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Sample records for hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta

  1. Exonal deletion of SLC24A4 causes hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Seymen, F; Lee, K-E; Tran Le, C G; Yildirim, M; Gencay, K; Lee, Z H; Kim, J-W

    2014-04-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions affecting enamel formation. Recently, mutations in solute carrier family 24 member 4 (SLC24A4) have been identified to cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We recruited a consanguineous family with hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta with generalized brown discoloration. Sequencing of the candidate genes identified a 10-kb deletion, including exons 15, 16, and most of the last exon of the SLC24A4 gene. Interestingly, this deletion was caused by homologous recombination between two 354-bp-long homologous sequences located in intron 14 and the 3' UTR. This is the first report of exonal deletion in SLC24A4 providing confirmatory evidence that the function of SLC24A4 in calcium transport has a crucial role in the maturation stage of amelogenesis.

  2. Hypomaturation Amelogenesis Imperfecta Caused By A Novel SLC24A4 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Curtis R.; Reid, Bryan M.; Seymen, Figen; Koruyucu, Mine; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Simmer, James P.; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2014-01-01

    In this case report of autosomal recessive pigmented hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), we identify a novel homozygous missense mutation (g.165151T>G; c.1317T>G; p.Leu436Arg) in SLC24A4, a gene encoding a potassium-dependent sodium-calcium exchanger that is critical for hardening dental enamel during tooth development. PMID:25442250

  3. Restoring Aesthetics and Function in a Young Boy with Hypomature Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ağaçkiran, Engin; Tümen, Emin Caner; Çelenk, Sema; Bolgül, Behiye; Atakul, Fatma

    2011-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta has been described as a complex group of inherited conditions that disturbs the developing enamel structure and exists independent of any related systemic disorder. It is a rare dental disease but represents a great restorative challenge for dentists. A 12-year-old boy presented with sensitive, discolored, and mutilated teeth and decreased vertical dimension of occlusion. Direct composite resin restorations were applied to all teeth to modify the occlusion, to restore mild crowding, and to improve aesthetics. The 24-month recall examination revealed no pathology associated with the rehabilitation, and the patient's aesthetic and functional expectations were satisfied. The rehabilitation included multiple anterior and posterior composite resins to eliminate tooth sensitivity, improve the aesthetics and occlusion, and restore function. PMID:21991481

  4. Amelogenesis imperfecta: a clinician's challenge.

    PubMed

    Chamarthi, V; Varma, B R; Jayanthi, M

    2012-01-01

    Defective enamel formation can be explained as defects occurring at the stages of enamel formation. Quantitative defects in matrix formation leads to hypoplastic form of amelogenesis imperfecta. Inadequate mineralization of matrix leads to hypocalcification and hypomaturation variants. The demarcation of matrix formation and mineralization is not so distinct. This paper describes a case of a 7-year-old boy with amelogenesis imperfecta - Type IA i.e., hypoplastic pitted autosomal dominant.

  5. Amelogenesis imperfecta: Four case reports

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Dhaval N.; Shah, Jigna; Thakkar, Bhavik

    2013-01-01

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) represents a group of developmental conditions, genomic in origin, which affect the structure and clinical appearance of enamel of all or nearly all the teeth in a more or less equal manner. AI is a serious problem that reduces oral health-related quality of life and causes some physiological problems. We presented here four case reports of AI (Hypoplastic and Hypomaturation) which we diagnosed on the basis of classical clinical and radiographic features. PMID:24082752

  6. Interradicular dentin dysplasia associated with amelogenesis imperfecta with taurodontism or trichodentoosseous syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Veda; Srikanth, K

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary disorder with diverse clinical presentation, where enamel is the tissue that is primarily affected either quantitatively or qualitatively. Hypomaturation/hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta with taurodontism is a rare variant of amelogenesis imperfecta which is often confused with trichodentoosseous syndrome. We report a rare case of hereditary enamel defect with taurodontism associated with interradicular dentin dysplasia.

  7. Homozygous and compound heterozygous MMP20 mutations in amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Gasse, B; Karayigit, E; Mathieu, E; Jung, S; Garret, A; Huckert, M; Morkmued, S; Schneider, C; Vidal, L; Hemmerlé, J; Sire, J-Y; Bloch-Zupan, A

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we focus on hypomaturation autosomal-recessive-type amelogenesis imperfecta (type IIA2) and describe 2 new causal Matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) mutations validated in two unrelated families: a missense mutation p.T130I at the expected homozygous state, and a compound heterozygous mutation having the same mutation combined with a nucleotide deletion, leading to a premature stop codon (p.N120fz*2). We characterized the enamel structure of the latter case using scanning electron microscopy analysis and microanalysis (Energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, EDX) and confirmed the hypomaturation-type amelogenesis imperfecta as identified in the clinical diagnosis. The mineralized content was slightly decreased, with magnesium substituting for calcium in the crystal structure. The anomalies affected enamel with minimal inter-rod enamel present and apatite crystals perpendicular to the enamel prisms, suggesting a possible new role for MMP20 in enamel formation.

  8. Enamel formation and amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jan C-C; Chun, Yong-Hee P; Al Hazzazzi, Turki; Simmer, James P

    2007-01-01

    Dental enamel is the epithelial-derived hard tissue covering the crowns of teeth. It is the most highly mineralized and hardest tissue in the body. Dental enamel is acellular and has no physiological means of repair outside of the protective and remineralization potential provided by saliva. Enamel is comprised of highly organized hydroxyapatite crystals that form in a defined extracellular space, the contents of which are supplied and regulated by ameloblasts. The entire process is under genetic instruction. The genetic control of amelogenesis is poorly understood, but requires the activities of multiple components that are uniquely important for dental enamel formation. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a collective designation for the variety of inherited conditions displaying isolated enamel malformations, but the designation is also used to indicate the presence of an enamel phenotype in syndromes. Recently, genetic studies have demonstrated the importance of genes encoding enamel matrix proteins in the etiology of isolated AI. Here we review the essential elements of dental enamel formation and the results of genetic analyses that have identified disease-causing mutations in genes encoding enamel matrix proteins. In addition, we provide a fresh perspective on the roles matrix proteins play in catalyzing the biomineralization of dental enamel.

  9. Defining a new candidate gene for amelogenesis imperfecta: from molecular genetics to biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Blanca; Ortega-Pinto, Ana; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-02-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic conditions that affect the structure and clinical appearance of tooth enamel. The types (hypoplastic, hypocalcified, and hypomature) are correlated with defects in different stages of the process of enamel synthesis. Autosomal dominant, recessive, and X-linked types have been previously described. These disorders are considered clinically and genetically heterogeneous in etiology, involving a variety of genes, such as AMELX, ENAM, DLX3, FAM83H, MMP-20, KLK4, and WDR72. The mutations identified within these causal genes explain less than half of all cases of amelogenesis imperfecta. Most of the candidate and causal genes currently identified encode proteins involved in enamel synthesis. We think it is necessary to refocus the search for candidate genes using biochemical processes. This review provides theoretical evidence that the human SLC4A4 gene (sodium bicarbonate cotransporter) may be a new candidate gene.

  10. Multiple unerupted teeth with amelogenesis imperfecta in siblings.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shruthi

    2012-05-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta encompasses a group of inherited abnormalities that are generally considered to primarily affect the formation and/or calcification of enamel. This case report describes the unusual presentation of amelogenesis imperfecta in siblings as multiple unerupted teeth, multiple pulpal calcifications, and multiple dilacerations of roots along with the defect in the enamel. The intent of our report is to highlight a rare co-occurrence of amelogenesis imperfecta with multiple morphologic alterations in siblings.

  11. Amelogenesis imperfecta: review of diagnostic findings and treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Sabandal, Martin M I; Schäfer, Edgar

    2016-09-01

    Mineralization defects like amelogenesis imperfecta are often of hereditary origin. This article reviews the diagnostic findings and summarizes the suggested treatment approaches. Currently, there are no defined therapy recommendations available for patients suffering from amelogenesis imperfecta. The mentioned therapies are more or less equal but no comprehensive therapy recommendation is evident. When treating patients suffering from amelogenesis imperfecta, a comprehensive therapy of almost every dental discipline has to be considered. The earlier the diagnosis of amelogenesis imperfecta is confirmed, the better the outcome is. Optimal treatment approaches consist of early diagnosis and treatment approach and frequent dental recall appointments to prevent progressive occlusal wear or early destruction by caries. Full-mouth prosthetic treatment seems to be the best treatment option.

  12. Amelogenesis imperfecta: review of diagnostic findings and treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Sabandal, Martin M I; Schäfer, Edgar

    2016-09-01

    Mineralization defects like amelogenesis imperfecta are often of hereditary origin. This article reviews the diagnostic findings and summarizes the suggested treatment approaches. Currently, there are no defined therapy recommendations available for patients suffering from amelogenesis imperfecta. The mentioned therapies are more or less equal but no comprehensive therapy recommendation is evident. When treating patients suffering from amelogenesis imperfecta, a comprehensive therapy of almost every dental discipline has to be considered. The earlier the diagnosis of amelogenesis imperfecta is confirmed, the better the outcome is. Optimal treatment approaches consist of early diagnosis and treatment approach and frequent dental recall appointments to prevent progressive occlusal wear or early destruction by caries. Full-mouth prosthetic treatment seems to be the best treatment option. PMID:27550338

  13. Amelogenesis Imperfecta with Coronal Resorption: Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Shannu K; Hunter, M Lindsay; Ashley, Paul F

    2015-12-01

    Intracoronal resorption of the permanent dentition in cases of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a rare finding which poses an added complication to the already complex management of this condition. This paper presents three cases of AI associated with delayed eruption of permanent teeth in which asymptomatic intracoronal resorption occurred. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This paper highlights the fact that teeth affected with amelogenesis imperfecta may undergo asymptomatic intracoronal resorption which is only identifiable radiographically.

  14. Amelogenesis imperfecta and the treatment plan - interdisciplinary team approach.

    PubMed

    Suchancova, B; Holly, D; Janska, M; Stebel, J; Lysy, J; Thurzo, A; Sasinek, S

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a set of hereditary defects representing mainly the development defects of enamel without the presence of whole-body symptoms. Developmental disorders can manifest a complete absence of enamel, which is caused by improper differentiation of ameloblasts. This article describes the diagnosis and treatment of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta, as well as the need for interdisciplinary cooperation to achieve the best possible morphological, skeletal, functional and aesthetic rehabilitation of the patients with this diagnosis. Furthermore, the article reviews literature dealing with other anomalies occurring in association with amelogenesis imperfect (Fig. 12, Ref. 20).

  15. Interdisciplinary approach to oral rehabilitation of patient with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Burak; Oz, Ulas; Yilmaz, Hasan Guney

    2014-03-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary condition that affects the development of enamel, causing quantity, structural and compositional anomalies that involve all dentitions. Consequently, the effects can extend to both the primary and secondary dentitions. Patients with amelogenesis imperfecta may present with clinical difficulties, such as insufficient crown length, tooth sensitivity and orthodontic discrepancies, all of which can be resolved successfully with an interdisciplinary approach. This case report describes the interdisciplinary approach to the treatment of a 22-year-old patient with amelogenesis imperfecta. The proper alignment of anterior teeth and gingivo-cervical line was provided with orthodontic and periodontal treatments. All-ceramic crowns were placed on anterior, and metal-ceramic restorations were placed on posterior teeth to reduce sensitivity and improve esthetics with function. Improved esthetic appearance, reduced tooth sensitivity and the resolution of a potentially harmful psychosocial condition were achieved. Patient remained satisfied in the 12-month follow-up examination.

  16. The restorative management of amelogenesis imperfecta in the mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Kwok-Tung, Law; King, Nigel M

    2006-01-01

    Amelogenesis impefecta is a hereditary condition affecting the formation of enamel in which the rough enamel suface can compromise periodontal health and the esthetics. Affected posterior teeth usually exhibit interproximal space loss which makes restoration of the primary molars difficult. This article describes a technique, using separators to regain interproximal space prior to the placement of stainless steel crowns on the molars of a girl with amelogenesis imperfecta. PMID:17315810

  17. Oral Rehabilitation of a Patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Cogulu, Dilsah; Becerik, Sema; Emingil, Gülnur; Hart, P. Suzanne; Hart, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary disorder that causes defective enamel development in the primary and permanent teeth. Clinical treatment is important to address the esthetic appearance of affected teeth, reduce dentinal sensitivity, preserve tooth structure, and optimize masticatory function. The purpose of this case report was to describe the diagnosis, treatment planning, and dental rehabilitation of a patient with autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta. The patient was followed for 5 years, and evaluation 3 years after restorations revealed no pathology associated with the rehabilitation. The patient’s esthetic and functional expectations were satisfied. PMID:20108745

  18. The mineral composition and enamel ultrastructure of hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wright, J T; Duggal, M S; Robinson, C; Kirkham, J; Shore, R

    1993-01-01

    Hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta is characterized clinically by a yellow-brown colored enamel that is prone to severe attrition, often leading to rapid destruction of the crown. While the enamel is thought to be poorly mineralized few studies have evaluated the mineral content, or the histological or microradiographic features of this specific AI type. The purpose of this investigation was to examine teeth affected with autosomal dominant hypocalcified AI histologically using light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and to evaluate the degree of enamel mineralization chemically and with microradiography. Four AI teeth were obtained from an affected individual for comparison with age-matched teeth from normal healthy individuals. Thin sections approximately 100 microns were cut with a diamond disc for examination by LM and microradiography. Using SEM, fractured enamel samples were examined either untreated or after removal of organic material using NaOCl or urea. Normal and AI enamel particles were dissected from thin sections to evaluate the mineral per volume and carbonate content. The enamel was not uniformly affected in all areas of the teeth with the lingual surfaces of the mandibular central incisors appearing clinically and histologically normal. The affected enamel was porous and appeared opaque with LM. Both SEM and LM showed the enamel to be prismatic with relatively normal prism morphology. However, the enamel crystallites were rough and granular compared with those of normal enamel. Extraction to remove organic material did not change the appearance of the crystallites indicating their granular appearance was due to mineral and not residual organic material such as enamel protein. Microradiography showed the enamel was less radiodense and therefore poorly mineralized compared with normal enamel. This was confirmed by chemical determination of the mineral per volume, which showed some areas of the AI enamel had as much as 30% less

  19. Amelogenesis Imperfecta: Full Mouth Rehabilitation in Deciduous Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Satyajith; ND, Shashikiran

    2011-01-01

    This clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of a very young child diagnosed with hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta. The specific treatment objectives being adequate patient management, eliminate tooth sensitivity while enhancing esthetics, masticatory function and improved self confidence. The treatment included full mouth rehabilitation with stainless steel crowns on posterior teeth and indirect composite veneers on anterior teeth.

  20. Treatment considerations for patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiung-Fen; Hu, Jan CC; Bresciani, Eduardo; Peters, Mathilde C; Estrella, Maria Regina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of inherited disorders primary affecting the structural of enamel. Patients with AI experience poor esthetic, excessive tooth sensitivity and compromised chewing function that dental treatments are frequently required at early age. This review describes the non-enamel implications, stage-specific management strategies and outcomes of selected restorative materials based on literature evidence. PMID:27274954

  1. Amelogenesis Imperfecta with Anterior Open Bite: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Ruchi; Pathak, Anuradha; Goenka, Puneet

    2011-01-01

    This clinical report describes the treatment plan for a young patient affected by amelogenesis imperfecta with anterior open bite. The objectives of the treatment were to eliminate tooth sensitivity while enhancing esthetics and restoring masticatory function. Treatment included resin composite laminate veneers on maxillary anterior teeth and stainless steel crowns for posterior teeth.

  2. Amelogenesis imperfecta and anterior open bite: Etiological, classification, clinical and management interrelationships.

    PubMed

    Alachioti, Xanthippi Sofia; Dimopoulou, Eleni; Vlasakidou, Anatoli; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2014-01-01

    Although amelogenesis imperfecta is not a common dental pathological condition, its etiological, classification, clinical and management aspects have been addressed extensively in the scientific literature. Of special clinical consideration is the frequent co-existence of amelogenesis imperfecta with the anterior open bite. This paper provides an updated review on amelogenesis imperfecta as well as anterior open bite, in general, and documents the association of these two separate entities, in particular. Diagnosis and treatment of amelogenesis imperfecta patients presenting also with anterior open bite require a lengthy, comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach, which should aim to successfully address all dental, occlusal, developmental, skeletal and soft tissue problems associated with these two serious clinical conditions.

  3. Compositional, structural and mechanical comparisons of normal enamel and hypomaturation enamel.

    PubMed

    Sa, Yue; Liang, Shanshan; Ma, Xiao; Lu, Steven; Wang, Zhejun; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yining

    2014-12-01

    Hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary disorder of the enamel that severely influences the function, aesthetics and psychosocial well-being of patients. In this study, we performed a thorough comparison of normal and hypomaturation enamel through a series of systematical tests on human permanent molars to understand the biomineralization process during pathological amelogenesis. The results of microcomputed tomography, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, Raman spectroscopy, microzone X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, energy diffraction spectrum and Vickers microhardness testing together show dramatic contrasts between hypomaturation enamel and normal enamel in terms of their hierarchical structures, spectral features, crystallographic characteristics, thermodynamic behavior, mineral distribution and mechanical property. Our current study highlights the importance of the organic matrix during the amelogenesis process. It is found that the retention of the organic matrix will influence the quantity, quality and distribution of mineral crystals, which will further demolish the hierarchical architecture of the enamel and affect the related mechanical property. In addition, the high carbonate content in hypomaturation enamel influences the crystallinity, crystal size and solubility of hydroxyapatite crystals. These results deepen our understanding of hypomaturation enamel biomineralization during amelogenesis, explain the clinical manifestations of hypomaturation enamel, provide fundamental evidence to help dentists choose optimal therapeutic strategies and lead to improved biofabrication and gene therapies.

  4. Restoring Function and Aesthetics in a Class II Division 1 Patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Doruk, Cenk; Ozturk, Firat; Sari, Fatih; Turgut, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) encompasses a complicated group of hereditary conditions that cause developmental alterations in the structure of the enamel in the absence of a systemic disorder. AI primarily affects the quality and/or quantity of dental enamel, and it may affect all or only some of the teeth in the primary and/or permanent dentition. This clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of a 21-year-old man diagnosed with hypomaturation-type AI. He presented with discolored and mutilated teeth. Cephalometrically, the patient has skeletal class II malocclusion due to mandibular deficiency considered as a result of maxillary constriction. The interdisciplinary approach was followed because of the complex needs of the patient. The aim of treatment was to restore aesthetics, improve malocclusion and masticatory function. Aesthetic and functional expectations were met with metal ceramic restorations. In this report, the interdisciplinary approach for a patient with AI and a malocclusion is described. PMID:21494393

  5. A missense mutation in ITGB6 causes pitted hypomineralized amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Brookes, Steven J; Shore, Roger C; Smith, Claire E L; Abi Farraj, Layal; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-04-15

    We identified a family in which pitted hypomineralized amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) with premature enamel failure segregated in an autosomal recessive fashion. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a missense mutation (c.586C>A, p.P196T) in the I-domain of integrin-β6 (ITGB6), which is consistently predicted to be pathogenic by all available programmes and is the only variant that segregates with the disease phenotype. Furthermore, a recent study revealed that mice lacking a functional allele of Itgb6 display a hypomaturation AI phenotype. Phenotypic characterization of affected human teeth in this study showed areas of abnormal prismatic organization, areas of low mineral density and severe abnormal surface pitting in the tooth's coronal portion. We suggest that the pathogenesis of this form of AI may be due to ineffective ligand binding of ITGB6 resulting in either compromised cell-matrix interaction or compromised ITGB6 activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) impacting indirectly on ameloblast-ameloblast interactions and proteolytic processing of extracellular matrix proteins via MMP20. This study adds to the list of genes mutated in AI and further highlights the importance of cell-matrix interactions during enamel formation.

  6. Deletion of ameloblastin exon 6 is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Murillo, Gina; Brookes, Steven J; Smith, Claire E L; Parry, David A; Silva, Sandra; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-10-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects reflecting failure of normal amelogenesis. Ameloblastin (AMBN) is the second most abundant enamel matrix protein expressed during amelogenesis. The pivotal role of AMBN in amelogenesis has been confirmed experimentally using mouse models. However, no AMBN mutations have been associated with human AI. Using autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we identified genomic deletion of AMBN exon 6 in a second cousin consanguineous family with three of the six children having hypoplastic AI. The genomic deletion corresponds to an in-frame deletion of 79 amino acids, shortening the protein from 447 to 368 residues. Exfoliated primary teeth (unmatched to genotype) were available from family members. The most severely affected had thin, aprismatic enamel (similar to that reported in mice homozygous for Ambn lacking exons 5 and 6). Other teeth exhibited thicker but largely aprismatic enamel. One tooth had apparently normal enamel. It has been suggested that AMBN may function in bone development. No clinically obvious bone or other co-segregating health problems were identified in the family investigated. This study confirms for the first time that AMBN mutations cause non-syndromic human AI and that mouse models with disrupted Ambn function are valid.

  7. Crown lengthening procedure in the management of amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, S; Manohar, Jenish; Shakunthala, P; Sujatha, S; Rajasekaran, S A; Karthikeyan, B; Kalaiselvan, S

    2015-08-01

    Full mouth rehabilitation includes a promising treatment planning and execution thus fulfilling esthetic, occlusal, and functional parameters maintaining the harmony of the stomatognathic system. Crown lengthening procedures have become an integral component of the esthetic armamentarium and are utilized with increasing frequency to enhance the appearance of restorations placed in the esthetic zone. Crown lengthening plays a role to create healthy relationship of the gingiva and bone levels so as to gain access to more of the tooth which can be restored, if it is badly worn, decayed or fractured, below the gum line. This paper highlights the full mouth crown lengthening procedure performed on a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta.

  8. Amelogenesis Imperfecta, Facial Esthetics and Snap-On Smile.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lee; Bradshaw, Jonathan P; Marks, Murray K

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary enamel protein disorder affecting deciduous and secondary crown formation. The prevalence ranges from 1:700 to 1:14,000 depending on the population. These teeth may be hypoplastic, hypomineralized, or hypermineralized and are often discolored, sensitive and caries vulnerable. Patients often present with psychosocial issues due to appearance. Primary teeth are often treated with stainless steel crowns while secondary teeth are treated with full coverage esthetic crowns. The presenting preteen male here was fitted with Snap-On Smile? (www.snaponsmile.com). This treatment option provided cosmetic enhancement of the patient's appearance besides stabilization without altering the primary and secondary dentition during adolescent development.

  9. Crown lengthening procedure in the management of amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Kalaivani, S.; Manohar, Jenish; Shakunthala, P.; Sujatha, S.; Rajasekaran, S. A.; Karthikeyan, B.; Kalaiselvan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Full mouth rehabilitation includes a promising treatment planning and execution thus fulfilling esthetic, occlusal, and functional parameters maintaining the harmony of the stomatognathic system. Crown lengthening procedures have become an integral component of the esthetic armamentarium and are utilized with increasing frequency to enhance the appearance of restorations placed in the esthetic zone. Crown lengthening plays a role to create healthy relationship of the gingiva and bone levels so as to gain access to more of the tooth which can be restored, if it is badly worn, decayed or fractured, below the gum line. This paper highlights the full mouth crown lengthening procedure performed on a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta. PMID:26538965

  10. Oral Rehabilitation of a Case of Amelogenesis Imperfecta with Multiple Periapical Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Lini; Hegde, Amitha M; Shetty, Y Rajmohan

    2008-01-01

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta is a hereditary anomaly that affects the enamel of human teeth and is not associated with any systemic disorder of affected patients. The affected teeth are disturbed in coloration, thickness and resistance. The rehabilitation of amelogenesis imperfecta in a child must take into account the development of the child’s teeth, the health of the periodontal tissues and the maxillary and mandibular growth. This article reports the endodontic and occlusal rehabilitation of a 14-year-old girl affected with autosomal recessive hypocalcified type of amelogenesis imperfecta with multiple periapical cysts. PMID:25206085

  11. LAMB3 mutations causing autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Seymen, F; Lee, K E; Ko, J; Yildirim, M; Tuna, E B; Gencay, K; Shin, T J; Kyun, H K; Simmer, J P; Hu, J C-C

    2013-10-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) can be either isolated or part of a larger syndrome. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a collection of autosomal-recessive disorders featuring AI associated with skin fragility and other symptoms. JEB is a recessive syndrome usually caused by mutations in both alleles of COL17A1, LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2. In rare cases, heterozygous carriers in JEB kindreds display enamel malformations in the absence of skin fragility (isolated AI). We recruited two kindreds with autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) characterized by generalized severe enamel hypoplasia with deep linear grooves and pits. Whole-exome sequencing of both probands identified novel heterozygous mutations in the last exon of LAMB3 that likely truncated the protein. The mutations perfectly segregated with the enamel defects in both families. In Family 1, an 8-bp deletion (c.3446_3453del GACTGGAG) shifted the reading frame (p.Gly 1149Glufs*8). In Family 2, a single nucleotide substitution (c.C3431A) generated an in-frame translation termination codon (p.Ser1144*). We conclude that enamel formation is particularly sensitive to defects in hemidesmosome/basement-membrane complexes and that syndromic and non-syndromic forms of AI can be etiologically related. PMID:23958762

  12. Amelogenesis imperfecta and anterior open bite: Etiological, classification, clinical and management interrelationships

    PubMed Central

    Alachioti, Xanthippi Sofia; Dimopoulou, Eleni; Vlasakidou, Anatoli; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2014-01-01

    Although amelogenesis imperfecta is not a common dental pathological condition, its etiological, classification, clinical and management aspects have been addressed extensively in the scientific literature. Of special clinical consideration is the frequent co-existence of amelogenesis imperfecta with the anterior open bite. This paper provides an updated review on amelogenesis imperfecta as well as anterior open bite, in general, and documents the association of these two separate entities, in particular. Diagnosis and treatment of amelogenesis imperfecta patients presenting also with anterior open bite require a lengthy, comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach, which should aim to successfully address all dental, occlusal, developmental, skeletal and soft tissue problems associated with these two serious clinical conditions. PMID:24987656

  13. Occurrence of epidermolysis bullosa along with Amelogenesis imperfecta in female patient of India

    PubMed Central

    Javed, A. P.; Shenai, Prashanth; Chatra, Laxmikanth; Veena, K. M.; Rao, Prasanna Kumar; Prabhu, Rachana

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited disorder, which is characteristically presented as skin blisters developing in response to minor injury. Junctional variety of EB is also associated with enamel hypoplasia. Amelogenesis imperfecta presents with abnormal formation of the enamel both in deciduous and permanent dentition. This article describes a previously unreported case of Amelogenesis imperfecta with complete loss of enamel in a young female patient with EB. PMID:24379873

  14. Clinical findings and long-term managements of patients with amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Koruyucu, Mine; Bayram, Merve; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Gencay, Koray; Seymen, Figen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this clinical case series is to present a diagnosis and different treatment methods of patients in different ages with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) as well as further treatments during a 3-6 years follow-up period. A number of 31 patients (16 female, 15 male with a mean age of 10.77 ± 2.65 years) with AI have been examined for the study group between 2007 and 2010 years. A detailed anamnesis was recorded, followed by a clinical and radiological assessment of oral health. The types of AI classified for each patient according to clinical and radiographic evaluation. The main complaints of patients, presence of dental caries and dental anomalies were noted. Necessary treatments had been planned for the individual cases of AI. A number of 19 patients had hypoplastic (HP) form, and 10 patients showed hypomaturation (HM) form of AI, while one patient showed hypocalcified form of AI and one patient had HM-HP form with taurodontism. Main complaints were chiefly related to dissatisfactory esthetics and dental sensitivity. Caries prevalence index was 93.5%. Mean decayed, missing, filling permanent teeth (DMF) and DMF surface (DMFS) were found as 2.74 ± 1.71 and 6.23 ± 3.99; df (decayed, filling primary teeth) and dfs (decayed, filling primary teeth surface) were found as 3.12 ± 2.85 and 5.24 ± 4.97, respectively. All patients received individual clinical care, including preventive, restorative, and prosthetic treatments. Patients have scheduled for regular follow-up in every 3 months. Composite restorations were used as the most common treatment (25 patients, 80.6%). The treatment plan should be based on patient's age, type of defects and individual needs of the patients. Necessary treatment plan is essential, not only due to functional and aesthetic reasons, but also for the positive psychological impact on young patients. PMID:25512739

  15. Amelogenesis imperfecta: Report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Mayur; Dixit, Shweta; Singh, Asha; Kunte, Sanket

    2009-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a diverse collection of inherited diseases that exhibit quantitative or qualitative tooth enamel defects in the absence of systemic manifestations. Also known by varied names such as Hereditary enamel dysplasia, Hereditary brown enamel, Hereditary brown opalescent teeth, this defect is entirely ectodermal, since mesodermal components of the teeth are basically normal. The AI trait can be transmitted by either autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked modes of inheritance. Genes implicated in autosomal forms are genes encoding enamel matrix proteins, namely: enamelin and ameloblastin, tuftelin, MMP-20 and kallikrein – 4. This article presents a case reported to Dr. D. Y. Patil, Dental College and Hospital, Pune, India, along with a review of this often seen clinical entity. PMID:21887005

  16. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-01

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI. PMID:24201615

  17. Hereditary gingival hyperplasia associated with amelogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nibali, Luigi; Brett, Peter M; Donos, Nikos; Griffiths, Gareth S

    2012-06-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) and amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) are two rare oral conditions with genetic etiologies. The case of a 17-year-old boy affected by HGF, AI, anterior open bite, and pyramidal impaction of the maxillary molars is reported. Internal bevel gingivectomies were carried out to reduce gingival overgrowth. Clinical examination of the family revealed the presence of HGF and AI in his 12-year-old sister (both in milder forms) and of HGF in his older half brother. Genetic sequencing analyses were performed to detect any of the known mutations leading to HGF and AI. Histologic analysis revealed the presence of fibroepithelial hyperplasia, consistent with a diagnosis of GF. Sequencing genetic analysis failed to identify any of the common mutations leading to HGF (SOS-1) or AI (enamelin and amelogenin genes). This phenotype, similar to what has been described in other families, may represent a new syndrome caused by an as-yet unknown genotype.

  18. Amelogenesis Imperfecta, Facial Esthetics and Snap-On Smile.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lee; Bradshaw, Jonathan P; Marks, Murray K

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary enamel protein disorder affecting deciduous and secondary crown formation. The prevalence ranges from 1:700 to 1:14,000 depending on the population. These teeth may be hypoplastic, hypomineralized, or hypermineralized and are often discolored, sensitive and caries vulnerable. Patients often present with psychosocial issues due to appearance. Primary teeth are often treated with stainless steel crowns while secondary teeth are treated with full coverage esthetic crowns. The presenting preteen male here was fitted with Snap-On Smile? (www.snaponsmile.com). This treatment option provided cosmetic enhancement of the patient's appearance besides stabilization without altering the primary and secondary dentition during adolescent development. PMID:26433999

  19. Dental rehabilitation of amelogenesis imperfecta using thermoformed templates.

    PubMed

    Sockalingam, Snmp

    2011-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta represents a group of dental developmental conditions that are genomic in origin. Hypoplastic AI, hypomineralised AI or both in combination were the most common types seen clinically. This paper describes oral rehabilitation of a 9-year-old Malay girl with inherited hypoplastic AI using transparent thermoforming templates. The defective surface areas were reconstructed to their original dimensions on stone cast models of the upper and lower arches using composite, and transparent thermoform templates were fabricated on the models. The templates were used as crown formers to reconstruct the defective teeth clinically using esthetically matching composite. The usage of the templates allowed direct light curing of the composite, accurate reproducibility of the anatomic contours of the defective teeth, reduced chair-side time and easy contouring and placement of homogenous thickness of composite in otherwise inaccessible sites of the affected teeth.

  20. Esthetic and functional rehabilitation of mutilated dentition and loss of vertical dimension due to amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Shweta; Tewari, Sanjay; Goel, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    Cases of severe attrition are a common finding. Among the congenital anomalies, amelogenesis imperfecta and dentinogenesis imperfecta are important conditions that may cause accelerated wear of teeth. The following case report describes the complete oral rehabilitation of a patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta. A detailed treatment plan was chalked out which included proper oral hygiene measures, restoration of carious teeth and endodontic treatment followed by foundation restorations of teeth that were crucial for the final prostheses. Patient was given transitional restorations for about 6 weeks with the aim of regaining the lost vertical dimensions. Final rehabilitation was done by fixed dental prostheses. PMID:25565735

  1. Esthetic and functional rehabilitation of mutilated dentition and loss of vertical dimension due to amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shweta; Tewari, Sanjay; Goel, Rajat

    2014-04-01

    Cases of severe attrition are a common finding. Among the congenital anomalies, amelogenesis imperfecta and dentinogenesis imperfecta are important conditions that may cause accelerated wear of teeth. The following case report describes the complete oral rehabilitation of a patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta. A detailed treatment plan was chalked out which included proper oral hygiene measures, restoration of carious teeth and endodontic treatment followed by foundation restorations of teeth that were crucial for the final prostheses. Patient was given transitional restorations for about 6 weeks with the aim of regaining the lost vertical dimensions. Final rehabilitation was done by fixed dental prostheses. PMID:25565735

  2. Enamel renal syndrome with associated amelogenesis imperfecta, nephrolithiasis, and hypocitraturia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bhesania, Dhvani; Kapoor, Sonali

    2015-01-01

    Numerous cases of enamel renal syndrome have been previously reported. Various terms, such as enamel renal syndrome, amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis syndrome, and enamel-renal-gingival syndrome, have been used for patients presenting with the dental phenotype characteristic of this condition, nephrocalcinosis or nephrolithiasis, and gingival findings. This report describes a case of amelogenesis imperfecta of the enamel agenesis variety with nephrolithiasis in a 21-year-old male patient who complained of small teeth. The imaging modalities employed were conventional radiography, cone-beam computed tomography, and renal sonography. Such cases are first encountered by dentists, as other organ or metabolic diseases are generally hidden. Hence, cases of amelogenesis imperfecta should be subjected to advanced diagnostic modalities, incorporating both dental and medical criteria, in order to facilitate comprehensive long-term management. PMID:26389061

  3. Enamel renal syndrome with associated amelogenesis imperfecta, nephrolithiasis, and hypocitraturia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bhesania, Dhvani; Arora, Ankit; Kapoor, Sonali

    2015-09-01

    Numerous cases of enamel renal syndrome have been previously reported. Various terms, such as enamel renal syndrome, amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis syndrome, and enamel-renal-gingival syndrome, have been used for patients presenting with the dental phenotype characteristic of this condition, nephrocalcinosis or nephrolithiasis, and gingival findings. This report describes a case of amelogenesis imperfecta of the enamel agenesis variety with nephrolithiasis in a 21-year-old male patient who complained of small teeth. The imaging modalities employed were conventional radiography, cone-beam computed tomography, and renal sonography. Such cases are first encountered by dentists, as other organ or metabolic diseases are generally hidden. Hence, cases of amelogenesis imperfecta should be subjected to advanced diagnostic modalities, incorporating both dental and medical criteria, in order to facilitate comprehensive long-term management.

  4. Dental management of amelogenesis imperfecta patients: a primer on genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Ng, F K; Messer, L B

    2009-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) represents a group of hereditary conditions which affects enamel formation in the primary and permanent dentitions. Mutations in genes critical for amelogenesis result in diverse phenotypes characterized by variably thin and/or defective enamel. To date, mutations in 5 genes are known to cause AI in humans. Understanding the molecular etiologies and associated inheritance patterns can assist in the early diagnosis of this condition. Recognition of genotype-phenotype correlations will allow clinicians to guide genetic testing and select appropriate management strategies for patients who express different phenotypes. The purpose of this paper was to provide a narrative review of the current literature on amelogenesis imperfecta, particularly regarding recent advances in the identification of candidate genes and the patterns of inheritance.

  5. Amelogenesis imperfecta: report of a successful transitional treatment in the mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Pires Dos Santos, Ana Paula; Cabral, Camila Melo; Moliterno, Luiz Flávio Martins; Oliveira, Branca Heloisa de

    2008-01-01

    The term amelogenesis imperfecta is applied to a clinically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders that interfere with the normal development of dental enamel. These disorders cause a deficiency in the enamel's quantity and/or the quality that may result in poor dental esthetics. The purpose of this paper was to describe a case of hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta in an 8-year-old girl whose dissatisfaction with the appearance of her teeth led to impaired social functioning. Since the patient was in the mixed dentition stage, a temporary treatment aiming to improve dental esthetics, preserve oral function, and allow for the recovery of the patient's self-confidence was performed by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:18647520

  6. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Generalized Gingival Overgrowth Resembling Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis in Siblings: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yaprak, Emre; Subaşı, Meryem Gülce; Avunduk, Mustafa; Aykent, Filiz

    2012-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of hereditary disorders primarily characterized by developmental abnormalities in the quantity and/or quality of enamel. There are some reports suggesting an association between AI and generalized gingival enlargement. This paper describes the clinical findings and oral management of two siblings presenting both AI and hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) like generalized gingival enlargements. The treatment of gingival enlargements by periodontal flap surgery was successful in the management of the physiologic gingival form for both patients in the 3-year follow-up period. Prosthetic treatment was also satisfactory for the older patient both aesthetically and functionally. PMID:23091740

  7. Full Mouth Rehabilitation of a Patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, P; Prasad, Maruthi; Haldal, Sindhu

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a hereditary disorder expressing a group of conditions which cause developmental alterations in the structure of enamel. This disorder has an adverse impact on oral health and also hampers the quality of life of the individual causing physiologic problems. The treatment of such patients would not only upgrade their quality-of-life, but also improve their self-esteem. The correction of such severely worn out dentition may require extensive restorative treatment to achieve appropriate results. It is important to identify the factors that contribute to the excessive wear and loss of vertical dimension. The correction of the defects has to be done without violating the biologic or mechanical principles. Full mouth rehabilitation in such patients improves esthetics, function and comfort. The following case report presents a systematic approach in rehabilitating a case of AI hypoplastic type using full mouth metal reinforced porcelain restorations. PMID:25214738

  8. Exclusion of known gene for enamel development in two Brazilian families with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria C L G; Hart, P Suzanne; Ramaswami, Mukundhan; Kanno, Cláudia M; Hart, Thomas C; Line, Sergio R P

    2007-01-31

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that result in defective development of tooth enamel. Mutations in several enamel proteins and proteinases have been associated with AI. The object of this study was to evaluate evidence of etiology for the six major candidate gene loci in two Brazilian families with AI. Genomic DNA was obtained from family members and all exons and exon-intron boundaries of the ENAM, AMBN, AMELX, MMP20, KLK4 and Amelotin gene were amplified and sequenced. Each family was also evaluated for linkage to chromosome regions known to contain genes important in enamel development. The present study indicates that the AI in these two families is not caused by any of the known loci for AI or any of the major candidate genes proposed in the literature. These findings indicate extensive genetic heterogeneity for non-syndromic AI.

  9. Novel ENAM and LAMB3 Mutations in Chinese Families with Hypoplastic Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Yuming; Yang, Yuan; Qin, Man

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of inherited diseases affecting the quality and quantity of dental enamel. To date, mutations in more than ten genes have been associated with non-syndromic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Among these, ENAM and LAMB3 mutations are known to be parts of the etiology of hypoplastic AI in human cases. When both alleles of LAMB3 are defective, it could cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), while with only one mutant allele in the C-terminus of LAMB3, it could result in severe hypoplastic AI without skin fragility. We enrolled three Chinese families with hypoplastic autosomal-dominant AI. Despite the diagnosis falling into the same type, the characteristics of their enamel hypoplasia were different. Screening of ENAM and LAMB3 genes was performed by direct sequencing of genomic DNA from blood samples. Disease-causing mutations were identified and perfectly segregated with the enamel defects in three families: a 19-bp insertion mutation in the exon 7 of ENAM (c.406_407insTCAAAAAAGCCGACCACAA, p.K136Ifs*16) in Family 1, a single-base deletion mutation in the exon 5 of ENAM (c. 139delA, p. M47Cfs*11) in Family 2, and a LAMB3 nonsense mutation in the last exon (c.3466C>T, p.Q1156X) in Family 3. Our results suggest that heterozygous mutations in ENAM and LAMB3 genes can cause hypoplastic AI with markedly different phenotypes in Chinese patients. And these findings extend the mutation spectrum of both genes and can be used for mutation screening of AI in the Chinese population. PMID:25769099

  10. Novel ENAM and LAMB3 mutations in Chinese families with hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Yuming; Yang, Yuan; Qin, Man

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of inherited diseases affecting the quality and quantity of dental enamel. To date, mutations in more than ten genes have been associated with non-syndromic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Among these, ENAM and LAMB3 mutations are known to be parts of the etiology of hypoplastic AI in human cases. When both alleles of LAMB3 are defective, it could cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), while with only one mutant allele in the C-terminus of LAMB3, it could result in severe hypoplastic AI without skin fragility. We enrolled three Chinese families with hypoplastic autosomal-dominant AI. Despite the diagnosis falling into the same type, the characteristics of their enamel hypoplasia were different. Screening of ENAM and LAMB3 genes was performed by direct sequencing of genomic DNA from blood samples. Disease-causing mutations were identified and perfectly segregated with the enamel defects in three families: a 19-bp insertion mutation in the exon 7 of ENAM (c.406_407insTCAAAAAAGCCGACCACAA, p.K136Ifs*16) in Family 1, a single-base deletion mutation in the exon 5 of ENAM (c. 139delA, p. M47Cfs*11) in Family 2, and a LAMB3 nonsense mutation in the last exon (c.3466C>T, p.Q1156X) in Family 3. Our results suggest that heterozygous mutations in ENAM and LAMB3 genes can cause hypoplastic AI with markedly different phenotypes in Chinese patients. And these findings extend the mutation spectrum of both genes and can be used for mutation screening of AI in the Chinese population.

  11. Rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta using porcelain veneers and CAD/CAM polymer restorations: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Saeidi Pour, Reza; Edelhoff, Daniel; Prandtner, Otto; Liebermann, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The complete dental rehabilitation of patients with a vertical dimension loss (VDL) caused by structural enamel deficits associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) represents a difficult challenge for restorative teams. Accurate analysis and treatment planning that includes esthetic and functional evaluations and adequate material selection are important prerequisites for successful results. Long-term provisional restorations play an important role in exploring and elucidating the patients' esthetic demands and functional needs. Restorative treatment options can vary from requiring only oral hygiene instructions to extensive dental restorations that include composite fillings, ceramic veneers, metal-ceramic, or all-ceramic crowns. This case report describes a full-mouth rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta including the case planning, bite replacement, preparation, and restoration setting steps with an experimental CAD/CAM polymer and porcelain veneers.

  12. Rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta using porcelain veneers and CAD/CAM polymer restorations: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Saeidi Pour, Reza; Edelhoff, Daniel; Prandtner, Otto; Liebermann, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The complete dental rehabilitation of patients with a vertical dimension loss (VDL) caused by structural enamel deficits associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) represents a difficult challenge for restorative teams. Accurate analysis and treatment planning that includes esthetic and functional evaluations and adequate material selection are important prerequisites for successful results. Long-term provisional restorations play an important role in exploring and elucidating the patients' esthetic demands and functional needs. Restorative treatment options can vary from requiring only oral hygiene instructions to extensive dental restorations that include composite fillings, ceramic veneers, metal-ceramic, or all-ceramic crowns. This case report describes a full-mouth rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta including the case planning, bite replacement, preparation, and restoration setting steps with an experimental CAD/CAM polymer and porcelain veneers. PMID:26345104

  13. Amelogenesis imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... a tooth development disorder. It causes the tooth enamel to be thin and abnormally formed. Enamel is the outer layer of teeth. ... The enamel of the tooth is soft and thin. The teeth appear yellow and are easily damaged. Both baby ...

  14. ITGB6 loss-of-function mutations cause autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Richardson, Amelia S; Reid, Bryan M; Lin, Brent P; Wang, Susan J; Kim, Jung-Wook; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C

    2014-04-15

    Integrins are cell-surface adhesion receptors that bind to extracellular matrices (ECM) and mediate cell-ECM interactions. Some integrins are known to play critical roles in dental enamel formation. We recruited two Hispanic families with generalized hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Analysis of whole-exome sequences identified three integrin beta 6 (ITGB6) mutations responsible for their enamel malformations. The female proband of Family 1 was a compound heterozygote with an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 4 (g.4545G > A c.427G > A p.Ala143Thr) and an ITGB6 transversion mutation in Exon 6 (g.27415T > A c.825T > A p.His275Gln). The male proband of Family 2 was homozygous for an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 11 (g.73664C > T c.1846C > T p.Arg616*) and hemizygous for a transition mutation in Exon 6 of Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS Xp22.13; g.355444T > C c.1697T > C p.Met566Thr). These are the first disease-causing ITGB6 mutations to be reported. Immunohistochemistry of mouse mandibular incisors localized ITGB6 to the distal membrane of differentiating ameloblasts and pre-ameloblasts, and then ITGB6 appeared to be internalized by secretory stage ameloblasts. ITGB6 expression was strongest in the maturation stage and its localization was associated with ameloblast modulation. Our findings demonstrate that early and late amelogenesis depend upon cell-matrix interactions. Our approach (from knockout mouse phenotype to human disease) demonstrates the power of mouse reverse genetics in mutational analysis of human genetic disorders and attests to the need for a careful dental phenotyping in large-scale knockout mouse projects.

  15. Aesthetic and Functional Rehabilitation of the Primary Dentition Affected by Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Marquezin, Maria Carolina Salomé; Zancopé, Bruna Raquel; Pacheco, Larissa Ferreira; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte; Pascon, Fernanda Miori

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this case report was to describe the oral rehabilitation of a five-year-old boy patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the primary dentition. AI is a group of hereditary disorders that affects the enamel structure. The patient was brought to the dental clinic complaining of tooth hypersensitivity during meals. The medical history and clinical examination were used to arrive at the diagnosis of AI. The treatment was oral rehabilitation of the primary molars with stainless steel crowns and resin-filled celluloid forms. The main objectives of the selected treatment were to enhance the esthetics, restore masticatory function, and eliminate the teeth sensitivity. The child was monitored in the pediatric dentistry clinic at four-month intervals until the mixed dentition stage. Treatment not only restored function and esthetic, but also showed a positive psychological impact and thereby improved perceived quality of life. The preventive, psychological, and curative measures of a young child with AI were successful. This result can encourage the clinicians to seek a cost-effective technique such as stainless steel crowns, and resin-filled celluloid forms to reestablish the oral functions and improve the child's psychosocial development. PMID:25705526

  16. Amelogenesis Imperfecta: Rehabilitation and Brainstorming on the Treatment Outcome after the First Year.

    PubMed

    İzgi, Ayça Deniz; Kale, Ediz; Niğiz, Remzi

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) affects enamel on primary and permanent dentition. This hereditary disorder is characterized by loss of enamel, poor esthetics, and hypersensitivity. Functional and cosmetic rehabilitation is challenging with variety of treatment options. This report presents the treatment of an AI patient using conventional fixed dentures and discusses issues related to posttreatment complications and prosthetic treatment outcome after 1 year of follow-up. A 19-year-old male AI patient with impaired self-esteem presented with hypersensitive, discolored, and mutilated teeth. Clinical examination revealed compromised occlusion and anterior open-bite. After hygiene maintenance full-coverage porcelain-fused-to-metal fixed restorations were indicated and applied. At the end of the treatment acceptable functional and esthetic results could be achieved. However, nearly a year after treatment a gingival inflammation in the esthetic zone complicated the outcome. Insufficient oral hygiene was to be blamed. Tooth sensitivity present from early childhood in these patients may prevent oral hygiene from becoming a habit. The relaxation due to relieve of hypersensitivity after treatment makes oral hygiene learning difficult. Continuous oral hygiene maintenance motivation may be crucial for the success of the treatment of AI patients. Treatment of AI patients should be carefully planned and an acceptable risk-benefit balance should be established. PMID:26783475

  17. Aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of the primary dentition affected by amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Marquezin, Maria Carolina Salomé; Zancopé, Bruna Raquel; Pacheco, Larissa Ferreira; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte; Pascon, Fernanda Miori

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this case report was to describe the oral rehabilitation of a five-year-old boy patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the primary dentition. AI is a group of hereditary disorders that affects the enamel structure. The patient was brought to the dental clinic complaining of tooth hypersensitivity during meals. The medical history and clinical examination were used to arrive at the diagnosis of AI. The treatment was oral rehabilitation of the primary molars with stainless steel crowns and resin-filled celluloid forms. The main objectives of the selected treatment were to enhance the esthetics, restore masticatory function, and eliminate the teeth sensitivity. The child was monitored in the pediatric dentistry clinic at four-month intervals until the mixed dentition stage. Treatment not only restored function and esthetic, but also showed a positive psychological impact and thereby improved perceived quality of life. The preventive, psychological, and curative measures of a young child with AI were successful. This result can encourage the clinicians to seek a cost-effective technique such as stainless steel crowns, and resin-filled celluloid forms to reestablish the oral functions and improve the child's psychosocial development. PMID:25705526

  18. Amelogenesis Imperfecta: Rehabilitation and Brainstorming on the Treatment Outcome after the First Year.

    PubMed

    İzgi, Ayça Deniz; Kale, Ediz; Niğiz, Remzi

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) affects enamel on primary and permanent dentition. This hereditary disorder is characterized by loss of enamel, poor esthetics, and hypersensitivity. Functional and cosmetic rehabilitation is challenging with variety of treatment options. This report presents the treatment of an AI patient using conventional fixed dentures and discusses issues related to posttreatment complications and prosthetic treatment outcome after 1 year of follow-up. A 19-year-old male AI patient with impaired self-esteem presented with hypersensitive, discolored, and mutilated teeth. Clinical examination revealed compromised occlusion and anterior open-bite. After hygiene maintenance full-coverage porcelain-fused-to-metal fixed restorations were indicated and applied. At the end of the treatment acceptable functional and esthetic results could be achieved. However, nearly a year after treatment a gingival inflammation in the esthetic zone complicated the outcome. Insufficient oral hygiene was to be blamed. Tooth sensitivity present from early childhood in these patients may prevent oral hygiene from becoming a habit. The relaxation due to relieve of hypersensitivity after treatment makes oral hygiene learning difficult. Continuous oral hygiene maintenance motivation may be crucial for the success of the treatment of AI patients. Treatment of AI patients should be carefully planned and an acceptable risk-benefit balance should be established.

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in amelogenesis imperfecta and phenotypic rescue using 4-phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Steven J; Barron, Martin J; Boot-Handford, Ray; Kirkham, Jennifer; Dixon, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Inherited diseases caused by genetic mutations can arise due to loss of protein function. Alternatively, mutated proteins may mis-fold, impairing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) trafficking, causing ER stress and triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR attempts to restore proteostasis but if unsuccessful drives affected cells towards apoptosis. Previously, we reported that in mice, the p.Tyr64His mutation in the enamel extracellular matrix (EEM) protein amelogenin disrupts the secretory pathway in the enamel-forming ameloblasts, resulting in eruption of malformed tooth enamel that phenocopies human amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Defective amelogenin post-secretory self-assembly and processing within the developing EEM has been suggested to underlie the pathogenesis of X chromosome-linked AI. Here, we challenge this concept by showing that AI pathogenesis associated with the p.Tyr64His amelogenin mutation involves ameloblast apoptosis induced by ER stress. Furthermore, we show that 4-phenylbutyrate can rescue the enamel phenotype in affected female mice by promoting cell survival over apoptosis such that they are able to complete enamel formation despite the presence of the mutation, offering a potential therapeutic option for patients with this form of AI and emphasizing the importance of ER stress in the pathogenesis of this inherited conformational disease.

  20. Amelogenesis Imperfecta: Rehabilitation and Brainstorming on the Treatment Outcome after the First Year

    PubMed Central

    İzgi, Ayça Deniz; Kale, Ediz; Niğiz, Remzi

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) affects enamel on primary and permanent dentition. This hereditary disorder is characterized by loss of enamel, poor esthetics, and hypersensitivity. Functional and cosmetic rehabilitation is challenging with variety of treatment options. This report presents the treatment of an AI patient using conventional fixed dentures and discusses issues related to posttreatment complications and prosthetic treatment outcome after 1 year of follow-up. A 19-year-old male AI patient with impaired self-esteem presented with hypersensitive, discolored, and mutilated teeth. Clinical examination revealed compromised occlusion and anterior open-bite. After hygiene maintenance full-coverage porcelain-fused-to-metal fixed restorations were indicated and applied. At the end of the treatment acceptable functional and esthetic results could be achieved. However, nearly a year after treatment a gingival inflammation in the esthetic zone complicated the outcome. Insufficient oral hygiene was to be blamed. Tooth sensitivity present from early childhood in these patients may prevent oral hygiene from becoming a habit. The relaxation due to relieve of hypersensitivity after treatment makes oral hygiene learning difficult. Continuous oral hygiene maintenance motivation may be crucial for the success of the treatment of AI patients. Treatment of AI patients should be carefully planned and an acceptable risk-benefit balance should be established. PMID:26783475

  1. Multidisciplinary Approach for Restoring Function and Esthetics in a Patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Vaibhav D; Parkhedkar, Rambhau D

    2013-01-01

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) is a genetically determined and enamel mineralization defect reported, depicted as “Hereditary brown teeth.” AI is characterized as a clinical entity and its clinical manifestations, histological appearance, and genetic pattern are characterized by their heterogeneity. The need for prosthodontic management of this group of patients varies. Some patients need oral hygiene instructions only, whereas others need extensive dental treatment that includes composite restorations, metal ceramic crowns, all ceramic crowns, porcelain veneers. A 20-year-old male patient presented with sensitive, discoloured, and mutilated teeth, with a decreased vertical dimension of occlusion. The 4-year recall examination revealed no pathology associated with the full mouth rehabilitation, and the patient’s aesthetic and functional expectations were satisfied. The rehabilitation included all-ceramic crowns on anterior teeth and metal-ceramic crowns on posterior teeth following endodontic treatment and a crown-lengthening procedure for eliminating tooth sensitivity, improving the aesthetics and occlusion, and for restoring function. PMID:24551735

  2. Phenotype-Genotype Correlations in Mouse Models of Amelogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Amelx and Enam Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Coxon, Thomas Liam; Brook, Alan Henry; Barron, Martin John; Smith, Richard Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in human and in mouse orthologous genes Amelx and Enam result in a diverse range of enamel defects. In this study we aimed to investigate the phenotype-genotype correlation between the mutants and the wild-type controls in mouse models of amelogenesis imperfecta using novel measurement approaches. Ten hemi-mandibles and incisors were dissected from each group of AmelxWT, AmelxX/Y64H, AmelxY/Y64H, AmelxY64H/Y64H, and EnamWT, EnamRgsc395 heterozygous and EnamRgsc395 homozygous mice. Their macro-morphology, colour and micro-topography were assessed using bespoke 2D and 3D image analysis systems and customized colour and whiteness algorithms. The novel methods identified significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between the Amelx groups for mandible and incisor size and enamel colour and between the Enam groups for incisor size and enamel colour. The AmelxWT mice had the largest mandibles and incisors, followed in descending order of size by the AmelxX/Y64H, AmelxY/Y64H and AmelxY64H/Y64H mice. Within the Enam groups the EnamWT incisors were largest and the EnamRgsc395 heterozygous mice were smallest. The effect on tooth morphology was also reflected by the severity of the enamel defects in the colour and whiteness assessment. Amelogenin affected mandible morphology and incisor enamel formation, while enamelin only affected incisors, supporting the multifunctional role of amelogenin. The enamelin mutation was associated with earlier forming enamel defects. The study supported the critical involvement of amelogenin and enamelin in enamel mineralization. PMID:22759786

  3. Abrogation of epithelial BMP2 and BMP4 causes Amelogenesis Imperfecta by reducing MMP20 and KLK4 expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaohua; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hua; Jani, Priyam H; Lu, Yongbo; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Bin; Qin, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) can be caused by the deficiencies of enamel matrix proteins, molecules responsible for the transportation and secretion of enamel matrix components, and proteases processing enamel matrix proteins. In the present study, we discovered the double deletion of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) in the dental epithelium by K14-cre resulted in hypoplastic enamel and reduced density in X-ray radiography as well as shortened enamel rods under scanning electron microscopy. Such enamel phenotype was consistent with the diagnosis of hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta. Histological and molecular analyses revealed that the removal of matrix proteins in the mutant enamel was drastically delayed, which was coincided with the greatly reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) and kallikrein 4 (KLK4). Although the expression of multiple enamel matrix proteins was down-regulated in the mutant ameloblasts, the cleavage of ameloblastin was drastically impaired. Therefore, we attributed the AI primarily to the reduction of MMP20 and KLK4. Further investigation found that BMP/Smad4 signaling pathway was down-regulated in the K14-cre;Bmp2(f/f);Bmp4(f/f)ameloblasts, suggesting that the reduced MMP20 and KLK4 expression may be due to the attenuated epithelial BMP/Smad4 signaling. PMID:27146352

  4. Abrogation of epithelial BMP2 and BMP4 causes Amelogenesis Imperfecta by reducing MMP20 and KLK4 expression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaohua; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hua; Jani, Priyam H.; Lu, Yongbo; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Bin; Qin, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) can be caused by the deficiencies of enamel matrix proteins, molecules responsible for the transportation and secretion of enamel matrix components, and proteases processing enamel matrix proteins. In the present study, we discovered the double deletion of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) in the dental epithelium by K14-cre resulted in hypoplastic enamel and reduced density in X-ray radiography as well as shortened enamel rods under scanning electron microscopy. Such enamel phenotype was consistent with the diagnosis of hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta. Histological and molecular analyses revealed that the removal of matrix proteins in the mutant enamel was drastically delayed, which was coincided with the greatly reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) and kallikrein 4 (KLK4). Although the expression of multiple enamel matrix proteins was down-regulated in the mutant ameloblasts, the cleavage of ameloblastin was drastically impaired. Therefore, we attributed the AI primarily to the reduction of MMP20 and KLK4. Further investigation found that BMP/Smad4 signaling pathway was down-regulated in the K14-cre;Bmp2f/f;Bmp4f/fameloblasts, suggesting that the reduced MMP20 and KLK4 expression may be due to the attenuated epithelial BMP/Smad4 signaling. PMID:27146352

  5. Mutations in C4orf26, encoding a peptide with in vitro hydroxyapatite crystal nucleation and growth activity, cause amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Parry, David A; Brookes, Steven J; Logan, Clare V; Poulter, James A; El-Sayed, Walid; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Al Harasi, Sharifa; Sayed, Jihad; Raïf, El Mostafa; Shore, Roger C; Dashash, Mayssoon; Barron, Martin; Morgan, Joanne E; Carr, Ian M; Taylor, Graham R; Johnson, Colin A; Aldred, Michael J; Dixon, Michael J; Wright, J Tim; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2012-09-01

    Autozygosity mapping and clonal sequencing of an Omani family identified mutations in the uncharacterized gene, C4orf26, as a cause of recessive hypomineralized amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), a disease in which the formation of tooth enamel fails. Screening of a panel of 57 autosomal-recessive AI-affected families identified eight further families with loss-of-function mutations in C4orf26. C4orf26 encodes a putative extracellular matrix acidic phosphoprotein expressed in the enamel organ. A mineral nucleation assay showed that the protein's phosphorylated C terminus has the capacity to promote nucleation of hydroxyapatite, suggesting a possible function in enamel mineralization during amelogenesis.

  6. Mutations in the latent TGF-beta binding protein 3 (LTBP3) gene cause brachyolmia with amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Huckert, Mathilde; Stoetzel, Corinne; Morkmued, Supawich; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Geoffroy, Véronique; Muller, Jean; Clauss, François; Prasad, Megana K.; Obry, Frédéric; Raymond, Jean Louis; Switala, Marzena; Alembik, Yves; Soskin, Sylvie; Mathieu, Eric; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Dabovic, Branka Brukner; Rifkin, Daniel B.; Dheedene, Annelies; Boudin, Eveline; Caluseriu, Oana; Cholette, Marie-Claude; Mcleod, Ross; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gellé, Marie-Paule; Coeuriot, Jean-Louis; Jacquelin, Louis-Frédéric; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Van Hul, Wim; Bertola, Debora; Dollé, Pascal; Verloes, Alain; Mortier, Geert; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Inherited dental malformations constitute a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Here, we report on four families, three of them consanguineous, with an identical phenotype, characterized by significant short stature with brachyolmia and hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) with almost absent enamel. This phenotype was first described in 1996 by Verloes et al. as an autosomal recessive form of brachyolmia associated with AI. Whole-exome sequencing resulted in the identification of recessive hypomorphic mutations including deletion, nonsense and splice mutations, in the LTBP3 gene, which is involved in the TGF-beta signaling pathway. We further investigated gene expression during mouse development and tooth formation. Differentiated ameloblasts synthesizing enamel matrix proteins and odontoblasts expressed the gene. Study of an available knockout mouse model showed that the mutant mice displayed very thin to absent enamel in both incisors and molars, hereby recapitulating the AI phenotype in the human disorder. PMID:25669657

  7. Mutations in the latent TGF-beta binding protein 3 (LTBP3) gene cause brachyolmia with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Huckert, Mathilde; Stoetzel, Corinne; Morkmued, Supawich; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Geoffroy, Véronique; Muller, Jean; Clauss, François; Prasad, Megana K; Obry, Frédéric; Raymond, Jean Louis; Switala, Marzena; Alembik, Yves; Soskin, Sylvie; Mathieu, Eric; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Dabovic, Branka Brukner; Rifkin, Daniel B; Dheedene, Annelies; Boudin, Eveline; Caluseriu, Oana; Cholette, Marie-Claude; Mcleod, Ross; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gellé, Marie-Paule; Coeuriot, Jean-Louis; Jacquelin, Louis-Frédéric; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Van Hul, Wim; Bertola, Debora; Dollé, Pascal; Verloes, Alain; Mortier, Geert; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2015-06-01

    Inherited dental malformations constitute a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Here, we report on four families, three of them consanguineous, with an identical phenotype, characterized by significant short stature with brachyolmia and hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) with almost absent enamel. This phenotype was first described in 1996 by Verloes et al. as an autosomal recessive form of brachyolmia associated with AI. Whole-exome sequencing resulted in the identification of recessive hypomorphic mutations including deletion, nonsense and splice mutations, in the LTBP3 gene, which is involved in the TGF-beta signaling pathway. We further investigated gene expression during mouse development and tooth formation. Differentiated ameloblasts synthesizing enamel matrix proteins and odontoblasts expressed the gene. Study of an available knockout mouse model showed that the mutant mice displayed very thin to absent enamel in both incisors and molars, hereby recapitulating the AI phenotype in the human disorder.

  8. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies FAM20A Mutations as a Cause of Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Gingival Hyperplasia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, James; Bitu, Carolina C.; Daly, Sarah B.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Barron, Martin J.; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S.; Martelli-Júnior, Hercilio; dos Santos Neto, Pedro Eleuterio; Mansilla, Maria A.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Black, Graeme C.M.; Dixon, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of biomineralization resulting from failure of normal enamel formation. AI is found as an isolated entity or as part of a syndrome, and an autosomal-recessive syndrome associating AI and gingival hyperplasia was recently reported. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 2 of FAM20A that was not present in the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism database (dbSNP), the 1000 Genomes database, or the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) Diversity Panel. Expression analyses indicated that Fam20a is expressed in ameloblasts and gingivae, providing biological plausibility for mutations in FAM20A underlying the pathogenesis of this syndrome. PMID:21549343

  9. Loss of epithelial FAM20A in mice causes amelogenesis imperfecta, tooth eruption delay and gingival overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Li; Liu, Pei-Hong; Xie, Xiao-Hua; Ma, Su; Liu, Chao; Chen, Li; Qin, Chun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    FAM20A has been studied to a very limited extent. Mutations in human FAM20A cause amelogenesis imperfecta, gingival fibromatosis and kidney problems. It would be desirable to systemically analyse the expression of FAM20A in dental tissues and to assess the pathological changes when this molecule is specifically nullified in individual tissues. Recently, we generated mice with a Fam20A-floxed allele containing the beta-galactosidase reporter gene. We analysed FAM20A expression in dental tissues using X-Gal staining, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, which showed that the ameloblasts in the mouse mandibular first molar began to express FAM20A at 1 day after birth, and the reduced enamel epithelium in erupting molars expressed a significant level of FAM20A. By breeding K14-Cre mice with Fam20A(flox/flox) mice, we created K14-Cre;Fam20A(flox/flox) (conditional knock out, cKO) mice, in which Fam20A was inactivated in the epithelium. We analysed the dental tissues of cKO mice using X-ray radiography, histology and immunohistochemistry. The molar enamel matrix in cKO mice was much thinner than normal and was often separated from the dentinoenamel junction. The Fam20A-deficient ameloblasts were non-polarized and disorganized and were detached from the enamel matrix. The enamel abnormality in cKO mice was consistent with the diagnosis of amelogenesis imperfecta. The levels of enamelin and matrix metalloproteinase 20 were lower in the ameloblasts and enamel of cKO mice than the normal mice. The cKO mice had remarkable delays in the eruption of molars and hyperplasia of the gingival epithelium. The findings emphasize the essential roles of FAM20A in the development of dental and oral tissues.

