified hypothesis that the net effects for anabolic steroid administration must necessarily include the period after their cessation or ASIH.

  17. Testosterone therapy for clinical symptoms of hypogonadism in eugonadal men with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G J; Rabkin, J G

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a small exploratory study to assess whether testosterone therapy is an effective treatment for clinical symptoms characteristic of hypogonadism in eugonadal men with AIDS. Treatment consisted of 12 weeks of bi-weekly intramuscular injections of testosterone cypionate. Twenty-three men enrolled in the study; mean age was 37 and 44% were ethnic minorities. All had an AIDS diagnosis and the mean CD4 cell count was 150 cells/mm3. All baseline serum testosterone levels were within the laboratory reference range and above 500 ng/dl. Diminished libido was an inclusion criterion, plus each patient had at least one additional symptom (low mood, low energy, loss of appetite and/or weight). Nineteen men completed the trial and a majority of patients responded with regard to libido (89%), mood (67%), energy (71%), and appetite (67%) as rated by the Clinical Global Impressions Scale. With the exception of appetite, self and clinician rated measures showed significant improvement in all symptom domains. Among the 14 study completers with significant weight loss, the average weight gain was 2.3 kg, with a 1.8 kg increase in body cell mass and no change in body fat. These results suggest that testosterone is as effective in treating these symptoms in eugonadal men with AIDS as we have found in our research with hypogonadal HIV+men.

  18. Dopa-testotoxicosis: disruptive hypersexuality in hypogonadal men with prolactinomas treated with dopamine agonists.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Sunita M C; Chapman, Ian M; Falhammar, Henrik; Torpy, David J

    2017-02-01

    Dopamine agonists are the first line of therapy for prolactinomas, with high rates of biochemical control and tumour shrinkage. Toxicity is considered to be low and manageable by switching of agents and dose reduction. Dopamine agonist-induced impulse control disorders are well described in the neurology setting, but further data are required regarding this toxicity in prolactinoma patients. We performed a multicenter retrospective cohort study of eight men with prolactinomas and associated central hypogonadism. The eight men had no prior history of psychiatric disease, but each developed disruptive hypersexuality whilst on dopamine agonist therapy at various doses. Cabergoline, bromocriptine and quinagolide were all implicated. Hypersexuality had manifold consequences, including relationship discord, financial loss, reduced work performance, and illicit activity. We hypothesise that this phenomenon is due to synergy between reward pathway stimulation by dopamine agonists, together with rapid restoration of the eugonadal state after prolonged hypogonadism. We refer here to this distinct drug toxicity as 'dopa-testotoxicosis'. Given the profound impact in these patients and their families, cessation of dopamine agonists should be considered in men who develop hypersexuality, and pituitary surgery may be required to facilitate this. Awareness of this distinct impulse control disorder should enable further research into the prevalence, natural history and management of dopa-testotoxicosis. The condition is likely under-reported due to the highly personal nature of the symptoms and we suggest a simple written questionnaire to screen for hypersexuality and other behavioural symptoms within the first six months of dopamine agonist treatment.

  19. Targeted Disruption of ALK Reveals a Potential Role in Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Christoffer; Ahlgren, Ulf; Eriksson, Maria; Vernersson-Lindahl, Emma; Helland, Åslaug; Alexeyev, Oleg A.; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth H.

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking ALK activity have previously been reported to exhibit subtle behavioral phenotypes. In this study of ALK of loss of function mice we present data supporting a role for ALK in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in male mice. We observed lower level of serum testosterone at P40 in ALK knock-out males, accompanied by mild disorganization of seminiferous tubules exhibiting decreased numbers of GATA4 expressing cells. These observations highlight a role for ALK in testis function and are further supported by experiments in which chemical inhibition of ALK activity with the ALK TKI crizotinib was employed. Oral administration of crizotinib resulted in a decrease of serum testosterone levels in adult wild type male mice, which reverted to normal levels after cessation of treatment. Analysis of GnRH expression in neurons of the hypothalamus revealed a significant decrease in the number of GnRH positive neurons in ALK knock-out mice at P40 when compared with control littermates. Thus, ALK appears to be involved in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by regulating the timing of pubertal onset and testis function at the upper levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. PMID:25955180

  20. [Osteoporosis fracture in a male patient secondary to hypogonadism due to androgen deprivation treatment for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Verdú Solans, J; Roig Grau, I; Almirall Banqué, C

    2014-01-01

    A 84 year-old patient, in therapy with androgen deprivation during the last 5 years due a prostate cancer, is presented with a osteoporotic fracture of the first lumbar vertebra. The pivotal role of the primary care physician, in the prevention of the osteoporosis secondary to the hypogonadism in these patients, is highlighted.

  1. Bone mineral density in human immunodeficiency virus-1 infected men with hypogonadism prior to highly-active-antiretroviral-therapy (HAART)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Alterations of bone metabolism have been observed in numerous studies of HIV-infected patients. Sex steroids are known to profoundly influence bone mass and bone turnover. Hypogonadism is common in HIV-infection. Therefore, we performed a cross sectional study of 80 male HIV-infected patients without wasting syndrome, and 20 healthy male controls, in whom we analyzed urine and serum samples for both calciotropic hormones and markers of bone metabolism and of endocrine testicular function. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry both in the lumbar spine and Ward's triangle of the left hip. None of the patients received highly-active-antiretroviral-therapy (HAART). Compared to eugonadal HIV-infected patients, subjects with hypogonadism (n = 32; 40%) showed statistically significant decrease of serum osteocalcin (p < 0.05) and elevated urinary excretion of crosslinks (p < 0.05). However, we found 13 and 15, respectively, patients with osteopenia (t-score -1.0 to -2.5 SD below normal) of the lumbar spine. The dissociation between bone formation and resorption and the reduction of of BMD (p < 0.05) is stronger expressed in patients with hypogonadism. Habitual hypogonadism appears to be of additional relevance for bone metabolism of male HIV-positive patients prior to HAART. PMID:19258214

  2. [Micropump infusion of gonadorelin in the treatment of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in patients with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome: cases analysis and literature review].

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei-min; Bai, Wen-jun; Chen, Yi-min; Liu, Lei; Wang, Yu-jie

    2014-08-18

    Two cases of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by pituitary stalk interruption syndrome treated by pulse infusion of gonadorelin via micropump were reported, and their clinical features and the treatment process of pulse infusion of gonadorelin via micropump summarized. Both of the 2 patients were presented primarily with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. After the treatment with pulse infusion of gonadorelin via micropump, their syndrome of androgen deficiency improved and the gonadotropin levels promoted at the end of 12 weeks' follow-up. Pulse infusion of gonadorelin via micropump is an alternative to treat hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by pituitary stalk interruption syndrome.

  3. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    MedlinePlus

    ... or infections Certain medical conditions, such as iron overload Kallmann syndrome is an inherited form of HH. ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  4. Male Hypogonadism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not ...

  5. Reproduction, Smell, and Neurodevelopmental Disorders: Genetic Defects in Different Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadal Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Valdes-Socin, Hernan; Rubio Almanza, Matilde; Tomé Fernández-Ladreda, Mariana; Debray, François Guillaume; Bours, Vincent; Beckers, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The neuroendocrine control of reproduction in mammals is governed by a neural hypothalamic network of nearly 1500 gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secreting neurons that modulate the activity of the reproductive axis across life. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is a clinical syndrome that is characterized by partial or complete pubertal failure. HH may result from inadequate hypothalamic GnRH axis activation, or a failure of pituitary gonadotropin secretion/effects. In man, several genes that participate in olfactory and GnRH neuronal migration are thought to interact during the embryonic life. A growing number of mutations in different genes are responsible for congenital HH. Based on the presence or absence of olfaction dysfunction, HH is divided in two syndromes: HH with olfactory alterations [Kallmann syndrome (KS)] and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) with normal smell (normosmic IHH). KS is a heterogeneous disorder affecting 1 in 5000 males, with a three to fivefold of males over females. KS is associated with mutations in KAL1, FGFR1/FGF8, FGF17, IL17RD, PROK2/PROKR2, NELF, CHD7, HS6ST1, FLRT3, SPRY4, DUSP6, SEMA3A, NELF, and WDR11 genes that are related to defects in neuronal migration. These reproductive and olfactory deficits include a variable non-reproductive phenotype, including sensorineural deafness, coloboma, bimanual synkinesis, craniofacial abnormalities, and/or renal agenesis. Interestingly, defects in PROKR2, FGFR1, FGF8, CHD7, DUSP6, and WDR11 genes are also associated with normosmic IHH, whereas mutations in KISS1/KISSR, TAC3/TACR3, GNRH1/GNRHR, LEP/LEPR, HESX1, FSHB, and LHB are only present in patients with normosmic IHH. In this paper, we summarize the reproductive, neurodevelopmental, and genetic aspects of HH in human pathology. PMID:25071724

  6. Antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinaemia, hypogonadism and osteoporosis in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    O'Keane, Veronica

    2008-03-01

    Treatment of schizophrenic illness usually involves the long-term administration of antipsychotic drugs. Most antipsychotic agents antagonise the actions of endogenous dopamine (DA) at DA-2 receptors in the brain. The relative affinity for, and binding time to, DA-2 receptors was considered to be one of the key determinants of the antipsychotic potency of classical antipsychotic drugs. Some newer atypical antipsychotics, of which clozapine is the prototype, have a relatively poor affinity for DA-2 receptors; whereas other atypical antipsychotics are potent DA-2 antagonists. The propensity of antipsychotic agents to cause hyperprolactinaemia is related to their potency in antagonising DA-2 receptors on the anterior pituitary. In our studies, bone loss was consistently related to DA-2 antagonist potency of antipsychotic drugs, rather than their classification using conventional 'typical' versus 'atypical' systems. It is established that hyperprolactinaemia causes suppression of the reproductive endocrine axis and consequent bone mineral density (BMD) loss. Results from our group and others have demonstrated that a similar pathophysiological process is occurring in individuals with antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinaemia. We found high rates of osteoporosis and osteopenia in those taking long-term antipsychotic drugs, and this was related to the dose and duration of treatment. Bone loss was associated with hypogonadism in male and female groups. Young Caucasian women appear to be particularly vulnerable to developing hyperprolactinaemia and the associated hypogonadism and bone loss. The occurrence of menstrual dysfunction should alert clinical suspicions of hyperprolactinaemia and bone de-mineralisation. Lastly, there are no published trials examining the effects of hormone replacement on BMD in those taking long-term antipsychotic drugs, but preliminary findings from our studies suggest that active management of bone loss in those with antipsychotic-associated bone

  7. Prolonged Hypogonadism in Males Following Withdrawal from Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids: an Underrecognized Problem

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Hudson, James I.; DeLuca, James; Isaacs, Stephanie; Baggish, Aaron; Weiner, Rory; Bhasin, Shalender; Pope, Harrison G.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the frequency and severity of hypogonadal symptoms in male long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) misusers who have discontinued AAS use. Design Cross-sectional, naturalistic. Setting Outpatient facility. Participants Twenty-four male former long-term AAS users and 36 non-AAS-using weightlifters, recruited by advertisement in Massachusetts, USA. Five of the former users were currently receiving treatment with physiologic testosterone replacement, leaving 19 untreated users for the numerical comparisons below. Measurements The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, questions regarding history of AAS use, physical examination, serum hormone determinations, and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Findings Compared with the 36 non-AAS-using weightlifters, the 19 untreated former AAS users displayed significantly smaller testicular volumes (estimated difference [95% confidence interval (CI)]: 2.3 [0.1, 4.5] ml; p = 0.042) and lower serum testosterone levels (estimated difference: 131 [25, 227] dL; p = 0.009), with five users showing testosterone levels below 200 ng/dL despite abstinence from AAS for 3–26 months. Untreated former users also displayed significantly lower scores on the IIEF Sexual Desire subscale (estimated difference: 2.4 [1.3, 3.5] points on a 10-point scale; p < 0.001). In the overall group of 24 treated plus untreated former users, 7 (29%) had experienced major depressive episodes during AAS withdrawal; 4 of these had not experienced major depressive episodes at any other time. Two men (8%) had failed to regain normal libidinal or erectile function despite adequate replacement testosterone treatment. Conclusions Among long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid misusers, anabolic-androgenic steroid-withdrawal hypogonadism appears to be common, frequently prolonged, and associated with substantial morbidity. PMID:25598171

  8. Management of hypogonadism in adolescent girls and adult women with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eldar-Geva, Talia; Hirsch, Harry J; Pollak, Yehuda; Benarroch, Fortu; Gross-Tsur, Varda

    2013-12-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an insatiable appetite, dysmorphic features, cognitive and behavioral difficulties, and hypogonadism. The heterogeneous reproductive hormone profiles indicate that some PWS women may have symptoms of hypoestrogenism, while others may potentially be fertile. We describe our experience in the assessment and treatment of hypogonadism in adolescents and adult females with PWS. The study population consisted of 20 PWS females, age ≥16 years (27.3 ± 7.9 years), followed in our clinic (12 deletion, 7 uniparental disomy, 1 imprinting-center defect). General physical examination, pubertal assessment, body mass index (BMI), gynecological examination, ultrasonography, bone densitometry, and hormonal profiles [FSH, LH, inhibin B, estradiol, prolactin, and TSH] were performed. The relevant assessed factors were: FSH and inhibin B, menstrual cycles (oligo/amenorrhea or irregular bleeding), ultrasound findings (endometrial thickness, uterine/ovarian abnormalities), BMI, bone densitometry, and patient/caregivers attitude. We classified seven women with inhibin B >20 ng/ml as potentially fertile. Following the assessment of the above factors, we recommended the individual-specific treatment; contraceptive pills, intra-uterine device, estrogen/progesterone replacement, and cyclic progesterone, in 3, 1, 4, and 1 patients, respectively. Four patients did not follow our recommendations due to poor compliance or family refusal. We recommended contraception pills for one 26-year-old woman with inhibin B and FSH levels 53 ng/ml and 6.4 IU/L; however, she refused treatment, conceived spontaneously and had an abortion. Guidelines for hormonal replacement therapy in PWS need to be tailored individually depending on physical development, hormonal profiles, bone density, and emotional and social needs of each PWS adolescent and adult.

  9. Hypogonadism predisposes males to the development of behavioural and neuroplastic depressive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Steven R; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Galea, Liisa A M

    2011-10-01

    The incidence of depression is 2-3× higher in women particularly during the reproductive years, an occurrence that has been associated with levels of sex hormones. The age-related decline of testosterone levels in men corresponds with the increased acquisition of depressive symptoms, and hormone replacement therapy can be efficacious in treating depression in hypogonadal men. Although it is not possible to model depression in rodents, it is possible to model some of the symptoms of depression including a dysregulated stress response and altered neuroplasticity. Among animal models of depression, chronic mild unpredictable stress (CMS) is a common paradigm used to induce depressive-like behaviours in rodents, disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis and decrease hippocampal neuroplasticity. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of hypogonadism, produced by gonadectomy, on the acquisition of depressive-like behaviours and changes in hippocampal neuroplasticity in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. A 21-day unpredictable CMS protocol was used on gonadectomised (GDX) and sham-operated males which produced an attenuation of weight gain in the GDX males receiving CMS treatment (GDX-CMS). Behavioural analysis was carried out to assess anxiety- and depressive-like behaviours. The combination of GDX and CMS produced greater passive behaviours within the forced swim test than CMS exposure alone. Similarly, hippocampal cell proliferation, neurogenesis and the expression of the neuroplastic protein polysialated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) were all significantly reduced in the GDX-CMS group compared to all other treatment groups. These findings indicate that testicular hormones confer resiliency to chronic stress in males therefore reducing the likelihood of developing putative physiological, behavioural or neurological depressive-like phenotypes.

  10. Argirein alleviates stress-induced and diabetic hypogonadism in rats via normalizing testis endothelin receptor A and connexin 43

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Hu, Chen; Khan, Hussein-hamed; Shi, Fang-hong; Cong, Xiao-dong; Li, Qing; Dai, Yin; Dai, De-zai

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Argirein (rhein-arginine) is a derivative of rhein isolated from Chinese rhubarb (Rheum Officinale Baill.) that exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study we investigated the effects of argirein on stress-induced (hypergonadotrophic) and diabetic (hypogonadotrophic) hypogonadism in male rats. Methods: Stress-induced and diabetic hypogonadism was induced in male rats via injection of isoproterenol (ISO) or streptozotocin (STZ). ISO-injected rats were treated with argirein (30 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) or testosterone replacement (0.5 mg·kg−1·d−1, sc) for 5 days, and STZ-injected rats were treated with argirein (40–120 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) or aminoguanidine (100 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) for 4 weeks. After the rats were euthanized, blood samples and testes were collected. Serum hormone levels were measured, and the expression of endothelin receptor A (ETA), connexin 43 (Cx43) and other proteins in testes was detected. For in vitro experiments, testis homogenate was prepared from normal male rats, and incubated with ISO (1 μmol/L) or high glucose (27 mmol/L). Results: ISO injection induced hyper-gonadotrophic hypogonadism characterized by low testosterone and high FSH and LH levels in the serum, whereas STZ injection induced hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism as evidenced by low testosterone and low FSH and LH levels in the serum. In the testes of ISO- and STZ-injected rats, the expression of ETA, MMP-9, NADPH oxidase and pPKCε was significantly increased, and the expression of Cx43 was decreased. Administration of argirein attenuated both the abnormal serum hormone levels and the testis changes in ISO- and STZ-injected rats, and aminoguanidine produced similar actions in STZ-injected rats; testosterone replacement reversed the abnormal serum hormone levels, but did not affect the testis changes in ISO-injected rats. Argirein (0.3–3 μmol/L) exerted similar effects in testis homogenate incubated with ISO or high glucose in

  11. Ataxia and hypogonadism caused by the loss of ubiquitin ligase activity of the U box protein CHIP

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chang-He; Schisler, Jonathan C.; Rubel, Carrie E.; Tan, Song; Song, Bo; McDonough, Holly; Xu, Lei; Portbury, Andrea L.; Mao, Cheng-Yuan; True, Cadence; Wang, Rui-Hao; Wang, Qing-Zhi; Sun, Shi-Lei; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Patterson, Cam; Xu, Yu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a rare Mendelian neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia and hypogonadism. Recently, it was suggested that disordered ubiquitination underlies GHS though the discovery of exome mutations in the E3 ligase RNF216 and deubiquitinase OTUD4. We performed exome sequencing in a family with two of three siblings afflicted with ataxia and hypogonadism and identified a homozygous mutation in STUB1 (NM_005861) c.737C→T, p.Thr246Met, a gene that encodes the protein CHIP (C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein). CHIP plays a central role in regulating protein quality control, in part through its ability to function as an E3 ligase. Loss of CHIP function has long been associated with protein misfolding and aggregation in several genetic mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders; however, a role for CHIP in human neurological disease has yet to be identified. Introduction of the Thr246Met mutation into CHIP results in a loss of ubiquitin ligase activity measured directly using recombinant proteins as well as in cell culture models. Loss of CHIP function in mice resulted in behavioral and reproductive impairments that mimic human ataxia and hypogonadism. We conclude that GHS can be caused by a loss-of-function mutation in CHIP. Our findings further highlight the role of disordered ubiquitination and protein quality control in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease and demonstrate the utility of combining whole-exome sequencing with molecular analyses and animal models to define causal disease polymorphisms. PMID:24113144

  12. The low density lipoprotein receptor modulates the effects of hypogonadism on diet-induced obesity and related metabolic perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Caterina; Mpatsoulis, Diogenis; Natsos, Anastasios; Petropoulou, Peristera-Ioanna; Zvintzou, Evangelia; Traish, Abdulmaged M.; Voshol, Peter J.; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Kypreos, Kyriakos E.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we investigated how LDL receptor deficiency (Ldlr−/−) modulates the effects of testosterone on obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions. Though sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice fed Western-type diet for 12 weeks became obese and showed disturbed plasma glucose metabolism and plasma cholesterol and TG profiles, castrated mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity and had improved glucose metabolism and reduced plasma TG levels, despite a further deterioration in their plasma cholesterol profile. The effect of hypogonadism on diet-induced weight gain of Ldlr−/− mice was independent of ApoE and Lrp1. Indirect calorimetry analysis indicated that hypogonadism in Ldlr−/− mice was associated with increased metabolic rate. Indeed, mitochondrial cytochrome c and uncoupling protein 1 expression were elevated, primarily in white adipose tissue, confirming increased mitochondrial metabolic activity due to thermogenesis. Testosterone replacement in castrated Ldlr−/− mice for a period of 8 weeks promoted diet-induced obesity, indicating a direct role of testosterone in the observed phenotype. Treatment of sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice with the aromatase inhibitor exemestane for 8 weeks showed that the obesity of castrated Ldlr−/− mice is independent of estrogens. Overall, our data reveal a novel role of Ldlr as functional modulator of metabolic alterations associated with hypogonadism. PMID:24837748

  13. Testosterone restoration using enclomiphene citrate in men with secondary hypogonadism: a pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Wiehle, Ronald; Cunningham, Glenn R; Pitteloud, Nelly; Wike, Jenny; Hsu, Kuang; Fontenot, Gregory K; Rosner, Michele; Dwyer, Andrew; Podolski, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the pharmacodynamic profile of serum total testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels in men with secondary hypogonadism after initial and chronic daily oral doses of enclomiphene citrate vs transdermal testosterone. To determine the effects of daily oral doses of enclomiphene citrate in comparison with transdermal testosterone on other hormones and markers in men with secondary hypogonadism. Patients and Methods This was a randomized, single-blind, two-centre, phase II study to evaluate the effects of three different doses of enclomiphene citrate (6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg) vs transdermal testosterone on 24-h LH and total testosterone in otherwise normal healthy men with secondary hypogonadism. Forty-eight men were enrolled in the trial (the intent-to-treat population), but four men had testosterone levels >350 ng/dL at baseline. Forty-four men completed the study per protocol. All subjects enrolled in this trial had serum total testosterone in the low range (<350 ng/dL) and had low to normal LH (<12 IU/L) on at least two occasions. Total testosterone and LH levels were assessed each hour for 24 h to examine the effects at each of three treatment doses of enclomiphene citrate vs a standard dose (5 g) of transdermal testosterone. In the initial profile, total testosterone and LH were determined in a naïve population after a single initial oral or transdermal treatment (day 1). This was contrasted to that seen after 6 weeks of continuous daily oral or transdermal treatment (day 42). The pharmacokinetics of enclomiphene citrate were assessed in a select subpopulation. Serum samples were obtained over the course of the study to determine the levels of various hormones and lipids. Results After 6 weeks of continuous use, the mean (sd) concentration of total testosterone at day 42 was 604 (160) ng/dL for men taking the highest dose of enclomiphene citrate (enclomiphene citrate, 25 mg daily) and 500 (278) ng in those men treated with transdermal

  14. An update on the role of testosterone replacement therapy in the management of hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    While US testosterone prescriptions have tripled in the last decade with lower trends in Europe, debate continues over the risks, benefits and appropriate use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Some authors blame advertising and the availability of more convenient formulations whilst other have pointed out that the routine testing of men with erectile dysfunction (a significant marker of cardiovascular risk) and those with diabetes would inevitably increase the diagnosis of hypogonadism and lead to an increase in totally appropriate prescribing. They commented that this was merely an appropriate correction of previous underdiagnosis and undertreatment by adherence to evidence-based guidelines. Urologists and primary care physicians are the most frequent initiators of TRT, usually for erectile dysfunction. Benefits are clearly established for sexual function, increase in lean muscle mass and strength, mood and cognitive function, with possible reduction in frailty and osteoporosis. There remains no evidence that TRT is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer or symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, yet the decision to initiate and continue therapy is often decided by urologists. The cardiovascular issues associated with TRT have been clarified by recent studies showing clearly that therapy associated with clear rise in testosterone levels are associated with reduced mortality. Studies reporting to show increased risk have been subject to flawed designs with inadequate baseline diagnosis and follow-up testing. Effectively they have compared nontreated patients with undertreated or on-compliant subjects involving a range of different therapy regimens. Recent evidence suggests long acting injections may be associated with decreased cardiovascular risk but the transdermal route may be associated with potentially relatively greater risk because of conversion to dihydrotestosterone by the effect of 5α reductase in skin. The multiple effects of TRT

  15. Natesto™ , a novel testosterone nasal gel, normalizes androgen levels in hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Rogol, A D; Tkachenko, N; Bryson, N

    2016-01-01

    Advantages of testosterone nasal gel include ease of administration, low dose, and no risk of secondary transference. The efficacy and safety of testosterone nasal gel was evaluated in hypogonadal males. The ninety-day, randomized, open-label, dose-ranging study, included potential dose titration and sequential safety extensions to 1 year. At 39 US outpatient sites, 306 men (mean age 54.4 years) with two fasting morning total serum testosterone levels <300 ng/dL were randomized (n = 228, b.i.d. dosing; n = 78, t.i.d. dosing). Natesto(™) Testosterone Nasal Gel was self-administered, using a multiple-dose dispenser, as two or three daily doses (5.5 mg per nostril, 11.0 mg single dose). Total daily doses were 22 mg or 33 mg. The primary endpoint was the Percentage of patients with Day-90 serum total testosterone average concentration (C(avg)) value within the eugonadal range (≥300 ng/dL, ≤1050 ng/dL). At Day 90, 200/273 subjects (73%; 95% CI 68, 79) in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population and 180/237 subjects (76%; 71, 81) in the per-protocol (PP) population were in the normal range. Also, in the normal range were 68% (61, 74) of ITT subjects and 70% (63, 77) of PP subjects in the titration arm, as well as, 90% (83, 97) of ITT subjects and 91% (84, 98) of PP subjects in the fixed-dose arm. Natesto(™) 11 mg b.i.d. or 11 mg t.i.d. restores normal serum total testosterone levels in most hypogonadal men. Erectile function, mood, body composition, and bone mineral density improved from baseline. Treatment was well tolerated; adverse event rates were low. Adverse event discontinuation rates were 2.1% (b.i.d.) and 3.7% (t.i.d.). This study lacked a placebo or an active comparator control which limited the ability to adequately assess some measures.

  16. Late-onset hypogonadism: current concepts and controversies of pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Huhtaniemi, Ilpo

    2014-01-01

    Although suppressed serum testosterone (T) is common in ageing men, only a small proportion of them develop the genuine syndrome of low T associated with diffuse sexual (e.g., erectile dysfunction), physical (e.g. loss of vigor and frailty) and psychological (e.g., depression) symptoms. This syndrome carries many names, including male menopause or climacterium, andropause and partial androgen deficiency of the ageing male (PADAM). Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) describes it best and is therefore generally preferred. The decrease of T in LOH is often marginal, and hypogonadism can be either due to primary testicular failure (low T, high luteinizing hormone (LH)) or secondary to a hypothalamic-pituitary failure (low T, low or inappropriately normal LH). The latter form is more common and it is usually associated with overweight/obesity or chronic diseases (e.g., type 2 diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and frailty). A problem with the diagnosis of LOH is that often the symptoms (in 20%-40% of unselected men) and low circulating T (in 20% of men >70 years of age) do not coincide in the same individual. The European Male Ageing Study (EMAS) has recently defined the strict diagnostic criteria for LOH to include the simultaneous presence of reproducibly low serum T (total T <11 nmol l-1 and free T <220 pmol l-1 ) and three sexual symptoms (erectile dysfunction, and reduced frequency of sexual thoughts and morning erections). By these criteria, only 2% of 40- to 80-year-old men have LOH. In particular obesity, but also impaired general health, are more common causes of low T than chronological age per se. Evidence-based information whether, and how, LOH should be treated is sparse. The most logical approach is lifestyle modification, weight reduction and good treatment of comorbid diseases. T replacement is widely used for the treatment, but evidence-based information about its real benefi ts and short- and

  17. Testosterone replacement therapy does not promote priapism in hypogonadal men with sickle cell disease: 12-month safety report.

    PubMed

    Morrison, B F; Reid, M; Madden, W; Burnett, A L

    2013-07-01

    Hypogonadism, which is highly prevalent in men with sickle cell disease (SCD), affects quality of life and causes great morbidity. The safety of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in SCD in relation to priapism episodes is relatively unknown. Our aim was to monitor the safety of TRT in a cohort of seven hypogonadal men with SCD. Testosterone undecanoate (Nebido) 1 g was administered intramuscularly to adult men with homozygous SCD (Hb SS) having hypogonadism [serum total testosterone ≤12.0 nmol/L (346 ng/dL), reference range 12.5-38.1 nmol/L (360-1098 ng/dL)] for 12 months. Serum total testosterone, haemoglobin, haematocrit, renal and liver function tests, glucose and PSA measurements were done at baseline and 12-month follow-up. Trough serum total testosterone, haemoglobin and haematocrit were measured three monthly. Priapism events and adverse drug events were assessed every 3 months. International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), Androgen Deficiency in the Ageing Male (ADAM) and World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL) questionnaires were administered at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Seven men with a mean age of 34.4 years were treated. Median total testosterone increased from 10.6 to 11.2 nmol/L (p = 0.46). Median serum lactate dehydrogenase levels decreased from 1445 to 1143.5 IU/L (p < 0.05), while all other laboratory indices remained stable. Injection site pain was the most frequently reported adverse event, with no increases in painful crises, hypersensitivity or oedema. After TRT, there was no significant increase in priapism frequency. Median questionnaire scores were increased for the IIEF (46-68, p = 0.018), reduced for ADAM (5.0-2.0, p = 0.016) and unchanged for WHOQOL (98-103, p = 0.086). TRT using testosterone undecanoate with eugonadal intent for hypogonadism appears to be safe in men with SCD. This treatment does not appear to promote priapism occurrences and rather it possibly improves sexual function. Future prospective

  18. Adding liraglutide to lifestyle changes, metformin and testosterone therapy boosts erectile function in diabetic obese men with overt hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Giagulli, V A; Carbone, M D; Ramunni, M I; Licchelli, B; De Pergola, G; Sabbà, C; Guastamacchia, E; Triggiani, V

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective observational study was to evaluate whether adding liraglutide to lifestyle changes, metformin (Met) and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), by means of improving weight and glycaemic control, could boost erectile function in type 2 diabetic obese men with overt hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction (ED) in a 'real-life setting'. Forty-three obese, diabetic and hypogonadal men (aged 45-59 years) were evaluated because of complaining about the recent onset of ED. They were subdivided into two groups according to whether hypogonadism occurred after puberty (G1; n = 30: 25 with dysfunctional hypogonadism and 5 with acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism) or before puberty (G2; n = 13: 10 with Klinefelter's syndrome and 3 with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). Both G1 and G2 patients were given a combination of testosterone (T) [testosterone undecanoate (TU) 1000 mg/every 12 weeks] and Met (2000-3000 mg/day) for 1 year. In the poor responders (N) to this therapy in terms of glycaemic target (G1N: n = 16; G2N: n = 10), liraglutide (L) (1.2 μg/day) was added for a second year, while the good responders (Y) to T + Met (G1Y: 14/30 and G2Y: 3/13) continued this two drugs regimen therapy for another year. All patients were asked to fill in the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF 15) questionnaire before starting TU plus Met (T1) and after 12 months (T2) and 24 months (T3) of treatment. Patients underwent a clinical examination and a determination of serum sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), total testosterone (T) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) at T1, T2 and T3. At T2, each patient obtained an improvement of ED (p < 0.01) and of the metabolic parameters without reaching, however, the glycaemic goals [HbA1c = >7.5% (>58 mmol/mol)], while T turned out to be within the range of young men. L added to TU and Met regimen in G1N and G2N allowed these patients to reach not only the glycaemic target [HbA1c = <7.5% (<58 nmol

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Sexual Dysfunctions in Late-Onset Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Wook

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone is the principal androgen in the human male. The decline of testosterone with aging was recognized to be associated with a number of symptoms and signs that reduce the quality of life and that may even have severe, debilitating consequences. Clinically, late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) is diagnosed by use of biochemical and clinical measures. Despite published guidelines and recommendations, however, uncertainty surrounds the profile of clinical symptoms as well as the biochemical threshold of diagnosis. Clinicians should be aware of these shortcomings while adhering to the guidelines. Current treatment methods are centered on restoring testosterone to mid to lower levels of young men with natural testosterone replacements. Although recent studies have highlighted possible additional benefits involving improvement of systemic disorders, the goal of treatment is to improve sexual function, while observing for adverse effects in the prostate. Overall, the problem of LOH in debilitating the quality of life and well-being is real, and by following proper guidelines with attentiveness to the results of treatment trials, testosterone replacement therapy presents a safe and effective treatment option. PMID:22195260

  20. Male Hypogonadism Causes Obesity Associated with Impairment of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Akira; Fujitani, Kohei; Takagi, Kohei; Kimura, Tomoki; Nagase, Hisamitsu; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The steroid hormones synthesized by the male gonads play diverse roles in biological processes. Androgens, the primary hormones produced by the male gonads, are key regulators of fat homeostasis, hence androgen-deprivation therapies often induce obesity. However, the molecular mechanism by which male gonadal dysfunction leads to obesity remains unclear, because results from animal studies regarding fat accumulation in the context of gonadal defects do not reflect clinical findings. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying the development of obesity in animals with male gonadal dysfunction by analyzing the long-term physiological changes in adult male mice with surgical castration. Nine weeks after surgery, white adipose tissue (WAT) mass was higher in the castrated (Cas) mice than in sham-operated (Sham) mice. In addition, castration induced hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. However, genes involved in lipid metabolism, including hormone-sensitive lipase, were unchanged in the adipose tissue of the Cas mice, despite the increase in WAT. In contrast, a hepatic gluconeogenesis gene, glucose-6-phosphatase, was significantly upregulated in the Cas mice than in Sham mice. Our findings suggest that long-term hypogonadism in mice mimics the effects in humans, and a potential molecular basis for the induction of obesity in this model is impairment of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

  1. Carnitine deficiency is associated with late-onset hypogonadism and depression in uremic men with hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Kei; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Sakai, Kazuko; Kaida, Yusuke; Minami, Aki; Nakayama, Yosuke; Ando, Ryotaro; Obara, Nana; Ueda, Seiji; Wada, Yoshifumi; Okuda, Seiya

    2014-12-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) and depression contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) in male hemodialysis (HD) patients. Carnitine deficiency is frequently observed in HD patients, playing a role in CVD. We examined whether carnitine deficiency was independently associated with LOH and depression in these patients. Twenty-six male HD patients underwent determinations of serum levels of free carnitine and testosterone. Status of LOH and depression were evaluated by questionnaires using aging male symptoms' (AMS) scale and self-rating depression scale (SDS), respectively. Free carnitine and testosterone levels in male HD patients were significantly lower than those in age-matched healthy male subjects. Linear regression analysis showed that AMS scale was positively associated with SDS. Univariate regression analysis revealed that total carnitine (inversely), free carnitine (inversely) and HD duration were correlated with AMS scale. Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed that free carnitine was an independent determinant of AMS scale. Furthermore, free carnitine was also independently correlated with SDS in male HD patients. This study demonstrated that decreased free carnitine levels were independently associated with AMS scale and SDS in male HD patients. The observations suggest that decreased free carnitine levels could be a marker and therapeutic target of LOH and depression in uremic men with HD.

  2. Cognitive effects of testosterone and finasteride administration in older hypogonadal men

    PubMed Central

    Borst, Stephen E; Yarrow, Joshua F; Fernandez, Carmen; Conover, Christine F; Ye, Fan; Meuleman, John R; Morrow, Matthew; Zou, Baiming; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    Serum concentrations of neuroactive androgens decline in older men and, in some studies, low testosterone is associated with decreased cognitive function and incidence of depression. Existing studies evaluating the effect of testosterone administration on cognition in older men have been largely inconclusive, with some studies reporting minor to moderate cognitive benefit, while others indicate no cognitive effect. Our objective was to assess the cognitive effects of treating older hypogonadal men for 1 year with a supraphysiological dose of testosterone, either alone or in combination with finasteride (a type II 5α-reductase inhibitor), in order to determine whether testosterone produces cognitive benefit and whether suppressed dihydrotestosterone influences cognition. Sixty men aged ≥60 years with a serum testosterone concentration of ≤300 ng/dL or bioavailable testosterone ≤70 ng/dL and no evidence of cognitive impairment received testosterone-enanthate (125 mg/week) versus vehicle, paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) versus placebo using a 2×2 factorial design. Testosterone caused a small decrease in depressive symptoms as assessed by the Geriatric Depression Scale and a moderate increase in visuospatial memory as assessed by performance on a recall trial of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test. Finasteride caused a small increase in performance on the Benton Judgment of Line Orientation test. In total, major improvements in cognition were not observed either with testosterone or finasteride. Further studies are warranted to determine if testosterone replacement may improve cognition in other domains. PMID:25143719

  3. Estrogen receptor alpha single nucleotide polymorphism as predictor of diabetes type 2 risk in hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Linnér, Carl; Svartberg, Johan; Giwercman, Aleksander; Giwercman, Yvonne Lundberg

    2013-06-01

    Estradiol (E2) is, apart from its role as a reproductive hormone, also important for cardiac function and bone maturation in both genders. It has also been shown to play a role in insulin production, energy expenditure and in inducing lipolysis. The aim of the study was to investigate if low circulating testosterone or E2 levels in combination with variants in the estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) and estrogen receptor beta (ESR2) genes were of importance for the risk of type-2 diabetes. The single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2207396 and rs1256049, in ESR1 and ESR2, respectively, were analysed by allele specific PCR in 172 elderly men from the population-based Tromsø study. The results were adjusted for age. In individuals with low total (≤11 nmol/L) or free testosterone (≤0.18 nmol/L) being carriers of the variant A-allele in ESR1 was associated with 7.3 and 15.9 times, respectively, increased odds ratio of being diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 2 (p = 0.025 and p = 0.018, respectively). Lower concentrations of E2 did not seem to increase the risk of being diagnosed with diabetes. In conclusion, in hypogonadal men, the rs2207396 variant in ESR1 predicts the risk of type 2 diabetes.

  4. Reserved Sertoli cell function in the hypogonadic male patients with myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lou, X Y; Nishi, Y; Haji, M; Antoku, Y; Tanaka, S; Ikuyama, S; Yanase, T; Takayanagi, R; Nawata, H

    1994-05-01

    To clarify the Sertoli cell and Leydig cell function in hypogonadic male patients with myotonic dystrophy (DM), serum concentrations of inhibin, total testosterone (TT), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) were measured by radioimmunoassay in 6 male DM patients (41 to 56 years old, 47.7 +/- 5.05 years old) and compared with those in normal adult men. In 116 healthy men aged from 24 to 92 years, serum inhibin and TT levels decreased and serum FSH and LH concentrations increased with advancing age. There was an inverse correlation between serum inhibin and FSH. These results support the concept of negative feedback regulation system of FSH secretion by inhibin. Male DM patients showed significantly lower serum TT and higher concentrations of FSH and LH, compared with the age-matched 39 normal adult men (49-59 years old, 48.2 +/- 6.14 years old). However, there was no significant difference in serum inhibin levels between the patients and normal counterparts. These results indicate that the Sertoli cell function is reserved in male DM patient, although the Leydig cell function is impaired. It is also suggested that in these patients a negative feedback control system between inhibin and FSH may be disordered to some extent.

  5. Hypogonadism Associated with Cyp19a1 (Aromatase) Posttranscriptional Upregulation in Celf1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Gaella; Cibois, Marie; Viet, Justine; Fostier, Alexis; Deschamps, Stéphane; Pastezeur, Sylvain; Massart, Catherine; Gschloessl, Bernhard; Gautier-Courteille, Carole; Paillard, Luc

    2015-09-01

    CELF1 is a multifunctional RNA-binding protein that controls several aspects of RNA fate. The targeted disruption of the Celf1 gene in mice causes male infertility due to impaired spermiogenesis, the postmeiotic differentiation of male gametes. Here, we investigated the molecular reasons that underlie this testicular phenotype. By measuring sex hormone levels, we detected low concentrations of testosterone in Celf1-null mice. We investigated the effect of Celf1 disruption on the expression levels of steroidogenic enzyme genes, and we observed that Cyp19a1 was upregulated. Cyp19a1 encodes aromatase, which transforms testosterone into estradiol. Administration of testosterone or the aromatase inhibitor letrozole partly rescued the spermiogenesis defects, indicating that a lack of testosterone associated with excessive aromatase contributes to the testicular phenotype. In vivo and in vitro interaction assays demonstrated that CELF1 binds to Cyp19a1 mRNA, and reporter assays supported the conclusion that CELF1 directly represses Cyp19a1 translation. We conclude that CELF1 downregulates Cyp19a1 (Aromatase) posttranscriptionally to achieve high concentrations of testosterone compatible with spermiogenesis completion. We discuss the implications of these findings with respect to reproductive defects in men, including patients suffering from isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and myotonic dystrophy type I.

  6. Cognitive effects of testosterone and finasteride administration in older hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Borst, Stephen E; Yarrow, Joshua F; Fernandez, Carmen; Conover, Christine F; Ye, Fan; Meuleman, John R; Morrow, Matthew; Zou, Baiming; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    Serum concentrations of neuroactive androgens decline in older men and, in some studies, low testosterone is associated with decreased cognitive function and incidence of depression. Existing studies evaluating the effect of testosterone administration on cognition in older men have been largely inconclusive, with some studies reporting minor to moderate cognitive benefit, while others indicate no cognitive effect. Our objective was to assess the cognitive effects of treating older hypogonadal men for 1 year with a supraphysiological dose of testosterone, either alone or in combination with finasteride (a type II 5α-reductase inhibitor), in order to determine whether testosterone produces cognitive benefit and whether suppressed dihydrotestosterone influences cognition. Sixty men aged ≥ 60 years with a serum testosterone concentration of ≤ 300 ng/dL or bioavailable testosterone ≤ 70 ng/dL and no evidence of cognitive impairment received testosterone-enanthate (125 mg/week) versus vehicle, paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) versus placebo using a 2×2 factorial design. Testosterone caused a small decrease in depressive symptoms as assessed by the Geriatric Depression Scale and a moderate increase in visuospatial memory as assessed by performance on a recall trial of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test. Finasteride caused a small increase in performance on the Benton Judgment of Line Orientation test. In total, major improvements in cognition were not observed either with testosterone or finasteride. Further studies are warranted to determine if testosterone replacement may improve cognition in other domains.

  7. Multiple Fractures in Patient with Graves' Disease Accompanied by Isolated Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hyon-Seung; Kim, Ji Min; Ju, Sang Hyeon; Lee, Younghak; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) is known to decrease bone mineral density due to deficiency of sex steroid hormone. Graves' disease is also an important cause of secondary osteoporosis. However, IHH does not preclude the development of primary hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease, leading to more severe osteoporosis rapidly. Here, we describe the first case of 35-year-old Asian female patient with IHH accompanied by Graves' disease and osteoporosis-induced multiple fractures. Endocrine laboratory findings revealed preserved anterior pituitary functions except for secretion of gonadotropins and showed primary hyperthyroidism with positive autoantibodies. Sella magnetic resonance imaging showed slightly small sized pituitary gland without mass lesion. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed severe osteoporosis in lumbar spine and femur neck of the patient. Plain film radiography of the pelvis and shoulder revealed a displaced and nondisplaced fracture, respectively. After surgical fixation with screws for the femoral fracture, the patient was treated with antithyroid medication, calcium, and vitamin D until now and has been recovering fairly well. We report a patient of IHH with Graves' disease and multiple fractures that is a first case in Korea. PMID:26981520

  8. 7Alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone maintains sexual behavior and mood in hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R A; Martin, C W; Kung, A W; Everington, D; Pun, T C; Tan, K C; Bancroft, J; Sundaram, K; Moo-Young, A J; Baird, D T

    1999-10-01

    The synthetic steroid 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT) is a potent androgen that is resistant to 5alpha-reductase. It thus has decreased activity at the prostate and may have advantages over testosterone-based regimens in long term treatment or as part of a male contraceptive. Administration to eugonadal men results in suppression of gonadotropins, but its ability to support androgen-dependent behavior has not been investigated. For sustained release administration, MENT acetate was used, because its diffusion characteristics were more suitable for use in implants. However, upon release the acetate is rapidly hydrolyzed, and MENT is the biologically active moiety in circulation. We studied the effects of MENT on sexual interest and activity, spontaneous erection, and mood states in comparison with testosterone enanthate (TE) in 20 Caucasian and Chinese hypogonadal men recruited in Edinburgh and Hong Kong (n = 10 in each center). Outcomes were measured using a combination of daily diaries, semistructured interviews, and questionnaires. Nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) was also recorded in the Edinburgh group. After withdrawal of androgen replacement treatment (wash-out phase) for a minimum of 6 weeks, subjects were randomized to two groups in a cross-over design. Drug treatment regimens were of 6-week duration and consisted of two implants, each containing 115 mg MENT acetate, inserted s.c. into the upper arm and removed after 6 weeks and two injections of TE (200 mg, i.m.) 3 weeks apart. MENT treatment resulted in stable plasma MENT concentrations of 1.4 +/- 0.1 nmol/L after 3 weeks and 1.3 +/- 0.1 nmol/L after 6 weeks (mean +/- SEM; all men). Nadir testosterone concentrations were 3.6 +/- 0.6 nmol/L at the end of the wash-out phase and 9.4 +/- 0.6 nmol/L 3 weeks after each injection. There were no differences in hormone concentrations between centers. There were no adverse toxicological effects. There were only minor differences between the two treatments

  9. Increases in bone density during treatment of men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.S.; Klibanski, A.; Neer, R.M.; Doppelt, S.H.; Rosenthal, D.I.; Segre, G.V.; Crowley, W.F. Jr. )

    1989-10-01

    To assess the effects of gonadal steroid replacement on bone density in men with osteoporosis due to severe hypogonadism, we measured cortical bone density in the distal radius by 125I photon absorptiometry and trabecular bone density in the lumbar spine by quantitative computed tomography in 21 men with isolated GnRH deficiency while serum testosterone levels were maintained in the normal adult male range for 12-31 months (mean +/- SE, 23.7 +/- 1.1). In men who initially had fused epiphyses (n = 15), cortical bone density increased from 0.71 +/- 0.02 to 0.74 +/- 0.01 g/cm2 (P less than 0.01), while trabecular bone density did not change (116 +/- 9 compared with 119 +/- 7 mg/cm3). In men who initially had open epiphyses (n = 6), cortical bone density increased from 0.62 +/- 0.01 to 0.70 +/- 0.03 g/cm2 (P less than 0.01), while trabecular bone density increased from 96 +/- 13 to 109 +/- 12 mg/cm3 (P less than 0.01). Cortical bone density increased 0.03 +/- 0.01 g/cm2 in men with fused epiphyses and 0.08 +/- 0.02 g/cm2 in men with open epiphyses (P less than 0.05). Despite these increases, neither cortical nor trabecular bone density returned to normal levels. Histomorphometric analyses of iliac crest bone biopsies demonstrated that most of the men had low turnover osteoporosis, although some men had normal to high turnover osteoporosis. We conclude that bone density increases during gonadal steroid replacement of GnRH-deficient men, particularly in men who are skeletally immature.

  10. Risk of Hypogonadism From Scatter Radiation During Pelvic Radiation in Male Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, Ivan; Vuong, Te Garant, Aurelie; Ducruet, Thierry; Doran, Patrick; Faria, Sergio; Liberman, Sender; Richard, Carole; Letellier, Francois; Charlebois, Patrick; Loungnarath, Rasmy; Stein, Barry; Devic, Slobodan

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have reported fluctuations in sex hormones during pelvic irradiation. The objective of this study was to observe the effects of radiation on hormonal profiles for two treatment modalities: conventional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) given neoadjuvantly for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Routine serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels were collected from 119 consecutive male patients receiving either EBRT, using 45.0-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy or HDRBT using 26 Gy in 4 fractions. Results: Thirty patients with initially abnormal profiles were excluded. Profiles included in this study were collected from 51 patients treated with EBRT and 38 patients treated with HDRBT, all of whom had normal hormonal profiles before treatment. Mean follow-up times were 17 months for the entire patient cohort-14 and 20 months, respectively-for the EBRT and HDRBT arms. Dosimetry results revealed a mean cumulative testicular dose of 1.24 Gy received in EBRT patients compared with 0.27 Gy in the HDRBT group. After treatment, FSH and LH were elevated in all patients but were more pronounced in the EBRT group. The testosterone-to-LH ratio was significantly lower (p = 0.0036) in EBRT patients for tumors in the lower third of the rectum. The 2-year hypogonadism rate observed was 2.6% for HDRBT compared with 17.6% for EBRT (p = 0.09) for tumors in the lower two thirds of the rectum. Conclusion: HDRBT allows better hormonal sparing than EBRT during neoadjuvant treatment of patients with rectal cancer.

  11. Late-onset hypogonadism: the advantages of treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin rather than testosterone.

    PubMed

    La Vignera, Sandro; Condorelli, Rosita Angela; Cimino, Laura; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Morgia, Giuseppe; Calogero, Aldo E

    2016-01-01

    The traditional pharmacological treatment of patients with late onset hypogonadism (LOH) is represented by different formulations of testosterone (T) or alternatively by the extractive human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). The hormone replacement treatment (HRT) is associated with the potential increase of hematocrit, serum concentrations of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate volume. Moreover, the gynecomastia represent a condition frequently associated with HRT. Recent evidences showed the role of leydig cells in the 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D and the elevated frequency of hypovitaminosis D among LOH patients. Finally, another important aspect of LOH is represented by the frequency of secondary infertility due to age or to traditional HRT. This study evaluated 40 LOH patients treated for 6 months with extractive HCG (n = 10 patients) and three different formulations of T: transdermal (n = 10 patients), undecaonate (n = 10 patients) and enantate (n = 10 patients). Hormonal, anthropometric, metabolic and sperm parameters were evaluated and compared. Moreover, the main safety parameters and the results of the main questionnaires were evaluated. After treatment, HCG group showed serum concentrations of 25-OH-vitamin D significantly higher (p < 0.05) and serum concentrations of oestrogens significantly lower (p < 0.05) compared with other groups. Moreover, they showed a mean value of hematocrit, PSA and prostate volume significantly lower (p < 0.05) compared with other groups. Finally, all the groups treated with T showed a significant reduction (p < 0.05) of sperm density and of percentage of spermatozoa with progressive motility compared with HCG group.

  12. Risks and Benefits of Late Onset Hypogonadism Treatment: An Expert Opinion

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Vignozzi, Linda; Sforza, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) is a syndromic condition that has a well-recognized association with sexual and reproductive failure. LOH is frequently associated with chronic conditions including cardiovascular diseases (CVD), obesity, osteoporosis, HIV infection, renal failure, and obstructive pulmonary diseases. Despite this evidence, in patients with these conditions, LOH is still only rarely investigated and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) rarely considered. In this paper, we critically reviewed the available evidence on LOH treatment focusing on possible risks and benefits. Medical therapy of LOH should be individualized depending on the etiology of the disease and the patient's expectations. The fear of prostate cancer and the risk of erythrocytosis probably represent the main limitations of TRT in aging men. However, TRT in healthy older men in near physiological doses does not appear to incur serious adverse events, although regular monitoring of prostate-specific antigen and hematocrit levels is required. Available evidence also suggests that TRT might ameliorate central obesity and glycometabolic control in patients with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In addition, TRT has been associated with an increase in bone mineral density in men with osteoporosis, with an improvement in lean body mass in subjects with human immunodeficiency virus infection or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, as well as with peripheral oxygenation in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Despite this evidence, however, it should be recognized that the results of these trials were heterogeneous and limited by small sample sizes. Hence, further research is required regarding the long-term benefits and adverse effects of TRT in LOH. PMID:24044106

  13. 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENTR): the population council's contribution to research on male contraception and treatment of hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Kumar, Narender; Sitruk-Ware, Régine

    2013-03-01

    Testosterone is an essential part of all regimens for hormonal male contraception tested to date. Initial efficacy trials revealed that the half-life of the testosterone preparations available at that time was too short to be used for male contraception. The ensuing search for long-acting preparations yielded testosterone buciclate and undecanoate as well as 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT). Following description of the principle of male hormonal contraception and the efficacy trials performed to date, the systematic development of MENT for substitution of male hypogonadism and use in male contraception by the Population Council is reviewed here.

  14. Influence of Normo- and Hypogonadal Condition, Hyperuricemia, and High-Fructose Diet on Renal Changes in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alejandra Samaniego, Yanina; Cecilia Fornari, María; Reyes Toso, Carlos; Juan Ponzo, Osvaldo

    2017-01-01

    Background. There is a gender disparity in the incidence, prevalence, and progression of renal disease. The object of this paper is to evaluate the presence and type of renal lesion in normogonadic and hypogonadic male rats in a mild hyperuricemia induced condition and exposed to a high-fructose diet. Methods. 56 adult male Wistar rats were used. Animals were divided into two groups, one normogonadic (NGN) and one hypogonadic (HGN), and each group was divided into four subgroups in accordance with the treatment: control with only water (C), fructose (F), oxonic acid (OA), and fructose + oxonic acid (FOA). Renal changes were evaluated by measuring glomerulosclerosis, fibrosis, and arteriolar media/lumen (M/L) ratio. Results. The OA and FOA groups presented significantly hypertension (p < 0.001). The OA group significantly increased (p < 0.05) the percentage of glomerulosclerosis as well as the FOA group (p < 0.001). When comparing NGN versus HGN, we observed a trend to a lower glomerulosclerosis in the latter. A higher arteriolar M/L ratio was observed in the OA (p < 0.05) and FOA (p < 0.001). Conclusion. Hyperuricemia conditions and a high-fructose diet favor blood pressure increase together with changes in the arteriolar media/lumen ratio and renal glomerular damage. These changes were more apparent in normogonadic animals. PMID:28293259

  15. Improvement in reproductive parameters in hypogonadal female mice by regulated gene replacement therapy in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Jeong, K-H; Bakowska, J C; Song, I O; Fu, N; Breakefield, X O; Kaiser, U B

    2007-07-01

    One of the challenges of gene targeting is to achieve regulated transgene expression in specific target cells. The hypogonadal (hpg) mice are genetically deficient in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) production due to a deletion in the GnRH gene, resulting in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here we show an improvement in reproductive parameters of adult female homozygous hpg mice by direct infusion into the hypothalamic preoptic area (POA) of a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based amplicon vector containing a 13.5 kb genomic fragment encoding the GnRH gene together with its cognate promoter and regulatory elements. Following vector injection, GnRH-expressing neurons were detected in the POA, and pituitary and plasma gonadotropin levels as well as ovarian and uterine weights increased. In addition, a subset of injected hpg mice demonstrated cyclic estrous changes, consistent with regulated control of GnRH production. Administration of kisspeptin-10 resulted in an increase in plasma luteinizing hormone levels, further supporting appropriate regulation of the introduced GnRH transgene. These findings indicate that delivery of the GnRH gene resulted in selective neuronal expression of GnRH and regulated hypothalamic GnRH release. To our knowledge, this is the first example of the correct targeting of a gene under its cognate promoter to neurons resulting in selective and regulated synthesis of a biologically active peptide, and thus may have a wide range of applications in the treatment of human disorders.

  16. Prevalence of Olfactory and Other Developmental Anomalies in Patients with Central Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Della Valle, Elisa; Vezzani, Silvia; Rochira, Vincenzo; Granata, Antonio Raffaele Michele; Madeo, Bruno; Genovese, Elisabetta; Pignatti, Elisa; Marino, Marco; Carani, Cesare; Simoni, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is a heterogeneous disease caused by mutations in several genes. Based on the presence of hyposmia/anosmia it is distinguished into Kallmann syndrome (KS) and isolated HH. The prevalence of other developmental anomalies is not well established. Methods: We studied 36 patients with HH (31 males, 5 females, mean age 41.5), 9 with familial and 27 with sporadic HH (33 congenital, 3 adult-onset), by physical examination, smell test (BSIT Sensonics), audiometry, renal ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging of the olfactory structures. Results: Based on the smell test, patients were classified as normosmic (n = 21, 58.3%) and hypo/anosmic (n = 15, 41.6%). Hypoplasia/agenesis of olfactory bulbs was found in 40% of patients (10/25; 75% hypo/anosmic, 7.6% normosmic, p < 0.01, Fisher’s test). Remarkably, olfactory structures were normal in two anosmic patients, while one normosmic patient presented a unilateral hypoplastic bulb. Fourteen of 33 patients (42.4%) presented neurosensorial hearing loss of various degrees (28.5% hypo/anosmic, 52.6% normosmic, p = NS). Renal ultrasound revealed 27.7% of cases with renal anomalies (26.6% hypo/anosmic, 28.5% normosmic, p = NS). At least one midline defect was found in 50% of the patients (53.3% hypo/anosmic, 47.6% normosmic, p = NS), including abnormal palate, dental anomalies, pectus excavatum, bimanual synkinesis, iris coloboma, and absent nasal cartilage. Anamnestically 4/31 patients reported cryptorchidism (25% hypo/anosmic, 5.2% normosmic, p = NS). Conclusion: Hypo/anosmia is significantly related to anatomical anomalies of the olfactory bulbs/tracts but the prevalence of other developmental anomalies, especially midline defects and neurosensorial hearing loss, is high both in HH and KS and independent of the presence of anosmia/hyposmia. From the clinical standpoint KS and normosmic HH should be considered as the same complex, developmental

  17. Effects of testosterone replacement therapy withdrawal and re-treatment in hypogonadal elderly men upon obesity, voiding function and prostate safety parameters.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Aksam; Nettleship, Joanne E; Talib, Raidh A; Almehmadi, Yousef; Doros, Gheorge

    2016-01-01

    Whether testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is a lifelong treatment for men with hypogonadism remains unknown. We investigated long-term TRT and TRT withdrawal on obesity and prostate-related parameters. Two hundred and sixty-two hypogonadal patients (mean age 59.5) received testosterone undecanoate in 12-week intervals for a maximum of 11 years. One hundred and forty-seven men had TRT interrupted for a mean of 16.9 months and resumed thereafter (Group A). The remaining 115 patients were treated continuously (Group B). Prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), residual voiding volume, bladder wall thickness, C-reactive protein (CRP), aging male symptoms (AMS), International Index of erectile function - erectile function (IIEF-EF) and International Prostate Symptoms Scores (IPSS) were measured over the study period with anthropometric parameters of obesity, including weight, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Prior to interruption, TRT resulted in improvements in residual voiding volume, bladder wall thickness, CRP, AMS, IIEF-EF, IPSS and obesity parameters while PSA and prostate volume increased. TRT interruption reduced total testosterone to hypogonadal levels in Group A and resulted in worsening of obesity parameters, AMS, IPSS, residual voiding volume and bladder wall thickness, IIEF-EF and PSA while CRP and prostate volume were unchanged until treatment resumed whereby these effects were reversed. TRT interruption results in worsening of symptoms. Hypogonadism may require lifelong TRT.

  18. 7α-Methyl-19-Nortestosterone (MENT) vs. Testosterone Implants for Hypogonadal Osteoporosis: a Preclinical Study in the Aged Male Orchidectomized Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sinnesael, Mieke; Callewaert, Filip; Morreels, Maarten; Kumar, Narender; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Van Proeyen, Karen; Hespel, Peter; Boonen, Steven; Claessens, Frank; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Overt male hypogonadism induces not only osteoporosis but also unfavorable changes in body composition, which can be prevented by testosterone (T) replacement. In this preclinical study, the potential of synthetic androgen 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT) as alternative treatment for male hypogonadism was evaluated in comparison with T. Methods 11-month-old male rats were orchidectomized (orch) and left untreated for 2-months. Subsequently, the effects of 4-months MENT (12 µg/day) and T (72µg/day) treatment on bone, muscle and fat were analyzed by microcomputed tomography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, dynamic bone histomorphometry and muscle fiber typing. Results At the onset of treatment orch rats were clearly hypogonadal. This was evidenced by significant reductions of androgen-sensitive organ weight, lean mass, cortical thickness and trabecular bone volume compared with sham-operated aged-matched controls (sham). MENT and T restored weight of androgen-sensitive organs to a similar extent, with a superior anabolic action of MENT on levator ani muscle. Both androgens not only fully rescued hypogonadal loss of lean mass, but also restored muscle fiber type composition and trabecular bone volume. Cortical bone loss was similarly prevented by MENT and T, but without full recovery to sham. Both androgens stimulated periosteal bone formation, but with a stronger effect of T. In contrast, MENT more strongly suppressed endocortical bone formation and bone turnover rate and reduced fat mass and serum leptin to a greater extent than T. Conclusion MENT and T are both effective replacement therapies to stimulate bone and muscle in hypogonadal rats, with stronger lipolytic action of MENT. PMID:21790658

  19. 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone vs. testosterone implants for hypogonadal osteoporosis: a preclinical study in the aged male orchidectomized rat model.

    PubMed

    Sinnesael, M; Callewaert, F; Morreels, M; Kumar, N; Sitruk-Ware, R; Van Proeyen, K; Hespel, P; Boonen, S; Claessens, F; Vanderschueren, D

    2011-12-01

    Overt male hypogonadism induces not only osteoporosis but also unfavourable changes in body composition, which can be prevented by testosterone (T) replacement. In this preclinical study, the potential of synthetic androgen 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT) as alternative treatment for male hypogonadism was evaluated in comparison with T. Eleven-month-old male rats were orchidectomized (orch) and left untreated for 2-months. Subsequently, the effects of 4-month MENT (12 μg/day) and T (72 μg/day) treatment on bone, muscle and fat were analysed using microcomputed tomography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, dynamic bone histomorphometry and muscle fibre typing. At the onset of treatment, orch rats were clearly hypogonadal. This was evidenced by significant reductions of androgen-sensitive organ weight, lean mass, cortical thickness and trabecular bone volume compared with sham-operated aged-matched controls (sham). MENT and T restored weight of androgen-sensitive organs to a similar extent, with a superior anabolic action of MENT on levator ani muscle. Both androgens not only fully rescued hypogonadal loss of lean mass but also restored muscle fibre type composition and trabecular bone volume. Cortical bone loss was similarly prevented by MENT and T, but without full recovery to sham. Both androgens stimulated periosteal bone formation, but with a stronger effect of T. By contrast, MENT more strongly suppressed endocortical bone formation and bone turnover rate and reduced fat mass and serum leptin to a greater extent than T. MENT and T are both effective replacement therapies to stimulate bone and muscle in hypogonadal rats, with stronger lipolytic action of MENT.

