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Sample records for hypothalamic leucine sensing

  1. Oral Leucine Supplementation Is Sensed by the Brain but neither Reduces Food Intake nor Induces an Anorectic Pattern of Gene Expression in the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Thais T.; Pedroso, João A. B.; Furigo, Isadora C.; Tirapegui, Julio; Donato, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Leucine activates the intracellular mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and hypothalamic mTOR signaling regulates food intake. Although central infusion of leucine reduces food intake, it is still uncertain whether oral leucine supplementation is able to affect the hypothalamic circuits that control energy balance. We observed increased phosphorylation of p70s6k in the mouse hypothalamus after an acute oral gavage of leucine. We then assessed whether acute oral gavage of leucine induces the activation of neurons in several hypothalamic nuclei and in the brainstem. Leucine did not induce the expression of Fos in hypothalamic nuclei, but it increased the number of Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the area postrema. In addition, oral gavage of leucine acutely increased the 24 h food intake of mice. Nonetheless, chronic leucine supplementation in the drinking water did not change the food intake and the weight gain of ob/ob mice and of wild-type mice consuming a low- or a high-fat diet. We assessed the hypothalamic gene expression and observed that leucine supplementation increased the expression of enzymes (BCAT1, BCAT2 and BCKDK) that metabolize branched-chain amino acids. Despite these effects, leucine supplementation did not induce an anorectic pattern of gene expression in the hypothalamus. In conclusion, our data show that the brain is able to sense oral leucine intake. However, the food intake is not modified by chronic oral leucine supplementation. These results question the possible efficacy of leucine supplementation as an appetite suppressant to treat obesity. PMID:24349566

  2. Hypothalamic glucose sensing: making ends meet

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Vanessa H.; Hao, Lihong; Santiago, Ammy M.; Sheng, Zhenyu; Zhou, Chunxue

    2014-01-01

    The neuroendocrine system governs essential survival and homeostatic functions. For example, growth is needed for development, thermoregulation maintains optimal core temperature in a changing environment, and reproduction ensures species survival. Stress and immune responses enable an organism to overcome external and internal threats while the circadian system regulates arousal and sleep such that vegetative and active functions do not overlap. All of these functions require a significant portion of the body's energy. As the integrator of the neuroendocrine system, the hypothalamus carefully assesses the energy status of the body in order to appropriately partition resources to provide for each system without compromising the others. While doing so the hypothalamus must ensure that adequate glucose levels are preserved for brain function since glucose is the primary fuel of the brain. To this end, the hypothalamus contains specialized glucose sensing neurons which are scattered throughout the nuclei controlling distinct neuroendocrine functions. We hypothesize that these neurons play a key role in enabling the hypothalamus to partition energy to meet these peripheral survival needs without endangering the brain's glucose supply. This review will first describe the varied mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in neurons within discrete hypothalamic nuclei. We will then evaluate the way in which peripheral energy status regulates glucose sensitivity. For example, during energy deficit such as fasting specific hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons become sensitized to decreased glucose. This increases the gain of the information relay when glucose availability is a greater concern for the brain. Finally, changes in glucose sensitivity under pathological conditions (e.g., recurrent insulin-hypoglycemia, diabetes) will be addressed. The overall goal of this review is to place glucose sensing neurons within the context of hypothalamic control of neuroendocrine function

  3. L-leucine supplementation worsens the adiposity of already obese rats by promoting a hypothalamic pattern of gene expression that favors fat accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Thais T; Torres-Leal, Francisco L; Campaña, Amanda B; Lima, Fabio B; Donato, Jose

    2014-04-02

    Several studies showed that l-leucine supplementation reduces adiposity when provided before the onset of obesity. We studied rats that were exposed to a high-fat diet (HFD) for 10 weeks before they started to receive l-leucine supplementation. Fat mass was increased in l-leucine-supplemented rats consuming the HFD. Accordingly, l-leucine produced a hypothalamic pattern of gene expression that favors fat accumulation. In conclusion, l-leucine supplementation worsened the adiposity of rats previously exposed to HFD possibly by central mechanisms.

  4. Structural basis for leucine sensing by the Sestrin2-mTORC1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Saxton, Robert A; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Wolfson, Rachel L; Chantranupong, Lynne; Pacold, Michael E; Wang, Tim; Schwartz, Thomas U; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate growth with the availability of nutrients through the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), a master growth regulator. Leucine is of particular importance and activates mTORC1 via the Rag guanosine triphosphatases and their regulators GATOR1 and GATOR2. Sestrin2 interacts with GATOR2 and is a leucine sensor. Here we present the 2.7 angstrom crystal structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine. Leucine binds through a single pocket that coordinates its charged functional groups and confers specificity for the hydrophobic side chain. A loop encloses leucine and forms a lid-latch mechanism required for binding. A structure-guided mutation in Sestrin2 that decreases its affinity for leucine leads to a concomitant increase in the leucine concentration required for mTORC1 activation in cells. These results provide a structural mechanism of amino acid sensing by the mTORC1 pathway.

  5. Structural basis for leucine sensing by the Sestrin2-mTORC1 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Saxton, Robert A.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Wolfson, Rachel L.; Chantranupong, Lynne; Pacold, Michael E.; Wang, Tim; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-11-19

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate growth with the availability of nutrients through mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), a master growth regulator. Leucine is of particular importance and activates mTORC1 via the Rag GTPases and their regulators GATOR1 and GATOR2. Sestrin2 interacts with GATOR2 and is a leucine sensor. We present the 2.7-Å crystal structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine. Leucine binds through a single pocket that coordinates its charged functional groups and confers specificity for the hydrophobic side chain. A loop encloses leucine and forms a lid-latch mechanism required for binding. A structure-guided mutation in Sestrin2 that decreases its affinity for leucine leads to a concomitant increase in the leucine concentration required for mTORC1 activation in cells. Lastly, these results provide a structural mechanism of amino acid sensing by the mTORC1 pathway.

  6. Structural basis for leucine sensing by the Sestrin2-mTORC1 pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Saxton, Robert A.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Wolfson, Rachel L.; ...

    2015-11-19

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate growth with the availability of nutrients through mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), a master growth regulator. Leucine is of particular importance and activates mTORC1 via the Rag GTPases and their regulators GATOR1 and GATOR2. Sestrin2 interacts with GATOR2 and is a leucine sensor. We present the 2.7-Å crystal structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine. Leucine binds through a single pocket that coordinates its charged functional groups and confers specificity for the hydrophobic side chain. A loop encloses leucine and forms a lid-latch mechanism required for binding. A structure-guided mutation in Sestrin2 that decreases its affinity for leucinemore » leads to a concomitant increase in the leucine concentration required for mTORC1 activation in cells. Lastly, these results provide a structural mechanism of amino acid sensing by the mTORC1 pathway.« less

  7. Nutrient-sensing hypothalamic TXNIP links nutrient excess to energy imbalance in mice.

    PubMed

    Blouet, Clémence; Schwartz, Gary J

    2011-04-20

    Nutrient excess in obesity and diabetes is emerging as a common putative cause for multiple deleterious effects across diverse cell types, responsible for a variety of metabolic dysfunctions. The hypothalamus is acknowledged as an important regulator of whole-body energy homeostasis, through both detection of nutrient availability and coordination of effectors that determine nutrient intake and utilization, thus preventing cellular and whole-body nutrient excess. However, the mechanisms underlying hypothalamic nutrient detection and its impact on peripheral nutrient utilization remain poorly understood. Recent data suggest a role for thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) as a molecular nutrient sensor important in the regulation of energy metabolism, but the role of hypothalamic TXNIP in the regulation of energy balance has not been evaluated. Here we show in mice that TXNIP is expressed in nutrient-sensing neurons of the mediobasal hypothalamus, responds to hormonal and nutrient signals, and regulates adipose tissue metabolism, fuel partitioning, and glucose homeostasis. Hypothalamic expression of TXNIP is induced by acute nutrient excess and in mouse models of obesity and diabetes, and downregulation of mediobasal hypothalamic TXNIP expression prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Thus, mediobasal hypothalamic TXNIP plays a critical role in nutrient sensing and the regulation of fuel utilization.

  8. Hypothalamic glucose-sensing: role of Glia-to-neuron signaling.

    PubMed

    Tonon, M C; Lanfray, D; Castel, H; Vaudry, H; Morin, F

    2013-12-01

    The hypothalamus senses hormones and nutrients in order to regulate energy balance. In particular, detection of hypothalamic glucose levels has been shown to regulate both feeding behavior and peripheral glucose homeostasis, and impairment of this regulatory system is believed to be involved in the development of obesity and diabetes. Several data clearly demonstrate that glial cells are key elements in the perception of glucose, constituting with neurons a "glucose-sensing unit". Characterization of this interplay between glia and neurons represents an exciting challenge, and will undoubtedly contribute to identify new candidates for therapeutic intervention. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current data that stress the importance of glia in central glucose-sensing. The nature of the glia-to-neuron signaling is discussed, with a special focus on the endozepine ODN, a potent anorexigenic peptide that is highly expressed in hypothalamic glia.

  9. Hypothalamic astroglial connexins are required for brain glucose sensing-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Allard, Camille; Carneiro, Lionel; Grall, Sylvie; Cline, Brandon H; Fioramonti, Xavier; Chrétien, Chloé; Baba-Aissa, Fawzia; Giaume, Christian; Pénicaud, Luc; Leloup, Corinne

    2014-02-01

    Hypothalamic glucose detection participates in maintaining glycemic balance, food intake, and thermogenesis. Although hypothalamic neurons are the executive cells involved in these responses, there is increasing evidence that astrocytes participate in glucose sensing (GS); however, it is unknown whether astroglial networking is required for glucose sensitivity. Astroglial connexins 30 and 43 (Cx30 and Cx43) form hexameric channels, which are apposed in gap junctions, allowing for the intercellular transfer of small molecules such as glucose throughout the astroglial networks. Here, we hypothesized that hypothalamic glucose sensitivity requires these connexins. First, we showed that both Cxs are enriched in the rat hypothalamus, with highly concentrated Cx43 expression around blood vessels of the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). Both fasting and high glycemic levels rapidly altered the protein levels of MBH astroglial connexins, suggesting cross talk within the MBH between glycemic status and the connexins' ability to dispatch glucose. Finally, the inhibition of MBH Cx43 (by transient RNA interference) attenuated hypothalamic glucose sensitivity in rats, which was demonstrated by a pronounced decreased insulin secretion in response to a brain glucose challenge. These results illustrate that astroglial connexins contribute to hypothalamic GS.

  10. The effect of diet interventions on hypothalamic nutrient sensing pathways in rodents.

    PubMed

    Rijnsburger, Merel; Belegri, Evita; Eggels, Leslie; Unmehopa, Unga A; Boelen, Anita; Serlie, Mireille J; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2016-08-01

    The hypothalamus plays a fundamental role in regulating homeostatic processes including regulation of food intake. Food intake is driven in part by energy balance, which is sensed by specific brain structures through signaling molecules such as nutrients and hormones. Both circulating glucose and fatty acids decrease food intake via a central mechanism involving the hypothalamus and brain stem. Besides playing a role in signaling energy status, glucose and fatty acids serve as fuel for neurons. This review focuses on the effects of glucose and fatty acids on hypothalamic pathways involved in regulation of energy metabolism as well as on the role of the family of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) which are implicated in regulation of central energy homeostasis. We further discuss the effects of different hypercaloric diets on these pathways.

  11. Cell type-specific transcriptomics of hypothalamic energy-sensing neuron responses to weight-loss.

    PubMed

    Henry, Fredrick E; Sugino, Ken; Tozer, Adam; Branco, Tiago; Sternson, Scott M

    2015-09-02

    Molecular and cellular processes in neurons are critical for sensing and responding to energy deficit states, such as during weight-loss. Agouti related protein (AGRP)-expressing neurons are a key hypothalamic population that is activated during energy deficit and increases appetite and weight-gain. Cell type-specific transcriptomics can be used to identify pathways that counteract weight-loss, and here we report high-quality gene expression profiles of AGRP neurons from well-fed and food-deprived young adult mice. For comparison, we also analyzed Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, an intermingled population that suppresses appetite and body weight. We find that AGRP neurons are considerably more sensitive to energy deficit than POMC neurons. Furthermore, we identify cell type-specific pathways involving endoplasmic reticulum-stress, circadian signaling, ion channels, neuropeptides, and receptors. Combined with methods to validate and manipulate these pathways, this resource greatly expands molecular insight into neuronal regulation of body weight, and may be useful for devising therapeutic strategies for obesity and eating disorders.

  12. Cell type-specific transcriptomics of hypothalamic energy-sensing neuron responses to weight-loss

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Fredrick E; Sugino, Ken; Tozer, Adam; Branco, Tiago; Sternson, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    Molecular and cellular processes in neurons are critical for sensing and responding to energy deficit states, such as during weight-loss. Agouti related protein (AGRP)-expressing neurons are a key hypothalamic population that is activated during energy deficit and increases appetite and weight-gain. Cell type-specific transcriptomics can be used to identify pathways that counteract weight-loss, and here we report high-quality gene expression profiles of AGRP neurons from well-fed and food-deprived young adult mice. For comparison, we also analyzed Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, an intermingled population that suppresses appetite and body weight. We find that AGRP neurons are considerably more sensitive to energy deficit than POMC neurons. Furthermore, we identify cell type-specific pathways involving endoplasmic reticulum-stress, circadian signaling, ion channels, neuropeptides, and receptors. Combined with methods to validate and manipulate these pathways, this resource greatly expands molecular insight into neuronal regulation of body weight, and may be useful for devising therapeutic strategies for obesity and eating disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09800.001 PMID:26329458

  13. Chronic exposure to KATP channel openers results in attenuated glucose sensing in hypothalamic GT1-7 neurons.

    PubMed

    Haythorne, Elizabeth; Hamilton, D Lee; Findlay, John A; Beall, Craig; McCrimmon, Rory J; Ashford, Michael L J

    2016-12-01

    Individuals with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) are often exposed to recurrent episodes of hypoglycaemia. This reduces hormonal and behavioural responses that normally counteract low glucose in order to maintain glucose homeostasis, with altered responsiveness of glucose sensing hypothalamic neurons implicated. Although the molecular mechanisms are unknown, pharmacological studies implicate hypothalamic ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) activity, with KATP openers (KCOs) amplifying, through cell hyperpolarization, the response to hypoglycaemia. Although initial findings, using acute hypothalamic KCO delivery, in rats were promising, chronic exposure to the KCO NN414 worsened the responses to subsequent hypoglycaemic challenge. To investigate this further we used GT1-7 cells to explore how NN414 affected glucose-sensing behaviour, the metabolic response of cells to hypoglycaemia and KATP activity. GT1-7 cells exposed to 3 or 24 h NN414 exhibited an attenuated hyperpolarization to subsequent hypoglycaemic challenge or NN414, which correlated with diminished KATP activity. The reduced sensitivity to hypoglycaemia was apparent 24 h after NN414 removal, even though intrinsic KATP activity recovered. The NN414-modified glucose responsiveness was not associated with adaptations in glucose uptake, metabolism or oxidation. KATP inactivation by NN414 was prevented by the concurrent presence of tolbutamide, which maintains KATP closure. Single channel recordings indicate that NN414 alters KATP intrinsic gating inducing a stable closed or inactivated state. These data indicate that exposure of hypothalamic glucose sensing cells to chronic NN414 drives a sustained conformational change to KATP, probably by binding to SUR1, that results in loss of channel sensitivity to intrinsic metabolic factors such as MgADP and small molecule agonists.

  14. Effect of very high dose D-leucine6-gonadotropin-releasing hormone proethylamide on the hypothalamic-pituitary testicular axis in patients with prostatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, B; Worgul, T J; Drago, J; Demers, L; Dufau, M; Max, D; Santen, R J

    1983-01-01

    Potent synthetic analogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone produce parodoxical antireproductive effects when administered chronically. These compounds are minimally toxic and may exhibit no plateau of the dose-response curve even at very high doses. These considerations served as the basis for our systematic evaluation of [D-leucine6-desarginine-glycine-NH2(10)]gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-A) proethylamide in the very high dose range (i.e., 10-fold larger amounts than previously used). In rats given the analog for 12 wk, prostate, testis, and seminal vesicle weights were suppressed to a greater extent with 200 micrograms q.d. than with 40 micrograms q.d. (P less than 0.01 prostate, less than 0.01 testis, less than 0.01 seminal vesicles), indicating dose-response effects in the very high dose range. 200 micrograms of [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10]-GnRH-A consistently suppressed leutinizing hormone (LH) values at 6 and 12 wk (basal 71 +/- 9.5; 6 wk 34 +/- 3.8; 12 wk 28 +/- 5 ng/ml) whereas 40 micrograms suppressed LH variably (basal 33 +/- 3.8; 6 wk 17 +/- 3.9; 12 wk 32 +/- 5.2). Testosterone fell to 15 +/- 2.4 and 19 +/- 2.0 ng/100 ml in response to 200 micrograms q.d. and to 27 +/- 6.4 and 22 +/- 7.4 ng/100 ml with the 40-micrograms dose. These findings in the rodent prompted treatment of stage D prostate cancer patients with similarly high doses of [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10)]-GnRH-A. After treatment for 11 wk with 1,000 or 10,000 micrograms/d of the analog, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels transiently rose and then fell into the surgically castrate range (testosterone 19 +/- 4.4 ng/100 ml [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10)]-GnRH-A vs. surgically castrate 11 +/- 0.9 ng/100 ml, P = NS; dihydrotestosterone 15 +/- 1.7 ng/100 ml GnRH-A vs. surgically castrate 15 +/- 4.1 ng/100 ml. P = NS). However, unlike the chronic stimulatory effect on the pituitary at lower doses, very high dose therapy resulted in profound suppression of plasma and urine LH. Plasma levels fell to

  15. Hypothalamic sensing of ketone bodies after prolonged cerebral exposure leads to metabolic control dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Lionel; Geller, Sarah; Hébert, Audrey; Repond, Cendrine; Fioramonti, Xavier; Leloup, Corinne; Pellerin, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies have been shown to transiently stimulate food intake and modify energy homeostasis regulatory systems following cerebral infusion for a moderate period of time (<6 hours). As ketone bodies are usually enhanced during episodes of fasting, this effect might correspond to a physiological regulation. In contrast, ketone bodies levels remain elevated for prolonged periods during obesity, and thus could play an important role in the development of this pathology. In order to understand this transition, ketone bodies were infused through a catheter inserted in the carotid to directly stimulate the brain for a period of 24 hours. Food ingested and blood circulating parameters involved in metabolic control as well as glucose homeostasis were determined. Results show that ketone bodies infusion for 24 hours increased food intake associated with a stimulation of hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides. Moreover, insulinemia was increased and caused a decrease in glucose production despite an increased resistance to insulin. The present study confirms that ketone bodies reaching the brain stimulates food intake. Moreover, we provide evidence that a prolonged hyperketonemia leads to a dysregulation of energy homeostasis control mechanisms. Finally, this study shows that brain exposure to ketone bodies alters insulin signaling and consequently glucose homeostasis. PMID:27708432

  16. Glucose sensing mechanisms in hypothalamic cell models: glucose inhibition of AgRP synthesis and secretion.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Jennifer A; Jang, Janet J; Belsham, Denise D

    2014-01-25

    Glucose-sensing neurons play a role in energy homeostasis, yet how orexigenic neurons sense glucose remains unclear. As models of glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons, mHypoE-29/1 and mHypoA-NPY/GFP cells express the essential orexigenic neuropeptide AgRP and glucose sensing machinery. Exposure to increasing concentrations of glucose or the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) results in a decrease in AgRP mRNA levels. Taste receptor, Tas1R2 mRNA expression was reduced by glucose, whereas 2-DG reduced Tas1R3 mRNA levels. Increasing glucose concentrations elicited a rise in Akt and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) phosphorylation, CaMKKβ levels, and a reduction of AMP-kinase alpha phosphorylation. Inhibitors of NOS and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) prevented a decrease in AgRP secretion with glucose, suggesting a pivotal role for nNOS and the CFTR in glucose-sensing. These models possess the hallmark characteristics of GI neurons, and can be used to disentangle the mechanisms by which orexigenic neurons sense glucose.

  17. Regulation of hypothalamic neuronal sensing and food intake by ketone bodies and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A; Miziorko, Henri M; Levin, Barry E

    2014-04-01

    Metabolic sensing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) alter their activity when ambient levels of metabolic substrates, such as glucose and fatty acids (FA), change. To assess the relationship between a high-fat diet (HFD; 60%) intake on feeding and serum and VMH FA levels, rats were trained to eat a low-fat diet (LFD; 13.5%) or an HFD in 3 h/day and were monitored with VMH FA microdialysis. Despite having higher serum levels, HFD rats had lower VMH FA levels but ate less from 3 to 6 h of refeeding than did LFD rats. However, VMH β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) and VMH-to-serum β-OHB ratio levels were higher in HFD rats during the first 1 h of refeeding, suggesting that VMH astrocyte ketone production mediated their reduced intake. In fact, using calcium imaging in dissociated VMH neurons showed that ketone bodies overrode normal FA sensing, primarily by exciting neurons that were activated or inhibited by oleic acid. Importantly, bilateral inhibition of VMH ketone production with a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase inhibitor reversed the 3- to 6-h HFD-induced inhibition of intake but had no effect in LFD-fed rats. These data suggest that a restricted HFD intake regimen inhibits caloric intake as a consequence of FA-induced VMH ketone body production by astrocytes.

  18. Nutrient sensing and insulin signaling in neuropeptide-expressing immortalized, hypothalamic neurons: A cellular model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Fick, Laura J; Belsham, Denise D

    2010-08-15

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus represent a significant global health crisis. These two interrelated diseases are typified by perturbed insulin signaling in the hypothalamus. Using novel hypothalamic cell lines, we have begun to elucidate the molecular and intracellular mechanisms involved in the hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis and insulin resistance. In this review, we present evidence of insulin and glucose signaling pathways that lead to changes in neuropeptide gene expression. We have identified some of the molecular mechanisms involved in the control of de novo hypothalamic insulin mRNA expression. And finally, we have defined key mechanisms involved in the etiology of cellular insulin resistance in hypothalamic neurons that may play a fundamental role in cases of high levels of insulin or saturated fatty acids, often linked to the exacerbation of obesity and diabetes.

  19. Hypothalamic fatty acid sensing in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis): response to long-chain saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated (n-3) fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Conde-Sieira, Marta; Bonacic, Kruno; Velasco, Cristina; Valente, Luisa M P; Morais, Sofia; Soengas, José L

    2015-12-15

    We assessed the presence of fatty acid (FA)-sensing mechanisms in hypothalamus of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) and investigated their sensitivity to FA chain length and/or level of unsaturation. Stearate (SA, saturated FA), oleate (OA, monounsaturated FA of the same chain length), α-linolenate [ALA, a n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) of the same chain length], and eicosapentanoate (EPA, a n-3 PUFA of a larger chain length) were injected intraperitoneally. Parameters related to FA sensing and neuropeptide expression in the hypothalamus were assessed after 3 h and changes in accumulated food intake after 4, 24, and 48 h. Three FA sensing systems characterized in rainbow trout were also found in Senegalese sole and were activated by OA in a way similar to that previously characterized in rainbow trout and mammals. These hypothalamic FA sensing systems were also activated by ALA, differing from mammals, where n-3 PUFAs do not seem to activate FA sensors. This might suggest additional roles and highlights the importance of n-3 PUFA in fish diets, especially in marine species. The activation of FA sensing seems to be partially dependent on acyl chain length and degree of saturation, as no major changes were observed after treating fish with SA or EPA. The activation of FA sensing systems by OA and ALA, but not SA or EPA, is further reflected in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in the control of food intake. Both OA and ALA enhanced anorexigenic capacity compatible with the activation of FA sensing systems.

  20. Leucine aminopeptidase - urine

    MedlinePlus

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  1. Leucine aminopeptidase urine test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is a proteolytic enzyme that breaks chemical bonds in proteins at specific sites next to leucine amino acids. Serum (blood) LAP is measured to diagnose liver (hepatic) dysfunction.

  2. The basic leucine zipper stress response regulator Yap5 senses high-iron conditions by coordination of [2Fe-2S] clusters.

    PubMed

    Rietzschel, Nicole; Pierik, Antonio J; Bill, Eckhard; Lill, Roland; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential, yet at elevated concentrations toxic trace element. To date, the mechanisms of iron sensing by eukaryotic iron-responsive transcription factors are poorly understood. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor Yap5, a member of the Yap family of bZIP stress response regulators, administrates the adaptive response to high-iron conditions. Despite the central role of the iron-sensing process for cell viability, the molecule perceived by Yap5 and the underlying regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that Yap5 senses high-iron conditions by two Fe/S clusters bound to its activator domain (Yap5-AD). The more stable iron-regulatory Fe/S cluster at the N-terminal cysteine-rich domain (n-CRD) of Yap5 is detected in vivo and in vitro. The second cluster coordinated by the C-terminal CRD can only be shown after chemical reconstitution, since it is bound in a labile fashion. Both clusters are of the [2Fe-2S] type as characterized by UV/visible (UV/Vis), circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Fe/S cluster binding to Yap5-AD induces a conformational change that may activate transcription. The cluster-binding motif of the n-CRD domain is highly conserved in HapX-like transcription factors of pathogenic fungi and thus may represent a general sensor module common to many eukaryotic stress response regulators.

  3. The Basic Leucine Zipper Stress Response Regulator Yap5 Senses High-Iron Conditions by Coordination of [2Fe-2S] Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Rietzschel, Nicole; Pierik, Antonio J.; Bill, Eckhard; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential, yet at elevated concentrations toxic trace element. To date, the mechanisms of iron sensing by eukaryotic iron-responsive transcription factors are poorly understood. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor Yap5, a member of the Yap family of bZIP stress response regulators, administrates the adaptive response to high-iron conditions. Despite the central role of the iron-sensing process for cell viability, the molecule perceived by Yap5 and the underlying regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that Yap5 senses high-iron conditions by two Fe/S clusters bound to its activator domain (Yap5-AD). The more stable iron-regulatory Fe/S cluster at the N-terminal cysteine-rich domain (n-CRD) of Yap5 is detected in vivo and in vitro. The second cluster coordinated by the C-terminal CRD can only be shown after chemical reconstitution, since it is bound in a labile fashion. Both clusters are of the [2Fe-2S] type as characterized by UV/visible (UV/Vis), circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Fe/S cluster binding to Yap5-AD induces a conformational change that may activate transcription. The cluster-binding motif of the n-CRD domain is highly conserved in HapX-like transcription factors of pathogenic fungi and thus may represent a general sensor module common to many eukaryotic stress response regulators. PMID:25368382

  4. Leucine as a treatment for muscle wasting: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Ham, Daniel J; Caldow, Marissa K; Lynch, Gordon S; Koopman, René

    2014-12-01

    Amino acids are potent modulators of protein turnover and skeletal muscle cells are highly sensitive to changes in amino acid availability. During amino acid abundance increased activity of mTORC1 drives protein synthesis and growth. In skeletal muscle, it has been clearly demonstrated that of all the amino acids, leucine is the most potent stimulator of mTORC1 and protein synthesis in vitro and in vivo. As such, leucine has received considerable attention as a potential pharmaconutrient for the treatment of numerous muscle wasting conditions. However, despite a multitude of studies showing enhanced acute protein synthesis with leucine or leucine-rich supplements in healthy individuals, additional leucine intake does not necessarily enhance protein synthesis during muscle wasting conditions. In addition, long-term, placebo controlled, iso-caloric studies in humans consistently show no beneficial effect of leucine supplementation on skeletal muscle mass or function. This review, critically evaluates the therapeutic potential of leucine to attenuate the skeletal muscle wasting associated with ageing, cancer and immobilization/bed rest. It also highlights the impact of inflammation on amino acid sensing, mTORC1 activation and stimulation of protein synthesis and challenges the underlying hypothesis that the acute activation of mTORC1 and stimulation of protein synthesis by leucine increases in muscle mass over time. We conclude that leucine, as a standalone nutritional intervention, is not effective in the prevention of muscle wasting. Future work should focus on identifying and utilizing other nutrients or treatments that sensitize skeletal muscle to leucine, thereby enhancing its therapeutic potential for muscle wasting conditions.

  5. Leucine metabolism in human newborns

    SciTech Connect

    Denne, S.C.; Kalhan, S.C. )

    1987-12-01

    The present study was designed to (1) determine whether a relationship exists between newborn birth weight and leucine metabolism and (2) compare leucine and energy metabolism in a period of rapid growth and development (i.e., newborn) with a constant nongrowth period (i.e., adult). Leucine kinetics and energy expenditure were measured in the postabsorptive state in 12 normal full-term newborns in early neonatal life and in 11 normal adults using a primed constant L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine infusion combined with respiratory calorimetry. A significant positive correlation between newborn birth weight and leucine flux was observed. These data suggest the following. (1) A relationship exists between newborn birth weight and protein metabolism, as reflected by the correlation between leucine flux when expressed as micromoles per kilogram per hour and birth weight. (2) The high rate of leucine flux measured in newborns probably reflects the rapid remodeling of protein that occurs in this period of development, even during fasting. (3) The similar values in newborns and adults of leucine kinetics and energy expenditure when normalized to metabolic body weight and the nearly equivalent allometric exponents relating body weight to leucine flux and energy expenditure support a close relationship between leucine and energy metabolism, at least at the extremes of human growth.

  6. The role of tanycytes in hypothalamic glucosensing

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortes-Campos, Christian; Barahona, Maria J; Oyarce, Karina A; Carril, Claudio A; García-Robles, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Tanycytes are elongated hypothalamic glial cells that cover the basal walls of the third ventricle; their apical regions contact the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and their processes reach hypothalamic neuronal nuclei that control the energy status of an organism. These nuclei maintain the balance between energy expenditure and intake, integrating several peripheral signals and triggering cellular responses that modify the feeding behaviour and peripheral glucose homeostasis. One of the most important and well-studied signals that control this process is glucose; however, the mechanism by which this molecule is sensed remains unknown. We along with others have proposed that tanycytes play a key role in this process, transducing changes in CSF glucose concentration to the neurons that control energy status. Recent studies have demonstrated the expression and function of monocarboxylate transporters and canonical pancreatic β cell glucose sensing molecules, including glucose transporter 2 and glucokinase, in tanycytes. These and other data, which will be discussed in this review, suggest that hypothalamic glucosensing is mediated through a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and neurons through lactate. This article will summarize the recent evidence that supports the importance of tanycytes in hypothalamic glucosensing, and discuss the possible mechanisms involved in this process. Finally, it is important to highlight that a detailed analysis of this mechanism could represent an opportunity to understand the evolution of associated pathologies, including diabetes and obesity, and identify new candidates for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26081217

  7. Regulation of Blood Glucose by Hypothalamic Pyruvate Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Tony K. T.; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Pocai, Alessandro; Rossetti, Luciano

    2005-08-01

    The brain keenly depends on glucose for energy, and mammalians have redundant systems to control glucose production. An increase in circulating glucose inhibits glucose production in the liver, but this negative feedback is impaired in type 2 diabetes. Here we report that a primary increase in hypothalamic glucose levels lowers blood glucose through inhibition of glucose production in rats. The effect of glucose requires its conversion to lactate followed by stimulation of pyruvate metabolism, which leads to activation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels. Thus, interventions designed to enhance the hypothalamic sensing of glucose may improve glucose homeostasis in diabetes.

  8. Leucine Modulation of the mTOR Pathway for Cognition Modulation: Kinetic and In Vitro Studies and Model Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Hall, 2008; Wang et al., 2008). mTOR complexes regulate many processes such as mRNA translation, autophagy, metabolism, biogenesis, and protein...amino acids, especially leucine (Lynch et al., 2003; Sancak and Sabatini, 2009; Tokunaga et al., 2004; Wang et al., 2008). Hypothalamic mTOR...blood, brain, kidney, liver, muscle, and brown and white fat (n=3 rats per time point). The tissues were kept frozen at -80°C prior to HPLC analysis

  9. [Hypothalamic involvement in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Darlix, A; Mathey, G; Monin, M-L; Sauvée, M; Braun, M; Schaff, J-L; Debouverie, M

    2012-05-01

    Hypothalamic involvement is a rare condition in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We report two patients with a long history of MS who presented with severe acute hypothermia with associated thrombocytopenia and elevated transaminase levels. Several cases of hypothermia or hyperthermia in patients with MS have been reported in the literature. They could be linked with hypothalamic lesions, in particular in the pre-optic area. However, other anatomical locations seem to be involved in thermoregulation and can be affected by MS. Besides, some cases of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion have been reported in patients with MS. Finally, some sleep disorders, particularly hypersomnia or narcolepsy, could be related to hypothalamic lesions, through the fall in hypocretin-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. Hypocretin-1 is a neuropeptide that is secreted by some hypothalamic cells. It plays a role in the sleep-awake rhythm. We report one patient with narcolepsy and cataplexy before the first symptoms of MS appeared. Hypothalamic signs are rare in MS. However, several series of autopsies have shown a high frequency of demyelinating lesions in the hypothalamic area. Among these lesions, the proportion of active lesions seems elevated. Yet only few of them have a clinical or biological translation such as thermoregulation dysfunction, sleep disorders or natremia abnormalities. Thus, it seems unlikely that inflammatory hypothalamic lesions alone, even when bilateral, could be the explanation of these signs. A sufficient number of inflammatory demyelinating lesions, which we can observe in patients with a long history of MS and an already severe disability, is probably necessary to develop such a rare symptomatology. Hypothalamic signs might be a factor of poor prognosis for the disease course and progression of the disability.

  10. [Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea].

    PubMed

    Stárka, Luboslav; Dušková, Michaela

    2015-10-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) besides pregnancy and syndrome of polycystic ovary is one of the most common causes of secondary amenorrhea. FHA results from the aberrations in pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, which in turn causes impairment of the gonadotropins (follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone). FHA is a form of the defence of organism in situations where life functions are more important than reproductive function. FHA is reversible; it can be normalized after ceasing the stress situation. There are three types of FHA: weight loss related, stress-related, and exercise-related amenorrhea. The final consequences are complex hormonal changes manifested by profound hypoestrogenism. Additionally, these patients present mild hypercortisolemia, low serum insulin levels, low insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and low total triiodothyronine. Women health in this disorder is disturbed in several aspects including the skeletal system, cardiovascular system, and mental problems. Patients manifest a decrease in bone mass density, which is related to an increase in fracture risk. Therefore, osteopenia and osteoporosis are the main long-term complications of FHA. Cardiovascular complications include endothelial dysfunction and abnormal changes in the lipid profile. FHA patients present significantly higher depression and anxiety and also sexual problems compared to healthy subjects.

  11. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-03-01

    A primed continuous infusion of (/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C)leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)). An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO/sub 2/ enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

  12. A Heterospecific Leucine Zipper Tetramer

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Y.; Liu, J; Zheng, Q; Li, Q; Kallenbach, N; Lu, M

    2008-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions dictate the assembly of the macromolecular complexes essential for functional networks and cellular behavior. Elucidating principles of molecular recognition governing important interfaces such as coiled coils is a challenging goal for structural and systems biology. We report here that two valine-containing mutants of the GCN4 leucine zipper that fold individually as four-stranded coiled coils associate preferentially in mixtures to form an antiparallel, heterotetrameric structure. X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that the coinciding hydrophobic interfaces of the hetero- and homotetramers differ in detail, explaining their partnering and structural specificity. Equilibrium disulfide exchange and thermal denaturation experiments show that the 50-fold preference for heterospecificity results from a combination of preferential packing and hydrophobicity. The extent of preference is sensitive to the side chains comprising the interface. Thus, heterotypic versus homotypic interaction specificity in coiled coils reflects a delicate balance in complementarity of shape and chemistry of the participating side chains.

  13. Gelastic epilepsy: Beyond hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Uribe-San-Martin, Reinaldo; Ciampi, Ethel; Lawson-Peralta, Balduin; Acevedo-Gallinato, Keryma; Torrealba-Marchant, Gonzalo; Campos-Puebla, Manuel; Godoy-Fernández, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Gelastic epilepsy or laughing seizures have been historically related to children with hypothalamic hamartomas. We report three adult patients who had gelastic epilepsy, defined as the presence of seizures with a prominent laugh component, including brain imaging, surface/invasive electroencephalography, positron emission tomography, and medical/surgical outcomes. None of the patients had hamartoma or other hypothalamic lesion. Two patients were classified as having refractory epilepsy (one had biopsy-proven neurocysticercosis and the other one hippocampal sclerosis and temporal cortical dysplasia). The third patient had no lesion on MRI and had complete control with carbamazepine. Both lesional patients underwent resective surgery, one with complete seizure control and the other one with poor outcome. Although hypothalamic hamartomas should always be ruled out in patients with gelastic epilepsy, laughing seizures can also arise from frontal and temporal lobe foci, which can be surgically removed. In addition, we present the first case of gelastic epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis.

  14. Hypothyroidism compromises hypothalamic leptin signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Groba, Claudia; Mayerl, Steffen; van Mullem, Alies A; Visser, Theo J; Darras, Veerle M; Habenicht, Andreas J; Heuer, Heike

    2013-04-01

    The impact of thyroid hormone (TH) on metabolism and energy expenditure is well established, but the role of TH in regulating nutritional sensing, particularly in the central nervous system, is only poorly defined. Here, we studied the consequences of hypothyroidism on leptin production as well as leptin sensing in congenital hypothyroid TRH receptor 1 knockout (Trhr1 ko) mice and euthyroid control animals. Hypothyroid mice exhibited decreased circulating leptin levels due to a decrease in fat mass and reduced leptin expression in white adipose tissue. In neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, hypothyroid mice showed increased leptin receptor Ob-R expression and decreased suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 transcript levels. In order to monitor putative changes in central leptin sensing, we generated hypothyroid and leptin-deficient animals by crossing hypothyroid Trhr1 ko mice with the leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Hypothyroid Trhr1/ob double knockout mice showed a blunted response to leptin treatment with respect to body weight and food intake and exhibited a decreased activation of phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as well as a up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 upon leptin treatment, particularly in the arcuate nucleus. These data indicate alterations in the intracellular processing of the leptin signal under hypothyroid conditions and thereby unravel a novel mode of action by which TH affects energy metabolism.

  15. Hypothalamic involvement in chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Peres, M; del Rio, M S.; Seabra, M; Tufik, S; Abucham, J; Cipolla-Neto, J; Silberstein, S; Zukerman, E

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Chronic migraine (CM), previously called transformed migraine, is a frequent headache disorder that affects 2%-3% of the general population. Analgesic overuse, insomnia, depression, and anxiety are disorders that are often comorbid with CM. Hypothalamic dysfunction has been implicated in its pathogenesis, but it has never been studied in patients with CM. The aim was to analyze hypothalamic involvement in CM by measurement of melatonin, prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol nocturnal secretion.
METHODS—A total of 338 blood samples (13/patient) from 17 patients with CM and nine age and sex matched healthy volunteers were taken. Melatonin, prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol concentrations were determined every hour for 12 hours. The presence of comorbid disorders was also evaluated.
RESULTS—An abnormal pattern of hypothalamic hormonal secretion was found in CM. This included: (1) a decreased nocturnal prolactin peak, (2) increased cortisol concentrations, (3) a delayed nocturnal melatonin peak in patients with CM, and (4) lower melatonin concentrations in patients with CM with insomnia. Growth hormone secretion did not differ from controls.
CONCLUSION—These results support hypothalamic involvement in CM, shown by a chronobiologic dysregulation, and a possible hyperdopaminergic state in patients with CM. Insomnia might be an important variable in the study findings.

 PMID:11723194

  16. Dietary l-leucine supplementation of lactating rats results in a tendency to increase lean/fat ratio associated to lower orexigenic neuropeptide expression in hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    López, N; Sánchez, J; Picó, C; Palou, A; Serra, F

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of dietary leucine supplementation in lactating dams, particularly on energy homeostasis through signaling mechanisms in the central nervous system. Dams were fed ad libitum with standard diet during pregnancy (control dams) or supplemented with 2% leucine (leucine-supplemented dams) from delivery onwards. Food intake, body weight and composition were periodically recorded. Hypothalamus was collected at the end of lactation, and the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP) pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), insulin receptor (InsR), ghrelin receptor (GSHR), melanocortin receptor (MCR4), leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) were analyzed. Dietary leucine supplementation to lactating rats increased plasma leucine by 56%, modulated body composition and contributed to a tendency of higher ratio of lean/fat mass content of dams during lactation, without affecting food intake, thermogenesis capacity or body or tissue/organs weights. No differences in body weight of offspring from control and leucine-supplemented dams were found. The expression of orexigenic peptides (NPY and AgRP) decreased in leucine-dams, whereas the expression of anorexigenic peptides (POMC and CART), the hypothalamic receptors of insulin, ghrelin, melanocortin and leptin and SOCS3 did not change by leucine supplementation. In conclusion, increased leucine intake during lactation may contribute to a healthier profile of body composition in dams, without compromising the growth and development of the progeny by a mechanism associated with lower expression of orexigenic neuropeptides in hypothalamus.

  17. Regulation of Leucine Catabolism in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Linda K.; Conrad, Robert S.; Sokatch, John R.

    1974-01-01

    The generation time of Pseudomonas putida with l-leucine was 20 h in synthetic media but only 3 h with d-leucine. Slow growth in the presence of l-leucine was partially overcome by addition of 0.1 mM amounts of either d-valine, l-valine, or 2-ketoisovalerate. The activities of five enzymes which take part in the oxidation of leucine by P. putida were measured under various conditions of growth. Four enzymes were induced by growth with dl-leucine as sole source of carbon: d-amino acid dehydrogenase, branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase, 3-methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase. The segment of the pathway required for oxidation of 3-methylcrotonate was induced by growth on isovalerate or 3-methylcrotonate without formation of the preceding enzymes. The synthesis of carboxylase and lyase appeared to have been repressed by the addition of l-glutamate or glucose to cells growing on dl-leucine as the sole carbon source. Mutants unable to grow at the expense of isovalerate had reduced levels of carboxylase and lyase, whereas the levels of three enzymes common to the catabolism of all three branched-chain amino acids and those of two isoleucine catabolic enzymes were normal. PMID:4150714

  18. Hypothalamic neurohormones and immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Quintanar, J. Luis; Guzmán-Soto, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed. PMID:23964208

  19. Hypothalamic neurohormones and immune responses.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, J Luis; Guzmán-Soto, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed.

  20. METABOLIC RESPONSES TO DIETARY LEUCINE RESTRICTION INVOLVE REMODELING OF ADIPOSE TISSUE AND ENHANCED HEPATIC INSULIN SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Wanders, Desiree; Stone, Kirsten P.; Dille, Kelly; Simon, Jacob; Pierse, Alicia; Gettys, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary leucine was incrementally restricted to test whether limiting this essential amino acid (EAA) would fully reproduce the beneficial responses produced by dietary methionine restriction. Restricting leucine by 85% increased energy intake and expenditure within five to seven days of its introduction and reduced overall accumulation of adipose tissue. Leucine restriction (LR) also improved glucose tolerance, increased hepatic release of FGF21 into the blood stream, and enhanced insulin-dependent activation of Akt in liver. However, LR had no effect on hepatic lipid levels and failed to lower lipogenic gene expression in the liver. LR did affect remodeling of white and brown adipose tissue, increasing expression of both thermogenic and lipogenic genes. These findings illustrate that dietary LR reproduces many but not all of the physiological responses of methionine restriction. The primary differences occur in the liver, where methionine and leucine restriction cause opposite effects on tissue lipid levels and expression of lipogenic genes. Together these findings suggest that the sensing systems which detect and respond to dietary restriction of EAAs act through mechanisms that both leucine and methionine are able to engage, and in the case of hepatic lipid metabolism, may be unique to specific EAAs such as methionine. PMID:26643647

  1. Leucine stimulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, D.K.; Grogan, C.K.

    1986-03-01

    Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated a stimulatory effect of leucine on skeletal muscle protein synthesis measured in vitro during catabolic conditions. Studies in other laboratories have consistently found this effect in diaphragm muscle, however, studies examining effects on nitrogen balance or with in vivo protein synthesis in skeletal muscle are equivocal. This experiment was designed to determine the potential of leucine to stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis in vivo. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200 g were fasted for 12 hrs, anesthetized, a jugular cannula inserted, and protein synthesis measured using a primed continuous infusion of /sup 14/C-tyrosine. A plateau in specific activity was reached after 30 to 60 min and maintained for 3 hrs. The leucine dose consisted of a 240 umole priming dose followed by a continuous infusion of 160 umoles/hr. Leucine infusion stimulated protein synthesis in the soleus muscle (28%) and in the red (28%) and white portions (12%) of the gastrocnemius muscle compared with controls infused with only tyrosine. The increased rates of protein synthesis were due to increased incorporation of tyrosine into protein and to decreased specific activity of the free tyrosine pool. These data indicate that infusion of leucine has the potential to stimulate in vivo protein synthesis in skeletal muscles.

  2. Hypothalamic thermosensitivity in capsaicin-desensitized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cormarèche-Leydier, M; Shimada, S G; Stitt, J T

    1985-01-01

    In rats, we tested the hypothesis that capsaicin desensitization reduces hypothalamic warm thermosensitivity. We locally heated and cooled the hypothalamus using water-perfused thermodes while observing thermoregulatory variables. In untreated rats, a small dose of capsaicin had profound effects on thermoregulation. However, desensitizing rats to capsaicin had no effect on hypothalamic thermosensitivity for metabolic rate or changes in body temperature due to displacements of hypothalamic temperature. Contrary to current opinion, we conclude that capsaicin desensitization does not alter hypothalamic thermosensitivity to warm or cold. PMID:4020699

  3. Directed evolution of leucine dehydrogenase for improved efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Wu, Zhe; Jin, Jian-Ming; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2016-07-01

    L-tert-Leucine and its derivatives are used as synthetic building blocks for pharmaceutical active ingredients, chiral auxiliaries, and ligands. Leucine dehydrogenase (LeuDH) is frequently used to prepare L-tert-leucine from the α-keto acid precursor trimethylpyruvate (TMP). In this study, a high-throughput screening method for the L-tert-leucine synthesis reaction based on a spectrophotometric approach was developed. Directed evolution strategy was applied to engineer LeuDH from Lysinibacillus sphaericus for improved efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis. After two rounds of random mutagenesis, the specific activity of LeuDH on the substrate TMP was enhanced by more than two-fold, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme, while the activity towards its natural substrate, leucine, decreased. The catalytic efficiencies (k cat/K m) of the best mutant enzyme, H6, on substrates TMP and NADH were all enhanced by more than five-fold as compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. The efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis by mutant H6 was significantly improved. A productivity of 1170 g/l/day was achieved for the mutant enzyme H6, compared with 666 g/l/day for the wild-type enzyme.

  4. The behaviour of leucine aminopeptidase towards thionopeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, R E; Elmore, D T; Williams, C H; Guthrie, D J

    1987-01-01

    Thionoleucine S-anilide (Leut-anilide), Leut-Gly-OEt and Leut-Phe-OMe were synthesized and shown to be competitive inhibitors of leucine aminopeptidase from pig kidney. The kinetics of inhibition were determined in the presence of leucine 4-methylcoumarin-7-amide as substrate. Although the compounds showed only moderate inhibitory potency, it was found that all were resistant to hydrolysis by the enzyme, in contrast with the reported behaviour of some thionopeptide analogues of substrates for other Zn2+-peptidases such as carboxypeptidase A and angiotensin-converting enzyme. PMID:3663153

  5. Glucose and hypothalamic astrocytes: More than a fueling role?

    PubMed

    Leloup, C; Allard, C; Carneiro, L; Fioramonti, X; Collins, S; Pénicaud, L

    2016-05-26

    Brain plays a central role in energy homeostasis continuously integrating numerous peripheral signals such as circulating nutrients, and in particular blood glucose level, a variable that must be highly regulated. Then, the brain orchestrates adaptive responses to modulate food intake and peripheral organs activity in order to achieve the fine tuning of glycemia. More than fifty years ago, the presence of glucose-sensitive neurons was discovered in the hypothalamus, but what makes them specific and identifiable still remains disconnected from their electrophysiological signature. On the other hand, astrocytes represent the major class of macroglial cells and are now recognized to support an increasing number of neuronal functions. One of these functions consists in the regulation of energy homeostasis through neuronal fueling and nutrient sensing. Twenty years ago, we discovered that the glucose transporter GLUT2, the canonical "glucosensor" of the pancreatic beta-cell together with the glucokinase, was also present in astrocytes and participated in hypothalamic glucose sensing. Since then, many studies have identified other actors and emphasized the astroglial participation in this mechanism. Growing evidence suggest that astrocytes form a complex network and have to be considered as spatially coordinated and regulated metabolic units. In this review we aim to provide an updated view of the molecular and respective cellular pathways involved in hypothalamic glucose sensing, and their relevance in physiological and pathological states.

  6. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  11. Metabolic responses to dietary leucine restriction involve remodeling of adipose tissue and enhanced hepatic insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Wanders, Desiree; Stone, Kirsten P; Dille, Kelly; Simon, Jacob; Pierse, Alicia; Gettys, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Dietary leucine was incrementally restricted to test whether limiting this essential amino acid (EAA) would fully reproduce the beneficial responses produced by dietary methionine restriction. Restricting leucine by 85% increased energy intake and expenditure within 5 to 7 days of its introduction and reduced overall accumulation of adipose tissue. Leucine restriction (LR) also improved glucose tolerance, increased hepatic release of fibroblast growth factor 21 into the blood stream, and enhanced insulin-dependent activation of Akt in liver. However, LR had no effect on hepatic lipid levels and failed to lower lipogenic gene expression in the liver. LR did affect remodeling of white and brown adipose tissues, increasing expression of both thermogenic and lipogenic genes. These findings illustrate that dietary LR reproduces many but not all of the physiological responses of methionine restriction. The primary differences occur in the liver, where methionine and LR cause opposite effects on tissue lipid levels and expression of lipogenic genes. Altogether, these findings suggest that the sensing systems which detect and respond to dietary restriction of EAAs act through mechanisms that both leucine and methionine are able to engage, and in the case of hepatic lipid metabolism, may be unique to specific EAAs such as methionine.

  12. FLCN Maintains the Leucine Level in Lysosome to Stimulate mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular amino acid pool within lysosome is a signal that stimulates the nutrient-sensing mTORC1 signalling pathway. The signal transduction cascade has garnered much attention, but little is known about the sequestration of the signalling molecules within the lysosome. Using human HEK293 cells as a model, we found that suppression of the BHD syndrome gene FLCN reduced the leucine level in lysosome, which correlated with decreased mTORC1 activity. Both consequences could be reversed by supplementation with high levels of leucine, but not other tested amino acids. Conversely, overexpressed FLCN could sequester lysosomal leucine and stimulate mTORC1 in an amino acid limitation environment. These results identify a novel function of FLCN: it controls mTORC1 by modulating the leucine signal in lysosome. Furthermore, we provided evidence that FLCN exerted this role by inhibiting the accumulation of the amino acid transporter PAT1 on the lysosome surface, thereby maintaining the signal level within the organelle. PMID:27280402

  13. Hypothalamic control of bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Kunal; Yadav, Vijay K

    2014-10-01

    Bones are structures in vertebrates that provide support to organs, protect soft organs, and give them shape and defined features, functions that are essential for their survival. To perform these functions, bones are constantly renewed throughout life. The process through which bones are renewed is known as bone remodeling, an energy demanding process sensitive to changes in energy homeostasis of the organism. A close interplay takes place between the diversity of nutritional cues and metabolic signals with different elements of the hypothalamic circuits to co-ordinate energy metabolism with the regulation of bone mass. In this review, we focus on how mouse and human genetics have elucidated the roles of hormonal signals and neural circuits that originate in, or impinge on, the hypothalamus in the regulation of bone mass. This will help to understand the mechanisms whereby regulation of bone is gated and dynamically regulated by the hypothalamus.

  14. Hypothalamic eIF2α Signaling Regulates Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Benani, Alexandre; Lorsignol, Anne; Brenachot, Xavier; Parry, Laurent; Carraro, Valérie; Guissard, Christophe; Averous, Julien; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Chaveroux, Cédric; B’chir, Wafa; Muranishi, Yuki; Ron, David; Pénicaud, Luc; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Summary The reversible phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) is a highly conserved signal implicated in the cellular adaptation to numerous stresses such as the one caused by amino acid limitation. In response to dietary amino acid deficiency, the brain-specific activation of the eIF2α kinase GCN2 leads to food intake inhibition. We report here that GCN2 is rapidly activated in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) after consumption of a leucine-deficient diet. Furthermore, knockdown of GCN2 in this particular area shows that MBH GCN2 activity controls the onset of the aversive response. Importantly, pharmacological experiments demonstrate that the sole phosphorylation of eIF2α in the MBH is sufficient to regulate food intake. eIF2α signaling being at the crossroad of stress pathways activated in several pathological states, our study indicates that hypothalamic eIF2α phosphorylation could play a critical role in the onset of anorexia associated with certain diseases. PMID:24485657

  15. Age Attenuates Leucine Oxidation after Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kullman, E. L.; Campbell, W. W.; Krishnan, R. K.; Yarasheski, K. E.; Evans, W. J.; Kirwan, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Aging may alter protein metabolism during periods of metabolic and physiologic challenge. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of age on whole-body amino acid turnover in response to eccentric exercise and hyperglycemia-induced hyperinsulinemia. 16 healthy men were divided into young (N = 8) and older (N = 8) groups. Protein metabolism was assessed using a [1-13C]-leucine isotopic tracer approach. Measures were obtained under fasted basal conditions and during 3-h hyperglycemic clamps that were performed without (control) and 48 h after eccentric exercise. Exercise reduced leucine oxidation in the younger men (P < 0.05), but not in older men. Insulin sensitivity was inversely correlated with leucine oxidation (P < 0.05), and was lower in older men (P < 0.05). Healthy aging is associated with an impaired capacity to adjust protein oxidation in response to eccentric exercise. The decreased efficiency of protein utilization in older men may contribute to impaired maintenance, growth, and repair of body tissues with advancing age. PMID:23325713

  16. Mitochondrial leucine tRNA level and PTCD1 are regulated in response to leucine starvation.

    PubMed

    Schild, Christof; Hahn, Dagmar; Schaller, André; Jackson, Christopher Benjamin; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Mirkovitch, Jelena; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc

    2014-07-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat domain protein 1 (PTCD1) is a novel human protein that was recently shown to decrease the levels of mitochondrial leucine tRNAs. The physiological role of this regulation, however, remains unclear. Here we show that amino acid starvation by leucine deprivation significantly increased the mRNA steady-state levels of PTCD1 in human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells. Amino acid starvation also increased the mitochondrially encoded leucine tRNA (tRNA(Leu(CUN))) and the mRNA for the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LARS2). Despite increased PTCD1 mRNA steady-state levels, amino acid starvation decreased PTCD1 on the protein level. Decreasing PTCD1 protein concentration increases the stability of the mitochondrial leucine tRNAs, tRNA(Leu(CUN)) and tRNA(Leu(UUR)) as could be shown by RNAi experiments against PTCD1. Therefore, it is likely that decreased PTCD1 protein contributes to the increased tRNA(Leu(CUN)) levels in amino acid-starved cells. The stabilisation of the mitochondrial leucine tRNAs and the upregulation of the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase LARS2 might play a role in adaptation of mitochondria to amino acid starvation.

  17. Defective regulation of POMC precedes hypothalamic inflammation in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Gabriela F. P.; Solon, Carina; Nascimento, Lucas F.; De-Lima-Junior, Jose C.; Nogueira, Guilherme; Moura, Rodrigo; Rocha, Guilherme Z.; Fioravante, Milena; Bobbo, Vanessa; Morari, Joseane; Razolli, Daniela; Araujo, Eliana P.; Velloso, Licio A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is the result of a long-term positive energy balance in which caloric intake overrides energy expenditure. This anabolic state results from the defective activity of hypothalamic neurons involved in the sensing and response to adiposity. However, it is currently unknown what the earliest obesity-linked hypothalamic defect is and how it orchestrates the energy imbalance present in obesity. Using an outbred model of diet-induced obesity we show that defective regulation of hypothalamic POMC is the earliest marker distinguishing obesity-prone from obesity-resistant mice. The early inhibition of hypothalamic POMC was sufficient to transform obesity-resistant in obesity-prone mice. In addition, the post-prandial change in the blood level of β-endorphin, a POMC-derived peptide, correlates with body mass gain in rodents and humans. Taken together, these results suggest that defective regulation of POMC expression, which leads to a change of β-endorphin levels, is the earliest hypothalamic defect leading to obesity. PMID:27373214

  18. Elevated Hypothalamic Glucocorticoid Levels Are Associated With Obesity and Hyperphagia in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sefton, Charlotte; Harno, Erika; Davies, Alison; Small, Helen; Allen, Tiffany-Jayne; Wray, Jonathan R.; Lawrence, Catherine B.; Coll, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (Gc) excess, from endogenous overproduction in disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis or exogenous medical therapy, is recognized to cause adverse metabolic side effects. The Gc receptor (GR) is widely expressed throughout the body, including brain regions such as the hypothalamus. However, the extent to which chronic Gcs affect Gc concentrations in the hypothalamus and impact on GR and target genes is unknown. To investigate this, we used a murine model of corticosterone (Cort)-induced obesity and analyzed Cort levels in the hypothalamus and expression of genes relevant to Gc action. Mice were administered Cort (75 μg/mL) or ethanol (1%, vehicle) in drinking water for 4 weeks. Cort-treated mice had increased body weight, food intake, and adiposity. As expected, Cort increased plasma Cort levels at both zeitgeber time 1 and zeitgeber time 13, ablating the diurnal rhythm. Liquid chromatography dual tandem mass spectrometry revealed a 4-fold increase in hypothalamic Cort, which correlated with circulating levels and concentrations of Cort in other brain regions. This occurred despite decreased 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (Hsd11b1) expression, the gene encoding the enzyme that regenerates active Gcs, whereas efflux transporter Abcb1 mRNA was unaltered. In addition, although Cort decreased hypothalamic GR (Nr3c1) expression 2-fold, the Gc-induced leucine zipper (Tsc22d3) mRNA increased, which indicated elevated GR activation. In keeping with the development of hyperphagia and obesity, Cort increased Agrp, but there were no changes in Pomc, Npy, or Cart mRNA in the hypothalamus. In summary, chronic Cort treatment causes chronic increases in hypothalamic Cort levels and a persistent elevation in Agrp, a mediator in the development of metabolic disturbances. PMID:27649090

  19. Neuropeptide Y stimulates autophagy in hypothalamic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aveleira, Célia A.; Botelho, Mariana; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Ferreira-Marques, Marisa; Nóbrega, Clévio; Cortes, Luísa; Valero, Jorge; Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Álvaro, Ana R.; Santana, Magda; Kügler, Sebastian; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Aging is characterized by autophagy impairment that contributes to age-related disease aggravation. Moreover, it was described that the hypothalamus is a critical brain area for whole-body aging development and has impact on lifespan. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the major neuropeptides present in the hypothalamus, and it has been shown that, in aged animals, the hypothalamic NPY levels decrease. Because caloric restriction (CR) delays aging, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy, and also increases hypothalamic NPY levels, we hypothesized that NPY could have a relevant role on autophagy modulation in the hypothalamus. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of NPY on autophagy in the hypothalamus. Using both hypothalamic neuronal in vitro models and mice overexpressing NPY in the hypothalamus, we observed that NPY stimulates autophagy in the hypothalamus. Mechanistically, in rodent hypothalamic neurons, NPY increases autophagy through the activation of NPY Y1 and Y5 receptors, and this effect is tightly associated with the concerted activation of PI3K, MEK/ERK, and PKA signaling pathways. Modulation of hypothalamic NPY levels may be considered a potential strategy to produce protective effects against hypothalamic impairments associated with age and to delay aging. PMID:25775546

  20. Potent anti-seizure effects of D-leucine.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Adam L; Santos, Polan; O'Riordan, Kenneth J; Stafstrom, Carl E; Hardwick, J Marie

    2015-10-01

    There are no effective treatments for millions of patients with intractable epilepsy. High-fat ketogenic diets may provide significant clinical benefit but are challenging to implement. Low carbohydrate levels appear to be essential for the ketogenic diet to work, but the active ingredients in dietary interventions remain elusive, and a role for ketogenesis has been challenged. A potential antiseizure role of dietary protein or of individual amino acids in the ketogenic diet is understudied. We investigated the two exclusively ketogenic amino acids, L-leucine and L-lysine, and found that only L-leucine potently protects mice when administered prior to the onset of seizures induced by kainic acid injection, but not by inducing ketosis. Unexpectedly, the D-enantiomer of leucine, which is found in trace amounts in the brain, worked as well or better than L-leucine against both kainic acid and 6Hz electroshock-induced seizures. However, unlike L-leucine, D-leucine potently terminated seizures even after the onset of seizure activity. Furthermore, D-leucine, but not L-leucine, reduced long-term potentiation but had no effect on basal synaptic transmission in vitro. In a screen of candidate neuronal receptors, D-leucine failed to compete for binding by cognate ligands, potentially suggesting a novel target. Even at low doses, D-leucine suppressed ongoing seizures at least as effectively as diazepam but without sedative effects. These studies raise the possibility that D-leucine may represent a new class of anti-seizure agents, and that D-leucine may have a previously unknown function in eukaryotes.