  10. Loss of epithelial FAM20A in mice causes amelogenesis imperfecta, tooth eruption delay and gingival overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Li; Liu, Pei-Hong; Xie, Xiao-Hua; Ma, Su; Liu, Chao; Chen, Li; Qin, Chun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    FAM20A has been studied to a very limited extent. Mutations in human FAM20A cause amelogenesis imperfecta, gingival fibromatosis and kidney problems. It would be desirable to systemically analyse the expression of FAM20A in dental tissues and to assess the pathological changes when this molecule is specifically nullified in individual tissues. Recently, we generated mice with a Fam20A-floxed allele containing the beta-galactosidase reporter gene. We analysed FAM20A expression in dental tissues using X-Gal staining, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, which showed that the ameloblasts in the mouse mandibular first molar began to express FAM20A at 1 day after birth, and the reduced enamel epithelium in erupting molars expressed a significant level of FAM20A. By breeding K14-Cre mice with Fam20Aflox/flox mice, we created K14-Cre;Fam20Aflox/flox (conditional knock out, cKO) mice, in which Fam20A was inactivated in the epithelium. We analysed the dental tissues of cKO mice using X-ray radiography, histology and immunohistochemistry. The molar enamel matrix in cKO mice was much thinner than normal and was often separated from the dentinoenamel junction. The Fam20A-deficient ameloblasts were non-polarized and disorganized and were detached from the enamel matrix. The enamel abnormality in cKO mice was consistent with the diagnosis of amelogenesis imperfecta. The levels of enamelin and matrix metalloproteinase 20 were lower in the ameloblasts and enamel of cKO mice than the normal mice. The cKO mice had remarkable delays in the eruption of molars and hyperplasia of the gingival epithelium. The findings emphasize the essential roles of FAM20A in the development of dental and oral tissues. PMID:27281036

  11. Noninvasive and Multidisciplinary Approach to the Functional and Esthetic Rehabilitation of Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Pediatric Case Report

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Juliana Feltrin; Fragelli, Camila Maria Bullio; Paschoal, Marco Aurélio Benini; Campos, Edson Alves; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Losso, Estela Maris; Cordeiro, Rita de Cássia Loiola

    2014-01-01

    Case Report. An 8-year-old girl with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) reported unsatisfactory aesthetics, difficulty in mastication, and dental hypersensitivity. The intraoral examination observed mixed dentition, malocclusion in anteroposterior relationships, anterior open bite, and dental asymmetry. A hypoplastic form of AI was diagnosed in the permanent dentition. A multidisciplinary planning was performed and divided into preventive, orthopedic, and rehabilitation stages. Initially, preventive treatment was implemented, with fluoride varnish applications, in order to protect the fragile enamel and reduce the dental sensitivity. In the second stage, the patient received an interceptive orthopedic treatment to improve cross-relationship of the arches during six months. Finally, the rehabilitation treatment was executed to establish the vertical dimension. In the posterior teeth, indirect composite resin crowns were performed with minimally invasive dental preparation. Direct composite resin restorations were used to improve the appearance of anterior teeth. Follow-Up. The follow-up was carried out after 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. After 18 months of follow-up, The restoration of integrity, oral hygiene, and patient satisfaction were observed . Conclusion. Successful reduction of the dental hypersensitivity and improvement of the aesthetic and functional aspects as well as quality of life were observed. PMID:25061528

  12. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Early Restorative Crown Therapy: An Interview Study with Adolescents and Young Adults on Their Experiences.

    PubMed

    Pousette Lundgren, Gunilla; Wickström, Anette; Hasselblad, Tove; Dahllöf, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) can present with rapid tooth loss or fractures of enamel as well as alterations in enamel thickness, color, and shape; factors that may compromise aesthetic appearance and masticatory function. The aim was to explore the experiences and perceptions of adolescents and young adults living with AI and receiving early prosthetic therapy. Seven patients with severe AI aged 16 to 23 years who underwent porcelain crown therapy participated in one-to-one individual interviews. The interviews followed a topic guide consisting of open-ended questions related to experiences of having AI. Transcripts from the interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. The analysis process identified three main themes: Disturbances in daily life, Managing disturbances, and Normalization of daily life. These themes explain the experiences of patients living with enamel disturbances caused by AI and receiving early crown therapy. Experiences include severe pain and sensitivity problems, feelings of embarrassment, and dealing with dental staff that lack knowledge and understanding of their condition. The patients described ways to manage their disturbances and to reduce pain when eating or drinking, and strategies for meeting other people. After definitive treatment with porcelain crown therapy, they described feeling like a normal patient. In conclusion the results showed that adolescents and young adults describe a profound effect of AI on several aspects of their daily life. PMID:27359125

  13. Mutations in CNNM4 Cause Jalili Syndrome, Consisting of Autosomal-Recessive Cone-Rod Dystrophy and Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Parry, David A.; Mighell, Alan J.; El-Sayed, Walid; Shore, Roger C.; Jalili, Ismail K.; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnes; Carlos, Roman; Carr, Ian M.; Downey, Louise M.; Blain, Katharine M.; Mansfield, David C.; Shahrabi, Mehdi; Heidari, Mansour; Aref, Parissa; Abbasi, Mohsen; Michaelides, Michel; Moore, Anthony T.; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F.

    2009-01-01

    The combination of recessively inherited cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) and amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) was first reported by Jalili and Smith in 1988 in a family subsequently linked to a locus on chromosome 2q11, and it has since been reported in a second small family. We have identified five further ethnically diverse families cosegregating CRD and AI. Phenotypic characterization of teeth and visual function in the published and new families reveals a consistent syndrome in all seven families, and all link or are consistent with linkage to 2q11, confirming the existence of a genetically homogenous condition that we now propose to call Jalili syndrome. Using a positional-candidate approach, we have identified mutations in the CNNM4 gene, encoding a putative metal transporter, accounting for the condition in all seven families. Nine mutations are described in all, three missense, three terminations, two large deletions, and a single base insertion. We confirmed expression of Cnnm4 in the neural retina and in ameloblasts in the developing tooth, suggesting a hitherto unknown connection between tooth biomineralization and retinal function. The identification of CNNM4 as the causative gene for Jalili syndrome, characterized by syndromic CRD with AI, has the potential to provide new insights into the roles of metal transport in visual function and biomineralization. PMID:19200525

  14. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Early Restorative Crown Therapy: An Interview Study with Adolescents and Young Adults on Their Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wickström, Anette; Hasselblad, Tove; Dahllöf, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) can present with rapid tooth loss or fractures of enamel as well as alterations in enamel thickness, color, and shape; factors that may compromise aesthetic appearance and masticatory function. The aim was to explore the experiences and perceptions of adolescents and young adults living with AI and receiving early prosthetic therapy. Seven patients with severe AI aged 16 to 23 years who underwent porcelain crown therapy participated in one-to-one individual interviews. The interviews followed a topic guide consisting of open-ended questions related to experiences of having AI. Transcripts from the interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. The analysis process identified three main themes: Disturbances in daily life, Managing disturbances, and Normalization of daily life. These themes explain the experiences of patients living with enamel disturbances caused by AI and receiving early crown therapy. Experiences include severe pain and sensitivity problems, feelings of embarrassment, and dealing with dental staff that lack knowledge and understanding of their condition. The patients described ways to manage their disturbances and to reduce pain when eating or drinking, and strategies for meeting other people. After definitive treatment with porcelain crown therapy, they described feeling like a normal patient. In conclusion the results showed that adolescents and young adults describe a profound effect of AI on several aspects of their daily life. PMID:27359125

  15. A Rare Co-occurrence of Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) and Various Non-Enamel Manifestations In Siblings-Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, A.J. Sai; Samatha, Y; Suneela, S; Ankineedu Babu, D

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) is a hereditary enamel defect which is characterized by developmental abnormalities in the quantity and/ or quality of enamel. This condition has been associated with dental anomalies, including taurodontism, congenitally missing teeth, delayed eruption, crown resorption, pulpal calcifications and odontogenic fibromas. This paper presents two cases of AI which were associated with multiple impacted permanent teeth in both the cases; and pulpal calcifications and pericoronal odontogenic fibromas of W.H.O type additionally, in one of the cases. PMID:24596797

  16. Complex morphological and molecular genetic examination of amelogenesis imperfecta: a case presentation of two Czech siblings with a non-syndrome form of the disease.

    PubMed

    Kripnerova, Tereza; Krulisova, Veronika; Ptakova, Nikola; Macek, Milan; Dostalova, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is an overarching term for a group of rare inherited disorders of hard tooth tissues. It is characterized by various defects in proper enamel formation. AI is a severe disorder that affects both the aesthetics and function of the dentition, with affected teeth increasingly suffering from dental caries. Therefore, early diagnosis and lifelong stomatological interventions are important. Due to the complex nature of AI family history, stomatological, radiographic, and molecular genetic examinations should be part of the diagnostic portfolio. Additionally, we utilized new visualization methods for the assessment of teeth demineralization. We present a case report of two affected Czech sisters (6 and 8 years old) with clinically defined AI. These are the first Czech cases in which comprehensive clinical and genetic analysis had been carried out and reflect the complex clinical nature, positive treatment options, and limitations of candidate-gene molecular genetic testing.

  17. Hypomaturation Enamel Defects in Klk4 Knockout/LacZ Knockin Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Simmer, James P.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Lertlam, Rangsiyakorn; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Hu, Jan C.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Kallikrein 4 (Klk4) is believed to play an essential role in enamel biomineralization, because defects in KLK4 cause hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We used gene targeting to generate a knockin mouse that replaces the Klk4 gene sequence, starting at the translation initiation site, with a lacZ reporter gene. Correct targeting of the transgene was confirmed by Southern blot and PCR analyses. Histochemical X-gal (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactopyranoside) staining demonstrated expression of β-galactosidase in maturation stage ameloblasts. No X-gal staining was observed in secretory stage ameloblasts or in odontoblasts. Retained enamel proteins were observed in the maturation stage enamel of the Klk4 null mouse, but not in the Klk4 heterozygous or wild-type mice. The enamel layer in the Klk4 null mouse was normal in thickness and contained decussating enamel rods but was rapidly abraded following weaning, despite the mice being maintained on soft chow. In function the enamel readily fractured within the initial rod and interrod enamel above the parallel enamel covering the dentino-enamel junction. Despite the lack of Klk4 and the retention of enamel proteins, significant levels of crystal maturation occurred (although delayed), and the enamel achieved a mineral density in some places greater than that detected in bone and dentin. An important finding was that individual enamel crystallites of erupted teeth failed to grow together, interlock, and function as a unit. Instead, individual crystallites seemed to spill out of the enamel when fractured. These results demonstrate that Klk4 is essential for the removal of enamel proteins and the proper maturation of enamel crystals. PMID:19578120

  18. Identification of the first multi-exonic WDR72 deletion in isolated amelogenesis imperfecta, and generation of a WDR72-specific copy number screening tool.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, Julia; Tatun, Dana; Parkhomchuk, Dmitri; Kurth, Ingo; Schimmel, Bettina; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha; Bertzbach, Sabine; Peters, Hartmut; Beetz, Christian

    2016-09-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder of tooth development which is due to aberrant deposition or composition of enamel. Both syndromic and isolated forms exist; they may be inherited in an X-linked, autosomal recessive, or autosomal dominant manner. WDR72 is one of ten currently known genes for recessive isolated AI; nine WDR72 mutations affecting single nucleotides have been described to date. Based on whole exome sequencing in a large consanguineous AI pedigree, we obtained evidence for presence of a multi-exonic WDR72 deletion. A home-made multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay was used to confirm the aberration, to narrow its extent, and to identify heterozygous carriers. Our study extends the mutational spectrum for WDR72 to include large deletions, and supports a relevance of the previously proposed loss-of-function mechanism. It also introduces an easy-to-use and highly sensitive tool for detecting WDR72 copy number alterations.

  19. Whole-exome sequencing, without prior linkage, identifies a mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; El-Sayed, Walid; Shore, Roger C; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    The conventional approach to identifying the defective gene in a family with an inherited disease is to find the disease locus through family studies. However, the rapid development and decreasing cost of next generation sequencing facilitates a more direct approach. Here, we report the identification of a frameshift mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Whole-exome sequencing of three affected family members and subsequent filtering of shared variants, without prior genetic linkage, sufficed to identify the pathogenic variant. Simultaneous analysis of multiple family members confirms segregation, enhancing the power to filter the genetic variation found and leading to rapid identification of the pathogenic variant. LAMB3 encodes a subunit of Laminin-5, one of a family of basement membrane proteins with essential functions in cell growth, movement and adhesion. Homozygous LAMB3 mutations cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) and enamel defects are seen in JEB cases. However, to our knowledge, this is the first report of dominant AI due to a LAMB3 mutation in the absence of JEB.

  20. Limited phenotypic variation of hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta in a Danish five-generation family with a novel FAM83H nonsense mutation.

    PubMed

    Haubek, Dorte; Gjørup, Hans; Jensen, Lillian G; Juncker, Inger; Nyegaard, Mette; Børglum, Anders D; Poulsen, Sven; Hertz, Jens M

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND.  Autosomal dominant hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta (ADHCAI) is a disease with severe dental manifestations. OBJECTIVES.  The aims were by means of a genome-wide linkage scan to search for the gene underlying the ADHCAI phenotype in a Danish five-generation family and to study the phenotypic variation of the enamel in affected family members. RESULTS.  Significant linkage was found to a locus at chromosome 8q24.3 comprising the gene FAM83H identified to be responsible for ADHCAI in other families. Subsequent sequencing of FAM83H in affected family members revealed a novel nonsense mutation, p.Y302X. Limited phenotypic variation was found among affected family members with loss of translucency and discoloration of the enamel. Extensive posteruptive loss of enamel was found in all teeth of affected subjects. The tip of the cusps on the premolars and molars and a zone along the gingival margin seemed resistant to posteruptive loss of enamel. We have screened FAM83H in another five unrelated Danish patients with a phenotype of ADHCAI similar to that in the five-generation family, and identified a de novo FAM83H nonsense mutation, p.Q452X in one of these patients. CONCLUSION.  We have identified a FAM83H mutation in two of six unrelated families with ADHCAI and found limited phenotypic variation of the enamel in these patients.

  1. Improved protocol to purify untagged amelogenin - Application to murine amelogenin containing the equivalent P70→T point mutation observed in human amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Shaw, Wendy J

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenin is the predominant extracellular protein responsible for converting carbonated hydroxyapatite into dental enamel, the hardest and most heavily mineralized tissue in vertebrates. Despite much effort, the precise mechanism by which amelogenin regulates enamel formation is not fully understood. To assist efforts aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanism of enamel formation, more facile protocols to purify recombinantly expressed amelogenin, ideally without any tag to assist affinity purification, are advantageous. Here we describe an improved method to purify milligram quantities of amelogenin that exploits its high solubility in 2% glacial acetic acid under conditions of low ionic strength. The method involves heating the frozen cell pellet for two 15min periods at ∼70°C with 2min of sonication in between, dialysis twice in 2% acetic acid (1:250 v/v), and reverse phase chromatography. A further improvement in yield is obtained by resuspending the frozen cell pellet in 6M guanidine hydrochloride in the first step. The acetic acid heating method is illustrated with a murine amelogenin containing the corresponding P70→T point mutation observed in an human amelogenin associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (P71T), while the guanidine hydrochloride heating method is illustrated with wild type murine amelogenin (M180). The self-assembly properties of P71T were probed by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies as a function of protein (0.1-1.8mM) and NaCl (0-367mM) concentration. Relative to similar studies with wild type murine amelogenin, P71T self-associates at lower protein or salt concentrations with the interactions initiated near the N-terminus.

  2. Improved protocol to purify untagged amelogenin – Application to murine amelogenin containing the equivalent P70→T point mutation observed in human amelogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-13

    Amelogenin is the predominant extracellular protein responsible for converting carbonated hydroxyapatite into dental enamel, the hardest and most heavily mineralized tissue in vertebrates. Despite much effort, the precise mechanism by which amelogenin regulates enamel formation is not fully understood. To assist efforts aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanism of enamel formation, more facile protocols to purify recombinantly expressed amelogenin, ideally without any tag to assist affinity purification, are advantageous. Here we describe an improved method to purify milligram quantities of amelogenin that exploits its high solubility in 2% glacial acetic acid under conditions of low ionic strength. The method involves heating the frozen cell pellet for two 15 min periods at ~70 ºC with two minutes of sonication in between, dialysis twice in 2% acetic acid (1:250 v/v), and reverse phase chromatography. A further improvement in yield is obtained by resuspending the frozen cell pellet in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride in the first step. The acetic acid heating method is illustrated with a murine amelogenin containing the corresponding P70→T point mutation observed in an human amelogenin associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (P71T), while the guanidine hydrochloride heating method is illustrated with wild type murine amelogenin (M180). The self-assembly properties of P71T were probed by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies as a function of protein (0.1 to 1.8 mM) and NaCl (0 to 367 mM) concentration. In conclusion, relative to similar studies with wild type murine amelogenin, P71T self-associates at lower protein or salt concentrations with the interactions initiated near the N-terminus.

  3. Improved protocol to purify untagged amelogenin – Application to murine amelogenin containing the equivalent P70→T point mutation observed in human amelogenesis imperfecta

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Buchko, Garry W.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-13

    Amelogenin is the predominant extracellular protein responsible for converting carbonated hydroxyapatite into dental enamel, the hardest and most heavily mineralized tissue in vertebrates. Despite much effort, the precise mechanism by which amelogenin regulates enamel formation is not fully understood. To assist efforts aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanism of enamel formation, more facile protocols to purify recombinantly expressed amelogenin, ideally without any tag to assist affinity purification, are advantageous. Here we describe an improved method to purify milligram quantities of amelogenin that exploits its high solubility in 2% glacial acetic acid under conditions of low ionic strength. The method involvesmore » heating the frozen cell pellet for two 15 min periods at ~70 ºC with two minutes of sonication in between, dialysis twice in 2% acetic acid (1:250 v/v), and reverse phase chromatography. A further improvement in yield is obtained by resuspending the frozen cell pellet in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride in the first step. The acetic acid heating method is illustrated with a murine amelogenin containing the corresponding P70→T point mutation observed in an human amelogenin associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (P71T), while the guanidine hydrochloride heating method is illustrated with wild type murine amelogenin (M180). The self-assembly properties of P71T were probed by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies as a function of protein (0.1 to 1.8 mM) and NaCl (0 to 367 mM) concentration. In conclusion, relative to similar studies with wild type murine amelogenin, P71T self-associates at lower protein or salt concentrations with the interactions initiated near the N-terminus.« less

  4. Amelogenesis imperfecta with bilateral nephrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Poornima, P; Katkade, Shashikant; Mohamed, Roshan Noor; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old patient presented with a severe delay of eruption in permanent maxillary and mandibular incisors. On examination, there was over-retained primary teeth and delayed eruption of permanent teeth. Retained primary teeth showed light yellow discolouration whereas permanent teeth were distinct yellow with thin or little enamel. Subsequent imaging revealed all the premolars except maxillary left first premolar showed signs of intra-alveolar coronal resorption, nephrocalcinosis with bilateral multiple calculi and small papillary tip calcifications, marked increase in alkaline phosphatase. Subsequent dental treatment for restoring the functional and aesthetic requirement followed by appropriate treatment for renal problem was undertaken. PMID:23709541

  5. A Functional Study of Mutations in K+-dependent Na+-Ca2+ Exchangers Associated with Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Non-syndromic Oculocutaneous Albinism.

    PubMed

    Jalloul, Ali H; Rogasevskaia, Tatiana P; Szerencsei, Robert T; Schnetkamp, Paul P M

    2016-06-17

    K(+)-dependent Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers belong to the solute carrier 24 (SLC24A1-5) gene family of membrane transporters. Five different gene products (NCKX1-5) have been identified in humans, which play key roles in biological processes including vision, olfaction, and skin pigmentation. NCKXs are bi-directional membrane transporters that transport 1 Ca(2+)+K(+) ions in exchange for 4 Na(+) ions. Recent studies have linked mutations in the SLC24A4 (NCKX4) and SLC24A5 (NCKX5) genes to amylogenesis imperfecta (AI) and non-syndromic oculocutaneous albinism (OCA6), respectively. Here, we introduced mutations found in patients with AI and OCA6 into human SLC24A4 (NCKX4) cDNA leading to single residue substitutions in the mutant NCKX4 proteins. We measured NCKX-mediated Ca(2+) transport activity of WT and mutant NCKX4 proteins expressed in HEK293 cells. Three mutant NCKX4 cDNAs represent mutations found in the SCL24A4 gene and three represent mutations found in the SCL24A5 gene involving residues conserved between NCKX4 and NCKX5. Five mutant proteins had no observable NCKX activity, whereas one mutation resulted in a 78% reduction in transport activity. Total protein expression and trafficking to the plasma membrane (the latter with one exception) were not affected in the HEK293 cell expression system. We also analyzed two mutations in a Drosophila NCKX gene that have been reported to result in an increased susceptibility for seizures, and found that both resulted in mutant proteins with significantly reduced but observable NCKX activity. The data presented here support the genetic analyses that mutations in SLC24A4 and SLC24A5 are responsible for the phenotypic defects observed in human patients. PMID:27129268

  6. Osteogenesis imperfecta and dentinogenesis imperfecta: associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniela; Vieira, Ana Luiza Falavinha; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a review of dentinogenesis imperfecta occurring in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. The systemic manifestations and the oral aspects of dentinogenesis imperfecta in osteogenesis imperfecta are discussed, and an illustrative case is described.

  7. Osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A

    2007-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a relatively common hereditary connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility and fractures. Other frequently affected tissues include tendons, ligaments, skin, sclera, teeth, and middle and inner ear. Molecular studies have demonstrated that most cases result from mutations affecting the genes responsible for the formation of type 1 collagen. The phenotypic presentation varies from mild to lethal. Commonly observed dental abnormalities include dentinogenesis imperfecta and malocclusion. Medical therapies using bisphosphonates have resulted in reduced fracture risk and decreased bone pain. To date, no cases of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis have been reported. With appropriate precautions, the patient with osteogenesis imperfecta can tolerate and benefit from the delivery of necessary dental care to control oral disease, improve function, and improve esthetics.

  8. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia with localized aggressive periodontitis and amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Ajlan, Sumaiah Abdulbaqi

    2015-11-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an inherited medical condition that implies defects in steroid biosynthesis. The dental findings of a female patient with CAH are reported. The patient suffered from severe periodontal tissue destruction, obvious enamel defects, as well as some occlusal problems. The management approach is presented and the possibility of interrelation of her dental findings with her medical condition is discussed.

  9. Osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Brusin, Joyce Helena

    2008-01-01

    "Fragile bones" have been described in medical literature for centuries. Cases dating from antiquity include dental and skeletal details eerily similar to those found among modern patients whose bones fracture easily and whose bodies show signs of muscular and other weakness. Osteogenesis imperfecta--whose name implies "imperfect birth of bone"--is one of these inherited fragile bone syndromes. A generalized disorder of the body's connective tissues, it is most obvious in its effect on bone, but also involves the body's ligaments, tendons, fascia, eyes, skin, teeth and ears. Radiographs, bone scans and other imaging tools are essential in the initial diagnosis, assessment of fracture risk, and planning and tracking of treatment. PMID:18650529

  10. Osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Ben Amor, Mouna; Rauch, Frank; Monti, Elena; Antoniazzi, Franco

    2013-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), an inherited skeletal disorder characterized by low bone mass, bone fragility, and often short stature. The clinical severity varies widely from being nearly asymptomatic with a mild predisposition to fractures, normal stature and normal lifespan being to profoundly disabling and even lethal. Extra skeletal manifestations may include blue-grey sclera and dental abnormalities. Initially, the classification of OI into four types was based on clinical findings, but more recently additional types OI (types V-XI) have been ascertained, based on the identification of different mutations. While this classification is somewhat controversial, it is described in this article. The treatment of patients with OI is based on the nature and severity of symptoms. The goal of therapy is to prevent fractures and disability, improve function and quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach is needed, and treatment options include medication such as bisphosphonates, surgery, and rehabilitation. Investigations continue to explore gene and cell therapies that may be developed in the future.

  11. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation provides medically verified information to families and healthcare professionals, funds new OI research and promotes public policy that supports people living with osteogenesis imperfecta. Learn ...

  12. Msx2 -/- transgenic mice develop compound amelogenesis imperfecta, dentinogenesis imperfecta and periodental osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Aïoub, M; Lézot, F; Molla, M; Castaneda, B; Robert, B; Goubin, G; Néfussi, J R; Berdal, A

    2007-11-01

    The physiological function of the transcription factor Msx2 in tooth and alveolar bone was analysed using a knock-in transgenic mouse line. In this mouse line, the beta-galactosidase gene was used to disrupt Msx2: thus, beta-galactosidase expression was driven by the Msx2 promoter, but Msx2 was not produced. This allowed to monitor Msx2 expression using a beta-galactosidase assay. Msx2 transgenic mice ubiquitously and continuously expressed the mutated Msx2-nlacZ gene in cells of the complex formed by tooth and alveolar bone. Msx2 -/- homozygous mice displayed a wide spectrum of alterations in tooth eruption and morphology as well as dental and periodontal defects from the first post-natal weeks up to 6 months. These defects culminated with the formation of an odontogenic tumour at the mandibular third molar site. This study suggests that bone resorption is a functional target of Msx2 in the alveolar compartment, since Msx2 was expressed in osteoclasts, with the highest expression levels found in the active sites of bone modelling associated with tooth eruption and root elongation. The RANK osteoclast differentiation pathway was affected in microdissected Msx2 -/- mouse alveolar bone (as inferred by RANK ligand mRNA levels) compared to basal bone and wild-type controls. Decreased alveolar osteoclast activity was observed in Msx2 -/- mice, similar to that seen in osteopetrosis, another condition in which osteoclast activity is impaired and odontogenic tumours form. These data suggest a pleiotropic role for Msx2 in oral bone growth from birth until adult homeostasis. RANK pathway appeared to be modulated by Msx2, in addition to the previously reported modulations of BMP4 and laminin5alpha3 in early tooth development. Non-overlapping Msx1 and Msx2 expression patterns suggested that these two homeogenes play non-redundant roles in skeletal growth, with Msx1 targeting basal bone and Msx2 targeting alveolar bone. This study provides a detailed analysis of the phenotype resulting from the Msx2 null mutation and identifies the impact of Msx1 and Msx2 on post-natal oral bone growth.

  13. Osteogenesis imperfecta/lobstein syndrome associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Lingaraju, Naresh; Nagarathna, P J; Vijayalakshmi, R; Sheshadri, P

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a collagen related disorder characterized by increased bone fragility and low bone mass. The important oral finding in osteogenesis imperfect is the presence of dentinogenesis imperfecta. This article presents a case of osteogenesis imperfecta (type IV B) with dentinogenesis imperfecta where a 7-year-old girl had opalacent primary teeth associated with severe bone deformity, scoliosis, barrel shaped rib cage, and short stature. The clinical, radiographic ad histologic features are reviewed along with management aspects.

  14. Osteogenesis imperfecta/lobstein syndrome associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Lingaraju, Naresh; Nagarathna, P J; Vijayalakshmi, R; Sheshadri, P

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a collagen related disorder characterized by increased bone fragility and low bone mass. The important oral finding in osteogenesis imperfect is the presence of dentinogenesis imperfecta. This article presents a case of osteogenesis imperfecta (type IV B) with dentinogenesis imperfecta where a 7-year-old girl had opalacent primary teeth associated with severe bone deformity, scoliosis, barrel shaped rib cage, and short stature. The clinical, radiographic ad histologic features are reviewed along with management aspects. PMID:23579912

  15. Dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Biria, Mina; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi; Mozaffar, Sedighe; Ahmadi, Rahil

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a case with dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) associated with osteogenesis imperfecta. Systemic and dental manifestations of OI and its medical and dental treatments are discussed in this paper. A 5-year-old child with the diagnosis of OI was referred to the Dental School of Shaid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. On clinical examination yellow/brown discoloration of primary teeth with the attrition of the exposed dentin and class III malocclusion was observed. Enamel of first permanent molars was hypoplastic. Radiographic examinations confirmed the diagnosis of DI. A histological study was performed on one of the exfoliating teeth, which showed abnormal dentin. Primary teeth with DI were more severely affected compared to permanent teeth; enamel disintegration occurred in teeth with DI, demonstrating the need for restricts recalls for these patients.

  16. Dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Biria, Mina; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi; Mozaffar, Sedighe; Ahmadi, Rahil

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a case with dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) associated with osteogenesis imperfecta. Systemic and dental manifestations of OI and its medical and dental treatments are discussed in this paper. A 5-year-old child with the diagnosis of OI was referred to the Dental School of Shaid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. On clinical examination yellow/brown discoloration of primary teeth with the attrition of the exposed dentin and class III malocclusion was observed. Enamel of first permanent molars was hypoplastic. Radiographic examinations confirmed the diagnosis of DI. A histological study was performed on one of the exfoliating teeth, which showed abnormal dentin. Primary teeth with DI were more severely affected compared to permanent teeth; enamel disintegration occurred in teeth with DI, demonstrating the need for restricts recalls for these patients. PMID:23162594

  17. Dentinogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, P; Mathew, S; Sugnani, S N

    2008-06-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta is an autosomal dominant disorder of tooth development characterized by the presence of opalescent dentin, resulting in a dusky blue to brownish discoloration of the teeth. This condition is genetically and clinically heterogeneous; it may affect only the teeth or it may be associated with the osteogenesis imperfecta. Dentinogenesis imperfecta has been subdivided into three types: type I is associated with osteogenesis imperfecta; in type II there is no associated osteogenesis imperfecta; and when the condition is associated with the Brandywine triracial isolate and large pulp chambers it is classified as type III. This report describes a 16-year-old female patient who showed the characteristic dental features of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II. The etiology and prevalence of the disorder, and a comprehensive treatment plan, will be briefly reviewed.

  18. Prosthodontic rehabilitation of dentinogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Goud, Anil; Deshpande, Saee

    2011-04-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta and its prosthodontic management is a challenging task. Treatment protocol varies according to clinical case. Although various reports in the literature suggest general guidelines for treatment planning, the present case report describes a full mouth rehabilitation of a young patient with dentinogenesis imperfecta treated by maxillary fixed partial dentures and mandibular fiber reinforced overdenture with metal occlusal surfaces.

  19. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Barron, Martin J; McDonnell, Sinead T; Mackie, Iain; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-11-20

    The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome), permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a number of options including

  20. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin J; McDonnell, Sinead T; MacKie, Iain; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome), permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a number of options including

  1. Bmp2 deletion causes an amelogenesis imperfecta phenotype via regulating enamel gene expression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Feng, Junsheng; Wang, Feng; Li, Wentong; Gao, Qingping; Chen, Zhuo; Shoff, Lisa; Donly, Kevin J; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; Chun, Yong Hee Patricia; Harris, Stephen E; MacDougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Although Bmp2 is essential for tooth formation, the role of Bmp2 during enamel formation remains unknown in vivo. In this study, the role of Bmp2 in regulation of enamel formation was investigated by the Bmp2 conditional knock out (Bmp2 cKO) mice. Teeth of Bmp2 cKO mice displayed severe and profound phenotypes with asymmetric and misshaped incisors as well as abrasion of incisors and molars. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the enamel layer was hypoplastic and enamel lacked a typical prismatic pattern. Teeth from null mice were much more brittle as tested by shear and compressive moduli. Expression of enamel matrix protein genes, amelogenin, enamelin, and enamel-processing proteases, Mmp-20 and Klk4 was reduced in the Bmp2 cKO teeth as reflected in a reduced enamel formation. Exogenous Bmp2 up-regulated those gene expressions in mouse enamel organ epithelial cells. This result for the first time indicates Bmp2 signaling is essential for proper enamel development and mineralization in vivo.

  2. Bmp2 Deletion Causes an Amelogenesis Imperfecta Phenotype Via Regulating Enamel Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    GUO, FENG; FENG, JUNSHENG; WANG, FENG; LI, WENTONG; GAO, QINGPING; CHEN, ZHUO; SHOFF, LISA; DONLY, KEVIN J.; GLUHAK-HEINRICH, JELICA; CHUN, YONG HEE PATRICIA; HARRIS, STEPHEN E.; MACDOUGALL, MARY; CHEN, SHUO

    2015-01-01

    Although Bmp2 is essential for tooth formation, the role of Bmp2 during enamel formation remains unknown in vivo. In this study, the role of Bmp2 in regulation of enamel formation was investigated by the Bmp2 conditional knock out (Bmp2 cKO) mice. Teeth of Bmp2 cKO mice displayed severe and profound phenotypes with asymmetric and misshaped incisors as well as abrasion of incisors and molars. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the enamel layer was hypoplastic and enamel lacked a typical prismatic pattern. Teeth from null mice were much more brittle as tested by shear and compressive moduli. Expression of enamel matrix protein genes, amelogenin, enamelin, and enamel-processing proteases, Mmp-20 and Klk4 was reduced in the Bmp2 cKO teeth as reflected in a reduced enamel formation. Exogenous Bmp2 up-regulated those gene expressions in mouse enamel organ epithelial cells. This result for the first time indicates Bmp2 signaling is essential for proper enamel development and mineralization in vivo. PMID:25545831

  3. Osteogenesis imperfecta: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hoyer-Kuhn, Heike; Netzer, Christian; Semler, Oliver

    2015-07-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a rare hereditary disease mostly caused by mutations impairing collagen synthesis and modification. Recently recessive forms have been described influencing differentiation and activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Most prominent signs are fractures due to low traumata and deformities of long bones and vertebrae. Additional patients can be affected by dwarfism, scoliosis Dentinogenesis imperfecta, deafness and a blueish discoloration of the sclera. During childhood state of the art medical treatment are i.v. bisphosphonates to increase bone mass and to reduce fracture rate. Surgical interventions are needed to treat fractures, to correct deformities and should always be accompanied by physiotherapeutic and rehabilitative interventions.

  4. Perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, W G; Dalgleish, R

    1995-01-01

    Perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta is the result of heterozygous mutations of the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes that encode the alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) chains of type I collagen, respectively. Point mutations resulting in the substitution of Gly residues in Gly-X-Y amino acid triplets of the triple helical domain of the alpha 1(I) or alpha 2(I) chains are the most frequent mutations. They interrupt the repetitive Gly-X-Y structure that is mandatory for the formation of a stable triple helix. Most babies have their own private de novo mutation. However, the recurrence rate is about 7% owing to germline mosaicism in one parent. The mutations act in a dominant negative manner as the mutant pro alpha chains are incorporated into type I procollagen molecules that also contain normal pro alpha chains. The abnormal molecules are poorly secreted, more susceptible to degradation, and impair the formation of the extracellular matrix. The collagen fibres are abnormally organised and mineralisation is impaired. The severity of the clinical phenotype appears to be related to the type of mutation, its location in the alpha chain, the surrounding amino acid sequences, and the level of expression of the mutant allele. Images PMID:7643358

  5. Dentinogenesis imperfecta: endodontic implications. Case report.

    PubMed

    Pettiette, M T; Wright, J T; Trope, M

    1998-12-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary disorder resulting in defective dentin in both the primary and secondary dentitions. The complications of dentinogenesis imperfecta are difficult to manage and provide a challenge to the dentist. This case report concerns treating an African American patient with dentinogenesis imperfecta who appeared for treatment with endodontic pathosis. It illustrates the need for appropriate and timely restorative treatment to prevent pulpal pathosis. Also demonstrated is the difficulty of endodontically treating dentinogenesis imperfecta teeth because of pulpal obliteration and abnormal dentin mineralization. Early and correct diagnosis of dentinogenesis imperfecta is imperative to enable appropriate preventive interventions and optimal dental treatment. Although pulpal pathosis is rarely reported with dentinogenesis imperfecta, endodontic treatment is occasionally necessary and has a guarded prognosis if initiated after pulp canal obliteration has occurred.

  6. Dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with osteogenesis imperfecta: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yng-Tzer; Lin, Yai-Tin

    2003-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable systemic disorder of the connective tissue. Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), which is sometimes an accompanying symptom of OI, belongs to a group of genetically conditioned dentin dysplasias and is characterized clinically by an opalescent amber appearance of the dentin. Although the teeth of DI cases wear more easily and excessively compared to normal teeth, they do not appear to be more susceptible to dental caries than normal teeth. Two cases of DI associated with OI are presented in this paper, with 1 case suffering from nursing bottle caries. The purposes of this paper are to present the dental and skeletal characteristics of moderately and mildly involved DI associated with OI, and to discuss the possible methods of dental treatment. Patients with OI and opalescent teeth should be evaluated as soon as the deciduous teeth erupt; immediate dental involvement and oral hygiene instruction can be of help in reducing the necessity of extensive dental care.

  7. Recent developments in osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Joseph L.; Albert, Carolyne; Fritz, Jessica; Harris, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an uncommon genetic bone disease associated with brittle bones and fractures in children and adults. Although OI is most commonly associated with mutations of the genes for type I collagen, many other genes (some associated with type I collagen processing) have now been identified. The genetics of OI and advances in our understanding of the biomechanical properties of OI bone are reviewed in this article. Treatment includes physiotherapy, fall prevention, and sometimes orthopedic procedures. In this brief review, we will also discuss current understanding of pharmacologic therapies for treatment of OI. PMID:26401268

  8. Assessment of dysplastic dentin in osteogenesis imperfecta and dentinogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Malmgren, Barbro; Lindskog, Sven

    2003-04-01

    Two semiquantitative scoring systems, Clinical Radiographic Score (CRS) and Dysplastic Dentin Score (DDS), were introduced for analyzing degree of dysplastic manifestations in dentin. The utility of both systems was demonstrated in a large material of teeth from patients with dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) and osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Twenty teeth from healthy controls, 81 teeth from 40 patients with OI, and 18 teeth with DI without OI (DI type II) were examined. The degree of dysplasia was correlated with type and form of OI and type of DI. The median DDS did not differ between DI associated with OI (DI type I) and DI type II. DDS in OI patients without clinical signs of DI was above that of control teeth. Both circumpulpal and mantle dentin showed increased DDS, although circumpulpal dentin was more severely affected. The median DDS was highest for the most severe type of non-lethal OI (type III). DDS increased significantly with form (severity) of OI. A significant association between DDS and CRS was found, although diagnosis of DI in less severe cases was not possible based on radiographic or clinical signs alone. Thus, the DDS system proved valuable when the CRS system based on radiographic/clinical manifestations failed, the most significant finding being subclinical histological manifestations of DI in patients with OI but without clinical or radiographic signs of DI. These subtle dysplastic changes are most likely an expression of genetic disturbances associated with OI and should not be diagnosed as DI, but rather be termed histologic manifestations of dysplastic dentin associated with OI.

  9. Orthodontic and orthognathic management of a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta and dentinogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kindelan, J; Tobin, M; Roberts-Harry, D; Loukota, R A

    2003-12-01

    This case report describes a patient's severe Class III malocclusion, managed with a combination of orthodontic and orthognathic treatment. The medical history was complicated by osteogenesis imperfecta and dentinogenesis imperfecta. In addition the patient was a Jehovah's Witness. Patients with osteogenesis imperfecta carry an increased risk of perioperative haemorrhage, and this led to bimaxillary surgery being carried out as two discrete surgical episodes for the patient described. In addition, the risk of enamel fracture led to orthodontic bands being cemented on all teeth. In spite of the increased risks a successful outcome was achieved.

  10. Dentinogenesis imperfecta: the importance of early treatment.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Antonio Carlos; Ruiz, Matilde; Alarcón, Jose Antonio; González, Encarnación

    2008-03-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta, also known as hereditary opalescent dentin, is a dentin development disorder with autosomal dominant transmission that affects both the primary and permanent dentition. A case is reported of a family in which the mother and her 6- and 20-year-old children were diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II. The mouths of these patients illustrate the progressive deterioration of affected teeth if not adequately treated. The treatment of the 6-year-old son is described, and therapeutic approaches to this disorder in primary and permanent dentition are reviewed. This family exemplifies the need for the earliest possible diagnosis and treatment of dentinogenesis imperfecta to prevent extensive deterioration of the dentition and occlusion.

  11. New Perspectives on Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Forlino, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.

    2012-01-01

    A new paradigm has emerged for osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) as a collagen-related disorder. The more prevalent autosomal dominant forms of OI are caused by primary defects in type I collagen, while autosomal recessive forms are caused by deficiency of proteins which interact with type I procollagen for post-translational modification and/or folding. Factors contributing to the mechanism of dominant OI include intracellular stress, disruption of interactions between collagen and non-collagenous proteins, compromised matrix structure, abnormal cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and tissue mineralization. Recessive OI is caused by deficiency of any of the three components of the collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex; absence of 3-hydroxylation is associated with increased modification of the collagen helix, supporting delayed collagen folding. Other causes of recessive OI include deficiency of collagen chaperones, FKBP65 or HSP47. Murine models are crucial to uncovering the common pathways in dominant and recessive OI bone dysplasia. Clinical management of OI is multidiscipinary, encompassing substantial progress in physical rehabilitation and surgical procedures, managment of hearing, dental and pulmonary abnormalities, as well as drugs such as bisphosphonates and rGH. Novel treatments using cell therapy or new drug regimens hold promise for the future. PMID:21670757

  12. Genetic heterogeneity in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Sillence, D O; Senn, A; Danks, D M

    1979-01-01

    An epidemiological and genetical study of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) in Victoria, Australia confirmed that there are at least four distinct syndromes at present called OI. The largest group of patients showed autosomal dominant inheritance of osteoporosis leading to fractures and distinctly blue sclerae. A large proportion of adults had presenile deafness or a family history of presenile conductive hearing loss. A second group, who comprised the majority of newborns with neonatal fractures, all died before or soon after birth. These had characteristic broad, crumpled femora and beaded ribs in skeletal x-rays. Autosomal recessive inheritance was likely for some, if not all, of these cases. A third group, two thirds of whom had fractures at birth, showed severe progressive deformity of limbs and spine. The density of scleral blueness appeared less than that seen in the first group of patients and approximated that seen in normal children and adults. Moreover, the blueness appeared to decrease with age. All patients in this group were sporadic cases. The mode of inheritance was not resolved by the study, but it is likely that the group is heterogeneous with both dominant and recessive genotypes responsible for the syndrome. The fourth group of patients showed dominant inheritance of osteoporosis leading to fractures, with variable deformity of long bones, but normal sclerae. Images PMID:458828

  13. Management overview of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Albright, J A

    1981-09-01

    The treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta varies with the age of the patients and the severity of disease. Patients with mild disease rarely develop significant deformities; therefore, the care required is mainly limited to periodic fractures or to associated problems, such as erosion of the teeth, decreased hearing, and difficulties in adjustment. It is the patient with severe disease who often requires an unusual amount of attention. Regardless of the immediate problem, the treatment program should be geared toward the long-term function of the patient; in most cases this will be best served by the prevention and/or correction of long bone deformities, and by encouraging maximum intellectual and academic development. The latter requires contact of the child with normal children by placement in regular school classes. The primary basis of a successful treatment program to maintain acceptable skeletal alignment consists of properly timed operations for insertion of extensible intramedullary rods, together with supportive splints and braces. No other method of treatment, such as the use of systemic medications, has yet been shown to benefit the patient clinically. Progressive improvement in bone strength during childhood permits better eventual function for those patients in whom good skeletal alignment has been maintained. Most patients will become productive members of society, so the combination of optimum physical and optimum academic development will offer maximum opportunity to those who enter the competitive job market. PMID:7285473

  14. Ebstein's anomaly in a child with osteogenesis imperfecta type I.

    PubMed

    D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Celli, Mauro; Versacci, Paolo; Zambrano, Anna; Lodato, Valentina; Persiani, Pietro; Sangiorgi, Luca

    2011-05-01

    Cardiovascular involvement is relatively rare in osteogenesis imperfecta and has a predilection for left-sided cardiac valves. We report a 5 years old female child affected by osteogenesis imperfecta type I in which an asymptomatic mild form of Ebstein's anomaly, a congenital tricuspid malformation, was diagnosed during routinely investigation. The association of these two relatively rare entities could provide new insight to better understand the pathogenesis of cardiac involvement in osteogenesis imperfecta. PMID:22461818

  15. Dental management of severe dentinogenesis imperfecta in a mild form of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Stephen, L X G; Beighton, P

    2002-01-01

    Dentinogenesis Imperfecta (DI), in which the teeth are discolored, translucent and brittle, can occur in isolation as a familial trait and as a component of the skeletal dysplasia Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). In a Cape Town family, 20 persons in 3 generations had mild OI, with the additional manifestation of severe DI. The family was assessed at the Dental Genetic Unit of the University of the Western Cape and appropriate dental treatment was provided. In this setting, a detailed treatment plan was devised for a severely affected woman. This plan proved to be efficient and cost effective, and the final outcome was pleasing to the patient. Dentinogenesis Imperfecta is not uncommon and may well be encountered in conventional dental practice. The necessary clinical expertise is within the scope of the skills of the general dentist.

  16. [Osteogenesis imperfecta and dentinogenesis imperfecta: diagnostic frontiers and importance in dentofacial orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Kamoun-Goldrat, Agnès S; Le Merrer, Martine F

    2007-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disease that varies in severity and is characterized by fragile bones that fracture easily. Many extra-skeletal manifestations can be noted such as blue sclerotic markings, dentinogenesis imperfecta and impaired hearing or deafness. In most cases, an anomaly of collagen is the cause. It is usually accompanied by a specific Class III type cranio-facial morphology with open bite and increased incidence of impacted permanent molars. Orthodontists called upon to treat the dental aspects of this malady, should be careful to protect their patients against bacterial infection and hemorrhages, and to be well aware of the side affects that can be caused by the biophosphanates that constitute the basis of current medical treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta.

  17. Cardiovascular Involvement in Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Karamifar, Hamdollah; Ilkhanipoor, Homa; Ajami, Gholamhossein; Karamizadeh, Zohreh; Amirhakimi, Gholamhossein; Shakiba, Ali-Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Objective Osteogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary disease resulting from mutation in type I procollagen genes. One of the extra skeletal manifestations of this disease is cardiac involvement. The prevalence of cardiac involvement is still unknown in the children with osteogenesis imperfecta. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cardiovascular abnormalities in these patients. Methods 24 children with osteogenesis imperfecta and 24 normal children who were matched with the patients regarding sex and age were studied. In both groups, standard echocardiography was performed, and heart valves were investigated. Dimensions of left ventricle, aorta annulus, sinotubular junction, ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between the two groups. Findings The results revealed no significant difference between the two groups regarding age, sex, ejection fraction, shortening fraction, mean of aorta annulus, sinotubular junction, ascending and descending aorta, but after correction based on the body surface area, dimensions of aorta annulus, sinotubular junction, ascending and descending aorta in the patients were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Two (8.3%) patients had aortic insufficiency and five (20%) patients had tricuspid regurgitation, three of whom had gradient >25 mmHg and one patient had pulmonary insufficiency with indirect evidence of pulmonary hypertension. According to Z scores of aorta annulus, sinotubular junction and ascending aorta, 5, 3, and 1 out of 24 patients had Z scores >2 respectively. Conclusion The prevalence of valvular heart diseases and aortic root dilation was higher in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. In conclusion, cardiovascular investigation is recommended in these children. PMID:24800009

  18. Selachian tooth development: III. Ultrastructural features of secretory amelogenesis in Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Nanci, A; Bringas, P; Samuel, N; Slavkin, H C

    1983-01-01

    Ultrastructural features of secretory amelogenesis during selachian tooth development show several similarities to mammalian amelogenesis. However, the following critical differences were noticed: 1) subcellular organelles associated with merocrine-type protein synthesis and secretion were located in both the infranuclear as well as supranuclear regions of the selachian ameloblasts; 2) no evidence for Tomes process formation was found; 3) the basal lamina was not removed during epithelial differentiation into ameloblasts in the selachian model, and the structural features of the basal lamina were significantly altered during amelogenesis in rows III, IV, and VI; and 4) no dentine-enameloid junction was detected. It is suggested that enameloid is an extracellular matrix which is derived from the selachian inner enamel epithelium and appears to be secreted from both the lateral and apical surfaces of ameloblasts.

  19. Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Pseudoachalasia, and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mizrak, Dilsa; Alkan, Ali; Erdogdu, Batuhan; Utkan, Gungor

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare, inherited skeletal disorder characterized by abnormalities of type 1 collagen. Malignancy is rarely reported in patients with OI and it was suggested that this disease can protect against cancer. Here, we report a 41-year-old woman with symptoms of achalasia where repeated treatment of pneumatic dilation and stent replacement was unsuccessful; therefore, surgery was performed. Pathology showed gastric adenocarcinoma unexpectedly. Chemotherapy was given after assessing dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme activity, which can be deficient in OI patients. This is the first report of gastric cancer mimicking achalasia in a patient with OI. PMID:25874139

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)? Skip sharing on ... Page Content If OI is moderate or severe, health care providers usually diagnose it during prenatal ultrasound at ...

  1. [Genetic heterogeneity of osteogenesis imperfecta. Study of 6 cases].

    PubMed

    Olivares, J L; Hernández, M C; Bueno, M

    1986-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta one of the most common disorders of connective tissue, has been known for centuries. The most characteristic alterations which define it are: osteoporosis, osseous fragility with multiple fractures, blue sclerae, deafness and imperfect dentinogenesis. Important advances in the biochemical, anatomopathological, genetic, therapeutic and prophylactic fields have resulted in a great present-day interest in this disease. In this work we report six cases of osteogenesis imperfecta according to the current classification and we review the most outstanding aspects. PMID:3789548

  2. Pediatric dental management of a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta and dentinogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Muhney, Kelly; Campbell, Patricia Regener

    2007-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that affects all connective tissue. Clinical manifestations of OI include bone fragility, hyperlaxity of joints, hearing loss, abnormalities of stature and facial structure, blue sclerae, and dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI). OI is classified into four groups according to the severity and physical characteristics of the disease, although not all characteristics may be present in one individual. Currently, 20,000 to 50,000 individuals in the U.S. have been diagnosed with this disease. The aim of this article is to discuss medical and dental complications associated with OI and DI. A case presentation describes the clinical care of a patient from birth to age 12.

  3. [Orthotic management for patients with osteogenesis imperfecta].

    PubMed

    Alguacil Diego, I M; Molina Rueda, F; Gómez Conches, M

    2011-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a disease caused by a genetic defect in the qualitative and quantitative synthesis of type I collagen. There is a wide variation in its clinical signs, characterized by bone fragility, resulting in a bone vulnerable to external and internal forces, determining the occurrence of frequent fractures with minimal or no trauma. The therapeutic objective is directed to improve the functional capacity of the child or adult concerned, adopting those compensatory strategies to optimise their independence. In this sense, the use of different orthoses and assistive technology are important for achieving these objectives. We reviewed the main contributions to this orthotic disease and the evolution of the different devices used in different databases over the last 25 years. PMID:20880764

  4. GEP, a local growth factor, is critical for odontogenesis and amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhengguo; Jiang, Baichun; Xie, Yixia; Liu, Chuan-ju; Feng, Jian Q

    2010-11-25

    Granulin epithelin precursor (GEP) is a new growth factor that functions in brain development, chondrogenesis, tissue regeneration, tumorigenesis, and inflammation. The goal of this study was to study whether GEP was critical for odontogenesis and amelogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry data showed that GEP was expressed in both odontoblast and ameloblast cells postnatally. Knockdown of GEP by crossing U6-ploxPneo-GEP and Sox2-Cre transgenic mice led to a reduction of dentin thickness, an increase in predentin thickness, and a reduction in mineral content in enamel. The in vitro application of recombinant GEP up-regulated molecular markers important for odontogenesis (DMP1, DSPP, and ALP) and amelogenesis (ameloblastin, amelogenin and enamelin). In conclusion, both the in vivo and the in vivo data support an important role of GEP in tooth formation during postnatal development.

  5. Sickle cell disease with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Patil, P L; Rao, B Varun

    2013-06-01

    A 16 yr old female presented with generalized weakness and easy fatigability since 2 months. Her medical history included that she had sickle cell disease (ss pattern) on regular treatment. She denied smoking and consumption of alcohol. She had adequate calcium intake and her menstrual history was non-contributory. History of right tibial diaphysial fracture 1 year back followed by refracture at the same site 6 months later. On examination patient was 146 cm tall & weighed 48 kg. She had pallor, blue-grey sclera,scar mark of previous operation on right leg. Her mother and two maternal aunts also had blue-gray sclera. She had normal dentition and other systems were normal. Radiological screening showed diffuse osteopenia of all visualized skeleton, biconcave vertebral bodies in lumbar spine, Old healed fracture of right tibial diaphysis with intra-medullary nail in situ, wormian bones seen along the lambdoid suture, old healed fracture with sclerosis noted involving diaphysis of first metatarsal. Secondary causes of osteoporosis were ruled out. Skeletal involvement is sickle cell disease is usually in the form of avascular necrosis, dactylitis, joint effusions or osteomyelitis however osteoporosis and long bone fractures are not known in sickle cell disease. Owing to high index of suspicion a diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta was pursued, since the patient presented at 16 years age with relatively minor symptoms type 1A osteogenesis imperfecta (mildest form) was established. Systemic screening for disease complications included osteopontogram, audiogram and consultation with ophthalmologist and geneticist. Therapy with calcium and vit D was initiated and an in depth discussion regarding biphosphonates was pursued. Anaemia was corrected with blood transfusion and treatment of sickle cell disease was continued. Family screening was offered. Fractures particularly adults older than 45 are associated with osteoporosis. This case illustrates the importance of family

  6. Dentinogenesis imperfecta: long-term rehabilitation in a child.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Dominique; Leheis, Benoît; Duprez, Jean-Pierre; Bittar, Elias; Coudert, Jean-Loup

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of dentinogenesis imperfecta represents a challenge for the dental practitioner. The aim of this case report was to describe the chronology and problems encountered in the long-term rehabilitation of a young girl suffering from dentinogenesis imperfecta with severe attrition. A 2-stage treatment over a period of 9 years is described and discussed. This treatment comprised an initial treatment to restore esthetic appearance and function during primary and mixed dentitions and a complete prosthetic rehabilitation in a second stage to protect permanent teeth with low-fusion ceramicmetal individual crowns. Discovery of a follicular cyst is also reported and its treatment is described.

  7. Clinical manifestations and dental management of dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with osteogenesis imperfecta: Case report.

    PubMed

    Abukabbos, Halima; Al-Sineedi, Faisal

    2013-10-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) associated with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that affects the connective tissues and results in dentine dysplasia. This case report discusses the systemic and dental manifestations of OI and DI in a 4-year-old child, with moderate presentation of both disorders, who was treated at King Fahd Military Medical Complex in Dhahran. Dental treatment included the use of strip and stainless-steel crowns under local anesthesia, as well as behavior modification techniques. Rigorous home care instructions, including reinforcement of the oral hygiene practice and avoidance of any episode that may lead to bone fracture, were discussed with the parents. The case was reevaluated at 3-month follow-up visits, wherein the medical and dental histories were updated, the child's growth was monitored, periodic clinical and radiographic examinations were performed, and the oral hygiene was evaluated via the debris index score and caries risk assessment. Further treatment of the permanent dentition may be needed in the future.

  8. Clinical manifestations and dental management of dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with osteogenesis imperfecta: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Abukabbos, Halima; Al-Sineedi, Faisal

    2013-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) associated with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that affects the connective tissues and results in dentine dysplasia. This case report discusses the systemic and dental manifestations of OI and DI in a 4-year-old child, with moderate presentation of both disorders, who was treated at King Fahd Military Medical Complex in Dhahran. Dental treatment included the use of strip and stainless-steel crowns under local anesthesia, as well as behavior modification techniques. Rigorous home care instructions, including reinforcement of the oral hygiene practice and avoidance of any episode that may lead to bone fracture, were discussed with the parents. The case was reevaluated at 3-month follow-up visits, wherein the medical and dental histories were updated, the child’s growth was monitored, periodic clinical and radiographic examinations were performed, and the oral hygiene was evaluated via the debris index score and caries risk assessment. Further treatment of the permanent dentition may be needed in the future. PMID:24371383

  9. Dentinogenesis imperfecta: an early treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Sapir, S; Shapira, J

    2001-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) type 2 is a disease inherited in a simple autosomal dominant mode. As soon as the teeth erupt the parents may notice the problem and look for a pediatric dentist's advice and treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment of DI is recommended, as it may prevent or intercept deterioration of the teeth and occlusion and improve esthetics. The purpose of this article is to present the objectives, treatment options, and problems encountered in the treatment of DI in the early primary dentition. A two-stage treatment of a toddler under general anesthesia is described and discussed. This paper recommends for severe cases of DI two treatment stages performed under general anesthesia. Stage 1 is early (around age 18-20 months) and is directed to covering the incisors with composite restorations and the first primary molars with preformed crowns. Stage 2 (around age 28-30 months) seeks to protect the second primary molars with preformed crowns and cover the canines with composite restorations.

  10. Skeletal muscle weakness in osteogeneis imperfecta mice

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Bettina A; Ferreira, J. Andries; McCambridge, Amanda J.; Brown, Marybeth; Phillips, Charlotte L.

    2010-01-01

    Exercise intolerance, muscle fatigue and weakness are often-reported, little-investigated concerns of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a heritable connective tissue disorder hallmarked by bone fragility resulting primarily from dominant mutations in the proα1(I) or proα2(I) collagen genes and the recently discovered recessive mutations in post-translational modifying proteins of type I collagen. In this study we examined the soleus (S), plantaris (P), gastrocnemius (G), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (Q) muscles of mice expressing mild (+/oim) and moderately severe (oim/oim) OI for evidence of inherent muscle pathology. In particular, muscle weight, fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fiber type, fiber histomorphology, fibrillar collagen content, absolute, relative and specific peak tetanic force (Po, Po/mg and Po/CSA respectively) of individual muscles were evaluated. Oim/oim mouse muscles were generally smaller, contained less fibrillar collagen, had decreased Po and an inability to sustain Po for the 300 ms testing duration for specific muscles; +/oim mice had a similar but milder skeletal muscle phenotype. +/oim mice had mild weakness of specific muscles but were less affected than their oim/oim counterparts which demonstrated readily apparent skeletal muscle pathology. Therefore muscle weakness in oim mice reflects inherent skeletal muscle pathology. PMID:20619344

  11. A Case of Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Treated with Submerged Root Technique.

    PubMed

    Uday, Ginjupally; Chandar, Bhanu; Srilakshmi, J; Khaitan, Tanya; Babu, B Balaji

    2015-09-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI), an autosomal dominant trait, is one of the most common hereditary disorders affecting both the formation and mineralization of dentin. Either or both primary and permanent dentition is affected by it. Here, we present a case report of a 13-year-old female patient affected with DGI who had undergone prosthetic rehabilitation with submerged root technique.

  12. A Case of Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Treated with Submerged Root Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chandar, Bhanu; Srilakshmi, J.; Khaitan, Tanya; Babu, B. Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI), an autosomal dominant trait, is one of the most common hereditary disorders affecting both the formation and mineralization of dentin. Either or both primary and permanent dentition is affected by it. Here, we present a case report of a 13-year-old female patient affected with DGI who had undergone prosthetic rehabilitation with submerged root technique. PMID:26501025

  13. Association between juvenile idiopathic arthritis and osteogenesis imperfecta: case report.

    PubMed

    Bica, Blanca Elena Rios Gomes; Ruiz, Danilo Garcia; Magalhães, Priscilla de Andrade; Barcellos, Marlúcia Guimarães; de Azevedo, Mário Newton Leitão

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a rare association case of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) in a 53 years-old female patient, present a literature review and discuss the radiological aspects of the temporo-mandibular joint involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of JIA an OI association.

  14. A Guide to Education for Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta. What Is OIF? Care of an Osteogenesis Imperfecta Baby and Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostegenesis Imperfecta Foundation, Inc., Manchester, NH.

    Three pamphlets provide basic information on the care and education of children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) a lifelong liability to fractures due to imperfectly formed "brittle bones." The first brochure, a guide to education for children with OI, addresses the importance of attitudes, the value of early education, public school enrollment,…

  15. Collagen defects in lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Chan, D; Mascara, T; Rogers, J G; Cole, W G

    1986-12-15

    Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of collagen were observed in tissues and fibroblast cultures from 17 consecutive cases of lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The content of type I collagen was reduced in OI dermis and bone and the content of type III collagen was also reduced in the dermis. Normal bone contained 99.3% type I and 0.7% type V collagen whereas OI bone contained a lower proportion of type I, a greater proportion of type V and a significant amount of type III collagen. The type III and V collagens appeared to be structurally normal. In contrast, abnormal type I collagen chains, which migrated slowly on electrophoresis, were observed in all babies with OI. Cultured fibroblasts from five babies produced a mixture of normal and abnormal type I collagens; the abnormal collagen was not secreted in two cases and was slowly secreted in the others. Fibroblasts from 12 babies produced only abnormal type I collagens and they were also secreted slowly. The slower electrophoretic migration of the abnormal chains was due to enzymic overmodification of the lysine residues. The distribution of the cyanogen bromide peptides containing the overmodified residues was used to localize the underlying structural abnormalities to three regions of the type I procollagen chains. These regions included the carboxy-propeptide of the pro alpha 1(I)-chain, the helical alpha 1(I) CB7 peptide and the helical alpha 1(I) CB8 and CB3 peptides. In one baby a basic charge mutation was observed in the alpha 1(I) CB7 peptide and in another baby a basic charge mutation was observed in the alpha 1(I) CB8 peptide. The primary defects in lethal perinatal OI appear to reside in the type I collagen chains. Type III and V collagens did not appear to compensate for the deficiency of type I collagen in the tissues.

  16. Isolated dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia: revision of the classification.

    PubMed

    de La Dure-Molla, Muriel; Philippe Fournier, Benjamin; Berdal, Ariane

    2015-04-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by severe hypomineralization of dentin and altered dentin structure. Dentin extra cellular matrix is composed of 90% of collagen type I and 10% of non-collagenous proteins among which dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) are crucial in dentinogenesis. These proteins are encoded by a single gene: dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and undergo several post-translational modifications such as glycosylation and phosphorylation to contribute and to control mineralization. Human mutations of this DSPP gene are responsible for three isolated dentinal diseases classified by Shield in 1973: type II and III dentinogenesis imperfecta and type II dentin dysplasia. Shield classification was based on clinical phenotypes observed in patient. Genetics results show now that these three diseases are a severity variation of the same pathology. So this review aims to revise and to propose a new classification of the isolated forms of DI to simplify diagnosis for practitioners.

  17. All-ceramic restorations for complete-mouth rehabilitation in dentinogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moundouri-Andritsakis, Heleni; Kourtis, Stephanos G; Andritsakis, Demetrios P

    2002-10-01

    Prosthetic treatment of patients with dentinogenesis imperfecta is a challenge for the dental practitioner because numerous factors have to be considered. The use of all-ceramic restorations to rehabilitate the dentition of a young patient with dentinogenesis imperfecta is reported. Clinical and laboratory procedures are described.

  18. Multidisciplinary approach for a patient with dentinogenesis imperfecta and anterior trauma.

    PubMed

    Roh, Won-Jong; Kang, Seung-Goo; Kim, Su-Jung

    2010-09-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta is an inherited dentinal dysplasia involving several risks for orthodontic treatment. This case report describes the multidisciplinary treatment of a 17-year-old girl whose Class II Division 1 malocclusion was complicated by dentinogenesis imperfecta type II and maxillary anterior trauma.

  19. Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Their Life Situation. Report and Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodin, Jane

    Children with osteogenesis imperfecta form a small and relatively unknown group, with 5 to 10 children diagnosed in Sweden each year and a total of around 200 people under the age of 17 having the condition. A questionnaire was completed by families of 24 Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta, and three families were interviewed. The…

  20. Anesthetic Management in a Gravida with Type IV Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Vue, Elizabeth; Davila, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited disorder of the connective tissues caused by abnormalities in collagen formation. OI may present many challenges to the anesthesiologist. A literature review reveals a wide range of implications, from basic positioning to management of the difficult airway. We present the anesthetic management of a 25-year-old gravid woman with OI, fetal demise, and possible uterine rupture, admitted for an exploratory laparotomy. PMID:27433164

  1. Osteogenesis imperfecta: from diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment to future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bregou Bourgeois, Aline; Aubry-Rozier, Bérengère; Bonafé, Luisa; Laurent-Applegate, Lee; Pioletti, Dominique P; Zambelli, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is an inherited connective tissue disorder with wide phenotypic and molecular heterogeneity. A common issue associated with the molecular abnormality is a disturbance in bone matrix synthesis and homeostasis inducing bone fragility. In very early life, this can lead to multiple fractures and progressive bone deformities, including long bone bowing and scoliosis. Multidisciplinary management improves quality of life for patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. It consists of physical therapy, medical treatment and orthopaedic surgery as necessary. Medical treatment consists of bone-remodelling drug therapy. Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of moderate to severe osteogenesis imperfecta, from infancy to adulthood. Other more recent drug therapies include teriparatide and denosumab. All these therapies target the symptoms and have effects on the mechanical properties of bone due to modification of bone remodelling, therefore influencing skeletal outcome and orthopaedic surgery. Innovative therapies, such as progenitor and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, targeting the specific altered pathway rather than the symptoms, are in the process of development. PMID:27346233

  2. Immunocytochemical detection of dentin matrix proteins in primary teeth from patients with dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Orsini, G; Majorana, A; Mazzoni, A; Putignano, A; Falconi, M; Polimeni, A; Breschi, L

    2014-12-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta determines structural alterations of the collagen structure still not completely elucidated. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to assay Type I and VI collagen, various non-collagenous proteins distribution in human primary teeth from healthy patients or from patients affected by type I dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI-I) associated with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). In sound primary teeth, an organized well-known ordered pattern of the type I collagen fibrils was found, whereas atypical and disorganized fibrillar structures were observed in dentin of DGI-I affected patients. Expression of type I collagen was observed in both normal and affected primary teeth, although normal dentin stained more uniformly than DGI-I affected dentin. Reactivity of type VI collagen was significantly lower in normal teeth than in dentin from DGI-I affected patients (P<0.05). Expressions of dentin matrix protein (DMP)-1 and osteopontin (OPN) were observed in both normal dentin and dentin from DGI-I affected patients, without significant differences, being DMP1 generally more abundantly expressed. Immunolabeling for chondroitin sulfate (CS) and biglycan (BGN) was weaker in dentin from DGI-I-affected patients compared to normal dentin, this decrease being significant only for CS. This study shows ultrastructural alterations in dentin obtained from patients affected by DGI-I, supported by immunocytochemical assays of different collagenous and non-collagenous proteins.