  20. Acquired Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism (AHH) in Thalassaemia Major Patients: An Underdiagnosed Condition?

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elsedfy, Heba; Soliman, Ashraf T; Elhakim, Ihab Zaki; Pepe, Alessia; Kattamis, Christos; Soliman, Nada A.; Elalaily, Rania; El Kholy, Mohamed; Yassin, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In males, acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (AHH) includes all disorders that damage or alter the function of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons and/or pituitary gonadotroph cells. The clinical characteristics of AHH are androgen deficiency and lack, delay or halt of pubertal sexual maturation. AHH lead to decreased libido, impaired erectile function, and strength, a worsened sense of well-being and degraded quality of life (QOL). Patients and methods We studied 11 adult men with thalassemia major (TM) aged between 26 to 54 years (mean ± SD: 34.3 ± 8.8 years) with AHH. Twelve age- and sex-matched TM patients with normal pubertal development were used as a control group. All patients were on regular transfusions and iron chelation therapy. Fasting venous blood samples were collected two weeks after transfusion to measure serum concentrations of IGF-1, free thyroxine (FT4), thyrotropin (TSH), cortisol, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone (TT), prolactin and estradiol (E2), glucose, urea, creatinine and electrolytes (including calcium and phosphate). Liver functions and screening for hepatitis C virus seropositivity (HCVab and HCV-RNA) were performed. Iron status was assessed by measuring serum ferritin levels, and evaluation of iron concentrations in the liver (LIC) and heart using MRI- T2*. Bone mineral density was measured at the lumbar spine (L1–L4) for all patients with AHH by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) using Hologic QDR 4000 machine. Results The mean basal serum LH and FSH concentrations in AHH patients were 2.4 ± 2.2 IU/L and 1.2 ± 0.9 IU/L respectively; these, values were significantly lower compared to the control group. Semen analysis in 5 patients with AHH showed azoospermia in 3 and oligoasthenozoospermia in 2. The percentage of patients with serum ferritin level >2000 ng/ml (severe iron load) was significantly higher in AHH patients compared to controls, 5/11 (45

  1. Low-intermediate dose testosterone replacement therapy by different pharmaceutical preparations improves frailty score in elderly hypogonadal hyperglycaemic patients.

    PubMed

    Strollo, Felice; Strollo, Giovanna; Morè, Massimo; Magni, Paolo; Macchi, Chiara; Masini, Maria Angela; Carucci, Iarba; Celotti, Fabio; Ruscica, Massimiliano; Gentile, Sandro

    2013-06-01

    An open-label follow-up study of low-to-intermediate dose testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) was conducted in 64 overweight patients (aged 65-75 years) with late onset hypogonadism (LOH) and increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Patients were subdivided into four treatment groups: oral testosterone (T) (T undecanoate, 80 mg/d), transmucosal T (60 mg/d), transdermal T (30 mg/d) or no treatment (control), and evaluated at 0 and 6 months. FPG, hemoglobin (Hb), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and total T were measured and the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index was calculated. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, fitness level (6-min walking test), Aging Males' Symptoms (AMS) scale, handgrip strength and energy expenditure with physical activity (Minnesota questionnaire for Leisure Time Physical Activity (LTPA)) were evaluated and a "frailty score" (based on: grip strength, gait speed and LTPA) was calculated. T levels increased in all treatment groups; the oral T group had values still in the hypogonadal range (5.9 ± 1.1 nmol/L). PSA and Hb concentrations did not change in any group. BMI, waist circumference, FPG and HOMA-IR improved in all T-treated groups after 6 months, with a greater effect seen with transmucosal and transdermal T compared with oral T. This study indicates that low-to-intermediate dose TRT may be safely utilized in LOH patients to ameliorate somatic and psychological frailty symptoms in association with improved anthropometric and glycometabolic parameters in aging, overweight men with LOH and impaired fasting glucose.

  2. Effects of a novel selective androgen receptor modulator on dexamethasone-induced and hypogonadism-induced muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Amanda; Hwang, Dong-Jin; Narayanan, Ramesh; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2010-08-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most widely used antiinflammatory drugs in the world. However, prolonged use of glucocorticoids results in undesirable side effects such as muscle wasting, osteoporosis, and diabetes. Skeletal muscle wasting, which currently has no approved therapy, is a debilitating condition resulting from either reduced muscle protein synthesis or increased degradation. The imbalance in protein synthesis could occur from increased expression and function of muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1), or decreased function of the IGF-I and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt kinase pathways. We examined the effects of a nonsteroidal tissue selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) and testosterone on glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy and castration-induced muscle atrophy. The SARM and testosterone propionate blocked the dexamethasone-induced dephosphorylation of Akt and other proteins involved in protein synthesis, including Forkhead box O (FoxO). Dexamethasone caused a significant up-regulation in the expression of ubiquitin ligases, but testosterone propionate and SARM administration blocked this effect by phosphorylating FoxO. Castration induced rapid myopathy of the levator ani muscle, accompanied by up-regulation of MAFbx and MuRF1 and down-regulation of IGF-I, all of which was attenuated by a SARM. The results suggest that levator ani atrophy caused by hypogonadism may be the result of loss of IGF-I stimulation, whereas that caused by glucocorticoid treatment relies almost solely on up-regulation of MAFbx and MuRF1. Our studies provide the first evidence that glucocorticoid- and hypogonadism-induced muscle atrophy are mediated by distinct but overlapping mechanisms and that SARMs may provide a more effective and selective pharmacological approach to prevent glucocorticoid-induced muscle loss than steroidal androgen therapy.

  3. Review and Recommendations on Management of Adult Female Thalassemia Patients with Hypogonadism based on Literature Review and Experience of ICET-A Network Specialists

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Soliman, Ashraf T.; Elsedfy, Heba; Albu, Alice; Al Jaouni, Soad; Anastasi, Salvatore; Bisconte, Maria Grazia; Canatan, Duran; Christou, Soteroula; Daar, Shahina; Di Maio, Salvatore; El Kholy, Mohamed; Khater, Doaa; Elshinawy, Mohamed; Kilinc, Yurdanur; Mattei, Roberto; Mosli, Hala H.; Quota, Alessandra; Roberti, Maria Grazia; Sobti, Praveen; Yaarubi, Saif AL; Canpisi, Saveria; Kattamis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Background Multi-transfused thalassemia major (TM) patients frequently develop severe endocrine complications, mainly due to iron overload, anemia, and chronic liver disease, which require prompt diagnosis, treatment and follow-up by specialists. The most common endocrine complication documented is hypogonadotropic hypogonadism which increases with age and associated comorbidities. It is thus important for physicians to have a clear understanding of the pathophysiology and management of this disorder. Also to be aware of the side effects, contraindications and monitoring of sex steroid therapy. In this paper, practical ICET-A recommendations for the management of hypogonadism in adult females with TM are addressed. Methods In March 2015, the Coordinator of the International Network of Clinicians for Endocrinopathies in Thalassemia and Adolescent Medicine (ICET-A) conducted a two-step survey to assess the attitudes and practices of doctors in the ICET-A network taking care of adult female TM patients with hypogonadism. They were clinically characterized by the absence of pubertal development or discontinuation or regression of the maturation of secondary sex characteristics, and biochemically by persistent low FSH, LH and estradiol levels. Recently a supplementary survey on adult female hypogonadism in TM was undertaken within the ICET-A network. Results The completed questionnaires were returned by 16 of 27 specialists (59.2%) following 590 female TM patients over the age of 18 years; 315 patients (53.3%) had hypogonadism, and only 245 (74.6%) were on hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Contraceptive oral pills (COC) were the first treatment choice in 11 centers (68.7%). A wide range of COCs was used with different progestin contents. In general, the patients’ compliance to treatment was reported as good in 81.2 % of centers. The frequency of required tests for follow-up HRT, in addition to the regular check-up for thalassemia, was variable in the participating

  4. Gut Endotoxin Leading to a Decline IN Gonadal function (GELDING) - a novel theory for the development of late onset hypogonadism in obese men.

    PubMed

    Tremellen, Kelton

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an increasing public health problem, with two-thirds of the adult population in many Western countries now being either overweight or obese. Male obesity is associated with late onset hypogonadism, a condition characterised by decreased serum testosterone, sperm quality plus diminished fertility and quality of life. In this paper we propose a novel theory underlying the development of obesity related hypogonadism- the GELDING theory (Gut Endotoxin Leading to a Decline IN Gonadal function). Several observational studies have previously reported an association between obesity related hypogonadism (low testosterone) and systemic inflammation. However, for the first time we postulate that the trans-mucosal passage of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the gut lumen into the circulation is a key inflammatory trigger underlying male hypogonadism. Obesity and a high fat/high calorie diet are both reported to result in changes to gut bacteria and intestinal wall permeability, leading to the passage of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide- LPS) from within the gut lumen into the circulation (metabolic endotoxaemia), where it initiates systemic inflammation. Endotoxin is known to reduce testosterone production by the testis, both by direct inhibition of Leydig cell steroidogenic pathways and indirectly by reducing pituitary LH drive, thereby also leading to a decline in sperm production. In this paper we also highlight the novel evolutionary benefits of the GELDING theory. Testosterone is known to be a powerful immune-suppressive, decreasing a man's ability to fight infection. Therefore we postulate that the male reproductive axis has evolved the capacity to lower testosterone production during times of infection and resulting endotoxin exposure, decreasing the immunosuppressive influence of testosterone, in turn enhancing the ability to fight infection. While this response is adaptive in times of sepsis, it becomes maladaptive in the setting of "non

  5. Increased frequency of anxiety, depression, quality of life and sexual life in young hypogonadotropic hypogonadal males and impacts of testosterone replacement therapy on these conditions.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Umit; Aydogdu, Aydogan; Akbulut, Halil; Sonmez, Alper; Yuksel, Servet; Basaran, Yalcin; Uzun, Ozcan; Bolu, Erol; Saglam, Kenan

    2012-01-01

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is defined as the failure in production of gonadal hormones, thus resulting in lower amounts of testosterone. Depression, anxiety and decreased quality of life are the most common psychopathological conditions in young hypogonadal men. The aim of the present study was to assess the still debated relationship with testosterone levels and psychological symptoms in young male patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH). Thirty-nine young male patients with CHH and 40 age-matched healthy males were enrolled in the present study. The impact of testosterone replacement treatment (TRT) on the patients' anxiety and depression levels, sexual function and quality of life were assessed before and after 6 months of treatment using valid and reliable scales, including the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Arizona Sexual Experiences (ASEX). Patients with CHH had significantly higher scores for BDI, BAI, and ASEX than the control subjects at baseline (p=0.011, p=0.036, p<0.001, respectively). The ASEX and BDI scores significantly improved after the TRT (p<0.001 for both), while the improvement in the BAI score was not statistically significant (p=0.135). When compared to the control group, treatment naïve hypogonadal patients had more severe symptoms of sexual dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and worse quality of life. After 6 months of TRT, we observed improvements in the above parameters, suggesting that low endogenous levels of testosterone might be related to the increased incidence of psychological symptoms.

  6. Boucher Neuhäuser Syndrome - A rare cause of inherited hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. A case of two adult siblings with two novel mutations in PNPLA6.

    PubMed

    Langdahl, Jakob H; Frederiksen, Anja L; Nguyen, Nina; Brusgaard, Klaus; Juhl, Claus B

    2017-02-01

    Boucher Neuhäuser Syndrome (BNS) is a rare clinical syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance defined by early-onset ataxia, hypogonadism and chorioretinal dystrophy. We present two siblings diagnosed with BNS in late adult life identified with compound heterozygous state of two novel PNPLA6 mutations. Five healthy siblings were non- or heterozygous carriers of the mutations. The cases, which presented with ataxia in childhood and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), were diagnosed at age 17 and 25, respectively, when examined for delayed puberty. The youngest case, a 55-year old male, was referred to our department in 2006 for evaluation of secondary causes of osteoporosis, which he developed despite adequate testosterone replacement therapy. The unusual medical history with childhood ataxia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism lead to further examinations and eventually the diagnosis of BNS. The older sister of the proband also displayed the triad of ataxia, HH and chorioretinal dystrophy accompanied by cerebellar atrophy and in 2014, we found the mutations in PNPLA6. BNS is a rare cause of HH and secondary osteoporosis, but should be considered in patients presenting with one or more of the key features. Genetic screening is becoming increasingly available and inexpensive and accordingly this may be considered earlier and by broader indication in unusual phenotypic presentations. The increasing knowledge of causes for inherited diseases should extend the use of genetic screening, as the correct diagnosis will benefit the patients.

  7. Waist circumference is superior to weight and BMI in predicting sexual symptoms, voiding symptoms and psychosomatic symptoms in men with hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yassin, A A; Nettleship, J E; Salman, M; Almehmadi, Y

    2017-05-01

    Waist circumference is considered a useful predictor of obesity-associated cardiovascular risk, but its use as an indicator of sexual health status and quality of life (QoL) in hypogonadal men is unknown. We investigated whether three measurements of obesity, weight, body mass index and waist circumference, correlate with the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5), the Aging Males' Symptoms (AMS) and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaires. A total of 261 patients were enrolled in a prospective study on hypogonadism treatment with intramuscular long-acting testosterone undecanoate. Patients with total testosterone ≤3.5 ng ml(-1) were enrolled, and baseline demographic data were recorded. Patient's response to IIEF, IPSS and AMS standardised questionnaires was recorded to evaluate health-related QoL. The mean length of treatment and follow-up was 4.7 years (max 6 years). ANOVA regression analysis showed that waist circumference was significantly inversely proportional to IIEF-5 and directly proportional to AMS and IPSS. Weight was inversely proportional to IIEF and directly proportional to IPSS but not associated with AMS. BMI had no proportionality to measurements of sexual function and quality of life. These results suggest that among weight, BMI and waist circumference, the latter is the best predictor of health-related QoL in men with hypogonadism.

  8. Studies of the pituitary-Leydig cell axis in young men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and hyposmia: comparison with normal men, prepuberal boys, and hypopituitary patients

    PubMed Central

    Bardin, C. Wayne; Ross, Griff T.; Rifkind, Arleen B.; Cargille, Charles M.; Lipsett, Mortimer B.

    1969-01-01

    Pituitary and gonadal function was studied in seven chromatin-negative men, ages 15-27 yr, with retarded sexual and somatic development, skeletal anomalies, and hyposmia. These hyposmic patients were compared with normal men, prepuberal boys and hypogonadal patients with hypopituitarism. The urinary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels of hyposmic subjects were the same as those of normal boys and hypopituitary patients but significantly lower than those of normal men. Clomiphene citrate did not cause an increase in plasma FSH and LH levels in either hypogonadal group as it does in normal men. In contrast to hypopituitary patients, thyroid and adrenocortical function and release of growth hormone in the hyposmic subjects were normal. The plasma testosterone levels were equally low in prepuberal, hypopituitary, and hyposmic patients but were increased to a greater extent by human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) treatment in prepuberal and hypopituitary subjects than in the hyposmic patients. Prolonged treatment with HCG has failed to return plasma testosterone levels to normal in two hyposmic patients. These observations suggest that there are defects of both pituitary and Leydig cell function in men with the syndrome of hypogonadism, skeletal anomalies, and hyposmia. They have impaired secretion of FSH and LH and a Leydig cell insensitivity to gonadotropin. Images PMID:4390462

  9. A small-scale clinical trial to determine the safety and efficacy of testosterone replacement therapy in hypogonadal men with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bauman, W A; Cirnigliaro, C M; La Fountaine, M F; Jensen, A M; Wecht, J M; Kirshblum, S C; Spungen, A M

    2011-07-01

    Men with spinal cord injury are at an increased risk for secondary medical conditions, including metabolic disorders, accelerated musculoskeletal atrophy, and, for some, hypogonadism, a deficiency, which may further adversely affect metabolism and body composition. A prospective, open label, controlled drug intervention trial was performed to determine whether 12 months of testosterone replacement therapy increases lean tissue mass and resting energy expenditure in hypogonadal males with spinal cord injury. Healthy eugonadal (n = 11) and hypogonadal (n = 11) outpatients with chronic spinal cord injury were enrolled. Hypogonadal subjects received transdermal testosterone (5 or 10 mg) daily for 12 months. Measurements of body composition and resting energy expenditure were obtained at baseline and 12 months. The testosterone replacement therapy group increased lean tissue mass for total body (49.6 ± 7.6 vs. 53.1 ± 6.9 kg; p < 0.0005), trunk (24.1 ± 4.1 vs. 25.8 ± 3.8 kg; p < 0.005), leg (14.5 ± 2.7 vs. 15.8 ±2.6  kg; p = 0.005), and arm (7.6 ± 2.3 vs. 8.0 ± 2.2 kg; p < 0.005) from baseline to month 12. After testosterone replacement therapy, resting energy expenditure (1328 ± 262 vs. 1440 ± 262 kcal/d; p < 0.01) and percent predicted basal energy expenditure (73 ± 9 vs. 79 ± 10%; p < 0.05) were significantly increased. In conclusion, testosterone replacement therapy significantly improved lean tissue mass and energy expenditure in hypogonadal men with spinal cord injury, findings that would be expected to influence the practice of clinical care, if confirmed. Larger, randomized, controlled clinical trials should be performed to confirm and extend our preliminary findings.

  10. Novel mutation in the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GNRHR) gene in a patient with normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Beneduzzi, Daiane; Trarbach, Ericka B; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho de; Silveira, Letícia F G

    2012-11-01

    We report a novel GNRHR mutation in a male with normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nIHH). The coding region of the GNRHR gene was amplified and sequenced. Three variants p.[Asn10Lys;Gln11Lys]; [Tyr283His] were identified in the GNRHR coding region in a male with sporadic complete nIHH. The three variants were absent in the controls (130 normal adults). Familial segregation showed that the previously described p.Asn10Lys and p.Gln11Lys are in the same allele, in compound heterozygozity with the novel variant p.Tyr283His. The p.[Asn10Lys;Gln11Lys] are known inactivating mutations. The p.Tyr283His affects a well-conserved residue, and in silico analysis suggested it is a deleterious variant. We describe a novel GNRHR mutation in a male with nIHH. Absence of the mutation in the control group, conservation among species, in silico analysis, and familial segregation suggest that p.Tyr283His, which was identified in compound heterozygozity with the p.[Asn10Lys;Gln11Lys] variants, is an inactivating mutation.

  11. A successful healthy live birth from a female patient with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and oocytes with unusually large cytoplasmic inclusions.

    PubMed

    Duvan, Candan İltemir; Pekel, Aslıhan; Ercan, Ummu Gulsum; Arıkan, Yuksel Onaran

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to report the case of a successful live birth from a woman having oocytes with abnormally large cytoplasmic inclusions. The patient described in this case is a 28 year-old woman with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) with a history of two previous unsuccessful in vitro fertilization (IVF) attempts offered an antagonist protocol. Stimulation was performed with human menopausal gonadotropin 300 IU/day. The intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedure was performed 4-6 hours after oocyte aspiration for all mature oocytes. Six oocytes were retrieved, five of which mature (MII). All oocytes had abnormal cytoplasmic structures. Two were fertilized after ICSI and two top quality embryos were transferred on Day 2. Our case report suggests that HH patients with refractile bodies/lipofuscin in their oocytes may not have their pregnancies negatively affected. While there have been several reports of successful births from dysmorphic oocytes, no cases of successful pregnancies followed by live births from young women with HH and oocytes with large cytoplasmic inclusions had been reported to date.

  12. Hypogonadal men with psoriasis benefit from long-term testosterone replacement therapy - a series of 15 case reports.

    PubMed

    Saad, F; Haider, A; Gooren, L

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is increasingly recognised as a skin disease with far-reaching systemic effects, associated with a high prevalence of comorbid disease such as cardiometabolic dysfunction, shifting the focus from a single organ disease confined to the skin to a systemic inflammatory condition. Chronic and systemic inflammation plays a major role in the development of these diseases, and there are striking similarities between the molecular and inflammatory pathways in psoriasis and atherosclerosis. In a single-centre, cumulative, prospective registry study of 347 hypogonadal men (total testosterone ≤12.1 nmol l(-1) ), fifteen men with psoriasis could be studied. Upon testosterone administration, the skin disease improved considerably. Scores on the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index and Physician Global Assessment for Psoriasis showed significant improvement for the first 24 months. Thereafter, these improvements were sustained. Upon testosterone treatment, C-reactive protein declined significantly. There were significant improvements of obesity and of lipid profiles. Adipose tissue is now regarded as a source of inflammatory factors. These preliminary results deserve to be studied in a specifically designed study to investigate the effects of testosterone on psoriasis and its associated immunopathology.

  13. FGFR1 Analyses in Four Patients with Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism with Split-Hand/Foot Malformation: Implications for the Promoter Region.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Kohnosuke; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Takada, Fumio; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Miyoshi, Tatsuya; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Kameda, Hiraku; Kurokawa-Seo, Misuzu; Fukami, Maki; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2017-01-13

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations of FGFR1 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 1) cause various disorders including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with split-hand/foot malformation (HH-SHFM). We examined FGFR1 in four Japanese patients with HH-SHFM (cases 1-4) and the mother of case 4 with HH only. Cases 1 and 2 had heterozygous loss-of-function mutations with no dominant negative effect (c.289G>A, p.[G97S]; and c.2231G>C, p.[R744T]), and case 3 had a splice donor site mutation (c.1663+1G>T). Notably, case 4 had a maternally inherited 8,312 bp microdeletion that involved noncoding exon 1U and impaired FGFR1 expression. Furthermore, consistent with the presence of transcription-related histone marks (e.g., H3K4Me3, H3K4Me1, and H3K27Ac) and multiple transcription factor-binding sites around exon 1U, functional studies demonstrated a marked transactivation function of a 414-bp segment harboring the transcription start site. These results support the relevance of FGFR1 mutations to HH-SHFM, and argue for the presence of the FGFR1 core-promoter elements around exon 1U.

  14. Prevalence of male secondary hypogonadism in moderate to severe obesity and its relationship with insulin resistance and excess body weight.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Berniza; Gómez-Martín, Jesús M; Vega-Piñero, Belén; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia; Galindo, Julio; Luque-Ramírez, Manuel; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Botella-Carretero, José I

    2016-01-01

    To study the prevalence of male obesity-secondary hypogonadism (MOSH) in patients with moderate to severe obesity, we performed a prospective prevalence study including 100 male patients with moderate to severe obesity at a university tertiary hospital. Total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations among others were assayed in all patients. Serum-free testosterone (FT) concentration was calculated from TT and SHBG levels. Semen analysis was conducted in 31 patients. We found a prevalence of 45% (95% CI: 35-55%) when considering decreased TT and/or FT concentrations. Serum concentrations of TT were correlated negatively with glucose (r = -0.328, p < 0.001) and insulin resistance (r = -0.261, p = 0.011). The same occurred with FT and glucose (r = -0.340, p < 0.001) and insulin resistance (r = -0.246, p = 0.016). Sixty-two percent (95% CI: 39-85%) of the patients with seminogram also presented abnormal results in semen analysis. The frequencies of low TT or low FT values were similar in patients with abnormal or normal semen analysis (p = 0.646 and p = 0.346, respectively). Ejaculate volume inversely correlated with BMI (ρ = -0.400, p = 0.029) and with excess body weight (ρ = -0.464, p = 0.010). Our data show the prevalence of MOSH in patients with moderate to severe obesity is high. Low circulating testosterone is associated with insulin resistance and low ejaculate volume with higher BMI and excess body weight. Semen analysis must be performed in these patients when considering fertility whether or not presenting low circulating testosterone.

  15. Effects of bariatric surgery on male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism: comparison of laparoscopic gastric bypass with restrictive procedures.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Berniza; Galdón, Alba; Calañas, Alfonso; Peromingo, Roberto; Galindo, Julio; García-Moreno, Francisca; Rodriguez-Velasco, Gloria; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia; Vazquez, Clotilde; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Botella-Carretero, José I

    2014-10-01

    Bariatric surgery results in the complete resolution of male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism (MOSH) in many patients. However, the effects of different bariatric surgical procedures on male sexual hormone profiles and sexual dysfunction have not been compared to date. We compared the pre- and post-operative (at least 6 months after initial surgery) sex hormone profiles of 20 severely obese men submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass (LGB) with 15 similar patients submitted to restrictive techniques (sleeve gastrectomy in 10 and adjustable gastric banding in 5). We calculated free testosterone (FT) levels from total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations. Fasting glucose and insulin levels served for homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR). MOSH was present in 25 and 16 of the 35 patients when considering TT and FT concentrations respectively, resolving after surgery in all but one of them. When considering all obese men as a whole, patients submitted to LGB or restrictive procedures did not differ in terms of excess weight loss, in the decrease of fasting glucose and insulin, HOMAIR and waist circumference, or in the increase of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, TT and FT levels. The improvement in TT correlated with the decrease in fasting glucose (r = -0.390, P = 0.021), insulin (r = -0.425, P = 0.015) and HOMAIR (r = -0.380, P = 0.029), and with the increase in SHBG (r = 0.692, P < 0.001). The increase in FT correlated with the decrease in fasting glucose (r = -0.360, P = 0.034). LGB and restrictive techniques are equally effective in producing a remission of MOSH.

  16. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and Kallmann syndrome as models for studying hormonal regulation of human testicular endocrine functions.

    PubMed

    Trabado, Séverine; Lamothe, Sophie; Maione, Luigi; Bouvattier, Claire; Sarfati, Julie; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Young, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    Men with Kallmann syndrome (KS) and those with congenital isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with normal olfaction share a chronic, usually profound deficit, in FSH and LH, the two pituitary gonadotropins. Many studies indicate that this gonadotropin deficiency is already present during fetal life, thus explaining the micropenis, cryptorchidism and marked testicular hypotrophy already present at birth. In addition, neonatal activation of gonadotropin secretion is compromised in boys with severe CHH/Kallmann, preventing the first phase of postnatal testicular activation. Finally, CHH is characterized by the persistence, in the vast majority of cases, of gonadotropin deficiency at the time of puberty and during adulthood. This prevents the normal pubertal testicular reactivation required for physiological sex steroid and testicular peptide production, and for spermatogenesis. CHH/KS thus represents a pathological paradigm that can help to unravel, in vivo, the role of each gonadotropin in human testicular exocrine and endocrine functions at different stages of development. Recombinant gonadotropins with pure LH or FSH activity have been used to stimulate Leydig's cells and Sertoli's cells, respectively, and thereby to clarify their paracrine interaction in vivo. The effects of these pharmacological probes can be assessed by measuring the changes they provoke in circulating testicular hormone concentrations. This review discusses the impact of chronic gonadotropin deficiency on the endocrine functions of the interstitial compartment, which contains testosterone-, estradiol- and INSL3-secreting Leydig's cells. It also examines the regulation of inhibin B and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) secretion in the seminiferous tubules, and the insights provided by studies of human testicular stimulation with recombinant gonadotropins, used either individually or in combination.

  17. Musculoskeletal and prostate effects of combined testosterone and finasteride administration in older hypogonadal men: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Borst, Stephen E; Yarrow, Joshua F; Conover, Christine F; Nseyo, Unyime; Meuleman, John R; Lipinska, Judyta A; Braith, Randy W; Beck, Darren T; Martin, Jeffrey S; Morrow, Matthew; Roessner, Shirley; Beggs, Luke A; McCoy, Sean C; Cannady, Darryl F; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2014-02-15

    Testosterone acts directly at androgen receptors and also exerts potent actions following 5α-reduction to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Finasteride (type II 5α-reductase inhibitor) lowers DHT and is used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, it is unknown whether elevated DHT mediates either beneficial musculoskeletal effects or prostate enlargement resulting from higher-than-replacement doses of testosterone. Our purpose was to determine whether administration of testosterone plus finasteride to older hypogonadal men could produce musculoskeletal benefits without prostate enlargement. Sixty men aged ≥60 yr with a serum testosterone concentration of ≤300 ng/dl or bioavailable testosterone ≤70 ng/dl received 52 wk of treatment with testosterone enanthate (TE; 125 mg/wk) vs. vehicle, paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) vs. placebo using a 2 × 2 factorial design. Over the course of 12 mo, TE increased upper and lower body muscle strength by 8-14% (P = 0.015 to <0.001), fat-free mass 4.04 kg (P = 0.032), lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) 4.19% (P < 0.001), and total hip BMD 1.96% (P = 0.024) while reducing total body fat -3.87 kg (P < 0.001) and trunk fat -1.88 kg (P = 0.0051). In the first 3 mo, testosterone increased hematocrit 4.13% (P < 0.001). Coadministration of finasteride did not alter any of these effects. Over 12 mo, testosterone also increased prostate volume 11.4 cm(3) (P = 0.0051), an effect that was completely prevented by finasteride (P = 0.0027). We conclude that a higher-than-replacement TE combined with finasteride significantly increases muscle strength and BMD and reduces body fat without causing prostate enlargement. These results demonstrate that elevated DHT mediates testosterone-induced prostate enlargement but is not required for benefits in musculoskeletal or adipose tissue.

  18. Reproductive hormone-dependent and -independent contributions to developmental changes in kisspeptin in GnRH-deficient hypogonadal mice.

    PubMed

    Gill, John C; Wang, Oulu; Kakar, Shelley; Martinelli, Enzo; Carroll, Rona S; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2010-07-30

    Kisspeptin is a potent activator of GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion and is a proposed central regulator of pubertal onset. In mice, there is a neuroanatomical separation of two discrete kisspeptin neuronal populations, which are sexually dimorphic and are believed to make distinct contributions to reproductive physiology. Within these kisspeptin neuron populations, Kiss1 expression is directly regulated by sex hormones, thereby confounding the roles of sex differences and early activational events that drive the establishment of kisspeptin neurons. In order to better understand sex steroid hormone-dependent and -independent effects on the maturation of kisspeptin neurons, hypogonadal (hpg) mice deficient in GnRH and its downstream effectors were used to determine changes in the developmental kisspeptin expression. In hpg mice, sex differences in Kiss1 mRNA levels and kisspeptin immunoreactivity, typically present at 30 days of age, were absent in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV). Although immunoreactive kisspeptin increased from 10 to 30 days of age to levels intermediate between wild type (WT) females and males, corresponding increases in Kiss1 mRNA were not detected. In contrast, the hpg arcuate nucleus (ARC) demonstrated a 10-fold increase in Kiss1 mRNA between 10 and 30 days in both females and males, suggesting that the ARC is a significant center for sex steroid-independent pubertal kisspeptin expression. Interestingly, the normal positive feedback response of AVPV kisspeptin neurons to estrogen observed in WT mice was lost in hpg females, suggesting that exposure to reproductive hormones during development may contribute to the establishment of the ovulatory gonadotropin surge mechanism. Overall, these studies suggest that the onset of pubertal kisspeptin expression is not dependent on reproductive hormones, but that gonadal sex steroids critically shape the hypothalamic kisspeptin neuronal subpopulations to make distinct contributions to

  19. Metabolic effects of testosterone replacement therapy on hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiang; Tian, Ye; Wu, Tao; Cao, Chen-Xi; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review was aimed at assessing the metabolic effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) on hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A literature search was performed using the Cochrane Library, EMBASE and PubMed. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the meta-analysis. Two reviewers retrieved articles and evaluated the study quality using an appropriate scoring method. Outcomes including glucose metabolism, lipid parameters, body fat and blood pressure were pooled using a random effects model and tested for heterogeneity. We used the Cochrane Collaboration's Review Manager 5.2 software for statistical analysis. Five RCTs including 351 participants with a mean follow-up time of 6.5-months were identified that strictly met our eligibility criteria. A meta-analysis of the extractable data showed that testosterone reduced fasting plasma glucose levels (mean difference (MD): -1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI) (-1.88, -0.31)), fasting serum insulin levels (MD: -2.73; 95% CI (-3.62, -1.84)), HbA1c % (MD: -0.87; 95% CI (-1.32, -0.42)) and triglyceride levels (MD: -0.35; 95% CI (-0.62, -0.07)). The testosterone and control groups demonstrated no significant difference for other outcomes. In conclusion, we found that TRT can improve glycemic control and decrease triglyceride levels of hypogonadal men with T2DM. Considering the limited number of participants and the confounding factors in our systematic review; additional large, well-designed RCTs are needed to address the metabolic effects of TRT and its long-term influence on hypogonadal men with T2DM.

  20. Metabolic effects of testosterone replacement therapy on hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiang; Tian, Ye; Wu, Tao; Cao, Chen-Xi; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review was aimed at assessing the metabolic effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) on hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A literature search was performed using the Cochrane Library, EMBASE and PubMed. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the meta-analysis. Two reviewers retrieved articles and evaluated the study quality using an appropriate scoring method. Outcomes including glucose metabolism, lipid parameters, body fat and blood pressure were pooled using a random effects model and tested for heterogeneity. We used the Cochrane Collaboration's Review Manager 5.2 software for statistical analysis. Five RCTs including 351 participants with a mean follow-up time of 6.5-months were identified that strictly met our eligibility criteria. A meta-analysis of the extractable data showed that testosterone reduced fasting plasma glucose levels (mean difference (MD): −1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI) (−1.88, −0.31)), fasting serum insulin levels (MD: −2.73; 95% CI (−3.62, −1.84)), HbA1c % (MD: −0.87; 95% CI (−1.32, −0.42)) and triglyceride levels (MD: −0.35; 95% CI (−0.62, −0.07)). The testosterone and control groups demonstrated no significant difference for other outcomes. In conclusion, we found that TRT can improve glycemic control and decrease triglyceride levels of hypogonadal men with T2DM. Considering the limited number of participants and the confounding factors in our systematic review; additional large, well-designed RCTs are needed to address the metabolic effects of TRT and its long-term influence on hypogonadal men with T2DM. PMID:24369149

  1. Follow-up 20 years later of 34 Klinefelter males with karyotype 47,XXY and 16 hypogonadal males with karyotype 46,XY.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, J; Pelsen, B

    1987-10-01

    A 20-year follow-up study of 50 hypogonadal males has been made. Of these 34 had Klinefelter's syndrome with the karyotype 47,XXY and 16 had the karyotype 46,XY. These males have been examined at mean ages of 27 and 37 and in the present study at a mean age of 47. At the first examination the following conditions were found in the Klinefelter males to a significantly higher degree than in the hypogonadal males with 46,XY: immaturity, below average school performance, few or no friends, previous mental illness, little energy and initiative, few or no spare time interests, occupation as an unskilled labourer. Psychological testing showed a full scale IQ of 103 in the Klinefelter males and 115 in the hypogonadal males. The follow-up studies have shown that in spite of these findings the Klinefelter males have managed far better than could have been expected at the time of the first investigation. The improvement in a number of conditions such as mental health, working capacity, social adjustment, relations with other people, and activity level was considerable between the ages of 27 and 37. The present examination shows a further improvement at the age of 47 with the only significant difference between the Klinefelter males and the hypogonadal males with 46,XY being a higher frequency of single Klinefelter males. The present examination also showed that there was no significant difference between the two groups in occupation, working capacity, social adjustment, mental and physical disorders or criminality. The results of the examination at the mean age of 27 would probably have been considerably more favourable for the Klinefelter males if diagnosis had been made in childhood, and information, counselling, support and hormone treatment had been given from an early age. The fact that the great majority of the Klinefelter males have managed quite well in spite of this and that no remarkable differences were found between them and a control group is of great importance

  2. Standardised water-soluble extract of Eurycoma longifolia, Tongkat ali, as testosterone booster for managing men with late-onset hypogonadism?

    PubMed

    Tambi, M I B M; Imran, M K; Henkel, R R

    2012-05-01

    In most countries, millions of people are relying on herbal medicines as remedy for numerous ailments. In South-East Asia, Eurycoma longifolia Jack, also known as 'Malaysian ginseng' or Tongkat ali, is used to combat stress and disease and to improve physical strength. Moreover, the compounds of the roots of this plant are reported to have aphrodisiac and testosterone enhancing effects in the rat. Considering that human studies are not available, 76 of 320 patients suffering from late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) were given 200 mg of a standardised water-soluble extract of Tongkat ali for 1 month. The Ageing Males' Symptoms (AMS) according to the standardised rating scale and the serum testosterone concentration were taken. Results show that treatment of LOH patients with this Tongkat ali extract significantly (P < 0.0001) improved the AMS score as well as the serum testosterone concentration. While before treatment only 10.5% of the patients did not show any complaint according to the AMS scale and 35.5% had normal testosterone levels, after the completed treatment 71.7% and 90.8% of the patients showed normal values, respectively. Thus, Tongkat ali extract appears to be useful as a supplement in overcoming the symptoms of LOH and for the management of hypogonadism.

  3. Definitive localization of X-linked Kallman syndrome (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia) to Xp22.3: close linkage to the hypervariable repeat sequence CRI-S232.

    PubMed Central

    Meitinger, T; Heye, B; Petit, C; Levilliers, J; Golla, A; Moraine, C; Dalla Piccola, B; Sippell, W G; Murken, J; Ballabio, A

    1990-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. Six families in which the disorder followed an X-linked inheritance were investigated by linkage analysis. Diagnostic criteria were uniformly applied and included tests for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. Close linkage was found by using the hypervariable repeated sequence CRI-S232 (DXS278) previously mapped to Xp22.3. At a maximum lod score of 6.5, the recombination fraction was calculated as .03. Of 30 fully informative meioses, one recombination between the disease locus and the loci recognized by probe CRI-S232 was observed. When an independent approach is used, these results confirm the X-linked Kallmann syndrome assignment previously made by deletion mapping, and allow definitive localization of the syndrome assignment previously made by deletion mapping, and allow definitive localization of the syndrome to the Xp22.3 region. This opens the way to carrier detection and to the identification of a gene responsible for this disorder. Images Figure 2 PMID:1977309

  4. Treatment situation of male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in pediatrics and proposal of testosterone and gonadotropins replacement therapy protocols

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Naoko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Arisaka, Osamu; Ozono, Keiichi; Amemiya, Shin; Kikuchi, Toru; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Harada, Shohei; Miyata, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (MHH), a disorder associated with infertility, is treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and/or gonadotropins replacement therapy (GRT) (TRT and GRT, together with HRT hormone replacement therapy). In Japan, guidelines have been set for treatment during adolescence. Due to the risk of rapid maturation of bone age, low doses of testosterone or gonadotropins have been used. However, the optimal timing and methods of therapeutic intervention have not yet been established. The objective of this study was to investigate the current situation of treatment for children with MHH in Japan and to review a primary survey involving councilors of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and a secondary survey obtained from 26 facilities conducting HRT. The subjects were 55 patients with MHH who reached their adult height after HRT. The breakdown of the patients is as follows: 7 patients with Kallmann syndrome, 6 patients with isolated gonadotropin deficiency, 18 patients with acquired hypopituitarism due to intracranial and pituitary tumor, 22 patients with classical idiopathic hypopituitarism due to breech delivery, and 2 patients with CHARGE syndrome. The mean age at the start of HRT was 15.7 yrs and mean height was 157.2 cm. The mean age at reaching adult height was 19.4 yrs, and the mean adult height was 171.0 cm. The starting age of HRT was later than the normal pubertal age and showed a significant negative correlation with pubertal height gain, but it showed no correlation with adult height. As for spermatogenesis, 76% of the above patients treated with hCG-rFSH combined therapy showed positive results, though ranging in levels; impaired spermatogenesis was observed in some with congenital MHH, and favorable spermatogenesis was observed in all with acquired MHH. From the above, we propose the establishment of a treatment protocol for the start low-dose testosterone or low-dose gonadotropins by dividing

  5. Former Abusers of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Exhibit Decreased Testosterone Levels and Hypogonadal Symptoms Years after Cessation: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Selmer, Christian; Østergren, Peter Busch; Pedersen, Karen Boje; Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Faber, Jens; Juul, Anders; Kistorp, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Aims Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is highly prevalent among male recreational athletes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of AAS abuse on reproductive hormone levels and symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism in current and former AAS abusers. Methods This study had a cross-sectional case-control design and involved 37 current AAS abusers, 33 former AAS abusers (mean (95%CI) elapsed duration since AAS cessation: 2.5 (1.7; 3.7) years) and 30 healthy control participants. All participants were aged 18–50 years and were involved in recreational strength training. Reproductive hormones (FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH)) were measured using morning blood samples. Symptoms of hypogonadism (depressive symptoms, fatigue, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction) were recorded systematically. Results Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower median (25th –75th percentiles) total and free testosterone levels than control participants (total testosterone: 14.4 (11.9–17.7) nmol/l vs. 18.8 (16.6–22.0) nmol/l) (P < 0.01). Overall, 27.2% (13.3; 45.5) of former AAS abusers exhibited plasma total testosterone levels below the lower reference limit (12.1 nmol/l) whereas no control participants exhibited testosterone below this limit (P < 0.01). Gonadotropins were significantly suppressed, and inhibin B and AMH were significantly decreased in current AAS abusers compared with former AAS abusers and control participants (P < 0.01). The group of former AAS abusers had higher proportions of participants with depressive symptoms ((24.2%) (11.1; 42.2)), erectile dysfunction ((27.3%) (13.3; 45.6)) and decreased libido ((40.1%) (23.2; 57.0)) than the other two groups (trend analyses: P < 0.05). Conclusions Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower plasma testosterone levels and higher frequencies of symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism than healthy control participants years after AAS cessation

  6. Constitutional delayed puberty in males and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: a reliable and cost-effective approach to differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Malcolm M; Martin, Arline L A

    2005-09-01

    Forty-six male teenagers 13-19 years old with delayed puberty (DP) underwent gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) stimulation as part of their work-up. All were followed to age 18 and beyond. Thirty-seven had constitutional delayed puberty (CDP). Nine had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). At referral 34 youngsters with CDP were properly diagnosed when the lower limit for the luteinizing hormone (LH) response to GnRH (Factrel 0.1 mg i.v.) was set at 12 IU/l. Three boys with CDP failed to reach that level and were not assigned appropriately. All nine patients with HH had basal serum testosterone (T) < 50 ng/dl when first seen and LH responses to GnRH stimulation < 8.0 IU/l. In the late 1970s, five subjects with DP were given HCG 3,000 IU (two patients daily for 5 days; three on 3 alternate days). Serum T was measured before the first, and 48 hours after the last injection (day 7). With recognition of the long biological half-life of injected HCG and receptor downregulation by daily doses, the protocol was changed. In the early 1980s, the dose of HCG was randomized to either 500 IU or 1,000 IU given on 3 alternate days. T was measured before the first injection (basal), 48 hours later (day 3) and 48 hours after the third injection (day 7). At referral 35 patients with CDP, including one GnRH failure, met the criterion for a positive response to HCG stimulation based on their own reactions (T > 170 ng/dl on day 3; > 200 on day 7). Eleven patients with DP failed the test. Nine had HH and two had CDP. The nine patients with HH included the two given daily injections and the three given HCG 3,000 IU on 3 alternate days. Of the two with CDP, one, an obese boy with a normal GnRH test, only received 500 IU HCG (5.6 IU/kg), which may have been inadequate. The other failed both tests. Of the 35 responders, 17 (group 1) were given HCG 500 IU and 18 (group 2) were given 1,000 IU i.m. on 3 alternate days. Seven boys in group 1 and 12 in

  7. Truncating Homozygous Mutation of Carboxypeptidase E (CPE) in a Morbidly Obese Female with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Intellectual Disability and Hypogonadotrophic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Jessica L.; Zekavati, Anna; Sosinsky, Alona; Yiorkas, Andrianos M.; Holder, Susan; Klaber, Robert E.; Bridges, Nicola; van Haelst, Mieke M.; le Roux, Carel W.; Walley, Andrew J.; Walters, Robin G.; Mueller, Michael; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.

    2015-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase E is a peptide processing enzyme, involved in cleaving numerous peptide precursors, including neuropeptides and hormones involved in appetite control and glucose metabolism. Exome sequencing of a morbidly obese female from a consanguineous family revealed homozygosity for a truncating mutation of the CPE gene (c.76_98del; p.E26RfsX68). Analysis detected no CPE expression in whole blood-derived RNA from the proband, consistent with nonsense-mediated decay. The morbid obesity, intellectual disability, abnormal glucose homeostasis and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism seen in this individual recapitulates phenotypes in the previously described fat/fat and Cpe knockout mouse models, evidencing the importance of this peptide/hormone-processing enzyme in regulating body weight, metabolism, and brain and reproductive function in humans. PMID:26120850

  8. Partial hypogonadotropic hypogonadism associated with the Leu266Arg and Gln106Arg mutation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Quintos, J B; Krotz, Stephan; Vogiatzi, Maria G; Kralickova, Milena; New, Maria I

    2009-02-01

    We describe a patient with partial hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by a compound heterozygous GnRH-R mutation. She is a 20-year-old tall, eunuchoid female referred for evaluation of primary amenorrhea. Spontaneous thelarche occurred at the age of 15 years. Breast and pubic hair were at Tanner stages 3 and 4, respectively. Evaluation revealed low plasma estradiol level and absence of withdrawal bleeding after progestin challenge. Pelvic ultrasonography showed a small uterus and ovaries. Bone age was delayed at 14.5 years. Bone mineral density showed osteopenia. Endogenous LH secretory pattern was abnormal with low amplitude and frequency, but responded to pulsatile GnRH administration. The coding exons of the GnRH-R gene were amplified and the PCR products were sequenced bidirectionally. Two different mutations were identified: one in exon 1 (Gln106Arg) and the other in exon 3 (Leu266Arg).

  9. The efficacy, bioavailability and safety of a novel hydroalcoholic testosterone gel 2% in hypogonadal men: results from phase II open-label studies.

    PubMed

    Efros, M; Carrara, D; Neijber, A

    2016-08-01

    Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of a novel hydroalcoholic testosterone gel 2% (TG) were evaluated in phase II sequential dose escalation studies using 3 application sites (thigh, abdomen and shoulder/upper arm) and 2 application methods. Hypogonadal men (n = 40), 18-75 years, with serum testosterone <300 ng dl(-1) were included in both studies. Study 1 evaluated hand-applied multiple doses of TG 1.25, 2.50 and 3.75 ml (23, 46 and 70 mg of testosterone, respectively), once daily for 10 days to shoulder/upper arm. Study 2 evaluated applicator-applied (TG 1.25, 2.50 and 3.75 ml) versus hand-applied (TG 2.5 ml) doses, once daily for 7 days to shoulder/upper arm. Primary endpoint for both studies was responder rate (Cave testosterone levels between 298 and 1050 ng dl(-1) ). In Study 1 following multiple applications, >70% participants in each group were responders. Dose-dependent increase was observed in PK values for total testosterone, free testosterone and DHT. In Study 2, responder rate was dose proportional: 16.7%, 50.0% and 77.8% responders in TG 1.25, 2.50 and 3.75 ml groups respectively. The bioavailability was highest for the shoulder application. There was a significant improvement in almost all the domains of sexual functioning. Applicator-application was preferred over hand-application by majority of the participants. TG was found to be safe and well tolerated in hypogonadal men.

  10. A novel mutation m.8561C>G in MT-ATP6/8 causing a mitochondrial syndrome with ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Kytövuori, Laura; Lipponen, Joonas; Rusanen, Harri; Komulainen, Tuomas; Martikainen, Mika H; Majamaa, Kari

    2016-11-01

    Defects in the respiratory chain or mitochondrial ATP synthase (complex V) result in mitochondrial dysfunction that is an important cause of inherited neurological disease. Two of the subunits of complex V are encoded by MT-ATP6 and MT-ATP8 in the mitochondrial genome. Pathogenic mutations in MT-ATP6 are associated with the Leigh syndrome, the syndrome of neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), as well as with non-classical phenotypes, while MT-ATP8 is less frequently mutated in patients with mitochondrial disease. We investigated two adult siblings presenting with features of cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes mellitus, sensorineural hearing impairment, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. As the phenotype was suggestive of mitochondrial disease, mitochondrial DNA was sequenced and a novel heteroplasmic mutation m.8561C>G in the overlapping region of the MT-ATP6 and MT-ATP8 was found. The mutation changed amino acids in both subunits. Mutation heteroplasmy correlated with the disease phenotype in five family members. An additional assembly intermediate of complex V and increased amount of subcomplex F1 were observed in myoblasts of the two patients, but the total amount of complex V was unaffected. Furthermore, intracellular ATP concentration was lower in patient myoblasts indicating defective energy production. We suggest that the m.8561C>G mutation in MT-ATP6/8 is pathogenic, leads biochemically to impaired assembly and decreased ATP production of complex V, and results clinically in a phenotype with the core features of cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism.

  11. Duplication of the Xq27.3-q28 region, including the FMR1 gene, in an X-linked hypogonadism, gynecomastia, intellectual disability, short stature, and obesity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Scott E; Walters-Sen, Lauren; Mosher, Theresa Mihalic; Pfau, Ruthann B; Pyatt, Robert; Snyder, Pamela J; Sotos, Juan F; Prior, Thomas W

    2013-09-01

    In 1979 a "new" syndrome characterized by X-linked inheritance, hypogonadism, gynecomastia, intellectual disability, obesity, and short stature was described. The now-36-year-old propositus was recently referred to the genetics clinic for profound intellectual disability. Fragile X testing initially demonstrated a duplication of the FMR1 region, and upon further testing we identified an Xq27.3-q28 8.05 Mb-long duplication responsible for a syndrome. Our report describes the molecular and clinical aspects of the X-linked syndrome. Our results suggest that male patients with intellectual disability, hypogonadism, short stature, and gynecomastia should be further investigated for rearrangements in the Xq27.3-q28 region. In the future, when more cases of the duplication are identified, it may become possible to more accurately determine the specific genes affected by overexpression and responsible for the phenotype.

  12. Effects of long-term testosterone replacement therapy, with a temporary intermission, on glycemic control of nine hypogonadal men with type 1 diabetes mellitus - a series of case reports.

    PubMed

    Saad, Farid; Yassin, Aksam; Almehmadi, Yousef; Doros, Gheorghe; Gooren, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is often associated with obesity and subnormal serum testosterone (T) levels. Until 5 years ago there was no indication that men with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) had subnormal serum T. But recent studies indicate that about 10% of men with T1DM suffer from hypogonadism, as a rule aged men and men with obesity. While hypogonadal men with T2DM benefit from normalization of their serum T, this has not been investigated in men with T1DM. Nine men with T1DM, erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism (total testosterone ≤ 12 nmol/L) received testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). In seven men TRT was intermitted: one man with prostate malignancy and six men because of problems of reimbursement. Incidentally, this provided an opportunity to monitor the effects of withdrawal and of the reinstatement of TRT. In all men, glycemic control (serum glucose and HbA1c), weight, waist circumference, lipid profiles and erectile function improved upon TRT. The seven men whose TRT was intermitted showed a deterioration which improved again upon reinstatement of TRT. The data suggest that aging and obese men with T1DM might have subnormal T levels and that their glycemic control, lipid profiles and erectile function might benefit from TRT.

  13. The effect of testosterone replacement therapy on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in men being treated for hypogonadism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels.Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer.After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117-0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48-2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls.Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration is minimal.

  14. Efficacy and safety of testosterone replacement therapy in men with hypogonadism: A meta-analysis study of placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changcheng; Gu, Wenyu; Liu, Min; Peng, B O; Yao, Xudong; Yang, Bin; Zheng, Junhua

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of testosterone replacement therapy in men with hypogonadism. A search was conducted for appropriate randomized controlled trials and the data from 16 trials were pooled. The intended primary outcome of the present study was to determine the efficacy and safety of testosterone replacement therapy. The current data demonstrated that scores for Aging Male Symptoms (AMS) were significantly reduced following testosterone replacement therapy, with a mean decrease in AMS score of 1.52 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72 to 2.32; P=0.0002]. Testosterone replacement therapy increased lean body mass [mean difference (MD), 1.22; 95% CI, 0.33 to 2.11; P=0.007], reduced fat mass in a non-significantly manner (MD, -0.85; 95% CI, -1.74 to 0.04; P=0.06) and significantly reduced total cholesterol (MD, -0.16; 95% CI, -0.29 to -0.03; P=0.01). No significant differences were identified in body weight (MD, 0.09; 95% CI, -1.13 to 1.31; P=0.89), body mass index (MD, 0.10; 95% CI, -0.62 to 0.82; P=0.78) or bone mineral density (MD, -0.01; 95% CI, -0.03 to 0.02; P=0.60). Average prostate volume increased (MD, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.6 to 2.56; P=0.002) following testosterone replacement therapy, but the levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (MD, 0.10; 95% CI, -0.03 to 0.22; P=0.14) and the International Prostate Symptom Scores (MD, 0.01; 95% CI, -0.37 to 0.39; P=0.96) did not change. In conclusion, testosterone replacement therapy improves quality of life, increases lean body mass, significantly decreases total cholesterol, and is well-tolerated and safe for men with hypogonadism who are exhibiting PSA levels of <4 ng/ml.

  15. Prospective assessment of health-related quality of life in men with late-onset hypogonadism who received testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Sumii, K; Miyake, H; Enatsu, N; Matsushita, K; Fujisawa, M

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to characterise the status of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in Japanese men with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). HRQOL in 69 consecutive Japanese men with LOH undergoing TRT for at least 6 months was prospectively evaluated before and 6 months after the initiation of TRT using the Medical Outcomes Study 8-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-8). All eight-scale scores except for bodily pain (BP) in the 69 patients at 6 months after the introduction of TRT significantly improved compared with those before TRT; however, all scale scores except for BP in the 69 patients were significantly inferior to those in age-matched Japanese controls irrespective of the timing of SF-8. Multivariate analyses of several parameters revealed that both age and Aging Male Symptom (AMS) score had an independent impact on mental health (MH), despite the lack of an independent association between any score and the remaining factors examined. TRT appeared to significantly improve the status of HRQOL in men with LOH; however, even after the introduction of TRT, HRQOL associated with MH remained significantly impaired in elderly men and/or those with a high AMS score.

  16. Implantation Failure in Female Kiss1−/− Mice Is Independent of Their Hypogonadic State and Can Be Partially Rescued by Leukemia Inhibitory Factor

    PubMed Central

    Calder, Michele; Chan, Yee-Ming; Raj, Renju; Pampillo, Macarena; Elbert, Adrienne; Noonan, Michelle; Gillio-Meina, Carolina; Caligioni, Claudia; Bérubé, Nathalie G.; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Watson, Andrew J.; Seminara, Stephanie B.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic kisspeptin signaling system is a major positive regulator of the reproductive neuroendocrine axis, and loss of Kiss1 in the mouse results in infertility, a condition generally attributed to its hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. We demonstrate that in Kiss1−/− female mice, acute replacement of gonadotropins and estradiol restores ovulation, mating, and fertilization; however, these mice are still unable to achieve pregnancy because embryos fail to implant. Progesterone treatment did not overcome this defect. Kiss1+/− embryos transferred to a wild-type female mouse can successfully implant, demonstrating the defect is due to maternal factors. Kisspeptin and its receptor are expressed in the mouse uterus, and we suggest that it is the absence of uterine kisspeptin signaling that underlies the implantation failure. This absence, however, does not prevent the closure of the uterine implantation chamber, proper alignment of the embryo, and the ability of the uterus to undergo decidualization. Instead, the loss of Kiss1 expression specifically disrupts embryo attachment to the uterus. We observed that on the day of implantation, leukemia inhibitory factor (Lif), a cytokine that is absolutely required for implantation in mice, is weakly expressed in Kiss1−/− uterine glands and that the administration of exogenous Lif to hormone-primed Kiss1−/− female mice is sufficient to partially rescue implantation. Taken together, our study reveals that uterine kisspeptin signaling regulates glandular Lif levels, thereby identifying a novel and critical role for kisspeptin in regulating embryo implantation in the mouse. This study provides compelling reasons to explore this role in other species, particularly livestock and humans. PMID:24877624

  17. Embryonic pathogenesis of hypogonadism and renal hypoplasia in hgn/hgn rats characterized by male sterility, reduced female fertility and progressive renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroetsu; Yagi, Mio; Saito, Kenichi; Suzuki, Katsushi

    2007-03-01

    Congenital hypoplasia and dysplasia affect the postnatal development of organs, their physiological functioning in adulthood and the incidence of related diseases at an advanced age. Hypogonadic (hgn/hgn) rats are characterized by male sterility, reduced female fertility, progressive renal insufficiency and growth retardation, all controlled by a single recessive allele (hgn) located on chromosome 10. Since our previous studies indicated that the hypoplasia (dysplasia) of the affected organs was present at birth, we examined the embryonic pathogenesis. We mated hgn/hgn females to Brown Norway males and backcrossed F(1) males to hgn/hgn females. The resulting N(1) fetuses were genotyped using a hgn-linked microsatellite. Both sexes of hgn/hgn fetuses showed low body weight after embryonic day (ED) 15.5 and renal hypoplasia after ED 17.5. Their kidneys contained a reduced number of nephrons in a poorly formed nephrogenic zone and renal cortex. The hgn/hgn ovaries contained a small number of oogonia at ED 15.5 and oocytes after ED 17.5. Testicular growth defects were obvious after ED 17.5, and reduced numbers of Sertoli cells were detected at ED 19.5 and 21.5. The seminiferous cords in hgn/hgn testes contained more apoptotic and mitotic cells than those in +/hgn testes. These findings suggest that the phenotypes described in adult hgn/hgn rats result from embryonic hypogenesis, which continues to early postnatal stage and causes a reduction in functional tissues and cells. Since hgn/hgn rats have an insertion mutation in the microtubule-associated protein Spag5 gene, the embryonic hypogenesis described in hgn/hgn rats might result from defective cell proliferation.

  18. Lack of sexual dimorphism in femora of the eusocial and hypogonadic naked mole-rat: a novel animal model for the study of delayed puberty on the skeletal system.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Jepsen, K J; Terranova, C J; Buffenstein, R

    2010-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones are major determinants of bone morphology and quality and are responsible for sexually dimorphic skeletal traits. Hypogonadism results in suboptimal skeletal development and may lead to an increased risk of bone fracture later in life. The etiology of delayed puberty and/or hypothalamic amenorrhea is poorly understood, and experimental animal models addressing this issue are predominantly based upon short-term experimental induction of hormonal suppression via gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonists (GnRH-a). This acute change in hormone profile does not necessarily emulate the natural progression of hypogonadic bone disorders. We propose a novel animal model with which to explore the effects of chronic hypogonadism on bone quality, the naked mole-rat (NMR; Heterocephalus glaber). This mouse-size rodent may remain reproductively suppressed throughout its life, if it remains as a subordinate within the eusocial mole-rat colony. NMRs live in large colonies with a single dominant breeding female. She, primarily by using aggressive social contact, naturally suppresses the hypothalamic gonadotropic axis of subordinate NMRs and thereby their reproductive expression. However, should an NMR be separated from the dominant breeder, within less than a week reproductive hormones may become elevated and the animal attains breeding status. We questioned if sexual suppression of subordinates impact upon the development and maintenance of the femora and lead to a sexually indistinct monomorphic skeleton. Femora were obtained from male and female NMRs that were either non-breeders (subordinate) or breeders at the time of sacrifice. Diaphyseal cross-sectional morphology, metaphyseal trabecular micro-architecture and tissue mineral density of the femur were measured using microcomputed tomography and diaphyseal mechanical properties were assessed by four-point bending tests to failure. Subordinates were sexually monomorphic and showed no significant

  19. Testosterone therapy has positive effects on anthropometric measures, metabolic syndrome components (obesity, lipid profile, Diabetes Mellitus control), blood indices, liver enzymes, and prostate health indicators in elderly hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Canguven, O; Talib, R A; El Ansari, W; Yassin, D-J; Salman, M; Al-Ansari, A

    2017-03-10

    To alleviate late-onset hypogonadism, testosterone treatment is offered to suitable patients. Although testosterone treatment is commonly given to late-onset hypogonadism patients, there remains uncertainty about the metabolic effects during follow-ups. We assessed the associations between testosterone treatment and wide range of characteristics that included hormonal, anthropometric, biochemical features. Patients received intramuscular 1,000 mg testosterone undecanoate for 1 year. Patient anthropometric measurements were undertaken at baseline and at each visit, and blood samples were drawn at each visit, prior to the next testosterone undecanoate. Eighty-eight patients (51.1 ± 13.0 years) completed the follow-up period. Testosterone treatment was associated with significant increase in serum testosterone levels and significant stepladder decrease in body mass index, total cholesterol, triglycerides and glycated haemoglobin from baseline values among all patients. There was no significant increase in liver enzymes. There was an increase in haemoglobin and haematocrit, as well as in prostate-specific antigen and prostate volume, but no prostate biopsy intervention was needed for study patients during 1-year testosterone treatment follow-up. Testosterone treatment with long-acting testosterone undecanoate improved the constituents of metabolic syndrome and improved glycated haemoglobin in a stepladder fashion, with no adverse effects.