  1. 21 CFR 862.1460 - Leucine aminopeptidase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., plasma, and urine. Leucine aminopeptidase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as viral hepatitis and obstructive jaundice. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1460 - Leucine aminopeptidase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., plasma, and urine. Leucine aminopeptidase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as viral hepatitis and obstructive jaundice. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1460 - Leucine aminopeptidase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., plasma, and urine. Leucine aminopeptidase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as viral hepatitis and obstructive jaundice. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1460 - Leucine aminopeptidase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., plasma, and urine. Leucine aminopeptidase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as viral hepatitis and obstructive jaundice. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  5. B(0)AT2 (SLC6A15) is localized to neurons and astrocytes, and is involved in mediating the effect of leucine in the brain.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Maria G A; Roshanbin, Sahar; Löfqvist, Erik; Hellsten, Sofie V; Nilsson, Victor C O; Todkar, Aniruddha; Zhu, Yinan; Stephansson, Olga; Drgonova, Jana; Uhl, George R; Schiöth, Helgi B; Fredriksson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The B(0)AT2 protein is a product of the SLC6A15 gene belonging to the SLC6 subfamily and has been shown to be a transporter of essential branched-chain amino acids. We aimed to further characterize the B(0)AT2 transporter in CNS, and to use Slc6a15 knock out (KO) mice to investigate whether B(0)AT2 is important for mediating the anorexigenic effect of leucine. We used the Slc6a15 KO mice to investigate the role of B(0)AT2 in brain in response to leucine and in particular the effect on food intake. Slc6a15 KO mice show lower reduction of food intake as well as lower neuronal activation in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) in response to leucine injections compared to wild type mice. We also used RT-PCR on rat tissues, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry on mouse CNS tissues to document in detail the distribution of SLC6A15 on gene and protein levels. We showed that B(0)AT2 immunoreactivity is mainly neuronal, including localization in many GABAergic neurons and spinal cord motor neurons. B(0)AT2 immunoreactivity was also found in astrocytes close to ventricles, and co-localized with cytokeratin and diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) in epithelial cells of the choroid plexus. The data suggest that B(0)AT2 play a role in leucine homeostasis in the brain.

  6. Structure-activity relations of leucine derivatives reveal critical moieties for cellular uptake and activation of mTORC1-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Nagamori, Shushi; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Okuda, Suguru; Kojima, Naoto; Hari, Yoshiyuki; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Mori, Yasuo; Tominaga, Hideyuki; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2016-04-01

    Among amino acids, leucine is a potential signaling molecule to regulate cell growth and metabolism by activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). To reveal the critical structures of leucine molecule to activate mTORC1, we examined the structure-activity relationships of leucine derivatives in HeLa S3 cells for cellular uptake and for the induction of phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K), a downstream effector of mTORC1. The activation of mTORC1 by leucine and its derivatives was the consequence of two successive events: the cellular uptake by L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) responsible for leucine uptake in HeLa S3 cells and the activation of mTORC1 following the transport. The structural requirement for the recognition by LAT1 was to have carbonyl oxygen, alkoxy oxygen of carboxyl group, amino group and hydrophobic side chain. In contrast, the requirement for mTORC1 activation was more rigorous. It additionally required fixed distance between carbonyl oxygen and alkoxy oxygen of carboxyl group, and amino group positioned at α-carbon. L-Configuration in chirality and appropriate length of side chain with a terminal isopropyl group were also important. This confirmed that LAT1 itself is not a leucine sensor. Some specialized leucine sensing mechanism with rigorous requirement for agonistic structures should exist inside the cells because leucine derivatives not transported by LAT1 did not activate mTORC1. Because LAT1-mTOR axis is involved in the regulation of cell growth and cancer progression, the results from this study may provide a new insight into therapeutics targeting both LAT1 and leucine sensor.

  7. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism integrates nutrient and hormonal feedback to regulate energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-12-15

    The maintenance of energy homeostasis requires the hypothalamic integration of nutrient feedback cues, such as glucose, fatty acids, amino acids, and metabolic hormones such as insulin, leptin and ghrelin. Although hypothalamic neurons are critical to maintain energy homeostasis research efforts have focused on feedback mechanisms in isolation, such as glucose alone, fatty acids alone or single hormones. However this seems rather too simplistic considering the range of nutrient and endocrine changes associated with different metabolic states, such as starvation (negative energy balance) or diet-induced obesity (positive energy balance). In order to understand how neurons integrate multiple nutrient or hormonal signals, we need to identify and examine potential intracellular convergence points or common molecular targets that have the ability to sense glucose, fatty acids, amino acids and hormones. In this review, we focus on the role of carnitine metabolism in neurons regulating energy homeostasis. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a novel means for neurons to facilitate and control both nutrient and hormonal feedback. In terms of nutrient regulation, carnitine metabolism regulates hypothalamic fatty acid sensing through the actions of CPT1 and has an underappreciated role in glucose sensing since carnitine metabolism also buffers mitochondrial matrix levels of acetyl-CoA, an allosteric inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase and hence glucose metabolism. Studies also show that hypothalamic CPT1 activity also controls hormonal feedback. We hypothesis that hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a key molecular target that can concurrently integrate nutrient and hormonal information, which is critical to maintain energy homeostasis. We also suggest this is relevant to broader neuroendocrine research as it predicts that hormonal signaling in the brain varies depending on current nutrient status. Indeed, the metabolic action of ghrelin, leptin or insulin

  8. Effect of hypothalamic electrical stimulation on protein synthesis in organs of adult and old rats

    SciTech Connect

    Frol'kis, V.V.; Muradyan, K.K.; Rushkevich, Yu.E.; Mozzhukhina, T.G.; Khilobok, I.Yu.; Gol'dshtein, N.B.

    1986-12-01

    Age differences in hypothalamic regulation of total protein synthesis in different organs and also of liver chromatin proteins were compared in this investigation. Rats were used in the experiments and the intensity of protein synthesis was judged from the relative specific radioactivity which was determined as the ratio of the specific radioactivities of acid-insoluble and acid-soluble materials, separated by means of nitrocellulose membrane filters. Protein was determined by two-wave spectrophotometry and the radioactivity of all samples was measured on a Mark III radio spectrometer. The investigations showed that hypothalmic electrical stimulation causes a marked increase in /sup 3/H-leucine incorporation into protein of active and inactive liver chromatin.

  9. Bardoxolone methyl prevents obesity and hypothalamic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-08-25

    High-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity is associated with hypothalamic leptin resistance and low grade chronic inflammation, which largely impairs the neuroregulation of negative energy balance. Neuroregulation of negative energy balance is largely controlled by the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus via leptin signal transduction. Recently, a derivative of oleanolic acid, bardoxolone methyl (BM), has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. We tested the hypothesis that BM would prevent HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation in mice fed a HF diet. Oral administration of BM via drinking water (10 mg/kg daily) for 21 weeks significantly prevented an increase in body weight, energy intake, hyperleptinemia, and peripheral fat accumulation in mice fed a HF diet. Furthermore, BM treatment prevented HF diet-induced decreases in the anorexigenic effects of peripheral leptin administration. In the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced impairments of the downstream protein kinase b (Akt) pathway of hypothalamic leptin signalling. BM treatment also prevented an increase in inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in these two hypothalamic regions. These results identify a potential novel neuropharmacological application for BM in preventing HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation.

  10. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  11. Neuroanatomy and physiology of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis: clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Midge

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the anatomy of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the somatotrophic axis, and neurohypophysis.

  12. Leucine acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial rise in amino acids and insulin independently stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of piglets. Leucine is an important mediator of the response to amino acids. We have shown that the postprandial rise in leucine, but not isoleucine or valine, acutely stimulates muscle pro...

  13. Transcriptional profiling of fetal hypothalamic TRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During murine hypothalamic development, different neuroendocrine cell phenotypes are generated in overlapping periods; this suggests that cell-type specific developmental programs operate to achieve complete maturation. A balance between programs that include cell proliferation, cell cycle withdrawal as well as epigenetic regulation of gene expression characterizes neurogenesis. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is a peptide that regulates energy homeostasis and autonomic responses. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying TRH neuron development, we performed a genome wide study of its transcriptome during fetal hypothalamic development. Results In primary cultures, TRH cells constitute 2% of the total fetal hypothalamic cell population. To purify these cells, we took advantage of the fact that the segment spanning -774 to +84 bp of the Trh gene regulatory region confers specific expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the TRH cells. Transfected TRH cells were purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting, various cell preparations pooled, and their transcriptome compared to that of GFP- hypothalamic cells. TRH cells undergoing the terminal phase of differentiation, expressed genes implicated in protein biosynthesis, intracellular signaling and transcriptional control. Among the transcription-associated transcripts, we identified the transcription factors Klf4, Klf10 and Atf3, which were previously uncharacterized within the hypothalamus. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports identifying transcripts with a potentially important role during the development of a specific hypothalamic neuronal phenotype. This genome-scale study forms a rational foundation for identifying genes that might participate in the development and function of hypothalamic TRH neurons. PMID:21569245

  14. Psychogenic gelastic seizures in a patient with hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Scarella, Timothy; Macken, Michael P; Gerard, Elizabeth; Schuele, Stephan U

    2012-06-01

    Gelastic seizures are classically associated with hypothalamic hamartoma. The most effective treatment for gelastic epilepsy is surgery, although confirming that a hypothalamic hamartoma is an epileptic lesion prior to surgical intervention is challenging. Here, we report the case of a patient with a hypothalamic hamartoma who was diagnosed with psychogenic non-epileptic gelastic seizures using video-EEG monitoring. [Published with video sequences].

  15. Immunoglobulin therapy in idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huppke, Peter; Heise, Alexander; Rostasy, Kevin; Huppke, Brenda; Gärtner, Jutta

    2009-09-01

    Idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction is a rare disorder presenting at age 3-7 years. Severe hypothalamic and brainstem dysfunction leads to death in 25% of patients. The disease is presumed to be autoimmune, or in some cases paraneoplastic. No successful treatment has been reported. Patient V. developed hyperphagia, hypersomnia, and extreme aggression at age 7 years, accompanied by episodes of hyperthermia, hypothermia, sinus bradycardia, hypernatremia, hyponatremia, persistent hyperprolactinemia, hypothyroidism, and growth-hormone deficiency. At age 9 years, a diagnosis of idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction was rendered, and immunoglobulin therapy was commenced. Nine courses of immunoglobulins, at a dose of 2 g/kg every 4 weeks, were administered. Reproducible improvements in behavior and no further episodes of hyponatremia or hypernatremia and sinus bradycardia were evident. The endocrinologic abnormalities and poor thermoregulation remained. Administration of immunoglobulins during late stages of idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction led to improvement in some but not all signs. Assuming an autoimmune basis for this disorder, treatment during early stages of disease should be more effective. To facilitate such early treatment, increased awareness of this disorder is necessary, to allow for early diagnosis.

  16. Gelastic seizures: not always hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christina S; Parrent, Andrew G; Burneo, Jorge G

    2007-12-01

    Gelastic seizures are often associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. However, focal cortical dysplasias can also cause "laughing seizures", and such cases can be difficult to localize with EEG. This case report presents a 29-year-old woman who was successfully rendered free of gelastic seizures after resection of a frontal cortical dysplasia, localized through MRI and SPECT imaging.[Published with video sequences].

  17. Flatfish metamorphosis: a hypothalamic independent process?

    PubMed

    Campinho, Marco A; Silva, Nadia; Roman-Padilla, Javier; Ponce, Marian; Manchado, Manuel; Power, Deborah M

    2015-03-15

    Anuran and flatfish metamorphosis are tightly regulated by thyroid hormones that are the necessary and sufficient factors that drive this developmental event. In the present study whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and quantitative PCR in sole are used to explore the central regulation of flatfish metamorphosis. Central regulation of the thyroid in vertebrates is mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Teleosts diverge from other vertebrates as hypothalamic regulation in the HPT axis is proposed to be through hypothalamic inhibition although the regulatory factor remains enigmatic. The dynamics of the HPT axis during sole metamorphosis revealed integration between the activity of the thyrotrophes in the pituitary and the thyroid follicles. No evidence was found supporting a role for thyroid releasing hormone (trh) or corticotrophin releasing hormone (crh) in hypothalamic control of TH production during sole metamorphosis. Intriguingly the results of the present study suggest that neither hypothalamic trh nor crh expression changes during sole metamorphosis and raises questions about the role of these factors and the hypothalamus in regulation of thyrotrophs.

  18. Hyperprolactinemia from radiation-induced hypothalamic hypopituitarism

    SciTech Connect

    Corkill, G.; Hanson, F.W.; Gold, E.M.; White, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    In 1975 Samaan et al., described the effects of radiation damage of the hypothalamus in 15 patients with head and neck cancer. Shalet et al., in 1977 described endocrine morbidity in adults who as children had been irradiated for brain tumors. This report describes instances of hyperprolactinemia and associated hypothalamic, pituitary, and thyroid dysfunction following irradiation of a young adult female for brain neoplasia.

  19. Role of developmental factors in hypothalamic function

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Jakob; Tahor, Maayan; Wircer, Einav; Levkowitz, Gil

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a brain region which regulates homeostasis by mediating endocrine, autonomic and behavioral functions. It is comprised of several nuclei containing distinct neuronal populations producing neuropeptides and neurotransmitters that regulate fundamental body functions including temperature and metabolic rate, thirst and hunger, sexual behavior and reproduction, circadian rhythm, and emotional responses. The identity, number and connectivity of these neuronal populations are established during the organism’s development and are of crucial importance for normal hypothalamic function. Studies have suggested that developmental abnormalities in specific hypothalamic circuits can lead to obesity, sleep disorders, anxiety, depression and autism. At the molecular level, the development of the hypothalamus is regulated by transcription factors (TF), secreted growth factors, neuropeptides and their receptors. Recent studies in zebrafish and mouse have demonstrated that some of these molecules maintain their expression in the adult brain and subsequently play a role in the physiological functions that are regulated by hypothalamic neurons. Here, we summarize the involvement of some of the key developmental factors in hypothalamic development and function by focusing on the mouse and zebrafish genetic model organisms. PMID:25954163

  20. Understanding how discrete populations of hypothalamic neurons orchestrate complicated behavioral states

    PubMed Central

    Graebner, Allison K.; Iyer, Manasi; Carter, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    A major question in systems neuroscience is how a single population of neurons can interact with the rest of the brain to orchestrate complex behavioral states. The hypothalamus contains many such discrete neuronal populations that individually regulate arousal, feeding, and drinking. For example, hypothalamic neurons that express hypocretin (Hcrt) neuropeptides can sense homeostatic and metabolic factors affecting wakefulness and orchestrate organismal arousal. Neurons that express agouti-related protein (AgRP) can sense the metabolic needs of the body and orchestrate a state of hunger. The organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT) can detect the hypertonicity of blood and orchestrate a state of thirst. Each hypothalamic population is sufficient to generate complicated behavioral states through the combined efforts of distinct efferent projections. The principal challenge to understanding these brain systems is therefore to determine the individual roles of each downstream projection for each behavioral state. In recent years, the development and application of temporally precise, genetically encoded tools has greatly improved our understanding of the structure and function of these neural systems. This review will survey recent advances in our understanding of how these individual hypothalamic populations can orchestrate complicated behavioral states due to the combined efforts of individual downstream projections. PMID:26300745

  1. 21 CFR 862.1460 - Leucine aminopeptidase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzyme leucine amino-peptidase in serum... diseases such as viral hepatitis and obstructive jaundice. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  2. Leucine supplementation improves regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2015-12-01

    The decreased regenerative capacity of old skeletal muscles involves disrupted turnover of proteins. This study investigated whether leucine supplementation in old rats could improve muscle regenerative capacity. Young and old male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine; then, the muscles were cryolesioned and examined after 3 and 10 days. Leucine supplementation attenuated the decrease in the expression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in young and old muscles on day 3 post-injury and promoted an increase in the cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers from both young and old soleus muscles on day 10 post-injury. This supplementation decreased the levels of ubiquitinated proteins and increased the proteasome activity in young regenerating muscles, but the opposite effect was observed in old regenerating muscles. Moreover, leucine decreased the inflammation area and induced an increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells in both young and old muscles. Our results suggest that leucine supplementation improves the regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats, through the preservation of certain biological responses upon leucine supplementation. Such responses comprise the decrease in the inflammation area, increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells and size of regenerating myofibers, combined with the modulation of components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  3. Microglia Dictate the Impact of Saturated Fat Consumption on Hypothalamic Inflammation and Neuronal Function

    PubMed Central

    Valdearcos, Martin; Robblee, Megan M.; Benjamin, Daniel I.; Nomura, Daniel K.; Xu, Allison W.; Koliwad, Suneil K.

    2014-01-01

    Diets rich in saturated fat produce inflammation, gliosis, and neuronal stress in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). Here we show that microglia mediate this process and its functional impact. Although microglia and astrocytes accumulate in the MBH of mice fed a diet rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs), only the microglia undergo inflammatory activation, along with a build-up of hypothalamic SFAs. Enteric gavage specifically with SFAs reproduces microglial activation and neuronal stress in the MBH, and SFA treatment activates murine microglia, but not astrocytes, in culture. Moreover, depleting microglia abrogates SFA-induced inflammation in hypothalamic slices. Remarkably, depleting microglia from the MBH of mice abolishes inflammation and neuronal stress induced by excess SFA consumption, and in this context, microglial depletion enhances leptin signaling and reduces food intake. We thus show that microglia sense SFAs and orchestrate an inflammatory process in the MBH that alters neuronal function when SFA consumption is high. PMID:25497089

  4. Hypothalamic Survival Circuits: Blueprints for Purposive Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Sternson, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Neural processes that direct an animal’s actions toward environmental goals are critical elements for understanding behavior. The hypothalamus is closely associated with motivated behaviors required for survival and reproduction. Intense feeding, drinking, aggressive, and sexual behaviors can be produced by a simple neuronal stimulus applied to discrete hypothalamic regions. What can these “evoked behaviors” teach us about the neural processes that determine behavioral intent and intensity? Small populations of neurons sufficient to evoke a complex motivated behavior may be used as entry points to identify circuits that energize and direct behavior to specific goals. Here, I review recent applications of molecular genetic, optogenetic, and pharmacogenetic approaches that overcome previous limitations for analyzing anatomically complex hypothalamic circuits and their interactions with the rest of the brain. These new tools have the potential to bridge the gaps between neurobiological and psychological thinking about the mechanisms of complex motivated behavior. PMID:23473313

  5. Organisation of the human dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Koutcherov, Yuri; Mai, Juergen K; Ashwell, Ken W; Paxinos, George

    2004-01-19

    This study used acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry to reveal the organization of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DM) in the human. Topographically, the human DM is similar to DM in the monkey and rat. It is wedged between the paraventricular nucleus, dorsally, and the ventromedial nucleus, ventrally. Laterally, DM borders the lateral hypothalamic area while medially it approaches the 3rd ventricle. The AChE staining distinguished two subcompartments of the human DM: the larger diffuse and the smaller compact DM. The subcompartmental organization of the human DM appears homologous to that found in the monkey and less complex than that reported in rats. Understanding of the organization of DM creates meaningful anatomical reference for physiological and pharmacological studies in the human hypothalamus.

  6. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways.

  7. Hypothalamic NUCKS regulates peripheral glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Beiying; Shi, Xiaohe; Zhou, Qiling; Chen, Hui Shan; Lim, Joy; Han, Weiping; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate (NUCKS) is highly expressed in the brain and peripheral metabolic organs, and regulates transcription of a number of genes involved in insulin signalling. Whole-body depletion of NUCKS (NKO) in mice leads to obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, a tissue-specific contribution of NUCKS to the observed phenotypes remains unknown. Considering the pivotal roles of insulin signalling in the brain, especially in the hypothalamus, we examined the functions of hypothalamic NUCKS in the regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism. Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus was impaired in the NKO mice when insulin was delivered through intracerebroventricular injection. To validate the hypothalamic specificity, we crossed transgenic mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the Nkx2.1 promoter with floxed NUCKS mice to generate mice with hypothalamus-specific deletion of NUCKS (HNKO). We fed the HNKO and littermate control mice with a normal chow diet (NCD) and a high-fat diet (HFD), and assessed glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and metabolic parameters. HNKO mice showed mild glucose intolerance under an NCD, but exacerbated obesity and insulin resistance phenotypes under an HFD. In addition, NUCKS regulated levels of insulin receptor in the brain. Unlike HNKO mice, mice with immune-cell-specific deletion of NUCKS (VNKO) did not develop obesity or insulin-resistant phenotypes under an HFD. These studies indicate that hypothalamic NUCKS plays an essential role in regulating glucose homoeostasis and insulin signalling in vivo.

  8. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and the regulation of appetite.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jennifer A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptides released by hypothalamic neurons play a major role in the regulation of feeding, acting both within the hypothalamus, and at other appetite regulating centres throughout the brain. Where classical neurotransmitters signal only within synapses, neuropeptides diffuse over greater distances affecting both nearby and distant neurons expressing the relevant receptors, which are often extrasynaptic. As well as triggering a behavioural output, neuropeptides also act as neuromodulators: altering the response of neurons to both neurotransmitters and circulating signals of nutrient status. The mechanisms of action of hypothalamic neuropeptides with established roles in feeding, including melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), the orexins, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), agouti-gene related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y, and oxytocin, are reviewed in this article, with emphasis laid on both their effects on appetite regulating centres throughout the brain, and on examining the evidence for their physiological roles. In addition, evidence for the involvement of several putative appetite regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides is assessed including, ghrelin, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide W and the galanin-like peptides. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central control of Food Intake'.

  9. Fetoplacental deamination and decarboxylation of leucine

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, G.L.; Quick, A.N. Jr.; Hay, W.W. Jr.; Meschia, G.; Battaglia, F.C.; Fennessey, P.V. )

    1990-10-01

    Fetal and placental metabolism of leucine (Leu) and ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) were studied in seven fetal lambs at 132 +/- 1.3-days gestation. Fetal infusions of (1-13C)Leu, (1-14C)Leu, and antipyrine were carried out for 4 h. Uterine and umbilical blood flows were measured using the antipyrine steady-state diffusion technique. Leu and KIC concentrations, (14C)Leu-specific activities, 14CO2, (13C)Leu, and (13C)KIC enrichment (mole percent enrichment) were measured in the maternal artery, uterine vein, and umbilical artery and vein to calculate net fluxes of tracee and tracer molecules between fetus and placenta and between the uteroplacenta and the maternal circulation. There were net Leu and KIC fluxes into the fetus from the placenta with the KIC flux equal to approximately 19% of the combined Leu plus KIC flux. In addition, there was a net KIC flux into the uterine circulation. The fraction of infused tracer Leu escaping the placenta into the mother was small (approximately 6%). By contrast, there was a rapid exchange of tracer Leu carbon between placenta and fetus resulting in a significant flux of labeled KIC from placenta to fetus. Approximately 20% of the infused tracer carbon was converted to CO2 within the fetus. This rate of conversion was greater than 80% of the total fetoplacental conversion rate and significantly higher than the flux of KIC tracer carbon from placenta to fetus. Fetal KIC decarboxylation rate, calculated from the fetal KIC enrichment data, was 2.83 +/- 0.40 mumol.min-1.kg fetus-1 and approximately 60% of the combined net Leu and KIC flux into the fetus from the placenta.

  10. Photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated leucine enkephalin.

    PubMed

    Herburger, Andreas; van der Linde, Christian; Beyer, Martin K

    2017-02-24

    Protonated leucine enkephalin (YGGFL) was studied by ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) from 225 to 300 nm utilizing an optical parametric oscillator tunable wavelength laser system (OPO). Fragments were identified by absolute mass measurement in a 9.4 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). Bond cleavage was preferred in the vicinity of the two aromatic residues, resulting in high ion abundances for a4, a1, b3, y2 and y1 fragments. a, b and y ions dominated the mass spectrum, and full sequence coverage was achieved for those types. Photodissociation was most effective at the short wavelength end of the studied range, which is assigned to the onset of the La π-π* transition of the tyrosine chromophore, but worked well also at the Lb π-π* chromophore absorption maxima in the 35 000-39 000 cm(-1) region. Several side-chain and internal fragments were observed. H atom loss is observed only above 41 000 cm(-1), consistent with the requirement of a curve crossing to a repulsive (1)πσ* state. It is suggested that the photochemically generated mobile H atom plays a role in further backbone cleavages, similar to the mechanism for electron capture dissociation. The b4 fragment is most intense at the Lb chromophore absorptions, undergoing additional fragmentation at higher photon energies. The high resolution of the FT-ICR MS revealed that out of all x and z-type fragments only x3 and x4 were formed, with low intensity. Other previously reported x- and z-fragments were re-assigned to internal fragments, based on exact mass measurement.

  11. Effect of exercise training on leucine oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, M.K.; Layman, D.K.

    1986-03-01

    Oxidation of the BCAA leucine is increased during a bout of exhaustive exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training on leu oxidation during aerobic exercise. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a commercial diet ad lib and divided into sedentary and two trained groups. Animals were trained to run on a treadmill with a 10/sup 0/ incline at 28 m/min for 5 wks for either 50 or 120 min/day. There were no differences in food intake or body weight. After a 12 hr fast, animals were run for 50 or 120 min and changes in leu catabolism determined by measurement of in vivo leu oxidation and activity of branched chain keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD). For measurement of leu oxidation, rats were injected IP with 4 ..mu..Ci 1-/sup 14/C-leu during the last 15 min of exercise, placed in glass metabolic chambers, and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ collected in 1 N NaOH for 30 min periods. Leu oxidation was increased by 40% after 50 min of exercise and by 79% after 120 min of exercise. Five weeks of training reduced the rate of leu oxidation during an exercise bout. The activity of the BCKAD was not increased in the trained animals after either 50 or 120 min of exercise. These data indicate that the rate of leu oxidation during exercises is dependent on the duration of the exercise and that training will reduce the magnitude of this effect.

  12. GCN2 contributes to mTORC1 inhibition by leucine deprivation through an ATF4 independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Averous, Julien; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Mesclon, Florent; Carraro, Valérie; Parry, Laurent; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Pierre, Philippe; Proud, Christopher G.; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the GCN2 and mTORC1 signaling pathways are regulated by amino acids and share common functions, in particular the control of translation. The regulation of GCN2 activity by amino acid availability relies on the capacity of GCN2 to sense the increased levels of uncharged tRNAs upon amino acid scarcity. In contrast, despite recent progress in the understanding of the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids, key aspects of this process remain unsolved. In particular, while leucine is well known to be a potent regulator of mTORC1, the mechanisms by which this amino acid is sensed and control mTORC1 activity are not well defined. Our data establish that GCN2 is involved in the inhibition of mTORC1 upon leucine or arginine deprivation. However, the activation of GCN2 alone is not sufficient to inhibit mTORC1 activity, indicating that leucine and arginine exert regulation via additional mechanisms. While the mechanism by which GCN2 contributes to the initial step of mTORC1 inhibition involves the phosphorylation of eIF2α, we show that it is independent of the downstream transcription factor ATF4. These data point to a novel role for GCN2 and phosphorylation of eIF2α in the control of mTORC1 by certain amino acids. PMID:27297692

  13. L-Leucine and NO-mediated cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Zhenlong; Meininger, Cynthia J; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-03-01

    Reduced availability of nitric oxide (NO) in the vasculature is a major factor contributing to the impaired action of insulin on blood flow and, therefore, insulin resistance in obese and diabetic subjects. Available evidence shows that vascular insulin resistance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in developed nations. Interestingly, increased concentrations of L-leucine in the plasma occur in obese humans and other animals with vascular dysfunction. Among branched-chain amino acids, L-leucine is unique in inhibiting NO synthesis from L-arginine in endothelial cells and may modulate cardiovascular homeostasis in insulin resistance. Results of recent studies indicate that L-leucine is an activator of glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase (GFAT), which is the first and a rate-controlling enzyme in the synthesis of glucosamine (an inhibitor of endothelial NO synthesis). Through stimulating the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and thus protein synthesis, L-leucine may enhance GFAT protein expression, thereby inhibiting NO synthesis in endothelial cells. We propose that reducing circulating levels of L-leucine or endothelial GFAT activity may provide a potentially novel strategy for preventing and/or treating cardiovascular disease in obese and diabetic subjects. Such means may include dietary supplementation with either α-ketoglutarate to enhance the catabolism of L-leucine in the small intestine and other tissues or with N-ethyl-L-glutamine to inhibit GFAT activity in endothelial cells. Preventing leucine-induced activation of GFAT by nutritional supplements or pharmaceutical drugs may contribute to improved cardiovascular function by enhancing vascular NO synthesis.

  14. Leucine markedly regulates pancreatic exocrine secretion in goats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z P; Xu, M; Liu, K; Yao, J H; Yu, H X; Wang, F

    2014-02-01

    Four goats (30.1 ± 1.3 kg) with common bile duct re-entrant catheter and duodenal catheter were used to evaluate the effects of duodenal leucine infusion on pancreatic exocrine secretion and plasma parameters with two 4 × 4 Latin square design experiments. In the long-term infusion experiment, goats were fed twice daily [700 g/day, dry matter (DM) basis] at 8:00 and 18:00 hours and were duodenally infused with 0, 3, 6, 9 g/day leucine for 14 days. Pancreatic juice and jugular blood samples were collected over 1-h intervals for 6 h daily from d 11 to 14 days to encompass a 24-h day. In the short-term experiment, goats were infused leucine for 10 h continuously at the same infusion rate with Experiment 1 after feed deprivation for 24 h repeated every 10 days. Pancreatic juice and blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 h of infusion. The results showed that the long-term leucine infusion did not affect pancreatic juice secretion, protein output, trypsin and lipase secretion and plasma insulin concentration, but linearly increased α-amylase secretion. No changes in pancreatic protein and lipase secretion were observed in the short-term infusion. Pancreatic juice and α-amylase secretion responded quadratically, with the greatest values observed in the 3 and 6 g/day leucine respectively. Trypsin secretion linearly decreased, while plasma insulin concentration increased linearly with increased leucine infusion. The results demonstrated that duodenal leucine infusion dose and time dependently regulated pancreatic enzyme secretion not associated with the change in plasma insulin concentration.

  15. Leptin signaling in astrocytes regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesús; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H; Horvath, Tamas L

    2014-07-01

    We found that leptin receptors were expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that their conditional deletion led to altered glial morphology and synaptic inputs onto hypothalamic neurons involved in feeding control. Leptin-regulated feeding was diminished, whereas feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data reveal an active role of glial cells in hypothalamic synaptic remodeling and control of feeding by leptin.

  16. Effect of hyperammonemia on leucine and protein metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Holecek, M; Sprongl, L; Tichý, M

    2000-10-01

    The cause of muscle wasting and decreased plasma levels of branched chain amino acids (BCAA), valine, leucine, and isoleucine in liver cirrhosis is obscure. Here we have evaluated the effect of hyperammonemia. Rats were infused with either an ammonium acetate/bicarbonate mixture, a sodium acetate/bicarbonate mixture, or saline for 320 minutes. The parameters of leucine and protein metabolism were evaluated in the whole body and in several tissues using a primed constant intravenous infusion of L-[1-14C]leucine. Ammonium infusion caused an increase in ammonia and glutamine levels in plasma, a decrease in BCAA and alanine in plasma and skeletal muscle, a significant decrease in whole-body proteolysis and protein synthesis, and an increase in leucine oxidized fraction. A significant decrease in protein synthesis after ammonium infusion was observed in skeletal muscle while a nonsignificant effect was observed in liver, gut, heart, spleen, and kidneys. We conclude that the decrease in plasma BCAA after ammonia infusion is associated with decreased proteolysis and increased leucine oxidized fraction.

  17. Inhibition of hypothalamic MCT1 expression increases food intake and alters orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptide expression

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortés-Campos, Christian; Barahona, María José; Carril, Claudio; Ordenes, Patricio; Salgado, Magdiel; Oyarce, Karina; García-Robles, María de los Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic glucosensing, which involves the detection of glucose concentration changes by brain cells and subsequent release of orexigenic or anorexigenic neuropeptides, is a crucial process that regulates feeding behavior. Arcuate nucleus (AN) neurons are classically thought to be responsible for hypothalamic glucosensing through a direct sensing mechanism; however, recent data has shown a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and AN neurons through lactate that may also be contributing to this process. Monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) is the main isoform expressed by tanycytes, which could facilitate lactate release to hypothalamic AN neurons. We hypothesize that MCT1 inhibition could alter the metabolic coupling between tanycytes and AN neurons, altering feeding behavior. To test this, we inhibited MCT1 expression using adenovirus-mediated transfection of a shRNA into the third ventricle, transducing ependymal wall cells and tanycytes. Neuropeptide expression and feeding behavior were measured in MCT1-inhibited animals after intracerebroventricular glucose administration following a fasting period. Results showed a loss in glucose regulation of orexigenic neuropeptides and an abnormal expression of anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to fasting. This was accompanied by an increase in food intake and in body weight gain. Taken together, these results indicate that MCT1 expression in tanycytes plays a role in feeding behavior regulation. PMID:27677351

  18. The role of astrocytes in the hypothalamic response and adaptation to metabolic signals.

    PubMed

    Chowen, Julie A; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Frago, Laura M; Horvath, Tamas L; Argente, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    The hypothalamus is crucial in the regulation of homeostatic functions in mammals, with the disruption of hypothalamic circuits contributing to chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and infertility. Metabolic signals and hormonal inputs drive functional and morphological changes in the hypothalamus in attempt to maintain metabolic homeostasis. However, the dramatic increase in the incidence of obesity and its secondary complications, such as type 2 diabetes, have evidenced the need to better understand how this system functions and how it can go awry. Growing evidence points to a critical role of astrocytes in orchestrating the hypothalamic response to metabolic cues by participating in processes of synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity and nutrient sensing. These glial cells express receptors for important metabolic signals, such as the anorexigenic hormone leptin, and determine the type and quantity of nutrients reaching their neighboring neurons. Understanding the mechanisms by which astrocytes participate in hypothalamic adaptations to changes in dietary and metabolic signals is fundamental for understanding the neuroendocrine control of metabolism and key in the search for adequate treatments of metabolic diseases.

  19. Severe hyponatremia caused by hypothalamic adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Shibata, T; Oeda, T; Saito, Y

    1999-05-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with severe hyponatremia. Basal values of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), thyroid hormone and cortisol were normal on admission. Impairment of water diuresis was observed by water loading test. Initially, we diagnosed her condition as the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). By provocation test, we finally confirmed that the hyponatremia was caused by hypothalamic adrenal insufficiency. The basal values of ACTH and cortisol might not be sufficient to exclude the possibility of adrenal insufficiency. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate adrenal function by provocation test or to re-evaluate it after recovery from hyponatremia.

  20. Hypothalamic control of sleep in aging.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Asya

    2012-09-01

    The timing of sleep and its duration are affected by circadian and homeostatic factors. Physiological and behavioral attributes such as the duration of previous wake period, food availability, temperature, and stress all affect sleep and its quality. As many of these physiological inputs are integrated in the hypothalamus, it is not surprising that this brain structure plays a crucial role in the regulation of sleep. I will discuss this role also in the context of aging, which is associated with changes in both hypothalamic function and the composition of sleep.

  1. The Development of Leucine Dehydrogenase and Formate Dehydrogenase Bifunctional Enzyme Cascade Improves the Biosynthsis of L-tert-Leucine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixue; Zhang, Yonghui; Sun, Dongfang; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2016-11-01

    Leucine dehydrogenase (LDH) and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) were assembled together based on a high-affinity interaction between two different cohesins in a miniscaffoldin and corresponding dockerins in LDH and FDH. The miniscaffoldin with two enzymes was further absorbed by regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC) to form a bifunctional enzyme complex (miniscaffoldin with LDH and FDH adsorbed by RAC, RSLF) in vitro. The enzymatic characteristics of the bifunctional enzyme complex and free enzymes mixture were systematically compared. The synthesis of L-tert-leucine by the RSLF and free enzyme mixture were compared under different concentrations of enzymes, coenzyme, and substrates. The initial L-tert-leucine production rate by RSLF was enhanced by 2-fold compared with that of the free enzyme mixture. Ninety-one grams per liter of L-tert-leucine with an enantiomeric purity of 99 % e.e. was obtained by RSLF multienzyme catalysis. The results indicated that the bifuntional enzyme complex based on cohesin-dockerin interaction has great potential in the synthesis of L-tert-leucine.

  2. Spectroscopic, thermal and structural studies of new L-leucine and D-leucine complexes with chloranilic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlukojć, A.; Hetmańczyk, J.; Nowicka-Scheibe, J.; Maurin, Jan K.; Schilf, W.; Rozwadowski, Z.

    2017-04-01

    New molecular complexes of L-leucine and D-leucine with chloranilic acid have been synthesized. Crystal structures of these crystals have been solved; they crystallize in non-centrosymmetric monoclinic P21 space group. In the crystal, leucine molecules exist in protonated form (C6NO2H14+) and chloranilic acid molecules in deprotonated form (C6HCl2O4-). Electronic (UV-Vis) and vibrational absorption (VA) spectra for both materials were collected. Circular dichroism methods such as electronic circular dichroism (ECD) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) were used to determine the absolute configuration of new complexes. In both methods a characteristic (-,+) Cotton patterns are observed. In ECD spectra absorption bands are observed at 212 nm for acetonitrile solution and at 202 nm for aqueous solution. VCD spectra (in DMSO-d6 solution) show (-,+) Cotton pattern with strong peaks at 1323 cm-1 (CH rocking mode). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TG) investigations were performed to explore thermal properties of new materials. In DSC curve the decomposition and combustion processes are observed in 220-227 °C. The decomposition process was described by use of TG method and quadruple mass spectrometer (QMS). NMR spectra of pure L-leucine and chloranilic acid as well as L-leucine - chloranilic acid complex in solutions (D2O and DMSO) and in solid state confirm the geometry of molecules in complex both in solution and in solid state.

  3. Timing of gene expression from different genetic systems in shaping leucine and isoleucine contents of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) meal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guolin; Wu, Jianguo; Variath, Murali-Tottekkaad; Shi, Chunhai

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) using a diallel design with nine parents: Youcai 601, Double 20-4, Huashuang 3, Gaoyou 605, Zhongyou 821, Eyouchangjia, Zhong R-888, Tower and Zheshuang 72. The seed developmental process was divided into five stages, namely initial (days 1-15 after flowering), early (days 16-22 after flowering), middle (days 23-29), late (days 30-36), and maturing (days 37-43) developmental stages. The variation of dynamic genetic effects for leucine and isoleucine contents of rapeseed meal was analysed at five developmental stages, across different environments using the genetic models with time-dependent measures. The results from unconditional and conditional analyses indicated that the expression of diploid embryo, cytoplasmic and diploid maternal plant genes were important for leucine and isoleucine contents at different developmental stages of rapeseed, particularly at the initial and early developmental stages. Among different genetic systems, nutrition quality traits were mainly controlled by the accumulative or net maternal main effects and their GE interaction effects, except at maturity when the net diploid embryo effects were larger. The expression of genes was affected by the environmental conditions on 15, 22, 29 or 36 days after flowering, but was more stable at mature stage. For the isoleucine content the narrow-sense heritabilities on 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 days after flowering were 43.0, 65.7, 60.1, 65.5 and 78.2%, respectively, while for the leucine content the corresponding narrow-sense heritabilities were relatively smaller. The interaction heritabilities were more important than the general heritabilities at the first three developmental times. The improvement for isoleucine content could be achieved by selection based on the higher narrow-sense heritabilities. Various genetic systems exhibited genetic correlations among the developmental times or leucine and isoleucine contents. A simultaneous

  4. Dietary leucine requirement of juvenile Japanese seabass ( Lateolabrax japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Cheng, Zhenyan; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-02-01

    A 56-day feeding trial was conducted to examine the dietary leucine requirement of juvenile Japanese seabass in seawater floating net cages (1.5 m × 1.5 m × 2.0 m). Six isonitrogenous (crude protein 40%) and isoenergetic (gross energy 20 kJ g-1) diets were formulated to contain different concentrations of leucine (0.9%, 1.49%, 2.07%, 2.70%, 3.30% and 3.88% of dry matter). Crystalline L-amino acids were supplemented to simulate the whole body amino acid pattern of Japanese seabass except for leucine. Three groups (30 fish individuals each, 8.0 g ± 0.20 g in initial weight) were fed to apparent satiation at 5:00 and 17:30 every day. During the experimental period, the water temperature ranged from 26 to 32δC and salinity from 26 to 30, and the dissolved oxygen was maintained at 7 mg L-1. The results showed that weight gain ( WG), nitrogen retention ( NR), feed efficiency ( FE) and protein efficiency ratio ( PER) were significantly increased when dietary leucine was increased from 0.90% to 2.70% of dry matter, and then declined. WG was the highest when fish were fed D4 containing 2.70% of leucine. No significant differences were observed in body composition among dietary treatments ( P > 0.05). Considering the change of WG, the optimum dietary leucine requirement of juvenile Japanese seabass was either 2.39% of dry matter or 5.68% of dietary protein.

  5. Leucine metabolism in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether increased oxidation of or protein synthesis requiring leucine occurs in cirrhotic patients. Five control subjects and four subjects with cirrhosis were equilibrated on a baseline diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)) with sufficient nonprotein calories to preclude negative nitrogen balance. An additional four patients were equilibrated on the same type of diet with a higher protein level (0.75 g per kg IBW). Control subjects and the patients were then studied during continuous infusion of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C) leucine in the fasted state and, in the fed state, with a Propac diet which had the same distribution of energy nutrients as the baseline diets. Plasma levels of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C), L-(1-/sup 13/C) and L-(/sup 15/N) leucine were measured during isotopic steady state by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fractional excretion of /sup 13/CO/sup 2/ in breath samples were analyzed by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. During the fasted and fed states leucine metabolism was measured to quantitate rates of nitrogen flux (Q/sub N/), carbon flux (Q/sub c/) and oxidation to carbon dioxide and water (C). From these measured values, proteins breakdown (B), protein synthesis (S), deamination (X/sup 0/) and reamination (X/sub N/) were calculated. The results showed that protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW and maintenance level of nonprotein calories. The data also showed that leucine metabolism can be quantitatively and reproducibly measured in subjects with cirrhosis.

  6. The Role of Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing Protein 10 (LRRC10) in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Matthew J.; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 10 (LRRC10) is a cardiomyocyte-specific member of the Leucine-rich repeat containing (LRRC) protein superfamily with critical roles in cardiac function and disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have identified LRRC10 mutations in human idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and Lrrc10 homozygous knockout mice develop DCM, strongly linking LRRC10 to the molecular etiology of DCM. LRRC10 localizes to the dyad region in cardiomyocytes where it can interact with actin and α-actinin at the Z-disc and associate with T-tubule components. Indeed, this region is becoming increasingly recognized as a signaling center in cardiomyocytes, not only for calcium cycling, excitation-contraction coupling, and calcium-sensitive hypertrophic signaling, but also as a nodal signaling hub where the myocyte can sense and respond to mechanical stress. Disruption of a wide range of critical structural and signaling molecules in cardiomyocytes confers susceptibility to cardiomyopathies in addition to the more classically studied mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying DCM remain unclear. Here, we review what is known about the cardiomyocyte functions of LRRC10, lessons learned about LRRC10 and DCM from the Lrrc10 knockout mouse model, and discuss ongoing efforts to elucidate molecular mechanisms whereby mutation or absence of LRRC10 mediates cardiac disease. PMID:27536250

  7. Restoration of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal Response to Hypoglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes by Avoiding Chronic Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Shin-ichi; Konishi, Kazunori; Otoda, Toshiki; Nagai, Takako; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kanasaki, Megumi; Kitada, Munehiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nishizawa, Makoto; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    An impaired ability to sense and respond to drug-induced hypoglycemia is a common and serious complication in diabetic patients. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity plays a critical role in the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia. We herein report a case that experienced restoration of a blunted HPA axis by avoiding hypoglycemia with the use of the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin. PMID:27904111

  8. The radiolysis and racemization of leucine on proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Lemmon, R. M.; Conzett, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    D- and L-Leucine have been subjected to 39-55 percent radiolysis using 0.11 MeV protons, both with the proton beam passing through the sample or being absorbed by it and with quenching the sample immediately on completion of irradiation or after a 21-day interval. Racemization was small (1.1-1.7 percent) and comparable in all cases, suggesting that radioracemization and secondary degradative effects were not important factors in the recent unsuccessful attempts to induce optical activity in DL-Leucine by partial radiolysis using 0-11 MeV longitudinally polarized protons.

  9. Estrogen Signaling in Hypothalamic Circuits Controling Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Martin J.; Qiu, Jian

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that many of the actions of 17β-estradiol (E2) in the central nervous system are mediated via intracellular receptor/transcription factors that interact with steroid response elements on target genes. However, there is compelling evidence for membrane steroid receptors for estrogen in hypothalamic and other brain neurons. Yet, it is not well understood how estrogen signals via membrane receptors, and how these signals impact not only membrane excitability but also gene transcription in neurons that modulate GnRH neuronal excitability. Indeed, it has been known for sometime that E2 can rapidly alter neuronal activity within seconds, indicating that some cellular effects can occur via membrane delimited events. In addition, E2 can affect second messenger systems including calcium mobilization and a plethora of kinases to alter cell signaling. Therefore, this review will consider our current knowledge of rapid membrane-initiated and intracellular signaling by E2 in hypothalamic neurons critical for reproductive function. PMID:20807512

  10. Quantitative role of splanchnic region in leucine metabolism: L-(1-13C,15N)leucine and substrate balance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.M.; Wagner, D.A.; Tredget, E.E.; Walaszewski, J.A.; Burke, J.F.; Young, V.R. )

    1990-07-01

    The role of the splanchnic region (Sp) in whole body leucine metabolism was assessed in six chronically catheterized fasting mongrel dogs and in eight dogs during constant enteral feeding of a complete amino acid solution (0.24 g.kg-1.h-1). We used primed continuous intravenous infusions of L-(1-13C,15N)leucine and L-(1-14C)leucine and measurements of arteriovenous isotope and leucine balance across the gut, liver, and Sp. In the fasted condition, 3.5% of arterial leucine supply was oxidized in the Sp, accounting for 13% of total body leucine oxidation, with 10% by liver. With amino acid feeding (1) leucine carbon and nitrogen fluxes and oxidation were increased (P less than 0.01) at the whole body level; (2) the percent of whole body leucine oxidation occurring in the Sp and liver increased (P less than 0.01) to 41 and 27%, respectively; (3) fractional metabolic utilization of leucine delivered to the Sp was reduced (P less than 0.01) from 47 to 35%; (4) the deamination rate of leucine in the gut was increased (P less than 0.05), along with an increased reamination rate of alpha-ketoisocaproic acid in the Sp (P less than 0.05). These findings reveal that the Sp accounts for a small fraction of whole body leucine oxidation during the fasting condition, but it plays a quantitatively important role in total body leucine oxidation during amino acid feeding; the gut and liver play cooperative roles in controlling leucine supply to peripheral tissues.

  11. RNA-seq analysis of the hypothalamic transcriptome reveals the networks regulating physiopathological progress in the diabetic GK rat

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yuhuan; Guan, Yujia; Zhang, Wenlu; Wu, Yu-e; Jia, Huanhuan; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xiuqing; Du, Hongli; Wang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    The Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat is an animal model of non-obese type 2 diabetes (T2D). The GK rat was generated through the introduction of various genetic mutations from continuous inbreeding; these rats develop diabetes spontaneously. The mutated genes in GK rats may play key roles in the regulation of diabetes. The hypothalamus plays a central role in systematic energy homeostasis. Here, the hypothalamic transcriptomes in GK and Wistar rats at 4, 8 and 12 weeks were investigated by RNA-seq, and multiple variants and gene expression profiles were obtained. The number of variants identified from GK rats was significantly greater than that of Wistar rats, indicating that many variants were fixed and heritable in GK rats after selective inbreeding. The differential gene expression analysis indicated that GK rats had a dysfunctional hypothalamic melanocortin system and attenuation of the hypothalamic glucose-sensing pathway. In addition, we generated integrated gene network modules by combining the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, co-expression network and mutations in GK and Wistar rats. In the modules, GK-specific genes, such as Bad, Map2k2, Adcy3, Adcy2 and Gstm6, may play key roles in hypothalamic regulation in GK rats. Our research provides a comprehensive map of the abnormalities in the GK rat hypothalamus, which reveals the new mechanisms of pathogenesis of T2D. PMID:27677945

  12. Enteral leucine and protein synthesis in skeletal and cardiac muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are three members of the Branch Chain Amino Acids: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. As essential amino acids, these amino acids have important functions which include a primary role in protein structure and metabolism. It is intriguing that the requirement for BCAA in humans comprise about 40–...

  13. Genetic studies of leucine transport in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Shotwell, M A; Lobatón, C D; Collarini, E J; Moreno, A; Giles, R E; Oxender, D L

    1984-05-15

    We have taken two approaches to the study of the genetics of leucine transport in mammalian cells. First, from a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line that has a temperature-sensitive leucyl-tRNA synthetase, we isolated temperature-resistant revertants with increased leucine transport activity. This transport elevation is reflected by increased Vmax values of leucine uptake and unchanged Km values of uptake. The temperature resistance in each revertant appears to result from the increased transport and not from any change in the leucyl-tRNA synthetase. We conclude that in each revertant there is a stable derepression of amino acid transport system L. In a second approach, we started with a Chinese hamster-human hybrid strain formed by the fusion of a temperature-sensitive leucyl-tRNA synthetase mutant hamster cell line and normal human leukocytes. From this temperature-sensitive hybrid strain we selected temperature-resistant hybrids, one class of which we found to have greatly elevated leucine transport activity. We have allowed human chromosomes to segregate from these high-transport hybrids, promoted by the presence of low concentrations of colcemid. The loss of the high-transport phenotype coincides with the loss of a single small human chromosome, which we are attempting to identify by using G-11 and G-banding staining techniques.

  14. The apo-structure of the leucine sensor Sestrin2 is still elusive

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Robert A.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Sabatini, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 is a GATOR2 interacting protein that directly binds leucine and is required for the inhibition of mTORC1 under leucine deprivation, indicating that it is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway. We recently reported the structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine (PDB ID: 5DJ4), and demonstrated that mutations in the leucine-binding pocket alter the affinity of Sestrin2 for leucine and result in a corresponding change in the leucine sensitivity of mTORC1 in cells. A lower resolution structure of human Sestrin2 (PDB ID: 5CUF), which was crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine, showed Sestrin2 to be in a nearly identical conformation as the leucine-bound structure. Based on this observation, it has been argued that leucine binding does not affect the conformation of Sestrin2 and thus that Sestrin2 may not be a sensor for leucine. Here, we show that simple analysis of the reported “apo”-Sestrin2 structure reveals the clear presence of prominent, unmodeled electron density in the leucine-binding pocket that exactly accommodates the leucine observed in the higher resolution structure. Refining the reported “apo”-structure with leucine eliminates the large FO-FC difference density at this position and improves the working and free R-factors of the model. Consistent with this, our own structure of Sestrin2 crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine also contains electron density that is best explained by leucine. Thus, the structure of apo-Sestrin2 remains elusive. PMID:27649739

  15. Enhanced production of branched-chain amino acids by Gluconacetobacter europaeus with a specific regional deletion in a leucine responsive regulator.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Naoki; Ishii, Yuri; Hidese, Ryota; Sakoda, Hisao; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2014-12-01

    Vinegar with increased amounts of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; valine, leucine and isoleucine) is favorable for human health as BCAAs decrease diet-induced obesity and hyperglycemia. To construct Gluconacetobacter europaeus which produces BCAAs, leucine responsive regulator (GeLrp) is focused and two Gelrp mutants were constructed. Wild-type KGMA0119 didn't produce significant amount of valine (0.13 mM) and leucine (0 mM) and strain KGMA7110 which lacks complete Gelrp accumulated valine (0.48 mM) and leucine (0.11 mM) but showed impaired growth, and it was fully restored in the presence of essential amino acids. Strain KGMA7203 was then constructed with a nonsense mutation at codon Trp132 in the Gelrp, which leads a specific deletion at an estimated ligand-sensing region in the C-terminal domain. KGMA7203 produced greater quantities of valine (0.80 mM) and leucine (0.26 mM) and showed the same growth characteristics as KGMA0119. mRNA levels of BCAAs biosynthesis genes (ilvI and ilvC) and probable BCAAs efflux pump (leuE) were determined by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Expression rates of ilvI and ilvC in the two Gelrp disruptants were greater than those in KGMA0119. leuE was highly expressed in KGMA7110 only, suggesting that the accumulation in KGMA7110 culture was caused by increased expression of the biosynthesis genes and abnormal enhanced export of amino acids resulting in impaired cell growth. In contrast, KGMA7203 would achieve the high level production through enhanced expression of the biosynthesis genes without enhancing that for the efflux pump. KGMA7203 was considered advantageous for production of vinegar with higher amounts of valine and leucine.

  16. Relation between plasma and tissue parameters of leucine metabolism in fed and starved rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, J.A.; Paul, H.S.; Adibi, S.A.

    1986-06-01

    By use of a primed continuous infusion of (1-/sup 14/C)leucine, the authors investigated parameters of leucine metabolism in plasma, expired air, and tissues of fed and 48-h starved rats. The ratios of muscle to plasma specific activity of ..cap alpha..-ketoisocaproate (KIC) in fed and starved rats were not significantly different from 1. The ratio of muscle to plasma specific activity of leucine was also not significantly different from 1 in fed rats, but was significantly lower than 1 in starved rats. The rate of leucine oxidation was 28-34% higher when calculation was based on plasma KIC rather than leucine specific activity. However, starvation significantly increased the rate of leucine oxidation with either specific activity. The rates of leucine incorporation into whole-body protein, calculated as the difference between plasma leucine turnover and oxidation, were unaffected by starvation, but the incorporations into total protein measured directly were significantly decreased in liver and muscle. They conclude that a) leucine or KIC specific activity in muscle is better predicted by plasma KIC than leucine specific activity, and b) the difference between rates of plasma leucine turnover and oxidation does not appear to be a valid measurement of leucine incorporation into whole-body protein.

  17. Lateral Hypothalamic Circuits for Feeding and Reward

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Garret D.; Wise, Roy A.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments conducted over 60 years ago, the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) was identified as a critical neuroanatomical substrate for motivated behavior. Electrical stimulation of the LHA induces voracious feeding even in non-restricted animals. In the absence of food, animals will work tirelessly, often lever-pressing 1000’s of times per hour, for electrical stimulation at the same site that provokes feeding, drinking, and other species-typical motivated behaviors. Here we review the classic findings from electrical stimulation studies and integrate them with more recent work that has utilized contemporary circuit-based approaches to study the LHA. We identify specific anatomically and molecularly defined LHA elements that integrate diverse information arising from cortical, extended amygdala, and basal forebrain networks to ultimately generate a highly specified and invigorated behavioral state conveyed via LHA projections to downstream reward and feeding specific circuits. PMID:26814589

  18. MEMBRANE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR REGULATION OF HYPOTHALAMIC FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul E.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the decades, our understanding of estrogen receptor (ER) function has evolved. Today we are confronted by at least two nuclear ERs: ERα and ERβ; and a number of putative membrane ERs, including ERα, ERβ, ER-X, GPR30 and Gq-mER. These receptors all bind estrogens or at least estrogenic compounds and activate intracellular signaling pathways. In some cases, a well-defined pharmacology, and physiology has been discovered. In other cases, the identity or the function remains to be elucidated. This mini-review attempts to synthesize our understanding of 17β-estradiol membrane signaling within hypothalamic circuits involved in homeostatic functions focusing on reproduction and energy balance. PMID:22538318

  19. Lateral hypothalamic circuits for feeding and reward.

    PubMed

    Stuber, Garret D; Wise, Roy A

    2016-02-01

    In experiments conducted over 60 years ago, the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) was identified as a critical neuroanatomical substrate for motivated behavior. Electrical stimulation of the LHA induces voracious feeding even in well-fed animals. In the absence of food, animals will work tirelessly, often lever-pressing thousands of times per hour, for electrical stimulation at the same site that provokes feeding, drinking and other species-typical motivated behaviors. Here we review the classic findings from electrical stimulation studies and integrate them with more recent work that has used contemporary circuit-based approaches to study the LHA. We identify specific anatomically and molecularly defined LHA elements that integrate diverse information arising from cortical, extended amygdala and basal forebrain networks to ultimately generate a highly specified and invigorated behavioral state conveyed via LHA projections to downstream reward and feeding-specific circuits.

  20. Relationship between surface concentration of L-leucine and bulk powder properties in spray dried formulations.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Sharad; Meiser, Felix; Tan, Geoffrey; Gengenbach, Thomas; Denman, John; Rowles, Matthew R; Larson, Ian; Morton, David A V

    2015-08-01

    The amino acid L-leucine has been demonstrated to act as a lubricant and improve the dispersibility of otherwise cohesive fine particles. It was hypothesized that optimum surface L-leucine concentration is necessary to achieve optimal surface and bulk powder properties. Polyvinylpyrrolidone was spray dried with different concentration of L-leucine and the change in surface composition of the formulations was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The formulations were also subjected to powder X-ray diffraction analysis in order to understand the relationship between surface concentration and solid-state properties of L-leucine. In addition, the morphology, surface energy and bulk cohesion of spray dried formulations were also assessed to understand the relation between surface L-leucine concentration and surface and bulk properties. The surface concentration of L-leucine increased with higher feed concentrations and plateaued at about 10% L-leucine. Higher surface L-leucine concentration also resulted in the formation of larger L-leucine crystals and not much change in crystal size was noted above 10% L-leucine. A change in surface morphology of particles from spherical to increasingly corrugated was also observed with increasing surface l-leucine concentration. Specific collapsed/folded over particles were only seen in formulations with 10% or higher l-leucine feed concentration suggesting a change in particle surface formation process. In addition, bulk cohesion also reduced and approached a minimum with 10% L-leucine concentration. Thus, the surface concentration of L-leucine governs particle formation and optimum surface L-leucine concentration results in optimum surface and bulk powder properties.

  1. Regulation of the plasma amino acid profile by leucine via the system L amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Hongmin; Nakamura, Koichi; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Kadota, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuya; Kondo, Yusuke; Xu, Minjun; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of amino acids reflect the intracellular amino acid pool in mammals. However, the regulatory mechanism requires clarification. In this study, we examined the effect of leucine administration on plasma amino acid profiles in mice with and without the treatment of 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) or rapamycin as an inhibitor of system L or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, respectively. The elevation of plasma leucine concentration after leucine administration was associated with a significant decrease in the plasma concentrations of isoleucine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine; BCH treatment almost completely blocked the leucine-induced decrease in plasma amino acid concentrations. Rapamycin treatment had much less effects on the actions of leucine than BCH treatment. These results suggest that leucine regulates the plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, and that system L amino acid transporters are involved in the leucine action.