  3. Selachian tooth development: II. Immunolocalization of amelogenin polypeptides in epithelium during secretory amelogenesis in Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Slavkin, H C; Samuel, N; Bringas, P; Nanci, A; Santos, V

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the distribution of amelogenin polypeptides in an order of elasmobranchs using indirect immunofluorescence with rabbit polyclonal antibodies prepared to purified murine amelogenins. We find that amelogenins are definitely present within the inner enamel epithelium prior to the production of the extracellular matrix component termed "enameloid" (row II developing tooth organs). During subsequent stages of selachian tooth development (row III tooth organs), immunofluorescence staining data indicated localization of amelogenin antigens within epithelium as well as the enameloid extracellular matrix. The results from these immunohistochemical studies suggest that the 16-20 kdalton amelogenins, which are characteristic of murine inner enamel epithelial cells undergoing terminal biochemical differentiation into secretory ameloblasts, may also be regarded as molecular markers for amelogenesis in developing teeth in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias.

  4. Management of dentinogenesis imperfecta: a review of two case reports.

    PubMed

    Rafeek, Reisha N; Paryag, Amit; Al-Bayaty, Haytham

    2013-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) is an inherited disorder that affects dentin and often manifests as tooth discoloration; in addition, the dentition is also extremely susceptible to wear. Treatment of DI focuses primarily on protecting affected dentin, reducing sensitivity, and improving esthetics. Routine restorative materials, such as amalgams and composites, may be used. In more severe cases, the treatment of choice is full coverage crowns, while bonding of veneers may be used to improve the esthetics of the anterior teeth. This study presents two cases of Type II DI in the same family and the management of each case. Restorative management included amalgams, composite veneers, crowns, bridges, and overdentures.

  5. Perinatal lethal type II osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Imene Dahmane; Hamida, Emira Ben; Rebeh, Rania Ben; Chaouachi, Sihem; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II which is a perinatal lethal form. First trimester ultrasound didn't identified abnormalities. Second trimester ultrasound showed incurved limbs, narrow chest, with hypomineralization and multiple fractures of ribs and long bones. Parents refused pregnancy termination; they felt that the diagnosis was late. At birth, the newborn presented immediate respiratory distress. Postnatal examination and bone radiography confirmed the diagnosis of OI type IIA. Death occurred on day 25 of life related to respiratory failure. PMID:26401205

  6. Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II: an affected family saga.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Mala; Chandra, Anil

    2007-09-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) type II or hereditary opalescent dentin is inherited in simple autosomal dominant mode with high penetrance and low mutation rate. It generally affects both the deciduous and permanent dentitions. DI type II corresponds to a localized form of mesodermal dysplasia, observed in histodifferentiation. Early diagnosis and treatment are therefore, fundamental, aiming at obtaining a favourable prognosis since late intervention makes treatment more complex. We present two cases of DI type II with the disease affecting three generations of a family in India, and briefly highlight the molecular basis of this disease.

  7. Adhesive Restorations as An Esthetic Solution in Dentinogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; Giorgi, Maria Cecília Caldas; Carvalho, Ariany Borges; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Baron, Gisele Maria Marchi; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio

    2015-01-01

    Loss of tooth structure is the main sequela of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI). Due to severe enamel attrition, patients with DI often present with esthetic, occlusal, endodontic, and speech complications. Therefore, an interdisciplinary approach, divided into separate clinical steps, should be developed to provide comprehensive dental rehabilitation. The purpose of this case report is to discuss the use of composite resin restorations as a transitional treatment step for the anterior teeth of an eight-year-old boy with DI until his bone and dental development permit orthodontic and orthognatic surgery.

  8. [PREPARATIONS OF PAMIDRONOVIC ACID IN COMPLEX TREATMENT ON OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA].

    PubMed

    Zyma, A M; Guk, Yu M; Magomedov, O M; Gayko, O G; Kincha-Polishchuk, T A

    2015-07-01

    Modern view of drug therapy in the complex treatment of orthopedic manifestations of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) was submitted. Developed and tested system of drug correction of structural and functional state of bone tissue (BT) using drugs pamidronovic acid, depending on osteoporosis severity and type of disease. Such therapy is appropriate to apply both independently and in conjunction with surgery to correct deformations of long bones of the lower extremities. Effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed methods of drug therapy was proved, most patients resume features walking and support. PMID:26591224

  9. Correlation of clinical and molecular biological abnormalities in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Cole, W; Chan, D; Lamande, S; Mascara, T; Rogers, J; Bateman, J

    1989-01-01

    Substitution of a glycine residue in the triple helix of the alpha 1(I) chain by either arginine, valine or alanine was associated with the type II lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta phenotype. This phenotype was also produced by a frameshift mutation that resulted in an abnormal amino acid sequence of the carboxy-terminal propeptide of the pro-alpha 1(I) chain. The latter baby, however, showed some clinical and radiographic differences from the other babies with type II OI. The severity of the clinical and radiographic phenotypes are likely to be determined by both the type and site of the mutation as well as by the intra-uterine environment.

  10. Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Edelu, BO; Ndu, IK; Asinobi, IN; Obu, HA; Adimora, GN

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a group of rare inherited disorders of connective tissue with the common feature of excessive fragility of bones caused by mutations in collagen. Diagnosis is mainly based on the clinical features of the disorder. We report, the case of a male neonate delivered to a 33-year-old para 2 female at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu with no family history suggestive of OI. He had clinical features of a type II OI and severe birth asphyxia. Multidisciplinary management was instituted, but he died on the 7th day of life. PMID:25031897

  11. [Dentinogenesis imperfecta: a developmental anomaly of the dentin in the primary dentition. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Bercovich, R

    2010-01-01

    This literature review summarizes the current knowledge about Dentinigenesis Imperfecta, a developmental anomaly of thedentin.The phenomenon's classification is presented in details, as well as its etiology, clinical, rentgenological and histological characteristics. In addition, the treatment modes are described.

  12. Advances in the Classification and Treatment of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Inas H; DiMeglio, Linda A

    2016-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare disorder of type 1 collagen with 13 currently identified types attributable to inherited abnormalities in type 1 collagen amount, structure, or processing. The disease is characterized by an increased susceptibility to bony fracture. In addition to the skeletal phenotype, common additional extraskeletal manifestations include blue sclerae, dentinogenesis imperfecta, vascular fragility, and hearing loss. Medical management is focused on minimizing the morbidity of fractures, pain, and bone deformities by maximizing bone health. Along with optimizing Vitamin D status and calcium intake and physical/occupational therapy, individualized surgical treatment may be indicated. Pharmacological therapy with bisphosphonate medications is now routinely utilized for moderate to severe forms and appears to have a good safety profile and bone health benefits. New therapies with other anti-resorptives as well as anabolic agents and transforming growth factor (TGF)β antibodies are in development. Other potential treatment modalities could include gene therapy or mesenchymal cell transplant. In the future, treatment choices will be further individualized in order to reduce disease morbidity and mortality.

  13. An atypical fracture in male patient with osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Etxebarria-Foronda, Iñigo; Carpintero, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Summary So-called atypical fractures have been related to prolonged treatment with bisphosphonates. Although there remain unanswered questions with respect to their etiology and physiopathology, it does appear to be a causal relationship. There are many references in the literature about this problem in patients in whom these drugs have been used to treat osteoporosis, but few reports in patients who have received this therapy for the management of osteogenesis imperfecta. The Authors describe a case of a young male patient with osteogenesis imperfecta with a number of historical fractures, and who received treatment with these drugs, initially parenterally and subsequently orally, presenting as a complication of the treatment, an atypical diaphyseal femoral fracture. The characteristics of the fracture are consistent with the updated diagnostic criteria of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. The clinical case, its treatment, both surgically and metabolically with teriparatide, and its development over a year, are analysed. The case is notable for, on the one hand, the significance of the presence of this type of fracture in a young patient with this disease, and on the other, because of the administration of teriparatide outside its established clinical indications, with twin objectives: to improve the bone structure of the patient’s underlying disease, and to counteract the harmful effects which bisphosphonates may have on this bone. PMID:26811713

  14. Advances in the Classification and Treatment of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Inas H; DiMeglio, Linda A

    2016-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare disorder of type 1 collagen with 13 currently identified types attributable to inherited abnormalities in type 1 collagen amount, structure, or processing. The disease is characterized by an increased susceptibility to bony fracture. In addition to the skeletal phenotype, common additional extraskeletal manifestations include blue sclerae, dentinogenesis imperfecta, vascular fragility, and hearing loss. Medical management is focused on minimizing the morbidity of fractures, pain, and bone deformities by maximizing bone health. Along with optimizing Vitamin D status and calcium intake and physical/occupational therapy, individualized surgical treatment may be indicated. Pharmacological therapy with bisphosphonate medications is now routinely utilized for moderate to severe forms and appears to have a good safety profile and bone health benefits. New therapies with other anti-resorptives as well as anabolic agents and transforming growth factor (TGF)β antibodies are in development. Other potential treatment modalities could include gene therapy or mesenchymal cell transplant. In the future, treatment choices will be further individualized in order to reduce disease morbidity and mortality. PMID:26861807

  15. Clinical and Molecular Characterization of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type V.

    PubMed

    Brizola, Evelise; Mattos, Eduardo P; Ferrari, Jessica; Freire, Patricia O A; Germer, Raquel; Llerena, Juan C; Félix, Têmis M

    2015-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V) has a wide clinical variability, with distinct clinical/radiological features, such as calcification of the interosseous membrane (CIM) between the radius-ulna and/or tibia-fibula, hyperplastic callus (HPC) formation, dislocation of the radial head (DRH), and absence of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI). Recently, a single heterozygous mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5'UTR of the IFITM5 gene was identified to be causative for OI-V. Here, we describe 7 individuals from 5 unrelated families that carry the c.-14C>T IFITM5 mutation. The clinical findings in these cases are: absence of DI in all patients, presence of blue sclera in 2 cases, and 4 patients with DRH. Radiographic findings revealed HPC in 3 cases. All patients presented CIM between the radius and ulna, while 4 patients presented additional CIM between the tibia and fibula. Spinal fractures by vertebral compression were observed in all individuals. The proportion of cases identified with this mutation represents 4% of OI cases at our institution. The clinical identification of OI-V is crucial, as this mutation has an autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expressivity.

  16. Clinical and Molecular Characterization of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type V

    PubMed Central

    Brizola, Evelise; Mattos, Eduardo P.; Ferrari, Jessica; Freire, Patricia O.A.; Germer, Raquel; Llerena Jr, Juan C.; Félix, Têmis M.

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V) has a wide clinical variability, with distinct clinical/radiological features, such as calcification of the interosseous membrane (CIM) between the radius-ulna and/or tibia-fibula, hyperplastic callus (HPC) formation, dislocation of the radial head (DRH), and absence of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI). Recently, a single heterozygous mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5′UTR of the IFITM5 gene was identified to be causative for OI-V. Here, we describe 7 individuals from 5 unrelated families that carry the c.-14C>T IFITM5 mutation. The clinical findings in these cases are: absence of DI in all patients, presence of blue sclera in 2 cases, and 4 patients with DRH. Radiographic findings revealed HPC in 3 cases. All patients presented CIM between the radius and ulna, while 4 patients presented additional CIM between the tibia and fibula. Spinal fractures by vertebral compression were observed in all individuals. The proportion of cases identified with this mutation represents 4% of OI cases at our institution. The clinical identification of OI-V is crucial, as this mutation has an autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expressivity. PMID:26648832

  17. Overlapping DSPP mutations cause dentin dysplasia and dentinogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    McKnight, D A; Simmer, J P; Hart, P S; Hart, T C; Fisher, L W

    2008-12-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentin dysplasia (DD) are allelic disorders due to mutations in DSPP. Typically, the phenotype breeds true within a family. Recently, two reports showed that 3 different net -1 bp frameshift mutations early in DSPP's repeat domain caused DD, whereas 6 more 3' frameshift mutations were associated with DGI. Here we identify a DD kindred with a novel -1 bp frameshift (c.3141delC) that falls within the portion of the DSPP repeat domain previously associated solely with the DGI phenotype. This new frameshift mutation shows that overlapping DSPP mutations can give rise to either DGI or DD phenotypes. Furthermore, the consistent kindred presentation of the DD or DGI phenotype appears to be dependent on an as-yet-undescribed genetic modifier closely linked to DSPP.

  18. Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II: ultrastructure of teeth in sagittal sections.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Aneta; Loster, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    The morphological abnormalities of the teeth of patients affected by dentinogenesis imperfecta type 2 (DI-II) may underlie the difficulties with the clinical restoration of such teeth. We therefore performed a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of four permanent first mandibular molars of four DI-II patients with periapical pathosis. The teeth were prepared for SEM evaluation by standard methods. In the crown, the enamel presented a highly irregular surface with a number of cracks and crevices. In some places, only granular remains of the enamel were found, while in other parts of the crown, the enamel was absent. SEM examination revealed the structural changes responsible for the lower enamel's hardness and resistance to attrition, and for tooth wear, while the structural changes in the dentin may explain the failure of some adhesive restorative materials. This SEM study thus revealed structural defects which underlie the problems of attrition and restoration loss found in patients with this genetic dental condition.

  19. Multiple teeth fractures in dentinogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Min, Boram; Song, Je Seon; Lee, Jae-Ho; Choi, Byung-Jai; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Seong-Oh

    2014-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) is a hereditary defect consisting of opalescent teeth composed of irregularly formed and hypomineralized dentin. This paper presents the multiple fractures of DGI-affected teeth and suggests the reason of low fracture resistance by observing the dentin microstructures directly using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and by measuring its surface hardness using the Vickers hardness test. SEM revealed that while the enamel microstructure was similar in the DGI-affected and normal teeth, the microstructure of the DGI-affected dentin was poorly woven and more loosely packed than that of the normal dentin. The Vickers hardness of the DGI-affected dentin was 4.89 times softer than the normal dentin. The low fracture resistance of DGI-affected teeth can be attributed to the poorly woven microstructure of their dentin, which leads to a reduction in hardness.

  20. Cochlear implantation in a child with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Migirov, Lela; Henkin, Yael; Hildesheimer, Minka; Kronenberg, Jona

    2003-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary disease of connective tissue and affects bone, dentine, sclera, joint, tendon, blood vessels, heart valves, and skin. Approximately 50% of the adult patients with OI have associated hearing impairment. To date, only three cases of cochlear implantation in adults with OI have been reported, but none in children. We present a case of cochlear implantation in a congenitally deaf 6-year-old boy with OI. The Nucleus 24 Contour device was successfully implanted using the suprameatal approach (SMA). At 6 months post-initial stimulation there was no evidence of non-acoustic nerve excitation (i.e. facial twitching) or discomfort, and significant progress in auditory abilities was manifested by open set word identification. PMID:12745164

  1. Prenatal transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to treat osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jerry K. Y.; Götherström, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) can be a severe disorder that can be diagnosed before birth. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) has the potential to improve the bone structure, growth, and fracture healing. In this review, we give an introduction to OI and MSC, and the basis for pre- and postnatal transplantation in OI. We also summarize the two patients with OI who have received pre- and postnatal transplantation of MSC. The findings suggest that prenatal transplantation of allogeneic MSC in OI is safe. The cell therapy is of likely clinical benefit with improved linear growth, mobility, and reduced fracture incidence. Unfortunately, the effect is transient. For this reason, postnatal booster infusions using same-donor MSC have been performed with clinical benefit, and without any adverse events. So far there is limited experience in this specific field and proper studies are required to accurately conclude on clinical benefits of MSC transplantation to treat OI. PMID:25346689

  2. Fluoride enhances intracellular degradation of amelogenins during secretory phase of amelogenesis of hamster teeth in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Bronckers, A L J J; Lyaruu, D M; Bervoets, T J M; Wöltgens, J H M

    2002-01-01

    Amelogenins are the major protein species synthesized by secretory ameloblasts and are believed to be involved in enamel mineralization. During enamel formation, amelogenins are progressively degraded into smaller fragments by protease activity. These amelogenin fragments are removed from the enamel extracellular space, thereby enabling full mineralization of the dental enamel. Enamel from fluorotic teeth is porous and contains more proteins and less mineral than sound enamel. In this study we examined the hypothesis that fluoride (F-) is capable of inhibiting the proteolysis of amelogenins in enamel being formed in organ culture. Hamster molar tooth germs in stages of secretory amelogenesis were pulse labeled in vitro with [3H]- or [14C] proline and subsequently pulse chased. The explants were exposed to F- at different days of chase (i.e., during secretory amelogenesis early after labeling, later after labeling or at stages just beyond secretory amelogenesis). Exposure of secretory stage explants to F- enhanced the release of radiolabeled fragments when F- was applied early after labeling but progressively less if applied later. In contrast, F- had no such effect in stages beyond secretion. The enhanced release of radiolabeled fragments in secretory stages was associated with a reduction of radioactivity in the soft tissue enamel organ indicating that fragmentation of enamel matrix proteins (mainly amelogenins) occurred intracellularly. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) demonstrated that the fluorotic enamel contained less radiolabeled parent amelogenins (M(r) 28 kD and 26 kD) but more low-molecular-mass fragments than enamel from control explants. Our data indicate that F- promotes intracellular degradation of the newly synthesized parent amelogenins during secretory stage. Our in vitro data do not support the concept that F- impairs extracellular proteolysis of amelogenins, either in the secretory phase or in the

  3. Clinical Application of Antenatal Genetic Diagnosis of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type IV

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Li, Song; Xu, YeYe; Cong, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical analysis and genetic testing of a family with osteogenesis imperfecta type IV were conducted, aiming to discuss antenatal genetic diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type IV. Material/Methods Preliminary genotyping was performed based on clinical characteristics of the family members and then high-throughput sequencing was applied to rapidly and accurately detect the changes in candidate genes. Results Genetic testing of the III5 fetus and other family members revealed missense mutation in c.2746G>A, pGly916Arg in COL1A2 gene coding region and missense and synonymous mutation in COL1A1 gene coding region. Conclusions Application of antenatal genetic diagnosis provides fast and accurate genetic counseling and eugenics suggestions for patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type IV and their families. PMID:25835785

  4. AB129. Osteogenesis imperfecta: clinical features and bisphosphonate treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Can, Ngoc Thi Bich; Vu, Dung Chi; Bui, Thao Phuong; Nguyen, Khanh Ngoc

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of disorders principally affecting type I collagen which result in increased bone fragility. Children with severe OI suffer recurrent fractures, resulting in severe deformity and growth stunting in many cases, with loss of independent ambulation by the teenage years in over 50% of cases. Recently, cyclical intravenous treatment with pamidronate has proven of benefit to children with severe forms of OI. This article aims to describle clinical features and laboratory manifestations of patient with OI and evaluate outcome of bisphosphonate management. Methods Clinical features, biochemical finding, and management outcome of 104 cases were study. The patients were classified into four major subtypes of Sillience et al. 1979. Patients with severe types were treatment with pamidronate (Aredia) used Rauch protocol 2003. Results Now we have 196 patients (87 females and 109 males) but we studied focus on 104 patients from 98 families (60 males, 44 females) onset at 2.1±3.0 years (median 0.35) with the average fracture bone of 5.9±4.4 times. In there, 17% type I, 8% type II, 63% type III, and 12% type IV. Clinical features include of intrauterine fracture visible on ultrasound 35%, bone deformation after birth 68%, triangle face 76%, long bone deformation 91%, chest deformation 46%, scoliosis 27%, short status 90%, blue sclera 83%, dentinogenesis imperfecta 20%, hearing loss 6%. Thirty patients have been treated with pamidronate at 3.2±3.7 years (4 months to 8 years) during 13±0.8 months (6-30 months). Fourteen patients had fracture bone after 6 months of treatment but no patients had fracture bone after 12 months. Seven patients had been treatment after 1.6±0.5 years, BMD increase from 0.39±0.311 to 0.79±0.105 g/cm2 (P<0.05). One patient had fever reaction after first pamidronate infusion but controlled with standard antipyretic therapy, and do not recur in later treatments. Conclusions OI has

  5. [Oral cavity features in patients suffering from osteogenesis imperfecta].

    PubMed

    Alania, K N; Iverieli, M B; Abashidze, N O; Gogishvili, Kh B; Chigladze, T T

    2011-04-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a rare hereditary connective tissue disorder. This pathology is characterized by disruption of biosynthesis of Type I collagen, and production of limited amount of defective and imperfect collagens. This causes decrease in bone mass of human body, bones become fragile and brittle, resulting in unreasonable multiple fractures. Reportedly, number of patients with OI ranges between 32-38 in Georgia. However, exact number of patients, including children and their parents, is unknown. Dentinogenesis Imperfecta (DI; DGI) and skeletal malocclusion occupy special place in varied spectrum of OI clinical symptoms. We studied 14 patients: 9 women (64.3%), 5 men (35.7%) and divided them in three age groups: I - 2.5-6 years - period of primary dentition (28.6%), II - 6-14 years - period of changing teeth dentition (35.7%) and III - above 14 years - period of permanent dentition (35.7%). 28.5% of screened patients had one of the symptoms of DI, such as tooth discoloration. Discoloration of primary teeth was revealed in 4 patients (primary dentition). Another symptom of DI, such as early abrasion, was detected in 5 patients i.e. 35.71%. This was divided in the following manner: I age group - 3 cases, II and III age groups - 1-1 cases. It was also observed that early abrasion of primary teeth prevails over permanent. One of DI's radiographic symptoms, such as peculiar form of teeth crown and root, was revealed in 21.4% or in 3 patients, 2 of whom had bulbous crown, and the third one deformed (curved) root. Peculiar characteristics of DI, such as increased constriction of the coronal-radicular junction, obliterated pulp chamber, short and narrow roots, were not observed in the patients examined. Interesting characteristic of DI, such as periapical destruction of intact tooth root, was revealed in the form of bone defect in 7.1% of those examined (1 patient). Therefore, out of examined 14 patients with OI - DI had 6 patients or 42.85% of cases. Also

  6. Dentinogenesis imperfecta - hardness and Young's modulus of teeth.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Aneta; Loster, Jolanta; Ryniewicz, Wojciech; Ryniewicz, Anna M

    2013-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DI-II) is the most common dental genetic disease with reported incidence 1 in 8000. Elasticity and hardness of the enamel of teeth are important values which are connected with their resistance to attrition. It is hypothesized that values of physical properties for healthy teeth and teeth with DI-II are different. The aim of the study was to investigate some physical properties of teeth extracted from patients with DI-II in comparison with normal teeth. The material of the study was six teeth: three lower molars, with clinical signs of DI-II, which were extracted due to complications of pulp inflammation and three other lower molars which were extracted for orthodontic reasons - well formed, without any signs of pathology. The surfaces of DI-II and normal teeth were tested on the CSM Instruments Scratch Tester machine (producer CSEM Switzerland) by Oliver and Pharr method. The indenter used was Vicker's VG-73 diamond indenter. Additionally, the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis of the surface of the teeth with DI-II was made. Vickers hardness of the teeth with dental pathology (DI-II) was seven times smaller, and Young's modulus six times smaller than those of healthy teeth. The parameters of hardness and elasticity of enamel of teeth with clinical diagnosis of DI-II were very much smaller than in normal teeth and because of that can be responsible for attrition.

  7. Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Missense Mutations in SPARC

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Majewski, Jacek; Tétreault, Martine; Nadaf, Javad; Kannu, Peter; Sochett, Etienne; Howard, Andrew; Stimec, Jennifer; Dupuis, Lucie; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Palomo, Telma; Ouellet, Jean; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Mort, John S.; Moffatt, Pierre; Boudko, Sergei; Bächinger, Hans-Peter; Rauch, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (SPARC) is a glycoprotein that binds to collagen type I and other proteins in the extracellular matrix. Using whole-exome sequencing to identify the molecular defect in two unrelated girls with severe bone fragility and a clinical diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type IV, we identified two homozygous variants in SPARC (GenBank: NM_003118.3; c.497G>A [p.Arg166His] in individual 1; c.787G>A [p.Glu263Lys] in individual 2). Published modeling and site-directed mutagenesis studies had previously shown that the residues substituted by these mutations form an intramolecular salt bridge in SPARC and are essential for the binding of SPARC to collagen type I. The amount of SPARC secreted by skin fibroblasts was reduced in individual 1 but appeared normal in individual 2. The migration of collagen type I alpha chains produced by these fibroblasts was mildly delayed on SDS-PAGE gel, suggesting some overmodification of collagen during triple helical formation. Pulse-chase experiments showed that collagen type I secretion was mildly delayed in skin fibroblasts from both individuals. Analysis of an iliac bone sample from individual 2 showed that trabecular bone was hypermineralized on the material level. In conclusion, these observations show that homozygous mutations in SPARC can give rise to severe bone fragility in humans. PMID:26027498

  8. Novel dentin phosphoprotein frameshift mutations in dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Lee, K-E; Kang, H-Y; Lee, S-K; Yoo, S-H; Lee, J-C; Hwang, Y-H; Nam, K H; Kim, J-S; Park, J-C; Kim, J-W

    2011-04-01

    The dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encodes the most abundant non-collagenous protein in tooth dentin and DSPP protein is cleaved into several segments including the highly phosphorylated dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Mutations in the DSPP gene have been solely related to non-syndromic form of hereditary dentin defects. We recruited three Korean families with dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II and sequenced the exons and exon-intron boundaries of the DSPP gene based on the candidate gene approach. Direct sequencing of PCR products and allele-specific cloning of the highly repetitive exon 5 revealed novel single base pair (bp) deletional mutations (c.2688delT and c.3560delG) introducing hydrophobic amino acids in the hydrophilic repeat domain of the DPP coding region. All affected members of the three families showed exceptionally rapid pulp chambers obliteration, even before tooth eruption. Individuals with the c.3560delG mutation showed only mild, yellowish tooth discoloration, in contrast to the affected individuals from two families with c.2688delT mutation. We believe that these results will help us to understand the molecular pathogenesis of DGI type II as well as the normal process of dentin biomineralization.

  9. Cochlear implantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Makizumi, Yoshimi; Kashio, Akinori; Sakamoto, Takashi; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2013-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficit in the synthesis of type I collagen. Hearing loss affects 42-58% of OI patients and progresses to deafness in 35-60% of these patients. For OI patients, cochlear implantation (CI) is the only promising treatment option. However, literature on CI in patients with OI is relatively rare. After CI, speech perception is generally good. However, among patients with severe demineralization of the cochlea, most patients are reported to have complications of facial nerve stimulation (FNS), preventing some patients from using the cochlear implant on a daily basis. Here we report a successful CI using a Nucleus CI24 Contour Advance cochlear implant in a patient with OI. Although high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) showed extensive demineralization of the cochlea, intracochlear electrodes were inserted properly. The use of a modiolus-hugging device and the advance off-stylet technique contributed to the successful implantation, with no complications such as FNS or misplacement of electrodes. Therefore, CI can be used for treating deaf patients with OI. PMID:23219154

  10. Excessive TGFβ signaling is a common mechanism in Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Grafe, Ingo; Yang, Tao; Alexander, Stefanie; Homan, Erica; Lietman, Caressa; Jiang, Ming Ming; Bertin, Terry; Munivez, Elda; Chen, Yuqing; Dawson, Brian; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Weis, Mary Ann; Sampath, T. Kuber; Ambrose, Catherine; Eyre, David; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Lee, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue characterized by brittle bones, fractures and extraskeletal manifestations1. How structural mutations of type I collagen (dominant OI) or of its post-translational modification machinery (recessive OI) can cause abnormal quality and quantity of bone is poorly understood. Notably, the clinical overlap between dominant and recessive forms of OI suggests common molecular pathomechanisms2. Here, we show that excessive transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) signaling is a mechanism of OI in both recessive (Crtap−/−) and dominant (Col1a2tm1.1Mcbr) OI mouse models. In the skeleton, we find higher expression of TGFβ target genes, ratio of pSmad2/Smad2 protein, and in vivo Smad2 reporter activity. Anti-TGFβ treatment using the neutralizing antibody 1D11 corrects the bone phenotype in both forms of OI, and improves the lung abnormalities in Crtap−/− mice. Moreover, type I collagen of Crtap−/− mice shows reduced binding to the small leucine rich proteoglycan decorin, a known regulator of TGFβ activity3–4. Hence, altered TGFβ matrix-cell signaling is a primary mechanism in the pathogenesis of OI, and could be a promising target for the treatment of OI. PMID:24793237

  11. Roentgenographic Evaluation of the Spine in Patients With Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Marcos Vaz; de Lima, Fabiana Vaz; Akkari, Miguel; de Resende, Vanessa Ribeiro; Santili, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary connective tissue disorder that leads to bone weakness and deformities, especially in the spine, which can lead to poor outcomes. The aim of this study was to find patterns and risk factors in spinal deformities in patients with OI. In a retrospective study, 70 patients with OI were selected. Radiographs of the spine were evaluated. We observed the presence or absence of the following changes: biconcave vertebrae, chest and vertebral deformities, unilateral rib, and thoracolumbar kyphosis. The greater curve was considered the primary one, and the secondary curve considered compensatory. In the study sample, we observed that the patients’ ages ranged between 7 and 50 years, with a mean equal to 13 years, and 76% had scoliosis. In 68% of cases the main curve in the thoracic region was observed with the convexity to the right. The following was found in patients with OI: scoliosis, biconcave vertebrae, vertebral and chest deformity, unilateral rib, and thoracolumbar kyphosis. The thoracolumbar kyphosis is highly associated with thoracic hypokyphosis in patients with OI. PMID:26632680

  12. Osteogenesis imperfecta: Clinical diagnosis, nomenclature and severity assessment

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijk, FS; Sillence, DO

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the genetic heterogeneity in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), proposed in 1979 by Sillence et al., has been confirmed with molecular genetic studies. At present, 17 genetic causes of OI and closely related disorders have been identified and it is expected that more will follow. Unlike most reviews that have been published in the last decade on the genetic causes and biochemical processes leading to OI, this review focuses on the clinical classification of OI and elaborates on the newly proposed OI classification from 2010, which returned to a descriptive and numerical grouping of five OI syndromic groups. The new OI nomenclature and the pre-and postnatal severity assessment introduced in this review, emphasize the importance of phenotyping in order to diagnose, classify, and assess severity of OI. This will provide patients and their families with insight into the probable course of the disorder and it will allow physicians to evaluate the effect of therapy. A careful clinical description in combination with knowledge of the specific molecular genetic cause is the starting point for development and assessment of therapy in patients with heritable disorders including OI. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution–NonCommercial–NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:24715559

  13. Fracture of mandible during yawning in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Ram, Hari; Shadab, Mohammad; Vardaan, Ajay; Aga, Pallavi

    2014-08-07

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder characterised by fragility and multiple fractures of bones. Clinical signs and symptoms vary depending on the type of disease. Fractures of facial bones are rare compared with load-bearing long bones. We report a case of fracture of the mandible during yawning which was managed by open reduction and internal fixation.

  14. A rare occurrence of pyloric stenosis in an infant with osteogenesis imperfecta: Anesthetic implications

    PubMed Central

    Jagtap, Sheetal R; Bakhshi, Rochana G; Jain, Ankit

    2014-01-01

    Congenital anomalies pose many challenges during anesthesia due to anatomic and physiological alterations. The inherent complications associated with the disorders necessitate vigilance for providing anesthesia to even seemingly simple surgical intervention. Here, we share our experience of anesthesia management of an infant of congenital osteogenesis imperfecta with pyloric stenosis for pyloromyotomy. PMID:24803772

  15. Anesthetic management in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta for rush nail removal in femur

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Divanshu; Purohit, Alaka

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare genetically inherited syndrome involving connective tissues, resulting in anatomic and physiologic abnormalities, which results in any form of anesthesia, a challenging task. We hereby report a case of OI type I presented with distinctively blue sclera, hearing loss, kyphoscoliosis, and mild pulmonary restrictive disease who underwent rush nail removal in the femur. PMID:27746572

  16. Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Their Daily Living. Handicap Research Group Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodin, Jane

    The study examined aspects of daily living of Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta, a mineral deficiency in the skeleton which results in stunted growth and frequent fractures. A questionnaire was administered to 24 families with children under the age of 18 and 3 families were interviewed. The study found the families in great need of…

  17. Three Preschool Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta--Interviews with Parents. Handicap Research Group Report No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodin, Jane; Millde, Kristina

    The report describes three preschool Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bones) and the psychosocial support families require from society. Introductory sections explain the condition, review international research on brittle bones, consider the life situation of children with brittle bones, and examine societal support for…

  18. Effects of chronic fluoride exposure on morphometric parameters defining the stages of amelogenesis and ameloblast modulation in rat incisors.

    PubMed

    Smith, C E; Nanci, A; Denbesten, P K

    1993-10-01

    The response of ameloblasts to long-term (6 weeks) exposure to 100 ppm fluoride was examined in continuously erupting mandibular incisors of female Sprague-Dawley rats as compared to control rats receiving a similar diet (Teklad L-356) but no sodium fluoride in their drinking water. After treatment, animals from both groups were perfused intravascularly with glutaraldehyde, and the incisors were removed and processed for light microscope morphometric analyses directly from 1 microns thick Epon sections. Other animals were injected intravenously with calcein (green fluorescence) followed 4 hours later by xylenol orange (red fluorescence) in order to reveal smooth-ended ameloblast modulation bands and thereby allow quantification of parameters related to the creation and movement of modulation waves within the maturation zone of these teeth. The results indicated that rat incisors expressed four major changes in normal amelogenesis which could be attributed to the chronic fluoride treatment. First, ameloblasts produced a thinner than normal enamel layer by the time they completed the secretory stage and entered the maturation stage of amelogenesis. Second, enamel organ cells within the maturation zone, especially those from the papillary layer, were shorter in height than normal. Third, ameloblasts related to maturing enamel in areas where it was partially soluble and/or fully soluble in EDTA modulated at a rate that was much slower than normal. In some locations ameloblasts remained ruffle-ended for as much as 30% longer than normal per cycle. This upset the usual pattern such that fewer total modulation cycles were completed per unit time by these ameloblasts. Fourth, enamel proteins were lost from the maturing enamel layer at a rate that was about 40% slower than normal. The data suggested that ameloblasts detected the delay in the extracellular breakdown and/or loss of enamel proteins and they responded by remaining ruffle-ended for longer intervals than usual

  19. Bone mineral density in developing children with osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Sakkers, Ralph J B; Pruijs, Hans E H; Joosse, Pieter; Castelein, René M

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose — Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue caused by a defect in collagen type I synthesis. For bone, this includes fragility, low bone mass, and progressive skeletal deformities, which can result in various degrees of short stature. The purpose of this study was to investigate development of bone mineral density in children with OI. Patients and methods — Development of lumbar bone mineral density was studied retrospectively in a cohort of 74 children with OI. Mean age was 16.3 years (SD 4.3). In 52 children, repeated measurements were available. Mean age at the start of measurement was 8.8 years (SD 4.1), and mean follow-up was 9 years (SD 2.7). A longitudinal data analysis was performed. In the total cohort (74 children), a cross-sectional analysis was performed with the latest-measured BMD. Age at the latest BMD measurement was almost equal for girls and boys: 17.4 and 17.7 years respectively. Result — Mean annual increase in BMD in the 52 children was 0.038 g/cm2/year (SD 0.024). Annual increase in BMD was statistically significantly higher in girls, in both the unadjusted and adjusted analysis. In cross-sectional analysis, in the whole cohort the latest-measured lumbar BMD was significantly higher in girls, in the children with OI of type I, in walkers, and in those who were older, in both unadjusted and adjusted analysis. Interpretation — During 9 years of follow-up, there appeared to be an increase in bone mineral density, which was most pronounced in girls. One possible explanation might be a later growth spurt and older age at peak bone mass in boys. PMID:23992144

  20. Pamidronate Affects the Mandibular Cortex of Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Apolinário, A.C.; Figueiredo, P.T.; Guimarães, A.T.; Acevedo, A.C.; Castro, L.C.; Paula, A.P.; Paula, L.M.; Melo, N.S.; Leite, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that mandibular cortical width (MCW) is smaller in children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) than in healthy children and that pamidronate can improve the cortical mandibular thickness. The aim of this study was to assess changes in the MCW on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) of children with normal bone mineral density (BMD) and with OI. We also compared the MCW of children with different types of OI regarding the number of pamidronate cycles and age at the beginning of treatment. MCW measurements were retrospectively obtained from 197 DPRs of 66 children with OI types I, III, and IV who were in treatment with a comparable dosage of cyclical intravenous pamidronate between 2007 and 2013. The control group had 92 DPRs from normal BMD children. Factorial analysis of variance was used to compare MCW measurements among different age groups and between sexes and also to compare MCW measurements of children with different types of OI among different pamidronate cycles and age at the beginning of treatment. No significant differences in results were found between male and female subjects in both OI and healthy children, so they were evaluated altogether (P > 0.05). There was an increase of MCW values related to aging in all normal BMD and OI children but on a smaller scale in children with OI types I and III. Children with OI presented lower mean MCW values than did children with normal BMD at the beginning of treatment (P < 0.05). A linear model estimated the number of pamidronate cycles necessary to achieve mean MCW values equivalent to those of healthy children. The thinning of the mandibular cortex depended on the number of pamidronate cycles, the type of OI, and the age at the beginning of treatment. DPRs could thus provide a way to identify cyclic pamidronate treatment outcomes in patients with OI. PMID:25608973

  1. Management of Multiple Mandibular Fractures in a Child with Osteogenesis Imperfecta Using Arch Bar Retained Thermoformed Splints: A Novel Technique.

    PubMed

    Nilesh, Kumar; Sawant, Ashwini; Taur, Swapnil; Parkar, M I

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of autosomal dominant and recessive inherited disorders of type I collagen metabolism. Clinical features of OI include multiple bone fractures, muscle weakness, joint laxity, skeletal deformities, blue sclerae, hearing loss, and dentinogenesis imperfecta. This report presents a challenging case of multiple mandibular fractures in a five years old child with OI, which was successfully treated with a new, minimally invasive technique of closed reduction with arch bar retained thermoformed splint.

  2. Osteogenesis imperfecta and clubfoot—a rare combination

    PubMed Central

    Persiani, Pietro; Ranaldi, Filippo Maria; Martini, Lorena; Zambrano, Anna; Celli, Mauro; D’Eufemia, Patrizia; Villani, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare congenital genetic osteodystrophy, which has a prevalence of 1:20,000. OI is caused by the mutation of the COL1A1/COL1A2 genes, leading to a deficit of quality and/or quantity in the synthesis of procollagen-α type 1. Seven different forms of diverse clinical entity have been classified by Sillence and Glorieux, although, recently, up to 11 forms characterized by different genetic mutations have been recognized. Patients with OI suffer from extreme bone fragility and osteoporosis, which often predisposes them to frequent fractures. This paper presents the case of a child with OI type IV who, at birth, was also diagnosed with a severe clubfoot (congenital talipes equinovarus) grade III. Patient's mother also suffers from OI type IV. Methods: The treatment was started by placing femoro-podalic corrective casts, according to the Ponseti method, but some unexpected problems occurred during this treatment. When the patient was 3 months of age, we decided to correct the clubfoot before the time limit planned, performing a bilateral posteromedial surgical release. Results: Three weeks after surgery the casts were removed and replaced with bilateral Spica cast-like braces. On the 6th postoperative week, the patient began wearing Bebax corrective shoes, after 1 year ambidextrous orthopedic shoes. Now, he is 2 years old and has started to walk properly without any orthesis. Conclusion: In the presence of an orthopedic pathology associated with OI, it is recommended to manage the patient according to the underlying pathology, always considering the bone fragility associated with OI. The final surgical treatment to correct the clubfoot can be done earlier, if necessary. In our opinion, this uncommon association between OI and clubfoot is non-syndromic. This means that the two congenital diseases are not necessarily included in a singular uncommon genetic syndrome, but the clubfoot was caused by multifactorial causes

  3. Transgenic mouse model of the mild dominant form of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Bonadio, J; Saunders, T L; Tsai, E; Goldstein, S A; Morris-Wiman, J; Brinkley, L; Dolan, D F; Altschuler, R A; Hawkins, J E; Bateman, J F

    1990-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta type I is a mild, dominantly inherited, connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility. Mutations in type I collagen account for all known cases. In Mov-13 mice, integration of a murine retrovirus within the first intron of the alpha 1(I) collagen gene results in a null allele blocked at the level of transcription. This study demonstrates that mutant mice heterozygous for the null allele are a model of osteogenesis imperfecta type I. A defect in type I collagen production is associated with dominant-acting morphological and functional defects in mineralized and nonmineralized connective tissue and with progressive hearing loss. The model provides an opportunity to investigate the effect of a reduced amount of type I collagen on the structure and integrity of extracellular matrix. It also may represent a system in which therapeutic strategies to strengthen connective tissue can be developed. Images PMID:2402497

  4. Dentinogenesis imperfecta type I: A case report with literature review on nomenclature system.

    PubMed

    Devaraju, D; Devi, Bk Yashoda; Vasudevan, Vijeev; Manjunath, V

    2014-09-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) is an inherited disorder affecting dentin. Defective dentin formation results in discolored teeth that are prone to attrition and fracture. Mutation in dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) has been found to cause the dentin disorders DI - I and II (shields II and III). Early diagnosis and treatment of DI is recommended as it may prevent or intercept deterioration of the teeth and occlusion and improve esthetics. Here, we report a case with characteristic clinical, radiological and histological features of DI-I. The etiology and classification followed in literature is confusing since dentinoenamel junction (DEJ) in DI seems to be structurally and functionally normal and DI is clearly a disorder distinct from osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), but we still relate etiology of DI to DEJ and follow Shields classification. Therefore, we have briefly reviewed etiology and nomenclature system of DI.

  5. A novel mutation in the DSPP gene associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-K; Lee, K-E; Jeon, D; Lee, G; Lee, H; Shin, C-U; Jung, Y-J; Lee, S-H; Hahn, S-H; Kim, J-W

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary dentin defects are divided into dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia. We identified a family segregating severe dentinogenesis imperfecta. The kindred spanned four generations and showed an autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance. The proband was a child presenting with a severely affected primary dentition, with wide-open pulp chambers and multiple pulp exposures, resembling a DGI type III (DGI-III) pattern. We hypothesized that a mutation in the DSPP gene is responsible for this severe phenotype. Mutational analyses revealed a novel mutation (c.53T>A, p.V18D) near the intron-exon boundary in the third exon of the DSPP gene. We analyzed the effect of the mutation by means of an in vitro splicing assay, which revealed that the mutation did not affect pre-mRNA splicing. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the nature of the disease and the development of an appropriate treatment strategy.

  6. Esthetic reconstruction of teeth in patient with dentinogenesis imperfecta--a case report.

    PubMed

    Knezević, Alena; Tarle, Zrinka; Pandurić, Vlatko

    2006-03-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) is the result of a dominant genetic defect and affects both the deciduous and permanent dentitions. It is characterized by opalescent teeth composed of irregularly formed and undemineralized dentin which obliterates pulp chamber and root canal. DI can appear as a separate disorder or with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The teeth with DI show a grayish-blue to brown hue with dislodged enamel, dysplastic dentine with irregular dentinal tubules and interglobular dentine, short roots and pulpal obliteration, which all may lead to rapid and extensive attrition which require adequate crown reconstruction. The aim of this study was to show a reconstruction of frontal teeth in upper jaw with direct composite veneers in young adult patient with DI.

  7. Evolution of Klk4 and enamel maturation in eutherians

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Hu, Jan C.-C; Simmer, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) is a secreted serine protease that degrades residual enamel proteins to facilitate their removal by ameloblasts, which increases mineralization and hardens the enamel. Mutations in human KLK4 cause hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. Enamel formed by Klk4 null mice is normal in thickness and prism structure, but the enamel layer retains proteins, is hypomineralized, and undergoes rapid attrition following tooth eruption. We searched multiple databases, retrieved Klk4 and Klk5 from various mammalian genomes, and identified Klk4 in 47 boreoeutherian genomes. In non-Boreoeutheria, Klk4 was detected in only one afrotherian genome (as a pseudogene), and not in the other six afrotherian, two xenarthran, or three marsupial genomes. In contrast, Klk5 was detected in both marsupial and eutherian mammals. Our phylogenetic and mutation rate analyses support the hypothesis that Klk4 arose from Klk5 by gene duplication near the divergence of Afrotheria, Xenarthra and Boreoeutheria, and that functionally- differentiated Klk4 survived only in Boreoeutheria. Afrotherian mammals share the feature of delayed dental eruption relative to boreoeutherian mammals. KLK4 shortens the time required for enamel maturation and could have alleviated negative selection following mutations that resulted in thicker enamel or earlier tooth eruption, without reducing enamel hardness or causing dental attrition. PMID:25153384

  8. Evolution of Klk4 and enamel maturation in eutherians.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2014-09-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) is a secreted serine protease that degrades residual enamel proteins to facilitate their removal by ameloblasts, which increases mineralization and hardens the enamel. Mutations in human KLK4 cause hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. Enamel formed by Klk4 null mice is normal in thickness and prism structure, but the enamel layer retains proteins, is hypomineralized, and undergoes rapid attrition following tooth eruption. We searched multiple databases, retrieved Klk4 and Klk5 from various mammalian genomes, and identified Klk4 in 46 boreoeutherian genomes. In non-Boreoeutheria, Klk4 was detected in only one afrotherian genome (as a pseudogene), and not in the other six afrotherian, two xenarthran, or three marsupial genomes. In contrast, Klk5 was detected in both marsupial and eutherian mammals. Our phylogenetic and mutation rate analyses support the hypothesis that Klk4 arose from Klk5 by gene duplication near the divergence of Afrotheria, Xenarthra and Boreoeutheria, and that functionally-differentiated Klk4 survived only in Boreoeutheria. Afrotherian mammals share the feature of delayed dental eruption relative to boreoeutherian mammals. KLK4 shortens the time required for enamel maturation and could have alleviated negative selection following mutations that resulted in thicker enamel or earlier tooth eruption, without reducing enamel hardness or causing dental attrition. PMID:25153384

  9. A rare presentation of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta and congenital laryngomalacia for herniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Roshith; Dave, Nandini; Padvi, Amit; Garasia, Madhu

    2011-01-01

    Sometimes anaesthesiologists come across rare congenital anomalies in their practice. The inherent complications associated with the disorder necessitate tailor-made approaches for providing anaesthesia to even seemingly simple surgical interventions. Here, we share our experience of anaesthesia management of an infant with congenital laryngomalacia and recently diagnosed osteogenesis imperfecta type 1 who had presented to us with an acute abdomen for a semi-emergency herniotomy. PMID:22174477

  10. A rare presentation of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta and congenital laryngomalacia for herniotomy.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Roshith; Dave, Nandini; Padvi, Amit; Garasia, Madhu

    2011-09-01

    Sometimes anaesthesiologists come across rare congenital anomalies in their practice. The inherent complications associated with the disorder necessitate tailor-made approaches for providing anaesthesia to even seemingly simple surgical interventions. Here, we share our experience of anaesthesia management of an infant with congenital laryngomalacia and recently diagnosed osteogenesis imperfecta type 1 who had presented to us with an acute abdomen for a semi-emergency herniotomy. PMID:22174477

  11. Diagnostic features and pedodontic-orthodontic management in dentinogenesis imperfecta type II: a case report.

    PubMed

    Huth, K Ch; Paschos, E; Sagner, T; Hickel, R

    2002-09-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II, also known as hereditary opalescent dentin, is an isolated inherited condition transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait affecting the primary and permanent dentition. The combined pedodontic-orthodontic management of a 4-year-old child is described. Following orthodontic analysis to encourage a favourable growth outcome, treatment comprised restoration of the primary teeth with stainless steel crowns and composite crowns. Differential diagnosis and alternative therapies, including orthodontic considerations, are discussed.

  12. Dentinogenesis imperfecta: a case report of comprehensive treatment for a teenager.

    PubMed

    Biethman, Rick; Capati, Laura Richards; Eldger, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Improving a smile can change a person's self-image. This case report describes treatment for an adolescent boy with dentinogenesis imperfecta. Soon to begin high school, the 14-year-old patient was severely obese and disliked his stained teeth. A combination of surgical periodontal treatment, endodontic treatment, and veneers improved both his smile and self-perception-which may have played a role in achieving his weight loss goal of 125 lb at 12 months post-treatment.

  13. Dentinogenesis imperfecta: a review and case report of a family over four generations.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Sudhir; Pannu, Karneev

    2008-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) is one of the most common hereditary disorders of dentin formation. It follows an autosomal dominant pattern of transmission, affecting both the formation and mineralization of dentin. Either or both primary and permanent dentition is affected by it. This paper briefly reviews the manifestations of DGI Type II (DGI1) and presents a case report of a family affected with DGI1 over four generations.

  14. The epitheliogenesis imperfecta locus maps to equine chromosome 8 in American Saddlebred horses.

    PubMed

    Lieto, L D; Cothran, E G

    2003-01-01

    Epitheliogenesis imperfecta (EI) is a hereditary junctional mechanobullous disease that occurs in newborn American Saddlebred foals. The pathological signs of epitheliogenesis imperfecta closely match a similar disease in humans known as Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa, which is caused by a mutation in one of the genes (LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2) coding for the subunits of the laminin 5 protein (laminin alpha3, laminin beta3 and laminin gamma2). The LAMA3 gene has been assigned to equine chromosome 8 and LAMB3 and LAMC2 have been mapped to equine chromosome 5. Linkage disequilibrium between microsatellite markers that mapped to equine chromosome 5 and equine chromosome 8 and the EI disease locus was tested in American Saddlebred horses. The allele frequencies of microsatellite alleles at 11 loci were determined for both epitheliogenesis imperfecta affected and unaffected populations of American Saddlebred horses by genotyping and direct counting of alleles. These were used to determine fit to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for control and EI populations using Chi square analysis. Two microsatellite loci located on equine chromosome 8q, ASB14 and AHT3, were not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in affected American Saddlebred horses. In comparison, all of the microsatellite markers located on equine chromosome 5 were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in affected American Saddlebred horses. This suggested that the EI disease locus was located on equine chromosome 8q, where LAMA3 is also located. PMID:14970704

  15. A cephalometric method to diagnosis the craniovertebral junction abnormalities in osteogenesis imperfecta patients

    PubMed Central

    Ríos-Rodenas, Mercedes; Gutiérrez-Díez, María-Pilar; Feijóo, Gonzalo; Mourelle, Maria-Rosa; Garcilazo, Mario; Ortega-Aranegui, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary bone fragility disorder that in most patients is caused by mutations affecting collagen type I. Their typical oral and craneofacial characteristics (Dentinogenesis imperfecta type I and class III malocclusion), involve the dentist in the multidisciplinary team that treat these patients. It is usual to perform lateral skull radiographs for the orthodontic diagnosis. In addition, this radiograph is useful to analyse the junctional area between skull base and spine, that could be damaged in OI. Pathology in the craneovertebral junction (CVJ) is a serious complication of OI with a prevalence ranging from rare to 37%. To diagnosis early skull base anomalies in these patients, previously the neurological symptoms have been appear, we make a simple cephalometric analysis of the CVJ. This method has four measurements and one angle. Once we calculate the values of the OI patient, we compare the result with the mean and the standard deviations of an age-appropriate average in healthy controls. If the patient has a result more than 2,5 SDs above the age-appropriate average in healthy controls, we should to refer the patient to his/her pediatrician or neurologist. These doctors have to consider acquiring another diagnostic images to be used to determine cranial base measurements with more reliability. Thereby, dentists who treat these patients, must be aware of the normal radiological anatomy of the cervical spine on the lateral cephalogram. Key words:Osteogenesis imperfecta, craniovertebral junction, cephalometric. PMID:25810828

  16. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical characterization of ameloblast-enamel adhesion at maturation stage in amelogenesis in Macaca fuscata tooth germ.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Maturation-stage ameloblasts are firmly bound to the tooth enamel by a basal lamina-like structure. The mechanism underlying this adhesion, however, remains to be fully clarified. The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying adhesion between the basal lamina-like structure and the enamel in monkey tooth germ. High-resolution immunogold labeling was performed to localize amelotin and laminin 332 at the interface between ameloblasts and tooth enamel. Minute, electron-dense strands were observed on the enamel side of the lamina densa, extending into the degrading enamel matrix to produce a well-developed fibrous layer (lamina fibroreticularis). In un-demineralized tissue sections, mineral crystals smaller than those in the bulk of the enamel were observed adhering to these strands where they protruded into the surface enamel. Immunogold particles reactive for amelotin were preferentially localized on these strands in the fibrous layer. On the other hand, those for laminin 332 were localized solely in the lamina densa; none were observed in the fibrous layer. These results suggest that the fibrous layer of the basal lamina-like structure is partly composed of amelotin molecules, and that these molecules facilitate ameloblast-enamel adhesion by promoting mineralization of the fibrous layer during the maturation stage of amelogenesis. PMID:26357954

  17. Critical roles for WDR72 in calcium transport and matrix protein removal during enamel maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Hu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jie; Smith, Charles E; Nunez, Stephanie M; Richardson, Amelia S; Pal, Soumya; Samann, Andrew C; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2015-01-01

    Defects in WDR72 (WD repeat-containing protein 72) cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We generated and characterized Wdr72-knockout/lacZ-knockin mice to investigate the role of WDR72 in enamel formation. In all analyses, enamel formed by Wdr72 heterozygous mice was indistinguishable from wild-type enamel. Without WDR72, enamel mineral density increased early during the maturation stage but soon arrested. The null enamel layer was only a tenth as hard as wild-type enamel and underwent rapid attrition following eruption. Despite the failure to further mineralize enamel deposited during the secretory stage, ectopic mineral formed on the enamel surface and penetrated into the overlying soft tissue. While the proteins in the enamel matrix were successfully degraded, the digestion products remained inside the enamel. Interactome analysis of WDR72 protein revealed potential interactions with clathrin-associated proteins and involvement in ameloblastic endocytosis. The maturation stage mandibular incisor enamel did not stain with methyl red, indicating that the enamel did not acidify beneath ruffle-ended ameloblasts. Attachment of maturation ameloblasts to the enamel layer was weakened, and SLC24A4, a critical ameloblast calcium transporter, did not localize appropriately along the ameloblast distal membrane. Fewer blood vessels were observed in the papillary layer supporting ameloblasts. Specific WDR72 expression by maturation stage ameloblasts explained the observation that enamel thickness and rod decussation (established during the secretory stage) are normal in the Wdr72 null mice. We conclude that WDR72 serves critical functions specifically during the maturation stage of amelogenesis and is required for both protein removal and enamel mineralization. PMID:26247047

  18. Dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with short stature, hearing loss and mental retardation: a new syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance?

    PubMed

    Cauwels, R G E C; De Coster, P J; Mortier, G R; Marks, L A M; Martens, L C

    2005-08-01

    The follow-up history and oral findings in two brothers from consanguineous parents suggest that the association of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), delayed tooth eruption, mild mental retardation, proportionate short stature, sensorineural hearing loss and dysmorphic facies may represent a new syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance. Histological examination of the dentin matrix of a permanent molar from one of the siblings reveals morphological similarities with defective dentinogenesis as presenting in patients affected with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), a condition caused by deficiency of type I collagen. A number of radiographic and histological characteristics, however, are inconsistent with classical features of DI. These findings suggest that DI may imply greater genetical heterogeneity than currently assumed.

  19. Comparative study of dentinogenesis imperfecta in different families of the same topographical region.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Mk; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Radhika; Khan, Mohd Toseef

    2009-09-01

    Dental hard tissue is subject to variety of disorders. Dentinogenesis Imperfecta is one such disorder attributed to heredity. It is known to be an autosomal dominant trait. Teeth with such 'imperfect' dentin are liable to be weak and discolored. The disease has variable penetration and therefore can be expressed as a range of phenotypic manifestations from mild discoloration and chipping to frank attrition and multiple pulp canal exposures. Here we present a comparative study of a series of cases from different families of one topographical region with widely different presentation and histories that are characteristic of this disease.

  20. Dentinogenesis Imperfecta : A Family which was Affected for Over Three Generations.

    PubMed

    Surendra, Poornima; Shah, Rohan; N M, Roshan; Reddy, V V Subba

    2013-08-01

    Dentinogenesis Imperfecta (DI) or hereditary opalescent dentin is inherited in a simple autosomal dominant mode with high penetrance and low mutation rates. It generally affects both the deciduous and the permanent dentitions. DI corresponds to a localized form of mesodermal dysplasia which is observed in the histo-differentiation. An early diagnosis and treatment are therefore fundamental, which aim at obtaining a favourable prognosis, since at late intervention makes the treatment more complex. We are presenting here a case of DI in which the disease affected the three generations of a family in India.

  1. An integrated treatment approach: a case report for dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Shetty, N; Joseph, M; Basnet, P; Dixit, S

    2007-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II or hereditary opalscent dentin is one of the most common autosomal dominant anomaly of dentin that occurs in both sex affecting approximately 1:8000 persons. Clinically this disorder is characterized by variable blue gray to yellow brown teeth, with fracture of enamel and excessive wear. The treatment strategy is focused towards protecting teeth from further wear and tear and total oral rehabilitation of patient with paramount importance to aesthetics, obtaining an appropriate vertical dimension and providing soft tissue support which will help to return the facial profile to a more normal appearance. A multidisciplinary treatment planning is required for treatment of these individuals.

  2. Perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta in a Thai newborn: the autopsy and histopathogical findings.

    PubMed

    Himakhun, Wanwisa; Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Prachukthum, Sariya

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited disorder of type I collagen synthesis with an estimate incidence of I in 100,000 live births. Among all types, OI type II is the most severe type with perinatal death. The authors describes a male neonate with characteristic features of osteogenesis imperfect type II, including short crumpling limbs, beaded ribs, poorly bony ossification and blue sclera. Autopsy with histological study revealed not only multiple fractures, but pulmonary hypoplasia and intracerebral hemorrhages were also present. Both are the leading causes of death in the lethal type OI patients. PMID:23964465

  3. [Bilateral quadriceps rupture in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. A case report].

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Dueñas, Jesús Alejandro; Torres Castro, Carlos; Estrada Gómez, José Andrés; Algarín Reyes, José Antonio; Bello González, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    We present the case of a 24-year-old patient with bilateral quadriceps rupture and history of type I congenital osteogenesis imperfecta diagnosed clinically and with ultrasound. Bilateral quadriceps tenoplasty was performed with an anterior approach and without any complications. The patient was discharged with bilateral neoprene knee-guards. The sutures were removed at the 21-day follow-up visit, rehabilitation was started at six weeks and the patient was doing well at the 2- and 3-month follow-up visits. Timely management and early rehabilitation contribute to decrease the risk of sequelae despite the poor functional prognosis.

  4. Mandibular lengthening by distraction osteogenesis in the setting of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Black, Jonathan S; Denny, Arlen D

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited disorder characterized by bone fragility and deformity. The craniofacial skeleton may be involved either primarily or by result of a concomitant diagnosis. Distraction osteogenesis has emerged as a versatile reconstructive option for many craniofacial deformities. Mandibular lengthening by distraction has not been reported in a patient with OI. We present a patient in whom mandibular lengthening was successfully performed twice for hemifacial microsomia. Bilateral lengthening was initially performed with successful airway improvement. This was followed by transport distraction on the more severely affected side for condylar reconstruction. Successful mandibular lengthening by distraction is possible in the setting of OI. PMID:25565236

  5. Spontaneous and simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, David; Calvo, Rafael; Vaisman, Alex

    2006-03-01

    Bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon and serious injury that usually occurs in middle aged to elderly patients. It is frequently associated with chronic metabolic disorders like diabetes, hyperparathyroidism, gout, chronic renal failure or the chronic use of steroids. We report a case of spontaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

  6. Investigation of the Human Disease Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Research-Based Introduction to Concepts and Skills in Biomolecular Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mate, Karen; Sim, Alistair; Weidenhofer, Judith; Milward, Liz; Scott, Judith

    2013-01-01

    A blended approach encompassing problem-based learning (PBL) and structured inquiry was used in this laboratory exercise based on the congenital disease Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), to introduce commonly used techniques in biomolecular analysis within a clinical context. During a series of PBL sessions students were presented with several…

  7. Combined treatment with laser sintering and zirconium: a case report of dentinogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Ayyildiz, Simel; Sahin, Cem; Akgün, Ozlem Marti; Basak, Feridun

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous disorder of connective tissue that manifests mainly as skeletal deformity and bone fragility. Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) is sometimes an accompanying symptom of OI. The treatment protocol of these patients varies according to the clinical appearance. The case report here describes complete mouth rehabilitation of an 18-year-old male patient with OI and DI using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technique of metal-ceramic restorations and zirconium all-ceramic crowns. DMLS is an additive metal fabrication technology that is simpler, more precise, and healthier than conventional manufacturing and can be remarkably cost effective. Moreover, the technique affords highly accurate production of fixed partial dentures with ideal marginal fit and excellent mechanical properties. The patient was treated using a multidisciplinary strategy that focused on controlling caries, protecting teeth from further wear, obtaining an appropriate vertical dimension, and providing soft tissue support to return the facial profile to a normal appearance using new technology in the field of prosthetics.

  8. Osteogenesis imperfecta type V: clinical and radiographic manifestations in mutation confirmed patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok-Hwa; Jin, Dong-Kyu; Kosaki, Keisuke; Kim, Jung-Wook; Cho, Sung Yoon; Yoo, Won Joon; Choi, In Ho; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2013-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type V is a specific OI phenotype with interosseous membrane calcification of the forearm and hyperplastic callus formation as typical features. The causative gene mutation for OI type V has been recently discovered. The purpose of this report is to review the clinical and radiographic characteristics of mutation confirmed OI type V in detail. Sixteen (nine familial and seven sporadic) patients were enrolled in the study. Blue sclera and dentinogenesis imperfecta were not evident in any patient. However, hypodontia in the permanent teeth, ectopic eruption, and short roots in molars were additionally observed in 11 patients. Of the radiographic abnormalities, cortical thickening and bony excrescence of interosseous margin of the ulna was the most common finding, followed by overgrowth of the olecranon and/or coronoid process of the ulna. Slender ribs and sloping of the posterior ribs with or without fractures were also a consistent finding. Hyperplastic callus was detected in 75% of patients and was commonly encountered at the femur. Heterotopic ossification in the muscles and tendon insertion sites were noted in four patients, which resulted in bony ankylosis or contracture of joints. The current study confirms common clinical and radiographic findings of OI type V and reports additional phenotypic information. These observations provide clues to recognize OI type V more promptly and guide to direct targeted molecular study. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. What every clinical geneticist should know about testing for osteogenesis imperfecta in suspected child abuse cases.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Melanie G; Byers, Peter H

    2015-12-01

    Non-accidental injury (NAI) is a major medical concern in the United States. One of the challenges in evaluation of children with unexplained fractures is that genetic forms of bone fragility are one of the differential diagnoses. Infants who present with fractures with mild forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) (OI type I or OI type IV), the most common genetic form of bone disease leading to fractures might be missed if clinical evaluation alone is used to make the diagnosis. Diagnostic clinical features (blue sclera, dentinogenesis imperfecta, Wormian bones on X-rays or positive family history) may not be present or apparent at the age of evaluation. The evaluating clinician faces the decision about whether genetic testing is necessary in certain NAI cases. In this review, we outline clinical presentations of mild OI and review the history of genetic testing for OI in the NAI versus OI setting. We summarize our data of molecular testing in the Collagen Diagnostic Laboratory (CDL) from 2008 to 2014 where NAI was noted on the request for DNA sequencing of COL1A1 and COL1A2. We provide recommendations for molecular testing in the NAI versus OI setting. First, DNA sequencing of COL1A1, COL1A2, and IFITM5 simultaneously and duplication/deletion testing is recommended. If a causative variant is not identified, in the absence of a pathologic clinical phenotype, no additional gene testing is indicated. If a VUS is found, parental segregation studies are recommended.