  20. Of Mice and Men-Warning: Intact Versus Castrated Adult Male Mice as Xenograft Hosts Are Equivalent to Hypogonadal Versus Abiraterone Treated Aging Human Males, Respectively

    PubMed Central

    Sedelaar, J.P. Michiel; Dalrymple, Susan S.; Isaacs, John T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune deficient male mice bearing human prostate cancer xenografts are used to evaluate therapeutic response to novel androgen ablation approaches and the results compared to surgical castration based upon assumption that testosterone microenvironment in intact and castrated adult male mice mimics eugonadal and castrated aging adult human males. METHODS To test these assumptions, serum total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were determined longitudinally in groups (n > 20) of intact versus castrated adult male nude, NOG, and immune competent C57BL/6 mice. RESULTS In adult male mice, TT and FT varies by 30- to 100-fold within the same animal providing a microenvironment that is only equivalent to hypogonadal, not eugonadal, adult human males (TT is 1.7 ± 1.2 ng/ml [5.8 ± 4.1 nM] in nude and 2.5 ± 1.3 ng/ml [8.7 ± 4.4 nM] in NOG mice versus >4.2 ng/ml [14.7 nM] in eugonadal humans). This was confirmed based upon enhanced growth of androgen dependent human prostate cancer xenografts inoculated into mice supplemented with exogenous testosterone to elevate and chronically maintain serum TT at a level (5 ng/ml [18 nM]) equivalent to a 50-year-old eugonadal human male. In castrated mice, TT and FT range from 2 to 20 pg/ml (7–70 pM) and <0.8 pg/ml (<2.6 pM), respectively, which is equivalent to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with abiraterone. This was confirmed based upon the inability of another CYP17A1 inhibitor, ketoconazole, to inhibit the growth of CRPC xenografts in castrated mice. CONCLUSIONS Adult male mice supplemented with testosterone mimic eugonadal human males, while unsupplemented animals mimic standard androgen ablation and castrated animals mimic abiraterone treated patients. These studies confirm what is claimed in Robert Burns’ poem “To a Mouse” that “The best laid schemes of mice and men/often go awry. PMID:23775398

  1. Identifying the unmet health needs of patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism using a web-based needs assessment: implications for online interventions and peer-to-peer support

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with rare diseases such as congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) are dispersed, often challenged to find specialized care and face other health disparities. The internet has the potential to reach a wide audience of rare disease patients and can help connect patients and specialists. Therefore, this study aimed to: (i) determine if web-based platforms could be effectively used to conduct an online needs assessment of dispersed CHH patients; (ii) identify the unmet health and informational needs of CHH patients and (iii) assess patient acceptability regarding patient-centered, web-based interventions to bridge shortfalls in care. Methods A sequential mixed-methods design was used: first, an online survey was conducted to evaluate health promoting behavior and identify unmet health and informational needs of CHH men. Subsequently, patient focus groups were held to explore specific patient-identified targets for care and to examine the acceptability of possible online interventions. Descriptive statistics and thematic qualitative analyses were used. Results 105 male participants completed the online survey (mean age 37 ± 11, range 19–66 years) representing a spectrum of patients across a broad socioeconomic range and all but one subject had adequate healthcare literacy. The survey revealed periods of non-adherence to treatment (34/93, 37%) and gaps in healthcare (36/87, 41%) exceeding one year. Patient focus groups identified lasting psychological effects related to feelings of isolation, shame and body-image concerns. Survey respondents were active internet users, nearly all had sought CHH information online (101/105, 96%), and they rated the internet, healthcare providers, and online community as equally important CHH information sources. Focus group participants were overwhelmingly positive regarding online interventions/support with links to reach expert healthcare providers and for peer-to-peer support. Conclusion The web

  2. Estradiol and testosterone secretion by human, simian, and canine testes, in males with hypogonadism and in male pseudohermaphrodites with the feminizing testes syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelch, R P; Jenner, M R; Weinstein, R; Kaplan, S L; Grumbach, M M

    1972-04-01

    The role of the human testis in the production of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) was investigated by determining the concentration of E(2) and testosterone in peripheral and spermatic vein plasma samples. Specimens were obtained from eight normal men, three men with hypogonadism, and two patients with the incomplete form of the feminizing testes syndrome. For comparison, similar studies were performed in four monkeys, 10 mongrel dogs, and 4 additional dogs who were given 1000 IU of human chorionic gonadotropin/day for 5 days. Plasma E(2) was measured by radioimmunoassay utilizing sheep anti-E(2) serum preceded by ether extraction and thin layer chromatographic separation of plasma steroids. Procedural blanks, which were subtracted from all reported values were 14.1+/-0.74 (SEM) pg for deionized water and 13.1+/-0.66 pg for charcoaladsorbed pooled male plasma. Pooled male and pooled female control plasmas averaged 17+/-0.71 pg/ml and 95+/-6.9 pg/ml, respectively; individual adult male specimens ranged between 8 and 28 with a mean of 18+/-1.4 pg/ml. In the eight normal men, the mean peripheral vein E(2) concentration was 20+/-1.6 pg/ml, while the spermatic vein concentration was 50 times as great, 1049+/-57 pg/ml. All three patients with testicular abnormalities had low spermatic vein E(2) concentrations (160, 280, and 416 pg/ml). Lesser E(2) gradients were found across the simian (3-fold) and canine (approximately 12-fold) testes. Testicular testosterone gradients (human 110-, simian 10-, and canine 77-fold) were greater than the E(2) gradients in all three species. In four dogs, HCG treatment elicited a 6-fold increase in peripheral and a 9-fold increase in spermatic vein testosterone concentrations; however, peripheral and spermatic vein E(2) concentrations did not differ from control values. Spermatic vein E(2) concentrations were > 4600 and 2210 pg/ml (post-HCG) in two patients with the incomplete form of the feminizing testes syndrome. Postorchiectomy, peripheral E(2

  3. Hypogonadism, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, hypoparathyroidism: incidence and prevalence related to iron overload and chelation therapy in patients with thalassaemia major followed from 1980 to 2007 in the Ferrara Centre.

    PubMed

    Gamberini, Maria Rita; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Gilli, Giuseppe

    2008-10-01

    273 patients with thalassaemia major followed from diagnosis in the Ferrara Centre were divided into 3 cohorts (C) according to the year of birth (C1=1954-1964, 85 patients; C2=1965-1974, 129 patients; C3=1975-2001, 59 patients) in order to study the trends of endocrine complications. Menarche occurred in 52 out of 112 patients (46%), without significant differences among the 3 groups, at the mean age of 13.9+/-1.4 years. Sixty-five percent of these patients had secondary amenorrhoea at the mean age of 18.8+/-3.7 years. In males complete pubertal development occurred in 48% of patients (C1:31%, C2: 44%, C3: 63%, p<0.05) followed by secondary hypogonadism in 24% of patients above 21 years of age. Primary (80%) and central 20%) hypothyroidism were diagnosed in 31% of patients (C1: 55%, C2: 31.5%, C3: 13.4%, p<0.05), diabetes mellitus (DM) in 17% of patients (C1: 28.6%, C2: 17.2%, C3: 3.4%, p<0.05), and hypoparathyroidism in 10.6% of cases (C1: 18.7%, C2: 10.1%, C3: 3.4%, p<0.05). No difference was found in patient mean age of diagnosis of hypothyroidism, DM or hypoparathyroidism (20.4+/-8.2 years, 19+/-5 yrs and 18.5+/-5.8 yrs respectively) but in all three groups age at diagnosis significantly increased over time (hypothyroidism and DM: p<0.001; hypoparathyroidism: p<0.01). Over time the prevalence of hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus and hypoparathyroidism increased to 24.4%, 14.7%, and 6.7%, respectively, at the time of the study. Incidences peaked in the early 1980's, and declined in the following years (primary hypothyroidism from 6.5% in 1981 to 0.9% in 2007, p<0.01; DM from 3.9% in 1986 to 0.8% in 2007, p<0.05; hypoparathyroidism 2.4% in 1984 to 0% in 2007, p<0.01) and correlated with the decrease in annual mean serum ferritin levels in all patients (p<0.001). The main risk factors associated with endocrine complications were high serum ferritin levels, poor compliance with desferioxamine (DFO) therapy, early onset of transfusion therapy (only for hypogonadism

  4. Mutations in CUL4B, Which Encodes a Ubiquitin E3 Ligase Subunit, Cause an X-linked Mental Retardation Syndrome Associated with Aggressive Outbursts, Seizures, Relative Macrocephaly, Central Obesity, Hypogonadism, Pes Cavus, and Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Tarpey, Patrick S. ; Raymond, F. Lucy ; O’Meara, Sarah ; Edkins, Sarah ; Teague, Jon ; Butler, Adam ; Dicks, Ed ; Stevens, Claire ; Tofts, Calli ; Avis, Tim ; Barthorpe, Syd ; Buck, Gemma ; Cole, Jennifer ; Gray, Kristian ; Halliday, Kelly ; Harrison, Rachel ; Hills, Katy ; Jenkinson, Andrew ; Jones, David ; Menzies, Andrew ; Mironenko, Tatiana ; Perry, Janet ; Raine, Keiran ; Richardson, David ; Shepherd, Rebecca ; Small, Alexandra ; Varian, Jennifer ; West, Sofie ; Widaa, Sara ; Mallya, Uma ; Moon, Jenny ; Luo, Ying ; Holder, Susan ; Smithson, Sarah F. ; Hurst, Jane A. ; Clayton-Smith, Jill ; Kerr, Bronwyn ; Boyle, Jackie ; Shaw, Marie ; Vandeleur, Lucianne ; Rodriguez, Jayson ; Slaugh, Rachel ; Easton, Douglas F. ; Wooster, Richard ; Bobrow, Martin ; Srivastava, Anand K. ; Stevenson, Roger E. ; Schwartz, Charles E. ; Turner, Gillian ; Gecz, Jozef ; Futreal, P. Andrew ; Stratton, Michael R. ; Partington, Michael 

    2007-01-01

    We have identified three truncating, two splice-site, and three missense variants at conserved amino acids in the CUL4B gene on Xq24 in 8 of 250 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). During affected subjects' adolescence, a syndrome emerged with delayed puberty, hypogonadism, relative macrocephaly, moderate short stature, central obesity, unprovoked aggressive outbursts, fine intention tremor, pes cavus, and abnormalities of the toes. This syndrome was first described by Cazebas et al., in a family that was included in our study and that carried a CUL4B missense variant. CUL4B is a ubiquitin E3 ligase subunit implicated in the regulation of several biological processes, and CUL4B is the first XLMR gene that encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase. The relatively high frequency of CUL4B mutations in this series indicates that it is one of the most commonly mutated genes underlying XLMR and suggests that its introduction into clinical diagnostics should be a high priority. PMID:17236139

  5. The Ability of Lumbar Spine DXA and Phalanx QUS to Detect Previous Fractures in Young Thalassemic Patients With Hypogonadism, Hypothyroidism, Diabetes, and Hepatitis-B: A 2-Year Subgroup Analysis From the Taranto Area of Apulia Region

    PubMed Central

    Neglia, Cosimo; Peluso, Angelo; di Rosa, Salvatore; Ferrarese, Antonio; Di Tanna, Gianluca; Caiaffa, Vincenzo; Benvenuto, Marco; Cozma, Alexandru; Chitano, Giovanna; Agnello, Nadia; Paladini, Daniele; Baldi, Nicola; Distante, Alessandro; Piscitelli, Prisco

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a leading cause of morbidity in patients affected by β-thalassemia major or intermediate; we aimed to assess the association between demineralization observed in young thalassemic patients. Methods: A total of 88 patients with β-thalassemia were recruited at Microcitemia Center of Taranto Hospital under the Prevention Osteoporosis and Fractures research project from 2008 to 2010. All the patients were screened with both dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative ultrasound (QUS). T score and Z score values were obtained for each subject. Results: The overall prevalence of demineralization was 84% with DXA and 70% with QUS, whereas normality was found in 16% of patients screened with DXA and in 30% of cases with QUS. Hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis-B, and the presence of previous fragility fractures were significantly associated with the demineralization status (lower T scores values) both with DXA and QUS. Conclusion: Our data confirm that DXA and QUS examinations are both useful for detecting bone demineralization in thalassemic patients. PMID:23652868

  6. Effects of continuous long-term testosterone therapy (TTh) on anthropometric, endocrine and metabolic parameters for up to 10 years in 115 hypogonadal elderly men: real-life experience from an observational registry study.

    PubMed

    Yassin, A A; Nettleship, J; Almehmadi, Y; Salman, M; Saad, F

    2016-09-01

    Subnormal levels of testosterone are associated with significant negative health consequences, with higher risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. The numbers of studies reporting on the benefits of normalisation of testosterone is increasing but longer-term data on (elderly) men receiving testosterone treatment are almost nonexistent. In this single-centre, cumulative, prospective, registry study, 115 hypogonadal men (mean age 59.05 years) received injections with testosterone undecanoate in 12-week intervals for up to 10 years. Waist circumference, body weight and mean BMI dropped progressively with statistical significance versus previous year for 7 years and, respectively, 8 years for weight and body mass index. Similarly, fasting glucose displayed a significant decrease after the first year continuing to decrease thereafter. A decline in HbA1c , from 6.4% to 5.6% (mean <6%), was observed from year 2 on, together with a decrease in the ratio of triglycerides:high-density lipoprotein (HDL), a surrogate marker of insulin resistance, with an increase in HDL levels. The total cholesterol:HDL ratio and non-HDL cholesterol declined significantly. A decrease was also observed in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, with a decrease in levels of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein. No major adverse cardiovascular events were observed throughout the study.

  7. Are the Aging Male's Symptoms (AMS) scale and the Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (ADAM) questionnaire suitable for the screening of late-onset hypogonadism in aging Chinese men?

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Lin-Hui; Zeng, Qin-Song; Wang, Hui-Qing; Sun, Ying-hao

    2013-09-01

    The Aging Male's Symptoms (AMS) scale and the Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (ADAM) questionnaire have been widely used for screening men suspected of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). We evaluated the consistency of the two questionnaires with sex hormone levels. A total of 985 men completed the two questionnaires, as well as an analysis of the serum levels of total testosterone (TT), bioavailable testosterone (BT), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol (E2), prolactin (PRL) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). No correlation was observed between any hormone level and the psychological or somatic section of the AMS score, whereas the sexual section was correlated with the levels of FT, LH, FSH, SHBG and BT. Significant correlations were observed between the result of the two questionnaires and these hormone levels. When LOH was defined as TT < 300 ng/dl and FT < 5 ng/dl, the sensitivity and specificity of the AMS scale were 54.0% and 41.2% compared with 78.7% and 14.8% for the ADAM questionnaire. Several sex hormone levels correlated with the two questionnaires, but neither of these questionnaires had sufficient sensitivity and specificity. It is necessary to provide a new questionnaire applicable to the Chinese population to screening LOH.

  8. The rs5934505 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is associated with low testosterone and late-onset hypogonadism, but the rs10822184 SNP is associated with overweight and obesity in a Chinese Han population: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-P; Nie, L-L; Li, H-G; Liu, T-H; Fang, F; Zhao, K; Yang, R-F; Ma, X-L; Kong, X-B; Zhang, H-P; Guan, H-T; Xia, W; Hong, W-X; Duan, S; Zeng, X-C; Shang, X-J; Zhou, Y-Z; Gu, Y-Q; Wu, W-X; Xiong, C-L

    2016-01-01

    Low testosterone is associated with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) and obesity. Recently, studies have shown that four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs12150660, rs727428, rs5934505, and rs10822184, are associated with testosterone levels in populations of European descent. Therefore, we investigated whether the SNP loci are related to low testosterone, LOH, or obesity in a Chinese Han population. Ruling out co-morbidities, DNA was prepared from 409 men (aged 40-65 years) with low serum testosterone (defined as total testosterone <11.6 nmol/L) and 1 : 1 normal controls (matched age, body mass index (BMI), and the same living area) who were selected from 6898 males. According to the same standards, 310 men with LOH and 1 : 1 normal controls were selected from 6898 males. Excluding the cases with an unreliable sequencing result, genetic analyses were performed. The minor allele frequencies of the SNP loci rs12150660, rs727428, rs5934505, and rs10822184 were 0.1%, 44.6%, 18.7%, and 38.9%, respectively. rs5934505 was associated with the serum total testosterone and calculated free testosterone (CFT) levels (p = 0.045 and p = 0.021). rs5934505 (C>T) was associated with an increased risk of low total testosterone, low CFT, and LOH and adjusted for other factors, with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.01 (1.34-3.01), 2.14 (1.42-3.20), and 1.64 (1.04-2.58). rs10822184 was significantly correlated with weight and BMI (p = 0.035 and p = 0.027). rs10822184 (T>C) was associated with an increased risk of overweight and obesity. We adjusted for other factors, with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.94 (1.36-2.78) and 1.56 (1.00-2.43). In summary, our study provided convincing evidence that rs5934505 (C>T) was associated with the risk of low testosterone and LOH in Chinese populations. We were the first to find that rs10822184 (T>C) was significantly correlated with the risk of overweight and obesity in Chinese populations. However, further large and functional studies are warranted to confirm

  9. Vitamin C reverses hypogonadal bone loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiologic studies correlate low vitamin C intake with bone loss. The genetic deletion of enzymes involved in de novo vitamin C synthesis in mice, likewise, causes severe osteoporosis. However, very few studies have evaluated a protective role of this dietary supplement on the skeleton. Here, ...

  10. Klinefelter syndrome (KS): genetics, clinical phenotype and hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, M; Rochira, V; Pasquali, D; Balercia, G; Jannini, E A; Ferlin, A

    2017-02-01

    Klinefelter Syndrome (KS) is characterized by an extreme heterogeneity in its clinical and genetic presentation. The relationship between clinical phenotype and genetic background has been partially disclosed; nevertheless, physicians are aware that several aspects concerning this issue are far to be fully understood. By improving our knowledge on the role of some genetic aspects as well as on the KS, patients' interindividual differences in terms of health status will result in a better management of this chromosomal disease. The aim of this review is to provide an update on both genetic and clinical phenotype and their interrelationships.

  11. Pituitary-testicular responsiveness in male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R L; Reitz, R E

    1974-01-01

    An isolated deficiency of pituitary gonadotropins was demonstrated in six 46 XY males, 22 to 36 years of age, with and without anosmia. Undetectable or low levels of serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) clearly separated hypogonadotropic from normal adult males. Chronic (8-12 wk) administration of clomiphene citrate caused no increase in serum FSH or LH in gonadotropin-deficient subjects. However, the administration of synthetic luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF) resulted in the appearance of serum LH and, to a lesser degree, serum FSH in three subjects tested. While levels of plasma testosterone were significantly lower in gonadotropin-deficient subjects, plasma androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone were in a range similar to that of age-matched normal men. Treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) increased levels of plasma testosterone to normal adult male values in all gonadotropin-deficient subjects. Cessation of treatment with HCG resulted in the return of plasma testosterone to low, pretreatment levels. That HCG therapy with resultant normal levels of plasma testosterone may somehow stimulate endogenous gonadotropin secretion in gonadotropin-deficient subjects was not evident. The adult male levels of serum FSH and LH after LRF, and plasma testosterone after HCG, confirm pituitary and Leydig cell responsiveness in these subjects. Images PMID:11344554

  12. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in mice lacking a functional Kiss1 gene

    PubMed Central

    d'Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; Fagg, Lisa A.; Dixon, John P. C.; Day, Kate; Leitch, Harry G.; Hendrick, Alan G.; Zahn, Dirk; Franceschini, Isabelle; Caraty, Alain; Carlton, Mark B. L.; Aparicio, Samuel A. J. R.; Colledge, William H.

    2007-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor GPR54 (AXOR12, OT7T175) is central to acquisition of reproductive competency in mammals. Peptide ligands (kisspeptins) for this receptor are encoded by the Kiss1 gene, and administration of exogenous kisspeptins stimulates hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release in several species, including humans. To establish that kisspeptins are the authentic agonists of GPR54 in vivo and to determine whether these ligands have additional physiological functions we have generated mice with a targeted disruption of the Kiss1 gene. Kiss1-null mice are viable and healthy with no apparent abnormalities but fail to undergo sexual maturation. Mutant female mice do not progress through the estrous cycle, have thread-like uteri and small ovaries, and do not produce mature Graffian follicles. Mutant males have small testes, and spermatogenesis arrests mainly at the early haploid spermatid stage. Both sexes have low circulating gonadotropin (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone) and sex steroid (β-estradiol or testosterone) hormone levels. Migration of GnRH neurons into the hypothalamus appears normal with appropriate axonal connections to the median eminence and total GnRH content. The hypothalamic–pituitary axis is functional in these mice as shown by robust luteinizing hormone secretion after peripheral administration of kisspeptin. The virtually identical phenotype of Gpr54- and Kiss1-null mice provides direct proof that kisspeptins are the true physiological ligand for the GPR54 receptor in vivo. Kiss1 also does not seem to play a vital role in any other physiological processes other than activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, and loss of Kiss1 cannot be overcome by compensatory mechanisms. PMID:17563351

  13. Gene Expression Changes Underlying Idiopathic Central Hypogonadism in Cryptorchidism with Defective Mini-Puberty.

    PubMed

    Hadziselimovic, Faruk; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Verkauskas, Gilvydas; Docampo-Garcia, Maria J; Demougin, Philippe; Bilius, Vytautas; Malcius, Dalius; Dasevicius, Darius; Stadtler, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    The whole genome RNA profiling of testicular biopsies by DNA strand-specific RNA sequencing was examined to determine a potential causative role of isolated congenital cryptorchidism in azoospermia and/or infertility in the context of our previously published GeneChip data. Cryptorchid patients, aged 7 months to 5 years and otherwise healthy, were enrolled in this prospective study. During surgery, testicular tissue biopsies were obtained for histological examination and RNA sequencing. Fifteen patients were selected based on the histological results and were divided into 2 groups. Seven were classified as belonging to the high infertility risk (HIR) and 8 to the low infertility risk (LIR) group. Cryptorchid boys in the HIR group lacked transformation of gonocytes into Ad spermatogonia due to impaired mini-puberty. This group of patients will be infertile despite successful surgery. The new important finding was a decreased PROK2, CHD7, FGFR1, and SPRY4 gene expression in the HIR group. Furthermore, identification of multiple differences in gene expression between HIR and LIR groups underscores the importance of an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis for fertility development. Our RNA profiling data strongly support the theory that in the HIR group of cryptorchid boys insufficient PROK2/CHD7/FGFR1/SPRY4 gene expression induces deficient LH secretion, resulting in impaired mini-puberty and infertility. We therefore recommend hormonal treatment for this cohort of cryptorchid boys with defective mini-puberty following a seemingly successful orchidopexy.

  14. Safety and efficacy of testosterone gel in the treatment of male hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Lakshman, Kishore M; Basaria, Shehzad

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal testosterone gels were first introduced in the US in 2000. Since then, they have emerged as a favorable mode of testosterone substitution. Serum testosterone levels reach a steady-state in the first 24 hours of application and remain in the normal range for the duration of the application. This pharmacokinetic profile is comparable to that of testosterone patch but superior to injectable testosterone esters that are associated with peaks and troughs with each dose. Testosterone gels are as efficacious as patches and injectable forms in their effects on sexual function and mood. Anticipated increases in prostate-specific antigen with testosterone therapy are not significantly different with testosterone gels, and the risk of polycythemia is lower than injectable modalities. Application site reactions, a major drawback of testosterone patches, occur less frequently with testosterone gels. However, inter-personal transfer is a concern if appropriate precautions are not taken. Superior tolerability and dose flexibility make testosterone gel highly desirable over other modalities of testosterone replacement. Androgel and Testim, the two currently available testosterone gel products in the US, have certain brand-specific properties that clinicians may consider prior to prescribing. PMID:19966909

  15. From Mental Disorder to Iatrogenic Hypogonadism - Dilemmas in Conceptualizing Gender Identity Variants as Psychiatric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.

    2009-01-01

    The categorization of gender identity variants (GIVs) as “mental disorders” in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) is highly controversial among professionals as well as among persons with GIV. After providing a brief history of GIV categorizations in the DSM, this paper presents some of the major issues of the ongoing debate: GIV as psychopathology versus natural variation; definition of “impairment” and “distress” for GID; associated psychopathology and its relation to stigma; the stigma impact of the mental-disorder label itself; the unusual character of “sex reassignment surgery” as a psychiatric treatment; and the consequences for health and mental-health services if the disorder label is removed. Finally, several categorization options are examined: Retaining the GID category, but possibly modifying its grouping with other syndromes; narrowing the definition to dysphoria and taking “disorder” out of the label; categorizing GID as a neurological or medical rather than a psychiatric disorder; removing GID from both the DSM and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD); and creating a special category for GIV in the DSM. I conclude that--as also evident in other DSM categories--the decision on the categorization of GIVs cannot be achieved on a purely scientific basis, and that a consensus for a pragmatic compromise needs to be arrived at that accommodates both scientific considerations and the service needs of persons with GIVs. PMID:19851856

  16. FSHbeta gene mutation in a female with delayed puberty and hypogonadism: response to recombinant human FSH.

    PubMed

    Kottler, M L; Richard, N; Chabre, O; Alain, S; Young, J

    2009-01-01

    We report a woman with primary amenorrhoea and infertility associated with an isolated deficiency of pituitary FSH that does not respond to GnRH administration. Serum inhibin B was undetectable and antimullerian hormone (AMH) was within the normal range. Ultra sound examination revealed a small uterus and small ovaries with few small follicles. We identified an homozygous 1-bp (G) deletion at codon 79 in FSHbeta gene suggesting a complete loss of function. The patient underwent studies of ovarian responsiveness to recombinant human FSH according to the following protocol: 150UI/d for five days following by 75 UI/d for 10 days. Estradiol plasma level started to increase from day 5 associated to a sharp increase of inhibine B and a decrease of LH. During the same time, we observed an excessive development of multiple follicles resulting in an arrest of the treatment to avoid hyperstimulation. The present study confirm that follicles up to 5 mm in diameter had developed in the absence of FSH and that FSH is required for the growth of follicles beyond the two-layer granulose stage.

  17. Testosterone undecanoate improves lipid profile in patients with type 1 diabetes and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Chillarón, Juan J; Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Albareda, Mercè; Fontserè, Sara; Colom, Cristina; Vila, Lluís; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Flores Le-Roux, Juana A

    2016-09-30

    Testosterone deficiency (Td) has been associated with the metabolic syndrome. Few studies have evaluated this condition in type 1 diabetes (T1D). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of testosterone undecanoate (TU) on insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, anthropometric parameters, blood pressure and lipid profile in patients with Td and T1D. We performed a randomized placebo-controlled multicenter study.

  18. Glutaminyl cyclase knock-out mice exhibit slight hypothyroidism but no hypogonadism: implications for enzyme function and drug development.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Stephan; Kohlmann, Stephanie; Bäuscher, Christoph; Sedlmeier, Reinhard; Koch, Birgit; Eichentopf, Rico; Becker, Andreas; Cynis, Holger; Hoffmann, Torsten; Berg, Sabine; Freyse, Ernst-Joachim; von Hörsten, Stephan; Rossner, Steffen; Graubner, Sigrid; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-04-22

    Glutaminyl cyclases (QCs) catalyze the formation of pyroglutamate (pGlu) residues at the N terminus of peptides and proteins. Hypothalamic pGlu hormones, such as thyrotropin-releasing hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone are essential for regulation of metabolism and fertility in the hypothalamic pituitary thyroid and gonadal axes, respectively. Here, we analyzed the consequences of constitutive genetic QC ablation on endocrine functions and on the behavior of adult mice. Adult homozygous QC knock-out mice are fertile and behave indistinguishably from wild type mice in tests of motor function, cognition, general activity, and ingestion behavior. The QC knock-out results in a dramatic drop of enzyme activity in the brain, especially in hypothalamus and in plasma. Other peripheral organs like liver and spleen still contain QC activity, which is most likely caused by its homolog isoQC. The serum gonadotropin-releasing hormone, TSH, and testosterone concentrations were not changed by QC depletion. The serum thyroxine was decreased by 24% in homozygous QC knock-out animals, suggesting a mild hypothyroidism. QC knock-out mice were indistinguishable from wild type with regard to blood glucose and glucose tolerance, thus differing from reports of thyrotropin-releasing hormone knock-out mice significantly. The results suggest a significant formation of the hypothalamic pGlu hormones by alternative mechanisms, like spontaneous cyclization or conversion by isoQC. The different effects of QC depletion on the hypothalamic pituitary thyroid and gonadal axes might indicate slightly different modes of substrate conversion of both enzymes. The absence of significant abnormalities in QC knock-out mice suggests the presence of a therapeutic window for suppression of QC activity in current drug development.

  19. Obesity-induced hypogonadism in the male: premature reproductive neuroendocrine senescence and contribution of Kiss1-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Angel; Ruiz-Pino, Francisco; Manfredi-Lozano, Maria; Leon, Silvia; Garcia-Galiano, David; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raul M; Romero-Ruiz, Antonio; Castellano, Juan M; Diéguez, Carlos; Pinilla, Leonor; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Reproduction is sensitive to insufficient body energy reserves, especially in females. Metabolic regulation of the male reproductive axis is less obvious, and the impact of conditions of persistent energy excess has received moderate attention. Yet, the escalating prevalence of obesity and the clinical evidence of its deleterious effects on male fertility have raised considerable concerns. We report here phenotypic and mechanistic studies of the reproductive impact of postnatal nutritional manipulations (mainly overnutrition) coupled to a high-fat diet (HFD) after weaning. Metabolic and hormonal analyses in young (4 months old) and middle-aged (10 months old) animals revealed that HFD caused profound metabolic perturbations, including glucose intolerance, which were worsened by precedent postnatal overfeeding; these were detectable already in young males but aggravated in 10-month-old rats. Impairment of reproductive parameters took place progressively, and HFD alone was sufficient to explain most of these alterations, regardless of postnatal under- or overnutrition. In young males, testosterone (T) levels and steroidogenic enzyme expression were suppressed by HFD, without compensatory increases of LH levels, which were in fact partially inhibited in heavier males. In addition, obese males displayed suppressed hypothalamic Kiss1 expression despite low T, and HFD inhibited LH responses to kisspeptin. Overweight anticipated some of the neuroendocrine effects of aging, such as the suppression of hypothalamic Kiss1 expression and the decline in serum T and LH levels. Nonetheless, HFD per se caused a detectable worsening of key reproductive indices in middle-aged males, such as basal LH and FSH levels as well as LH responses to kisspeptin. Our study demonstrates that nutritional stress, especially HFD, has a profound deleterious impact on metabolic and gonadotropic function as well as on the Kiss1 system and precipitates neuroendocrine reproductive senescence in the male.

  20. Use of genetic models of idiopathic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in mice and men to understand the mechanisms of disease.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, Margaret F; True, Cadence; Seminara, Stephanie B

    2013-11-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding the neuropeptides kisspeptin and neurokinin B, as well as their receptors, are associated with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency and a failure to initiate and/or progress through puberty. Although the total number of patients studied to date is small, mutations in the kisspeptin pathway appear to result in lifelong GnRH deficiency. Mice with mutations in kisspeptin and the kisspeptin receptor, Kiss1(-/-) and Kiss1r(-/-), respectively, appear to be phenocopies of the human with abnormal sexual maturation and infertility. In contrast, mutations in the neurokinin B pathway lead to a more variable adult reproductive phenotype, with a subset of hypogonadotrophic individuals demonstrating paradoxical recovery of reproductive function later in life. While 'reversal' remains poorly understood, the ability to recover reproductive function indicates that neurokinin B may play different roles in the initiation of sexual maturation compared with the maintenance of adult reproductive function. Mice with mutations in the gene encoding the neurokinin B receptor, Tacr3, have abnormal oestrous cycles and subfertility but, similar to their human counterparts, appear less severely affected than mice with kisspeptin deficiency. Further investigations into the interaction between the kisspeptin and neurokinin B pathways will reveal key insights into how GnRH neuronal modulation occurs at puberty and throughout reproductive life.

  1. Denosumab is really effective in the treatment of osteoporosis secondary to hypogonadism in prostate carcinoma patients? A prospective randomized multicenter international study

    PubMed Central

    Doria, Carlo; Leali, Paolo Tranquilli; Solla, Federico; Maestretti, Gianluca; Balsano, Massimo; Scarpa, Robero Mario

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Osteoporosis is a complication of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in men with prostate carcinoma. The best defense against osteoporosis in prostate cancer is to identify patients with a high risk for fracture during the first clinical visit, select an effective anti-osteoporosis agent, and advise the patient to change his lifestyle and diet to prevent further bone loss. New agents include denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the RANK ligand (RANKL). RANKL promotes the formation, activity, and survival of osteoclasts and, thus, supports the breakdown of bone. Purpose This is a multicenter, randomized, double-blind prospective study on use of denosumab versus alendronate in the therapy of secondary osteoporosis related to ADT in prostate cancer patients in three European countries (Italy, France, Switzerland). Patients and methods In this 24-month observation study we enrolled 234 patients with diagnosis of osteoporosis underwent ADT for prostate cancer. All patients aged ≥55 years and had a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) T-score <−1.0 (hip or spine, measured within last 2 years) and ≥ 1 fragility fracture. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive denosumab 60 mg subcutaneously every 6 months or alendronate (70 mg weekly) for 2 years. All patient received supplemental vitamin D (600 IU per day) and supplemental calcium to maintain a calcium intake of 1200 mg per day. Effectiveness of therapy in both groups (denosumab group and alendronate group) was assessed by changes in bone turnover markers (BTMs), Bone Mineral Density (BMD), fracture incidence, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score for back pain, and Short Form-8 (SF-8TM) health survey score for health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Percent changes from baseline in BTMs and BMD were assessed using the paired t test; a P-value 0.05). Mean changes in BMD at final follow-up differed significantly between two groups. BMD changes at the lumbar spine at 24 months were 5.6% with denosumab vs −1.1% with alendronate (P<0.001). New vertebral fractures developed in fewer patients in the denosumab group than in the alendronate group during the 24-month period, although this difference was not significant (P=0.10). Back pain significantly (P<0.001) improved from baseline at all time points during the study in both study groups. SF-8 health survey scores significantly improved following treatment with both drugs. Incidence of adverse drug reactions were similar in both groups. Conclusion In our study denosumab and alendronate showed similar clinical efficacy in the therapy of ADT-related osteoporosis in men with prostate carcinoma; both drugs provided significant improvements in back pain and general health conditions. Denosumab showed significant increase of BTMs and BMD than alendronate with lower rate of new vertebral fractures. PMID:28228781

  2. Normal growth and normalization of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in atypical Turner syndrome (45,X/46,XX/47,XXX). Correlation of body height with distribution of cell lines.

    PubMed

    Partsch, C J; Pankau, R; Sippell, W G; Tolksdorf, M

    1994-06-01

    A comparison has been made of a case with 45,X/46,XX/47,XXX mosaicism with some 50 cases in the literature. A significant positive correlation was found between height standard deviation scores of mosaic patients from the literature and the frequency of cells with a normal chromosome constitution (n = 21, rs = 0.552, P < 0.01). In contrast, a significant negative correlation was seen between body height and the frequency of cells with a 45,X constitution (n = 21, rs = -0.594, P < 0.01). There was no significant correlation of height standard deviation score with the 47,XXX cell line (n = 21, rs = -0.353). A patient with a rare chromosomal mosaicism (45,X/46,XX/47,XXX) is described. The diagnosis was first made by chromosome analysis in amniotic cells. The patient showed no symptoms suggestive of Turner syndrome and growth followed the 75th height percentile. Basal and gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulated gonadotropin levels normalized after age 4.8 years and did not subsequently return to hypergonadotropic levels. In blood lymphocytes, there was an increase in the frequency of cells with a normal chromosome constitution over 9 years. This in vivo cell selection is discussed. Chromosome analysis in skin fibroblasts showed the same triple mosaicism with a similar distribution of cell lines as in blood lymphocytes. In conclusion, statistical evidence was demonstrated that the severity of short stature is correlated with the distribution of cell lines in 45,X/46,XX/47,XXX mosaicism. This finding is of importance for the genetic counselling in cases of prenatal diagnosis of mosaic Turner syndrome.

  3. What Are Normal Puberty, Precocious Puberty, and Delayed Puberty?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a long-lasting condition known as hypogonadism (pronounced HI-poe-GO-nad-iz-uhm ) in which the ... Turner syndrome or in individuals with hypogonadotropic (pronounced HI-po-GO-nah-doe-TROH-pik ) hypogonadism, which ...

  4. Comparison between spontaneous gonadotropin concentration profiles and gonadotropin response to low-dose gonadotropin-releasing hormone in prepubertal and early pubertal boys and patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: assessment by using ultrasensitive, time-resolved immunofluorometric assay.

    PubMed

    Goji, K; Tanikaze, S

    1992-05-01

    To assess whether nocturnal gonadotropin concentration profiles in children could be predicted by measurement of peak gonadotropin levels after gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administration, we measured spontaneous gonadotropin levels every 20 min and the gonadotropin responses to low-dose GnRH using an ultrasensitive, time-resolved immunofluorometric assay in 61 boys with short stature and/or delayed puberty. Spontaneous nocturnal LH pulses were observed in 58 out of 61 patients. After GnRH administration in a dose of 25 ng/kg, all of the 61 patients had significant LH and FSH responses, and GnRH-stimulated peak LH and FSH levels were highly correlated with maximal spontaneous nocturnal LH and FSH levels, respectively (r = 0.83 for LH and r = 0.91 for FSH; p less than 0.00001). Analysis of individual subjects revealed that GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels were almost identical to maximal nocturnal LH levels in the subjects whose GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels were between 5 and 10 IU/L, whereas GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels tended to be higher than maximal nocturnal levels in the subjects whose GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels were 5 IU/L or lower. To determine if there were any parameters in the gonadotropin response to GnRH that might be useful in distinguishing early pubertal boys from prepubertal boys, we evaluated the gonadotropin response to GnRH in 44 prepubertal and 10 early pubertal normal short boys. Although maximal nocturnal LH levels did not overlap between prepubertal and pubertal groups, GnRH-stimulated LH peak levels overlapped considerably between the two groups. Even the GnRH-stimulated peak LH to peak FSH ratio overlapped between the two groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. An open-label, phase 2, single centre, randomized, crossover design bioequivalence study of AndroForte 5 testosterone cream and Testogel 1% testosterone gel in hypogonadal men: study LP101.

    PubMed

    Wittert, G A; Harrison, R W; Buckley, M J; Wlodarczyk, J

    2016-01-01

    We compared a novel 5% testosterone (T) cream (AndroForte 5, Lawley Pharmaceuticals, Australia) with a 1% T gel (Testogel, Besins Healthcare, Australia). Using an open-label crossover design, subjects were randomized to one of two treatment sequences using either the T gel or T cream first in a 1 : 1 ratio. Each treatment period was 30 days with a 7-14 days washout period between them. On Days 1 and 30 of each treatment period blood was sampled at -15, -5 min, 0, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12 and 16 h post study drug administration. Sixteen men with established androgen deficiency aged between 29 and 73 years, who had undertaken a washout from prior testosterone therapy participated in the study. One subject failed to complete both arms and another was excluded post-completion because of a major protocol violation. Bioequivalence was established based on key pharmacokinetic (PK) variables: AUC, C(avg), C(max), T(max), % fluctuation (with and without baseline correction) for the two formulations of testosterone on Day 1 and Day 30. The ratio and 90% CI of AUC 0.99 (0.86-1.14), C(max) 1.02 (0.84-1.24) and C(avg) 0.99 (0.86-1.14) for T cream/T gel were within the predetermined bio-equivalence criteria of 80% to 125% at Day 30. There were no statistically significant differences between secondary biochemical markers: serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT), oestradiol (E2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), luteinizing hormone (LH) and (FSH). The two testosterone formulations were shown to be bioequivalent.

  6. An assessment of sex chromosome copy number in a phenotypic female patient with hypergonadtropic hypogonadism, primary amenorrhea and growth retardation by GTG-banding and FISH in peripheral blood and skin tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, I.M.D.; DeMoranville, B.; Grollino, M.G.

    1994-09-01

    The present report describes studies performed on an 18-year-old phenotypic female referred because of primary amenorrhea, hypergonadotropic hypoganadism and growth retardation. The clinical features raised the possibility of a gonadal dysgenesis. The ovaries were not identified on either side. Her testosterone was significantly elevated, with serum level at 48 ng/dl, and her free testosterone at 7 pg/ml. A GTG-banding analysis of 33 peripheral blood leukocytes revealed the modal number of chromosomes to be 46 per cell with a male sex constitution and normal appearing banding patterns (46,XY). In view of the clinical findings, additional cells were scored to rule out low percentage mosaicism. Out of 35 additional GTG-banded cells scored for the sex chromosomes, 4 cells (11.5%) were found to contain only one copy of the X chromosome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using dual color biotinylated X and Y probes (Imagenetics) was subsequently performed. Out of approximately 500 cells scored, 87% were found to be XY and 9% were found to be positive for the X signal only, versus 7% and 3% X signal only for 2 XY controls, aged 61 and 46, respectively. As loss of the Y chromosome has been reported in elderly males as well as certain males with leukemia, the age of the controls was important to note. To unequivocally establish the presence of mosaicism, a skin biopsy was obtained for fibroblast culture. Out of 388 total cells scored, 286 (74%) were found to be XY and 46 (12%) were found to be X, versus 99% XY and <1% X in controls. GTG-banding analysis of the same fibroblast culture is currently in progress. Preliminary data on this specimen thus far corroborate results of the FISH study. The presence of XY cells, along with an increased testosterone level, raises the distinct possibility of a gonadoblastoma. In view of this increased risk, arrangements are being made for the patient to have a laparoscopy and surgical removal of her presumptive streak gonads.

  7. Fertility Issues for Patients with Hypogonadotropic Causes of Delayed Puberty.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia; Chan, Yee-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Delayed puberty presenting with low gonadotropins has multiple causes. Self-limited delay (constitutional delay) is generally considered benign, but adult height and bone mineral density may be compromised, and fertility has not been studied. Functional hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to a stressor is thought to resolve with removal of the stressor, but reproductive endocrine dysfunction can sometimes persist. Most but not all patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a typically long-lasting condition, can achieve fertility with exogenous hormone therapy. Future studies are needed to determine fertility outcomes in self-limited delayed puberty and to more clearly define prognostic factors for fertility in functional and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

  8. GnRH-agonist induced depressive and anxiety symptoms during in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Miki; Azem, Foad; Aharonov, Inbar; Ben Avi, Irit; Yagil, Yaron; Schreiber, Shaul; Amit, Ami; Weizman, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether the use of a GnRH agonist inducing a hypogonadic state during IVF-ET cycles induces negative mood symptoms, we conducted a prospective randomized study in 108 women comparing two different controlled ovarian stimulation protocols. A significant phase effect was observed for depression and anxiety symptoms during IVF-ET cycles reflecting an increase in symptoms between the hypogonadal phase and the peak in gonadotropin stimulation; however, the hypogonadal phase induced by the GnRH agonist was not associated with a significant increase in any of the studied mood parameters.

  9. Cardiac effects of anabolic steroids

    PubMed Central

    Payne, J R; Kotwinski, P J; Montgomery, H E

    2004-01-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse in athletes has been associated with a wide range of adverse conditions, including hypogonadism, testicular atrophy, impaired spermatogenesis, gynaecomastia, and psychiatric disturbance. But what effect does steroid abuse have on the cardiovascular system? PMID:15084526

  10. Testosterone replacement therapy: role of pituitary and thyroid in diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Crosstalk among hormones characterizes endocrine function, and assessment of the hypogonadal man should take that into consideration. In men for whom testosterone deficiency is a concern, initial evaluation should include a thorough history and physical exam in which other endocrinopathies are being considered. Hypogonadism can be associated with both pituitary and thyroid dysfunction, for which appropriate biochemical evaluation should be undertaken in certain clinical scenarios. If low serum testosterone is confirmed measurement of luteinizing and follicle stimulating hormones (LH and FSH respectively) is essential to establish whether the hypogonadism is primary or secondary. In secondary hypogonadism measurement of prolactin is always necessary, and measurement of other pituitary hormones, along with pituitary imaging, may be indicated. Checking thyroid function may also be enlightening, and can raise additional therapeutic considerations. Correction of other pituitary axes may attenuate the need for testosterone replacement therapy in some cases. PMID:28078216

  11. Pituitary infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... body's sex glands produce little or no hormones) Hypothyroidism (thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormone) ... other missing hormones are not replaced, symptoms of hypothyroidism and hypogonadism may develop. When to Contact a ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... worsen slowly throughout life and can result in blindness or the need for a wheelchair for mobility ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (6 links) Encyclopedia: Blindness and Vision Loss Encyclopedia: Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Encyclopedia: Movement- ...

  13. Disturbances of sexual potency in patients with basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Caetano de Barros, M; Farias da Silva, W; De Azevedo Filho, H C; Spinelli, C

    1975-06-01

    Sexual impotence is common in patients with basilar impression and/or Arnold-Chiari malformation. There is no evidence of hypogonadism and testicular biopsy is usually normal. An autonomic disturbance is postulated.

  14. Could you have low testosterone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... menopause; Andropause; Testosterone deficiency; Androgen deficiency of the aging male; Late-onset hypogonadism ... Some symptoms may be a normal part of aging. For example, it is normal to feel less ...

  15. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Pol III-related leukodystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... movement and at rest. Development of the teeth (dentition) is often abnormal in Pol III-related leukodystrophy , ... Affected individuals may be diagnosed with ataxia, delayed dentition, and hypomyelination (ADDH); hypomyelination, hypodontia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (4H ...

  17. Assays of Serum Testosterone.

    PubMed

    Herati, Amin S; Cengiz, Cenk; Lamb, Dolores J

    2016-05-01

    The diagnosis of male hypogonadism depends on an assessment of the clinical signs and symptoms of hypogonadism and serum testosterone level. Current clinical laboratory testosterone assay platforms include immunoassays and mass spectrometry. Despite significant advances to improve the accuracy and precision of the currently available assays, limited comparability exists between assays at the lower and upper extremes of the testosterone range. Because of this lack of comparability, there is no current gold standard assay for the assessment of total testosterone levels.

  18. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH) have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supporting the concept of restoration of endogenous testosterone in the treatment of LOH.

  19. Prediction of Long-term Post-operative Testosterone Replacement Requirement Based on the Pre-operative Tumor Volume and Testosterone Level in Pituitary Macroadenoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Chung-Ming; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Pai, Ping-Ching; Toh, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Chi-Cheng

    2015-11-05

    Non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPAs) are the most prevalent pituitary macroadenomas. One common symptom of NFPA is hypogonadism, which may require long-term hormone replacement. This study was designed to clarify the association between the pre-operative tumor volume, pre-operative testosterone level, intraoperative resection status and the need of long-term post-operative testosterone replacement. Between 2004 and 2012, 45 male patients with NFPAs were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Hypogonadism was defined as total serum testosterone levels of <2.4 ng/mL. The tumor volume was calculated based on the pre- and post-operative magnetic resonance images. We prescribed testosterone to patients with defined hypogonadism or clinical symptoms of hypogonadism. Hormone replacement for longer than 1 year was considered as long-term therapy. The need for long-term post-operative testosterone replacement was significantly associated with larger pre-operative tumor volume (p = 0.0067), and lower pre-operative testosterone level (p = 0.0101). There was no significant difference between the gross total tumor resection and subtotal resection groups (p = 0.1059). The pre-operative tumor volume and testosterone level impact post-operative hypogonadism. By measuring the tumor volume and the testosterone level and by performing adequate tumor resection, surgeons will be able to predict post-operative hypogonadism and the need for long-term hormone replacement.

  20. Pathology or normal variant: what constitutes a delay in puberty?

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Carine; Argente, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Puberty is a complex maturation process that begins during fetal life and persists until the acquisition of reproduction function. The fundamental event that activates puberty occurs in the hypothalamus. A complex neuron network stimulates GnRH secretion, which stimulates pituitary gonadotropin secretion and then gonadal steroid secretion. Pubertal delay is defined as the presentation of clinical signs of puberty 2-2.5 SD later than in the normal population. Three major groups of etiopathogeneses are described: (1) hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, (2) hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and (3) constitutional delay of puberty (CDP) - the most common cause of delayed puberty in boys. The differential diagnosis between CDP and isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism remains difficult. Mechanisms of pubertal timing are now better understood and genetic or epigenetic causes can explain some pubertal delays. However, there are still unexplained mechanisms. Treatment of delayed puberty is necessary to ensure full pubertal development for the adolescent and in case of hypogonadism, to restore fertility. Finally, precocious diagnosis of hypogonadism is primordial but can be difficult during childhood and in cases of partial hypogonadism. The study of genetic pubertal diseases or of different animal models could help to discover new diagnostic or therapeutic tools.

  1. Testosterone deficiency in the aging male

    PubMed Central

    McBride, J. Abram; Carson, Culley C.; Coward, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for hypogonadism is on the rise, particularly in the aging population. Yet treatment in this population represents a unique challenge to clinicians. The physiology of normal aging is complex and often shares the same, often vague, symptoms of hypogonadism. In older men, a highly prevalent burden of comorbid medical conditions and polypharmacy complicates the differentiation of signs and symptoms of hypogonadism from those of normal aging, yet this differentiation is essential to the diagnosis of hypogonadism. Even in older patients with unequivocally symptomatic hypogonadism, the clinician must navigate the potential benefits and risks of treatment that are not clearly defined in older men. More recently, a greater awareness of the potential risks associated with treatment in older men, particularly in regard to cardiovascular risk and mortality, have been appreciated with recent changes in the US Food and Drug Administration recommendations for use of testosterone in aging men. The aim of this review is to provide a framework for the clinician evaluating testosterone deficiency in older men in order to identify correctly and treat clinically significant hypogonadism in this unique population while minimizing treatment-associated harm. PMID:26834840

  2. High prevalence of androgen deficiency and abnormal lipid profile in infertile men with non-obstructive azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Bobjer, J; Naumovska, M; Giwercman, Y L; Giwercman, A

    2012-10-01

    In men with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA), the risk of hypogonadism is often overlooked. Testicular sperm extraction (TESE) may increase this risk. The objective of this study was to elucidate the prevalence of hypogonadism in NOA-patients, the impact of TESE on hormone balance and the association between testosterone deficiency and dyslipidaemia. Men with NOA who had undergone TESE during the period 2004-2009 were eligible. Hypogonadism was defined as total testosterone <10 nmol/L and/or LH >10 IU/L and/or ongoing androgen replacement therapy. Sixty-five consecutive men who had undergone TESE owing to NOA and from whom post-TESE serum testosterone levels measured before 1100 h were available. Furthermore, 141 fertile men served as controls. Serum concentrations of testosterone, LH and lipids were assessed. Odds ratios (OR) for biochemical hypogonadism were calculated. Pre- and post-TESE hormone levels were compared. Lipid profile was related to testosterone levels. Hypogonadism was found in 47% (95% CI, 0.36, 0.59) of the NOA-men. As compared with fertile controls, the OR for hypogonadism post-TESE was 17 (95% CI 6.6-45). Serum LH (p = 0.03), but not testosterone (p = 0.43), differed significantly pre- and post-TESE. Compared with eugonadal NOA-men, the OR for having deviations in lipid profile was 3.3 (95% CI 1.3-8.8) for the hypogonadal NOA-men. NOA-men are at very high risk of androgen deficiency, which even in young subjects is associated with dyslipidaemia. Medical management of these men should therefore include endocrinological evaluation and follow-up after completion of infertility treatment.

  3. Delayed puberty due to a novel mutation in CHD7 causing CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Andrew; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Picker, Jonathan; Maher, Thomas A; Milunsky, Aubrey

    2010-12-01

    We report the case of a 15-year-old girl who presented to a pediatric endocrinology clinic for delayed puberty with no signs of secondary sexual development. Her past medical history was significant for bilateral colobomas, inner-ear anomalies, hearing loss, and anosmia. Genetic testing revealed a novel de novo mutation in the CHD7 gene, one of the causative genes in CHARGE syndrome (coloboma, heart disease, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development and/or central nervous system anomalies, genital anomalies and/or hypogonadism, and ear anomalies and/or deafness). We review the distinction between hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism and discuss the availability of molecular genetic testing for idiopathic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. CHD7 mutations have also been found in some patients with Kallmann syndrome, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, and anosmia, and we discuss the overlap between this syndrome and CHARGE syndrome. With the increased availability of genetic testing for a variety of disorders, it is important for pediatricians to become familiar with interpreting genetic test results. Finally, we illustrate that Bayes' theorem is a useful statistical tool for interpreting novel missense mutations of unknown significance.

  4. The impact of sex hormone changes on bone mineral deficit in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Doumouchtsis, Konstantinos K; Perrea, Despoina N; Doumouchtsis, Stergios K

    2009-01-01

    In chronic renal failure several factors affect bone homeostasis leading to the development of renal osteodystrophy. Common calcitropic hormone derangements in renal failure play a central role in bone structure and mineral defects, which in turn accompany osteodystrophy frequently resulting in low bone mineral density (BMD) values. However, patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) suffer from several comorbidities, which may partly account for renal bone disease lesions. Hypogonadism in particular accompanies chronic renal failure frequently and exerts an additive effect on bone loss potential. Sex hormones contribute to the equilibrium of osteotropic hormones and cytokines, exerting a protective action on bone tissue. Estrogens have a regulatory effect on bone metabolism in women with renal failure as well. Hypogonadal ESRD women experience a higher bone turnover and more significant bone mass decrements than ESRD women with relatively normal hormone profile and menstrual habits. Female hemodialysis patients have lower BMD values than male patients on average, probably because of menstrual cycle irregularities. However, hypogonadal ESRD men may also experience bone mineral deficits and the severity of hypogonadism may correlate to their bone mineral status. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) appears to reverse bone mineral loss to some extent in both sexes. In conclusion hypogonadism in renal failure contributes to the bone structure and mineral defects as well as the low-energy fracture risk, reflected in BMD measurements. HRT in ESRD patients should therefore not be overlooked in these patients in the face of their significant comorbidities.

  5. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kathleen; Miner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV) health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term prospective studies to determine safety. Literature spanning over the past 30 years has suggested that not only is there a possible increased CV risk in men with low levels of testosterone, but the benefits from testosterone therapy may even lower this risk. We review here the recent studies that have garnered such intense scrutiny. This article is intended as a thorough review of testosterone levels and CV risk, providing the clinician with the facts needed to make informed clinical decisions in managing patients with clinical hypogonadism.

  6. Endocrine and metabolic manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Tigas, Stelios; Tsatsoulis, Agathocles

    2012-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations from nearly every organ system are common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This review article describes the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of the main endocrine and metabolic manifestations in IBD, including metabolic bone disease, growth retardation, hypogonadism, pubertal delay, lipid abnormalities and insulin resistance. These clinical problems are commonly interrelated and they share a common basis, influenced by disease-related inflammation and nutritional status. In addition to nutritional support, every effort should be made to achieve and maintain disease remission, thus correcting the underlying chronic inflammation. The criteria for screening and diagnosing osteoporosis are described and treatment options are discussed (lifestyle advice, vitamin D and calcium supplementation, use of bisphosphonates or other specific antiosteoporotic agents, correction of hypogonadism). Chronic glucocorticoid therapy may affect growth as well as predispose to osteoporosis. The diagnosis and management of growth failure, pubertal delay and hypogonadism in IBD are discussed.

  7. Novel Uses for the Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Nandrolone and Oxandrolone in the Management of Male Health.

    PubMed

    Wu, Christopher; Kovac, Jason R

    2016-10-01

    There has recently been renewed interest in novel clinical applications of the anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) testosterone and its synthetic derivatives, particularly given with the rising popularity of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) for the treatment of male hypogonadism. In this manuscript, we provide a brief review of the history of AAS and discuss clinical applications of two of the more well-known AAS: nandrolone and oxandrolone. Both agents exhibit favorable myotrophic/androgenic ratios and have been investigated for effectiveness in numerous disease states. We also provide a brief synopsis of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) and postulate how these orally active, non-aromatizing, tissue-selective agents might be used in contemporary andrology. Currently, the applications of testosterone alternatives in hypogonadism are limited. However, it is tempting to speculate that these agents may one day become accepted as alternatives, or adjuncts, to the treatment of male hypogonadism.

  8. [Diagnosis of delayed puberty].

    PubMed

    Busiah, K; Belien, V; Dallot, N; Fila, M; Guilbert, J; Harroche, A; Leger, J

    2007-09-01

    Puberty is the phenomenon that conducts once to reproductive maturation. Delayed puberty (DP) is defined by the absence of testicular development in boys beyond 14 years old (or a testicular volume lower than 4 ml) and by the absence of breast development in girls beyond 13 years old. DP occurs in approximatively 3% of cases. Most cases are functional DP, with a large amount of constitutional delay of puberty. Others etiologies are hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism like Kallmann syndrome, or hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism. Turner syndrome is a diagnostic one should not forget by its frequency. Treatment is hormonal replacement therapy and of the etiology. During the last decade, many genes have been identified and elucidated the etiological diagnosis of some hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism syndrome. Further studies are required in collaboration with molecular biologists to better understand the mechanism of hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis abnormalities and of the neuroendocrine physiology of the onset of puberty.

  9. Sex Steroid and Gonadotropin Treatment in Male Delayed Puberty.

    PubMed

    Howard, Sasha; Dunkel, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Male delayed puberty is common, affecting up to 3% of the population. Management of patients with pubertal delay is dependent on the underlying cause. The main differential diagnoses of delayed puberty in males include constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP), idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Treatment of isolated CDGP involves expectant observation or short courses of low-dose sex steroid supplementation. More complex and involved management is required in males with hypogonadism to achieve both development of secondary sexual characteristics and to maximise the potential for fertility. This review will cover the options for management involving androgen or gonadotropin therapy, with discussion of benefits, limitations and specific considerations of the different treatment options.

  10. [Ovulation induction by pulsatile GnRH therapy in 2014: literature review and synthesis of current practice].

    PubMed

    Gronier, H; Peigné, M; Catteau-Jonard, S; Dewailly, D; Robin, G

    2014-10-01

    The hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is an easily treatable form of female infertility. The most common cause of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. The GnRH pump is a simple and effective treatment to restore fertility of patients with hypothalamic amenorrhea: cumulative pregnancy rate is estimated between 70 and 100% after 6 cycles, compared to a low rate of complications and multiple pregnancies. While only 2.8 cycles are on average required to achieve a pregnancy with a pump, this induction of ovulation stays underused in France. The objective of this paper is to propose a practical manual of pulsatile GnRH, in order to improve the accessibility of pulsatile GnRH for patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

  11. 20 years of leptin: role of leptin in human reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Chou, Sharon H; Mantzoros, Christos

    2014-10-01

    Leptin, as a key hormone in energy homeostasis, regulates neuroendocrine function, including reproduction. It has a permissive role in the initiation of puberty and maintenance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This is notable in patients with either congenital or acquired leptin deficiency from a state of chronic energy insufficiency. Hypothalamic amenorrhea is the best-studied, with clinical trials confirming a causative role of leptin in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Implications of leptin deficiency have also emerged in the pathophysiology of hypogonadism in type 1 diabetes. At the other end of the spectrum, hyperleptinemia may play a role in hypogonadism associated with obesity, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. In these conditions of energy excess, mechanisms of reproductive dysfunction include central leptin resistance as well as direct effects at the gonadal level. Thus, reproductive dysfunction due to energy imbalance at both ends can be linked to leptin.

  12. Testosterone replacement therapy and voiding dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Baas, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) represents an increasing popular treatment option for men with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Because of unsubstantiated beliefs of testosterone’s effect on the prostate, the FDA has recently placed a warning on testosterone products, stating that TRT may worsen benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Within this review article we have demonstrated the current understanding of the physiology of testosterone and its relationship with prostatic and lower urinary tract physiology. The current evidence suggests that not only does TRT not worsen lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), but that hypogonadism itself is an important risk factor for LUTS/BPH. PMID:28078221

  13. Testis Development and Reproductive Options in Males with Klinefelter Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Shanlee M.; Rogol, Alan D.; Ross, Judith L.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the leading genetic cause of primary hypogonadism and infertility in men.1,2 The clinical phenotype has expanded beyond the original description of infertility, small testes and gynecomastia.3 Animal models, epidemiological studies, and clinical research of males with KS throughout the lifespan have allowed us to better characterize the variable phenotype of this condition. This review will provide an overview on what is known of the epidemiology, clinical features, and pathophysiology of KS, followed by a more focused discussion of testicular development and the clinical management of hypogonadism and fertility in men with KS. PMID:26568497

  14. [Suprasellar germinoma: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Néjib; Cherif, Lotfi; Khiari, Karima; Hadj Ali, Insaf; Turki, Sami; Mezni, Faouzi; Ben Jilani, Sarrah; Ben Maïz, Hédi

    2002-03-01

    Suprasellar germinomas are frequent in childhood and adolescence, particularly in male sex. The clinical and neuroendocrine abnormalities depend of tumor localization: Increased intracranial pressure, visual disturbances, hypopituitarism, Parinaud syndrome. We report two cases of suprasellar germinoma in young male patients (16 and 18 years old). The first patient hrad corticotorpin insufficiency and clinical signs of hypothyroïdism and hypogonadism. The second had central hypocorticism, hypothyroïdism and hypogonadism associated with central diabetes insipidus and hyperprolactinemia. The diagnosis of germinoma was confirmed after surgery by anatomopathologic examination in the first case and by stereotaxic biopsy in the second case. Treatment by radiotherapy improves prognosis of this disease.

  15. Testosterone replacement in the infertile man

    PubMed Central

    Sabanegh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is a common clinical condition affecting men of different age groups. In addition to its sexual consequences, it has several implications posing significant concerns for a man’s health and well-being. Recent advances in testosterone (T) supplementation have facilitated hypogonadism treatment. Despite that, patients complaining of infertility or seeking conception are still hindered by the unfavorable effects supplemental T has on testicular function. Consequently, alternative approaches that can stimulate endogenous T production are favored. Selective estrogen receptor modulators, gonadotropins and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) can be successful in restoring serum T levels, preserving fertility, and providing symptomatic relief. PMID:28078217

  16. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and BPH/LUTS. What is the Evidence?

    PubMed

    Baas, Wesley; Köhler, Tobias S

    2016-06-01

    Contrary to the previous dogma that prostatic growth is directly proportional to testosterone levels, emerging research has suggested a lack of testosterone may be a risk factor for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Within this review article, we have demonstrated the current understanding of the physiology of hypogonadism and its interplay with prostatic and lower urinary tract physiology. The current evidence suggests that not only does testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) not worsen LUTS, but that hypogonadism itself is an important risk factor for LUTS/BPH.