  2. Supplemental dietary leucine and the skeletal muscle anabolic response to essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; McClung, James P

    2011-09-01

    Skeletal muscle protein synthesis (MPS) is regulated by a number of dietary factors, to include essential amino acids (EAAs). Leucine, a branched-chain amino acid, has been identified as a stimulator of MPS in many cell culture and animal studies. However, whether supplemental leucine exerts a unique stimulatory effect, as compared to other EAAs, on muscle anabolism in humans has not been clearly demonstrated. A recent study found no improvement in resting MPS in adults who consumed a 10 g EAA supplement providing added leucine (3.5 g leucine) when compared to a control 10 g EAA supplement (1.8 g leucine). These findings suggest that added leucine is unnecessary for the stimulation of MPS when sufficient EAAs are provided; however, the study of supplemental leucine during conditions such as endurance exercise, caloric deprivation, and ageing may be warranted.

  3. Hypothalamic dysfunction without hamartomas causing gelastic seizures in optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fink, Cassandra; Borchert, Mark; Simon, Carrie Zaslow; Saper, Clifford

    2015-02-01

    This report describes gelastic seizures in patients with optic nerve hypoplasia and hypothalamic dysfunction without hypothalamic hamartoma. All participants (n = 4) from the optic nerve hypoplasia registry study at Children's Hospital Los Angeles presenting with gelastic seizures were included. The clinical and pathology characteristics include hypothalamic dysgenesis and dysfunction, but no hamartomas. Optic nerve hypoplasia is the only reported condition with gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartomas, suggesting that hypothalamic disorganization alone can cause gelastic seizures.

  4. Behavioral state-dependent thermal feedback influencing the hypothalamic thermostat.

    PubMed

    Parmeggiani, P L; Azzaroni, A; Calasso, M

    2000-11-01

    The experimental evidence on the behavioral state-dependent compartmentalization of temperature in the central nervous system of three homeothermic species has been reviewed to address the question of how selective brain cooling influences hypothalamic temperature regulation.

  5. Inverse relationship of leucine flux and oxidation to free fatty acid availability in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Tessari, P; Nissen, S L; Miles, J M; Haymond, M W

    1986-01-01

    To determine the effect of fatty acid availability on leucine metabolism, 14-h fasted dogs were infused with either glycerol or triglyceride plus heparin, and 46-h fasted dogs were infused with either nicotinic acid or nicotinic acid plus triglyceride and heparin. Leucine metabolism was assessed using a simultaneous infusion of L-[4,5-3H]leucine and alpha-[1-14C]ketoisocaproate. Leucine, alpha-ketoisocaproate (KIC), and totalleucine carbon (leucine plus KIC) flux and oxidation rates were calculated at steady state. In 14-h fasted animals, infusion of triglyceride and heparin increased plasma free fatty acids (FFA) by 0.7 mM (P less than 0.01) and decreased leucine (P less than 0.01), total leucine carbon flux (P less than 0.02), and oxidation (P less than 0.05). The estimated rate of leucine utilization not accounted for by oxidation and KIC flux decreased, but the changes were not significant. During glycerol infusion, leucine and KIC flux and oxidation did not change. In 46-h fasted dogs, nicotinic acid decreased FFA by 1.0 mM (P less than 0.01) and increased (P less than 0.05) the rate of leucine and total leucine carbon flux, but did not affect KIC flux. Leucine oxidation increased (P less than 0.01) by nearly threefold, whereas nonoxidized leucine utilization decreased. Infusion of triglyceride plus heparin together with nicotinic acid blunted some of the responses observed with nicotinic acid alone. In that changes in oxidation under steady state condition reflect changes in net leucine balance, these data suggest that FFA availability may positively affect the sparing of at least one essential amino acid and may influence whole body protein metabolism. PMID:3080479

  6. Dietary L-leucine supplementation enhances intestinal development in suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuli; Wu, Zhenlong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Sun, Kaiji; Ji, Yun; Wang, Bin; Jiao, Ning; He, Beibei; Wang, Weiwei; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-08-01

    L-Leucine is a signaling amino acid in animal metabolism. It is unknown whether supplementing L-leucine to breast-fed neonates may enhance their small-intestinal development. This hypothesis was tested with a piglet model. Seven-day-old sow-reared pigs with an average birth weight of 1.45 kg were assigned randomly to the control or leucine group (n = 30/group). Piglets in the leucine group were orally administrated with 1.4 g L-leucine/kg body weight, whereas piglets in the control group received isonitrogenous L-alanine, twice daily for 14 days. The supplemental L-leucine amounted to 200 % of L-leucine intake from sow's milk by 7-day-old pigs. At the end of the 2-week experiment, tissue samples were collected for determining intestinal morphology, expression of genes for intestinal leucine transporters (real-time RT-PCR and western blot analysis), and plasma metabolites and hormones. L-leucine administration increased (P < 0.05) villus height in the duodenum, an elevated ratio of villus height to crypt depth in the duodenum and ileum, plasma concentrations of leucine, glutamine and asparagine, as well as body-weight gains. mRNA levels for L-leucine transporters (SLC6A14, SLC6A19 and SLC7A9) and the abundance of the ATB(0,+) protein were increased (P < 0.05) but those for SLC7A7 mRNA and the LAT2 protein were decreased (P < 0.05) in the jejunum of leucine-supplemented piglets, compared with the control. Plasma concentrations of ammonia, urea, triglycerides, and growth-related hormones did not differ between the control and leucine groups. Collectively, these results indicate that L-leucine supplementation improves intestinal development and whole-body growth in suckling piglets with a normal birth weight.

  7. Determination of Levo-Rotatory Leucine by a Fluorescent Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, D.; Zhu, H.

    2015-03-01

    With a certain concentration of Michaelis buffer solution (pH 6.1), and in the presence of CTMAB, the fluorescence intensity of fluorescein, which is quenched by Pd 2+ , can be enhanced after adding a certain content of L-leucine. Thereby, we establish a fluorescence spectrometry method to detect the content of L-leucine, the added amount of which is proportional to the fluorescence enhancement. When the excitation slit width is 3 nm and the emission slit width is 5 nm, we obtain the following results: correlation coefficient R = 0.9981, linear range 0.125-1.375 mg/l, and detection limit 0.00028 mg/l.

  8. Photolysis of rac-leucine with circularly polarized synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Filippi, Jean-Jacques; Meinert, Cornelia; Hoffmann, Søren V; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Nahon, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    Amino acids that pass the RNA machinery in living organisms occur in L-configuration. The question on the evolutionary origin of this biomolecular asymmetry remains unanswered to this day. Amino acids were detected in artificially produced interstellar ices, and L-enantiomer-enriched amino acids were identified in CM-type meteorites. This hints at a possible interstellar/circumstellar origin of the amino acids themselves as well as their stereochemical asymmetry. Based upon the current knowledge about the occurrence of circularly-polarized electromagnetic radiation in interstellar environments, we subjected rac-leucine to far-UV circularly-polarized synchrotron radiation. Asymmetric photolysis was followed by an analysis in an enantioselective GC/MS system. Here, we report on an advanced photolysis rate of more than 99% for leucine. The results indicate that high photolysis rates can occur under the chosen conditions, favoring enantioselective photolysis. In 2014, the obtained results will be reexamined by cometary mission Rosetta.

  9. Artificial leucine rich repeats as new scaffolds for protein design.

    PubMed

    Baabur-Cohen, Hemda; Dayalan, Subashini; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2011-04-15

    The leucine rich repeat (LRR) motif that participates in many biomolecular recognition events in cells was suggested as a general scaffold for producing artificial receptors. We describe here the design and first total chemical synthesis of small LRR proteins, and their structural analysis. When evaluating the tertiary structure as a function of different number of repeating units (1-3), we were able to find that the 3-repeats sequence, containing 90 amino acids, folds into the expected structure.

  10. Pure endoscopic management of epileptogenic hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Chibbaro, S; Cebula, H; Scholly, J; Todeschi, J; Ollivier, I; Timofeev, A; Ganau, M; Di Emidio, P; Valenti, M P; Staack, A M; Bast, T; Steinhoff, B J; Hirsch, E; Kehrli, P; Proust, F

    2017-02-07

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HH) are rare congenital malformations located in the region of the tuber cinereum and third ventricle. Their usual clinical presentation is characterized by gelastic/dacrystic seizures which often become pharmaco-resistant and progress to secondary focal/generalized intractable epilepsy causing mostly in children cognitive and behavioral problems (particularly in cases of progressive epileptic encephalopathy) and precocious puberty. Whereas gelastic seizures can be surgically controlled either by resection of the lesion or disconnection (tissue-destructive) procedures, aimed at functionally prevent the spreading of the epileptic burst; generalized seizures tend to respond better to HH excision rather than isolated neocortical resections, which generally fail to control them. Prospective analysis of 14 consecutive patients harboring HH treated in an 8-year period; 12 patients had unilateral and two bilateral HH. All patients were managed by pure endoscopic excision of the HH. The mean operative time was 48 min and mean hospital stay was 2 days; perioperative blood loss was negligible in all cases. Two patients showed a transient diabetes insipidus (DI); no transient or permanent postoperative neurological deficit or memory impairment was recorded. Complete HH excision was achieved in 10/14 patients. At a mean follow-up of 48 months, no wound infection, meningitis, postoperative hydrocephalus, and/or mortality were recorded in this series of patients. Eight patients became seizure free (Engel class I), 2 other experienced worthwhile improvement of disabling seizures (Engel class II); 2 patients were cured from gelastic attacks while still experiencing focal dyscognitive seizures; and 2, having bilateral HH (both undergoing unilateral HH excision), did not experience significant improvement and required later on a temporal lobectomy coupled to amygdalohyppocampectomy. Overall, the followings resulted to be predictive factors for better

  11. Controlling Mechanical Properties of Bis-leucine Oxalyl Amide Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, William; Carvajal, Daniel; Shull, Kenneth

    2011-03-01

    is-leucine oxalyl amide is a low molecular weight gelator capable of gelling polar and organic solvents. A fundamental understanding of self-assembled systems can lead to new methods in drug delivery and the design of new soft material systems. An important feature of self-assembled systems are the intermolecular forces between solvent and gelator molecule; by changing the environment the gel is in, the mechanical properties also change. In this project two variables were considered: the degree of neutralization present for the gelator molecule from neutral to completely ionized, and the concentration of the gelator molecule, from 1 weight percent to 8 weight percent in 1-butanol. Mechanical properties were studied using displacement controlled indentation techniques and temperature sweep rheometry. It has been found that properties such as the storage modulus, gelation temperature and maximum stress allowed increase with bis-leucine oxalyl amide concentration. The results from this study establish a 3-d contour map between the gelator concentration, the gelator degree of ionization and mechanical properties such as storage modulus and maximum stress allowed. The intermolecular forces between the bis-leucine low molecular weight gelator and 1-butanol govern the mechanical properties of the gel system, and understanding these interactions will be key to rationally designed self-assembled systems.

  12. Characterization of a leucine aminopeptidase of Babesia gibsoni.

    PubMed

    Jia, H; Terkawi, M A; Aboge, G O; Goo, Y-K; Luo, Y; Li, Y; Yamagishi, J; Nishikawa, Y; Igarashi, I; Sugimoto, C; Fujisaki, K; Xuan, X

    2009-08-01

    Peptidases of parasitic protozoa are currently under intense investigation in order to identify novel virulence factors, drug targets, and vaccine candidates, except in Babesia. Leucine aminopeptidases in protozoa, such as Plasmodium and Leishmania, have been identified to be involved in free amino acid regulation. We report here the molecular and enzymatic characterization, as well as the localization of a leucine aminopeptidase, a member of the M17 cytosolic aminopeptidase family, from B. gibsoni (BgLAP). A functional recombinant BgLAP (rBgLAP) expressed in Escherichia coli efficiently hydrolysed synthetic substrates for aminopeptidase, a leucine substrate. Enzyme activity of the rBgLAP was found to be optimum at pH 8.0 and at 37 degrees C. The substrate profile was slightly different from its homologue in P. falciprum. The activity was also strongly dependent on metal divalent cations, and was inhibited by bestatin, which is a specific inhibitor for metalloprotease. These results indicated that BgLAP played an important role in free amino acid regulation.

  13. Identification and characterization of Paragonimus westermani leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Song, Su-Min; Park, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Jin; Kim, Suk-Il; Hong, Yeon-Chul; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il

    2008-09-01

    Paragonimus westermani is a tissue-invading trematode parasite that causes inflammatory lung disease as well as systemic infections including cerebral invasion in carnivorous mammals. While aminopeptidases play important roles in trematodes in the catabolism of host hemoglobin, an essential source of nutrient for the parasite, little is known about aminopeptidase in Paragonimus. Presently, we isolated a cDNA encoding a 58 kDa P. westermani leucine aminopeptidase (PwLAP). Deduced amino acid sequence of PwLAP exhibited significant sequence homology with LAP from Schistosoma spp. and Fasciola hepatica. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant PwLAP protein demonstrated preferential substrate specificity for Leu-NHMec and inhibition by EDTA, 1,10-phenanthroline, and bestatin, which are conserved characteristics of the M17 family of leucine aminopeptidase. PwLAP exhibited relatively higher enzyme activity in the presence of Mn2+ compared to Schistosoma mansoni LAP. Based on the biochemical properties and immunohistochemical analysis, PwLAP is concluded to represent a leucine aminopeptidase. The enzyme is most likely responsible for the catabolism of host hemoglobin, and, hence, represents a potential target of Paragonimus chemotherapy.

  14. Hypothalamic effects of thyroid hormones on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Alvarez, Clara V; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    Over the past few decades, obesity and its related metabolic disorders have increased at an epidemic rate in the developed and developing world. New signals and factors involved in the modulation of energy balance and metabolism are continuously being discovered, providing potential novel drug targets for the treatment of metabolic disease. A parallel strategy is to better understand how hormonal signals, with an already established role in energy metabolism, work, and how manipulation of the pathways involved may lead to amelioration of metabolic dysfunction. The thyroid hormones belong to the latter category, with dysregulation of the thyroid axis leading to marked alterations in energy balance. The potential of thyroid hormones in the treatment of obesity has been known for decades, but their therapeutic use has been hampered because of side-effects. Data gleaned over the past few years, however, have uncovered new features at the mechanisms of action involved in thyroid hormones. Sophisticated neurobiological approaches have allowed the identification of specific energy sensors, such as AMP-activated protein kinase and mechanistic target of rapamycin, acting in specific groups of hypothalamic neurons, mediating many of the effects of thyroid hormones on food intake, energy expenditure, glucose, lipid metabolism, and cardiovascular function. More extensive knowledge about these molecular mechanisms will be of great relevance for the treatment of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  15. Hypothalamic control of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Sebastien M.; Caron, Alexandre; Lanfray, Damien; Monge-Rofarello, Boris; Bartness, Timothy J.; Richard, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known, in large part from animal studies, that the control of brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis is insured by the central nervous system (CNS), which integrates several stimuli in order to control BAT activation through the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). SNS-mediated BAT activity is governed by diverse neurons found in brain structures involved in homeostatic regulations and whose activity is modulated by various factors including oscillations of energy fluxes. The characterization of these neurons has always represented a challenging issue. The available literature suggests that the neuronal circuits controlling BAT thermogenesis are largely part of an autonomic circuitry involving the hypothalamus, brainstem and the SNS efferent neurons. In the present review, we recapitulate the latest progresses in regards to the hypothalamic regulation of BAT metabolism. We briefly addressed the role of the thermoregulatory pathway and its interactions with the energy balance systems in the control of thermogenesis. We also reviewed the involvement of the brain melanocortin and endocannabinoid systems as well as the emerging role of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) neurons in BAT thermogenesis. Finally, we examined the link existing between these systems and the homeostatic factors that modulate their activities. PMID:26578907

  16. Paraventricular Hypothalamic Mechanisms of Chronic Stress Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Herman, James P.; Tasker, Jeffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is the primary driver of hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) responses. At least part of the role of the PVN is managing the demands of chronic stress exposure. With repeated exposure to stress, hypophysiotrophic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons of the PVN display a remarkable cellular, synaptic, and connectional plasticity that serves to maximize the ability of the HPA axis to maintain response vigor and flexibility. At the cellular level, chronic stress enhances the production of CRH and its co-secretagogue arginine vasopressin and rearranges neurotransmitter receptor expression so as to maximize cellular excitability. There is also evidence to suggest that efficacy of local glucocorticoid feedback is reduced following chronic stress. At the level of the synapse, chronic stress enhances cellular excitability and reduces inhibitory tone. Finally, chronic stress causes a structural enhancement of excitatory innervation, increasing the density of glutamate and noradrenergic/adrenergic terminals on CRH neuronal cell somata and dendrites. Together, these neuroplastic changes favor the ability of the HPA axis to retain responsiveness even under conditions of considerable adversity. Thus, chronic stress appears able to drive PVN neurons via a number of convergent mechanisms, processes that may play a major role in HPA axis dysfunction seen in variety of stress-linked disease states. PMID:27843437

  17. Fatty Acid Transporter CD36 Mediates Hypothalamic Effect of Fatty Acids on Food Intake in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moullé, Valentine S.; Le Foll, Christelle; Philippe, Erwann; Kassis, Nadim; Rouch, Claude; Marsollier, Nicolas; Bui, Linh-Chi; Guissard, Christophe; Dairou, Julien; Lorsignol, Anne; Pénicaud, Luc; Levin, Barry E.; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline; Magnan, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Variations in plasma fatty acid (FA) concentrations are detected by FA sensing neurons in specific brain areas such as the hypothalamus. These neurons play a physiological role in the control of food intake and the regulation of hepatic glucose production. Le Foll et al. previously showed in vitro that at least 50% of the FA sensing in ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) neurons is attributable to the interaction of long chain FA with FA translocase/CD36 (CD36). The present work assessed whether in vivo effects of hypothalamic FA sensing might be partly mediated by CD36 or intracellular events such as acylCoA synthesis or β-oxidation. To that end, a catheter was implanted in the carotid artery toward the brain in male Wistar rats. After 1 wk recovery, animals were food-deprived for 5 h, then 10 min infusions of triglyceride emulsion, Intralipid +/− heparin (IL, ILH, respectively) or saline/heparin (SH) were carried out and food intake was assessed over the next 5 h. Experimental groups included: 1) Rats previously injected in ventromedian nucleus (VMN) with shRNA against CD36 or scrambled RNA; 2) Etomoxir (CPT1 inhibitor) or saline co-infused with ILH/SH; and 3) Triacsin C (acylCoA synthase inhibitor) or saline co-infused with ILH/SH. ILH significantly lowered food intake during refeeding compared to SH (p<0.001). Five hours after refeeding, etomoxir did not affect this inhibitory effect of ILH on food intake while VMN CD36 depletion totally prevented it. Triacsin C also prevented ILH effects on food intake. In conclusion, the effect of FA to inhibit food intake is dependent on VMN CD36 and acylCoA synthesis but does not required FA oxidation. PMID:24040150

  18. Sestrin2 is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Rachel L; Chantranupong, Lynne; Saxton, Robert A; Shen, Kuang; Scaria, Sonia M; Cantor, Jason R; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    Leucine is a proteogenic amino acid that also regulates many aspects of mammalian physiology, in large part by activating the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase, a master growth controller. Amino acids signal to mTORC1 through the Rag guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases). Several factors regulate the Rags, including GATOR1, aGTPase-activating protein; GATOR2, a positive regulator of unknown function; and Sestrin2, a GATOR2-interacting protein that inhibits mTORC1 signaling. We find that leucine, but not arginine, disrupts the Sestrin2-GATOR2 interaction by binding to Sestrin2 with a dissociation constant of 20 micromolar, which is the leucine concentration that half-maximally activates mTORC1. The leucine-binding capacity of Sestrin2 is required for leucine to activate mTORC1 in cells. These results indicate that Sestrin2 is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway.

  19. Hypothalamic integration of body fluid regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Denton, D A; McKinley, M J; Weisinger, R S

    1996-01-01

    The progression of animal life from the paleozoic ocean to rivers and diverse econiches on the planet's surface, as well as the subsequent reinvasion of the ocean, involved many different stresses on ionic pattern, osmotic pressure, and volume of the extracellular fluid bathing body cells. The relatively constant ionic pattern of vertebrates reflects a genetic "set" of many regulatory mechanisms--particularly renal regulation. Renal regulation of ionic pattern when loss of fluid from the body is disproportionate relative to the extracellular fluid composition (e.g., gastric juice with vomiting and pancreatic secretion with diarrhea) makes manifest that a mechanism to produce a biologically relatively inactive extracellular anion HCO3- exists, whereas no comparable mechanism to produce a biologically inactive cation has evolved. Life in the ocean, which has three times the sodium concentration of extracellular fluid, involves quite different osmoregulatory stress to that in freshwater. Terrestrial life involves risk of desiccation and, in large areas of the planet, salt deficiency. Mechanisms integrated in the hypothalamus (the evolutionary ancient midbrain) control water retention and facilitate excretion of sodium, and also control the secretion of renin by the kidney. Over and above the multifactorial processes of excretion, hypothalamic sensors reacting to sodium concentration, as well as circumventricular organs sensors reacting to osmotic pressure and angiotensin II, subserve genesis of sodium hunger and thirst. These behaviors spectacularly augment the adaptive capacities of animals. Instinct (genotypic memory) and learning (phenotypic memory) are melded to give specific behavior apt to the metabolic status of the animal. The sensations, compelling emotions, and intentions generated by these vegetative systems focus the issue of the phylogenetic emergence of consciousness and whether primal awareness initially came from the interoreceptors and vegetative

  20. Dynamic localization of glucokinase and its regulatory protein in hypothalamic tanycytes.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Magdiel; Tarifeño-Saldivia, Estefanía; Ordenes, Patricio; Millán, Carola; Yañez, María José; Llanos, Paula; Villagra, Marcos; Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Martínez, Fernando; Nualart, Francisco; Uribe, Elena; de Los Angeles García-Robles, María

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic β cells, is also expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, which cover the ventricular walls of the basal hypothalamus and are implicated in an indirect control of neuronal activity by glucose. Previously, we demonstrated that GK was preferentially localized in tanycyte nuclei in euglycemic rats, which has been reported in hepatocytes and is suggestive of the presence of the GK regulatory protein, GKRP. In the present study, GK intracellular localization in hypothalamic and hepatic tissues of the same rats under several glycemic conditions was compared using confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In the hypothalamus, increased GK nuclear localization was observed in hyperglycemic conditions; however, it was primarily localized in the cytoplasm in hepatic tissue under the same conditions. Both GK and GKRP were next cloned from primary cultures of tanycytes. Expression of GK by Escherichia coli revealed a functional cooperative protein with a S0.5 of 10 mM. GKRP, expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inhibited GK activity in vitro with a Ki 0.2 µM. We also demonstrated increased nuclear reactivity of both GK and GKRP in response to high glucose concentrations in tanycyte cultures. These data were confirmed using Western blot analysis of nuclear extracts. Results indicate that GK undergoes short-term regulation by nuclear compartmentalization. Thus, in tanycytes, GK can act as a molecular switch to arrest cellular responses to increased glucose.

  1. Dynamic Localization of Glucokinase and Its Regulatory Protein in Hypothalamic Tanycytes

    PubMed Central

    Ordenes, Patricio; Millán, Carola; Yañez, María José; Llanos, Paula; Villagra, Marcos; Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Martínez, Fernando; Nualart, Francisco; Uribe, Elena; de los Angeles García-Robles, María

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic β cells, is also expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, which cover the ventricular walls of the basal hypothalamus and are implicated in an indirect control of neuronal activity by glucose. Previously, we demonstrated that GK was preferentially localized in tanycyte nuclei in euglycemic rats, which has been reported in hepatocytes and is suggestive of the presence of the GK regulatory protein, GKRP. In the present study, GK intracellular localization in hypothalamic and hepatic tissues of the same rats under several glycemic conditions was compared using confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In the hypothalamus, increased GK nuclear localization was observed in hyperglycemic conditions; however, it was primarily localized in the cytoplasm in hepatic tissue under the same conditions. Both GK and GKRP were next cloned from primary cultures of tanycytes. Expression of GK by Escherichia coli revealed a functional cooperative protein with a S0.5 of 10 mM. GKRP, expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inhibited GK activity in vitro with a Ki 0.2 µM. We also demonstrated increased nuclear reactivity of both GK and GKRP in response to high glucose concentrations in tanycyte cultures. These data were confirmed using Western blot analysis of nuclear extracts. Results indicate that GK undergoes short-term regulation by nuclear compartmentalization. Thus, in tanycytes, GK can act as a molecular switch to arrest cellular responses to increased glucose. PMID:24739934

  2. Knockout of leucine aminopeptidase in Toxoplasma gondii using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Jia, Honglin; Zheng, Yonghui

    2015-02-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases of the M17 peptidase family represent ideal drug targets for therapies directed against the pathogens Plasmodium, Babesia and Trypanosoma. Previously, we characterised Toxoplasma gondii leucine aminopeptidase and demonstrated its role in regulating the levels of free amino acids. In this study, we evaluated the potential of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase as a drug target in T. gondii by a knockout method. Existing knockout methods for T. gondii have many drawbacks; therefore, we developed a new technique that takes advantage of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We first chose a Cas9 target site in the gene encoding T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase and then constructed a knockout vector containing Cas9 and the single guide RNA. After transfection, single tachyzoites were cloned in 96-well plates by limiting dilution. Two transfected strains derived from a single clone were cultured in Vero cells, and then subjected to expression analysis by western blotting. The phenotypic analysis revealed that knockout of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase resulted in inhibition of attachment/invasion and replication; both the growth and attachment/invasion capacity of knockout parasites were restored by complementation with a synonymously substituted allele of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase. Mouse experiments demonstrated that T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout somewhat reduced the pathogenicity of T. gondii. An enzymatic activity assay showed that T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout reduced the processing of a leucine aminopeptidase-specific substrate in T. gondii. The absence of leucine aminopeptidase activity could be slightly compensated for in T. gondii. Overall, T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout influenced the growth of T. gondii, but did not completely block parasite development, virulence or enzymatic activity. Therefore, we conclude that leucine aminopeptidase would be useful only as an adjunctive drug target in T. gondii.

  3. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Martin, Bronwen; Chadwick, Wayne; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Becker, Kevin G.; WoodIII, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Maudsley, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db) and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6) animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds. PMID:22934110

  4. Behavioural responses to hypothalamic cooling and heating in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cabanac, M; Dib, B

    1983-03-28

    Rats with hypothalamic thermodes had their hypothalamus cooled or warmed for short sessions. In a first series of experiments, rats could bar-press to obtain fanning with cool air. Cooling the hypothalamus did not suppress or inhibit this behaviour although rectal temperature was markedly increased. In a second series of experiments, bar-pressing would warm the water flowing in the thermode. The rats thus self suppressed the cooling of their hypothalamus. This behaviour was absent at 10 degrees C ambient temperature, and increased with increasing ambient temperature up to 35 degrees C. The result of this behaviour was a small hyperthermia in warm and hot environment compared to control when the rats could not self-suppress the cooling of hypothalamus. The results of both experiments suggest that no conscious direct sensation is aroused by hypothalamic cooling. Hypothalamic heating increased the rat's bar-pressing for cool air and decreased the rat's rectal temperature. When pressure on the lever would suppress a warm hypothalamic stimulus rats self-cooled their hypothalamus, especially in warm environments. Such behaviour resulted in an increased somatic hyperthermia due to the warm environment and hypothalamic cooling. These results are compatible with the hypothesis of a direct conscious sensation from a warm hypothalamus.

  5. Kinetics and conformational stability studies of recombinant leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Moreno, Ana V; Villaseñor, Francisco; Medina-Rivero, Emilio; Pérez, Néstor O; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Leucine aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus is a broad specificity N-terminal aminopeptidase that is widely used in pharmaceutical processes where the removal of N-terminal residues in recombinant proteins is required. We previously reported the expression of a heterologous construction of the mature protein fused to a 6-histidine tag that presents a reasonable refolding rate for its use at industrial level. Here, we investigate this recombinant leucine aminopeptidase (rLAP) to explain the gain of activity observed when incubated at 37 °C after its production. Unfolding transitions of rLAP as a function of urea concentration were monitored by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence (FL) spectroscopy exhibiting single transitions by both techniques. Free energy change for unfolding measured by CD and FL spectroscopy are 2.8 ± 0.4 and 3.7 ± 0.4 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Thermal stability conformation of rLAP is 2.6 ± 0.1 and 6.1 kcal mol(-1) for CD and Nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry (Nano-DSC), respectively. Enzyme activity was assessed with L-leucine-p-nitroanilide (L-pNA) as substrate. The catalytic efficiency was 3.87 ± 0.10 min(-1) μM(-1) at 37 °C and pH 8.0. Kinetic and conformation studies show differences between the enzyme native and rLAP; however rLAP is selective and specific to remove N-terminal groups from amino acids.

  6. Histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, Gerald R.

    1979-01-01

    The histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) was studied in frozen tissue sections of rainbow trout both in yearling and adult fish. Age of fish had relatively little effect upon the results. The most intense LAN color production was in epithelial cells of midgut, pyloric ceca, hindgut, and in some segments of kidney tubules. Lower levels of LAN were evident in liver cells of Kupffer, and still lower or slight levels of LAN activity were found in blood cells, muscle, nerve, connective tissue, gonad, and pancreas. The results indicate that LAN might be useful in assessing histotoxicity to LAN-rich areas of the body.

  7. Histochemistry of leucine aminoaphthylamidase (LAN) in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, Gerald R.

    1979-01-01

    The histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) was studied in frozen tissue sections of rainbow trout both in yearling and adult fish. Age of fish had relatively little effect upon the results. The most intense LAN color production was in epithelial cells of midgut, pyloric ceca, hindgut, and in some segments of kidney tubules. Lower levels of LAN were evident in liver cells of Kupffer, and still lower or slight levels of LAN activity were found in blood cells, muscle, nerve, connective tissue, gonad, and pancreas. The results indicate that LAN might be useful in assessing histotoxicity to LAN-rich areas of the body.

  8. Novel leucine ureido derivatives as inhibitors of aminopeptidase N (APN).

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunhua; Jin, Kang; Cao, Jiangying; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xiaoguang; Xu, Wenfang

    2013-04-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) over expressed on tumor cells, plays a critical role in tumor invasion, metastasis, and tumor angiogenesis. Here we described the design, synthesis and preliminary activity studies of novel leucine ureido derivatives as aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) inhibitors. The results showed that compound 8c had the most potent inhibitory activity against APN with the IC50 value to 0.06 ± 0.041 μM, which could be used for further anticancer agent research.

  9. "Leucine aminopeptidase" (neutral arylamidase) in sheep sera: improved resolution with gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Manwell, C; Baker, C M

    1986-01-01

    Electrophoretic resolution of the heterogeneity of sheep serum "leucine aminopeptidase" is greatly improved by the use of gradients of acrylamide polymer, together with enzyme localisation involving L-alanyl beta-naphthylamide and cobaltous ion. The improved resolution contradicts an earlier claim of the existence of only two patterns of individual variation in the heterogeneity of sheep serum "leucine aminopeptidase", with one pattern completely dominant to the other. While the sheep enzyme is unusual among mammalian serum "leucine aminopeptidases" in its complex heterogeneity, it does conform to the typical mammalian pattern of codominant individual variation. The complexity of sheep serum "leucine aminopeptidase" is useful in the study of sheep evolution.

  10. Comparative analysis of pharmacological treatments with N-acetyl-DL-leucine (Tanganil) and its two isomers (N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine) on vestibular compensation: Behavioral investigation in the cat.

    PubMed

    Tighilet, Brahim; Leonard, Jacques; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Lacour, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Head roll tilt, postural imbalance and spontaneous nystagmus are the main static vestibular deficits observed after an acute unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). In the UVL cat model, these deficits are fully compensated over 6 weeks as the result of central vestibular compensation. N-Acetyl-dl-leucine is a drug prescribed in clinical practice for the symptomatic treatment of acute UVL patients. The present study investigated the effects of N-acetyl-dl-leucine on the behavioral recovery after unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN) in the cat, and compared the effects of each of its two isomers N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine. Efficacy of these three drug treatments has been evaluated with respect to a placebo group (UVN+saline water) on the global sensorimotor activity (observation grids), the posture control (support surface measurement), the locomotor balance (maximum performance at the rotating beam test), and the spontaneous vestibular nystagmus (recorded in the light). Whatever the parameters tested, the behavioral recovery was strongly and significantly accelerated under pharmacological treatments with N-acetyl-dl-leucine and N-acetyl-L-leucine. In contrast, the N-acetyl-D-leucine isomer had no effect at all on the behavioral recovery, and animals of this group showed the same recovery profile as those receiving a placebo. It is concluded that the N-acetyl-L-leucine isomer is the active part of the racemate component since it induces a significant acceleration of the vestibular compensation process similar (and even better) to that observed under treatment with the racemate component only.

  11. Hypothalamic BOLD response to glucose intake and hypothalamic volume are similar in anorexia nervosa and healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    van Opstal, Anna M.; Westerink, Anna M.; Teeuwisse, Wouter M.; van der Geest, Mirjam A. M.; van Furth, Eric F.; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inconsistent findings about the neurobiology of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) hinder the development of effective treatments for this severe mental disorder. Therefore, the need arises for elucidation of neurobiological factors involved in the pathophysiology of AN. The hypothalamus plays a key role in the neurobiological processes that govern food intake and energy homeostasis, processes that are disturbed in anorexia nervosa (AN). The present study will assess the hypothalamic response to energy intake and the hypothalamic structure in patients with AN and healthy controls. Methods: Ten women aged 18–30 years diagnosed with AN and 11 healthy, lean (BMI < 23 kg/m2) women in the same age range were recruited. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine function of the hypothalamus in response to glucose. Structural MRI was used to determine differences in hypothalamic volume and local gray matter volume using manual segmentation and voxel-based morphometry. Results: No differences were found in hypothalamic volume and neuronal activity in response to a glucose load between the patients and controls. Whole brain structural analysis showed a significant decrease in gray matter volume in the cingulate cortex in the AN patients, bilaterally. Conclusions: We argue that in spite of various known changes in the hypothalamus the direct hypothalamic response to glucose intake is similar in AN patients and healthy controls. PMID:25999808

  12. Hypothalamic Obesity in Craniopharyngioma Patients: Disturbed Energy Homeostasis Related to Extent of Hypothalamic Damage and Its Implication for Obesity Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Christian L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HO) occurs in patients with tumors and lesions in the medial hypothalamic region. Hypothalamic dysfunction can lead to hyperinsulinemia and leptin resistance. This review is focused on HO caused by craniopharyngiomas (CP), which are the most common childhood brain tumors of nonglial origin. Despite excellent overall survival rates, CP patients have substantially reduced quality of life because of significant long-term sequelae, notably severe obesity in about 50% of patients, leading to a high rate of cardiovascular mortality. Recent studies reported that both hyperphagia and decreased energy expenditure can contribute to severe obesity in HO patients. Recognized risk factors for severe obesity include large hypothalamic tumors or lesions affecting several medial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei that impact satiety signaling pathways. Structural damage in these nuclei often lead to hyperphagia, rapid weight gain, central insulin and leptin resistance, decreased sympathetic activity, low energy expenditure, and increased energy storage in adipose tissue. To date, most efforts to treat HO have shown disappointing long-term success rates. However, treatments based on the distinct pathophysiology of disturbed energy homeostasis related to CP may offer options for successful interventions in the future. PMID:26371051

  13. Hypothalamic AMPK as a Regulator of Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, My Khanh Q.; Kinyua, Ann W.; Yang, Dong Joo

    2016-01-01

    Activated in energy depletion conditions, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a cellular energy sensor and regulator in both central nervous system and peripheral organs. Hypothalamic AMPK restores energy balance by promoting feeding behavior to increase energy intake, increasing glucose production, and reducing thermogenesis to decrease energy output. Besides energy state, many hormones have been shown to act in concert with AMPK to mediate their anorexigenic and orexigenic central effects as well as thermogenic influences. Here we explore the factors that affect hypothalamic AMPK activity and give the underlying mechanisms for the role of central AMPK in energy homeostasis together with the physiological effects of hypothalamic AMPK on energy balance restoration. PMID:27547453

  14. Gelastic epilepsy without hypothalamic hamartoma: three additional cases.

    PubMed

    Savasta, Salvatore; Budetta, Mauro; Spartà, Maria Valentina; Carpentieri, Maria Luisa; Trasimeni, Guido; Zavras, Niki; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2014-08-01

    We describe three children with gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartoma whose seizures were characterized by typical laughing attacks associated or not with other seizure types. Ictal/interictal EEG and magnetic resonance imaging were performed. All three subjects showed a good response to carbamazepine therapy with complete seizure control in addition to a benign clinical and cognitive outcome. These three cases confirm that gelastic epilepsy without hypothalamic hamartoma, both in cryptogenic or symptomatic patients (one child showed a dysplastic right parietotemporal lesion), usually has a more benign natural history, and carbamazepine seems to be the most efficacious therapy to obtain both immediate and long-term seizure control. These findings need to be confirmed in a larger sample of children affected by gelastic epilepsy without hypothalamic hamartoma.

  15. The Role of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides in Neurogenesis and Neuritogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bakos, Jan; Zatkova, Martina; Bacova, Zuzana; Ostatnikova, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a source of neural progenitor cells which give rise to different populations of specialized and differentiated cells during brain development. Newly formed neurons in the hypothalamus can synthesize and release various neuropeptides. Although term neuropeptide recently undergoes redefinition, small-size hypothalamic neuropeptides remain major signaling molecules mediating short- and long-term effects on brain development. They represent important factors in neurite growth and formation of neural circuits. There is evidence suggesting that the newly generated hypothalamic neurons may be involved in regulation of metabolism, energy balance, body weight, and social behavior as well. Here we review recent data on the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides in adult neurogenesis and neuritogenesis with special emphasis on the development of food intake and social behavior related brain circuits. PMID:26881105

  16. SdAb heterodimer formation using leucine zippers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Ellen R.; Anderson, George P.; Brozozog-Lee, P. Audrey; Zabetakis, Dan

    2013-05-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAb) are variable domains cloned from camel, llama, or shark heavy chain only antibodies, and are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments. SdAb derived from immunized llamas are able to bind antigens with high affinity, and most are capable of refolding after heat or chemical denaturation to bind antigen again. We hypothesized that the ability to produce heterodimeric sdAb would enable reagents with the robust characteristics of component sdAb, but with dramatically improved overall affinity through increased avidity. Previously we had constructed multimeric sdAb by genetically linking sdAb that bind non-overlapping epitopes on the toxin, ricin. In this work we explored a more flexible approach; the construction of multivalent binding reagents using multimerization domains. We expressed anti-ricin sdAb that recognize different epitopes on the toxin as fusions with differently charged leucine zippers. When the initially produced homodimers are mixed the leucine zipper domains will pair to produce heterodimers. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to confirm heterodimer formation. Surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays, and fluid array assays were used to characterize the multimer constructs, and evaluate their utility in toxin detection.

  17. Effect of insulin and plasma amino acid concentrations on leucine metabolism in man. Role of substrate availability on estimates of whole body protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Castellino, P; Luzi, L; Simonson, D C; Haymond, M; DeFronzo, R A

    1987-01-01

    We examined the effect of insulin and plasma amino acid concentrations on leucine kinetics in 15 healthy volunteers (age 22 +/- 2 yr) using the euglycemic insulin clamp technique and an infusion of [1-14C]leucine. Four different experimental conditions were examined: (a) study one, high insulin with reduced plasma amino acid concentrations; (b) study two, high insulin with maintenance of basal plasma amino acid concentrations; (c) study three, high insulin with elevated plasma amino acid concentrations; and (d) study four, basal insulin with elevated plasma amino acid concentrations. Data were analyzed using both the plasma leucine and alpha-ketoisocaproate (the alpha-ketoacid of leucine) specific activities. In study one total leucine flux, leucine oxidation, and nonoxidative leucine disposal (an index of whole body protein synthesis) all decreased (P less than 0.01) regardless of the isotope model utilized. In study two leucine flux did not change, while leucine oxidation increased (P less than 0.01) and nonoxidative leucine disposal was maintained at the basal rate; endogenous leucine flux (an index of whole body protein degradation) decreased (P less than 0.01). In study three total leucine flux, leucine oxidation, and nonoxidative leucine disposal all increased significantly (P less than 0.01). In study four total leucine flux, leucine oxidation, and nonoxidative leucine disposal all increased (P less than 0.001), while endogenous leucine flux decreased (P less than 0.001). We conclude that: (a) hyperinsulinemia alone decreases plasma leucine concentration and inhibits endogenous leucine flux (protein breakdown), leucine oxidation, and nonoxidative leucine disposal (protein synthesis); (b) hyperaminoacidemia, whether in combination with hyperinsulinemia or with maintained basal insulin levels decreases endogenous leucine flux and stimulates both leucine oxidation and nonoxidative leucine disposal. PMID:3316280

  18. To ingest or rest? Specialized roles of lateral hypothalamic area neurons in coordinating energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Juliette A.; Woodworth, Hillary L.; Leinninger, Gina M.

    2015-01-01

    Survival depends on an organism’s ability to sense nutrient status and accordingly regulate intake and energy expenditure behaviors. Uncoupling of energy sensing and behavior, however, underlies energy balance disorders such as anorexia or obesity. The hypothalamus regulates energy balance, and in particular the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) is poised to coordinate peripheral cues of energy status and behaviors that impact weight, such as drinking, locomotor behavior, arousal/sleep and autonomic output. There are several populations of LHA neurons that are defined by their neuropeptide content and contribute to energy balance. LHA neurons that express the neuropeptides melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) or orexins/hypocretins (OX) are best characterized and these neurons play important roles in regulating ingestion, arousal, locomotor behavior and autonomic function via distinct neuronal circuits. Recently, another population of LHA neurons containing the neuropeptide Neurotensin (Nts) has been implicated in coordinating anorectic stimuli and behavior to regulate hydration and energy balance. Understanding the specific roles of MCH, OX and Nts neurons in harmonizing energy sensing and behavior thus has the potential to inform pharmacological strategies to modify behaviors and treat energy balance disorders. PMID:25741247

  19. Long-term leucine induced stimulation of muscle protein synthesis is amino acid dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infusing leucine for 1 h increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the neonate, but this is not sustained for 2 h unless the corresponding fall in amino acids is prevented. This study aimed to determine whether a continuous leucine infusion can stimulate protein synthesis for a prolonged period...

  20. Differential effects of long-term leucine infusion on tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine is unique among the amino acids in its ability to promote protein synthesis by activating translation initiation via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Previously, we showed that leucine infusion acutely stimulates protein synthesis in fast-twitch glycolytic muscle of neonatal...

  1. Prolonged stimulation of protein synthesis by leucine is dependent on amino acid availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine is unique among the amino acids in its ability to enhance protein synthesis by activating translation initiation (Kimball and Jefferson, 2005). Our laboratory has shown that raising leucine to postprandial levels, whilst keeping all other amino acids at the post absorptive, level acutely st...

  2. Triennial growth symposium: Leucine acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial increases in AA and insulin independently stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of piglets. Leucine is an important mediator of the response to AA. We have shown that the postprandial increase in leucine, but not isoleucine or valine, acutely stimulates muscle protein synth...

  3. Genetically encoded FRET-based nanosensor for in vivo measurement of leucine.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Mohd; Abdin, M Z; Nischal, Lata; Kardam, Hemant; Ahmad, Altaf

    2013-12-15

    Besides fundamental role in protein synthesis, leucine has metabolic roles as energy substrates, precursors for synthesis of other amino acids and as a modulator of muscle protein synthesis via the insulin-signaling pathway. Leucine concentration in cell and tissue is temporally dynamic as the metabolism of leucine is regulated through multiple enzymes and transporters. Assessment of cell-type specific activities of transporters and enzymes by physical fractionation is extremely challenging. Therefore, a method of reporting leucine dynamics at the cellular level is highly desirable. Given this, we developed a series of genetically encoded nanosensors for real-time in vivo measurement of leucine at cellular level. A leucine binding periplasmic binding protein (LivK) of Escherichia coli K12 was flanked with CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) and YFP (yellow fluorescent protein) at N-terminus and C-terminus, respectively. The constructed nanosensors allowed in vitro determination of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) changes in a concentration-dependent manner. These sensors were found to be specific to leucine, and stable to pH-changes within a physiological range. Genetically encoded sensors can be targeted to a specific cell type, and allow dynamic measurement of leucine concentration in bacterial and yeast cells.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium glutamicum CP, a Chinese l-leucine producing strain.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yongli; Ma, Yuechao; Xu, Qingyang; Zhang, Chenglin; Xie, Xixian; Chen, Ning

    2016-02-20

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium glutamicum CP, an industrial l-leucine producing strain in China. The whole genome consists of a circular chromosome and a plasmid. The comparative genomics analysis shows that there are many mutations in the key enzyme coding genes relevant to l-leucine biosynthesis compared to C. glutamicum ATCC 13032.

  5. Leucine Modulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and SIRT1-AMPK Signaling in C2C12 Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chunzi; Curry, Benjamin J.; Brown, Patricia L.; Zemel, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrate that dietary leucine protects against high fat diet-induced mitochondrial impairments and stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis and energy partitioning from adipocytes to muscle cells through SIRT1-mediated mechanisms. Moreover, β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate (HMB), a metabolite of leucine, has been reported to activate AMPK synergistically with resveratrol in C2C12 myotubes. Therefore, we hypothesize that leucine-induced activation of SIRT1 and AMPK is the central event that links the upregulated mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. Thus, C2C12 myotubes were treated with leucine (0.5 mM), alanine (0.5 mM), valine (0.5 mM), EX527 (SIRT1 inhibitor, 25 μM), and Compound C (AMPK inhibitor, 25 μM) alone or in combination to determine the roles of AMPK and SIRT1 in leucine-modulation of energy metabolism. Leucine significantly increased mitochondrial content, mitochondrial biogenesis-related genes expression, fatty acid oxidation, SIRT1 activity and gene expression, and AMPK phosphorylation in C2C12 myotubes compared to the controls, while EX527 and Compound C markedly attenuated these effects. Furthermore, leucine treatment for 24 hours resulted in time-dependent increases in cellular NAD+, SIRT1 activity, and p-AMPK level, with SIRT1 activation preceding that of AMPK, indicating that leucine activation of SIRT1, rather than AMPK, is the primary event. PMID:25400942

  6. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by leucine is dependent on plasma amino acid availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have reported that a physiological increase in plasma leucine increased translation initiation factor activity during 60- and 120-min leucine infusion. Muscle protein synthesis was stimulated at 60 min but not at 120 min, perhaps due to the decrease (-50%) in plasma essential amino acids (AA). ...

  7. Kinetic Behavior of Leucine and Other Amino Acids Modulating Cognitive Performance via mTOR Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-02

    Acid BBB Transporter Type Structure Leucine L1 Essential Neutral Non-polar (hydrophobic) Branched chain Aspartic Acid Acidic X- Acidic Polar Glutamine...compared with other tissues. • Effects of leucine on other amino acids were analyzed. Those measured were aspartic acid , glutamic acid, serine, histidine

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of the heterodimerization of leucine zippers of Jun and Fos transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Seldeen, Kenneth L.; McDonald, Caleb B.; Deegan, Brian J.

    2008-10-31

    Jun and Fos are components of the AP1 family of transcription factors and bind to the promoters of a diverse multitude of genes involved in critical cellular responses such as cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle regulation, embryonic development and cancer. Here, using the powerful technique of isothermal titration calorimetry, we characterize the thermodynamics of heterodimerization of leucine zippers of Jun and Fos. Our data suggest that the heterodimerization of leucine zippers is driven by enthalpic forces with unfavorable entropy change at physiological temperatures. Furthermore, the basic regions appear to modulate the heterodimerization of leucine zippers and may undergo at least partial folding upon heterodimerization. Large negative heat capacity changes accompanying the heterodimerization of leucine zippers are consistent with the view that leucine zippers do not retain {alpha}-helical conformations in isolation and that the formation of the native coiled-coil {alpha}-helical dimer is attained through a coupled folding-dimerization mechanism.

  9. Dietary L-leucine improves the anemia in a mouse model for Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaako, Pekka; Debnath, Shubhranshu; Olsson, Karin; Bryder, David; Flygare, Johan; Karlsson, Stefan

    2012-09-13

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by a functional haploinsufficiency of genes encoding for ribosomal proteins. Recently, a case study reported a patient who became transfusion-independent in response to treatment with the amino acid L-leucine. Therefore, we have validated the therapeutic effect of L-leucine using our recently generated mouse model for RPS19-deficient DBA. Administration of L-leucine significantly improved the anemia in Rps19-deficient mice (19% improvement in hemoglobin concentration; 18% increase in the number of erythrocytes), increased the bone marrow cellularity, and alleviated stress hematopoiesis. Furthermore, the therapeutic response to L-leucine appeared specific for Rps19-deficient hematopoiesis and was associated with down-regulation of p53 activity. Our study supports the rationale for clinical trials of L-leucine as a therapeutic agent for DBA.

  10. Hypothalamic inflammation in the control of metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Valdearcos, Martin; Xu, Allison W; Koliwad, Suneil K

    2015-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity leads to devastating and common chronic diseases, fueling ongoing interest in determining new mechanisms underlying both obesity and its consequences. It is now well known that chronic overnutrition produces a unique form of inflammation in peripheral insulin target tissues, and efforts to limit this inflammation have met with some success in preserving insulin sensitivity in obese individuals. Recently, the activation of inflammatory pathways by dietary excess has also been observed among cells located in the mediobasal hypothalamus, a brain area that exerts central control over peripheral glucose, fat, and energy metabolism. Here we review progress in the field of diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation, drawing key distinctions between metabolic inflammation in the hypothalamus and that occurring in peripheral tissues. We focus on specific stimuli of the inflammatory response, the roles of individual hypothalamic cell types, and the links between hypothalamic inflammation and metabolic function under normal and pathophysiological circumstances. Finally, we explore the concept of controlling hypothalamic inflammation to mitigate metabolic disease.

  11. The effect of spaceflight on retino-hypothalamic tract development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Tang, I. H.; Fuller, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers examined the effect of late prenatal exposure to microgravity on the development of the retina, retinohypothalamic tract, geniculo-hypothalamic tract, and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Results indicate an effect on c-fos activity in the intergeniculate leaflet between gestational day 20 and postnatal day 8, suggesting a delay in development of the circadian timing system.

  12. Stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation for hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic seizures.

    PubMed

    Homma, Junpei; Kameyama, Shigeki; Masuda, Hiroshi; Ueno, Takehiko; Fujimoto, Ayataka; Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi

    2007-08-01

    Management of hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic epilepsy remains controversial. We have used stereotactic thermocoagulation for treatment of hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic epilepsy since 1997. Herein, we review our experience in five cases to clarify the usefulness of this treatment. A total of five patients with hypothalamic hamartoma were treated by stereotactic thermocoagulation at our hospital during the period October 1997 through February 2004. In all patients, the hamartoma was less than 10mm in diameter and was located on the floor of the third ventricle with sessile attachment to the wall. To identify ictal onset, chronic intracranial electroencephalography was performed in three patients with the use of a depth electrode implanted in the hamartoma. Attempts were made to induce gelastic seizure by electrical stimulation of the hamartoma in three patients. After magnetic resonance imaging-guided targeting, radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the boundary between the hamartoma and normal hypothalamus was performed to achieve disconnection effects. Marked reductions in seizure frequency were obtained in all cases, with three patients becoming seizure-free after the procedure. No intraoperative complications occurred except in one patient who experienced acute and transient panidrosis with hot flushes during coagulation. Our results suggest that stereotactic thermocoagulation of hypothalamic hamartoma is an acceptable treatment option for patients with intractable gelastic seizures.

  13. Effect of leucine uptake on hepatic and skeletal muscle gene expression in rats: a microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Wookwang

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to explore the physiological functions of leucine by exploring genes with leucine-dependent variability using DNA microarray. [Methods] Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 20) were separated into a HPD (30% High Protein Diet, n = 10) group and a NPD (0% Non Protein Diet, n = 10) group and fed a protein diet for 2 weeks. At the end of the 2-week period, the rats were fasted for 12-16 hours, further separated into subgroups within the HPD (Saline, n = 5, Leucine, n = 5) and NPD (Saline, n = 5, Leucine, n = 5) groups and administered with a leucine solution. The liver and muscles were harvested after 2 hours for RNA extraction. RNA purification from the isolated muscles and target gene identification using DNA chip were performed. The target gene was determined based on the results of the DNA chip experiment, and mRNA expression of the target gene was analyzed using Real-Time PCR. [Results] In the skeletal muscle, 27 genes were upregulated while 52 genes were down regulated after leucine administration in the NPD group. In the liver, 160 genes were up-regulated while 126 were down-regulated. The per2 gene was one of the genes with leucine-dependent induction in muscles and liver. [Conclusion] This study was performed to explore the physiological functions of leucine, however, a large number of genes showed variability. Therefore, it was difficult to definitively identify the genes linked with a particular physiological function. Various nutritional effects of leucine were observed. High variability in cytokines, receptors, and various membrane proteins were observed, which suggests that leucine functions as more than a nutrient. The interpretation may depend on investigators’ perspectives, therefore, discussion with relevant experts and the BCAA (Branched-Chain Amino Acids) society may be needed for effective utilization of this data. PMID:26244133

  14. Leucine improves protein nutritional status and regulates hepatic lipid metabolism in calorie-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, João Alfredo B; Nishimura, Luciana Sigueta; de Matos-Neto, Emídio Marques; Donato, Jose; Tirapegui, Julio

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have highlighted the potential of leucine supplementation for the treatment of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and obesity. Caloric restriction is a common approach to improve the health in diabetic and obese subjects. However, very few studies assessed the effects of leucine supplementation in calorie-restricted animals. Rats were subjected to a 30% calorie-restricted diet for 6 weeks to study the effects of leucine supplementation on protein status markers and lipid metabolism. Caloric restriction reduced the body weight. However, increased leucine intake preserved body lean mass and protein mass and improved protein anabolism as indicated by the increased circulating levels of albumin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and the liver expression of albumin and IGF-1 messenger RNA. Leucine supplementation also increased the circulating levels of interleukin-6 and leptin but did not affect the tumour necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 concentrations. Ketone bodies were increased in rats consuming a leucine-rich diet, but we observed no changes in cholesterol or triglycerides concentrations. Caloric restriction reduced the liver expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α and glucose-6-phosphatase, whereas leucine supplementation increased the liver expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA) reductase and sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1. A leucine-rich diet during caloric restriction preserved whole body protein mass and improved markers of protein anabolism. In addition, leucine modulated the hepatic lipid metabolism. These results indicate that increased leucine intake may be useful in preventing excessive protein waste in conditions of large weight loss.

  15. Glutamate formation via the leucine-to-glutamate pathway of rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schachter, David; Buteau, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The leucine-to-glutamate (Leu→Glu) pathway, which metabolizes the carbon atoms of l-leucine to form l-glutamate, was studied by incubation of rat tissue segments with l-[U-(14)C]leucine and estimation of the [(14)C]glutamate formed. Metabolism of the leucine carbon chain occurs in most rat tissues, but maximal activity of the Leu→Glu pathway for glutamate formation is limited to the thoracic aorta and pancreas. In rat aorta, the Leu→Glu pathway functions to relax the underlying smooth muscle; its functions in the pancreas are unknown. This report characterizes the Leu→Glu pathway of rat pancreas and develops methods to examine its functions. Pancreatic segments effect net formation of glutamate on incubation with l-leucine, l-glutamine, or a mix of 18 other plasma amino acids at their concentrations in normal rat plasma. Glutamate formed from leucine remains mainly in the tissue, whereas that from glutamine enters the medium. The pancreatic Leu→Glu pathway uses the leucine carbons for net glutamate formation; the α-amino group is not used; the stoichiometry is as follows: 1 mol of leucine yields 2 mol of glutamate (2 leucine carbons per glutamate) plus 2 mol of CO2. Comparison of the Leu→Glu pathway in preparations of whole pancreatic segments, isolated acini, and islets of Langerhans localizes it in the acini; relatively high activity is found in cultures of the AR42J cell line and very little in the INS-1 832/13 cell line. Pancreatic tissue glutamate concentration is homeostatically regulated in the range of ∼1-3 μmol/g wet wt. l-Valine and leucine ethyl, benzyl, and tert-butyl esters inhibit the Leu→Glu pathway without decreasing tissue total glutamate.

  16. Leucine supplementation via drinking water reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apoE null mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dai, Xiao-yan; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Ge-xin; Wang, Xian; Xu, Ming-jiang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent evidence suggests that the essential amino acid leucine may be involved in systemic cholesterol metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of leucine supplementation on the development of atherosclerosis in apoE null mice. Methods: ApoE null mice were fed with chow supplemented with leucine (1.5% w/v) in drinking water for 8 week. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions were examined using Oil Red O staining. Plasma lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were measured with fast protein liquid chromatography. Hepatic gene expression was detected using real-time PCR and Western blot analyses. Results: Leucine supplementation resulted in 57.6% reduction of aortic atherosclerotic lesion area in apoE null mice, accompanied by 41.2% decrease of serum LDL-C levels and 40.2% increase of serum HDL-C levels. The body weight, food intake and blood glucose level were not affected by leucine supplementation. Furthermore, leucine supplementation increased the expression of Abcg5 and Abcg8 (that were involved in hepatic cholesterol efflux) by 1.28- and 0.86-fold, respectively, and significantly increased their protein levels. Leucine supplementation also increased the expression of Srebf1, Scd1 and Pgc1b (that were involved in hepatic triglyceride metabolism) by 3.73-, 1.35- and 1.71-fold, respectively. Consequently, leucine supplementation resulted in 51.77% reduction of liver cholesterol content and 2.2-fold increase of liver triglyceride content. Additionally, leucine supplementation did not affect the serum levels of IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-12, but markedly decreased the serum level of MCP-1. Conclusion: Leucine supplementation effectively attenuates atherosclerosis in apoE null mice by improving the plasma lipid profile and reducing systemic inflammation. PMID:26687933

  17. Craniopharyngioma and hypothalamic injury: latest insights into consequent eating disorders and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Hermann L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Hypothalamic alterations, pathological or treatment induced, have major impact on prognosis in craniopharyngioma patients mainly because of consequent hypothalamic obesity. Recent insight in molecular genetics, treatment strategies, risk factors and outcomes associated with hypothalamic obesity provide novel therapeutic perspectives. This review includes relevant publications since 2013. Recent findings Recent findings confirm that alterations in posterior hypothalamic areas because of tumour location and/or treatment-related injuries are associated with severe hypothalamic obesity, reduced overall survival and impaired quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood-onset craniopharyngioma. However, eating disorders are observed because of hypothalamic obesity without clear disease-specific patterns. Treatment options for hypothalamic obesity are very limited. Treatment with invasive, nonreversible bariatric methods such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is most efficient in weight reduction, but controversial in the paediatric population because of medical, ethical, and legal considerations. Accordingly, treatment in craniopharyngioma should focus on prevention of (further) hypothalamic injury. Presurgical imaging for grading of hypothalamic involvement should be the basis for hypothalamus-sparing strategies conducted by experienced multidisciplinary teams. Summary Until a nonsurgical therapeutic option for hypothalamic obesity for paediatric patients is found, prevention of hypothalamic injury should be the preferred treatment strategy, conducted exclusively by experienced multidisciplinary teams. PMID:26574645

  18. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by prolonged parenteral infusion of leucine is dependent on amino acid availability in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial rise in amino acids, particularly leucine, stimulates muscle protein synthesis in neonates. Previously, we showed that a 1-h infusion of leucine increased protein synthesis, but this response was not sustained for 2 h unless the leucine-induced decrease in amino acids was prevented....

  19. Stimulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs by long-term infusion of leucine is amino acid dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infusing leucine for 1 hr increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs, but this is not sustained for 2 h unless the leucine-induced fall in amino acids is prevented. We aimed to determine whether continuous leucine infusion can stimulate protein synthesis for a prolonged period whe...

  20. Residues threonine 346 and leucine 352 are critical for the proper function of Bacillus kaustophilus leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Chi, Meng-Chun; Huang, Hsien-Ben; Liu, Jai-Shin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Liang, Wan-Chi; Lin, Long-Liu

    2006-07-01

    The importance of Thr-346 and Leu-352 residues in Bacillus kaustophilus leucine aminopeptidase (BkLAP) was explored by site-directed mutagenesis. The impact of substitutions at these positions was evaluated with His6-BkLAP fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. Substitution of Thr-346 with Tyr, Arg, and Leu, respectively, resulted in a dramatic reduction in LAP activity. A complete loss of activity was observed in L352E and L352R variants with the exception of L352 V, which retained approximately 60% of the wild-type activity. Zinc content analysis and protein modeling suggested that Thr-346 and Leu-352 of BkLAP play a role in maintaining the coordination environment for the zinc-binding residues.