  10. Bulbous epiphysis and popcorn calcification as related to growth plate differentiation in osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Brizola, Evelise; McCarthy, Edward; Shapiro, Jay Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is an heritable systemic disorder of connective tissue due to different sequence variants in genes affecting both the synthesis of type I collagen and osteoblast function. Dominant and recessive inheritance is recognized. Approximately 90% of the OI cases are due to mutations in COL1A1/A2 genes. We clinically and radiologically describes an adult male with type III osteogenesis imperfecta who presents a rare bone dysplasia termed bulbous epiphyseal deformity in association with popcorn calcifications. Popcorn calcifications may occur with bulbous epiphyseal deformity or independently. Methods Molecular analysis was performed for COL1A1, COL1A2, LEPRE1 and WNT1 genes. Results An uncommon COL1A1 mutation was identified. Clinical and radiological exams confirmed a distinctive bulbous epiphyseal deformity with popcorn calcifications in distal femurs. We have identified four additional OI patients reported in current literature, whose X-rays show bulbous epiphyseal deformity related to mutations in CR-TAP, LEPRE1 and WNT1 genes. Conclusion The mutation identified here had been previously described twice in OI patients and no previous correlation with bulbous epiphyseal deformity was described. The occurrence of this bone dysplasia focuses attention on alterations in normal growth plate differentiation and the subsequent effect on endochondral bone formation in OI. PMID:26604951

  11. Next-generation sequencing of common osteogenesis imperfecta-related genes in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Balla, Bernadett; Tobiás, Bálint; Kató, Karina; Kirschner, Gyöngyi; Klujber, Valéria; Lakatos, Péter; Kósa, János P.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is a rapidly developing area in genetics. Utilizing this technology in the management of disorders with complex genetic background and not recurrent mutation hot spots can be extremely useful. In this study, we applied NGS, namely semiconductor sequencing to determine the most significant osteogenesis imperfecta-related genetic variants in the clinical practice. We selected genes coding collagen type I alpha-1 and-2 (COL1A1, COL1A2) which are responsible for more than 90% of all cases. CRTAP and LEPRE1/P3H1 genes involved in the background of the recessive forms with relatively high frequency (type VII and VIII) represent less than 10% of the disease. In our six patients (1–41 years), we identified 23 different variants. We found a total of 14 single nucleotide variants (SNV) in COL1A1 and COL1A2, 5 in CRTAP and 4 in LEPRE1. Two novel and two already well-established pathogenic SNVs have been identified. Among the newly recognized mutations, one results in an amino acid change and one of them is a stop codon. We have shown that a new full-scale cost-effective NGS method can be developed and utilized to supplement diagnostic process of osteogenesis imperfecta with molecular genetic data in clinical practice. PMID:27335225

  12. Combined Treatment with Laser Sintering and Zirconium: A Case Report of Dentinogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Cem; Akgün, Özlem Marti; Basak, Feridun

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous disorder of connective tissue that manifests mainly as skeletal deformity and bone fragility. Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) is sometimes an accompanying symptom of OI. The treatment protocol of these patients varies according to the clinical appearance. The case report here describes complete mouth rehabilitation of an 18-year-old male patient with OI and DI using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technique of metal-ceramic restorations and zirconium all-ceramic crowns. DMLS is an additive metal fabrication technology that is simpler, more precise, and healthier than conventional manufacturing and can be remarkably cost effective. Moreover, the technique affords highly accurate production of fixed partial dentures with ideal marginal fit and excellent mechanical properties. The patient was treated using a multidisciplinary strategy that focused on controlling caries, protecting teeth from further wear, obtaining an appropriate vertical dimension, and providing soft tissue support to return the facial profile to a normal appearance using new technology in the field of prosthetics. PMID:23533828

  13. Craniofacial and Dental Defects in the Col1a1Jrt/+ Mouse Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Eimar, H; Tamimi, F; Retrouvey, J-M; Rauch, F; Aubin, J E; McKee, M D

    2016-07-01

    Certain mutations in the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes produce clinical symptoms of both osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) that include abnormal craniofacial growth, dental malocclusion, and dentinogenesis imperfecta. A mouse model (Col1a1(Jrt)/+) was recently developed that had a skeletal phenotype and other features consistent with moderate-to-severe OI and also with EDS. The craniofacial phenotype of 4- and 20-wk-old Col1a1(Jrt)/+ mice and wild-type littermates was assessed by micro-computed tomography (µCT) and morphometry. Teeth and the periodontal ligament compartment were analyzed by µCT, light microscopy/histomorphometry, and electron microscopy. Over time, at 20 wk, Col1a1(Jrt)/+ mice developed smaller heads, a shortened anterior cranial base, class III occlusion, and a mandibular side shift with shorter morphology in the masticatory region (maxilla and mandible). Col1a1(Jrt)/+ mice also had changes in the periodontal compartment and abnormalities in the dentin matrix and mineralization. These findings validate Col1a1(Jrt)/+ mice as a model for OI and EDS in humans. PMID:26951553

  14. How tough is Brittle Bone? Investigating Osteogenesis Imperfecta in Mouse Bone††

    PubMed Central

    Carriero, A.; Zimmermann, E. A.; Paluszny, A.; Tang, S. Y.; Bale, H.; Busse, B.; Alliston, T.; Kazakia, G.

    2015-01-01

    The multiscale hierarchical structure of bone is naturally optimized to resist fractures. In osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease, genetic mutations affect the quality and/or quantity of collagen, dramatically increasing bone fracture risk. Here we reveal how the collagen defect results in bone fragility in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (oim), which has homotrimeric α1(I) collagen. At the molecular level we attribute the loss in toughness to a decrease in the stabilizing enzymatic crosslinks and an increase in non-enzymatic crosslinks, which may break prematurely inhibiting plasticity. At the tissue level, high vascular canal density reduces the stable crack growth, and extensive woven bone limits the crack-deflection toughening during crack growth. This demonstrates how modifications at the bone molecular level have ramifications at larger length scales affecting the overall mechanical integrity of the bone; thus, treatment strategies have to address multiscale properties in order to regain bone toughness. In this regard, findings from the heterozygous oim bone, where defective as well as normal collagen are present, suggest that increasing the quantity of healthy collagen in these bones helps to recover toughness at the multiple length scales. PMID:24420672

  15. Tomographic imaging of collagen-mineral interaction: implications for osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J

    1995-01-01

    The novel method of high voltage electron microscopic tomography (3D) has been applied for the first time to examine ultrastructural features and spatial relations between collagen fibrils and mineral crystals in a mouse mutant (oim/oim) which replicates a moderate to severe form of osteogenesis imperfecta. The animal produces collagen consisting of the alpha1(I) homotrimer and has a brittle calcified skeleton. Three-dimensional image reconstructions of the Achilles tendons, which were found to mineralize in the mutant mice, revealed that their composite crystals were different in their structural appearance and spatial association with collagen compared to that determined in normal calcified tissues. These results indicate that the nature of the organic matrix of a mineralizing tissue critically influences the formation, structure, and location of the constituent mineral and, further, the data are interpreted as suggesting that the unusual structural and organizational interaction between mineral and collagen underlies the inherent brittleness and weakness of calcification in this model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

  16. Phenotype characterization and DSPP mutational analysis of three Brazilian dentinogenesis imperfecta type II families.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, A C; Santos, L J S; Paula, L M; Dong, J; MacDougall, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform phenotype analysis and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) mutational analysis on 3 Brazilian families diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II) attending the Dental Anomalies Clinic in Brasilia, Brazil. Physical and oral examinations, as well as radiographic and histopathological analyses, were performed on 28 affected and unaffected individuals. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological analyses confirmed the diagnosis of DGI-II in 19 individuals. Pulp stones were observed in ground sections of several teeth in 2 families, suggesting that obliteration of pulp chambers and root canals results from the growth of these nodular structures. Mutational DSPP gene analysis of representative affected family members revealed 7 various non-disease-causing alterations in exons 1-4 within the dentin sialoprotein domain. Further longitudinal studies are necessary to elucidate the progression of pulpal obliteration in the DGI-II patients studied as well as the molecular basis of their disease.

  17. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A.; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M.; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R.; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C.; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  18. [Sliding centro-medullary nailing. Application to the treatment of severe forms of osteogenesis imperfecta].

    PubMed

    Metaizeau, J P

    1987-01-01

    In osteogenesis Imperfecta, the bowing of bones concures to increase their fragility. In order to avoid bowing of bones, Sofield, followed by Bailey have proposed centro medullary nailing. The pins used by Sofield do not expand and repeated changes are necessary. The expanding rods used by Bailey are to large and they can't be used in neonates. The author describe a new technique of bipolar centro medullary pinning. Two bowed K. Wires are introduced in the centromedullary canal, the first one through the proximal epiphysis, the second one through the distal epiphysis. During growth, each pin migrates distally and the osteosynthesis expand regularly. The technique can be used in the neonates and protects their bone from progressive bowing. PMID:3442930

  19. Splicing site mutations in dentin sialophosphoprotein causing dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Holappa, Heidi; Nieminen, Pekka; Tolva, Liisa; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2006-10-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II (OMIM # 125490) is an inherited disorder affecting dentin. Defective dentin formation results in discolored teeth that are prone to attrition and fracture. To date, several mutations have been described in the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene, causing DGI types II and III and dentin dysplasia type II. DSPP encodes two proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Here, we describe a mutational analysis of DSPP in seven Finnish families with DGI type II. We report two mutations and five single nucleotide polymorphisms. In one family we found a mutation that has been described earlier in families with different ethnicity, while in six families we found a novel g.1194C>A (IVS2-3) transversion. Bioinformatic analysis of known DSPP mutations suggests that DGI type II is usually caused by aberration of normal splicing.

  20. Osteogenesis imperfecta type III in South Africa: Psychosocial challenges.

    PubMed

    Stephen, L X G; Roberts, T; Van Hayden, E; Chetty, M

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta type III (OI III) are severely physically disabled due to frequent fracturing. Their disability poses numerous barriers that challenge their social development. Despite these limitations, several affected persons are able to rise above these problems and achieve success in their personal and professional life. This outcome is directly relevant to their psychosocial development.The achievements of five individuals with OI III living in Cape Town are highlighted in this article, as well as the challenges that they have experienced and continue to experience in their daily lives. The authors intend to promulgate understanding of the psychosocial circumstances of affected persons, thereby facilitating the deployment of appropriate efforts and resources to address these challenges. PMID:27245537

  1. Total knee arthroplasty with concurrent femoral and tibial osteotomies in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Russell; Luedke, Colten

    2014-01-01

    Three total knee arthroplasties (TKA) with concurrent femoral and/or tibial osteotomies in 2 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta were performed from 2004 to 2009. The 2 patients were followed for a mean of 6 years. One patient with concurrent TKA, and femoral and tibial osteotomies developed a nonunion of the tibial site that responded to open reduction and internal fixation with iliac crest bone graft. The second patient underwent right TKA with bi-level tibial osteotomies, which healed uneventfully, allowing pain free, unassisted ambulation. The same patient then elected to undergo left TKA with bi-level tibial osteotomies. Intraoperatively he sustained a minor tibial plateau fracture requiring the use of a stemmed component and postoperatively, he developed a nonunion at the proximal site and valgus malunion of the distal site. Revision of fixation was performed at both osteotomy sites, and both healed within 3 months. Both patients are now pain free and ambulate without assistance.

  2. AB069. Effect of osteogenesis imperfecta on children and their families

    PubMed Central

    Dung, Vu Chi; Armstrong, Kate; Ngoc, Can Thi Bich; Thao, Bui Phuong; Khanh, Nguyen Ngoc; Trang, Nguyen Thu; Hoan, Nguyen Thi; Dat, Nguyen Phu; Munns, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder, with features that include increased bone fragility, pathological fractures, blue sclera, dentinogenesis imperfecta and conductive or mixed hearing loss. Clinical variability is wide from children with few fractures and normal stature to children with multiple fractures, long bone deformity, scoliosis and extreme short stature. Although there is no curative treatment, there are several therapeutic tools capable of improving the course of the condition and patient quality of life. We aim to evaluate the effect of OI on the well-being of children with the disorder and their families through a family-centered questionnaire. Sixty children with OI from the Vietnam National Hospital of Pediatrics and/or their parent(s), who attended the first annual family support group in 2011, completed a child and parent questionnaire. Sixty patients participated, 26 female and 34 male. The median age was 6.0 years [interquartile range (IQR), 0.25-18 years]. Of these, 36 (60%) had dentinogenesis imperfect and 23 (38.3%) had a scoliosis. The median number of fractures was 6.0 (IQR 0-30) and median number of hospitalizations due to OI was 5.0 (IQR 0-30). Among patients of school age, 9 (15%) could not go to school due to OI. Almost all parents (93.7%) worried about school social communication of the patients. Among these parents, 100% fear of inferiority with friends and 98.3% fear of broken bones. Most parents (76.2%) were significantly concerned about their child’s health. The parents’ themselves reported psychological concerns, with feelings of desperation (58.4%), anxiety (81.7%) and depression (56.7%). OI appeared to have a significant deleterious effect on the life of the patients and their families. These data provide a baseline from which to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to improve the medical and psychological needs of this cohort and their families.

  3. Genetic epidemiology, prevalence, and genotype–phenotype correlations in the Swedish population with osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Katarina; Åström, Eva; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Malmgren, Barbro; Ljunggren, Östen; Kindmark, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare hereditary bone fragility disorder, caused by collagen I mutations in 90% of cases. There are no comprehensive genotype–phenotype studies on >100 families outside North America, and no population-based studies determining the genetic epidemiology of OI. Here, detailed clinical phenotypes were recorded, and the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes were analyzed in 164 Swedish OI families (223 individuals). Averages for bone mineral density (BMD), height and yearly fracture rate were calculated and related to OI and mutation type. N-terminal helical mutations in both the α1- and α2-chains were associated with the absence of dentinogenesis imperfecta (P<0.0001 vs 0.0049), while only those in the α1-chain were associated with blue sclera (P=0.0110). Comparing glycine with serine substitutions, α1-alterations were associated with more severe phenotype (P=0.0031). Individuals with type I OI caused by qualitative vs quantitative mutations were shorter (P<0.0001), but did not differ considering fractures or BMD. The children in this cohort were estimated to represent >95% of the complete Swedish pediatric OI population. The prevalence of OI types I, III, and IV was 5.16, 0.89, and 1.35/100 000, respectively (7.40/100 000 overall), corresponding to what has been estimated but not unequivocally proven in any population. Collagen I mutation analysis was performed in the family of 97% of known cases, with causative mutations found in 87%. Qualitative mutations caused 32% of OI type I. The data reported here may be helpful to predict phenotype, and describes for the first time the genetic epidemiology in >95% of an entire OI population. PMID:25944380

  4. A rare case of osteogenesis imperfecta combined with complete tooth loss.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanqin; Zhao, Fei; Ren, Xiuzhi; Li, Zhiliang; Yang, Xiaomeng; Han, Jinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue characterized by blue sclerae, osteoporosis and bone fragility. Dentinogenesis imperfecta type I is commonly seen in OI patients, but other dental impairments, such as tooth agenesis or complete tooth loss, are rarely reported for these patients. Here, we report the case of a 37-year-old female Chinese OI patient who experienced complete tooth loss before puberty. The patient has a family history of OI and her father has a history of tooth loss. She showed obvious OI phenotypes, including a dwarfed stature, blue sclerae, scoliosis, pigeon chest and a history of fractures. Tooth loss began at the age of 6 years and continued until complete tooth loss at 20 years; this occurred in the absence of dental decay, gum disease, accidents or drug usage. Radiological studies revealed osteoporosis of the lower limbs and an underdeveloped scapula. Type I collagen gene analysis identified a known c.2314G>A (p.Gly772Ser) substitution in the COL1A2 gene, which we suggest affects the interaction between type I collagen and extracellular matrix proteins, including cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, phosphophoryn and SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine). In silico prediction indicated a relatively mild effect of the mutation, so it is conceivable that the severity of the clinical phenotype may result from additional mutations in candidate genes responsible for abnormal dental phenotypes in this family. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an OI patient with a phenotype of complete tooth loss at a young age.

  5. Genetic epidemiology, prevalence, and genotype-phenotype correlations in the Swedish population with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Katarina; Åström, Eva; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Malmgren, Barbro; Ljunggren, Östen; Kindmark, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare hereditary bone fragility disorder, caused by collagen I mutations in 90% of cases. There are no comprehensive genotype-phenotype studies on >100 families outside North America, and no population-based studies determining the genetic epidemiology of OI. Here, detailed clinical phenotypes were recorded, and the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes were analyzed in 164 Swedish OI families (223 individuals). Averages for bone mineral density (BMD), height and yearly fracture rate were calculated and related to OI and mutation type. N-terminal helical mutations in both the α1- and α2-chains were associated with the absence of dentinogenesis imperfecta (P<0.0001 vs 0.0049), while only those in the α1-chain were associated with blue sclera (P=0.0110). Comparing glycine with serine substitutions, α1-alterations were associated with more severe phenotype (P=0.0031). Individuals with type I OI caused by qualitative vs quantitative mutations were shorter (P<0.0001), but did not differ considering fractures or BMD. The children in this cohort were estimated to represent >95% of the complete Swedish pediatric OI population. The prevalence of OI types I, III, and IV was 5.16, 0.89, and 1.35/100 000, respectively (7.40/100 000 overall), corresponding to what has been estimated but not unequivocally proven in any population. Collagen I mutation analysis was performed in the family of 97% of known cases, with causative mutations found in 87%. Qualitative mutations caused 32% of OI type I. The data reported here may be helpful to predict phenotype, and describes for the first time the genetic epidemiology in >95% of an entire OI population.

  6. A deletion in the gene encoding sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (Smpd3) results in osteogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Isabelle; Adams, Carolyn P; Opsahl, Sibylle; Septier, Dominique; Bishop, Colin E; Auge, Nathalie; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Goldberg, Michel; Guénet, Jean-Louis; Poirier, Christophe

    2005-08-01

    The mouse mutation fragilitas ossium (fro) leads to a syndrome of severe osteogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta with no detectable collagen defect. Positional cloning of the locus identified a deletion in the gene encoding neutral sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (Smpd3) that led to complete loss of enzymatic activity. Our knowledge of SMPD3 function is consistent with the pathology observed in mutant mice and provides new insight into human pathologies.

  7. Perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta in transgenic mice bearing an engineered mutant pro-alpha 1(I) collagen gene.

    PubMed

    Stacey, A; Bateman, J; Choi, T; Mascara, T; Cole, W; Jaenisch, R

    1988-03-10

    Substitutions of single glycine residues of alpha 1(I) collagen have previously been associated with the inherited disease osteogenesis imperfecta type II. Transgenic mice bearing a mutant alpha 1(I) collagen gene into which specific glycine substitutions have been engineered show a dominant lethal phenotype characteristic of the human disease, and demonstrate that as little as 10% mutant gene expression can disrupt normal collagen function.

  8. Reduced diaphyseal strength associated with high intracortical vascular porosity within long bones of children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, John; Smith, Peter; Harris, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta is a genetic disorder resulting in bone fragility. The mechanisms behind this fragility are not well understood. In addition to characteristic bone mass deficiencies, research suggests that bone material properties are compromised in individuals with this disorder. However, little data exists regarding bone properties beyond the microstructural scale in individuals with this disorder. Specimens were obtained from long bone diaphyses of nine children with osteogenesis imperfecta during routine osteotomy procedures. Small rectangular beams, oriented longitudinally and transversely to the diaphyseal axis, were machined from these specimens and elastic modulus, yield strength, and maximum strength were measured in three-point bending. Intracortical vascular porosity, bone volume fraction, osteocyte lacuna density, and volumetric tissue mineral density were determined by synchrotron micro-computed tomography, and relationships among these mechanical properties and structural parameters were explored. Modulus and strength were on average 64–68% lower in the transverse vs. longitudinal beams (P<0.001, linear mixed model). Vascular porosity ranged between 3–42% of total bone volume. Longitudinal properties were associated negatively with porosity (P≤0.006, linear regressions). Mechanical properties, however, were not associated with osteocyte lacuna density or volumetric tissue mineral density (P≥0.167). Bone properties and structural parameters were not associated significantly with donor age (p≥0.225, linear mixed models). This study presents novel data regarding bone material strength in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Results confirm that these properties are anisotropic. Elevated vascular porosity was observed in most specimens, and this parameter was associated with reduced bone material strength. These results offer insight towards understanding bone fragility and the role of intracortical porosity on the strength of bone

  9. Burnei’s technique of femoral neck variation and valgisation by using the intramedullary rod in Osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, I; Gavriliu, Șt; Nepaliuc, I; Munteanu, L; Țiripa, I; Ghiță, R; Japie, E; Hamei, S; Dughilă, C; Macadon, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Varus or valgus deviations of the femoral neck in osteogenesis imperfecta have been an ignored chapter because the classic correction procedures were applied in medical practice with unsatisfying results. Until the use of telescopic rods, coronal deviations remained unsolved and the distal configuration of the proximal femoral extremity remained uncorrected or partially corrected, which required an extensive use of the wheel chair or bed immobilization of the patient. The concomitant correction of the complex deformities, coxa vara/valga and femoral integrated configuration, have been a progress which allowed the patients to walk with or without support. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present the Burnei’s technique, a therapeutic alternative in deformity corrections of the varus or valgus hip in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Study design: The paper is about a retrospective study done in a single center, which analyses Burnei technique and other procedures described in literature. Patient sample: The content of the article is based on a 12 years experience on a batch of 51 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta from which 10 patients (13 hips) presented frontal plane deviations of the femoral neck. Outcome measures: All the patients with osteogenesis imperfecta who presented coxa vara or valga were submitted to investigations with the purpose of measuring blood loss, the possibility of extending the surgical intervention to the leg, the association of severe deformities of the proximal extremity of the femur and the necessity of postoperative intensive care. Burnei’s technique: The operation was first performed in 2002. A subtrochanteric osteotomy was made in an oblique cut, from the internal side to the external side and from proximal to distal for coxa vara, or by using a cuneiform resection associated with muscular disinsertions. Only telescopic rods were used for osteosynthesis. Discussions: There are a few articles in

  10. Bisphosphonates for the prevention of fractures in osteogenesis imperfecta: meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jannie D; Evangelou, Evangelos; Langdahl, Bente L; Ralston, Stuart H

    2015-05-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used off-label in the treatment of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) with the intention of reducing the risk of fracture. Although there is strong evidence that bisphosphonates increase bone mineral density in osteogenesis imperfecta, the effects on fracture occurrence have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to gain a better insight into the effects of bisphosphonate therapy on fracture risk in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta by conducting a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in which fractures were a reported endpoint. We searched Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in which the effects of bisphosphonates on fracture risk in osteogenesis imperfecta were compared with placebo and conducted a meta-analysis of these studies using standard methods. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. Six eligible studies were identified involving 424 subjects with 751 patient-years of follow-up. The proportion of patients who experienced a fracture was not significantly reduced by bisphosphonate therapy (Relative Risk [RR] = 0.83 [95% confidence interval 0.69-1.01], p = 0.06) with no heterogeneity between studies (I2  = 0). The fracture rate was reduced by bisphosphonate treatment when all studies were considered (RR = 0.71 [0.52-0.96], p = 0.02), but with considerable heterogeneity (I2  = 36%) explained by one study where a small number of patients in the placebo group experienced a large number of fractures. When this study was excluded, the effects of bisphosphonates on fracture rate was not significant (RR = 0.79 [0.61-1.02], p = 0.07, I2  = 0%). We conclude that the effects of bisphosphonates on fracture prevention in osteogenesis imperfecta are inconclusive. Adequately powered trials with a fracture endpoint are needed to further investigate the risks and benefits of bisphosphonates in this condition.

  11. Osteogenesis imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... defect in the gene that produces type 1 collagen, an important building block of bone. There are ... fractures Early hearing loss ( deafness ) Because type I collagen is also found in ligaments, people with OI ...

  12. Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... cure, but you can manage symptoms. Treatments include exercise, pain medicine, physical therapy, wheelchairs, braces, and surgery. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  13. Clinical, histopathologic, and genetic investigation in two large families with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Malmgren, B; Lindskog, S; Elgadi, A; Norgren, S

    2004-04-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) type II, an inherited disorder affecting dentin, has been linked to mutations in the dentin sialophosphoprotein ( DSPP) gene on chromosome 4q21. The gene product is cleaved into two dentin-specific matrix proteins, dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein. The aim of this investigation was to study genotypes and phenotypes in two affected families with special reference to clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic manifestations. Seven affected members of Family A and five of Family B were documented clinically and radiographically; 14 and 10 teeth, respectively, were available for histopathologic investigation and prepared for ground sections, which were assessed semiquantitatively for dysplastic manifestations in the dentin according to the scoring system, dysplastic dentin score (DDS). Venous blood samples were collected from six affected and ten unaffected members of Family A, and from eight affected and six unaffected members of Family B. Genomic DNA was extracted and used for sequence analyses. The two families presented with different missense mutations. An Arg68Trp missense mutation in the DSP part of the gene was revealed in all six analyzed affected individuals in Family A. This mutation was not present in any of the ten healthy members. In Family B, an Ala15Val missense mutation involving the last residue of the signal peptide was found in all eight affected but in none of the six healthy members. The clinical and radiographic disturbances and DDS were more severe in Family B. The data indicate the presence of a genotype-phenotype correlation in DI type II.

  14. A DSPP mutation causing dentinogenesis imperfecta and characterization of the mutational effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Song, Su Jeong; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the DSPP gene have been identified in nonsyndromic hereditary dentin defects, but the genotype-phenotype correlations are not fully understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the mutations of DSPP affecting the IPV leader sequence result in mutant DSPP retention in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this study, we identified a Korean family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III. To identify the disease causing mutation in this family, we performed mutational analysis based on candidate gene sequencing. Exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP gene were sequenced, and the effects of the identified mutation on the pre-mRNA splicing and protein secretion were investigated. Candidate gene sequencing revealed a mutation (c.50C > T, p.P17L) in exon 2 of the DSPP gene. The splicing assay showed that the mutation did not influence pre-mRNA splicing. However, the mutation interfered with protein secretion and resulted in the mutant protein remaining largely in the ER. These results suggest that the mutation affects ER-to-Golgi apparatus export and results in the reduction of secreted DSPP and ER overload. This may induce cell stress and damage processing and/or transport of dentin matrix proteins or other critical proteins.

  15. Childhood Osteoporosis and Presentation of Two Cases with Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type V

    PubMed Central

    BRATANIC, Nina; DZODAN, Bojana; TREBUSAK PODKRAJSEK, Katarina; BERTOK, Sara; OSTANEK, Barbara; MARC, Janja; BATTELINO, Tadej; AVBELJ STEFANIJA, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is etiologically heterogeneous disorder characterized by childhood osteoporosis. A subtype OI type V is caused by the same c.-14C>T mutation in the IFITM5 gene. Nevertheless, there is a marked interindividual phenotypic variability in clinical presentation; however, response to bisphosphonates is reported to be good. Methods Two individuals with OI type V had multiple recurrent fractures with hypertrophic calluses, scoliosis and ossifications of the forearm interosseous membranes. Sequencing of IFITM5, genotyping of variants rs2297480 in farnesyl diphosphate synthase gene (FDPS), and rs3840452 in geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 1 gene (GGPS1), both involved in bisphosphonate metabolism, was performed. Results In patient 1 BMD reached normal values during bisphosphonate treatment and remained normal four years after the treatment discontinuation. In patient 2 no increase in BMD after five years of bisphosphonate treatment was observed and callus formation continued. The c.-14C>T IFITM5 mutation in heterozygous state was detected in both individuals. Additionally, both patients carried FDPS variant rs2297480 in homozygous state, and were heterozygous for GGPS 1 variant rs3840452. Conclusions The paper presents a short overview of childhood osteoporosis with a special emphasis on OI type V by presenting two cases. Both OI type V patients had identical disease-causing mutation, but marked interindividual phenotypic variability. The striking failure in response to bisphosphonate treatment in one of the patients could not be explained by the variants in genes involved in bisphosphonate metabolism. PMID:27646918

  16. A novel splicing mutation alters DSPP transcription and leads to dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jiucun; Ma, Yanyun; Du, Wenqi; Zhao, Siyang; Zhang, Zuowei; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Liu, Yue; Xiao, Huasheng; Wang, Hongyan; Jin, Li; Liu, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a serious disorders in teeth. Mutations of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene were revealed to be the causation of DGI type II (DGI-II). In this study, we identified a novel mutation (NG_011595.1:g.8662T>C, c.135+2T>C) lying in the splice donor site of intron 3 of DSPP gene in a Chinese Han DGI-II pedigree. It was found in all affected subjects but not in unaffected ones or other unrelated healthy controls. The function of the mutant DSPP gene, which was predicted online and subsequently confirmed by in vitro splicing analysis, was the loss of splicing of intron 3, leading to the extended length of DSPP mRNA. For the first time, the functional non-splicing of intron was revealed in a novel DSPP mutation and was considered as the causation of DGI-II. It was also indicated that splicing was of key importance to the function of DSPP and this splice donor site might be a sensitive mutation hot spot. Our findings combined with other reports would facilitate the genetic diagnosis of DGI-II, shed light on its gene therapy and help to finally conquer human diseases.

  17. Dentin phosphoprotein compound mutation in dentin sialophosphoprotein causes dentinogenesis imperfecta type III.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Gu, TingTing; Jeffords, Leticia; MacDougall, Mary

    2005-01-30

    A rare compound mutation involving a 36 bp deletion and 18 bp insertion within exon 5 of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene has been identified in a family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III (DGI-III). The DSPP gene encodes two major tooth matrix proteins dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). DSPP mutations associated with DGI-III results in an in frame truncation of the serine aspartic acid triplet repeat found in DPP near the highly conserved carboxyl terminal region shortening the protein by six amino acids. Clinically this family presents with discolored amber opalescent teeth and severe attrition of the tooth structure. This study is the first report of a mutation within DPP associated with a genetic dentin disease. Our study indicates that DGI-III is allelic with some forms of DGI-II with and without progressive hearing loss and dentin dysplasia type II that have been shown to be caused by mutations within the DSP coding or signal peptide regions.

  18. Quality of life in children and adolescents with Osteogenesis Imperfecta: a qualitative interview based study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a disease with varying severity affecting physical, social and emotional well-being of the child and their family. There is no existing evidence on how the OI population regard their quality of life (QoL). The main aim of this study was to determine how OI impacts on the quality of life and well-being of children and their family. It is the first stage of a larger project to develop a disease specific quality of life measure for children with OI. Methods Purposive sampling was used to cover the diversity of the OI population. Twenty-five qualitative interviews were undertaken with children (n = 10), parents (n = 10) and health professionals (n = 5). Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Significant themes were identified, extracted and organised, undergoing framework analysis. Results Six main themes were identified; being safe and careful, reduced function, pain, fear, isolation, independence. There was a large amount of agreement between the three groups of interviewees, although discrepancies did occur between parents and children, with regard to the themes independence and fear. Conclusions This data presents the first step in developing items for a disease specific QoL measure for children with OI. Several of the themes uncovered showed similarity to other QoL measures, but the addition of being safe and careful, particularly in relation to fractures, demonstrated the need for a disease specific measure for children with OI. PMID:24742068

  19. Anesthesia management in a child with osteogenesis imperfecta and epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Mehmet Ali; Sanli, Mukadder; Ersoy, Mehmet Ozcan

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) results from gene mutation that causes defective or insufficient collagen formation. It may cause various anesthetic complications due to the difficulty in airway management, existence of spinal deformity, respiratory disorders, cardiac anomalies, thrombocyte function disorder, risk of hyperthermia, bacillary invagination, bone deformities and metabolic disorders. The anesthesia management of OI patients should be exercised with caution given certain risks of respiratory disorders. These risks are due to thorax deformity, bone fractures during moving or changing position, mandibular and cervical fractures related with intubation, difficult intubation and malignant hyperthermia. The anesthetic technique using Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) and laryngeal mask airway is suitable for pediatric patient care with OI. However, these techniques have not yet been reported as useful in neurosurgery case reports. In this study, we present the use of TIVA and ProSeal Laringeal Mask in a child with OI and epidural hemorrhage. We came to the conclusion that LMA and TIVA can safely be used in the anesthetic management of OI patients with severe anesthetic problems. PMID:24565246

  20. Novel Deletion of SERPINF1 Causes Autosomal Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type VI in Two Brazilian Families

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer Minillo, Renata; Sobreira, Nara; de Fatima de Faria Soares, Maria; Jurgens, Julie; Ling, Hua; Hetrick, Kurt N.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Valle, David; Brunoni, Decio; Alvarez Perez, Ana B.

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) accounts for 10% of all OI cases, and, currently, mutations in 10 genes (CRTAP, LEPRE1, PPIB, SERPINH1, FKBP10, SERPINF1, SP7, BMP1, TMEM38B, and WNT1) are known to be responsible for this form of the disease. PEDF is a secreted glycoprotein of the serpin superfamily that maintains bone homeostasis and regulates osteoid mineralization, and it is encoded by SERPINF1, currently associated with OI type VI (MIM 172860). Here, we report a consanguineous Brazilian family in which multiple individuals from at least 4 generations are affected with a severe form of OI, and we also report an unrelated individual from the same small city in Brazil with a similar but more severe phenotype. In both families the same homozygous SERPINF1 19-bp deletion was identified which is not known in the literature yet. We described intra- and interfamilial clinical and radiological phenotypic variability of OI type VI caused by the same homozygous SERPINF1 19-bp deletion and suggest a founder effect. Furthermore, the SERPINF1 genotypes/phenotypes reported so far in the literature are reviewed. PMID:25565926

  1. A fracture risk assessment model of the femur in children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) during gait.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jessica M; Guan, Yabo; Wang, Mei; Smith, Peter A; Harris, Gerald F

    2009-11-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable bone fragility disorder characterized by skeletal deformities and increased bone fragility. There is currently no established clinical method for quantifying fracture risk in OI patients. This study begins the development of a patient-specific model for femur fracture risk assessment and prediction based on individuals' gait analysis data, bone geometry from imaging and material properties from nanoindentation (Young's modulus=19 GPa, Poisson's ratio=0.3). Finite element models of the femur were developed to assess fracture risk of the femur in a pediatric patient with OI type I. Kinetic data from clinical gait analysis was used to prescribe loading conditions on the femoral head and condyles along with muscle forces on the bone's surface. von Mises stresses were analyzed against a fracture strength of 115 MPa. The patient with OI whose femur was modeled showed no risk of femoral fracture during normal gait. The highest stress levels occurred during the mid-stance and loading responses phases of gait. The location of high stress migrated throughout the femoral diaphysis across the gait cycle. Maximum femoral stress levels occurred during the gait cycle phases associated with the highest loading. The fracture risk (fracture strength/von Mises stress), however, was low. This study provides a relevant method for combining functional activity, material property and analytical methods to improve patient monitoring.

  2. Multiparametric Classification of Skin from Osteogenesis Imperfecta Patients and Controls by Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Microimaging.

    PubMed

    Ashinsky, Beth G; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Carter, Erin M; Lin, Ping-Chang; Pleshko, Nancy; Raggio, Cathleen L; Spencer, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to discriminate between skin biopsies from individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and skin biopsies from individuals without OI. Skin biopsies from nine controls (unaffected) and nine OI patients were imaged to generate maps of five separate MR parameters, T1, T2, km, MTR and ADC. Parameter values were calculated over the dermal region and used for univariate and multiparametric classification analysis. A substantial degree of overlap of individual MR parameters was observed between control and OI groups, which limited the sensitivity and specificity of univariate classification. Classification accuracies ranging between 39% and 67% were found depending on the variable of investigation, with T2 yielding the best accuracy of 67%. When several MR parameters were considered simultaneously in a multivariate analysis, the classification accuracies improved up to 89% for specific combinations, including the combination of T2 and km. These results indicate that multiparametric classification by quantitative MRI is able to detect differences between the skin of OI patients and of unaffected individuals, which motivates further study of quantitative MRI for the clinical diagnosis of OI. PMID:27416032

  3. Child abuse and osteogenesis imperfecta: how can they be still misdiagnosed? A case report

    PubMed Central

    D’Eufemia, Patrizia; Palombaro, Marta; Lodato, Valentina; Zambrano, Anna; Celli, Mauro; Persiani, Pietro; De Bari, Maria Pia; Sangiorgi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Summary Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare hereditary disease caused by mutations in genes coding for type I collagen, resulting in bone fragility. In literature are described forms lethal in perinatal period, forms which are moderate and slight forms where the only sign of disease is osteopenia. Child abuse is an important social and medical problem. Fractures are the second most common presentation after skin lesions and may present specific patterns. The differential diagnosis between slight-moderate forms of OI and child abuse could be very challenging especially when other signs typical of abuse are absent, since both could present with multiple fractures without reasonable explanations. We report a 20 months-old female with a history of 4 fractures occurred between the age of three and eighteen months, brought to authorities’ attention as a suspected child abuse. However when she came to our department physical examination, biochemical tests, total body X-ray and a molecular analysis of DNA led the diagnosis of OI. Thus, a treatment with bisphosphonate and a physical rehabilitation process, according to Vojta method, were started with improvement in bony mineralization, gross motor skills and absence of new fracture. In conclusion our case demonstrates how in any child presenting fractures efforts should be made to consider, besides child abuse, all the other hypothesis even the rarest as OI. PMID:23289038

  4. [Anesthetic management of a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta combined with mandibular defect].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Masanori; Hirokawa, Jun; Sako, Saori; Fujiwara, Shigeki; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by an excessive tendency to bone fractures and retarded growth. We report an anesthetic management of the patient with OI who has the history of vertebral bone fracture by coughing. A 44-year-old female underwent mandibular resection and reconstruction with a metal instrument due to ossifying fibroma 35 years ago. Since then, she had undergone mandibular resection and shaving the instrument several times because of recurrence of the tumor and/or fracture of the instrument. This time, some parts of the instrument were removed under general anesthesia since it had exposed from the skin. Difficulty in mask ventilation and intubation was predicted due to the defect of mandible and some muscles supporting the tongue and the pharynx. Awake fiber-optic nasotracheal intubation, therefore, was performed in consideration of airway obstruction. Dexmedetomidine was administered to reduce the risk of bone fracture in addition to low doses of midazolam and fentanyl. Considering incomplete respiration after extubation, the tracheal tube was extubated after inserting the tube exchanger into the trachea through the tube. The tube exchanger was pulled out after confirming spontaneous respiration and upper airway patency. The patient was cooperative, and respiratory and hemodynamic conditions were stable throughout. PMID:24979864

  5. Full-mouth rehabilitation for a patient with dentinogenesis imperfecta: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bencharit, Sompop; Border, Michael B; Mack, C Russell; Byrd, Warren C; Wright, John T

    2014-10-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) is a genetic disorder affecting the structural integrity of the dentin that can result in weakened dentin. The affected teeth, especially posterior teeth, often need to be extracted due to severe wear or fracture. This frequently yields a loss of posterior occlusion and occlusal vertical dimension. Besides wear and fracture, anterior teeth often have an unesthetic appearance because of discoloration. Current treatments of choice, including composite bonding restorations and, more recently, all-ceramic restorations, are typically suggested to preserve the remaining teeth and tooth structure. However, there are a limited number of studies on dental implants in patients with DI. The effectiveness of dentin bonding and dental implants in patients with DI is not known. This clinical report describes a 32-year-old Asian woman with DI who underwent full-mouth rehabilitation. The posterior occlusion, mostly in the molar areas, was restored with dental implants and ceramometal restorations. The anterior teeth and premolars were restored with bonded lithium disilicate glass-ceramic pressed veneers and crowns made with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing. This case demonstrates that restoring functional occlusion and esthetics for a patient with DI can be completed successfully using contemporary implant therapy and adhesive dentistry.

  6. Structure-mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, O G; Chang, S W; Vanleene, M; Howarth, P H; Davies, D E; Shefelbine, S J; Buehler, M J; Thurner, P J

    2015-10-01

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry.

  7. Multiparametric Classification of Skin from Osteogenesis Imperfecta Patients and Controls by Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Erin M.; Lin, Ping-Chang; Pleshko, Nancy; Raggio, Cathleen L.; Spencer, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to discriminate between skin biopsies from individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and skin biopsies from individuals without OI. Skin biopsies from nine controls (unaffected) and nine OI patients were imaged to generate maps of five separate MR parameters, T1, T2, km, MTR and ADC. Parameter values were calculated over the dermal region and used for univariate and multiparametric classification analysis. A substantial degree of overlap of individual MR parameters was observed between control and OI groups, which limited the sensitivity and specificity of univariate classification. Classification accuracies ranging between 39% and 67% were found depending on the variable of investigation, with T2 yielding the best accuracy of 67%. When several MR parameters were considered simultaneously in a multivariate analysis, the classification accuracies improved up to 89% for specific combinations, including the combination of T2 and km. These results indicate that multiparametric classification by quantitative MRI is able to detect differences between the skin of OI patients and of unaffected individuals, which motivates further study of quantitative MRI for the clinical diagnosis of OI. PMID:27416032

  8. Ultra-structural defects cause low bone matrix stiffness despite high mineralization in osteogenesis imperfecta mice☆

    PubMed Central

    Vanleene, Maximilien; Porter, Alexandra; Guillot, Pascale-Valerie; Boyde, Alan; Oyen, Michelle; Shefelbine, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Bone is a complex material with a hierarchical multi-scale organization from the molecule to the organ scale. The genetic bone disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, is primarily caused by mutations in the collagen type I genes, resulting in bone fragility. Because the basis of the disease is molecular with ramifications at the whole bone level, it provides a platform for investigating the relationship between structure, composition, and mechanics throughout the hierarchy. Prior studies have individually shown that OI leads to: 1. increased bone mineralization, 2. decreased elastic modulus, and 3. smaller apatite crystal size. However, these have not been studied together and the mechanism for how mineral structure influences tissue mechanics has not been identified. This lack of understanding inhibits the development of more accurate models and therapies. To address this research gap, we used a mouse model of the disease (oim) to measure these outcomes together in order to propose an underlying mechanism for the changes in properties. Our main finding was that despite increased mineralization, oim bones have lower stiffness that may result from the poorly organized mineral matrix with significantly smaller, highly packed and disoriented apatite crystals. Using a composite framework, we interpret the lower oim bone matrix elasticity observed as the result of a change in the aspect ratio of apatite crystals and a disruption of the crystal connectivity. PMID:22449447

  9. Phenotypic variation in dentinogenesis imperfecta/dentin dysplasia linked to 4q21.

    PubMed

    Beattie, M L; Kim, J-W; Gong, S-G; Murdoch-Kinch, C A; Simmer, J P; Hu, J C-C

    2006-04-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentin dysplasia (DD) are allelic disorders that primarily affect the formation of tooth dentin. Both conditions are autosomal-dominant and can be caused by mutations in the dentin sialophosphoprotein gene (DSPP, 4q21.3). We recruited 23 members of a four-generation kindred, including ten persons with dentin defects, and tested the hypothesis that these defects are linked to DSPP. The primary dentition showed amber discoloration, pulp obliteration, and severe attrition. The secondary dentition showed either pulp obliteration with bulbous crowns and gray discoloration or thistle-tube pulp configurations, normal crowns, and mild gray discoloration. Haplotype analyses showed no recombination between three 4q21-q24 markers and the disease locus. Mutational analyses identified no coding or intron junction sequence variations associated with affection status in DMP1, MEPE, or the DSP portion of DSPP. The defects in the permanent dentition were typically mild and consistent with a diagnosis of DD-II, but some dental features associated with DGI-II were also present. We conclude that DD-II and DGI-II are milder and more severe forms, respectively, of the same disease.

  10. Microstructural and Photoacoustic Infrared Spectroscopic Studies of Human Cortical Bone with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chunju; Katti, Dinesh R.; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2016-04-01

    The molecular basis of bone disease osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and the mineralization of hydroxyapatite in OI bone have been of significant research interest. To further investigate the mechanism of OI disease and bone mineralization, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) are used in the present study to describe the structural and compositional differences between OI and healthy bone. OI bone exhibits more porous, fibrous features, abnormal collagen fibrils, and abnormal mineral deposits. Likewise, photoacoustic-FTIR experiments indicate an aberrant collagen structure and an altered mineral structure in OI. In contrast, there is neither significant difference in the non-collagenous proteins (NCPs) composition observed nor apparent change in the crystal structure between OI and healthy bone minerals as shown in XRD and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results. This observation indicates that the biomineralization process is more controlled by the bone cells and non-collagenous phosphorylated proteins. The present study also confirms that there is an orientational influence on the stoichiometry of the mineral in OI bone. Also, a larger volume of the hydrated layer in the transverse plane than the longitudinal plane of the mineral crystal structure is proposed. The appearance of a new C-S band in the FTIR spectra in OI bone suggests the substitution of glycine by cysteine in collagen molecules or/and an increased amount of cysteine-rich osteonectin that relates to mineral nucleation and mineral crystal formation.

  11. Quantitative changes in human epithelial cancers and osteogenesis imperfecta disease detected using nonlinear multicontrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; de Thomaz, Andre A.; D'Souza-Li, Lilia; Assunção, Maria do Carmo; Bottcher-Luiz, Fátima; Andrade, Liliana A. L. A.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2012-08-01

    We show that combined multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopies, including two-photon excitation fluorescence, second-harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can be used to detect morphological and metabolic changes associated with stroma and epithelial transformation during the progression of cancer and osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) disease. NLO microscopes provide complementary information about tissue microstructure, showing distinctive patterns for different types of human breast cancer, mucinous ovarian tumors, and skin dermis of patients with OI. Using a set of scoring methods (anisotropy, correlation, uniformity, entropy, and lifetime components), we found significant differences in the content, distribution and organization of collagen fibrils in the stroma of breast and ovary as well as in the dermis of skin. We suggest that our results provide a framework for using NLO techniques as a clinical diagnostic tool for human cancer and OI. We further suggest that the SHG and FLIM metrics described could be applied to other connective or epithelial tissue disorders that are characterized by abnormal cells proliferation and collagen assembly.

  12. Structure-mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, O G; Chang, S W; Vanleene, M; Howarth, P H; Davies, D E; Shefelbine, S J; Buehler, M J; Thurner, P J

    2015-10-01

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry. PMID:26468064

  13. Quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging to detect osteogenesis imperfecta in human skin samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, J.; Ferreira, A. E.; D'Souza-Li, L.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Baratti, M. O.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that leads to bone fractures due to mutations in the Col1A1 or Col1A2 genes that affect the primary structure of the collagen I chain with the ultimate outcome in collagen I fibrils that are either reduced in quantity or abnormally organized in the whole body. A quick test screening of the patients would largely reduce the sample number to be studied by the time consuming molecular genetics techniques. For this reason an assessment of the human skin collagen structure by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) can be used as a screening technique to speed up the correlation of genetics/phenotype/OI types understanding. In the present work we have used quantitative second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to investigate the collagen matrix organization of the OI human skin samples comparing with normal control patients. By comparing fibril collagen distribution and spatial organization, we calculated the anisotropy and texture patterns of this structural protein. The analysis of the anisotropy was performed by means of the two-dimensional Discrete Fourier Transform and image pattern analysis with Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). From these results, we show that statistically different results are obtained for the normal and disease states of OI.

  14. Structure–mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Andriotis, O. G.; Chang, S. W.; Vanleene, M.; Howarth, P. H.; Davies, D. E.; Shefelbine, S. J.; Buehler, M. J.; Thurner, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry. PMID:26468064

  15. Safety enhancement of a specialized power assisted tricycle for a child with osteogenesis imperfecta type III.

    PubMed

    Geu, Matthew J; Tuffner, Francis F; Madsen, Robert O; Harman, William M; Barrett, Steven F

    2005-01-01

    A child in the community of Laramie, Wyoming was born with Osteogenesis Imperfecta which is a genetic disorder that limits the physical abilities, size, and strength of the child. A customized power assisted tricycle was developed, which offered a unique opportunity to serve multiple purposes in his childhood development. This tricycle will ultimately provide him with the opportunity to gain muscle mass, strength, coordination, and confidence. The tricycle was completed as a senior design project in 2002, funded by the National Science Foundation, Biomedical Engineering Program and research to Aid Persons with Disabilities Program and University of Wyoming, College of Engineering Undergraduate Design Project to Aid Wyoming Persons with Disabilities. Unfortunately, the tricycle did not provide the necessary features to allow him to ride the tricycle safely. For this reason the tricycle was redesigned to include many different redundant safety systems which allows the tricycle to be safe for the child's use. Being funded by the same grant, new systems were added to the tricycle. A panic kill switch, automatic brakes, numerous redundant velocity sensors, tip over prevention circuitry, a redesigned operating system, a battery recharge port, and other systems were added, allowing for the tricycle to provide a high level of safety. A great deal of testing and sound design practices have been taken into consideration throughout the addition of these systems. Without these improvements, the child would not have the opportunity to use the tricycle to help with his development. PMID:15850131

  16. Robust physical methods that enrich genomic regions identical by descent for linkage studies: confirmation of a locus for osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Peter; Marcaillou, Charles; Vanpeene, Maud; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Stockholm, Daniel; Francke, Stephan; Favis, Reyna; Cohen, Nadine; Rousseau, Francis; Tores, Frédéric; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Hager, Jörg; Philippi, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Background The monogenic disease osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is due to single mutations in either of the collagen genes ColA1 or ColA2, but within the same family a given mutation is accompanied by a wide range of disease severity. Although this phenotypic variability implies the existence of modifier gene variants, genome wide scanning of DNA from OI patients has not been reported. Promising genome wide marker-independent physical methods for identifying disease-related loci have lacked robustness for widespread applicability. Therefore we sought to improve these methods and demonstrate their performance to identify known and novel loci relevant to OI. Results We have improved methods for enriching regions of identity-by-descent (IBD) shared between related, afflicted individuals. The extent of enrichment exceeds 10- to 50-fold for some loci. The efficiency of the new process is shown by confirmation of the identification of the Col1A2 locus in osteogenesis imperfecta patients from Amish families. Moreover the analysis revealed additional candidate linkage loci that may harbour modifier genes for OI; a locus on chromosome 1q includes COX-2, a gene implicated in osteogenesis. Conclusion Technology for physical enrichment of IBD loci is now robust and applicable for finding genes for monogenic diseases and genes for complex diseases. The data support the further investigation of genetic loci other than collagen gene loci to identify genes affecting the clinical expression of osteogenesis imperfecta. The discrimination of IBD mapping will be enhanced when the IBD enrichment procedure is coupled with deep resequencing. PMID:19331686

  17. Deep tissue single cell MSC ablation using a fiber laser source to evaluate therapeutic potential in osteogenesis imperfecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Kayvan F.; Pendleton, Emily G.; Lin, Charles P.; Mortensen, Luke J.

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a currently uncurable disease where a mutation in collagen type I yields brittle bones. One potential therapy is transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but controlling and enhancing transplanted cell survival has proven challenging. Therefore, we use a 2- photon imaging system to study individual transplanted cells in the living bone marrow. We ablated cells deep in the bone marrow and observed minimal collateral damage to surrounding tissue. Future work will evaluate the local impact of transplanted MSCs on bone deposition in vivo.

  18. Pregnancy complicated by a severe form of foetal osteogenesis imperfecta in a 17-year-old primigravida: case report and overview of literature.

    PubMed

    Madu, Anthony Emeka; Olamijulo, Joseph Ayodeji

    2013-05-01

    Abstract Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an important inheritable thanetrophic disorder with wide ranging variable implications and prognosis for babies in utero and those who survive the perinatal period. The diagnosis of the severe forms can be readily made but some forms of the disease are known to go unrecognised until childhood.

  19. Osteogenesis imperfecta Type VI with severe bony deformities caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations in SERPINF1.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Yoon; Ki, Chang-Seok; Sohn, Young Bae; Kim, Su Jin; Maeng, Se Hyun; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2013-07-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by bone fragility, frequent fractures, and low bone mass. Dominantly inherited COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutations appear to be causative in the majority of OI types, but rare recessively inherited genes have also been reported. Recently, SERPINF1 has been reported as another causative gene in OI type VI. To date, only eight SERPINF1 mutations have been reported and all are homozygous. Our patient showed no abnormalities at birth, frequent fractures, osteopenia, and poor response on pamidronate therapy. At the time of her most recent evaluation, she was 8 yr old, and could not walk independently due to frequent lower-extremity fractures, resulting in severe deformity. No clinical signs were seen of hearing impairment, blue sclera, or dentinogenesis imperfecta. In this study, we describe the clinical and radiological findings of one Korean patient with novel compound heterozygous mutations (c.77dupC and c.421dupC) of SERPINF1.

  20. Fluoroscopy-guided Sacroiliac Joint Steroid Injection for Low Back Pain in a Patient with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, PUA; Rose, REC; Wade, NA

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as ‘brittle bone disease’, is a genetic connective tissue disease. It is characterized by bone fragility and osteopenia (low bone density). In this case, a 57-year old female presented to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic with left low back pain rated 6/10 on the numeric rating scale (NRS). Clinically, the patient had sacroiliac joint-mediated pain although X-rays did not show the sacroiliac joint changes. Fluoroscopy-guided left sacroiliac joint steroid injection was done. Methods: Numeric rating scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire were used to evaluate outcome. This was completed at baseline, one week follow-up and at eight weeks post fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint steroid injection. Results: Numeric rating scale improved from 6/10 before the procedure to 0/10 post procedure, and ODI questionnaire score improved from a moderate disability score of 40% to a minimal disability score of 13%. Up to eight weeks, the NRS was 0/10 and ODI remained at minimal disability of 15%. Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint injection is a known diagnostic and treatment method for sacroiliac joint mediated pain. To our knowledge, this is the first case published on the use of fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint steroid injection in the treatment of sacroiliac joint mediated low back pain in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. PMID:26624601

  1. A cross-sectional multicenter study of osteogenesis imperfecta in North America - results from the linked clinical research centers.

    PubMed

    Patel, R M; Nagamani, S C S; Cuthbertson, D; Campeau, P M; Krischer, J P; Shapiro, J R; Steiner, R D; Smith, P A; Bober, M B; Byers, P H; Pepin, M; Durigova, M; Glorieux, F H; Rauch, F; Lee, B H; Hart, T; Sutton, V R

    2015-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is the most common skeletal dysplasia that predisposes to recurrent fractures and bone deformities. In spite of significant advances in understanding the genetic basis of OI, there have been no large-scale natural history studies. To better understand the natural history and improve the care of patients, a network of Linked Clinical Research Centers (LCRC) was established. Subjects with OI were enrolled in a longitudinal study, and in this report, we present cross-sectional data on the largest cohort of OI subjects (n = 544). OI type III subjects had higher prevalence of dentinogenesis imperfecta, severe scoliosis, and long bone deformities as compared to those with OI types I and IV. Whereas the mean lumbar spine area bone mineral density (LS aBMD) was low across all OI subtypes, those with more severe forms had lower bone mass. Molecular testing may help predict the subtype in type I collagen-related OI. Analysis of such well-collected and unbiased data in OI can not only help answering questions that are relevant to patient care but also foster hypothesis-driven research, especially in the context of 'phenotypic expansion' driven by next-generation sequencing.

  2. Osteogenesis imperfecta Type VI with severe bony deformities caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations in SERPINF1.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Yoon; Ki, Chang-Seok; Sohn, Young Bae; Kim, Su Jin; Maeng, Se Hyun; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2013-07-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by bone fragility, frequent fractures, and low bone mass. Dominantly inherited COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutations appear to be causative in the majority of OI types, but rare recessively inherited genes have also been reported. Recently, SERPINF1 has been reported as another causative gene in OI type VI. To date, only eight SERPINF1 mutations have been reported and all are homozygous. Our patient showed no abnormalities at birth, frequent fractures, osteopenia, and poor response on pamidronate therapy. At the time of her most recent evaluation, she was 8 yr old, and could not walk independently due to frequent lower-extremity fractures, resulting in severe deformity. No clinical signs were seen of hearing impairment, blue sclera, or dentinogenesis imperfecta. In this study, we describe the clinical and radiological findings of one Korean patient with novel compound heterozygous mutations (c.77dupC and c.421dupC) of SERPINF1. PMID:23853499

  3. Clinical Aspects, Imaging Features, and Considerations on Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis Risk in a Pediatric Patient with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Fábio Wildson Gurgel; Nogueira, Alexandre Simões; Rodrigues Carvalho, Francisco Samuel; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; Kurita, Lúcio Mitsuo; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Fonteles, Cristiane Sá Roriz

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare hereditary condition caused by changes in collagen metabolism. It is classified into four types according to clinical, genetic, and radiological criteria. Clinically, bone fragility, short stature, blue sclerae, and locomotion difficulties may be observed in this disease. OI is often associated to severe dental problems, such as dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) and malocclusions. Radiographically, affected teeth may have crowns with bulbous appearance, accentuated constriction in the cementoenamel junction, narrowed roots, large root canals due to defective dentin formation, and taurodontism (enlarged pulp chambers). There is no definitive cure, but bisphosphonate therapy is reported to improve bone quality; however, there is a potential risk of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. In this study we report a case of OI in a male pediatric patient with no family history of OI who was receiving ongoing treatment with intravenous perfusion of bisphosphonate and who required dental surgery. In addition, we discussed the clinical and imaging findings and briefly reviewed the literature. PMID:25215248

  4. Strontium Ranelate Reduces the Fracture Incidence in a Growing Mouse Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Shi, Changgui; Hu, Bo; Guo, Lei; Cao, Peng; Tian, Ye; Ma, Jun; Chen, Yuanyuan; Wu, Huiqiao; Hu, Jinquan; Deng, Lianfu; Zhang, Ying; Yuan, Wen

    2016-05-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic bone dysplasia characterized by brittle bones with increased fracture risk. Although current treatment options to improve bone strength in OI focus on antiresorptive bisphosphonates, controlled clinical trials suggest they have an equivocal effect on reducing fracture risk. Strontium ranelate (SrR) is a promising therapy with a dual mode of action that is capable of simultaneously maintaining bone formation and reducing bone resorption, and may be beneficial for the treatment of OI. In this study, SrR therapy was investigated to assess its effects on fracture frequency and bone mass and strength in an animal model of OI, the oim/oim mouse. Three-week-old oim/oim and wt/wt mice were treated with either SrR or vehicle (Veh) for 11 weeks. After treatment, the average number of fractures sustained by SrR-treated oim/oim mice was significantly reduced compared to Veh-treated oim/oim mice. Micro-computed tomographic (μCT) analyses of femurs showed that both trabecular and cortical bone mass were significantly improved with SrR treatment in both genotypes. SrR significantly inhibited bone resorption, whereas bone formation indices were maintained. Biomechanical testing revealed improved bone structural properties in both oim/oim and wild-type (wt/wt) mice under the treatment, whereas no significant effects on bone brittleness and material quality were observed. In conclusion, SrR was able to effectively reduce fractures in oim/oim mice by improving bone mass and strength and thus represents a potential therapy for the treatment of pediatric OI. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26679066

  5. Mutational hot spot in the DSPP gene causing dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Wook; Hu, Jan C-C; Lee, Jae-Il; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Young-Jae; Jang, Ki-Taeg; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Chong-Chul; Hahn, Se-Hyun; Simmer, James P

    2005-02-01

    The current system for the classification of hereditary defects of tooth dentin is based upon clinical and radiographic findings and consists of two types of dentin dysplasia (DD) and three types of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI). However, whether DGI type III should be considered a distinct phenotype or a variation of DGI type II is debatable. In the 30 years since the classification system was first proposed, significant advances have been made regarding the genetic etiologies of inherited dentin defects. DGI type II is recognized as an autosomal dominant disorder with almost complete penetrance and a low frequency of de novo mutations. We have identified a mutation (c.52G-->T, p.V18F) at the first nucleotide of exon 3 of the DSPP (dentin sialophosphoprotein) gene in a Korean family (de novo) and a Caucasian family. This mutation has previously been reported as causing DGI type II in a Chinese family. These findings suggest that this mutation site represents a mutational "hot spot" in the DSPP gene. The clinical and radiographic features of these two families include the classic phenotypes associated with both DGI type II and type III. Finding that a single mutation causes both phenotypic patterns strongly supports the conclusion that DGI type II and DGI type III are not separate diseases but rather the phenotypic variation of a single disease. We propose a modification of the current classification system such that the designation "hereditary opalescent dentin" or "DGI type II" should be used to describe both the DGI type II and type III phenotypes.

  6. A novel splice acceptor mutation in the DSPP gene causing dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Nam, S H; Jang, K T; Lee, S H; Kim, C C; Hahn, S H; Hu, J C C; Simmer, J P

    2004-08-01

    The dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene (4q21.3) encodes two major noncollagenous dentin matrix proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Defects in the human gene encoding DSPP cause inherited dentin defects, and these defects can be associated with bilateral progressive high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. Clinically, five different patterns of inherited dentin defects are distinguished and are classified as dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) types I, II, and III, and dentin dysplasia types I and II. The genetic basis for this clinical heterogeneity is unknown. Among the 11 members recruited from the studied kindred, five were affected with autosomal dominant DGI type II. The mutation (g.1188C-->G, IVS2-3C-->G) lay in the third from the last nucleotide of intron 2 and changed its sequence from CAG to GAG. The mutation was correlated with the affection status and was absent in 104 unaffected individuals (208 alleles) with the same ethnic and geological background. The proband was in the primary dentition stage and presented with multiple pulp exposures. The occlusal surface of his dental enamel was generally abraded, and the dentin was heavily worn and uniformly shaded brown. The dental pulp chambers appeared originally to be within normal limits without any sign of obliteration, but over time (by age 4), the pulp chambers became partially or completely obliterated. The oldest affected member (age 59) showed mild hearing loss at high-frequency (8 kHz). Permanent dentition was severely affected in the adults, who had advanced dental attrition, premature loss of teeth, and extensive dental reconstruction.

  7. Intrafibrillar Mineral May be Absent in Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II (DI-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Pople, John A.

    2001-03-29

    High-resolution synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SRCT) and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) were performed on normal and dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DI-II) teeth. Three normal and three DI-II human third molars were used in this study. The normal molars were unerupted and had intact enamel; donors were female and ranged in age from 18-21y. The DI-II specimens, which were also unerupted with intact enamel, came from a single female donor age 20y. SRCT showed that the mineral concentration was 33% lower on average in the DI-II dentin with respect to normal dentin. The SAXS spectra from normal dentin exhibited low-angle diffraction peaks at harmonics of 67.6 nm, consistent with nucleation and growth of the apatite phase within gaps in the collagen fibrils (intrafibrillar mineralization). In contrast, the low-angle peaks were almost nonexistent in the DI-II dentin. Crystallite thickness was independent of location in both DI-II and normal dentin, although the crystallites were significantly thicker in DI-II dentin (6.8 nm (s.d. = 0.5) vs 5.1 nm (s.d. = 0.6)). The shape factor of the crystallites, as determined by SAXS, showed a continuous progression in normal dentin from roughly one-dimensional (needle-like) near the pulp to two-dimensional (plate-like) near the dentin-enamel junction. The crystallites in DI-II dentin, on the other hand, remained needle-like throughout. The above observations are consistent with an absence of intrafibrillar mineral in DI-II dentin.

  8. Skeletal dysplasia in perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta. A complex disorder of endochondral and intramembranous ossification.

    PubMed

    Marion, M J; Gannon, F H; Fallon, M D; Mennuti, M T; Lodato, R F; Kaplan, F S

    1993-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) Type II is a rare heritable disorder of bone matrix that results in catastrophic congenital skeletal dysplasia. Two cases of OI Type II had symmetric rhizomelic skeletal dysplasia apparent on ultrasound at 16 and 20 weeks' gestation. Histologic and histochemical studies performed on skeletal tissue from fetal autopsies showed the following: (1) abnormal growth plate tissue characterized by failure of formation of primary bony spongiosa; (2) persistence of calcified cartilage bars in the diaphysis; (3) metaphyseal microfractures; (4) abundant cartilaginous fracture callus; (5) absence of bony callus; (6) failure of formation of intramembranous cortical diaphyseal bone; (7) angulation of long bones in portions of the metadiaphyses bordered by fracture callus; and (8) mechanical failure of the perichondral ring of LaCroix with a normal fibrous ossification groove of Ranvier. These findings suggest that skeletal dysplasia in OI Type II results from the action of muscular forces on a skeleton weakened by a complex disorder of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. The paucity of primary metaphyseal trabeculae and subperiosteal cortical bone leads to pathologic fractures of the immature fiber bone and an imperfect attempt at fracture repair. Angulation and shortening of long bones occurs between numerous sites of focal endochondral fracture callus. Mechanical failure of the fibrous perichondral ring leads to further collapse and shortening without obvious functional impairment of the fibrous ossification groove. Perinatal lethal OI provides insight into how a molecular disorder predominantly of Type I collagen metabolism results in pathology of numerous tissues, leading to severe skeletal dysplasia without primarily affecting chondrogenesis. PMID:8339500

  9. Effect of paternal age in achondroplasia, thanatophoric dysplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Orioli, I M; Castilla, E E; Scarano, G; Mastroiacovo, P

    1995-11-01

    The paternal ages of nonfamilial cases of achondroplasia (AC) (n = 78), thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) (n = 64), and osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) (n = 106), were compared with those of matched controls, from an Italian Indagine Policentrica Italiana sulle Malformazioni Congenite and a South American Estudio Colaborativo Latinoamericano de Malformaciones Congénitas series. The degree of paternal age effect on the origin of these dominant mutations differed among the three conditions. Mean paternal age was highly elevated in AC, 36.30 +/- 6.74 years in the IPIMC, and 37.19 +/- 10.53 years in the ECLAMC; less consistently elevated in TD, 33.60 +/- 7.08 years in the IPIMC, and 36.41 +/- 9.38 years in the ECLAMC; and only slightly elevated in OI in the ECLAMC, 31.15 +/- 9.25 years, but not in the IPIMC, 32.26 +/- 6.07 years. Increased maternal age or birth order in these conditions disappeared when corrected for paternal age. Approximately 50% of AC and TD cases, and only 30% of OI cases, were born to fathers above age 35 years. For AC and TD, the increase in relative incidence with paternal age fitted an exponential curve. The variability of paternal age effect in these new mutations could be due, among other reasons, to the high proportion of germ-line mosaicism in OI parents, or to the localization of the AC gene, mapped to the 4p16.3 region, in the neighborhood of an unstable DNA area.