  17. Testis Development and Fertility Potential in Boys with Klinefelter Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davis, Shanlee M; Rogol, Alan D; Ross, Judith L

    2015-12-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the leading genetic cause of primary hypogonadism and infertility in men. The clinical phenotype has expanded beyond the original description of infertility, small testes, and gynecomastia. Animal models, epidemiologic studies, and clinical research of male subjects with KS throughout the lifespan have allowed the better characterization of the variable phenotype of this condition. This review provides an overview on what is known of the epidemiology, clinical features, and pathophysiology of KS, followed by a more focused discussion of testicular development and the clinical management of hypogonadism and fertility in boys and men with KS.

  18. Zinc and growth.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Y

    1996-08-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrients and plays an important role in growth and sexual function. Zinc deficiency has been known to cause growth retardation and hypogonadism. Several mechanisms of growth retardation and hypogonadism due to zinc deficiency have been suggested. Zinc affects growth hormone (GH) metabolism. Conversely, GH affects zinc metabolism. Zinc deficiency may result in reduced GH production and/or insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Zinc deficiency may also affect bone metabolism and gonadal function. The interrelationships among zinc, growth, gonadal function, and GH-IGF-I axis appears to be complex.

  19. Testosterone deficiency and quality of life in Australasian testicular cancer survivors: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    O'Carrigan, B; Fournier, M; Olver, I N; Stockler, M R; Whitford, H; Toner, G C; Thomson, D B; Davis, I D; Hanning, F; Singhal, N; Underhill, C; Clingan, P; McDonald, A; Boland, A; Grimison, P

    2014-08-01

    This is the first prospective study in a contemporary Australian/New Zealand population to determine the prevalence of testosterone deficiency in testicular cancer survivors at 12 months from treatment, and any association with poorer quality of life. Hormone assays from 54 evaluable patients in a prospective cohort study revealed biochemical hypogonadism in 18 patients (33%) and low-normal testosterone in 13 patients (24%). We found no association between testosterone levels and quality of life (all P > 0.05). Hypogonadal patients should be considered for testosterone replacement to prevent long-term morbidity.

  20. Drug-induced gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Ari; Dobs, Adrian

    2008-11-01

    Gynecomastia is caused by drugs in 10 - 25% of all cases. The pathophysiologic mechanism for some drugs includes exogenous estrogens exposure, medications that cause hypogonadism, anti-androgenic effects and hyperprolactinemia. This manuscript reviews common examples of drug-induced gynecomastia, discussing the mechanisms and possible treatments. Discontinuing the medication is always the best choice; however, if this is not possible, then testosterone replacement therapy may be needed for hypogonadism. When a man is euogonadal, a trial of the anti-estrogen, tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor may be an option.

  1. Hormone replacement therapy and longevity.

    PubMed

    Comhaire, F

    2016-02-01

    To assess whether hormone replacement therapy influences longevity, an analysis was made of published life tables allowing for the calculation of the relative benefit of hormone replacement therapy on longevity in men with late onset hypogonadism and in post-menopausal women. It was found that testosterone replacement therapy of men suffering from late onset hypogonadism increased survival rate by 9-10% in 5 years, similar to that of eugonadal, non-LOH men with normal endogenous testosterone secretion. Oestrogen replacement therapy resulted in increased survival by 2.6% in 5 years. It is concluded that hormone replacement therapy increases longevity.

  2. Off label therapies for testosterone replacement

    PubMed Central

    DiGiorgio, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of hypogonadism has been steadily increasing over the last few years. Exogenous testosterone has been the standard treatment for hypogonadal men, but is associated with suppression of spermatogenesis as well as other possible adverse effects. There are other medications, currently considered “off label” for androgen replenishment, that exert their effect through modulation of the hypothalamic-gonadal axis. These medications increase endogenous testosterone levels and offer a different therapeutic approach. This review will focus on these alternative (off-label) therapies for androgen replacement in men. PMID:28078215

  3. Prader-Willi Disease: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbus, William R., III

    A case study focuses on the characteristics and physical management of a 15-year-old with Prader-Willi Syndrome, a birth defect associated with hypotonia, insatiable appetite, hypogonadism, central nervous system dysfunction, and abnormal growth and development . A literature review addresses studies dealing with behavior modification of obesity…

  4. Testosterone replacement therapy in obese males.

    PubMed

    Drewa, Tomasz; Olszewska-Słonina, Dorota; Chlosta, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Controversy surrounds testosterone replacement therapy in obese ageing due to no generally accepted lower limits of normal testosterone level and high prevalence of hypogonadal symptoms in the ageing male population and the non-specific nature of these symptoms. Late onset hypogonadism is a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advancing age, often coexisting with obesity and metabolic syndrome. High fat and carbohydrates (fructose) consumption is responsible for development of obesity and metabolic syndrome which is one of risk factors for hypogonadism in older men. High fructose intake has been shown to cause dyslipidemia and to impair hepatic insulin sensitivity. Obesity and lack of physical activity negatively influence testosterone level. Low testosterone level should be regarded as an effect of obesity, but reverse relationship has not been proved yet. The management of late-onset hypogonadism symptoms has to be treated by a change of a life style and prevented with healthy nutrition and physical activity. The question related to rational indications for testosterone replacement therapy in obese males seems to be still actual.

  5. Visual-Motor Integration in Children with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, S. T.; Collin, P. J. L.; Hokken-Koelega, A. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterised by hypotonia, hypogonadism, short stature, obesity, behavioural problems, intellectual disability, and delay in language, social and motor development. There is very limited knowledge about visual-motor integration in children with PWS. Method: Seventy-three children with PWS aged 7-17 years…

  6. Cryptorchidism due to chromosome 5q inversion duplication.

    PubMed

    Dutta, M K; Gundgurthi, A; Garg, M K; Pakhetr, R

    2013-12-01

    We present a 15 year old boy who was born out of a non consanguineous marriage, and presented with bilateral cryptorchidism, mental retardation, facial dysmorphism, hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism with failure of anatomical and biochemical localisation of testes. Karyotype analysis showed 46 XY with inverted duplication on chromosome 5q22-31.

  7. Pituitary Disorders and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Jawiarczyk-Przybyłowska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Various hormonal disorders can influence bone metabolism and cause secondary osteoporosis. The consequence of this is a significant increase of fracture risk. Among pituitary disorders such effects are observed in patients with Cushing's disease, hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly, and hypopituitarism. Severe osteoporosis is the result of the coexistence of some of these disorders and hypogonadism at the same time, which is quite often. PMID:25873948

  8. The genetic basis of female reproductive disorders: Etiology and clinical testing ☆

    PubMed Central

    Layman, Lawrence C.

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of improved molecular biology techniques, the genetic basis of an increasing number of reproductive disorders has been elucidated. Mutations in at least 20 genes cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism including Kallmann syndrome in about 35–40% of patients. The two most commonly involved genes are FGFR1 and CHD7. When combined pituitary hormone deficiency includes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism as a feature, PROP1 mutations are the most common of the six genes involved. For hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, mutations in 14 genes cause gonadal failure in 15% of affected females, most commonly in FMR1. In eugonadal disorders, activating FSHR mutations have been identified for spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome; and WNT4 mutations have been described in mullerian aplasia. For other eugonadal disorders, such as endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and leiomyomata, specific germline gene mutations have not been identified, but some chromosomal regions are associated with the corresponding phenotype. Practical genetic testing is possible to perform in both hypogonadotropic and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. However, clinical testing for endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and leiomyomata is not currently practical for the clinician. PMID:23499866

  9. Cognitive, Emotional, Physical and Social Effects of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoybye, C; Thoren, M.; Bohm, B.

    2005-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a multisystem genetic disorder characterized by short stature, muscular hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, maladaptive behaviour, hypogonadism and partial growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD). Severe GHD of other aetiologies has been shown to affect mood and quality of life negatively, and there are reports of…

  10. Quality of Life and Psychological Well-Being in GH-Treated, Adult PWS Patients: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertella, L.; Mori, I.; Grugni, G.; Pignatti, R.; Ceriani, F.; Molinari, E.; Ceccarelli, A.; Sartorio, A.; Vettor, R.; Semenza, C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a congenital alteration of chromosome pair 15. It is characterized by short stature, muscular hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, behavioural and emotional disturbances, hypogonadism and partial Growth Hormone (GH) deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of GH treatment on the…

  11. Transition in endocrinology: induction of puberty.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Leo; Quinton, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Puberty is the period during which we attain adult secondary sexual characteristics and reproductive capability. Its onset depends upon reactivation of pulsative GNRH, secretion from its relative quiescence during childhood, on the background of intact potential for pituitary-gonadal function. This review is intended: to highlight those current practices in diagnosis and management that are evidence based and those that are not; to help clinicians deal with areas of uncertainty with reference to physiologic first principles; by sign-posting relevant data arising from other patient groups with shared issues; to illustrate how recent scientific advances are (or should be) altering clinician perceptions of pubertal delay; and finally, to emphasise that the management of men and women presenting in advanced adult life with absent puberty cannot simply be extrapolated from paediatric practice. There is a broad spectrum of pubertal timing that varies among different populations, separated in time and space. Delayed puberty usually represents an extreme of the normal, a developmental pattern referred to as constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP), but organic defects of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis predisposing to hypogonadism may not always be initially distinguishable from it. CDGP and organic, or congenital hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism are both significantly more common in boys than girls. Moreover, around 1/3 of adults with organic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism had evidence of partial puberty at presentation and, confusingly, some 5-10% of these subsequently may exhibit recovery of endogenous gonadotrophin secretion, including men with Kallmann syndrome. However, the distinction is crucial as expectative ('watch-and-wait') management is inappropriate in the context of hypogonadism. The probability of pubertal delay being caused by organic hypogonadism rises exponentially both with increasing age at presentation and the presence of associated 'red

  12. Assessment of thyroid and gonadal function in liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kharb, Sandeep; Garg, M. K.; Puri, Pankaj; Brar, Karninder S.; Pandit, Aditi; Srivastava, Sharad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Liver is involved with the synthesis of carrier proteins and metabolism of various hormones and liver diseases may, therefore, be associated with various endocrine disturbances. This study was conducted to assess thyroid and gonadal function in subjects with acute hepatitis (AH), chronic liver disease (CLD), and those who had undergone liver transplantation (LT). Materials and Methods: Patients with AH, CLD with Child-Pugh stage A (CLD-1) and Child-Pugh stage B or C (CLD-2), and LT seen at our tertiary level hospital were assessed clinically, biochemically, and for thyroid and gonadal functions besides 25 healthy controls. Results: Thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism were present in 14 (16%) and 24 (28%) patients with liver diseases respectively. Among thyroid dysfunction, the commonest was sick euthyroid syndrome six (7%), followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in three patients (3.5%), subclinical hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxicosis in two patients each (2.3%) and overt hypothyroidism in one patient. Among patients with LT and AH groups, the only abnormality was significantly lower total T3 compared with healthy controls. The CLD2 group had significantly lower levels of all thyroid hormones compared with controls and CLD1 group. Hypogonadism was commonest in patients with CLD-2 (14; 50%) followed by LT (3; 33%), CLD-1 (4; 20%), and AH (3; 14%). Hypogonadism was predicted by older age, lower levels of serum albumin, total cholesterol, and triglycerides and higher levels of plasma glucose, serum bilirubin, aspartate transaminases, and international normalized ratio. Gonadal functions showed recovery following LT. Conclusions: Thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism form an important part of the spectrum of acute and CLD, and patients with LT. Deterioration of synthetic functions of liver disease predicts presence of hypogonadism. PMID:25593833

  13. Prevalence of pituitary hormone dysfunction, metabolic syndrome, and impaired quality of life in retired professional football players: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Daniel F; Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C J; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30-65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL years, 5; median NFL concussions, 3; mean BMI, 33.8±6.0), 28 (41.2%) were GHD using a peak GH cutoff of <3 ng/mL. However, with a BMI-adjusted definition of GHD, 13 of 68 (19.1%) were GHD. Using this BMI-adjusted definition, overall HD was found in 16 (23.5%) subjects: 10 (14.7%) with isolated GHD; 3 (4.4%) with isolated hypogonadism; and 3 (4.4%) with both GHD and hypogonadism. Subjects with HD had lower mean scores on the IIEF survey (p=0.016) and trended toward lower scores on the SF-36 MCS (p=0.113). MetS was present in 50% of subjects, including 5 of 6 (83%) with hypogonadism, and 29 of 62 (46.8%) without hypogonadism (p=0.087). Age, BMI, median years in NFL, games played, number of concussions, and acknowledged use of performance-enhancing steroids were similar between HD and non-HD groups. In summary, in this cohort of retired NFL players with poor QoL, 23.5% had HD, including 19% with GHD (using a BMI-adjusted definition), 9% with hypogonadism, and 50% had Met

  14. Prevalence of Pituitary Hormone Dysfunction, Metabolic Syndrome, and Impaired Quality of Life in Retired Professional Football Players: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J.; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C.J.; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30–65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL years, 5; median NFL concussions, 3; mean BMI, 33.8±6.0), 28 (41.2%) were GHD using a peak GH cutoff of <3 ng/mL. However, with a BMI-adjusted definition of GHD, 13 of 68 (19.1%) were GHD. Using this BMI-adjusted definition, overall HD was found in 16 (23.5%) subjects: 10 (14.7%) with isolated GHD; 3 (4.4%) with isolated hypogonadism; and 3 (4.4%) with both GHD and hypogonadism. Subjects with HD had lower mean scores on the IIEF survey (p=0.016) and trended toward lower scores on the SF-36 MCS (p=0.113). MetS was present in 50% of subjects, including 5 of 6 (83%) with hypogonadism, and 29 of 62 (46.8%) without hypogonadism (p=0.087). Age, BMI, median years in NFL, games played, number of concussions, and acknowledged use of performance-enhancing steroids were similar between HD and non-HD groups. In summary, in this cohort of retired NFL players with poor QoL, 23.5% had HD, including 19% with GHD (using a BMI-adjusted definition), 9% with hypogonadism, and

  15. Testosterone replacement therapy and the risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Daniel; Hobaugh, Christopher; Wang, Grace; Lin, Haocheng; Wang, Run

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in the development and progression of prostate cancer is an important concept in treating patients with symptoms of hypogonadism. This article revealed a small number of mostly retrospective, observational studies describing the use of TRT in the general population, in men with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), in men with a history of treated prostate cancer, and in men on active surveillance for prostate cancer. The current literature does not report a statistically significant increase in the development or progression of prostate cancer in men receiving testosterone replacement for symptomatic hypogonadism, and the prostate saturation theory provides a model explaining the basis for these results. The use of TRT in men with a history of prostate cancer is considered experimental, but future results from randomized controlled trials could lead to a change in our current treatment approach.

  16. Subcutaneous pellet testosterone replacement therapy: the "first steps" in treating men with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kendra M; Derosa, Angela

    2013-12-01

    The authors describe the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with hormone level concerns 6 months after a rock climbing accident that resulted in paraplegia. Hypogonadism was diagnosed, and the patient received subcutaneous pellet testosterone replacement therapy. Within 6 months, the patient had substantial improvement in muscle function and was able to take several steps with the assistance of crutches or a walker. This case highlights the potential improvement in quality of life and overall prognosis resulting from the subcutaneous pellet form of testosterone when used as part of the overall treatment plan in such patients. Considering the overwhelming preponderance of hypogonadism in men with spinal cord injuries, the standard of care for such patients should include screening, laboratory hormone evaluation, and prompt treatment for testosterone deficiency.

  17. Updates on the relation of weight excess and reproductive function in men: sleep apnea as a new area of interest

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Ahmad O; Carrell, Douglas T; Gibson, Mark; Matthew Peterson, C; Wayne Meikle, A

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has a negative effect on male reproductive function. It is associated with low testosterone levels and alteration in gonadotropin secretion. Male obesity has been linked to reduced male fertility. Data regarding the relation of obesity to sperm parameters are conflicting in terms of the nature and magnitude of the effect. New areas of interest are emerging that can help explain the variation in study results, such as genetic polymorphism and sleep apnea. Sleep disorders have been linked to altered testosterone production and hypogonadism in men. It was also correlated to erectile dysfunction. The relation of sleep disorders to male fertility and sperm parameters remains to be investigated. Men with hypogonadism and infertility should be screened for sleep apnea. Treatment of obesity and sleep apnea improves testosterone levels and erectile function. PMID:22138900

  18. Modifying Risk Factors in the Management of Erectile Dysfunction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    DeLay, Kenneth J; Haney, Nora

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is prevalent among men and its presence is often an indicator of systemic disease. Risk factors for ED include cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), tobacco use, hyperlipidemia, hypogonadism, lower urinary tract symptoms, metabolic syndrome, and depression. Addressing the modifiable risk factors frequently improves a patient's overall health and increases lifespan. The literature suggests that smoking cessation, treatment of hyperlipidemia, and increasing physical activity will improve erectile function in many patients. How the treatment of DM, depression, and hypogonadism impacts erectile function is less clear. Clinicians need to be aware that certain antihypertensive agents can adversely impact erectile function. The treatment of men with ED needs to address the underlying risk factors to ameliorate the disease process. PMID:27574592

  19. Early onset of puberty in an obese boy with Klinefelter syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byoung-Wook; Kwon, Seung-Eun; Kim, Soon-Ki; Lee, Taek; Han, Jee-Young

    2016-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is one of the most common disease entities characterized by X-chromosomal aberration causing the primary hypogonadism in adult men. Patients with KS seem to be typically characterized by tall, slender bodies with delayed puberty and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. However, it has been known that they have a broad spectrum of phenotype ranging from almost normal external appearances to typical phenotype. Only 25% KS Patients are ever diagnosed because KS remains unrecognized. Also, boys with KS have an onset of pubertal development within the normal range, not delayed onset of puberty. Adolescents with KS are generally diagnosed as having the lack of pubertal progress. Early detection of KS can be difficult without awareness. We report an unusual case of early onset of puberty in obese boy with KS who presented with a unilateral non-hormone secreting testicular teratoma. PMID:27104178

  20. Men living with HIV and experiencing sexual dysfunction: an analysis of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Donna W; Kosko, Debra A

    2013-01-01

    Men living with HIV (MLWH), especially younger MLWH, may experience sexual dysfunction in greater numbers than men without HIV infection. This manuscript describes the prevalence of two major causative factors of sexual dysfunction in MLWH: hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction. A description of assessment and evaluation is presented. Additionally, the evidence for use of pharmacological and herbal therapies is presented with recommendations for treatment. MLWH who exhibit hypogonadism and/or erectile dysfunction should receive similar care to those without HIV infection. There is evidence to support the use of testosterone replacement therapy and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors in this population, and there is limited evidence for the use of certain herbs such as yohimbine. The ethics of treating sexual dysfunction for MLWH are discussed. A case study follows as an example of the application of evidence-based treatments recommended for practice.

  1. Monitoring testosterone levels in testosterone-treated men.

    PubMed

    Winters, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Dose adjustment with transdermal testosterone preparations should recognize the variability of serum total testosterone levels between applications and over the course of 24 h. Dose adjustments are also made difficult by between-laboratory assay variability. Low SHBG with obesity and diabetes lowers the total testosterone level, and free or bioavailable testosterone may prove to be a better choice for monitoring the progress and dosing of testosterone-treated men with adult onset hypogonadism.

  2. Chromosome banding studies in two patients with XXXXY syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, C L; Sparkes, R S; Carlson, H E

    1978-01-01

    In 2 adult male patients with 49 chromosomes, an XXXXY sex chromosome constitution was confirmed by trypsin-Giemsa banding sites. Clinical findings as well as fingerprint ridge counts were typical of the syndrome. Primary hypogonadism was documented by finding low serum testosterone and raised serum LH and FSH levels. Several radiological abnormalities, not previously described in this syndrome, were seen in 1 patient. Images PMID:568665

  3. A vital region for human glycoprotein hormone trafficking revealed by an LHB mutation.

    PubMed

    Potorac, Iulia; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo; Trehan, Ashutosh; Kiełbus, Michał; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Pralong, Francois; Hafidi, Aicha; Thiry, Albert; Ménagé, Jean-Jacques; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Beckers, Albert; Daly, Adrian F

    2016-12-01

    Glycoprotein hormones are complex hormonally active macromolecules. Luteinizing hormone (LH) is essential for the postnatal development and maturation of the male gonad. Inactivating Luteinizing hormone beta (LHB) gene mutations are exceptionally rare and lead to hypogonadism that is particularly severe in males. We describe a family with selective LH deficiency and hypogonadism in two brothers. DNA sequencing of LHB was performed and the effects of genetic variants on hormone function and secretion were characterized by mutagenesis studies, confocal microscopy and functional assays. A 20-year-old male from a consanguineous family had pubertal delay, hypogonadism and undetectable LH. A homozygous c.118_120del (p.Lys40del) mutation was identified in the patient and his brother, who subsequently had the same phenotype. Treatment with hCG led to pubertal development, increased circulating testosterone and spermatogenesis. Experiments in HeLa cells revealed that the mutant LH is retained intracellularly and showed diffuse cytoplasmic distribution. The mutated LHB heterodimerizes with the common alpha-subunit and can activate its receptor. Deletion of flanking glutamic acid residues at positions 39 and 41 impair LH to a similar extent as deletion of Lys40. This region is functionally important across all heterodimeric glycoprotein hormones, because deletion of the corresponding residues in hCG, follicle-stimulating hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone beta-subunits also led to intracellular hormone retention. This novel LHB mutation results in hypogonadism due to intracellular sequestration of the hormone and reveals a discrete region in the protein that is crucial for normal secretion of all human glycoprotein hormones.

  4. Testosterone replacement in older men and women.

    PubMed

    Morley, J E

    2001-01-01

    This article examines in detail the present state of the art concerning androgen deficiency in aging males. There is increasing evidence that testosterone replacement in hypogonadal older males can result in an improvement in quality of life. The major effects of testosterone are on libido, muscles, bone, and cognition. Less information is available concerning the role of testosterone in postmenopausal women, but testosterone replacement may have a role to play in treating disorders of libido and the sarcopenia that occurs at menopause.

  5. Endocrine involvement in mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with partial cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Doriguzzi, C; Palmucci, L; Mongini, T; Bresolin, N; Bet, L; Comi, G; Lala, R

    1989-01-01

    A 19-year-old man born with thyroprivic hypothyroidism, due to congenital development defect, manifested hypogonadism, stunted growth, chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), diffuse muscle weakness and wasting, right bundle branch block, cerebral atrophy. Muscle biopsy showed mitochondrial abnormalities. Biochemical investigations on muscle disclosed partial (50%) cytochrome c oxidase deficiency, 58% decrease of cytochrome aa3 and 41% decrease of cytochrome b. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed decrease of the immunologically active enzyme protein. Images PMID:2540284

  6. Hairy pinnae after orchiectomy and chemotherapy for testicular cancer: acquired localized hypertrichosis of the ears.

    PubMed

    Sänger, C F E; Dietrich, N; Pelivani, N; Borradori, L; de Viragh, P A

    2011-01-01

    Acquired localized hypertrichosis has rarely been reported. Here, we describe a patient with localized hypertrichosis of the pinnae that occurred 4 months after orchiectomy and chemotherapy for a testicular carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of an acquired hypertrichosis of the pinnae after cancer therapy. We propose that in our patient either hypogonadism or the hormonal imbalance caused by the cancer therapy led to the development of the hairy pinnae, perhaps alongside a genetic predisposition for hairy ears.

  7. Sexual dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Leyla J; Patil, Seema A; Cross, Raymond K

    2015-04-01

    Sexual health is a broad term that encompasses a variety of functions including sexual thoughts, desire, arousal, intercourse, orgasm, and the impact of body image. Sexual dysfunction in individuals with inflammatory bowel disease is multifactorial including the impact of psychosocial factors, disease activity, medical therapies, surgical interventions, body image perceptions and changes, hypogonadism, and pelvic floor disorders. Providers caring for patients with inflammatory bowel disease should be cognizant of these concerns and develop management plans and techniques for earlier diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Prolactin, hyperprolactinaemia and antipsychotic treatment: a review and lessons for treatment of early psychosis.

    PubMed

    Cookson, John; Hodgson, Richard; Wildgust, Hiram J

    2012-05-01

    Hyperprolactinaemia is a common side effect of antipsychotics; markedly raised levels are less common. Higher levels of prolactin result from longer exposure to higher doses, especially with older antipsychotics or with risperidone, sulpiride or amisulpride. Galactorrhoea, gynaecomastia, menstrual abnormalities and sexual dysfunction including hypogonadism and fertility problems are consequences of raised prolactin, and in the longer-term bone demineralisation. Younger patients may be more susceptible to hyperprolactinaemia. Trial reports often fail to state the frequency of raised levels.

  9. Testosterone and prostate cancer: an evidence-based review of pathogenesis and oncologic risk.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jason E; Billups, Kevin L; Partin, Alan W

    2015-12-01

    Testosterone plays a central role in male development and health. Likewise, androgen deficiency, or hypogonadism, is associated with a variety of symptoms including decreased energy, diminished libido and erectile dysfunction, among others. Male androgen levels steadily decline with age, and, in a subset of symptomatic older men, can result in late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Over the last decade, increased awareness of hypogonadism among patients and providers has led to a significant rise in the use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) for hypogonadism, and especially in LOH. Accompanying the rise in TRT are concerns of potential adverse effects, including cardiovascular risks and the promotion of prostate cancer. The 'androgen hypothesis' asserts that prostate cancer development and progression is driven by androgens, and thus TRT has the theoretical potential to drive prostate cancer development and progression. In this review, we examine existing data surrounding testosterone and prostate cancer. There is significant evidence that androgens promote prostate cancer in experimental systems. However, there is no clear evidence that elevations in endogenous testosterone levels promote the development of prostate cancer in humans. As a result of experimental and historical data on the progression of prostate cancer following TRT, there has been widespread belief that TRT will promote disease progression in prostate cancer patients. Despite these fears, there are a growing number of studies demonstrating no increase in prostate cancer incidence among men on TRT. Furthermore, in studies involving a small number of patients, there has been no discernable increase in disease progression in prostate cancer patients on TRT. While data from large, prospective, randomized, controlled trials are absent, TRT in select prostate cancer patients is likely safe. In the end, the use of TRT in prostate cancer patients is still considered experimental and should only be offered

  10. Testosterone and prostate cancer: an evidence-based review of pathogenesis and oncologic risk

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Jason E.; Billups, Kevin L.; Partin, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone plays a central role in male development and health. Likewise, androgen deficiency, or hypogonadism, is associated with a variety of symptoms including decreased energy, diminished libido and erectile dysfunction, among others. Male androgen levels steadily decline with age, and, in a subset of symptomatic older men, can result in late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Over the last decade, increased awareness of hypogonadism among patients and providers has led to a significant rise in the use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) for hypogonadism, and especially in LOH. Accompanying the rise in TRT are concerns of potential adverse effects, including cardiovascular risks and the promotion of prostate cancer. The ‘androgen hypothesis’ asserts that prostate cancer development and progression is driven by androgens, and thus TRT has the theoretical potential to drive prostate cancer development and progression. In this review, we examine existing data surrounding testosterone and prostate cancer. There is significant evidence that androgens promote prostate cancer in experimental systems. However, there is no clear evidence that elevations in endogenous testosterone levels promote the development of prostate cancer in humans. As a result of experimental and historical data on the progression of prostate cancer following TRT, there has been widespread belief that TRT will promote disease progression in prostate cancer patients. Despite these fears, there are a growing number of studies demonstrating no increase in prostate cancer incidence among men on TRT. Furthermore, in studies involving a small number of patients, there has been no discernable increase in disease progression in prostate cancer patients on TRT. While data from large, prospective, randomized, controlled trials are absent, TRT in select prostate cancer patients is likely safe. In the end, the use of TRT in prostate cancer patients is still considered experimental and should only be

  11. Can Serum Testosterone Be Used as a Marker of Overall Health?

    PubMed Central

    Mederos, Michael A; Bernie, Aaron M; Scovell, Jason M; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    Low serum testosterone has been associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Individuals with these comorbidities are at increased risk of premature death and other adverse health effects. Clinical data portend low testosterone as a risk factor for developing these conditions which are supported by the hypogonadal-obesity-adipocytokine hypothesis. The authors support comprehensive evaluation for these comorbid conditions in men found to have low serum testosterone. PMID:26839520

  12. Suprasellar arachnoid cyst with delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Singhal, Namit

    2007-11-01

    A 15-year-old female presented with primary amenorrhea and delayed onset of secondary sexual characteristics. Earlier she was operated for endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) for a tense suprasellar arachnoid cyst with obstructive hydrocephalus. MRI revealed recurrence of hydrocephalus. Hormonal levels were suggestive of hypogonadism and deficiency of growth hormone. She was operated for fenestration of cyst. In this case, suprasellar arachnoid cyst presented with delayed puberty, which is unusual.

  13. Recent advances in the understanding and management of delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Wei, Christina; Crowne, Elizabeth Clare

    2016-05-01

    Delayed puberty, especially in boys, is a common presentation in paediatrics. Recent advances have improved our understanding of the neuroendocrine, genetic and environmental factors controlling pubertal development, and hence inform the pathophysiology of delayed puberty. The discovery of kisspeptin signalling through its receptor identified neuroendocrine mechanisms controlling the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator at the onset of puberty. Genetic mechanisms from single gene mutations to single nucleotide polymorphism associated with delayed puberty are being identified. Environmental factors, including nutritional factors and endocrine disruptors, have also been implicated in changes in secular trends and abnormal timing of puberty. Despite these advances, the key clinical question is to distinguish delayed puberty associated with an underlying pathology or hypogonadism from constitutional delay in growth and puberty, which remains challenging as biochemical tests are not always discriminatory. The diagnostic accuracies of newer investigations, including 36-hour luteinising hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) tests, GnRH-agonist tests, antimullerian hormone and inhibin-B, require further evaluation. Sex hormone replacement remains the main available treatment for delayed puberty, the choice of which is largely dictated by clinical practice and availability of the various sex steroid preparations. Spontaneous reversal of hypogonadism has been reported in boys with idiopathic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism after a period of sex steroid treatment, highlighting the importance of reassessment at the end of pubertal induction. Novel therapies with a more physiological basis such as gonadotrophins or kisspeptin-agonist are being investigated for the management of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Careful clinical assessment and appreciation of the normal physiology remain the key approach to patients with delayed puberty.

  14. Injection of testosterone may be safer and more effective than transdermal administration for combating loss of muscle and bone in older men.

    PubMed

    Borst, Stephen E; Yarrow, Joshua F

    2015-06-15

    The value of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) for older men is currently a topic of intense debate. While US testosterone prescriptions have tripled in the past decade (9), debate continues over the risks and benefits of TRT. TRT is currently prescribed for older men with either low serum testosterone (T) or low T plus accompanying symptoms of hypogonadism. The normal range for serum testosterone is 300 to 1,000 ng/dl. Serum T ≤ 300 ng/dl is considered to be low, and T ≤ 250 is considered to be frank hypogonadism. Most experts support TRT for older men with frank hypogonadism and symptoms. Treatment for men who simply have low T remains somewhat controversial. TRT is most frequently administered by intramuscular (im) injection of long-acting T esters or transdermally via patch or gel preparations and infrequently via oral administration. TRT produces a number of established benefits in hypogonadal men, including increased muscle mass and strength, decreased fat mass, increased bone mineral density, and improved sexual function, and in some cases those benefits are dose dependent. For example, doses of TRT administered by im injection are typically higher than those administered transdermally, which results in greater musculoskeletal benefits. TRT also produces known risks including development of polycythemia (Hct > 50) in 6% of those treated, decrease in HDL, breast tenderness and enlargement, prostate enlargement, increases in serum PSA, and prostate-related events and may cause suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Importantly, TRT does not increase the risk of prostate cancer. Putative risks include edema and worsening of sleep apnea. Several recent reports have also indicated that TRT may produce cardiovascular (CV) risks, while others report no risk or even benefit. To address the potential CV risks of TRT, we have recently reported via meta-analysis that oral TRT increases CV risk and suggested that the CV risk profile for im TRT

  15. Deficiency in prohormone convertase PC1 impairs prohormone processing in Prader-Willi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Lisa C.; LeDuc, Charles A.; Sulsona, Carlos R.; Paull, Daniel; Rausch, Richard; Eddiry, Sanaa; Carli, Jayne F. Martin; Morabito, Michael V.; Skowronski, Alicja A.; Hubner, Gabriela; Zimmer, Matthew; Wang, Liheng; Day, Robert; Levy, Brynn; Dubern, Beatrice; Poitou, Christine; Clement, Karine; Rosenbaum, Michael; Salles, Jean Pierre; Tauber, Maithe; Egli, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by a loss of paternally expressed genes in an imprinted region of chromosome 15q. Among the canonical PWS phenotypes are hyperphagic obesity, central hypogonadism, and low growth hormone (GH). Rare microdeletions in PWS patients define a 91-kb minimum critical deletion region encompassing 3 genes, including the noncoding RNA gene SNORD116. Here, we found that protein and transcript levels of nescient helix loop helix 2 (NHLH2) and the prohormone convertase PC1 (encoded by PCSK1) were reduced in PWS patient induced pluripotent stem cell–derived (iPSC-derived) neurons. Moreover, Nhlh2 and Pcsk1 expression were reduced in hypothalami of fasted Snord116 paternal knockout (Snord116p–/m+) mice. Hypothalamic Agrp and Npy remained elevated following refeeding in association with relative hyperphagia in Snord116p–/m+ mice. Nhlh2-deficient mice display growth deficiencies as adolescents and hypogonadism, hyperphagia, and obesity as adults. Nhlh2 has also been shown to promote Pcsk1 expression. Humans and mice deficient in PC1 display hyperphagic obesity, hypogonadism, decreased GH, and hypoinsulinemic diabetes due to impaired prohormone processing. Here, we found that Snord116p–/m+ mice displayed in vivo functional defects in prohormone processing of proinsulin, pro-GH–releasing hormone, and proghrelin in association with reductions in islet, hypothalamic, and stomach PC1 content. Our findings suggest that the major neuroendocrine features of PWS are due to PC1 deficiency. PMID:27941249

  16. Endocrinological issues and hormonal manipulation in children and men with Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wosnitzer, Matthew S; Paduch, Darius A

    2013-02-15

    47, XXY or Klinefelter syndrome (KS), the most common chromosomal aberration in males, is characterized by either absolute or relative hypogonadism with frequent decline in serum testosterone (T) following the onset of puberty. Decreased T levels are the result of testicular dysfunction with decrease in size of Leydig cells, and loss of germs and Sertoli cells leading to tubular hyalinization. Increase in estradiol results from over-expression of aromatase CYP19. Deficient androgen production and observed varied response of end-organs to T leads to delayed progression of puberty with decreased facial/body hair, poor muscle development, osteoporosis, and gynecomastia. It is possible that hypogonadism and excessive estradiol production contribute to emotional and social immaturity, and specific learning disabilities in KS. Based on the authors' experience and literature review, early fertility preservation and hormonal supplementation may normalize pubertal development, prevent metabolic sequelae of hypogonadism, and have a positive effect on academic and social development. No randomized clinical trials are available studying the effects of T supplementation on reproductive or cognitive issues in KS. Aggressive T supplementation (topical gel) and selective use of aromatase inhibitors may be considered at the onset of puberty with careful follow-up and titration to reach age-specific high-normal physiologic serum values. The decision to institute hormonal therapy should be part of a multidisciplinary approach including physical, speech, behavioral, and occupational therapy. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Management of erectile dysfunction by combination therapy with testosterone and sildenafil in recipients of high-dose therapy for haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, R; Kottaridis, P D; McGarrigle, H H; Linch, D C

    2002-04-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a well recognised complication of bone marrow transplantation, which affects quality of life in adult patients. Although the major contributory factors include hypogonadism and psychogenic factors, the best treatment still remains to be established due to the complex aetiopathology of the condition. Here, we report our preliminary results in eight patients treated with testosterone replacement therapy and sildenafil. We studied eight male recipients of BMT aged 22-58 years, presenting with clinical features of hypogonadism, ED, diminished libido and ejaculatory disorders. ED was assessed clinically and by colour flow Doppler studies of the cavernosal vessels. Testicular function was assessed by testicular volume, FSH, LH and testosterone (T) measurements. Erectile performance, libido and ejaculatory function were determined by a structured interview. Patients had severe primary hypogonadism as evidenced by low mean testicular volume, elevated gonadotrophins and low normal mean testosterone levels compared with controls. All had Leydig cell insufficiency (LCI) with or without frank serum testosterone insufficiency. All except one had cavernosal arterial insufficiency. All patients received intramuscular injections of testosterone cypionate (250 mg 4 weekly) for 6 months and 50-100 mg of sildenafil orally, one to two times per week. All patients responded favourably as substantiated from the NIH consensus criteria. Our preliminary results suggest that this combined therapy is a safe and effective therapeutic approach in recipients of high-dose therapy presenting with ED after transplant.

  18. Enclomiphene, an estrogen receptor antagonist for the treatment of testosterone deficiency in men.

    PubMed

    Hill, Simon; Arutchelvam, Vijayaraman; Quinton, Richard

    2009-02-01

    Enclomiphene (Androxal), in development by Repros Therapeutics Inc, is a non-steroidal estrogen receptor antagonist that promotes gonadotropin-dependent testosterone secretion by the testes. Enclomiphene constitutes the trans-stereoisomer of clomiphene citrate, a drug that has been widely prescribed for several decades for the treatment of female ovulatory dysfunction. Because of the antagonistic effects of enclomiphene, the drug has the potential to increase serum testosterone levels in men with secondary hypogonadism by restoring physiological endogenous testosterone secretion while maintaining testicular volume and, potentially, spermatogenesis. In clinical trials conducted to date, enclomiphene demonstrated significant efficacy in the physiological restoration of testosterone levels in males with secondary hypogonadism. The compound also exhibited an unanticipated favorable effect on fasting plasma glucose; this result has been accompanied by rapidly accumulating evidence from other researchers for a bidirectional relationship between low serum testosterone and obesity/metabolic syndrome (syndrome X) in men. Short-term clinical safety data for enclomiphene have been satisfactory and equivalent to safety data for testosterone gels and placebo. Enclomiphene demonstrates promise in the management of secondary hypogonadism associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome and, possibly, infertility, and should undergo placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials for these indications.

  19. [Diagnosis and management of amenorrhea in adolescent girls].

    PubMed

    Laroche, E; Bricaire, L; Christin-Maitre, S

    2013-07-01

    Amenorrhea in adolescents can be primary, with or without breast development, or secondary. Whether amenorrhea is primary or secondary, height, body mass index, food intake, the level of physical activity per week, the presence of hirsutism or galactorrhea, pelvic pain and past history of intercourse need to be investigated. Initially, blood tests should include hCG, FSH, estradiol, testosterone and prolactin serum levels. This screening will discriminate between hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and amenorrhea from primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). In case of primary amenorrhea, hypogonadism may be due to congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) or more rarely acquired HH. If FSH is elevated, amenorrhea is due to primary ovarian failure, mainly related to Turner syndrome. If pubertal development is normal, a pelvic ultrasound should be performed. It may visualize a hindering of menses output or less frequently an absence of uterus, as in Rokitansky syndrome or androgen insentivity syndrome. The most frequent etiologies of secondary amenorrhea are polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), functional hypothalamic amenorrhea and less frequently POI and hyperprolactinemia. The differential diagnoses of PCOS are late-onset 21-hydroxylase deficiency and very rare ovarian or adrenal tumors. When contraception is not necessary, hormonal replacement therapy, including estrogen and progestins should be administered in order to avoid hypoestrogenism. In case of PCOS, sequential progestins can be prescribed. A contraceptive pill can be considered when contraception is needed and/or when hyperandrogenism needs to be treated.

  20. A study on endocrine dysfunction in thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjay K; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjana; Roy, Dipankar; Maisnam, Indira; Ghosh, Moloy K

    2008-10-01

    The aim was to study the prevalence and severity of hormonal imbalance affecting growth, gonadal and thyroid function in thalassaemic patients and to find out whether any correlation exists between the degree of tissue iron-overload and several patients characteristics like age, gender, foetal haemoglobin (HbF) level, type of thalassaemia (beta or E-beta), and the presence of specific endocrine abnormality. Sixty-eight consecutive non-chelated, transfusion-dependent patients of beta and E-beta-thalassaemia with significant tissue iron overload (serum ferritin more than 2000 microg/l) were included. Standing height was noted and clinical features of hypogonadism were recorded. Insulin tolerance test was done to assess growth hormone reserve. Serum oestradiol, T3,T4,TSH were measured in fasting clotted sample, while pooled sera (from 3 consevutive morning samples) was used for testosterone, FSH and LH. Hypogonadism was the commonest abnormality, both in males (52.28%) and females (35.89%) followed by growth retardation (20.58%) and reduced growth hormone reserve (7.35%). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of endocrine dysfunction with regard to patient's age, gender, type of thalassaemia (beta or E-beta) amd HbF level. Hypogonadic females had a significantly elevated mean serum ferritin level. Subclinical hypothyroidism was present in 23.52% of patients, related to the duration of disease. No association was found between pituitarty and thyroid dysfunction.

  1. The benefits and risks of testosterone replacement therapy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Bassil, Nazem; Alkaade, Saad; Morley, John E

    2009-01-01

    Increased longevity and population aging will increase the number of men with late onset hypogonadism. It is a common condition, but often underdiagnosed and undertreated. The indication of testosterone-replacement therapy (TRT) treatment requires the presence of low testosterone level, and symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Although controversy remains regarding indications for testosterone supplementation in aging men due to lack of large-scale, long-term studies assessing the benefits and risks of testosterone-replacement therapy in men, reports indicate that TRT may produce a wide range of benefits for men with hypogonadism that include improvement in libido and sexual function, bone density, muscle mass, body composition, mood, erythropoiesis, cognition, quality of life and cardiovascular disease. Perhaps the most controversial area is the issue of risk, especially possible stimulation of prostate cancer by testosterone, even though no evidence to support this risk exists. Other possible risks include worsening symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, liver toxicity, hyperviscosity, erythrocytosis, worsening untreated sleep apnea or severe heart failure. Despite this controversy, testosterone supplementation in the United States has increased substantially over the past several years. The physician should discuss with the patient the potential benefits and risks of TRT. The purpose of this review is to discuss what is known and not known regarding the benefits and risks of TRT. PMID:19707253

  2. Hormone Treatment and Muscle Anabolism during Aging: Androgens

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, E. Lichar; Durham, William J.; Urban, Randall J.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual decline in circulating testosterone concentrations and decreased musculature in men. While testosterone administration is often considered when symptoms of hypogonadism are presented, the long-term effects of androgen use on muscle physiology are not yet fully understood. The definition of hypogonadism in men remains obscure but is generally indicated by total testosterone concentrations less than a threshold value of 300-500 ng/dL. Androgen replacement therapy is generally safe in men and women with low endogenous testosterone concentrations. The development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide additional options in treatment of hypogonadism while lowering the potential of side effects often associated with long-term androgen use. Androgen administration, either alone or in combination with other treatments, can be successful in improving muscle mass by increasing protein anabolism and reducing protein catabolism in men and women. Further research is necessary to optimize the anabolic and anticatabolic properties of androgens for treatment and prevention of muscle loss in men and women. PMID:20452103

  3. Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency not linked to gene for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in Brazilian kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Faraco, J.; Francke, U.; Toledo, S.

    1994-09-01

    Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency (FIGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in failure to develop secondary sexual characteristics. The origin is a hypothalamic defect resulting in insufficient secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (also called LHRH, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) and follicle-stimuating hormone (FSH). FIGD has been determined to be a separate entity from Kallmann syndrome which presents with hypogonadism as well as anosmia. The FIGD phenotype appears to be analogous to the phenotype of the hpg (hypogonadal) mouse. Because the hpg phenotype is the result of a structurally abnormal GnRH gene, we have studied the GnRH gene in individuals from a previously reported Brazilian FIGD family. An informative dimorphic marker in the signal peptide sequence of the GnRH gene allowed assessment of linkage between the disease gene and the GnRH locus in this pedigree. We have concluded that the GnRH locus is not linked to the disease-causing mutation in these hypogonadal individuals. Recent evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a role in the initiation of puberty. We hypothesize that mutations in NPY may result in failure to secrete GnRH. We have characterized three diallelic frequent-cutter restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the human NPY locus, and are currently using these markers to determine if the NPY gene is linked to, and possibly the site of the disease mutation in this kindred.

  4. Acute stress masking the biochemical phenotype of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome in a patient with a novel mutation in the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Pitteloud, Nelly; Villegas, Jacob; Dwyer, Andrew A; Crowley, William F; McPhaul, Michael J; Hayes, Frances J

    2004-03-01

    Hypogonadism has traditionally been classified as either hypogonadotropic or hypergonadotropic based on serum gonadotropin levels. However, when hypothalamic suppression of GnRH secretion occurs, it can mask an underlying hypergonadotropic state. In this report we document the unusual case of a 61-yr-old man with androgen insensitivity and coincidental functional hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). Although functional HH is not a well-recognized entity in the male, major stress has been reported to cause transient suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in men. The patient in question was noted to have undervirilization, minimal pubertal development, hypogonadal testosterone, and low gonadotropin levels consistent with congenital HH during a hospital admission for myocardial infarction. However, the patient had also had surgery for hypospadias, a clinical feature not typically part of the phenotypic spectrum of congenital HH. We therefore hypothesized that the combination of acute stress and chronic glucocorticoid administration for temporal arteritis induced transient HH in a patient with a disorder of sexual differentiation in whom gonadotropin levels would have otherwise been elevated. Using clinical, molecular, and genetic studies, the patient was found to have partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) caused by a novel mutation (Ser(740)Cys) in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor. Subsequent studies of the patient confirmed the characteristic gonadotropin and sex steroid abnormalities of PAIS. We describe for the first time a patient with PAIS presenting with a reversible hypogonadotropic biochemical profile triggered by an acute illness and corticosteroid therapy. This case highlights the necessity for caution when interpreting gonadotropin levels during acute stress.

  5. Endothelial progenitor cells as a new cardiovascular risk factor in Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Mambro, A; Ferlin, A; De Toni, L; Selice, R; Caretta, N; Foresta, C

    2010-06-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is associated with a significant reduced life expectancy (2.1 years) including greater mortality from cardiovascular diseases. Underlying causes that may involve low levels of testosterone as well as the extra X chromosome are not fully understood. Low testosterone may have a direct affect on vascular tissue or act indirectly via metabolic effects. Testosterone levels may act genomically on cardiac function via the androgen receptor (AR) or non-genomically. Recently, it has been demonstrated that a reduced number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular diseases. Because EPCs have never been studied in KS, we evaluated the number of circulating EPCs in 68 adult 47,XXY Klinefelter men and 46 healthy males. Patients and controls were divided into two groups, according to the absence or presence of cardiovascular risk factors (CRFs). Controls without CRFs had significantly higher levels of EPCs than controls with CRFs; on the contrary, KS patients without CRFs had EPCs levels similar to KS men with risk factors and significantly lower with respect to controls without CRFs. The number of EPCs in patients with hypogonadism was not different from that of those with normal testosterone levels. Twenty-two hypogonadal patients were re-evaluated after 6 months of androgen therapy, but we did not observe any modification in the number of EPCs. These primary hypothesis-generating data suggest that factors involved in KS, whether hypogonadism, CRFs or other genetically determined factors related to the supernumerary X chromosome might contribute to a reduction in EPCs number and that this could be considered another CRF contributing to the increased mortality of these subjects.

  6. Testosterone replacement in 49,XXXXY syndrome: andrological, metabolic and neurological aspects

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, Michele; Elia, Jlenia; Benedetti, Francesco; Alesi, Laura; Chessa, Luciana; Mazzilli, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report the case of a 19-year-old boy, presenting several congenital malformations (facial dysmorphisms, cardiac and musculoskeletal abnormalities), mental retardation, recurrent respiratory infections during growth and delayed puberty. Although previously hospitalised in other medical centres, only psychological support had been recommended for this patient. In our department, genetic, biochemical/hormonal and ultrasound examinations were undertaken. The karyotype was 49,XXXXY, a rare aneuploidy with an incidence of 1/85 000–100 000, characterised by the presence of three extra X chromosomes in phenotypically male subjects. The hormonal/biochemical profile showed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, insulin resistance and vitamin D deficiency. The patient was then treated with testosterone replacement therapy. After 12 months of treatment, we observed the normalisation of testosterone levels. There was also an increase in pubic hair growth, testicular volume and penis size, weight loss, homeostatic model assessment index reduction and the normalisation of vitamin D values. Moreover, the patient showed greater interaction with the social environment and context. Learning points In cases of plurimalformative syndrome, cognitive impairment, recurrent infections during growth and, primarily, delayed puberty, it is necessary to ascertain as soon as possible whether the patient is suffering from hypogonadism or metabolic disorders due to genetic causes. In our case, the diagnosis of hypogonadism, and then of 49,XXXXY syndrome, was unfortunately made only at the age of 19 years.The testosterone replacement treatment, even though delayed, induced positive effects on: i) development of the reproductive system, ii) regulation of the metabolic profile and iii) interaction with the social environment and context.However, earlier and timely hormonal replacement treatment could probably have improved the quality of life of this subject and his family. PMID:26767114

  7. Predicting low testosterone in aging men: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Adam C.; Lau, Adrian N.C.; Tomlinson, George; Kraguljac, Alan; Simel, David L.; Detsky, Allan S.; Lipscombe, Lorraine L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physicians diagnose and treat suspected hypogonadism in older men by extrapolating from the defined clinical entity of hypogonadism found in younger men. We conducted a systematic review to estimate the accuracy of clinical symptoms and signs for predicting low testosterone among aging men. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE and Embase databases (January 1966 to July 2014) for studies that compared clinical features with a measurement of serum testosterone in men. Three of the authors independently reviewed articles for inclusion, assessed quality and extracted data. Results: Among 6053 articles identified, 40 met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of low testosterone ranged between 2% and 77%. Threshold testosterone levels used for reference standards also varied substantially. The summary likelihood ratio associated with decreased libido was 1.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–1.9), and the likelihood ratio for absence of this finding was 0.72 (95% CI 0.58–0.85). The likelihood ratio associated with the presence of erectile dysfunction was 1.5 (95% CI 1.3–1.8) and with absence of erectile dysfunction was 0.83 (95% CI 0.76–0.91). Of the multiple-item instruments, the ANDROTEST showed both the most favourable positive likelihood ratio (range 1.9–2.2) and the most favourable negative likelihood ratio (range 0.37–0.49). Interpretation: We found weak correlation between signs, symptoms and testosterone levels, uncertainty about what threshold testosterone levels should be considered low for aging men and wide variation in estimated prevalence of the condition. It is therefore difficult to extrapolate the method of diagnosing pathologic hypogonadism in younger men to clinical decisions regarding age-related testosterone decline in aging men. PMID:27325129

  8. Sport and male sexuality.

    PubMed

    Sgrò, P; Di Luigi, L

    2017-03-22

    The relationships between sport and sexuality in males are of great social and clinical interest, because of sports and motor activities that highly promote social and sexual relationships. Even if few literature exist, two main questions should be taken into account: whether and how physical exercise and sport positively or negatively influence sexual health and behavior and/or whether and how sexual behavior may affect a sub-sequent sport performance. Physical exercise and sport per se can influence, positively or negatively, the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis function and, consequently, the individual's reproductive and/or sexual health. This depends on individual factors such as genetic and epigenetic ones and on different variables involved in the practice of sport activities (type of sport, intensity and duration of training, doping and drug use and abuse, nutrition, supplements, psychological stress, allostatic load, etc.). If well conducted, motor and sport activities could have beneficial effects on sexual health in males. Among different lifestyle changes, influencing sexual health, regular physical activity is fundamental to antagonize the onset of erectile dysfunction (ED). However, competitive sport can lead both reproductive and/or sexual tract damages and dysfunctions, transient (genital pain, hypoesthesia of the genitalia, hypogonadism, DE, altered sexual drive, etc.) or permanent (hypogonadism, DE, etc.), by acting directly (traumas of the external genitalia, saddle-related disorders in cyclists, etc.) or indirectly (exercise-related hypogonadism, drug abuse, doping, stress, etc.). Sexual activities shortly performed before a sport competition could differently influence sport performance. Due to the few existing data, it is advisable to avoid an absolute pre-competition sexual abstinence.

  9. Conjugated linoleic acid mitigates testosterone-related changes in body composition in male guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Susan Q; DeGuire, Jason R; Lavery, Paula; Mak, Ivy L; Weiler, Hope A; Santosa, Sylvia

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesize that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) may be effective in preventing the changes in total and regional body composition and increases in interleukin (IL) 6 that occur as a result of hypogonadism. Male guinea pigs (n = 40, 70- to 72-week retired breeders) were block randomized by weight into 4 groups: (1) sham surgery (SHAM)/control (CTRL) diet, (2) SHAM/conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) diet (1%), (3) orchidectomy (ORX)/CTRL diet, and (4) ORX/CLA diet. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed at baseline and week 16 to assess body composition. Serum IL-6 was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. Fatty acids (FAs) from visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue were analyzed using gas chromatography. In ORX/CTRL guinea pigs, percent total body fat increased by 6.1%, and percent lean mass decreased by 6.7% over the 16-week treatment period, whereas no changes were observed for either parameter in ORX/CLA guinea pigs. Guinea pigs fed the CLA diet gained less percent total, upper, and lower body fat than those fed the CTRL diet regardless of surgical treatment. Regional adipose tissue FA composition was reflective of dietary FAs. Serum IL-6 concentrations were not different among groups. In this study, we observed that, in male guinea pigs, hypogonadism resulted in increased fat mass and decreased lean mass. In addition, CLA was effective in reducing gains in body fat and maintaining lean mass in both hypogonadal and intact guinea pigs.

  10. Therapeutic uses of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs.

    PubMed

    Andreyko, J L; Marshall, L A; Dumesic, D A; Jaffe, R B

    1987-01-01

    Since the discovery and synthesis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in 1971, numerous long-acting agonistic and antagonistic analogs have been synthesized. Agonistic analogs were found to desensitize pituitary GnRH receptors with chronic use, resulting in decreased gonadotropin secretion and a hypogonadal state. These analogs are being investigated as potential contraceptives and in the treatment of several conditions in which decreased gonadal steroid production is desired. Substantial progress has been made in these areas. The purpose of this review is to provide the clinician with data regarding the potential clinical utility of this class of peptides.

  11. [Endocrino-gynecologic problems of the female adolescent].

    PubMed

    Sirpresi, S; Antoniazzi, F; Costantini, E; Zamboni, G; Tatò, L

    1996-01-01

    Adolescence is usually defined as the period of rapid physical and psychological growth and development occurring during the second decade of life. After the introduction about the physiology of puberty and menstrual cycle, the major problems in female adolescents are discussed: delayed puberty, hypo and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, causes of primary and secondary amenorrhea, menstrual irregularity, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, dysmenorrhea, breast disorders, hirsutism, acne. Finally, adolescent pregnancy prevention and contraception are discussed. The Authors want to stress the importance of the endocrinological and gynaecological disorders in female adolescents and their impact on the psychological and emotional development at this very delicate age.

  12. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: A rare genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sánchez, Sheila; Álvarez-Satta, María; Valverde, Diana

    2013-06-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare multisystem genetic disease, with high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Rod-cone dystrophy, obesity, polydactyly, hypogonadism, cognitive impairment and renal abnormalities have been established as primary features. There are 17 BBS genes (BBS1-BBS17) described to date, which explain 70-80% of the patients clinically diagnosed, therefore more BBS genes remain to be identified. BBS belongs to a group of diseases known as ciliopathies. In general, ciliopathies and BBS in particular share a partial overlapping phenotype that makes them complicated to diagnose. We present an up-to-date review including clinical, epidemiologic and genetic aspects of the syndrome.

  13. A case of the rare variant of Klinefelter syndrome 47,XY,i(X)(q10).

    PubMed

    Song, Seung-Hun; Won, Hyung Jae; Yoon, Tae Ki; Cha, Dong Hyun; Shim, Jeong Yun; Shim, Sung Han

    2013-12-01

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common genetic form of male hypogonadism, but the phenotype becomes evident only after puberty. It is characterized by infertility, small testes, sparse body and facial hair, increased body weight, gynecomastia, increased LH and FSH, and a low level of testosterone. Early recognition and treatment of Klinefelter syndrome can significantly improve the patient's quality of life and prevent serious consequences. Here, we report an infertile man with a rare variant of Klinefelter syndrome with a 47, XY, i(X)(q10) karyotype.

  14. Klinefelter syndrome with low gonadotropin levels.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Kripa Elizabeth; Jebasingh, Felix K; Kapoor, Nitin; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2015-12-29

    Klinefelter syndrome is usually characterised by the presence of a eunuchoid body habitus and testes that are usually small and firm, with low testosterone, and elevated luteinising hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels, consistent with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Low levels of gonadotropins in karyotypically proven cases are not expected, they are extremely rare occurrences. We report a case of a patient who was diagnosed to have Klinefelter syndrome (47 XXY) with low gonadotropin levels. The rest of his anterior pituitary hormonal profile was normal with no lesions in the pituitary gland on imaging. He was continued on androgen replacement therapy.

  15. Is there a need for recombinant human luteinizing hormone (lutropin alfa) supplementation in ovarian stimulation for assisted reproduction?

    PubMed

    Nawroth, Frank; Ludwig, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Luteinizing hormone is now available as the recombinant product, lutropin alfa for the treatment of female infertility. It is necessary in the natural process of follicular growth and maturation. It is not yet clear which patients really benefit from the addition of this medication to conventional gonadotropin stimulation procedures in infertility treatment. Certainly, it has a proven benefit in patients suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (WHO I). Others may be older patients, patients with a profound gonadotropin suppression stimulated in long gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist protocols, or patients with poor ovarian response to conventional stimulation strategies. The available data are reviewed herein.

  16. Genome-first approach diagnosed Cabezas syndrome via novel CUL4B mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Miki; Naruto, Takuya; Matsuda, Keiko; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Saito, Masako; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Cabezas syndrome is a syndromic form of X-linked intellectual disability primarily characterized by a short stature, hypogonadism and abnormal gait, with other variable features resulting from mutations in the CUL4B gene. Here, we report a clinically undiagnosed 5-year-old male with severe intellectual disability. A genome-first approach using targeted exome sequencing identified a novel nonsense mutation [NM_003588.3:c.2698G>T, p.(Glu900*)] in the last coding exon of CUL4B, thus diagnosing this patient with Cabezas syndrome.

  17. Genome-first approach diagnosed Cabezas syndrome via novel CUL4B mutation detection

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Miki; Naruto, Takuya; Matsuda, Keiko; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Saito, Masako; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Cabezas syndrome is a syndromic form of X-linked intellectual disability primarily characterized by a short stature, hypogonadism and abnormal gait, with other variable features resulting from mutations in the CUL4B gene. Here, we report a clinically undiagnosed 5-year-old male with severe intellectual disability. A genome-first approach using targeted exome sequencing identified a novel nonsense mutation [NM_003588.3:c.2698G>T, p.(Glu900*)] in the last coding exon of CUL4B, thus diagnosing this patient with Cabezas syndrome. PMID:28144446

  18. Acquired central hypothyroidism in a male thalassaemic patient with severe iron overload.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Giovannini, Michela

    2011-03-01

    Acquired central hypothyroidism (CH) is a rare form of hypothyroidism that results from a variety of conditions affecting the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. This pathology remains difficult to diagnose in patients with chronic disease. The Authors describe a 21-year-old patient with thalassaemia (TM) who was referred for the evaluation of short stature and hypogonadism, and was found to have CH.This case report stresses the importance of following thyroid function in TM patients and underlines the criteria for diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Multihormonal hypopituitarism, hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism in a 17-years-old girl with Diamond-Blackfan anemia and secondary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Głąb, Ewa; Barg, Ewa; Wikiera, Beata; Bieniasz, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    Congenital hypoplastic anemia (Diamond-Blakcfan syndrom) is a genetically determined disorder which is manifested in early childhood with selective deficiency of erythrocyte line in bone marrow. Severe anemia usually appears in the first six months of life. Survival depends on blood transfusions, which in consequence lead to hemochromatosis. The most common complications of transfusional hemochromatosis are hepatic cirrhosis, hypopituitarism, hypogonadism, diabetes mellitus, other endocrinopathies, and cardiomyopathy. We present the case of 17 years old girl with congenital hypoplastic anemia and multihormonal insufficiency due to secondary hemochromatosis.

  20. LHB — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The pituitary glycoprotein hormone family includes follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), chorionic gonadotropin (CG), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). All of these glycoproteins consist of an identical alpha subunit and a hormone-specific beta subunit. LHB, the beta subunit of luteinizing hormone, confers biological specificity. LH is expressed in the pituitary gland and promotes spermatogenesis and ovulation by stimulating the testes and ovaries to synthesize steroids. The genes for the beta chains of chorionic gonadotropin and for luteinizing hormone are contiguous on chromosome 19q13.3. Mutations in this gene are associated with hypogonadism which is characterized by infertility and pseudohermaphroditism.

  1. Stress fracture of the acetabulum in a ballet dancer. A case report.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, Emmanuel; Simon, Jean-Pierre

    2005-12-01

    The authors report the case of a 26-year old professional ballet dancer with chronic dysmenorrhea and a Body Mass Index of 17, who presented with right hip pain related with a stress fracture of the acetabulum. Plain radiographs were unremarkable and the diagnosis was made with magnetic resonance imaging. Conservative treatment including partial weight bearing with crutches for six weeks resulted in immediate resolution of symptoms. The authors discuss the specific risk factors for stress fractures encountered in professional ballet dancers, such as hypogonadism and eating disorders.