  1. Functional diversification within the family of B-GATA transcription factors through the leucine-leucine-methionine domain.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Carina; Bastakis, Emmanouil; Ranftl, Quirin L; Mayer, Klaus F X; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2014-09-01

    The transcription of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GATA transcription factors GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON METABOLISM-INVOLVED (GNC) and GNC-LIKE (GNL)/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1 is controlled by several growth regulatory signals including light and the phytohormones auxin, cytokinin, and gibberellin. To date, GNC and GNL have been attributed functions in the control of germination, greening, flowering time, floral development, senescence, and floral organ abscission. GNC and GNL belong to the 11-member family of B-class GATA transcription factors that are characterized to date solely by their high sequence conservation within the GATA DNA-binding domain. The degree of functional conservation among the various B-class GATA family members is not understood. Here, we identify and examine B-class GATAs from Arabidopsis, tomato (Solanum lycopersicon), Brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon), and barley (Hordeum vulgare). We find that B-class GATAs from these four species can be subdivided based on their short or long N termini and the presence of the 13-amino acid C-terminal leucine-leucine-methionine (LLM) domain with the conserved motif LLM. Through overexpression analyses and by complementation of a gnc gnl double mutant, we provide evidence that the length of the N terminus may not allow distinguishing between the different B-class GATAs at the functional level. In turn, we find that the presence and absence of the LLM domain in the overexpressors has differential effects on hypocotyl elongation, leaf shape, and petiole length, as well as on gene expression. Thus, our analyses identify the LLM domain as an evolutionarily conserved domain that determines B-class GATA factor identity and provides a further subclassification criterion for this transcription factor family.

  2. Leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair of injured tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; Carlassara, Eduardo O C; Gonçalves, Dawit A; Abrahamsohn, Paulo A; Kettelhut, Isis C; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2014-09-29

    This study investigated the effect of leucine supplementation on the skeletal muscle regenerative process, focusing on the remodeling of connective tissue of the fast twitch muscle tibialis anterior (TA). Young male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine (1.35 g/kg per day); then, TA muscles from the left hind limb were cryolesioned and examined after 10 days. Although leucine supplementation induced increased protein synthesis, it was not sufficient to promote an increase in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of regenerating myofibers (p > 0.05) from TA muscles. However, leucine supplementation reduced the amount of collagen and the activation of phosphorylated transforming growth factor-β receptor type I (TβR-I) and Smad2/3 in regenerating muscles (p < 0.05). Leucine also reduced neonatal myosin heavy chain (MyHC-n) (p < 0.05), increased adult MyHC-II expression (p < 0.05) and prevented the decrease in maximum tetanic strength in regenerating TA muscles (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair and consequent function of regenerating TA through the attenuation of TβR-I and Smad2/3 activation. Therefore, future studies are warranted to investigate leucine supplementation as a nutritional strategy to prevent or attenuate muscle fibrosis in patients with several muscle diseases.

  3. Leucine deprivation inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cells via fatty acid synthase

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chunxia; Yin, Hongkun; Yu, Junjie; Chen, Shanghai; Fang, Jing; Guo, Feifan

    2016-01-01

    Substantial studies on fatty acid synthase (FASN) have focused on its role in regulating lipid metabolism and researchers have a great interest in treating cancer with dietary manipulation of amino acids. In the current study, we found that leucine deprivation caused the FASN-dependent anticancer effect. Here we showed that leucine deprivation inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In an in vivo tumor xenograft model, the leucine-free diet suppressed the growth of human breast cancer tumors and triggered widespread apoptosis of the cancer cells. Further study indicated that leucine deprivation decreased expression of lipogenic gene FASN in vitro and in vivo. Over-expression of FASN or supplementation of palmitic acid (the product of FASN action) blocked the effects of leucine deprivation on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, leucine deprivation suppressed the FASN expression via regulating general control non-derepressible (GCN)2 and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1C (SREBP1C). Taken together, our study represents proof of principle that anticancer effects can be obtained with strategies to deprive tumors of leucine via suppressing FASN expression, which provides important insights in prevention of breast cancer via metabolic intervention. PMID:27579768

  4. Increased IGFBP-1 phosphorylation in response to leucine deprivation is mediated by CK2 and PKC.

    PubMed

    Malkani, Niyati; Biggar, Kyle; Shehab, Majida Abu; Li, Shawn Shun-Cheng; Jansson, Thomas; Gupta, Madhulika B

    2016-04-15

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), secreted by fetal liver, is a key regulator of IGF-I bioavailability and fetal growth. IGFBP-1 phosphorylation decreases IGF-I bioavailability and diminishes its growth-promoting effects. Growth-restricted fetuses have decreased levels of circulating essential amino acids. We recently showed that IGFBP-1 hyperphosphorylation (pSer101/119/169) in response to leucine deprivation is regulated via activation of the amino acid response (AAR) in HepG2 cells. Here we investigated nutrient-sensitive protein kinases CK2/PKC/PKA in mediating IGFBP-1 phosphorylation in leucine deprivation. We demonstrated that leucine deprivation stimulated CK2 activity (enzymatic assay) and induced IGFBP-1 phosphorylation (immunoblotting/MRM-MS). Inhibition (pharmacological/siRNA) of CK2/PKC, but not PKA, prevented IGFBP-1 hyperphosphorylation in leucine deprivation. PKC inhibition also prevented leucine deprivation-stimulated CK2 activity. Functionally, leucine deprivation decreased IGF-I-induced-IGF-1R autophosphorylation when CK2/PKC were not inhibited. Our data strongly support that PKC promotes leucine deprivation-induced IGFBP-1 hyperphosphorylation via CK2 activation, mechanistically linking decreased amino acid availability and reduced fetal growth.

  5. L-Leucine for gold nanoparticles synthesis and their cytotoxic effects evaluation.

    PubMed

    Berghian-Grosan, Camelia; Olenic, Liliana; Katona, Gabriel; Perde-Schrepler, Maria; Vulcu, Adriana

    2014-11-01

    This work reports the preparation of water-soluble leucine capped gold nanoparticles by two single-step synthesis methods. The first procedure involves a citrate reduction approach where the citrate is used as reducing agent and leucine as capping/stabilizing agent. Different sizes of gold nanoparticles, citrate reduced and stabilized by leucine, Leu-AuNPs-C, with the mean diameters in the range of 21-56 nm, were obtained by varying the macroscopic parameters such as: concentration of the gold precursor solution, Au (III):citrate molar ratio and leucine pH. In the second procedure, leucine acts both as reducing and stabilizing agent, allowing us to obtain spherical gold nanoparticles, Leu-AuNPs, with a majority of 80 % (with the mean diameter of 63 nm). This proves that leucine is an appropriate reductant for the formation of water-soluble and stable gold nanoparticles colloids. The characterization of the leucine coated gold nanoparticles was carried out by TEM, UV-Vis and FT-IR analysis. The cytotoxic effect of Leu-AuNPs-C and Leu-AuNPs was also evaluated.

  6. Purification and identification of a novel leucine aminopeptidase from Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis.

    PubMed

    Cahan, Rivka; Hetzroni, Efrat; Nisnevitch, Marina; Nitzan, Yeshayahu

    2007-11-01

    A novel leucine aminopeptidase was purified from a Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) culture. The purification stages included heating the concentrated supernatant to 65 degrees C for 90 min, anion-exchange chromatography by DEAE cellulose, and hydrophobic chromatography by phenyl Sepharose. The specific activity of leucine aminopeptidase after the hydrophobic chromatography increased by 215.5-fold and the yield was 16%. The molecular weight of the active enzyme was 59 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis of the 59-kDa leucine aminopeptidase revealed that this protein has at least 41% homology with the cytosol leucine aminopeptidase produced by Bacillus cereus. Maximal leucine aminopeptidase activity occurred at 65 degrees C, pH 10 toward leucine as the amino acid terminus. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by bestatin, dithiothreitol, and 1,10-phenanthroline, indicating that the enzyme might be considered as a metallo-aminopeptidase that has disulfide bonds at the catalytic site or at a region that influences its configuration. Examination of the purified leucine aminopeptidase's effect on the activation of the protoxin Cyt1Aa from Bti revealed that when it acts synergistically with Bti endogenous proteases, it has only a minor role in the processing of Cyt1Aa into an active toxin.

  7. Lack of protective efficacy in buffaloes vaccinated with Fasciola gigantica leucine aminopeptidase and peroxiredoxin recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Raina, O K; Nagar, Gaurav; Varghese, Anju; Prajitha, G; Alex, Asha; Maharana, B R; Joshi, P

    2011-06-01

    Gene coding for leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), a metalloprotease, was identified in the tropical liver fluke, Fasciola gigantica; that on sequence analysis showed a close homology (98.6%) with leucine aminopeptidase of the temperate liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica. The recombinant leucine aminopeptidase protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. F. gigantica peroxiredoxin, a hydrogen peroxide scavenger and an immunomodulating protein, was also cloned and expressed in E. coli. A vaccination trial in buffaloes was conducted with these two recombinant proteins, with 150 and 300 μg of leucine aminopeptidase and a cocktail of 150 μg each of recombinant leucine aminopeptidase and peroxiredoxin in three groups, respectively. Both Th1- and Th2-associated humoral immune responses were elicited to immunization with these antigens. A challenge study with 400 metacercariae did not show a significant protection in terms of reduction in the worm burden (8.4%) or anti-fecundity/embryonation effect in the immunized groups, as to the non-immunized control animals. Our observations in this buffalo vaccination trial are contrary to the earlier promise shown by leucine aminopeptidase of F. hepatica as a leading candidate vaccine molecule. Identification of leucine aminopeptidase gene and evaluation of the protein for its protective efficacy in buffaloes is the first scientific report on this protein in F. gigantica.

  8. A Leucine Zipper Motif Essential for Gating of Hyperpolarization-activated Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Silbernagel, Nicole; Marzian, Stefanie; Netter, Michael F.; Rinné, Susanne; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Decher, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are pacemakers in cardiac myocytes and neurons. Although their membrane topology closely resembles that of voltage-gated K+ channels, the mechanism of their unique gating behavior in response to hyperpolarization is still poorly understood. We have identified a highly conserved leucine zipper motif in the S5 segment of HCN family members. In order to study the role of this motif for channel function, the leucine residues of the zipper were individually mutated to alanine, arginine, or glutamine residues. Leucine zipper mutants traffic to the plasma membrane, but the channels lose their sensitivity to open upon hyperpolarization. Thus, our data indicate that the leucine zipper is an important molecular determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. Residues of the leucine zipper interact with the adjacent S6 segment of the channel. This interaction is essential for voltage-dependent gating of the channel. The lower part of the leucine zipper, at the intracellular mouth of the channel, is important for stabilizing the closed state. Mutations at these sites increase current amplitudes or result in channels with deficient closing and increased min-Po. Our data are further supported by homology models of the open and closed state of the HCN2 channel pore. Thus, we conclude that the leucine zipper of HCN channels is a major determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. PMID:23048023

  9. The role of hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling in insulin regulation of food intake, body weight, and sympathetic nerve activity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Muta, Kenjiro; Morgan, Donald A; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-04-01

    Insulin action in the brain particularly the hypothalamus is critically involved in the regulation of several physiological processes, including energy homeostasis and sympathetic nerve activity, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is implicated in the control of diverse cellular functions, including sensing nutrients and energy status. Here, we examined the role of hypothalamic mTORC1 in mediating the anorectic, weight-reducing, and sympathetic effects of central insulin action. In a mouse hypothalamic cell line (GT1-7), insulin treatment increased mTORC1 activity in a time-dependent manner. In addition, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of insulin to mice activated mTORC1 pathway in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, a key site of central action of insulin. Interestingly, inhibition of hypothalamic mTORC1 with rapamycin reversed the food intake- and body weight-lowering effects of ICV insulin. Rapamycin also abolished the ability of ICV insulin to cause lumbar sympathetic nerve activation. In GT1-7 cells, we found that insulin activation of mTORC1 pathway requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Consistent with this, genetic disruption of PI3K in mice abolished insulin stimulation of hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling as well as the lumbar sympathetic nerve activation evoked by insulin. These results demonstrate the importance of mTORC1 pathway in the hypothalamus in mediating the action of insulin to regulate energy homeostasis and sympathetic nerve traffic. Our data also highlight the key role of PI3K as a link between insulin receptor and mTORC1 signaling in the hypothalamus.

  10. Design and characterization of short antimicrobial peptides using leucine zipper templates with selectivity towards microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aqeel; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, Jitendra Kumar; Mishra, Nripendra N; Shukla, Praveen K; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2014-11-01

    Design of antimicrobial peptides with selective activity towards microorganisms is an important step towards the development of new antimicrobial agents. Leucine zipper sequence has been implicated in cytotoxic activity of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides; moreover, this motif has been utilized for the design of novel antimicrobial peptides with modulated cytotoxicity. To understand further the impact of substitution of amino acids at 'a' and/or 'd' position of a leucine zipper sequence of an antimicrobial peptides on its antimicrobial and cytotoxic properties four short peptides (14-residue) were designed on the basis of a leucine zipper sequence without or with replacement of leucine residues in its 'a' and 'd' positions with D-leucine or alanine or proline residue. The original short leucine zipper peptide (SLZP) and its D-leucine substituted analog, DLSA showed comparable activity against the tested Gram-positive and negative bacteria and the fungal strains. The alanine substituted analog (ASA) though showed appreciable activity against the tested bacteria, it showed to some extent lower activity against the tested fungi. However, the proline substituted analog (PSA) showed lower activity against the tested bacterial or fungal strains. Interestingly, DLSA, ASA and PSA showed significantly lower cytotoxicity than SLZP against both human red blood cells (hRBCs) and murine 3T3 cells. Cytotoxic and bactericidal properties of these peptides matched with peptide-induced damage/permeabilization of mammalian cells and bacteria or their mimetic lipid vesicles suggesting cell membrane could be the target of these peptides. As evidenced by tryptophan fluorescence and acrylamide quenching studies the peptides showed similarities either in interaction or in their localization within the bacterial membrane mimetic negatively charged lipid vesicles. Only SLZP showed localization inside the mammalian membrane mimetic zwitterionic lipid vesicles. The results show

  11. Enhanced Incorporation of 3-Hydroxy-4-Methylvalerate Unit into Biosynthetic Polyhydroxyalkanoate Using Leucine as a Precursor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha PHB-4 expressing Pseudomonas sp. 61-3 polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase 1 (PhaC1Ps) synthesizes PHA copolymer containing 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and a small amount (0.5 mol%) of 3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate (3H4MV) from fructose as a carbon source. In this study, enhanced incorporation of 3H4MV into PHA was investigated using branched amino acid leucine as a precursor of 3H4MV. Leucine has the same carbon backbone as 3H4MV and is expected to be a natural and self-producible precursor. We found that the incorporation of 3H4MV was enhanced by the supplementation of excess amount (10 g/L) of leucine in the culture medium. This finding indicates that 3H4MV can be derived from leucine. To increase metabolic flux to leucine biosynthesis in the host strain by eliminating the feedback inhibition, the cells were subjected to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG) mutagenesis and leucine analog resistant mutants were generated. The mutants showed statistically higher 3H4MV fraction than the parent strain without supplementing leucine. Additionally, by supplying excess amount of leucine, the mutants synthesized 3HB-based PHA copolymer containing 3.1 mol% 3H4MV and 1.2 mol% 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) as minor constituents, which significantly affected the thermal properties of the copolymer. This study demonstrates that it is possible to enhance the monomer supply of 3H4MV into PHA by manipulating leucine metabolism. PMID:21906338

  12. Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal responsiveness in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Grinevich, V; Ma, X M; Verbalis, J; Aguilera, G

    2001-10-01

    The differential effects of osmotic stimulation on magnocellular and parvocellular hypothalamic neurons were studied by analysis of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (VP) expression in controls and 48-h water-deprived rats subjected to either restraint for 1 h or a single lipopolysaccharide injection (250 microg/100 g). Water deprivation reduced basal CRH mRNA levels but the increments following 4 h of restraint or 6 h lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection were similar to those in controls. In contrast, water deprivation had no effect on basal VP heteronuclear RNA (hnRNA) and mRNA levels in parvocellular neurons, but responses to restraint or LPS injection were reduced. VP expression in magnocellular paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei, and plasma sodium and vasopressin were higher in water-deprived rats, changes which were unaffected by restraint. LPS injection reduced VP mRNA but not hnRNA levels in magnocellular neurons and increased plasma vasopressin levels only in water-deprived rats independently of changes in plasma sodium. This was accompanied by an increase in vasopressin mRNA content in the posterior pituitary. The data show that the blunted ACTH responses to acute stress during chronic osmotic stimulation are correlated with the inability of parvocellular neurons to increase VP rather than CRH expression. In addition, LPS-induced endotoxemia causes disturbances of the magnocellular vasopressinergic system with an unexpected potentiation of osmotic simulated VP secretion. The lack of increase in VP transcription after LPS and changes in VP mRNA distribution suggest that endotoxemia affect the secretory process at the levels of the neurohypophyseal axon terminal.

  13. Glial glucokinase expression in adult and post-natal development of the hypothalamic region.

    PubMed

    Millán, Carola; Martínez, Fernando; Cortés-Campos, Christian; Lizama, Isabel; Yañez, Maria Jose; Llanos, Paula; Reinicke, Karin; Rodríguez, Federico; Peruzzo, Bruno; Nualart, Francisco; García, Maria Angeles

    2010-05-25

    It has recently been proposed that hypothalamic glial cells sense glucose levels and release lactate as a signal to activate adjacent neurons. GK (glucokinase), the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic beta-cells, is also expressed in the hypothalamus. However, it has not been clearly determined if glial and/or neuronal cells express this protein. Interestingly, tanycytes, the glia that cover the ventricular walls of the hypothalamus, are in contact with CSF (cerebrospinal fluid), the capillaries of the arcuate nucleus and adjacent neurons; this would be expected for a system that can detect and communicate changes in glucose concentration. Here, we demonstrated by Western-blot analysis, QRT-PCR [quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR)] and in situ hybridization that GK is expressed in tanycytes. Confocal microscopy and immuno-ultrastructural analysis revealed that GK is localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm of beta1-tanycytes. Furthermore, GK expression increased in these cells during the second week of post-natal development. Based on this evidence, we propose that tanycytes mediate, at least in part, the mechanism by which the hypothalamus detects changes in glucose concentrations.

  14. Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin processing and the regulation of energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play a key role in regulating energy balance and neuroendocrine function. Much attention has been focused on regulation of POMC gene expression with less emphasis on regulated peptide processing. This is particularly important given the complexity of posttranslational POMC processing which is essential for the generation of biologically active MSH peptides. Mutations that impair POMC sorting and processing are associated with obesity in humans and in animals. Specifically, mutations in the POMC processing enzymes prohormone convertase 1/3 (PCI/3) and in carboxypeptidase E (CPE) and in the α-MSH degrading enzyme, PRCP, are associated with changes in energy balance. There is increasing evidence that POMC processing is regulated with respect to energy balance. Studies have implicated both the leptin and insulin signaling pathways in the regulation of POMC at various steps in the processing pathway. This article will review the role of hypothalamic POMC in regulating energy balance with a focus on POMC processing. PMID:21208604

  15. Hypothalamic ER stress: A bridge between leptin resistance and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Sara; Claret, Marc

    2015-06-22

    The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide at an alarming rate. However, non-invasive pharmacological treatments remain elusive. Leptin resistance is a general feature of obesity, thus strategies aimed at enhancing the sensitivity to this hormone may constitute an excellent therapeutical approach to counteract current obesity epidemics. Nevertheless, the etiology and neuronal basis of leptin resistance remains an enigma. A recent hypothesis gaining substantial experimental support is that hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a causal role in the development of leptin resistance and obesity. The objective of this review article is to provide an updated view on current evidence connecting hypothalamic ER stress with leptin resistance. We discuss the experimental findings supporting this hypothesis, as well as the potential causes and underlying mechanisms leading to this metabolic disorder. Understanding these mechanisms may provide key insights into the development of novel intervention approaches.

  16. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zorzano, Antonio; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1) cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA). Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction. PMID:26113818

  17. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  18. Hypothalamic pituitary disorders expressed by galactorrhea. A dynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Perez-Lopez, F R

    1975-11-01

    Physiologic and pathologic production of milk involves complex relations between the mammary glands, hormones, and the central nervous system. In all the galactorrhea syndromes there is a functional or mechanical problem at the pituitary level, with abnormal secretion or reserve of prolactin secretion. Stimulatory agents of prolactin, like thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), chlorpromazine, amnio acids, and insulin, can be helpful in the study of the hypothalamic pituitary functional reserve, while the osmotic tests seem to provide a clear distinction between functional and tumoral causes. The inhibitory agents of prolactin secretion, L-dopa and CB 154, permit the study of the negative control of the hormone. In addition, CB 154 appears to be an effective treatment for functional galactorrhea. Hyperprolactinemia appears to exert an inhibitory influence on gonadotropins. Clomiphene, acting on the hypothalamus, and LHRH, acting on the gonadotropes, permit the assessment of the gonadotropic hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis.

  19. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function during perinatal depression.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Phillipe Leff; Flores-Ramos, Mónica; López-Martínez, Margarita; Fuentes, Carlos Cruz; Grajeda, Juan Pablo Reyes

    2015-06-01

    Abnormal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is an important pathological finding in pregnant women exhibiting major depressive disorder. They show high levels of cortisol pro-inflammatory cytokines, hypothalamic-pituitary peptide hormones and catecholamines, along with low dehydroepiandrosterone levels in plasma. During pregnancy, the TH2 balance together with the immune system and placental factors play crucial roles in the development of the fetal allograft to full term. These factors, when altered, may generate a persistent dysfunction of the HPA axis that may lead to an overt transfer of cortisol and toxicity to the fetus at the expense of reduced activity of placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2. Epigenetic modifications also may contribute to the dysregulation of the HPA axis. Affective disorders in pregnant women should be taken seriously, and therapies focused on preventing the deleterious effects of stressors should be implemented to promote the welfare of both mother and baby.

  20. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks: effects of dietary leucine and age.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huiling; Zheng, Aijuan; Liu, Guohua; Chang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is necessary for cellular protein synthesis regulation. Leucine was reported to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in mammalian embryos and neonates, but in higher animals (chickens) the effect of dietary leucine on mTOR signaling is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effects of dietary leucine and age on mRNA expression and phosphorylation of mTOR as well as its downstream targets, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) in chick pectoral muscles. One hundred eighty newly hatched male chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary leucine treatment groups (1.43, 1.73, and 2.03% leucine) for 14 d, respectively. Each treatment group consisted of 6 cages with 10 chicks each. On d 3, 7, and 14, plasma insulin and leucine were measured and target gene expression and phosphorylation was assessed. Dietary leucine influenced plasma leucine but not insulin, and plasma leucine and insulin declined with chick age. The mTOR, S6K1, and 4E-BP1 mRNA expression and phosphorylation within chick pectoral muscles were upregulated with increased dietary leucine but downregulated with increased chick age. Thus, high dietary leucine activates target of rapamycin signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks to stimulate muscle protein synthesis, and this pathway is attenuated with aging.

  1. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Masumi

    2013-12-30

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates). Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrates known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol) feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir) GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTHβ mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  2. Regulation of the Immune System by Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Meyer, W.J. 1987. Decreased mononuclear leukocyte TSH secretion in patients with major depression. Abstr. Society for Neuroscience. 14. Smith, E.M...corticotropin (ACTH). Also, presented are results that the hypothalamic releasing hormones for luteinizing hormone (LH) and thyrotropin ( TSH ) induce...lymphocytes to synthesize immunoreactive LH and TSH , respectively. Finally, we discuss our data that the ACTH receptor on lymphoeytes acts through

  3. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  4. Hypothalamic stimulation and baroceptor reflex interaction on renal nerve activity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. F.; Ninomiya, I.; Franz, G. N.; Judy, W. V.

    1971-01-01

    The basal level of mean renal nerve activity (MRNA-0) measured in anesthetized cats was found to be modified by the additive interaction of hypothalamic and baroceptor reflex influences. Data were collected with the four major baroceptor nerves either intact or cut, and with mean aortic pressure (MAP) either clamped with a reservoir or raised with l-epinephrine. With intact baroceptor nerves, MRNA stayed essentially constant at level MRNA-0 for MAP below an initial pressure P1, and fell approximately linearly to zero as MAP was raised to P2. Cutting the baroceptor nerves kept MRNA at MRNA-0 (assumed to represent basal central neural output) independent of MAP. The addition of hypothalamic stimulation produced nearly constant increments in MRNA for all pressure levels up to P2, with complete inhibition at some level above P2. The increments in MRNA depended on frequency and location of the stimulus. A piecewise linear model describes MRNA as a linear combination of hypothalamic, basal central neural, and baroceptor reflex activity.

  5. Early life stress experience may blunt hypothalamic leptin signalling.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Yoo, S B; Kim, J Y; Lee, J Y; Kim, B T; Park, K; Jahng, J W

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether neonatal maternal separation (MS) - chronic stress experience in early life - affects the anorectic efficacy of leptin in the offspring at adolescence. Sprague-Dawley pups were separated from the dam daily for 3 h during postnatal day 1-14 or left undisturbed as non-handled controls (NH). NH and MS male pups received an intraperitoneal leptin (100 μg/kg) or saline on postnatal day (PND) 28, and then food intake and body weight gain were recorded. The hypothalamic levels of leptin-signalling-related genes, phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3) and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) were examined at 40 min after a single injection of leptin on PND 39 by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Leptin-induced suppressions in food intake and weight gain was observed in NH pups, but not in MS. Leptin increased pSTAT3 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of NH pups, but not of MS. Interestingly, basal levels of the hypothalamic PTP1B and pSTAT3 were increased in MS pups compared with NH controls. The results suggest that neonatal MS experience may blunt the anorectic efficacy of leptin later in life, possibly in relation with increased expressions of PTP1B and/or pSTAT3 in the hypothalamus.

  6. Effects of undernourishment on the hypothalamic orexinergic system.

    PubMed

    Pinos, H; Pérez-Izquierdo, M A; Carrillo, B; Collado, P

    2011-01-10

    The present study examined the effects of a severely restricted diet during the pre- and postnatal periods with later nutritional rehabilitation on orexin hypothalamic neurons in male and female Wistar rats. Immunocytochemistry was used to reveal orexin-immunoreactive (orexin-ir) cells in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), lateral hypothalamic area (LH) and the perifornical nucleus (PF). Dietary restriction decreased the number of orexin-ir cells in the LH, whereas DMH or PF orexin-ir populations were not affected in either male or female rats. Nutritional rehabilitation resulted in a differential recovery that depended on the period during which rehabilitation occurred and on the sex of the animal. In summary, our study suggests that the hypothalamic nuclei implicated in eating behavior present a differential vulnerability to adverse environmental conditions during development. Specifically, among the studied nuclei only the LH orexin-ir cells were sensitive to severe food deprivation during development in male and female rats. These results suggest that starvation interferes with developmental events that occur during CNS sexual differentiation.

  7. Central apelin-13 administration modulates hypothalamic control of feeding.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, C; Orlando, G; Recinella, L; Leone, S; Chiavaroli, A; Di Nisio, C; Shohreh, R; Manippa, F; Ricciuti, A; Vacca, M; Brunetti, L

    2016-01-01

    The 77 amino prepropeptide apelin has been isolated from bovine stomach tissue and several smaller fragments, including apelin-13, showed high affinity for the orphan APJ receptor. The distribution of apelinergic fibers and receptors in the hypothalamus may suggest a role of apelin-13 on energy balance regulation, albeit the studies reporting the acute effects of apelin on feeding control are inconsistent. Considering the possible involvement of apelinergic system on hypothalamic appetite controlling network, in the present study we evaluated in the rat the effects of intrahypothalamic apelin-13 injection on food intake and the involvement of orexigenic and anorexigenic hypothalamic peptides and neurotransmitters. Eighteen rats (6 for each group of treatment) were injected into the ARC with either vehicle or apelin-13 (1-2 μg/rat). Food intake and hypothalamic peptide and neurotransmitter levels were evaluated 2 and 24 h after injection. Compared to vehicle, apelin-13 administration increased food intake both 2 and 24 h following treatment. This effect could be related to inhibited cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) gene expression and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) synthesis and release, and increased orexin A gene expression in the hypothalamus.

  8. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea — diagnostic challenges, monitoring, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sowińska-Przepiera, Elżbieta; Andrysiak-Mamos, Elżbieta; Jarząbek-Bielecka, Grażyna; Walkowiak, Aleksandra; Osowicz-Korolonek, Lilianna; Syrenicz, Małgorzata; Kędzia, Witold; Syrenicz, Anhelli

    2015-01-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (FHA) is associated with functional inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Causes of FHA can be classified into the three groups: 1) stress-related factors, 2) consequences of weight loss and/or underweight, and 3) consequences of physical exercise or practicing sports. Diagnosis of FHA should be based on a history of menstrual disorders. During physical examination, patients with FHA present with secondary and tertiary sex characteristics specific for the pubertal stage preceding development of the condition and with the signs of hypoestrogenism. Laboratory results determine further management of patients with amenorrhea, and thus their correct interpretation is vital for making appropriate therapeutic decisions. Treatment of chronic anovulation, menstrual disorders, and secondary amenorrhea resulting from hypothalamic disorders should be aimed at the elimination of the primary cause, i.e. a decrease in psycho-emotional strain, avoidance of chronic stressors, reduction of physical exercise level, or optimisation of BMI in patients who lose weight. If menses do not resume after a period of six months or primary causative treatment is not possible, neutralisation of hypoestrogenism consequences, especially unfavourable effects on bone metabolism, become the main issue. Previous studies have shown that oestroprogestagen therapy is useful in both the treatment of menstrual disorders and normalisation of bone mineral density. Hormonal preparations should be introduced into therapeutic protocol on an individualised basis.

  9. Effects of sugar solutions on hypothalamic appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Colley, Danielle L; Castonguay, Thomas W

    2015-02-01

    Several hypotheses for the causes of the obesity epidemic in the US have been proposed. One such hypothesis is that dietary intake patterns have significantly shifted to include unprecedented amounts of refined sugar. We set out to determine if different sugars might promote changes in the hypothalamic mechanisms controlling food intake by measuring several hypothalamic peptides subsequent to overnight access to dilute glucose, sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, or fructose solutions. Rats were given access to food, water and a sugar solution for 24h, after which blood and tissues were collected. Fructose access (as opposed to other sugars that were tested) resulted in a doubling of circulating triglycerides. Glucose consumption resulted in upregulation of 7 satiety-related hypothalamic peptides whereas changes in gene expression were mixed for remaining sugars. Also, following multiple verification assays, 6 satiety related peptides were verified as being affected by sugar intake. These data provide evidence that not all sugars are equally effective in affecting the control of intake.

  10. Hypothalamic leptin action is mediated by histone deacetylase 5

    PubMed Central

    Kabra, Dhiraj G.; Pfuhlmann, Katrin; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Schriever, Sonja C.; Casquero García, Veronica; Kebede, Adam Fiseha; Fuente-Martin, Esther; Trivedi, Chitrang; Heppner, Kristy; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Legutko, Beata; Kabra, Uma D.; Gao, Yuanqing; Yi, Chun-Xia; Quarta, Carmelo; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Finan, Brian; Müller, Timo D.; Meyer, Carola W.; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stemmer, Kerstin; Woods, Stephen C.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Schneider, Robert; Olson, Eric N.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Pfluger, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic leptin signalling has a key role in food intake and energy-balance control and is often impaired in obese individuals. Here we identify histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) as a regulator of leptin signalling and organismal energy balance. Global HDAC5 KO mice have increased food intake and greater diet-induced obesity when fed high-fat diet. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of HDAC5 activity in the mediobasal hypothalamus increases food intake and modulates pathways implicated in leptin signalling. We show HDAC5 directly regulates STAT3 localization and transcriptional activity via reciprocal STAT3 deacetylation at Lys685 and phosphorylation at Tyr705. In vivo, leptin sensitivity is substantially impaired in HDAC5 loss-of-function mice. Hypothalamic HDAC5 overexpression improves leptin action and partially protects against HFD-induced leptin resistance and obesity. Overall, our data suggest that hypothalamic HDAC5 activity is a regulator of leptin signalling that adapts food intake and body weight to our dietary environment. PMID:26923837

  11. Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper inhibits apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by doxorubicin

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, David; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M.

    2014-04-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an indispensable chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various forms of neoplasia such as lung, breast, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cardiotoxicity is a major concern for patients receiving Dox therapy. Previous work from our laboratory indicated that glucocorticoids (GCs) alleviate Dox-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Here we have found Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) to be a mediator of GC-induced cytoprotection. GILZ was found to be induced in cardiomyocytes by GC treatment. Knocking down of GILZ using siRNA resulted in cancelation of GC-induced cytoprotection against apoptosis by Dox treatment. Overexpressing GILZ by transfection was able to protect cells from apoptosis induced by Dox as measured by caspase activation, Annexin V binding and morphologic changes. Western blot analyses indicate that GILZ overexpression prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-3. When bcl-2 family proteins were examined, we found that GILZ overexpression causes induction of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL. Since siRNA against Bcl-xL reverses GC induced cytoprotection, Bcl-xL induction represents an important event in GILZ-induced cytoprotection. Our data suggest that GILZ functions as a cytoprotective gene in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • Corticosteroids act as a cytoprotective agent in cardiomyocytes • Corticosteroids induce GILZ expression in cardiomyocytes • Elevated GILZ results in resistance against apoptosis induced by doxorubicin • GILZ induces Bcl-xL protein without inducing Bcl-xL mRNA.

  12. Computer-aided design and activity prediction of leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grembecka, J.; Sokalski, W. A.; Kafarski, P.

    2000-08-01

    The Ligand Design (LUDI) approach has been used in order to design leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors, predict their activity and analyze their interactions with the enzyme. The investigation was based on the crystal structure of bovine lens leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) complexed with its inhibitor - the phosphonic acid analogue of leucine (LeuP). More than 50 potential leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors have been obtained, including the most potent aminophosphonic LAP inhibitors with experimentally known activity, which have been the subject of more detailed studies. A reasonable agreement between theoretical and experimental activities has been obtained for most of the studied inhibitors. Our results confirm that LUDI is a powerful tool for the design of enzyme inhibitors as well as in the prediction of their activity. In addition, for inhibitor-active site interactions dominated by the electrostatic effects it is possible to improve binding energy estimates by using a more accurate description of inhibitor charge distribution.

  13. Leucine incorporation into the membranellar bands of regenerating and nonregenerating stentor.

    PubMed

    de Terra, N

    1966-07-29

    Autoradiographs of membranellar bands isolated from regenerating and nonregenerating stentors labeled with tritiated leucine indicate that the synthesis of proteins of the oral apparatus is continuous in Stentor and is not initiated at the time of regeneration.

  14. Differential Assimilation of Inorganic Carbon and Leucine by Prochlorococcus in the Oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, Karin M.; Church, Matthew J.; Doggett, Joseph K.; Karl, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The light effect on photoheterotrophic processes in Prochlorococcus, and primary and bacterial productivity in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was investigated using 14C-bicarbonate and 3H-leucine. Light and dark incubation experiments were conducted in situ throughout the euphotic zone (0–175 m) on nine expeditions to Station ALOHA over a 3-year period. Photosynthetrons were also used to elucidate rate responses in leucine and inorganic carbon assimilation as a function of light intensity. Taxonomic group and cell-specific rates were assessed using flow cytometric sorting. The light:dark assimilation rate ratios of leucine in the top 150 m were ∼7:1 for Prochlorococcus, whereas the light:dark ratios for the non-pigmented bacteria (NPB) were not significant different from 1:1. Prochlorococcus assimilated leucine in the dark at per cell rates similar to the NPB, with a contribution to the total community bacterial production, integrated over the euphotic zone, of approximately 20% in the dark and 60% in the light. Depth-resolved primary productivity and leucine incorporation showed that the ratio of Prochlorococcus leucine:primary production peaked at 100 m then declined steeply below the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). The photosynthetron experiments revealed that, for Prochlorococcus at the DCM, the saturating irradiance (Ek) for leucine incorporation was reached at approximately half the light intensity required for light saturation of 14C-bicarbonate assimilation. Additionally, high and low red fluorescing Prochlorococcus populations (HRF and LRF), co-occurring at the DCM, had similar Ek values for their respective substrates, however, maximum assimilation rates, for both leucine and inorganic carbon, were two times greater for HRF cells. Our results show that Prochlorococcus contributes significantly to bacterial production estimates using 3H-leucine, whether or not the incubations are conducted in the dark or light, and this should be

  15. Differential Assimilation of Inorganic Carbon and Leucine by Prochlorococcus in the Oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Karin M; Church, Matthew J; Doggett, Joseph K; Karl, David M

    2015-01-01

    The light effect on photoheterotrophic processes in Prochlorococcus, and primary and bacterial productivity in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was investigated using (14)C-bicarbonate and (3)H-leucine. Light and dark incubation experiments were conducted in situ throughout the euphotic zone (0-175 m) on nine expeditions to Station ALOHA over a 3-year period. Photosynthetrons were also used to elucidate rate responses in leucine and inorganic carbon assimilation as a function of light intensity. Taxonomic group and cell-specific rates were assessed using flow cytometric sorting. The light:dark assimilation rate ratios of leucine in the top 150 m were ∼7:1 for Prochlorococcus, whereas the light:dark ratios for the non-pigmented bacteria (NPB) were not significant different from 1:1. Prochlorococcus assimilated leucine in the dark at per cell rates similar to the NPB, with a contribution to the total community bacterial production, integrated over the euphotic zone, of approximately 20% in the dark and 60% in the light. Depth-resolved primary productivity and leucine incorporation showed that the ratio of Prochlorococcus leucine:primary production peaked at 100 m then declined steeply below the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). The photosynthetron experiments revealed that, for Prochlorococcus at the DCM, the saturating irradiance (E k) for leucine incorporation was reached at approximately half the light intensity required for light saturation of (14)C-bicarbonate assimilation. Additionally, high and low red fluorescing Prochlorococcus populations (HRF and LRF), co-occurring at the DCM, had similar E k values for their respective substrates, however, maximum assimilation rates, for both leucine and inorganic carbon, were two times greater for HRF cells. Our results show that Prochlorococcus contributes significantly to bacterial production estimates using (3)H-leucine, whether or not the incubations are conducted in the dark or light, and this should

  16. Relationships between leucine and the pancreatic exocrine function for improving starch digestibility in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Liu, Y; Liu, S M; Xu, M; Yu, Z P; Wang, X; Cao, Y C; Yao, J H

    2015-04-01

    Four Holstein heifers (215 ± 7 kg; means ± SD), fitted with one pancreatic pouch, duodenal re-entrant cannulas, and duodenal infusion catheters, were used in this experiment. In phase 1, the 24-h profile of pancreatic fluid was determined. Pancreatic fluid flow peaked 1h after feeding, but peaks of similar magnitude also occurred before the morning feed, necessitating 24-h collection of pancreatic fluid to estimate daily excretion. In phase 2, the effects of duodenal infusions of 0, 10, 20, or 30 g of leucine on pancreatic fluid flow were determined in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. The leucine was infused for 12h in 2,500 mL of the infusate, and samples of pancreatic fluid and jugular blood were collected in 1-h intervals from the beginning of the infusion for 36 h. The results showed that the secretion rate of pancreatic fluid (mL/h) was significantly higher in 10-g leucine group than the other groups (mL/h). Protein concentration (mg/mL) in pancreatic fluid was elevated proportional to the amount of leucine infused. Leucine infusions increased both the concentration (U/mL) and secretion rate (U/h) of α-amylase. Infusion of 10 g of leucine also increased the secretion rates (U/h) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and lipase, but did not change their concentrations. No significant effects of leucine infusions on plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were found. The results indicate that leucine could act as a nutrient signal to stimulate α-amylase production and pancreatic exocrine function in dairy heifers.

  17. Leucine induced dephosphorylation of Sestrin2 promotes mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Scot R; Gordon, Bradley S; Moyer, Jenna E; Dennis, Michael D; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2016-08-01

    The studies described herein were designed to explore the role of Sestrin2 in mediating the selective action of leucine to activate mTORC1. The results demonstrate that Sestrin2 is a phosphoprotein and that its phosphorylation state is responsive to the availability of leucine, but not other essential amino acids. Moreover, leucine availability-induced alterations in Sestrin2 phosphorylation correlated temporally and dose dependently with the activation state of mTORC1, there being a reciprocal relationship between the degree of phosphorylation of Sestrin2 and the extent of repression of mTORC1. With leucine deprivation, Sestrin2 became more highly phosphorylated and interacted more strongly with proteins of the GATOR2 complex. Notably, in cells lacking the protein kinase ULK1, the activation state of mTORC1 was elevated in leucine-deficient medium, such that the effect of re-addition of the amino acid was blunted. In contrast, overexpression of ULK1 led to hyperphosphorylation of Sestrin2 and enhanced its interaction with GATOR2. Neither rapamycin nor Torin2 had any effect on Sestrin2 phosphorylation, suggesting that leucine deprivation-induced repression of mTORC1 was not responsible for the action of ULK1 on Sestrin2. Mass spectrometry analysis of Sestrin2 revealed three phosphorylation sites that are conserved across mammalian species. Mutation of the three sites to phospho-mimetic amino acids in exogenously expressed Sestrin2 promoted its interaction with GATOR2 and dramatically repressed mTORC1 even in the presence of leucine. Overall, the results support a model in which leucine selectively promotes dephosphorylation of Sestrin2, causing it to dissociate from and thereby activate GATOR2, leading to activation of mTORC1.

  18. Isolation and characterization of awamori yeast mutants with L-leucine accumulation that overproduce isoamyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Hashida, Keisuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Nasuno, Ryo; Ohashi, Masataka; Iha, Tomoya; Nezuo, Maiko; Tsukahara, Masatoshi

    2015-02-01

    Awamori shochu is a traditional distilled alcoholic beverage made from steamed rice in Okinawa, Japan. Although it has a unique aroma that is distinguishable from that of other types of shochu, no studies have been reported on the breeding of awamori yeasts. In yeast, isoamyl alcohol (i-AmOH), known as the key flavor of bread, is mainly produced from α-ketoisocaproate in the pathway of L-leucine biosynthesis, which is regulated by end-product inhibition of α-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS). Here, we isolated mutants resistant to the L-leucine analog 5,5,5-trifluoro-DL-leucine (TFL) derived from diploid awamori yeast of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some of the mutants accumulated a greater amount of intracellular L-leucine, and among them, one mutant overproduced i-AmOH in awamori brewing. This mutant carried an allele of the LEU4 gene encoding the Ser542Phe/Ala551Val variant IPMS, which is less sensitive to feedback inhibition by L-leucine. Interestingly, we found that either of the constituent mutations (LEU4(S542F) and LEU4(A551V)) resulted in the TFL tolerance of yeast cells and desensitization to L-leucine feedback inhibition of IPMS, leading to intracellular L-leucine accumulation. Homology modeling also suggested that L-leucine binding was drastically inhibited in the Ser542Phe, Ala551Val, and Ser542Phe/Ala551Val variants due to steric hindrance in the cavity of IPMS. As we expected, awamori yeast cells expressing LEU4(S542F), LEU4(A551V), and LEU4(S542F/A551V) showed a prominent increase in extracellular i-AmOH production, compared with that of cells carrying the vector only. The approach described here could be a practical method for the breeding of novel awamori yeasts to expand the diversity of awamori taste and flavor.

  19. Orexin-A suppresses postischemic glucose intolerance and neuronal damage through hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Yui; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    Orexin-A (a glucose-sensing neuropeptide in the hypothalamus) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a member of the neurotrophin family) play roles in many physiologic functions, including regulation of glucose metabolism. We previously showed that the development of postischemic glucose intolerance is one of the triggers of ischemic neuronal damage. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was an interaction between orexin-A and BDNF functions in the hypothalamus after cerebral ischemic stress. Male ddY mice were subjected to 2 hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Neuronal damage was estimated by histologic and behavioral analyses. Expression of protein levels was analyzed by Western blot. Small interfering RNA directed BDNF, orexin-A, and SB334867 [N-(2-methyl-6-benzoxazolyl)-N'-1,5-naphthyridin-4-yl urea; a specific orexin-1 receptor antagonist] were administered directly into the hypothalamus. The level of hypothalamic orexin-A, detected by immunohistochemistry, was decreased on day 1 after MCAO. Intrahypothalamic administration of orexin-A (1 or 5 pmol/mouse) significantly and dose-dependently suppressed the development of postischemic glucose intolerance on day 1 and development of neuronal damage on day 3. The MCAO-induced decrease in insulin receptor levels in the liver and skeletal muscle on day 1 was recovered to control levels by orexin-A, and this effect of orexin-A was reversed by the administration of SB334867 as well as by hypothalamic BDNF knockdown. These results suggest that suppression of postischemic glucose intolerance by orexin-A assists in the prevention of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. In addition, hypothalamic BDNF may play an important role in this effect of orexin-A.

  20. Stimulation of mTORC1 with L-leucine Rescues Defects Associated with Roberts Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Baoshan; Lee, Kenneth K.; Zhang, Lily; Gerton, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Roberts syndrome (RBS) is a human disease characterized by defects in limb and craniofacial development and growth and mental retardation. RBS is caused by mutations in ESCO2, a gene which encodes an acetyltransferase for the cohesin complex. While the essential role of the cohesin complex in chromosome segregation has been well characterized, it plays additional roles in DNA damage repair, chromosome condensation, and gene expression. The developmental phenotypes of Roberts syndrome and other cohesinopathies suggest that gene expression is impaired during embryogenesis. It was previously reported that ribosomal RNA production and protein translation were impaired in immortalized RBS cells. It was speculated that cohesin binding at the rDNA was important for nucleolar form and function. We have explored the hypothesis that reduced ribosome function contributes to RBS in zebrafish models and human cells. Two key pathways that sense cellular stress are the p53 and mTOR pathways. We report that mTOR signaling is inhibited in human RBS cells based on the reduced phosphorylation of the downstream effectors S6K1, S6 and 4EBP1, and this correlates with p53 activation. Nucleoli, the sites of ribosome production, are highly fragmented in RBS cells. We tested the effect of inhibiting p53 or stimulating mTOR in RBS cells. The rescue provided by mTOR activation was more significant, with activation rescuing both cell division and cell death. To study this cohesinopathy in a whole animal model we used ESCO2-mutant and morphant zebrafish embryos, which have developmental defects mimicking RBS. Consistent with RBS patient cells, the ESCO2 mutant embryos show p53 activation and inhibition of the TOR pathway. Stimulation of the TOR pathway with L-leucine rescued many developmental defects of ESCO2-mutant embryos. Our data support the idea that RBS can be attributed in part to defects in ribosome biogenesis, and stimulation of the TOR pathway has therapeutic potential. PMID:24098154

  1. Stimulation of mTORC1 with L-leucine rescues defects associated with Roberts syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baoshan; Lee, Kenneth K; Zhang, Lily; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Roberts syndrome (RBS) is a human disease characterized by defects in limb and craniofacial development and growth and mental retardation. RBS is caused by mutations in ESCO2, a gene which encodes an acetyltransferase for the cohesin complex. While the essential role of the cohesin complex in chromosome segregation has been well characterized, it plays additional roles in DNA damage repair, chromosome condensation, and gene expression. The developmental phenotypes of Roberts syndrome and other cohesinopathies suggest that gene expression is impaired during embryogenesis. It was previously reported that ribosomal RNA production and protein translation were impaired in immortalized RBS cells. It was speculated that cohesin binding at the rDNA was important for nucleolar form and function. We have explored the hypothesis that reduced ribosome function contributes to RBS in zebrafish models and human cells. Two key pathways that sense cellular stress are the p53 and mTOR pathways. We report that mTOR signaling is inhibited in human RBS cells based on the reduced phosphorylation of the downstream effectors S6K1, S6 and 4EBP1, and this correlates with p53 activation. Nucleoli, the sites of ribosome production, are highly fragmented in RBS cells. We tested the effect of inhibiting p53 or stimulating mTOR in RBS cells. The rescue provided by mTOR activation was more significant, with activation rescuing both cell division and cell death. To study this cohesinopathy in a whole animal model we used ESCO2-mutant and morphant zebrafish embryos, which have developmental defects mimicking RBS. Consistent with RBS patient cells, the ESCO2 mutant embryos show p53 activation and inhibition of the TOR pathway. Stimulation of the TOR pathway with L-leucine rescued many developmental defects of ESCO2-mutant embryos. Our data support the idea that RBS can be attributed in part to defects in ribosome biogenesis, and stimulation of the TOR pathway has therapeutic potential.

  2. [Hypothalamic inflammation and energy balance deregulations: focus on chemokines.

    PubMed

    Le Thuc, Ophélia; Rovère, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a key brain region in the regulation of energy balance. It especially controls food intake and both energy storage and expenditure through integration of humoral, neural and nutrient-related signals and cues. Hypothalamic neurons and glial cells act jointly to orchestrate, both spatially and temporally, regulated metabolic functions of the hypothalamus. Thus, the existence of a causal link between hypothalamic inflammation and deregulations of feeding behavior, such as involuntary weight-loss or obesity, has been suggested. Among the inflammatory mediators that could induce deregulations of hypothalamic control of the energy balance, chemokines represent interesting candidates. Indeed, chemokines, primarily known for their chemoattractant role of immune cells to the inflamed site, have also been suggested capable of neuromodulation. Thus, chemokines could disrupt cellular activity together with synthesis and/or secretion of multiple neurotransmitters/mediators that are involved in the maintenance of energy balance. Here, we relate, on one hand, recent results showing the primary role of the central chemokinergic signaling CCL2/CCR2 for metabolic and behavioral adaptation to high-grade inflammation, especially loss of appetite and weight, through its activity on hypothalamic neurons producing the orexigenic peptide Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH) and, on the other hand, results that suggest that chemokines could also deregulate hypothalamic neuropeptidergic circuits to induce an opposite phenotype and eventually participate in the onset/development of obesity. In more details, we will emphasize a study recently showing, in a model of high-grade acute inflammation of LPS injection in mice, that central CCL2/CCR2 signaling is of primary importance for several aspects explaining weight loss associated with inflammation: after LPS injection, animals lose weight, reduce their food intake, increase their fat oxidation (thus energy consumption from

  3. Metabolic mechanism for L-leucine-induced metabolome to eliminate Streptococcus iniae.

    PubMed

    Du, Chao-Chao; Yang, Manjun; Li, Min-Yi; Yang, Jun; Peng, Bo; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2017-03-07

    Crucial metabolites that modulate hosts' metabolome to eliminate bacterial pathogens have been documented, but the metabolic mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study explores the metabolic mechanism for L-leucine-induced metabolome to eliminate Streptococcus iniae in tilapia. GC-MS based metabolomics was used to investigate tilapia liver metabolic profile in the presence of exogenous L-leucine. Thirty-seven metabolites of differential abundance were determined, and eleven metabolic pathways were enriched. Pattern recognition analysis identified serine and proline as crucial metabolites, which are the two metabolites identified in survived tilapias during S. iniae infection, suggesting the two metabolites play crucial roles in L-leucine-induced elimination of the pathogen by the host. Exogenous L-serine reduces mortality of tilapias infected by S. iniae, providing a robust proof for supporting the conclusion. Furthermore, exogenous serine elevates expression of genes Il-1β and Il-8 in tilapia spleen, but not TNFα, CXCR4 and Mx, suggesting the metabolite promotes a phagocytosis role of macrophages, which is consistent with the finding that L-leucine promotes macrophages to kill both Gram-positive and negative bacterial pathogens. Therefore, the ability of phagocytosis enhanced by exogenous L-leucine is partly attributed to elevation of serine. These results demonstrate a metabolic mechanism by which exogenous L-leucine modulates tilapias' metabolome to enhance innate immunity and eliminate pathogens.

  4. How to find a leucine in a haystack? Structure, ligand recognition and regulation of leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs.

    PubMed

    Alam, Tanvir; Alazmi, Meshari; Gao, Xin; Arold, Stefan T

    2014-06-15

    LD motifs (leucine-aspartic acid motifs) are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs that have emerged as key players in connecting cell adhesion with cell motility and survival. LD motifs are required for embryogenesis, wound healing and the evolution of multicellularity. LD motifs also play roles in disease, such as in cancer metastasis or viral infection. First described in the paxillin family of scaffolding proteins, LD motifs and similar acidic LXXLL interaction motifs have been discovered in several other proteins, whereas 16 proteins have been reported to contain LDBDs (LD motif-binding domains). Collectively, structural and functional analyses have revealed a surprising multivalency in LD motif interactions and a wide diversity in LDBD architectures. In the present review, we summarize the molecular basis for function, regulation and selectivity of LD motif interactions that has emerged from more than a decade of research. This overview highlights the intricate multi-level regulation and the inherently noisy and heterogeneous nature of signalling through short protein-protein interaction motifs.

  5. Gliotransmission and brain glucose sensing: critical role of endozepines.

    PubMed

    Lanfray, Damien; Arthaud, Sébastien; Ouellet, Johanne; Compère, Vincent; Do Rego, Jean-Luc; Leprince, Jérôme; Lefranc, Benjamin; Castel, Hélène; Bouchard, Cynthia; Monge-Roffarello, Boris; Richard, Denis; Pelletier, Georges; Vaudry, Hubert; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Morin, Fabrice

    2013-03-01

    Hypothalamic glucose sensing is involved in the control of feeding behavior and peripheral glucose homeostasis, and glial cells are suggested to play an important role in this process. Diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI) and its processing product the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN), collectively named endozepines, are secreted by astroglia, and ODN is a potent anorexigenic factor. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of endozepines in brain glucose sensing. First, we showed that intracerebroventricular administration of glucose in rats increases DBI expression in hypothalamic glial-like tanycytes. We then demonstrated that glucose stimulates endozepine secretion from hypothalamic explants. Feeding experiments indicate that the anorexigenic effect of central administration of glucose was blunted by coinjection of an ODN antagonist. Conversely, the hyperphagic response elicited by central glucoprivation was suppressed by an ODN agonist. The anorexigenic effects of centrally injected glucose or ODN agonist were suppressed by blockade of the melanocortin-3/4 receptors, suggesting that glucose sensing involves endozepinergic control of the melanocortin pathway. Finally, we found that brain endozepines modulate blood glucose levels, suggesting their involvement in a feedback loop controlling whole-body glucose homeostasis. Collectively, these data indicate that endozepines are a critical relay in brain glucose sensing and potentially new targets in treatment of metabolic disorders.

  6. Differential activities of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein isoforms.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Rama; Wang, Jian; Melters, Daniël; Pearce, David

    2007-12-14

    Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (GILZ) is expressed in both epithelial and immune tissues and modulates a variety of cellular functions, including proliferation and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity. A number of reports have described various GILZ activities, focusing on a single isoform with molecular mass of approximately 17 kDa, now termed GILZ1. In GILZ immunoblots using a newly developed antiserum, we detected multiple species in extracts from cultured kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that one of these represented a previously uncharacterized distinct isoform of GILZ, GILZ2. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to clone cDNAs corresponding to four isoforms, which, in addition to GILZ1 and GILZ2, included new isoforms GILZ3 and GILZ4. Heterologous expression of these four GILZ isoforms in cultured cells revealed striking functional differences. Notably, GILZ1 was the only isoform that significantly stimulated ENaC-mediated Na+ current in a kidney collecting duct cell line, although GILZ2 and GILZ3 also stimulated ENaC surface expression in HEK 293 cells. GILZ1 and GILZ3, and to a lesser extent GILZ2, inhibited ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, GILZ4, which had no effect on either ENaC or ERK, potently suppressed cellular proliferation, as did GILZ1, but not GILZ2 or GILZ3. Finally, rat and mouse tissues all expressed multiple GILZ species but varied in the relative abundance of each. These data suggest that multiple GILZ isoforms are expressed in most cells and tissues and that these play distinct roles in regulating key cellular functions, including proliferation and ion transport. Furthermore, GILZ inhibition of ERK appears to play an essential role in stimulation of cell surface ENaC but not in inhibition of proliferation.

  7. Distribution and Evolution of Yersinia Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yueming; Huang, He; Hui, Xinjie; Cheng, Xi; White, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, playing important roles in various protein-protein interaction processes. In Yersinia, the well-characterized type III secreted effector YopM also belongs to the LRR protein family and is encoded by virulence plasmids. However, little has been known about other LRR members encoded by Yersinia genomes or their evolution. In this study, the Yersinia LRR proteins were comprehensively screened, categorized, and compared. The LRR proteins encoded by chromosomes (LRR1 proteins) appeared to be more similar to each other and different from those encoded by plasmids (LRR2 proteins) with regard to repeat-unit length, amino acid composition profile, and gene expression regulation circuits. LRR1 proteins were also different from LRR2 proteins in that the LRR1 proteins contained an E3 ligase domain (NEL domain) in the C-terminal region or an NEL domain-encoding nucleotide relic in flanking genomic sequences. The LRR1 protein-encoding genes (LRR1 genes) varied dramatically and were categorized into 4 subgroups (a to d), with the LRR1a to -c genes evolving from the same ancestor and LRR1d genes evolving from another ancestor. The consensus and ancestor repeat-unit sequences were inferred for different LRR1 protein subgroups by use of a maximum parsimony modeling strategy. Structural modeling disclosed very similar repeat-unit structures between LRR1 and LRR2 proteins despite the different unit lengths and amino acid compositions. Structural constraints may serve as the driving force to explain the observed mutations in the LRR regions. This study suggests that there may be functional variation and lays the foundation for future experiments investigating the functions of the chromosomally encoded LRR proteins of Yersinia. PMID:27217422

  8. Biomimetic Enamel Regeneration Mediated by Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Peptide.

    PubMed

    Kwak, S Y; Litman, A; Margolis, H C; Yamakoshi, Y; Simmer, J P

    2017-01-01

    We report here a novel biomimetic approach to the regeneration of human enamel. The approach combines the use of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) to control the onset and rate of enamel regeneration and the use of leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP), a nonphosphorylated 56-amino acid alternative splice product of amelogenin, to regulate the shape and orientation of growing enamel crystals. This study builds on our previous findings that show LRAP can effectively guide the formation of ordered arrays of needle-like hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals in vitro and on the known role mineralization inhibitors, like PPi, play in the regulation of mineralized tissue formation. Acid-etched enamel surfaces of extracted human molars, cut perpendicular or parallel to the direction of the enamel rods, were exposed to a PPi-stabilized supersaturated calcium phosphate (CaP) solution containing 0 to 0.06 mg/mL LRAP for 20 h. In the absence of LRAP, PPi inhibition was reversed by the presence of etched enamel surfaces and led to the formation of large, randomly distributed plate-like HA crystals that were weakly attached, regardless of rod orientation. In the presence of 0.04 mg/mL LRAP, however, densely packed mineral layers, comprising bundles of small needle-like HA crystals, formed on etched surfaces that were cut perpendicular to the enamel rods. These crystals were strongly attached, and their arrangement reflected to a significant degree the underlying enamel prism pattern. In contrast, under the same conditions with LRAP, little to no crystal formation was found on enamel surfaces that were cut parallel to the direction of the enamel rods. These results suggest that LRAP preferentially interacts with ab surfaces of mature enamel crystals, inhibiting their directional growth, thus selectively promoting linear growth along the c-axis of enamel crystals. The present findings demonstrate a potential for the development of a new approach to regenerate enamel structure and properties.