  10. Induced ablation of Bmp1 and Tll1 produces osteogenesis imperfecta in mice

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Alison M.; Ren, Yinshi; Butz, Delana Hopkins; Davis, Nicholas A.; Blank, Robert D.; Birk, David E.; Lee, Se-Jin; Rowe, David; Feng, Jian Q.; Greenspan, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), or brittle bone disease, is most often caused by dominant mutations in the collagen I genes COL1A1/COL1A2, whereas rarer recessive OI is often caused by mutations in genes encoding collagen I-interacting proteins. Recently, mutations in the gene for the proteinase bone morphogenetic 1 (BMP1) were reported in two recessive OI families. BMP1 and the closely related proteinase mammalian tolloid-like 1 (mTLL1) are co-expressed in various tissues, including bone, and have overlapping activities that include biosynthetic processing of procollagen precursors into mature collagen monomers. However, early lethality of Bmp1- and Tll1-null mice has precluded use of such models for careful study of in vivo roles of their protein products. Here we employ novel mouse strains with floxed Bmp1 and Tll1 alleles to induce postnatal, simultaneous ablation of the two genes, thus avoiding barriers of Bmp1−/− and Tll1−/− lethality and issues of functional redundancy. Bones of the conditionally null mice are dramatically weakened and brittle, with spontaneous fractures—defining features of OI. Additional skeletal features include osteomalacia, thinned/porous cortical bone, reduced processing of procollagen and dentin matrix protein 1, remarkably high bone turnover and defective osteocyte maturation that is accompanied by decreased expression of the osteocyte marker and Wnt-signaling inhibitor sclerostin, and by marked induction of canonical Wnt signaling. The novel animal model presented here provides new opportunities for in-depth analyses of in vivo roles of BMP1-like proteinases in bone and other tissues, and for their roles, and for possible therapeutic interventions, in OI. PMID:24419319

  11. Abnormal type I collagen metabolism by cultured fibroblasts in lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Mascara, T; Chan, D; Cole, W G

    1984-01-01

    Cultured skin fibroblasts from seven consecutive cases of lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) expressed defects of type I collagen metabolism. The secretion of [14C]proline-labelled collagen by the OI cells was specifically reduced (51-79% of control), and collagen degradation was increased to twice that of control cells in five cases and increased by approx. 30% in the other two cases. Sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis revealed that four of the OI cell lines produced two forms of type I collagen consisting of both normally and slowly migrating forms of the alpha 1(I)- and alpha 2(I)-chains. In the other three OI cell lines only the 'slow' alpha (I)'- and alpha 2(I)'-chains were detected. In both groups inhibition of the post-translational modifications of proline and lysine resulted in the production of a single species of type I collagen with normal electrophoretic migration. Proline hydroxylation was normal, but the hydroxylysine contents of alpha 1(I)'- and alpha 2(I)'-chains purified by h.p.l.c. were greater than in control alpha-chains. The glucosylgalactosylhydroxylysine content was increased approx. 3-fold while the galactosylhydroxylysine content was only slightly increased in the alpha 1(I)'-chains relative to control alpha 1(I)-chains. Peptide mapping of the CNBr-cleavage peptides provided evidence that the increased post-translational modifications were distributed throughout the alpha 1(I)'- and alpha 2(I)'-chains. It is postulated that the greater modification of these chains was due to structural defects of the alpha-chains leading to delayed helix formation. The abnormal charge heterogeneity observed in the alpha 1 CB8 peptide of one patient may reflect such a structural defect in the type I collagen molecule.

  12. Extraperitoneal laparoscopy-assisted percutaneous nephrolithotomy in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Basal, Seref; Ozgok, Yasar; Tahmaz, Lutfi; Atim, Abdulkadir; Zor, Murat; Bilgic, Serkan; Istanbulluoglu, Okan

    2011-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) patients represent a challenge to all physicians, as they do for anesthetists and urologists, when they develop symptomatic stones in the urinary tract. We recently treated an OI patient with renal pelvic stone by extraperitoneal laparoscopy-assisted percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). To our knowledge, this combined treatment modality has not been reported previously in OI. An 18-year-old paraplegic girl with OI presented to our urology department because of right-sided flank pain. She pointed out that she had right kidney stone for the previous 2 years, and because of risks of general anesthesia and surgical procedures, surveillance was recommended. Intravenous pyelography was performed and an 11.9-mm stone at the pelvis of the right kidney and grade 1-2 hydronephrosis at the same side with normal kidney functions and severe left-sided scoliosis were detected. After explanation of risks of the treatment modality and general anesthesia to the patient, extraperitoneal laparoscopy-assisted PCNL was performed. No complications occurred due to general anesthesia or surgical procedure. The operation time was 95 min and no blood transfusion was required. The nephrostomy tube and retroperitoneal drain were removed 2 and 3 days after the procedure, respectively. The patient was doing well at a follow-up of 6 months. Extraperitoneal laparoscopy-assisted PCNL approach may decrease the risk of surgery as an alternative treatment modality for OI patients. Such cases should be operated on at centers with significant experience in the field of endourology, where all the equipment and specialized personnel are readily available.

  13. Evidence for a Role for Nanoporosity and Pyridinoline Content in Human Mild Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Paschalis, Eleftherios P; Gamsjaeger, Sonja; Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Roschger, Paul; Masic, Admir; Brozek, Wolfgang; Hassler, Norbert; Glorieux, Francis H; Rauch, Frank; Klaushofer, Klaus; Fratzl, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility that arises from decreased bone mass and abnormalities in bone material quality. OI type I represents the milder form of the disease and according to the original Sillence classification is characterized by minimal skeletal deformities and near-normal stature. Raman microspectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that allows the determination of bone material properties in bone biopsy blocks with a spatial resolution of ∼1 µm, as a function of tissue age. In the present study, we used Raman microspectroscopy to evaluate bone material quality in transiliac bone biopsies from children with a mild form of OI, either attributable to collagen haploinsufficiency OI type I (OI-Quant; n = 11) or aberrant collagen structure (OI-Qual; n = 5), as a function of tissue age, and compared it against the previously published values established in a cohort of biopsies from healthy children (n = 54, ages 1 to 23 years). The results indicated significant differences in bone material compositional characteristics between OI-Quant patients and healthy controls, whereas fewer were evident in the OI-Qual patients. Differences in both subgroups of OI compared with healthy children were evident for nanoporosity, mineral maturity/crystallinity as determined by maxima of the v1 PO4 Raman band, and pyridinoline (albeit in different direction) content. These alterations in bone material compositional properties most likely contribute to the bone fragility characterizing this disease. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26748579

  14. Tracing the pathway between mutation and phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta: Isolation of mineralization-specific genes

    SciTech Connect

    Culbert, A.A.; Wallis, G.A.; Kadler, K.E.

    1996-05-03

    The brittleness of bone in people with lethal (type II) osteogenesis imperfecta, a heritable disorder caused by mutations in the type I collagen genes, arises from the deposition of abnormal collagen in the bone matrix. The inability of the abnormal collagen to participate in mineralization may be caused by its failure to interact with other bone proteins. Here, we have designed a strategy to isolate the genes important for mineralization of collagen during bone formation. Cells isolated from 16-day embryonic chick calvaria and seeded post-confluence in culture deposited a mineralized matrix over a period of 2 weeks. Chick skin fibroblasts seeded and cultured under the same conditions did not mineralize. Using RT-PCR, we prepared short cDNAs ({approximately}300 bp) corresponding to the 3{prime} ends of mRNA from fibroblasts and separately from the mineralizing calvarial cells. Subtractive cDNA hybridization generated a pool of cDNAs that were specific to mineralizing calvarial cells but not to fibroblasts. Screening of 100,000 plaques of a chick bone ZAP Express cDNA library with this pool of mineralizing-specific cDNAs identified ten clones which comprised full-length cDNAs for the bone proteins osteopontin (eight of the ten positives), bone sialoprotein II (one of the ten positives), and cystatin (one of the ten positives). cDNAs for type I collagen, fibronectin, alkaline phosphatase, house-keeping genes, and other genes expressed in fibroblasts were not identified in this preliminary screen. The pool of short cDNAs is likely to comprise cDNAs for further bone-specific genes and will be used to screen the entire bone cDNA library of 4.2 million clones. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Raloxifene reduces skeletal fractures in an animal model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Berman, Alycia G; Wallace, Joseph M; Bart, Zachary R; Allen, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disease of Type I collagen and collagen-associated pathways that results in brittle bone behavior characterized by fracture and reduced mechanical properties. Based on previous work in our laboratory showing that raloxifene (RAL) can significantly improve bone mechanical properties through non-cellular mechanisms, we hypothesized that raloxifene would improve the mechanical properties of OI bone. In experiment 1, tibiae from female wild type (WT) and homozygous oim mice were subjected to in vitro soaking in RAL followed by mechanical tests. RAL soaking resulted in significantly higher post-yield displacement (+75% in WT, +472% in oim; p<0.004), with no effect on ultimate load or stiffness, in both WT and oim animals. In experiment 2, eight-week old WT and oim male mice were treated for eight weeks with saline vehicle (VEH) or RAL. Endpoint measures included assessment of in vivo skeletal fractures, bone density/geometry and mechanical properties. In vivo skeletal fractures of the femora, assessed by micro CT imaging, were significantly lower in oim-RAL (20%) compared to oim-VEH (48%, p=0.047). RAL led to significantly higher DXA-based BMD (p<0.01) and CT-based trabecular BV/TV in both WT and oim animals compared to those treated with VEH. Fracture toughness of the femora was lower in oim mice compared to WT and improved with RAL in both genotypes. These results suggest that raloxifene reduces the incidence of fracture in this mouse model of oim. Furthermore, they suggest that raloxifene's effects may be the result of both cellular (increased bone mass) and non-cellular (presumably changes in hydration) mechanisms, raising the possibility of using raloxifene, or related compounds, as a new approach for treating bone fragility associated with OI. PMID:26707242

  16. Effect of paternal age in achondroplasia, thanatophoric dysplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Orioli, I.M.; Castilla, E.E.; Scarano, G.; Mastroiacovo, P.

    1995-11-06

    The paternal ages of nonfamilial cases of achondroplasia (AC) (n = 78), thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) (n = 64), and osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) (n = 106), were compared with those of matched controls, from an Italian Indagine Policentrica Italiana sulle Malformazioni Congenite (IPIMC) and a South American Estudio Colaborativo Latinoamericano de Malformaciones Congenitas (ECLAMC) series. The degree of paternal age effect on the origin of these dominant mutations differed among the three conditions. Mean paternal age was highly elevated in AC, 36.30 {plus_minus} 6.74 years in the IPIMC, and 37.19 {plus_minus} 10.53 years in the ECLAMC; less consistently elevated in TD, 33.60 {plus_minus} 7.08 years in the IPIMC, and 36.41 {plus_minus} 9.38 years in the ECLAMC; and only slightly elevated in OI in the ECLAMC, 31.15 {plus_minus} 9.25 years, but not in the IPIMC, 32.26 {plus_minus} 6.07 years. Increased maternal age or birth order in these conditions disappeared when corrected for paternal age. Approximately 50% of AC and TD cases, and only 30% of OI cases, were born to fathers above age 35 years. For AC and TD, the increase in relative incidence with paternal age fitted an exponential curve. The variability of paternal age effect in these new mutations could be due, among other reasons, to the high proportion of germ-line mosaicism in OI parents, or to the localization of the AC gene, mapped to the 4p16.3 region, in the neighborhood of an unstable DNA area. 28 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  17. Osteogenesis imperfecta caused by PPIB mutation with severe phenotype and congenital hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Eric T.; Caldwell, Kathleen S.; Kreikemeier, Rose M.; Lutz, Richard E.; Esposito, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited disorder of connective tissue typically caused by defects in either COL1A1 or COL1A2. A number of other genes causative of this disorder have been found, including PPIB, which forms one subunit of the prolyl 3-hydroxylase enzyme complex. Patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in this gene have OI with a trend toward lethal or severe phenotype. We present a Native American female with prenatal diagnosis of OI. Long bones were shortened with significant rhizomelia. At birth, fractures were present in ribs, humerii, and femurs. She had significant respiratory disease at birth, and required oxygen throughout her life. She also had recurrent pneumonias, one of which ultimately caused her death at age 16 mo. She also had significant bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Molecular testing showed that the patient was homozygous for a single nucleotide substitution in PPIB (c. 136-2A>G). Patients with OI caused by PPIB mutations have had variable disease, but with majority of either with perinatal lethality or progressively deforming severe disease. Patients with OI due to PPIB mutation have shown some differences in phenotype. There appears to be a trend toward rhizomelic shortening and less severe bowing of the extremities, as compared to patients with comparably severe OI caused by COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutation. Congenital hearing loss may be an inconsistent feature of this condition, or may have co-occurred in our patient for unrelated reasons. Still, patients with OI caused by PPIB mutation should have appropriate early and regular management of their hearing. PMID:27625864

  18. Skeletal clinical characteristics of osteogenesis imperfecta caused by haploinsufficiency mutations in COL1A1.

    PubMed

    Ben Amor, I Mouna; Roughley, Peter; Glorieux, Francis H; Rauch, Frank

    2013-09-01

    COL1A1 haploinsufficiency mutations lead to the mildest form of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), OI type I. The skeletal clinical characteristics resulting from such mutations have not been characterized in detail. In this study we assessed 86 patients (36 male, 50 female; mean age 13.3 years; range, 0.6 to 54 years) with COL1A1 haploinsufficiency mutations, of whom 70 were aged 21 years or less ("pediatric" patients). Birth history was positive for fracture or long-bone deformity in 12% of patients. The average rate of long-bone fracture (femur, tibia/fibula, humerus, radius/ulna) in pediatric patients was 0.62 fractures per year, one-half of which affected the tibia/fibula. Long-bone fracture rate was negatively associated with age and lumbar spine areal bone mineral density. Vertebral compression fractures were observed in 71% of the 58 pediatric patients who had lateral spine radiographs. The median number of vertebral fractures was higher for females (median 4; range, 0 to 14) than for males (median 1; range, 0 to 8) (p = 0.03). Lumbar spine areal bone mineral density was negatively associated with the severity of vertebral compression fractures, as reflected in the spine deformity index. Scoliosis was present in about 30% of pediatric patients but the Cobb angle was <30 degrees in all cases. The average final height Z-score was -1.1, representing a deficit of 8 to 10 cm compared to the general population. In summary, OI patients with COL1A1 haploinsufficiency mutations have high rates of significant skeletal involvement. Systematic follow-up of growing patients with COL1A1 haploinsufficiency mutations including radiographic screening for vertebral compression fractures and scoliosis is warranted.

  19. Copy number variants in association with type 1 collagenopathy: Atypical osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Meena; Cartwright, Ashley; Smith, Kath; Arundel, Paul; Bishop, Nicholas J

    2016-02-01

    We report a sibling-pair and a 4-year old child from two families with an atypical presentation in Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). In the sib-pair, the older sibling initially came to medical attention due to a fracture history (Patient 1) and she was shown to have a COL1A2 mutation. In addition, she also had developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, and a history of frequent infections which led to a search for an alternate diagnosis. ArrayCGH revealed a 4.3 Mb duplication on chromosome 19q13.42q13.43, which was confirmed by FISH analysis. On further familial analysis, the younger sibling who had no previous fracture history was also found to have the COL1A2 mutation and tested positive for the 19q13.42q13.43 duplication (Patient 2). The 19q13 duplication appears to be the cause of intellectual disability in these siblings but given that this is a chromosomal duplication, it is still possible that there is an as yet unidentified cause that may account for the combined phenotype in this family. Patient 3 was a 4-year old child presenting with a femoral fracture, blue sclerae, developmental delay, and joint hypermobility. Genetic analyses confirmed a COL1A2 mutation but also revealed an 8.8 Mb deletion of 11q24.2q25, confirmed by G-band chromosome analysis. We discuss the differing phenotypes in patients presenting with atypical OI and stress the need to consider ancillary investigations in individuals presenting with heterogeneous phenotypic symptoms, not entirely attributable to OI. PMID:26471105

  20. Osteogenesis imperfecta caused by PPIB mutation with severe phenotype and congenital hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Caldwell, Kathleen S; Kreikemeier, Rose M; Lutz, Richard E; Esposito, Paul W

    2014-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited disorder of connective tissue typically caused by defects in either COL1A1 or COL1A2. A number of other genes causative of this disorder have been found, including PPIB, which forms one subunit of the prolyl 3-hydroxylase enzyme complex. Patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in this gene have OI with a trend toward lethal or severe phenotype. We present a Native American female with prenatal diagnosis of OI. Long bones were shortened with significant rhizomelia. At birth, fractures were present in ribs, humerii, and femurs. She had significant respiratory disease at birth, and required oxygen throughout her life. She also had recurrent pneumonias, one of which ultimately caused her death at age 16 mo. She also had significant bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Molecular testing showed that the patient was homozygous for a single nucleotide substitution in PPIB (c. 136-2A>G). Patients with OI caused by PPIB mutations have had variable disease, but with majority of either with perinatal lethality or progressively deforming severe disease. Patients with OI due to PPIB mutation have shown some differences in phenotype. There appears to be a trend toward rhizomelic shortening and less severe bowing of the extremities, as compared to patients with comparably severe OI caused by COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutation. Congenital hearing loss may be an inconsistent feature of this condition, or may have co-occurred in our patient for unrelated reasons. Still, patients with OI caused by PPIB mutation should have appropriate early and regular management of their hearing. PMID:27625864

  1. Allelic background of LEPRE1 mutations that cause recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta in different populations

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Melanie G; Schwarze, Ulrike; Singh, Virendra; Romana, Marc; Jones-LeCointe, Altheia; Byers, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in LEPRE1 result in recessively inherited forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are often lethal in the perinatal period. A mutation (c.1080+1G>T, IVS5+1G>T) in African Americans has a carrier frequency of about 1/240. The mutant allele originated in West Africa in tribes of Ghana and Nigeria where the carrier frequencies are 2% and 5%. By examining 200 samples from an African-derived population in Tobago and reviewing hospital neonatal death records, we determined that the carrier frequency of c.1080+1G>T was about one in 200 and did not contribute to the neonatal deaths recorded over a 3-year period of time in Trinidad. In the course of sequence analysis, we found surprisingly high LEPRE1 allelic diversity in the Tobago DNA samples in which there were 11 alleles distinguished by a single basepair variant in or near exon 5. All the alleles found in the Tobago population that were within the sequence analysis region were found in the African American population in the Exome Variant Project. This diversity appeared to reflect the geographic origin of the original population in Tobago. In 44 individuals with biallelic LEPRE1 mutations identified by clinical diagnostic testing, we found the sequence alterations occurred on seven of the 11 variant alleles. All but one of the mutations identified resulted in mRNA or protein instability for the majority of the transcripts from the altered allele. These findings suggest that the milder end of the clinical spectrum could be due to as yet unidentified missense mutations in LEPRE1. PMID:24498616

  2. Unique micro- and nano-scale mineralization pattern of human osteogenesis imperfecta type VI bone.

    PubMed

    Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Schmidt, Ingo; Roschger, Paul; Roschger, Andreas; Glorieux, Francis H; Klaushofer, Klaus; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Rauch, Frank; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of inheritable connective tissue disorders characterized by mutation in genes involved in collagen synthesis and leading to increased bone fragility, low bone mass, impaired bone material properties and abnormally high bone matrix mineralization. Recessive OI type VI is caused by mutation in SERPINF1 leading to a loss-of-function of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) a collagen-binding protein with potent antiangiogenic activity. Affected patients develop a severe OI phenotype with a striking histological characteristic, rare in other OI types, of an excess of osteoid tissue and prolonged mineralization lag time. To get insights into matrix mineralization, we evaluated biopsies from 9 affected children by quantitative and by high-resolution backscattered electron imaging and assessed bone mineralization density distribution. Thickness, shape and arrangement of mineral particles were measured in a subset of 4 patients by synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering. Typical calcium content in the bone matrix was found to be increased compared to controls, even exceeding values found previously in OI patients with collagen-gene mutations. A main characteristic however, is the coexistence of this highly mineralized bone matrix with seams showing abnormally low mineral content. Atypical collagen fibril organization was found in the perilacunar region of young osteocytes, suggesting a disturbance in the early steps of mineralization. These observations are consistent with the presence of a heterogeneous population of mineral particles with unusual size, shape and arrangement, especially in the region with lower mineral content. The majority of the particles in the highly mineralized bone areas were less disorganized, but smaller and more densely packed than in controls and in previously measured OI patients. These data suggest that the lack of PEDF impairs a proper osteoblast-osteocyte transition and consequently

  3. Fracture healing with alendronate treatment in the Brtl/+ mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Meganck, J A; Begun, D L; McElderry, J D; Swick, A; Kozloff, K M; Goldstein, S A; Morris, M D; Marini, J C; Caird, M S

    2013-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable bone dysplasia characterized by increased skeletal fragility. Patients are often treated with bisphosphonates to attempt to reduce fracture risk. However, bisphosphonates reside in the skeleton for many years and long-term administration may impact bone material quality. Acutely, there is concern about risk of non-union of fractures that occur near the time of bisphosphonate administration. This study investigated the effect of alendronate, a potent aminobisphosphonate, on fracture healing. Using the Brtl/+ murine model of type IV OI, tibial fractures were generated in 8-week-old mice that were untreated, treated with alendronate before fracture, or treated before and after fracture. After 2, 3, or 5 weeks of healing, tibiae were assessed using microcomputed tomography (μCT), torsion testing, quantitative histomorphometry, and Raman microspectroscopy. There were no morphologic, biomechanical or histomorphometric differences in callus between untreated mice and mice that received alendronate before fracture. Alendronate treatment before fracture did not cause a significant increase in cartilage retention in fracture callus. Both Brtl/+ and WT mice that received alendronate before and after fracture had increases in the callus volume, bone volume fraction and torque at failure after 5 weeks of healing. Raman microspectroscopy results did not show any effects of alendronate in wild-type mice, but calluses from Brtl/+ mice treated with alendronate during healing had a decreased mineral-to-matrix ratio, decreased crystallinity and an increased carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Treatment with alendronate altered the dynamics of healing by preventing callus volume decreases later in the healing process. Fracture healing in Brtl/+ untreated animals was not significantly different from animals in which alendronate was halted at the time of fracture.

  4. X-ray micro-analysis of the mineralization patterns in developing enamel in hamster tooth germs exposed to fluoride in vitro during the secretory phase of amelogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Blijleven, N.; Hoeben-Schornagel, K.; Bronckers, A.L.; Woeltgens, J.H.

    1989-09-01

    The developing enamel from three-day-old hamster first maxillary (M1) molar tooth germs exposed to fluoride (F-) in vitro was analyzed for its mineral content by means of the energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis technique. The aim of this study was to obtain semi-quantitative data on the F(-)-induced hypermineralization patterns in the enamel and to confirm that the increase in electron density observed in micrographs of F(-)-treated enamel is indeed due to an increase in mineral content in the fluorotic enamel. The tooth germs were explanted during the early stages of secretory amelogenesis and initially cultured for 24 hr in the presence of 10 ppm F- in the culture medium. The germs were then cultured for another 24 hr without F-. In order to compare the ultrastructural results directly with the microprobe data, we used the same specimens for both investigations. The net calcium counts (measurement minus background counts) in the analyses were used as a measure of the mineral content in the enamel. The aprismatic pre-exposure enamel, deposited in vivo before the onset of culture, was the most hypermineralized region in the fluorotic enamel, i.e., it contained the highest amount of calcium measured. The degree of the F(-)-induced hypermineralization gradually decreased (but was not abolished) in the more mature regions of the enamel. The unmineralized enamel matrix secreted during the initial F- treatment in vitro mineralized during the subsequent culture without F-. The calcium content in this enamel layer was in the same order of magnitude as that recorded for the newly deposited enamel in control tooth germs cultured without F-.

  5. Right ventricular and pulmonary arterial dimensions in adults with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Radunovic, Zoran; Wekre, Lena L; Steine, Kjetil

    2012-06-15

    We examined right ventricular (RV) and ascending pulmonary artery (PA1) dimensions in adults with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The survey included 99 adults with OI divided in 3 clinical types (I, III, and IV) and 52 controls. RV and PA1 dimensions were measured by echocardiography and indexed for body surface area. Scoliosis was registered, and spirometry was performed in 75 patients with OI. All RV dimensions indexed by body surface area were significantly larger in the OI group compared to controls (RV basal dimension 1.9 ± 0.5 vs 1.7 ± 0.3 cm/m(2), p <0.05; RV midcavity dimension 1.7 ± 0.5 vs 1.5 ± 0.3 cm/m(2), p <0.05; RV longitudinal dimension 4.3 ± 1.1 vs 4.0 ± 0.9 cm/m(2), p <0.05). RV outflow tract (RVOT) proximal diameter (1.8 ± 0.4 vs 1.5 ± 0.2 cm/m(2), p <0.05), RVOT distal diameter (1.2 ± 0.2 vs 1.0 ± 0.1 cm/m(2), p <0.05), and PA1 (1.2 ± 0.3 vs 1.0 ± 0.2 cm/m(2), p <0.05) were also significantly larger in the OI group. Furthermore, all RV dimensions and PA1 were significantly larger in patients with OI type III compared to patients with OI types I and IV and controls. There were no differences in RV, RVOT, or PA1 dimensions between patients presenting a restrictive ventilatory pattern (n = 11) and patients a normal ventilatory pattern. Scoliosis was registered in 42 patients. Patients with OI type III had greater RV and PA1 dimensions compared to controls and patients with OI types I and IV. Impaired ventilatory patterns and scoliosis did not have any impact on RV dimensions in these patients. In conclusion, patients with OI had increased RV and PA1 dimensions compared to the control group. PMID:22459302

  6. First mouse model for combined osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Frieda; Guo, Ruolin; Itoh, Shousaku; Moreno, Luisa; Rosenthal, Esther; Zappitelli, Tanya; Zirngibl, Ralph A; Flenniken, Ann; Cole, William; Grynpas, Marc; Osborne, Lucy R; Vogel, Wolfgang; Adamson, Lee; Rossant, Janet; Aubin, Jane E

    2014-06-01

    By using a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced dominant mutagenesis screen in mice, a founder with low bone mineral density (BMD) was identified. Mapping and sequencing revealed a T to C transition in a splice donor of the collagen alpha1 type I (Col1a1) gene, resulting in the skipping of exon 9 and a predicted 18-amino acid deletion within the N-terminal region of the triple helical domain of Col1a1. Col1a1(Jrt) /+ mice were smaller in size, had lower BMD associated with decreased bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) and reduced trabecular number, and furthermore exhibited mechanically weak, brittle, fracture-prone bones, a hallmark of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Several markers of osteoblast differentiation were upregulated in mutant bone, and histomorphometry showed that the proportion of trabecular bone surfaces covered by activated osteoblasts (Ob.S/BS and N.Ob/BS) was elevated, but bone surfaces undergoing resorption (Oc.S/BS and N.Oc/BS) were not. The number of bone marrow stromal osteoprogenitors (CFU-ALP) was unaffected, but mineralization was decreased in cultures from young Col1a1(Jrt) /+ versus +/+ mice. Total collagen and type I collagen content of matrices deposited by Col1a1(Jrt) /+ dermal fibroblasts in culture was ∼40% and 30%, respectively, that of +/+ cells, suggesting that mutant collagen chains exerted a dominant negative effect on type I collagen biosynthesis. Mutant collagen fibrils were also markedly smaller in diameter than +/+ fibrils in bone, tendon, and extracellular matrices deposited by dermal fibroblasts in vitro. Col1a1(Jrt) /+ mice also exhibited traits associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS): Their skin had reduced tensile properties, tail tendon appeared more frayed, and a third of the young adult mice had noticeable curvature of the spine. Col1a1(Jrt) /+ is the first reported model of combined OI/EDS and will be useful for exploring aspects of OI and EDS pathophysiology and treatment.

  7. Microstructure and compressive mechanical properties of cortical bone in children with osteogenesis imperfecta treated with bisphosphonates compared with healthy children.

    PubMed

    Imbert, Laurianne; Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Pernelle, Kélig; Hoc, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder characterized by a change in bone tissue quality, but little data are available to describe the factors involved at the macroscopic scale. To better understand the effect of microstructure alterations on the mechanical properties at the sample scale, we studied the structural and mechanical properties of six cortical bone samples from children with OI treated with bisphosphonates and compared them to the properties of three controls. Scanning electron microscopy, high resolution computed tomography and compression testing were used to assess these properties. More resorption cavities and a higher osteocyte lacunar density were observed in OI bone compared with controls. Moreover, a higher porosity was measured for OI bones along with lower macroscopic Young's modulus, yield stress and ultimate stress. The microstructure was impaired in OI bones; the higher porosity and osteocyte lacunar density negatively impacted the mechanical properties and made the bone more prone to fracture.

  8. A novel splicing mutation in COL1A1 gene caused type I osteogenesis imperfecta in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Zhang, Yuhui; Long, Zhigao; Zhao, Ding; Guo, Zhenxin; Xue, Jinjie; Xie, Zhiguo; Xiong, Zhimin; Xu, Xiaojuan; Su, Wei; Wang, Bing; Xia, Kun; Hu, Zhengmao

    2012-07-10

    Osteogenesis imperfect (OI) is a heritable connective tissue disorder with bone fragility as a cardinal manifestation, accompanied by short stature, dentinogenesis imperfecta, hyperlaxity of ligaments and skin, blue sclerae and hearing loss. Dominant form of OI is caused by mutations in the type I procollagen genes, COL1A1/A2. Here we identified a novel splicing mutation c.3207+1G>A (GenBank ID: JQ236861) in the COL1A1 gene that caused type I OI in a Chinese family. RNA splicing analysis proved that this mutation created a new splicing site at c.3200, and then led to frameshift. This result further enriched the mutation spectrum of type I procollagen genes. PMID:22565191

  9. Lethal osteogenesis imperfecta congenita and a 300 base pair gene deletion for an alpha 1(I)-like collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Pope, F M; Cheah, K S; Nicholls, A C; Price, A B; Grosveld, F G

    1984-01-01

    Broad boned lethal osteogenesis imperfecta is a severely crippling disease of unknown cause. By means of recombinant DNA technology a 300 base pair deletion in an alpha 1(I)-like collagen gene was detected in six patients and four complete parent-child groups including patients with this disease. One from each set of the patients' clinically unaffected parents also carried the deletion, implying that affected patients were genetic compounds. The study suggests that prenatal diagnosis should be possible with 100% accuracy in subjects without the deletion and with 50% accuracy in those who possess it (who would be either heterozygous--normal, or affected with the disease). Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:6419953

  10. Transcriptional repression of the Dspp gene leads to dentinogenesis imperfecta phenotype in Col1a1-Trps1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Napierala, Dobrawa; Sun, Yao; Maciejewska, Izabela; Bertin, Terry K; Dawson, Brian; D'Souza, Rena; Qin, Chunlin; Lee, Brendan

    2012-08-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) is a hereditary defect of dentin, a calcified tissue that is the most abundant component of teeth. Most commonly, DGI is manifested as a part of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) or the phenotype is restricted to dental findings only. In the latter case, DGI is caused by mutations in the DSPP gene, which codes for dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Although these two proteins together constitute the majority of noncollagenous proteins of the dentin, little is known about their transcriptional regulation. Here we demonstrate that mice overexpressing the Trps1 transcription factor (Col1a1-Trps1 mice) in dentin-producing cells, odontoblasts, present with severe defects of dentin formation that resemble DGI. Combined micro-computed tomography (µCT) and histological analyses revealed tooth fragility due to severe hypomineralization of dentin and a diminished dentin layer with irregular mineralization in Col1a1-Trps1 mice. Biochemical analyses of noncollagenous dentin matrix proteins demonstrated decreased levels of both DSP and DPP proteins in Col1a1-Trps1 mice. On the molecular level, we demonstrated that sustained high levels of Trps1 in odontoblasts lead to dramatic decrease of Dspp expression as a result of direct inhibition of the Dspp promoter by Trps1. During tooth development Trps1 is highly expressed in preodontoblasts, but in mature odontoblasts secreting matrix its expression significantly decreases, which suggests a Trps1 role in odontoblast development. In these studies we identified Trps1 as a potent inhibitor of Dspp expression and the subsequent mineralization of dentin. Thus, we provide novel insights into mechanisms of transcriptional dysregulation that leads to DGI.

  11. Osteogenesis imperfecta Type I caused by a novel mutation in the start codon of the COL1A1 gene in a Korean family.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Yoon; Lee, Ji-Ho; Ki, Chang-Seok; Chang, Mi Sun; Jin, Dong-Kyu; Han, Heon-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by susceptibility to bone fractures ranging in severity from perinatal death to a subtle increase in fracture frequency. We report the case of a patient who appeared healthy at birth and did not experience any fractures until 12 months of age. We observed blue sclera, frequent fractures without commensurate trauma, nearly normal stature, the absence of dentinogenesis imperfecta, no bony deformity, and no limitation of mobility in the patient--all characteristics suggestive of OI Type I. The patient's mother also had blue sclera and a history of frequent fracture episodes until the age of 15 years. A novel COL1A1 missense mutation (c.2T>G) disrupting the start codon of the gene (ATG to AGG (Met1Arg)) was found in the patient and his mother.

  12. Current Practices and the Provider Perspectives on Inconclusive Genetic Test Results for Osteogenesis Imperfecta in Children with Unexplained Fractures: ELSI Implications.

    PubMed

    Youngblom, Emily; Murray, Mitzi Leah; Byers, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    Genetic testing can be used to determine if unexplained fractures in children could have resulted from a predisposition to bone fractures, e.g., osteogenesis imperfecta. However, uncertainty is introduced if a variant of unknown significance (VUS) is identified. Proper interpretation of VUS in these situations is critical because of its influence on clinical care and in court rulings. This study sought to understand how VUS are interpreted and used by practitioners when there is a differential diagnosis including both osteogenesis imperfecta and non-accidental injury.A 15-question survey was emailed to physicians who requested analysis of two genes, COL1A1 and COL1A2, from the University of Washington from 2005-2013 for patient cases involving suspicion of child abuse.Among the 89 participants, responses differed about when genetic testing should be ordered for osteogenesis imperfecta, who should be consulted about utilization of VUS test results, follow-up procedures, and who should receive the VUS results.There are no clear guidelines for how to interpret and follow up on VUS. In the legal setting, misinterpreted VUS could lead to unintended consequences and deleterious ramifications for family members. The need for better practice guidelines to help promote more equitable handling of these sensitive legal cases is clear. PMID:27587455

  13. Kohlschütter-Tönz Syndrome – Report of an additional case

    PubMed Central

    González-Arriagada, Wilfredo A.; Carlos-Bregni, Román; Contreras, Elisa; Almeida, Oslei P.

    2013-01-01

    Kohlschütter-Tönz Syndrome is a rare disorder clinically characterized by amelogenesis imperfecta, epilepsy and progressive mental deterioration. We present an additional case of this syndrome of a nine year-old boy who was referred by pigmented teeth. The mental deterioration was associated with speech delay, impulsive behavior, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and learning problems. The physical examination revealed a reduction of lower third, slightly palpebral fissures, low ear and hair implantation, coarse hair and hypertrichosis. The intraoral examination showed alteration in teeth pigmentation diagnosed as amelogenesis imperfecta. Although rare, the present case report illustrates a syndrome that has dental anomalies and systemic alterations. It is important to recognize this syndrome as early as possible and paediatric dentist may contribute to the diagnosis and consequently to better manage the patients. Key words:Kohlschütter-Tönz syndrome, amelogenesis imperfecta, seizures, mental deterioration. PMID:24455057

  14. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) normalizes matrix defects in iPSCs derived from Osteogenesis imperfecta Type VI

    PubMed Central

    Belinsky, Glenn S.; Ward, Leanne; Chung, Chuhan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) Type VI is characterized by a defect in bone mineralization, which results in multiple fractures early in life. Null mutations in the PEDF gene, Serpinf1, are the cause of OI VI. Whether PEDF restoration in a murine model of OI Type VI could improve bone mass and function was previously unknown. In Belinsky et al, we provided evidence that PEDF delivery enhanced bone mass and improved parameters of bone function in vivo. Further, we demonstrated that PEDF temporally inhibits Wnt signaling to enhance osteoblast differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a PEDF null patient provides additional evidence for PEDF's role in regulating extracellular matrix proteins secreted from osteoblasts. PEDF null iPSCs have marked abnormalities in secreted matrix proteins, capturing a key feature of human OI Type VI, which were normalized by exogenous PEDF. Lastly, we place our recent findings within the broader context of PEDF biology and the developmental signaling pathways that are implicated in its actions. PMID:27579219

  15. De novo mutation in the DSPP gene associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II in a Japanese family.

    PubMed

    Kida, Miyuki; Tsutsumi, Tomonori; Shindoh, Masanobu; Ikeda, Hisami; Ariga, Tadashi

    2009-12-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II is one of the most common dominantly inherited dentin defects, in which both the primary and permanent teeth are affected. Here, we report a Japanese family with autosomal-dominant DGI type II, including both molecular genetic defects and pathogenesis with histological analysis. Mutation analysis revealed a mutation (c.53T>A, p.V18D, g.1192T>A) involving the second nucleotide of the first codon within exon 3 of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene. This mutation has previously been reported in a Korean family. Thus far, 24 allelic DSPP mutations have been reported, and this is the seventh mutation involving the DSPP V18 residue. Among those, only one other was shown to be caused by a de novo mutation, and that mutation also affected the V18 amino acid residue. The DSPP V18 residue is highly conserved among other mammalian species. These findings thus suggest that the V18 amino acid might be a sensitive mutational hot spot, playing a critical role in the pathogenesis of DGI.

  16. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Missense Mutations in Collagen: Structural consequences of a glycine to alanine replacement at a highly charged site

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianxi; Cheng, Haiming; Silva, Teresita; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Glycine is required as every third residue in the collagen triple-helix, and a missense mutation leading to the replacement of even one Gly in the repeating (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)n sequence by a larger residue leads to a pathological condition. Gly to Ala missense mutations are highly underrepresented in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and other collagen diseases, suggesting that the smallest replacement residue Ala might cause the least structural perturbation and mildest clinical consequences. The relatively small number of Gly to Ala mutation sites that do lead to OI must have some unusual features, such as greater structural disruption due to local sequence environment or location at a biologically important site. Here, peptides are used to model a severe OI case where a Gly to Ala mutation is found within a highly stabilizing Lys-Gly-Asp sequence environment. NMR, CD and DSC studies indicate this Gly to Ala replacement leads to a substantial loss in triple-helix stability and non-equivalence of the Ala residues in the three chains such that only one of the three Ala residues is capable of form a good backbone hydrogen bond. Examination of reported OI Gly to Ala mutations suggests preferential location at known collagen binding sites, and we propose that structural defects due to Ala replacements may lead to pathology when interfering with interactions. PMID:22054507

  17. Osteogenesis imperfecta type I: Molecular heterogeneity for COL1A1 null alleles of type I collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.C.; Deschenes, S.P.; Pitts, S.H.; Arikat, H.; Roberts, E.J.; Scott, D.A.; Slayton, R.L.; Byers, P.H.

    1994-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is the mildest form of inherited brittle-bone disease. Dermal fibroblasts from most affected individuals produce about half the usual amount of type I procollagen, as a result of a COL1A1 {open_quotes}null{close_quotes} allele. Using PCR amplification of genomic DNA from affected individuals, followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and SSCP, we identified seven different COL1A1 gene mutations in eight unrelated families with OI type I. Three families have single nucleotide substitutions that alter 5{prime} donor splice sites; two of these unrelated families have the same mutation. One family has a point mutation, in an exon, that creates a premature termination codon, and four have small deletions or insertions, within exons, that create translational frameshifts and new termination codons downstream of the mutation sites. Each mutation leads to both marked reduction in steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant allele and a quantitative decrease in type I procollagen production. Our data demonstrate that different molecular mechanisms that have the same effect on type I collagen production result in the same clinical phenotype. 58 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. An unusual case of atrophic mandible fracture in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta and on oral bisphosphonate therapy: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Osaimi, Abdulrahman; Samman, Mahmood; Al-Shakhs, Mohammad; Al-Suhaim, Faisal; Ramalingam, Sundar

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of severely atrophic (height < 10 mm) edentulous mandibles are infrequent and challenging to manage. Factors such as sclerotic bone and decreased vascularity combined with systemic diseases complicate the management of such fractures. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of type I collagen metabolism. Patients with OI characteristically present with histories of long bone fractures, deformities, blue sclerae, and opalescent dentin. However, fractures of the facial skeleton are rare. Bisphosphonate therapy has been proven to effectively reduce the fracture risk in patients with OI. The purpose of this clinical report is to present an unusual case of spontaneous fracture of the atrophic mandible in a patient with OI. Despite open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with miniplate osteosynthesis, the patient developed a second fracture at a screw placement site distal to the first fracture. The patient was successfully treated with ORIF using locking reconstruction plates fixed in the symphyseal and angle regions. Bone healing following ORIF was normal, and no clinical sign of osteonecrosis as a result of bisphosphonate therapy was observed. Patients with OI can present with spontaneous fractures of already weakened mandibles. Although such fractures can be managed with care using established protocols, further research is required to examine the effects of concomitant medication, such as bisphosphonates. PMID:25408599

  19. Delivery by Cesarean Section is not Associated With Decreased at-Birth Fracture Rates in Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Bellur, S; Jain, M; Cuthbertson, D; Krakow, D; Shapiro, JR; Steiner, RD; Smith, PA; Bober, MB; Hart, T; Krischer, J; Mullins, M; Byers, PH; Pepin, M; Durigova, M; Glorieux, FH; Rauch, F; Sutton, VR; Lee, B; Nagamani, SC

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) predisposes to recurrent fractures. The moderate-to-severe forms of OI present with antenatal fractures and the mode of delivery that would be safest for the fetus is not known. Methods We conducted systematic analyses on the largest cohort of individuals (n=540) with OI enrolled to-date in the OI Linked Clinical Research Centers. Self-reported at-birth fracture rates were compared in individuals with OI types I, III, and IV. Multivariate analyses utilizing backward-elimination logistic regression model building were performed to assess the effect of multiple covariates including method of delivery on fracture-related outcomes. Results When accounting for other covariates, at-birth fracture rates did not differ based on whether delivery was by vaginal route or by cesarean section (CS). Increased birth weight conferred higher risk for fractures irrespective of the delivery method. In utero fracture, maternal history of OI, and breech presentation were strong predictors for choosing CS for delivery. Conclusion Our study, the largest to analyze the effect of various factors on at-birth fracture rates in OI shows that delivery by CS is not associated with decreased fracture rate. With the limitation that the fracture data were self-reported in this cohort, these results suggest that CS should be performed only for other maternal or fetal indications, but not for the sole purpose of fracture prevention in OI. PMID:26426884

  20. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) normalizes matrix defects in iPSCs derived from Osteogenesis imperfecta Type VI.

    PubMed

    Belinsky, Glenn S; Ward, Leanne; Chung, Chuhan

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) Type VI is characterized by a defect in bone mineralization, which results in multiple fractures early in life. Null mutations in the PEDF gene, Serpinf1, are the cause of OI VI. Whether PEDF restoration in a murine model of OI Type VI could improve bone mass and function was previously unknown. In Belinsky et al, we provided evidence that PEDF delivery enhanced bone mass and improved parameters of bone function in vivo. Further, we demonstrated that PEDF temporally inhibits Wnt signaling to enhance osteoblast differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a PEDF null patient provides additional evidence for PEDF's role in regulating extracellular matrix proteins secreted from osteoblasts. PEDF null iPSCs have marked abnormalities in secreted matrix proteins, capturing a key feature of human OI Type VI, which were normalized by exogenous PEDF. Lastly, we place our recent findings within the broader context of PEDF biology and the developmental signaling pathways that are implicated in its actions. PMID:27579219

  1. Rapidly Growing Brtl/+ Mouse Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Improves Bone Mass and Strength with Sclerostin Antibody Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sinder, Benjamin P.; Salemi, Joseph D.; Ominsky, Michael S.; Caird, Michelle S.; Marini, Joan C.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable collagen-related bone dysplasia, characterized by brittle bones with increased fracture risk that presents most severely in children. Anti-resorptive bisphosphonates are frequently used to treat pediatric OI and controlled clinical trials have shown bisphosphonate therapy improves vertebral outcomes but has little benefit on long bone fracture rate. New treatments which increase bone mass throughout the pediatric OI skeleton would be beneficial. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) is a potential candidate anabolic therapy for pediatric OI and functions by stimulating osteoblastic bone formation via the canonical wnt signaling pathway. To explore the effect of Scl-Ab on the rapidly growing OI skeleton, we treated rapidly growing 3 week old Brtl/+ mice, harboring a typical heterozygous OI-causing Gly->Cys substitution on col1a1, for 5 weeks with Scl-Ab. Scl-Ab had anabolic effects in Brtl/+ and led to new cortical bone formation and increased cortical bone mass. This anabolic action resulted in improved mechanical strength to WT Veh levels without altering the underlying brittle nature of the material. While Scl-Ab was anabolic in trabecular bone of the distal femur in both genotypes, the effect was less strong in these rapidly growing Brtl/+ mice compared to WT. In conclusion, Scl-Ab was able to stimulate bone formation in a rapidly growing Brtl/+ murine model of OI, and represents a potential new therapy to improve bone mass and reduce fracture risk in pediatric OI. PMID:25445450

  2. [Contradictions of public health policies geared to rare disorders: the example of the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Treatment Program in the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS)].

    PubMed

    Lima, Maria Angelica de Faria Domingues de; Horovitz, Dafne Dain Gandelman

    2014-02-01

    The scope of this paper is to examine the process of consolidation of a public health policy in Brazil geared to a rare disorder, namely osteogenesis imperfecta, the treatment for which has fallen under the responsibility of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) after the publication of Ministerial Ruling GM/MS2305/2001. The implementation of this law has been accompanied by many contradictions, especially with respect to therapeutic decisions and the strengthening of the specialized network for addressing this condition. These attitudes are clearly shown both by the drafting process and the final text of the new law (Ministerial Ruling 714/2010). PMID:24863824

  3. Evaluation of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms (FokI, TaqI and ApaI) in a family with dentinogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Ulucan, K; Akyüz, S; Ozbay, G; Pekiner, F N; Güney, A Ilter

    2013-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta Type II (DGI-II) is a condition inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized by abnormal dentine structure affecting both the primary and secondary dentitions. The genetic etiology of the disease still remains unclear, suggesting a genetically heterogeneous background. The aim of this study is to manifest briefly DGI-II and to investigate the association between BsmI, TaqI and FokI polymorphisms of Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and dentinogenesis imperfecta type II in a Turkish family by PCR-RFLP methodology. The affected mother and her two affected daughters were bb for BsmI polymorphism, whereas her unaffected son and her husband were Bb for the same polymorphism. One of the affected children was tt, the rest of the family were Tt for TaqI polymorphism, and all of the enrolled subjects were FF for FokI polymorphism. As a conclusion, BsmI polymorphism bb seems to be associated with (DGI-II), but should be examined in larger numbers in order to be considered as a risk factor.

  4. Dentin sialophosphoprotein knockout mouse teeth display widened predentin zone and develop defective dentin mineralization similar to human dentinogenesis imperfecta type III.

    PubMed

    Sreenath, Taduru; Thyagarajan, Tamizchelvi; Hall, Bradford; Longenecker, Glenn; D'Souza, Rena; Hong, Sung; Wright, J Tim; MacDougall, Mary; Sauk, John; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2003-07-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) is mainly expressed in teeth by the odontoblasts and preameloblasts. The Dspp mRNA is translated into a single protein, Dspp, and cleaved into two peptides, dentin sialoprotein and dentin phosphoprotein, that are localized within the dentin matrix. Recently, mutations in this gene were identified in human dentinogenesis imperfecta II (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) accession number 125490) and in dentin dysplasia II (OMIM accession number 125420) syndromes. Herein, we report the generation of Dspp-null mice that develop tooth defects similar to human dentinogenesis imperfecta III with enlarged pulp chambers, increased width of predentin zone, hypomineralization, and pulp exposure. Electron microscopy revealed an irregular mineralization front and a lack of calcospherites coalescence in the dentin. Interestingly, the levels of biglycan and decorin, small leucine-rich proteoglycans, were increased in the widened predentin zone and in void spaces among the calcospherites in the dentin of null teeth. These enhanced levels correlate well with the defective regions in mineralization and further indicate that these molecules may adversely affect the dentin mineralization process by interfering with coalescence of calcospherites. Overall, our results identify a crucial role for Dspp in orchestrating the events essential during dentin mineralization, including potential regulation of proteoglycan levels.

  5. Determination of a new collagen type I alpha 2 gene point mutation which causes a Gly640 Cys substitution in osteogenesis imperfecta and prenatal diagnosis by DNA hybridisation.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Lira, M; Sangalli, A; Pignatti, P F; Digilio, M C; Giannotti, A; Carnevale, E; Mottes, M

    1994-01-01

    The molecular defect responsible for a sporadic case of extremely severe (type II/III) osteogenesis imperfecta was investigated. The mutation site was localised in the collagen type I pro alpha 2 mRNA molecules produced by the proband's skin fibroblasts by chemical cleavage of mismatch in heteroduplex nucleic acids. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification, followed by cloning and sequencing, showed heterozygosity for a G to T transversion in the first nucleotide of exon 37 of the COL1A2 gene, which led to a cysteine for glycine substitution at position 640 of the triple helical domain. This newly characterised mutation is localised in a domain which contains several milder mutations, confirming that glycine substitutions within the alpha 2(I) chain do not follow a linear gradient pattern for genotype to phenotype correlations. In a subsequent pregnancy, absence of the G2327T mutation in the fetus was shown by allele specific oligonucleotide hybridisation to the trophoblast derived fibroblast mRNA after reverse transcription and in vitro amplification. (The nucleotide number assigned to the mutant base was inferred from the numbering system devised by the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Analysis Consortium (The OIAC Newsletter, 1 April 1994).) Images PMID:7891382

  6. Heterozygous mutation of c.3521C>T in COL1A1 may cause mild osteogenesis imperfecta/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianlong; Lu, Yanqin; Wang, Yanzhou; Zhang, Yu-ang; Teng, Yuanwei; Han, Wanshui; Han, Zhenzhong; Li, Tianyou; Chen, Mei; Liu, Junlong; Fang, Fengling; Dou, Conghui; Ren, Xiuzhi; Han, Jinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inheritable connective tissue disorder with a broad clinical heterozygosis, which can be complicated by other connective tissue disorders like Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). OI/EDS are rarely documented. Most OI/EDS mutations are located in the N-anchor region of type I procollagen and predominated by glycine substitution. We identified a c.3521C>T (p.A1174V) heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 gene in a four-generation pedigree with proposed mild OI/EDS phenotype. The affected individuals had blue sclera and dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) was uniformly absent. The OI phenotype varied from mild to moderate, with the absence of scoliosis and increased skin extensibility. Easy bruising, joint dislocations and high Beighton score were present in some affected individuals. EDS phenotype is either mild or unremarkable in some individuals. The mutation is poorly conserved and in silico prediction support the relatively mild phenotype. The molecular mechanisms of the mutation that leads to the possible OI/EDS phenotype should be further identified by biochemical analysis of N-propeptide processing and steady state collagen analysis. PMID:25674388

  7. Mutation in a gene for type I procollagen (COL1A2) in a woman with postmenopausal osteoporosis: evidence for phenotypic and genotypic overlap with mild osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Spotila, L D; Constantinou, C D; Sereda, L; Ganguly, A; Riggs, B L; Prockop, D J

    1991-01-01

    Mutations in the two genes for type I collagen (COL1A1 or COL1A2) cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a heritable disease characterized by moderate to extreme brittleness of bone early in life. Here we show that a 52-year-old postmenopausal woman with severe osteopenia and a compression fracture of a thoracic vertebra had a mutation in the gene for the alpha 2(I) chain of type I collagen (COL1A2) similar to mutations that cause OI. cDNA was prepared from the woman's skin fibroblast RNA and assayed for the presence of a mutation by treating DNA heteroduplexes with carbodiimide. The results indicated a sequence variation in the region encoding amino acid residues 660-667 of the alpha 2(I) chain. Further analysis demonstrated a single-base mutation that caused a serine-for-glycine substitution at position 661 of the alpha 2(I) triple-helical domain. The substitution produced posttranslational overmodification of the collagen triple helix, as is seen with most glycine substitutions that cause OI. The patient had a history of five previous fractures, slightly blue sclerae, and slight hearing loss. Therefore, the results suggest that there may be phenotypic and genotypic overlap between mild osteogenesis imperfecta and postmenopausal osteoporosis, and that a subset of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis may have mutations in the genes for type I procollagen. Images PMID:2052622

  8. Mutation in a gene for type I procollagen (COL1A2) in a woman with postmenopausal osteoporosis: Evidence for phenotypic and genotypic overlap with mild osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Spotila, L.D.; Constantinou, C.D.; Sereda, L.; Ganguly, A.; Prockop, D.J. ); Riggs, B.L. )

    1991-06-15

    Mutations in the two genes for type I collagen (COL1A1 or COL1A2) cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a heritable disease characterized by moderate to extreme brittleness of bone early in life. Here, the authors show that a 52-year-old post menopausal woman with severe osteopenia and a compression fracture of a thoracic vertebra had a mutation in the gene for the {alpha}2(I) chain of type I collagen (COL1A2) similar to mutations that cause OI. cDNA was prepared from the woman's skin fibroblast RNA and assayed for the presence of a mutation by treating DNA heteroduplexes with carbodiimide. The results indicated a sequence variation in the region encoding amino acid residues 660-667 of the {alpha}2(I) chain. Further analysis demonstrated a single-base mutation that caused a serine-for-glycine substitution at position 661 of the {alpha}2(I) triple-helical domain. The substitution produced posttranslational overmodification of the collagen triple helix, as is seen with most glycine substitutions that cause OI. The patient had a history of five previous fractures, slightly blue sclerae, and slight hearing loss. Therefore, the results suggest that there may be phenotypic and genotypic overlap between mild osteogenesis imperfecta and postmenopausal osteoporosis, and that a subset of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis may have mutations in the genes for type I procollagen.

  9. Bone marrow stromal cells contribute to bone formation following infusion into femoral cavities of a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wang, Xujun; Niyibizi, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Currently, there are conflicting data in literature regarding contribution of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) to bone formation when the cells are systemically delivered in recipient animals. To understand if BMSCs contribute to bone cell phenotype and bone formation in osteogenesis imperfecta bones (OI), MSCs marked with GFP were directly infused into the femurs of a mouse model of OI (oim). The contribution of the cells to the cell phenotype and bone formation was assessed by histology, immunohistochemistry and biomechanical loading of recipient bones. Two weeks following infusion of BMSCs, histological examination of the recipient femurs demonstrated presence of new bone when compared to femurs injected with saline which showed little or no bone formation. The new bone contained few donor cells as demonstrated by GFP fluorescence. At 6 weeks following cell injection, new bone was still detectable in the recipient femurs but was enhanced by injection of the cells suspended in pepsin solubilized type I collagen. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical staining showed that donor GFP positive cells in the new bone were localized with osteocalcin expressing cells suggesting that the cells differentiated into osteoblasts in vivo. Biomechanical loading to failure in three point bending, revealed that, femurs infused with BMSCs in PBS or in soluble type I collagen were biomechanically stronger than those injected with PBS or type I collagen alone. Taken together, the results indicate that transplanted cells differentiated into osteoblasts in vivo and contributed to bone formation in vivo; we also speculate that donor cells induced differentiation or recruitment of endogenous cells to initiate reparative process at early stages following transplantation.

  10. Molecular Consequences of the SERPINH1/HSP47 Mutation in the Dachshund Natural Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta*

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Uschi; Weis, Mary Ann; Rai, Jyoti; Seeliger, Frank; Hausser, Ingrid; Leeb, Tosso; Eyre, David; Rohrbach, Marianne; Giunta, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable connective tissue disease characterized by bone fragility and increased risk of fractures. Up to now, mutations in at least 18 genes have been associated with dominant and recessive forms of OI that affect the production or post-translational processing of procollagen or alter bone homeostasis. Among those, SERPINH1 encoding heat shock protein 47 (HSP47), a chaperone exclusive for collagen folding in the ER, was identified to cause a severe form of OI in dachshunds (L326P) as well as in humans (one single case with a L78P mutation). To elucidate the disease mechanism underlying OI in the dog model, we applied a range of biochemical assays to mutant and control skin fibroblasts as well as on bone samples. These experiments revealed that type I collagen synthesized by mutant cells had decreased electrophoretic mobility. Procollagen was retained intracellularly with concomitant dilation of ER cisternae and activation of the ER stress response markers GRP78 and phospho-eIF2α, thus suggesting a defect in procollagen processing. In line with the migration shift detected on SDS-PAGE of cell culture collagen, extracts of bone collagen from the OI dog showed a similar mobility shift, and on tandem mass spectrometry, the chains were post-translationally overmodified. The bone collagen had a higher content of pyridinoline than control dog bone. We conclude that the SERPINH1 mutation in this naturally occurring model of OI impairs how HSP47 acts as a chaperone in the ER. This results in abnormal post-translational modification and cross-linking of the bone collagen. PMID:26004778

  11. A novel splice site mutation in the dentin sialophosphoprotein gene in a Chinese family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Wang, HaoYang; Hou, YanNing; Cui, YingXia; Huang, YuFeng; Shi, YiChao; Xia, XinYi; Lu, HongYong; Wang, YunHua; Li, XiaoJun

    2009-03-01

    Twenty-four individuals were investigated that spanned six generations in a Chinese family affected with an apparently autosomal dominant form of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II, OMIM #125490). All affected individuals presented with typical, clinical and radiographic features of DGI-II, but without bilateral progressive high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. To investigate the mutated molecule, a positional candidate approach was used to determine the mutated gene in this family. Genomic DNA was obtained from 24 affected individuals, 18 unaffected relatives of the family and 50 controls. Haplotype analysis was performed using leukocyte DNA for 6 short tandem repeat (STR) markers present in chromosome 4 (D4S1534, GATA62A11, DSPP, DMP1, SPP1 and D4S1563). In the critical region between D4S1534 and DMP1, the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene (OMIM *125485) was considered as the strongest candidate gene. The first four exons and exon/intron boundaries of the gene were analyzed using DNA from 24 affected individuals and 18 unaffected relatives of the same family. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous deletion mutation in intron 2 (at positions -3 to -25), which resulted in a frameshift mutation, that changed the acceptor site sequence from CAG to AAG (IVS2-3C-->A) and may also have disrupted the branch point consensus sequence in intron 2. The mutation was found in the 24 affected individuals, but not in the 18 unaffected relatives and 50 controls. The deletion was identified by allele-specific sequencing and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) analysis. We conclude that the heterozygous deletion mutation contributed to the pathogenesis of DGI-II.

  12. A method distinguishing expressed vs. null mutations of the Col1A1 gene in osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Redford-Badwal, D.A.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of heritable disorders of bone characterized by increased susceptibility to fracture. Most of the causative mutations were identified in patients with the lethal form of the disease. Attention is now shifting to the milder forms of OI where glycine substitutions and null producing mutations have been found. Single amino acid substitutions can be identified by RT/PCR of total cellular RNA, but this approach does not work well for null mutations since the defective transcript does not accumulate in the cytoplasm. We have altered our RNA extraction method to separate RNA from the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of cultured fibroblasts. Standard methods of mutation identification (RT/PCR followed by SSCP) is applied to each RNA fraction. DNA from an abnormal band on the SSCP gel is eluted and amplified by PCR for cloning and sequencing. Using this approach we have identified an Asp to Asn change in exon 50 (type II OI) and a Gly to Arg in exon 11 (type I OI) of the COL1A1 gene. These changes were found in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. These putative mutations are currently being confirmed by protein studies. In contrast, three patients with mild OI associated with reduced {proportional_to}(I)mRNA, had distinguishing SSCP bands present in the nuclear but not the cytoplasmic compartment. In one case a frame shift mutation was observed, while the other two revealed polymorphisms. The compartmentalization of the mutant allele has directed us to look elsewhere in the transcript for the causative mutation. This approach to mutation identification is capable of distinguishing these fundamentally different types of mutations and allows for preferential cloning and sequencing of the abnormal allele.

  13. Altered lacunar and vascular porosity in osteogenesis imperfecta mouse bone as revealed by synchrotron tomography contributes to bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Carriero, A; Doube, M; Vogt, M; Busse, B; Zustin, J; Levchuk, A; Schneider, P; Müller, R; Shefelbine, S J

    2014-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease) is caused by mutations in the collagen genes and results in skeletal fragility. Changes in bone porosity at the tissue level indicate changes in bone metabolism and alter bone mechanical integrity. We investigated the cortical bone tissue porosity of a mouse model of the disease, oim, in comparison to a wild type (WT-C57BL/6), and examined the influence of canal architecture on bone mechanical performance. High-resolution 3D representations of the posterior tibial and the lateral humeral mid-diaphysis of the bones were acquired for both mouse groups using synchrotron radiation-based computed tomography at a nominal resolution of 700nm. Volumetric morphometric indices were determined for cortical bone, canal network and osteocyte lacunae. The influence of canal porosity architecture on bone mechanics was investigated using microarchitectural finite element (μFE) models of the cortical bone. Bright-field microscopy of stained sections was used to determine if canals were vascular. Although total cortical porosity was comparable between oim and WT bone, oim bone had more numerous and more branched canals (p<0.001), and more osteocyte lacunae per unit volume compared to WT (p<0.001). Lacunae in oim were more spherical in shape compared to the ellipsoidal WT lacunae (p<0.001). Histology revealed blood vessels in all WT and oim canals. μFE models of cortical bone revealed that small and branched canals, typical of oim bone, increase the risk of bone failure. These results portray a state of compromised bone quality in oim bone at the tissue level, which contributes to its deficient mechanical properties.

  14. Recurrent Proximal Femur Fractures in a Teenager With Osteogenesis Imperfecta on Continuous Bisphosphonate Therapy: Are We Overtreating?

    PubMed

    Vasanwala, Rashida F; Sanghrajka, Anish; Bishop, Nicholas J; Högler, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Long-term bisphosphonate (BP) therapy in adults with osteoporosis is associated with atypical femoral fractures, caused by increased material bone density and prolonged suppression of bone remodeling which may reduce fracture toughness. In children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), long-term intravenous BP therapy improves bone structure and mass without further increasing the already hypermineralized bone matrix, and is generally regarded as safe. Here we report a teenage girl with OI type IV, who was started on cyclical intravenous pamidronate therapy at age 6 years because of recurrent fractures. Transiliac bone biopsy revealed classical structural features of OI but unusually low bone resorption surfaces. She made substantial improvements in functional ability, bone mass, and fracture rate. However, after 5 years of pamidronate therapy she started to develop recurrent, bilateral, nontraumatic, and proximal femur fractures, which satisfied the case definition for atypical femur fractures. Some fractures were preceded by periosteal reactions and prodromal pain. Pamidronate was discontinued after 7 years of therapy, following which she sustained two further nontraumatic femur fractures, and continued to show delayed tibial osteotomy healing. Despite rodding surgery, and very much in contrast to her affected, untreated, and normally mobile mother, she remains wheelchair-dependent. The case of this girl raises questions about the long-term safety of BP therapy in some children, in particular about the risk of oversuppressed bone remodeling with the potential for microcrack accumulation, delayed healing, and increased stiffness. The principal concern is whether there is point at which benefit from BP therapy could turn into harm, where fracture risk increases again. This case should stimulate debate whether current adult atypical femoral fracture guidance should apply to children, and whether low-frequency, low-dose cyclical, intermittent, or oral treatment

  15. Tissue level material composition and mechanical properties in Brtl/+ mouse model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta after sclerostin antibody treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, William R.; Sinder, Benjamin P.; Salemi, Joseph; Ominsky, Michael S.; Marini, Joan C.; Caird, Michelle S.; Morris, Michael D.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.

    2015-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder resulting in defective collagen or collagen-associated proteins and fragile, brittle bones. To date, therapies to improve OI bone mass, such as bisphosphonates, have increased bone mass in the axial skeleton of OI patients, but have shown limited effects at reducing long bone fragility. Sclerostin antibody (Scl- Ab), currently in clinical trials for osteoporosis, stimulates bone formation and may have the potential to reduce long bone fracture rates in OI patients. Scl-Ab has been investigated as an anabolic therapy for OI in the Brtl/+ mouse model of moderately severe Type IV OI. While Scl-Ab increases long bone mass in the Brtl/+ mouse, it is not known whether material properties and composition changes also occur. Here, we report on the effects of Scl-Ab on wild type and Brtl/+ young (3 week) and adult (6 month) male mice. Scl-Ab was administered over 5 weeks (25mg/kg, 2x/week). Raman microspectroscopy and nanoindentation are used for bone composition and biomechanical bone property measurements in excised bone. Fluorescent labels (calcein and alizarin) at 4 time points over the entire treatment period are used to enable measurements at specific tissue age. Differences between wild type and Brtl/+ groups included variations in the mineral and matrix lattices, particularly the phosphate v1, carbonate v1, and the v(CC) proline and hydroxyproline stretch vibrations. Results of Raman spectroscopy corresponded to nanoindentation findings which indicated that old bone (near midcortex) is stiffer (higher elastic modulus) than new bone. We compare and contrast mineral to matrix and carbonate to phosphate ratios in young and adult mice with and without treatment.