  2. Long-term Morbidity of Testicular Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fung, Chunkit; Fossa, Sophie D; Williams, Annalynn; Travis, Lois B

    2015-08-01

    Second malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity and ototoxicity, pulmonary complications, hypogonadism, and nephrotoxicity are potentially life-threatening long-term complications of testicular cancer and its therapy. This article describes the pathogenesis, risks, and management of these late effects experienced by long-term testicular cancer survivors, who are defined as individuals who are disease free 5 years or more after primary treatment. Testicular cancer survivors should follow applicable national guidelines for cancer screening and management of cardiovascular disease risk factors. In addition, health care providers should capitalize on the time of cancer diagnosis as a teachable moment to introduce and promote lifestyle changes.

  3. Intratubular Germ Cell Neoplasia of the Testis, Bilateral Testicular Cancer, and Aberrant Histologies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pranav; Dhillon, Jasreman; Sexton, Wade J

    2015-08-01

    Intratubular germ cell neoplasia (ITGCN) is a precursor lesion for testicular germ cell tumors, most of which are early stage. ITGCN is also associated with testicular cancer or ITGCN in the contralateral testis, leading to a risk of bilateral testicular malignancy. Testicular biopsy detects most cases, and orchiectomy is the treatment of choice in patients with unilateral ITGCN. Low-dose radiation therapy is recommended in patients with bilateral ITGCN or ITGCN in the solitary testis, but the long-term risks of infertility and hypogonadism need to be discussed with the patient. Rare histologies of primary testicular cancer are also discussed.

  4. [Bone and Men's Health. Androgen replacement therapy and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Sumito

    2010-02-01

    During aging process in men, decline of androgen level is involved in symptoms of hypogonadism, and recent findings suggest that sex hormones are crucial for skeletal development and maintenance of bone mineral properties. In practice, androgen replacement therapy has not been established for bone-related symptoms in late onset hypogonadisim or male osteoporosis. Whereas recent evidences suggest that bone mineral properties are improved by androgen replacement therapy in aging male, further studies including large clinical trials are necessary to assess long-term benefits and risks by the therapy.

  5. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parakh, Rajendrakumar; Nairy, Dhananjaya Matapadi

    2016-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is one of the rare autosomal recessive disorders that affect multiple organs of the body. The signs and symptoms of this condition vary among affected individuals, even among members of the same family. We present a case of BBS with features of hypogonadism and features such as marked central obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, polydactyly, renal abnormalities and mental retardation, along with a brief review of the literature. The patient had end stage renal disease and managed with dialysis. This case also exemplifies the need for multidisciplinary approach in the management of such cases. PMID:27853335

  6. Azoospermia: clinical, hormonal, and biochemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Papadimas, J; Papadopoulou, F; Ioannidis, S; Spanos, E; Tarlatzis, B; Bontis, J; Mantalenakis, S

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, hormonal and biochemical characteristics of infertile men with azoospermia. A total of 187 azoospermic out of 2610 infertile men (7.2%) were studied. Mean testicular volume and basal plasma levels of FSH were the most useful parameters concerning the evaluation of azoospermia. Basal plasma levels of LH and T were useful only in azoospermic men with hypogonadism, whereas plasma PRL levels, semen volume, and seminal plasma fructose levels were not found to be of common use except in selected cases.

  7. A novel C-terminal truncating NR5A1 mutation in dizygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Atsushi; Zukeran, Hiroaki; Igarashi, Maki; Toguchi, Suzuka; Toubaru, Yuji; Inoue, Takanobu; Katoh-Fukui, Yuko; Fukami, Maki

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 1 (NR5A1) is a nuclear receptor involved in gonadal and adrenal development. We identified a novel C-terminally truncating NR5A1 mutation, p.Leu423Trpfs*7, in dizygotic twins with 46,XY disorders of sex development. Our results highlight the functional importance of C-terminal region of NR5A1 and indicate that NR5A1 mutations can be associated with intrafamilial phenotypic variations, progressive testicular dysfunction, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and borderline adrenal dysfunction.

  8. Pigmentary retinopathy due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Luis Jesuino de Oliveira; Andrade, Rafael; França, Caroline Santos; Bittencourt, Alcina Vinhaes

    2009-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. This syndrome was first described by Laurence and Moon in 1866 and additional cases were described by Bardet and Biedl between 1920 and 1922. The main features are obesity, polydactyly, pigmentary retinopathy, learning disabilities, various degrees of intellectual impairment, hypogonadism, and renal abnormalities. Bardet-Biedl syndrome is both phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of 4 of the 5 cardinal features. The authors present a typical case of pigmentary retinopathy due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome and made a brief commentary about the disease's cardinal manifestations.

  9. The long-term efficacy and safety of a testosterone mucoadhesive buccal tablet in testosterone-deficient men.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, Wallace W; Wyllie, Michael G

    2012-07-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Striant® SR is the only available buccal delivery system for testosterone replacement therapy. Previous pharmacokinetic studies have shown that Striant SR effectively produces physiological serum testosterone levels in hypogonadal men. Efficacy and safety data from previously unpublished studies over 2 years of continuous use indicate that Striant SR is effective long term in maintaining serum testosterone within a physiological range, is well tolerated and has a high level of patient acceptance. Striant® sustained-release (SR) is a mucoadhesive buccal tablet (30 mg testosterone, The Urology Company) that adheres to the gum surface in the mouth providing controlled- and sustained-release of testosterone over a 12-h dosing period, offering a unique and rational method of testosterone delivery. Striant SR is indicated for testosterone-replacement therapy (TRT) for male hypogonadism when testosterone deficiency has been confirmed by clinical features and biochemical tests. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that testosterone is released from Striant SR in a manner similar to the normal daily rhythm of endogenous testosterone secretion, with serum levels rising rapidly after insertion and peak levels reached by the second 12-hourly dose with no accumulation over time. In clinical trials involving hypogonadal men receiving Striant SR for up to 2 years, mean serum testosterone levels have always remained within the normal range. Striant SR is well tolerated, with gum-related disorders (such as irritation, inflammation and gingivitis) and taste perversion being the most commonly reported adverse events, reported by 5.6-16.3% and 3.0-4.1% of patients, respectively. Once patients have become accustomed to it, Striant SR has a high level of patient acceptance. In a long-term study, 90% of patients rated the twice-daily dosing as acceptable, just under half preferred it to other forms of TRT that they have used and

  10. A reappraisal of the CHARGE association.

    PubMed Central

    Oley, C A; Baraitser, M; Grant, D B

    1988-01-01

    We describe 14 boys and six girls, including monozygotic twins, with the CHARGE association. All of the children had at least four of the seven major features included in the mnemonic CHARGE and all had ear anomalies or deafness or both and either coloboma or choanal atresia or both. All the boys had evidence of hypogonadism. A characteristic facial appearance (unusually shaped ears, unilateral facial palsy, square face, malar flattening, pinched nostrils) was observed in many of our cases. The aetiology remains unknown. All our cases are sporadic. Images PMID:3351900

  11. Association of Wolfram syndrome with Fallot tetralogy in a girl.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Hüseyin A; Demir, Korcan; Hazan, Filiz; Yıldız, Melek; Elmas, Özlem N; Özkan, Behzat

    2016-06-01

    Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD: diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder. Mutations of the WFS1 (wolframin) on chromosome 4 are responsible for the clinical manifestations in majority of patients with Wolfram syndrome. Wolfram syndrome is also accompanied by neurologic and psychiatric disorders, urodynamic abnormalities, restricted joint motility, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy, hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism in males and diabetic microvascular disorders. There are very limited data in the literature regarding cardiac malformations associated in children with Wolfram syndrome. A 5-year-old girl with Wolfram syndrome and tetralogy of Fallot is presented herein.

  12. A novel C-terminal truncating NR5A1 mutation in dizygotic twins

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Atsushi; Zukeran, Hiroaki; Igarashi, Maki; Toguchi, Suzuka; Toubaru, Yuji; Inoue, Takanobu; Katoh-Fukui, Yuko; Fukami, Maki

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 1 (NR5A1) is a nuclear receptor involved in gonadal and adrenal development. We identified a novel C-terminally truncating NR5A1 mutation, p.Leu423Trpfs*7, in dizygotic twins with 46,XY disorders of sex development. Our results highlight the functional importance of C-terminal region of NR5A1 and indicate that NR5A1 mutations can be associated with intrafamilial phenotypic variations, progressive testicular dysfunction, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and borderline adrenal dysfunction. PMID:28326187

  13. The endocrine pharmacology of testosterone therapy in men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oettel, Michael

    The review starts off by outlining the history of the discovery of the male sex hormone testosterone and the historical background to the various, often dubious, approaches to the treatment of age-related endocrine disorders in older men. A discussion of congenital androgen deficiency in young men is followed by methods of diagnosing hypogonadism in older men. Among therapeutic options, the alternatives to direct testosterone replacement are discussed, although none of them have proved to be particularly successful in clinical practice. For testosterone replacement itself, various routes of administration and pharmaceutical formulations are now available, facilitating good monitoring and individualized therapy.

  14. Male sexual dysfunction in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher CK; Singam, Praveen; Hong, Goh Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2011-01-01

    Sex has always been a taboo subject in Asian society. However, over the past few years, awareness in the field of men's sexual health has improved, and interest in sexual health research has recently increased. The epidemiology and prevalence of erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism and premature ejaculation in Asia are similar in the West. However, several issues are specific to Asian males, including culture and beliefs, awareness, compliance and the availability of traditional/complementary medicine. In Asia, sexual medicine is still in its infancy, and a concerted effort from the government, relevant societies, physicians and the media is required to propel sexual medicine to the forefront of health care. PMID:21643001

  15. Evaluation of the patient with erectile dysfunction: history, questionnaires, and physical examination.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Raymond C

    2004-01-01

    Historically the province of urologists and sex therapists, erectile dysfunction (ED) is now managed predominantly by primary care practitioners. In recognition of this trend, simplified assessment and treatment models have been proposed. These new treatment models strongly emphasize the need for sexual inquiry in all middle-age and older men but deemphasize the value of intensive medical or psychologic assessment in most cases. New management guidelines emphasize the need for a brief sexual and medical history, physical examination, and standard laboratory tests to rule out diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypogonadism.

  16. [Delayed puberty].

    PubMed

    Edouard, T; Tauber, M

    2010-02-01

    Delayed puberty is defined in girls by the absence of breast development beyond 13 years old and in boys by the absence of testicular enlargement (< 4 ml) beyond 14 years old. Simple investigations lead to the diagnosis of central or peripheral hypogonadism and constitutional delay of puberty. In girls, delayed puberty is rare and often organic, and then Turner syndrome should be systematically suspected. In boys, delayed puberty is often constitutional and functional. Treatment is etiologic when possible, hormonal replacement therapy (oestrogen in girls and testosterone in boys) and psychological management.

  17. Endocrine complications during and after adolescence in a patient with cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Moon Bae; Kim, Sung Eun; Cho, Won Kyoung; Suh, Byung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Cystinosis is a rare disease characterized by abnormal lysosomal cystine accumulation of cystine due to impaired lysosomal transport. We previously reported the first case of cystinosis in Korea in a 12-year-old boy with short stature, general weakness, and photophobia. The diagnosis was confirmed based on ophthalmic findings and biochemical analyses (serum leukocyte cystine measurement). Major endocrine manifestations at diagnosis included hypothyroidism, growth retardation, and hypogonadism. Despite oral cysteamine administration and renal replacement therapy, multiple complications including both endocrine and nonendocrine disorders developed during and after adolescence. In this report, we review the presenting features and factors related to the long-term complications in a patient with cystinosis. PMID:27777912

  18. Clinical case of acute myeloblastic leukemia with t(8;21)(q22;q22) in a patient with Klinefelter's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Slavcheva, Vanya; Lukanov, Tzvetan; Balatsenko, Gueorgui; Angelova, Svetlana; Antonov, Antonio; Bogdanov, Lachezar; Tsvetkov, Nikolay

    2010-01-01

    Klinefelter's syndrome is characterized by abnormal karyotype 47, XXY and a phenotype associated with hypogonadism and gynecomastia. Often the disease can be diagnosed accidentally, when carrying out cytogenetic analysis in cases of a malignant blood disease. We present the clinical case of a patient diagnosed with acute myelomonoblastic leukemia-M4 Eo (AML- M4), where by means of classic cytogenetics a karyotype was found corresponding to Klinefelter's syndrome. Three induction courses of polychemotherapy wermade, which led to remission of the disease, documented both flowcytometrically and cytogenetically. PMID:22184514

  19. Enhanced Androgen Signaling with Androgen Receptor Overexpression in the Osteoblast Lineage Controls Skeletal Turnover, Matrix Quality and Bone Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Kristine M. - 4 - Introduction Androgen deficiency (as a result of aging, hypogonadism, glucocorticoid therapy, or alcoholism), and other...way ANOVA revealed significant differences in BMD (p < 0.01), BMC (p < 0.001), and bone area (p < 0.05) following ORX. Tukey’s multiple comparison...reduced BMC and bone area (p < 0.001) following OVX. Tukey’s multiple comparison test ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001, vs. Sham controls (n = 12-15

  20. Luteal Phase Dynamics of Follicle Stimulating and Luteinizing Hormones in Obese and Normal Weight Women

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Lauren W.; Allshouse, Amanda A.; Bradshaw-Pierce, Erica L.; Lesh, Jennifer; Chosich, Justin; Kohrt, Wendy; Bradford, Andrew P.; Polotsky, Alex J.; Santoro, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Female obesity is a state of relative hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The aim of this study is to examine gonadotrophin secretion and response to GnRH in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and to investigate the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of endogenous and exogenous LH in obese women. Design Participants underwent a luteal phase frequent blood sampling study. Endogenous LH pulsatility was observed, gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) was given in 2 weight based doses, and GnRH antagonist was administered followed by recombinant LH. Patients Regularly menstruating obese (n=10) and normal weight (n=10) women Measurements Endogenous hypothalamic-pituitary function (as measured by LH pulsatility), pituitary sensitivity (GnRH induced LH secretion), pharmacodynamics of endogenous LH, and pharmacokinetics of exogenous LH were compared between the obese and normal weight groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences in endogenous LH pulsatility or pituitary responses to two weight-based doses of GnRH between the obese and normal weight women. There were no differences in the pharmacodynamics of endogenous LH or the pharmacokinetics of exogenous LH between the groups. FSH dynamics did not differ between the groups throughout the study. Conclusions The relative hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism of obesity cannot be explained by differences in LH and FSH luteal phase dynamics or differences in endogenous LH pharmacodynamics or exogenous LH pharmacokinetics. Clinical trial registration number NCT01457703, www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:24576183

  1. Recovery of spermatogenesis following testosterone replacement therapy or anabolic-androgenic steroid use

    PubMed Central

    McBride, J Abram; Coward, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    The use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) for hypogonadism continues to rise, particularly in younger men who may wish to remain fertile. Concurrently, awareness of a more pervasive use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) within the general population has been appreciated. Both TRT and AAS can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis resulting in diminution of spermatogenesis. Therefore, it is important that clinicians recognize previous TRT or AAS use in patients presenting for infertility treatment. Cessation of TRT or AAS use may result in spontaneous recovery of normal spermatogenesis in a reasonable number of patients if allowed sufficient time for recovery. However, some patients may not recover normal spermatogenesis or tolerate waiting for spontaneous recovery. In such cases, clinicians must be aware of the pathophysiologic derangements of the HPG axis related to TRT or AAS use and the pharmacologic agents available to reverse them. The available agents include injectable gonadotropins, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and aromatase inhibitors, but their off-label use is poorly described in the literature, potentially creating a knowledge gap for the clinician. Reviewing their use clinically for the treatment of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and other HPG axis abnormalities can familiarize the clinician with the manner in which they can be used to recover spermatogenesis after TRT or AAS use. PMID:26908067

  2. Testosterone therapy and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Rodriguez, Katherine M.; Nguyen, Taylor M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of exogenous testosterone to treat hypogonadism in the men with a history of prostate cancer (CaP) remains controversial due to fears of cancer recurrence or progression. Due to the detrimental impact of hypogonadism on patient quality of life, recent work has examined the safety of testosterone therapy (TTh) in men with a history of CaP. In this review, we evaluate the literature with regards to the safety of TTh in men with a history of CaP. TTh results in improvements in quality of life with little evidence of biochemical recurrence or progression in men with a history of CaP, or de novo cancer in unaffected men. An insufficient amount of evidence is currently available to truly demonstrate the safe use of TTh in men with low risk CaP. In men with high-risk cancer, more limited data suggest that TTh may be safe, but these findings remain inconclusive. Despite the historic avoidance of TTh in men with a history of CaP, the existing body of evidence largely supports the safe and effective use of testosterone in these men, although additional study is needed before unequivocal safety can be demonstrated. PMID:28078223

  3. Recombinant follitropin alfa/lutropin alfa in fertility treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gibreel, Ahmed; Bhattacharya, Siladitya

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), also known as follitropin alpha and lutropin alpha, are manufactured by genetic engineering techniques which ensure high quality and batch to batch consistency. Follitropin alpha can be used for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in assisted reproduction, ovulation induction for WHO group I and II anovulatory infertility and in men with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HH) or idiopathic oligo-asthenospermia. Current evidence suggests superiority of urinary human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG) over follitropin alpha in controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for IVF in terms of live birth rate per couple. Addition of lutropin to follitropin alpha in an unselected IVF population does not appear to confer any benefit; however, it may have a role in ovulation induction in women with hypothalamic hypogonadism. Urinary HMG preparations (especially currently available highly purified preparations) are more cost effective than rFSH in terms of cost per ongoing pregnancy. However, women using rFSH injection pen devices have higher levels of satisfaction as compared to those using urinary HMG by means of conventional syringes. PMID:20161981

  4. Testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency: Are we beyond the point of no return?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency was introduced in the early 1940s, utilization of this effective treatment approach in hypogonadal men is met with considerable skepticism and resistance. Indeed, for decades, the fear that testosterone may cause prostate cancer has hampered clinical progress in this field. Nevertheless, even after considerable knowledge was acquired that this fear is unsubstantiated, many in the medical community remain hesitant to utilize this therapeutic approach to treat men with hypogonadism. As the fears concerning prostate cancer have subsided, a new controversy regarding use of testosterone therapy and increase in cardiovascular disease was introduced. Although the new controversy was based on one ill-fated clinical trial, one meta-analysis with studies that utilized unapproved formulation in men with liver cirrhosis, and two retrospective studies with suspect or nonvalidated statistical methodologies and database contaminations, the flames of such controversy were fanned by the lay press and academics alike. In this review we discuss the adverse effect of testosterone deficiency and highlight the numerous proven benefits of testosterone therapy on men's health and debunk the myth that testosterone therapy increases cardiovascular risk. Ultimately, we believe that there is considerable scientific and clinical evidence to suggest that testosterone therapy is safe and effective with restoration of physiological levels in men with testosterone deficiency, irrespective of its etiology. PMID:27847912

  5. Normalisation of total body iron load with very intensive combined chelation reverses cardiac and endocrine complications of thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Farmaki, Kallistheni; Tzoumari, Ioanna; Pappa, Christina; Chouliaras, Giorgos; Berdoukas, Vasilios

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac and endocrine disorders are common sequelae of iron overload in transfused thalassaemia patients. Combined chelation with desferrioxamine (DFO) and deferiprone (DFP) is well tolerated and produces an additive/synergistic effect superior to either drug alone. 52 thalassaemia major patients were transitioned from DFO to combined chelation with DFO and DFP. Serum ferritin, cardiac and hepatic iron levels were monitored regularly for up to 7 years, as were cardiac and endocrine function. Patients' iron load normalized, as judged by ferritin and cardiac and hepatic magnetic resonance imaging findings. In all 12 patients receiving treatment for cardiac dysfunction, symptoms reversed following combined chelation, enabling nine patients to discontinue heart medications. In the 39 patients with abnormal glucose metabolism, 44% normalized. In 18 requiring thyroxine supplementation for hypothyroidism, 10 were able to discontinue, and four reduced their thyroxine dose. In 14 hypogonadal males on testosterone therapy, seven stopped treatment. Of the 19 females, who were hypogonadal on DFO monotherapy, six were able to conceive. Moreover, no patients developed de novo cardiac or endocrine complications. These results suggest that intensive combined chelation normalized patients' iron load and thereby prevented and reversed cardiac and multiple endocrine complications associated with transfusion iron overload.

  6. [Bone involvement in endocrinopathies].

    PubMed

    Ribot, C; Trémollières, F; Pouillès, J M

    1994-06-04

    Progress in bone densitometry, particularly biphotonic absoptiometry, has made it possible to better identify the effects of endocrinopathies on bone. Both cortical and trabecular bone structures can be evaluated quantitatively and topographically revealing important information on the pathophysiology of bone loss. Sex hormones play a major role in the regulation of bone mineralization and hypogonadism, whatever the origin, can lead to deleterious effects. Bone loss is known to be significative in high performance female athletes with amenorrhoea; long-term consequences are not yet determined, but stress fractures have been reported in up to 50%. Other hypogonadisms leading to bone demineralization include anorexia nervosa, chronic intake of gonadotrophin releasing hormone analogues and anti-oestrogens, and hyperprolactinism. Hyperthyroidism leads to a negative calcium balance and demineralization with remodelling, predominantly in cortical bone. In hypothyroid states a 10% bone loss is observed in vertebrae. In both cases, bone densitometry should be performed in order to evaluate the effect of treatment. The deleterious effect of spontaneous or iatrogenic hypercortisism is well known, leading to spontaneous wedge fractures of the vertebrae due to predominating trabecular bone loss. The mechanism of action of corticosteroids on bone metabolism is complex, but the major effect is an inhibition of osteoblast maturation. Recovery may be possible, but no large long-term series have yet been reported. Hyperparathyroidism and acromegaly also affect bone mineralization. The information provided by bone densitometry is essential to properly manage patients with endocrinopathies affecting bone mineralization.

  7. Influence of Androgen Receptor Gene CAG and GGC Polymorphisms on Male Sexual Function: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Falzetti, Sara; delli Muti, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Background. No study has assessed the possible involvement of GGC androgen receptor (AR) polymorphism in sexual function. Our aim is to evaluate the association between CAG and GGC AR polymorphisms in this function. Methods. We retrospectively examined eighty-five outpatients. Clinical, biochemical, and genetic parameters were considered. Sexual assessment was performed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) which evaluates erectile function (EF), orgasmic function (OF), sexual desire (SD), intercourse satisfaction (IS), and overall satisfaction (OS). Results. In the whole sample, CAG repeats were inversely correlated with EF, OF, and total IIEF-15 score, whereas GGC tracts did not show any significant correlation with sexual function. CAG relationship with IIEF items retained significance only in the eugonadal but not in the hypogonadal cohort. On the other hand, GGC tracts were not found to be significantly correlated with IIEF variables in either eugonadal or hypogonadal subjects. In eugonadal subjects, logistic regression pointed out that a higher number of CAG triplets were associated with lower values of EF, OF, SD, OS, and total IIEF independently from other confounders. Conclusions. GGC polymorphism seems not to exert any influence on sexual function, whereas CAG polymorphism appears to affect sexual parameters only in eugonadal subjects. PMID:28243253

  8. Adolescent gynecomastia is associated with a high incidence of obesity, dysglycemia, and family background of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Arpita, Arora; Rajesh, Patnaik T.; Sameek, Bhattacharya; Dutta, Deep; Neera, Sharma; Mohd, Mohsin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Gynecomastia during adolescence is common though etiology is not clear. We studied the clinical and hormonal profile of adolescent patients with gynecomastia. Methodology: Patients who had onset of breast development between age 10 and 20 years were included in this study. Their clinical profile, biochemical, and hormonal parameters were studied. Results: Of 94 patients with gynecomastia, 4 had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, 4 had hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and 1 had fibroadenosis, but in majority (90.4%), no apparent cause for breast enlargement was evident. In the idiopathic group, majority were obese (63%). Fourteen (16%) patients had impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance. Another twenty patients had subtle abnormalities (high 1 h glucose or glucose peak at 2 h). Twenty-nine percent of lean and 38% of obese patients had mild abnormalities in glucose profile. Sixty percent of patients had family background of diabetes. Obese patients had lower testosterone as compared to lean patients; however, estradiol, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone levels were similar in the two groups. Conclusion: Gynecomastia during adolescence is associated with obesity, dysglycemia, and family background of diabetes mellitus. PMID:28217517

  9. An Infant Born to a Mother with Gestational Diabetes Presenting with 49,XXXXY Syndrome and Renal Agenesis-A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sumathipala, Dulika; Gamage, Thilini; Wijesiriwardena, Bandula; Jayasekara, Rohan W.; Dissanayake, Vajira H.W.

    2012-01-01

    49,XXXXY is a rare sex chromosome polysomy with an incidence of 1 in 85 000 male births. It has a characteristic triad of mental retardation, skeletal malformation and hypogonadism. This is the first case report of a child with 49,XXXXY syndrome and renal agenesis. This child was referred for genetic testing at 14 years of age due to facial dysmorphism and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. He had coarse facial features, cryptorchidism of the right testis, genu valgus deformities, and patent ductus arteriosus which are known associations of 49,XXXXY syndrome. He also had agenesis of the right kidney, hydronephrosis of the left kidney with hydroureter which is not a known association of 49,XXXXY syndrome. The patient was the offspring of a mother with gestational diabetes. There is a strong correlation between maternal diabetes and congenital anomalies, especially renal and cardiovascular anomalies. Additionally, it has been noted that gestational diabetes increases the incidence of chromosomal aneuploidies. The teratogenic effects of maternal diabetes during embryogenesis may be the causative factor for the final phenotype of 49,XXXXY syndrome and renal agenesis. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23032147

  10. Delivering enhanced testosterone replacement therapy through nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Ferrati, Silvia; Nicolov, Eugenia; Bansal, Shyam; Zabre, Erika; Geninatti, Thomas; Ziemys, Arturas; Hudson, Lee; Ferrari, Mauro; Goodall, Randal; Khera, Mohit; Palapattu, Ganesh; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-02-18

    Primary or secondary hypogonadism results in a range of signs and symptoms that compromise quality of life and requires life-long testosterone replacement therapy. In this study, an implantable nanochannel system is investigated as an alternative delivery strategy for the long-term sustained and constant release of testosterone. In vitro release tests are performed using a dissolution set up, with testosterone and testosterone:2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (TES:HPCD) 1:1 and 1:2 molar ratio complexes release from the implantable nanochannel system and quantify by HPLC. 1:2 TES:HPCD complex stably achieve 10-15 times higher testosterone solubility with 25-30 times higher in vitro release. Bioactivity of delivered testosterone is verified by LNCaP/LUC cell luminescence. In vivo evaluation of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and multiplex assay is performed in castrated Sprague-Dawley rats over 30 d. Animals are treated with the nanochannel implants or degradable testosterone pellets. The 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implant exhibits sustained and clinically relevant in vivo release kinetics and attains physiologically stable plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by providing long-term steady release 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implants may represent a major breakthrough for the treatment of male hypogonadism.

  11. Recovery of spermatogenesis following testosterone replacement therapy or anabolic-androgenic steroid use.

    PubMed

    McBride, J Abram; Coward, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    The use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) for hypogonadism continues to rise, particularly in younger men who may wish to remain fertile. Concurrently, awareness of a more pervasive use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) within the general population has been appreciated. Both TRT and AAS can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis resulting in diminution of spermatogenesis. Therefore, it is important that clinicians recognize previous TRT or AAS use in patients presenting for infertility treatment. Cessation of TRT or AAS use may result in spontaneous recovery of normal spermatogenesis in a reasonable number of patients if allowed sufficient time for recovery. However, some patients may not recover normal spermatogenesis or tolerate waiting for spontaneous recovery. In such cases, clinicians must be aware of the pathophysiologic derangements of the HPG axis related to TRT or AAS use and the pharmacologic agents available to reverse them. The available agents include injectable gonadotropins, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and aromatase inhibitors, but their off-label use is poorly described in the literature, potentially creating a knowledge gap for the clinician. Reviewing their use clinically for the treatment of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and other HPG axis abnormalities can familiarize the clinician with the manner in which they can be used to recover spermatogenesis after TRT or AAS use.

  12. 47,XXY Klinefelter syndrome: clinical characteristics and age-specific recommendations for medical management.

    PubMed

    Aksglaede, Lise; Link, Katarina; Giwercman, Aleksander; Jørgensen, Niels; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Juul, Anders

    2013-02-15

    47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) is the most frequent sex chromosomal disorder and affects approximately one in 660 newborn boys. The syndrome is characterized by varying degrees of cognitive, social, behavioral, and learning difficulties and in adulthood additionally primary testicular failure with small testes, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, tall stature, and eunuchoid body proportions. The phenotype is variable ranging from "near-normal" to a significantly affected individual. In addition, newborns with Klinefelter syndrome generally present with a normal male phenotype and the only consistent clinical finding in KS is small testes, that are most often not identified until after puberty. Decreased awareness of this syndrome among health professionals and a general perception that all patients with 47,XXY exhibit the classic textbook phenotype results in a highly under-diagnosed condition with up to 75% of the patients left undetected. Typically, diagnosis is delayed with the majority of patients identified during fertility workup in adulthood, and only 10% of patients diagnosed prior to puberty. Early detection of this syndrome is recommended in order to offer treatment and intervention at the appropriate ages and stages of development for the purpose of preventing osteopenia/osteoporosis, metabolic syndrome, and other medical conditions related to hypogonadism and to the XXY as well as minimizing potential learning and psychosocial problems. The aim of this review is to present the clinical aspects of XXY and the age-specific recommendations for medical management. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A 47,X,+t(X;X)(p22.3;p22.3)del(X)(p11.23q11.2),Y Klinefelter variant with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsook; Kim, Won Jin; Huh, Ji Hye; Lee, Sujin; Kim, Daham; Hong, Jae Won; Lee, Eun Jig

    2013-03-01

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common type of genetic cause of hypogonadism. This syndrome is characterized by the presence of 1 or more extra X chromosomes. Phenotype manifestations of this syndrome are small testes, fibrosis of the seminiferous tubules, inability to produce sperm, gynecomastia, tall stature, decrease of serum testosterone and increases of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone. Most patients with Klinefelter syndrome are tall, with slender body compositions, and reports of obesity are rare. We report the case of a 35-yr-old man with hypogonadism and morbid obesity and diabetes mellitus. He had gynecomastia, small testes and penis, very sparse body hair and his body mass index was 44.85. He did not report experiencing broken voice and was able to have erections. We conducted a chromosome study. His genotype was 47,X,+t(X;X)(p22.3;p22.3)del(X)(p11.23q11.2). In this case, the patient was diagnosed as Klinefelter syndrome. He showed rare phenotypes like morbid obesity and average height and the phenotype may be caused by the karyotype and the excess number of X chromosome. Further studies of the relationship between chromosomes and phenotype are warranted.

  14. Changes in Testosterone Levels and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Levels in Extremely Obese Men after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Laichuthai, Nitchakarn; Suwannasrisuk, Preaw; Houngngam, Natnicha; Udomsawaengsup, Suthep; Snabboon, Thiti

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Obesity is a risk factor for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in men. Weight loss has been shown to improve hypogonadism in obese men. This study evaluated the early changes in sex hormones profile after bariatric surgery. Methods. This is a prospective study including 29 morbidly obese men. Main outcomes were changes in serum levels of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (cFT), SHBG, estradiol, adiponectin, and leptin at 1 and 6 months after surgery. Results. The mean age of patients was 31 ± 8 years and the mean BMI was 56.8 ± 11.7 kg/m2. Fifteen patients underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 14 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy. At baseline, 22 patients (75.9%) had either low TT levels (<10.4 nmol/L) or low cFT levels (<225 pmol/L). Total testosterone and SHBG levels increased significantly at 1 month after surgery (p ≤ 0.001). At 6 months after surgery, TT and cFT increased significantly (p ≤ 0.001) and 22 patients (75.9%) had normalized TT and cFT levels. There were no changes in estradiol levels at either 1 month or 6 months after surgery. Conclusions. Increases in TT and SHBG levels occurred early at 1 month after bariatric surgery while improvements in cFT levels were observed at 6 months after bariatric surgery. PMID:27725831

  15. Endocrine manifestations and management of Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Emerick, Jill E; Vogt, Karen S

    2013-08-21

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic disorder, caused by lack of expression of genes on the paternally inherited chromosome 15q11.2-q13. In infancy it is characterized by hypotonia with poor suck resulting in failure to thrive. As the child ages, other manifestations such as developmental delay, cognitive disability, and behavior problems become evident. Hypothalamic dysfunction has been implicated in many manifestations of this syndrome including hyperphagia, temperature instability, high pain threshold, sleep disordered breathing, and multiple endocrine abnormalities. These include growth hormone deficiency, central adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, and complications of obesity such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review summarizes the recent literature investigating optimal screening and treatment of endocrine abnormalities associated with PWS, and provides an update on nutrition and food-related behavioral intervention. The standard of care regarding growth hormone therapy and surveillance for potential side effects, the potential for central adrenal insufficiency, evaluation for and treatment of hypogonadism in males and females, and the prevalence and screening recommendations for hypothyroidism and diabetes are covered in detail. PWS is a genetic syndrome in which early diagnosis and careful attention to detail regarding all the potential endocrine and behavioral manifestations can lead to a significant improvement in health and developmental outcomes. Thus, the important role of the provider caring for the child with PWS cannot be overstated.

  16. A late 17α-hydroxylase deficiency diagnosis that leads to the discovery of a new CYP17 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Guenego, Agathe; Morel, Yves; Ionesco, Oana; Mallet, Delphine; Priou-Guesdon, Melanie

    2015-02-01

    17α-Hydroxylase deficiency is a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. It leads to a reduced production of cortisol and sex steroids and thus an increase in adrenocorticotrophic hormone and gonadotrophins levels. High adrenocorticotrophic hormone levels result in an accumulation of 17-deoxysteroids, such as deoxycorticosterone and corticosterone. Deoxycorticosterone and corticosterone have an important mineralocorticoid activity. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman who presented with hypertension and symptomatic hypokalaemia. Primary hyperaldosteronism was suspected and a right adrenal mass was removed. After surgery, the patient was referred to the endocrinology department for persistant hypokalaemia. Actually, she presented some signs of hypogonadism (impuberism, primary amenorrhea, infertility). Cortisol and 17OH-progesterone serum levels were low. Deoxycorticosterone and corticosterone were markedly elevated. The hypothesis of 17α-hydroxylase deficiency was considered and confirmed by genetic exploration. A non-sense mutation c.938G>A (p.Trp313X) in exon 5 of the CYP17 gene was found that had never been reported so far to our knowledge. Moreover, the patient's karyotype found a mosaic Turner syndrome. This case is particularly interesting because of the delay of diagnosis. The 17α-hydroxylase deficiency diagnosis is to be considered when hypertension is associated with hypokalaemia and hypogonadism, even in adult patients.

  17. Laurence Moon Bardet Biedl Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, A B; Niloy, Ahmed Al Muntasir; Shah, Tazin Afrose; Biswas, Sunil Kumar; Imran, A Khan; Murshed, Khaled Mahbub; Ahmed, Mashrafi

    2009-01-01

    A 14 year old Bangladeshi boy presented with obesity, reduced vision, mental retardation, hypogonadism, delayed development and learning difficulty. On examination, he had polydactyly, moon face, bilateral gynaecomastia, small penis and undescended testes. Retinitis pigmentosa was found on fundoscopy. With typical features, he was diagnosed as a case of Laurence-Moon-Bardet-Biedl syndrome. It is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with mutation in 6 loci identified so far. It is commonly found in communities with high inter-family marriage. Clinical features appear early in childhood and diagnosis is usually done by puberty. Prominent features include rod-cone dystrophy leading to blindness, postaxial polydactyly, central obesity, learning disability, hypogonadism in males and renal dysfunction. Relatives with a single affected gene may have obesity, hypertension, diabetes and renal disease. There is increased risk of renal cell carcinoma. There is no definite treatment. Early diagnosis and symptomatic, supportive and rehabilitative measures can reduce the disability. These include dietary modification, oral hypoglycaemic drugs, testosterone supplement etc. Relatives of the patient should be screened for renal abnormality.

  18. Tubulointerstitial nephritis is a dominant feature of hereditary apolipoprotein A-I amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Gregorini, Gina; Izzi, Claudia; Ravani, Pietro; Obici, Laura; Dallera, Nadia; Del Barba, Andrea; Negrinelli, Alessandro; Tardanico, Regina; Nardi, Matilde; Biasi, Luciano; Scalvini, Tiziano; Merlini, Giampaolo; Scolari, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I is the main protein of high-density lipoprotein particles, and is encoded by the APOA1 gene. Several APOA1 mutations have been found, either affecting the lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity, determining familial HDL deficiency, or resulting in amyloid formation with prevalent deposits in the kidney and liver. Evaluation of familial tubulointerstitial nephritis in patients with the Leu75Pro APOA-I amyloidosis mutation resulted in the identification of 253 carriers belonging to 50 families from Brescia, Italy. A total of 219 mutation carriers underwent clinical, laboratory, and instrumental tests. Of these, 62% had renal, hepatic, and testicular disease; 38% were asymptomatic. The disease showed an age-dependent penetrance. Tubulointerstitial nephritis was diagnosed in 49% of the carriers, 13% of whom progressed to kidney failure requiring dialysis. Hepatic involvement with elevation of cholestasis indices was diagnosed in 30% of the carriers, 38% of whom developed portal hypertension. Impaired spermatogenesis and hypogonadism was found in 68% of male carriers. The cholesterol levels were lower than normal in 80% of the mutation carriers. Thus, tubulointerstitial nephritis was highly prevalent in this large series of patients with Leu75Pro apoA-I amyloidosis. Persistent elevation of alkaline phosphatase, reduced HDL cholesterol plasma levels, and hypogonadism in men are key diagnostic features of this form of amyloidosis.

  19. 46 XX karyotype during male fertility evaluation; case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Majzoub, Ahmad; Arafa, Mohamed; Starks, Christopher; Elbardisi, Haitham; Al Said, Sami; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2017-01-01

    Forty-six XX disorder of sex development is an uncommon medical condition observed at times during the evaluation of a man's fertility. The following is a case series and literature review of phenotypically normal men diagnosed with this karyotype. Our goal is to comprehend the patients’ clinical presentation as well as their laboratory results aiming to explore options available for their management. A formal literature review through PubMed and MEDLINE databases was performed using “46 XX man” as a word search. A total of 55 patients, including those conveyed in this article were diagnosed with a 46 XX karyotype during their fertility evaluation. The patients’ mean age ± s.d. was 34 ± 10 years and their mean height ± s.d. was 166 ± 6.5 cm. Overall, they presented with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Sexual dysfunction, reduced hair distribution, and gynecomastia were reported in 20% (4/20), 25.8% (8/31), and 42% (13/31) of the patients, respectively. The SRY gene was detected in 36 (83.7%) and was absent in the remaining seven (16.3%) patients. We found that a multidisciplinary approach to management is preferred in 46 XX patients. Screening for remnants of the mullerian ducts and for malignant transformation in dysgenetic gonads is imperative. Hypogonadism should be addressed, while fertility options are in vitro fertilization with donor sperm or adoption. PMID:27297128

  20. A summary of the controversy surrounding off-label medications in men’s health

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Adam; Bruha, Matthew; Akinola, Oluwaseun

    2016-01-01

    While there are common and accepted practices in men’s health, barriers exist to treatment of these disorders with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medications. In male factor infertility, these barriers include studies that are often underpowered for desired outcomes. This has led to the use of medications previously examined in females in an off-label fashion for treatment of male infertility. Issues surrounding the treatment of hypogonadism in men are more complex, becoming increasingly so in the last few years. Drug companies have developed compounds for treatment of hypogonadism for particular subgroups of men. However, the indicated groups for these medications are narrow leading to these medications being regularly used for an indication the FDA considers to be part of “normal aging”. This work will examine the controversy surrounding the use of off-label medications in men’s health and how factors like pharma advertising, FDA regulation and difficulties in creating adequate studies has affected the current paradigm. PMID:27141447

  1. Castration influences intestinal microflora and induces abdominal obesity in high-fat diet-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Naoki; Hanaoka, Ryo; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Kitakaze, Tomoya; Mitani, Takakazu; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (i.e. androgen deficiency) raises the risk for abdominal obesity in men. The mechanism for this obesity is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that hypogonadism after castration caused abdominal obesity in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed, but not in standard diet (SD)-fed, C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, the phenotype was not induced in mice treated with antibiotics that disrupt the intestinal microflora. In HFD-fed mice, castration increased feed efficiency and decreased fecal weight per food intake. Castration also induced in an increase of visceral fat mass only in the absence of antibiotics in HFD-fed mice, whereas subcutaneous fat mass was increased by castration irrespective of antibiotics. Castration reduced the expression in the mesenteric fat of both adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase in HFD-fed mice, which was not observed in the presence of antibiotics. Castration decreased thigh muscle (i.e. quadriceps and hamstrings) mass, elevated fasting blood glucose levels, and increased liver triglyceride levels in a HFD-dependent manner, whereas these changes were not observed in castrated mice treated with antibiotics. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and Lactobacillus species increased in the feces of HFD-fed castrated mice. These results show that androgen (e.g. testosterone) deficiency can alter the intestinal microbiome and induce abdominal obesity in a diet-dependent manner. PMID:26961573

  2. MCM9 Mutations Are Associated with Ovarian Failure, Short Stature, and Chromosomal Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wood-Trageser, Michelle A.; Gurbuz, Fatih; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Jeffries, Elizabeth P.; Kotan, L. Damla; Surti, Urvashi; Ketterer, Deborah M.; Matic, Jelena; Chipkin, Jacqueline; Jiang, Huaiyang; Trakselis, Michael A.; Topaloglu, A. Kemal; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is genetically heterogeneous and manifests as hypergonadotropic hypogonadism either as part of a syndrome or in isolation. We studied two unrelated consanguineous families with daughters exhibiting primary amenorrhea, short stature, and a 46,XX karyotype. A combination of SNP arrays, comparative genomic hybridization arrays, and whole-exome sequencing analyses identified homozygous pathogenic variants in MCM9, a gene implicated in homologous recombination and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. In one family, the MCM9 c.1732+2T>C variant alters a splice donor site, resulting in abnormal alternative splicing and truncated forms of MCM9 that are unable to be recruited to sites of DNA damage. In the second family, MCM9 c.394C>T (p.Arg132∗) results in a predicted loss of functional MCM9. Repair of chromosome breaks was impaired in lymphocytes from affected, but not unaffected, females in both families, consistent with MCM9 function in homologous recombination. Autosomal-recessive variants in MCM9 cause a genomic-instability syndrome associated with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and short stature. Preferential sensitivity of germline meiosis to MCM9 functional deficiency and compromised DNA repair in the somatic component most likely account for the ovarian failure and short stature. PMID:25480036

  3. Anti-Müllerian Hormone: A Valuable Addition to the Toolbox of the Pediatric Endocrinologist

    PubMed Central

    Josso, Nathalie; Rey, Rodolfo A.; Picard, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), secreted by immature Sertoli cells, provokes the regression of male fetal Müllerian ducts. FSH stimulates AMH production; during puberty, AMH is downregulated by intratesticular testosterone and meiotic germ cells. In boys, AMH determination is useful in the clinical setting. Serum AMH, which is low in infants with congenital central hypogonadism, increases with FSH treatment. AMH is also low in patients with primary hypogonadism, for instance in Down syndrome, from early postnatal life and in Klinefelter syndrome from midpuberty. In boys with nonpalpable gonads, AMH determination, without the need for a stimulation test, is useful to distinguish between bilaterally abdominal gonads and anorchism. In patients with disorders of sex development (DSD), serum AMH determination helps as a first line test to orientate the etiologic diagnosis: low AMH is indicative of dysgenetic DSD whereas normal AMH is suggestive of androgen synthesis or action defects. Finally, in patients with persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS), undetectable serum AMH drives the genetic search to mutations in the AMH gene, whereas normal or high AMH is indicative of an end organ defect due to AMH receptor gene defects. PMID:24382961

  4. Endocrinology of the Aging Male

    PubMed Central

    Wittert, Gary A.

    2011-01-01

    The endocrinology of the aging male is complex, with multiple hormones along the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis interacting with one another in feedback. As men age, there is a small and progressive (not precipitous, as in women) decline in several sex hormones, in particular testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone, and related increases in luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and sex hormone-binding globulin. The importance of these changes is wide-ranging because of the ubiquitous role of sex hormones in male physiology. This chapter discusses the endocrinology of the aging male. We provide an overview of the regulation of the HPT axis with an emphasis on the changes that occur with aging and the measurement of gonadal steroids, including hormone pulsatility, within-subject and circadian variations. The difficulties of assessing the symptoms of late-onset hypogonadism are highlighted. There is a comprehensive discussion of the epidemiology of sex hormone changes, including their age associations, prevalence of symptomatic hypogonadism, secular changes, risk factors, and the association of sex hormones with outcomes. PMID:21397200

  5. [Testosterone deficit syndrome in fertile or subfertile men].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Navarro, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    Spermatogenesis is a well defined, complex,long and very orderlyprocess of cellular division and differentiation that is under regulation by endocrine signals (GnRH, LH, Inhibin and FSH ): paracrine signals, derived from the interrelation of the various types of cells in the tubules and interstitium (even in a juxtacrine way), and autocrine signals of self communication of the cell with itself. Testosterone plays an essential role in this process. In the testicular tubules, testosterone reaches concentrations 100 times higher than circulating testosterone in the blood stream. From a reproduction point of view, we can find two completely different scenarios in relation to testosterone deficit syndrome with a similar final clinical result: The difficulties of the male to have children. On one side the presence of hypogonadism, which requires a different management depending of the clinical priority and wishes of parenthood of the patient an his partner. On the other side, the opposite situation, the patient who requires or is already under testosterone therapy. In patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, when patient's clinical priority is fertility, the treatment to restore normal spermatogenesis requires external administration of gonadotropins. Treatment must be prolonged, at least 12-18 months. 95% of the cases will have a favorable response, meaning the finding of spermatozoids in ejaculation sperm as a consequence of spermatogenesis restoration.

  6. [Craniopharyngioma and Klinefelter syndrome during the pubertal transition: A diagnostic challenge].

    PubMed

    Mocarbel, Yamile; Arébalo de Cross, Graciela; Lebrethon, Marie C; Thiry, Albert; Beckersd, Albert; Valdes-Socin, Hernan

    2017-04-01

    Craniopharyngioma is the most common pituitary tumor in childhood. It can compromise the pubertal development because of its evolution or treatment. Syndrome of Klinefelter is the most common cause of hipergonadotrophic hypogonadism in males. The concomitant presentation of both entities is extremely low (1/109) and the pathophysiological association is questionned. We present the case of a 18-year-old Belgian patient. He had a diagnosis of craniopharyngioma in childhood and he presented with panhypopituitarism after radiotherapy and surgical treatment. At the age of 14, he started pubertal induction with gonadotropin therapy without clinical response. Asociación de craneofaringioma y síndrome de Klinefelter en la transición puberal: un desafío diagnóstico Craniopharyngioma and Klinefelter syndrome during the pubertal transition: A diagnostic challenge A genetic evaluation confirmed a homogeneous 47, XXY karyotype. Failure of exogenous gonadotropin therapy revealed the hidden association of primary and secondary hypogonadism, demonstrating the importance of the followup and a multidisciplinary approach in these patients.

  7. Rapid enlargement of an intracranial germ cell tumor after gonadotropin hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Yasuo; Tachibana, Osamu; Nakagawa, Athushi; Nakada, Satoko; Nojima, Takayuki; Koya, Daisuke; Iizuka, Hideaki

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of an intracranial germ cell tumor (iGCT) that showed rapid enlargement after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) hormone therapy for pituitary hypogonadism. A 16-year-old boy presented with headache and was diagnosed with a suprasellar tumor. He was initially observed without surgery. Intranasal desmopressin therapy was started for central diabetes insipidus, but there was no change in the tumor size on MRI. The diagnosis of the tumor remained unknown for 4years. Levels of serum gonadotropin hormones (follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormone) and testosterone progressively decreased, and the patient developed pituitary hypogonadism and complained about his undeveloped beard, lack of underarm hair, and erectile dysfunction. Intramuscular gonadotropin injection (hCG 5000U×2/week) was started at age 20. Eight months after the first gonadotropin injection, the MRI showed tumor growth with vivid enhancement. Craniotomy was performed and the tumor was partially resected. The histological diagnosis was immature teratoma. After surgery, the patient was treated with 5 cycles of chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide. He also received radiation therapy of 50Gy (20Gy tumor bed and 30Gy whole ventricles) to the residual tumor, after which the tumor decreased in size. We postulate that iGCT may be at risk of progression during hCG hormone therapy. Thus, careful monitoring is required for a patient with iGCT who receives this therapy.

  8. Bone Loss in Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chakhtoura, Marlene; Nasrallah, Mona; Chami, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related respiratory disorder. It is associated with many endocrinopathies including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolism, and glucose intolerance that may lead to bone loss with secondary osteoporosis. Methods: We report the case of a 41-year-old man who presented with bilateral 9th rib fractures and was found to have obstructive sleep apnea and osteoporosis. We also present a literature review on this topic. Results: OSA can lead to bone loss through various mechanisms. Some are shared with obesity, including hypogonadism, altered adrenergic tone, inflammation, oxidative stress, vitamin D deficiency and diabetes mellitus; others are specific to OSA, such as hypoxia and altered glucocorticoids regulation. Conclusion: There are no guidelines on screening for osteoporosis in OSA. Further research is needed to assess the incidence of bone loss and fractures in OSA. Citation: Chakhtoura M, Nasrallah M, Chami H. Bone loss in obesity and obstructive sleep apnea: a review of literature. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):575–580. PMID:25580607

  9. Neuroprotection via Reduction in Stress: Altered Menstrual Patterns as a Marker for Stress and Implications for Long-Term Neurologic Health in Women

    PubMed Central

    Prokai, David; Berga, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals under chronic psychological stress can be difficult to identify clinically. There is often no outwardly visible phenotype. Chronic stress of sufficient magnitude not only impacts reproductive function, but also concomitantly elicits a constellation of neuroendocrine changes that may accelerate aging in general and brain aging in particular. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, a phenotypically recognizable form of stress, is due to stress-induced suppression of endogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion. Reversal of functional hypothalamic amenorrhea includes restoration of ovulatory ovarian function and fertility and amelioration of hypercortisolism and hypothyroidism. Taken together, recovery from functional hypothalamic amenorrhea putatively offers neuroprotection and ameliorates stress-induced premature brain aging and possibly syndromic Alzheimer’s disease. Amenorrhea may be viewed as a sentinel indicator of stress. Hypothalamic hypogonadism is less clinically evident in men and the diagnosis is difficult to establish. Whether there are other sex differences in the impact of stress on brain aging remains to be better investigated, but it is likely that both low estradiol from stress-induced anovulation and low testosterone from stress-induced hypogonadism compromise brain health. PMID:27999413

  10. Reversible kallmann syndrome, delayed puberty, and isolated anosmia occurring in a single family with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Pitteloud, Nelly; Acierno, James S; Meysing, Astrid U; Dwyer, Andrew A; Hayes, Frances J; Crowley, William F

    2005-03-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Recently, loss-of-function mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene have been shown to cause autosomal dominant KS. To date, the detailed reproductive phenotype of KS associated with mutations in the FGFR1 has yet to be described. We report a kindred comprising a male proband with KS and spontaneous reversibility, whose mother had delayed puberty and whose maternal grandfather isolated anosmia. The proband presented at age 18 yr with KS and was subsequently treated with testosterone (T) therapy. Upon discontinuation of T therapy, he recovered from his hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, as evidenced by a normal LH secretion pattern, sustained normal serum T levels, and active spermatogenesis. The three members of this single family harbor the same FGFR1 mutation (Arg(622)X) in the tyrosine kinase domain. This report demonstrates 1) the first genetic cause of the rare variant of reversible KS, 2) the reversal of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in a proband carrying an FGFR1 mutation suggests a role of FGFR1 beyond embryonic GnRH neuron migration, and 3) a loss of function mutation in the FGFR1 gene causing delayed puberty.

  11. Ascertainment and treatment of delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Jesús; Argente, Jesús

    2003-01-01

    The majority of patients with pubertal delay, can be classified as having primary pubertal delay (constitutional delay of growth and puberty, CDGP), although any child with a chronic disease could present with delayed puberty. In contrast, children with hypogonadism, either hyper- or hypogonadotropic, exhibit a total absence of pubertal development. Hence, early evaluation of these patients should be performed. Delay of puberty leads to psychological problems, secondary to short stature and/or delay in the acquisition of secondary sex characteristics and the reduction of bone mass. Although the final height in patients with CDGP is usually normal, some of these patients do not reach the third percentile or remain in the lowest part of the growth chart according to familial height. The most common reason for treating CDGP patients, usually with sex steroids, is for psychological difficulties and for loss of bone mineralization. Treatment must be individualized. Therapeutic options and new drugs will be discussed. Appropriate treatment and adequate nutritional intake are indicated in patients with delayed puberty due to chronic illness. In patients with hypo- or hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, puberty must be induced or completed. Different treatments (GnRH analogues, gonadotropins and sex steroids), and the main objectives are discussed.

  12. [Primary amenorrhea: constitutional delayed puberty or hormonal disturbance].

    PubMed

    van der Heyden, J C; Janssens, L P F; Drop, S L S

    2006-07-01

    Investigations were carried out in 2 women of 17 and 18 years with primary amenorrhea, normal external female genitalia and delayed secondary sexual characteristics, for the reasons for delayed puberty. The 17-year-old patient had reduced values of FSH, LH and oestradiol. This disturbance in the hypothalamo-hypophysary axis was caused by hydrocephalus. Menarche occurred following drainage of the fluid. The 18-year-old patient had raised values ofFSH and LH and a lowered oestradiol value. There was therefore a disfunction existing at ovarian level, which appeared to be caused by an XX-gonadal dysgenesis. The patient was treated with hormones which led to breast development and menarche taking place. The cause ofprimary amenorrhea can mainly be divided into three categories: constitutional delayed puberty, delayed puberty due to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, or delayed puberty due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. A carefully taken medical history, together with determination of the serum levels of FSH and LH, is helpful in differentiating between these categories. Subsequently, structured clinical management must be performed in order to approach the differential diagnosis of each of these categories, which will then be followed by the final diagnosis.

  13. Men regret anabolic steroid use due to a lack of comprehension regarding the consequences on future fertility.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J R; Scovell, J; Ramasamy, R; Rajanahally, S; Coward, R M; Smith, R P; Lipshultz, L I

    2015-10-01

    We examined whether men with anabolic-steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH) seeking testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) regretted their decision to use anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) and what their reasons were for this regret. An anonymous, prospective survey was distributed to 382 men seeking follow-up treatment for hypogonadism. Prior AAS use was confirmed by self-report, and men were categorised based upon whether they regretted (R) or did not regret (NR) their use of AAS. The average patient age was 40 ± 0.9 years (n = 79) and 15.2% expressed regret over AAS use. No demographic differences were identified between those who regretted AAS use (n = 12) and those who did not (n = 67). Regret was not related to ASIH diagnosis or to AAS-related side effects like increased aggression, mood disorders, erectile dysfunction, acne, fluid retention or dyslipidemia. Those who regretted AAS use were significantly more likely to have not comprehended the negative impact on future fertility (P < 0.030). Actual fertility issues were comparable in men who regretted AAS use (16.7%) and those who did not (13%). A total of 15.2% of men regretted using AAS. A lack of awareness regarding the negative long-term effects on fertility was the primary factor related to regret of AAS use in men with ASIH.

  14. Endocrinopathies, Bone Health, and Insulin Resistance in Patients with Fanconi Anemia after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Jessie L; Petryk, Anna; Zhang, Lei; DeFor, Todd E; Baker, K Scott; Steinberger, Julia; Nathan, Brandon; Wagner, John E; MacMillan, Margaret L

    2016-08-01

    A number of endocrinopathies have been described after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but data are limited in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA). We report several endocrine-based disorders in a cohort of 44 patients with FA after HCT compared with both 74 patients who received HCT for hematologic malignancies and with 275 healthy controls. Endocrinopathies assessed included hypothyroidism, hypogonadism, short stature, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, abnormalities in body composition, and bone health. Most (86%) patients with FA had at least 1 endocrinopathy, with 11% having 3 or more. Hypothyroidism was seen in 57%, hypogonadism in 27%, short stature in 50%, and reduced total body and lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) (height adjusted Z-score < -1) in 57% and 21%, respectively. Vitamin D deficiency was seen in 71%. Short stature was associated with younger age at HCT and gonadal failure was associated with older age at HCT. Insulin resistance was associated with increased percent fat mass and increased android/gynoid ratio by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Hypothyroidism, short stature, and reduced total body BMD were more prevalent in patients with FA compared with patients with hematologic malignancies. We recommend an assessment before transplantation and close follow-up afterwards to ensure proper clinical management. Future studies should continue to explore the impact of HCT on endocrinopathies in FA patients.

  15. [Osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, R

    1994-09-20

    Liver cirrhosis may be accompanied by osteoporosis and, rarely, osteomalacia. Normal liver function is required for normal digestion and absorption of calcium-containing nutrients. The liver plays an important role for the metabolisation of vitamin D: the 25-hydroxylation takes place in the liver. However, the respective enzymatic capacity is not limited by liver diseases except for almost complete liver insufficiency. Therefore, true hypovitaminosis D only rarely plays a role in hepatic osteopenia, but direct toxic effects on bone forming cells (osteoblasts) are discussed: e.g. by bile salts. Coexisting hypogonadism leads to further bone loss. Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis in part present with osteoporosis and fractures. Bone histology reveals normal resorption, but decreased formation. Calcitropic hormones are generally normal. Chronic alcoholism induces the same histologic picture in bone, i.e. normal resorption and diminished formation. These changes are reversible after abstinence and as long as of cirrhosis has not yet developed. Patients undergoing liver transplantation due to end stage liver insufficiency including cirrhosis present with diminished bone mass before receiving a new liver, and they show further bone loss after the transplantation due to immunosuppressive treatment including glucocorticoids. There is no specific treatment of bone loss or osteoporosis due to liver cirrhosis. Preventive efforts should be devoted to the avoidance of suboptimal calcium and vitamin D supply, immobilization, and hypogonadism. Fluorides may increase bone mass after liver transplantation--perhaps they are also useful in liver cirrhosis. Antiresorption agents like calcitonins or bisphosphonates may be cautiously tried.

  16. Monosodium glutamate-sensitive hypothalamic neurons contribute to the control of bone mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elefteriou, Florent; Takeda, Shu; Liu, Xiuyun; Armstrong, Dawna; Karsenty, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    Using chemical lesioning we previously identified hypothalamic neurons that are required for leptin antiosteogenic function. In the course of these studies we observed that destruction of neurons sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) in arcuate nuclei did not affect bone mass. However MSG treatment leads to hypogonadism, a condition inducing bone loss. Therefore the normal bone mass of MSG-treated mice suggested that MSG-sensitive neurons may be implicated in the control of bone mass. To test this hypothesis we assessed bone resorption and bone formation parameters in MSG-treated mice. We show here that MSG-treated mice display the expected increase in bone resorption and that their normal bone mass is due to a concomitant increase in bone formation. Correction of MSG-induced hypogonadism by physiological doses of estradiol corrected the abnormal bone resorptive activity in MSG-treated mice and uncovered their high bone mass phenotype. Because neuropeptide Y (NPY) is highly expressed in MSG-sensitive neurons we tested whether NPY regulates bone formation. Surprisingly, NPY-deficient mice had a normal bone mass. This study reveals that distinct populations of hypothalamic neurons are involved in the control of bone mass and demonstrates that MSG-sensitive neurons control bone formation in a leptin-independent manner. It also indicates that NPY deficiency does not affect bone mass.

  17. Human GnRH Deficiency: A Unique Disease Model to Unravel the Ontogeny of GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Dwyer, Andrew; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Pitteloud, Nelly; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Crowley, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary survival of a species is largely a function of its reproductive fitness. In mammals, a sparsely populated and widely dispersed network of hypothalamic neurons, the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, serve as the pilot light of reproduction via coordinated secretion of GnRH. Since it first description, human GnRH deficiency has been recognized both clinically and genetically as a heterogeneous disease. A spectrum of different reproductive phenotypes comprised of congenital GnRH deficiency with anosmia (Kallmann syndrome), congenital GnRH deficiency with normal olfaction (normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism), and adult-onset hypogonadotropic hypogonadism has been described. In the last two decades, several genes and pathways which govern GnRH ontogeny have been discovered by studying humans with GnRH deficiency. More importantly, detailed study of these patients has highlighted the emerging theme of oligogenicity and genotypic synergism, and also expanded the phenotypic diversity with the documentation of reversal of GnRH deficiency later in adulthood in some patients. The underlying genetic defect has also helped understand the associated nonreproductive phenotypes seen in some of these patients. These insights now provide practicing clinicians with targeted genetic diagnostic strategies and also impact on clinical management. PMID:20606386

  18. Testosterone has antidepressant-like efficacy and facilitates imipramine-induced neuroplasticity in male rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Steven R; Workman, Joanna L; Tehrani, Amir; Hamson, Dwayne K; Chow, Carmen; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Galea, Liisa A M

    2016-03-01

    Hypogonadal men are more likely to develop depression, while testosterone supplementation shows antidepressant-like effects in hypogonadal men and facilitates antidepressant efficacy. Depression is associated with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and testosterone exerts suppressive effects on the HPA axis. The hippocampus also plays a role in the feedback regulation of the HPA axis, and depressed patients show reduced hippocampal neuroplasticity. We assessed the antidepressant-like effects of testosterone with, or without, imipramine on behavioral and neural endophenotypes of depression in a chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) model of depression. A 21-day CUS protocol was used on gonadectomized male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with vehicle, 1mg of testosterone propionate, 10mg/kg of imipramine, or testosterone and imipramine in tandem. Testosterone treatment reduced novelty-induced hypophagia following CUS exposure, but not under non-stress conditions, representing state-dependent effects. Further, testosterone increased the latency to immobility in the forced swim test (FST), reduced basal corticosterone, and reduced adrenal mass in CUS-exposed rats. Testosterone also facilitated the effects of imipramine by reducing the latency to immobility in the FST and increasing sucrose preference. Testosterone treatment had no significant effect on neurogenesis, though the combination of testosterone and imipramine increased PSA-NCAM expression in the ventral dentate gyrus. These findings demonstrate the antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects of testosterone within a CUS model of depression, and provide insight into the mechanism of action, which appears to be independent of enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis.