  9. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Function in Diverse Hyperprolactinemic States

    PubMed Central

    Boyar, R. M.; Kapen, S.; Finkelstein, J. W.; Perlow, M.; Sassin, J. F.; Fukushima, D. K.; Weitzman, E. D.; Hellman, Leon

    1974-01-01

    Prolactin secretion in normal adults is characterized by periods of episodic secretion which increase in magnitude during sleep. In this study, we report the 24-h mean prolactin concentrations, prolactin secretory patterns, and associated pituitary hormone function in nine patients (seven women and two men) with hyperprolactinemia of diverse etiologies. Four of the women and one of the men had clinically demonstrable pituitary tumors, one boy had a hypothalamic tumor, and the three other women had “functional” hyperprolactinemia. The 24-h mean prolactin concentrations derived from averaging the 20-min interval samples for 24 h ranged from 28.6 to 1,220 ng/ml. The plasma prolactin patterns in these patients showed persistence of episodic secretion in all and loss of the normal sleep-wake difference in plasma prolactin in seven of nine. Three of the patients with galactorrhea and comparable 24-h mean prolactin concentrations (58.3, 59.7, and 64.3 ng/ml) showed similar prolactin secretory patterns despite different etiologic mechanisms. Evaluation of the secretory patterns of luteinizing hormone (LH) in these patients showed loss of normal pulsatile LH release and a low 24-h mean LH concentration in the patient with the pituitary tumor, while the two patients without clinically demonstrable pituitary tumors (“post-pill” galactorrhea and “idiopathic” galactorrhea) showed normal LH secretory patterns and 24-h mean LH concentrations. The 24-h mean cortisol concentrations and secretory patterns were normal in five of the seven patients who had these parameters measured. The patient with the hypothalamic tumor had a low 24-h mean cortisol concentration and production rate and absent response to metyrapone. The patient with “idiopathic” galactorrhea had an elevated 24-h mean cortisol concentration but normal cortisol production rate and urinary 17-hydroxycorticoid excretion. Growth hormone secretion was abnormal in four of the patients (one with the

  10. Simulations of potentials of mean force for separating a leucine zipper dimer and the basic region of a basic region leucine zipper dimer.

    PubMed

    Cukier, Robert I

    2014-09-04

    Basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors involved in DNA recognition are dimeric proteins. The monomers consist of two subdomains, a leucine zipper sequence responsible for dimerization and a highly basic DNA recognition sequence. Leucine zippers are strongly dimerized, and in a bZIP, the basic region can, in the absence of DNA, undergo extensive relative monomer-to-monomer fluctuations. In this work, LZ and bZIP potentials of mean force (PMFs), which provide free energies along reaction coordinates, are simulated with a distance replica exchange method. The method uses restraint potentials to provide sampling along a reaction coordinate and enhances configuration space exploration by exchanging information between neighboring restraint potential configurations. Restraint potentials that are constructed from sums over a number of atom distances are employed. Their use requires a modification of the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM) procedure to combine and unbias the data from the different restraint-potential-biased window densities to provide a PMF. These methods are first used to obtain a PMF for separating a leucine zipper (GCN4-p1) of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. The PMF indicates a very strong binding free energy that only weakens when the monomers are separated by about 12 Å, which is about 6 Å beyond their bound, dimer equilibrium distance. PMFs are also obtained for separating the basic subdomain monomer parts of the GCN4 bZIP transcriptional factor, in the absence of DNA. In a monomer separation range spanning the open, crystal-based structure to closer configurations, the basic subdomain PMF is quite flat, implying essentially thermal sampling in this distance range. A PMF generated starting from a "collapsed" state, taken from a previous simulation ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2012 , 116 , 6071 ), where collapsed refers to the feature that the basic subdomain monomers are also effectively dimerized, shows that this state is

  11. Projections from the Subfornical Region of the Lateral Hypothalamic Area

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, MARINA; CANTERAS, NEWTON S.; BURNS, GULLY; SWANSON, LARRY W.

    2010-01-01

    The L-shaped anterior zone of the lateral hypothalamic area’s subfornical region (LHAsfa) is delineated by a pontine nucleus incertus input. Function evidence suggests the subfornical region and nucleus incertus modulate foraging and defensive behaviors, although subfornical region connections are poorly understood. A high resolution Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHAL) structural analysis is presented here of the LHAsfa neuron population’s overall axonal projection pattern. The strongest LHAsfa targets are in the interbrain and cerebral hemisphere. The former include inputs to anterior hypothalamic nucleus, dorsomedial part of the ventromedial nucleus, and ventral region of the dorsal premammillary nucleus (defensive behavior control system components), and to lateral habenula and dorsal region of the dorsal premammillary nucleus (foraging behavior control system components). The latter include massive inputs to lateral and medial septal nuclei (septo-hippocampal system components), and inputs to bed nuclei of the stria terminalis posterior division related to the defensive behavior system, intercalated amygdalar nucleus (projecting to central amygdalar nucleus), and posterior part of the basomedial amygdalar nucleus. LHAsfa vertical and horizontal limb basic projection patterns are similar, although each preferentially innervates certain terminal fields. Lateral hypothalamic area regions immediately medial, lateral, and caudal to the LHAsfa each generate quite distinct projection patterns. Combined with previous evidence that major sources LHAsfa neural inputs include the parabrachial nucleus (nociceptive information), defensive and foraging behavior system components, and the septo-hippocampal system, the present results suggest that the LHAsfa helps match adaptive behavioral responses (either defensive or foraging) to current internal motivational status and external environmental conditions. PMID:16261534

  12. Hypothalamic opioid-melanocortin appetitive balance and addictive craving.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Whilst the parallels between drug and food craving are receiving increasing attention, the recently elucidated complex physiology of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centres has been largely overlooked in the efforts to understand drug craving which is one of the most refractory and problematic aspects of drug and behavioural addictions. Important conceptual gains could be made by researchers from both appetite and addiction neuroscience if they were to have an improved understanding of each others' disciplines. It is well known in addiction medicine that the use of many substances is elevated in opiate dependency. There is voluminous evidence of very high rates of drug use in opiate agonist maintained patients, and the real possibility exists that opiate agonist therapy therefore increases drug craving. Conversely, opiate antagonist therapy with naloxone or naltrexone has been shown to reduce most chemical and behavioural addictions, and naltrexone is now being developed together with bupropion as the anti-obesity drug "Contrave". Hypothalamic melanocortins, particularly α-MSH, are known to constitute the main brake to consumptive behaviour of food. There is a well described antagonism between melanocortins and opioids at many loci including the hypothalamus. Administration of exogenous opiates is known to both suppress α-MSH and to stimulate hedonic food consumption. Opiate maintenance programs are associated with weight gain. As monoamines, opioids and cannabinoids are known to be involved in appetite regulation, and as endorphin opioids are known to be perturbed in other addictions, further exploration of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centre would appear to be an obvious, albeit presently largely overlooked, locus in which to study drug and other craving mechanisms.

  13. The hypothalamic peptidergic system, hypocretin/orexin and vigilance control.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Seiji

    2007-06-01

    Using forward and reverse genetics, the genes (hypocretin/orexin ligand and its receptor) involved in the pathogenesis of the sleep disorder, narcolepsy, in animals, have been identified. Mutations in hypocretin related-genes are extremely rare in humans, but hypocretin-ligand deficiency is found in most narcolepsy-cataplexy cases. Hypocretin deficiency in humans can be clinically detected by CSF hypocretin-1 measures, and undetectably low CSF hypocretin-1 is now included in the revised international diagnostic criteria of narcolepsy. Since hypocretin-ligand deficiency is the major pathophysiology in human narcolepsy, hypocretin replacements (using hypocretin agonists or gene therapy) are promising future therapeutic options. New insights into the roles of hypocretin system on sleep physiology have also rapidly increased. Hypocretins are involved in various fundamental hypothalamic functions such as feeding, energy homeostasis and neuroendocrine regulation. Hypocretin neurons project to most ascending arousal systems (including monoaminergic and cholinergic systems), and generally exhibit excitatory inputs. Together with the recent finding of the sleep promoting system in the hypothalamus (especially in the GABA/galanin ventrolateral preoptic area which exhibits inhibitory inputs to these ascending systems), the hypothalamus is now recognized as the most important brain site for the sleep switch, and other peptidergic systems may also participate in this regulation. Meanwhile, narcolepsy now appears to be a more complex condition than previously thought. The pathophysiology of the disease is involved in the abnormalities of sleep and various hypothalamic functions due to hypocretin deficiency, such as the changes in energy homeostasis, stress reactions and rewarding. Narcolepsy is therefore, an important model to study the link between sleep regulation and other fundamental hypothalamic functions.

  14. Hypothalamic neuropeptide systems and anticipatory weight change in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Adam, C L; Mercer, J G

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal animals are able both to programme changes in body weight in response to annual changes in photoperiod (anticipatory regulation) and to correct changes in body weight caused by imposed energetic demand (compensatory regulation). Experimental evidence from the Siberian hamster suggests that seasonally appropriate body weight is continually reset according to photoperiodic history, even when actual body weight is driven away from this target weight by manipulation of energy intake. These characteristics constitute the "sliding set point" of seasonal body weight regulation. To define the mechanisms and molecules underlying anticipatory body weight regulation, we are investigating the involvement of hypothalamic systems with an established role in the compensatory defence of body weight. Weight loss or restricted growth induced by short days (SD) results in low circulating leptin compared with long day (LD) controls. However, this chronic low leptin signal is read differently from acute low leptin resulting from food deprivation; leptin receptor gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) is lower in SD, whereas food deprivation increases expression levels, suggesting changes in sensitivity to leptin feedback. SD alterations in mRNA levels for a number of hypothalamic neuropeptide and receptor genes appear counter-intuitive for a SD body weight trajectory. However, early increases in ARC cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) gene expression in SDs could be involved in driving body weight loss or growth restriction. The sites of photoperiod interaction with energy balance neuronal circuitry and the neurochemical encoding of body weight set point require full characterisation. Study of anticipatory regulation in seasonal animals offers new insight into body weight regulation across mammalian species, including man.

  15. Thyroid hormone activation of retinoic acid synthesis in hypothalamic tanycytes

    PubMed Central

    Stoney, Patrick N.; Helfer, Gisela; Rodrigues, Diana; Morgan, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for adult brain function and its actions include several key roles in the hypothalamus. Although TH controls gene expression via specific TH receptors of the nuclear receptor class, surprisingly few genes have been demonstrated to be directly regulated by TH in the hypothalamus, or the adult brain as a whole. This study explored the rapid induction by TH of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (Raldh1), encoding a retinoic acid (RA)‐synthesizing enzyme, as a gene specifically expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, cells that mediate a number of actions of TH in the hypothalamus. The resulting increase in RA may then regulate gene expression via the RA receptors, also of the nuclear receptor class. In vivo exposure of the rat to TH led to a significant and rapid increase in hypothalamic Raldh1 within 4 hours. That this may lead to an in vivo increase in RA is suggested by the later induction by TH of the RA‐responsive gene Cyp26b1. To explore the actions of RA in the hypothalamus as a potential mediator of TH control of gene regulation, an ex vivo hypothalamic rat slice culture method was developed in which the Raldh1‐expressing tanycytes were maintained. These slice cultures confirmed that TH did not act on genes regulating energy balance but could induce Raldh1. RA has the potential to upregulate expression of genes involved in growth and appetite, Ghrh and Agrp. This regulation is acutely sensitive to epigenetic changes, as has been shown for TH action in vivo. These results indicate that sequential triggering of two nuclear receptor signalling systems has the capability to mediate some of the functions of TH in the hypothalamus. GLIA 2016;64:425–439 PMID:26527258

  16. Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gordon I; Yoshino, Jun; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L; Klein, Seth J; Magkos, Faidon; Reeds, Dominic N; Klein, Samuel; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    Increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, and intravenous amino acid infusion blunts insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We tested the hypothesis that protein ingestion impairs insulin-mediated glucose disposal by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling, which can inhibit AKT. We measured glucose disposal and muscle p-mTOR(Ser2448), p-AKT(Ser473), and p-AKT(Thr308) in 22 women during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with and without concomitant ingestion of whey protein (0.6 g/kg fat-free mass; n = 11) or leucine that matched the amount given with whey protein (n = 11). Both whey protein and leucine ingestion raised plasma leucine concentration by approximately twofold and muscle p-mTOR(Ser2448) by ∼30% above the values observed in the control (no amino acid ingestion) studies; p-AKT(Ser473) and p-AKT(Thr308) were not affected by whey protein or leucine ingestion. Whey protein ingestion decreased insulin-mediated glucose disposal (median 38.8 [quartiles 30.8, 61.8] vs. 51.9 [41.0, 77.3] µmol glucose/µU insulin · mL(-1) · min(-1); P < 0.01), whereas ingestion of leucine did not (52.3 [43.3, 65.4] vs. 52.3 [43.9, 73.2]). These results indicate that 1) protein ingestion causes insulin resistance and could be an important regulator of postprandial glucose homeostasis and 2) the insulin-desensitizing effect of protein ingestion is not due to inhibition of AKT by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling.

  17. Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gordon I.; Yoshino, Jun; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L.; Klein, Seth J.; Magkos, Faidon; Reeds, Dominic N.; Klein, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, and intravenous amino acid infusion blunts insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We tested the hypothesis that protein ingestion impairs insulin-mediated glucose disposal by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling, which can inhibit AKT. We measured glucose disposal and muscle p-mTORSer2448, p-AKTSer473, and p-AKTThr308 in 22 women during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with and without concomitant ingestion of whey protein (0.6 g/kg fat-free mass; n = 11) or leucine that matched the amount given with whey protein (n = 11). Both whey protein and leucine ingestion raised plasma leucine concentration by approximately twofold and muscle p-mTORSer2448 by ∼30% above the values observed in the control (no amino acid ingestion) studies; p-AKTSer473 and p-AKTThr308 were not affected by whey protein or leucine ingestion. Whey protein ingestion decreased insulin-mediated glucose disposal (median 38.8 [quartiles 30.8, 61.8] vs. 51.9 [41.0, 77.3] µmol glucose/µU insulin · mL−1 · min−1; P < 0.01), whereas ingestion of leucine did not (52.3 [43.3, 65.4] vs. 52.3 [43.9, 73.2]). These results indicate that 1) protein ingestion causes insulin resistance and could be an important regulator of postprandial glucose homeostasis and 2) the insulin-desensitizing effect of protein ingestion is not due to inhibition of AKT by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling. PMID:25475435

  18. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase: double duty in amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Durán, Raúl V; Hall, Michael N

    2012-08-01

    The cellular response to amino acids is controlled at the molecular level by TORC1. While many of the elements that participate in TORC1 signaling are known, we still have no clear idea how cells sense amino acids. Two recent studies found that leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LRS) is a leucine sensor for TORC1, in both yeast and mammalian cells.

  19. Regulation of Prolactin in Mice with Altered Hypothalamic Melanocortin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dutia, Roxanne; Kim, Andrea J.; Mosharov, Eugene; Savontaus, Eriika; Chua, Streamson C.; Wardlaw, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    This study used two mouse models with genetic manipulation of the melanocortin system to investigate prolactin regulation. Mice with overexpression of the melanocortin receptor (MC-R) agonist, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (Tg-MSH) or deletion of the MC-R antagonist agouti-related protein (AgRP KO) were studied. Male Tg-MSH mice had lower blood prolactin levels at baseline (2.9±0.3 vs 4.7±0.7 ng/ml) and after restraint stress(68 ±6.5 vs 117±22 ng/ml) versus WT (p<0.05); however, pituitary prolactin content was not different. Blood prolactin was also decreased in male AgRP KO mice at baseline (4.2±0.5 vs 7.6±1.3 ng/ml) and after stress (60±4.5 vs 86.1±5.7 ng/ml) vs WT (p <0.001). Pituitary prolactin content was lower in male AgRP KO mice (4.3±0.3 vs 6.7±0.5 μg/pituitary, p <0.001) versus WT. No differences in blood or pituitary prolactin levels were observed in female AgRP KO mice versus WT. Hypothalamic dopamine activity was assessed as the potential mechanism responsible for changes in prolactin levels. Hypothalamic tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA was measured in both genetic models versus WT mice and hypothalamic dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) content were measured in male AgRP KO and WT mice but neither were significantly different. However, these results do not preclude changes in dopamine activity as dopamine turnover was not directly investigated. This is the first study to show that baseline and stress-induced prolactin release and pituitary prolactin content are reduced in mice with genetic alterations of the melanocortin system and suggests that changes in hypothalamic melanocortin activity may be reflected in measurements of serum prolactin levels. PMID:22800691

  20. Experience salience gates endocannabinoid signaling at hypothalamic synapses.

    PubMed

    Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I; Senst, Laura; Teskey, G Campbell; Bains, Jaideep S

    2014-04-30

    Alterations in synaptic endocannabinoid signaling are a widespread neurobiological consequence of many in vivo experiences, including stress. Here, we report that stressor salience is critical for bidirectionally modifying presynaptic CB-1 receptor (CB1R) function at hypothalamic GABA synapses controlling the neuroendocrine stress axis in male rats. While repetitive, predictable stressor exposure impairs presynaptic CB1R function, these changes are rapidly reversed upon exposure to a high salience experience such as novel stress or by manipulations that enhance neural activity levels in vivo or in vitro. Together these data demonstrate that experience salience, through alterations in afferent synaptic activity, induces rapid changes in endocannabinoid signaling.

  1. Alterations in the hypothalamic melanocortin pathway in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; El Oussini, Hajer; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Dengler, Reinhard; Meyer, Thomas; Zierz, Stephan; Kassubek, Jan; Fischer, Wilhelm; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Grehl, Torsten; Hermann, Andreas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witting, Anke; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease, leads to death within 3 to 5 years after onset. Beyond progressive motor impairment, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis suffer from major defects in energy metabolism, such as weight loss, which are well correlated with survival. Indeed, nutritional intervention targeting weight loss might improve survival of patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying metabolic impairment in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remain elusive, in particular due to the lack of longitudinal studies. Here we took advantage of samples collected during the clinical trial of pioglitazone (GERP-ALS), and characterized longitudinally energy metabolism of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in response to pioglitazone, a drug with well-characterized metabolic effects. As expected, pioglitazone decreased glycaemia, decreased liver enzymes and increased circulating adiponectin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, showing its efficacy in the periphery. However, pioglitazone did not increase body weight of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis independently of bulbar involvement. As pioglitazone increases body weight through a direct inhibition of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, we studied hypothalamic neurons producing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the endogenous melanocortin inhibitor agouti-related peptide (AGRP), in mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1(G86R). We observed lower Pomc but higher Agrp mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of presymptomatic SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistently, numbers of POMC-positive neurons were decreased, whereas AGRP fibre density was elevated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistent with a defect in the hypothalamic melanocortin system, food intake after short term fasting was increased in SOD1(G86R) mice. Importantly, these findings were replicated in two other amyotrophic

  2. Methamphetamine and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis

    PubMed Central

    Zuloaga, Damian G.; Jacobskind, Jason S.; Raber, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants such as methamphetamine (MA) induce significant alterations in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. These changes in HPA axis function are associated with altered stress-related behaviors and might contribute to addictive processes such as relapse. In this mini-review we discuss acute and chronic effects of MA (adult and developmental exposure) on the HPA axis, including effects on HPA axis associated genes/proteins, brain regions, and behaviors such as anxiety and depression. A better understanding of the mechanisms through which MA affects the HPA axis may lead to more effective treatment strategies for MA addiction. PMID:26074755

  3. Hypothalamic hamartoma in an unusual case with delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Nakhaeimoghadam, Maryam; Rostami, Parastoo; Zare-Shahabadi, Ameneh; Mehdizadeh, Mehrzad; Rabbani, Ali; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) is a rare intracranial lesion that usually presents with classic triad of central precocious puberty, gelastic epilepsy, and developmental delay. Herein, a 14-year old boy is presented in whom the diagnosis of HH was made by magnetic resonance imaging. While he did not have any complain of precocious puberty, he surprisingly suffered from delay in puberty. The definite diagnosis of HH can only be made by appropriate imaging, in a case with atypical feature of delay in puberty and in the absence of gelastic epilepsy. To our best knowledge, this is the first case of HH who is presented with delay in puberty as of first manifestation.

  4. Assessment of hypothalamic pituitary function in endocrine disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, F. C.; Landon, J.

    1966-01-01

    The insulin test carried out with adequate safeguards under standardized conditions yields valuable information regarding hypothalamic and pituitary function when plasma levels of sugar, cortisol, and growth hormone are determined. The use of a test based on the plasma cortisol response to the infusion of lysine-vasopressin, a polypeptide with a corticotrophin-releasing action, is also of value as a test of pituitary function. Used in conjunction with the insulin test it enables pituitary disorders to be differentiated from those involving the hypothalamus. PMID:4287115

  5. Model of how plants sense zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Ana G L; Persson, Daniel P; Husted, Søren; Schjørring, Jan K; Alexander, Ross D; Aarts, Mark G M

    2013-09-01

    Plants are capable of inducing a range of physico-chemical and microbial modifications of the rhizosphere which can mobilize mineral nutrients or prevent toxic elements from entering the roots. Understanding how plants sense and adapt to variations in nutrient availability is essential in order to develop plant-based solutions addressing nutrient-use-efficiency and adaptation to nutrient-limited or -toxic soils. Recently two transcription factors of the bZIP family (basic-region leucine zipper) have been identified in Arabidopsis and shown to be pivotal in the adaptation response to zinc deficiency. They represent not only the first regulators of zinc homeostasis identified in plants, but also a very promising starting-point that can provide new insights into the molecular basis of how plants sense and adapt to the stress of zinc deficiency. Considering the available information thus far we propose in this review a putative model of how plants sense zinc deficiency.

  6. Phosphorylation of 4EBP by oral leucine administration was suppressed in the skeletal muscle of PGC-1α knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryoji; Minami, Kimiko; Matsuda, Junichiro; Sawada, Naoki; Miura, Shinji; Kamei, Yasutomi

    2016-01-01

    Leucine is known to increase mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of 4EBP. In this study, leucine was administered to skeletal muscle-PGC-1α knockout mice. We observed attenuated 4EBP phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle, but not in the liver, of the PGC-1α knockout mice. These data suggest that skeletal muscle-PGC-1α is important for leucine-mediated mTOR activation and protein biosynthesis.

  7. Separation by high-performance liquid chromatography of (3R)- and (3S)-beta-leucine as diastereomeric derivatives.

    PubMed

    Aberhart, D J; Cotting, J A; Lin, H J

    1985-11-15

    For studies on the coenzyme B12-dependent enzyme, leucine-2,3-aminomutase, (3R)- and (3S)-beta-leucines were synthesized. The 10-camphorsulfonamide p-nitrobenzyl esters could be resolved by normal-phase HPLC. A much better separation was obtained by reversed-phase HPLC of the diastereomeric derivatives obtained by treatment of -leucine with Marfey's reagent (N2-(5-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-alaninamide).

  8. Protective effects of leucine against lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in Labeo rohita fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Giri, Sib Sankar; Sen, Shib Sankar; Jun, Jin Woo; Sukumaran, Venkatachalam; Park, Se Chang

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the protective effects of leucine against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in Labeo rohita (rohu) in vivo and in vitro. Primary hepatocytes, isolated from the hepatopancreas, were exposed to different concentrations of LPS for 24 h to induce an inflammatory response, and the protective effects of leucine against LPS-induced inflammation were studied. Finally, we investigated the efficiency of dietary leucine supplementation in attenuating an immune challenge induced by LPS in vivo. Exposure of cells to 10-25 μg mL(-1) of LPS for 24 h resulted in a significant production of nitric oxide and release of lactate dehydrogenase to the medium, whereas cell viability and protein content were reduced (p < 0.05). LPS exposure (10 μg mL(-1)) increased mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-8 in vitro (p < 0.05). However, pretreatment with leucine prevented the LPS-induced upregulation of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-8 mRNAs by downregulating TLR4, MyD88, NF-κBp65, and MAPKp38 mRNA expression. Interestingly, mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, which was increased by LPS treatment, was further enhanced (p < 0.05) by leucine pretreatment. The enhanced expression of IL-10 might inhibit the production of other pro-inflammatory cytokines. It was found that leucine pretreatment attenuated the excessive activation of LPS-induced TLR4-MyD88 signaling as manifested by lower level of TLR4, MyD88, MAPKp38, NF-κBp65 and increased level of IκB-α protein in leucine pre-treatment group. In vivo experiments demonstrated that leucine pre-supplementation could protect fish against LPS-induced inflammation through an attenuation of TLR4-MyD88 signaling pathway. Taken together, we propose that leucine pre-supplementation decreases LPS-induced immune damage in rohu by enhancing the expression of IL-10 and by regulating the TLR4-MyD88 signaling pathways.

  9. Reviewing the Effects of L-Leucine Supplementation in the Regulation of Food Intake, Energy Balance, and Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, João A B; Zampieri, Thais T; Donato, Jose

    2015-05-22

    Leucine is a well-known activator of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because mTOR signaling regulates several aspects of metabolism, the potential of leucine as a dietary supplement for treating obesity and diabetes mellitus has been investigated. The objective of the present review was to summarize and discuss the available evidence regarding the mechanisms and the effects of leucine supplementation on the regulation of food intake, energy balance, and glucose homeostasis. Based on the available evidence, we conclude that although central leucine injection decreases food intake, this effect is not well reproduced when leucine is provided as a dietary supplement. Consequently, no robust evidence indicates that oral leucine supplementation significantly affects food intake, although several studies have shown that leucine supplementation may help to decrease body adiposity in specific conditions. However, more studies are necessary to assess the effects of leucine supplementation in already-obese subjects. Finally, although several studies have found that leucine supplementation improves glucose homeostasis, the underlying mechanisms involved in these potential beneficial effects remain unknown and may be partially dependent on weight loss.

  10. Reviewing the Effects of l-Leucine Supplementation in the Regulation of Food Intake, Energy Balance, and Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pedroso, João A.B.; Zampieri, Thais T.; Donato, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Leucine is a well-known activator of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because mTOR signaling regulates several aspects of metabolism, the potential of leucine as a dietary supplement for treating obesity and diabetes mellitus has been investigated. The objective of the present review was to summarize and discuss the available evidence regarding the mechanisms and the effects of leucine supplementation on the regulation of food intake, energy balance, and glucose homeostasis. Based on the available evidence, we conclude that although central leucine injection decreases food intake, this effect is not well reproduced when leucine is provided as a dietary supplement. Consequently, no robust evidence indicates that oral leucine supplementation significantly affects food intake, although several studies have shown that leucine supplementation may help to decrease body adiposity in specific conditions. However, more studies are necessary to assess the effects of leucine supplementation in already-obese subjects. Finally, although several studies have found that leucine supplementation improves glucose homeostasis, the underlying mechanisms involved in these potential beneficial effects remain unknown and may be partially dependent on weight loss. PMID:26007339

  11. Incorporation of radiolabeled leucine into protein to estimate bacterial production in plant litter, sediment, epiphytic biofilms, and water samples.

    PubMed

    Buesing, N; Gessner, M O

    2003-03-01

    The present study assessed the application of tritiated leucine incorporation into protein, as a measure of bacterial biomass production, within four benthic habitats of a littoral freshwater wetland dominated by emergent vegetation. Basic assumptions underlying the method, such as linearity of leucine incorporation, saturation level of incorporation rates, and specificity of incorporation for bacterial assemblages, were tested, and two procedures for extracting radiolabeled protein were compared. TCA precipitation followed by ultrasonication, and subsequent alkaline dissolution in 0.5 M NaOH, 25 mM EDTA, and 0.1% w/v SDS, gave best results in terms of both extraction efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio. Incorporation of leucine was linear for all habitats for up to 1 h. Saturation concentrations of leucine incorporation into protein were 150 nM for littoral surface waters, >960 nM for biofilms on plant surfaces, and 50 mM for aerobic sediment and submerged plant litter. An experiment with prokaryotic and eukaryotic inhibitors designed to examine specificity of leucine incorporation into bacterial protein showed no significant leucine incorporation into eukaryotes during short-term incubations. Calculations based on kinetic parameters of fungal leucine uptake suggest, nevertheless, that significant leucine incorporation cannot be ruled out in all situations. Thus, the leucine methodology can be used for estimating bacterial production in benthic aquatic habitats, provided that substrate saturation and isotope dilution are determined and that the active biomass of eukaryotes, such as fungi, does not greatly exceed bacterial biomass.

  12. IGFBP-1 hyperphosphorylation in response to leucine deprivation is mediated by the AAR pathway.

    PubMed

    Malkani, Niyati; Jansson, Thomas; Gupta, Madhulika B

    2015-09-05

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) is the key regulator of fetal growth. IGF-I bioavailability is markedly diminished by IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) phosphorylation. Leucine deprivation strongly induces IGFBP-1 hyperphosphorylation, and plays an important role in fetal growth restriction (FGR). FGR is characterized by decreased amino acid availability, which activates the amino acid response (AAR) and inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. We investigated the role of AAR and mTOR in mediating IGFBP-1 secretion and phosphorylation in HepG2 cells in leucine deprivation. mTOR inhibition (rapamycin or raptor + rictor siRNA), or activation (DEPTOR siRNA) demonstrated a role of mTOR in leucine deprivation-induced IGFBP-1 secretion but not phosphorylation. When the AAR was blocked (U0126, or ERK/GCN2 siRNA), both IGFBP-1 secretion and hyperphosphorylation (pSer101/pSer119/pSer169) due to leucine deprivation were prevented. CK2 inhibition by TBB also attenuated IGFBP-1 phosphorylation in leucine deprivation. These results suggest that the AAR and mTOR independently regulate IGFBP-1 secretion and phosphorylation in response to decreased amino acid availability.

  13. Arabinose-leucine deletion mutants of Escherichia coli B-r.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D P; Englesberg, E

    1969-06-01

    The control of ara gene expression was studied in mutants of Escherichia coli B/r containing deletions which fused the l-arabinose gene complex with the leucine operon (the normal gene order being araDABIOC...leuDCBAO). Complementation experiments with stable merodiploids showed that expression of ara genes cis to araC-leu deletions was controlled by the trans-acting product of the araC gene. Expression of ara genes cis to araB-leu deletions was under leucine control. These studies confirm the existence of a region between genes araC and araB essential for normal activator controlled expression of the ara structural genes. One deletion was characterized as an araO-leu deletion. Its effect on ara gene expression was unique in that ara genes were susceptible to potential regulation by both l-arabinose and leucine. These experiments suggest that two different species of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) may be produced for the ara-leu region as a result of this deletion. One, under l-arabinose-activator control, is initiated in the l-arabinose region; the other, under leucine control, is initiated in the leucine region. The latter indicates that araI can be transcribed. Whether araI is transcribed in the former instance (mRNA made under activator control) remains to be established.

  14. Fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis from specifically labeled leucine by isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mathias, M M; Sullivan, A C; Hamilton, J G

    1981-10-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from female rats meal-fed a high-glucose diet were incubated in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate medium containing 16.5 mM glucose, 3H2O, and 14C-labeled amino acids (-)-Hydroxycitrate depressed the incorporation of 3H2O and [14C] alanine into fatty acids and cholesterol. Incorporation of [U-14C]leucine into lipids was not affected but incorporation of 3H2O into lipids was decreased significantly by (-)-hydroxycitrate. (-)-Hydroxycitrate depressed the incorporation of radioactivity from [2-14C]leucine into fatty acids and cholesterol by 61 and 38%, respectively, and stimulated the incorporation of radioactivity from [4,5-3H]leucine 35 and 28%. As [2-14C]leucine labels the acetyl-CoA pool and [4,5-3H]leucine labels the acetoacetate pool, it was concluded that mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA is not incorporated intact into cholesterol, and that acetoacetate can be activated effectively in the liver cytosol for support of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis.

  15. Arabinose-Leucine Deletion Mutants of Escherichia coli B/r

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Donald P.; Englesberg, Ellis

    1969-01-01

    The control of ara gene expression was studied in mutants of Escherichia coli B/r containing deletions which fused the l-arabinose gene complex with the leucine operon (the normal gene order being araDABIOC...leuDCBAO). Complementation experiments with stable merodiploids showed that expression of ara genes cis to araC-leu deletions was controlled by the trans-acting product of the araC gene. Expression of ara genes cis to araB-leu deletions was under leucine control. These studies confirm the existence of a region between genes araC and araB essential for normal activator controlled expression of the ara structural genes. One deletion was characterized as an araO-leu deletion. Its effect on ara gene expression was unique in that ara genes were susceptible to potential regulation by both l-arabinose and leucine. These experiments suggest that two different species of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) may be produced for the ara-leu region as a result of this deletion. One, under l-arabinose-activator control, is initiated in the l-arabinose region; the other, under leucine control, is initiated in the leucine region. The latter indicates that araI can be transcribed. Whether araI is transcribed in the former instance (mRNA made under activator control) remains to be established. PMID:4892369

  16. Functional profiling discovers the dieldrin organochlorinated pesticide affects leucine availability in yeast.

    PubMed

    Gaytán, Brandon D; Loguinov, Alex V; Lantz, Stephen R; Lerot, Jan-Michael; Denslow, Nancy D; Vulpe, Chris D

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to organochlorinated pesticides such as dieldrin has been linked to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, endocrine disruption, and cancer, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity behind these effects remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate, using a functional genomics approach in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that dieldrin alters leucine availability. This model is supported by multiple lines of congruent evidence: (1) mutants defective in amino acid signaling or transport are sensitive to dieldrin, which is reversed by the addition of exogenous leucine; (2) dieldrin sensitivity of wild-type or mutant strains is dependent upon leucine concentration in the media; (3) overexpression of proteins that increase intracellular leucine confer resistance to dieldrin; (4) leucine uptake is inhibited in the presence of dieldrin; and (5) dieldrin induces the amino acid starvation response. Additionally, we demonstrate that appropriate negative regulation of the Ras/protein kinase A pathway, along with an intact pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is required for dieldrin tolerance. Many yeast genes described in this study have human orthologs that may modulate dieldrin toxicity in humans.

  17. Cj1199 Affect the Development of Erythromycin Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni through Regulation of Leucine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Li, Fei; Han, Jing; Foley, Steven L.; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yulian; Huang, Lingli; Sun, Yawei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the biological function of Cj1199 which was overexpressed in the laboratory induced erythromycin resistant strains. The Cj1199 deletion mutant (ΦCj1199) was constructed via insertional inactivation from its parent strain Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168. The ΦCj1199 and NCTC11168 were then subjected to microarray and real-time PCR to find gene pathway of Cj1199. The antimicrobial susceptibility, antimicrobial resistance development, growth characteristics and leucine metabolism were examined to confirm the biological function of Cj1199. Our result showed that a total of 20 genes were down-regulated in ΦCj1199. These genes were mainly involved in leucine biosynthesis, amino acid transport and periplasmic/membrane structure. Compared to NCTC11168, ΦCj1199 was difficult to acquire higher-level erythromycin resistance during the in vitro step-wise selection. The competition growth and leucine-dependent growth assays demonstrated that ΦCj1199 imposed a growth disadvantage under pressure of erythromycin and in the leucine-free medium. In conclusion, Cj1199 gene may directly regulate the leucine biosynthesis and transport and indirectly affect the development of erythromycin resistance in C. jejuni. PMID:28144238

  18. Substrate binding and formation of an occluded state in the leucine transporter.

    PubMed

    Celik, Leyla; Schiøtt, Birgit; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-03-01

    Translocation through the extracellular vestibule and binding of leucine in the leucine transporter (LeuT) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. More than 0.1 mus of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on different combinations of LeuT, bound substrate, and bound structural Na(+) ions to describe molecular events involved in substrate binding and in the formation of the occluded state and to investigate the dynamics of this state. Three structural features are found to be directly involved in the initial steps of leucine transport: a Na(+) ion directly coordinated to leucine (Na-1), two aromatic residues closing the binding site toward the extracellular vestibule (Tyr-108 and Phe-253), and a salt bridge in the extracellular vestibule (Arg-30 and Asp-404). These features account for observed differences between simulations of LeuT with and without bound substrate and for a possible pathway for leucine binding and thereby formation of the occluded LeuT binding site.

  19. Ca2+/calmodulin system: participation on rat sexual hypothalamic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Medina, M; Canchola, E; Vergara-Onofre, M; Rosado, A

    1993-11-01

    Modifications of male rat hypothalamic sexual differentiation after neonatal administration of drugs that participate on the Ca2+/calmodulin system (haloperidol, trifluoperazine, penfluridol, pimozide, and verapamil) were studied. Pups treated 72 h after birth were behaviorally tested on day 120 of extrauterine life. Five tests for homotypical behavior were conducted. Afterwards animals were castrated and tested twice for heterotypical (female) behavior under replacement hormonal therapy. Fifty percent (80% in the case of pimozide) of all treated males showed lordotic behavior compared with none of the controls. Haloperidol (39%, lordosis quotient) and pimozide (40%, lordosis quotient) were more active than the others. Results obtained with verapamil were not statistically different from the controls. Pimozide was the most active agent influencing the appetitive masculine behavior (mount latency, intromission latency, and postejaculatory interval). Verapamil was more efficient than the rest of the drugs on the consummatory behavior (mount latency, intromission frequency, interintromission interval, and ejaculatory latency). Our results support the participation of the Ca2+/calmodulin system in hypothalamic sexual differentiation and in the differential modulation of the masculine and feminine behavioral patterns.

  20. Few isolated neurons in hypothalamic hamartomas may cause gelastic seizures.

    PubMed

    Waldau, Ben; McLendon, Roger E; Fuchs, Herbert E; George, Timothy M; Grant, Gerald A

    2009-01-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are congenital, benign masses in the hypothalamus and tuber cinereum that may cause central precocious puberty and gelastic seizures. Nodules of small neurons are thought to be a universal feature of the microarchitecture of HH lesions associated with epilepsy. Here we describe the case of a 5-year-old boy with gelastic seizures who underwent resection of a HH that contained nodules of glial cells, but only few, randomly distributed neurons. HHs that contain few or no neurons have only been reported thus far in cases associated with precocious puberty. This case demonstrates that few solitary neurons in HHs can drive the development of gelastic seizures, and nodules of small neurons may not be a universal feature of HHs associated with epilepsy. This finding is clinically important since hypothalamic hamartomas with rare neurons can easily be misdiagnosed as pilocytic astrocytomas or subependymomas if their presence is overlooked. A neuronal stain is helpful in making the correct diagnosis in these cases.

  1. Endoscopic disconnection of hypothalamic astrocytoma causing gelastic epilepsy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Seok; Lee, Yun Ho; Shim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Heung Dong

    2009-08-01

    The authors report on a case of juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) and concomitant hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) with gelastic epilepsy that was successfully treated with endoscopic disconnection. This 6-year-old girl presented with prolonged, medically intractable gelastic seizures that were often followed by generalized tonic seizures. An enhancing, low-grade hypothalamic tumor was identified on MR images obtained when she was 11 months old, but no surgical intervention was attempted at that time apart from bur hole drainage of a chronic subdural hemorrhage. In the first surgery, performed when she was 6 years of age, the authors attempted disconnection and tumor sampling; the lesion was revealed to be a JPA. A second endoscopic disconnection was performed 1 year later to improve seizure control and obtain a pathological specimen from the nonenhancing contralateral side. The pathological results after the second surgery revealed that the enhancing mass was a spontaneously regressing JPA and the contralateral nonenhancing mass was an HH. The HH was found as latent tumor and the JPA was the mass causing gelastic epilepsy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with a spontaneously regressing JPA and concomitant HH, both of which were treated by endoscopic disconnection.

  2. Oestrogen Modulates Hypothalamic Control of Energy Homeostasis Through Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Roepke, Troy A.

    2009-01-01

    The control of energy homeostasis in women is correlated with the anorectic effects of oestrogen, which can attenuate body weight gain and reduce food intake in rodent models. This review will investigate the multiple signalling pathways and cellular targets that oestrogen utilises to control energy homeostasis in the hypothalamus. Oestrogen affects all of the hypothalamic nuclei that control energy homeostasis. Oestrogen controls the activity of hypothalamic neurones through gene regulation and neuronal excitability. Oestrogen’s primary cellular pathway is the control of gene transcription through the classical ERs (ERα and ERβ) with ERα having the primary role in energy homeostasis. Oestrogen also controls energy homeostasis through membrane-mediated events via membrane-associated ERs or a novel, putative membrane ER that is coupled to G-proteins. Therefore, oestrogen has at least two receptors with multiple signalling and transcriptional pathways to activate during immediate and long-term anorectic effects. Ultimately, it is the interactions of all the receptor-mediated processes in hypothalamus and other areas of the CNS that will determine the anorectic effects of oestrogen and its control of energy homeostasis. PMID:19076267

  3. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  4. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Reveals Hypothalamic Cell Diversity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renchao; Wu, Xiaoji; Jiang, Lan; Zhang, Yi

    2017-03-28

    The hypothalamus is one of the most complex brain structures involved in homeostatic regulation. Defining cell composition and identifying cell-type-specific transcriptional features of the hypothalamus is essential for understanding its functions and related disorders. Here, we report single-cell RNA sequencing results of adult mouse hypothalamus, which defines 11 non-neuronal and 34 neuronal cell clusters with distinct transcriptional signatures. Analyses of cell-type-specific transcriptomes reveal gene expression dynamics underlying oligodendrocyte differentiation and tanycyte subtypes. Additionally, data analysis provides a comprehensive view of neuropeptide expression across hypothalamic neuronal subtypes and uncover Crabp1(+) and Pax6(+) neuronal populations in specific hypothalamic sub-regions. Furthermore, we found food deprivation exhibited differential transcriptional effects among the different neuronal subtypes, suggesting functional specification of various neuronal subtypes. Thus, the work provides a comprehensive transcriptional perspective of adult hypothalamus, which serves as a valuable resource for dissecting cell-type-specific functions of this complex brain region.

  5. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  6. Molecular interrogation of hypothalamic organization reveals distinct dopamine neuronal subtypes.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Roman A; Zeisel, Amit; Bakker, Joanne; Girach, Fatima; Hellysaz, Arash; Tomer, Raju; Alpár, Alán; Mulder, Jan; Clotman, Frédéric; Keimpema, Erik; Hsueh, Brian; Crow, Ailey K; Martens, Henrik; Schwindling, Christian; Calvigioni, Daniela; Bains, Jaideep S; Máté, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Rendeiro, Andre; Farlik, Matthias; Uhlén, Mathias; Wulff, Peer; Bock, Christoph; Broberger, Christian; Deisseroth, Karl; Hökfelt, Tomas; Linnarsson, Sten; Horvath, Tamas L; Harkany, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    The hypothalamus contains the highest diversity of neurons in the brain. Many of these neurons can co-release neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in a use-dependent manner. Investigators have hitherto relied on candidate protein-based tools to correlate behavioral, endocrine and gender traits with hypothalamic neuron identity. Here we map neuronal identities in the hypothalamus by single-cell RNA sequencing. We distinguished 62 neuronal subtypes producing glutamatergic, dopaminergic or GABAergic markers for synaptic neurotransmission and harboring the ability to engage in task-dependent neurotransmitter switching. We identified dopamine neurons that uniquely coexpress the Onecut3 and Nmur2 genes, and placed these in the periventricular nucleus with many synaptic afferents arising from neuromedin S(+) neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. These neuroendocrine dopamine cells may contribute to the dopaminergic inhibition of prolactin secretion diurnally, as their neuromedin S(+) inputs originate from neurons expressing Per2 and Per3 and their tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation is regulated in a circadian fashion. Overall, our catalog of neuronal subclasses provides new understanding of hypothalamic organization and function.

  7. A treasure trove of hypothalamic neurocircuitries governing body weight homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Claudia R; Coppari, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Changes in physical activities and feeding habits have transformed the historically rare disease of obesity into a modern metabolic pandemic. Obesity occurs when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure over time. This energy imbalance significantly increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus and as such represents an enormous socioeconomic burden and health threat. To combat obesity, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms and neurocircuitries underlying normal body weight homeostasis is required. In the 1940s, pioneering lesion experiments unveiled the importance of medial and lateral hypothalamic structures. In the 1980s and 1990s, several neuropeptides and peripheral hormones critical for appropriate feeding behavior, energy expenditure, and hence body weight homeostasis were identified. In the 2000s, results from metabolic analyses of genetically engineered mice bearing mutations only in selected neuronal groups greatly advanced our knowledge of the peripheral/brain feedback-loop modalities by which central neurons control energy balance. In this review, we will summarize these recent progresses with particular emphasis on the biochemical identities of hypothalamic neurons and molecular components underlying normal appetite, energy expenditure, and body weight homeostasis. We will also parse which of those neurons and molecules are critical components of homeostatic adaptive pathways against obesity induced by hypercaloric feeding.

  8. Early effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary function

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, K.S.; Tse, V.K.; Wang, C.; Yeung, R.T.; Ma, J.T.; Ho, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary function was studied in 31 patients before and after cranial irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The estimated radiotherapy (RT) doses to the hypothalamus and pituitary were 3979 +/- 78 (+/- SD) and 6167 +/- 122 centiGrays, respectively. All patients had normal pituitary function before RT. One year after RT, there was a significant decrease in the integrated serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In the male patients, basal serum FSH significantly increased, while basal serum LH and testosterone did not change. Moreover, in response to LHRH, the integrated FSH response was increased while that of LH was decreased. Such discordant changes in FSH and LH may be explained by a defect in LHRH pulsatile release involving predominantly a decrease in pulse frequency. The peak serum TSH response to TRH became delayed in 28 patients, suggesting a defect in TRH release. Twenty-one patients were reassessed 2 yr after RT. Their mean basal serum T4 and plasma cortisol levels had significantly decreased. Hyperprolactinemia associated with oligomenorrhoea was found in 3 women. Further impairment in the secretion of GH, FSH, LH, TSH, and ACTH had occurred, and 4 patients had hypopituitarism. Thus, progressive impairment in hypothalamic-pituitary function occurs after cranial irradiation and can be demonstrated as early as 1 yr after RT.

  9. [Symptomatic hypersomnia due to orexin deficiency in hypothalamic lesions].

    PubMed

    Kanbayashi, Takashi; Arii, Junko; Kubota, Hiroaki; Yano, Tamami; Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Yoshikawa, Sousuke; Tohyama, Jun; Sawaishi, Yukio

    2006-09-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy and other abnormal manifestations of REM sleep. Recently, it was discovered that the pathophysiology of idiopathic narcolepsy-cataplexy is linked to orexin ligand deficiency in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Orexin neurons localize in the posterior hypothalamic area, which was previously described as "waking center" by von Economo in 1920s. Hypersomnia due to orexin ligand deficiency can also occur during the course of other neurological conditions, such as hypothalamic tumor, encephalopathy and demyelinating disorder (i.e. symptomatic hypersomnia). We experienced 8 pediatric cases with symptomatic hypersomnia. These cases were diagnosed as brain tumor (n = 2), head trauma (n = 1), encephalopathy (n = 1), demyelinating disorder (n = 3) and infarction (n = 1). Six pediatric cases with orexin measurements from the literatures were additionally included and total 14 cases were studied. Although it is difficult to rule out the comorbidity of idiopathic narcolepsy in some cases, a review of the case histories reveals numerous unquestionable cases of symptomatic hypersomnia. In these cases, the occurrences of the hypersomnia run parallel with the rise and fall of the causative diseases. Most of symptomatic hypersomnia cases show both extended nocturnal sleep time and EDS consisting of prolonged sleep episodes of NREM sleep. The features of nocturnal sleep and EDS in symptomatic hypersomnia are more similar to idiopathic hypersomnia than to narcolepsy.

  10. Hypothalamic leptin-neurotensin-hypocretin neuronal networks in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levitas-Djerbi, Talia; Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-04-01

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13 amino acid neuropeptide that is expressed in the hypothalamus. In mammals, NTS-producing neurons that express leptin receptor (LepRb) regulate the function of hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) and dopamine neurons. Thus, the hypothalamic leptin-NTS-HCRT neuronal network orchestrates key homeostatic output, including sleep, feeding, and reward. However, the intricate mechanisms of the circuitry and the unique role of NTS-expressing neurons remain unclear. We studied the NTS neuronal networks in zebrafish and cloned the genes encoding the NTS neuropeptide and receptor (NTSR). Similar to mammals, the ligand is expressed primarily in the hypothalamus, while the receptor is expressed widely throughout the brain in zebrafish. A portion of hypothalamic nts-expressing neurons are inhibitory and some coexpress leptin receptor (lepR1). As in mammals, NTS and HCRT neurons are localized adjacently in the hypothalamus. To track the development and axonal projection of NTS neurons, the NTS promoter was isolated. Transgenesis and double labeling of NTS and HCRT neurons showed that NTS axons project toward HCRT neurons, some of which express ntsr. Moreover, another target of NTS neurons is ntsr-expressing dopaminergeric neurons. These findings suggest structural circuitry between leptin, NTS, and hypocretinergic or dopaminergic neurons and establish the zebrafish as a model to study the role of these neuronal circuits in the regulation of feeding, sleep, and reward.

  11. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Guaraldi, Federica; Grottoli, Silvia; Arvat, Emanuela; Ghigo, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A). The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data. PMID:26239463

  12. [A successful surgical case of a hypothalamic hamartoma with gelastic seizure: a case report].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoaki; Nishimura, Shinjitsu; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Furuno, Yuichi; Mino, Masaki; Hori, Emiko; Kaimori, Mitsuomi; Shirane, Reizou; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2009-08-01

    Gelastic seizure is a rare form of epilepsy defined as automatic bouts of laughter without mirth commonly associated with a hypothalamic hamartoma. Surgical treatment of hypothalamic hamartomas is associated with a high risk of complications because of the close vicinity of adjacent structures such as the optic tracts and mammillary bodies. This case was an 11-year-old girl who presented with gelastic seizure and complicated partial seizure. She developed gelastic seizure at a frequency of 10 bouts per day. She was found to have an elliptical mass close to the left hypothalamus. The signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was consistent with hypothalamic hamartoma. The patient underwent surgical resection by a subtemporal approach. Pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of hypothalamic hamartoma. Postoperative MRI demonstrated that the hypothalamic hamartoma was successfully resected. Twenty four months after surgery, complicated partial seizure in this patient has improved to Engel's class 1a and gelastic seizure has improved to Engel's class IIIa.

  13. Amphetamine, an appetite suppressant, decreases neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity in rat hypothalamic paraventriculum.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Yang, Shun-Fa; Kuo, Dong-Yih

    2005-04-15

    Amphetamine (AMPH) is a well-known anorectic agent. The mechanism underlying the anorectic response of AMPH has been attributed to its inhibitory effect on hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY), an orexigenic peptide in the brain. However, there is still lack of genomic or in situ immunohistochemical evidence to prove it. The present study was aimed to assess the molecular mechanism of AMPH anorexia by immunostaining of hypothalamic NPY protein in the area of paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and by detecting the change of hypothalamic NPY mRNA level using RT-PCR. Results revealed that an AMPH treatment might reduce the expression of NPY at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Comparatively, a treatment of clomipramine, a serotonin transporter inhibitor, was unable to reduce NPY mRNA level, revealing the noninvolvement of hypothalamic NPY gene in serotonin anorexia. Our results provided genomic and in situ immunohistochemical evidence to confirm the mediation of hypothalamic NPY neurons in the anorectic action of AMPH.

  14. Asymmetric photolysis of /RS/-leucine with circularly polarized ultraviolet light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Bonner, W. A.; Massey, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    (RS)-leucine in 0.1 M HCl solution has been subjected to photolysis with 212.8-nm right (R-) and left circularly polarized light (LCPL) obtained from a laser source. RCPL preferentially photolyzed the (R)-leucine component and LCPL the (S)-leucine component of the RS substrate. The enantiomeric excess produced were 1.98% for the 59% conversion with RCPL and 2.50% for the 75% conversion with LCPL. These 'equal and opposite' effects represent the second highest enantiomeric enrichments yet reported for an asymmetric photolysis and the first ever reported for a prebiotically important substrate - an amino acid. Implications regarding the origin of optical activity are briefly discussed.

  15. TGFβ1-induced leucine limitation uncovered by differential ribosome codon reading.

    PubMed

    Loayza-Puch, Fabricio; Rooijers, Koos; Zijlstra, Jelle; Moumbeini, Behzad; Zaal, Esther A; Oude Vrielink, Joachim F; Lopes, Rui; Pineiro Ugalde, Alejandro; Berkers, Celia R; Agami, Reuven

    2017-03-08

    Cancer cells modulate their metabolic networks to support cell proliferation and a higher demand of building blocks. These changes may restrict the availability of certain amino acids for protein synthesis, which can be utilized for cancer therapy. However, little is known about the amino acid demand changes occurring during aggressive and invasive stages of cancer. Recently, we developed diricore, an approach based on ribosome profiling that can uncover amino acid limitations. Here, we applied diricore to a cellular model in which epithelial breast cells respond rapidly to TGFβ1, a cytokine essential for cancer progression and metastasis, and uncovered shortage of leucine. Further analyses indicated that TGFβ1 treatment of human breast epithelial cells reduces the expression of SLC3A2, a subunit of the leucine transporter, which diminishes leucine uptake and inhibits cell proliferation. Thus, we identified a specific amino acid limitation associated with the TGFβ1 response, a vulnerability that might be associated with aggressiveness in cancer.

  16. Morphological templating of metastable calcium carbonates by the amino acid leucine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. P.; Parker, J. E.; Street, S. R.; Tang, C. C.

    2011-03-01

    The in vitro precipitation of the metastable CaCO3 phases aragonite and vaterite in the presence of leucine is investigated. Under normal conditions, the production of CaCO3 via the hydrolysis of urea method favours the formation of regular needle-like aragonite crystals, with very minor quantities of vaterite and calcite. However in the presence of leucine, aragonite forms highly branched structures and the vaterite yield is increased, forming flower-like clusters composed of nano-thin sheets. Both the degree of aragonite branching and the occurrence, regularity of shape and number of vaterite "petals" increases with leucine concentration. The two phases exhibit different variations in their crystallographic parameters with increasing concentration, while the molecular structure appears unaffected.

  17. Incorporation of fucose and leucine into PNS myelin proteins in nerves undergoing early Wallerian degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.G.; Baughman, S.; Scheidler, D.M.

    1981-02-01

    The simultaneous incorporation of (/sup 3/H)fucose and (1-/sup 14/C)leucine into normal rat sciatic nerve was examined using an in vitro incubation model. A linear rate of protein precursor uptake was found in purified myelin protein over 1/2-6 hr of incubation utilizing a supplemented medium containing amino acids. This model was then used to examine myelin protein synthesis in nerves undergoing degeneration at 1-4 days following a crush injury. Data showed a statistically significant decrease in the ratio of fucose to leucine at 2, 3, and 4 days of degeneration, which was the consequence of a significant increase in leucine uptake. These results, plus substantial protein recovery in axotomized nerves, are indicative of active synthesis of proteins that purify with myelin during early Wallerian degeneration.

  18. Leucine aminopeptidase: an inducible component of the defense response in Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato).

    PubMed

    Pautot, V; Holzer, F M; Reisch, B; Walling, L L

    1993-11-01

    A leucine aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.1) cDNA clone (DR57) that was induced in response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (P.s. tomato) infection was isolated using a subtractive hybridization-enriched cDNA probe. Genomic DNA blot analysis showed that the tomato genome had two leucine aminopeptidase genes. The levels of DR57 mRNAs after P.s. tomato infection and mechanical wounding were determined in two inbred tomato lines that exhibit susceptibility and resistance to P.s. tomato. DR57 mRNAs were detected 12 hours after infection and 4 hours after wounding. Furthermore, DR57 mRNAs were systemically induced in response to wounding. DR57 mRNAs were induced in leaves after Spodoptera littoralis feeding but were not detected in detached leaf controls. Possible roles for the DR57 leucine aminopeptidase in the defense reactions are discussed.

  19. The leucine-responsive regulatory protein, a global regulator of metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, J M; Matthews, R G

    1994-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) regulates the expression of more than 40 genes and proteins in Escherichia coli. Among the operons that are positively regulated by Lrp are operons involved in amino acid biosynthesis (ilvIH, serA)), in the biosynthesis of pili (pap, fan, fim), and in the assimilation of ammonia (glnA, gltBD). Negatively regulated operons include operons involved in amino acid catabolism (sdaA, tdh) and peptide transport (opp) and the operon coding for Lrp itself (lrp). Detailed studies of a few members of the regulon have shown that Lrp can act directly to activate or repress transcription of target operons. A substantial fraction of operons regulated by Lrp are also regulated by leucine, and the effect of leucine on expression of these operons requires a functional Lrp protein. The patterns of regulation are surprising and interesting: in some cases activation or repression mediated by Lrp is antagonized by leucine, in other cases Lrp-mediated activation or repression is potentiated by leucine, and in still other cases leucine has no effect on Lrp-mediated regulation. Current research is just beginning to elucidate the detailed mechanisms by which Lrp can mediate such a broad spectrum of regulatory effects. Our view of the role of Lrp in metabolism may change as more members of the regulon are identified and their regulation characterized, but at this point Lrp seems to be important in regulating nitrogen metabolism and one-carbon metabolism, permitting adaptations to feast and to famine. PMID:7968922

  20. The I2C family from the wilt disease resistance locus I2 belongs to the nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat superfamily of plant resistance genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ori, N; Eshed, Y; Paran, I; Presting, G; Aviv, D; Tanksley, S; Zamir, D; Fluhr, R

    1997-01-01

    Characterization of plant resistance genes is an important step in understanding plant defense mechanisms. Fusarium oxysporum f sp lycopersici is the causal agent of a vascular wilt disease in tomato. Genes conferring resistance to plant vascular diseases have yet to be described molecularly. Members of a new multigene family, complex I2C, were isolated by map-based cloning from the I2 F. o. lycopersici race 2 resistance locus. The genes show structural similarity to the group of recently isolated resistance genes that contain a nucleotide binding motif and leucine-rich repeats. Importantly, the presence of I2C antisense transgenes abrogated race 2 but not race 1 resistance in otherwise normal plants. Expression of the complete sense I2C-1 transgene conferred significant but partial resistance to F. o. lycopersici race 2. All members of the I2C gene family have been mapped genetically and are dispersed on three different chromosomes. Some of the I2C members cosegregate with other tomato resistance loci. Comparison within the leucine-rich repeat region of I2C gene family members shows that they differ from each other mainly by insertions or deletions. PMID:9144960

  1. Down Regulation of Asparagine Synthetase and 3-Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase, and the Up-Regulation of Serine Dehydratase in Rat Liver from Intake of Excess Amount of Leucine Are Not Related to Leucine-Caused Amino Acid Imbalance.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryoji; Takai, Marie; Namaki, Hiroya; Minami, Kimiko; Imamura, Wataru; Kato, Hisanori; Kamei, Yasutomi; Kanamoto, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine synthetase (ASNS), 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and serine dehydratase (SDS) in rat liver are expressed in response to protein and amino acid intake. In the present study, we examined the expression of these enzymes in relation to amino acid imbalance caused by leucine. Rats were subjected to leucine administration in the diet or orally between meals. Consumption of more than 2% leucine in a 6% casein diet suppressed food intake and caused growth retardation in a dose-dependent manner, but this was not seen in a 12% or 40% casein diet. ASNS and PHGDH expression in the liver was significantly induced by the 6% casein diet and was suppressed by leucine in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the SDS expression was induced. These effects were leucine specific and not seen with ingestion of isoleucine or valine. However, leucine orally administered between meals did not change the food intake or growth of rats fed a 6% casein die, though it similarly affected the expression of ASNS, PHGDH and SDS in the liver. These results suggest that the growth retardation caused by leucine imbalance was mainly because of the suppression of food intake, and demonstrated that there are no causal relationships between ASNS, PHGDH and SDS expression and amino acid imbalance caused by leucine.

  2. Computational Analysis of the Hypothalamic Control of Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Tabe-Bordbar, Shayan; Anastasio, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Food-intake control is mediated by a heterogeneous network of different neural subtypes, distributed over various hypothalamic nuclei and other brain structures, in which each subtype can release more than one neurotransmitter or neurohormone. The complexity of the interactions of these subtypes poses a challenge to understanding their specific contributions to food-intake control, and apparent consistencies in the dataset can be contradicted by new findings. For example, the growing consensus that arcuate nucleus neurons expressing Agouti-related peptide (AgRP neurons) promote feeding, while those expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC neurons) suppress feeding, is contradicted by findings that low AgRP neuron activity and high POMC neuron activity can be associated with high levels of food intake. Similarly, the growing consensus that GABAergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus suppress feeding is contradicted by findings suggesting the opposite. Yet the complexity of the food-intake control network admits many different network behaviors. It is possible that anomalous associations between the responses of certain neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with known interactions, but their effect on feeding depends on the responses of the other neural subtypes in the network. We explored this possibility through computational analysis. We made a computer model of the interactions between the hypothalamic and other neural subtypes known to be involved in food-intake control, and optimized its parameters so that model behavior matched observed behavior over an extensive test battery. We then used specialized computational techniques to search the entire model state space, where each state represents a different configuration of the responses of the units (model neural subtypes) in the network. We found that the anomalous associations between the responses of certain hypothalamic neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with the known structure

  3. Measurement of L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine kinetics in splanchnic and leg tissues in humans. Effect of amino acid infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, R.A.; Glickman, M.G.; Castellino, P.; Louard, R.J.; DeFronzo, R.A.