  16. Investigation of the human disease osteogenesis imperfecta: a research-based introduction to concepts and skills in biomolecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Mate, Karen; Sim, Alistair; Weidenhofer, Judith; Milward, Liz; Scott, Judith

    2013-01-01

    A blended approach encompassing problem-based learning (PBL) and structured inquiry was used in this laboratory exercise based on the congenital disease Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), to introduce commonly used techniques in biomolecular analysis within a clinical context. During a series of PBL sessions students were presented with several scenarios involving a 2 year old child, who had experienced numerous fractures. Key learning goals related to both the theory and practical aspects of the course, covering biomolecular analysis and functional genomics, were identified in successive PBL sessions. The laboratory exercises were conducted in 3 hour blocks over six weeks, focused firstly on protein analysis, followed by nucleic acids. Students isolated collagen from normal and OI affected fibroblast cultures. Analysis by SDS-PAGE demonstrated α1 and α2 of collagen Type I chains at approximately 95 kDa and 92 kDa, respectively. Subtle differences in protein mobility between the control and OI samples were observed by some students, but most considered it inconclusive as a diagnostic tool. The nucleic acid module involved isolation of RNA from OI affected fibroblasts. The RNA was reverse transcribed and used as template to amplify a 354 bp COL1A1 fragment. Students were provided with the sequence of the OI affected COL1A1 PCR product aligned with the normal COL1A1 sequence, allowing identification of the mutation, as the substitution of Arg for Gly(976) of the triple helical region. Our experience with student cohorts over several years is that presentation of this laboratory exercise within a relevant clinical context, and the opportunity for active engagement with the experimental procedures via PBL sessions, supported the learning of basic theory and practical techniques of biomolecular analysis.

  17. Pre- and Postnatal Transplantation of Fetal Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Two-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Westgren, Magnus; Shaw, S.W. Steven; Åström, Eva; Biswas, Arijit; Byers, Peter H.; Mattar, Citra N.Z.; Graham, Gail E.; Taslimi, Jahan; Ewald, Uwe; Fisk, Nicholas M.; Yeoh, Allen E.J.; Lin, Ju-Li; Cheng, Po-Jen; Choolani, Mahesh; Le Blanc, Katarina; Chan, Jerry K.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) can be recognized prenatally with ultrasound. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has the potential to ameliorate skeletal damage. We report the clinical course of two patients with OI who received prenatal human fetal MSC (hfMSC) transplantation and postnatal boosting with same-donor MSCs. We have previously reported on prenatal transplantation for OI type III. This patient was retransplanted with 2.8 × 106 same-donor MSCs per kilogram at 8 years of age, resulting in low-level engraftment in bone and improved linear growth, mobility, and fracture incidence. An infant with an identical mutation who did not receive MSC therapy succumbed at 5 months despite postnatal bisphosphonate therapy. A second fetus with OI type IV was also transplanted with 30 × 106 hfMSCs per kilogram at 31 weeks of gestation and did not suffer any new fractures for the remainder of the pregnancy or during infancy. The patient followed her normal growth velocity until 13 months of age, at which time longitudinal length plateaued. A postnatal infusion of 10 × 106 MSCs per kilogram from the same donor was performed at 19 months of age, resulting in resumption of her growth trajectory. Neither patient demonstrated alloreactivity toward the donor hfMSCs or manifested any evidence of toxicities after transplantation. Our findings suggest that prenatal transplantation of allogeneic hfMSCs in OI appears safe and is of likely clinical benefit and that retransplantation with same-donor cells is feasible. However, the limited experience to date means that it is not possible to be conclusive and that further studies are required. PMID:24342908

  18. Osteogenesis imperfecta: Ultrastructural and histological findings on examination of skin revealing novel insights into genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, M; Sobey, G J; Wagner, B E; Peres, L C; Bowen, J; Bexon, J; Javaid, M K; Arundel, P; Bishop, N J

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of bone formation, resulting in low bone mass and an increased propensity to fracture. Over 90% of patients with OI have a mutation in COL1A1/COL1A2, which shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. In-depth phenotyping and in particular, studies involving manifestations in the skin connective tissue have not previously been undertaken in OI. The aims of the study were to perform histological and ultrastructural examination of skin biopsies in a cohort of patients with OI; to identify common and distinguishing features in order to inform genotype-phenotype correlation; and to identify common and distinguishing features between the different subtypes of OI. As part of the RUDY (Rare Diseases in Bone, Joints and/or Blood Vessels) study, in collaboration with the NIHR Rare Diseases Translational Research Collaboration, we undertook a national study of skin biopsies in patients with OI. We studied the manifestations in the skin connective tissue and undertook in-depth clinical and molecular phenotyping of 16 patients with OI. We recruited 16 patients: analyses have shown that in type 1 collagen mutation positive patients (COL1A1/ COL1A2) (n-4/16) consistent findings included: variable collagen fibril diameter (CFD) and presence of collagen flowers. Histological examination in these patients showed an increase in elastic fibers that are frequently fragmented and clumped. These observations provide evidence that collagen flowers and CFD variability are consistent features in OI due to type 1 collagen defects and reinforce the need for accurate phenotyping in conjunction with genomic analyses. PMID:26863094

  19. Altered cytoskeletal organization characterized lethal but not surviving Brtl+/- mice: insight on phenotypic variability in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Laura; Gagliardi, Assunta; Maruelli, Silvia; Besio, Roberta; Landi, Claudia; Gioia, Roberta; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Khoury, Basma M; Coucke, Paul J; Symoens, Sofie; Marini, Joan C; Rossi, Antonio; Bini, Luca; Forlino, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable bone disease with dominant and recessive transmission. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical outcomes ranging from very mild to lethal in the perinatal period. The intra- and inter-familiar OI phenotypic variability in the presence of an identical molecular defect is still puzzling to the research field. We used the OI murine model Brtl(+/-) to investigate the molecular basis of OI phenotypic variability. Brtl(+/-) resembles classical dominant OI and shows either a moderately severe or a lethal outcome associated with the same Gly349Cys substitution in the α1 chain of type I collagen. A systems biology approach was used. We took advantage of proteomic pathway analysis to functionally link proteins differentially expressed in bone and skin of Brtl(+/-) mice with different outcomes to define possible phenotype modulators. The skin/bone and bone/skin hybrid networks highlighted three focal proteins: vimentin, stathmin and cofilin-1, belonging to or involved in cytoskeletal organization. Abnormal cytoskeleton was indeed demonstrated by immunohistochemistry to occur only in tissues from Brtl(+/-) lethal mice. The aberrant cytoskeleton affected osteoblast proliferation, collagen deposition, integrin and TGF-β signaling with impairment of bone structural properties. Finally, aberrant cytoskeletal assembly was detected in fibroblasts obtained from lethal, but not from non-lethal, OI patients carrying an identical glycine substitution. Our data demonstrated that compromised cytoskeletal assembly impaired both cell signaling and cellular trafficking in mutant lethal mice, altering bone properties. These results point to the cytoskeleton as a phenotypic modulator and potential novel target for OI treatment.

  20. Severe osteogenesis imperfecta caused by double glycine substitutions near the amino-terminal triple helical region in COL1A2.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Masaki; Shinohara, Hiroyuki; Narumi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Gen; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2015-07-01

    Most cases of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) are caused by heterozygous mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2, the genes encoding the two type I procollagen alpha chains, proα1 (I) and proα2 (I). We report on a unique case of severe OI, a long term survivor of lethal type II OI, rather than progressively deforming type III, due to double substitutions of glycine residues in COL1A2 (p.Gly208Glu and p.Gly235Asp), located on the same allele. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a patient with double COL1A2 glycine substitution mutations on the same allele. We show for the first time that double COL1A2 glycine substitution mutations located near the amino-terminal triple helical region, which individually are likely to result in mild OI, cause severe OI in combination. PMID:25858481

  1. The recurrent causal mutation for osteogenesis imperfecta type V occurs at a highly methylated CpG dinucleotide within the IFITM5 gene

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Massimiliano; Monti, Elena; Venturi, Giacomo; Gandini, Alberto; Mottes, Monica; Antoniazzi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have identified the molecular defect underlying autosomal dominant osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type V. Unlike all other OI types, which are characterized by high genetic heterogeneity, OI type V appears consistently associated to a unique de novo C>T transition within the 5′ UTR of the IFITM5 gene. Although the precise frequency of OI type V is not known, this recurrent base substitution may well represent a mutational hotspot in the human genome. We show that it occurs at a CpG dinucleotide that is highly methylated in several tissues and particularly in the sperm DNA, suggesting a mutational mechanism common to other de novo recurrent dominant mutations. PMID:27625865

  2. The recurrent causal mutation for osteogenesis imperfecta type V occurs at a highly methylated CpG dinucleotide within the IFITM5 gene.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Massimiliano; Monti, Elena; Venturi, Giacomo; Gandini, Alberto; Mottes, Monica; Antoniazzi, Franco

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have identified the molecular defect underlying autosomal dominant osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type V. Unlike all other OI types, which are characterized by high genetic heterogeneity, OI type V appears consistently associated to a unique de novo C>T transition within the 5' UTR of the IFITM5 gene. Although the precise frequency of OI type V is not known, this recurrent base substitution may well represent a mutational hotspot in the human genome. We show that it occurs at a CpG dinucleotide that is highly methylated in several tissues and particularly in the sperm DNA, suggesting a mutational mechanism common to other de novo recurrent dominant mutations. PMID:27625865

  3. Mineral particle size in children with osteogenesis imperfecta type I is not increased independently of specific collagen mutations.

    PubMed

    Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Schmidt, Ingo; Roschger, Paul; Glorieux, Francis H; Klaushofer, Klaus; Fratzl, Peter; Rauch, Frank; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I represents the mildest form of OI and is usually caused by two classes of autosomal dominant mutations in collagen type I: haploinsufficiency leading to a reduced quantity of structurally normal collagen (quantitative mutation), or sequence abnormalities generating structurally aberrant collagen chains (qualitative mutation). An abnormally high bone matrix mineralization has been observed in all OI cases investigated so far, independently of mutation type. This raises the question whether the increased amount of mineral is due to mineral particles growing to larger sizes or to a higher number of more densely packed particles. For this reason, we revisit the problem by investigating the mineral particle size in cancellous bone from two subsets of the previously analyzed biopsies (patient's age: 2-4.2 and 7.6-11years) comparing OI quantitative mutations (n=5), OI qualitative mutations (n=5) and controls (n=6). We used a combined small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) setup with a beam diameter of 10μm of synchrotron radiation, which allows the determination of mineral particle characteristics in 10μm thick sections at the same positions where the matrix mineralization density was previously determined. The thickness parameter of mineral particles (T) was obtained from SAXS data and the mineral volume fraction was calculated from the mean calcium content of the bone matrix determined by quantitative back-scattered electron imaging (qBEI). The combination of these two quantities allowed calculating the true particle width (W) of the plate-like mineral crystals. T was larger in the older than in the younger age-group independently of genotype (p<0.004) and was larger in the controls than in each OI group. The qBEI results showed that the mineral volume fraction increased from 32.45wt.% in controls to 36.44wt.% in both OI groups (corresponding to a 12% increase in relative terms). Combining these

  4. What Is Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Other Related Conditions: NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ... FDA-approved drug products. NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ...

  5. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... is extremely rare slightly elevated activity level of alkaline phosphatase (an enzyme linked to bone formation), which ... for people with OI. This treatment involves inserting metal rods through the length of the long bones ...

  6. Learning about Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic Careers National DNA Day Online Education Kit Online Genetics Education ... Subjects Research Informed Consent for Genomics Research Intellectual ...

  7. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Issues: Constipation

    MedlinePlus

    ... cultures that contain the bacteria lactobacillus acidophilus. • Limit soft drinks and drinks containing caffeine such as colas or tea. • Drink water throughout the day. Strive for a diet that keeps the stool soft. Too much fiber has the secondary effect of ...

  8. A case of fetal osteogenesis imperfecta type 2A: longitudinal observation of natural course in utero and pitfalls for prenatal ultrasound diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ibuki; Araki, Ryota; Yoshizato, Toshiyuki; Miyamoto, Shingo

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type 2A in which a natural course in utero was observed from 23 weeks' gestation to term. At 23 weeks' gestation, a sonographic examination showed a cloverleaf skull-like head, a narrow thorax, and marked shortening of the long bones with bowing of the femurs and humeri. Follow-up examinations showed that the cloverleaf skull-like head was not evident at 28 weeks' gestation. Discontinuity of the ribs and femurs was observed at 26 and 30 weeks' gestation, respectively. This finding suggested bone fractures, which were confirmed by three-dimensional computed tomography at 32 weeks' gestation. Ultrasonographic findings of bones, including the long bones and calvarium, changed with advancing gestation during the second trimester. Characteristic features of OI type 2A were evident during the late second to early third trimesters. Repeated ultrasonographic examinations together with three-dimensional computed tomography are necessary for the definitive diagnosis of OI type 2A in the second trimester. PMID:26576983

  9. An N-terminal glycine to cysteine mutation in the collagen COL1A1 gene produces moderately severe osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, W.; Scott, L.; Cohn, D.

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is usually due to mutations in the type I procollagen genes COL1A1 and COL1A2. Point mutations close to the N-terminus are generally milder than those near the C-terminus of the molecule (the gradient hypothesis of collagen mutations). We describe a patient with moderately severe OI due to a mutation in the N-terminal portion of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Electrophoretic analysis of collagen isolated from fibroblast cultures suggested the abnormal presence of a cysteine in the N-terminal portion of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Five overlapping DNA fragments amplified from fibroblast RNA were screened for mutations using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analyses. Direct DNA sequence analysis of the single positive fragment demonstrated a G to T transversion, corresponding to a glycine to cysteine substitution at position 226 of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. The mutation was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified genomic DNA. The mutation was not present in fibroblasts from either phenotypically normal parent. Combining this mutation with other reported mutations, glycine to cysteine substitutions at positions 205, 211, 223, and 226 produce a moderately severe phenotype whereas flanking mutations at positions 175 and 382 produce a mild phenotype. This data supports a regional rather than a gradient model of the relationship between the nature and location of type I collagen mutations and OI phenotype.

  10. Identification of a novel COL1A1 frameshift mutation, c.700delG, in a Chinese osteogenesis imperfecta family.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiran; Pei, Yu; Dou, Jingtao; Lu, Juming; Li, Jian; Lv, Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a family of genetic disorders associated with bone loss and fragility. Mutations associated with OI have been found in genes encoding the type I collagen chains. People with OI type I often produce insufficient α1-chain type I collagen because of frameshift, nonsense, or splice site mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2. This report is of a Chinese daughter and mother who had both experienced two bone fractures. Because skeletal fragility is predominantly inherited, we focused on identifying mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. A novel mutation in COL1A1, c.700delG, was detected by genomic DNA sequencing in the mother and daughter, but not in their relatives. The identification of this mutation led to the conclusion that they were affected by mild OI type I. Open reading frame analysis indicated that this frameshift mutation would truncate α1-chain type I collagen at residue p263 (p.E234KfsX264), while the wild-type protein would contain 1,464 residues. The clinical data were consistent with the patients' diagnosis of mild OI type I caused by haploinsufficiency of α1-chain type I collagen. Combined with previous reports, identification of the novel mutation COL1A1-c.700delG in these patients suggests that additional genetic and environmental factors may influence the severity of OI.

  11. Mapping of the human dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein gene (DMP1) to the dentinogenesis imperfecta type II critical region at chromosome 4q21

    SciTech Connect

    Aplin, H.M.; Hirst, K.L.; Crosby, A.H.; Dixon, M.J.

    1995-11-20

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of dentin formation, which has been mapped to human chromosome 4q12-q21. The region most likely to contain the DGI1 locus is a 3.2-cM region surrounding the osteopontin (SPP1) locus. Recently, a novel dentin-specific acidic phosphoprotein (dmp1) has been cloned in the rat and mapped to mouse chromosome 5q21. In the current investigation, we have isolated a cosmid containing the human DMP1 gene. The isolation of a short tandem repeat polymorphism at this locus has allowed us to map the DMP1 locus to human chromosome 4q21 and demonstrate that it is tightly linked to DGI1 in two families (Z{sub max} = 11.01, {theta} = 0.001). The creation of a yeast artificial chromosome contig around SPP1 has further allowed us to demonstrate that DMP1 is located within 150 kb of the bone sialoprotein and 490 kb of the SPP1 loci, respectively. DMP1 is therefore a strong candidate for the DGI1 locus. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Defective splicing of mRNA from one COL1A1 allele of type I collagen in nondeforming (type I) osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, M L; Primorac, D; Liu, S C; McKinstry, M B; Rowe, D W

    1993-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is the mildest form of heritable bone fragility resulting from mutations within the COL1A1 gene. We studied fibroblasts established from a child with OI type I and demonstrated underproduction of alpha 1 (I) collagen chains and alpha 1 (I) mRNA. Indirect RNase protection suggested two species of alpha 1 (I) mRNA, one of which was not collinear with fully spliced alpha 1 (I) mRNA. The noncollinear population was confined to the nuclear compartment of the cell, and contained the entire sequence of intron 26 and a G-->A transition in the first position of the intron donor site. The G-->A transition was also identified in the genomic DNA. The retained intron contained an in-frame stop codon and introduced an out-of-frame insertion within the collagen mRNA producing stop codons downstream of the insertion. These changes probably account for the failure of the mutant RNA to appear in the cytoplasm. Unlike other splice site mutations within collagen mRNA that resulted in exon skipping and a truncated but inframe RNA transcript, this mutation did not result in production of a defective collagen pro alpha 1 (I) chain. Instead, the mild nature of the disease in this case reflects failure to process the defective mRNA and thus the absence of a protein product from the mutant allele. Images PMID:8408653

  13. Substitution of arginine for glycine at position 154 of the {alpha}1 chain of type I collagen in a variant of osteogenesis imperfecta: Comparison to previous cases with the same mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, J.; Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Prockop, D.J.; Castells, S.

    1996-01-11

    A substitution of arginine for glycine at amino acid position 154 of the {alpha}1(I) collagen chain was found in a father and his three children. The phenotype of the patients includes manifestations of types I and III/IV osteogenesis imperfecta, but appears to be milder than that of the previously described two unrelated patients that had the identical mutation in the {alpha}1(I) collagen chain. The variability in the phenotype raises the possibility of epistatic loci or environmental effects on expression of the disorder. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Four patients with Sillence type I osteogenesis imperfecta and mild bone fragility, complicated by left ventricular cardiac valvular disease and cardiac tissue fragility caused by type I collagen mutations.

    PubMed

    Vandersteen, Anthony M; Lund, Allan M; Ferguson, David J P; Sawle, Philip; Pollitt, Rebecca C; Holder, Susan E; Wakeling, Emma; Moat, Neil; Pope, F Michael

    2014-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is a hereditary disorder of connective tissue (HDCT) characterized by blue or gray sclerae, variable short stature, dentinogenesis imperfecta, hearing loss, and recurrent fractures from infancy. We present four examples of OI type I complicated by valvular heart disease and associated with tissue fragility. The diagnosis of a type I collagen disorder was confirmed by abnormal COL1A1 or COL1A2 gene sequencing. One patient was investigated with electrophoresis of collagens from cultured skin fibroblasts, showing structurally abnormal collagen type I, skin biopsy showed unusual histology and abnormal collagen fibril ultra-structure at electron microscopy. The combined clinical, surgical, histological, ultra-structural, and molecular genetic data suggest the type I collagen defect as contributory to cardiac valvular disease. The degree of tissue fragility experienced at cardiac surgery in these individuals, also reported in a small number of similar case reports, suggests that patients with OI type I need careful pre-operative assessment and consideration of the risks and benefits of cardiac surgery.

  15. Four patients with Sillence type I osteogenesis imperfecta and mild bone fragility, complicated by left ventricular cardiac valvular disease and cardiac tissue fragility caused by type I collagen mutations.

    PubMed

    Vandersteen, Anthony M; Lund, Allan M; Ferguson, David J P; Sawle, Philip; Pollitt, Rebecca C; Holder, Susan E; Wakeling, Emma; Moat, Neil; Pope, F Michael

    2014-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is a hereditary disorder of connective tissue (HDCT) characterized by blue or gray sclerae, variable short stature, dentinogenesis imperfecta, hearing loss, and recurrent fractures from infancy. We present four examples of OI type I complicated by valvular heart disease and associated with tissue fragility. The diagnosis of a type I collagen disorder was confirmed by abnormal COL1A1 or COL1A2 gene sequencing. One patient was investigated with electrophoresis of collagens from cultured skin fibroblasts, showing structurally abnormal collagen type I, skin biopsy showed unusual histology and abnormal collagen fibril ultra-structure at electron microscopy. The combined clinical, surgical, histological, ultra-structural, and molecular genetic data suggest the type I collagen defect as contributory to cardiac valvular disease. The degree of tissue fragility experienced at cardiac surgery in these individuals, also reported in a small number of similar case reports, suggests that patients with OI type I need careful pre-operative assessment and consideration of the risks and benefits of cardiac surgery. PMID:24311407

  16. Local amino acid sequence patterns dominate the heterogeneous phenotype for the collagen connective tissue disease Osteogenesis Imperfecta resulting from Gly mutations

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianxi; Yang, Zhangfu; Sun, Xiuxia; Addabbo, Rayna; Baum, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), a hereditary connective tissue disease in collagen that arises from a single Gly->X mutation in the collagen chain, varies widely in phenotype from perinatal lethal to mild. It is unclear why there is such a large variation in the severity of the disease considering the repeating (Gly-X-Y)n sequence and the uniform rod-like structure of collagen. We systematically evaluate the effect of local (Gly-X-Y)n sequence around the mutation site on OI phenotype using integrated bio-statistical approaches, including odds ratio analysis and decision tree modeling. We show that different Gly->X mutations have different local sequence patterns that are correlated with lethal and nonlethal phenotypes providing a mechanism for understanding the sensitivity of local context in defining lethal and non-lethal OI. A number of important trends about which factors are related to OI phenotypes are revealed by the bio-statistical analyses; most striking is the complementary relationship between the placement of Pro residues and small residues and their correlation to OI phenotype. When Pro is present or small flexible residues are absent nearby a mutation site, the OI case tends to be lethal; when Pro is present or small flexible residues are absent further away from the mutation site, the OI case tends to be nonlethal. The analysis also reveals the dominant role of local sequence around mutation sites in the Major Ligand Binding Regions that are primarily responsible for collagen binding to its receptors and shows that non-lethal mutations are highly predicted by local sequence considerations alone whereas lethal mutations are not as easily predicted and may be a result of more complex interactions. Understanding the sequence determinants of OI mutations will enhance genetic counseling and help establish which steps in the collagen hierarchy to target for drug therapy. PMID:25980613

  17. Characterization of skin abnormalities in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging and Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Canuto, H C; Fishbein, K W; Huang, A; Doty, S B; Herbert, R A; Peckham, J; Pleshko, N; Spencer, R G

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of the skin phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) typically involves biochemical measurements, such as histologic or biochemical assessment of the collagen produced from biopsy-derived dermal fibroblasts. As an alternative, the current study utilized non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy and optical spectroscopy to define biophysical characteristics of skin in an animal model of OI. MRI of skin harvested from control, homozygous oim/oim and heterozygous oim/+ mice demonstrated several differences in anatomic and biophysical properties. Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) was used to interpret observed MRI signal characteristics in terms of chemical composition. Differences between wild-type and OI mouse skin included the appearance of a collagen-depleted lower dermal layer containing prominent hair follicles in the oim/oim mice, accounting for 55% of skin thickness in these. The MRI magnetization transfer rate was lower by 50% in this layer as compared to the upper dermis, consistent with lower collagen content. The MRI transverse relaxation time, T2, was greater by 30% in the dermis of the oim/oim mice compared to controls, consistent with a more highly hydrated collagen network. Similarly, an FT-IRIS-defined measure of collagen integrity was 30% lower in the oim/oim mice. We conclude that characterization of phenotypic differences between the skin of OI and wild-type mice by MRI and FT-IRIS is feasible, and that these techniques provide powerful complementary approaches for the analysis of the skin phenotype in animal models of disease. PMID:21845737

  18. A novel IFITM5 mutation in severe atypical osteogenesis imperfecta type VI impairs osteoblast production of pigment epithelium-derived factor.

    PubMed

    Farber, Charles R; Reich, Adi; Barnes, Aileen M; Becerra, Patricia; Rauch, Frank; Cabral, Wayne A; Bae, Alison; Quinlan, Aaron; Glorieux, Francis H; Clemens, Thomas L; Marini, Joan C

    2014-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) types V and VI are caused, respectively, by a unique dominant mutation in IFITM5, encoding BRIL, a transmembrane ifitm-like protein most strongly expressed in the skeletal system, and recessive null mutations in SERPINF1, encoding pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). We identified a 25-year-old woman with severe OI whose dermal fibroblasts and cultured osteoblasts displayed minimal secretion of PEDF, but whose serum PEDF level was in the normal range. SERPINF1 sequences were normal despite bone histomorphometry consistent with type VI OI and elevated childhood serum alkaline phosphatase. We performed exome sequencing on the proband, both parents, and an unaffected sibling. IFITM5 emerged as the candidate gene from bioinformatics analysis, and was corroborated by membership in a murine bone co-expression network module containing all currently known OI genes. The de novo IFITM5 mutation was confirmed in one allele of the proband, resulting in a p.S40L substitution in the intracellular domain of BRIL but was absent in unaffected family members. IFITM5 expression was normal in proband fibroblasts and osteoblasts, and BRIL protein level was similar to control in differentiated proband osteoblasts on Western blot and in permeabilized mutant osteoblasts by microscopy. In contrast, SERPINF1 expression was decreased in proband osteoblasts; PEDF was barely detectable in conditioned media of proband cells. Expression and secretion of type I collagen was similarly decreased in proband osteoblasts; the expression pattern of several osteoblast markers largely overlapped reported values from cells with a primary PEDF defect. In contrast, osteoblasts from a typical case of type V OI, with an activating mutation at the 5'-terminus of BRIL, have increased SERPINF1 expression and PEDF secretion during osteoblast differentiation. Together, these data suggest that BRIL and PEDF have a relationship that connects the genes for types V and VI OI and

  19. A frameshift mutation results in a truncated nonfunctional carboxyl-terminal pro alpha 1(I) propeptide of type I collagen in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Lamande, S R; Dahl, H H; Chan, D; Mascara, T; Cole, W G

    1989-07-01

    A codon frameshift mutation caused by a single base (U) insertion after base pair 4088 of prepro alpha 1(I) mRNA of type I procollagen was identified in a baby with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The mutation was identified in fibroblast RNA by a new method that allows the direct detection of mismatched bases by chemical modification and cleavage in heteroduplexes formed between mRNA and control cDNA probes. The region of mismatches was specifically amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The heterozygous mutation in the amplified cDNA most likely resulted from a T insertion in exon 49 of COL1A1. The frameshift resulted in a truncated pro alpha 1(I) carboxyl-terminal propeptide in which the amino acid sequence was abnormal from Val1146 to the carboxyl terminus. The propeptide lacked Asn1187, which normally carries an N-linked oligosaccharide unit, and was more basic than the normal propeptide. The distribution of cysteines was altered and the mutant propeptide was unable to form normal interchain disulfide bonds. Some of the mutant pro alpha 1(I)' chains were incorporated into type I procollagen molecules but resulted in abnormal helix formation with over-hydroxylation of lysine residues, increased degradation, and poor secretion. Only normal type I collagen was incorporated into the extracellular matrix in vivo resulting in a tissue type I collagen content approximately 20% of that of control (Bateman, J. F., Chan, D., Mascara, T., Rogers, J. G., and Cole, W. G. (1986) Biochem. J. 240, 699-708).

  20. COL1A1 and miR-29b show lower expression levels during osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells from Osteogenesis Imperfecta patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) cases are caused by mutations in one of the two genes, COL1A1 and COL1A2 encoding for the two chains that trimerize to form the procollagen 1 molecule. However, alterations in gene expression and microRNAs (miRNAs) are responsible for the regulation of cell fate determination and may be evolved in OI phenotype. Methods In this work, we analyzed the coding region and intron/exon boundaries of COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes by sequence analysis using an ABI PRISM 3130 automated sequencer and Big Dye Terminator Sequencing protocol. COL1A1 and miR-29b expression were also evaluated during the osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) by qRT-PCR using an ABI7500 Sequence Detection System. Results We have identified eight novel mutations, where of four may be responsible for OI phenotype. COL1A1 and miR-29b showed lower expression values in OI type I and type III samples. Interestingly, one type III OI sample from a patient with Bruck Syndrome showed COL1A1 and miR-29b expressions alike those from normal samples. Conclusions Results suggest that the miR-29b mechanism directed to regulate collagen protein accumulation during mineralization is dependent upon the amount of COL1A1 mRNA. Taken together, results indicate that the lower levels observed in OI samples were not sufficient for the induction of miR-29b. PMID:24767406

  1. Recombinant Collagen Studies Link the Severe Conformational Changes Induced by Osteogenesis Imperfecta Mutations to the Disruption of a Set of Interchain Salt Bridges*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Nowak, Iwona; Kirchner, Michele; Xu, Yujia

    2008-01-01

    The clinical severity of Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), also known as the brittle bone disease, relates to the extent of conformational changes in the collagen triple helix induced by Gly substitution mutations. The lingering question is why Gly substitutions at different locations of collagen cause different disruptions of the triple helix. Here, we describe markedly different conformational changes of the triple helix induced by two Gly substitution mutations placed only 12 residues apart. The effects of the Gly substitutions were characterized using a recombinant collagen fragment modeling the 63-residue segment of the α1 chain of type I collagen containing no Hyp (residues 877-939) obtained from Escherichia coli. Two Gly → Ser substitutions at Gly-901 and Gly-913 associated with, respectively, mild and severe OI variants were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis. Biophysical characterization and limited protease digestion experiments revealed that while the substitution at Gly-901 causes relatively minor destabilization of the triple helix, the substitution at Gly-913 induces large scale unfolding of an unstable region C-terminal to the mutation site. This extensive unfolding is caused by the intrinsic low stability of the C-terminal region of the helix and the mutation induced disruption of a set of salt bridges, which functions to lock this unstable region into the triple helical conformation. The extensive conformational changes associated with the loss of the salt bridges highlight the long range impact of the local interactions of triple helix and suggest a new mechanism by which OI mutations cause severe conformational damages in collagen. PMID:18845533

  2. Absence of the ER Cation Channel TMEM38B/TRIC-B Disrupts Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis and Dysregulates Collagen Synthesis in Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Wayne A.; Ishikawa, Masaki; Garten, Matthias; Makareeva, Elena N.; Sargent, Brandi M.; Weis, MaryAnn; Barnes, Aileen M.; Webb, Emma A.; Shaw, Nicholas J.; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Lacbawan, Felicitas L.; Högler, Wolfgang; Leikin, Sergey; Blank, Paul S.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Eyre, David R.; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Marini, Joan C.

    2016-01-01

    Recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by defects in proteins involved in post-translational interactions with type I collagen. Recently, a novel form of moderately severe OI caused by null mutations in TMEM38B was identified. TMEM38B encodes the ER membrane monovalent cation channel, TRIC-B, proposed to counterbalance IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The molecular mechanisms by which TMEM38B mutations cause OI are unknown. We identified 3 probands with recessive defects in TMEM38B. TRIC-B protein is undetectable in proband fibroblasts and osteoblasts, although reduced TMEM38B transcripts are present. TRIC-B deficiency causes impaired release of ER luminal Ca2+, associated with deficient store-operated calcium entry, although SERCA and IP3R have normal stability. Notably, steady state ER Ca2+ is unchanged in TRIC-B deficiency, supporting a role for TRIC-B in the kinetics of ER calcium depletion and recovery. The disturbed Ca2+ flux causes ER stress and increased BiP, and dysregulates synthesis of proband type I collagen at multiple steps. Collagen helical lysine hydroxylation is reduced, while telopeptide hydroxylation is increased, despite increased LH1 and decreased Ca2+-dependent FKBP65, respectively. Although PDI levels are maintained, procollagen chain assembly is delayed in proband cells. The resulting misfolded collagen is substantially retained in TRIC-B null cells, consistent with a 50–70% reduction in secreted collagen. Lower-stability forms of collagen that elude proteasomal degradation are not incorporated into extracellular matrix, which contains only normal stability collagen, resulting in matrix insufficiency. These data support a role for TRIC-B in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and demonstrate that absence of TMEM38B causes OI by dysregulation of calcium flux kinetics in the ER, impacting multiple collagen-specific chaperones and modifying enzymes. PMID:27441836

  3. A Novel IFITM5 Mutation in Severe Atypical Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type VI Impairs Osteoblast Production of Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Charles R; Reich, Adi; Barnes, Aileen M; Becerra, Patricia; Rauch, Frank; Cabral, Wayne A; Bae, Alison; Quinlan, Aaron; Glorieux, Francis H; Clemens, Thomas L; Marini, Joan C

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) types V and VI are caused, respectively, by a unique dominant mutation in IFITM5, encoding BRIL, a transmembrane ifitm-like protein most strongly expressed in the skeletal system, and recessive null mutations in SERPINF1, encoding pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). We identified a 25-year-old woman with severe OI whose dermal fibroblasts and cultured osteoblasts displayed minimal secretion of PEDF, but whose serum PEDF level was in the normal range. SERPINF1 sequences were normal despite bone histomorphometry consistent with type VI OI and elevated childhood serum alkaline phosphatase. We performed exome sequencing on the proband, both parents, and an unaffected sibling. IFITM5 emerged as the candidate gene from bioinformatics analysis, and was corroborated by membership in a murine bone co-expression network module containing all currently known OI genes. The de novo IFITM5 mutation was confirmed in one allele of the proband, resulting in a p.S40L substitution in the intracellular domain of BRIL but was absent in unaffected family members. IFITM5 expression was normal in proband fibroblasts and osteoblasts, and BRIL protein level was similar to control in differentiated proband osteoblasts on Western blot and in permeabilized mutant osteoblasts by microscopy. In contrast, SERPINF1 expression was decreased in proband osteoblasts; PEDF was barely detectable in conditioned media of proband cells. Expression and secretion of type I collagen was similarly decreased in proband osteoblasts; the expression pattern of several osteoblast markers largely overlapped reported values from cells with a primary PEDF defect. In contrast, osteoblasts from a typical case of type V OI, with an activating mutation at the 5′-terminus of BRIL, have increased SERPINF1 expression and PEDF secretion during osteoblast differentiation. Together, these data suggest that BRIL and PEDF have a relationship that connects the genes for types V and VI OI and

  4. Consistent linkage of dominantly inherited osteogenesis imperfecta to the type I collagen loci: COL1A1 and COL1A2.

    PubMed

    Sykes, B; Ogilvie, D; Wordsworth, P; Wallis, G; Mathew, C; Beighton, P; Nicholls, A; Pope, F M; Thompson, E; Tsipouras, P

    1990-02-01

    The segregation of COL1A1 and COL1A2, the two genes which encode the chains of type I collagen, was analyzed in 38 dominant osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) pedigrees by using polymorphic markers within or close to the genes. This was done in order to estimate the consistency of linkage of OI genes to these two loci. None of the 38 pedigrees showed evidence of recombination between the OI gene and both collagen loci, suggesting that the frequency of unlinked loci in the population must be low. From these results, approximate 95% confidence limits for the proportion of families linked to the type I collagen genes can be set between .91 and 1.00. This is high enough to base prenatal diagnosis of dominantly inherited OI on linkage to these genes even in families which are too small for the linkage to be independently confirmed to high levels of significance. When phenotypic features were compared with the concordant collagen locus, all eight pedigrees with Sillence OI type IV segregated with COL1A2. On the other hand, Sillence OI type I segregated with both COL1A1 (17 pedigrees) and COL1A2 (7 pedigrees). The concordant locus was uncertain in the remaining six OI type I pedigrees. Of several other features, the presence or absence of presenile hearing loss was the best predictor of the mutant locus in OI type I families, with 13 of the 17 COL1A1 segregants and none of the 7 COL1A2 segregants showing this feature.

  5. Characterization of skin abnormalities in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging and Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Canuto, H C; Fishbein, K W; Huang, A; Doty, S B; Herbert, R A; Peckham, J; Pleshko, N; Spencer, R G

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of the skin phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) typically involves biochemical measurements, such as histologic or biochemical assessment of the collagen produced from biopsy-derived dermal fibroblasts. As an alternative, the current study utilized non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy and optical spectroscopy to define biophysical characteristics of skin in an animal model of OI. MRI of skin harvested from control, homozygous oim/oim and heterozygous oim/+ mice demonstrated several differences in anatomic and biophysical properties. Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) was used to interpret observed MRI signal characteristics in terms of chemical composition. Differences between wild-type and OI mouse skin included the appearance of a collagen-depleted lower dermal layer containing prominent hair follicles in the oim/oim mice, accounting for 55% of skin thickness in these. The MRI magnetization transfer rate was lower by 50% in this layer as compared to the upper dermis, consistent with lower collagen content. The MRI transverse relaxation time, T2, was greater by 30% in the dermis of the oim/oim mice compared to controls, consistent with a more highly hydrated collagen network. Similarly, an FT-IRIS-defined measure of collagen integrity was 30% lower in the oim/oim mice. We conclude that characterization of phenotypic differences between the skin of OI and wild-type mice by MRI and FT-IRIS is feasible, and that these techniques provide powerful complementary approaches for the analysis of the skin phenotype in animal models of disease.

  6. Abnormal type I collagen post-translational modification and crosslinking in a cyclophilin B KO mouse model of recessive osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Wayne A; Perdivara, Irina; Weis, MaryAnn; Terajima, Masahiko; Blissett, Angela R; Chang, Weizhong; Perosky, Joseph E; Makareeva, Elena N; Mertz, Edward L; Leikin, Sergey; Tomer, Kenneth B; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Eyre, David R; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Marini, Joan C

    2014-06-01

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB), encoded by PPIB, is an ER-resident peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that functions independently and as a component of the collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. CyPB is proposed to be the major PPIase catalyzing the rate-limiting step in collagen folding. Mutations in PPIB cause recessively inherited osteogenesis imperfecta type IX, a moderately severe to lethal bone dysplasia. To investigate the role of CyPB in collagen folding and post-translational modifications, we generated Ppib-/- mice that recapitulate the OI phenotype. Knock-out (KO) mice are small, with reduced femoral areal bone mineral density (aBMD), bone volume per total volume (BV/TV) and mechanical properties, as well as increased femoral brittleness. Ppib transcripts are absent in skin, fibroblasts, femora and calvarial osteoblasts, and CyPB is absent from KO osteoblasts and fibroblasts on western blots. Only residual (2-11%) collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation is detectable in KO cells and tissues. Collagen folds more slowly in the absence of CyPB, supporting its rate-limiting role in folding. However, treatment of KO cells with cyclosporine A causes further delay in folding, indicating the potential existence of another collagen PPIase. We confirmed and extended the reported role of CyPB in supporting collagen lysyl hydroxylase (LH1) activity. Ppib-/- fibroblast and osteoblast collagen has normal total lysyl hydroxylation, while increased collagen diglycosylation is observed. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of bone and osteoblast type I collagen revealed site-specific alterations of helical lysine hydroxylation, in particular, significantly reduced hydroxylation of helical crosslinking residue K87. Consequently, underhydroxylated forms of di- and trivalent crosslinks are strikingly increased in KO bone, leading to increased total crosslinks and decreased helical hydroxylysine- to lysine-derived crosslink ratios. The altered crosslink

  7. Rough endoplasmic reticulum trafficking errors by different classes of mutant dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) cause dominant negative effects in both dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia by entrapping normal DSPP.

    PubMed

    von Marschall, Zofia; Mok, Seeun; Phillips, Matthew D; McKnight, Dianalee A; Fisher, Larry W

    2012-06-01

    Families with nonsyndromic dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and the milder, dentin dysplasia (DD), have mutations in one allele of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene. Because loss of a single Dspp allele in mice (and likely, humans) causes no dental phenotype, the mechanism(s) underling the dominant negative effects were investigated. DSPP mutations occur in three classes. (The first class, the mid-leader missense mutation, Y6D, was not investigated in this report.) All other 5′ mutations of DSPP result in changes/loss in the first three amino acids (isoleucine-proline-valine [IPV]) of mature DSPP or, for the A15V missense mutation, some retention of the hydrophobic leader sequence. All of this second class of mutations caused mutant DSPP to be retained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) of transfected HEK293 cells. Trafficking out of the rER by coexpressed normal DSPP was reduced in a dose-responsive manner, probably due to formation of Ca2+-dependent complexes with the retained mutant DSPP. IPV-like sequences begin many secreted Ca2+-binding proteins, and changing the third amino acid to the charged aspartate (D) in three other acidic proteins also caused increased rER accumulation. Both the leader-retaining A15V and the long string of hydrophobic amino acids resulting from all known frameshift mutations within the 3′-encoded Ca2+-binding repeat domain (third class of mutations) caused retention by association of the mutant proteins with rER membranes. More 5′ frameshift mutations result in longer mutant hydrophobic domains, but the milder phenotype, DD, probably due to lower effectiveness of the remaining, shorter Ca2+-binding domain in capturing normal DSPP protein within the rER. This study presents evidence of a shared underlying mechanism of capturing of normal DSPP by two different classes of DSPP mutations and offers an explanation for the mild (DD-II) versus severe (DGI-II and III) nonsyndromic dentin phenotypes. Evidence is also

  8. Abnormal Type I Collagen Post-translational Modification and Crosslinking in a Cyclophilin B KO Mouse Model of Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Wayne A.; Perdivara, Irina; Weis, MaryAnn; Terajima, Masahiko; Blissett, Angela R.; Chang, Weizhong; Perosky, Joseph E.; Makareeva, Elena N.; Mertz, Edward L.; Leikin, Sergey; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Eyre, David R.; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Marini, Joan C.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB), encoded by PPIB, is an ER-resident peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that functions independently and as a component of the collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. CyPB is proposed to be the major PPIase catalyzing the rate-limiting step in collagen folding. Mutations in PPIB cause recessively inherited osteogenesis imperfecta type IX, a moderately severe to lethal bone dysplasia. To investigate the role of CyPB in collagen folding and post-translational modifications, we generated Ppib−/− mice that recapitulate the OI phenotype. Knock-out (KO) mice are small, with reduced femoral areal bone mineral density (aBMD), bone volume per total volume (BV/TV) and mechanical properties, as well as increased femoral brittleness. Ppib transcripts are absent in skin, fibroblasts, femora and calvarial osteoblasts, and CyPB is absent from KO osteoblasts and fibroblasts on western blots. Only residual (2–11%) collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation is detectable in KO cells and tissues. Collagen folds more slowly in the absence of CyPB, supporting its rate-limiting role in folding. However, treatment of KO cells with cyclosporine A causes further delay in folding, indicating the potential existence of another collagen PPIase. We confirmed and extended the reported role of CyPB in supporting collagen lysyl hydroxylase (LH1) activity. Ppib−/− fibroblast and osteoblast collagen has normal total lysyl hydroxylation, while increased collagen diglycosylation is observed. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of bone and osteoblast type I collagen revealed site-specific alterations of helical lysine hydroxylation, in particular, significantly reduced hydroxylation of helical crosslinking residue K87. Consequently, underhydroxylated forms of di- and trivalent crosslinks are strikingly increased in KO bone, leading to increased total crosslinks and decreased helical hydroxylysine- to lysine-derived crosslink ratios. The altered

  9. Nephrocalcinosis (Enamel Renal Syndrome) Caused by Autosomal Recessive FAM20A Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jaureguiberry, Graciana; De la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Parry, David; Quentric, Mickael; Himmerkus, Nina; Koike, Toshiyasu; Poulter, James; Klootwijk, Enriko; Robinette, Steven L.; Howie, Alexander J.; Patel, Vaksha; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Stanescu, Horia C.; Issler, Naomi; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Laing, Christopher; Walsh, Stephen B.; McCredie, David A.; Povey, Sue; Asselin, Audrey; Picard, Arnaud; Coulomb, Aurore; Medlar, Alan J.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Verloes, Alain; Le Caignec, Cedric; Roussey, Gwenaelle; Guiol, Julien; Isidor, Bertrand; Logan, Clare; Shore, Roger; Johnson, Colin; Inglehearn, Christopher; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Schmittbuhl, Matthieu; Clauss, François; Huckert, Mathilde; Laugel, Virginie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Pajarola, Sandra; Spartà, Giuseppina; Bartholdi, Deborah; Rauch, Anita; Addor, Marie-Claude; Yamaguti, Paulo M.; Safatle, Heloisa P.; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; dos Santos Netos, Pedro E.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Gruessel, Sandra; Sandmann, Carolin; Ruehmann, Denise; Langman, Craig B.; Scheinman, Steven J.; Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Hart, Thomas C.; Hart, P. Suzanne; Neugebauer, Ute; Schlatter, Eberhard; Houillier, Pascal; Gahl, William A.; Vikkula, Miikka; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Bleich, Markus; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Unwin, Robert J.; Mighell, Alan; Berdal, Ariane; Kleta, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Calcium homeostasis requires regulated cellular and interstitial systems interacting to modulate the activity and movement of this ion. Disruption of these systems in the kidney results in nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis, important medical problems whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Methods We investigated 25 patients from 16 families with unexplained nephrocalcinosis and characteristic dental defects (amelogenesis imperfecta, gingival hyperplasia, impaired tooth eruption). To identify the causative gene, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis, exome capture, next-generation sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. Results All patients had bi-allelic FAM20A mutations segregating with the disease; 20 different mutations were identified. Conclusions This au-tosomal recessive disorder, also known as enamel renal syndrome, of FAM20A causes nephrocalcinosis and amelogenesis imperfecta. We speculate that all individuals with biallelic FAM20A mutations will eventually show nephrocalcinosis. PMID:23434854

  10. Child Abuse or Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most cases involve a defect in type 1 collagen—the protein “scaffolding” of bone and other connective ... bodies to make either too little type 1 collagen or poor quality type 1 collagen. The result ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: osteogenesis imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... proteins that are used to assemble type I collagen. This type of collagen is the most abundant protein in bone, skin, ... genetic changes reduce the amount of type I collagen produced in the body, which causes bones to ...

  12. Fast Facts on Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... IV in appearance and symptoms of OI. The alkaline phosphatase (an enzyme linked to bone formation) activity ... for people with OI. This treatment involves inserting metal rods through the length of the long bones ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: dentinogenesis imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... Review. Citation on PubMed Kim JW, Hu JC, Lee JI, Moon SK, Kim YJ, Jang KT, Lee SH, Kim CC, Hahn SH, Simmer JP. Mutational ... on PubMed Kim JW, Nam SH, Jang KT, Lee SH, Kim CC, Hahn SH, Hu JC, Simmer ...

  14. Myths about OI (Osteogenesis Imperfecta)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Groups Glossary Links of Interest Clinic Directory Child Abuse Allegations Adoption Brittle Bone Disorders Rare Disease Consortium ... can be easily distinguished from those caused by child abuse. FACT: Children with OI can have all types ...

  15. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype.

  16. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype. PMID:26799614

  17. The genetic basis of inherited anomalies of the teeth. Part 2: syndromes with significant dental involvement.

    PubMed

    Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Berdal, Ariane; Vinckier, Frans; de Ravel, Thomy; Fryns, Jean Pierre; Verloes, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Teeth are specialized structural components of the craniofacial skeleton. Developmental defects occur either alone or in combination with other birth defects. In this paper, we review the dental anomalies in several multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndromes, in which the dental component is pivotal in the recognition of the phenotype and/or the molecular basis of the disorder is known. We will consider successively syndromic forms of amelogenesis imperfecta or enamel defects, dentinogenesis imperfecta (i.e. osteogenesis imperfecta) and other dentine anomalies. Focusing on dental aspects, we will review a selection of MCA syndromes associated with teeth number and/or shape anomalies. A better knowledge of the dental phenotype may contribute to an earlier diagnosis of some MCA syndromes involving teeth anomalies. They may serve as a diagnostic indicator or help confirm a syndrome diagnosis. PMID:18599376

  18. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  19. Amelogenins as Potential Buffers during Secretory-stage Amelogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, J.; Lyaruu, D.M.; Takano, Y.; Gibson, C.W.; DenBesten, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenins are the most abundant protein species in forming dental enamel, taken to regulate crystal shape and crystal growth. Unprotonated amelogenins can bind protons, suggesting that amelogenins could regulate the pH in enamel in situ. We hypothesized that without amelogenins the enamel would acidify unless ameloblasts were buffered by alternative ways. To investigate this, we measured the mineral and chloride content in incisor enamel of amelogenin-knockout (AmelX-/-) mice and determined the pH of enamel by staining with methyl-red. Ameloblasts were immunostained for anion exchanger-2 (Ae2), a transmembrane pH regulator sensitive for acid that secretes bicarbonate in exchange for chloride. The enamel of AmelX-/- mice was 10-fold thinner, mineralized in the secretory stage 1.8-fold more than wild-type enamel and containing less chloride (suggesting more bicarbonate secretion). Enamel of AmelX-/- mice stained with methyl-red contained no acidic bands in the maturation stage as seen in wild-type enamel. Secretory ameloblasts of AmelX-/- mice, but not wild-type mice, were immunopositive for Ae2, and stained more intensely in the maturation stage compared with wild-type mice. Exposure of AmelX-/- mice to fluoride enhanced the mineral content in the secretory stage, lowered chloride, and intensified Ae2 immunostaining in the enamel organ in comparison with non-fluorotic mutant teeth. The results suggest that unprotonated amelogenins may regulate the pH of forming enamel in situ. Without amelogenins, Ae2 could compensate for the pH drop associated with crystal formation. PMID:25535204

  20. [The child with osteogenesis imperfecta. Care plans].

    PubMed

    Fernández Maldonado, Ana I; Gutiérrez Alonso, José Luis

    2002-06-01

    The authors state what is the nursing care to follow with a child affected by imperfect osteogenesis. This treatment is divided into three fundamental parts. In the first part, one plans out the psycho-sociological assistance the parents in question need in order to achieve their acceptance of a child suffering from a serious illness. In the second part, the authors describe the physical and psychological treatment which patients suffering imperfect osteogenesis should receive in order to avoid serious complications which can develop during their growth, treatment directed towards the family and the professional who shall care for this child. Finally in the third part, a child suffering imperfect osteogenesis shall receive the necessary knowledge and skills so that he/she can achieve maximum social integration. PMID:14508948

  1. What Are the Symptoms of Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePlus

    ... deformities worsen over time The bone deformities and collagen defects common to OI can affect various internal ... be less space for the lungs to expand. Collagen also is an important building block of connective ...

  2. Planning for Your Child's Surgery (Osteogenesis Imperfecta)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when something hurts. Common reactions to pain include anger, whining, uncooperativeness, regression to babyish behavior previously outgrown, ... It is normal to experience feelings of guilt, anger, sorrow, depression, fatigue, and stress. The hospital routine ...

  3. What Are the Treatments for Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles, clinical trials, resources Clinical Trials & Clinical Research Find clinical trials, guidance for clinical researchers Health Education Campaigns & Programs Safe to Sleep, Media-Smart Youth, Maternal/Child Health Education Program NICHD Publications ...

  4. Enamel-renal-gingival syndrome and FAM20A mutations.

    PubMed

    Kantaputra, Piranit Nik; Kaewgahya, Massupa; Khemaleelakul, Udomrat; Dejkhamron, Prapai; Sutthimethakorn, Suchitra; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Iamaroon, Anak

    2014-01-01

    The enamel-renal syndrome of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) and nephrocalcinosis, and the amelogenesis imperfecta-gingival fibromatosis syndrome have both been associated with mutations in FAM20A. We report on two unrelated Thai patients with three novel and one previously reported mutations in FAM20A with findings suggesting both disorders, including hypoplastic AI, gingival fibromatosis, unerupted teeth, aggressive periodontitis, and nephrocalcinosis/nephrolithiasis. Additional findings consisted of a supernumerary premolar, localized aggressive periodontitis, thin alveolar bone, vitamin D deficiency-associated hyperparathyroidism, and heterotopic calcification in other tissues, including lungs, dental pulp, gingiva, dental follicles, and periodontal tissues, and early cessation of limited menstruation. Greater promotory activity of urine on calcium oxalate crystal growth compared to controls may help to explain the pathogenesis, and suggest that FAM20A mutations can contribute to nephrocalcinosis/nephrolithiasis. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of FAM20A mutations. Since both of our patients and a large number of previously reported cases had all the important features of both syndromes, including AI, renal anomalies, and gingival fibromatosis, we are convinced that these two disorders actually are the same entity. The name of enamel-renal-gingival syndrome is suggested. PMID:24259279

  5. Tricho-Dento-Osseous Syndrome: Diagnosis and Dental Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Batayneh, Ola B.

    2012-01-01

    Tricho-dento-osseous (TDO) syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder principally characterised by curly hair at infancy, severe enamel hypomineralization and hypoplasia and taurodontism of teeth, sclerotic bone, and other defects. Diagnostic criteria are based on the generalized enamel defects, severe taurodontism especially of the mandibular first permanent molars, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, and at least one of the other features (i.e., nail defects, bone sclerosis, and curly, kinky or wavy hair present at a young age that may straighten out later). Confusion with amelogenesis imperfecta is common; however, taurodontism is not a constant feature of any of the types of amelogenesis imperfecta. Management of TDO requires a team approach, proper documentation, and a long-term treatment and follow-up plan. The aim of treatment is to prevent problems such as sensitivity, caries, dental abscesses, and loss of occlusal vertical dimension through attrition of hypoplastic tooth structure. Another aim is to restore function of the dentition and enhance the esthetics and self-esteem of the patient. This paper proposes treatment approaches that include preventive, restorative, endodontic, prosthetic, and surgical options to management. In addition, it sheds light on the difficulties faced during dental treatment of such cases. PMID:22969805

  6. A solution NMR investigation into the impaired self-assembly properties of two murine amelogenins containing the point mutations T21→I or P41→T

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Lin, Genyao; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-08-26

    Amelogenesis imperfecta describes a group of inherited disorders that results in defective tooth enamel. Two disorders associated with human amelogenesis imperfecta are the point mutations T21?I or P40?T in amelogenin, the dominant protein present during the early stages of enamel biomineralization. The biophysical properties of wildtype murine amelogenin (M180) and two proteins containing the equivalent mutations in murine amelogenin, T21?I (M180-I) and P41?T (M180-T), were probed by NMR spectroscopy. At low protein concentration (0.1 mM), M180, M180-I, and M180-T are predomi- nately monomeric at pH 3.0 in 2% acetic acid and neither mutation produces a major structural change. Chemical shift perturbation studies as a function of protein (0.1–1.8 mM) or NaCl (0–400 mM) concentra- tions show that the mutations affect the self-association properties by causing self-assembly at lower protein or salt concentrations, relative to wildtype amelogenin, with the largest effect observed for M180-I. Under both conditions, the premature self-assembly is initiated near the N-terminus, providing further evidence for the importance of this region in the self-assembly process. The self-association of M180-I and M180-T at lower protein concentrations and lower ionic strengths than wildtype M180 may account for the clinical phenotypes of these mutations, defective enamel formation.

  7. Enamel-renal-gingival syndrome and FAM20A mutations.

    PubMed

    Kantaputra, Piranit Nik; Kaewgahya, Massupa; Khemaleelakul, Udomrat; Dejkhamron, Prapai; Sutthimethakorn, Suchitra; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Iamaroon, Anak

    2014-01-01

    The enamel-renal syndrome of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) and nephrocalcinosis, and the amelogenesis imperfecta-gingival fibromatosis syndrome have both been associated with mutations in FAM20A. We report on two unrelated Thai patients with three novel and one previously reported mutations in FAM20A with findings suggesting both disorders, including hypoplastic AI, gingival fibromatosis, unerupted teeth, aggressive periodontitis, and nephrocalcinosis/nephrolithiasis. Additional findings consisted of a supernumerary premolar, localized aggressive periodontitis, thin alveolar bone, vitamin D deficiency-associated hyperparathyroidism, and heterotopic calcification in other tissues, including lungs, dental pulp, gingiva, dental follicles, and periodontal tissues, and early cessation of limited menstruation. Greater promotory activity of urine on calcium oxalate crystal growth compared to controls may help to explain the pathogenesis, and suggest that FAM20A mutations can contribute to nephrocalcinosis/nephrolithiasis. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of FAM20A mutations. Since both of our patients and a large number of previously reported cases had all the important features of both syndromes, including AI, renal anomalies, and gingival fibromatosis, we are convinced that these two disorders actually are the same entity. The name of enamel-renal-gingival syndrome is suggested.

  8. Molecular basis and consequences of a deletion in the amelogenin gene, analyzed by capture PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerstroem-Fermer, M.; Pettersson, U.; Landegren, U. )

    1993-07-01

    A mutation that disrupts the gene for one of the major proteins in tooth enamel has been investigated. The mutation is located in the amelogenin gene and causes X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta, characterized by defective mineralization of tooth enamel. The authors have isolated the breakpoints of a 5-kb deletion in the amelogenin gene on the basis of nucleotide sequence information located upstream of the lesion, using a technique termed capture PCR. The deletion removes five of the seven exons, spanning from the second intron to the last exon. Only the first two codons for the mature protein remain, consistent with the relatively severe phenotype of affected individuals in the present family. The mutation appears to have arisen as an illegitimate recombination event since of 11 nucleotide positions immediately surrounding the two breakpoints, 9 are identical. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Functions of KLK4 and MMP-20 in dental enamel formation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuhe; Papagerakis, Petros; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Hu, Jan C-C; Bartlett, John D; Simmer, James P

    2008-06-01

    Two proteases are secreted into the enamel matrix of developing teeth. The early protease is enamelysin (MMP-20). The late protease is kallikrein 4 (KLK4). Mutations in MMP20 and KLK4 both cause autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta, a condition featuring soft, porous enamel containing residual protein. MMP-20 is secreted along with enamel proteins by secretory-stage ameloblasts. Enamel protein-cleavage products accumulate in the space between the crystal ribbons, helping to support them. MMP-20 steadily cleaves accumulated enamel proteins, so their concentration decreases with depth. KLK4 is secreted by transition- and maturation-stage ameloblasts. KLK4 aggressively degrades the retained organic matrix following the termination of enamel protein secretion. The principle functions of MMP-20 and KLK4 in dental enamel formation are to facilitate the orderly replacement of organic matrix with mineral, generating an enamel layer that is harder, less porous, and unstained by retained enamel proteins.

  10. A Novel Mutation in the ROGDI Gene in a Patient with Kohlschütter-Tönz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huckert, Mathilde; Mecili, Helen; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Stoetzel, Corinne; Muller, Jean; Flori, Elisabeth; Laugel, Vincent; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Kohlschütter-Tönz Syndrome (KTZS) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ROGDI gene. This syndrome is characterized by epilepsy, psychomotor regression and amelogenesis imperfecta. In this paper, we report a case of a 13-year-old Malian girl presenting with this rare disease. By genetic analysis, we identified a novel ROGDI homozygous mutation NM_024589.1: c.117+1G>T [Chr16 (GRCh37): g.4852382C>A] which confirmed the diagnosis of Kohlschütter-Tönz syndrome. The mutation abolishes the usual splice donor site of intron 2 which leads to the deletion of exon 2 and in-frame assembly of exon 3. Exon 2 encodes a highly conserved leucine-rich region that is essential for ROGDI protein function. Hence, this deletion may affect the function of the ROGDI protein. PMID:25565929

  11. A Novel Mutation in the ROGDI Gene in a Patient with Kohlschütter-Tönz Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huckert, Mathilde; Mecili, Helen; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Stoetzel, Corinne; Muller, Jean; Flori, Elisabeth; Laugel, Vincent; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2014-12-01

    Kohlschütter-Tönz Syndrome (KTZS) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ROGDI gene. This syndrome is characterized by epilepsy, psychomotor regression and amelogenesis imperfecta. In this paper, we report a case of a 13-year-old Malian girl presenting with this rare disease. By genetic analysis, we identified a novel ROGDI homozygous mutation NM_024589.1: c.117+1G>T [Chr16 (GRCh37): g.4852382C>A] which confirmed the diagnosis of Kohlschütter-Tönz syndrome. The mutation abolishes the usual splice donor site of intron 2 which leads to the deletion of exon 2 and in-frame assembly of exon 3. Exon 2 encodes a highly conserved leucine-rich region that is essential for ROGDI protein function. Hence, this deletion may affect the function of the ROGDI protein.

  12. Severe early onset retinitis pigmentosa in a Moroccan patient with Heimler syndrome due to novel homozygous mutation of PEX1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ratbi, Ilham; Jaouad, Imane Cherkaoui; Elorch, Hamza; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Elalloussi, Mustapha; Lyahyai, Jaber; Berraho, Amina; Newman, William G; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2016-10-01

    Heimler syndrome (HS) is a rare recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), amelogenesis imperfecta, nail abnormalities, and occasional or late-onset retinal pigmentation. It is the mildest form known to date of peroxisome biogenesis disorder caused by hypomorphic mutations of PEX1 and PEX6 genes. We report on a second Moroccan family with Heimler syndrome with early onset, severe visual impairment and important phenotypic overlap with Usher syndrome. The patient carried a novel homozygous missense variant c.3140T > C (p.Leu1047Pro) of PEX1 gene. As standard biochemical screening of blood for evidence of a peroxisomal disorder did not provide a diagnosis in the individuals with HS, patients with SNHL and retinal pigmentation should have mutation analysis of PEX1 and PEX6 genes. PMID:27633571

  13. Severe early onset retinitis pigmentosa in a Moroccan patient with Heimler syndrome due to novel homozygous mutation of PEX1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ratbi, Ilham; Jaouad, Imane Cherkaoui; Elorch, Hamza; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Elalloussi, Mustapha; Lyahyai, Jaber; Berraho, Amina; Newman, William G; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2016-10-01

    Heimler syndrome (HS) is a rare recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), amelogenesis imperfecta, nail abnormalities, and occasional or late-onset retinal pigmentation. It is the mildest form known to date of peroxisome biogenesis disorder caused by hypomorphic mutations of PEX1 and PEX6 genes. We report on a second Moroccan family with Heimler syndrome with early onset, severe visual impairment and important phenotypic overlap with Usher syndrome. The patient carried a novel homozygous missense variant c.3140T > C (p.Leu1047Pro) of PEX1 gene. As standard biochemical screening of blood for evidence of a peroxisomal disorder did not provide a diagnosis in the individuals with HS, patients with SNHL and retinal pigmentation should have mutation analysis of PEX1 and PEX6 genes.

  14. Full-mouth oral rehabilitation in a titanium allergy patient using zirconium oxide dental implants and zirconium oxide restorations. A case report from an ongoing clinical study.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Xavi; Oliva, Josep; Oliva, Josep D

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes the full-mouth oral rehabilitation of a titanium allergic patient. The patient was a young female with amelogenesis imperfecta who had generalized massive tooth destruction. All teeth in the mouth were extracted and 15 CeraRoot acid-etched (ICE surface) implants were placed (seven implants in the maxilla and eight implants in the mandible). No immediate temporaries were placed. Temporaries were placed 3 months after surgery, and left in function for 2 months. The case was finally restored with zirconium oxide bridges and ceramic veneering (three bridges in the maxilla and another three in the mandible). The 3-year follow-up showed good stability of soft tissues and bone level. Zirconium oxide implants and restorations might be an alternative for the oral rehabilitation of titanium allergic patients.