  19. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation in girls undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplant: experience of a single centre.

    PubMed

    Biasin, E; Salvagno, F; Berger, M; Nesi, F; Quarello, P; Vassallo, E; Evangelista, F; Marchino, G L; Revelli, A; Benedetto, C; Fagioli, F

    2015-09-01

    Fertility after childhood haemopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is a major concern. Conditioning regimens before HSCT present a high risk (>80%) of ovarian failure. Since 2000, we have proposed cryopreservation of ovarian tissue to female patients undergoing HSCT at our centre, to preserve future fertility. After clinical and haematological evaluation, the patients underwent ovarian tissue collection by laparoscopy. The tissue was analysed by histologic examination to detect any tumour contamination and then frozen following the slow freezing procedure and cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. From August 2000 to September 2013, 47 patients planned to receive HSCT, underwent ovarian tissue cryopreservation. The median age at diagnosis was 11.1 years and at the time of procedure it was 13 years, respectively. Twenty-four patients were not pubertal at the time of storage, whereas 23 patients had already experienced menarche. The median time between laparoscopy and HSCT was 25 days. Twenty-six out of 28 evaluable patients (93%) developed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism at a median time of 23.3 months after HSCT. One patient required autologous orthotopic transplantation that resulted in one live birth. Results show a very high rate of iatrogenic hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, highlighting the need for fertility preservation in these patients.

  20. [Atypical and rare cardiac revelation about Sheehan's syndrome: A report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Bouznad, N; Mghari, G El; Hattaoui, M El; Ansari, N El

    2017-01-24

    Sheehan syndrome is a potentially serious complication in the postpartum period corresponding to ischemic necrosis of the anterior pituitary related to postpartum haemorrhage. We report three original observations showing an unusual mode of revelation of this syndrome. The first observation is that of a 46-year-old patient admitted initially to resuscitation for a recovered cardiorespiratory arrest, severe hypoglycemia and profound hyponatremia. The second is that of a 45-year-old patient, admitted for recurrent cardiac tamponade after pericardial and pleural puncture and pericardial drainage; clinical survey found signs of slight panhypopituitarism. The latest case is that of a patient of 44 years, admitted to pericardial effusion average abundance revealed by dyspnea and tachypnea with hypotension. The interrogation of all patients revealed the concept of an old hemorrhagic syndrome, absence of lactation and secondary amenorrhea thereafter. Laboratory tests showed insufficient thyroid-stimulating, low cortisol, a hypogonadism hypogonadism. The pituitary magnetic resonance imaging showed an empty sella in the three cases. Patients were placed under replacement therapy with L-thyroxine and hydrocortisone with good clinical, biological and echocardiographic evolution. The three cases illustrate a rare heart atypical presentation for Sheehan's syndrome and underline the importance of early diagnosis and suitable replacement therapy of this syndrome to avoid this complication that can be life threatening.

  1. Compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations cause Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome with late-onset ataxia.

    PubMed

    Deik, A; Johannes, B; Rucker, J C; Sánchez, E; Brodie, S E; Deegan, E; Landy, K; Kajiwara, Y; Scelsa, S; Saunders-Pullman, R; Paisán-Ruiz, C

    2014-12-01

    PNPLA6 mutations, known to be associated with the development of motor neuron phenotypes, have recently been identified in families with Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome. Boucher-Neuhäuser is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by the co-occurrence of cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and chorioretinal dystrophy. Gait ataxia in Boucher-Neuhäuser usually manifests before early adulthood, although onset in the third or fourth decade has also been reported. However, given the recent identification of PNPLA6 mutations as the cause of this condition, the determining factors of age of symptom onset still need to be established. Here, we have identified a sporadic Boucher-Neuhäuser case with late-onset gait ataxia and relatively milder retinal changes due to compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations. Compound heterozygosity was confirmed by cloning and sequencing the patient's genomic DNA from coding exons 26-29. Furthermore, both mutations (one novel and one known) fell in the phospholipase esterase domain, where most pathogenic mutations seem to cluster. Taken together, we herein confirm PNPLA6 mutations as the leading cause of Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome and suggest inquiring about a history of hypogonadism or visual changes in patients presenting with late-onset gait ataxia. We also advocate for neuroophthalmologic evaluation in suspected cases.

  2. Nutritional status and the gonadotrophic response to a polar expedition.

    PubMed

    Woods, David R; Delves, Simon K; Britland, Sophie E; Shaw, Anneliese; Brown, Piete E; Bentley, Conor; Hornby, Simon; Burnett, Anne; Lanham-New, Sue A; Fallowfield, Joanne L

    2015-03-01

    Polar expeditions have been associated with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis consistent with central hypogonadism (i.e., decreased testosterone, luteinising hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)). These changes are typically associated with body mass loss. Our aim was to evaluate whether maintenance of body mass during a polar expedition could mitigate against the development of central hypogonadism. Male participants (n = 22) from a 42-day expedition (British Services Antarctic Expedition 2012) volunteered to take part in the study. Body mass, body composition, and strength data were recorded pre- and postexpedition in addition to assessment of serum testosterone, LH, FSH, thyroid hormones, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and trace elements. Energy provision and energy expenditure were assessed at mid- and end-expedition. Daily energy provision was 6335 ± 149 kcal·day(-1). Estimated energy expenditure midexpedition was 5783 ± 1690 kcal·day(-1). Body mass and percentage body fat did not change between pre- and postexpedition. Total testosterone (nmol·L(-1)) (14.0 ± 4.9 vs. 17.3 ± 4.0, p = 0.006), calculated free testosterone (pmol·L(-1)) (288 ± 82 vs. 350 ± 70, p = 0.003), and sex hormone binding globulin (nmol·L(-1)) (33 ± 12 vs. 36 ± 11, p = 0.023) concentrations increased. LH and FSH remained unchanged. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH; IU·L(-1)) (2.1 ± 0.8 vs. 4.1 ± 2.1, p < 0.001) and free triiodothyronine (FT3; IU·L(-1)) (5.4 ± 0.4 vs. 6.1 ± 0.8, p < 0.001) increased while free thyroxine, IGF-1, and trace elements remained unchanged. Hand-grip strength was reduced postexpedition but static lift strength was maintained. Maintenance of body mass and nutritional status appeared to negate the central hypogonadism previously reported from polar expeditions. The elevated TSH and free FT3 were consistent with a previously reported "polar T3 syndrome".

  3. Improvement of endothelial function following initiation of testosterone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tucky, Barbara; Polackwich, Allan S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Isolated recent studies have suggested an increased risk of heart attack as early as 3 months following testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Such a rapid risk increase would likely require rapid deterioration of arterial endothelial function. Our goal was to assess arterial endothelial function in hypogonadal men prior to and at least 3 months after initiation of TRT. Methods Adult men were consented if they had symptoms of hypogonadism, a total testosterone <350 ng/dL, and planned to begin TRT. Endothelial function was non-invasively assessed using the EndoPAT-2000 machine. We measured the augmentation index (AI) (normal <3%), a measure of arterial stiffness and reactive hyperemia index (RHI), a measure of endothelial vasodilation (normal >1.69). Prior studies suggest that a 10% level of day-to-day test variability is expected. Endothelial function was reassessed at the next clinic visit, between 3 and 6 months if the patients were compliant with therapy. Changes in continuous variables were assessed with the paired t test. Results Twenty-three patients were consented with a mean age of 52.7 years (range, 34–68 years) and starting testosterone 196.9 ng/dL (range, 35–339 ng/dL). There was a history of diabetes in four, hypertension in ten and coronary artery disease in five. Mean RHI was 1.67±0.37 (70% were abnormal) and mean AI was 2.57%±14.0% (39% were abnormal). There were no cardiac events. At follow-up 20 patients were compliant with therapy and retested. Mean testosterone increased from 203 to 511 (P<0.0001). Mean RHI improved from 1.70 to 2.14 (P=0.01). Mean AI improved from 2.9% to −1.75% (P=0.01). In four men RHI worsened but in each case less than the 10% error of the test. No man had worsened AI. Conclusions Men with symptomatic hypogonadism often have abnormal arterial endothelial function. Following TRT, endothelial function either remains unchanged or improves. PMID:28078212

  4. [Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to lack of 17α-hydroxylase: a report of a new mutation in the gene CYP17A1].

    PubMed

    Perales Martínez, J I; Pina Marqués, B; de Arriba Muñoz, A; Mayayo Dehesa, E; Labarta Aizpún, J I; Loidi Fernández, L

    2015-01-01

    P450c17 enzyme catalyses two different reactions: the 17α-hydroxylation of progesterone and pregnenolone, and segmenting the carbon 17-20 binding from the 17,20lyase producing adrenal androgens. This enzyme is coded by the CYP17A1 gene. The case is presented of a 14 year old patient with delayed pubertal development and a high blood pressure for height and age. 46,XX karyotype. Hormonal studies highlighted hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, adrenal insufficiency and mineralocorticoid excess. Subsequent genetic studies showed a homozygous mutation in the CYP17A1 gene (c.753+G>A), not previously described, which is responsible for the pathophysiology of 17α-hydroxylase deficiency. This entity is a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The disease often goes unnoticed until adolescence or early adult life, and should be suspected in 46,XY individuals with ambiguous genitalia or 46,XX with delayed puberty associated with hypertension and/or hypokalaemia.

  5. Endocrine abnormalities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Elizabeth A; Klibanski, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disease associated with notable medical complications and increased mortality. Endocrine abnormalities, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, growth hormone resistance and sick euthyroid syndrome, mediate the clinical manifestations of this disease. Alterations in anorexigenic and orexigenic appetite-regulating pathways have also been described. Decreases in fat mass result in adipokine abnormalities. Although most of the endocrine changes that occur in AN represent physiologic adaptation to starvation, some persist after recovery and might contribute to susceptibility to AN recurrence. In this Review, we summarize key endocrine alterations in AN, with a particular focus on the profound bone loss that can occur in this disease. Although AN is increasingly prevalent among boys and men, the disorder predominantly affects girls and women who are, therefore, the focus of this Review.

  6. Glucocorticoid osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Philip N

    2002-01-01

    Postmenopausal women are at greatest risk of rapid bone loss and fracture with glucocorticoids and should be actively considered for prophylactic measures. In men and premenopausal women receiving glucocorticoids, the decision to use anti-osteoporosis prophylaxis is less clear and depends upon baseline bone mineral density [BMD], anticipated dose and duration of glucocorticoids. Based upon evidence the order of choice for prophylaxis would be a bisphosphonate followed by a vitamin D metabolite or hormone replacement therapy [HRT]. Calcium alone appears unable to prevent rapid bone loss in patients starting glucocorticoids. HRT should clearly be considered if hypogonadism is present. In patients receiving chronic low dose glucocorticoids, treatment with calcium and vitamin D may be sufficient to prevent further bone loss. However since fracture risk is a function of multiple factors including the degree of reduction in BMD as well as the duration of exposure, treatment with therapy to increase BMD will reduce fracture risk even in patients receiving chronic low dose glucocorticoids.

  7. Prader-Willi Syndrome after age 15 years.

    PubMed Central

    Laurance, B M; Brito, A; Wilkinson, J

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-four patients, all of them over 15 years, with the Prader-Willi syndrome are described. Obesity, often extreme, associated with an insatiable appetite, was their principal handicap and this was made worse by educational subnormality and hypogonadism. Three of the them developed diabetes. Each attended a special school or an adult training centre. Although most of them were of short stature and had scoliosis, 2 were tall but they even more severely mentally retarded than is usually the case. Nine other patients died aged between 3 and 23 years. The most common cause of death was cor pulmonale. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7212756

  8. Beyond testosterone cypionate: evidence behind the use of nandrolone in male health and wellness.

    PubMed

    Pan, Michael M; Kovac, Jason R

    2016-04-01

    Characterized by low serum testosterone levels and diverse symptoms, male hypogonadism is a common condition. Current medical treatment focuses on testosterone supplementation using multiple modalities such as injections, gels and pellets. Interestingly, while testosterone is considered an anabolic androgenic steroid, it has not been saddled with the social stigma that other, similar medications have. The goal of this review is to highlight an anabolic steroid, 19-nortestosterone (i.e., nandrolone, deca-durabolin) and illustrate prospective therapeutic applications for male health. Containing a chemical structure similar to testosterone, nandrolone has a higher myotrophic: androgenic ratio resulting in improved effects on muscle mass. Animal models have suggested application in the improvement of joint healing following rotator cuff repair. Minimal literature exists regarding the use of nandrolone and, as such, further human studies are required.

  9. Kisspeptins: regulators of metastasis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, K G

    2005-08-01

    The kisspeptins are the peptide products of the KiSS-1 gene and the endogenous agonists for the GPR54 receptor. Although KiSS-1 was initially discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene, recent evidence suggests the kisspeptin/GPR54 system is a key regulator of the reproductive system. Disrupted GPR54 signalling causes hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in rodents and man. Central or peripheral administration of kisspeptin potently stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, increasing circulating gonadotrophin concentrations in a number of animal models. These effects appear likely to be mediated via the hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone system, although kisspeptins may have direct effects on the anterior pituitary gland. Hypothalamic KiSS-1 expression is regulated by circulating sex steroids. The precise physiological role of the kisspeptin system in the regulation of reproductive function remains to be elucidated.

  10. [Efficacy of prostatic adenoma treatment with alfusozine depending on sexuality].

    PubMed

    Kogan, M I; Kireev, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    Blood levels of total PSA and testosterone, size of the prostatic gland, Qmax were measured in 40 patients with prostatic adenoma symptoms treated with alfusozine in a dose 10 mg/day before the treatment, on the treatment week 4, 12 and 24. At the same time the examinees were questioned using IPSS, MSHQ, IIEF questionnaires. The sexuality phenotype was estimated according to the Rostov Questionnaire of Integral Male Sexuality. It was found that sexuality phenotypes (hypo-, normo- and hypersexuality) occur with the same frequency in males with prostatic adenoma symptoms. Hypersexual men with prostatic adenoma have more definite lower urinary tract symptoms, worse erection and ejaculation, more frequent signs of hypogonadism. The highest alfusozine efficacy was observed in normo- and hyposexual men with prostatic adenoma who achieved better results in improvement of Qmax, symptoms of the lower urinary tract, erectile and ejaculation function. The treatment efficacy in the hypersexual men is low.

  11. Sickling Cells, Cyclic Nucleotides, and Protein Kinases: The Pathophysiology of Urogenital Disorders in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Claudino, Mário Angelo; Fertrin, Kleber Yotsumoto

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is one of the best studied inherited diseases, and despite being caused by a single point mutation in the HBB gene, multiple pleiotropic effects of the abnormal hemoglobin S production range from vaso-occlusive crisis, stroke, and pulmonary hypertension to osteonecrosis and leg ulcers. Urogenital function is not spared, and although priapism is most frequently remembered, other related clinical manifestations have been described, such as nocturia, enuresis, increased frequence of lower urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence, hypogonadism, and testicular infarction. Studies on sickle cell vaso-occlusion and priapism using both in vitro and in vivo models have shed light on the pathogenesis of some of these events. The authors review what is known about the deleterious effects of sickling on the genitourinary tract and how the role of cyclic nucleotides signaling and protein kinases may help understand the pathophysiology underlying these manifestations and develop novel therapies in the setting of urogenital disorders in sickle cell disease. PMID:22745902

  12. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of nonsteroidal androgen receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T

    2006-08-01

    Testosterone and structurally related anabolic steroids have been used to treat hypogonadism, muscle wasting, osteoporosis, male contraception, cancer cachexia, anemia, and hormone replacement therapy in aging men or age-related frailty; while antiandrogens may be useful for treatment of conditions like acne, alopecia (male-pattern baldness), hirsutism, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. However, the undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands limited their clinical use. Nonsteroidal AR ligands with improved pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties have been developed to overcome these problems. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and pharmacology of clinically used and emerging nonsteroidal AR ligands, including antagonists, agonists, and selective androgen receptor modulators.

  13. Androgen-mediated regulation of skeletal muscle protein balance.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Michael L; Steiner, Jennifer L; Gordon, Bradley S

    2017-02-22

    Androgens significantly alter muscle mass in part by shifting protein balance in favor of net protein accretion. During various atrophic conditions, the clinical impact of decreased production or bioavailability of androgens (termed hypogonadism) is important as a loss of muscle mass is intimately linked with survival outcome. While androgen replacement therapy increases muscle mass in part by restoring protein balance, this is not a comprehensive treatment option due to potential side effects. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which androgens alter protein balance is needed for the development of androgen-independent therapies. While the data in humans suggest androgens alter protein balance (both synthesis and breakdown) in the fasted metabolic state, a predominant molecular mechanism(s) behind this observation is still lacking. This failure is likely due in part to inconsistent experimental design between studies including failure to control nutrient/feeding status, the method of altering androgens, and the model systems utilized.

  14. Kennedy's disease and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. Report of 4 cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Valera Yepes, Rocío; Virgili Casas, Maria; Povedano Panades, Monica; Guerrero Gual, Mireia; Villabona Artero, Carles

    2015-05-01

    Kennedy's disease, also known as bulbospinal muscular atrophy, is a rare, X-linked recessive neurodegenerative disorder affecting adult males. It is caused by expansion of an unstable cytosine-adenine-guanine tandem-repeat in exon 1 of the androgen-receptor gene on chromosome Xq11-12, and is characterized by spinal motor neuron progressive degeneration. Endocrinologically, these patients often have the features of hypogonadism associated to the androgen insensitivity syndrome, particularly its partial forms. We report 4 cases with the typical neurological presentation, consisting of slowly progressing generalized muscle weakness with atrophy and bulbar muscle involvement; these patients also had several endocrine manifestations; the most common non-neurological manifestation was gynecomastia. In all cases reported, molecular analysis showed an abnormal cytosine-adenine-guanine triplet repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene.

  15. Novel heterozygous mutation in the extracellular domain of FGFR1 associated with Hartsfield syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Masaki; Miyoshi, Tatsuya; Nagashima, Yuka; Shibata, Nao; Yagi, Hiroko; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous kinase domain mutations or homozygous extracellular domain mutations in FGFR1 have been reported to cause Hartsfield syndrome (HS), which is characterized by the triad of holoprosencephaly, ectrodactyly and cleft lip/palate. To date, more than 200 mutations in FGFR1 have been described; however, only 10 HS-associated mutations have been reported thus far. We describe a case of typical HS with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) harboring a novel heterozygous mutation, p.His253Pro, in the extracellular domain of FGFR1. This is the first report of an HS-associated heterozygous mutation located in the extracellular domain of FGFR1, thus expanding our understanding of the phenotypic features and further developmental course associated with FGFR1 mutations. PMID:27790375

  16. Primary hyperparathyroidism and Klinefelter's syndrome in a young man

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, M; Attanasio, R; Guarnieri, V; Maffè, A; Borretta, G

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report the association of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) in a 22-year-old male complaining of worsening fatigue. PHPT was asymptomatic at the diagnosis, but the patient had worsening hypercalcemia and osteoporosis, and developed acute renal colic. He then underwent parathyroidectomy with resection of a single adenoma and normalization of calcium and parathyroid hormone levels. Clinical and therapeutic implications of this rare association are discussed. Learning points The coexistence of KS and PHPT is very uncommon.Patients with mild PHPT often have nonspecific symptoms that may be confused and superimposed with those of hypogonadism.KS patients, especially when young and already osteoporotic at diagnosis, should be screened for other causes of secondary osteoporosis, in particular PHPT. PMID:25859391

  17. Testosterone deficiency syndrome: benefits, risks, and realities associated with testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Jacob; Barkin, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone deficiency syndrome, which has sometimes been termed age-related or late-onset hypogonadism, is a syndrome characterized by both clinical manifestations as well as a biochemical deficiency of testosterone. This condition is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, accounting for billions of dollars in health care costs. There is some evidence that suggests that restoring testosterone levels in these individuals may help to manage or delay progression of the associated morbidities. Furthermore, despite controversies in the literature and media, testosterone replacement has proven to be quite safe in most men with minimal if any adverse effects when dosing to achieve the eugonadal range. It is nevertheless very important for clinicians to be aware of the possible risks and contraindications of treatment to ensure proper patient selection and appropriate monitoring.

  18. [Testosterone therapy].

    PubMed

    Diemer, T; Hauptmann, A; Wagenlehner, F M E

    2016-04-01

    Hormone replacement therapy with testosterone has become well-established over the course of time. The initial substantial concerns with respect to complications and potential adverse events, particularly in older patients, were proven to be unfounded over time. Testosterone therapy has therefore gradually become a regular treatment modality in urological practice. It has also been shown to represent a valuable tool as supportive treatment for patients with erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism. A variety of testosterone preparations are available for treatment. Recent pharmaceutical developments have greatly improved the practicability and ease of administration for patients. Several guidelines have been developed that provide clearly formulated standards and instructions for indications, contraindications, application, risk factors and monitoring of testosterone therapy. Adverse events affecting the cardiovascular system and especially diseases of the prostate gland are of great importance, thus making the urologist the primary partner in the treatment of patients with testosterone deficiency.

  19. Pseudomembranous trigonitis in a male with Klinefelter syndrome: a case report and evidence of a hormonal etiology.

    PubMed

    Lian, Derrick W Q; Li, Fay X; Ong, Caroline C P; Kuick, C H; Chang, Kenneth T E

    2014-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome is a clinical syndrome with a distinct 47, XXY karyotype. Patients are characterized by a tall eunuchoid stature, small testes, hypergonotrophic hypogonadism, gynecomastia, learning difficulties and infertility. These patients have also been found to have raised estrogen levels. We report a 16 year old boy with Klinefelter syndrome presenting to our institution with gross hematuria. Cystoscopy and biopsy revealed the diagnosis of pseudomembranous trigonitis. Immunohistochemical stains showed an increase in estrogen and progesterone receptors in the trigone area but not in the rest of the bladder. In view of the patient's mildly raised estrogen levels and the histological findings, we postulate that estrogen is the driver of the development of pseudomembranous trigonitis. This is the first reported case of pseudomembranous trigonitis seen in association with Klinefelter syndrome, and also the first case of pseudomembranous trigonitis occurring within the male adolescent age group.

  20. Reassessing the role of growth hormone and sex steroids in thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyeyoung; Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    The concomitant decline in growth hormone (GH) and increase in sex steroid production with age is thought to be responsible for thymic involution. If changes in the production of these hormones trigger or sustain thymic involution, that process should be accelerated in little mice, which have a genetic deficiency resulting in reduced production of thymopoietic GH, and delayed in the hypogonadal strain, which fails to produce thymocytotoxic sex steroids. The results indicated that thymic involution in both strains progressed in a manner similar to their normal littermates. That blocking sex steroid production did not delay thymic involution was surprising since castration reportedly increases thymus cellularity. Re-examination of that phenomenon revealed that, while gonadectomy results in increased thymus size, its effects are transient, and the thymus ultimately undergoes involution. Taken together, these data suggest that age-related changes in the endocrine system do not underlie thymic involution.

  1. A successful laparoscopic neovaginoplasty using peritoneum in Müllerian agenesis with inguinal ovaries accompanied by primary ovarian insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gweon, Seonghye; Lee, Jisun; Hwang, Suna; Hwang, Kyoung Joo

    2016-01-01

    The combination of Müllerian agenesis with inguinal ovaries accompanied by primary ovarian insufficiency is extremely rare. A 21-year-old Korean woman was referred to our center with primary amenorrhea. The patient was diagnosed with Müllerian agenesis with inguinal ovaries. Her hormonal profile showed hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism suggesting primary ovarian insufficiency. We performed laparoscopic neovaginoplasty using modified Davydov's procedure and reposition inguinal ovaries in the pelvic cavity. Oral estrogen replacement was applied for the treatment of primary ovarian insufficiency. This is a rare case report on Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome accompanied not only by inguinal ovaries but also with primary ovarian insufficiency. We present our first experience on the laparoscopic neovaginoplasty performed on the patient with müllerian agenesis accompanied by inguinal ovaries and primary ovarian insufficiency. PMID:27462606

  2. [Testosterone replacement therapy and prostate cancer: the downfall of a paradigm?].

    PubMed

    Castillo, Octavio A; López-Fontana, Gastón; Vidal-Mora, Ivar; López Laur, José Daniel

    2015-04-06

    For six decades, it has been a part of the conventional medical wisdom that higher levels of testosterone increase the risk of prostate cancer. This belief is mostly derived from the well-documented regression of prostate cancer after surgical or pharmacological castration. However, there is an absence of scientific data supporting the concept that higher testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Moreover, men with hypogonadism have substantial rates of prostate cancer in prostatic biopsies, suggesting that low testosterone has no protective effect against the development of prostate cancer. Moreover, prostate cancer rate is higher in elderly patients when hormonal levels are low. These results argue against an increased risk of prostate cancer with testosterone replacement therapy.

  3. Differential Gene Expression Reveals Mitochondrial Dysfunction in an Imprinting Center Deletion Mouse Model of Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Weiwei; Coskun, Pinar E.; Nalbandian, Angèle; Knoblach, Susan; Resnick, James L.; Hoffman, Eric; Wallace, Douglas C.; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2013-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder caused by deficiency of imprinted gene expression from the paternal chromosome 15q11-15q13 and clinically characterized by neonatal hypotonia, short stature, cognitive impairment, hypogonadism, hyperphagia, morbid obesity and diabetes. Previous clinical studies suggest that a defect in energy metabolism may be involved in the pathogenesis of PWS. We focused our attention on the genes associated with energy metabolism and found that there were 95 and 66 mitochondrial genes differentially expressed in PWS muscle and brain, respectively. Assessment of enzyme activities of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes in the brain, heart, liver and muscle were assessed. We found the enzyme activities of the cardiac mitochondrial complexes II+III were upregulated in the imprinting center deletion (PWS-IC) mice compared to the wild type littermates. These studies suggest that differential gene expression, especially of the mitochondrial genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of PWS. PMID:24127921

  4. Systemic Analysis of Atg5-Null Mice Rescued from Neonatal Lethality by Transgenic ATG5 Expression in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Saori R; Kuma, Akiko; Akashi, Takumi; Hara, Taichi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kurikawa, Yoshitaka; Itakura, Eisuke; Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Shitara, Hiroshi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Mizushima, Noboru

    2016-10-10

    Autophagy is a cytoplasmic degradation system that is important for starvation adaptation and cellular quality control. Previously, we reported that Atg5-null mice are neonatal lethal; however, the exact cause of their death remains unknown. Here, we show that restoration of ATG5 in the brain is sufficient to rescue Atg5-null mice from neonatal lethality. This suggests that neuronal dysfunction, including suckling failure, is the primary cause of the death of Atg5-null neonates, which would further be accelerated by nutrient insufficiency due to a systemic failure in autophagy. The rescued Atg5-null mouse model, as a resource, allows us to investigate the physiological roles of autophagy in the whole body after the neonatal period. These rescued mice demonstrate previously unappreciated abnormalities such as hypogonadism and iron-deficiency anemia. These observations provide new insights into the physiological roles of the autophagy factor ATG5.

  5. X;7 translocation in an Indian woman with hypergonadotropic amenorrhea-a case report.

    PubMed

    Vasu, Vidya Rendheer; Chandra, Nallathambi; Santhiya, Sathiyavedu Thyagarajan

    2009-08-01

    Translocations involving X chromosome and an autosome are rather rare due to the associated infertility in men and subfertility in women. X-autosome translocations are frequently associated with primary or secondary ovarian failure and at times Turner syndrome-like features if there is an involvement of the critical region of Xq13-q26. A 19-year-old proposita with a complaint of amenorrhea was found to have hypoplastic uterus and streak ovaries. Hormonal profile revealed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Chromosomal analysis of 25 conventionally stained metaphases revealed the karyotype to be 46,X,t(X;7)(q13;p15)de novo. This rare finding is the first report from India, to the best of our knowledge. She also exhibited the maternally inherited heteromorphic variant of chromosome 21. The occurrence of t(X;7) in the proposita with hypergonadotropic amenorrhea confirms the role of X-autosome translocations in ovarian dysfunction.

  6. A rare case of 46,XX gonadal dysgenesis and Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sriharibabu; Veeraabhinav, C. H.; Jetti, Mounica; Himabindu, Yalamanchali; Donthu, Kiranmai; Badireddy, Mutyalarayudu

    2016-01-01

    46,XX gonadal dysgenesis is a rare genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by underdeveloped ovaries with consequent, impuberism, primary amenorrhea, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Mullerian agenesis or Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is characterized by congenital aplasia of the uterus and the upper part (2/3) of the vagina in a woman with normal development of secondary sexual characteristics and a normal 46,XX karyotype. The phenotypic manifestations of MRKH syndrome may sometimes overlap with various other syndromes and require accurate delineation. The coexistence of both these disorders is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 46,XX gonadal dysgenesis and MRKH syndrome with anatomically dispersed congenital anomalies unique among reported cases. PMID:28216916

  7. Muscle cramping over the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lally, David R; Moster, Mark L; Foroozan, Rod

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old man with hypogonadism and adrenal insufficiency presented with transient blurred vision and halos around lights. Visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes, and he had mild bilateral optic disk edema. Brain imaging was unremarkable, and lumbar puncture showed an opening pressure of 28.5 cm H2O with elevated protein. He also complained of muscle cramping, and magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated a heterogenous bone marrow signal. Bone survey showed a mixed lytic and sclerotic lesion within the left femur that proved to be a plasmacytoma. Serum protein electrophoresis had a small IgA spike, and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was elevated. He was diagnosed with POEMS syndrome and underwent radiation to the plasmacytoma. Two years later he had a stable neuro-ophthalmologic exam with no signs of multiple myeloma. POEMS syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome from a plasma cell dyscrasia that may cause optic disk edema.

  8. Translocator protein-mediated pharmacology of cholesterol transport and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Fan, Jinjiang; Campioli, Enrico; Zirkin, Barry; Midzak, Andrew

    2015-06-15

    Steroidogenesis begins with cholesterol transfer into mitochondria through the transduceosome, a complex composed of cytosolic proteins that include steroidogenesis acute regulatory protein (STAR), 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, and the outer mitochondrial membrane proteins Translocator Protein (TSPO) and Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC). TSPO is a drug- and cholesterol-binding protein found at particularly high levels in steroid synthesizing cells. Its aberrant expression has been linked to cancer, neurodegeneration, neuropsychiatric disorders and primary hypogonadism. Brain steroids serve as local regulators of neural development and excitability. Reduced levels of these steroids have been linked to depression, anxiety and neurodegeneration. Reduced serum testosterone is common among subfertile young men and aging men, and is associated with depression, metabolic syndrome and reduced sexual function. Although testosterone-replacement therapy is available, there are undesired side-effects. TSPO drug ligands have been proposed as therapeutic agents to regulate steroid levels in the brain and testis.

  9. Drug delivery to the testis: current status and potential pathways for the development of novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Snow-Lisy, Devon C; Samplaski, Mary K; Labhasetwar, Vinod; Sabanegh, Edmund S

    2011-10-01

    Nanotechnology has been increasingly utilized for the targeting and delivery of novel therapeutic agents to different tissues and cell types. The current therapeutic options for testicular disorders fall short in many instances due to difficulty traversing the blood-testis barrier, systemic toxicities, and complicated dosing regiments. For testicular tissue, potential targeting can be obtained either via anatomic methods or specific ligands such as luteinizing hormone or follicle-stimulating hormone analogs. Potential novel therapeutic agents include DNA, RNA, cytokines, peptide receptor antagonists, peptide receptor agonists, hormones, and enzymes. Nanotherapeutic treatment of testicular cancer, infertility, testicular torsion, orchalgia, hypogonadism, testicular infections, and cryptorchidism within the framework of potential target cells are an emerging area of research. While there are many potential applications of nanotechnology in drug delivery to the testis, this remains a relatively unexplored field. This review highlights the current status as well as potential future of nanotechnology in the development of novel therapeutics for testicular disorders.

  10. Gonadal dysgenesis and the Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser Syndrome in a girl with a 46, XX karyotype: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kebaili, Sahbi; Chaabane, Kais; Mnif, Mouna Feki; Kamoun, Mahdi; Kacem, Faten Hadj; Guesmi, Nouha; Gassara, Hichem; Dammak, Abdallah; Louati, Doulira; Amouri, Habib; Guermazi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) is a characteristic syndrome in which the Mullerian structures are absent or rudimentary. It is also associated with anomalies of the genitourinary and skeletal systems. Its association with gonadal dysgenesis is extremely rare and appears to be fortuitous, independent of chromosomal anomalies. We report such a case in a 21-year-old girl who presented primary amenorrhea and impuberism. The endocrine study revealed hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism. The karyotype was normal, 46, XX. No chromosome Y was detected at the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Internal genitalia could not be identified on the pelvic ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. Laparoscopy disclosed concomitant ovarian dysgenesis and MRKH syndrome. There were no other associated malformations. Hormonal substitution therapy with oral conjugated estrogens was begun. The patient has been under regular follow-up for the last two years and is doing well. PMID:23869310

  11. Gonadal dysgenesis and the Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser Syndrome in a girl with a 46, XX karyotype: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kebaili, Sahbi; Chaabane, Kais; Mnif, Mouna Feki; Kamoun, Mahdi; Kacem, Faten Hadj; Guesmi, Nouha; Gassara, Hichem; Dammak, Abdallah; Louati, Doulira; Amouri, Habib; Guermazi, Mohamed

    2013-05-01

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) is a characteristic syndrome in which the Mullerian structures are absent or rudimentary. It is also associated with anomalies of the genitourinary and skeletal systems. Its association with gonadal dysgenesis is extremely rare and appears to be fortuitous, independent of chromosomal anomalies. We report such a case in a 21-year-old girl who presented primary amenorrhea and impuberism. The endocrine study revealed hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism. The karyotype was normal, 46, XX. No chromosome Y was detected at the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Internal genitalia could not be identified on the pelvic ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. Laparoscopy disclosed concomitant ovarian dysgenesis and MRKH syndrome. There were no other associated malformations. Hormonal substitution therapy with oral conjugated estrogens was begun. The patient has been under regular follow-up for the last two years and is doing well.

  12. [Severe chronic anemia and endocrine disorders in children].

    PubMed

    Hauschild, Michael; Theintz, Gérald

    2007-04-18

    Hemolytic anemias can induce various anomalies of the endocrine glands which can already be observed in children. Endocrine dysfunction is also found in the course of therapy for aplastic anemias, usually as undesirable side effects. In Europe, 2-9% of the population belongs to ethnic minorities at risk for developing hemolytic anemia. Pituitary affinity to iron deposition explains the high incidence of hypogonadism, puberty delay and growth retardation although other factors have to be considered. Growth hormone deficiency has to be ruled out as it can occur in a minority of subjects with thalassemia and sickle-cell disease (drepanocytosis). Diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism may also develop. Follow-up includes close monitoring of growth and pubertal development in order to guide therapeutic interventions.

  13. Endocrine abnormalities in patients with Jacobsen (11q-) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haghi, Marjan; Dewan, Asheesh; Jones, Kenneth Lee; Reitz, Richard; Jones, Christopher; Grossfeld, Paul

    2004-08-15

    Jacobsen syndrome (JS), a rare disorder with multiple dysmorphic features, is caused by the terminal deletion of chromosome 11q. Short stature has been reported in this syndrome, however very few of these patients have undergone endocrine evaluation. Serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels are an indirect indicator of growth hormone activity and are a useful initial screening tool in the assessment of an individual's growth hormone axis. We studied nine children with JS, eight of whom had short stature. Four out of eight children with short stature (50%) had low IGF-1 values, with three low for age and one low for Tanner stage. Four out of six males (67%) had cryptorchidism, a potential sign of hypogonadism. We conclude that low IGF-1 is common in patients with JS and short stature, and that growth hormone status and possibly hypothalamic-pituitary function should be evaluated in this patient population.

  14. Identification of a de novo inv dup(X)(pter--> q22) by multicolor banding in a girl with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burégio-Frota, P; Valença, L; Leal, G F; Duarte, A R; Bispo-Brito, A V S; Soares-Ventura, E M; Marques-Salles, T J; Nogueira, M T M C; Muniz, M T C; Silva, M L M; Hunstig, F; Liehr, T; Santos, N

    2010-04-27

    We report on a 23-year-old girl with short stature, short and wide neck, low posterior hairline, hypogonadism, underdeveloped breasts, infantile uterus, ovaries not visualized, and primary amenorrhea. Cytogenetic G-banding analysis revealed a mosaic karyotype of 46,X,dup(X)(q22)[35]/45,X[15], confirming the clinical suspicion of Turner syndrome. Molecular cytogenetics using a multicolor banding probe set for the X-chromosome characterized an inverted dup(X). The karyotype of the patient was therefore interpreted as 46,X,inv dup(X) (pter --> q22::q22 --> pter). This patient had a mosaic Turner syndrome with a cell line comprising partial trisomy Xpter to Xq22 and partial monosomy Xq22 to Xqter.

  15. [Hepatomegaly due to glycogen storage disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Flotats Bastardas, M; Miserachs Barba, M; Ricart Cumeras, A; Clemente León, M; Gussinyer Canadell, M; Yeste Fernández, D; Albisu Aparicio, María A; Carrascosa Lezcano, A

    2007-08-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes and poor metabolic control can develop hepatomegaly due to intrahepatic glycogen deposition. If these patients also have elevated liver enzymes, dyslipidemia, cushingoid features and delayed growth or sexual maturation, Mauriac syndrome can be diagnosed. This disorder is common and reversible with optimization of insulin therapy. We report three adolescents with type 1 diabetes and a long-standing history of poor glycemic control, who developed hepatomegaly, elevated liver enzymes and dyslipidemia with preserved liver function. One of these patients also had delayed growth and another had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Liver ultrasound showed changes suggestive of glycogenosis. In all three patients, optimization of insulin therapy achieved good glycemic control and reversed the manifestations within 2 weeks. The etiology of Mauriac syndrome is controversial since both prolonged hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinization produce glycogen accumulation in the liver. Hypercortisolism (due to ketosis or hypoglycemia) contributes to glycogen storage and also causes growth and sexual maturation delay.

  16. Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Suzanne B; Driscoll, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a highly variable genetic disorder affecting multiple body systems whose most consistent major manifestations include hypotonia with poor suck and poor weight gain in infancy; mild mental retardation, hypogonadism, growth hormone insufficiency causing short stature for the family, early childhood-onset hyperphagia and obesity, characteristic appearance, and behavioral and sometimes psychiatric disturbance. Many more minor characteristics can be helpful in diagnosis and important in management. PWS is an example of a genetic condition involving genomic imprinting. It can occur by three main mechanisms, which lead to absence of expression of paternally inherited genes in the 15q11.2-q13 region: paternal microdeletion, maternal uniparental disomy, and imprinting defect.

  17. [USE OF SILDENAFIL CITRATE FOR TREATMENT OF ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION OF VARIOUS ETIOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Efremov, E A; Kasatonova, E V; Mel'nik, Ja I

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is closely linked to the general state of both physical and psychological wellness. Among the major risk factors are heart disease, arterial hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, as well as sedentary lifestyle, smoking and alcohol abuse. Also, the disease is more frequently found in men undergoing radiation therapy or surgery for prostate cancer. Psychological correlates include anxiety, depression and irritability. Despite a higher prevalence among older men, erectile dysfunction is not considered an inevitable part of aging. Due to polyetiology of the disease, sildenafil is regarded as the gold standard of treatment, and new high quality generic drugs are marketed. The article covers the use of sildenafil in patients with diseases of the cardiovascular system, diabetes, hypogonadism. Effectiveness of sildenafil in patients on chronic hemodialysis as well as in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy is discussed. The issue of addiction to sildenafil is outlined.

  18. Eurycoma longifolia: Medicinal Plant in the Prevention and Treatment of Male Osteoporosis due to Androgen Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mohd Effendy, Nadia; Mohamed, Norazlina; Muhammad, Norliza; Naina Mohamad, Isa; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis in elderly men is now becoming an alarming health issue due to its relation with a higher mortality rate compared to osteoporosis in women. Androgen deficiency (hypogonadism) is one of the major factors of male osteoporosis and it can be treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). However, one medicinal plant, Eurycoma longifolia Jack (EL), can be used as an alternative treatment to prevent and treat male osteoporosis without causing the side effects associated with TRT. EL exerts proandrogenic effects that enhance testosterone level, as well as stimulate osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast apoptosis. This will maintain bone remodelling activity and reduce bone loss. Phytochemical components of EL may also prevent osteoporosis via its antioxidative property. Hence, EL has the potential as a complementary treatment for male osteoporosis.

  19. Eurycoma longifolia: Medicinal Plant in the Prevention and Treatment of Male Osteoporosis due to Androgen Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Effendy, Nadia; Mohamed, Norazlina; Muhammad, Norliza; Naina Mohamad, Isa; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis in elderly men is now becoming an alarming health issue due to its relation with a higher mortality rate compared to osteoporosis in women. Androgen deficiency (hypogonadism) is one of the major factors of male osteoporosis and it can be treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). However, one medicinal plant, Eurycoma longifolia Jack (EL), can be used as an alternative treatment to prevent and treat male osteoporosis without causing the side effects associated with TRT. EL exerts proandrogenic effects that enhance testosterone level, as well as stimulate osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast apoptosis. This will maintain bone remodelling activity and reduce bone loss. Phytochemical components of EL may also prevent osteoporosis via its antioxidative property. Hence, EL has the potential as a complementary treatment for male osteoporosis. PMID:22844328

  20. FSH — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Follicle stimulating hormone, a heterodimer glycoprotein of a common alpha chain and a unique beta chain which confers biological specificity to thyrotropin, lutropin, follitropin and gonadotropin, stimulates development of follicle and spermatogenesis in the reproductive organs. In conjunction with luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone induces egg and sperm production. Defects in FSHB are a cause of isolated follicle-stimulating hormone deficiency. Selective follicle-stimulating hormone deficiency is an uncommon cause of infertility, producing amenorrhea and hypogonadism in women and oligo or azoospermia with normal testosterone levels in normally virilised men. FSHB belongs to the glycoprotein hormones subunit beta family. There are two transcript variants from alternative splicing that each encode the same protein.

  1. LEP — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Leptin (LEP) is secreted by white adipocytes and plays a major role in the regulation of body weight. This protein, which acts through the leptin receptor, functions as part of a signaling pathway that can inhibit food intake and/or regulate energy expenditure to maintain constancy of the adipose mass. Leptin has also been implicated in the regulation of reproduction, glucose homeostasis, bone formation, wound healing and the immune system. Leptin has several endocrine functions and is also involved in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses, hematopoiesis, angiogenesis and wound healing. Mutations in the leptin gene and/or its regulatory regions cause severe obesity and morbid obesity with hypogonadism. The leptin gene has also been linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus development.

  2. Ten-year follow-up of a giant prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Vera; Santos, Maria Joana; Almeida, Rui; Marques, Olinda

    2015-11-20

    Giant prolactinomas are rare pituitary tumours of which management can be a challenge. A 28-year-old man presented with headaches, visual impairment and behavioural changes. Clinically, the patient was found to have hypogonadism and bitemporal hemianopsia. A MRI demonstrated a pituitary tumour 76 mm in diameter and blood tests revealed a serum prolactin of 158,700 µU/mL (reference range 58-254). Initially, a craniotomy was performed. Immunohistochemistry of the tumour identified a prolactinoma with a high proliferative index and the patient was started on treatment with a dopamine agonist. A year later, neurological symptoms worsened due to regrowth of the lesion's cystic component, and so further surgery was performed. After 10 years of treatment with dopamine agonists, the prolactin levels decreased by 96.8%, there was an effective reduction in tumour size, and the neurological signs and symptoms resolved.

  3. Postmortem diagnosis of "occult" Klinefelter syndrome in a patient with chronic renal disease and liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Kentaro; Orikasa, Hideki; Eyden, Brian; Yamazaki, Kazuto

    2002-03-01

    This report describes a patient not suspected of having Klinefelter syndrome during life but diagnosed with it following postmortem examination using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for sex chromosomes and hormone serum analysis. A 49-year-old Japanese man had a history of nephrosis, heavy alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, and liver cirrhosis and had been undergoing dialysis for 10 years. He died of ruptured esophageal varices. Autopsy revealed hypogonadism, suggesting Klinefelter syndrome. This was confirmed by FISH, which showed a mosaic 46XY, 47XXY karyotype, and by serum analysis, which revealed high luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone and low testosterone levels. Autopsy also revealed a nodular, bilateral, testicular Leydig cell hyperplasia. This report illustrates the value of postmortem laboratory investigations, particularly FISH for sex chromosomes and serum hormone analysis, for the demonstration of clinically uncertain or "occult" Klinefelter syndrome.

  4. Inhibitory effects of mitotane on viability and secretory activity in mouse gonadotroph cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gentilin, Erica; Molè, Daniela; Gagliano, Teresa; Minoia, Mariella; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Degli Uberti, Ettore C; Zatelli, Maria Chiara

    2014-06-01

    Mitotane represents the mainstay medical treatment for metastatic, inoperable or recurrent adrenocortical carcinoma. Besides the well-known adverse events, mitotane therapy is associated also with endocrinological effects, including sexual and reproductive dysfunction. The majority of male patients undergoing adjuvant mitotane therapy show a picture of hypogonadism, characterized by low free testosterone and high sex hormone binding globulin levels and unmodified LH concentrations. Since mitotane has been shown to have direct pituitary effects, we investigated whether mitotane may influence both cell viability and function of gonadotroph cells in the settings of two pituitary cell lines. We found that mitotane reduces cell viability, induces apoptosis, modifies cell cycle phase distribution and secretion of gonadotroph cells. The present data strengthen previous evidence showing a direct mitotane effect at pituitary level and represent a possible explanation of the lack of LH increase following decrease in free testosterone in patients undergoing adjuvant mitotane therapy.

  5. The role of testosterone therapy in cardiovascular mortality: culprit or innocent bystander?

    PubMed

    Tanna, Monique S; Schwartzbard, Arthur; Berger, Jeffery S; Alukal, Joseph; Weintraub, Howard

    2015-03-01

    Testosterone therapy is recommended for men with symptomatic androgen deficiency and unequivocally low testosterone levels. Although the prevalence of hypogonadism seems relatively constant, studies of prescribing patterns in both the United States and the United Kingdom show a dramatic increase in testosterone prescription in recent years, possibly due to increased marketing and inappropriate therapy. Concurrent with this, there has been growing concern regarding the potential adverse effects of testosterone therapy, particularly its cardiovascular risks. In this review, we present our current understanding of the implications of testosterone deficiency, as well as the conflicting evidence surrounding the cardiovascular effects of testosterone replacement therapy. Although there is a lack of adequate data, based on the current evidence, we conclude that testosterone therapy can be safely considered in men with appropriately diagnosed clinical androgen deficiency and increased cardiovascular risk after a thorough discussion of potential risks and with guideline recommended safety monitoring.

  6. [Giantism. A historical and medical view].

    PubMed

    de Herder, W W

    2004-12-25

    Patients with giantism were displayed as curiosities to large audiences in the past. The (medical) histories of famous giants like Daniel Cajanus (born in 1702 or 1703, Finland), Charles Byrne (1761, Ireland), Edouard Beaupré (1881, Canada) and Robert Wadlow (1918, Illinois, USA) are well described in the international medical literature. Extensive data from the entertainment world and/or medical data exist on famous Dutch giants like Klaas van Kyeten (end of 13th century), Gerrit Bastiaansz. de Hals (1620), Albert Johan Kramer (1897) and Rigardus Rijnhout (1922). Famous Dutch giantesses are Trijntje Kornelisse Keever (1614) and Kaatje van Dijk (1904). In most giants, excessive growth was caused by a somatotroph pituitary adenoma, sometimes in combination with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. In the western world, it is unlikely that there will be many more people with fully developed giantism due to the current high level of medical care.

  7. [Osteoporosis: a clinical perspective].

    PubMed

    Matikainen, Niina

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is defined by decreased bone density and microarchitectural deterioration that predispose to fragility fractures. The WHO diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis require bone densitometry but treatment is possible on the basis of high clinical fracture risk and can be assessed by the FRAX risk algorithm. All those subject to fracture risk should be advised about proper basic treatment of osteoporosis, including exercise, prevention of falls, smoking cessation, avoidance of alcohol intake, and dietary or supplemental abundance of calcium and vitamin D. Underlying diseases must be studied after diagnosis of osteoporosis even if treatment is initiated without densitometry. When indicated, specific osteoporosis therapy includes bisphosphonates, denosumab, teriparatide, strontium ranelate or SERMs. In hypogonadism, gonadal steroids may be indicated alone or in addition to a specific treatment. Treatment effect and continuation are assessed after 2 to 5 years.

  8. [Marked weight loss in two female patients with prader-willi syndrome by behavioral modification and improvement of the environment].

    PubMed

    Nishida, Keiko; Okada, Yosuke; Mori, Hiroko; Hirose, Akiko; Tanikawa, Takahisa; Arao, Tadashi; Morita, Emiko; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2006-03-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a complex neurogenetic disorder with considerable clinical variability, and is considered to be mainly the result of a hypothalamic defect. PWS is characterized by hyperphagia, obesity, mental retardation and hypogonadism from a young age. Hyperphagia is one of the most serious problems, which is organic in origin, inducing morbid obesity and leading to respiratory failure. Most studies attempting to control obesity in children with PWS by dietary management reported limited success due to difficulty in controlling foraging and food stealing. Here we report 16- and 20-year-old female patients with PWS who showed marked weight loss and improvement of respiratory failure by behavior modification and improvement of the environment.

  9. Pituitary gland development: an update.

    PubMed

    Bancalari, Rodrigo E; Gregory, Louise C; McCabe, Mark J; Dattani, Mehul T

    2012-01-01

    The embryonic development of the pituitary gland involves a complex and highly spatio-temporally regulated network of integrating signalling molecules and transcription factors. Genetic mutations in any of these factors can lead to congenital hypopituitarism in association with a wide spectrum of craniofacial/midline defects ranging from incompatibility with life to holoprosencephaly (HPE) and cleft palate and septo-optic dysplasia (SOD). Increasing evidence supports a genotypic overlap with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadal disorders such as Kallmann syndrome, which is consistent with the known overlap in phenotypes between these disorders. This chapter reviews the cascade of events leading up to the successful development of the pituitary gland and to highlight key areas where genetic variations can occur thus leading to congenital hypopituitarism and associated defects.

  10. Endocrine disturbances in suprasellar germinomas.

    PubMed

    Buchfelder, M; Fahlbusch, R; Walther, M; Mann, K

    1989-03-01

    The authors have investigated hypothalamic-pituitary function in 8 patients (aged 9-27 years) with surgically and histologically proven suprasellar germinomas. Diabetes insipidus was found in 7 patients. All the patients had hypogonadism and hypocortisolism as judged by dynamic endocrine testing. Hypothyroidism was found in 6. Moreover, growth hormone secretion, as assessed by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, was defective in all patients. Comparison of results of insulin-induced hypoglycemia testing and stimulation tests by CRH and GHRH suggested that all patients had a primary suprahypophyseal lesion rather than a primary pituitary defect. The authors conclude that suprasellar germinomas, although uncommon, should be included in the differential diagnosis of juvenile suprasellar tumours and in cases suggestive of idiopathic diabetes insipidus, even if neuroradiological investigation fails to demonstrate a discrete tumour.

  11. [Sexuality in overweight and obesity].

    PubMed

    Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    The association between obesity and sexual dysfunction has been described in many studies. Neurobiological, hormonal, vascular and mental disturbances are the main reasons in male and in female gender. Sexual interest and desire, sexual arousal, orgasm, painful intercourse and premature ejaculation can be involved. Data for prevalence of sexual function disturbances in obese people are scarce and most studies were small. For screening of sexual function we recommend the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-Score, which contains 15 Items for males and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), which contains 19 items for females. Treatment of sexual function disturbances include lifestyle changes with an increase of physical activity, weight control, healthy eating and smoking cessation. Testosterone substitution in cases of real hypogonadism and treatment with PDE-5 inhibitors are well documented treatment options in male individuals. New treatment options for female patients with variable effectiveness are fibanserin, testosterone, bupropione and oxytocin.

  12. Endogenous sex hormones, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes in men and women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Catherine; Halter, Jeffrey B

    2014-04-01

    Endogenous sex hormones predict impairments of glucose regulation. Cross-sectional studies suggest that lower levels of testosterone in men and higher levels in women increase risk of metabolic syndrome and diabetes, whereas lower levels of sex hormone binding globulin in both men and women increase risk of metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In a systematic review, we summarize existing longitudinal studies, which suggest similar patterns. However, these studies are often limited to a single sex steroid measure. Whether these associations are primarily a marker of adiposity, and whether these associations differ between younger eugonadal vs older hypogonadal adults is also uncertain. The impact of exogenous sex steroid therapy may not reflect relationships between sex hormones and impaired glucose regulation that occur without supplementation. Therefore, examination of endogenous sex steroid trajectories and obesity trajectories within individuals might aid our understanding of how sex steroids contribute to glucose regulation.

  13. Testosterone treatment in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Srinivas-Shankar, U; Sharma, D

    2009-01-01

    Testosterone has been used in testicular and hypothalamo-pituitary diseases since the 1940s. There is growing interest in the use of testosterone in aging men, and this has stimulated research into the benefits of male hormone replacement. Testosterone treatment of men with hypogonadism might have beneficial effects on body composition, muscle strength, sexual function, and cognition. There are several modes of administration of the male hormone, with injectable testosterone esters and implanted testosterone pellets being the mainstay of treatment until recently. These preparations are increasingly being replaced by transdermal patches, gels, and long-acting parenteral preparations. Testosterone patches and gels are ideally for elderly men. Treatment with the male hormone is relatively safe, if patients are selected appropriately and monitored carefully. The most important adverse effects are on the prostate. In this review, we briefly discuss the indications, contraindications, and benefits of testosterone treatment. Further, we list the adverse effects, advantages, and disadvantages of various testosterone preparations in elderly men.

  14. Genital manifestations of tropical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Richens, J

    2004-01-01

    Genital symptoms in tropical countries and among returned travellers can arise from a variety of bacterial, protozoal, and helminthic infections which are not usually sexually transmitted. The symptoms may mimic classic sexually transmitted infections (STIs) by producing ulceration (for example, amoebiasis, leishmaniasis), wart-like lesions (schistosomiasis), or lesions of the upper genital tract (epididymo-orchitis caused by tuberculosis, leprosy, and brucellosis; salpingitis as a result of tuberculosis, amoebiasis, and schistosomiasis). A variety of other genital symptoms less suggestive of STI are also seen in tropical countries. These include hydrocele (seen with filariasis), which can be no less stigmatising than STI, haemospermia (seen with schistosomiasis), and hypogonadism (which may occur in lepromatous leprosy). This article deals in turn with genital manifestations of filariasis, schistosomiasis, amoebiasis, leishmaniasis, tuberculosis and leprosy and gives clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:14755029

  15. Beyond testosterone cypionate: evidence behind the use of nandrolone in male health and wellness

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Characterized by low serum testosterone levels and diverse symptoms, male hypogonadism is a common condition. Current medical treatment focuses on testosterone supplementation using multiple modalities such as injections, gels and pellets. Interestingly, while testosterone is considered an anabolic androgenic steroid, it has not been saddled with the social stigma that other, similar medications have. The goal of this review is to highlight an anabolic steroid, 19-nortestosterone (i.e., nandrolone, deca-durabolin) and illustrate prospective therapeutic applications for male health. Containing a chemical structure similar to testosterone, nandrolone has a higher myotrophic: androgenic ratio resulting in improved effects on muscle mass. Animal models have suggested application in the improvement of joint healing following rotator cuff repair. Minimal literature exists regarding the use of nandrolone and, as such, further human studies are required. PMID:27141449

  16. Treatment of precocious puberty in a female with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pusz, Erin Rose; Rotenstein, Deborah

    2008-05-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by neonatal hypotonia, hyperphagia, childhood obesity at an early age, short stature, varying degrees of mental deficiency, and hypogonadism. In PWS, puberty is usually delayed and fails to complete, with most females never having regular menstrual cycles. We report a female patient with uniparental disomy, who experienced precocious puberty with menarche at age 8 years. The patient was treated with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) analog, which suppressed pubertal development. From our search of the literature this is the first application of LHRH analog to a female PWS patient for precocious puberty. Use of LHRH analog along with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) permitted stature closer to target height. The clinical course of this patient with PWS underscores the need for individualized treatment.

  17. Male osteoporosis and androgenic therapy: from testosterone to SARMs

    PubMed Central

    Cilotti, Antonio; Falchetti, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    As in the women, male osteoporosis represents an important social problem, amplified by the increasing life expectance. Differently from women, 50% of male osteoporosis is secondary to treatments and/or diseases that make mandatory their search through an accurate clinical investigations in every newly diagnosed osteoporotic men. Male osteoporosis is frequently underdiagnosed and consequently undertreated, and too often it is revealed only after the occurrence of a fragility fracture. Androgens may prevent the loss of cancellous bone and stimulate periosteal cortical bone apposition. The anabolic effect of testosterone on both bone and muscle, is limited by the high incidence of androgenic side effects. Hypogonadism is the only situation where the benefits of the use of testosterone formulations exceed the side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators can dissociate androgenic and anabolic effect on different tissues with various strategies. Many compounds have been studied with positive results in vivo and in clinical trials. PMID:22461251

  18. Turner syndrome mosaicism: an unusual case with a de novo large dicentric marker chromosome: mos 45,X/46,X, ter rea(X;X)(p22.3;p22.3).

    PubMed

    Nucaro, Anna Lisa; Melis, Paola; Casini, Maria Rosaria; Rossino, Rossano; Cau, Milena; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Loche, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    X/X translocations are quite rare in humans. The effect of this anomaly on the phenotype is variable and depends on the amount of deleted material and whether the chromosomes are joined by their long or short arms. We report an unusual case of Turner syndrome mosaicism in a 16-year-old girl, who was referred to our Institute for primary amenorrhoea associated with short stature. Endocrine evaluation revealed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, which required a study of the karyotype. Cytogenetic analysis, performed on peripheral blood leucocytes, showed a mos 45,X/46,X,ter rea (X;X)(p22.3;p22.3) de novo karyotype. The prevalent cell line was 45,X (90% cells). A second cell line (10% cells) showed a very large marker chromosome, similar to a large metacentric chromosome. FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridisation) and molecular analysis revealed that the marker chromosome was dicentric and totally derived from the paternal X chromosome.

  19. Antipsychotics and hyperprolactinaemia: mechanisms, consequences and management.

    PubMed

    Holt, Richard I G; Peveler, Robert C

    2011-02-01

    Hyperprolactinaemia is a common side effect in people receiving antipsychotics. The propensity to cause hyperprolactinaemia differs markedly between antipsychotics as a result of differential dopamine D(2) receptor-binding affinity and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Sexual dysfunction is common and under-recognized in people with severe mental illness and is in part caused by hyperprolactinaemia. There are a number of long-term consequences of hyperprolactinaemia, including osteoporosis. Regular monitoring before and during treatment will help identify those developing antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinaemia. The treatment includes dose reduction and change in antipsychotic. Where this is not possible because of the risk of relapse of the mental illness, sex steroid replacement may be helpful in improving symptoms secondary to hypogonadism and reducing the risk of osteoporosis. Tertiary prevention of complications should also be considered.

  20. A rare cause of primary amenorrhoea, the XY female with gonadal dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Mannaerts, Dominique; Muys, Joke; Blaumeiser, Bettina; Jacquemyn, Yves

    2015-02-09

    Disorders of sexual development are conditions where sexual phenotype and genotype are discordant. Genetic sex is determined at conception as the ovum is fertilised by a spermatozoon that contains either an X or Y chromosome. A complex pathway determined by genes and hormones leads to gonadal differentiation into testis or ovary and promotes the development of internal and external genitalia. We present a case of an 18-year-old woman who presented with primary amenorrhoea. She was a virgin, and apart from hirsutism and overweight, had no complaints. Her family history was insignificant. The patient was tall and had underdeveloped breasts. Her blood results showed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. A 46, XY genotype was detected with karyotype analysis. Ultrasound and MRI demonstrated the presence of a uterus, but no overt gonads. Laparoscopy was performed, with bilateral removal of streak ovaries.

  1. Sexual function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Priya; Schmidt, Rebecca J

    2007-04-01

    Endocrine abnormalities are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and lead to sexual dysfunction, anemia, hyperparathyroidism, and altered mineral metabolism. Common clinical problems include disturbances in menstruation in women, erectile dysfunction in men, and decreased libido and infertility in both sexes. Organic factors tend to be prominent and are related to uremia and other comorbid illnesses. Psychological factors and depression may exacerbate the primary problem. Alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are seen early in CKD and tend to worsen after patients start dialysis. Hypogonadism plays a dominant role in male sexual function, whereas changes in hypothalamic-pituitary function predominate in female sexual dysfunction. In patients on dialysis, treatment strategies include optimizing dose of dialysis, correction of anemia with erythropoietin, and correction of hyperparathyroidism. Successful kidney transplantation may restore normal sexual function, especially in younger patients.

  2. Sex hormones and the elderly male voice.

    PubMed

    Gugatschka, Markus; Kiesler, Karl; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Schoekler, Bernadette; Schmid, Christoph; Groselj-Strele, Andrea; Friedrich, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    The objective was to describe influences of sex hormones on the male voice in an elderly cohort. Sixty-three elderly males were recruited to undergo assessment of voice parameters, stroboscopy, voice-related questionnaires, a blood draw, and an ultrasound examination of the laryngeal skeleton. The group was divided into men with normal hormonal status and men with lowered levels of sex hormones, called hypogonades. Depending on the level of androgens, voice parameters did not differ. In subjects with decreased levels of estrogens, a significant increase in mean fundamental frequency, as well as changes of highest and lowest frequency plus a shift of the frequency range could be detected. We could detect significant changes of voice parameters depending on status of estrogens in elderly males. Androgens appear to have no impact on the elderly male voice. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study that correlates sex hormones with voice parameters in elderly men.