    1988-10-01

    Although whole-body leucine flux is widely measured to study body protein turnover in humans, the contribution of specific tissues to the total-body measurement remains unknown. By combining the organ-balance technique with the systemic infusion of L-(1-14C)leucine, we quantitated leucine production and disposal by splanchnic and leg tissues and by the whole body, simultaneously, in six normal men before and during amino acid infusion. At steady state, disposal of arterial leucine by splanchnic and leg tissues was calculated from the percent extraction (E) of L-(1-14C)leucine counts: uptake = E x (Leu)a x flow. Tissue release of cold leucine (from protein turnover) into vein was calculated as the difference between leucine uptake and the net tissue leucine balance. In the postabsorptive state, despite substantial (P less than .01) extraction of L-(1-14C)leucine by splanchnic (23 +/- 1%) and leg (18 +/- 2%) tissues, net leucine balance across both tissue beds was small, indicating active simultaneous disposal and production of leucine at nearly equivalent rates. Splanchnic tissues accounted for approximately 50% of the measured total-body leucine flux. During amino acid infusion, the net leucine balance across splanchnic and leg tissues became positive, reflecting not only an increase in leucine uptake but also a marked suppression (by approximately 50%, P less than .02) of cold leucine release. This reduction in splanchnic and leg leucine release was indicated by a sharp decline in whole-body endogenous leucine flux.

  4. Leucine Promotes Proliferation and Differentiation of Primary Preterm Rat Satellite Cells in Part through mTORC1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie-Min; Yu, Mu-Xue; Shen, Zhen-Yu; Guo, Chu-Yi; Zhuang, Si-Qi; Qiu, Xiao-Shan

    2015-05-08

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to leucine modulates many cellular and developmental processes. However, in the context of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation, the role of leucine and mTORC1 is less known. This study investigates the role of leucine in the process of proliferation and differentiation of primary preterm rat satellite cells, and the relationship with mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation. Dissociation of primary satellite cells occurred with type I collagenase and trypsin, and purification, via different speed adherence methods. Satellite cells with positive expression of Desmin were treated with leucine and rapamycin. We observed that leucine promoted proliferation and differentiation of primary satellite cells and increased the phosphorylation of mTOR. Rapamycin inhibited proliferation and differentiation, as well as decreased the phosphorylation level of mTOR. Furthermore, leucine increased the expression of MyoD and myogenin while the protein level of MyoD decreased due to rapamycin. However, myogenin expressed no affect by rapamycin. In conclusion, leucine may up-regulate the activation of mTORC1 to promote proliferation and differentiation of primary preterm rat satellite cells. We have shown that leucine promoted the differentiation of myotubes in part through the mTORC1-MyoD signal pathway.

  5. Effect of dehydration on hypothalamic control of evaporation in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M A; Doris, P A

    1982-01-01

    1. Cats were surgically prepared with intracranial thermodes for heating of the hypothalamic thermosensitive area or with venous cannulae for measurement of blood volume and plasma osmolality. They were kept in an environmental chamber in which the ambient temperature was cycled between 25 and 38 degrees C on an 18:6 hr diurnal schedule. 2. Measurements of blood volume and plasma osmolality and of the evaporative response to hypothalamic heating were made during the 38 degrees C phase of the diurnal temperature cycle in animals when they were hydrated ad lib and in the same animals after 72--96 hr of water deprivation. 3. Water deprivation produced a loss of 10% of the body weight, a significant rise in plasma osmolality and a significant fall in blood volume. 4. Hypothalamic heating in hydrated animals generated a highly significant, positive, linear relationship between hypothalamic temperature and evaporative heat loss in every case. 5. In dehydrated animals, the evaporative response to hypothalamic heating was reduced. Rates of evaporation at a given hypothalamic temperature were lower and the slopes of the lines relating evaporative heat loss to hypothalamic temperature were significantly reduced. 6. It is concluded that dehydration reduces the thermal responsiveness of central neural structures controlling evaporation in the cat. PMID:7069627

  6. Hypothalamic Dysfunction and Multiple Sclerosis: Implications for Fatigue and Weight Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Yadav, Vijayshree; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-11-01

    Signs and symptoms of multiple sclerosis are usually attributed to demyelinating lesions in the spinal cord or cerebral cortex. The hypothalamus is a region that is often overlooked yet controls many important homeostatic functions, including those that are perturbed in multiple sclerosis. In this review we discuss how hypothalamic dysfunction may contribute to signs and symptoms in people with multiple sclerosis. While dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is common in multiple sclerosis, the effects and mechanisms of this dysfunction are not well understood. We discuss three hypothalamic mechanisms of fatigue in multiple sclerosis: (1) general hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity, (2) disordered orexin neurotransmission, (3) abnormal cortisol secretion. We then review potential mechanisms of weight dysregulation caused by hypothalamic dysfunction. Lastly, we propose future studies and therapeutics to better understand and treat hypothalamic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. Hypothalamic dysfunction appears to be common in multiple sclerosis, yet current studies are underpowered and contradictory. Future studies should contain larger sample sizes and standardize hormone and neuropeptide measurements.

  7. Hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate complex behaviours after stress

    PubMed Central

    Füzesi, Tamás; Daviu, Nuria; Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I.; Bonin, Robert P.; Bains, Jaideep S.

    2016-01-01

    All organisms possess innate behavioural and physiological programmes that ensure survival. In order to have maximum adaptive benefit, these programmes must be sufficiently flexible to account for changes in the environment. Here we show that hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate an environmentally flexible repertoire of behaviours that emerge after acute stress in mice. Optical silencing of CRH neurons disrupts the organization of individual behaviours after acute stress. These behavioural patterns shift according to the environment after stress, but this environmental sensitivity is blunted by activation of PVN CRH neurons. These findings provide evidence that PVN CRH cells are part of a previously unexplored circuit that matches precise behavioural patterns to environmental context following stress. Overactivity in this network in the absence of stress may contribute to environmental ambivalence, resulting in context-inappropriate behavioural strategies. PMID:27306314

  8. Surgical management of hypothalamic hamartomas in patients with gelastic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Addas, Bassam; Sherman, Elisabeth M S; Hader, Walter J

    2008-09-01

    Gelastic epilepsy (GE) associated with hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) is now a well-characterized clinical syndrome consisting of gelastic seizures starting in infancy, medically refractory seizures with or without the development of multiple seizure types, and behavioral and cognitive decline. It has been postulated that the development of the HH-GE syndrome is a result of a progressive epileptic encephalopathy or secondary epileptogenesis, which is potentially reversible with treatment of the HH. A variety of surgical options for the treatment of HHs exist, including open and endoscopic procedures, radiosurgery, interstitial radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation. Surgical treatment can result in seizure freedom in up to 50% of patients and can be accompanied by significant improvements in behavior, cognition, and quality of life. Partial treatment of HHs may be sufficient to reduce seizure frequency and improve behavior and quality of life with less risk. A component of reversible cognitive dysfunction may be present in some patients with an HH-GE syndrome.

  9. [Cortico-hypothalamic interneuronal correlation during learning in cats].

    PubMed

    Merzhanova, G Kh; Berg, A I

    1988-01-01

    Spatial-temporal organization of neuronal activity in the motor cortex and hypothalamus lateral nucleus (inter- and intrastructural neuronal interactions) in cats with elaborated conditioned alimentary instrumental reflexes were studied by means of recording the multineuronal activity of structures under investigation and with the use of cross-correlation method of analysis. An increase was shown of the number of cortico-hypothalamic neurones pairs acting in interconnection after elaboration of conditioned reflexes, and a decrease of their number at extinction due to interaction with temporal delays (up to 30 ms). Local (intrastructural) connections of the motor cortex and lateral hypothalamus had opposite dynamics at extinction of the conditioned reflexes: the number of the first increased and the number of the second decreased. The character of the interconnected activity of neurones pairs of interstructural interaction is discussed.

  10. Ventromedial hypothalamic neurons control a defensive emotion state.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Prabhat S; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Remedios, Ryan; Cai, Haijiang; Yilmaz, Melis; Meister, Markus; Anderson, David J

    2015-03-06

    Defensive behaviors reflect underlying emotion states, such as fear. The hypothalamus plays a role in such behaviors, but prevailing textbook views depict it as an effector of upstream emotion centers, such as the amygdala, rather than as an emotion center itself. We used optogenetic manipulations to probe the function of a specific hypothalamic cell type that mediates innate defensive responses. These neurons are sufficient to drive multiple defensive actions, and required for defensive behaviors in diverse contexts. The behavioral consequences of activating these neurons, moreover, exhibit properties characteristic of emotion states in general, including scalability, (negative) valence, generalization and persistence. Importantly, these neurons can also condition learned defensive behavior, further refuting long-standing claims that the hypothalamus is unable to support emotional learning and therefore is not an emotion center. These data indicate that the hypothalamus plays an integral role to instantiate emotion states, and is not simply a passive effector of upstream emotion centers.

  11. Thiamine deficiency induces anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Alimov, A P; Wang, H; Frank, J A; Katz, W; Xu, M; Ke, Z-J; Luo, J

    2014-05-16

    Obesity and eating disorders are prevailing health concerns worldwide. It is important to understand the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can cause a number of disorders in humans, such as Beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We demonstrated here that TD caused anorexia in C57BL/6 mice. After feeding a TD diet for 16days, the mice displayed a significant decrease in food intake and an increase in resting energy expenditure (REE), which resulted in a severe weight loss. At the 22nd day, the food intake was reduced by 69% and 74% for male and female mice, respectively in TD group. The REE increased by ninefolds in TD group. The loss of body weight (17-24%) was similar between male and female animals and mainly resulted from the reduction of fat mass (49% decrease). Re-supplementation of thiamine (benfotiamine) restored animal's appetite, leading to a total recovery of body weight. The hypothalamic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical regulator of food intake. TD inhibited the phosphorylation of AMPK in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus without affecting its expression. TD-induced inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation was reversed once thiamine was re-supplemented. In contrast, TD increased AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle and upregulated the uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 in brown adipose tissues which was consistent with increased basal energy expenditure. Re-administration of thiamine stabilized AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle as well as energy expenditure. Taken together, TD may induce anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK activity. With a simultaneous increase in energy expenditure, TD caused an overall body weight loss. The results suggest that the status of thiamine levels in the body may affect food intake and body weight.

  12. Effects of taurine, homotaurine and GABA on hypothalamic and striatal dopamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Panula-Lehto, E; Mäkinen, M; Ahtee, L

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the effects of taurine on hypothalamic and striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission we compared its effects to those of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and homotaurine (a GABAA-receptor agonist) on hypothalamic and striatal concentrations of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and, in the case of striatum, 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) in rats. In addition, hypothalamic and striatal 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) und 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, hypothalamic noradrenaline (NA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol sulfate, and pituitary DA concentrations were also measured. The amino acids were injected into the lateral brain ventricles of conscious male rats in doses of 10 and 36 mumol/rat, and rat were sacrificed 15 and 60 min later, respectively. Homotaurine (by 11%) but not the other two amino acids elevated striatal DA, whereas hypothalamic DA was increased by both taurine (36%) and homotaurine (31%). All three amino acids at 36 mumol elevated striatal DOPAC, homotaurine (51%) more than taurine (31%) or GABA (30%), and hypothalamic DOPAC, both taurine (102%) and homotaurine (82%) clearly more than GABA (34%). Neither striatal nor hypothalamic HVA was altered by any of the amino acids. At 10 mumol the amino acids decreased striatal 3-MT by about 40%. At 36 mumol taurine and homotaurine reduced 3-MT by about 70%, whereas increasing the dose of GABA did not further reduce 3-MT. Both taurine and homotaurine at 36 mumol decreased hypothalamic NA content. Neither hypothalamic nor striatal 5-HT metabolism was altered. In the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary gland taurine at 10 mumol but not at 36 mumol slightly (20%) increased DA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Increasing leucine concentration stimulates mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling and cell growth in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Areta, José L; Hawley, John A; Ye, Ji-Ming; Chan, M H Stanley; Coffey, Vernon G

    2014-11-01

    Leucine is a key amino acid for initiating translation in muscle cells, but the dose-dependent effects of leucine on intracellular signaling are poorly characterized. This study examined the effect that increasing doses of leucine would have on changes in mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated signaling, rates of protein synthesis, and cell size in C2C12 cells. We hypothesized that a leucine "threshold" exists, which represents the minimum stimulus required to initiate mTOR signaling in muscle cells. Acute exposure to 1.5, 3.2, 5.0, and 16.1 mM leucine increased phosphorylation of mTOR(Ser2448) (~1.4-fold; P < .04), 4E-BP1 (Thr37/46) (~1.9-fold; P < .001), and rpS6(Ser235/6) (~2.3-fold; P < .001). However, only p70S6k(Thr389) exhibited a dose-dependent response to leucine with all treatments higher than control (~4-fold; P < .001) and at least 5 mM higher than the 1.5-mM concentration (1.2-fold; P < .02). Rates of protein synthesis were not altered by any treatment. Seven days of exposure to 0.5, 1.5, 5.0, and 16.5 mM leucine resulted in an increase in cell size in at least 5 mM treatments (~1.6-fold, P < .001 vs control). Our findings indicate that even at low leucine concentrations, phosphorylation of proteins regulating translation initiation signaling is enhanced. The phosphorylation of p70S6k(Thr389) follows a leucine dose-response relationship, although this was not reflected by the acute protein synthetic response. Nevertheless, under the conditions of the present study, it appears that leucine concentrations of at least 5 mM are necessary to enhance cell growth.

  14. Gelastic seizures and low-grade hypothalamic astrocytoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Spagnoli, Diego; Sciscio, Nicola; Russo, Francesco; Villani, Roberto Matteo

    2002-04-01

    The typical, well recognized childhood epilepsy syndrome caused by hypothalamic hamartoma is characterized by early-onset, stereotyped attacks of uncontrollable laughter, frequent refractory seizures with progressive cognitive deterioration and severe behavioral problems. Here, we report a 17-year-old patient with gelastic phenomenon started in the neonatal period, later on associated with drug resistant polymorphic seizures, intellectual deficit and behavioral disorders, who improved by partial resection of an expected hypothalamic hamartoma that, in turn, resulted to be a hypothalamic low-grade astrocytoma.

  15. Leucine pulses enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis during continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infants unable to maintain oral feeding can be nourished by orogastric tube. We have shown that orogastric continuous feeding restricts muscle protein synthesis compared with intermittent bolus feeding in neonatal pigs. To determine whether leucine leu infusion can be used to enhance protein synthes...

  16. Prolonged leucine infusion differentially affects tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine (Leu) acutely stimulates protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway. To determine whether Leu can stimulate protein synthesis in muscles of different fiber types and visceral tissues of the neonate for a prolonged period and to determine the ...

  17. 'Zipbody' leucine zipper-fused Fab in E. coli in vitro and in vivo expression systems.

    PubMed

    Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Fukui, Kansuke; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Hashimura, Dai; Miyake, Shiro; Hirakawa, Yuki; Yamasaki, Tomomi; Kojima, Takaaki; Nakano, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    A small antibody fragment, fragment of antigen binding (Fab), is favorable for various immunological assays. However, production efficiency of active Fab in microorganisms depends considerably on the clones. In this study, leucine zipper-peptide pairs that dimerize in parallel (ACID-p1 (LZA)/BASE-p1 (LZB) or c-Jun/c-Fos) were fused to the C-terminus of heavy chain (Hc, VH-CH1) and light chain (Lc, VL-CL), respectively, to accelerate the association of Hc and Lc to form Fab in Escherichia coli in vivo and in vitro expression systems. The leucine zipper-fused Fab named 'Zipbody' was constructed using anti-E. coli O157 monoclonal antibody obtained from mouse hybridoma and produced in both in vitro and in vivo expression systems in an active form, whereas Fab without the leucine zipper fusion was not. Similarly, Zipbody of rabbit monoclonal antibody produced in in vitro expression showed significant activity. The purified, mouse Zipbody produced in the E. coli strain Shuffle T7 Express had specificity toward the antigen; in bio-layer interferometry analysis, the KD value was measured to be 1.5-2.0 × 10(-8) M. These results indicate that leucine zipper fusion to Fab C-termini markedly enhances active Fab formation in E. coli.

  18. Preferential Enrichment of DL-Leucine Using Cocrystal Formation With Oxalic Acid Under Nonequilibrium Crystallization Conditions.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Kochunnoonny; Takahashi, Hiroki; Morita, Yoko; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Iwama, Sekai; Tsue, Hirohito; Tamura, Rui

    2015-07-01

    By utilizing the preferential enrichment (PE) technique, we achieved an improved enantiomeric resolution of DL-leucine (Leu) using a 1:1 cocrystal (DL-) of DL-Leu and oxalic acid. The crystal structure analysis of DL- indicated the occurrence of a novel type of phase transition and subsequent preferential redissolution of one enantiomer from the resulting crystals into solution.

  19. Role of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in bone acquisition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have both anabolic and catabolic effects on bone. However, no GC anabolic effect mediator has been identified to date. In this report, we provide the first evidence that glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a GC anti-inflammatory effect mediator, can enhance bone forma...

  20. Small-molecule probe using dual signals to monitor leucine aminopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hey Young; Shim, So Hee; Baek, Luck Ju; Hong, Jong-In

    2011-04-15

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are widely distributed in organisms from bacteria to humans, and play crucial roles in cell maintenance and cell growth. Thus, assays for LAP are necessary for measuring its activity and inhibitor potency. In this Letter, we report a small-molecule probe which exhibits colorimetric and fluorogenic changes according to LAP activity.

  1. Leucine supplementation has an anabolic effect on proteins in rabbit skin wound and muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Chinkes, David L; Wolfe, Robert R

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the effect of leucine supplementation on protein metabolism in skin wounds and muscle in anesthetized rabbits. l-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine was infused on d 7 after the ear was scalded, and the scalded ear and uninjured hindlimb were used as arteriovenous units to reflect protein kinetics in skin wounds and muscle. In comparison with a commercially available amino acid solution (10% Travasol), isonitrogenous [1638 micromol/(kg . h)] infusion of the amino acid solution with supplemental leucine to account for 35% of total nitrogen increased the net phenylalanine balance (P < 0.05) in the skin wound and muscle from -6.7 +/- 6.1 to 0.9 +/- 1.4 and from -4.4 +/- 2.4 to -1.0 +/- 0.4 micromol/(100 g . h), respectively. Infusion of leucine alone did not significantly improve the net phenylalanine balance in either skin wounds [-4.0 +/- 4.6 micromol/(100 g . h)] or muscle [-2.7 +/- 0.7 micromol/(100 g . h)]. We conclude that leucine supplementation had an anabolic effect on proteins in skin wounds and muscle, provided that adequate additional amino acids were also available.

  2. Impact of prolonged leucine supplementation on protein synthesis and lean growth in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most low-birth weight infants experience extrauterine growth failure due to reduced nutrient intake as a result of feeding intolerance. The objective of this study was to determine whether prolonged enteral leucine supplementation improves lean growth in neonatal pigs fed a restricted protein diet. ...

  3. 3D Printing of Protein Models in an Undergraduate Laboratory: Leucine Zippers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate laboratory experiment is described that explores the structure/function relationship of protein domains, namely leucine zippers, through a molecular graphics computer program and physical models fabricated by 3D printing. By generating solvent accessible surfaces and color-coding hydrophobic, basic, and acidic amino…

  4. Leucine-protein supplemented recovery feeding enhances subsequent cycling performance in well-trained men.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Jasmine S; Ali, Ajmol; Rowlands, David S

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a practical leucine-protein, high-carbohydrate postexercise feeding regimen could improve recovery, as measured by subsequent cycling performance and mechanistic markers, relative to control feeding. In a crossover, 10 male cyclists performed 2- to 2.5-h interval training bouts on 3 consecutive evenings, ingesting either leucine-protein, high-carbohydrate nutrition (0.1/0.4/1.2/0.2 g·kg(-1)·h(-1); leucine, protein, carbohydrate, fat, respectively) or isocaloric control (0.06/1.6/0.2 g·kg(-1)·h(-1); protein, carbohydrate, fat, respectively) nutrition for 1.5 h postexercise. Throughout the experimental period diet was controlled, energy and macronutrient intake balanced, and protein intake clamped at 1.6 g·kg(-1)·day(-1). The alternate supplement was provided the next morning, thereby isolating the postexercise nutrition effect. Following 39 h of recovery, cyclists performed a repeat-sprint performance test. Postexercise leucine-protein ingestion improved mean sprint power by 2.5% (99% confidence limit, ±2.6%; p = 0.013) and reduced perceived overall tiredness during the sprints by 13% (90% confidence limit, ±9.2%), but perceptions of leg tiredness and soreness were unaffected. Before exercise, creatine-kinase concentration was lowered by 19% (90% confidence limits, ±18%), but lactate dehydrogenase and pressure-pain threshold were unaltered. There was a small reduction in anger (25% ± 18%), but other moods were unchanged. Plasma leucine (3-fold) and essential amino acid (47%) concentrations were elevated postexercise. Net nitrogen balance trended mildly negative in both conditions (mean ± SD: leucine-protein, -20 ± 46 mg·kg(-1) per 24 h; control, -25 ± 36 mg·kg(-1) per 24 h). The ingestion of a leucine-protein supplement along with other high-carbohydrate food following intense training on consecutive days enhances subsequent high-intensity endurance performance and may attenuate

  5. Pushing product formation to its limit: metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for L-leucine overproduction.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Klaffl, Simon; Polen, Tino; Eggeling, Lothar; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using metabolic engineering, an efficient L-leucine production strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum was developed. In the wild type of C. glutamicum, the leuA-encoded 2-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS) is inhibited by low L-leucine concentrations with a K(i) of 0.4 mM. We identified a feedback-resistant IMPS variant, which carries two amino acid exchanges (R529H, G532D). The corresponding leuA(fbr) gene devoid of the attenuator region and under control of a strong promoter was integrated in one, two or three copies into the genome and combined with additional genomic modifications aimed at increasing L-leucine production. These modifications involved (i) deletion of the gene encoding the repressor LtbR to increase expression of leuBCD, (ii) deletion of the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator IolR to increase glucose uptake, (iii) reduction of citrate synthase activity to increase precursor supply, and (iv) introduction of a gene encoding a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase. The production performance of the resulting strains was characterized in bioreactor cultivations. Under fed-batch conditions, the best producer strain accumulated L-leucine to levels exceeding the solubility limit of about 24 g/l. The molar product yield was 0.30 mol L-leucine per mol glucose and the volumetric productivity was 4.3 mmol l⁻¹ h⁻¹. These values were obtained in a defined minimal medium with a prototrophic and plasmid-free strain, making this process highly interesting for industrial application.

  6. Crystal Structure of a Super Leucine Zipper an Extended Two-Stranded Super Long Coiled Coil

    SciTech Connect

    J Diao

    2011-12-31

    Coiled coil is a ubiquitous structural motif in proteins, with two to seven alpha helices coiled together like the strands of a rope, and coiled coil folding and assembly is not completely understood. A GCN4 leucine zipper mutant with four mutations of K3A, D7A, Y17W, and H18N has been designed, and the crystal structure has been determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. The peptide monomer shows a helix trunk with short curved N- and C-termini. In the crystal, two monomers cross in 35{sup o} and form an X-shaped dimer, and each X-shaped dimer is welded into the next one through sticky hydrophobic ends, thus forming an extended two-stranded, parallel, super long coiled coil rather than a discrete, two-helix coiled coil of the wild-type GCN4 leucine zipper. Leucine residues appear at every seventh position in the super long coiled coil, suggesting that it is an extended super leucine zipper. Compared to the wild-type leucine zipper, the N-terminus of the mutant has a dramatic conformational change and the C-terminus has one more residue Glu 32 determined. The mutant X-shaped dimer has a large crossing angle of 35{sup o} instead of 18{sup o} in the wild-type dimer. The results show a novel assembly mode and oligomeric state of coiled coil, and demonstrate that mutations may affect folding and assembly of the overall coiled coil. Analysis of the formation mechanism of the super long coiled coil may help understand and design self-assembling protein fibers.

  7. The distribution of methionine-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalin in the brain and peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J.; Kosterlitz, H.W.; Smith, T.W.

    1977-01-01

    1 A method is described for the rapid extraction of opioid peptides from the brain and other tissues. The method is based on acid extraction of tissues followed by adsorption of the extract onto Amberlite XAD-2 resin. Elution with methanol separates the enkephalins and α-endorphin from β-endorphin. 2 Over 90% of the opioid peptide activity isolated from brain and gut of several species by our method was due to methionine- and leucine-enkephalin. In contrast, the major opioid peptide activity recovered from the pituitary was due to peptides of much greater mol. wt. than the enkephalins. 3 An opioid peptide with properties unlike those of the known endorphins or enkephalins was present in brain extracts. This peptide, termed ε-endorphin, has an apparent mol. wt. of 700 to 1200; it constituted between 5 to 10% of the total opioid activity in our extracts. 4 A differential assay of methionine- and leucine-enkephalin was made either by destroying methionine-enkephalin activity with cyanogen bromide or by separating the peptides by thin layer chromatography. 5 The ratio of methionine-enkephalin to leucine-enkephalin varied greatly in different brain regions. The highest proportions of leucine-enkephalin were found in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. 6 Formaldehyde perfusion and fixation of the brain in vivo had no significant effect on the brain content of enkephalin, indicating that proteolytic breakdown is not a major problem in the extraction of these peptides. 7 It is suggested that the enkephalins may have a neurotransmitter role in both brain and peripheral tissues and that methionine- and leucine-enkephalin may subserve separate neuronal functions. PMID:597668

  8. THE DISTRIBUTION OF METHIONINE-ENKEPHALIN AND LEUCINE-ENKEPHALIN IN THE BRAIN AND PERIPHERAL TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Kosterlitz, HW; Smith, TW

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for the rapid extraction of opioid peptides from the brain and other tissues. The method is based on acid extraction of tissues followed by adsorption of the extract onto Amberlite XAD-2 resin. Elution with methanol separates the enkephalins and α-endorphin from β-endorphin. Over 90% of the opioid peptide activity isolated from brain and gut of several species by our method was due to methionine- and leucine-enkephalin. In contrast, the major opioid peptide activity recovered from the pituitary was due to peptides of much greater mol. wt. than the enkephalins. An opioid peptide with properties unlike those of the known endorphins or enkephalins was present in brain extracts. This peptide, termed ∈-endorphin, has an apparent mol. wt. of 700 to 1200; it constituted between 5 to 10% of the total opioid activity in our extracts. A differential assay of methionine- and leucine-enkephalin was made either by destroying methionine-enkephalin activity with cyanogen bromide or by separating the peptides by thin layer chromatography. The ratio of methionine-enkephalin to leucine-enkephalin varied greatly in different brain regions. The highest proportions of leucine-enkephalin were found in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Formaldehyde perfusion and fixation of the brain in vivo had no significant effect on the brain content of enkephalin, indicating that proteolytic breakdown is not a major problem in the extraction of these peptides. It is suggested that the enkephalins may have a neurotransmitter role in both brain and peripheral tissues and that methionine- and leucine-enkephalin may subserve separate neuronal functions. PMID:9142421

  9. Leucine pulses enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis during continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    PubMed Central

    Boutry, Claire; El-Kadi, Samer W.; Suryawan, Agus; Wheatley, Scott M.; Orellana, Renán A.; Kimball, Scot R.; Nguyen, Hanh V.

    2013-01-01

    Infants unable to maintain oral feeding can be nourished by orogastric tube. We have shown that orogastric continuous feeding restricts muscle protein synthesis compared with intermittent bolus feeding in neonatal pigs. To determine whether leucine infusion can be used to enhance protein synthesis during continuous feeding, neonatal piglets received the same amount of formula enterally by orogastric tube for 25.25 h continuously (CON) with or without LEU or intermittently by bolus every 4 h (BOL). For the CON+LEU group, leucine pulses were administered parenterally (800 μmol·kg−1·h−1) every 4 h. Insulin and glucose concentrations increased after the BOL meal and were unchanged in groups fed continuously. LEU infusion during CON feeding increased plasma leucine after the leucine pulse and decreased essential amino acids compared with CON feeding. Protein synthesis in longissimus dorsi (LD), gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles, but not liver or heart, were greater in CON+LEU and BOL than in the CON group. BOL feeding increased protein synthesis in the small intestine. Muscle S6K1 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and active eIF4E·eIF4G complex formation were higher in CON+LEU and BOL than in CON but AMPKα, eIF2α, and eEF2 phosphorylation were unchanged. LC3-II-to-total LC3 ratio was lower in CON+LEU and BOL than in CON, but there were no differences in atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 abundance and FoxO3 phosphorylation. In conclusion, administration of leucine pulses during continuous orogastric feeding in neonates increases muscle protein synthesis by stimulating translation initiation and may reduce protein degradation via the autophagy-lysosome, but not the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:23839523

  10. Effects of oleic acid on distinct populations of neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus are dependent on extracellular glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, C; Migrenne, S; Magnan, C; Cotero, V E; Routh, V H

    2006-03-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of fatty acid metabolism in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) alters energy balance and glucose homeostasis. Thus, we tested the hypotheses that distinctive populations of ARC neurons are oleic acid (OA) sensors that exhibit a glucose dependency, independent of whether some of these OA sensors are also glucose-sensing neurons. We used patch-clamp recordings to investigate the effects of OA on ARC neurons in brain slices from 14- to 21-day-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Additionally, we recorded spontaneous discharge rate in ARC neurons in 8-wk-old fed and fasted SD rats in vivo. Patch-clamp studies showed that in 2.5 mM glucose 12 of 94 (13%) ARC neurons were excited by 2 microM OA (OA-excited or OAE neurons), whereas six of 94 (6%) were inhibited (OA-inhibited2.5 or OAI2.5 neurons). In contrast, in 0.1 mM glucose, OA inhibited six of 20 (30%) ARC neurons (OAI0.1 neurons); none was excited. None of the OAI0.1 neurons responded to OA in 2.5 mM glucose. Thus OAI2.5 and OAI0.1 neurons are distinct. Similarly, in seven of 20 fed rats (35%) the overall response was OAE-like, whereas in three of 20 (15%) it was OAI-like. In contrast, in fasted rats only OAI-like response were observed (three of 15; 20%). There was minimal overlap between OA-sensing neurons and glucose-sensing neurons. In conclusion, OA regulated three distinct subpopulations of ARC neurons in a glucose-dependent fashion. These data suggest that an interaction between glucose and fatty acids regulates OA sensing in ARC neurons.

  11. Temporal Lobe Hypometabolism Ipsilateral to a Hypothalamic Mass. Relationship to Gelastic Seizures.

    PubMed

    Meyer

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate metabolic changes associated with a right hypothalamic mass in a 26-year-old gelastic seizure patient. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the brain was performed in the interictal state using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in this patient. Temporal lobe hypometabolism was noted ipsilateral to the hypothalamic lesion. The mass itself had little to no uptake of 18F-FDG. This is the first known PET imaging report of temporal lobe hypometabolism ipsilateral to a presumed hypothalamic hamartoma causing gelastic seizures. Further studies are needed in other patients to test whether interictal PET imaging may help plan the removal of epileptogenic hypothalamic lesions.

  12. Growth, Hypothalamic Function, and Brain Ventricle Size in Mentally Retarded Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leisti, S.; Iianainen, M.

    1978-01-01

    To determine whether moderate enlargement of the third brain ventricle or the temporal horns of the lateral ventricles was associated with hypothalamic dysfunction, 15 mentally retarded Ss (ages 12-25 years) with such characteristics were studies. (DLS)

  13. Leptin signaling in GFAP-expressing adult glia cells regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim1, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesus; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R.; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M.; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that synaptic re-organization of hypothalamic feeding circuits in response to metabolic shifts involves astrocytes, cells that can directly respond to the metabolic hormone, leptin, in vitro. It is not known whether the role of glia cells in hypothalamic synaptic adaptions is active or passive. Here we show that leptin receptors are expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that conditional, adult deletion of leptin receptors in astrocytes leads to altered glial morphology, decreased glial coverage and elevated synaptic inputs onto pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)- and Agouti-related protein (AgRP)-producing neurons. Leptin-induced suppression of feeding was diminished, while rebound feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data unmask an active role of glial cells in the initiation of hypothalamic synaptic plasticity and neuroendocrine control of feeding by leptin. PMID:24880214

  14. Specification of select hypothalamic circuits and innate behaviors by the embryonic patterning gene Dbx1

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, Katie; Esumi, Shigeyuki; Hirata, Tsutomu; Kamal, Yasman; Tran, Tuyen; Lam, Andrew; Oboti, Livio; Brighthaupt, Sherri-Chanelle; Zaghlula, Manar; Martinez, Jennifer; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Knoblach, Susan; Pierani, Alessandra; Tamamaki, Nobuaki; Shah, Nirao M; Jones, Kevin S; Corbin, Joshua G

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The hypothalamus integrates information required for the production of a variety of innate behaviors such as feeding, mating, aggression and predator avoidance. Despite an extensive knowledge of hypothalamic function, how embryonic genetic programs specify circuits that regulate these behaviors remains unknown. Here, we find that in the hypothalamus the developmentally regulated homeodomain-containing transcription factor Dbx1 is required for the generation of specific subclasses of neurons within the lateral hypothalamic area/zona incerta (LH) and the arcuate (Arc) nucleus. Consistent with this specific developmental role, Dbx1 hypothalamic-specific conditional-knockout mice display attenuated responses to predator odor and feeding stressors but do not display deficits in other innate behaviors such as mating or conspecific aggression. Thus, activity of a single developmentally regulated gene, Dbx1, is a shared requirement for the specification of hypothalamic nuclei governing a subset of innate behaviors. PMID:25864637

  15. Cultured hypothalamic neurons are resistant to inflammation and insulin resistance induced by saturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Ju; Kim, Francis; Schwartz, Michael W; Wisse, Brent E

    2010-06-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation induced by high-fat feeding causes insulin and leptin resistance and contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity. Since in vitro exposure to saturated fatty acids causes inflammation and insulin resistance in many cultured cell types, we determined how cultured hypothalamic neurons respond to this stimulus. Two murine hypothalamic neuronal cell cultures, N43/5 and GT1-7, were exposed to escalating concentrations of saturated fatty acids for up to 24 h. Harvested cells were evaluated for activation of inflammation by gene expression and protein content. Insulin-treated cells were evaluated for induction of markers of insulin receptor signaling (p-IRS, p-Akt). In both hypothalamic cell lines, inflammation was induced by prototypical inflammatory mediators LPS and TNFalpha, as judged by induction of IkappaBalpha (3- to 5-fold) and IL-6 (3- to 7-fold) mRNA and p-IkappaBalpha protein, and TNFalpha pretreatment reduced insulin-mediated p-Akt activation by 30% (P < 0.05). By comparison, neither mixed saturated fatty acid (100, 250, or 500 microM for hypothalamic neurons, whereas they did in control muscle and endothelial cell lines. Despite the lack of evidence of inflammatory signaling, saturated fatty acid exposure in cultured hypothalamic neurons causes endoplasmic reticulum stress, induces mitogen-activated protein kinase, and causes apoptotic cell death with prolonged exposure. We conclude that saturated fatty acid exposure does not induce inflammatory signaling or insulin resistance in cultured hypothalamic neurons. Therefore, hypothalamic neuronal inflammation in the setting of DIO may involve an indirect mechanism mediated by saturated fatty acids on nonneuronal cells.

  16. Remote Sensing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Southworth, C. Scott

    1983-01-01

    The Landsat Program became the major event of 1982 in geological remote sensing with the successful launch of Landsat 4. Other 1982 remote sensing accomplishments, research, publications, (including a set of Landsat worldwide reference system index maps), and conferences are highlighted. (JN)

  17. Chronic leucine exposure results in reduced but reversible glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujuan; Han, Wenxia; Jiang, Xiuyun; Li, Min; Gao, Ling; Zhao, Jia Jun

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sustained high leucine exposure decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, whether this effect is recoverable following the removal of leucine is unclear. Pancreatic/duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) and its downstream target, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), are reported to be positively associated with insulin secretion. However, it also remains unclear whether the effect of leucine on GSIS is accompanied by alterations in PDX-1 and GLUT2. In the present study, insulin secretion, insulin content, PDX-1 and GLUT2 protein expression in INS-1 (rat insulinoma cell line) cells were assessed following a 24-h incubation in 40 mmol/l leucine. Half of the cells were incubated in leucine-free media for a further 24 h to observe the abovementioned effects. In contrast to the control, 40 mmol/l leucine for 24 or 48 h diminished GSIS at high glucose concentrations by 11% (P=0.026) or 22% (P=0.003), insulin content by 14% (P=0.008) or 20% (P=0.002), as well as decreasing PDX-1 and GLUT2 expression. When leucine was removed from the media for a further 24-h incubation, in comparison with those cells that were maintained in leucine treatment for 24 and 48 h, the high GSIS increased by 13% (P=0.032) and 27% (P=0.002), insulin content was augmented by 10% (P=0.014) and 20% (P=0.003), and the protein expression of PDX-1 and GLUT2 also increased. The present study demonstrates that sustained high concentrations of leucine induce a reversible impairment of GSIS and alter insulin content, which is mediated by PDX-1 and GLUT2, in INS-1 cells.

  18. Leptin and leucine synergistically regulate protein metabolism in C2C12 myotubes and mouse skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Zeng, Xiangfang; Huang, Zhimin; Wang, Junjun; Qiao, Shiyan

    2013-07-28

    Leucine and leptin play important roles in regulating protein synthesis and degradation in skeletal muscles in vitro and in vivo. However, the objective of the present study was to determine whether leptin and leucine function synergistically in regulating protein metabolism of skeletal muscles. In the in vitro experiment, C2C12 myotubes were cultured for 2 h in the presence of 5 mm-leucine and/or 50 ng/ml of leptin. In the in vivo experiment, C57BL/6 and ob/ob mice were randomly assigned to be fed a non-purified diet supplemented with 3 % L-leucine or 2·04 % L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 14 d. Ob/ob mice were injected intraperitoneally with sterile PBS or recombinant mouse leptin (0·1 μg/g body weight) for 14 d. In C57BL/6 mice, dietary leucine supplementation increased (P< 0·05) plasma leptin, leptin receptor expression and protein synthesis in skeletal muscles, but reduced (P< 0·05) plasma urea and protein degradation in skeletal muscles. Dietary leucine supplementation and leptin injection increased the relative weight of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles in ob/ob mice. Moreover, leucine and leptin treatments stimulated (P< 0·05) protein synthesis and inhibited (P< 0·05) protein degradation in C2C12 myotubes and skeletal muscles of ob/ob mice. There were interactions (P< 0·05) between the leucine and leptin treatments with regard to protein metabolism in C2C12 myotubes and soleus muscles of ob/ob mice but not in the gastrocnemius muscles of ob/ob mice. Collectively, these results suggest that leptin and leucine synergistically regulate protein metabolism in skeletal muscles both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Tibolone Rapidly Attenuates the GABAB Response in Hypothalamic Neurones

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kloosterboer, Helenius J.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Tibolone is primarily used for the treatment of climacteric symptoms. Tibolone is rapidly converted into three major metabolites: 3α- and 3β-hydroxy-tibolone (3α- and 3βOH-tibolone), which have oestrogenic effects, and the Δ4-isomer (Δ4-tibolone), which has progestogenic and androgenic effects. Since tibolone is effective in treating climacteric symptoms, the effects on the brain may be explained by the oestrogenic activity of tibolone. Previously using whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found that 17β-oestradiol (E2) rapidly altered GABA neurotransmission in hypothalamic neurones through a membrane oestrogen receptor (mER). E2 reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate G-protein-coupled, inwardly rectifying K+ channels in hypothalamic neurones. Therefore, we hypothesized that tibolone may have some rapid effects through the mER and sought to elucidate the signalling pathway of tibolone’s action using selective inhibitors and whole cell recording in ovariectomized female guinea pigs and mice. A sub-population of neurones was identified post hoc as proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones by immunocytochemical staining. Similar to E2, we have found that tibolone and its active metabolite 3βOH-tibolone rapidly reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate GIRK channels in POMC neurones. The effects were blocked by the ER antagonist ICI 182,780. Other metabolites of tibolone (3αOH-tibolone and Δ4-tibolone) had no effect. Furthermore, tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) was fully efficacious in ERαKO and ERβKO mice to attenuate GABAB responses. The effects of tibolone were blocked by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. However, in contrast to E2, the effects of tibolone were not blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors or protein kinase A inhibitors. It appears that tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) activates phospholipase C leading to PIP2 metabolism and direct alteration of GIRK channel function. Therefore, tibolone

  20. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, neuroendocrine factors and stress.

    PubMed

    Tsigos, Constantine; Chrousos, George P

    2002-10-01

    The stress system coordinates the adaptive responses of the organism to stressors of any kind.(1). The main components of the stress system are the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and locus ceruleus-norepinephrine (LC/NE)-autonomic systems and their peripheral effectors, the pituitary-adrenal axis, and the limbs of the autonomic system. Activation of the stress system leads to behavioral and peripheral changes that improve the ability of the organism to adjust homeostasis and increase its chances for survival. The CRH and LC/NE systems stimulate arousal and attention, as well as the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system, which is involved in anticipatory and reward phenomena, and the hypothalamic beta-endorphin system, which suppresses pain sensation and, hence, increases analgesia. CRH inhibits appetite and activates thermogenesis via the catecholaminergic system. Also, reciprocal interactions exist between the amygdala and the hippocampus and the stress system, which stimulates these elements and is regulated by them. CRH plays an important role in inhibiting GnRH secretion during stress, while, via somatostatin, it also inhibits GH, TRH and TSH secretion, suppressing, thus, the reproductive, growth and thyroid functions. Interestingly, all three of these functions receive and depend on positive catecholaminergic input. The end-hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, glucocorticoids, on the other hand, have multiple roles. They simultaneously inhibit the CRH, LC/NE and beta-endorphin systems and stimulate the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system and the CRH peptidergic central nucleus of the amygdala. In addition, they directly inhibit pituitary gonadotropin, GH and TSH secretion, render the target tissues of sex steroids and growth factors resistant to these substances and suppress the 5' deiodinase, which converts the relatively inactive tetraiodothyronine (T(4)) to triiodothyronine (T(3)), contributing further to the suppression of

  1. Increasing Fatty Acid Oxidation Remodels the Hypothalamic Neurometabolome to Mitigate Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Joseph W.; Aja, Susan; Li, Qun; Bandaru, Veera V. R.; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Haughey, Norman J.; Kuhajda, Francis P.; Ronnett, Gabriele V.

    2014-01-01

    Modification of hypothalamic fatty acid (FA) metabolism can improve energy homeostasis and prevent hyperphagia and excessive weight gain in diet-induced obesity (DIO) from a diet high in saturated fatty acids. We have shown previously that C75, a stimulator of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1) and fatty acid oxidation (FAOx), exerts at least some of its hypophagic effects via neuronal mechanisms in the hypothalamus. In the present work, we characterized the effects of C75 and another anorexigenic compound, the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) inhibitor FSG67, on FA metabolism, metabolomics profiles, and metabolic stress responses in cultured hypothalamic neurons and hypothalamic neuronal cell lines during lipid excess with palmitate. Both compounds enhanced palmitate oxidation, increased ATP, and inactivated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in hypothalamic neurons in vitro. Lipidomics and untargeted metabolomics revealed that enhanced catabolism of FA decreased palmitate availability and prevented the production of fatty acylglycerols, ceramides, and cholesterol esters, lipids that are associated with lipotoxicity-provoked metabolic stress. This improved metabolic signature was accompanied by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and yet favorable changes in oxidative stress, overt ER stress, and inflammation. We propose that enhancing FAOx in hypothalamic neurons exposed to excess lipids promotes metabolic remodeling that reduces local inflammatory and cell stress responses. This shift would restore mitochondrial function such that increased FAOx can produce hypothalamic neuronal ATP and lead to decreased food intake and body weight to improve systemic metabolism. PMID:25541737

  2. Hypothalamic activation is essential for endotoxemia-induced acute muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Kaipeng; Chen, Qiyi; Cheng, Minhua; Zhao, Chenyan; Lin, Zhiliang; Tan, Shanjun; Xi, Fengchan; Gao, Tao; Shi, Jialiang; Shen, Juanhong; Li, Weiqin; Yu, Wenkui; Li, Jieshou; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests acute skeletal muscle wasting is a key factor affecting nutritional support and prognosis in critical patients. Previously, plenty of studies of muscle wasting focused on the peripheral pathway, little was known about the central role. We tested the hypothesis whether central inflammatory pathway and neuropeptides were involved in the process. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated rats, hypothalamic NF-κB pathway and inflammation were highly activated, which was accompanied with severe muscle wasting. Central inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) pathway activation by infusion of an inhibitor (PS1145) can efficiently reduce muscle wasting as well as attenuate hypothalamic neuropeptides alteration. Furthermore, knockdown the expression of anorexigenic neuropeptide proopiomelanocortin (POMC) expression with a lentiviral vector containing shRNA can significantly alleviate LPS-induced muscle wasting, whereas hypothalamic inflammation or NF-κB pathway was barely affected. Taken together, these results suggest activation of hypothalamic POMC is pivotal for acute muscle wasting caused by endotoxemia. Neuropeptide POMC expression may have mediated the contribution of hypothalamic inflammation to peripheral muscle wasting. Pharmaceuticals with the ability of inhibiting hypothalamic NF-κB pathway or POMC activation may have a therapeutic potential for acute muscle wasting and nutritional therapy in septic patients. PMID:27922103

  3. Social crowding stress diminishes the pituitary-adrenocortical and hypothalamic histamine response to adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bugajski, J; Gadek-Michalska, A; Borycz, J

    1993-12-01

    Social stress of crowding almost totally reduced the rise in serum corticosterone elicited by intracerebroventricular administration of isoprenaline, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, after 3 and 7 day of crowding and substantially diminished that response after 14 and 21 days. Crowding stress totally abolished the increase in hypothalamic histamine induced by isoprenaline in control rats. Crowding also significantly diminished the increase in serum corticosterone evoked by clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, and abolished the clonidine-induced elevation in hypothalamic histamine levels. The stimulatory effect of phenylephrine, an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist, on corticosterone secretion was only moderately diminished in crowded rats. Neither phenylephrine nor crowding stress changed significantly the hypothalamic histamine levels. These results indicate that social stress of crowding considerably impairs the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical responsiveness to central beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Crowding also abolishes the rise in hypothalamic histamine induced by beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, suggesting a role of hypothalamic histamine in the HPA adaptation to the social stress of crowding.

  4. N-acetyl-L-leucine accelerates vestibular compensation after unilateral labyrinthectomy by action in the cerebellum and thalamus.

    PubMed

    Günther, Lisa; Beck, Roswitha; Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Jahn, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Dutia, Mayank; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular behavioural testing included measurements of nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance as well as sequential whole-brain [18F]-FDG-μPET was done before and on days 1,3,7 and 15 after UL. A significant reduction of postural imbalance scores was identified on day 7 in the N-acetyl-DL-leucine (p < 0.03) and the N-acetyl-L-leucine groups (p < 0.01), compared to the sham treatment group, but not in the N-acetyl-D-leucine group (comparison for applied dose of 24 mg i.v. per rat, equivalent to 60 mg/kg body weight, in each group). The course of postural compensation in the DL- and L-group was accelerated by about 6 days relative to controls. The effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on postural compensation depended on the dose: in contrast to 60 mg/kg, doses of 15 mg/kg and 3.75 mg/kg had no significant effect. N-acetyl-L-leucine did not change the compensation of nystagmus or head roll tilt at any dose. Measurements of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) by means of μPET revealed that only N-acetyl-L-leucine but not N-acetyl-D-leucine caused a significant increase of rCGM in the vestibulocerebellum and a decrease in the posterolateral thalamus and subthalamic region on days 3 and 7. A similar pattern was found when comparing the effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on rCGM in an UL-group and a sham UL-group without vestibular damage. In conclusion, N-acetyl-L-leucine improves compensation of postural symptoms after UL in a dose-dependent and specific manner, most likely by

  5. N-Acetyl-L-Leucine Accelerates Vestibular Compensation after Unilateral Labyrinthectomy by Action in the Cerebellum and Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Jahn, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Dutia, Mayank; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular behavioural testing included measurements of nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance as well as sequential whole-brain [18F]-FDG-μPET was done before and on days 1,3,7 and 15 after UL. A significant reduction of postural imbalance scores was identified on day 7 in the N-acetyl-DL-leucine (p < 0.03) and the N-acetyl-L-leucine groups (p < 0.01), compared to the sham treatment group, but not in the N-acetyl-D-leucine group (comparison for applied dose of 24 mg i.v. per rat, equivalent to 60 mg/kg body weight, in each group). The course of postural compensation in the DL- and L-group was accelerated by about 6 days relative to controls. The effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on postural compensation depended on the dose: in contrast to 60 mg/kg, doses of 15 mg/kg and 3.75 mg/kg had no significant effect. N-acetyl-L-leucine did not change the compensation of nystagmus or head roll tilt at any dose. Measurements of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) by means of μPET revealed that only N-acetyl-L-leucine but not N-acetyl-D-leucine caused a significant increase of rCGM in the vestibulocerebellum and a decrease in the posterolateral thalamus and subthalamic region on days 3 and 7. A similar pattern was found when comparing the effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on rCGM in an UL-group and a sham UL-group without vestibular damage. In conclusion, N-acetyl-L-leucine improves compensation of postural symptoms after UL in a dose-dependent and specific manner, most likely by

  6. Hypothalamic gene expression underlying pre-hibernation satiety.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C; Hampton, M; Andrews, M T

    2015-03-01

    Prior to hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) enter a hypophagic period where food consumption drops by an average of 55% in 3 weeks. This occurs naturally, while the ground squirrels are in constant environmental conditions and have free access to food. Importantly, this transition occurs before exposure to hibernation conditions (5°C and constant darkness), so the ground squirrels are still maintaining a moderate level of activity. In this study, we used the Illumina HiSeq 2000 system to sequence the hypothalamic transcriptomes of ground squirrels before and after the autumn feeding transition to examine the genes underlying this extreme change in feeding behavior. The hypothalamus was chosen because it is known to play a role in the control and regulation of food intake and satiety. Overall, our analysis identified 143 genes that are significantly differentially expressed between the two groups. Specifically, we found five genes associated with feeding behavior and obesity (VGF, TRH, LEPR, ADIPOR2, IRS2) that are all upregulated during the hypophagic period, after the feeding transition has occurred. We also found that serum leptin significantly increases in the hypophagic group. Several of the genes associated with the natural autumnal feeding decline in 13-lined ground squirrels show parallels to signaling pathways known to be disrupted in human metabolic diseases, like obesity and diabetes. In addition, many other genes were identified that could be important for the control of food consumption in other animals, including humans.

  7. Preoptic-hypothalamic periventricular lesions: thirst deficits and hypernatremia.

    PubMed

    Buggy, J; Jonhson, A K

    1977-07-01

    To assess the significance of stimulation studies suggesting an anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) dipsogenic site of action for hyperosmotic and angiotensin thirst stimuli, electrolytic lesions of periventricular tissue surrounding AV3V were produced under ether anesthesia in rats preselected for responsiveness to subcutaneous angiotensin and hypertonic NaCl thirst challenges. Lesions limited to preoptic-anterior hypothalamic periventricular substrates resulted in adipsia; those rats resuming ad lib. drinking after a period of adipsia exhibited persistent drinking deficits to angiotensin and hypertonic NaCl thirst challenges, reduced drinking after water deprivation, and increased plasma osmolality and sodium. Drinking to polyethylene glycol-induced hypovolemia and feeding after food deprivation did not differ between lesioned and sham-lesioned animals. The disturbances in behavioral control of fluid balance imply that AV3V periventricular tissue normally plays a key role in mediating regulatory drinking. It is proposed that these AV3V periventricular lesion-induced effects on drinking behavior are due to destruction of receptors and/or integrative systems monitoring fluid-borne angiotensin and hyperosmotic stimuli.

  8. Decoding Ventromedial Hypothalamic Neural Activity during Male Mouse Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Dollar, Piotr; Perona, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The ventromedial hypothalamus, ventrolateral area (VMHvl) was identified recently as a critical locus for inter-male aggression. Optogenetic stimulation of VMHvl in male mice evokes attack toward conspecifics and inactivation of the region inhibits natural aggression, yet very little is known about its underlying neural activity. To understand its role in promoting aggression, we recorded and analyzed neural activity in the VMHvl in response to a wide range of social and nonsocial stimuli. Although response profiles of VMHvl neurons are complex and heterogeneous, we identified a subpopulation of neurons that respond maximally during investigation and attack of male conspecific mice and during investigation of a source of male mouse urine. These “male responsive” neurons in the VMHvl are tuned to both the inter-male distance and the animal's velocity during attack. Additionally, VMHvl activity predicts several parameters of future aggressive action, including the latency and duration of the next attack. Linear regression analysis further demonstrates that aggression-specific parameters, such as distance, movement velocity, and attack latency, can model ongoing VMHvl activity fluctuation during inter-male encounters. These results represent the first effort to understand the hypothalamic neural activity during social behaviors using quantitative tools and suggest an important role for the VMHvl in encoding movement, sensory, and motivation-related signals. PMID:24760856

  9. An Undiagnosed Case of Hypothalamic Hamartoma with a Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bahrani, Saeideh; Tabrizi, Nasim; Moein, Houshang; Zare, Mohammad; Barekatain, Majid; Basiratnia, Reza; Rahimian, Elham; Mehvari Habibabadi, Amirali; Moein, Payam

    2017-01-01

    Background. Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are rare tumor-like malformations that may present with complex partial seizures refractory to anticonvulsants in adulthood. The condition may be misdiagnosed because of rarity. Case Presentation. We report a 25-year-old man with complaint of seizures presented by falling, tonic spasm of limbs, oral automatism, vocalization, and hypermotor activities. His seizures started at the age of one month and presented as eye deviation and upper limbs myoclonic jerk, followed by frequent seizures with variable frequency. The patient had delayed developmental milestones and was mentally retarded. He was hospitalized and underwent video-EEG monitoring and neuroimaging, and the diagnosis of HH was made. The patient became candidate for surgery after that. Conclusion. In this case, the underlying etiology of seizures was diagnosed after 25 years. HH is a rare condition and neurologists may encounter very small number of these cases during their practice. Therefore, they should consider it in patients who present with suspected signs and symptoms. PMID:28246530

  10. Membrane-initiated Estrogen Signaling in Hypothalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary It is well known that many of the actions of 17β-estradiol (E2) in the central nervous system are mediated via intracellular receptor/transcription factors that interact with steroid response elements on target genes. However, there is compelling evidence for membrane steroid receptors for estrogen in hypothalamic and other brain neurons. But it is not well understood how estrogen signals via membrane receptors, and how these signals impact not only membrane excitability but also gene transcription in neurons. Indeed, it has been known for sometime that E2 can rapidly alter neuronal activity within seconds, indicating that some cellular effects can occur via membrane delimited events. In addition, E2 can affect second messenger systems including calcium mobilization and a plethora of kinases to alter cell signaling. Therefore, this review will consider our current knowledge of rapid membrane-initiated and intracellular signaling by E2 in the hypothalamus, the nature of receptors involved and how they contribute to homeostatic functions. PMID:18538919

  11. Ventromedial hypothalamic neurons control a defensive emotion state

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Prabhat S; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Remedios, Ryan; Cai, Haijiang; Yilmaz, Melis; Meister, Markus; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    Defensive behaviors reflect underlying emotion states, such as fear. The hypothalamus plays a role in such behaviors, but prevailing textbook views depict it as an effector of upstream emotion centers, such as the amygdala, rather than as an emotion center itself. We used optogenetic manipulations to probe the function of a specific hypothalamic cell type that mediates innate defensive responses. These neurons are sufficient to drive multiple defensive actions, and required for defensive behaviors in diverse contexts. The behavioral consequences of activating these neurons, moreover, exhibit properties characteristic of emotion states in general, including scalability, (negative) valence, generalization and persistence. Importantly, these neurons can also condition learned defensive behavior, further refuting long-standing claims that the hypothalamus is unable to support emotional learning and therefore is not an emotion center. These data indicate that the hypothalamus plays an integral role to instantiate emotion states, and is not simply a passive effector of upstream emotion centers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06633.001 PMID:25748136

  12. Neuronal glucoprivation enhances hypothalamic histamine turnover in rats.

    PubMed

    Oohara, A; Yoshimatsu, H; Kurokawa, M; Oishi, R; Saeki, K; Sakata, T

    1994-08-01

    Histamine (HA) turnover in the rat hypothalamus following insufficient energy supply due to glucoprivation was examined after administration of insulin or 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG). HA turnover was assessed by accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), a major metabolite of brain HA, following administration of pargyline. Intraperitoneal injection of 1, 2, and 4 U/kg of insulin, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased pargyline-induced accumulation of t-MH. Accumulation of t-MH due to pargyline was inversely related to the concomitant plasma glucose concentration after different doses of insulin. The level of t-MH accumulated by pargyline did not change compared with that of controls, when a euglycemic condition was maintained or insulin at a dose of 6 mU per rat was infused into the third cerebroventricle. Intracerebroventricular infusion of 24 mumol per rat of 2-DG, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased the level of t-MH enhanced by pargyline. The results indicate that an increase in hypothalamic HA turnover in response to glucoprivation may be involved in homeostatic regulation of energy metabolism in the brain.

  13. Dopamine Autoreceptor Regulation of a Hypothalamic Dopaminergic Network

    PubMed Central

    Stagkourakis, Stefanos; Kim, Hoseok; Lyons, David J.; Broberger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Summary How autoreceptors contribute to maintaining a stable output of rhythmically active neuronal circuits is poorly understood. Here, we examine this issue in a dopamine population, spontaneously oscillating hypothalamic rat (TIDA) neurons, that underlie neuroendocrine control of reproduction and neuroleptic side effects. Activation of dopamine receptors of the type 2 family (D2Rs) at the cell-body level slowed TIDA oscillations through two mechanisms. First, they prolonged the depolarizing phase through a combination of presynaptic increases in inhibition and postsynaptic hyperpolarization. Second, they extended the discharge phase through presynaptic attenuation of calcium currents and decreased synaptic inhibition. Dopamine reuptake blockade similarly reconfigured the oscillation, indicating that ambient somatodendritic transmitter concentration determines electrical behavior. In the absence of D2R feedback, however, discharge was abolished by depolarization block. These results indicate the existence of an ultra-short feedback loop whereby neuroendocrine dopamine neurons tune network behavior to echoes of their own activity, reflected in ambient somatodendritic dopamine, and also suggest a mechanism for antipsychotic side effects. PMID:27149844

  14. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Function in Brain Death: A Review.

    PubMed

    Nair-Collins, Michael; Northrup, Jesse; Olcese, James

    2016-01-01

    The Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) states that an individual is dead when "all functions of the entire brain" have ceased irreversibly. However, it has been questioned whether some functions of the hypothalamus, particularly osmoregulation, can continue after the clinical diagnosis of brain death (BD). In order to learn whether parts of the hypothalamus can continue to function after the diagnosis of BD, we performed 2 separate systematic searches of the MEDLINE database, corresponding to the functions of the posterior and anterior pituitary. No meta-analysis is possible due to nonuniformity in the clinical literature. However, some modest generalizations can reasonably be drawn from a narrative review and from anatomic considerations that explain why these findings should be expected. We found evidence suggesting the preservation of hypothalamic function, including secretion of hypophysiotropic hormones, responsiveness to anterior pituitary stimulation, and osmoregulation, in a substantial proportion of patients declared dead by neurological criteria. We discuss several possible explanations for these findings. We conclude by suggesting that additional clinical research with strict inclusion criteria is necessary and further that a more nuanced and forthright public dialogue is needed, particularly since standard diagnostic practices and the UDDA may not be entirely in accord.

  15. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis homeostasis predicts longevity.