  15. Imaging evalution of the gingival fibromatosis and dental abnormalities syndrome

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Neto, PE; dos Santos, LAN; Coletta, RD; Laranjeira, AL; de Oliveira Santos, CC; Bonan, PR; Martelli-Júnior, H

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dentomaxillofacial imaging features of one family affected by the gingival fibromatosis (GF) and dental abnormalities (DA) syndrome. Methods Conventional radiographs (periapical and panoramic) and cone beam CT (CBCT) were performed in nine members of this family: four were affected by the syndrome and five were not. Results The four affected members demonstrated mild generalized GF in association with DA, including hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta, intrapulpal calcifications, delay on tooth eruption and pericoronal radiolucencies in unerupted teeth. None of these oral changes were identified in the five unaffected members. All nine members presented alterations in the paranasal sinuses and mucosal thickening of the maxillary sinus was the most common finding. Conclusion Family members not affected by the syndrome showed similar alterations in the paranasal sinuses and CBCT was useful to characterize the dentomaxillofacial features of this new syndrome associating GF and DA. PMID:21493880

  16. Pathognomonic oral profile of Enamel Renal Syndrome (ERS) caused by recessive FAM20A mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects. Commonly described as an isolated trait, it may be observed concomitantly with other orodental and/or systemic features such as nephrocalcinosis in Enamel Renal Syndrome (ERS, MIM#204690), or gingival hyperplasia in Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Gingival Fibromatosis Syndrome (AIGFS, MIM#614253). Patients affected by ERS/AIGFS present a distinctive orodental phenotype consisting of generalized hypoplastic AI affecting both the primary and permanent dentition, delayed tooth eruption, pulp stones, hyperplastic dental follicles, and gingival hyperplasia with variable severity and calcified nodules. Renal exam reveals a nephrocalcinosis which is asymptomatic in children affected by ERS. FAM20A recessive mutations are responsible for both syndromes. We suggest that AIGFS and ERS are in fact descriptions of the same syndrome, but that the kidney phenotype has not always been investigated fully in AIGFS. The aim of this review is to highlight the distinctive and specific orodental features of patients with recessive mutations in FAM20A. We propose ERS to be the preferred term for all the phenotypes arising from recessive FAM20A mutations. A differential diagnosis has to be made with other forms of AI, isolated or syndromic, where only a subset of the clinical signs may be shared. When ERS is suspected, the patient should be assessed by a dentist, nephrologist and clinical geneticist. Confirmed cases require long-term follow-up. Management of the orodental aspects can be extremely challenging and requires the input of multi-disciplinary specialized dental team, especially when there are multiple unerupted teeth. PMID:24927635

  17. Postnatal epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells in bioengineered amelogenesis and dentinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Zhou, Jian; Chen, Mo; Schiff, Michael D.; Lee, Chang H.; Kong, Kimi; Embree, Mildred C.; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    Rodent incisors provide a classic model for studying epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in development. However, postnatal stem/progenitor cells in rodent incisors have not been exploited for tooth regeneration. Here, we characterized postnatal rat incisor epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells and found that they formed enamel- and dentin-like tissues in vivo. Epithelium and mesenchyme cells were harvested separately from the apical region of postnatal 4–5 day rat incisors. Epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes were confirmed by immunocytochemistry, CFU assay and/or multi-lineage differentiation. CK14+, Sox2+ and Lgr5+ epithelium stem cells from the cervical loop significantly enhanced amelogenin and ameloblastin expression upon BMP4 or FGF3 stimulation, signifying their differentiation towards ameloblast-like cells, whereas mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells upon BMP4, BMP7 and Wnt3a treatment robustly expressed Dspp, a hallmark of odontoblastic differentiation. We then control-released microencapsulated BMP4, BMP7 and Wnt3a in transplants of epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells in the renal capsule of athymic mice in vivo. Enamel and dentin-like tissues were generated in two integrated layers with specific expression of amelogenin and ameloblastin in the newly formed, de novo enamel-like tissue, and DSP in dentin-like tissue. These findings suggest that postnatal epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells can be primed by pivotal signals towards bioengineered tooth regeneration. PMID:24345734

  18. Ameloblast Modulation and Transport of Cl⁻, Na⁺, and K⁺ during Amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bronckers, A L J J; Lyaruu, D; Jalali, R; Medina, J F; Zandieh-Doulabi, B; DenBesten, P K

    2015-12-01

    Ameloblasts express transmembrane proteins for transport of mineral ions and regulation of pH in the enamel space. Two major transporters recently identified in ameloblasts are the Na(+)K(+)-dependent calcium transporter NCKX4 and the Na(+)-dependent HPO4 (2-) (Pi) cotransporter NaPi-2b. To regulate pH, ameloblasts express anion exchanger 2 (Ae2a,b), chloride channel Cftr, and amelogenins that can bind protons. Exposure to fluoride or null mutation of Cftr, Ae2a,b, or Amelx each results in formation of hypomineralized enamel. We hypothesized that enamel hypomineralization associated with disturbed pH regulation results from reduced ion transport by NCKX4 and NaPi-2b. This was tested by correlation analyses among the levels of Ca, Pi, Cl, Na, and K in forming enamel of mice with null mutation of Cftr, Ae2a,b, and Amelx, according to quantitative x-ray electron probe microanalysis. Immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction analysis, and Western blotting confirmed the presence of apical NaPi-2b and Nckx4 in maturation-stage ameloblasts. In wild-type mice, K levels in enamel were negatively correlated with Ca and Cl but less negatively or even positively in fluorotic enamel. Na did not correlate with P or Ca in enamel of wild-type mice but showed strong positive correlation in fluorotic and nonfluorotic Ae2a,b- and Cftr-null enamel. In hypomineralizing enamel of all models tested, 1) Cl(-) was strongly reduced; 2) K(+) and Na(+) accumulated (Na(+) not in Amelx-null enamel); and 3) modulation was delayed or blocked. These results suggest that a Na(+)K(+)-dependent calcium transporter (likely NCKX4) and a Na(+)-dependent Pi transporter (potentially NaPi-2b) located in ruffle-ended ameloblasts operate in a coordinated way with the pH-regulating machinery to transport Ca(2+), Pi, and bicarbonate into maturation-stage enamel. Acidification and/or associated physicochemical/electrochemical changes in ion levels in enamel fluid near the apical ameloblast membrane may reduce the transport activity of mineral transporters, which results in hypomineralization. PMID:26403673

  19. Claudin-16 Deficiency Impairs Tight Junction Function in Ameloblasts, Leading to Abnormal Enamel Formation.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Claire; Courson, Frédéric; Wu, Yong; Khaddam, Mayssam; Salmon, Benjamin; Ribes, Sandy; Thumfart, Julia; Yamaguti, Paulo M; Rochefort, Gael Y; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Garcia-Castaño, Alejandro; Vallée, Benoit; Le Denmat, Dominique; Baroukh, Brigitte; Guilbert, Thomas; Schmitt, Alain; Massé, Jean-Marc; Bazin, Dominique; Lorenz, Georg; Morawietz, Maria; Hou, Jianghui; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Manzanares, Maria Cristina; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Talmud, Deborah; Demontis, Renato; Neves, Francisco; Zenaty, Delphine; Berdal, Ariane; Kiesow, Andreas; Petzold, Matthias; Menashi, Suzanne; Linglart, Agnes; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Müller, Dominik; Houillier, Pascal; Chaussain, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Claudin-16 protein (CLDN16) is a component of tight junctions (TJ) with a restrictive distribution so far demonstrated mainly in the kidney. Here, we demonstrate the expression of CLDN16 also in the tooth germ and show that claudin-16 gene (CLDN16) mutations result in amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the 5 studied patients with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC). To investigate the role of CLDN16 in tooth formation, we studied a murine model of FHHNC and showed that CLDN16 deficiency led to altered secretory ameloblast TJ structure, lowering of extracellular pH in the forming enamel matrix, and abnormal enamel matrix protein processing, resulting in an enamel phenotype closely resembling human AI. This study unravels an association of FHHNC owing to CLDN16 mutations with AI, which is directly related to the loss of function of CLDN16 during amelogenesis. Overall, this study indicates for the first time the importance of a TJ protein in tooth formation and underlines the need to establish a specific dental follow-up for these patients.

  20. [The combined treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta in children].

    PubMed

    Berezhnoĭ, A P; Shilov, A V; Belova, N A; Snetkov, A I

    1989-12-01

    The authors present the results of complex drug and orthopaedic treatment of children with imperfect osteogenesis. 40 patients were treated with a somatotropic hormone, calcitrin and vitamin D metabolites (oxydevit and dihydrocholecalciferol). In 20 of these patients corrective osteotomies of the long bones of the lower extremities combined with metal osteosynthesis with rods and massive plates were performed. In a number of patients osteoplasty with long cortical allografts was made. After the treatment all the children were able to move independently either with the aid of unloading orthopaedic apparatuses (17 patients), or without them (3 patients). PMID:2628828

  1. [The oral aspects of osteogenesis imperfecta. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Moniaci, D; Migliario, M; Flecchia, G; Re, G

    1989-10-01

    The oral symptoms observable in patients with imperfect osteogenesis are described and a clinical case that makes a contribution to our knowledge of a rarely encountered pathology is reported. PMID:2615733

  2. [Children with osteogenesis imperfecta. An infrequent but important disease].

    PubMed

    Fernández Maldonado, A I; Gutiérrez Alonso, J L

    2001-05-01

    Imperfect osteogenesis is a disease which is included in the group of the osseous dysplasias having a heterogeneous genetic character and whose basic defect is an alteration in the synthesis of Procollagen I. This leads to a serious fragility in skeletal structures as well as in exoskeletal structures, causing multiple fractures and deformities. The absence of a truly effective medical, surgical or orthopedic treatment makes correctly planned nursing care acquire vital importance in order to succeed in avoiding, and diminishing, fractures and deformities due to an inadequate handling of these patients; while to the contrary contributing to success in integrating these patients into society in the best possible conditions. This is the first of two articles which the authors will dedicate to this disease; this disease will be described in this first article, while the second one will concentrate exclusively on nursing treatments recommended for patients suffering from this disease. PMID:12033039

  3. [Massive fecal impaction in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta].

    PubMed

    Bujanda, L; Beguiristain, A; Villar, J M; Medrano, M A; Arana, J; Alvarez-Caperochipi, J; Arenas, J I

    1994-05-01

    The case of a 22 year old male with massive faecal impaction and anorectal mechanical stenosis caused by multiples bone fractures and pelvic deformities secondary to imperfect osteogenesis is reported. The patient was treated with subtotal colectomy and permanent colostomy. PMID:8049109

  4. The genetic basis of inherited anomalies of the teeth. Part 1: clinical and molecular aspects of non-syndromic dental disorders.

    PubMed

    Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Molla, Muriel; Verloes, Alain; Berdal, Ariane

    2008-01-01

    The genetic control of dental development represents a complex series of events, which can very schematically be divided in two pathways: specification of type, size and position of each dental organ, and specific processes for the formation of enamel and dentin. Several genes linked with early tooth positioning and development, belong to signalling pathways and have morphogenesis regulatory functions in morphogenesis of other organs where they are associated with the signalling pathways. Their mutations often show pleïotropic effects beyond dental morphogenesis resulting in syndromic developmental disorders. Some genes affecting early tooth development (MSX1, AXIN2) are associated with tooth agenesis and systemic features (cleft palate, colorectal cancer). By contrast, genes involved in enamel (AMELX, ENAM, MMP20, and KLK4) and dentin (DSPP) structures are highly specific for tooth. Mutations in these genes have been identified as causes of amelogenesis imperfecta, dentinogenesis imperfecta, dentin dysplasias and anomalies of teeth number (hypo-, oligo and anodontia), which only partially overlap with the classical phenotypic classifications of dental disorders. This review of genetic basis of inherited anomalies describes, in this first paper, the molecular bases and clinical features of inherited non-syndromic teeth disorders. And in a second part, the review focus on genetic syndromes with dental involvement. PMID:18499550

  5. A targeted next-generation sequencing assay for the molecular diagnosis of genetic disorders with orodental involvement

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Megana K; Geoffroy, Véronique; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Dumas, Michael; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Switala, Marzena; Gasse, Barbara; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Paschaki, Marie; Leheup, Bruno; Droz, Dominique; Dalstein, Amelie; Loing, Adeline; Grollemund, Bruno; Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Lopez-Cazaux, Séréna; Minoux, Maryline; Jung, Sophie; Obry, Frédéric; Vogt, Vincent; Davideau, Jean-Luc; Davit-Beal, Tiphaine; Kaiser, Anne-Sophie; Moog, Ute; Richard, Béatrice; Morrier, Jean-Jacques; Duprez, Jean-Pierre; Odent, Sylvie; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Rousset, Monique Marie; Merametdijan, Laure; Toutain, Annick; Joseph, Clara; Giuliano, Fabienne; Dahlet, Jean-Christophe; Courval, Aymeric; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Laouina, Samir; Soskin, Sylvie; Guffon, Nathalie; Dieux, Anne; Doray, Bérénice; Feierabend, Stephanie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Fournier, Benjamin; de la Dure Molla, Muriel; Alembik, Yves; Tardieu, Corinne; Clauss, François; Berdal, Ariane; Stoetzel, Corinne; Manière, Marie Cécile; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Background Orodental diseases include several clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders that can present in isolation or as part of a genetic syndrome. Due to the vast number of genes implicated in these disorders, establishing a molecular diagnosis can be challenging. We aimed to develop a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay to diagnose mutations and potentially identify novel genes mutated in this group of disorders. Methods We designed an NGS gene panel that targets 585 known and candidate genes in orodental disease. We screened a cohort of 101 unrelated patients without a molecular diagnosis referred to the Reference Centre for Oro-Dental Manifestations of Rare Diseases, Strasbourg, France, for a variety of orodental disorders including isolated and syndromic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), isolated and syndromic selective tooth agenesis (STHAG), isolated and syndromic dentinogenesis imperfecta, isolated dentin dysplasia, otodental dysplasia and primary failure of tooth eruption. Results We discovered 21 novel pathogenic variants and identified the causative mutation in 39 unrelated patients in known genes (overall diagnostic rate: 39%). Among the largest subcohorts of patients with isolated AI (50 unrelated patients) and isolated STHAG (21 unrelated patients), we had a definitive diagnosis in 14 (27%) and 15 cases (71%), respectively. Surprisingly, COL17A1 mutations accounted for the majority of autosomal-dominant AI cases. Conclusions We have developed a novel targeted NGS assay for the efficient molecular diagnosis of a wide variety of orodental diseases. Furthermore, our panel will contribute to better understanding the contribution of these genes to orodental disease. Trial registration numbers NCT01746121 and NCT02397824. PMID:26502894

  6. The human enamel protein gene amelogenin is expressed from both the X and the Y chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Salido, E.C. ); Yen, P.H.; Koprivnikar, K.; Shapiro, L.J. ); Yu, Lohchung )

    1992-02-01

    Amelogenins, a family of extracellular matrix proteins of the dental enamel, are transiently but abundantly expressed by ameloblasts during tooth development. In this paper the authors report the characterization of the AMGX and AMGY genes on the short arms of the human X and Y chromosomes which encode the amelogenins. Their studies on the expression of the amelogenin genes in male developing tooth buds showed that both the AMGX and AMGY genes are transcriptionally active and encode potentially functional proteins. They have isolated genomic and cDNA clones form both the AMGX and AMGY loci and have studied the sequence organization of these two genes. Reverse transcriptase (RT)PCR amplification of the 5[prime] portion of the amelogenin transcripts revealed several alternatively spliced products. This information will be useful for studying the molecular basis of X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta, for understanding the evolution and regulation of gene expression on the mammalian sex chromosomes, and for investigating the role of amelogenin genes during tooth development.

  7. Evolutionary analysis suggests that AMTN is enamel-specific and a candidate for AI.

    PubMed

    Gasse, B; Silvent, J; Sire, J-Y

    2012-11-01

    Molecular evolutionary analysis is an efficient method to predict and/or validate amino acid substitutions that could lead to a genetic disease and to highlight residues and motifs that could play an important role in the protein structure and/or function. We have applied such analysis to amelotin (AMTN), a recently identified enamel protein in the rat, mouse, and humans. An in silico search for AMTN provided 42 new mammalian sequences that were added to the 3 published sequences with which we performed the analysis using a dataset representative of all lineages (circa 220 million years of evolution), including 2 enamel-less species, sloth and armadillo. During evolution, of the 209 residues of human AMTN, 17 were unchanged and 34 had conserved their chemical properties. Substituting these important residues could lead to amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Also, AMTN possesses a well-conserved signal peptide, 2 conserved motifs whose function is certainly important but unknown, and a putative phosphorylation site (SXE). In addition, the sequences of the 2 enamel-less species display mutations revealing that AMTN underwent pseudogenization, which suggests that AMTN is an enamel-specific protein. PMID:22968158

  8. Diseases of the tooth: the genetic and molecular basis of inherited anomalies affecting the dentition.

    PubMed

    Cobourne, Martyn T; Sharpe, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    In humans, inherited variation in the number, size, and shape of teeth within the dentitions are relatively common, while rarer defects of hard tissue formation, including amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta, and problems associated with tooth eruption are also seen. In many cases, these anomalies occur in isolation, but they can also present as a feature of numerous well-characterized developmental syndromes. Complex reiterative signaling between the epithelium and mesenchyme is a feature of normal tooth development in the embryo, occurring from early patterning through morphogenesis, hard tissue formation and during root development. Significant events also occur during postnatal development of the dentition, including hard tissue maturation and tooth eruption. In the last decade, advances in human and mouse genetics have meant that in many cases candidate genes have been identified for these anomalies. These genes have provided a useful platform for developmental biologists, allowing them to begin elucidating how these signals interact to generate a functional dentition and understand the mechanisms underlying many of the anomalies that are seen in human populations. In this article, we review current concepts relating to the developmental biology of tooth number, size, and shape, formation of the dental hard tissues and eruption of the tooth into the oral cavity. We will focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes in both health and disease.

  9. Complete mouth rehabilitation after transposition osteotomy based on intraoral scanning: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Güth, Jan-Frederik; Edelhoff, Daniel; Ihloff, Hela; Mast, Gerson

    2014-08-01

    This article describes the surgical and prosthodontic treatment of a patient with severe dysgnathia combined with amelogenesis imperfecta. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first treatment report to describe the application of intraoral scanning for a complete mouth reconstruction. After transposition osteotomy, the treatment included the simultaneous fabrication of antagonistic computer-aided design/computer-aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) long-term interim restorations for the maxilla and mandible and the establishment of a new centric relation position and adequate vertical dimension of occlusion. Particularly in complex situations, the major advantages of intraoral scanning can be identified as an extended magnification of the 3-dimensional digital data to control the preparation and impression at the dental office. However, the presented treatment revealed some deficiencies in the digital work flow that must be rectified. In combination with high-performance polymers, the CAD/CAM technology offers a wide range of new treatment options and simplifies the fabrication of long-term interim restorations. Although in the present treatment the esthetic and functional requirements of the patient were met, no published studies of this procedure have been based on intraoral scanning, and the approach has to be considered experimental.

  10. FAM83H and casein kinase I regulate the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and formation of desmosomes.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Takahisa; Sasaki, Mitsuho; Mikami, Toshinari; Miake, Yasuo; Adachi, Jun; Shimizu, Maiko; Saito, Youhei; Koura, Minako; Takeda, Yasunori; Matsuda, Junichiro; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Nakayama, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    FAM83H is essential for the formation of dental enamel because a mutation in the FAM83H gene causes amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). We previously reported that the overexpression of FAM83H often occurs and disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton in colorectal cancer cells. We herein show that FAM83H regulates the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and maintains the formation of desmosomes in ameloblastoma cells. FAM83H is expressed and localized on keratin filaments in human ameloblastoma cell lines and in mouse ameloblasts and epidermal germinative cells in vivo. FAM83H shows preferential localization to keratin filaments around the nucleus that often extend to cell-cell junctions. Alterations in the function of FAM83H by its overexpression, knockdown, or an AI-causing truncated mutant prevent the proper organization of the keratin cytoskeleton in ameloblastoma cells. Furthermore, the AI-causing mutant prevents desmosomal proteins from being localized to cell-cell junctions. The effects of the AI-causing mutant depend on its binding to and possible inhibition of casein kinase I (CK-1). The suppression of CK-1 by its inhibitor, D4476, disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest that AI caused by the FAM83H mutation is mediated by the disorganization of the keratin cytoskeleton and subsequent disruption of desmosomes in ameloblasts. PMID:27222304

  11. Evolutionary analysis suggests that AMTN is enamel-specific and a candidate for AI.

    PubMed

    Gasse, B; Silvent, J; Sire, J-Y

    2012-11-01

    Molecular evolutionary analysis is an efficient method to predict and/or validate amino acid substitutions that could lead to a genetic disease and to highlight residues and motifs that could play an important role in the protein structure and/or function. We have applied such analysis to amelotin (AMTN), a recently identified enamel protein in the rat, mouse, and humans. An in silico search for AMTN provided 42 new mammalian sequences that were added to the 3 published sequences with which we performed the analysis using a dataset representative of all lineages (circa 220 million years of evolution), including 2 enamel-less species, sloth and armadillo. During evolution, of the 209 residues of human AMTN, 17 were unchanged and 34 had conserved their chemical properties. Substituting these important residues could lead to amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Also, AMTN possesses a well-conserved signal peptide, 2 conserved motifs whose function is certainly important but unknown, and a putative phosphorylation site (SXE). In addition, the sequences of the 2 enamel-less species display mutations revealing that AMTN underwent pseudogenization, which suggests that AMTN is an enamel-specific protein.

  12. Heimler Syndrome Is Caused by Hypomorphic Mutations in the Peroxisome-Biogenesis Genes PEX1 and PEX6

    PubMed Central

    Ratbi, Ilham; Falkenberg, Kim D.; Sommen, Manou; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Guaoua, Soukaina; Vandeweyer, Geert; Urquhart, Jill E.; Chandler, Kate E.; Williams, Simon G.; Roberts, Neil A.; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Black, Graeme C.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Ramdi, Hind; Heimler, Audrey; Fryer, Alan; Lynch, Sally-Ann; Cooper, Nicola; Ong, Kai Ren; Smith, Claire E.L.; Inglehearn, Christopher F.; Mighell, Alan J.; Elcock, Claire; Poulter, James A.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Davies, Sally J.; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Mironov, Aleksandr A.; Newman, William G.; Waterham, Hans R.; Van Camp, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Heimler syndrome (HS) is a rare recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), amelogenesis imperfecta, nail abnormalities, and occasional or late-onset retinal pigmentation. We ascertained eight families affected by HS and, by using a whole-exome sequencing approach, identified biallelic mutations in PEX1 or PEX6 in six of them. Loss-of-function mutations in both genes are known causes of a spectrum of autosomal-recessive peroxisome-biogenesis disorders (PBDs), including Zellweger syndrome. PBDs are characterized by leukodystrophy, hypotonia, SNHL, retinopathy, and skeletal, craniofacial, and liver abnormalities. We demonstrate that each HS-affected family has at least one hypomorphic allele that results in extremely mild peroxisomal dysfunction. Although individuals with HS share some subtle clinical features found in PBDs, the diagnosis was not suggested by routine blood and skin fibroblast analyses used to detect PBDs. In conclusion, our findings define HS as a mild PBD, expanding the pleiotropy of mutations in PEX1 and PEX6. PMID:26387595

  13. Ion channels, channelopathies, and tooth formation.

    PubMed

    Duan, X

    2014-02-01

    The biological functions of ion channels in tooth development vary according to the nature of their gating, the species of ions passing through those gates, the number of gates, localization of channels, tissue expressing the channel, and interactions between cells and microenvironment. Ion channels feature unique and specific ion flux in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and other tooth-specific cell lineages. Both enamel and dentin have active chemical systems orchestrating a variety of ion exchanges and demineralization and remineralization processes in a stage-dependent manner. An important role for ion channels is to regulate and maintain the calcium and pH homeostasis that are critical for proper enamel and dentin biomineralization. Specific functions of chloride channels, TRPVs, calcium channels, potassium channels, and solute carrier superfamily members in tooth formation have been gradually clarified in recent years. Mutations in these ion channels or transporters often result in disastrous changes in tooth development. The channelopathies of tooth include altered eruption (CLCN7, KCNJ2, TRPV3), root dysplasia (CLCN7, KCNJ2), amelogenesis imperfecta (KCNJ1, CFTR, AE2, CACNA1C, GJA1), dentin dysplasia (CLCN5), small teeth (CACNA1C, GJA1), tooth agenesis (CLCN7), and other impairments. The mechanisms leading to tooth channelopathies are primarily related to pH regulation, calcium homeostasis, or other alterations of the niche for tooth eruption and development. PMID:24076519

  14. FAM83H and casein kinase I regulate the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and formation of desmosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kuga, Takahisa; Sasaki, Mitsuho; Mikami, Toshinari; Miake, Yasuo; Adachi, Jun; Shimizu, Maiko; Saito, Youhei; Koura, Minako; Takeda, Yasunori; Matsuda, Junichiro; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Nakayama, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    FAM83H is essential for the formation of dental enamel because a mutation in the FAM83H gene causes amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). We previously reported that the overexpression of FAM83H often occurs and disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton in colorectal cancer cells. We herein show that FAM83H regulates the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and maintains the formation of desmosomes in ameloblastoma cells. FAM83H is expressed and localized on keratin filaments in human ameloblastoma cell lines and in mouse ameloblasts and epidermal germinative cells in vivo. FAM83H shows preferential localization to keratin filaments around the nucleus that often extend to cell-cell junctions. Alterations in the function of FAM83H by its overexpression, knockdown, or an AI-causing truncated mutant prevent the proper organization of the keratin cytoskeleton in ameloblastoma cells. Furthermore, the AI-causing mutant prevents desmosomal proteins from being localized to cell-cell junctions. The effects of the AI-causing mutant depend on its binding to and possible inhibition of casein kinase I (CK-1). The suppression of CK-1 by its inhibitor, D4476, disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest that AI caused by the FAM83H mutation is mediated by the disorganization of the keratin cytoskeleton and subsequent disruption of desmosomes in ameloblasts. PMID:27222304

  15. Tooth Enamel Protein Amelogenin Binds to Ameloblast Cell Membrane-Mimicking Vesicles via its N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    LOKAPPA, SOWMYA BEKSHE; CHANDRABABU, KARTHIK BALAKRISHNA; MORADIAN-OLDAK, JANET

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that the extracellular enamel protein amelogenin has affinity to interact with phospholipids and proposed that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities. Here, in order to identify the liposome-interacting domains of amelogenin we designed four different amelogenin mutants containing only a single tryptophan at positions 25, 45, 112 and 161. Circular dichroism studies of the mutants confirmed that they are structurally similar to the wild-type amelogenin. Utilizing the intrinsic fluorescence of single tryptophan residues and fluorescence resonance energy transfer FRET, we analyzed the accessibility and strength of their binding with an ameloblast cell membrane-mimicking model membrane (ACML) and a negatively charged liposome used as a membrane model. We found that amelogenin has membrane-binding ability mainly via its N-terminal, close to residues W25 and W45. Significant blue shift was also observed in the fluorescence of a N-terminal peptide following addition of liposomes. We suggest that, among other mechanisms, enamel malformation in cases of Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) with mutations at the N-terminal may be the result of defective amelogenin-cell interactions. PMID:26188506

  16. Aesthetic management of dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand; Ninawe, Nupur

    2013-05-22

    Significant numbers of patients visiting the paediatric dental clinics have aesthetically objectionable brown stains and desire treatment for them. Intrinsic tooth discolouration can be a significant aesthetic, and in some instances, functional, problem. Dental fluorosis, tetracycline staining, localised and chronological hypoplasia, and both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta can all produce a cosmetically unsatisfactory dentition. The aetiology of intrinsic discolouration of enamel may sometimes be deduced from the patient's history, and one factor long associated with the problem has been a high level of fluoride intake. Optimal use of topical fluorides leads to a decrease in the caries prevalence but may show an increase in the prevalence of fluorosis staining because of metabolic alterations in the ameloblasts, causing a defective matrix formation and improper calcification. A 12-year-old male patient was screened at the dental clinic for routine dental care. He wanted us to remove and/or minimise the noticeable brown/yellow staining of his teeth. He requested the least invasive and most cost-effective treatment to change his smile. Various treatment modalities are present for the treatment of fluorosis stains. This report discusses the microabrasion technique in the patient having dental fluorosis.

  17. Aesthetic management of dental fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand; Ninawe, Nupur

    2013-01-01

    Significant numbers of patients visiting the paediatric dental clinics have aesthetically objectionable brown stains and desire treatment for them. Intrinsic tooth discolouration can be a significant aesthetic, and in some instances, functional, problem. Dental fluorosis, tetracycline staining, localised and chronological hypoplasia, and both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta can all produce a cosmetically unsatisfactory dentition. The aetiology of intrinsic discolouration of enamel may sometimes be deduced from the patient's history, and one factor long associated with the problem has been a high level of fluoride intake. Optimal use of topical fluorides leads to a decrease in the caries prevalence but may show an increase in the prevalence of fluorosis staining because of metabolic alterations in the ameloblasts, causing a defective matrix formation and improper calcification. A 12-year-old male patient was screened at the dental clinic for routine dental care. He wanted us to remove and/or minimise the noticeable brown/yellow staining of his teeth. He requested the least invasive and most cost-effective treatment to change his smile. Various treatment modalities are present for the treatment of fluorosis stains. This report discusses the microabrasion technique in the patient having dental fluorosis. PMID:23704468

  18. Dental Enamel Development: Proteinases and Their Enamel Matrix Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, John D.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on recent discoveries and delves in detail about what is known about each of the proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) and proteinases (matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-related peptidase-4) that are secreted into the enamel matrix. After an overview of enamel development, this review focuses on these enamel proteins by describing their nomenclature, tissue expression, functions, proteinase activation, and proteinase substrate specificity. These proteins and their respective null mice and human mutations are also evaluated to shed light on the mechanisms that cause nonsyndromic enamel malformations termed amelogenesis imperfecta. Pertinent controversies are addressed. For example, do any of these proteins have a critical function in addition to their role in enamel development? Does amelogenin initiate crystallite growth, does it inhibit crystallite growth in width and thickness, or does it do neither? Detailed examination of the null mouse literature provides unmistakable clues and/or answers to these questions, and this data is thoroughly analyzed. Striking conclusions from this analysis reveal that widely held paradigms of enamel formation are inadequate. The final section of this review weaves the recent data into a plausible new mechanism by which these enamel matrix proteins support and promote enamel development. PMID:24159389

  19. Heimler Syndrome Is Caused by Hypomorphic Mutations in the Peroxisome-Biogenesis Genes PEX1 and PEX6.

    PubMed

    Ratbi, Ilham; Falkenberg, Kim D; Sommen, Manou; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Guaoua, Soukaina; Vandeweyer, Geert; Urquhart, Jill E; Chandler, Kate E; Williams, Simon G; Roberts, Neil A; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Black, Graeme C; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Ramdi, Hind; Heimler, Audrey; Fryer, Alan; Lynch, Sally-Ann; Cooper, Nicola; Ong, Kai Ren; Smith, Claire E L; Inglehearn, Christopher F; Mighell, Alan J; Elcock, Claire; Poulter, James A; Tischkowitz, Marc; Davies, Sally J; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Mironov, Aleksandr A; Newman, William G; Waterham, Hans R; Van Camp, Guy

    2015-10-01

    Heimler syndrome (HS) is a rare recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), amelogenesis imperfecta, nail abnormalities, and occasional or late-onset retinal pigmentation. We ascertained eight families affected by HS and, by using a whole-exome sequencing approach, identified biallelic mutations in PEX1 or PEX6 in six of them. Loss-of-function mutations in both genes are known causes of a spectrum of autosomal-recessive peroxisome-biogenesis disorders (PBDs), including Zellweger syndrome. PBDs are characterized by leukodystrophy, hypotonia, SNHL, retinopathy, and skeletal, craniofacial, and liver abnormalities. We demonstrate that each HS-affected family has at least one hypomorphic allele that results in extremely mild peroxisomal dysfunction. Although individuals with HS share some subtle clinical features found in PBDs, the diagnosis was not suggested by routine blood and skin fibroblast analyses used to detect PBDs. In conclusion, our findings define HS as a mild PBD, expanding the pleiotropy of mutations in PEX1 and PEX6.

  20. Amelogenin processing by MMP-20 prevents protein occlusion inside calcite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Thompson, Mitchell; Lokappa, Sowmya B.; Gallon, Victoria A.; Cho, Kang R.; Qiu, S. Roger; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Calcite crystals were grown in the presence of full-length amelogenin and during its proteolysis by recombinant human matrix metalloproteinase 20 (rhMMP-20). Recombinant porcine amelogenin (rP172) altered the shape of calcite crystals by inhibiting the growth of steps on the {104} faces and became occluded inside the crystals. Upon co-addition of rhMMP-20, the majority of the protein was digested resulting in a truncated amelogenin lacking the C-terminal segment. In rP172-rhMMP-20 samples, the occlusion of amelogenin into the calcite crystals was drastically decreased. Truncated amelogenin (rP147) and the 25-residue C-terminal domain produced crystals with regular shape and less occluded organic material. Removal of the C-terminal diminished the affinity of amelogenin to the crystals and therefore prevented occlusion. We hypothesize that HAP and calcite interact with amelogenin in a similar manner. In the case of each material, full-length amelogenin binds most strongly, truncated amelogenin binds weakly and the C-terminus alone has the weakest interaction. Regarding enamel crystal growth, the prevention of occlusion into maturing enamel crystals might be a major benefit resulting from the selective cleavage of amelogenin at the C-terminus by MMP-20. Our data have important implications for understanding the hypomineralized enamel phenotype in cases of amelogenesis imperfecta resulting from MMP-20 mutations and will contribute to the design of enamel inspired biomaterials. PMID:23226976

  1. Enamel microabrasion: An overview of clinical and scientific considerations.

    PubMed

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Aguiar, Flavio Henrique Baggio; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-01-16

    Superficial stains and irregularities of the enamel are generally what prompt patients to seek dental intervention to improve their smile. These stains or defects may be due to hypoplasia, amelogenesis imperfecta, mineralized white spots, or fluorosis, for which enamel microabrasion is primarily indicated. Enamel microabrasion involves the use of acidic and abrasive agents, such as with 37% phosphoric acid and pumice or 6% hydrochloric acid and silica, applied to the altered enamel surface with mechanical pressure from a rubber cup coupled to a rotatory mandrel of a low-rotation micromotor. If necessary, this treatment can be safely combined with bleaching for better esthetic results. Recent studies show that microabrasion is a conservative treatment when the enamel wear is minimal and clinically imperceptible. The most important factor contributing to the success of enamel microabrasion is the depth of the defect, as deeper, opaque stains, such as those resulting from hypoplasia, cannot be resolved with microabrasion, and require a restorative approach. Surface enamel alterations that result from microabrasion, such as roughness and microhardness, are easily restored by saliva. Clinical studies support the efficacy and longevity of this safe and minimally invasive treatment. The present article presents the clinical and scientific aspects concerning the microabrasion technique, and discusses the indications for and effects of the treatment, including recent works describing microscopic and clinical evaluations. PMID:25610848

  2. Enamel microabrasion: An overview of clinical and scientific considerations

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Aguiar, Flavio Henrique Baggio; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-01-01

    Superficial stains and irregularities of the enamel are generally what prompt patients to seek dental intervention to improve their smile. These stains or defects may be due to hypoplasia, amelogenesis imperfecta, mineralized white spots, or fluorosis, for which enamel microabrasion is primarily indicated. Enamel microabrasion involves the use of acidic and abrasive agents, such as with 37% phosphoric acid and pumice or 6% hydrochloric acid and silica, applied to the altered enamel surface with mechanical pressure from a rubber cup coupled to a rotatory mandrel of a low-rotation micromotor. If necessary, this treatment can be safely combined with bleaching for better esthetic results. Recent studies show that microabrasion is a conservative treatment when the enamel wear is minimal and clinically imperceptible. The most important factor contributing to the success of enamel microabrasion is the depth of the defect, as deeper, opaque stains, such as those resulting from hypoplasia, cannot be resolved with microabrasion, and require a restorative approach. Surface enamel alterations that result from microabrasion, such as roughness and microhardness, are easily restored by saliva. Clinical studies support the efficacy and longevity of this safe and minimally invasive treatment. The present article presents the clinical and scientific aspects concerning the microabrasion technique, and discusses the indications for and effects of the treatment, including recent works describing microscopic and clinical evaluations. PMID:25610848

  3. FAM20A binds to and regulates FAM20C localization

    PubMed Central

    Ohyama, Yoshio; Lin, Ju-Hsien; Govitvattana, Nattanan; Lin, I-Ping; Venkitapathi, Sundharamani; Alamoudi, Ahmed; Husein, Dina; An, Chunying; Hotta, Hak; Kaku, Masaru; Mochida, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the Family with sequence similarity (FAM) 20 gene family are associated with mineralized tissue phenotypes in humans. Among these genes, FAM20A mutations are associated with Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) with gingival hyperplasia and nephrocalcinosis, while FAM20C mutations cause Raine syndrome, exhibiting bone and craniofacial/dental abnormalities. Although it has been demonstrated that Raine syndrome associated-FAM20C mutants prevented FAM20C kinase activity and secretion, overexpression of the catalytically inactive D478A FAM20C mutant was detected in both cell extracts and the media. This suggests that FAM20C secretion doesn’t require its kinase activity, and that another molecule(s) may control the secretion. In this study, we found that extracellular FAM20C localization was increased when wild-type (WT), but not AI-forms of FAM20A was co-transfected. On the other hand, extracellular FAM20C was absent in the conditioned media of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from Fam20a knock-out (KO) mouse, while it was detected in the media from WT MEFs. We also showed that cells with the conditioned media of Fam20a WT MEFs mineralized, but those with the conditioned media of KO MEFs failed to mineralize in vitro. Our data thus demonstrate that FAM20A controls FAM20C localization that may assist in the extracellular function of FAM20C in mineralized tissues. PMID:27292199

  4. Expansion of the spectrum of ITGB6-related disorders to adolescent alopecia, dentogingival abnormalities and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Muhammad; Jan, Abid; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Wang, Xin; Suliman, Muhammad; Acharya, Anushree; Habib, Rabia; Abbe, Izoduwa; Ali, Ghazanfar; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Smith, Joshua D; Nickerson, Deborah A; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2016-08-01

    Alopecia with mental retardation (APMR) is a very rare disorder. In this study, we report on a consanguineous Pakistani family (AP91) with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, adolescent alopecia and dentogingival abnormalities. Using homozygosity mapping, linkage analysis and exome sequencing, we identified a novel rare missense variant c.898G>A (p.(Glu300Lys)) in ITGB6, which co-segregates with the phenotype within the family and is predicted to be deleterious. Structural modeling shows that Glu300 lies in the β-propeller domain, and is surrounded by several residues that are important for heterodimerization with α integrin. Previous studies showed that ITGB6 variants can cause amelogenesis imperfecta in humans, but patients from family AP91 who are homozygous for the c.898G>A variant present with neurological and dermatological features, indicating a role for ITGB6 beyond enamel formation. Our study demonstrates that a rare deleterious variant within ITGB6 causes not only dentogingival anomalies but also intellectual disability and alopecia.

  5. Expansion of the spectrum of ITGB6-related disorders to adolescent alopecia, dentogingival abnormalities and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Muhammad; Jan, Abid; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Wang, Xin; Suliman, Muhammad; Acharya, Anushree; Habib, Rabia; Abbe, Izoduwa; Ali, Ghazanfar; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Smith, Joshua D; Nickerson, Deborah A; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2016-08-01

    Alopecia with mental retardation (APMR) is a very rare disorder. In this study, we report on a consanguineous Pakistani family (AP91) with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, adolescent alopecia and dentogingival abnormalities. Using homozygosity mapping, linkage analysis and exome sequencing, we identified a novel rare missense variant c.898G>A (p.(Glu300Lys)) in ITGB6, which co-segregates with the phenotype within the family and is predicted to be deleterious. Structural modeling shows that Glu300 lies in the β-propeller domain, and is surrounded by several residues that are important for heterodimerization with α integrin. Previous studies showed that ITGB6 variants can cause amelogenesis imperfecta in humans, but patients from family AP91 who are homozygous for the c.898G>A variant present with neurological and dermatological features, indicating a role for ITGB6 beyond enamel formation. Our study demonstrates that a rare deleterious variant within ITGB6 causes not only dentogingival anomalies but also intellectual disability and alopecia. PMID:26695873

  6. Clinical Performance of a New Biomimetic Double Network Material

    PubMed Central

    Dirxen, Christine; Blunck, Uwe; Preissner, Saskia

    2013-01-01

    Background: The development of ceramics during the last years was overwhelming. However, the focus was laid on the hardness and the strength of the restorative materials, resulting in high antagonistic tooth wear. This is critical for patients with bruxism. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of the new double hybrid material for non-invasive treatment approaches. Material and Methods: The new approach of the material tested, was to modify ceramics to create a biomimetic material that has similar physical properties like dentin and enamel and is still as strong as conventional ceramics. Results: The produced crowns had a thickness ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mm. To evaluate the clinical performance and durability of the crowns, the patient was examined half a year later. The crowns were still intact and soft tissues appeared healthy and this was achieved without any loss of tooth structure. Conclusions: The material can be milled to thin layers, but is still strong enough to prevent cracks which are stopped by the interpenetrating polymer within the network. Depending on the clinical situation, minimally- up to non-invasive restorations can be milled. Clinical Relevance: Dentistry aims in preservation of tooth structure. Patients suffering from loss of tooth structure (dental erosion, Amelogenesis imperfecta) or even young patients could benefit from minimally-invasive crowns. Due to a Vickers hardness between dentin and enamel, antagonistic tooth wear is very low. This might be interesting for treating patients with bruxism. PMID:24167534

  7. AB019. Osteogenesis imperfecta 2015: new genes, new treatments—an Asia pacific perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sillence, David

    2015-01-01

    For 40 years the pathogenesis of the group of brittle bone disorders collectively named osteogenesis imperfect (OI) has been ascribed to mutations in type I collagen. Recent discoveries in matrix biology have transformed our perspectives on the role of mutations in the α1- and α2-chains of type I collagen (COLIA1, COLIA2), their post-translational modifications, trafficking and matrix interactions. Furthermore progress in gene discovery has identified 22 genes including the 2 COLI genes, in which mutations result in at least one OI phenotype. The International Bone Dysplasia Committee has grouped the syndromes arising from mutations in these genes into five OI phenotypes. All 3 modes of inheritance, Autosomal Dominant (4 genes) and Recessive (16 genes), X-linked (2 genes) have been discovered. The gene products of the recessive genes have a variety of functions. Mutations in LEPRE1, CRTAP and PIPB regulate prolyl-3-hydroxylation. A recent study in Crtap−/− mice showed upregulation of TGF-β target genes and reduced binding of type 1 collagen to the proteoglycan decorin. A similar pattern of TGFB dysregulation was observed in the tissues of heterozygous Col1a2tm1.1 Mcbr mice. Mutations in FKBP10, SERPINF1 (HSP10), SERPINH1 affect polypeptide trafficking but have other matrix functions. Mutations in PLOD2 and FKBP10 both have extra-skeletal effects on matrices resulting in joint contractures. Mineralisation and osteoclast function are affected by mutations in LRP5, SP7, TMEM38B, WNT1, IFITM5 and CREB3L1 (OASIS), SPARC as do hemizygous mutations in the X-linked gene PLS3. A role for the unfolded protein response (UPR) is observed in the pathogenesis of OI resulting from mutation in CREB3L1. There is some evidence that the frequency of the varying types of OI may vary in and between populations in Asia and the Pacific. OI with Congenital Joint contractures for example is of high frequency in Samoa and Tonga and may well be common in a source community in Asia. Similarly my colleagues have observed a number of families with OI type 5 in the Philippines. This heterogeneity is becoming relevant to management as there is evidence of resistance to bisphosphonate therapy in patients with homozygous mutations in SERPINF1 also known as OI type VI. Non-COL1 related OI is the most prevalent form of OI in some parts of Africa so that it would not be unusual if non-COLI related OI was more prevalent in some communities in the Asia Pacific region. Targeted exome Multiple Parallel sequencing panels are being developed and may be needed in the future to resolve the question of exact diagnosis to facilitate patient care.

  8. RANKL inhibition improves bone properties in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bargman, Renee; Huang, Alice; Boskey, Adele L; Raggio, Cathleen; Pleshko, Nancy

    2010-04-01

    Recently, a new class of agents targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) pathway has been developed for the treatment of osteoporosis and other bone diseases. In the current study, inhibition of the RANKL pathway was evaluated to assess effects on "bone quality" and fracture incidence in an animal model of osteogenesis imperfect (OI), the oim/oim mouse. Juvenile oim/oim ( approximately 6 weeks old) and wildtype (+/+) mice were treated with either a RANKL inhibitor (RANK-Fc) or saline. After treatment, bone density increased significantly in the femurs of both genotypes. Femoral length decreased with RANK-Fc in +/+ mice. Geometric measurements at mid-diaphysis in the oim/oim groups showed increases in the ML periosteal and endosteal diameters and AP cortical thickness in the treated groups. Within +/+ groups, ML cortical thickness and ML femoral periosteal diameter were significantly increased with RANK-Fc. Biomechanical testing revealed increased stiffness in oim/oim and +/+ mice. Total strain was increased with treatment in the +/+ mice. Histologically, RANKL inhibition resulted in retained growth plate cartilage in both genotypes. The average number of fractures sustained by RANK-Fc-treated oim/oim mice was not significantly decreased compared to saline treated oim/oim mice. This preclinical study demonstrated that RANKL inhibition at the current dose improved density and some geometric and biomechanical properties of oim/oim bone, but it did not decrease fracture incidence. Further studies that address commencement of therapy at earlier time points are needed to determine whether this mode of therapy will be clinically useful in OI. PMID:20053133

  9. Dental implications of osteogenesis imperfecta: treatment with IV bisphosphonate: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Milano, Michael; Wright, Timothy; Loechner, Karen J

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfect (OI) is a group of genetically diverse connective tissue disorders. Bisphosphonates therapy to manage bone fragility, a now common medical therapy for OI, can increase the risk of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws. In this report, a 6 ½ year child, who was receiving bisphosphonate therapy for OI, underwent full mouth dental rehabilitation in the operating room while under general anesthesia. The child had numerous teeth restored and multiple primary molar extractions. The patient, who received prophylactic antibiotics intraoperatively, demonstrated no clinical signs of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis when seen at follow-up. Although bisphosphonate osteonecrosis is a possible sequel in children who receive multiple extractions, no clinical signs were manifested in our patient, who required multiple primary tooth extractions along with restorative treatment under general anesthesia. While no dental guidelines have been developed to manage OI children having been treated with bisphosphonates, consent for extractions should include the risk of bone necrosis and careful post-operative observation to monitor wound healing. PMID:21903004

  10. Study in Mice Links Key Signaling Molecule to Underlying Cause of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... by mutations in a gene that codes for collagen, an abundant structural component of bone. This type ... linked to defects in enzymes that help process collagen to its mature form. These types of OI ...

  11. OI Issues: Type I - Understanding the Mildest Form of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... counseling can address both types of problems. A nutritionist can design a diet that is rich in ... with Type I OI recommend developing an effective personal support network. Resources For more information about osteogenesis ...

  12. RANKL Inhibition Improves Bone Properties in a Mouse Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Bargman, Renee; Huang, Alice; Boskey, Adele L.; Raggio, Cathleen; Pleshko, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Recently, a new class of agents targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) pathway has been developed for the treatment of osteoporosis and other bone diseases. In the current study, inhibition of the RANKL pathway was evaluated to assess effects on “bone quality” and fracture incidence in an animal model of osteogenesis imperfect (OI), the oim/oim mouse. Juvenile oim/oim (~6 weeks old) and wildtype (+/+) mice were treated with either a RANKL inhibitor (RANK-Fc) or saline. After treatment, bone density increased significantly in the femurs of both genotypes. Femoral length decreased with RANK-Fc in +/+ mice. Geometric measurements at mid-diaphysis in the oim/oim groups showed increases in the ML periosteal and endosteal diameters and AP cortical thickness in the treated groups. Within +/+ groups, ML cortical thickness and ML femoral periosteal diameter were significantly increased with RANK-Fc. Biomechanical testing revealed increased stiffness in oim/oim and +/+ mice. Total strain was increased with treatment in the +/+ mice. Histologically, RANKL inhibition resulted in retained growth plate cartilage in both genotypes. The average number of fractures sustained by RANK-Fc-treated oim/oim mice was not significantly decreased compared to saline treated oim/oim mice. This preclinical study demonstrated that RANKL inhibition at the current dose improved density and some geometric and biomechanical properties of oim/oim bone, but it did not decrease fracture incidence. Further studies that address commencement of therapy at earlier time points are needed to determine whether this mode of therapy will be clinically useful in OI. PMID:20053133

  13. Nuclear sequestration of COL1A1 mRNA transcript associated with type I osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)

    SciTech Connect

    Primorac, D.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified an OI type I patient with a splice donor mutation that resulted in intron 26 retention instead of exon skipping and sequestration of normal levels of the mutant transcript in the nuclear compartment. Intron retention was consistent with the exon definition hypothesis for splice site selection since the size of the exon-intron-exon unit was less than 300 bp. Furthermore, the retained intron contained in-frame stop codons which is thought to cause the mutant RNA to remain within the nucleus rather than appearing in the cytoplasm. To test these hypotheses, genomic fragments containing the normal sequence or the donor mutation were cloned into a collagen minigene and expressed in stably tansfected NIH 3T3 cells. None of the modifications to the normal intron altered the level of RNA that accumulated in the cytoplasm, as expected. However none of the modifications to the mutant intron allowed accumulation of normal levels of mRNA in the cytoplasm. Moreover, in contrast to our findings in the patient`s cells only low levels of mutant transcript were found in the nucleus; a fraction of the transcript did appear in the cytoplasm which had spliced the mutant donor site correctly. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated equal levels of transcription from each transgene. Expression of another donor mutation known to cause in-frame exon skipping in OI type IV was accurately reproduced in the minigene in transfected 3T3 cells. Our experience suggests that either mechanism can lead to formation of a null allele possibly related to the type of splicing events surrounding the potential stop codons. Understanding the rules governing inactivation of a collagen RNA transcript may be important in designing a strategy to inactivate a dominate negative mutation associated with the more severe forms of OI.

  14. Achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis: the spectrum of chondrogenesis imperfecta. A radiological, ultrasonographic, and histopathologic study of 23 cases.

    PubMed

    van der Harten, H J; Brons, J T; Dijkstra, P F; Niermeyer, M F; Meijer, C J; van Giejn, H P; Arts, N F

    1988-01-01

    In the classification of lethal osteochondrodysplasias, achondrogenesis and hypochondrogenesis have recently received special attention. We describe 23 cases representing the different subtypes. Within the classical type I (Parenti-Fraccaro) two distinct disorders can be recognized: type IA (Houston-Harris) and type IB (Fraccaro). The classical type II (Langer-Saldino) and hypochondrogenesis represent phenotypic variants of one disorder in which type II is the most severe form and hypochondrogenesis the mildest form, while transitional forms exist. It is likely that a basic defect in cellular function of the chondrocyte results in a deficient cartilage matrix and in disorganized enchondral ossification. PMID:3072551

  15. MMP20, KLK4, and MMP20/KLK4 double null mice define roles for matrix proteases during dental enamel formation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Smith, Charles E; Richardson, Amelia S; Bartlett, John D; Hu, Jan C C; Simmer, James P

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) are secreted proteinases that are essential for proper dental enamel formation. We characterized and compared enamel formed in wild-type, Mmp20 (-/-), Klk4 (-/-), Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-), and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mice using dissecting and light microscopy, backscattered scanning electron microscopy (bSEM), SEM, microcomputed tomography (μCT), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Following eruption, fractures were observed on Mmp20 (-/-), Klk4 (-/-), Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-), and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) molars. Failure of the enamel in the Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) molars was unexpected and suggested that digenic effects could contribute to the etiology of amelogenesis imperfecta in humans. Micro-CT analyses of hemimandibles demonstrated significantly reduced high-density enamel volume in the Mmp20 (-/-) and Klk4 (-/-) mice relative to the wild-type, which was further reduced in Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mice. bSEM images of 7-week Mmp20 (-/-) and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mandibular incisors showed rough, pitted enamel surfaces with numerous indentations and protruding nodules. The Mmp20 (+/-) and Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) incisors showed prominent, evenly spaced, horizontal ridges that were more distinct in Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) incisors relative to Mmp20 (+/-) incisors due to the darkening of the valleys between the ridges. In cross sections, the Mmp20 (-/-) and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) exhibited three distinct layers. The outer layer exhibited a disturbed elemental composition and an irregular enamel surface covered with nodules. The Mmp20 null enamel was apparently unable to withstand the sheer forces associated with eruption and separated from dentin during development. Cells invaded the cracks and interposed between the dentin and enamel layers. MMP20 and KLK4 serve overlapping and complementary functions to harden enamel by removing protein, but MMP20 potentially serves multiple

  16. Inactivation of C4orf26 in toothless placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Springer, Mark S; Starrett, James; Morin, Phillip A; Lanzetti, Agnese; Hayashi, Cheryl; Gatesy, John

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have reported inactivated copies of six enamel-related genes (AMBN, AMEL, AMTN, ENAM, KLK4, MMP20) and one dentin-related gene (DSPP) in one or more toothless vertebrates and/or vertebrates with enamelless teeth, thereby providing evidence that these genes are enamel or tooth-specific with respect to their critical functions that are maintained by natural selection. Here, we employ available genome sequences for edentulous and enamelless mammals to evaluate the enamel specificity of four genes (WDR72, SLC24A4, FAM83H, C4orf26) that have been implicated in amelogenesis imperfecta, a condition in which proper enamel formation is abrogated during tooth development. Coding sequences for WDR72, SCL24A4, and FAM83H are intact in four edentulous taxa (Chinese pangolin, three baleen whales) and three taxa (aardvark, nine-banded armadillo, Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) with enamelless teeth, suggesting that these genes have critical functions beyond their involvement in tooth development. By contrast, genomic data for C4orf26 reveal inactivating mutations in pangolin and bowhead whale as well as evidence for deletion of this gene in two minke whale species. Hybridization capture of exonic regions and PCR screens provide evidence for inactivation of C4orf26 in eight additional baleen whale species. However, C4orf26 is intact in all three species with enamelless teeth that were surveyed, as well as in 95 additional mammalian species with enamel-capped teeth. Estimates of selection intensity suggest that dN/dS ratios on branches leading to taxa with enamelless teeth are similar to the dN/dS ratio on branches leading to taxa with enamel-capped teeth. Based on these results, we conclude that C4orf26 is tooth-specific, but not enamel-specific, with respect to its essential functions that are maintained by natural selection. A caveat is that an alternative splice site variant, which translates exon 3 in a different reading frame, is putatively functional in

  17. Inactivation of C4orf26 in toothless placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Springer, Mark S; Starrett, James; Morin, Phillip A; Lanzetti, Agnese; Hayashi, Cheryl; Gatesy, John

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have reported inactivated copies of six enamel-related genes (AMBN, AMEL, AMTN, ENAM, KLK4, MMP20) and one dentin-related gene (DSPP) in one or more toothless vertebrates and/or vertebrates with enamelless teeth, thereby providing evidence that these genes are enamel or tooth-specific with respect to their critical functions that are maintained by natural selection. Here, we employ available genome sequences for edentulous and enamelless mammals to evaluate the enamel specificity of four genes (WDR72, SLC24A4, FAM83H, C4orf26) that have been implicated in amelogenesis imperfecta, a condition in which proper enamel formation is abrogated during tooth development. Coding sequences for WDR72, SCL24A4, and FAM83H are intact in four edentulous taxa (Chinese pangolin, three baleen whales) and three taxa (aardvark, nine-banded armadillo, Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) with enamelless teeth, suggesting that these genes have critical functions beyond their involvement in tooth development. By contrast, genomic data for C4orf26 reveal inactivating mutations in pangolin and bowhead whale as well as evidence for deletion of this gene in two minke whale species. Hybridization capture of exonic regions and PCR screens provide evidence for inactivation of C4orf26 in eight additional baleen whale species. However, C4orf26 is intact in all three species with enamelless teeth that were surveyed, as well as in 95 additional mammalian species with enamel-capped teeth. Estimates of selection intensity suggest that dN/dS ratios on branches leading to taxa with enamelless teeth are similar to the dN/dS ratio on branches leading to taxa with enamel-capped teeth. Based on these results, we conclude that C4orf26 is tooth-specific, but not enamel-specific, with respect to its essential functions that are maintained by natural selection. A caveat is that an alternative splice site variant, which translates exon 3 in a different reading frame, is putatively functional in

  18. Further safety enhancement of a specialized power assisted tricycle for a child with osteogenesis imperfecta type III and design of an adjustble hand power tricycle.

    PubMed

    Geu, Matthew; Madsen, Robert; Weber, Erica; Burnett, Michael; Barrett, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Several tricycles, one a customized power assisted tricycle, and the second a hand powered tricycle were developed, which offered a unique opportunity to serve multiple purposes in several children's development throughout Wyoming. In Both cases these tricycles provide the children with the opportunity to gain muscle mass, strength, coordination, and confidence. The power assisted tricycle was completed as a senior design project in 2002, and over time safety enhancements have been completed to make the tricycle safer for operation. Unfortunately, the safety system enhancements were not acceptable for it to be released for use. For this reason the tricycle was further redesigned to include more redundant safety systems which will allow the tricycle to be safe for the child's use. The second tricycle was designed to allow for a group of children who have limited use of their legs, to be able to use the same tricycle to give them more upper body strength. A gear system using multiple gear sprockets was adapted to a preexisting tricycle to provide hand power rather than foot power. Without these improvements, the children would not have the opportunity to use these tricycles to help with their development. PMID:16817593

  19. Fontanelles - excessively large

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hydrocephalus Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) Premature birth Rarer causes: Achondroplasia Apert syndrome Cleidocranial dysostosis Congenital rubella Neonatal hypothyroidism Osteogenesis imperfecta Rickets When to Contact a Medical ...

  20. Fetal biometry of skeletal dysplasias: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, L; Jeanty, P

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-three diagnostic centers worldwide contributed 127 cases of 17 skeletal dysplasias. Discriminant analysis showed that the femur length was the best biometric parameter to distinguish among the five most common disorders in this series (thanatophoric dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, achondrogenesis, achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia). Fifty-four percent of fetuses with femur length below 30% of the mean for gestational age had achondrogenesis. Seventy-eight percent of measurements between 40 and 60% of the mean for gestational age represented either thanatophoric dysplasia or osteogenesis imperfecta type II. Fetuses who had over 80% of the mean for gestational age had predominantly hypochondroplasia, achondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta type III. PMID:7880297

  1. Fetal biometry of skeletal dysplasias: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, L; Jeanty, P

    1994-12-01

    Twenty-three diagnostic centers worldwide contributed 127 cases of 17 skeletal dysplasias. Discriminant analysis showed that the femur length was the best biometric parameter to distinguish among the five most common disorders in this series (thanatophoric dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, achondrogenesis, achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia). Fifty-four percent of fetuses with femur length below 30% of the mean for gestational age had achondrogenesis. Seventy-eight percent of measurements between 40 and 60% of the mean for gestational age represented either thanatophoric dysplasia or osteogenesis imperfecta type II. Fetuses who had over 80% of the mean for gestational age had predominantly hypochondroplasia, achondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta type III. PMID:7877211

  2. Adults Living with OI

    MedlinePlus

    ... to encourage/assist people attending conference, but it's applicable to any future travel plans. Airb ags Information ... Click here for details about the Oregon Health Science University, Portland, OR trial . © Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation, 2015 ...

  3. Hypophosphatasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... osteogenesis imperfecta. It is an inherited metabolic (chemical) bone disease that results from low levels of an enzyme ... Dr. Michael Whyte, Medical Director, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease Research at Shriners Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, and ...

  4. Surgery Considerations for Adults and Children

    MedlinePlus

    Surgery Considerations for Adults and Children 804 W. Diamond Ave., Ste. 210 Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (800) 981- ... orbdnrc@nof.org Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation 804 W. Diamond Avenue Suite 210 Gaithersburg, MD 20878 Tel (800) ...

  5. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bones can also ...

  6. Get in the Swim: Gaining Access to Recreational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Jean-Paul

    1980-01-01

    The father of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta, an orthopedic condition, recounts his struggles to convince local agencies to operate a swimming program for disabled students. He offers eight guidelines for advocating such programs in other areas. (CL)

  7. Children with Brittle Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Special help given to children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (brittle bone disease) is described, including adapted equipment to allow for writing and use of a classroom assistant to aid participation in a regular classroom. (CL)

  8. Histomorphometric and microchemical characterization of maturing dental enamel in rats fed a boron-deficient diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few reports are available in the literature on enamel formation under nutritional deficiencies. Continuously erupting rodent incisors have considerable potential to serve as a model system for amelogenesis. Thus, we performed a study to determine the effects of boron (B) deficiency on the maturing d...

  9. Design and validation of bending test method for characterization of miniature pediatric cortical bone specimens.

    PubMed

    Albert, Carolyne I; Jameson, John; Harris, Gerald

    2013-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder of bone fragility; however, the effects of this disorder on bone material properties are not well understood. No study has yet measured bone material strength in humans with osteogenesis imperfecta. Small bone specimens are often extracted during routine fracture surgeries in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. These specimens could provide valuable insight into the effects of osteogenesis imperfecta on bone material strength; however, their small size poses a challenge to their mechanical characterization. In this study, a validated miniature three-point bending test is described that enables measurement of the flexural material properties of pediatric cortical osteotomy specimens as small as 5 mm in length. This method was validated extensively using bovine bone, and the effect of span/depth aspect ratio (5 vs 6) on the measured flexural properties was examined. The method provided reasonable results for both Young's modulus and flexural strength in bovine bone. With a span/depth ratio of 6, the median longitudinal modulus and flexural strength results were 16.1 (range: 14.4-19.3)GPa and 251 (range: 219-293)MPa, respectively. Finally, the pilot results from two osteotomy specimens from children with osteogenesis imperfecta are presented. These results provide the first measures of bone material strength in this patient population.

  10. [Clinical condition and therapy of bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Miura, Kohji; Oznono, Keiichi

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal dysplasia is the term which represents disorders including growth and differentiation of bone, cartilage and ligament. A lot of diseases are included, and new disorders have been added. However, the therapy of most bone diseases is less well-established. Achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta are most frequent bone diseases. There is no curative treatment for these diseases, however, supportive therapies are available ; for example, growth-hormone therapy for achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia, and bisphosphonate therapy for osteogenesis imperfecta. In addition, enzyme replacement therapy for hypophosphatasia is now on clinical trial.

  11. Enamel Defects Reflect Perinatal Exposure to Bisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Jedeon, Katia; De la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Brookes, Steven J.; Loiodice, Sophia; Marciano, Clémence; Kirkham, Jennifer; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie-Chantal; Boudalia, Sofiane; Bergès, Raymond; Harada, Hidemitsu; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including bisphenol A (BPA), are environmental ubiquitous pollutants and associated with a growing health concern. Anecdotally, molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is increasing concurrently with EDC-related conditions, which has led us to investigate the effect of BPA on amelogenesis. Rats were exposed daily to BPA from conception until day 30 or 100. At day 30, BPA-affected enamel exhibited hypomineralization similar to human MIH. Scanning electron microscopy and elemental analysis revealed an abnormal accumulation of organic material in erupted enamel. BPA-affected enamel had an abnormal accumulation of exogenous albumin in the maturation stage. Quantitative real-timePCR, Western blotting, and luciferase reporter assays revealed increased expression of enamelin but decreased expression of kallikrein 4 (protease essential for removing enamel proteins) via transcriptional regulation. Data suggest that BPA exerts its effects on amelogenesis by disrupting normal protein removal from the enamel matrix. Interestingly, in 100-day-old rats, erupting incisor enamel was normal, suggesting amelogenesis is only sensitive to MIH-causing agents during a specific time window during development (as reported for human MIH). The present work documents the first experimental model that replicates MIH and presents BPA as a potential causative agent of MIH. Because human enamel defects are irreversible, MIH may provide an easily accessible marker for reporting early EDC exposure in humans. PMID:23764278

  12. What Happens After School? A Study of Disabled Women and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Toole, J. Corbett; Weeks, CeCe

    The report, over half of which consists of appendixes and lists of resources, discusses the educational and related life experiences of six disabled women. Focus is on their early experiences with school and family, their high school years, their college years, and their work. Their disabilities include blindness, osteogenesis imperfecta (fragile…

  13. Genetic disorders of collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Tsipouras, P; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Marfan syndrome form a group of genetic disorders of connective tissue. These disorders exhibit remarkable clinical heterogeneity which reflects their underlying biochemical and molecular differences. Defects in collagen types I and III have been found in all three syndromes. PMID:3543367

  14. Structural and contractile proteins. Part E: Extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 20 papers. Some of the titles are: Characterization of Pro-..cap alpha..2(I) Collagen Gene Mutation by Nuclease S/sub 1/ Mapping: Analysis of Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Messenger RNA in Fibroblasts from Patients with Type I Osteogenesis Imperfecta; R-Loop Analysis of Procollagen Messenger RNA from the Assessment of Human Collagen Mutations; and Bone Glycoproteins.

  15. National Institutes of Health Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases~National Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language Publications (en español) | Asian-Language Publications NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ NIH National Resource Center ... Font Size | S S M M L L Bone Basics Osteoporosis Osteogenesis Imperfecta Paget’s Disease of Bone Related Topics ...

  16. ["Facing"--a preliminary parameter in diagnosis of fetal skeletal abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Krause, M; Feige, A

    1993-03-01

    Four cases with abnormalities of foetal faces are demonstrated--thanatophoric dwarfism, cheilognathopalotoschisis, osteogenesis imperfecta, achondrogenesis (Type I). A relationship to skeletal dysplasia was shown. We think, that the representation of foetal faces and their profile plays an important part in second trimester ultrasound screening between 18 and 22 weeks of gestational age. PMID:8467986

  17. Infant Care Suggestions for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... fragile infants. They can help parents learn the skills and gain confidence necessary to care for their fragile. The infant who has osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) has some special characteristics. The infant may have an unusually soft skull, startle very easily, have bone deformity and ...

  18. OI Positive: A Look at Unbreakable Spirits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Priscilla

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on the positive outlook of parents and children with OI (Osteogenesis Imperfecta or simply, brittle bones), who attended the 15th Biennial National OI Conference. The author believes that the attendees positive attitudes comes from the positive influences they have had from the beginning. One example of an…

  19. Johanna and Tommy: Two Preschoolers in Sweden with Brittle Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millde, Kristina; Brodin, Jane

    Information is presented for caregivers of Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bones) and their families. Approximately five children with brittle bones are born in Sweden annually. Two main types of brittle bone disease have been identified: congenita and tarda. Typical symptoms include numerous and unexpected fractures, bluish…

  20. Children with Brittle Bones: An Examination of Their Educational Needs and Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1983-01-01

    A study of the educational achievements of 40 children (5-16 years old) with osteogenesis imperfecta, brittle bone disease, revealed no differences between Ss and control Ss without the condition in terms of nonverbal intelligence. Differences were found, however, in writing speed. Inteviews with children, teachers, and parents revealed…

  1. Inverse methods for estimating primary input signals from time-averaged isotope profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Cerling, Thure E.; Schuster, Gerard T.; Robinson, Todd F.; Roeder, Beverly L.; Krueger, Stephen K.