  3. Homozygous G320V mutation in the HJV gene causing juvenile hereditary haemochromatosis type A. A case report.

    PubMed

    Militaru, Mariela S; Popp, Radu A; Trifa, Adrian P

    2010-06-01

    While classical hereditary haemochromatosis, usually associated with mutations in the HFE gene, has an adult age onset and a long, progressive evolution, juvenile haemochromatosis, most often associated with mutations in the HJV gene, is a more severe, rapidly progressive condition and has an onset before the age of 30. We report a 26-year old woman with a severe iron overload, affected by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and moderate dilative cardiomyopathy, in whom the molecular analysis revealed a homozygous genotype for G320V mutation in the HJV gene. As juvenile haemochromatosis is a severe disease, death usually occurring from cardiac involvement, an efficient iron removal from the body strategy should be started as soon as possible, in order to prevent irreversible damage.

  4. Osteoporosis and Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is often overlooked or simply forgotten as a cause of osteoporosis. Yet, the consequences of osteoporotic fractures can be devastating. Although the bulk of the published experience regarding osteoporosis is derived from the postmenopausal population, this review will focus on gastrointestinal disorders implicated in osteoporosis, with an emphasis on inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease. The unique aspects of gastrointestinal diseases associated with osteoporosis include early onset of disease (and, therefore, prolonged exposure to risk factors for developing osteoporosis, particularly with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease), malabsorption, and maldigestion of nutrients necessary for bone health and maintenance (eg, calcium, vitamin D), as well as the impact of glucocorticoids. These factors, when added to smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, hypogonadism, and a family history of osteoporosis, accumulate into an imposing package of predictors for osteoporotic fracture. This paper will review the identification and treatment strategies for patients with gastrointestinal disorders and osteoporosis. PMID:20978554

  5. Selective androgen receptor modulators in preclinical and clinical development

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Mohler, Michael L.; Bohl, Casey E.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the function of several organs including primary and accessory sexual organs, skeletal muscle, and bone, making it a desirable therapeutic target. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) bind to the AR and demonstrate osteo- and myo-anabolic activity; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents produce less of a growth effect on prostate and other secondary sexual organs. SARMs provide therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, or end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty, and hypogonadism. This review summarizes the current standing of research and development of SARMs, crystallography of AR with SARMs, plausible mechanisms for their action and the potential therapeutic indications for this emerging class of drugs. PMID:19079612

  6. A rare cause of primary amenorrhoea, the XY female with gonadal dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mannaerts, Dominique; Muys, Joke; Blaumeiser, Bettina; Jacquemyn, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of sexual development are conditions where sexual phenotype and genotype are discordant. Genetic sex is determined at conception as the ovum is fertilised by a spermatozoon that contains either an X or Y chromosome. A complex pathway determined by genes and hormones leads to gonadal differentiation into testis or ovary and promotes the development of internal and external genitalia. We present a case of an 18-year-old woman who presented with primary amenorrhoea. She was a virgin, and apart from hirsutism and overweight, had no complaints. Her family history was insignificant. The patient was tall and had underdeveloped breasts. Her blood results showed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. A 46, XY genotype was detected with karyotype analysis. Ultrasound and MRI demonstrated the presence of a uterus, but no overt gonads. Laparoscopy was performed, with bilateral removal of streak ovaries. PMID:25666240

  7. Mini puberty and its interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Kurtoğlu, Selim; Baştuğ, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropins which are high in the middle of the fetal life are measured to be considerably low in the cord blood and estrogen is found to be high in the cord blood. Gonodotropins are supressed by estrogen. After delivery, the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis is activated when estrogen is eliminated and a hormone profile which reaches pubertal levels is established. These changes are called mini puberty. In boys, long-term testicular functions and sperm production are regulated with mini puberty and mini puberty contributes to masculinization of the brain. The role of mini puberty in female newborns is not known. Central hypogonadism, Turner syndrome and ovarian hyperstimulation in preterm babies may be diagnosed with evaluation of mini puberty. In this article, mini puberty and related problems were reviewed and the importance of this issue was emphasized. PMID:26078661

  8. Endocrine and musculoskeletal abnormalities in patients with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hawli, Yousra; Nasrallah, Mona; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada

    2009-06-01

    Down syndrome has a prevalence of one in 500 to one in 1,000 live births and is the most common cause of mental retardation. Most patients are treated in childhood and adolescence for mental or growth retardation. Studies that evaluate bone mass in Down syndrome are limited, and many are small case series in pediatric and adult populations who live either in the community or in residential institutions. Several environmental and hormonal factors contribute to low bone mineral density in such patients. Muscle hypotonia, low amounts of physical activity, poor calcium and vitamin D intakes, hypogonadism, growth retardation and thyroid dysfunction contribute to substantial impairments in skeletal maturation and bone-mass accrual that predispose these patients to fragility fractures. Here, we review indications and limitations of bone-mass measurements in children, summarize the endocrine and skeletal abnormalities in patients presenting with Down syndrome, and review studies that investigate therapeutic strategies for such patients.

  9. Obesity in the ageing man.

    PubMed

    Michalakis, K; Goulis, D G; Vazaiou, A; Mintziori, G; Polymeris, A; Abrahamian-Michalakis, A

    2013-10-01

    As the population is ageing globally, both ageing and obesity are recognized as major public health challenges. The aim of this narrative review is to present and discuss the current evidence on the changes in body composition, energy balance and endocrine environment that occur in the ageing man. Obesity in the ageing man is related to changes in both body weight and composition due to alterations in energy intake and total energy expenditure. In addition, somatopenia (decreased GH secretion), late-onset hypogonadism (LOH), changes in thyroid and adrenal function, as well as changes in appetite-related peptides (leptin, ghrelin) and, most importantly, insulin action are related to obesity, abnormal energy balance, redistribution of the adipose tissue and sarcopenia (decreased muscle mass). A better understanding of the complex relationship of ageing-related endocrine changes and obesity could lead to more effective interventions for elderly men.

  10. A case of autoimmune urticaria accompanying autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III associated with Hashimoto's disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kasznicki, Jacek; Drzewoski, Józef

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III (APS III) associated with Hashimoto's disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, vitiligo and autoimmune urticaria. This rare genetic disorder occurs with unknown frequency in the Polish population. It is characterised by endocrine tissue destruction resulting in the malfunction of multiple organs.Several cases of APS III associated with organ-specific autoimmune diseases such as coeliac disease, hypogonadism and myasthenia gravis, as well as organ-nonspecific or systemic autoimmune diseases such as sarcoidosis, Sjögren syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis have been described. To the best of our knowledge, we here describe the first case of APS III associated with autoimmune thyroiditis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, vitiligo and autoimmune urticaria in an adult patient.

  11. Zinc Deficiency after Gastric Bypass for Morbid Obesity: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mahawar, Kamal K; Bhasker, Aparna Govil; Bindal, Vivek; Graham, Yitka; Dudeja, Usha; Lakdawala, Muffazal; Small, Peter K

    2017-02-01

    Up to 50% of patients have zinc deficiency before bariatric surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the commonest bariatric procedure worldwide. It can further exacerbate zinc deficiency by reducing intake as well as absorption. The British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society, therefore, recommends that zinc level should be monitored routinely following gastric bypass. However, the American guidance does not recommend such monitoring for all RYGB patients and reserves it for patients with 'specific findings'. This review concludes that clinically relevant Zn deficiency is rare after RYGB. Routine monitoring of zinc levels is hence unnecessary for asymptomatic patients after RYGB and should be reserved for patients with skin lesions, hair loss, pica, dysgeusia, hypogonadism or erectile dysfunction in male patients, and unexplained iron deficiency anaemia.

  12. Comprehensive Review on Kisspeptin and Its Role in Reproductive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Holly; Dhillo, Waljit S.

    2015-01-01

    Kisspeptin has recently emerged as a key regulator of the mammalian reproductive axis. It is known that kisspeptin, acting centrally via the kisspeptin receptor, stimulates secretion of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH). Loss of kisspeptin signaling causes hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in humans and other mammals. Kisspeptin interacts with other neuropeptides such as neurokinin B and dynorphin, to regulate GnRH pulse generation. In addition, a growing body of evidence suggests that kisspeptin signaling be regulated by nutritional status and stress. Kisspeptin may also represent a novel potential therapeutic target in the treatment of fertility disorders. Early human studies suggest that peripheral exogenous kisspeptin administration stimulates gonadotrophin release in healthy adults and in patients with certain forms of infertility. This review aims to concisely summarize what is known about kisspeptin as a regulator of reproductive function, and provide an update on recent advances within this field. PMID:26194072

  13. Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, S B

    1997-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a complex disorder affecting multiple systems with many manifestations relating to hypothalamic insufficiency. Major findings include infantile hypotonia, developmental delay and mental retardation, behaviour disorder, characteristic facial appearance, obesity, hypogonadism, and short stature. Obesity and the behavioural problems are the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Prader-Willi syndrome is caused by abnormalities of the imprinted region of proximal 15q and results from absence of the normally active paternal genes in this region. Such absence results from paternal interstitial deletion, maternal uniparental disomy, or a mutation or other abnormality in the imprinting process. Diagnostic identification of all causes has become available in recent years, permitting early detection and institution of appropriate management. This testing has permitted recent identification of some phenotypic differences among affected subjects of different race and between those with deletions and uniparental disomy as a cause. Images PMID:9391886

  14. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Traggiai, Cristina; Stanhope, Richard

    2002-03-01

    Puberty is the acquisition of secondary sexual characteristics associated with a growth spurt and resulting in the attainment of reproductive function. Delayed puberty is diagnosed when there is no breast development by 13.4 years of age in a girl and no testicular enlargement by 14.0 years in a boy. The aetiologies are: (i) pubertal delay, either with constitutional delay of growth and puberty or secondary to chronic illness, and (ii) pubertal failure, with hypogonadotrophic (defect in the hypothalamo-pituitary region) or hypergonadotrophic (secondary to gonadal failure) hypogonadism, or both (secondary to radio/chemotherapy). The investigation includes: history, auxological data and pubertal development examination. Boys usually require treatment and, if they do not respond, investigation. In girls it is appropriate to measure the thyroid function and karyotype first and, if necessary, to offer treatment. If they present with dysmorphic features, or positive familial history, an assessment is required before treatment.

  15. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Edward O; Lee, Peter A

    2002-02-01

    Normal puberty is a time of life and a process of development that results in full adult maturity of growth, sexual development, and psychosocial achievement. Delayed puberty describes the clinical condition in which the pubertal events start late (usually > +2.5 SD later than the mean) or are attenuated in progression. The differential diagnosis includes syndromes of low gonadotropin production, usually constitutional delay of growth and maturation associated with chronic disease, but also an array of gene-mediated disorders, and syndromes of primary gonadal dysfunction with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, including Turner and Klinefelter syndromes, and a group of acquired and genetic abnormalities. Diagnostic assessment and varied therapeutic modalities are discussed. The issues of androgen or estrogen therapy are important to assess, and growth hormone treatment remains a difficult dilemma.

  16. Frasier syndrome: a rare cause of delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Chan, W K Y; To, K F; But, W M; Lee, K W

    2006-06-01

    We report on a post-renal transplant patient who presented with delayed pubertal development at the age of 15 years. She had a normal female phenotype. Blood analysis showed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Her karyotype was 46,XY. DNA analysis showed a heterozygous mutation in the WT1 gene (C to T mutation at position +4 of the splice donor site within intron 9). A diagnosis of Frasier syndrome was made and she underwent laparoscopic gonadectomy. This case illustrates that, while delayed puberty is common in children with chronic illness, clinicians should be particularly aware of the possibility of Frasier syndrome in those with progressive glomerulopathy and delayed puberty. DNA analysis is a useful means of confirming the diagnosis.

  17. Rathke's cyst with ectopic neurohypophysis presenting as severe short stature with delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Deep; Roy, Ajitesh; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Dasgupta, Ranen; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2012-12-01

    Ectopic neurohypophysis (EN) is found in nearly half of children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Rathke's cyst (RC) is uncommon in children and when present, hypopituitarism is found in nearly half of them. We present a fourteen and half-year-old girl with severe short stature and delayed puberty who on evaluation was found to have GHD, secondary hypocortisolism, and hypogonadism. Imaging revealed hypoplastic anterior pituitary, stalk agenesis, EN at tuber cinereum and intrapituitary RC. This is perhaps the first report of simultaneous occurrence of EN and RC, which was seen in a girl with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. A primary defect in pituitary development may explain this simultaneous occurrence of EN and RC and hence this severe anterior pituitary function deficit.

  18. Delayed puberty from partial 17-alpha hydroxylase enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed

    Croxson, Michael; Ogilvie, C Megan; Milsom, Stella; Lewis, John; Davidson, James; Rumsby, Gill

    2012-05-25

    An 18-year-old woman with primary amenorrhoea and pubertal delay was investigated for mild labile hypertension and secondary hypogonadism. Low renin and normal aldosterone levels combined with evidence of primary adrenal insufficiency suggested partial 17-alpha hydroxylase enzyme deficiency. The diagnosis was confirmed by measurement of 24-hour urine steroid metabolites and whole gene sequencing of CYP17A1 that demonstrated c.160_162delTTC (p.Phe54del) homozygous mutation. Ultrasound showed bilateral small ovaries with multiple cysts. The serum anti-mullerian hormone concentration was unremarkable at 6.6 (normal <12.6 ng/ml) but the outlook for her future ovulatory potential is uncertain. Dexamethasone 0.25 mg pre-bed and hydrocortisone 5 mg on waking normalised her hormonal profile and her blood pressure without side-effects.

  19. Obesity and male infertility: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Ahmad O; Meikle, A Wayne; Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Gibson, Mark; Peterson, C Matthew; Carrell, Douglas T

    2012-12-01

    Obesity in men is associated with infertility in numerous studies, and the temporal trend for a decline in semen parameters parallels the increasing prevalence of obesity in the developed world. In addition to impaired semen quality, fertility among obese men may be affected by decreased libido and erectile dysfunction. This spectrum of expression of hypogonadism among obese men originates from multiple interacting factors including reduced levels of gonadotropins and testosterone, altered androgen-to-estrogen ratios, insulin resistance, and sleep apnea. No evidence-based treatment that increases the likelihood of pregnancy for the infertility associated with male obesity has been demonstrated to date. Interventions associated with improvement of intermediate outcomes that include the endocrine profile, semen parameters, and sexual function may be appropriately selected based on history, physical findings, as well as endocrine and metabolic evaluation. Among these interventions are weight loss through lifestyle change, relief from sleep apnea, use of aromatase inhibitors, gonadotropin administration, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and insulin-sensitizing agents.

  20. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Kevan

    2008-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common problem affecting sexual function in men. Approximately one in 10 men over the age of 40 is affected by this condition and the incidence is age related. Erectile dysfunction is a sentinel marker for several reversible conditions including peripheral and coronary vascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Endothelial dysfunction is a common factor between the disease states. Concurrent conditions such as depression, late-onset hypogonadism, Peyronie's disease and lower urinary tract symptoms may significantly worsen erectile function, other sexual and relationship issues and penis dysmorphophobia. A focused physical examination and baseline laboratory investigations are mandatory. Management consists of initiating modifiable lifestyle changes, psychological and psychosexual/couples interventions and pharmacological and other interventions. In combination and with treatment of concurrent comorbid states, these interventions will often bring about successful resolution of symptoms and avoid the need for surgical interventions.

  1. SNORD116 deletions cause Prader-Willi syndrome with a mild phenotype and macrocephaly.

    PubMed

    Fontana, P; Grasso, M; Acquaviva, F; Gennaro, E; Galli, M L; Falco, M; Scarano, F; Scarano, G; Lonardo, F

    2017-03-07

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a complex condition caused by lack of expression of imprinted genes in the paternally derived region of chromosome 15 (15q11q13). A small number of patients with Prader-Willi phenotype have been discovered to have narrow deletions, not encompassing the whole critical region, but only the SNORD116 cluster, which includes genes codifying for small nucleolar RNAs. This kind of deletion usually is not detected by the classic DNA methylation analysis test. We present the case of a male patient with a mild Prader-Willi phenotype and a small deletion including SNORD116, diagnosed by methylation-sensitive multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. The patient showed neonatal hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, central hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, strabismus. Stature and intellectual development are within the normal range. The presence of macrocephaly, observed in other cases of SNORD116 deletions as well, is uncommon for the classic phenotype of the syndrome.

  2. Anticancer treatment and fertility: Effect of therapeutic modalities on reproductive system and functions.

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulou, Maria; Boostandoost, Erfaneh; Papaxoinis, George; de La Motte Rouge, Thibault; Khayat, David; Psyrri, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The significant improvement of cancer treatments entailed a longer life in cancer survivors and raised expectations for higher quality of life with minimized long-term toxicity. Infertility and gonadal dysfunction are adverse effects of anticancer therapy or may be related to specific tumors. In female cancer survivors, premature ovarian failure is common after antineoplastic treatments resulting in infertility and other morbidities related to oestrogen deficiency such as osteoporosis. In male cancer survivors, infertility and persistent a zoospermia is a more common long-term adverse effect than hypogonadism because germ cells are more sensitive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy than leydig cells. Gonadal toxicity and compromise of reproductive functions will be more efficiently prevented and treated if addressed before treatment initiation. This review focuses on these issues in young cancer survivors of childbearing age, where methods of protecting or restoring endocrine function and fertility need to be considered.

  3. Kisspeptin and KISS1R: a critical pathway in the reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Gianetti, Elena; Seminara, Stephanie

    2008-09-01

    In 2003, three groups around the world simultaneously discovered that KISS1R (GPR54) is a key gatekeeper of sexual maturation in both mice and men. Developmental changes in the expression of the ligand for KISS1R, kisspeptin, support its critical role in the pubertal transition. In addition, kisspeptin, a powerful stimulus of GNRH-induced gonadotropin secretion and may modulate both positive and negative sex steroid feedback effects at the hypothalamic level. Genetic studies in humans have revealed both loss-of-function and gainof-function mutations in patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and precocious puberty respectively. This review examines the kisspeptin/KISS1R pathway in the reproductive system.

  4. Role of kisspeptin/GPR54 system in human reproductive axis.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Leticia F G; Teles, Milena G; Trarbach, Ericka B; Latronico, Ana Claudia

    2010-01-01

    The kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling complex is a key gatekeeper of human sexual maturation. Kisspeptins, encoded by the KISS1 gene, constitute a powerful stimulus for gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced gonadotropin secretion. In addition, the KISS1 gene is a target for regulation by gonadal steroids in both sexes. The increase in hypothalamic kisspeptin expression at puberty is believed to contribute to maturation of the reproductive axis. Homozygous or compound heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the GPR54 gene have been identified in familial and sporadic patients with isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism without olfactory abnormalities. In addition, mice with targeted deletions of Kiss1 or Gpr54 have a similar failure of sexual maturation. Study of these mutations provides an important contribution in the understanding of the role of the kisspeptin/GPR54 system in the control of human puberty development and reproductive function.

  5. [A 74 year old patient with recurrent shock caused by hypopituitarism].

    PubMed

    Goedgezelschap, Annelien; Dejaeger, Eddy

    2015-12-01

    This article analyzes the case of a 74 year old patient who was hospitalized four times with recurrent complaints, which consisted of hypothermia, hypotension, weakness, and a hyponatremia, and were always caused by an underlying acute infection. Laboratory results showed an hypothyroidism, a secondary adrenal insufficiency, a secondary hypogonadism, and a growth hormone deficiency, which led to a diagnosis of pituitary dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed an 'empty sella', a non-visualization of the pituitary gland caused by an herniation of a supra-sellar cistern into the pituitary fossa. Considering the lack of an underlying pituitary tumor, a treatment consisting of partial hormonal substitution was started, eventually resulting in the full recovery of the patient.

  6. Obesity: genetic, molecular, and environmental aspects.

    PubMed

    Barness, Lewis A; Opitz, John M; Gilbert-Barness, Enid

    2007-12-15

    Obesity has emerged as one of the most serious public health concerns in the 21st century. Obese children tend to become obese adults. The dramatic rise in pediatric obesity closely parallels the rapid increase in the prevalence of adult obesity. As overweight children become adults they face the multitude of health problems associated with obesity at younger ages. The morbidity and mortality associated with obesity continue to increase. Obesity is one of the leading causes of preventable death. Complications of obesity include cardiovascular risks, hypertension, dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction, type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance, acanthosis nigricans, hepatic steatosis, premature puberty, hypogonadism and polycystic ovary syndrome, obstructive sleep disorder, orthopedic complications, cholelithiasis and pseudotumor cerebri. Genetic and molecular and environmental factors play an important role in the assessment and management of obesity.

  7. Adrenal insufficiency presenting as bilateral rigid auricles: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stiff ears appear to be a warning sign for adrenal insufficiency. This remarkable and rare sign has not been described to present in adrenal insufficiency in the setting of critical care. Case presentation We present the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male who underwent a thymoma resection and suffered from preoperative weight loss and lack of strength. The perioperative phase was characterised by hypotension and sputum stasis due to muscle weakness, which caused two readmissions to the intensive care unit. His physical examination showed two fully rigid auricles. In retrospect, our patient suffered from secondary adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadism. Conclusions The bilateral rigid auricles appeared to be a warning sign for adrenal insufficiency. This remarkable sign is easily checked, and should prompt a higher index of suspicion towards adrenal insufficiency and other hormonal deficiencies. PMID:25209544

  8. No Kiss1ng by leptin during puberty?

    PubMed

    Ahima, Rexford S

    2011-01-01

    Leptin exerts a permissive action on puberty by stimulating release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the hypothalamus. However, GnRH neurons lack leptin receptor (LepR), indicating that leptin must indirectly regulate these neurons. The Kiss1 gene produces kisspeptins that stimulate GnRH secretion. Because Kiss1 neurons express LepR and inactivation of Kiss1 causes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, Donato et al., in this issue of the JCI, assessed whether deletion of LepR from Kiss1 neurons would prevent sexual maturation. Unexpectedly, mice lacking LepR in Kiss1 neurons had normal pubertal development and fertility. In contrast, deletion of LepR from the ventral premammillary nucleus, a region of the brain involved in sexual behavior, prevented puberty and fertility. These findings highlight the complex biology of leptin in reproduction.

  9. HFE2 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    HFE2, also known as RGM-C, is a member of the repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) family and is involved in iron metabolism. HFE2 may act as a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) coreceptor. It is also thought to be a component of the signaling pathway which activates hepcidin or it may act as a modulator of hepcidin expression. It could also represent the cellular receptor for hepcidin. Alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been identified for this gene. Mutations in the HFE2 gene cause hemochromatosis type 2A, also called juvenile hemochromatosis (JH), an early-onset autosomal recessive disorder due to severe iron overload resulting in hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis and cardiomyopathy, occurring typically before age of 30.

  10. Acute psychosis as a presentation of hypopituitarism

    PubMed Central

    Kate, Shruti; Dhanwal, Dinesh Kumar; Kumar, Shishir; Bharti, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    Acute onset neuropsychiatric manifestations in hypopituitarism are uncommon. We report a case of a 60-year-old man who was a follow-up case of macroprolactinoma with hypopituitarism for the last 9 years. He was on medical treatment with cabergoline, thyroxine and depot testosterone. During the last 2 years he was non-adherent to medications especially cabergoline. He was hospitalised for 2 days through emergency services following acute onset psychosis. His pituitary hormone profile was suggestive of adrenal insufficiency, secondary hypothyroidism and hypogonadism. MRI of the hypothalamic pituitary region revealed a pituitary macroadenoma which was larger in size compared to the previous scan. Further, this lesion was compressing on the adjoining structures including optic chiasma. The patient was treated with intravenous fluids, hydrocortisone and thyroxine replacement therapy. With this treatment he completely recovered from psychosis within 48 h. PMID:23853186

  11. Testosterone as Potential Effective Therapy in Treatment of Obesity in Men with Testosterone Deficiency: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Farid; Aversa, Antonio; Isidori, Andrea M; Gooren, Louis J

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Obesity negatively affects human health. Limiting food intake, while producing some weight loss, results in reduction of lean body mass. Combined with moderate exercise it produces significant weight loss, maintains lean body mass and improves insulin sensitivity, but appears difficult to adhere to. Bariatric surgery is clinically effective for severely obese individuals compared with non-surgical interventions, but has limitations. Clinical and pre-clinical studies have implicated a role for testosterone (T) in the patho-physiology of obesity. Methods: Evidence Acquisition and Synthesis: A literature search in PubMed on the role of T in counteracting obesity and its complications. Results: Obesity per se impairs testicular T biosynthesis. Furthermore, lower-than-normal T levels increase accumulation of fat depots, particularly abdominal (visceral) fat. This fat distribution is associated with development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its sequels, namely type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). T treatment reverses fat accumulation with significant improvement in lean body mass, insulin sensitivity and biochemical profiles of cardiovascular risk. The contribution of T to combating obesity in hypogonadal men remains largely unknown to medical professionals managing patients with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Many physicians associate T treatment in men with risks for prostate malignancy and CVD. These beliefs are not supported by recent insights. Conclusion: While overall treatment of obesity is unsuccessful, T treatment of hypogonadal men may be effective, also because it improves mood, energy, reduces fatigue and may motivate men to adhere to diet and exercise regimens designed to combat obesity. PMID:22268394

  12. Risks of testosterone replacement therapy in ageing men.

    PubMed

    Tan, R S; Salazar, J A

    2004-11-01

    Testosterone has been available to practitioners for several decades. However, testosterone prescriptions have increased in recent years partly because of the introduction of newer delivery systems that are topical and have good bioavailability. In the US alone, approximately 2 million prescriptions for testosterone were written in 2002. This represents a 30% increase from 2001 and a 170% increase from 1999. There has also been a 500% increase in prescription sales in the past 10 years. The rise in prescriptions may be in part due to the increasing recognition of hypogonadism in ageing males or andropause. Treatment relating to hypogonadism has relieved symptoms and improved the quality of life of many individuals. Epidemiological studies point toward an association with increased morbidity and mortality, with low testosterone states in ageing males. For example, there is a higher prevalence of depression, coronary heart disease, osteoporosis, fracture rates, frailty and even dementia with low testosterone states. Recently, there have been some concerns raised regarding the long-term safety of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) from the Institute of Medicine. Current evidence suggests no causal relationship between prostate cancer and physiological dosing of testosterone, especially with careful selection and monitoring of patients. Cardiovascular risks have, overall, been neutral, although suggestions have been made that there are positive vasodilatory properties with testosterone. Mild eythrocytosis can be a common side effect of TRT, but thromboembolic events have rarely been reported in the literature. This paper addresses the evidence to date regarding the safety aspects of TRT. The medical-legal implications of TRT for men at this point in time is also discussed.

  13. Study of trabecular bone microstructure using spatial autocorrelation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Michael J.; Vasilic, Branimir; Saha, Punam K.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2005-04-01

    The spatial autocorrelation analysis method represents a powerful, new approach to quantitative characterization of structurally quasi-periodic anisotropic materials such as trabecular bone (TB). The method is applicable to grayscale images and thus does not require any preprocessing, such as segmentation which is difficult to achieve in the limited resolution regime of in vivo imaging. The 3D autocorrelation function (ACF) can be efficiently calculated using the Fourier transform. The resulting trabecular thickness and spacing measurements are robust to the presence of noise and produce values within the expected range as determined by other methods from μCT and μMRI datasets. TB features found from the ACF are shown to correlate well with those determined by the Fuzzy Distance transform (FDT) in the transverse plane, i.e. the plane orthogonal to bone"s major axis. The method is further shown to be applicable to in-vivo μMRI data. Using the ACF, we examine data acquired in a previous study aimed at evaluating the structural implications of male hypogonadism characterized by testosterone deficiency and reduced bone mass. Specifically, we consider the hypothesis that eugonadal and hypogonadal men differ in the anisotropy of their trabecular networks. The analysis indicates a significant difference in trabecular bone thickness and longitudinal spacing between the control group and the testosterone deficient group. We conclude that spatial autocorrelation analysis is able to characterize the 3D structure and anisotropy of trabecular bone and provides new insight into the structural changes associated with osteoporotic trabecular bone loss.

  14. The imbalance of sex-hormones related to depressive symptoms in obese men.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, Patrícia T; Falcão, Adriana A; Verreschi, Ieda T N; Zanella, Maria-Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Obese men may present hypogonadothrofic hypogonadism, mainly related to higher insulinemia and aromatase activity. Our objectives were to evaluate the relationship of sex-hormones profiles and frequency of depressive symptoms in 43 obese men, in a cross-sectional study. They had 19-60 years, and body mass index 30-50 kg/m(2). LH, total and free testosterone (TT and FT), estradiol (E2), sex hormone binding globulin, estradiol/total testosterone ratio (E2/T) were analyzed. Depressive symptoms were evaluated by "beck depression inventory" (BDI), and significant depression was considered if BDI ≥ 16.Thirty-four (80%) presented low TT levels, but only 4 (14%) had low free testosterone and hypogonadism symptoms; 12 of 43 (28%) presented increased E2. Forty five (56%) presented depressive symptoms, but 16 (28% of the 45) had significant depression. BDI correlated positively with E2 (r = 0.407; p = 0.001) and E2/T (r = 0.473; p = 0.001), but not TT or FT. Patients with significant depressive showed higher levels of estradiol (136 ± 48 versus 103 ± 48 pg/ml, p = 0.02) and E2/T (16.0 ± 9.9 versus 9.8 ± 4.6; p = 0.002) (mean ± SD).In conclusion, obese men may present relatively excess of estradiol and deficiency in testosterone, leading to an imbalance between these two hormones. The greater this imbalance, the more depressive symptoms had our patients.

  15. Viral-mediated Zif268 expression in the prefrontal cortex protects against gonadectomy-induced working memory, long-term memory, and social interaction deficits in male rats.

    PubMed

    Dossat, Amanda M; Jourdi, Hussam; Wright, Katherine N; Strong, Caroline E; Sarkar, Ambalika; Kabbaj, Mohamed

    2017-01-06

    In humans, some males experience reductions in testosterone levels, as a natural consequence of aging or in the clinical condition termed hypogonadism, which are associated with impaired cognitive performance and mood disorder(s). Some of these behavioral deficits can be reversed by testosterone treatment. Our previous work in rats reported that sex differences in the expression of the transcription factor Zif268, a downstream target of testosterone, within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) mediates sex differences in social interaction. In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of gonadectomy (GNX) in male rats on mPFC Zif268 expression, mood and cognitive behaviors. We also examined whether reinstitution of Zif268 in GNX rats will correct some of the behavioral deficits observed following GNX. Our results show that GNX induced a downregulation of Zif268 protein in the mPFC, which was concomitant with impaired memory in the y-maze and spontaneous object recognition test, reduced social interaction time, and depression-like behaviors in the forced swim test. Reinstitution of mPFC Zif268, using a novel adeno-associated-viral (AAV) construct, abrogated GNX-induced working memory and long-term memory impairments, and reductions in social interaction time, but not GNX-induced depression-like behaviors. These findings suggest that mPFC Zif268 exerts beneficial effects on memory and social interaction, and could be a potential target for novel treatments for behavioral impairments observed in hypogonadal and aged men with declining levels of gonadal hormones.

  16. A case series of the safety and efficacy of testosterone replacement therapy in renal failure and kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Majzoub, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypogonadism is common in patients with renal dysfunction and does not always correct following transplantation. Recent studies show increased mortality for dialysis and transplant patients with low testosterone (T). These patients are often not treated due to concerns over efficacy and complications (both real and imagined). There is surprisingly scant literature supporting the use of T therapy in these patients. We wished to examine the results of T therapy in our patients with renal failure or following transplant. Methods We identified 15 men in our Men’s Health Registry treated with T who either were on dialysis or had a functioning transplant at time of therapy. Demographic, laboratory and clinical outcome data were collected from the electronic medical record. Results There were 3 men on dialysis and 12 with a functioning transplant. Mean age was 53.7 years (range, 39–71 years) and mean total serum T was 207.9 ng/mL (range, 45–330 ng/mL). All had bothersome symptoms including fatigue (15/15) and erectile dysfunction (ED) (14/15). Mean hematocrit was 35.8% and 9/15 were anemic. Therapy included patches in 1, topical gels in 6 and testopel pellets in 8. With a mean follow-up of 22.7 months (range, 11–58 months), mean T post therapy was 528 (range, 226–869). Mean hematocrit improved to 42.6% and 7/9 anemic patients improved out of the anemic range. There were no cardiovascular or infectious complications. Conclusions Symptomatic hypogonadism is common in dialysis and transplant patients and T replacement therapy can be safely given with improvement in T values and symptoms in most patients. Anemia is usually improved. Testopel pellets can be used in immunosuppressed transplant recipients without infectious complications. PMID:28078211

  17. Proinflammatory Cytokine Infusion Attenuates LH's Feedforward on Testosterone Secretion: Modulation by Age

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rebecca; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Takahashi, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Context: In the experimental animal, inflammatory signals quench LH's feedforward drive of testosterone (T) secretion and appear to impair GnRH-LH output. The degree to which such suppressive effects operate in the human is not known. Objective: To test the hypothesis that IL-2 impairs LH's feedforward drive on T and T's feedback inhibition of LH secretion in healthy men. Setting: Mayo Center for Translational Science Activities. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 35 healthy men, 17 young and 18 older. Interventions: Randomized prospective double-blind saline-controlled study of IL-2 infusion in 2 doses with concurrent 10-minute blood sampling for 24 hours. Main Outcome Measures: Deconvolution analysis of LH and T secretion. Results: After saline injection, older compared with young men exhibited reduced LH feedforward drive on T secretion (P < .001), and decreased T feedback inhibition of LH secretion (P < .01). After IL-2 injection, LH's feedforward onto T secretion declined markedly especially in young subjects (P < .001). Concomitantly, IL-2 potentiated T's proportional feedback on LH secretion especially in older volunteers. Conclusion: This investigation confirms combined feedforward and feedback deficits in older relative to young men given saline and demonstrates 1) joint mechanisms by which IL-2 enforces biochemical hypogonadism, viz, combined feedforward block and feedback amplification; and 2) unequal absolute inhibition of T and LH secretion by IL-2 in young and older men. These outcomes establish that the male gonadal axis is susceptible to dual-site suppression by a prototypic inflammatory mediator. Thus, we postulate that selected ILs might also enforce male hypogonadism in chronic systemic inflammation. PMID:26600270

  18. High Prevalence of Chronic Pituitary and Target-Organ Hormone Abnormalities after Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles W.; Pagulayan, Kathleen F.; Petrie, Eric C.; Mayer, Cynthia L.; Colasurdo, Elizabeth A.; Shofer, Jane B.; Hart, Kim L.; Hoff, David; Tarabochia, Matthew A.; Peskind, Elaine R.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least 1 year after injury, in 25–50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI), an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least 1 year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and rehabilitation. PMID

  19. PRR repeats in the intracellular domain of KISS1R are important for its export to cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Chevrier, Lucie; de Brevern, Alexandre; Hernandez, Eva; Leprince, Jérome; Vaudry, Hubert; Guedj, Anne Marie; de Roux, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    Inactivating mutations of KISS-1 receptor (KISS1R) have been recently described as a rare cause of isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism transmitted as a recessive trait. Few mutations have been described, and the structure-function relationship of KISS1R remains poorly understood. Here, we have taken advantage of the discovery of a novel mutation of KISS1R to characterize the structure and function of an uncommon protein motif composed of 3 proline-arginine-arginine (PRR) repeats located within the intracellular domain. A heterozygous insertion of 1 PRR repeat in-frame with 3 PRR repeats leading to synthesis of a receptor bearing 4 PRR repeats (PRR-KISS1R) was found in the index case. Functional analysis of PRR-KISS1R showed a decrease of the maximal response to kisspeptin stimulation, associated to a lower cell surface expression without modification of total expression. PRR-KISS1R exerts a dominant negative effect on the synthesis of the wild-type (WT)-KISS1R. This effect was due to the nature of inserted residues but also to the difference of the length of the intracellular domain between PRR-KISS1R and WT-KISS1R. A molecular dynamic analysis showed that the additional PRR constrained this arginine-rich region into a polyproline type II helix. Altogether, this study shows that a heterozygous insertion in KISS1R may lead to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by a dominant negative effect on the WT receptor. An additional PRR repeat into a proline-arginine-rich motif can dramatically changed the conformation of the intracellular domain of KISS1R and its probable interaction with partner proteins.

  20. Hematotesticular barrier is altered from early stages of liver cirrhosis: Effect of insulin-like growth factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Cortázar, Inma; Diez, Nieves; García-Fernández, María; Puche, Juan Enrique; Diez-Caballero, Fernando; Quiroga, Jorge; Díaz-Sánchez, Matías; Castilla, Alberto; Casares, Amelia Díaz; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Prieto, Jesús; González-Barón, Salvador

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The pathogenesis of hypogonadism in liver cirrhosis is not well understood. Previous results from our laboratory showed that IGF-1 deficiency might play a pathogenetic role in hypogonadism of cirrhosis. The administration of IGF-1 for a short period of time reverted the testicular atrophy associated with advanced experimental cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to establish the historical progression of the described alterations in the testes, explore testicular morphology, histopathology, cellular proliferation, integrity of testicular barrier and hypophyso-gonadal axis in rats with no ascitic cirrhosis. METHODS: Male Wistar rats with histologically-proven cirrhosis induced with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) for 11 wk, were allocated into two groups (n = 12, each) to receive recombinant IGF-1 (2 μg/100 g.d, sc) for two weeks or vehicle. Healthy rats receiving vehicle were used as control group (n = 12). RESULTS: Compared to controls, rats with compensated cirrhosis showed a normal testicular size and weight and very few histopathological testicular abnormalities. However, these animals showed a significant diminution of cellular proliferation and a reduction of testicular transferrin expression. In addition, pituitary-gonadal axis was altered, with significant higher levels of FSH (P < 0.001 vs controls) and increased levels of LH in untreated cirrhotic animals. Interestingly, IGF-1 treatment normalized testicular transferrin expression and cellular proliferation and reduced serum levels of LH (P = ns vs controls, and P < 0.01 vs untreated cirrhotic group). CONCLUSION: The testicular barrier is altered from an early stage of cirrhosis, shown by a reduction of transferrin expression in Sertoli cells, a diminished cellular proliferation and an altered gonadal axis. The treatment with IGF-1 could be also useful in this initial stage of testicular disorder associated with compensated cirrhosis. PMID:15300898

  1. Partial trisomy 14q and monosomy 20q due to an unbalanced familial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Menasse-Palmer, L; Leo, J.; Cannizaro, L.

    1994-09-01

    Partial trisomy of distal 14q and monosomy of 20q are rare. There have been several reports of a partial distal trisomy 14q with characteristic clinical findings, including hypogonadism and a conotruncal cardiac anomaly. There is no deletion distal 20q syndrome. We have recently examined a newborn with this unique duplication/deletion syndrome. Case report: J.S. was the 2980 gm product of a term uneventful pregnancy delivered to a 24-year-old gravida 2, para 1001 mother. The newborn exam revealed a dysmorphic newborn male with a sloping forehead, bitemporal narrowing, glabellar furrowing and micrognathia. A systolic murmur was audible. The genital abnormalities were micropenis, hypospadias with chordee and bifid scrotum with prominent raphe, and gonads were palpable. A CAT scan of the head revealed grade I IVH. An echocardiogram showed a VSD, ASD and an AP window. A sonogram of the liver showed absence of the gallbladder. Chromosome analysis revealed an abnormal male karyotype containing a derivative 20, subsequently shown to be inherited as a result of malsegregation of a paternal translocation: 46,XY,-20,+der(20)t(14;20)(q32.1;q13.3)pat. The infant fed poorly and required tube feedings and was treated for congestive heart failure with Digoxin, Lasix and oxygen. A decreased cortisol level and cholestasis were noted. The infant died after a cardiopulmonary arrest at one month of age. No post-mortem was obtained. Clinical cytogenetic correlation (conotruncal abnormality and hypogonadism) with partial duplication of distal 14q was positive. This case helps to further delineate duplication 14q and a syndrome due to partial deletion 20q.

  2. Mechanism of testosterone deficiency in the transgenic sickle cell mouse.

    PubMed

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R; Zirkin, Barry R; Burnett, Arthur L

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease.

  3. The Effects of Opioids and Opioid Analogs on Animal and Human Endocrine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Cassidy; Van Uum, Stan H. M.; O'Dell, Laura E.; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Friedman, Theodore C.

    2010-01-01

    Opioid abuse has increased in the last decade, primarily as a result of increased access to prescription opioids. Physicians are also increasingly administering opioid analgesics for noncancer chronic pain. Thus, knowledge of the long-term consequences of opioid use/abuse has important implications for fully evaluating the clinical usefulness of opioid medications. Many studies have examined the effect of opioids on the endocrine system; however, a systematic review of the endocrine actions of opioids in both humans and animals has, to our knowledge, not been published since 1984. Thus, we reviewed the literature on the effect of opioids on the endocrine system. We included both acute and chronic effects of opioids, with the majority of the studies done on the acute effects although chronic effects are more physiologically relevant. In humans and laboratory animals, opioids generally increase GH and prolactin and decrease LH, testosterone, estradiol, and oxytocin. In humans, opioids increase TSH, whereas in rodents, TSH is decreased. In both rodents and humans, the reports of effects of opioids on arginine vasopressin and ACTH are conflicting. Opioids act preferentially at different receptor sites leading to stimulatory or inhibitory effects on hormone release. Increasing opioid abuse primarily leads to hypogonadism but may also affect the secretion of other pituitary hormones. The potential consequences of hypogonadism include decreased libido and erectile dysfunction in men, oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea in women, and bone loss or infertility in both sexes. Opioids may increase or decrease food intake, depending on the type of opioid and the duration of action. Additionally, opioids may act through the sympathetic nervous system to cause hyperglycemia and impaired insulin secretion. In this review, recent information regarding endocrine disorders among opioid abusers is presented. PMID:19903933

  4. Klinefelter's syndrome: a clinical and therapeutical update.

    PubMed

    Forti, G; Corona, G; Vignozzi, L; Krausz, C; Maggi, M

    2010-09-01

    The prevalence of the Klinefelter's syndrome, ranging between 1/500 and 1/1,000 in the general male population, rises up to 3-4% among infertile males and to 10-12% in azoospermic patients. Due to the paucity of symptoms, only 10% of Klinefelter patients are diagnosed prepubertally. The clinical spectrum of the phenotype of adult Klinefelter patients is very broad and ranges from clinically overt hypogonadism to normally virilized males. The diagnosis is usually made during the evaluation of couple infertility. The only nearly constant clinical feature is the reduced testicular volume and azoospermia or, in few cases, cryptozoospermia. Due to the variability of the phenotype and also to the fact that the main symptoms of the syndrome (androgen deficiency, infertility) are in the reproductive domain, approximately two thirds of Klinefelter patients are not diagnosed during their life. Low/normal testosterone and high levels of the luteinizing hormone (LH) suggest that all Klinefelter patients have overt or compensated hypogonadism which should be treated with testosterone, starting from the peri-pubertal age. Even if no medical treatment is possible for infertility, testicular sperm for assisted reproduction techniques can be obtained by multiple testicular biopsies in experienced centers in up to 50% of subjects. Although there are no predictors for successful sperm retrieval, the birth of 101 children with normal karyotype was reported in the last 15 years. Furthermore, the genetic risk to the offspring of Klinefelter patients has recently not been found to be greater than that of patients with nonobstructive azoospermia with normal karyotype.

  5. The pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of osteoporosis in men.

    PubMed

    Mosekilde, Leif; Vestergaard, Peter; Rejnmark, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone stimulates longitudinal and appositional growth during childhood, whereas estrogen induces epiphysial closure. During adulthood, testosterone continues to stimulate periosteal growth, whereas estrogen is important for the maintenance of trabecular bone mass and structure. In males, testosterone is aromatized to estradiol. Both free and bioavailable plasma levels of testosterone and estradiol decrease with age in males, and fracture risk is associated with low estradiol levels. Testosterone may increase muscle mass and prevent fractures related to falls. Younger hypogonadal males should be treated with testosterone to attain peak bone mass and increase bone mineral density (BMD). Older hypogonadal males should be treated in cases of osteoporosis, reduced muscle strength and increased risk of falling. Secondary hyperparathyroidism caused by calcium and vitamin D insufficiency may reduce bone mass and strength and increase fracture risk and should be avoided. Since calcium supplementation has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications and renal stones, the dose should be tailored to the habitual daily calcium intake. Lifestyle-related risk factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, lack of physical activity and low body weight) should be addressed. The antifracture efficacy of antiresorptive and anabolic treatment for osteoporosis has not been documented in larger randomized controlled studies. However, changes in BMD and bone markers suggest similar effects in males and females of bisphosphonates (alendronate, risedronate, ibandronate, zoledronic acid), nasal calcitonin, denosumab and teriparatide (parathyroid hormone [1-34]). The antiresorptive drugs should be used in males with BMD T-score less than -2.5 and one or more risk factors, or with hip and vertebral fractures. It seems appropriate to recommend a higher cut-off T-score (e.g. less than -1.0 standard deviation [SD]) in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and in patients

  6. Endocrine function and bone disease during long-term chelation therapy with deferasirox in patients with β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Casale, Maddalena; Citarella, Serena; Filosa, Aldo; De Michele, Elisa; Palmieri, Francesco; Ragozzino, Alfonso; Amendola, Giovanni; Pugliese, Umberto; Tartaglione, Immacolata; Della Rocca, Filomena; Cinque, Patrizia; Nobili, Bruno; Perrotta, Silverio

    2014-12-01

    Iron overload in β-thalassemia major (TM) typically results in iron-induced cardiomyopathy, liver disease, and endocrine complications. We examined the incidence and progression of endocrine disorders (hypothyroidism, diabetes, hypoparathyroidism, hypogonadism), growth and pubertal delay, and bone metabolism disease during long-term deferasirox chelation therapy in a real clinical practice setting. We report a multicenter retrospective cohort study of 86 transfusion-dependent patients with TM treated with once daily deferasirox for a median duration of 6.5 years, up to 10 years. No deaths or new cases of hypothyroidism or diabetes occurred. The incidence of new endocrine complications was 7% (P = 0.338, for change of prevalence from baseline to end of study) and included hypogonadism (n = 5) and hypoparathyroidism (n = 1). Among patients with hypothyroidism or diabetes at baseline, no significant change in thyroid parameters or insulin requirements were observed, respectively. Mean lumbar spine bone mineral density increased significantly (P < 0.001) and the number of patients with lumbar spine osteoporosis significantly decreased (P = 0.022) irrespective of bisphosphonate therapy, hormonal replacement therapy, and calcium or vitamin D supplementation. There were no significant differences in the number of pediatric patients below the 5th centile for height between baseline and study completion. Six pregnancies occurred successfully, and four of them were spontaneous without ovarian stimulation. This is the first study evaluating endocrine function during the newest oral chelation therapy with deferasirox. A low rate of new endocrine disorders and a stabilization of those pre-exisisting was observed in a real clinical practice setting.

  7. Androgens and prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has established the anabolic benefits of testosterone (T) therapy in hypogonadal men. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding the risks of exogenous androgen use in older men and the potential for adverse effects on the prostate gland. Whether T therapy in older, hypogonadal men might worsen lower urinary tract symptoms or exacerbate, unmask, or even incite prostate cancer development has tempered enthusiasm for T therapy, while known prostatic disease has served as a relative contraindication to T therapy. Androgens are necessary for the development and maintenance of the prostate gland. However, epidemiologic studies do not consistently find a positive relationship between endogenous serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate disease. Recent data demonstrate that 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the risk of low-grade prostate cancer, suggesting that modifying androgen metabolism may have beneficial effects on prostate health, yet similar reductions in high-grade disease have not been observed, thereby questioning the true clinical benefits of these agents for chemoprevention. Knowing how to best investigate the relationship between androgens and the development of prostate disease given the lack of large, randomized trials is difficult. Accumulating data challenges the assumption that alterations in serum androgens have parallel effects within the prostate hormonal environment or change androgen-regulated processes within the gland. Long-term intervention studies are needed to truly ascertain the effects of androgen manipulation on prostate tissue and disease risk. However, available data do not support the notion that restoring serum androgens to normal physiologic ranges drives prostate disease. PMID:24407178

  8. Analysis of the relationship between the blood concentration of several metals, macro- and micronutrients and endocrine disorders associated with male aging.

    PubMed

    Rotter, Iwona; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I; Dołęgowska, Barbara; Safranow, Krzysztof; Kuczyńska, Magdalena; Laszczyńska, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Beyond 30 years of age, men experience a decline in the production of testosterone, yet only a few develop late-onset hypogonadism. This study was designed to determine the relationship between blood concentrations of metals, macro- and micronutrients and age-related testosterone deficiency and associated hormonal changes in aging men. The research involved 313 men aged 50-75 years. We used ELISA to determine the concentrations of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), estradiol (E2), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). We calculated free androgen index (FAI). With the use of emission spectrometry in inductively coupled argon plasma, we determined the whole-blood concentrations of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), arsenic (As) and tungsten (W), as well as serum concentrations of magnesium (Mg), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn) and molybdenum (Mo). The study showed no relationship between TT and FT and the concentrations of metals. Men with TT deficiency had significantly lower concentrations of Mg and Fe and increased Mn. Men with FT deficiency had higher W and Cr levels and lower Fe. Assessing the correlation between the concentrations of hormones, SHBG and FAI, and the concentration of metals and macro- and microelements in the blood of the men, we found positive correlations between the concentrations of TT-Mg, TT-Fe, TT-Mo, FT-Fe, E2-As, SHBG-Mn, FAI-W, FAI-As, FAI-Zn and FAI-Ca, and negative correlations between the concentrations of TT-Mn, FT-Cd, FT-Cr, E2-Hg, E2-Cr, SHBG-W, SHBG-As, SHBG-Zn, SHBG-Ca, FAI-Pb and FAI-Mn. Positive correlations between As and E2 and between As and FAI may suggest a lack of association between this metal and hypogonadism in people not exposed to excess As levels. Our research indicates a positive relationship between the concentrations of Mg, Fe and Zn and endocrine system in aging men, in contrast to Mn and

  9. Delayed puberty: analysis of a large case series from an academic center.

    PubMed

    Sedlmeyer, Ines L; Palmert, Mark R

    2002-04-01

    Despite the clinical importance of delayed puberty, the understanding of this condition is hampered by the lack of studies evaluating etiologies and predisposing factors among large case series. We performed a retrospective study of clinical and laboratory data from adolescents (< or =18 yr of age) with delayed puberty who had been seen in our clinic between 1/96 and 7/99 (n = 232 subjects; 158 males and 74 females). Family histories of pubertal timing among primary relatives were classified as negative, having at least a tendency to pubertal delay (development > or =1 SD beyond the mean), or diagnostic of delay (development > or =2 SD beyond the mean). The most common cause of delayed puberty was constitutional delay of growth and maturation (CD), which affected 53% of the subjects (63% of males and 30% of females). The remaining subjects could be divided into four categories: those with an underlying condition associated with delayed, but spontaneous, pubertal development [functional hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (FHH)], 19% of subjects; those with permanent hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, 12% of subjects; those with permanent hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, 13% of subjects; and those without clearly classified disorders, 3% of subjects. Like CD, FHH was male predominant, whereas the other categories either affected both genders equally or were predominantly female. In total, 50 different etiologies led to pubertal delay within our case series. Data permitted classification of family histories of pubertal timing among primary relatives in 95 of 122 of the CD and in 25 of 45 of the FHH cases. Analysis revealed at least a tendency to pubertal delay in 77% of the CD and in 64% of the FHH families and a diagnosis of delay in 38% of the CD and 44% of the FHH families. Both parents contributed to the positive family histories. The rates of positive family histories among the CD and FHH groups were approximately twice those seen among the other subjects in our case

  10. Turner syndrome: contemporary thoughts and reproductive issues.

    PubMed

    Reindollar, Richard H

    2011-07-01

    Turner syndrome is a common genetic disorder that has been classically associated with a 45,X karyotype. Several X-chromosomal abnormalities have been identified in these patients, many of which involve mosaicism. These patients have variable but predictable phenotypic findings and are at risk for development of endocrine, autoimmune, and structural abnormalities. As many as 1.5% of the population with Turner syndrome may develop dissection and rupture of the ascending aorta; the presence of abnormalities of the cardiac tree and hypertension increase this risk, but their absence does not preclude it. Rupture has occurred at aortic diameters smaller than previously reported for other patient populations. Five percent or more of women with Turner syndrome may have abbreviated menstrual function before developing amenorrhea and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. An estimated 1 to 2% of all patients may become pregnant. Only three patients with Turner syndrome (and two of them with streak ovaries) have ever been reported to become pregnant after developing amenorrhea and elevated gonadotropin levels. Pregnancy, either spontaneous or more commonly from donor oocyte, increases maternal mortality rate for these women by an estimated ≥100 fold. It appears that all Turner women are at risk of rupture; neither prior spontaneous menses nor age >30 years provides protection. In addition, the literature suggests that the physiological changes of pregnancy may increase the risk of rupture in future years after delivery for those Turner women who seemingly made it safely through pregnancy. The use of the term PRIMARY OVARIAN INSUFFICIENCY (POI) for Turner syndrome gives me some discomfort. For women with 46,XX hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, POI accurately provides the suggestion that follicular depletion is often not complete (although remissions are usually self-limiting and the vast majority of patients will not spontaneously become pregnant). I clearly understand the need to

  11. The pituitary gland in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a clinical and radiological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kurtulmus, Neslihan; Mert, Meral; Tanakol, Refik; Yarman, Sema

    2015-04-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease in which the most common endocrine manifestation is diabetes insipidus (DI). Data on anterior pituitary function in patients with LCH are limited. Thus, the present study investigated anterior pituitary function in LCH patients with DI via the evaluation of clinical and radiological findings at disease onset and during follow-up. The present study retrospectively evaluated nine patients with LCH (five males and four females). All diagnoses of LCH were made following histological and/or immunophenotypic analyses of tissue biopsies, bronchoalveolar lavage, or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Basal and, if necessary, dynamic pituitary function tests were used to assess anterior pituitary function, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were used to image the pituitary. The LCH treatment modality was based on organ involvement. The mean age at onset of DI was 27.6 years (range 15-60 years). One patient (11%) exhibited single organ involvement, while eight patients (89%) displayed multisystem organ involvement. On admittance, one patient had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, one patient exhibited panhypopituitarism [hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, central hypothyroidism, hypocortisolism, and growth hormone (GH) deficiency], and four patients (44%) displayed hyperprolactinemia. The MRI data revealed infundibular enlargement in seven patients (78%), a thalamic mass in one patient (11%), and the absence of the bright spot in all patients. A single patient (11%) showed a mass in the pons that had a partially empty sella. The patients were treated with radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy (CT), or a combination of both (RT+CT) and were followed up for a median of 91.8 months (range 2-318 months). Seven patients were assessed during the follow-up period, of whom four patients (57.1%) developed anterior pituitary hormone deficiency, three (43%) were diagnosed with GH deficiency, and one (14%) exhibited gonadotropin deficiency

  12. Seminal, ultrasound and psychobiological parameters correlate with metabolic syndrome in male members of infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Lotti, F; Corona, G; Degli Innocenti, S; Filimberti, E; Scognamiglio, V; Vignozzi, L; Forti, G; Maggi, M

    2013-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a diagnostic category which identifies subjects at high risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, erectile dysfunction (ED) and male hypogonadism. However, MetS impact on male infertility has been poorly studied. We systematically evaluated possible associations between MetS and clinical characteristics in men with couple infertility. Out of 367 consecutive subjects, 351 men without genetic abnormalities were studied. MetS was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation&American Heart Association/National Heart,Lung, and Blood Institute classification. All men underwent physical, hormonal, seminal and scrotal ultrasound evaluation. Erectile and ejaculatory functions were assessed by International Index of Erectile Function-15 erectile function domain (IIEF-15-EFD) and Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT), respectively, while psychological symptoms by Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire. Out of 351 patients, 27 (7.7%) fulfilled MetS criteria. Among ultrasound features, in an age-adjusted logistic model, only testis inhomogeneity was significantly associated with increasing MetS factors (HR = 1.36 [1.09-1.70]; p < 0.01). In an age-adjusted model, MetS was associated with a stepwise decline in total testosterone (TT) (B = -1.25 ± 0.33; p < 0.0001), without a concomitant rise in gonadotropins. At univariate analysis, progressive motility and normal morphology were negatively related to the number of MetS components (both p < 0.0001), but when age and TT were introduced in a multivariate model, only sperm morphology retained a significant association (B = -1.418 ± 0.42; p = 0.001). The risk of ED (IIEF-15-EFD score <26) increased as a function of the number of MetS factors, even after adjusting for age and TT (HR = 1.45[1.08-1.95]; p < 0.02). No association between PEDT score and MetS was observed. Finally, after adjusting for age and TT, somatization and depressive symptoms were associated with increasing Met

  13. Effects of hypothyroidism and endocrine disruptor-dependent non-thyroidal illness syndrome on the GnRH-gonadotroph axis of the adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Toni, R; Della Casa, C; Castorina, S; Cocchi, D; Celotti, F

    2005-01-01

    Effects of primary hypothyroidism (HYPO) on the male gonadal axis are controversial, with only scanty data on the gonadotroph cell response and no information on GnRH tuberoinfundibular neurons, even in animal models. HYPO has been reported to variably induce hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a hypergonadotropic state, or to have no effects on basal levels of pituitary gonadotropins, both in adult male rats and humans. Similarly, the exogenous administration of GnRH to HYPO rats and humans may increase or decrease gonadotropin secretion. Since inhibitory effects of HYPO on the GnRH-gonadotropin axis are reversed by replacement with L-T4, it has been suggested that thyroid hormone (TH) may regulate tuberoinfundibular GnRH and pituitary gonadotropin biosynthesis and/or secretion. To shed light on this hypothesis, we conducted immunocytochemical studies on the distribution and immunostaining characteristics of hypophysiotropic GnRH neurons, LH, PRL and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) immunoreactive (IR) cells in the pituitary of adult, male rats. We show that HYPO reduces IR-GnRH in a restricted population of tuberoinfundibular perikarya and their proximal axons compared to euthyroid controls, but increases IR-VIP both in pituitary cells in direct association with LH-gonadotrophs and within IR-LH cells, itself. We propose that VIP may serve as a juxtacrine/paracrine/autocrine regulator of LH secretion and that, when GnRH biosynthesis is reduced by HYPO, gonadotropin secretion may be rescued by local activating effects of VIP. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industry toxicants found in food and water, also have inhibitory effects on the gonadal axis, decreasing fertility and suppressing basal and GnRHinduced LH release in male rats. Since PCB may also exert endocrine disruptor-dependent (EDD) effects on the thyroid axis producing a non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) (coined EDD-NTIS), we developed a rat model of EDD-NTIS to determine whether central

  14. Congenital adrenal hypoplasia: clinical spectrum, experience with hormonal diagnosis, and report on new point mutations of the DAX-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Peter, M; Viemann, M; Partsch, C J; Sippell, W G

    1998-08-01

    X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AHC) is a rare developmental disorder of the human adrenal cortex and is caused by deletion or mutation of the DAX-1 gene, a recently discovered member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is frequently associated with AHC. AHC occurs as part of a contiguous gene syndrome together with glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD) and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. The present series, collected over the past 2 decades, includes 18 AHC boys from 16 families: 4 with AHC, GKD, and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy; 2 with AHC and GKD; and 12 with AHC (5 young adults with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). Most of the boys presented with salt wasting and hyperpigmentation during the neonatal period. Plasma steroid determinations performed in the first weeks of life often showed confusing results, probably caused by steroids produced in the neonates' persisting fetocortex. Aldosterone deficiency usually preceded cortisol deficiency, which explains why the patients more often presented with salt-wasting rather than with hypoglycemic symptoms. An ACTH test was often necessary to detect cortisol deficiency in the very young infants. In some patients, serial testing was necessary to establish the correct diagnosis. In 4 boys studied during the first 3 months after birth, we found pubertal LH, FSH, and testosterone plasma levels indicating postnatal transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis as in normal boys. Previous studies have shown that the DAX-1 gene is deleted in the AHC patients with a contiguous gene syndrome and is mutated in nondeletion patients. Most of the point mutations identified in AHC patients were frameshift mutations and stop mutations. In the 15 patients available for molecular analysis of the DAX-1 gene, there were large deletions in 6 patients and point mutations in another 7 patients. All of the point mutations identified in the present study resulted in a nonfunctional

  15. Hormonal and echocardiographic abnormalities in adult patients with sickle-cell anemia in Bahrain

    PubMed Central

    Garadah, Taysir S; Jaradat, Ahmed A; Alalawi, Mohammed E; Hassan, Adla B

    2016-01-01

    Background Adrenal, thyroid, and parathyroid gland hormonal changes are recognized in children with homozygous (HbSS) sickle-cell anemia (SCA), but are not clear in adult patients with SCA. Aim To assess the metabolic and endocrine abnormalities in adult patients with SCA and evaluate left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic functions compared with patients with no SCA and further study the relationship between serum levels of cortisol, free thyroxine (T4), and testosterone with serum ferritin. Materials and methods The study was conducted on 82 patients with adult HbSS SCA compared with a sex- and age-matched control group. The serum levels of cortisol, parathyroid hormone (PTH), testosterone, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and free T4 were compared. Blood levels of hemoglobin, reticulocyte count, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), calcium, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), vitamin D3, and ferritin were also compared. Pulsed Doppler echo was performed to evaluate the LV mass, wall thickness, and cavity dimensions with diastolic filling velocities of early (E) and atria (A) waves. Biometric data were analyzed as mean ± standard deviation between the two groups. Multiple regression analysis was performed between serum levels of ferritin as independent variable and testosterone, cortisol, and thyroid hormones. Results A total of 82 adult patients with HbSS SCA were enrolled who had a mean age of 21±5.7 years, with 51 males (62%). Patients with SCA compared with the control group had significantly lower hemoglobin, body mass index, cortisol, vitamin D3, testosterone, and T4. Furthermore, there were significantly high levels of reticulocyte count, PTH, TSH, ferritin, LDH, ALP, and uric acid. The incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism and adrenal insufficiency was 7% and 4.8%, respectively, with hypogonadism 9.8% and vitamin D3 deficiency 61%. There were inverse relationships between ferritin as independent variable and serum levels of testosterone, T4, and cortisol

  16. Testosterone gel replacement improves sexual function in depressed men taking serotonergic antidepressants: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Amiaz, Revital; Pope, Harrison G; Mahne, Thomas; Kelly, John F; Brennan, Brian P; Kanayama, Gen; Weiser, Mark; Hudson, James I; Seidman, Stuart N

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone replacement is the most effective treatment for sexual dysfunction in hypogonadal men. Comorbid depression and antidepressant side effects may reduce its influence. The authors conducted a 6-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of testosterone gel versus placebo gel in men with major depressive disorder who were currently taking a serotonergic antidepressant and exhibited low or low-normal testosterone level. A total of 100 men were enrolled at 2 study sites (Boston, Massachusetts, USA, and Tel Aviv, Israel). The effects of testosterone augmentation on sexual functioning were determined using domain scores on the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Complete pre- and posttrial IIEF data were available for 63 subjects. Men randomized to testosterone (n = 31) and placebo (n = 32) were similar in age, baseline testosterone levels, and baseline IIEF scores. At study termination, men randomized to placebo showed virtually no change from baseline in mean (95% CI) IIEF score (-0.7 [-6.5, 5.2]), whereas those receiving testosterone exhibited a substantial increase (15.8 [8.5, 23.1]). The estimated mean difference between groups was 16.8 [7.5, 26.1]; p = .001 by linear regression with adjustment for age and study site. There were also significant between-group differences in each of the 5 IIEF subscales, as well as on the single question involving ejaculatory ability (p ≤ .03 in all cases). Effect sizes in these comparisons remained little changed, and generally remained statistically significant, when we further adjusted for change in depression scores on the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale. It is notable that the subgroup of men with the highest baseline testosterone levels showed virtually the same improvement as those with lower levels, suggesting that the observed improvement was unlikely to be due simply to correction of hypogonadism alone. In depressed men with low or low-normal testosterone levels who continued

  17. The gonadotrophic response of Royal Marines during an operational deployment in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Hill, N E; Woods, D R; Delves, S K; Murphy, K G; Davison, A S; Brett, S J; Quinton, R; Turner, S; Stacey, M; Allsopp, A J; Fallowfield, J L

    2015-03-01

    Military training has been associated with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis consistent with central hypogonadism. Often such changes have been associated with body mass loss, though sleep deprivation and other psychological stress may also contribute. The effects of deployment in a combat zone on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in military personnel are not known. The objective was to investigate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male military personnel deployed in Afghanistan. Eighty-nine Royal Marines were investigated pre-deployment, following 3 months in Afghanistan and following 2 weeks mid-tour leave. Testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH), 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione (AD) and insulin were assayed and body mass recorded. The results showed that body mass (kg) dropped from 83.2 ± 9.2 to 79.2 ± 8.2 kg during the first 3 months of deployment (p < 0.001). Total testosterone did not change, but SHBG increased (30.7 ± 9.7 vs. 42.3 ± 14.1 nmol/L, p < 0.001), resulting in a significant (p < 0.001) fall in calculated free testosterone (435.2 ± 138 vs. 375.1 ± 98 pmol/L). Luteinising hormone and FSH increased by 14.3% (p < 0.001) and 4.9% (p = 0.003) respectively. Free testosterone, SHBG, LH and FSH returned to baseline following 2 weeks of mid-tour leave. Androstenedione (AD) decreased by 14.5% (p = 0.024), and insulin decreased by 26% (p = 0.039), over the course of deployment. In this study of lean Royal Marines, free testosterone decreased during operational deployment to Afghanistan. There was no evidence to suggest major stress-induced central hypogonadism. We postulate that reduced body mass, accompanied by a decrease in insulin and AD synthesis, may have contributed to an elevated SHBG, leading to a decrease in free testosterone.