    PubMed

    Yonker, James A; Chang, Vicky; Roetker, Nicholas S; Hauser, Taissa S; Hauser, Robert M; Atwood, Craig S

    2013-02-01

    The reproductive-cell cycle theory of aging posits that reproductive hormone changes associated with menopause and andropause drive senescence via altered cell cycle signaling. Using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (n = 5,034), we analyzed the relationship between longevity and menopause, including other factors that impact "ovarian lifespan" such as births, oophorectomy, and hormone replacement therapy. We found that later onset of menopause was associated with lower mortality, with and without adjusting for additional factors (years of education, smoking status, body mass index, and marital status). Each year of delayed menopause resulted in a 2.9% reduction in mortality; after including a number of additional controls, the effect was attenuated modestly but remained statistically significant (2.6% reduction in mortality). We also found that no other reproductive parameters assessed added to the prediction of longevity, suggesting that reproductive factors shown to affect longevity elsewhere may be mediated by age of menopause. Thus, surgical and natural menopause at age 40, for example, resulted in identical survival probabilities. These results support the maintenance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in homeostasis in prolonging human longevity, which provides a coherent framework for understanding the relationship between reproduction and longevity.

  16. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Heller, Horace Craig

    2014-01-01

    The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages. PMID:25140132

  17. The Staphylococcus aureus leucine aminopeptidase is localized to the bacterial cytosol and demonstrates a broad substrate range that extends beyond leucine.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Ronan K; Veillard, Florian; Gagne, Danielle T; Lindenmuth, Jarrod M; Poreba, Marcin; Drag, Marcin; Potempa, Jan; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a potent pathogen of humans exhibiting a broad disease range, in part due to an extensive repertoire of secreted virulence factors, including proteases. Recently, we identified the first example of an intracellular protease (leucine aminopeptidase, LAP) that is required for virulence in S. aureus. Disruption of pepZ, the gene encoding LAP, had no affect on the growth rate of bacteria; however, in systemic and localized infection models the pepZ mutant had significantly attenuated virulence. Recently, a contradictory report was published suggesting that LAP is an extracellular enzyme and it is required for growth in S. aureus. Here, we investigate these results and confirm our previous findings that LAP is localized to the bacterial cytosol and is not required for growth. In addition, we conduct a biochemical investigation of purified recombinant LAP, identifying optimal conditions for enzymatic activity and substrate preference for hydrolysis. Our results show that LAP has a broad substrate range, including activity against the dipeptide cysteine-glycine, and that leucine is not the primary target of LAP.

  18. Leucine-nitrogen metabolism in the brain of conscious rats: its role as a nitrogen carrier in glutamate synthesis in glial and neuronal metabolic compartments.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Ryosei; Cohen, David M; Henry, Joseph F; Burrin, Douglas G; Reeds, Peter J

    2004-02-01

    The source of nitrogen (N) for the de novo synthesis of brain glutamate, glutamine and GABA remains controversial. Because leucine is readily transported into the brain and the brain contains high activities of branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT), we hypothesized that leucine is the predominant N-precursor for brain glutamate synthesis. Conscious and unstressed rats administered with [U-13C] and/or [15N]leucine as additions to the diet were killed at 0-9 h of continuous feeding. Plasma and brain leucine equilibrated rapidly and the brain leucine-N turnover was more than 100%/min. The isotopic dilution of [U-13C]leucine (brain/plasma ratio 0.61 +/- 0.06) and [15N]leucine (0.23 +/- 0.06) differed markedly, suggesting that 15% of cerebral leucine-N turnover derived from proteolysis and 62% from leucine synthesis via reverse transamination. The rate of glutamate synthesis from leucine was 5 micro mol/g/h and at least 50% of glutamate-N originally derived from leucine. The enrichment of [5-15N]glutamine was higher than [15N]ammonia in the brain, indicating glial ammonia generation from leucine via glutamate. The enrichment of [15N]GABA, [15N]aspartate, [15N]glutamate greater than [2-15N]glutamine suggests direct incorporation of leucine-N into both glial and neuronal glutamate. These findings provide a new insight for the role of leucine as N-carrier from the plasma pool and within the cerebral compartments.

  19. Structure of the 'Escherichia Coli' Leucine-Responsive Regulatory Protein Lrp Reveals a Novel Octameric Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    de los Rios, S.; Perona, J.J.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-07-09

    The structure of Escherichia coli leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) cocrystallized with a short duplex oligodeoxynucleotide reveals a novel quaternary assembly in which the protein octamer forms an open, linear array of four dimers. In contrast, structures of the Lrp homologs LrpA, LrpC and AsnC crystallized in the absence of DNA show that these proteins instead form highly symmetrical octamers in which the four dimers form a closed ring. Although the DNA is disordered within the Lrp crystal, comparative analyses suggest that the observed differences in quaternary state may arise from DNA interactions during crystallization. Interconversion of these conformations, possibly in response to DNA or leucine binding, provides an underlying mechanism to alter the relative spatial orientation of the DNA-binding domains. Breaking of the closed octamer symmetry may be a common essential step in the formation of active DNA complexes by all members of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  20. The radiolysis of tryptophan and leucine with P-32 beta-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N. E.; Bonner, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper extends earlier experiments on the radiolysis of DL-tryptophan using P-32 beta-radiation to longer reaction times, observing complete destruction of tryptophan by secondary, nonradiolytic processes. In addition DL-leucine is irradiated with P-32 beta-irradiation at -196 C, leading to radiolyses to the extents of about 20-30%, but observing no concomitant asymmetric bias. The complete absence of asymmetric bias in the present and earlier (Bonner et al., 1979) radiolyses of aqueous tryptophan at -25 C and the present radiolyses of water-free leucine at -196 C using P-32 beta-radiation and its accompanying bremsstrahlung leave it an open question whether or not the Vester-Ulbricht beta-decay/bremsstrahlung mechanism for the origin of optical activity is a viable one.

  1. Parkinson's Disease: Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 and Autophagy, Intimate Enemies

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-San Pedro, José M.; Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Niso-Santano, Mireia; González-Polo, Rosa A.; Fuentes Rodríguez, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second common neurodegenerative disorder, after Alzheimer's disease. It is a clinical syndrome characterized by loss of dopamine-generating cells in the substancia nigra, a region of the midbrain. The etiology of Parkinson's disease has long been through to involve both genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene cause late-onset Parkinson's disease with a clinical appearance indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease idiopathic. Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic mechanism whereby a cell recycles or degrades damage proteins and cytoplasmic organelles. This degradative process has been associated with cellular dysfunction in neurodegenerative processes including Parkinson's disease. We discuss the role of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 in autophagy, and how the deregulations of this degradative mechanism in cells can be implicated in the Parkinson's disease etiology. PMID:22970411

  2. Parkinson's disease: leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 and autophagy, intimate enemies.

    PubMed

    Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Niso-Santano, Mireia; González-Polo, Rosa A; Fuentes Rodríguez, José M

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second common neurodegenerative disorder, after Alzheimer's disease. It is a clinical syndrome characterized by loss of dopamine-generating cells in the substancia nigra, a region of the midbrain. The etiology of Parkinson's disease has long been through to involve both genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene cause late-onset Parkinson's disease with a clinical appearance indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease idiopathic. Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic mechanism whereby a cell recycles or degrades damage proteins and cytoplasmic organelles. This degradative process has been associated with cellular dysfunction in neurodegenerative processes including Parkinson's disease. We discuss the role of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 in autophagy, and how the deregulations of this degradative mechanism in cells can be implicated in the Parkinson's disease etiology.

  3. Medial hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors regulate neuroendocrine responses to stress and exploratory locomotor activity: application of recombinant adenovirus containing 5-HT1A sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Holmes, Andrew; Ma, Li; Van de Kar, Louis D; Garcia, Francisca; Murphy, Dennis L

    2004-12-01

    Our previous studies found that serotonin transporter (SERT) knock-out mice showed increased sensitivity to minor stress and increased anxiety-like behavior but reduced locomotor activity. These mice also showed decreased density of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1A) receptors in the hypothalamus, amygdala, and dorsal raphe. To evaluate the contribution of hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors to these phenotypes of SERT knock-out mice, two studies were conducted. Recombinant adenoviruses containing 5-HT1A sense and antisense sequences (Ad-1AP-sense and Ad-1AP-antisense) were used to manipulate 5-HT1A receptors in the hypothalamus. The expression of the 5-HT1A genes is controlled by the 5-HT1A promoter, so that they are only expressed in 5-HT1A receptor-containing cells. (1) Injection of Ad-1AP-sense into the hypothalamus of SERT knock-out mice restored 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus; this effect was accompanied by elimination of the exaggerated adrenocorticotropin responses to a saline injection (minor stress) and reduced locomotor activity but not by a change in increased exploratory anxiety-like behavior. (2) To further confirm the observation in SERT-/- mice, Ad-1AP-antisense was injected into the hypothalamus of normal mice. The density and the function of 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus were significantly reduced in Ad-1AP-antisense-treated mice. Compared with the control group (injected with Ad-track), Ad-1A-antisense-treated mice showed a significant reduction in locomotor activity, but again no changes in exploratory anxiety-like behaviors, tested by elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Thus, the present results demonstrate that medial hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors regulate stress responses and locomotor activity but may not regulate exploratory anxiety-like behaviors.

  4. Lysine and Leucine Deficiencies Affect Myocytes Development and IGF Signaling in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Azizi, Sheida; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Mojazi Amiri, Bagher; Vélez, Emilio J; Lutfi, Esmail; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing aquaculture production requires better knowledge of growth regulation and improvement in diet formulation. A great effort has been made to replace fish meal for plant protein sources in aquafeeds, making necessary the supplementation of such diets with crystalline amino acids (AA) to cover the nutritional requirements of each species. Lysine and Leucine are limiting essential AA in fish, and it has been demonstrated that supplementation with them improves growth in different species. However, the specific effects of AA deficiencies in myogenesis are completely unknown and have only been studied at the level of hepatic metabolism. It is well-known that the TOR pathway integrates the nutritional and hormonal signals to regulate protein synthesis and cell proliferation, to finally control muscle growth, a process also coordinated by the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). This study aimed to provide new information on the impact of Lysine and Leucine deficiencies in gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes examining their development and the response of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), MRFs, as well as key molecules involved in muscle growth regulation like TOR. Leucine deficiency did not cause significant differences in most of the molecules analyzed, whereas Lysine deficiency appeared crucial in IGFs regulation, decreasing significantly IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-IRb mRNA levels. This treatment also down-regulated the gene expression of different MRFs, including Myf5, Myogenin and MyoD2. These changes were also corroborated by a significant decrease in proliferation and differentiation markers in the Lysine-deficient treatment. Moreover, both Lysine and Leucine limitation induced a significant down-regulation in FOXO3 gene expression, which deserves further investigation. We believe that these results will be relevant for the production of a species as appreciated for human consumption as it is gilthead sea bream and demonstrates the importance of

  5. Structural and functional evolution of isopropylmalate dehydrogenases in the leucine and glucosinolate pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yan; Galant, Ashley; Pang, Qiuying; Strul, Johanna M.; Balogun, Sherifat F.; Jez, Joseph M.; Chen, Sixue

    2012-10-24

    The methionine chain-elongation pathway is required for aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis in plants and evolved from leucine biosynthesis. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenases (AtIPMDHs) play key roles in methionine chain-elongation for the synthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates (e.g. AtIPMDH1) and leucine (e.g. AtIPMDH2 and AtIPMDH3). Here we elucidate the molecular basis underlying the metabolic specialization of these enzymes. The 2.25 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of AtIPMDH2 was solved to provide the first detailed molecular architecture of a plant IPMDH. Modeling of 3-isopropylmalate binding in the AtIPMDH2 active site and sequence comparisons of prokaryotic and eukaryotic IPMDH suggest that substitution of one active site residue may lead to altered substrate specificity and metabolic function. Site-directed mutagenesis of Phe-137 to a leucine in AtIPMDH1 (AtIPMDH1-F137L) reduced activity toward 3-(2'-methylthio)ethylmalate by 200-fold, but enhanced catalytic efficiency with 3-isopropylmalate to levels observed with AtIPMDH2 and AtIPMDH3. Conversely, the AtIPMDH2-L134F and AtIPMDH3-L133F mutants enhanced catalytic efficiency with 3-(2'-methylthio)ethylmalate {approx}100-fold and reduced activity for 3-isopropylmalate. Furthermore, the altered in vivo glucosinolate profile of an Arabidopsis ipmdh1 T-DNA knock-out mutant could be restored to wild-type levels by constructs expressing AtIPMDH1, AtIPMDH2-L134F, or AtIPMDH3-L133F, but not by AtIPMDH1-F137L. These results indicate that a single amino acid substitution results in functional divergence of IPMDH in planta to affect substrate specificity and contributes to the evolution of specialized glucosinolate biosynthesis from the ancestral leucine pathway.

  6. Photoinduced fragmentation of gas-phase protonated leucine- enkephalin peptide in the VUV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranković, M. Lj; Canon, F.; Nahon, L.; Giuliani, A.; Milosavljević, A. R.

    2015-09-01

    In this article we report new results for action spectroscopy of protonated peptide Leucine enkephalin (YGGFL). By coupling a linear ion trap mass spectrometer with a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation beamline, we investigate photofragmentation pattern of this peptide, through the analysis of tandem mass spectra recorded over a range of VUV photon energies, below and above the ionization energy. The obtained fragmentation patterns are discussed and compared to previous results.

  7. Fragment-Based Discovery of Type I Inhibitors of Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design was successfully applied to maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK). A low affinity (160 μM) fragment hit was identified, which bound to the hinge region with an atypical binding mode, and this was optimized using structure-based design into a low-nanomolar and cell-penetrant inhibitor, with a good selectivity profile, suitable for use as a chemical probe for elucidation of MELK biology. PMID:25589925

  8. Impact of prolonged leucine supplementation on protein synthesis and lean growth in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Daniel A; Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Hernandez-Garcia, Adriana; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa A

    2015-09-15

    Most low-birth weight infants experience extrauterine growth failure due to reduced nutrient intake as a result of feeding intolerance. The objective of this study was to determine whether prolonged enteral leucine supplementation improves lean growth in neonatal pigs fed a restricted protein diet. Neonatal pigs (n = 14-16/diet, 5 days old, 1.8 ± 0.3 kg) were fed by gastric catheter a whey-based milk replacement diet with either a high protein (HP) or restricted protein (RP) content or RP supplemented with leucine to the same level as in the HP diet (RPL). Pigs were fed 40 ml·kg body wt(-1)·meal(-1) every 4 h for 21 days. Feeding the HP diet resulted in greater total body weight and lean body mass compared with RP-fed pigs (P < 0.05). Masses of the longissimus dorsi muscle, heart, and kidneys were greater in the HP- than RP-fed pigs (P < 0.05). Body weight, lean body mass, and masses of the longissimus dorsi, heart, and kidneys in pigs fed the RPL diet were intermediate to RP- and HP-fed pigs. Protein synthesis and mTOR signaling were increased in all muscles with feeding (P < 0.05); leucine supplementation increased mTOR signaling and protein synthesis rate in the longissimus dorsi (P < 0.05). There was no effect of diet on indices of protein degradation signaling in any tissue (P > 0.05). Thus, when protein intake is chronically restricted, the capacity for leucine supplementation to enhance muscle protein accretion in neonatal pigs that are meal-fed milk protein-based diets is limited.

  9. Site reactivity in the free radicals induced damage to leucine residues: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Medina, M E; Galano, A; Alvarez-Idaboy, J R

    2015-02-21

    Several recent computational studies have tried to explain the observed selectivity in radical damage to proteins. In this work we use Density Functional Theory and Transition State Theory including tunnelling corrections, reaction path degeneracy, the effect of diffusion, and the role of free radicals to get further insights into this important topic. The reaction between a leucine derivative and free radicals of biological significance, in aqueous and lipid media, has been investigated. Both thermochemical and kinetic analyses, in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic environments, have been carried out. DPPH, ˙OOH, ˙OOCH3, ˙OOCH2Cl, ˙OOCHCl2 and ˙OOCHCH2 radicals do not react with the target molecule. The reactions are proposed to be kinetically controlled. The leucine gamma site was the most reactive for the reactions with ˙N3, ˙OOCCl3, ˙OCH3, ˙OCH2Cl, and ˙OCHCl2 radicals, with rate constants equal to 1.97 × 10(5), 3.24 × 10(4), 6.68 × 10(5), 5.98 × 10(6) and 8.87 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution. The ˙Cl, ˙OH and ˙OCCl3 radicals react with leucine at the beta, gamma, and delta positions at rates close to the diffusion limit with the alpha position which is the slowest path and the most thermodynamically favored. The presented results confirm that the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not apply for the reactions between amino acid residues and free radicals. Regarding the influence of the environment on the reactivity of the studied series of free radicals towards leucine residues, it is concluded that hydrophilic media slightly lower the reactivity of the studied radicals, compared to hydrophobic ones, albeit the trends in reactivity are very similar.

  10. Systemic D-Phenylalanine and D-Leucine for Effective Treatment of Pain in the Horse

    PubMed Central

    McKibbin, L. S.; Cheng, R. S. S.

    1982-01-01

    This study showed that subcutaneous injection of a solution of D-amino acids produced effective analgesia in horses. It is postulated that systemic D-phenylalanine and D-leucine may become one of the safe, effective and nonaddictive drugs for acute and chronic pain treatment. These D-amino acids cause analgesia by presumably preserving brain endorphins. They may bind reversibly to enkephalinases and prevent enzymatic degradation of enkephalins. PMID:17422107

  11. Lysine and Leucine Deficiencies Affect Myocytes Development and IGF Signaling in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata)

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Sheida; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Mojazi Amiri, Bagher; Vélez, Emilio J.; Lutfi, Esmail; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing aquaculture production requires better knowledge of growth regulation and improvement in diet formulation. A great effort has been made to replace fish meal for plant protein sources in aquafeeds, making necessary the supplementation of such diets with crystalline amino acids (AA) to cover the nutritional requirements of each species. Lysine and Leucine are limiting essential AA in fish, and it has been demonstrated that supplementation with them improves growth in different species. However, the specific effects of AA deficiencies in myogenesis are completely unknown and have only been studied at the level of hepatic metabolism. It is well-known that the TOR pathway integrates the nutritional and hormonal signals to regulate protein synthesis and cell proliferation, to finally control muscle growth, a process also coordinated by the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). This study aimed to provide new information on the impact of Lysine and Leucine deficiencies in gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes examining their development and the response of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), MRFs, as well as key molecules involved in muscle growth regulation like TOR. Leucine deficiency did not cause significant differences in most of the molecules analyzed, whereas Lysine deficiency appeared crucial in IGFs regulation, decreasing significantly IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-IRb mRNA levels. This treatment also down-regulated the gene expression of different MRFs, including Myf5, Myogenin and MyoD2. These changes were also corroborated by a significant decrease in proliferation and differentiation markers in the Lysine-deficient treatment. Moreover, both Lysine and Leucine limitation induced a significant down-regulation in FOXO3 gene expression, which deserves further investigation. We believe that these results will be relevant for the production of a species as appreciated for human consumption as it is gilthead sea bream and demonstrates the importance of

  12. "Addition" and "Subtraction": Selectivity Design for Type II Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Giraldes, John; Sprague, Elizabeth R; Shakya, Subarna; Chen, Zhuoliang; Wang, Yaping; Joud, Carol; Mathieu, Simon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Straub, Christopher; Duca, Jose; Hurov, Kristen; Yuan, Yanqiu; Shao, Wenlin; Touré, B Barry

    2017-03-09

    While adding the structural features that are more favored by on-target activity is the more common strategy in selectivity optimization, the opposite strategy of subtracting the structural features that contribute more to off-target activity can also be very effective. Reported here is our successful effort of improving the kinase selectivity of type II maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase inhibitors by applying these two complementary approaches together, which clearly demonstrates the powerful synergy between them.

  13. Novel leucine ureido derivatives as aminopeptidase N inhibitors. Design, synthesis and activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunhua; Cao, Jiangying; Liang, Xuewu; Huang, Yongxue; Wu, Ping; Li, Yingxia; Xu, Wenfang; Zhang, Yingjie

    2016-01-27

    Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) over-expressed on tumor cells and tumor microenvironment, plays critical roles in tumor invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Here we described the design, synthesis and preliminary activity studies of novel leucine ureido derivatives as aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) inhibitors. The results showed that compound 7a had the most potent inhibitory activity against APN with the IC50 value of 20 nM, which could be used for further anticancer agent research.

  14. Overexpression and characterization of an extracellular leucine aminopeptidase from Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Matsushita-Morita, Mayumi; Tada, Sawaki; Suzuki, Satoshi; Hattori, Ryota; Marui, Junichiro; Furukawa, Ikuyo; Yamagata, Youhei; Amano, Hitoshi; Ishida, Hiroki; Takeuchi, Michio; Kashiwagi, Yutaka; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi

    2011-02-01

    Leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), an enzyme used in the food industry, is an exopeptidase that removes an amino acid residue, primarily leucine (Leu), from the N-terminus of peptides and protein substrates. In this study, we focused on the leucine aminopeptidase A (lapA) gene from Aspergillus oryzae RIB40. To purify and characterize the LapA, lapA was overexpressed in A. oryzae RIB40 using the amyB promoter. LAP activity in the culture supernatant of one transformant harboring the lapA expression plasmid was 33 times that of the host strain. LapA was purified from the culture supernatant of this lapA-overexpressing strain by column chromatography. The purified recombinant LapA had a molecular mass of 33 kDa, and its N-terminal amino acid was the tyrosine at position 80 of the deduced amino acid sequence. Optimal enzyme activity was observed at 60°C and pH 8.5, and the enzyme was stable at temperatures up to 60°C and in the pH range 7.5-11. In transcriptional analysis, lapA was induced under alkaline conditions and expressed at a relatively low level under normal conditions. LapA showed maximum hydrolyzing activity for the substrate leucine para-nitroanilide (Leu-pNA), followed by substrates Phe-pNA (39% activity compared with Leu-pNA), Met-pNA, Lys-pNA, and Arg-pNA. In addition, LapA preferentially hydrolyzed peptides longer than tripeptides.

  15. Leucine supplementation chronically improves muscle protein synthesis in older adults consuming the RDA for protein

    PubMed Central

    Casperson, Shanon L.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Hewlings, Susan J.; Paddon-Jones, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Background & aim Protein-energy supplementation is routinely employed to combat muscle loss. However, success is often compromised by increased satiety, poor palatability, high costs and low compliance. Methods For 2-weeks we supplemented meals of older individuals with leucine (4 g/meal; 3 meals/day; days 2–14). Metabolic studies were performed prior to (Day 1) and following (Day 15) supplementation. Leucine was not provided on metabolic study days. Venous blood and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained during a primed constant infusion of L-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine. Mixed muscle fractional synthesis rate (FSR), body composition and markers of nutrient signaling (mTOR, 4E-BP1 and p70S6K1 phosphorylation) were measured before and after a low protein/carbohydrate simulated meal. Results The meal modestly increased FSR on Day 1 (postabsorptive: 0.063 ± 0.004 vs. postprandial: 0.075 ± 0.006%/h; p = 0.03), however, two weeks of leucine supplementation increased postabsorptive FSR (p = 0.004) and the response to the meal (p = 0.01) (postabsorptive: 0.074 ± 0.007 vs. postprandial: 0.10 ± 0.007%/h). Changes in FSR were mirrored by increased phosphorylation of mTOR, 4E-BP1 and p70S6K1 (p ≤ 0.1). No change in fat free mass was observed (p > 0.05). Conclusions In older adults, leucine supplementation may improve muscle protein synthesis in response to lower protein meals. PMID:22357161

  16. Therapeutic Neuroendocrine Agonist and Antagonist Analogs of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides as Modulators of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis.

    PubMed

    Newton, Claire L; Anderson, Ross C; Millar, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive hormones play a role at all stages of life and affect most tissues of the body. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) synthesized in the hypothalamus stimulates the secretion of gonadotropins which in turn stimulate gonadal sex hormone production and gamete formation. This hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis has, therefore, been the target for the development of numerous drugs which regulate it at various points. These include sex steroid agonists and antagonists, inhibitors of sex steroid biosynthesis, and GnRH agonists and antagonists, which have found extensive applications in treating numerous conditions such as precocious puberty, delayed puberty, prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia, endometriosis, uterine fibroids and also in in vitro fertilization protocols. The novel neuroendocrine peptides, kisspeptin (KP) and neurokinin B (NKB), were recently discovered as upstream regulators of GnRH, and inactivating mutations of KP and NKB ligands or receptors result in a failure to progress through puberty. Agonists and antagonists of KP and NKB are being developed as more subtle modulators of the HPG axis. These new drugs offer additional and alternative therapeutic options in pediatric and adult hormone-dependent diseases.

  17. GABAergic activation inhibits the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovaric axis and sexual development in the immature female rat. Associated changes in hypothalamic glutamatergic and taurinergic systems.

    PubMed

    Feleder, C; Ginzburg, M; Wuttke, W; Moguilevsky, J A; Arias, P

    1999-09-06

    The aim of the present studies was to assess, in immature female rats, the effect of the GABAergic system on the reproductive axis and on pubertal development. With this purpose we initially evaluated, in 30-day-old female rats, the effect of persistently enhanced GABAergic activity (aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA) 10 mg/kg per day i.p., during postnatal days 23-29) on hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and amino acid neurotransmitter (AANT; glutamate or GLU, and taurine or TAU) concentrations, on circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol levels, and on ovaric weight. In a second group of similarly treated rats, the date of vaginal opening (VO) was recorded. Complementary in vitro experiments (superfusion of anterior/mediobasal hypothalamic fragments obtained from rats aged 30 days) were performed to evaluate the effect of the short-term activation of the GABAergic system (by means of AOAA, muscimol or baclofen) on hypothalamic GnRH and AANT release. Prolonged treatment with AOAA led to a marked increase in hypothalamic gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) concentrations (p<0.002), and to a significant decrease in hypothalamic GnRH and GLU content (p<0.05 and <0.02, respectively). Furthermore, treated animals showed diminished serum LH (p<0.05) and estradiol (p<0.005) levels, and a clear reduction in ovaric weight (p<0.002). Mean age at VO was 30. 8+/-0.6 days in control animals (range: 29-34 days), and 36.7+/-0.98 days in AOAA-treated rats (range: 33-40 days; p<0.0001). Acute treatment with AOAA resulted in a decreased GnRH and GLU output, and in an increased TAU release from superfused hypothalamic fragments. This effect was mimicked by the GABA-A and GABA-B agonists. Our results show that the activation of the GABAergic system during postnatal days 23-29 significantly restrains the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovaric axis, resulting in a clear-cut delay in sexual development. This can be attributed to the inhibitory effect exerted by GABA (acting on both

  18. Dexmedetomidine ameliorates muscle wasting and attenuates the alteration of hypothalamic neuropeptides and inflammation in endotoxemic rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Minhua; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; Cao, Chun; Chen, Yan; Zhao, Chenyan; Li, Qiurong

    2017-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is generally used for sedaton in critically ill, it could shorten duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay and lower basic metabolism. However, the exact mechanism of these positive effects remains unkown. Here we investigated the hypothesis that dexmedetomidine could ameliorate muscle wasting in endotoxemic rats and whether it was related to hypothalamic neuropeptides alteration and inflammation. Fourty-eight adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg) or saline, followed by 50 μg/kg dexmedetomidine or saline administration via the femoral vein catheter (infusion at 5 μg·kg-1·hr-1). Twenty-four hours after injection, hypothalamus tissues and skeletal muscle were obtained. Muscle wasting was measured by the mRNA expression of two E3 ubiquitin ligases, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF-1) as well as 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) and tyrosine release. Hypothalamic inflammatory markers and neuropeptides expression were also detected in all four groups. Results showed that LPS administration led to significant increase in hypothalamic inflammation together with muscle wasting. Increased hypothalamic neuropeptides, proopiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine and amphetamine-related transcript (CART) and neuropeptides Y (NPY) and decreased agouti-related protein (AgRP) were also observed. Meanwhile dexmedetomidine administration ameliorated muscle wasting, hypothalamic inflammation and modulated the alteration of neuropeptides, POMC, CART and AgRP, in endotoxemic rats. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine could alleviate muscle wasting in endotoxemic rats, and it could also attenuate the alteration of hypothalamic neuropeptides and reduce hypothalamic inflammation. PMID:28358856

  19. Regulation of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA by central glucose and leptin

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Cha, Seung Hun; Sidhaye, Aniket; Chohnan, Shigeru; Cline, Gary; Shulman, Gerald I.; Lane, M. Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Hypothalamic malonyl-CoA has been shown to function in global energy homeostasis by modulating food intake and energy expenditure. Little is known, however, about the regulation of malonyl-CoA concentration in the central nervous system. To address this issue we investigated the response of putative intermediates in the malonyl-CoA pathway to metabolic and endocrine cues, notably those provoked by glucose and leptin. Hypothalamic malonyl-CoA rises in proportion to the carbohydrate content of the diet consumed after food deprivation. Malonyl-CoA concentration peaks 1 h after refeeding or after peripheral glucose administration. This response depends on the dose of glucose administered and is blocked by the i.c.v. administration of an inhibitor of glucose metabolism, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). The kinetics of change in hypothalamic malonyl-CoA after glucose administration is coincident with the suppression of phosphorylation of AMP kinase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Blockade of glucose utilization in the CNS by i.c.v. 2-DG prevented the effects of glucose on 5′AMP-activated protein kinase, malonyl-CoA, hypothalamic neuropeptide expression, and food intake. Finally, we showed that leptin can increase hypothalamic malonyl-CoA and that the increase is additive with glucose administration. Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, however, showed no defect in the glucose- or refeeding-induced rise in hypothalamic malonyl-CoA after food deprivation, demonstrating that leptin was not required for this effect. These studies show that hypothalamic malonyl-CoA responds to the level of circulating glucose and leptin, both of which affect energy homeostasis. PMID:18032600

  20. Growth hormone modulates hypothalamic inflammation in long-lived pituitary dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Sadagurski, Marianna; Landeryou, Taylor; Cady, Gillian; Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Bartke, Andrzej; Miller, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Mice in which the genes for growth hormone (GH) or GH receptor (GHR(-/-) ) are disrupted from conception are dwarfs, possess low levels of IGF-1 and insulin, have low rates of cancer and diabetes, and are extremely long-lived. Median longevity is also increased in mice with deletion of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), which leads to isolated GH deficiency. The remarkable extension of longevity in hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice can be reversed by a 6-week course of GH injections started at the age of 2 weeks. Here, we demonstrate that mutations that interfere with GH production or response, in the Snell dwarf, Ames dwarf, or GHR(-/-) mice lead to reduced formation of both orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) projections to the main hypothalamic projection areas: the arcuate nucleus (ARH), paraventricular nucleus (PVH), and dorsomedial nucleus (DMH). These mutations also reduce hypothalamic inflammation in 18-month-old mice. GH injections, between 2 and 8 weeks of age, reversed both effects in Ames dwarf mice. Disruption of GHR specifically in liver (LiGHRKO), a mutation that reduces circulating IGF-1 but does not lead to lifespan extension, had no effect on hypothalamic projections or inflammation, suggesting an effect of GH, rather than peripheral IGF-1, on hypothalamic development. Hypothalamic leptin signaling, as monitored by induction of pStat3, is not impaired by GHR deficiency. Together, these results suggest that early-life disruption of GH signaling produces long-term hypothalamic changes that may contribute to the longevity of GH-deficient and GH-resistant mice.

  1. Liver functional metabolomics discloses an action of L-leucine against Streptococcus iniae infection in tilapias.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Mei; Yang, Man-Jun; Wang, Sanying; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus iniae seriously affects the intensive farming of tilapias. Much work has been conducted on prevention and control of S. iniae infection, but little published information on the metabolic response is available in tilapias against the bacterial infection, and no metabolic modulation way may be adopted to control this disease. The present study used GC/MS based metabolomics to characterize the metabolic profiling of tilapias infected by a lethal dose (LD50) of S. iniae and determined two characteristic metabolomes separately responsible for the survival and dying fishes. A reversal changed metabolite, decreased and increased l-leucine in the dying and survival groups, respectively, was identified as a biomarker which featured the difference between the two metabolomes. More importantly, exogenous l-leucine could be used as a metabolic modulator to elevate survival ability of tilapias infected by S. iniae. These results indicate that tilapias mount metabolic strategies to deal with bacterial infection, which can be regulated by exogenous metabolites such as l-leucine. The present study establishes an alternative way, metabolic modulation, to cope with bacterial infections.

  2. The CUG codon is decoded in vivo as serine and not leucine in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, M A; Tuite, M F

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the yeast Candida albicans encodes a unique seryl-tRNA(CAG) that should decode the leucine codon CUG as serine. However, in vitro translation of several different CUG-containing mRNAs in the presence of this unusual seryl-tRNA(CAG) result in an apparent increase in the molecular weight of the encoded polypeptides as judged by SDS-PAGE even though the molecular weight of serine is lower than that of leucine. A possible explanation for this altered electrophoretic mobility is that the CUG codon is decoded as modified serine in vitro. To elucidate the nature of CUG decoding in vivo, a reporter system based on the C. albicans gene (RBP1) encoding rapamycin-binding protein (RBP), coupled to the promoter of the C. albicans TEF3 gene, was utilized. Sequencing and mass-spectrometry analysis of the recombinant RBP expressed in C. albicans demonstrated that the CUG codon was decoded exclusively as serine while the related CUU codon was translated as leucine. A database search revealed that 32 out of the 65 C. albicans gene sequences available have CUG codons in their open reading frames. The CUG-containing genes do not belong to any particular gene family. Thus the amino acid specified by the CUG codon has been reassigned within the mRNAs of C. albicans. We argue here that this unique genetic code change in cellular mRNAs cannot be explained by the 'Codon Reassignment Theory'. Images PMID:7784200

  3. Leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding protein contracts upon binding of ligand.

    PubMed

    Olah, G A; Trakhanov, S; Trewhella, J; Quiocho, F A

    1993-08-05

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and computer modeling have been used to study the effects of ligand binding to the leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding protein, an initial component of the high-affinity active transport system for branched-chain aliphatic amino acids in Escherichia coli. Measurements were made with no ligand present and with either L-leucine or L-valine present. Upon binding of either leucine or valine, there is a decrease in the radius of gyration, from 23.2 +/- 0.2 to 22.2 +/- 0.2 A, and in the maximum particle dimension, from 82 +/- 3 to 73 +/- 3 A. The x-ray structure of the unbound form has been determined and gives a radius of gyration and a maximum dimension consistent with the values found for the solution structure in this study (Sack, J. S., Saper, M. A., and Quiocho, F. A. (1989) J. Mol. Biol. 206, 171-191). The reduction in the radius of gyration and maximum dimension upon ligand binding can be accounted for by a substrate-induced cleft closure in a combined "hinge-twist" motion. Modeling of the substrate-bound state was done by comparison of this protein with another periplasmic binding protein (L-arabinose-binding protein), which possesses a similar two-lobe structure and for which the x-ray structure is known in its ligand-bound form.

  4. Leucine metabolism regulates TRI6 expression and affects deoxynivalenol production and virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Narayanan, Swara; Walkowiak, Sean; Wang, Li; Joshi, Manisha; Rocheleau, Hélène; Ouellet, Thérèse; Harris, Linda J

    2015-11-01

    TRI6 is a positive regulator of the trichothecene gene cluster and the production of trichothecene mycotoxins [deoxynivalenol (DON)] and acetylated forms such as 15-Acetyl-DON) in the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. As a global transcriptional regulator, TRI6 expression is modulated by nitrogen-limiting conditions, sources of nitrogen and carbon, pH and light. However, the mechanism by which these diverse environmental factors affect TRI6 expression remains underexplored. In our effort to understand how nutrients affect TRI6 regulation, comparative digital expression profiling was performed with a wild-type F. graminearum and a Δtri6 mutant strain, grown in nutrient-rich conditions. Analysis showed that TRI6 negatively regulates genes of the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway. Feeding studies with deletion mutants of MCC, encoding methylcrotonyl-CoA-carboxylase, one of the key enzymes of leucine metabolism, showed that addition of leucine specifically down-regulated TRI6 expression and reduced 15-ADON accumulation. Constitutive expression of TRI6 in the Δmcc mutant strain restored 15-ADON production. A combination of cellophane breach assays and pathogenicity experiments on wheat demonstrated that disrupting the leucine metabolic pathway significantly reduced disease. These findings suggest a complex interaction between one of the primary metabolic pathways with a global regulator of mycotoxin biosynthesis and virulence in F. graminearum.

  5. Impact of leucine supplementation on exercise training induced anti-cardiac remodeling effect in heart failure mice.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Wilson Max Almeida Monteiro; Melara, Thaís Plasti; de Souza, Pamella Ramona Moraes; Guimarães, Fabiana de Salvi; Bozi, Luiz Henrique Marchesi; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2015-05-15

    Leucine supplementation potentiates the effects of aerobic exercise training (AET) on skeletal muscle; however, its potential effects associated with AET on cardiac muscle have not been clarified yet. We tested whether leucine supplementation would potentiate the anti-cardiac remodeling effect of AET in a genetic model of sympathetic hyperactivity-induced heart failure in mice (α2A/α2CARKO). Mice were assigned to five groups: wild type mice treated with placebo and sedentary (WT, n = 11), α2A/α2CARKO treated with placebo and sedentary (KO, n = 9), α2A/α2CARKO treated with leucine and sedentary (KOL, n = 11), α2A/α2CARKO treated with placebo and AET (KOT, n = 12) or α2A/α2CARKO treated with leucine and AET (KOLT, n = 12). AET consisted of four weeks on a treadmill with 60 min sessions (six days/week, 60% of maximal speed) and administration by gavage of leucine (1.35 g/kg/day) or placebo (distilled water). The AET significantly improved exercise capacity, fractional shortening and re-established cardiomyocytes' diameter and collagen fraction in KOT. Additionally, AET significantly prevented the proteasome hyperactivity, increased misfolded proteins and HSP27 expression. Isolated leucine supplementation displayed no effect on cardiac function and structure (KOL), however, when associated with AET (KOLT), it increased exercise tolerance to a higher degree than isolated AET (KOT) despite no additional effects on AET induced anti-cardiac remodeling. Our results provide evidence for the modest impact of leucine supplementation on cardiac structure and function in exercised heart failure mice. Leucine supplementation potentiated AET effects on exercise tolerance, which might be related to its recognized impact on skeletal muscle.

  6. Lean body mass change over 6 years is associated with dietary leucine intake in an older Danish population.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Cameron Keith; Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z; Capra, Sandra; Bauer, Judy; Raymond, Kyle; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2016-05-01

    Higher protein intake, and particularly higher leucine intake, is associated with attenuated loss of lean body mass (LBM) over time in older individuals. Dietary leucine is thought to be a key mediator of anabolism. This study aimed to assess this relationship over 6 years among younger and older adult Danes. Dietary leucine intake was assessed at baseline and after 6 years in men and women, aged 35-65 years, participating in the Danish cohort of the WHO-MONICA (Multinational MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease) study (n 368). Changes in LBM over the 6 years were measured by bioelectrical impedance using equations developed for this Danish population. The association between leucine and LBM changes was examined using multivariate linear regression and ANCOVA analyses adjusted for potential confounders. After adjustment for baseline LBM, sex, age, energy intake and physical activity, leucine intake was associated with LBM change in those older than 65 years (n 79), with no effect seen in those younger than 65 years. Older participants in the highest quartile of leucine intake (7·1 g/d) experienced LBM maintenance, whereas lower intakes were associated with LBM loss over 6 years (for trend: β=0·434, P=0·03). Sensitivity analysis indicated no effect modification of sex or the presence of CVD. Greater leucine intake in conjunction with adequate total protein intake was associated with long-term LBM retention in a healthy older Danish population. This study corroborates findings from laboratory investigations in relation to protein and leucine intakes and LBM change. A more diverse and larger sample is needed for confirmation of these results.

  7. Biosynthesis of 4-methyleneglutamic acid by peanut seedlings: Evidence for the involvement of a distinct source of leucine

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, H.C.; Dekker, E.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Germinating peanut seeds accumulate 4-methyleneglutamic acid its {gamma}-amide(MeGlx), as well as 4-methylglutamic acid(MGlu) for which leucine has been implicated as a precursor. When we incubated detached peanut cotyledons with {sup 14}C-leucine for 24-96 hr, most of the label was found in non-extractable components, while small but significant amounts were present in MeGlx, MGlu, and free leucine. The level of leucine in storage protein of ungerminated seeds is similar to the maximum level of MeGlx found in germinated seeds; further correlations were observed in various peanut tissues between rapid accumulation of MeGlx and the presence of high levels of glyoxysomal enzymes (catalase and isocitrate lyase). These results suggest that during germination, most of the leucine in the seed storage protein is converted to MeGlx, possibly by a glyoxysomal oxidase system in cotyledons, whereas most of the free leucine for protein synthesis is formed de novo.

  8. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhi; Cholewa, Jason; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Yue-Qin; Shang, Hua-Yu; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Su, Quan-Sheng; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2016-05-02

    Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1(®) mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload) and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity) of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown.

  9. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhi; Cholewa, Jason; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Yue-Qin; Shang, Hua-Yu; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Su, Quan-Sheng; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1® mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload) and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity) of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown. PMID:27144582

  10. Sequence and structural similarities between the leucine-specific binding protein and leucyl-tRNA synthetase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, R M; Oxender, D L

    1990-01-01

    A role for the leucyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.4) has been established for regulating the transport of leucine across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli by the leucine, isoleucine, valine (LIV-I) transport system. This transport system is mediated by interactions of periplasmic binding proteins with a complex of membrane-associated proteins, and transcription of the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system genes is repressed by growth of E. coli on high levels of leucine. We now report results from sequence comparisons and structural modeling studies, which indicate that the leucine-specific binding protein, one of the periplasmic components of the LIV-I transport system, contains a 121-residue stretch, representing 36% of the mature protein, which displays both sequence and structural similarities to a region within the putative nucleotide-binding domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase. Early fusion events between ancestral genes for the leucine-specific binding protein and leucyl-tRNA synthetase could account for the similarity and suggest that processes of aminoacylation and transport for leucine in E. coli may be performed by evolutionarily interrelated proteins. PMID:2191293

  11. Differential involvement of hypothalamic vasopressin neurons in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Benarroch, Eduardo E; Schmeichel, Ann M; Sandroni, Paola; Low, Phillip A; Parisi, Joseph E

    2006-10-01

    We sought to determine whether there is differential involvement of different groups of hypothalamic arginine-vasopressin (AVP) synthesizing neurons in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Hypothalamus was obtained from five subjects with clinical diagnosis of MSA confirmed neuropathologically and five age-matched controls. Sections were immunostained for AVP, and cells with visible nuclei were counted in the posterior portion of the paraventricular nucleus (PVNp), supraoptic nucleus (SON), magnocellular PVN and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Sections of the hypothalamus and medulla were also immunostained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). There was a significant loss of AVP neurons in the PVNp in MSA compared with controls (17 +/- 3 versus 59 +/- 10 cells/section, P < 0.01). There was preservation of AVP- and TH-immunoreactive neurons in the SON and magnocellular PVN in all MSA cases. In contrast, there was marked depletion of TH-immunoreactive fibres innervating these magnocellular AVP neurons, coincident with a loss of neurons in the A1 area (6 +/- 1 versus 13 +/- 1 cells/section, P < 0.01). There was loss of AVP neurons in the SCN in MSA compared with control cases (14 +/- 3 versus 71 +/- 16 cells/section, P < 0.02). Our results indicate that, in MSA, loss of AVP neurons in the PVNp may contribute to sympathetic failure, whereas loss of catecholaminergic input from the brainstem to the magnocellular AVP neurons may contribute to impaired AVP secretion in response to orthostatic stress. Loss of AVP neurons in the SCN may contribute to impaired circadian regulation of endocrine and autonomic functions.

  12. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Imrich, R; Rovensky, J; Zlnay, M; Radikova, Z; Macho, L; Vigas, M; Koska, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess basal function and responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis during dynamic testing. Methods: Insulin induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) (Actrapid HM 0.1 IU/kg, as intravenous bolus) was induced in 17 patients and 11 healthy controls matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Concentrations of glucose, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, insulin, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) were determined in plasma. Results: Comparable basal cortisol levels were found in the two groups, with a trend to be lower in ankylosing spondylitis. In the ankylosing spondylitis group, there were higher concentrations of IL-6 (mean (SEM): 16.6 (2.8) pg/ml v 1.41 (0.66) pg/ml in controls; p<0.001) and TNFα (8.5 (1.74) pg/ml v 4.08 (0.42) pg/ml in controls; p<0.01). Glucose, insulin, ACTH, DHEAS, and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone did not differ significantly from control. The IIH test was carried out successfully in 11 of the 17 patients with ankylosing spondylitis, and the ACTH and cortisol responses were comparable with control. General linear modelling showed a different course of glycaemia (p = 0.041) in the ankylosing spondylitis patients who met the criteria for a successful IIH test compared with the controls. Conclusions: The results suggest there is no difference in basal HPA axis activity and completely preserved responsiveness of the HPA axis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The interpretation of the different course of glycaemia during IIH in ankylosing spondylitis requires further investigation. PMID:15140773

  13. Leucine supplementation is anti-atrophic during paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    de Sá Souza, Helton; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Dáttilo, Murilo; Lee, Kil Sun; Mônico-Neto, Marcos; de Campos Giampa, Sara Quaglia; Phillips, Stuart M; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify sleep deprivation-induced atrophy and the muscle-specific fiber types affected and to determine the effects of leucine supplementation on atrophy and pertinent portions of the pathways of muscle protein synthesis and degradation in rats. A total of 46 Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: control (CTL), leucine supplementation (LEU), sleep deprivation (SD), and leucine supplementation + sleep deprivation (LEU + SD). Leucine supplementation was by gavage (1.35 g/kg/daily), and the animals were subjected to SD for 96 h. Testosterone and corticosterone concentrations, along with proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation and proteasome activity levels, were measured in the gastrocnemius (GA) muscle. Myosin ATPase staining was used to evaluate the different muscle fibers. After sleep deprivation, GA muscle and body masses decreased in the SD group compared to the CTL, LEU, and LEU + SD groups. There was no difference between groups in type I fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). The CSAs for type IIa fibers were lower in the SD and LEU + SD groups vs. the CTL and LEU groups, while the IIb fiber CSA was lower in the SD group vs. the CSAs in all other groups. The phospho (p)-Akt levels were lower in the SD and LEU + SD groups vs. the CTL and LEU groups. The p-mTORC1 levels were higher in the LEU, SD, and LEU + SD groups vs. the CTL group. The p-p70S6k levels were higher in the LEU and LEU + SD groups; the 4E-BP1 levels were higher in the SD and LEU + SD groups compared to those in the CTL and LEU groups, and the p-4E-BP1 levels were higher in the LEU and SD groups compared to those in the CTL group and even higher in the LEU + SD group compared to those in the LEU and SD groups. Ubiquitinated proteins, LC3, and p62/SQSTM, and proteasome activity levels were higher in the SD and LEU + SD groups vs. the LEU and CTL groups. Sleep deprivation led to the atrophy of IIa and IIb muscle fibers; however, leucine

  14. Characterization of the regulon controlled by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ernsting, B R; Atkinson, M R; Ninfa, A J; Matthews, R G

    1992-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) has been shown to regulate, either positively or negatively, the transcription of several Escherichia coli genes in response to leucine. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze the patterns of polypeptide expression in isogenic lrp+ and lrp mutant strains in the presence or absence of leucine. The absence of a functional Lrp protein alters the expression of at least 30 polypeptides. The expression of the majority of these polypeptides is not affected by the presence or absence of 10 mM exogenous leucine. Outer membrane porins OmpC and OmpF, glutamine synthetase (GlnA), the small subunit of glutamate synthase (GltD), lysyl-tRNA synthetase form II (LysU), a high-affinity periplasmic binding protein specific for branched-chain amino acids (LivJ), W protein, and the enzymes of the pathway converting threonine to glycine, namely, threonine dehydrogenase (Tdh) and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase (Kbl), were identified as members of the Lrp regulon by electrophoretic analysis. We have shown that Lrp is a positive regulator of glutamate synthase and glutamine synthetase and that exogenous leucine has little or no effect on the expression of these proteins. In strains carrying a glnL deletion and in strains carrying the glnL2302 allele, which directs the synthesis of a GlnL protein that is constitutively active, expression of glutamine synthetase is no longer regulated by Lrp, demonstrating that the effect of Lrp on glutamine synthetase levels is indirect and requires an intact glnL gene. lrp::Tn10 strains grow poorly when arginine or ornithine is present as the sole nitrogen source in the medium. On the bases of present studies and previous research, we propose that Lrp is involved in the adaptation of E. coli cells to major shifts in environment, such as those which occur when E. coli leaves the intestinal tract of its animal host. Several genes required for amino acid and peptide transport and

  15. Evaluation of hypothalamic murine and human melanocortin 3 receptor transcript structure.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Douglas, Dezmond C; Basu, Arunabha; Gardner, Ryan M; Aspelund, Sender; Wen, Xin; Yanovski, Jack A

    2014-11-07

    The melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R) is involved in regulation of energy homeostasis. However, its transcript structure is not well understood. We therefore studied initiation and termination sites for hypothalamic murine Mc3r and human MC3R transcripts. Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) was performed for the 5' and 3' ends of murine and human hypothalamic RNA. 5' RACE experiments using hypothalamic murine RNA indicated mouse hypothalamus expresses two major Mc3r transcription start sites: one with a 5' UTR approximately 368 bases in length and another previously unknown transcript with a 5' UTR approximately 440 bases in length. 5' RACE experiments using human hypothalamic RNA identified a 5' UTR beginning 533 bases upstream of the start codon with a 248 base splice. 3' RACE experiments using hypothalamic murine RNA indicated the 3' UTR terminates approximately 1286 bases after the translational stop codon, with a previously unknown 787 base splice between consensus splice donor and acceptor sites. 3' RACE experiments using human MC3R transcript indicated the 3' UTR terminates approximately 115-160 bases after the translational stop codon. These data provide insight into melanocortin 3 receptor transcript structure.

  16. Role of Hypothalamic Creb-Binding Protein in Obesity and Molecular Reprogramming of Metabolic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Cesar L.; Yang, Linda; Dacks, Penny A.; Isoda, Fumiko; van Deursen, Jan M. A.; Mobbs, Charles V.

    2016-01-01

    We have reported a correlation between hypothalamic expression of Creb-binding protein (Cbp) and lifespan, and that inhibition of Cbp prevents protective effects of dietary restriction during aging, suggesting that hypothalamic Cbp plays a role in responses to nutritional status and energy balance. Recent GWAS and network analyses have also implicated Cbp as the most connected gene in protein-protein interactions in human Type 2 diabetes. The present studies address mechanisms mediating the role of Cbp in diabetes by inhibiting hypothalamic Cbp using a Cre-lox strategy. Inhibition of hypothalamic Cbp results in profound obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis, increased food intake, and decreased body temperature. In addition, these changes are accompanied by molecular evidence in the hypothalamus for impaired leptin and insulin signaling, a shift from glucose to lipid metabolism, and decreased Pomc mRNA, with no effect on locomotion. Further assessment of the significance of the metabolic switch demonstrated that enhanced expression of hypothalamic Cpt1a, which promotes lipid metabolism, similarly resulted in increased body weight and reduced Pomc mRNA. PMID:27832201

  17. Gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. An update in the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Téllez-Zenteno, José F; Serrano-Almeida, Cesar; Moien-Afshari, Farzad

    2008-12-01

    Gelastic seizures are epileptic events characterized by bouts of laughter. Laughter-like vocalization is usually combined with facial contraction in the form of a smile. Autonomic features such as flushing, tachycardia, and altered respiration are widely recognized. Conscious state may not be impaired, although this is often difficult to asses particularly in young children. Gelastic seizures have been associated classically to hypothalamic hamartomas, although different extrahypothalamic localizations have been described. Hypothalamic hamartomas are rare congenital lesions presenting with the classic triad of gelastic epilepsy, precocious puberty and developmental delay. The clinical course of patients with gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas is progressive, commencing with gelastic seizures in infancy, deteriorating into more complex seizure disorder resulting in intractable epilepsy. Electrophysiological, radiological, and pathophysiological studies have confirmed the intrinsic epileptogenicity of the hypothalamic hamartoma. Currently the most effective surgical approach is the trancallosal anterior interforniceal approach, however newer approaches including the endoscopic and other treatment such as radiosurgery and gamma knife have been used with success. This review focuses on the syndrome of gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas, but it also reviews other concepts such as status gelasticus and some aspects of gelastic seizures in other locations.

  18. Hypothalamic volume loss is associated with reduced melatonin output in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nombela, Cristina; Vuono, Romina; Jones, P. Simon; Fisher, Kate; Burn, David J.; Brooks, David J.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.; Rowe, James B.; Barker, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Recent studies have suggested that melatonin—a hormone produced by the pineal gland under circadian control—contributes to PD‐related sleep dysfunction. We hypothesized that degenerative changes to the neural structures controlling pineal function (especially the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the anterior hypothalamus) may be responsible for reduced melatonin output in these patients. We compared hypothalamic volumes in PD patients with matched controls and determined whether volume loss correlated with reduced melatonin output in the PD group. Methods A total of 12 PD patients and 12 matched controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging to determine hypothalamic volume. In addition, PD patients underwent 24‐hour blood sampling in a controlled environment to determine serum melatonin concentrations using enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assays. Results PD patients had significantly reduced hypothalamic gray matter volume when compared with matched controls. Melatonin levels were significantly associated with hypothalamic gray matter volume and disease severity in PD patients. Conclusion Melatonin levels are associated with hypothalamic gray matter volume loss and disease severity in PD patients. This provides anatomical and physiological support for an intrinsic sleep and circadian phenotype in PD. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:26971528

  19. Identification of hypothalamic neuron-derived neurotrophic factor as a novel factor modulating appetite.

    PubMed

    Byerly, Mardi S; Swanson, Roy D; Semsarzadeh, Nina N; McCulloh, Patrick S; Kwon, Kiwook; Aja, Susan; Moran, Timothy H; Wong, G William; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-06-15

    Disruption of finely coordinated neuropeptide signals in the hypothalamus can result in altered food intake and body weight. We identified neuron-derived neurotrophic factor (NENF) as a novel secreted protein through a large-scale screen aimed at identifying novel secreted hypothalamic proteins that regulate food intake. We observed robust Nenf expression in hypothalamic nuclei known to regulate food intake, and its expression was altered under the diet-induced obese (DIO) condition relative to the fed state. Hypothalamic Nenf mRNA was regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, itself an important regulator of appetite. Delivery of purified recombinant BDNF into the lateral cerebral ventricle decreased hypothalamic Nenf expression, while pharmacological inhibition of trkB signaling increased Nenf mRNA expression. Furthermore, recombinant NENF administered via an intracerebroventricular cannula decreased food intake and body weight and increased hypothalamic Pomc and Mc4r mRNA expression. Importantly, the appetite-suppressing effect of NENF was abrogated in obese mice fed a high-fat diet, demonstrating a diet-dependent modulation of NENF function. We propose the existence of a regulatory circuit involving BDNF, NENF, and melanocortin signaling. Our study validates the power of using an integrated experimental and bioinformatic approach to identify novel CNS-derived proteins with appetite-modulating function and reveals NENF as an important central modulator of food intake.

  20. Leucine Leucine-37 Uses Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 to Activate Signal Transduction Pathways, Stimulate Oncogenic Gene Expression, and Enhance the Invasiveness of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor–like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein–coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37–induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37–stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37–treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  1. Leucine leucine-37 uses formyl peptide receptor-like 1 to activate signal transduction pathways, stimulate oncogenic gene expression, and enhance the invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein-coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37-induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37-stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37-treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1.

  2. Hypothalamic serotonin-insulin signaling cross-talk and alterations in a type 2 diabetic model.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Ioannis; Berthou, Flavien; Vicaire, Nicolas; Rouch, Claude; Markaki, Eirini M; Bailbe, Danielle; Portha, Bernard; Taouis, Mohammed; Gerozissis, Kyriaki

    2012-03-05

    Serotonin and insulin are key regulators of homeostatic mechanisms in the hypothalamus. However, in type 2 diabetes, the hypothalamic responsiveness to serotonin is not clearly established. We used a diabetic model, the Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats, to explore insulin receptor expression, insulin and serotonin efficiency in the hypothalamus and liver by means of Akt phosphorylation. Insulin or dexfenfluramine (stimulator of serotonin) treatment induced Akt phosphorylation in Wistar rats but not in GK rats that exhibit down-regulated insulin receptor. Studies in a neuroblastoma cell line showed that serotonin-induced Akt phosphorylation is PI3-kinase dependent. Finally, in response to food intake, hypothalamic serotonin release was reduced in GK rats, indicating impaired responsiveness of this neurotransmitter. In conclusion, hypothalamic serotonin as insulin efficiency is impaired in diabetic GK rats. The insulin-serotonin cross-talk and impairment observed is one potential key modification in the brain during the onset of diabetes.

  3. Kisspeptins: regulators of metastasis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, K G

    2005-08-01

    The kisspeptins are the peptide products of the KiSS-1 gene and the endogenous agonists for the GPR54 receptor. Although KiSS-1 was initially discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene, recent evidence suggests the kisspeptin/GPR54 system is a key regulator of the reproductive system. Disrupted GPR54 signalling causes hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in rodents and man. Central or peripheral administration of kisspeptin potently stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, increasing circulating gonadotrophin concentrations in a number of animal models. These effects appear likely to be mediated via the hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone system, although kisspeptins may have direct effects on the anterior pituitary gland. Hypothalamic KiSS-1 expression is regulated by circulating sex steroids. The precise physiological role of the kisspeptin system in the regulation of reproductive function remains to be elucidated.

  4. Hypothalamic KLF4 mediates leptin's effects on food intake via AgRP.

    PubMed

    Imbernon, Monica; Sanchez-Rebordelo, Estrella; Gallego, Rosalia; Gandara, Marina; Lear, Pamela; Lopez, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2014-07-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger-type transcription factor expressed in a range of tissues that plays multiple functions. We report that hypothalamic KLF4 represents a new transcription factor specifically modulating agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression in vivo. Hypothalamic KLF4 colocalizes with AgRP neurons and is modulated by nutritional status and leptin. Over-expression of KLF4 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) induces food intake and increases body weight through the specific stimulation of AgRP, as well as blunting leptin sensitivity in lean rats independent of forkhead box protein 01 (FoxO1). Down-regulation of KLF4 in the ARC inhibits fasting-induced food intake in both lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Silencing KLF4, however, does not, on its own, enhance peripheral leptin sensitivity in DIO rats.