    2005-08-01

    Mammalian teeth are invaluable archives of ancient seasonality because they record along their growth axes an isotopic record of temporal change in environment, plant diet, and animal behavior. A major problem with the intra-tooth method is that intra-tooth isotope profiles can be extremely time-averaged compared to the actual pattern of isotopic variation experienced by the animal during tooth formation. This time-averaging is a result of the temporal and spatial characteristics of amelogenesis (tooth enamel formation), and also results from laboratory sampling. This paper develops and evaluates an inverse method for reconstructing original input signals from time-averaged intra-tooth isotope profiles. The method requires that the temporal and spatial patterns of amelogenesis are known for the specific tooth and uses a minimum length solution of the linear system Am = d, where d is the measured isotopic profile, A is a matrix describing temporal and spatial averaging during amelogenesis and sampling, and m is the input vector that is sought. Accuracy is dependent on several factors, including the total measurement error and the isotopic structure of the measured profile. The method is shown to accurately reconstruct known input signals for synthetic tooth enamel profiles and the known input signal for a rabbit that underwent controlled dietary changes. Application to carbon isotope profiles of modern hippopotamus canines reveals detailed dietary histories that are not apparent from the measured data alone. Inverse methods show promise as an effective means of dealing with the time-averaging problem in studies of intra-tooth isotopic variation.

  2. V-type ATPase proton pump expression during enamel formation.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Juni; Wen, Xin; Simanian, Emil J; Paine, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Several diseases such as proximal and distal renal tubular acidosis and osteoporosis are related to intracellular pH dysregulation resulting from mutations in genes coding for ion channels, including proteins comprising the proton-pumping V-type ATPase. V-type ATPase is a multi-subunit protein complex expressed in enamel forming cells. V-type ATPase plays a key role in enamel development, specifically lysosomal acidification, yet our understanding of the relationship between the endocytotic activities and dental health and disease is limited. The objective of this study is to better understand the ameloblast-associated pH regulatory networks essential for amelogenesis. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed on tissues from secretory-stage and maturation-stage enamel organs to determine which of the V-type ATPase subunits are most highly upregulated during maturation-stage amelogenesis: a time when ameloblast endocytotic activity is highest. Western blot analyses, using specific antibodies to four of the V-type ATPase subunits (Atp6v0d2, Atp6v1b2, Atp6v1c1 and Atp6v1e1), were then applied to validate much of the qPCR data. Immunohistochemistry using these same four antibodies was also performed to identify the spatiotemporal expression profiles of individual V-type ATPase subunits. Our data show that cytoplasmic V-type ATPase is significantly upregulated in enamel organ cells during maturation-stage when compared to secretory-stage. These data likely relate to the higher endocytotic activities, and the greater need for lysosomal acidification, during maturation-stage amelogenesis. It is also apparent from our immunolocalization data, using antibodies against two of the V-type ATPase subunits (Atp6v1c1 and Atp6v1e1), that significant expression is seen at the apical membrane of maturation-stage ameloblasts. Others have also identified this V-type ATPase expression profile at the apical membrane of maturation ameloblasts. Collectively, these data better define the

  3. Simulating certain aspects of hypogravity: Effects on the mandibular incisors of suspended rats (PULEH model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Winter, F.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a hypogravity simulating model on the rate of mandibular incisor formation, dentinogenesis and, amelogenesis in laboratory rats was studied. The model is the partial unloading by elevating the hindquarters. In this system, rat hindquarters are elevated 30 to 40 deg from the cage floors to completely unload the hindlimbs, but the animals are free to move about using their forelimbs. This model replicates the fluid sift changes which occur during the weightlessness of spaceflight and produces an osteopenia in the weight bearing skeletons. The histogenesis and/or mineralization rates of the mandibular incisor during the first 19d of PULEH in young growing rats are recorded.

  4. Congenital anomalies in the teratological collection of Museum Vrolik in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. II: Skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Oostra, R J; Baljet, B; Dijkstra, P F; Hennekam, R C

    1998-05-01

    The Museum Vrolik collection of the Department of Anatomy and Embryology of the University of Amsterdam, founded by Gerardus Vrolik (1775-1859) and his son Willem Vrolik (1801-1863), consists of more than five thousand specimens of human and animal anatomy, embryology, pathology, and congenital anomalies. Recently, the collection of congenital anomalies was recatalogued and redescribed according to contempory syndromological views. The original descriptions, as far as preserved, were compared with the clinical and radiographical findings. In 18 specimens the following skeletal dysplasias were diagnosed: achondrogenesis, achondroplasia, Blomstrand chondrodysplasia, Majewski syndrome, osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, osteogenesis imperfecta type I, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, and thanatophoric dysplasia with and without cloverleaf skull. Radiography did not yield a diagnosis in 4 specimens. The use of additional diagnostical techniques, such as MRI and CT scanning and fluorescence in situ hybridization in these specimens, is currently being investigated. PMID:9605285

  5. Collagen protein abnormalities produced by site-directed mutagenesis of the pro alpha 1(I) gene.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Mascara, T; Cole, W G; Stacey, A; Jaenisch, R

    1989-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of collagen genes offers a powerful new approach for studying structure-function relationships. The construction of engineered mutant collagen genes coding for glycine substitutions and their expression giving rise to the osteogenesis imperfecta type II phenotype in cells and transgenic mice has recently been achieved. This paper further defines the molecular abnormalities of collagen and bone pathology resulting from the expression of the mutant genes.

  6. Erythropeltidaceen (Bangiophyceae, Rhodophyta) von Helgoland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornmann, P.; Sahling, P.-H.

    1985-06-01

    Ontogenesis and reproduction of the Helgolandian taxa of the Erythropeltidaceae have been studied. In all species monospores are only produced from differentiated sporangia. Filamentous Conchocelis-like stages have not been observed. Sexual reproduction was formerly demonstrated in the heteromorphous genus Erythrotrichopeltis (Kornmann, 1984). Based on these features a revised classification for the family is presented. Porphyropsis imperfecta, a new species, is a widespread epiphyte in sublittoral habitats.

  7. Specific ultrasonographic features of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Zankl, Andreas; Mornet, Etienne; Wong, Shell

    2008-05-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia (PL-HPH) by ultrasonography is difficult as PL-HPH must be differentiated from other skeletal dysplasias with short long bones and poor mineralization of the skeleton, such as osteogenesis imperfecta type II and achondrogenesis/hypochondrogenesis. Here we present a case of molecularly confirmed PL-HPH and illustrate specific ultrasonographic findings that help to distinguish PL-HPH from similar conditions. PMID:18386808

  8. TGF-β1 autocrine signalling and enamel matrix components.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi-Kinoshita, Saeko; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Onuma, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Asada, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is present in porcine enamel extracts and is critical for proper mineralization of tooth enamel. Here, we show that the mRNA of latent TGF-β1 is expressed throughout amelogenesis. Latent TGF-β1 is activated by matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20), coinciding with amelogenin processing by the same proteinase. Activated TGF-β1 binds to the major amelogenin cleavage products, particularly the neutral-soluble P103 amelogenin, to maintain its activity. The P103 amelogenin-TGF-β1 complex binds to TGFBR1 to induce TGF-β1 signalling. The P103 amelogenin-TGF-β1 complex is slowly cleaved by kallikrein 4 (KLK4), which is secreted into the transition- and maturation-stage enamel matrix, thereby reducing TGF-β1 activity. To exert the multiple biological functions of TGF-β1 for amelogenesis, we propose that TGF-β1 is activated or inactivated by MMP20 or KLK4 and that the amelogenin cleavage product is necessary for the in-solution mobility of TGF-β1, which is necessary for binding to its receptor on ameloblasts and retention of its activity. PMID:27633089

  9. TGF-β1 autocrine signalling and enamel matrix components.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi-Kinoshita, Saeko; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Onuma, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Asada, Yoshinobu

    2016-09-16

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is present in porcine enamel extracts and is critical for proper mineralization of tooth enamel. Here, we show that the mRNA of latent TGF-β1 is expressed throughout amelogenesis. Latent TGF-β1 is activated by matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20), coinciding with amelogenin processing by the same proteinase. Activated TGF-β1 binds to the major amelogenin cleavage products, particularly the neutral-soluble P103 amelogenin, to maintain its activity. The P103 amelogenin-TGF-β1 complex binds to TGFBR1 to induce TGF-β1 signalling. The P103 amelogenin-TGF-β1 complex is slowly cleaved by kallikrein 4 (KLK4), which is secreted into the transition- and maturation-stage enamel matrix, thereby reducing TGF-β1 activity. To exert the multiple biological functions of TGF-β1 for amelogenesis, we propose that TGF-β1 is activated or inactivated by MMP20 or KLK4 and that the amelogenin cleavage product is necessary for the in-solution mobility of TGF-β1, which is necessary for binding to its receptor on ameloblasts and retention of its activity.

  10. TGF-ß regulates enamel mineralization and maturation through KLK4 expression.

    PubMed

    Cho, Andrew; Haruyama, Naoto; Hall, Bradford; Danton, Mary Jo S; Zhang, Lu; Arany, Praveen; Mooney, David J; Harichane, Yassine; Goldberg, Michel; Gibson, Carolyn W; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß) signaling plays an important role in regulating crucial biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many of these processes are also an integral part of amelogenesis. In order to delineate a precise role of TGF-ß signaling during amelogenesis, we developed a transgenic mouse line that harbors bovine amelogenin promoter-driven Cre recombinase, and bred this line with TGF-ß receptor II floxed mice to generate ameloblast-specific TGF-ß receptor II conditional knockout (cKO) mice. Histological analysis of the teeth at postnatal day 7 (P7) showed altered enamel matrix composition in the cKO mice as compared to the floxed mice that had enamel similar to the wild-type mice. The µCT and SEM analyses revealed decreased mineral content in the cKO enamel concomitant with increased attrition and thinner enamel crystallites. Although the mRNA levels remained unaltered, immunostaining revealed increased amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin localization in the cKO enamel at the maturation stage. Interestingly, KLK4 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in the cKO teeth along with a slight increase in MMP-20 levels, suggesting that normal enamel maturation is regulated by TGF-ß signaling through the expression of KLK4. Thus, our study indicates that TGF-ß signaling plays an important role in ameloblast functions and enamel maturation.

  11. Tooth enamel mineralization in ungulates: implications for recovering a primary isotopic time-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Cerling, Thure E.

    2002-09-01

    Temporal changes in the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of an animal are an environmental and behavioral input signal that is recorded into the enamel of developing teeth. In this paper, we evaluate changes in phosphorus content and density along the axial lengths of three developing ungulate teeth to illustrate the protracted nature of mineral accumulation in a volume of developing enamel. The least mature enamel in these teeth contains by volume about 25% of the mineral mass of mature enamel, and the remaining 75% of the mineral accumulates during maturation. Using data from one of these teeth (a Hippopotamus amphibius canine), we develop a model for teeth growing at constant rate that describes how an input signal is recorded into tooth enamel. The model accounts for both the temporal and spatial patterns of amelogenesis (enamel formation) and the sampling geometry. The model shows that input signal attenuation occurs as a result of time-averaging during amelogenesis when the maturation interval is long compared to the duration of features in the input signal. Sampling does not induce significant attenuation, provided that the sampling interval is several times shorter than the maturation interval. We present a detailed δ 13C and δ 18O record for the H. amphibius canine and suggest possible input isotope signals that may have given rise to the measured isotope signal.

  12. TGF-β1 autocrine signalling and enamel matrix components

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi-Kinoshita, Saeko; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Onuma, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Asada, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is present in porcine enamel extracts and is critical for proper mineralization of tooth enamel. Here, we show that the mRNA of latent TGF-β1 is expressed throughout amelogenesis. Latent TGF-β1 is activated by matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20), coinciding with amelogenin processing by the same proteinase. Activated TGF-β1 binds to the major amelogenin cleavage products, particularly the neutral-soluble P103 amelogenin, to maintain its activity. The P103 amelogenin-TGF-β1 complex binds to TGFBR1 to induce TGF-β1 signalling. The P103 amelogenin-TGF-β1 complex is slowly cleaved by kallikrein 4 (KLK4), which is secreted into the transition- and maturation-stage enamel matrix, thereby reducing TGF-β1 activity. To exert the multiple biological functions of TGF-β1 for amelogenesis, we propose that TGF-β1 is activated or inactivated by MMP20 or KLK4 and that the amelogenin cleavage product is necessary for the in-solution mobility of TGF-β1, which is necessary for binding to its receptor on ameloblasts and retention of its activity. PMID:27633089

  13. Skeletal characteristics associated with homozygous and heterozygous WNT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Telma; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Moffatt, Pierre; Glorieux, Francis H; Lentle, Brian; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Rauch, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Recent reports have shown that homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in WNT1 can give rise to severe bone fragility resembling osteogenesis imperfecta, whereas heterozygous WNT1 mutations have been found in adults with dominant early-onset osteoporosis. Here we assessed the effects of WNT1 mutations in four children with recessive severe bone fragility and in heterozygous family members. In vitro studies using the Topflash luciferase reporter system showed that two WNT1 missense mutations that were observed in these families, p.Cys143Phe and p.Val355Phe, decreased the ability of WNT1 to stimulate WNT signaling by >90%. Analyses of iliac bone samples revealed no major abnormalities in bone mineralization density distribution, an indicator of material bone properties, whereas a shift towards higher bone mineralization density is characteristic of classical osteogenesis imperfecta caused by mutations in COL1A1/COL1A2. Intravenous bisphosphonate treatment of four children with homozygous or compound heterozygous WNT1 mutations was associated with increasing lumbar spine areal bone mineral density z-scores, as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, but the effect was smaller than what had previously been reported for children with classical osteogenesis imperfecta. Family members with heterozygous WNT1 mutation tended to have low bone mass. Three of these heterozygous individuals had radiographic signs of vertebral fractures. These observations suggest that more effective treatment approaches are needed for children with recessive WNT1-related bone fragility and that a systematic work-up for osteoporosis is warranted for WNT1 mutation carriers in these families.

  14. First Record of Anisoptera (Insecta: Odonata) from mid-Cretaceous Burmese Amber.

    PubMed

    Schädel, Mario; Bechly, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The fossil dragonfly Burmalindenia imperfecta gen. et sp. nov. is described from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber as the first record of the odonate suborder Anisoptera for this locality and one of the few records from amber in general. The inclusion comprises two fragments of the two hind wings of a dragonfly. The fossil can be attributed to a new genus and species of the family Gomphidae, presumably in the subfamily Lindeniinae, and features a strange teratological phenomenon in its wing venation. PMID:27394756

  15. New form of bone dysplasia with multiple fractures associated with monosomy X.

    PubMed

    Azouz, E M; Chen, M F; Khalifé, S; Cartier, L; Eydoux, P

    1996-12-11

    We report on the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings in a 20-week-old fetus with monosomy X and severe hydrops associated with fetal dwarfism. The fetus presented with osteoporosis, bent bones, multiple fractures, and distinctive symmetric submetaphyseal transverse bone interruptions or pseudofractures. We excluded by radiologic and histopathologic examination the diagnoses of osteogenesis imperfecta, hypophosphatasia, campomelic dysplasia, achondrogenesis, hypochondrogenesis, and other types of bone dysplasia. To our knowledge, this is a previously undescribed bone dysplasia associated with monosomy X. This bone dysplasia may be inherited as an X-linked recessive disorder. PMID:8958323

  16. Bone dysplasias of infancy in the Vienna collection.

    PubMed

    Beighton, P; Sujansky, E; Patzak, B; Portele, K A

    1994-01-01

    The Vienna Museum of Pathological Anatomy contains a vast collection of abnormal skeletons. We have appraised this material and attempted to establish firm diagnoses of specific genetic disorders in terms of modern syndromic concepts. A number of the skeletons in the museum are those of deceased neonates; in many instances it was impossible to reach a diagnosis on the basis of the outward appearance but radiographic investigations confirmed diagnoses including osteogenesis imperfecta type II, thanatophoric dysplasia, achondroplasia and achondrogenesis. The Vienna collection represents a priceless resource for the investigation of genetic skeletal disorders of this type. PMID:7700712

  17. Ultrasonic demonstration of fetal skeletal dysplasia. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Muller, L M; Cremin, B J

    1985-02-01

    Reports on prenatal diagnosis in cases of skeletal dysplasia have mostly been in high-risk mothers with a suspect genetic background where the fetal lesion could probably be predetermined. We deal with routine ultrasonographic appraisal of the fetal skeleton when dysplasia is not initially suspected, and relate our experience of the lethal forms of this condition. During the 4-year period 1981-1984, 6 cases of skeletal dysplasia, including thanatophoric dysplasia, achondrogenesis, the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (chondro-ectodermal dysplasia) and osteogenesis imperfecta, were detected; the ultrasonographic findings are discussed. PMID:3885435

  18. Elastosis perforans serpiginosa in a case of pseudoxanthoma elasticum: A rare association.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Konakanchi; Chennamsetty, Kavya

    2016-01-01

    Elastosis perforans serpiginosa (EPS), characterized by transepidermal elimination of fragmented elastic fibers, clinically presents as hyperkeratotic papules. EPS is classified into three types: (1) Idiopathic; (2) reactive, with associated connective tissue diseases such as pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, cutis laxa, Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, Down's syndrome; (3) the one that is induced by D-penicillamine. A rare association of EPS with PXE, which is primarily a defect of transmembrane transporter protein with accumulation of certain metabolic compounds and secondary calcification of elastic fibers has been documented in the literature. We report a case of PXE with associated lesions that were histopathologically compatible with EPS. PMID:27057491

  19. Elastosis perforans serpiginosa in a case of pseudoxanthoma elasticum: A rare association

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, Konakanchi; Chennamsetty, Kavya

    2016-01-01

    Elastosis perforans serpiginosa (EPS), characterized by transepidermal elimination of fragmented elastic fibers, clinically presents as hyperkeratotic papules. EPS is classified into three types: (1) Idiopathic; (2) reactive, with associated connective tissue diseases such as pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, cutis laxa, Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, Down's syndrome; (3) the one that is induced by D-penicillamine. A rare association of EPS with PXE, which is primarily a defect of transmembrane transporter protein with accumulation of certain metabolic compounds and secondary calcification of elastic fibers has been documented in the literature. We report a case of PXE with associated lesions that were histopathologically compatible with EPS. PMID:27057491

  20. [Enamel: a unique self-assembling in mineral world].

    PubMed

    Lignon, Guilhem; de la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Dessombz, Arnaud; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2015-05-01

    Enamel is a unique tissue in vertebrates, acellular, formed on a labile scaffolding matrix and hypermineralized. The ameloblasts are epithelial cells in charge of amelogenesis. They secrete a number of matrix proteins degraded by enzymes during enamel mineralization. This ordered cellular and extracellular events imply that any genetic or environmental perturbation will produce indelible and recognizable defects. The specificity of defects will indicate the affected cellular process. Thus, depending on the specificity of alterations, the teratogenic event can be retrospectively established. Advances in the field allow to use enamel defects as diagnostic tools for molecular disorders. The multifunctionality of enamel peptides is presently identified from their chemical roles in mineralization to cell signaling, constituting a source of concrete innovations in regenerative medicine.

  1. [Enamel: a unique self-assembling in mineral world].

    PubMed

    Lignon, Guilhem; de la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Dessombz, Arnaud; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2015-05-01

    Enamel is a unique tissue in vertebrates, acellular, formed on a labile scaffolding matrix and hypermineralized. The ameloblasts are epithelial cells in charge of amelogenesis. They secrete a number of matrix proteins degraded by enzymes during enamel mineralization. This ordered cellular and extracellular events imply that any genetic or environmental perturbation will produce indelible and recognizable defects. The specificity of defects will indicate the affected cellular process. Thus, depending on the specificity of alterations, the teratogenic event can be retrospectively established. Advances in the field allow to use enamel defects as diagnostic tools for molecular disorders. The multifunctionality of enamel peptides is presently identified from their chemical roles in mineralization to cell signaling, constituting a source of concrete innovations in regenerative medicine. PMID:26059302

  2. Protein- mediated enamel mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principals of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties as well as the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth. PMID:22652761

  3. Evaluation of the Esthetic Properties of Developmental Defects of Enamel: A Spectrophotometric Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Fabrizio; Mazur, Marta; Corridore, Denise; Pasqualotto, Debora; Nardi, Gianna Maria; Ottolenghi, Livia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Detailed clinical quantification of optical properties of developmental defect of enamel is possible with spectrophotometric evaluation. Developmental defects of enamel (DDE) are daily encountered in clinical practice. DDE are an alteration in quality and quantity of the enamel, caused by disruption and/or damage to the enamel organ during amelogenesis. Methods. Several clinical indices have been developed to categorize enamel defects based on their nature, appearance, microscopic features, or cause. A sample of 39 permanent teeth presenting DDE on labial surface was examined using the DDE Modified Index and SpectroShade evaluation. The spectrophotometric approach quantifies L* (luminosity), a* (quantity of green-red), and b* (quantity of blue-yellow) of different DDE. Conclusions. SpectroShade evaluation of the optical properties of the enamel defect enhances clinical understanding of severity and extent of the defect and characterizes the enamel alteration in terms of color discrepancy and surface characterization. PMID:25874260

  4. Mapping residual organics and carbonate at grain boundaries and the amorphous interphase in mouse incisor enamel.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Joester, Derk

    2015-01-01

    Dental enamel has evolved to resist the most grueling conditions of mechanical stress, fatigue, and wear. Adding insult to injury, it is exposed to the frequently corrosive environment of the oral cavity. While its hierarchical structure is unrivaled in its mechanical resilience, heterogeneity in the distribution of magnesium ions and the presence of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP) as an intergranular phase have recently been shown to increase the susceptibility of mouse enamel to acid attack. Herein we investigate the distribution of two important constituents of enamel, residual organic matter and inorganic carbonate. We find that organics, carbonate, and possibly water show distinct distribution patterns in the mouse enamel crystallites, at simple grain boundaries, and in the amorphous interphase at multiple grain boundaries. This has implications for the resistance to acid corrosion, mechanical properties, and the mechanism by which enamel crystals grow during amelogenesis.

  5. Protein-mediated enamel mineralization.

    PubMed

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-06-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principels of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties and the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth.

  6. Mapping residual organics and carbonate at grain boundaries and the amorphous interphase in mouse incisor enamel

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Lyle M.; Joester, Derk

    2015-01-01

    Dental enamel has evolved to resist the most grueling conditions of mechanical stress, fatigue, and wear. Adding insult to injury, it is exposed to the frequently corrosive environment of the oral cavity. While its hierarchical structure is unrivaled in its mechanical resilience, heterogeneity in the distribution of magnesium ions and the presence of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP) as an intergranular phase have recently been shown to increase the susceptibility of mouse enamel to acid attack. Herein we investigate the distribution of two important constituents of enamel, residual organic matter and inorganic carbonate. We find that organics, carbonate, and possibly water show distinct distribution patterns in the mouse enamel crystallites, at simple grain boundaries, and in the amorphous interphase at multiple grain boundaries. This has implications for the resistance to acid corrosion, mechanical properties, and the mechanism by which enamel crystals grow during amelogenesis. PMID:25852562

  7. Summary of the IADR Cariology Research, Craniofacial Biology, and Mineralized Tissue Groups Symposium, Iguaçu Falls, Brazil, June 2012

    PubMed Central

    Modesto, Adriana; Klein, Ophir; Tenuta, Livia M.A.; Gerlach, Raquel F.; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2014-01-01

    Characteristics of enamel may influence or modulate individual susceptibility to caries and erosion. These characteristics are defined during development, which is under strict genetic control, but can easily be modified in many ways by environmental factors. In the symposium, translational aspects of embryology, biochemistry, and genetics of amelogenesis were presented. The symposium provided unique insight into how basic sciences integrate with clinically relevant problems. The need for improved understanding of risks at the individual level, taking into consideration both environmental exposures and genetic background, was presented. The symposium was divided into four stepwise and interconnected topics as follows: 1) The Many Faces of Enamel Development; 2) Enamel Pathogenesis: Biochemistry Lessons; 3) Environmental Factors on Enamel Formation; and, 4) Genetic Variation in Enamel Formation Genes. PMID:25392764

  8. The tick tock of odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Ehardt, Lauren; McAlpin, Blake; About, Imad; Kim, Doohak; Papagerakis, Silvana; Papagerakis, Petros

    2014-07-15

    Although a big deal of dental research is being focused to the understanding of early stages of tooth development, a huge gap exist on our knowledge on how the dental hard tissues are formed and how this process is controlled daily in order to produce very complex and diverse tooth shapes adapted for specific functions. Emerging evidence suggests that clock genes, a family of genes that controls circadian functions within our bodies, regulate also dental mineralized tissues formation. Enamel formation, for example, is subjected to rhythmical molecular signals that occur on short (24h) periods and control the secretion and maturation of the enamel matrix. Accordingly, gene expression and ameloblast functions are also tightly modulated in regular daily intervals. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the circadian controls of dental mineralized tissues development with a special emphasis on amelogenesis.

  9. Expression of heat-shock protein 25 immunoreactivity in the dental pulp and enamel organ during odontogenesis in the rat molar.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Hayato; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2002-01-01

    The present immunocytochemical study reports on the expression of heat-shock protein (Hsp) 25 during odontogenesis in rat molars from postnatal 1 to 100 days. Hsp 25 immunoreactivity (IR) appeared in the immature dental mesenchymal cells and the differentiating and differentiated odontoblasts. At 30 days, the coronal odontoblasts retained intense Hsp25-IR, whereas the odontoblasts in the root and floor pulp were initially weak or negative but increased in IR in the later stages, indicating that the expression of Hsp 25 reflects the differentiation status of odontoblasts. During amelogenesis, the secretory ameloblasts were Hsp 25 immunopositive and the enamel free area (EFA) cells showed intense Hsp 25-IR when they developed a ruffled border. Ruffle-ended ameloblasts (RA) also consistently showed intense Hsp 25-IR, but smooth ended ameloblasts (SA) showed weak IR. These data suggest that Hsp 25 is related to the formation and maintenance of the ruffled border of RA and EFA cells.

  10. Amelotin Gene Structure and Expression during Enamel Formation in the Opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Gasse, Barbara; Liu, Xi; Corre, Erwan; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) is an ameloblast-secreted protein that belongs to the secretory calcium-binding phosphoprotein family, which also includes the enamel matrix proteins amelogenin, ameloblastin and enamelin. Although AMTN is supposed to play an important role in enamel formation, data were long limited to the rodents, in which it is expressed during the maturation stage. Recent comparative studies in sauropsids and amphibians revealed that (i) AMTN was expressed earlier, i.e. as soon as ameloblasts are depositing the enamel matrix, and (ii) AMTN structure was different, a change which mostly resulted from an intraexonic splicing in the large exon 8 of an ancestral mammal. The present study was performed to know whether the differences in AMTN structure and expression in rodents compared to non-mammalian tetrapods dated back to an early ancestral mammal or were acquired later in mammalian evolution. We sequenced, assembled and screened the jaw transcriptome of a neonate opossum Monodelphis domestica, a marsupial. We found two AMTN transcripts. Variant 1, representing 70.8% of AMTN transcripts, displayed the structure known in rodents, whereas variant 2 (29.2%) exhibited the nonmammalian tetrapod structure. Then, we studied AMTN expression during amelogenesis in a neonate specimen. We obtained similar data as those reported in rodents. These findings indicate that more than 180 million years ago, before the divergence of marsupials and placentals, changes occurred in AMTN function and structure. The spatiotemporal expression was delayed to the maturation stage of amelogenesis and the intraexonic splicing gave rise to isoform 1, encoded by variant 1 and lacking the RGD motif. The ancestral isoform 2, housing the RGD, was initially conserved, as demonstrated here in a marsupial, then secondarily lost in the placental lineages. These findings bring new elements towards our understanding of the non-prismatic to prismatic enamel transition that occurred at the onset of

  11. Amelotin Gene Structure and Expression during Enamel Formation in the Opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Gasse, Barbara; Liu, Xi; Corre, Erwan; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) is an ameloblast-secreted protein that belongs to the secretory calcium-binding phosphoprotein family, which also includes the enamel matrix proteins amelogenin, ameloblastin and enamelin. Although AMTN is supposed to play an important role in enamel formation, data were long limited to the rodents, in which it is expressed during the maturation stage. Recent comparative studies in sauropsids and amphibians revealed that (i) AMTN was expressed earlier, i.e. as soon as ameloblasts are depositing the enamel matrix, and (ii) AMTN structure was different, a change which mostly resulted from an intraexonic splicing in the large exon 8 of an ancestral mammal. The present study was performed to know whether the differences in AMTN structure and expression in rodents compared to non-mammalian tetrapods dated back to an early ancestral mammal or were acquired later in mammalian evolution. We sequenced, assembled and screened the jaw transcriptome of a neonate opossum Monodelphis domestica, a marsupial. We found two AMTN transcripts. Variant 1, representing 70.8% of AMTN transcripts, displayed the structure known in rodents, whereas variant 2 (29.2%) exhibited the nonmammalian tetrapod structure. Then, we studied AMTN expression during amelogenesis in a neonate specimen. We obtained similar data as those reported in rodents. These findings indicate that more than 180 million years ago, before the divergence of marsupials and placentals, changes occurred in AMTN function and structure. The spatiotemporal expression was delayed to the maturation stage of amelogenesis and the intraexonic splicing gave rise to isoform 1, encoded by variant 1 and lacking the RGD motif. The ancestral isoform 2, housing the RGD, was initially conserved, as demonstrated here in a marsupial, then secondarily lost in the placental lineages. These findings bring new elements towards our understanding of the non-prismatic to prismatic enamel transition that occurred at the onset of

  12. The anion exchanger Ae2 is required for enamel maturation in mouse teeth

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, DM; Bronckers, ALJJ; Mulder, L; Mardones, P; Medina, JF; Kellokumpu, S; Elferink, RPJ Oude; Everts, V

    2008-01-01

    One of the mechanisms by which epithelial cells regulate intracellular pH is exchanging bicarbonate for Cl−. We tested the hypothesis that in ameloblasts the anion exchanger-2 (Ae2) is involved in pH regulation during maturation stage amelogenesis. Quantitative X-ray microprobe mineral content analysis, scanning electron microscopy, histology, micro-computed tomography and Ae2 immuno-localisation analyses were applied to Ae2-deficient and wild-type mouse mandibles. Immuno-localisation of Ae2 in wild-type mouse incisors showed a very strong expression of Ae2 in the basolateral membranes of the maturation stage ameloblasts. Strikingly, zones of contiguous ameloblasts were found within the maturation stage in which Ae2 expression was extremely low as opposed to neighbouring cells. Maturation stage ameloblasts of the Ae2a,b−/− mice failed to stain for Ae2 and showed progressive disorganisation as enamel development advanced. Maturation stage enamel of the Ae2a,b−/− mice contained substantially less mineral and more protein than wild-type enamel as determined by quantitative X-ray microanalysis. Incisor enamel was more severely affected than molar enamel. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the rod-inter-rod structures of the Ae2a,b−/− mice incisor enamel were absent. Mineral content of dentine and bone of Ae2a,b−/− mice was not significantly different from wild-type mice. The enamel from knockout mouse teeth wore down much faster than that from wild-type litter mates. Basolateral bicarbonate secretion via the anionic exchanger Ae2 is essential for mineral growth in the maturation stage enamel. The observed zonal expression of Ae2 in the maturation stage ameloblasts is in line with a model for cyclic proton secretion during maturation stage amelogenesis. PMID:18042363

  13. Amelogenin in Enamel Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter the basic premises, the recent findings and the future challenges in the use of amelogenin for enamel tissue engineering are being discoursed on. Results emerging from the experiments performed to assess the fundamental physicochemical mechanisms of the interaction of amelogenin, the main protein of the enamel matrix, and the growing crystals of apatite, are mentioned, alongside a moderately comprehensive literature review of the subject at hand. The clinical importance of understanding this protein/mineral interaction at the nanoscale are highlighted as well as the potential for tooth enamel to act as an excellent model system for studying some of the essential aspects of biomineralization processes in general. The dominant paradigm stating that amelogenin directs the uniaxial growth of apatite crystals in enamel by slowing down the growth of (hk0) faces on which it adheres is being questioned based on the results demonstrating the ability of amelogenin to promote the nucleation and crystal growth of apatite under constant titration conditions designed to mimic those present in the developing enamel matrix. The role of numerous minor components of the enamel matrix is being highlighted as essential and impossible to compensate for by utilizing its more abundant ingredients only. It is concluded that the three major aspects of amelogenesis outlined hereby – (1) the assembly of amelogenin and other enamel matrix proteins, (2) the proteolytic activity, and (3) crystallization – need to be in precise synergy with each other in order for the grounds for the proper imitation of amelogenesis in the lab to be created. PMID:26545753

  14. Full Spectrum of Postnatal Tooth Phenotypes in a Novel Irf6 Cleft Lip Model.

    PubMed

    Chu, E Y; Tamasas, B; Fong, H; Foster, B L; LaCourse, M R; Tran, A B; Martin, J F; Schutte, B C; Somerman, M J; Cox, T C

    2016-10-01

    Clefting of the lip, with or without palatal involvement (CLP), is associated with a higher incidence of developmental tooth abnormalities, including hypodontia and supernumerary teeth, aberrant crown and root morphologies, and enamel defects, although the underlying mechanistic link is poorly understood. As most CLP genes are expressed throughout the oral epithelium, the authors hypothesized that the expression of CLP genes may persist in the dental epithelium and thus, in addition to their earlier role in labiopalatine development, may play an important functional role in subsequent tooth patterning and amelogenesis. To address this, the authors generated a unique conditional knockout model involving the major CLP gene, Irf6, that overcomes the previously reported perinatal lethality to enable assessment of any posteruption dental phenotypes. A dental epithelium-specific Irf6 conditional knockout (Irf6-cKO) mouse was generated via a Pitx2-Cre driver line. Dental development was analyzed by microcomputed tomography, scanning electron microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Irf6-cKO mice displayed variable hypodontia, occasional supernumerary incisors and molars, as well as crown and root patterning anomalies, including peg-shaped first molars and taurodontic and C-shaped mandibular second molars. Enamel density was reduced in preeruption Irf6-cKO mice, and some shearing of enamel rods was noted in posteruption incisors. There was also rapid attrition of Irf6-cKO molars following eruption. Histologically, Irf6-cKO ameloblasts exhibited disturbances in adhesion and polarity, and delayed enamel formation was confirmed immunohistochemically. Altered structure of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath was also observed. These data support a role for IRF6 in tooth number, crown and root morphology and amelogenesis that is likely due to a functional role of Irf6 in organization and polarity of epithelial cell types. This data

  15. Proteomics of Secretory-Stage and Maturation-Stage Enamel of Genetically Distinct Mice.

    PubMed

    Charone, Senda; De Lima Leite, Aline; Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Silva Fernandes, Mileni; Ferreira de Almeida, Lucas; Zardin Graeff, Marcia Sirlene; Cardoso de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Campanelli, Ana Paula; Groisman, Sonia; Whitford, Gary Milton; Everett, Eric T; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which excessive ingestion of fluoride (F) during amelogenesis leads to dental fluorosis (DF) are still not precisely known. Inbred strains of mice vary in their susceptibility to develop DF, and therefore permit the investigation of underlying molecular events influencing DF severity. We employed a proteomic approach to characterize and evaluate changes in protein expression from secretory-stage and maturation-stage enamel in 2 strains of mice with different susceptibilities to DF (A/J, i.e. 'susceptible' and 129P3/J, i.e. 'resistant'). Weanling male and female susceptible and resistant mice fed a low-F diet were divided into 2 F-water treatment groups. They received water containing 0 (control) or 50 mg F/l for 6 weeks. Plasma and incisor enamel was analyzed for F content. For proteomic analysis, the enamel proteins extracted for each group were separated by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and subsequently characterized by liquid-chromatography electrospray-ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. F data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Bonferroni's test (p < 0.05). Resistant mice had significantly higher plasma and enamel F concentrations when compared with susceptible mice in the F-treated groups. The proteomic results for mice treated with 0 mg F/l revealed that during the secretory stage, resistant mice had a higher abundance of proteins than their susceptible counterparts, but this was reversed during the maturation stage. Treatment with F greatly increased the number of protein spots detected in both stages. Many proteins not previously described in enamel (e.g. type 1 collagen) as well as some uncharacterized proteins were identified. Our findings reveal new insights regarding amelogenesis and how genetic background and F affect this process. PMID:26820156

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-20 mediates dental enamel biomineralization by preventing protein occlusion inside apatite crystals.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Saumya; Tao, Jinhui; Ruan, Qichao; De Yoreo, James J; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of enamel-like materials is a central topic of research in dentistry and material sciences. The importance of precise proteolytic mechanisms in amelogenesis to form a hard tissue with more than 95% mineral content has already been reported. A mutation in the Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) gene results in hypomineralized enamel that is thin, disorganized and breaks from the underlying dentin. We hypothesized that the absence of MMP-20 during amelogenesis results in the occlusion of amelogenin in the enamel hydroxyapatite crystals. We used spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze occluded proteins within the isolated enamel crystals from MMP-20 null and Wild type (WT) mice. Our results showed that the isolated enamel crystals of MMP-20 null mice had more organic macromolecules occluded inside them than enamel crystals from the WT. The crystal lattice arrangements of MMP-20 null enamel crystals analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) were found to be significantly different from those of the WT. Raman studies indicated that the crystallinity of the MMP-20 null enamel crystals was lower than that of the WT. In conclusion, we present a novel functional mechanism of MMP-20, specifically prevention of unwanted organic material entrapped in the forming enamel crystals, which occurs as the result of precise amelogenin cleavage. MMP-20 action guides the growth morphology of the forming hydroxyapatite crystals and enhances their crystallinity. Elucidating such molecular mechanisms can be applied in the design of novel biomaterials for future clinical applications in dental restoration or repair.

  17. Molecular, Phenotypic Aspects and Therapeutic Horizons of Rare Genetic Bone Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Naveen; Vohra, Shivani; Tu, Khin; Abdelmagid, Samir M.

    2014-01-01

    A rare disease afflicts less than 200,000 individuals, according to the National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD) of the United States. Over 6,000 rare disorders affect approximately 1 in 10 Americans. Rare genetic bone disorders remain the major causes of disability in US patients. These rare bone disorders also represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians, due to lack of understanding of underlying mechanisms. This systematic review explored current literature on therapeutic directions for the following rare genetic bone disorders: fibrous dysplasia, Gorham-Stout syndrome, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, melorheostosis, multiple hereditary exostosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, craniometaphyseal dysplasia, achondroplasia, and hypophosphatasia. The disease mechanisms of Gorham-Stout disease, melorheostosis, and multiple hereditary exostosis are not fully elucidated. Inhibitors of the ACVR1/ALK2 pathway may serve as possible therapeutic intervention for FOP. The use of bisphosphonates and IL-6 inhibitors has been explored to be useful in the treatment of fibrous dysplasia, but more research is warranted. Cell therapy, bisphosphonate polytherapy, and human growth hormone may avert the pathology in osteogenesis imperfecta, but further studies are needed. There are still no current effective treatments for these bone disorders; however, significant promising advances in therapeutic modalities were developed that will limit patient suffering and treat their skeletal disabilities. PMID:25530967

  18. Fanconi-Bickel syndrome versus osteogenesis imperfeeta: An Iranian case with a novel mutation in glucose transporter 2 gene, and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hadipour, Fatemeh; Sarkheil, Peymaneh; Noruzinia, Mehrdad; Hadipour, Zahra; Baghdadi, Taghi; Shafeghati, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi-Bickel syndrome is an extremely rare hereditary metabolic disease, characterized by hepatomegaly due to glycogen storage, refractory hypophosphatemic rickets, marked growth retardation and proximal renal tubular acidosis. Recurrent bone fractures are one of the hallmark findings. It is a single gene disorder; the responsible gene belongs to the facilitative glucose transporters 2 (GLUT2) family gene or (SLC2A2) mapped to the q26.1-26.3 locus on chromosome 3, and encodes the GLUT protein 2. This protein is expressed in pancreatic ί-cells, hepatocytes, renal tubules, and intestinal mucosa. Several mutations in the GLUT2 gene have been reported in different ethnicities. Herein we report an Iranian girl with a missed diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta. She was referred with the history of frequent fractures, and severe motor delay and was suspected to osteogenesis imperfecta. Following the case we detected refractory rickets instead of OI, sever growth failure, proximal renal tubulopathy and RTA, and enlarged kidneys, progressive hepatomegaly, and GSD on liver biopsy. Glucose and galactose tolerance tests confirmed abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. Molecular analysis on GLUT2 gene revealed a homozygous novel mutation in exon 5; it was 15 nucleotide deletion and 7 nucleotide insertion and caused a frame shift mutation, produced a premature truncated protein (P.A229QFsX19). This mutation has not been reported before in the relevant literature. PMID:23901198

  19. Pediatric aspects of skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ozono, Keiichi; Namba, Noriyuki; Kubota, Takuo; Kitaoka, Taichi; Miura, Kohji; Ohata, Yasuhisa; Fujiwara, Makoto; Miyoshi, Yoko; Michigami, Toshimi

    2012-10-01

    Skeletal dysplasia is a disorder of skeletal development characterized by abnormality in shape, length, a number and mineral density of the bone. Skeletal dysplasia is often associated with manifestation of other organs such as lung, brain and sensory systems. Skeletal dysplasias or dysostosis are classified with more than 400 different names. Enchondral bone formation is a coordinated event of chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation and exchange of terminally maturated chondrocyte with bone. Impaired enchondral bone formation will lead to skeletal dysplasia, especially associated with short long bones. Appropriate bone volume and mineral density are achieved by balance of bone formation and bone resorption and mineralization. The gene encoding fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 is responsible for achondroplasia, representative skeletal dysplasia with short stature. The treatment with growth hormone is approved for achondroplasia in Japan. Osteogenesis imperfecta is characterized by low bone mineral density and fragile bone. Data on the beneficial effect of bisphosphonate for osteogenesis imperfecta are accumulating. Osteopetrosis has high bone mineral density, but sometimes show bone fragility. In Japan as well as other countries, pediatrician treat larger numbers of patients with skeletal dysplasia with short stature and fragile bones compared to 20 years ago.

  20. Ex-vivo assessment and non-invasive in vivo imaging of internal hemorrhages in Aga2/+ mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ermolayev, Vladimir; Cohrs, Christian M.; Mohajerani, Pouyan; Ale, Angelique; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Aga2/+ mice, model for Osteogenesis imperfecta, have type I collagen mutation. ► Aga2/+ mice display both moderate and severe phenotypes lethal 6–11th postnatal. ► Internal hemorrhages studied in Aga2/+ vs. control mice at 6 and 9 days postnatal. ► Anatomical and functional findings in-vivo contrasted to the ex-vivo appearance. -- Abstract: Mutations in type I collagen genes (COL1A1/2) typically lead to Osteogenesis imperfecta, the most common heritable cause of skeletal fractures and bone deformation in humans. Heterozygous Col1a1{sup Aga2/+}, animals with a dominant mutation in the terminal C-propeptide domain of type I collagen develop typical skeletal hallmarks and internal hemorrhages starting from 6 day after birth. The disease progression for Aga2/+ mice, however, is not uniform differing between severe phenotype lethal at the 6–11th day of life, and moderate-to-severe one with survival to adulthood. Herein we investigated whether a new modality that combines X-ray computer tomography with fluorescence tomography in one hybrid system can be employed to study internal bleedings in relation to bone fractures and obtain insights into disease progression. The disease phenotype was characterized on Aga2/+ vs. wild type mice between 6 and 9 days postnatal. Anatomical and functional findings obtained in-vivo were contrasted to the ex-vivo appearance of the same tissues under cryo-slicing.

  1. Evaluation of prenatal-onset osteochondrodysplasias by ultrasonography: a retrospective and prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Krakow, Deborah; Alanay, Yasemin; Rimoin, Lauren P; Lin, Victoria; Wilcox, William R; Lachman, Ralph S; Rimoin, David L

    2008-08-01

    The osteochondrodysplasias or skeletal dysplasias are a heterogenous group of over 350 distinct disorders of skeletogenesis. Many manifest in the prenatal period, making them amenable to ultrasound prenatal diagnosis. A retrospective analysis evaluated 1,500 cases referred to the International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry (ISDR) to determine the relative frequency of specific osteochondrodysplasias and correlation of ultrasound versus radiographic diagnoses for these disorders. Within the retrospective cohort of 1,500 cases, 85% of the referred cases represented well-defined skeletal dysplasias, and the other 15% of cases were a mixture of genetic syndromes and probable early-onset intrauterine growth restriction. The three most common prenatal-onset skeletal dysplasias were osteogenesis imperfecta type 2, thanatophoric dysplasia and achondrogenesis 2, accounting for almost 40% of the cases. In a prospective analysis of 500 cases using a standardized ultrasound approach to the evaluation of these disorders, the relative frequencies of osteogenesis imperfecta type 2, thanatophoric dysplasia and achondrogenesis 2 were similar to the retrospective analysis. This study details the relative frequencies of specific prenatal-onset osteochondrodysplasias, their heterogeneity of prenatal-onset skeletal disorders and provides a standardized prenatal ultrasound approach to these disorders which should aid in the prenatal diagnosis of fetuses suspected of manifesting skeletal dysplasias. PMID:18627037

  2. Mapping the Effect of Gly Mutations in Collagen on α2β1 Integrin Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Sezin; Yu, Hongtao; An, Bo; Hamaia, Samir; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of one Gly in the essential repeating tripeptide sequence of the type I collagen triple helix results in the dominant hereditary bone disorder osteogenesis imperfecta. The mechanism leading to pathology likely involves misfolding and autophagy, although it has been hypothesized that some mutations interfere with known collagen interactions. Here, the effect of Gly replacements within and nearby the integrin binding GFPGER sequence was investigated using a recombinant bacterial collagen system. When a six-triplet human type I collagen sequence containing GFPGER was introduced into a bacterial collagen-like protein, this chimeric protein bound to integrin. Constructs with Gly to Ser substitutions within and nearby the inserted human sequence still formed a trypsin-resistant triple helix, suggesting a small local conformational perturbation. Gly to Ser mutations within the two Gly residues in the essential GFPGER sequence prevented integrin binding and cell attachment as predicted from molecular dynamics studies of the complex. Replacement of Gly residues C-terminal to GFPGER did not affect integrin binding. In contrast, Gly replacements N-terminal to the GFPGER sequence, up to four triplets away, decreased integrin binding and cell adhesion. This pattern suggests either an involvement of the triplets N-terminal to GFPGER in initial binding or a propagation of the perturbation of the triple helix C-terminal to a mutation site. The asymmetry in biological consequences relative to the mutation site may relate to the observed pattern of osteogenesis imperfecta mutations near the integrin binding site. PMID:27432884

  3. On strain and stress in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Brian N.; Smith, David W.

    2014-11-01

    Recent theoretical simulations of amelogenesis and network formation and new, simple analyses of the basic multicellular unit (BMU) allow estimation of the order of magnitude of the strain energy density in populations of living cells in their natural environment. A similar simple calculation translates recent measurements of the force-displacement relation for contacting cells (cell-cell adhesion energy) into equivalent volume energy densities, which are formed by averaging the changes in contact energy caused by a cell's migration over the cell's volume. The rates of change of these mechanical energy densities (energy density rates) are then compared to the order of magnitude of the metabolic activity of a cell, expressed as a rate of production of metabolic energy per unit volume. The mechanical energy density rates are 4-5 orders of magnitude smaller than the metabolic energy density rate in amelogenesis or bone remodeling in the BMU, which involve modest cell migration velocities, and 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller for innervation of the gut or angiogenesis, where migration rates are among the highest for all cell types. For representative cell-cell adhesion gradients, the mechanical energy density rate is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the metabolic energy density rate. The results call into question the validity of using simple constitutive laws to represent living cells. They also imply that cells need not migrate as inanimate objects of gradients in an energy field, but are better regarded as self-powered automata that may elect to be guided by such gradients or move otherwise. Thus Ġel=d/dt 1/2 >[(C11+C12)ɛ02+2μγ02]=(C11+C12)ɛ0ɛ˙0+2μγ0γ˙0 or Ġel=ηEɛ0ɛ˙0+η‧Eγ0γ˙0 with 1.4≤η≤3.4 and 0.7≤η‧≤0.8 for Poisson's ratio in the range 0.2≤ν≤0.4 and η=1.95 and η‧=0.75 for ν=0.3. The spatial distribution of shear strains arising within an individual cell as cells slide past one another during amelogenesis is not known

  4. Cells as strain-cued automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Brian N.; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2016-02-01

    We argue in favor of representing living cells as automata and review demonstrations that autonomous cells can form patterns by responding to local variations in the strain fields that arise from their individual or collective motions. An autonomous cell's response to strain stimuli is assumed to be effected by internally-generated, internally-powered forces, which generally move the cell in directions other than those implied by external energy gradients. Evidence of cells acting as strain-cued automata have been inferred from patterns observed in nature and from experiments conducted in vitro. Simulations that mimic particular cases of pattern forming share the idealization that cells are assumed to pass information among themselves solely via mechanical boundary conditions, i.e., the tractions and displacements present at their membranes. This assumption opens three mechanisms for pattern formation in large cell populations: wavelike behavior, kinematic feedback in cell motility that can lead to sliding and rotational patterns, and directed migration during invasions. Wavelike behavior among ameloblast cells during amelogenesis (the formation of dental enamel) has been inferred from enamel microstructure, while strain waves in populations of epithelial cells have been observed in vitro. One hypothesized kinematic feedback mechanism, "enhanced shear motility", accounts successfully for the spontaneous formation of layered patterns during amelogenesis in the mouse incisor. Directed migration is exemplified by a theory of invader cells that sense and respond to the strains they themselves create in the host population as they invade it: analysis shows that the strain fields contain positional information that could aid the formation of cell network structures, stabilizing the slender geometry of branches and helping govern the frequency of branch bifurcation and branch coalescence (the formation of closed networks). In simulations of pattern formation in

  5. Novel Mutations in FKBP10 and PLOD2 Cause Rare Bruck Syndrome in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peiran; Liu, Yi; Lv, Fang; Nie, Min; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Ou; Xia, Weibo; Xing, Xiaoping; Li, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Bruck syndrome (BS) is an extremely rare form of osteogenesis imperfecta characterized by congenital joint contracture, multiple fractures and short stature. We described the phenotypes of BS in two Chinese patients for the first time. The novel compound heterozygous mutations c.764_772dupACGTCCTCC (p.255_257dupHisValLeu) in exon 5 and c.1405G>T (p.Gly469X) in exon 9 of FKBP10 were identified in one proband. The novel compound heterozygous mutations c.1624delT (p.Tyr542Thrfs*18) in exon 14 and c.1880T>C (p.Val627Ala) in exon 17 of PLOD2 were identified in another probrand. Intravenous zoledronate was a potent agent for these patients, confirmed the efficacy of bisphosphonates on this disease. In conclusion, the novel causative mutations identified in the patients expand the genotypic spectrum of BS. PMID:25238597

  6. Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor (PEDF) is a Determinant of Stem Cell Fate: Lessons from an Ultra-Rare Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sagheer, Usman; Gong, Jingjing; Chung, Chuhan

    2016-01-01

    PEDF is a secreted glycoprotein that is widely expressed by multiple organs. Numerous functional contributions have been attributed to PEDF with antiangiogenic, antitumor, anti-inflammatory, and neurotrophic properties among the most prominent. The discovery that null mutations in the PEDF gene results in Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type VI, a rare autosomal recessive bone disease characterized by multiple fractures, highlights a critical developmental function for this protein. This ultra-rare orphan disease has provided biological insights into previous studies that noted PEDF’s effects on various stem cell populations. In addition to bone development, PEDF modulates resident stem cell populations in the brain, muscle, and eye. Functional effects on human embryonic stem cells have also been demonstrated. An overview of recent advances in our understanding by which PEDF regulates stem cells and their potential clinical applications will be evaluated in this review. PMID:27239449

  7. Detection of a Novel DSPP Mutation by NGS in a Population Isolate in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Huckert, Mathilde; Stoetzel, Corinne; Meyer, Julia; Geoffroy, Véronique; Razafindrakoto, Rabisoa W.; Ralison, Saholy N.; Randrianaivo, Jean-Claude; Ralison, Georgette; Andriamasinoro, Rija O.; Ramanampamaharana, Rija H.; Randrianazary, Solofomanantsoa E.; Ralimanana, Louise H.; Richard, Béatrice; Gorry, Philippe; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Rasoamananjara, Jeanne A.; Rakoto Alson, Simone; Dollfus, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    A large family from a small village in Madagascar, Antanetilava, is known to present with colored teeth. Through previous collaboration and 4 successive visits in 1994, 2004, 2005, and 2012, we provided dental care to the inhabitants and diagnosed dentinogenesis imperfecta. Recently, using whole exome sequencing we confirmed the clinical diagnosis by identifying a novel single nucleotide deletion in exon 5 of DSPP. This paper underlines the necessity of long run research, the importance of international and interpersonal collaborations as well as the major contribution of next generation sequencing tools in the genetic diagnosis of rare oro-dental anomalies. This study is registered in ClinicalTrials (https://clinicaltrials.gov) under the number NCT02397824. PMID:26973538

  8. Partial deletion of the LAMA3 gene is responsible for hereditary junctional epidermolysis bullosa in the American Saddlebred Horse.

    PubMed

    Graves, K T; Henney, P J; Ennis, R B

    2009-02-01

    Laminin 5 is a heterotrimeric basement membrane protein integral to the structure and function of the dermal-epidermal junction. It consists of three glycoprotein subunits: the alpha3, beta3 and gamma2 chains, which are encoded by the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes respectively. A mutation in any of these genes results in the condition known as hereditary junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). A 6589-bp deletion spanning exons 24-27 was found in the LAMA3 gene in American Saddlebred foals born with the skin-blistering condition epitheliogenesis imperfecta. The deletion confirms that this autosomal recessive condition in the American Saddlebred Horse can indeed be classified as JEB and corresponds to Herlitz JEB in humans. A diagnostic test was developed and nine of 175 randomly selected American Saddlebred foals from the 2007 foal crop were found to be carriers of the mutation (frequency of 0.026). PMID:19016681

  9. The birth prevalence rates for the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Orioli, I M; Castilla, E E; Barbosa-Neto, J G

    1986-01-01

    This study was undertaken to establish the prevalence rates at birth of the skeletal dysplasias that can be recognised in the perinatal period. Using the data base of the Latin-American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC), for the years 1978 to 1983, on 349 470 births (live and stillbirths), a crude prevalence rate of 2.3/10 000 was observed. However, several indications of under-registration suggest that the real value is about twice that observed. The most frequent types of skeletal dysplasia were achondroplasia, with a prevalence rate between 0.5 and 1.5/10 000 births, the thanatophoric dysplasia/achondrogenesis group (0.2 and 0.5/10 000 births), and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.4/10 000 births). The mutation rate for autosomal dominant achondroplasia was estimated at between 1.72 and 5.57 X 10(-5) per gamete per generation. PMID:3746832

  10. [Concomitant diseases in primary joint hypermobility syndrome].

    PubMed

    Skoumal, Martin; Haberhauer, Günther; Mayr, Hans

    2004-10-15

    The primary joint hypermobility syndrome (pJH) is an overlap disorder of connective-tissue dysplasias, which incorporates features seen in the Marfan syndromes (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS), and osteogenesis imperfecta. Patients with pJH usually present arthralgia, back pain, soft-tissue lesions, recurrent joint dislocation, or subluxation. Extraarticular features may include, e. g., striae cutis, keratoconus, easy bruising, mitral valve prolapse, aortic incompetence, aneurysms, pneumothorax, hernia, urinary incontinence, and pelvic floor prolapse. Due to the high frequency of critical dissection and rupture, the early recognition of rare life-threatening complications such as dilatation of the aortic root and aneurysms is important. Therefore, patients (and their family members) with pJH should also be examined for life-threatening features seen in MFS and EDS. PMID:15490074

  11. Bisphosphonates: Pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, mechanisms of action, clinical applications in children, and effects on tooth development.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana Prates; do Espírito Santo, Renan Fernandes; Line, Sérgio Roberto Peres; Pinto, Maria das Graças Farias; Santos, Pablo de Moura; Toralles, Maria Betânia Pereira; do Espírito Santo, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-03-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) avidly bind to calcium crystals and inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption, making them useful for treatment of skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis, Paget's disease, osteogenesis imperfecta and metastatic bone diseases. BPs therapeutically act by causing toxic effects on osteoclasts or interfering with specific intracellular pathways in those cells. BPs that possess nitrogen in their composition are called nitrogen-containing BPs (NBPs) and include alendronate, pamidronate, risedronate, ibandronate, and zoledronate. Simple BPs or non-NBPs do not have nitrogen in their composition, include etiodronate and clodronate, and were the first to be tested in animals and clinically used. Because BPs may be administered to pregnant women or children during deciduous and permanent teeth development, it is expected that they might disturb tooth eruption and development. A review of current literature on pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, mechanisms of action, and clinical applications of BPs in children, and their effects on tooth eruption and development is presented.

  12. Bone matrix hypermineralization in prolyl-3 hydroxylase 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Bächinger, Hans-Peter; Vranka, Janice A; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Rauch, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Lack of prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) due to mutations in P3H1 results in severe forms of recessive osteogenesis imperfecta. In the present study, we investigated the bone tissue characteristics of P3H1 null mice. Histomorphometric analyses of cancellous bone in the proximal tibia and lumbar vertebra in 1-month and 3-month old mice demonstrated that P3H1 deficient mice had low trabecular bone volume and low mineral apposition rate, but normal osteoid maturation time and normal osteoblast and osteoclast surfaces. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging revealed that the bone mineralization density distribution was shifted towards higher values, indicating hypermineralization of bone matrix. It thus appears that P3H1 deficiency leads to decreased deposition of extracellular matrix by osteoblasts and increased incorporation of mineral into the matrix. PMID:26808442

  13. The strength of a calcified tissue depends in part on the molecular structure and organization of its constituent mineral crystals in their organic matrix.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J

    1995-05-01

    High-voltage electron-microscopic tomographic (3D) studies of the ultrastructural interaction between mineral and organic matrix in a variety of calcified tissues reveal different crystal structural and organizational features in association with their respective organic matrices. In brittle or weak pathologic or ectopic calcifications, including examples of osteogenesis imperfecta, calciphylaxis, calcergy, and dermatomyositis, hydroxyapatite crystals occur in various sizes and shapes and are oriented and aligned with respect to collagen in a manner which is distinct from that found in normal calcified tissues. A model of collagen-mineral interaction is proposed which may account for the observed crystal structures and organization. The results indicate that the ultimate strength, support, and other mechanical properties provided by a calcified tissue are dependent in part upon the molecular structure and arrangement of its constituent mineral crystals within their organic matrix.

  14. [Newborn and infant fractures secondary to traditional massage].

    PubMed

    Mboutol-Mandavo, C; N'dour, O; Ouedraogo, S F; Missengue-Bosseba, R; Ndiaye, D; Ngom, G

    2016-09-01

    The traditional massage of the newborn and young infant is an ancient practice in Africa and other regions. It has many benefits that are currently recognized, even in Western societies. However, it can be dangerous. We report two cases of fractures of the femur and clavicle that occurred in a 17-day-old newborn and a 1-month-old infant secondary to a traditional massage. In both cases, there was no concept of trauma or a history of osteogenesis imperfecta in the family or the presence of other fractures suggesting abuse. We concluded in a fracture caused by traditional massage in both cases. Given its many benefits as described in the literature, the traditional massage of young infants cannot be considered a harmful practice. However, it should be practiced with care to prevent the occurrence of such complications. PMID:27364938

  15. Sc65-Null Mice Provide Evidence for a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Complex Regulating Collagen Lysyl Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Weis, MaryAnn; Rai, Jyoti; Hudson, David M.; Dimori, Milena; Zimmerman, Sarah M.; Hogue, William R.; Swain, Frances L.; Burdine, Marie S.; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Tackett, Alan J.; Suva, Larry J.; Eyre, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and its integrity is essential for connective tissue and organ function. The importance of proteins involved in intracellular collagen post-translational modification, folding and transport was recently highlighted from studies on recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Here we describe the critical role of SC65 (Synaptonemal Complex 65, P3H4), a leprecan-family member, as part of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) complex with prolyl 3-hydroxylase 3. This complex affects the activity of lysyl-hydroxylase 1 potentially through interactions with the enzyme and/or cyclophilin B. Loss of Sc65 in the mouse results in instability of this complex, altered collagen lysine hydroxylation and cross-linking leading to connective tissue defects that include low bone mass and skin fragility. This is the first indication of a prolyl-hydroxylase complex in the ER controlling lysyl-hydroxylase activity during collagen synthesis. PMID:27119146

  16. Sc65-Null Mice Provide Evidence for a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Complex Regulating Collagen Lysyl Hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Heard, Melissa E; Besio, Roberta; Weis, MaryAnn; Rai, Jyoti; Hudson, David M; Dimori, Milena; Zimmerman, Sarah M; Kamykowski, Jeffrey A; Hogue, William R; Swain, Frances L; Burdine, Marie S; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Tackett, Alan J; Suva, Larry J; Eyre, David R; Morello, Roy

    2016-04-01

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and its integrity is essential for connective tissue and organ function. The importance of proteins involved in intracellular collagen post-translational modification, folding and transport was recently highlighted from studies on recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Here we describe the critical role of SC65 (Synaptonemal Complex 65, P3H4), a leprecan-family member, as part of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) complex with prolyl 3-hydroxylase 3. This complex affects the activity of lysyl-hydroxylase 1 potentially through interactions with the enzyme and/or cyclophilin B. Loss of Sc65 in the mouse results in instability of this complex, altered collagen lysine hydroxylation and cross-linking leading to connective tissue defects that include low bone mass and skin fragility. This is the first indication of a prolyl-hydroxylase complex in the ER controlling lysyl-hydroxylase activity during collagen synthesis.

  17. The strength of a calcified tissue depends in part on the molecular structure and organization of its constituent mineral crystals in their organic matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    High-voltage electron-microscopic tomographic (3D) studies of the ultrastructural interaction between mineral and organic matrix in a variety of calcified tissues reveal different crystal structural and organizational features in association with their respective organic matrices. In brittle or weak pathologic or ectopic calcifications, including examples of osteogenesis imperfecta, calciphylaxis, calcergy, and dermatomyositis, hydroxyapatite crystals occur in various sizes and shapes and are oriented and aligned with respect to collagen in a manner which is distinct from that found in normal calcified tissues. A model of collagen-mineral interaction is proposed which may account for the observed crystal structures and organization. The results indicate that the ultimate strength, support, and other mechanical properties provided by a calcified tissue are dependent in part upon the molecular structure and arrangement of its constituent mineral crystals within their organic matrix.

  18. Spontaneous multivessel cervical artery dissection in a patient with a substitution of alanine for glycine (G13A) in the alpha 1 (I) chain of type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S A; Rubin, B S; Starman, B J; Byers, P H

    1996-08-01

    Cervical artery dissection occurs spontaneously and in multiple vessels with surprising frequency. An underlying arteriopathy is frequently suspected, but specific causes of vascular fragility are rarely identified. We describe a 35-year-old woman who developed multiple cervical artery dissections after scuba diving. She had no stigmata of connective tissue disease apart from bluish sclerae, and no family history of arterial dissection or congenital musculoskeletal disease. Analysis of the COL1A1 gene that encodes the pro alpha 1(I) chains of type I procollagen revealed a point mutation in one allele, resulting in substitution of alanine for glycine (G13A) in about half the alpha 1(I) chains of type I collagen. Genetic disorders of collagen, such as the mild phenotypic variant of osteogenesis imperfecta identified in our patient, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained cervical artery dissection.

  19. Detection of a Novel DSPP Mutation by NGS in a Population Isolate in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Huckert, Mathilde; Stoetzel, Corinne; Meyer, Julia; Geoffroy, Véronique; Razafindrakoto, Rabisoa W; Ralison, Saholy N; Randrianaivo, Jean-Claude; Ralison, Georgette; Andriamasinoro, Rija O; Ramanampamaharana, Rija H; Randrianazary, Solofomanantsoa E; Richard, Béatrice; Gorry, Philippe; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Rakoto Alson, Simone; Dollfus, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    A large family from a small village in Madagascar, Antanetilava, is known to present with colored teeth. Through previous collaboration and 4 successive visits in 1994, 2004, 2005, and 2012, we provided dental care to the inhabitants and diagnosed dentinogenesis imperfecta. Recently, using whole exome sequencing we confirmed the clinical diagnosis by identifying a novel single nucleotide deletion in exon 5 of DSPP. This paper underlines the necessity of long run research, the importance of international and interpersonal collaborations as well as the major contribution of next generation sequencing tools in the genetic diagnosis of rare oro-dental anomalies. This study is registered in ClinicalTrials (https://clinicaltrials.gov) under the number NCT02397824.

  20. The birth prevalence rates for the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Orioli, I M; Castilla, E E; Barbosa-Neto, J G

    1986-08-01

    This study was undertaken to establish the prevalence rates at birth of the skeletal dysplasias that can be recognised in the perinatal period. Using the data base of the Latin-American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC), for the years 1978 to 1983, on 349 470 births (live and stillbirths), a crude prevalence rate of 2.3/10 000 was observed. However, several indications of under-registration suggest that the real value is about twice that observed. The most frequent types of skeletal dysplasia were achondroplasia, with a prevalence rate between 0.5 and 1.5/10 000 births, the thanatophoric dysplasia/achondrogenesis group (0.2 and 0.5/10 000 births), and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.4/10 000 births). The mutation rate for autosomal dominant achondroplasia was estimated at between 1.72 and 5.57 X 10(-5) per gamete per generation. PMID:3746832