  18. Severity and pattern of bone mineral loss in endocrine causes of osteoporosis as compared to age-related bone mineral loss

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, D; Dharmshaktu, P; Aggarwal, A; Gaurav, K; Bansal, R; Devru, N; Garga, UC; Kulshreshtha, B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data are scant on bone health in endocrinopathies from India. This study evaluated bone mineral density (BMD) loss in endocrinopathies [Graves’ disease (GD), type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HypoH), hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (HyperH), hypopituitarism, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT)] as compared to age-related BMD loss [postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO), andropause]. Materials and Methods: Retrospective audit of records of patients >30 years age attending a bone clinic from August 2014 to January 2016 was done. Results: Five-hundred and seven records were screened, out of which 420 (females:male = 294:126) were analyzed. A significantly higher occurrence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was noted in T1DM (89.09%), HyperH (85%), and HypoH (79.59%) compared to age-related BMD loss (60.02%; P < 0.001). The occurrence of osteoporosis among females and males was 55.41% and 53.97%, respectively, and of osteopenia among females and males was 28.91% and 32.54%, respectively. In females, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (92%), HyperH (85%), and HypoH (59.26%) compared to PMO (49.34%; P < 0.001). Z score at LS, TF, NOF, and greater trochanter (GT) was consistently lowest in T1DM women. Among men, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (76.67%) and HypoH (54.55%) compared to andropause (45.45%; P = 0.001). Z score at LS, TF, NOF, GT, and TR was consistently lowest in T1DM men. In GD, the burden of osteoporosis was similar to PMO and andropause. BMD difference among the study groups was not significantly different after adjusting for body mass index (BMI) and vitamin D. Conclusion: Low bone mass is extremely common in endocrinopathies, warranting routine screening and intervention. Concomitant vitamin D deficiency compounds the problem. Calcium and vitamin D supplementations may improve bone health in this setting. PMID:27241810

  19. The Sertoli Cell Only Syndrome and Glaucoma in a Sex – Determining Region Y (SRY) Positive XX Infertile Male

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Manish; V, Veeramohan; Chaudhary, Isha; Halder, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    The XX male syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. The phenotype is variable; it ranges from a severe impairment of the external genitalia to a normal male phenotype with infertility. It generally results from an unequal crossing over between the short arms of the sex chromosomes (X and Y). We are reporting a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with infertility and the features of hypogonadism and glaucoma. The examinations revealed normal external male genitalia, soft small testes, gynaecomastia and glaucoma. The semen analysis showed azoospermia. The serum gonadotropins were high, with low Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) and Inhibin B levels. The chromosomal analysis demonstrated a 46, XX karyotype. Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) revealed the presence of a Sex-determining Region Y (SRY). Testicular Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) revealed the Sertoli Cell Only Syndrome (SCOS). The presence of only Sertoli Cells in the testes, with glaucoma in the XX male syndrome, to our knowledge, has not been reported in the literature. PMID:23998093

  20. The Development of Kisspeptin Circuits in the Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Semaan, Sheila J.; Tolson, Kristen P.

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide kisspeptin, encoded by the Kiss1 gene, is required for mammalian puberty and fertility. Examining the development of the kisspeptin system contributes to our understanding of pubertal progression and adult reproduction and sheds light on possible mechanisms underlying the development of reproductive disorders, such as precocious puberty or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Recent work, primarily in rodent models, has begun to study the development of kisspeptin neurons and their regulation by sex steroids and other factors at early life stages. In the brain, kisspeptin is predominantly expressed in two areas of the hypothalamus, the anteroventral periventricular nucleus and neighboring periventricular nucleus (pre-optic area in some species) and the arcuate nucleus. Kisspeptin neurons in these two hypothalamic regions are differentially regulated by testosterone and estradiol, both in development and in adulthood, and also display differences in their degree of sexual dimorphism. In this chapter, we discuss what is currently known and not known about the ontogeny, maturation, and sexual differentiation of kisspeptin neurons, as well as their regulation by sex steroids and other factors during development. PMID:23550009

  1. Kisspeptin/G protein-coupled receptor-54 system as an essential gatekeeper of pubertal development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Puberty is the end-point of a complex series of developmental events, defined by the dynamic interaction between genetic factors and environmental cues, ultimately leading to the attainment of reproductive capacity. Kisspeptins, products of the KISS1 gene, were originally identified as metastasis suppressor peptides with the ability to bind G protein-coupled receptors (GPR54). In 2003, loss-of-function mutations of the GPR54 gene were found in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This finding triggered study of the role of the kisspeptin/GPR54 system as an essential gatekeeper of control of reproduction and pubertal development. Kisspeptins are very potent elicitors of gonadotropin secretion, primarily through stimulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone release. KISS1 also functions as an essential integrator for peripheral inputs, including gonadal steroids and nutritional signals, and for controlling GnRH and gonadotropin secretion. Whether the kisspeptin/GPR54 system is the trigger for puberty onset and/or it operates as integrator and effector of up-stream regulatory factors warrants further investigation. PMID:24904852

  2. 47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) and 47,XYY: estimated rates of and indication for postnatal diagnosis with implications for prenatal counselling.

    PubMed

    Abramsky, L; Chapple, J

    1997-04-01

    Cytogenetic surveys of neonates have found that approximately one boy in 500 is born with an extra sex chromosome. Some of these boys are now being diagnosed when prenatal karyotyping is done for the detection of Down syndrome and other major aneuploidies. This study estimates what proportion of those not detected prenatally will be diagnosed postnatally and what the indications for karyotyping are likely to be. We ascertained all 47,XXY and 47,XYY males detected prenatally and postnatally (during the 4 years 1990-1993) in the three cytogenetic laboratories in the North Thames (West) region. The age at diagnosis and indication for karyotyping were noted for cases diagnosed postnatally. Less than 10 per cent of the estimated number of affected fetuses were detected prenatally. This study suggests that most males born with these chromosome patterns will go through life without being karyotyped, that the commonest indication for a 47,XYY male to be karyotyped will be developmental delay and/or behaviour problems, and that the commonest indication for a Klinefelter male to be karyotyped will be hypogonadism and/or infertility. It would appear that most undiagnosed 47,XXY and 47,XYY males do not look or behave in a manner which prompts testing for a chromosome abnormality.

  3. Testosterone regulates keratin 33B expression in rat penis growth through androgen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Min; Wu, Kai-Jie; Dang, Qiang; Shi, Qi; Gao, Yang; Guo, Peng; Xu, Shan; Wang, Xin-Yang; He, Da-Lin; Gong, Yong-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Androgen therapy is the mainstay of treatment for the hypogonadotropic hypogonadal micropenis because it obviously enhances penis growth in prepubescent microphallic patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of androgen treatment leading to penis growth are still largely unknown. To clarify this well-known phenomenon, we successfully generated a castrated male Sprague Dawley rat model at puberty followed by testosterone administration. Interestingly, compared with the control group, testosterone treatment stimulated a dose-dependent increase of penis weight, length, and width in castrated rats accompanied with a dramatic recovery of the pathological changes of the penis. Mechanistically, testosterone administration substantially increased the expression of androgen receptor (AR) protein. Increased AR protein in the penis could subsequently initiate transcription of its target genes, including keratin 33B (Krt33b). Importantly, we demonstrated that KRT33B is generally expressed in the rat penis and that most KRT33B expression is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, AR could directly modulate its expression by binding to a putative androgen response element sequence of the Krt33b promoter. Overall, this study reveals a novel mechanism facilitating penis growth after testosterone treatment in precastrated prepubescent animals, in which androgen enhances the expression of AR protein as well as its target genes, such as Krt33b.

  4. Induction of androgen formation in the male by a TAT-VDAC1 fusion peptide blocking 14-3-3ɛ protein adaptor and mitochondrial VDAC1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B; Fan, Jinjiang; Culty, Martine; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2014-10-01

    Low testosterone (T), a major cause of male hypogonadism and infertility, is linked to mood changes, fatigue, osteoporosis, reduced bone-mass index, and aging. The treatment of choice, T replacement therapy, has been linked with increased risk for prostate cancer and luteinizing hormone (LH) suppression, and shown to lead to infertility, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity. Alternate methods to induce T with lower side effects are desirable. In search of the mechanisms regulating T synthesis in the testes, we identified the 14-3-3ɛ protein adaptor as a negative regulator of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis begins in mitochondria. 14-3-3ɛ interacts with the outer mitochondrial membrane voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein, forming a scaffold that limits the availability of cholesterol for steroidogenesis. We report the development of a tool able to induce endogenous T formation. Peptides able to penetrate testes conjugated to 14-3-3ɛ site of interaction with VDAC1 blocked 14-3-3ɛ-VDAC1 interactions while at the same time increased VDAC1-translocator protein (18 kDa) interactions that induced steroid formation in rat testes, leading to increased serum T levels. These peptides rescued intratesticular and serum T formation in adult male rats treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist, which dampened LH and T production.

  5. Truncating Mutations of MAGEL2, a Gene within the Prader-Willi Locus, Are Responsible for Severe Arthrogryposis

    PubMed Central

    Mejlachowicz, Dan; Nolent, Flora; Maluenda, Jérome; Ranjatoelina-Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Giuliano, Fabienne; Gut, Ivo; Sternberg, Damien; Laquerrière, Annie; Melki, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is characterized by the presence of multiple joint contractures resulting from reduced or absent fetal movement. Here, we report two unrelated families affected by lethal AMC. By genetic mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a multiplex family, a heterozygous truncating MAGEL2 mutation leading to frameshift and a premature stop codon (c.1996delC, p.Gln666Serfs∗36) and inherited from the father was identified in the probands. In another family, a distinct heterozygous truncating mutation leading to frameshift (c.2118delT, p.Leu708Trpfs∗7) and occurring de novo on the paternal allele of MAGEL2 was identified in the affected individual. In both families, RNA analysis identified the mutated paternal MAGEL2 transcripts only in affected individuals. MAGEL2 is one of the paternally expressed genes within the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) locus. PWS is associated with, to varying extents, reduced fetal mobility, severe infantile hypotonia, childhood-onset obesity, hypogonadism, and intellectual disability. MAGEL2 mutations have been recently reported in affected individuals with features resembling PWS and called Schaaf-Yang syndrome. Here, we show that paternal MAGEL2 mutations are also responsible for lethal AMC, recapitulating the clinical spectrum of PWS and suggesting that MAGEL2 is a PWS-determining gene. PMID:26365340

  6. Occult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma, a Thickened Pituitary Stalk and Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Michael S; Gordon, Murray B

    2016-01-01

    Etiologies of a thickened stalk include inflammatory, neoplastic, and idiopathic origins, and the underlying diagnosis may remain occult. We report a patient with a thickened pituitary stalk (TPS) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) whose diagnosis remained obscure until a skin lesion appeared. The patient presented with PTC, status postthyroidectomy, and I(131) therapy. PTC molecular testing revealed BRAF mutant (V600E, GTC>GAG). She had a 5-year history of polyuria/polydipsia. Overnight dehydration study confirmed diabetes insipidus (DI). MRI revealed TPS with loss of the posterior pituitary bright spot. Evaluation showed hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and low IGF-1. Chest X-ray and ACE levels were normal. Radiographs to evaluate for extrapituitary sites of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) were unremarkable. Germinoma studies were negative: normal serum and CSF beta-hCG, alpha-fetoprotein, and CEA. Three years later, the patient developed vulvar labial lesions followed by inguinal region skin lesions, biopsy of which revealed LCH. Reanalysis of thyroid pathology was consistent with concurrent LCH, PTC, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis within the thyroid. This case illustrates that one must be vigilant for extrapituitary manifestations of systemic diseases to diagnose the etiology of TPS. An activating mutation of the protooncogene BRAF is a potential unifying etiology of both PTC and LCH.

  7. Classical forms of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency in adults.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Anne; Chakthoura, Zeina; Rouxel, Agnès; Dulon, Jérome; Touraine, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    During childhood, the main aims of the medical treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) secondary to 21-hydroxylase are to prevent salt loss and virilization and to attain normal stature and normal puberty. As such, there is a narrow therapeutic window through which the intended results can be achieved. In adulthood, the clinical management has received little attention, but recent studies have shown the relevance of long-term follow-up of these patients. The aims here are to review the multiple clinical, hormonal and metabolic abnormalities that could be found in adult CAH patients as such a decrease in bone mineral density, overweight and disturbed reproductive functions. In women with classic CAH, a low fertility rate is reported, and is probably the consequence of multiple factors including neuroendocrine and hormonal factors, feminizing surgery, and psychological factors. Men with CAH may present hypogonadism either through the effect of adrenal rests or from suppression of gonadotropins resulting in infertility. Therefore a multidisciplinary team with knowledge of CAH should carefully follow up these patients, from childhood through to adulthood, to avoid these complications and to ensure treatment compliance and tight control of the adrenal androgens.

  8. Gonadoblastoma and Papillary Tubal Hyperplasia in Ovotesticular Disorder of Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Şimşek, Enver; Binay, Çiğdem; Demiral, Meliha; Tokar, Baran; Kabukçuoğlu, Sare; Üstün, Melek

    2016-01-01

    Ovotesticular disorder of sexual development (DSD), formerly known as true hermaphroditism, is a rare form of DSD in which both testicular and ovarian tissues are present in the same individual either in a single gonad (ovotestis) or in opposite gonads with a testis and an ovary on each side. The diagnosis of ovotesticular DSD is based solely on the presence of ovarian and testicular tissue in the gonad and not on the characteristics of the internal and external genitalia, even if ambiguous. Herein, we report two patients with ovotesticular DSD-one presenting with ambiguous genitalia on the third day after birth and the other with short stature and primary amenorrhea in adolescence. Clinical and histopathological investigation revealed a sex-determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY)-positive 46,XX karyotype and bilateral ovotestes in case 1 and a 46,XY karyotype with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and a streak gonad in one ovotestis with dysgerminoma, gonadoblastoma, and papillary tubal hyperplasia in the contralateral ovotestis in case 2. Laparoscopic examination and gonadal biopsy for histopathological diagnosis remain the cornerstones for a diagnosis of ovotesticular DSD. Moreover, SRY positivity in a 46,XX patient, a 46,XY karyotype, an intra-abdominal gonad, and the age of patient at the time of diagnosis are predictive risk factors for the development of gonadoblastoma and/or dysgerminoma in ovotesticular DSD. PMID:27087521

  9. Hormonal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, A; Chakhtoura, Z; Rouxel, A; Dulon, J; Touraine, P

    2007-09-01

    During childhood, the main aims of the medical treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) secondary to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, are to prevent salt loss and virilization and to achieve normal stature and normal puberty. As such, there is a narrow therapeutic window through which the intended results can be achieved. In adulthood, the clinical management has received little attention, but recent studies have shown the relevance of long-term follow-up of these patients. Indeed, long-term evaluation of adult CAH patients enables the identification of multiple clinical, hormonal and metabolic abnormalities as bone mineral density alteration, overweight and disturbed reproductive functions. In women with classic CAH, low fertility rate is reported, and is probably the consequence of multiple factors, including neuroendocrine and hormonal factors, feminizing surgery, and psychological factors. Men with CAH may present hypogonadism either through the effect of adrenal rests or from suppression of gonadotropins resulting in infertility. These patients should therefore be carefully followed-up, from childhood through to adulthood, to avoid these complications and to ensure treatment compliance and tight control of the adrenal androgens, by multidisciplinary teams who have knowledge of CAH.

  10. Testosterone alters iron metabolism and stimulates red blood cell production independently of dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Beggs, Luke A; Yarrow, Joshua F; Conover, Christine F; Meuleman, John R; Beck, Darren T; Morrow, Matthew; Zou, Baiming; Shuster, Jonathan J; Borst, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    Testosterone (T) stimulates erythropoiesis and regulates iron homeostasis. However, it remains unknown whether the (type II) 5α-reduction of T to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) mediates these androgenic effects, as it does in some other tissues. Our purpose was to determine whether inhibition of type II 5α-reductase (via finasteride) alters red blood cell (RBC) production and serum markers of iron homeostasis subsequent to testosterone-enanthate (TE) administration in older hypogonadal men. Sixty men aged ≥60 yr with serum T <300 ng/dl or bioavailable T <70 ng/dl received treatment with TE (125 mg/wk) vs. vehicle paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) vs. placebo using a 2 × 2 factorial design. Over the course of 12 mo, TE increased RBC count 9%, hematocrit 4%, and hemoglobin 8% while suppressing serum hepcidin 57% (P < 0.001 for all measurements). Most of the aforementioned changes occurred in the first 3 mo of treatment, and finasteride coadministration did not significantly alter any of these effects. TE also reduced serum ferritin 32% (P = 0.002) within 3 mo of treatment initiation without altering iron, transferrin, or transferrin saturation. We conclude that TE stimulates erythropoiesis and alters iron homeostasis independently of the type II 5α-reductase enzyme. These results demonstrate that elevated DHT is not required for androgen-mediated erythropoiesis or for alterations in iron homeostasis that would appear to support iron incorporation into RBCs.

  11. Aging males' symptoms in relation to the genetically determined androgen receptor CAG polymorphism, sex hormone levels and sample membership.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gudrun; Nienhaus, Kathrin; Gromoll, Jörg; Heuft, Gereon; Nieschlag, Eberhard; Zitzmann, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism describes the co-occurrence of a range of physical, psychological and sexual symptoms in aging men, with the implication that these symptoms are caused by androgen deficiency. Previous investigations examined mostly population samples and did not take into account the testosterone modulating effects of the genetically determined CAG repeat polymorphism (CAGn) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. This is the first study which investigates aging male symptoms (AMS) in relation to the genetically determined androgen receptor CAG polymorphism, estradiol and testosterone levels in men > or =50 years of age in a healthy population sample (n=100), outpatients of an andrological department (n=76) who presented with sexual and "aging male" symptoms and a psychosomatic/psychiatric sample (n=120) who presented with various psychological and medically unexplained somatic complaints. Although the population sample was significantly older than the two patient groups, they reported significantly fewer AMS and had higher testosterone levels and shorter CAG repeats of the AR. Regression analysis revealed influences of CAGn on the AMS global score and the psychological and somatic subscale only in the two patient samples, while testosterone had some impact on the sexual subscale. Our results suggest that the so-called aging male symptoms show a certain association to androgenicity, but that they are rather unspecific and of multifactorial origin. Other factors contributing to AMS need further clarification.

  12. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of benign meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Candish, Charles; McKenzie, Michael . E-mail: mmckenzi@bccancer.bc.edu; Clark, Brenda G.; Ma, Roy; Lee, Richard; Vollans, Emily; Robar, James; Gete, Ermias; Martin, Monty

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the use of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and October 2004, 38 patients underwent SRT. Of 34 patients (36 tumors) assessed, the median age was 53 years. The indication was primary treatment in 26 cases (no histology) and postoperative in 10 cases. The most common sites were cavernous sinus (17), optic nerve (6), and cerebellopontine angle (5). The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 8.9 cm{sup 3} and 18.9 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Stereotactic treatment was delivered with 6-MV photons with static conformal fields (custom-made blocks, 9 patients, and micromultileaf collimator, 25 patients). Median number of fields was six. The median dose prescribed was 50 Gy (range, 45-50.4 Gy) in 28 fractions. The median homogeneity and conformality indices were 1.1 and 1.79, respectively. Results: Treatment was well tolerated. Median follow-up was 26 months with 100% progression-free survival. One patient developed an area of possible radionecrosis related to previous radiotherapy, and 2 men developed mild hypogonadism necessitating testosterone replacement. The vision of 5 of 6 patients with optic pathway meningiomas improved or remained static. Conclusions: Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of meningiomas is practical, and with early follow-up, seems to be effective.

  13. The novel p.E89K mutation in the SRY gene inhibits DNA binding and causes the 46,XY disorder of sex development.

    PubMed

    Cunha, J L; Soardi, F C; Bernardi, R D; Oliveira, L E C; Benedetti, C E; Guerra-Junior, G; Maciel-Guerra, A T; de Mello, M P

    2011-04-01

    Male sex determination in humans is controlled by the SRY gene, which encodes a transcriptional regulator containing a conserved high mobility group box domain (HMG-box) required for DNA binding. Mutations in the SRY HMG-box affect protein function, causing sex reversal phenotypes. In the present study, we describe a 19-year-old female presenting 46,XY karyotype with hypogonadism and primary amenorrhea that led to the diagnosis of 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis. The novel p.E89K missense mutation in the SRY HMG-box was identified as a de novo mutation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that p.E89K almost completely abolished SRY DNA-binding activity, suggesting that it is the cause of SRY function impairment. In addition, we report the occurrence of the p.G95R mutation in a 46,XY female with complete gonadal dysgenesis. According to the three-dimensional structure of the human SRY HMG-box, the substitution of the conserved glutamic acid residue by the basic lysine at position 89 introduces an extra positive charge adjacent to and between the positively charged residues R86 and K92, important for stabilizing the HMG-box helix 2 with DNA. Thus, we propose that an electrostatic repulsion caused by the proximity of these positive charges could destabilize the tip of helix 2, abrogating DNA interaction.

  14. 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis: new SRY point mutation in two siblings with paternal germ line mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Stoppa-Vaucher, S; Ayabe, T; Paquette, J; Patey, N; Francoeur, D; Vuissoz, J-M; Deladoëy, J; Samuels, M E; Ogata, T; Deal, C L

    2012-12-01

    Familial recurrence risks are poorly understood in cases of de novo mutations. In the event of parental germ line mosaicism, recurrence risks can be higher than generally appreciated, with implications for genetic counseling and clinical practice. In the course of treating a female with pubertal delay and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, we identified a new missense mutation in the SRY gene, leading to somatic feminization of this karyotypically normal XY individual. We tested a younger sister despite a normal onset of puberty, who also possessed an XY karyotype and the same SRY mutation. Imaging studies in the sister revealed an ovarian tumor, which was removed. DNA from the father's blood possessed the wild type SRY sequence, and paternity testing was consistent with the given family structure. A brother was 46, XY with a wild type SRY sequence strongly suggesting paternal Y-chromosome germline mosaicism for the mutation. In disorders of sexual development (DSDs), early diagnosis is critical for optimal psychological development of the affected patients. In this case, preventive karyotypic screening allowed early diagnosis of a gonadal tumor in the sibling prior to the age of normal puberty. Our results suggest that cytological or molecular diagnosis should be applied for siblings of an affected DSD individual.

  15. A design thinking approach to primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lisa A; Porter, Alison G; Pelligrini, Vincent A; Schnatz, Peter F; Jiang, Xuezhi; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Hall, Janet E; Verbiest, Sarah; Olmstead, Jill; Fair, Ryan; Falorni, Alberto; Persani, Luca; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Mehta, Khanjan; Nelson, Lawrence M

    2017-03-01

    Most clinicians are not prepared to provide integrated personal care to address all the clinical needs of women with primary ovarian insufficiency. Design thinking is an engineering methodology used to develop and evaluate novel concepts for systems operation. Here we articulate the need for a seamlessly integrated mobile health system to support genomic research as well as patient care. We also review the pathophysiology and management of primary ovarian insufficiency. Molecular understanding regarding the pathogenesis is essential to developing strategies for prevention, earlier diagnosis, and appropriate management of the disorder. The syndrome is a chronic disorder characterized by oligo/amenorrhea and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism before age 40 years. There may be significant morbidity due to: 1) depression and anxiety related to the loss of reproductive hormones and infertility; 2) associated autoimmune adrenal insufficiency or hypothyroidism; and 3) reduced bone mineral density and increased risk of cardiovascular disease related to estrogen deficiency. Approximately 5% to 10% of women with primary ovarian insufficiency conceive and have a child. Women who develop primary ovarian insufficiency related to a premutation in FMR1 are at risk of having a child with fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. In most cases of spontaneous primary ovarian insufficiency no environmental exposure or genetic mechanism can be identified. As a rare disease, the diagnosis of primary ovarian insufficiency presents special challenges. Connecting patients and community health providers in real time with investigators who have the requisite knowledge and expertise would help solve this dilemma.

  16. An Occult Malignancy Behind a Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lo Presti, Saberio; Kanagarajah, Prashanth; Pirela, Daniela; Morlote, Diana; Cusnir, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old man presenting with bilateral lower extremity weakness and paresthesias that progressed during a 4-month period to severe polyneuropathy forcing the patient to be bed bound. Throughout his multiple hospitalizations, he was treated erroneously for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, without significant improvement in his symptoms. In addition, he developed hepatosplenomegaly (organomegaly); endocrinopathies such as diabetes mellitus, central hypogonadism, and hypothyroidism; monoclonal spike evidenced in the serum electrophoresis; and hyperpigmentation of skin, altogether consistent with POEMS syndrome. During his last hospitalization he developed excruciating pain on his left hip, and imaging revealed the presence of a 9 × 6 cm osteolytic mass with sclerotic rim in the left acetabulum. Biopsy of the mass confirmed an isolated IgG lambda plasmacytoma. The patient received radiation to his left acetabular lesion followed by left hip replacement. Subsequently, the patient underwent autologous bone marrow transplant. Eighteen months after his initial presentation, he had satisfactory clinical response and is functional without significant limitations. POEMS syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to an underlying plasma cell disorder, which can oftentimes be overlooked and misdiagnosed. The median age of presentation is 51 years, and only 31% of the cases occur in fairly young patients under the age of 45 as evidenced in this case. As clinicians, we should be aware of the constellation of features associated with POEMS syndrome and be able to recognize them promptly. PMID:27790622

  17. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone is prerequisite for the constitutive expression of pituitary annexin A5.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Aiko; Kurusu, Shiro; Kawaminami, Mitsumori

    2015-01-01

    Annexin A5 (ANXA5), a member of the structurally related family of annexin proteins, is expressed in pituitary gonadotropes. We previously reported that ANXA5 expression is stimulated by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the present study, we investigated ANXA5 expression in the anterior pituitary gland of GnRH-deficient mutant hypogonadal (hpg) mice. RT-PCR demonstrated that luteinizing hormone β subunit (LHβ) and ANXA5 mRNA levels were both lower in the pituitary gland of hpg mice than in wild-type mice. Immunohistochemistry showed that ANXA5 expression throughout the pituitary gland was very low in hpg mice, suggesting that ANXA5 is diminished in gonadotropes and also in other cell types. Subcutaneous administration of a GnRH analogue, des-gly10 (Pro9)-GnRH ethylamide (1 μg/day for 7 days), augmented the expression of LHβ and ANXA5 in the pituitary gland in hpg mice. However, LHβ- and ANXA5-positive cells did not show exactly matched spatial distributions. These findings suggest that GnRH is necessary for constitutive ANXA5 expression in the pituitary gland, not only in gonadotropes but also in other pituitary gland cell types. A close relationship between ANXA5 and LHβ expression was confirmed. It is suggested that a significant role of ANXA5 in the physiologic secretion of LH.

  18. Novel Insights into 46,XY Disorders of Sex Development due to NR5A1 Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ralf; Mönig, Isabel; August, Julia; Freiberg, Clemens; Lünstedt, Ralf; Reiz, Benedikt; Wünsch, Lutz; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Kulle, Alexandra; Döhnert, Ulla; Wudy, Stefan A; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Thorns, Christoph; Hiort, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD) is based on the distinction between forms of gonadal dysgenesis and disorders of androgen biosynthesis and action. However, clinical and endocrine evaluations are often not conclusive. Here, we describe an adolescent female with hirsutism and hyperandrogenization at puberty. Her karyotype was 46,XY, and clinical investigation demonstrated clitoromegaly, but no uterine remnants were detected. Histology of the gonads revealed a testicular structure with a Sertoli-cell-only pattern. Endocrine evaluation showed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and the Sertoli cell markers inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone were also low. Several molecular genetic studies were initiated. While analyses of the androgen receptor gene, the SRD5A2 gene and HSD17B3 gene were uninformative, a novel p.L230R mutation was found in the NR5A1 gene. A mutant construct proved a severe dysfunction of this variant in functional analysis after recreation and transfection into HeLa cells. We conclude that the NR5A1 p.L230R mutation most likely leads to a spatial and time-dependent Leydig cell and Sertoli cell dysfunction during development not causing the classical gonadal dysgenesis phenotype. This case demonstrates that the current classification should be updated to encompass the overlapping phenotypes of some genetic conditions within 46,XY DSD.

  19. Narrative review: the role of leptin in human physiology: emerging clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Kelesidis, Theodore; Kelesidis, Iosif; Chou, Sharon; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2010-01-19

    Leptin is a hormone secreted by adipose tissue in direct proportion to amount of body fat. The circulating leptin levels serve as a gauge of energy stores, thereby directing the regulation of energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function, and metabolism. Persons with congenital deficiency are obese, and treatment with leptin results in dramatic weight loss through decreased food intake and possible increased energy expenditure. However, most obese persons are resistant to the weight-reducing effects of leptin. Recent studies suggest that leptin is physiologically more important as an indicator of energy deficiency, rather than energy excess, and may mediate adaptation by driving increased food intake and directing neuroendocrine function to converse energy, such as inducing hypothalamic hypogonadism to prevent fertilization. Current studies investigate the role of leptin in weight-loss management because persons who have recently lost weight have relative leptin deficiency that may drive them to regain weight. Leptin deficiency is also evident in patients with diet- or exercise-induced hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. Replacement of leptin in physiologic doses restores ovulatory menstruation in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea and improves metabolic dysfunction in patients with lipoatrophy, including lipoatrophy associated with HIV or highly active antiretroviral therapy. The applications of leptin continue to grow and will hopefully soon be used therapeutically.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor- I and factors affecting it in thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania; Yassin, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvement of blood transfusion regimens and iron chelation therapy growth and maturational delay, cardiomyopathy, endocrinopathies and osteoporosis still occur in good number of thalassemic patients. Decreased IGF-1 secretion occurs in the majority of the thalassemic patients particularly those with growth and pubertal delay. Many factors contribute to this decreased synthesis of IGF-I including disturbed growth hormone (GH) - insulin-like growth factor - I (IGF-I) axis. The possible factors contributing to low IGF-I synthesis in thalassemia and the possible interaction between low IGF-I secretion and the occurrence of these complications is discussed in this mini-review. Improvement of IGF-I secretion in thalassemic patients should be intended to improve linear growth and bone mineral accretion in thalassemic patients. This can be attained through adequate correction of anemia and proper chelation, nutritional supplementation (increasing caloric intake), correction of vitamin D and zinc deficiencies, induction of puberty and correction of hypogonadism at the proper time and treating GH deficiency. This review paper provides a summary of the current state of knowledge regarding IGF-I and factors affecting it in patients with thalassaemia major (TM). Search on PubMed and reference lists of articles with the term 'IGF-I, GH, growth, thalassemia, thyroxine, anemia, vitamin D, and zinc' was carried out. A hundred and forty-eight articles were found and used in the write up and the data analyzed was included in this report.

  1. Primary cilia enhance kisspeptin receptor signaling on gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koemeter-Cox, Andrew I.; Sherwood, Thomas W.; Green, Jill A.; Steiner, Robert A.; Berbari, Nicolas F.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Kauffman, Alexander S.; Monsma, Paula C.; Brown, Anthony; Askwith, Candice C.; Mykytyn, Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Most central neurons in the mammalian brain possess an appendage called a primary cilium that projects from the soma into the extracellular space. The importance of these organelles is highlighted by the fact that primary cilia dysfunction is associated with numerous neuropathologies, including hyperphagia-induced obesity, hypogonadism, and learning and memory deficits. Neuronal cilia are enriched for signaling molecules, including certain G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), suggesting that neuronal cilia sense and respond to neuromodulators in the extracellular space. However, the impact of cilia on signaling to central neurons has never been demonstrated. Here, we show that the kisspeptin receptor (Kiss1r), a GPCR that is activated by kisspeptin to regulate the onset of puberty and adult reproductive function, is enriched in cilia projecting from mouse gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Interestingly, GnRH neurons in adult animals are multiciliated and the percentage of GnRH neurons possessing multiple Kiss1r-positive cilia increases during postnatal development in a progression that correlates with sexual maturation. Remarkably, disruption of cilia selectively on GnRH neurons leads to a significant reduction in kisspeptin-mediated GnRH neuronal activity. To our knowledge, this result is the first demonstration of cilia disruption affecting central neuronal activity and highlights the importance of cilia for proper GPCR signaling. PMID:24982149

  2. Kisspeptins: a multifunctional peptide system with a role in reproduction, cancer and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Votsi, E; Roussos, D; Katsikis, I; Karkanaki, A; Kita, M; Panidis, D

    2008-01-01

    The pairing of the kisspeptins (KP) with the KISS1 (GPR54) receptor has received growing attention since the description of the receptor as a molecular switch for puberty. The role of KP and its receptor, GPR54, in puberty is the most exciting finding made in the field of reproductive biology since the discovery of Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) in 1970s. A significant body of evidence across several species now suggests that KISS1 (GPR54) activation is a critical point in the commencement of puberty, although further investigation is required to characterize the interaction between KP and GnRH cascade. Given such pivotal roles of kisspeptins and GPR54 as gatekeepers of reproductive function, and the proven ability of sex steroids to physiologically regulate this system, it is plausible that environmental compounds with ability to interfere oestrogen and/or androgen signaling (agonists or antagonists) may target the hypothalamic kiss-1/GPR54 system, thereby inducing functional alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Synthetic agonists targeting KISS1 (GPR54) may represent novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in some affected individuals. The diverse multifunctional nature of the KP is beginning to unravel. The unexpected role of these peptides in puberty has raised a number of important questions that remain to be answered.

  3. A new case of interstitial 6q16.2 deletion in a patient with Prader-Willi-like phenotype and investigation of SIM1 gene deletion in 87 patients with syndromic obesity.

    PubMed

    Varela, Monica C; Simões-Sato, Alex Y; Kim, Chong A; Bertola, Débora R; De Castro, Claudia I E; Koiffmann, Celia P

    2006-01-01

    The association of obesity, phenotypic abnormalities and mental retardation characterizes syndromic obesity. Its most common form is the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS-- neonatal hypotonia, poor sucking, delayed psychomotor development, hyperphagia, severe obesity, short stature, small hands and feet, hypogonadism, mild to moderate mental retardation and behavioral disorders). A PWS-like phenotype has been described in patients with chromosome abnormalities involving the chromosome region 6q16.2 that includes the SIM1 gene. Herein we report cytogenetic and gene studies including a screening for the SIM1 gene deletion, performed on 87 patients with PWS-like phenotype, and describe the fifth case of syndromic obesity with an interstitial deletion of the chromosome segment 6q16-q21 and suggest that mutational analysis and further studies of the parental origin of chromosome alterations of 6q16.2 in patients with and without PWS-like phenotype are needed to evaluate possible imprinting effects of SIM1 gene and establish the contribution that alterations in this gene makes to the etiology of syndromic and non-syndromic obesity.

  4. Homozygosity mapping with SNP arrays identifies TRIM32, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, as a Bardet–Biedl syndrome gene (BBS11)

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Annie P.; Beck, John S.; Yen, Hsan-Jan; Tayeh, Marwan K.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Swiderski, Ruth E.; Nishimura, Darryl Y.; Braun, Terry A.; Kim, Kwang-Youn A.; Huang, Jian; Elbedour, Khalil; Carmi, Rivka; Slusarski, Diane C.; Casavant, Thomas L.; Stone, Edwin M.; Sheffield, Val C.

    2006-01-01

    The identification of mutations in genes that cause human diseases has largely been accomplished through the use of positional cloning, which relies on linkage mapping. In studies of rare diseases, the resolution of linkage mapping is limited by the number of available meioses and informative marker density. One recent advance is the development of high-density SNP microarrays for genotyping. The SNP arrays overcome low marker informativity by using a large number of markers to achieve greater coverage at finer resolution. We used SNP microarray genotyping for homozygosity mapping in a small consanguineous Israeli Bedouin family with autosomal recessive Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS; obesity, pigmentary retinopathy, polydactyly, hypogonadism, renal and cardiac abnormalities, and cognitive impairment) in which previous linkage studies using short tandem repeat polymorphisms failed to identify a disease locus. SNP genotyping revealed a homozygous candidate region. Mutation analysis in the region of homozygosity identified a conserved homozygous missense mutation in the TRIM32 gene, a gene coding for an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Functional analysis of this gene in zebrafish and expression correlation analyses among other BBS genes in an expression quantitative trait loci data set demonstrate that TRIM32 is a BBS gene. This study shows the value of high-density SNP genotyping for homozygosity mapping and the use of expression correlation data for evaluation of candidate genes and identifies the proteasome degradation pathway as a pathway involved in BBS. PMID:16606853

  5. Contemporary concepts in the evaluation and management of male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kathleen; Walters, R. Chanc; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2013-01-01

    Infertility in men is a common condition. At the core of the medical evaluation of the male partner in a couple who are unable to conceive is the history and physical examination. Special attention should be directed to the patient’s developmental history and any use of testosterone products. The physical examination focuses on the genitals, and includes assessments of the size and consistency of the testicles, epididymis, vas deferens, and presence of varicoceles. Although many sophisticated tests are available, semen analysis is still the most important diagnostic tool used to assess fertility, and includes parameters such as sperm count, motility and viability. Treatment of male factor infertility can involve targeted agents, in the case of specific conditions such as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, or it can be empirical—using medical therapy or assisted conception techniques—for patients in whom no underlying cause has been identified. Although an all-encompassing treatment for male factor infertility has not yet been developed, the field offers many promising avenues of research. PMID:21243017

  6. A 20 bp Duplication in Exon 2 of the Aristaless-Like Homeobox 4 Gene (ALX4) Is the Candidate Causative Mutation for Tibial Hemimelia Syndrome in Galloway Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Brenig, Bertram; Schütz, Ekkehard; Hardt, Michael; Scheuermann, Petra; Freick, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (ALX4) gene is an important transcription regulator in skull and limb development. In humans and mice ALX4 mutations or loss of function result in a number of skeletal and organ malformations, including polydactyly, tibial hemimelia, omphalocele, biparietal foramina, impaired mammary epithelial morphogenesis, alopecia, coronal craniosynostosis, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge and ridge, bifid nasal tip, hypogonadism, and body agenesis. Here we show that a complex skeletal malformation of the hind limb in Galloway cattle together with other developmental anomalies is a recessive autosomal disorder most likely caused by a duplication of 20 bp in exon 2 of the bovine ALX4 gene. A second duplication of 34 bp in exon 4 of the same gene has no known effect, although both duplications result in a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to a truncated protein. Genotyping of 1,688 Black/Red/Belted/Riggit Galloway (GA) and 289 White Galloway (WGA) cattle showed that the duplication in exon 2 has allele frequencies of 1% in GA and 6% in WGA and the duplication in exon 4 has frequencies of 23% in GA and 38% in WGA. Both duplications were not detected in 876 randomly selected German Holstein Friesian and 86 cattle of 21 other breeds. Hence, we have identified a candidate causative mutation for tibial hemimelia syndrome in Galloway cattle and selection against this mutation can be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the breed. PMID:26076463

  7. Gender differences in macroprolactinomas: study of clinical features, outcome of patients and ki-67 expression in tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Fainstein Day, Patricia; Glerean, Mariela; Lovazzano, Soledad; Pietrani, Marcelo; Christiansen, Silvia; Balzaretti, Marta; Kozak, Andrea; Carrizo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Prolactinomas in men are usually macroprolactinomas and other investigators have attributed bigger size of tumors in men to delay in diagnosis. A retrospective study of 71 macroadenomas (42 men) was carried out. Parameters studied were age, signs and symptoms at presentation, time of onset of symptoms, basal prolactin, estradiol, and total testosterone levels, tumor size and Ki 67 expression in tumor tissue. Male patients were older. Visual defects were significantly more prevalent in men. Hardy 4 stage tumors were found only in men. We found no significant correlation between tumor size and the patients age nor between tumor size and the onset of symptoms. Whereas basal E2 levels (21.2+/-12.9 vs. 33.3+/-43.3 pg/ml, p=n.s.) were very similar in male and female patients, testosterone levels were significantly higher in men (0.6+/-0.5 vs. 1.8+/-1.2 ng/ml, p=0.02). The rate of cell proliferation represented by Ki 67 was significantly higher in tumors in men (3.5+/-1.2 vs. 1.5+/-0.5%, p=0.0001). This is the first study focused in macroprolactinomas that shows that they are clinically and biologically more aggressive in men. Hypogonadism in men could appear later in the progression of prolactinomas and this might explain why men were older at the time of diagnosis. Furthermore, testosterone could be a source for E2 in situ aromatization giving male tumors an advantage in cell proliferation.

  8. [Long-term effects of combined therapy in patients with beta-thalassemia major].

    PubMed

    Bagnulo, S; Giannini, A M; Moscatelli, F; Stragapede, L; Acquafredda, A; Dammacco, A

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated therapy complications in 19 beta-thalassemia major patients (mean age from 3 years/5 months and 1 years/6 months) who were followed at II Pediatric Department-University of Bari. 3 out of 19 patients underwent allogenic BMT from matched related donor; 2 out of 19 underwent splenectomy. All of them were receiving hypertransfusion therapy and continuous chelation with DFO. In all patients we performed physical examination, laboratory assays, cardiac and endocrinologic function tests, serum HBV-HCV-HIV antibodies, otoscopy and audiometric test, fundus oculi, skeletal x-ray. 1 out of 19 patients, who was under 15, had a slight dilatation of left ventricle and arythmia. All patients were HBsAb positive. 4/19 patients were HCV Ab positive (ELISA test) with an increase in ALT-AST serum levels since at least 6 months. In 3 of them we assessed RIBA test, always positive. 3 of them underwent liver biopsy (1 iron overload 2 chronic active hepatitis). All patients were HIV Ab negative. 4/15 patients revealed low GH levels after Arginina test. 13 pre-pubescent patients had normal results with GNRH test but lower results after FSH test. 1 pubescent patient had gonadotropic hypophyseal deficit. 4 patients had subclinic hypothiroidism. We couldn't find any sequelas in bone-eyes-ears. Hypertransfusion therapy, chelation, profilaxis of infections improved length and quality of life in thalassemic patients. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism remains a serious sequela and we think it needs to be treated.

  9. Disruption of aromatase homeostasis as the cause of a multiplicity of ailments: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema

    2017-04-01

    Human health is beset with a legion of ailments, which is exacerbated by lifestyle errors. Out of the numerous enzymes in human body, aromatase, a cytochrome P450 enzyme is particularly very critical. Occurring at the crossroads of multiple signalling pathways, its homeostasis is vital for optimal health. Unfortunately, medications, hormone therapy, chemical additives in food, and endocrine-disrupting personal care products are oscillating the aromatase concentration beyond the permissible level. As this enzyme converts androgens (C19) into estrogens (C18), its agitation has different outcomes in different genders and age groups. Some common pathologies associated with aromatase disruption include breast cancer, prostate cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, osteoporosis, ovarian cancer, gastric cancer, pituitary cancer, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, male hypogonadism, and transgender issues. Several drugs, cosmetics and pesticides act as the activators and suppressors of this enzyme. This carefully-compiled critical review is expected to increase public awareness regarding the threats resultant of the perturbations of this enzyme and to motivate researchers for further investigation of this field.

  10. Persistent amenorrhea and decreased DHEAS to cortisol ratio after recovery from anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Andrisani, Alessandra; Sabbadin, Chiara; Minardi, Silvia; Favaro, Angela; Donà, Gabriella; Bordin, Luciana; Ambrosini, Guido; Armanini, Decio

    2017-04-01

    Persistent amenorrhea is a frequent condition affecting anorexic patients after stable weight recovery. It has been proposed that it could be due to alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis linked with persistent hormonal impairments, such as relative hypercortisolemia and hypoleptinemia, and psychological symptoms related to anorexia nervosa (AN). The aim of our study was to evaluate the metabolic and hormonal pattern involved in the persistence of amenorrhea after recovery from AN. Eight weight-recovered anorexic patients with amenorrhea were investigated and matched with 10 healthy eumenorrhoic women, comparable for age and BMI. Data showed basal FSH and LH values similar in both groups and a normal pituitaric response to LHRH administration. Morning serum cortisol was normal but significantly higher in patients, while dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) to cortisol ratio, leptin and vitamin D were significantly lower in patients than controls. Women with previous AN presented insulin resistance and two patients showed an overall picture consistent with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In conclusion, long-lasting amenorrhea after recovery from AN is linked with a persistent hypothalamic dysfunction, although other concomitant causes like PCOS and insulin resistance should be considered. Decreased DHEAS to cortisol ratio is a new finding which could be correlated to the persistent hypogonadism.

  11. Fine structure mapping and deletion analysis of the murine piebald locus

    SciTech Connect

    Metallinos, D.L.; Tilghman, S.M. ); Oppenheimer, A.J. ); Rinchik, E.M.; Russell, L.B. ); Dietrich, W. )

    1994-01-01

    Piebald (s) is a recessive mutation that affects the development of two cell types of neural crest origin: melanocytes, responsible for pigment synthesis in the skin, and enteric ganglia, which innervate the lower bowel. As a result, mice carrying piebald mutations exhibit white spotting in the coat and aganglionic megacolon. Previously the gene had been localized to the distal half of mouse chromosome 14. To determine its precise location relative to molecular markers, an intersubspecific backcross was generated. Two anchor loci of chromosome 14, slaty and hypogonadal, in addition to simple sequence length repeat markers, were used to localize s to a 2-cM interval defined by the markers D14Mit38 and D14Mit42. The molecular markers were also used to characterize nine induced s alleles. Three of these mutations exhibited no deletions or rearrangements of the flanking markers, whereas the other six had two or more of these markers deleted. The extent of the deletions was found to be consistent with the severity of the homozygous phenotype. The location of deletion breakpoints in the induced alleles, coupled with the recombination breakpoints in the backcross progeny, provide useful molecular landmarks to define the location of the piebald gene.

  12. The Cognitive Phenotype in Klinefelter Syndrome: A Review of the Literature Including Genetic and Hormonal Factors

    PubMed Central

    Boada, Richard; Janusz, Jennifer; Hutaff-Lee, Christa; Tartaglia, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) or 47,XXY occurs in ∼1 in 650 males. Individuals with KS often present with physical characteristics including tall stature, hypogonadism, and fertility problems. In addition to medical findings, the presence of the extra X chromosome can lead to characteristic cognitive and language deficits of varying severity. While a small, but significant downward shift in mean overall IQ has been reported, the general cognitive abilities of patients with KS are not typically in the intellectual disability range. Most studies support that males with KS have an increased risk of language disorders and reading disabilities. Results of other studies investigating the relationship between verbal and nonverbal/spatial cognitive abilities have been mixed, with differing results based on the age and ascertainment method of the cohort studied. Executive function deficits have been identified in children and adults with KS, however, the research in this area is limited and further investigation of the neuropsychological profile is needed. In this article, we review the strengths and weaknesses of previous cognitive and neuropsychological studies in males with KS in childhood and adulthood, provide historical perspective of these studies, and review what is known about how hormonal and genetic factors influence cognitive features in 47,XXY/KS. PMID:20014369

  13. Transdermal testosterone replacement therapy in men.

    PubMed

    Ullah, M Iftekhar; Riche, Daniel M; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deficiency syndrome in men is a frequently diagnosed condition associated with clinical symptoms including fatigue, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Serum testosterone concentrations decline steadily with age. The prevalence of androgen deficiency syndrome in men varies depending on the age group, known and unknown comorbidities, and the respective study group. Reported prevalence rates may be underestimated, as not every man with symptoms of androgen deficiency seeks treatment. Additionally, men reporting symptoms of androgen deficiency may not be correctly diagnosed due to the vagueness of the symptom quality. The treatment of androgen deficiency syndrome or male hypogonadism may sometimes be difficult due to various reasons. There is no consensus as to when to start treating a respective man or with regards to the best treatment option for an individual patient. There is also lack of familiarity with treatment options among general practitioners. The formulations currently available on the market are generally expensive and dose adjustment protocols for each differ. All these factors add to the complexity of testosterone replacement therapy. In this article we will discuss the general indications of transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, available formulations, dosage, application sites, and recommended titration schedule.

  14. Outcome of testicular sperm extraction in nonmosaic Klinefelter syndrome patients: what is the best approach?

    PubMed

    Majzoub, A; Arafa, M; Al Said, S; Agarwal, A; Seif, A; Al Naimi, A; El Bardisi, H

    2016-03-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the most common chromosomal disorder associated with male hypogonadism and infertility. Parenthood can be achieved in men with KS by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) using testicular spermatozoon. The aim of this study was to evaluate surgical sperm retrieval (SSR) rate in patients with KS and to investigate the approach associated with the highest SSR. This is a retrospective study where all medical records of patients with KS who underwent SSR for ICSI, in our centre in the past 14 years, were reviewed. Forty-three patients were included in this study. Twenty-three underwent conventional testicular sperm extraction (TESE), while 20 patients underwent microsurgical TESE (Micro-TESE). The SSR was significantly higher in the Micro-TESE group when compared with the TESE group (30% versus 0% respectively). In the Micro-TESE group, hormonal stimulation was given to 16 patients, while no treatment was given to four patients. SSR was only successful in hormonally treated patients (6/16). When the type of hormone stimulation was evaluated, SSR was higher in patients receiving aromatase inhibitors (27.8%). SSR in patients with KS is significantly higher when using hormonal stimulation by aromatase inhibitors followed by microsurgical testicular sperm extraction.

  15. Chronology and evolution of temporal lobe epilepsy and endocrine reproductive dysfunction in women: relationships to side of focus and catameniality.

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Vladimir V; Zheleznova, Elena V

    2007-09-01

    The current study was carried out to determine the possible associations between side of focus, catameniality, reproductive dysfunction (RD), and chronology variables for epilepsy and concomitant RD in women. Eighty women of childbearing potential with temporal lobe epilepsy were included in the study. Catamenial epilepsy was observed mainly in women with left-sided foci, and a noncatamenial pattern in women with right-sided foci. Left-sided foci were associated with polycystic ovary syndrome, and right-sided foci with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Catamenial epilepsy with right-sided foci was associated with longer duration of epilepsy (P=0.021), trend toward earlier age at onset of epilepsy, and trend toward longer interval between onset of epilepsy and onset of RD compared with catamenial epilepsy with left-sided foci. On the other hand, noncatamenial epilepsy with right-sided foci was characterized by a shorter interval between onset of epilepsy and onset of RD in comparison with noncatamenial epilepsy with left-sided activity (P=0.03). In addition, comparison of patients with right-sided foci with catamenial and noncatamenial patterns of seizures revealed earlier age of epilepsy onset (P=0.049), longer duration of epilepsy (P=0.017) and of RD (P=0.036), and longer interval between onset of epilepsy and onset of RD (P=0.048) in patients with catamenial epilepsy. From an evolutionary point of view, catamenial epilepsy with right-sided focal activity seems to be the oldest subtype.

  16. Anosmin-1 over-expression increases adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and neuroblast migration to the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    García-González, Diego; Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Ortega, Felipe; Díaz, David; Sánchez-Vera, Irene; Lebrón-Galán, Rafael; Escobar-Castañondo, Laura; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Weruaga, Eduardo; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Berninger, Benedikt; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    New subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neuroblasts that migrate via the rostral migratory stream are continuously added to the olfactory bulb (OB) of the adult rodent brain. Anosmin-1 (A1) is an extracellular matrix protein that binds to FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) to exert its biological effects. When mutated as in Kallmann syndrome patients, A1 is associated with severe OB morphogenesis defects leading to anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we show that A1 over-expression in adult mice strongly increases proliferation in the SVZ, mainly with symmetrical divisions, and produces substantial morphological changes in the normal SVZ architecture, where we also report the presence of FGFR1 in almost all SVZ cells. Interestingly, for the first time we show FGFR1 expression in the basal body of primary cilia in neural progenitor cells. Additionally, we have found that A1 over-expression also enhances neuroblast motility, mainly through FGFR1 activity. Together, these changes lead to a selective increase in several GABAergic interneuron populations in different OB layers. These specific alterations in the OB would be sufficient to disrupt the normal processing of sensory information and consequently alter olfactory memory. In summary, this work shows that FGFR1-mediated A1 activity plays a crucial role in the continuous remodelling of the adult OB.

  17. Featured Article: Transcriptional landscape analysis identifies differently expressed genes involved in follicle-stimulating hormone induced postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Maasalu, Katre; Laius, Ott; Zhytnik, Lidiia; Kõks, Sulev; Prans, Ele; Reimann, Ene; Märtson, Aare

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disorder associated with bone tissue reorganization, bone mass, and mineral density. Osteoporosis can severely affect postmenopausal women, causing bone fragility and osteoporotic fractures. The aim of the current study was to compare blood mRNA profiles of postmenopausal women with and without osteoporosis, with the aim of finding different gene expressions and thus targets for future osteoporosis biomarker studies. Our study consisted of transcriptome analysis of whole blood serum from 12 elderly female osteoporotic patients and 12 non-osteoporotic elderly female controls. The transcriptome analysis was performed with RNA sequencing technology. For data analysis, the edgeR package of R Bioconductor was used. Two hundred and fourteen genes were expressed differently in osteoporotic compared with non-osteoporotic patients. Statistical analysis revealed 20 differently expressed genes with a false discovery rate of less than 1.47 × 10(-4) among osteoporotic patients. The expression of 10 genes were up-regulated and 10 down-regulated. Further statistical analysis identified a potential osteoporosis mRNA biomarker pattern consisting of six genes: CACNA1G, ALG13, SBK1, GGT7, MBNL3, and RIOK3. Functional ingenuity pathway analysis identified the strongest candidate genes with regard to potential involvement in a follicle-stimulating hormone activated network of increased osteoclast activity and hypogonadal bone loss. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study may contribute to future research of postmenopausal osteoporosis blood biomarkers.

  18. DAX-1 (NR0B1) and steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1, NR5A1) in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Suntharalingham, Jenifer P.; Buonocore, Federica; Duncan, Andrew J.; Achermann, John C.

    2016-01-01

    DAX-1 (NR0B1) and SF-1 (NR5A1) are two nuclear receptor transcription factors that play a key role in human adrenal and reproductive development. Loss of DAX-1 function is classically associated with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita. This condition typically affects boys and presents as primary adrenal insufficiency in early infancy or childhood, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism at puberty and impaired spermatogenesis. Late onset forms of this condition and variant phenotypes are increasingly recognized. In contrast, disruption of SF-1 only rarely causes adrenal insufficiency, usually in combination with testicular dysgenesis. Variants in SF-1/NR5A1 more commonly cause a spectrum of reproductive phenotypes ranging from 46,XY DSD (partial testicular dysgenesis or reduced androgen production) and hypospadias to male factor infertility or primary ovarian insufficiency. Making a specific diagnosis of DAX-1 or SF-1 associated conditions is important for long-term monitoring of endocrine and reproductive function, appropriate genetic counselling for family members, and for providing appropriate informed support for young people. PMID:26303087

  19. [Issues inherent to the management of disorders of sex development in Point G Hospital].

    PubMed

    Diakité, M L; Berthé H, J G; Timbely, A; Diallo, M; Maiga, M; Diakité, A; Diallo, M; Ouattara, K; Faure, A

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal sexual development causes unconformity between gender identity and gender role. In countries with low socio-economic level, the optimal management is difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, the genital anatomy appearance, the diagnostic and the surgical management of disorders of sex development (DSD) discovered during the adolescence. Between January 2005 and November 2006 (23 months), five patients with abnormal sexual development were identified in Point G Hospital. First-line testing included biology measurement and imaging. A surgical management was systematically offered. Median age was 19.5±11.8 years (6-31). All patients were initially assigned male. Sexual dimorphic with genital ambiguity was the first reason of consultation (three children to five). One patient had male breast development and one had pelvic pain. All clinical evaluation suggested genital ambiguity. The diagnostic was female pseudohermaphrodism in three cases, true hermaphrodism in one case and hypogonadism for one patient. A masculinizing genital surgery was performed in three cases. The other patients refused the treatment or were out of sight. Intersex disorders are relatively rare in Mali with a prevalence of 2.30‰ in our hospital. This study highlighted the lack of financial means and local resources for optimal clinical management of individuals with DSD.

  20. Metabolic syndrome-associated sperm alterations in an experimental rabbit model: relation with metabolic profile, testis and epididymis gene expression and effect of tamoxifen treatment.

    PubMed

    Marchiani, Sara; Vignozzi, Linda; Filippi, Sandra; Gurrieri, Bruna; Comeglio, Paolo; Morelli, Annamaria; Danza, Giovanna; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Maggi, Mario; Baldi, Elisabetta

    2015-02-05

    The influence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on sperm quality and function is debated. Using a well-established high fat diet (HFD) rabbit model resembling human MetS, including development of hypogonadism, we demonstrate that HFD decreased sperm motility, morphology and acrosome reaction in response to progesterone and increased sperm cholesterol content. All the above parameters were associated with most MetS features, its severity and plasma testosterone (T) at univariate analysis. After T adjustment, sperm morphology and motility retained a significant association, respectively, with mean arterial pressure and circulating cholesterol levels. MetS modified the expression of inflammatory and tissue remodelling genes in the testis and of aquaporins in the epididymis. In a multivariate analysis, sperm morphology resulted associated with testis expression of fibronectin and collagen type 1 genes, whereas motility with epididymis aquaporin 1 gene. Administration of tamoxifen, used in the treatment of idiopathic male infertility, to HFD rabbits partially restored motility, but further decreased morphology and increased spontaneous acrosome reaction, without restoring responsiveness to progesterone. Overall our results indicate that development of MetS produces detrimental effects on sperm quality and functionality by inducing metabolic disorders leading to alterations in testis and epididymis functions and evidence a role of hypertension as a new determinant of abnormal sperm morphology, in line with a previous human study from our group.