  5. Giant hypothalamic hamartoma associated with an intracranial cyst in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma with a large intracranial cyst in a neonate. On ultrasonography, the lesion presented as a lobulated, mass-like lesion with similar echogenicity to the adjacent brain parenchyma, located anterior to the underdeveloped and compressed left temporal lobe, and presenting as an intracranial cyst in the left cerebral convexity without definite internal echogenicity or septa. The presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma and intracranial neurenteric cyst were confirmed by surgical biopsy. The association of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma and a neurenteric cyst is rare. Due to the rarity of this association, the large size of the intracranial cyst, and the resulting distortion in the regional anatomy, the diagnosis of the solid mass was not made correctly on prenatal high-resolution ultrasonography. PMID:27101982

  6. Hypothalamic TLR2 triggers sickness behavior via a microglia-neuronal axis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sungho; Kim, Jae Geun; Park, Jeong Woo; Koch, Marco; Horvath, Tamas L.; Lee, Byung Ju

    2016-01-01

    Various pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to sickness behaviors have been proposed. For example, an inflammatory process in the hypothalamus has been implicated, but the signaling modalities that involve inflammatory mechanisms and neuronal circuit functions are ill-defined. Here, we show that toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) activation by intracerebroventricular injection of its ligand, Pam3CSK4, triggered hypothalamic inflammation and activation of arcuate nucleus microglia, resulting in altered input organization and increased activity of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. These animals developed sickness behavior symptoms, including anorexia, hypoactivity, and hyperthermia. Antagonists of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase pathway and melanocortin receptors 3/4 reversed the anorexia and body weight loss induced by TLR2 activation. These results unmask an important role of TLR2 in the development of sickness behaviors via stimulation of hypothalamic microglia to promote POMC neuronal activation in association with hypothalamic inflammation. PMID:27405276

  7. Crucial role of zebrafish prox1 in hypothalamic catecholaminergic neurons development

    PubMed Central

    Pistocchi, Anna; Gaudenzi, Germano; Carra, Silvia; Bresciani, Erica; Del Giacco, Luca; Cotelli, Franco

    2008-01-01

    Background Prox1, the vertebrate homolog of prospero in Drosophila melanogaster, is a divergent homeogene that regulates cell proliferation, fate determination and differentiation during vertebrate embryonic development. Results Here we report that, in zebrafish, prox1 is widely expressed in several districts of the Central Nervous System (CNS). Specifically, we evidenced prox1 expression in a group of neurons, already positive for otp1, located in the hypothalamus at the level of the posterior tuberculum (PT). Prox1 knock-down determines the severe loss of hypothalamic catecholaminergic (CA) neurons, identified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, and the synergistic prox1/otp1 overexpression induces the appearance of hypothalamic supernumerary TH-positive neurons and ectopic TH-positive cells on the yolk epitelium. Conclusion Our findings indicate that prox1 activity is crucial for the proper development of the otp1-positive hypothalamic neuronal precursors to their terminal CA phenotype. PMID:18331627

  8. The histone acetyltransferase MOF activates hypothalamic polysialylation to prevent diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brenachot, Xavier; Rigault, Caroline; Nédélec, Emmanuelle; Laderrière, Amélie; Khanam, Tasneem; Gouazé, Alexandra; Chaudy, Sylvie; Lemoine, Aleth; Datiche, Frédérique; Gascuel, Jean; Pénicaud, Luc; Benani, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Overfeeding causes rapid synaptic remodeling in hypothalamus feeding circuits. Polysialylation of cell surface molecules is a key step in this neuronal rewiring and allows normalization of food intake. Here we examined the role of hypothalamic polysialylation in the long-term maintenance of body weight, and deciphered the molecular sequence underlying its nutritional regulation. We found that upon high fat diet (HFD), reduced hypothalamic polysialylation exacerbated the diet-induced obese phenotype in mice. Upon HFD, the histone acetyltransferase MOF was rapidly recruited on the St8sia4 polysialyltransferase-encoding gene. Mof silencing in the mediobasal hypothalamus of adult mice prevented activation of the St8sia4 gene transcription, reduced polysialylation, altered the acute homeostatic feeding response to HFD and increased the body weight gain. These findings indicate that impaired hypothalamic polysialylation contribute to the development of obesity, and establish a role for MOF in the brain control of energy balance. PMID:25161885

  9. The TRPM2 channel is a hypothalamic heat sensor that limits fever and can drive hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Song, Kun; Wang, Hong; Kamm, Gretel B; Pohle, Jörg; Reis, Fernanda de Castro; Heppenstall, Paul; Wende, Hagen; Siemens, Jan

    2016-09-23

    Body temperature homeostasis is critical for survival and requires precise regulation by the nervous system. The hypothalamus serves as the principal thermostat that detects and regulates internal temperature. We demonstrate that the ion channel TRPM2 [of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family] is a temperature sensor in a subpopulation of hypothalamic neurons. TRPM2 limits the fever response and may detect increased temperatures to prevent overheating. Furthermore, chemogenetic activation and inhibition of hypothalamic TRPM2-expressing neurons in vivo decreased and increased body temperature, respectively. Such manipulation may allow analysis of the beneficial effects of altered body temperature on diverse disease states. Identification of a functional role for TRP channels in monitoring internal body temperature should promote further analysis of molecular mechanisms governing thermoregulation and foster the genetic dissection of hypothalamic circuits involved with temperature homeostasis.

  10. Early changes in the hypothalamic region in prodromal Huntington disease revealed by MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Soneson, Charlotte; Fontes, Magnus; Zhou, Yongxia; Denisov, Vladimir; Paulsen, Jane S.; Kirik, Deniz; Petersén, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat. Its length can be used to estimate the time of clinical diagnosis, which is defined by overt motor symptoms. Non-motor symptoms begin before motor onset, and involve changes in hypothalamus-regulated functions such as sleep, emotion and metabolism. Therefore we hypothesized that hypothalamic changes occur already prior to the clinical diagnosis. We performed voxel-based morphometry and logistic regression analyses of cross-sectional MR images from 220 HD gene carriers and 75 controls in the Predict-HD study. We show that changes in the hypothalamic region are detectable before clinical diagnosis and that its grey matter contents alone is sufficient to distinguish HD gene carriers from control cases. In conclusion, our study shows, for the first time, that alterations in grey matter contents in the hypothalamic region occur at least a decade before clinical diagnosis in HD using MRI. PMID:20682340

  11. Excitatory actions of GABA in developing rat hypothalamic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G; Trombley, P Q; van den Pol, A N

    1996-01-01

    1. Gramicidin-perforated patch clamp recording was employed to study GABA-mediated responses in rat hypothalamic neurones (n = 102) with an intracellular Cl- concentration unaltered by the pipette solution. 2. In young cultures after 1-7 days in vitro (DIV), GABA induced depolarizing membrane potentials (+16.5 +/- 1.3 mV) that often surpassed the threshold for the firing of action potentials (-42 +/- 1 mV) and resulted in an increase in neuronal activity. The depolarizing responses to GABA in young cultures were dose dependent. The concentration of GABA necessary to evoke the half-maximal depolarization (EC50) was 2.8 microM. In contrast, GABA induced hyperpolarizing membrane potentials (-12.0 +/- 1.4 mV) and a decrease in neuronal activity in older neurones (20-33 DIV). Both the depolarization and the hyperpolarization induced by GABA were blocked by bicuculline, indicating a mediation by GABAA receptors. 3. The reversal potentials of the GABA-evoked currents were between -40 to -50 mV during the first week of culture, and shifted to below -70 mV after 3 weeks of culture. In parallel, neurones that were dissociated from older animals (postnatal day 5) had a more negative reversal potential for the GABA-evoked currents than cells from younger animals (embryonic day 15), suggesting that the negative shift of the reversal potential occurs both in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the mechanism for GABA-induced depolarization is the depolarized Cl- reversal potential found in young but not older neurones. 4. Consistent with the depolarizing response to exogenous application of GABA, some spontaneous depolarizing postsynaptic potentials in young cultures were insensitive to AP5-CNQX, but were eliminated by bicuculline, indicating that synaptically released GABA mediated excitatory synaptic transmission in early development. 5. By combining a rapid computer-controlled delivery of GABA with subthreshold positive current injections into recorded neurones, we found

  12. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  13. Regulation of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone transcription by elevated glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew N; Liu, Ying; Macgregor, Robert; Huang, Victoria; Aguilera, Greti

    2013-11-01

    Negative glucocorticoid feedback is essential for preventing the deleterious effects of excessive hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis axis activation, with an important target being CRH transcription in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. The aim of these studies was to determine whether glucocorticoids repress CRH transcription directly in CRH neurons, by examining glucocorticoid effects on glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-CRH promoter interaction and the activation of proteins required for CRH transcription. Immunoprecipitation of hypothalamic chromatin from intact or adrenalectomized rats subjected to either stress or corticosterone injections showed minor association of the proximal CRH promoter with the GR compared with that with phospho-CREB (pCREB). In contrast, the Period-1 (Per1, a glucocorticoid-responsive gene) promoter markedly recruited GR. Stress increased pCREB recruitment by the CRH but not the Per1 promoter, irrespective of circulating glucocorticoids. In vitro, corticosterone pretreatment (30 minutes or 18 hours) only slightly inhibited basal and forskolin-stimulated CRH heteronuclear RNA in primary hypothalamic neuronal cultures and CRH promoter activity in hypothalamic 4B cells. In 4B cells, 30 minutes or 18 hours of corticosterone exposure had no effect on forskolin-induced nuclear accumulation of the recognized CRH transcriptional regulators, pCREB and transducer of regulated CREB activity 2. The data show that inhibition of CRH transcription by physiological glucocorticoids in vitro is minor and that direct interaction of GR with DNA in the proximal CRH promoter may not be a major mechanism of CRH gene repression. Although GR interaction with distal promoter elements may have a role, the data suggest that transcriptional repression of CRH by glucocorticoids involves protein-protein interactions and/or modulation of afferent inputs to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

  14. Research Resource: The Dexamethasone Transcriptome in Hypothalamic Embryonic Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Krystle A.; Peffer, Melanie E.; Zhang, Janie Y.; Luthra, Soumya; Chakka, Anish B.; Couger, Matthew B.; Chandran, Uma R.; Monaghan, A. Paula

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to excess glucocorticoids during fetal development has long-lasting physiological and behavioral consequences, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. The impact of prenatal glucocorticoids exposure on stress responses in juvenile and adult offspring implicates the developing hypothalamus as a target of adverse prenatal glucocorticoid action. Therefore, primary cultures of hypothalamic neural-progenitor/stem cells (NPSCs) derived from mouse embryos (embryonic day 14.5) were used to identify the glucocorticoid transcriptome in both males and females. NPSCs were treated with vehicle or the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (dex; 100nM) for 4 hours and total RNA analyzed using RNA-Sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that primary hypothalamic NPSC cultures expressed relatively high levels of a number of genes regulating stem cell proliferation and hypothalamic progenitor function. Interesting, although these cells express glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), only low levels of sex-steroid receptors are expressed, which suggested that sex-specific differentially regulated genes identified are mediated by genetic and not hormonal influences. We also identified known or novel GR-target coding and noncoding genes that are either regulated equivalently in male and female NPSCs or differential responsiveness in one sex. Using gene ontology analysis, the top functional network identified was cell proliferation and using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation observed a reduction in proliferation of hypothalamic NPSCs after dexamethasone treatment. Our studies provide the first characterization and description of glucocorticoid-regulated pathways in male and female embryonically derived hypothalamic NPSCs and identified GR-target genes during hypothalamic development. These findings may provide insight into potential mechanisms responsible for the long-term consequences of fetal glucocorticoid exposure in adulthood. PMID:26606517

  15. Functional mapping and implications of substrate specificity of the yeast high-affinity leucine permease Bap2.

    PubMed

    Usami, Yuki; Uemura, Satsohi; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Morita, Asami; Shishido, Fumi; Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2014-07-01

    Leucine is a major amino acid in nutrients and proteins and is also an important precursor of higher alcohols during brewing. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, leucine uptake is mediated by multiple amino acid permeases, including the high-affinity leucine permease Bap2. Although BAP2 transcription has been extensively analyzed, the mechanisms by which a substrate is recognized and moves through the permease remain unknown. Recently, we determined 15 amino acid residues required for Tat2-mediated tryptophan import. Here we introduced homologous mutations into Bap2 amino acid residues and showed that 7 residues played a role in leucine import. Residues I109/G110/T111 and E305 were located within the putative α-helix break in TMD1 and TMD6, respectively, according to the structurally homologous Escherichia coli arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC. Upon leucine binding, these α-helix breaks were assumed to mediate a conformational transition in Bap2 from an outward-open to a substrate-binding occluded state. Residues Y336 (TMD7) and Y181 (TMD3) were located near I109 and E305, respectively. Bap2-mediated leucine import was inhibited by some amino acids according to the following order of severity: phenylalanine, leucine>isoleucine>methionine, tyrosine>valine>tryptophan; histidine and asparagine had no effect. Moreover, this order of severity clearly coincided with the logP values (octanol-water partition coefficients) of all amino acids except tryptophan. This result suggests that the substrate partition efficiency to the buried Bap2 binding pocket is the primary determinant of substrate specificity rather than structural amino acid side chain recognition.

  16. Use of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone for Intractable Seizures in a Girl with Precocious Puberty without Hypothalamic Hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Govil-Dalela, Tuhina; Kumar, Ajay; Moltz, Kathleen C; Chugani, Harry T

    2016-07-01

    The use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs has been reported in the treatment of gelastic seizures and precocious puberty associated with hypothalamic hamartomas, but not in other seizure types without hypothalamic hamartoma. We describe a 7.5 year-old girl whose seizures subsided after gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog implant, administered for precocious puberty.

  17. Numbers Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathotia, Vinay

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on work undertaken by schools as part of Qualifications and Curriculum Authority's (QCA's) "Engaging mathematics for all learners" project. The goal was to use in the classroom, materials and approaches from a Royal Institution (Ri) Year 10 master-class, "Number Sense", which was inspired by examples from…

  18. Pervasive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2000-11-01

    The coordinated exploitation of modern communication, micro- sensor and computer technologies makes it possible to give global reach to our senses. Web-cameras for vision, web- microphones for hearing and web-'noses' for smelling, plus the abilities to sense many factors we cannot ordinarily perceive, are either available or will be soon. Applications include (1) determination of weather and environmental conditions on dense grids or over large areas, (2) monitoring of energy usage in buildings, (3) sensing the condition of hardware in electrical power distribution and information systems, (4) improving process control and other manufacturing, (5) development of intelligent terrestrial, marine, aeronautical and space transportation systems, (6) managing the continuum of routine security monitoring, diverse crises and military actions, and (7) medicine, notably the monitoring of the physiology and living conditions of individuals. Some of the emerging capabilities, such as the ability to measure remotely the conditions inside of people in real time, raise interesting social concerns centered on privacy issues. Methods for sensor data fusion and designs for human-computer interfaces are both crucial for the full realization of the potential of pervasive sensing. Computer-generated virtual reality, augmented with real-time sensor data, should be an effective means for presenting information from distributed sensors.

  19. HYPOTHALAMIC DIGOXIN AND SCHIZOPHRENIA - A MODEL FOR CONSCIOUS AND SUBLIMINAL PERCEPTION AND ITS DYSFUNCTION IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Ravikumar A.; Augustine, Jyothi; Kurup, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    In view of reports of an upregulated cation pump in genetically related Bipolar Affective Disorders the role of hypothalamic digoxin, an endogenous regulator of the cation pump was studied with special reference to its role as a modulator of glycoprotein synthesis. The study demonstrated elevated serum digoxin levels, elevated HMG CoA reductase activity suggesting increased digoxin synthesis, reduced sodium-potassium ATPase activity and altered sugar residues of serum glycoprotein in schizophrenia. A hypothalamic digoxin mediated model for conscious and subliminal perception is proposed and the significance of its dysfunction due to abnormal glycoprotein induced synaptic connectivity defects in schizophrenia is discussed. PMID:21455390

  20. Thermoregulatory Instability in Childhood: Linking the Normal Brain to Hypothalamic Storm

    PubMed Central

    Fussiger, Helena; Maria Vedana, Viviane; Hemb, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Central core temperature is tightly controlled by hypothalamic centers, a feature that makes sudden changes in body temperature very unusual. A dysfunction of these hypothalamic pathways leads to Shapiro's syndrome, comprising spontaneous hypothermia, hyperhidrosis, and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Although it may affect any age, usually it presents in childhood. Variants to this syndrome with completely normal brain anatomy have been consistently reported, expanding the clinical spectrum of the syndrome. Herein, we report the case of a 4-year-old girl with Shapiro's syndrome and unaffected corpus callosum. PMID:27847661

  1. Stereotactic radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartoma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Parrent, A G

    1999-11-01

    The author presents the case of a patient with gelastic seizures associated with a hypothalamic hamartoma, in whom partial resection of the hamartoma followed by temporal lobectomy and orbitofrontal corticectomy failed to reduce the seizures. Subsequent stereotactic radiofrequency ablation of the hamartoma resulted in progressive improvement in the seizure disorder during a 28-month follow-up period. There is support in the literature for the concept that gelastic seizures originate directly from the hamartoma; however, direct surgical approaches to these lesions pose significant risks. It is proposed that the technique of radiofrequency ablation provides a minimally invasive, low-risk approach for the treatment of hypothalamic hamartomas.

  2. Hypothalamic type of hypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus probably linked to Rathke's cleft cyst.

    PubMed

    Asano, Tomoko; Yamada, Hodaka; Yoshida, Masashi; Aoki, Atsushi; Ikoma, Aki; Kusaka, Ikuyo; Toyoshima, Hideo; Kakei, Masafumi; Ishikawa, San-E

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted due to weight loss and generalized malaise. The basal levels of all the anterior pituitary hormones, except for prolactin, were reduced. However, they were all elevated in response to exogenous hypothalamic hormones. After starting hydrocortisone replacement, the patient had polyuria of >5,000 mL/day. T1-weighted MRI depicted a low signal of an oval mass in the sella turcica and an iso-intense signal of another mass at the pituitary stalk. These findings indicate a hypothalamic type of hypopituitarism and masked central diabetes insipidus which possibly derived from the atypical occupation of Rathke's cleft cyst at the pituitary stalk.

  3. Neuropharmacological study on the induction of hypothalamic masculinization in female mice.

    PubMed

    Nishizuka, M

    1976-01-01

    82% of female mice, that had received a single injection of 50 mug testosterone propionate (TP) at 4 days of age, became persistent estrous by 90 days. If 50 mug pentobarbital or 10 mug reserpine was given simultaneously with TP, the incidence of hypothalamic masculinization (persistent estrus (PE) and polyfollicular ovaries lacking corpora lutea) at 90 days dropped to 33 and 30%, respectively. Phenoxybenzamine (50 mug) also decreased the incidence of PE to 20 and 30% at 60 and 90 days of age, respectively. However, propranolol failed to nullify the masculinization caused by TP. These results seem to suggest that a monoaminergic mechanism is involved in the hypothalamic masculinization of neonatal mice.

  4. Sweet Taste Receptor Serves to Activate Glucose- and Leptin-Responsive Neurons in the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus and Participates in Glucose Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Daisuke; Koike, Miho; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC): glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3) and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10−5–10−2 M dose dependently increased [Ca2+]i in 12–16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca2+-free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentages of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular activation mainly

  5. A (14)C-leucine absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) study in adult Sprague-Dawley rat reveals β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate as a metabolite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony J; Beno, David W A; Zhang, Xiaolin; Shapiro, Robin; Mason, Mark; Mason-Bright, Tanita; Surber, Bruce; Edens, Neilé K

    2015-05-01

    Leucine is an essential branched-chain amino acid that acts as a substrate for protein synthesis and as a signaling molecule. Leucine not incorporated into muscle protein is ultimately oxidized through intermediates such as β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) which itself is reported to enhance muscle mass and function in rats and humans. HMB has been reported in the plasma following oral leucine administration in sheep and pigs but not in Sprague-Dawley rats, the standard preclinical model. Therefore, we conducted radiolabeled absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) studies in rats using a low (3 mg/kg) or high dose (1,000 mg/kg) of (14)C-leucine. Blood, tissue, and urine samples were analyzed for (14)C-leucine and its metabolites by HPLC-MS. Our results show for the first time that (14)C-HMB appears in plasma and urine of rats following an oral dose of (14)C-leucine. (14)C-leucine appears in plasma as (14)C-α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) with a slower time course than (14)C-HMB, a putative product of KIC. Further, two novel metabolites of leucine were detected in urine, N-acetyl leucine and glycyl leucine. Mass balance studies demonstrate that excretory routes accounted for no more than 0.9 % of the radiolabel and approximately 61 % of the dose was recovered in the carcass. Approximately 65 % of the dose was recovered in total, suggesting that approximately one-third of the leucine dose is oxidized to CO2. In conclusion, this study demonstrates endogenous production of HMB from leucine in adult rats, a standard preclinical model used to guide design of clinical trials in nutrition.

  6. A C-terminal di-leucine motif controls plasma membrane expression of PMCA4b.

    PubMed

    Antalffy, Géza; Pászty, Katalin; Varga, Karolina; Hegedűs, Luca; Enyedi, Agnes; Padányi, Rita

    2013-12-01

    Recent evidences show that the localization of different plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases (PMCAs) is regulated in various complex, cell type-specific ways. Here we show that in low-density epithelial and endothelial cells PMCA4b localized mostly in intracellular compartments and its plasma membrane localization was enhanced upon increasing density of cells. In good correlation with the enhanced plasma membrane localization a significantly more efficient Ca(2+) clearance was observed in confluent versus non-confluent HeLa cell cultures expressing mCherry-PMCA4b. We analyzed the subcellular localization and function of various C-terminally truncated PMCA4b variants and found that a truncated mutant PMCA4b-ct24 was mostly intracellular while another mutant, PMCA4b-ct48, localized more to the plasma membrane, indicating that a protein sequence corresponding to amino acid residues 1158-1181 contained a signal responsible for the intracellular retention of PMCA4b in non-confluent cultures. Alteration of three leucines to alanines at positions 1167-1169 resulted in enhanced cell surface expression and an appropriate Ca(2+) transport activity of both wild type and truncated pumps, suggesting that the di-leucine-like motif (1167)LLL was crucial in targeting PMCA4b. Furthermore, upon loss of cell-cell contact by extracellular Ca(2+) removal, the wild-type pump was translocated to the early endosomal compartment. Targeting PMCA4b to early endosomes was diminished by the L(1167-69)A mutation, and the mutant pump accumulated in long tubular cytosolic structures. In summary, we report a di-leucine-like internalization signal at the C-tail of PMCA4b and suggest an internalization-mediated loss of function of the pump upon low degree of cell-cell contact.

  7. Leucine disposal rate for assessment of amino acid metabolism in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Gerald B.; Deger, Serpil M.; Chen, Guanhua; Bian, Aihua; Sha, Feng; Booker, Cindy; Kesler, Jaclyn T.; David, Sthuthi; Ellis, Charles D.; Ikizler, T. Alp

    2016-01-01

    Background Protein energy wasting (PEW) is common in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) and closely associated with poor outcomes. Insulin resistance and associated alterations in amino acid metabolism are potential pathways leading to PEW. We hypothesized that the measurement of leucine disposal during a hyperinsulinemic- euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamp (HEAC) procedure would accurately measure the sensitivity to insulin for its actions on concomitant carbohydrate and protein metabolism in MHD patients. Methods We examined 35 MHD patients and 17 control subjects with normal kidney function by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (HEGC) followed by HEAC clamp procedure to obtain leucine disposal rate (LDR) along with isotope tracer methodology to assess whole body protein turnover. Results The glucose disposal rate (GDR) by HEGC was 5.1 ± 2.1 mg/kg/min for the MHD patients compared to 6.3 ± 3.9 mg/kg/min for the controls (p = 0.38). The LDR during HEAC was 0.09 ± 0.03 mg/kg/min for the MHD patients compared to 0.11 ± 0.05 mg/kg/min for the controls (p = 0.009). The LDR level was correlated with whole body protein synthesis (r = 0.25; p = 0.08), with whole body protein breakdown (r = −0.38 p = 0.01) and net protein balance (r = 0.85; p < 0.001) in the overall study population. Correlations remained significant in subgroup analysis. The GDR derived by HEGC and LDR correlated well in the controls (r = 0.79, p < 0.001), but less so in the MHD patients (r = 0.58, p < 0.001). Conclusions Leucine disposal rate reliably measures amino acid utilization in MHD patients and controls in response to high dose insulin. PMID:27413537

  8. Activation of neurons in the hypothalamic dorsomedial nucleus via hypothalamic projections of the nucleus of the solitary tract following refeeding of fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Renner, Eva; Szabó-Meltzer, Kinga I; Puskás, Nela; Tóth, Zsuzsanna E; Dobolyi, Arpád; Palkovits, Miklós

    2010-01-01

    We report that satiation evokes neuronal activity in the ventral subdivision of the hypothalamic dorsomedial nucleus (DMH) as indicated by increased c-fos expression in response to refeeding in fasted rats. The absence of significant Fos activation following food presentation without consumption suggests that satiation but not craving for food elicits the activation of ventral DMH neurons. The distribution pattern of the prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP)-immunoreactive (ir) network showed remarkable correlations with the distribution of activated neurons within the DMH. The PrRP-ir fibers and terminals were immunolabeled with tyrosine hydroxylase, suggesting their origin in lower brainstem instead of local, hypothalamic PrRP cells. PrRP-ir fibers arising from neurons of the nucleus of the solitary tract could be followed to the hypothalamus. Unilateral transections of these fibers at pontine and caudal hypothalamic levels resulted in a disappearance of the dense PrRP-ir network in the ventral DMH while PrRP immunoreactivity was increased in transected fibers caudal to the knife cuts as well as in perikarya of the nucleus of the solitary tract ipsilateral to the transections. In accord with these changes, the number of Fos-expressing neurons following refeeding declined in the ipsilateral but remained high in the contralateral DMH. However, the Fos response in the ventral DMH was not attenuated following chemical lesion (neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment) of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, another possible source of DMH inputs. These findings suggest that PrRP projections from the nucleus of the solitary tract contribute to the activation of ventral DMH neurons during refeeding, possibly by transferring information on cholecystokinin-mediated satiation.

  9. Pregnancy Induces Resistance to the Anorectic Effect of Hypothalamic Malonyl-CoA and the Thermogenic Effect of Hypothalamic AMPK Inhibition in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B.; Lage, Ricardo; González-García, Ismael; Ruíz-Pino, Francisco; Martins, Luís; Fernández-Mallo, Diana; Gallego, Rosalía; Fernø, Johan; Señarís, Rosa; Saha, Asish K.; Tovar, Sulay; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    During gestation, hyperphagia is necessary to cope with the metabolic demands of embryonic development. There were three main aims of this study: Firstly, to investigate the effect of pregnancy on hypothalamic fatty acid metabolism, a key pathway for the regulation of energy balance; secondly, to study whether pregnancy induces resistance to the anorectic effect of fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibition and accumulation of malonyl-coenzyme A (CoA) in the hypothalamus; and, thirdly, to study whether changes in hypothalamic AMPK signaling are associated with brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis during pregnancy. Our data suggest that in pregnant rats, the hypothalamic fatty acid pathway shows an overall state that should lead to anorexia and elevated BAT thermogenesis: decreased activities of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), FAS, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, coupled with increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase function with subsequent elevation of malonyl-CoA levels. This profile seems dependent of estradiol levels but not prolactin or progesterone. Despite the apparent anorexic and thermogenic signaling in the hypothalamus, pregnant rats remain hyperphagic and display reduced temperature and BAT function. Actually, pregnant rats develop resistance to the anorectic effects of central FAS inhibition, which is associated with a reduction of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) expression and its transcription factors phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and phospho-forkhead box O1. This evidence demonstrates that pregnancy induces a state of resistance to the anorectic and thermogenic actions of hypothalamic cellular signals of energy surplus, which, in parallel to the already known refractoriness to leptin effects, likely contributes to gestational hyperphagia and adiposity. PMID:25535827

  10. Measuring the Activity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2: A Kinase Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Li, Xiaojie; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has multiple functional domains including a kinase domain. The kinase activity of LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Developing an assay to understand the mechanisms of LRRK2 kinase activity is important for the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe how to measure in vitro LRRK2 kinase activity and its inhibition. PMID:21960214

  11. Role and mechanism of action of leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 in bone

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Weirong R; Goodluck, Helen; Zeng, Canjun; Mohan, Subburaman

    2017-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 (LRRK1) plays a critical role in regulating cytoskeletal organization, osteoclast activity, and bone resorption with little effect on bone formation parameters. Deficiency of Lrrk1 in mice causes a severe osteopetrosis in the metaphysis of the long bones and vertebrae bones, which makes LRRK1 an attractive alternative drug target for the treatment of osteoporosis and other high-turnover bone diseases. This review summarizes recent advances on the functions of the Lrrk1-related family members, Lrrk1 deficiency-induced skeletal phenotypes, LRRK1 structure–function, potential biological substrates and interacting proteins, and the mechanisms of LRRK1 action in osteoclasts. PMID:28326224

  12. Thermodynamic characteristics of the heparin-leucine-CaCl2 system in a diluted physiological solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, L. S.; Belov, G. V.; Rulev, Yu. A.; Semenov, A. N.

    2013-03-01

    Chemical equilibria in aqueous solutions of high-molecular weight heparin (Na4hep) and leucine (HLeu) are calculated through the mathematical modeling of chemical equilibria based on representative experimental pH titration data. In addition, chemical equilibria in the CaCl2-Na4hep-HLeu-H2O-NaCl system in the presence of 0.154M NaCl background electrolyte at a temperature of 37°C in the range of 2.30 ≤ pH ≤ 10.50 and initial concentrations of basic components n × 10-3 M ( n ≤ 4).

  13. Additive insulinogenic action of Opuntia ficus-indica cladode and fruit skin extract and leucine after exercise in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral intake of a specific extract of Opuntia ficus-indica cladode and fruit skin (OpunDia™) (OFI) has been shown to increase serum insulin concentration while reducing blood glucose level for a given amount of glucose ingestion after an endurance exercise bout in healthy young volunteers. However, it is unknown whether OFI-induced insulin stimulation after exercise is of the same magnitude than the stimulation by other insulinogenic agents like leucine as well as whether OFI can interact with those agents. Therefore, the aims of the present study were: 1) to compare the degree of insulin stimulation by OFI with the effect of leucine administration; 2) to determine whether OFI and leucine have an additive action on insulin stimulation post-exercise. Methods Eleven subjects participated in a randomized double-blind cross-over study involving four experimental sessions. In each session the subjects successively underwent a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) after a 30-min cycling bout at ~70% VO2max. At t0 and t60 during the OGTT, subjects ingested 75 g glucose and capsules containing either 1) a placebo; 2) 1000 mg OFI; 3) 3 g leucine; 4) 1000 mg OFI + 3 g leucine. Blood samples were collected before and at 30-min intervals during the OGTT for determination of blood glucose and serum insulin. Results Whereas no effect of leucine was measured, OFI reduced blood glucose at t90 by ~7% and the area under the glucose curve by ~15% and increased serum insulin concentration at t90 by ~35% compared to placebo (P<0.05). From t60 to the end of the OGTT, serum insulin concentration was higher in OFI+leucine than in placebo which resulted in a higher area under the insulin curve (+40%, P<0.05). Conclusion Carbohydrate-induced insulin stimulation post-exercise can be further increased by the combination of OFI with leucine. OFI and leucine could be interesting ingredients to include together in recovery drinks to resynthesize muscle glycogen faster post

  14. Identification of valine/leucine/isoleucine and threonine/alanine/glycine proton-spin systems of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase by selective deuteration and selective protonation.

    PubMed Central

    Bock-Möbius, I; Brune, M; Wittinghofer, A; Zimmermann, H; Leberman, R; Dauvergne, M T; Zimmermann, S; Brandmeier, B; Rösch, P

    1991-01-01

    Adenylate kinase from two types of Escherichia coli strains, a wild-type and a leucine-auxotrophic strain, was purified. On the one hand, growing the leucine-auxotrophic bacteria on a medium containing deuterated leucine yielded E. coli adenylate kinase with all leucine residues deuterated. On the other hand, by growing the wild-type bacteria on deuterated medium with phenylalanine, threonine and isoleucine present as protonated specimens, 80% randomly deuterated enzyme with protonated phenylalanine, threonine and isoleucine residues could be prepared. Use of these proteins enabled identification of the spin systems of these amino acid residues in the n.m.r. spectra of the protein. PMID:1991031

  15. Membrane potential dye imaging of ventromedial hypothalamus neurons from adult mice to study glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Vazirani, Reema P; Fioramonti, Xavier; Routh, Vanessa H

    2013-11-27

    Studies of neuronal activity are often performed using neurons from rodents less than 2 months of age due to the technical difficulties associated with increasing connective tissue and decreased neuronal viability that occur with age. Here, we describe a methodology for the dissociation of healthy hypothalamic neurons from adult-aged mice. The ability to study neurons from adult-aged mice allows the use of disease models that manifest at a later age and might be more developmentally accurate for certain studies. Fluorescence imaging of dissociated neurons can be used to study the activity of a population of neurons, as opposed to using electrophysiology to study a single neuron. This is particularly useful when studying a heterogeneous neuronal population in which the desired neuronal type is rare such as for hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons. We utilized membrane potential dye imaging of adult ventromedial hypothalamic neurons to study their responses to changes in extracellular glucose. Glucose sensing neurons are believed to play a role in central regulation of energy balance. The ability to study glucose sensing in adult rodents is particularly useful since the predominance of diseases related to dysfunctional energy balance (e.g. obesity) increase with age.

  16. Crystal Structure of FadA Adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum Reveals a Novel Oligomerization Motif, the Leucine Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Xu, Minghua; Yamada, Mitsunori; Ikegami, Akihiko; Shoham, Menachem; Han, Yiping W.

    2009-04-07

    Many bacterial appendages have filamentous structures, often composed of repeating monomers assembled in a head-to-tail manner. The mechanisms of such linkages vary. We report here a novel protein oligomerization motif identified in the FadA adhesin from the Gram-negative bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the secreted form of FadA (mFadA) reveals two antiparallel {alpha}-helices connected by an intervening 8-residue hairpin loop. Leucine-leucine contacts play a prominent dual intra- and intermolecular role in the structure and function of FadA. First, they comprise the main association between the two helical arms of the monomer; second, they mediate the head-to-tail association of monomers to form the elongated polymers. This leucine-mediated filamentous assembly of FadA molecules constitutes a novel structural motif termed the 'leucine chain.' The essential role of these residues in FadA is corroborated by mutagenesis of selected leucine residues, which leads to the abrogation of oligomerization, filament formation, and binding to host cells.

  17. Toxicity of fungicides to natural bacterial communities in wetland water and sediment measured using leucine incorporation and potential denitrification.

    PubMed

    Milenkovski, Susann; Bååth, Erland; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Berglund, Olof

    2010-02-01

    We assessed potential toxicity of fungicides to natural bacterial communities from a constructed wetland, located in southern Sweden, and compared the sensitivity of two endpoints indicating bacterial activity, leucine incorporation, and potential denitrification, in detecting toxicity. The effects of eight fungicides (benomyl, carbendazim, carboxin, captan, cycloheximide, fenpropimorph, propiconazole, and thiram), two bactericides (bronopol and chlortetracycline) as controls, and one reference compound (3,5-dichlorophenol), were tested in a water-sediment microcosm set-up. Leucine incorporation was measured in both the water and sediment column, while potential denitrification was measured for the entire microcosm. The bactericides and the reference compound gave sigmoid concentration-response curves for both endpoints in all but one case. The fungicides thiram, captan, and benomyl, and to a lesser extent fenpropimorph and propiconazole had quantifiable toxic effects on leucine incorporation, with EC(50) values ranging from 3 to 70 mg l(-1), while carbendazim, carboxin, and cycloheximide had little effect at the investigated concentrations. Only thiram and captan inhibited potential denitrification; the other fungicides showed no quantifiable effect. A greater toxic effect on leucine incorporation was recorded for bacterial communities associated with the water column, compared to the sediment column, for all tested compounds. Leucine incorporation was the more sensitive method for toxicity assessment of bacterial communities, and also allowed for a rapid and simple way of comparing exposure in the sediment and water column, making it an attractive standard method for community based toxicological assays in aquatic environments.

  18. Opioids in the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus Stimulate Ethanol Intake

    PubMed Central

    Barson, Jessica R.; Carr, Ambrose J.; Soun, Jennifer E.; Sobhani, Nasim C.; Rada, Pedro; Leibowitz, Sarah F.; Hoebel, Bartley G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Specialized hypothalamic systems that increase food intake might also increase ethanol intake. To test this possibility, morphine and receptor-specific opioid agonists were microinjected in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of rats that had learned to drink ethanol. To cross-validate the results, naloxone methiodide (m-naloxone), an opioid antagonist, was microinjected with the expectation that it would have the opposite effect of morphine and the specific opioid agonists. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were trained, without sugar, to drink 4% or 7% ethanol and were then implanted with chronic brain cannulas aimed at the PVN. After recovery, those drinking 7% ethanol, with food and water available, were injected with two doses each of morphine or m-naloxone. To test for receptor specificity, two doses each of the μ-receptor agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin (DAMGO), δ-receptor agonist D-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-NH2 (DALA), or k-receptor agonist U-50,488H were injected. DAMGO was also tested in rats drinking 4% ethanol without food or water available. As an anatomical control for drug reflux, injections were made 2 mm dorsal to the PVN. Results A main result was a significant increase in ethanol intake induced by PVN injection of morphine. The opposite effect was produced by m-naloxone. The effects of morphine and m-naloxone were exclusively on intake of ethanol, even though food and water were freely available. In the analysis with specific receptor agonists, PVN injection of the δ-agonist DALA significantly increased 7% ethanol intake without affecting food or water intake. This is in contrast to the k-agonist U-50,488H, which decreased ethanol intake, and the μ-agonist DAMGO, which had no effect on ethanol intake in the presence or absence of food and water. In the anatomical control location 2 mm dorsal to the PVN, no drug caused any significant changes in ethanol, food, or water intake, providing evidence that the active site was close to the

  19. Conversational sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  20. Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Axis Functioning in Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Duran, Nestor L.; Olson, Sheryl L.; Hajal, Nastassia J.; Felt, Barbara T.; Vazquez, Delia M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) reactivity and proactive and reactive aggression in pre-pubertal children. After a 30-min controlled base line period, 73 7-year-old children (40 males and 33 females) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental tasks designed to…

  1. Gallium-67 breast uptake in a patient with hypothalamic granuloma (sarcoid)

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, R.; Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.; Fay, J.; Gale, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An unusual case is presented of bilateral breast uptake of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate in a patient with a hypothalamic granuloma in the absence of galactorrhea is presented. A possible mechanism for this incidental finding is elevated prolactin levels, as other causes of gallium breast uptake such as drug therapy, and intrinsic breast disease, were not present.

  2. An indirect action contributes to c-fos induction in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus by neuropeptide Y

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-established orexigenic peptide and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is one major brain site that mediates the orexigenic action of NPY. NPY induces abundant expression of C-Fos, an indicator for neuronal activation, in the PVH, which has been used extensively...

  3. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure in the Hypothalamic-Pituitary Gonadal Axis of Fathead Minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We are developing a mechanistic mathematical model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict doseresponse and time-course ...

  4. Feed intake of gilts following intracerebroventicular injection of the novel hypothalamic RFamide (RFa) neuropeptide, 26RFa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RFamide (RFa) peptides have been implicated in a broad spectrum of biological processes including energy expenditure and feed intake. 26RFa is a recently discovered hypothalamic neuropeptide that altered the release of pituitary hormones and stimulated feed intake via a NPY-specific mechanism in rat...

  5. Adolescent Survivors of Hurricane Katrina: A Pilot Study of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Tucker, Phebe; Nitiéma, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis constitutes an important biological component of the stress response commonly studied through the measurement of cortisol. Limited research has examined HPA axis dysregulation in youth exposed to disasters. Objective: This study examined HPA axis activation in adolescent Hurricane Katrina…

  6. Adaptive Response in Female Modeling of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal Axis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We are developing a mechanistic computational model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict dose-response and time-course ...

  7. Decreased leptin uptake in hypothalamic nuclei with ageing in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Galaz, C; Fernández-Agulló, T; Campoy, F; Arribas, C; Gallardo, N; Andrés, A; Ros, M; Carrascosa, J M

    2001-10-01

    Leptin interacts with specific receptors in hypothalamic nuclei and modulates energy balance. Growing evidence has shown the association of obesity and hyperleptinaemia with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance. The aged Wistar rat shows peripheral insulin resistance in the absence of obesity and alterations of glucose homeostasis. However, it is not known whether, in these animals, the leptin action is altered. Here we studied the effect of ageing on plasma leptin concentration and the ability of hypothalamic nuclei to capture i.c.v.-injected digoxigenin-labelled leptin. Our data indicate that 24-month-old animals are hyperleptinaemic. However, daily food intake was greater in old animals, suggesting that they are leptin resistant. Leptin uptake in the hypothalamus was reduced in old rats. This uptake was a receptor-mediated process as demonstrated by displacement. Leptin accumulation in hypothalamic nuclei was partially colocalized with neuropeptide Y fibres. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses showed a lower amount of the long form of leptin receptors in the hypothalamus of aged rats. Analysis by RT-PCR also demonstrated a decreased expression of leptin receptor mRNA in old animals. We conclude that the lower leptin uptake may be explained, at least in part, by a decreased amount of receptors in hypothalamic neurones of the aged rats.

  8. Hypothalamic hamartoma presenting with gelastic seizures, generalized convulsions, and ictal psychosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Hail, Hassan J; Sokrab, Tag-Eldin O; Al-Moslamani, Nasir J; Miyares, Francisco R

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of hypothalamic hamartoma in an adult female who presented with gelastic seizures, generalized convulsions, and ictal aggressive psychotic behavior. Anticonvulsant treatment was ineffective in controlling the epileptic seizures. Surgical excision after accurate imaging diagnosis 3 decades after the onset of symptoms markedly ameliorated her condition. Delayed and erroneous diagnosis had unnecessarily prolonged the suffering of our patient.

  9. MATERNAL ATRAZINE (ATR) ALTERS HYPOTHALAMIC DOPAMINE (HYP-DA) AND SERUM PROLACTIN (SPRL) IN MALE PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maternal Atrazine (ATR) alters hypothalamic dopamine (HYP-DA) and serum prolactin (sPRL) in male pups. 1Christopher Langdale, 2Tammy Stoker and 2Ralph Cooper. 1 Dept. of Cell Biology, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. 2 Endocrinology ...

  10. Hypothalamic deep brain stimulation in the treatment of chronic cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Massimo; Franzini, Angelo; Cecchini, Alberto Proietti; Broggi, Giovanni; Bussone, Gennaro

    2010-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is a short-lasting unilateral headache associated with ipsilateral craniofacial autonomic manifestations. A positron emission tomography (PET) study has shown that the posterior hypothalamus is activated during CH attacks, suggesting that hypothalamic hyperactivity plays a key role in CH pathophysiology. On this basis, stimulation of the ipsilateral posterior hypothalamus was hypothesized to counteract such hyperactivity to prevent intractable CH. Ten years after its introduction, hypothalamic stimulation has been proved to successfully prevent attacks in more than 60% of 58 hypothalamic implanted drug-resistant chronic CH patients. The implantation procedure has generally been proved to be safe, although it carries a small risk of brain haemorrhage. Long-term stimulation is safe, and nonsymptomatic impairment of orthostatic adaptation is the only noteworthy change. Microrecording studies will make it possible to better identify the target site. Neuroimaging investigations have shown that hypothalamic stimulation activates ipsilateral trigeminal complex, but with no immediate perceived sensation within the trigeminal distribution. Other studies on the pain threshold in chronically stimulated patients showed increased threshold for cold pain in the distribution of the first trigeminal branch ipsilateral to stimulation. These studies suggest that activation of the hypothalamus and of the trigeminal system are both necessary, but not sufficient to generate CH attacks. In addition to the hypothalamus, other unknown brain areas are likely to play a role in the pathophysiology of this illness. Hypothalamus implantation is associated with a small risk of intracerebral haemorrhage and must be performed by an expert neurosurgical team, in selected patients. PMID:21179610

  11. Single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

    PubMed

    El-Shehaby, Amr M N; Reda, Wael A; Abdel Karim, Khaled M; Emad Eldin, Reem M; Nabeel, Ahmed M

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Because of their critical and central location, it is deemed necessary to fractionate when considering irradiating optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy is considered safer when dealing with gliomas in this location. In this study, the safety and efficacy of single-session stereotactic radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were reviewed. METHODS Between December 2004 and June 2014, 22 patients with optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were treated by single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Twenty patients were available for follow-up for a minimum of 1 year after treatment. The patients were 5 to 43 years (median 16 years) of age. The tumor volume was 0.15 to 18.2 cm(3) (median 3.1 cm(3)). The prescription dose ranged from 8 to 14 Gy (median 11.5 Gy). RESULTS The mean follow-up period was 43 months. Five tumors involved the optic nerve only, and 15 tumors involved the chiasm/hypothalamus. Two patients died during the follow-up period. The tumors shrank in 12 cases, remained stable in 6 cases, and progressed in 2 cases, thereby making the tumor control rate 90%. Vision remained stable in 12 cases, improved in 6 cases, and worsened in 2 cases in which there was tumor progression. Progression-free survival was 83% at 3 years. CONCLUSIONS The initial results indicate that single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

  12. Improved metabolic phenotype of hypothalamic PTP1B-deficiency is dependent upon the leptin receptor☆

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Ryan C.; Rak, Kimberly S.; Zimmer, Derek J.; Bence, Kendra K.

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a known regulator of central metabolic signaling, and mice with whole brain-, leptin receptor (LepRb) expressing cell-, or proopiomelanocortin neuron-specific PTP1B-deficiency are lean, leptin hypersensitive, and display improved glucose homeostasis. However, whether the metabolic effects of central PTP1B-deficiency are due to action within the hypothalamus remains unclear. Moreover, whether or not these effects are exclusively due to enhanced leptin signaling is unknown. Here we report that mice with hypothalamic PTP1B-deficiency (Nkx2.1-PTP1B–/–) display decreased body weight and adiposity on high-fat diet with no associated improvements in glucose tolerance. Consistent with previous reports, we find that hypothalamic deletion of the LepRb in mice (Nkx2.1-LepRb–/–) results in extreme hyperphagia and obesity. Interestingly, deletion of hypothalamic PTP1B and LepRb (Nkx2.1-PTP1B–/–:LepRb–/–) does not rescue the hyperphagia or obesity of Nkx2.1-LepRb–/– mice, suggesting that hypothalamic PTP1B contributes to the central control of energy balance through a leptin receptor-dependent pathway. PMID:24749060

  13. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity.

  14. Paradoxical sleep deprivation activates hypothalamic nuclei that regulate food intake and stress response.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Milene de Oliveira Lara; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Kawakami, Suzi Emiko; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2009-09-01

    A large body of evidence has shown that prolonged paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) results in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, and in loss of body weight despite an apparent increase of food intake, reflecting increased energy expenditure. The flowerpot technique for PSD is an efficient paradigm for investigating the relationships among metabolic regulation and stress response. The purpose of the present study was to examine the mechanisms involved in the effects of 96 h of PSD on metabolism regulation, feeding behaviour and stress response by studying corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and orexin (ORX) immunoreactivity in specific hypothalamic nuclei. Once-daily assessments of body weight, twice-daily measurements of (spillage-corrected) food intake, and once-daily determinations of plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone were made throughout PSD or at corresponding times in control rats (CTL). Immunoreactivity for CRH in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and for ORX in the hypothalamic lateral area was evaluated at the end of the experimental period. PSD resulted in increased diurnal, but not nocturnal, food intake, producing no significant changes in global food intake. PSD augmented the immunoreactivity for CRH and plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels, characterizing activation of the HPA axis. PSD also markedly increased the ORX immunoreactivity. The average plasma level of corticosterone correlated negatively with body weight gain throughout PSD. These results indicate that augmented ORX and CRH immunoreactivity in specific hypothalamic nuclei may underlie some of the metabolic changes consistently described in PSD.

  15. SF-1 in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus: A key regulator of homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) regulates food intake and body weight homeostasis. The nuclear receptor NR5A1 (steroidogenic factor 1; SF-1) is a transcription factor whose expression is highly restricted in the VMH and is required for the development of the nucleus. Neurons expressing...

  16. Differential Acute and Chronic Effects of Leptin on Hypothalamic Astrocyte Morphology and Synaptic Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Granado, Miriam; Frago, Laura M.; Barrios, Vicente; Horvath, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in neuroendocrine functions partially through modulation of synaptic input density in the hypothalamus. Indeed, glial ensheathing of neurons is modified by specific hormones, thus determining the availability of neuronal membrane space for synaptic inputs, with the loss of this plasticity possibly being involved in pathological processes. Leptin modulates synaptic inputs in the hypothalamus, but whether astrocytes participate in this action is unknown. Here we report that astrocyte structural proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are induced and astrocyte morphology modified by chronic leptin administration (intracerebroventricular, 2 wk), with these changes being inversely related to modifications in synaptic protein densities. Similar changes in glial structural proteins were observed in adult male rats that had increased body weight and circulating leptin levels due to neonatal overnutrition (overnutrition: four pups/litter vs. control: 12 pups/litter). However, acute leptin treatment reduced hypothalamic GFAP levels and induced synaptic protein levels 1 h after administration, with no effect on vimentin. In primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures leptin also reduced GFAP levels at 1 h, with an induction at 24 h, indicating a possible direct effect of leptin. Hence, one mechanism by which leptin may affect metabolism is by modifying hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, which in turn could alter synaptic inputs to hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, the responses to acute and chronic leptin exposure are inverse, raising the possibility that increased glial activation in response to chronic leptin exposure could be involved in central leptin resistance. PMID:21343257

  17. Leucine is a major regulator of muscle protein synthesis in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Columbus, Daniel A; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa A

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10% of infants born in the United States are of low birth weight. Growth failure during the neonatal period is a common occurrence in low birth weight infants due to their inability to tolerate full feeds, concerns about advancing amino acid supply, and high nutrient requirements for growth. An improved understanding of the nutritional regulation of growth during this critical period of development is vital for the development of strategies to improve lean growth. Past studies with animal models have demonstrated that muscle protein synthesis is increased substantially following a meal and that this increase is due to the postprandial rise in amino acids as well as insulin, which independently stimulate protein synthesis in a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent manner. Further studies have elucidated that leucine, in particular, as well as its metabolites, α-ketoisocaproic acid and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate, have unique anabolic properties. Supplementation with leucine, provided either parenterally or enterally, has been shown to enhance muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs, making it an ideal candidate for stimulating growth of low birth weight infants. PMID:25408462

  18. Proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein PAL31 functions as a caspase-3 inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Weiyong; Kimura, Hiromichi; Shiota, Kunio . E-mail: ashiota@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-04-14

    Proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein PAL31 (PAL31) is expressed in proliferating cells and consists of 272 amino acids with a tandem structure of leucine-rich repeats in the N-terminus and a highly acidic region with a putative nuclear localization signal in the C-terminus. We previously reported that PAL31 is required for cell cycle progression. In the present study, we found that the antisense oligonucleotide of PAL31 induced apoptosis to the transfected Nb2 cells. Stable transfectants, in which PAL31 was regulated by an inducible promoter, were generated to gain further insight into the signaling role of PAL31 in the regulation of apoptosis. Expression of PAL31 resulted in the marked rescue of Rat1 cells from etoposide and UV radiation-induced apoptosis and the cytoprotection was correlated with the levels of PAL31 protein. Thus, cytoprotection from apoptosis is a physiological function of PAL31. PAL31 can suppress caspase-3 activity but not cytochrome c release in vitro, indicating that PAL31 is a direct caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, PAL31 is a multifunctional protein working as a cell cycle progression factor as well as a cell survival factor.

  19. Structure and Mechanism of Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana: INSIGHTS ON LEUCINE AND ALIPHATIC GLUCOSINOLATE BIOSYNTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Goo; Nwumeh, Ronald; Jez, Joseph M

    2016-06-24

    Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) and 3-(2'-methylthio)ethylmalate dehydrogenase catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of different β-hydroxyacids in the leucine- and methionine-derived glucosinolate biosynthesis pathways, respectively, in plants. Evolution of the glucosinolate biosynthetic enzyme from IPMDH results from a single amino acid substitution that alters substrate specificity. Here, we present the x-ray crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana IPMDH2 (AtIPMDH2) in complex with either isopropylmalate and Mg(2+) or NAD(+) These structures reveal conformational changes that occur upon ligand binding and provide insight on the active site of the enzyme. The x-ray structures and kinetic analysis of site-directed mutants are consistent with a chemical mechanism in which Lys-232 activates a water molecule for catalysis. Structural analysis of the AtIPMDH2 K232M mutant and isothermal titration calorimetry supports a key role of Lys-232 in the reaction mechanism. This study suggests that IPMDH-like enzymes in both leucine and glucosinolate biosynthesis pathways use a common mechanism and that members of the β-hydroxyacid reductive decarboxylase family employ different active site features for similar reactions.

  20. Podocan-like protein: a novel small leucine-rich repeat matrix protein in bone.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Kaku, Masaru; Yoshida, Keiko; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Atsawasuwan, Phimon; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2011-07-01

    Recently, significant attention has been drawn to the biology of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans (SLRPs) due to their multiple functionalities in various cell types and tissues. Here, we characterize a novel SLRP member, "Podocan-like (Podnl) protein" identified by a bioinformatics approach. The Podnl protein has a signal peptide, a unique cysteine-rich N-terminal cluster, 21 leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motifs, and one putative N-glycosylation site. This protein is structurally similar to podocan in SLRPs. The gene was highly expressed in mineralized tissues and in osteoblastic cells and the high expression level was observed at and after matrix mineralization in vitro. Podnl was enriched in newly formed bones based on immunohistochemical analysis. When Podnl was transfected into osteoblastic cells, the protein with N-glycosylation was detected mainly in the cultured medium, indicating that Podnl is a secreted N-glycosylated protein. The endogenous Podnl protein was also present in bone matrix. These data provide a new insight into our understanding of the emerging SLRP functions in bone formation.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of the homeodomain-leucine zipper IV transcription factor family in Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rao; Liu, Wei; Li, Qiang; Li, Jing; Wang, Lina; Ren, Zhonghai

    2013-07-01

    The class IV homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip IV) proteins are plant-specific transcriptional factors known to play crucial roles in plant growth and development. In this study, 11 cucumber (Cucumis sativus) HD-Zip IV genes were identified in the version 2 cucumber genome and found to be distributed unevenly across the chromosomes. The CsHDZIV (Cucumis sativus homeodomain-leucine zipper IV) gene family is smaller than in other studied species (except for rice) because of the absence of gene duplication events. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HD-Zip IV genes from cucumber, Arabidopsis, tomato, cotton, maize, and rice could be classified into five subgroups. All CsHDZIV genes appear to be derived from a basic module containing 11 exons in the coding region. Two conserved motifs of 21 and 19 nucleotides were found in the 3'-untranslated regions of six CsHDZIV genes, suggesting that post-transcriptional regulation may play a role in regulation of CsHDZIV genes. In addition, 6 of 11 CsHDZIV genes were found to undergo alternative splicing events. Reverse transcription PCR analysis showed that all CsHDZIV genes (except one) were expressed and showed preferential expression in reproductive organs.

  2. Human leucine zipper protein promotes hepatic steatosis via induction of apolipoprotein A-IV.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minsoo; Kim, Jeonghan; An, Hyoung-Tae; Ko, Jesang

    2017-02-28

    The molecular mechanism of stress-induced hepatic steatosis is not well known. Human leucine zipper protein (LZIP) regulates the expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell migration, and stress response. The aim of this study was to determine the regulatory role of LZIP in stress-induced hepatic steatosis. We used a microarray analysis to identify LZIP-induced genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. LZIP increased the expression of apolipoprotein A-IV (APOA4) mRNA. In the presence of stress inducer, APOA4 promoter analysis was performed and LZIP-induced lipid accumulation was monitored in mouse primary cells and human tissues. Under Golgi stress conditions, LZIP underwent proteolytic cleavage and was phosphorylated by AKT to protect against proteasome degradation. The stabilized N-terminal LZIP was translocated to the nucleus, where it directly bound to the APOA4 promoter, leading to APOA4 induction. LZIP-induced APOA4 expression resulted in increased absorption of surrounding free fatty acids. LZIP also promoted hepatic steatosis in mouse liver. Both LZIP and APOA4 were highly expressed in human steatosis samples. Our findings indicate that LZIP is a novel modulator of APOA4 expression and hepatic lipid metabolism. LZIP might be a therapeutic target for developing treatment strategies for hepatic steatosis and related metabolic diseases.-Kang, M., Kim, J., An, H.-T., Ko, J. Human leucine zipper protein promotes hepatic steatosis via induction of apolipoprotein A-IV.

  3. Unexpected Diversity of pepA Genes Encoding Leucine Aminopeptidases in Sediments from a Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein designed novel PCR primers for universal detection of the pepA gene, which encodes the representative leucine aminopeptidase gene, and investigated the genetic characteristics and diversity of pepA genes in sediments of hypereutrophic Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. Most of the amino acid sequences deduced from the obtained clones (369 out of 370) were related to PepA-like protein sequences in the M17 family of proteins. The developed primers broadly detected pepA-like clones associated with diverse bacterial phyla—Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Aquificae, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, and Spirochetes as well as the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating that prokaryotes in aquatic environments possessing leucine aminopeptidase are more diverse than previously reported. Moreover, prokaryotes related to the obtained pepA-like clones appeared to be r- and K-strategists, which was in contrast to our previous findings showing that the neutral metalloprotease gene clones obtained were related to the r-strategist genus Bacillus. Our results suggest that an unprecedented diversity of prokaryotes with a combination of different proteases participate in sedimentary proteolysis. PMID:26936797

  4. Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase promotes axon growth in mammalian central nervous system neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meifan; Geoffroy, Cédric G.; Wong, Hetty N.; Tress, Oliver; Nguyen, Mallorie T.; Holzman, Lawrence B.; Jin, Yishi; Zheng, Binhai

    2016-01-01

    Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase (LZK/MAP3K13) is a member of the mixed lineage kinase family with high sequence identity to Dual Leucine Zipper Kinase (DLK/MAP3K12). While DLK is established as a key regulator of axonal responses to injury, the role of LZK in mammalian neurons is poorly understood. By gain- and loss-of-function analyses in neuronal cultures, we identify LZK as a novel positive regulator of axon growth. LZK signals specifically through MKK4 and JNKs among MAP2Ks and MAPKs respectively in neuronal cells, with JNK activity positively regulating LZK protein levels. Neuronal maturation or activity deprivation activates the LZK-MKK4-JNK pathway. LZK and DLK share commonalities in signaling, regulation, and effects on axon extension. Furthermore, LZK-dependent regulation of DLK protein expression and the lack of additive effects on axon growth upon co-manipulation suggest complex functional interaction and cross-regulation between these two kinases. Together, our data support the possibility for two structurally related MAP3Ks to work in concert to mediate axonal responses to external insult or injury in mammalian CNS neurons. PMID:27511108

  5. Unexpected Diversity of pepA Genes Encoding Leucine Aminopeptidases in Sediments from a Freshwater Lake.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein designed novel PCR primers for universal detection of the pepA gene, which encodes the representative leucine aminopeptidase gene, and investigated the genetic characteristics and diversity of pepA genes in sediments of hypereutrophic Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. Most of the amino acid sequences deduced from the obtained clones (369 out of 370) were related to PepA-like protein sequences in the M17 family of proteins. The developed primers broadly detected pepA-like clones associated with diverse bacterial phyla-Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Aquificae, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, and Spirochetes as well as the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating that prokaryotes in aquatic environments possessing leucine aminopeptidase are more diverse than previously reported. Moreover, prokaryotes related to the obtained pepA-like clones appeared to be r- and K-strategists, which was in contrast to our previous findings showing that the neutral metalloprotease gene clones obtained were related to the r-strategist genus Bacillus. Our results suggest that an unprecedented diversity of prokaryotes with a combination of different proteases participate in sedimentary proteolysis.

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of a M17 leucine aminopeptidase of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Kang, J-M; Ju, H-L; Sohn, W-M; Na, B-K

    2011-05-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are a group of metalloexopeptidases that catalyse the sequential removal of amino acids from the N-termini of polypeptides or proteins. They play an important role in regulating the balance between catabolism and anabolism in living cells. LAPs of apicomplexa parasitic protozoa have been intensively investigated due to their crucial roles in parasite biology as well as their potentials as drug targets. In this study, we identified an M17 leucine aminopeptidase of Cryptosporidium parvum (CpLAP) and characterized the biochemical properties of the recombinant protein. Multiple sequence alignment of the deduced amino acid sequence of CpLAP with those of other organisms revealed that typical amino acid residues essential for metal binding and active-site formation in M17 LAPs were well conserved in CpLAP. Recombinant CpLAP shared similar biochemical properties such as optimal pH, stability at neutral pHs, and metal-binding characteristics with other characterized LAPs. The enzyme showed a marked preference for Leu and its activity was effectively inhibited by bestatin. These results collectively suggest that CpLAP is a typical member of the M17 LAP family and may play an important role in free amino acid regulation in the parasite.

  7. MHJ_0461 is a multifunctional leucine aminopeptidase on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jarocki, Veronica M; Santos, Jerran; Tacchi, Jessica L; Raymond, Benjamin B A; Deutscher, Ania T; Jenkins, Cheryl; Padula, Matthew P; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidases are part of the arsenal of virulence factors produced by bacterial pathogens that inactivate host immune peptides. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced pathogen of swine that lacks the genetic repertoire to synthesize amino acids and relies on the host for availability of amino acids for growth. M. hyopneumoniae recruits plasmin(ogen) onto its cell surface via the P97 and P102 adhesins and the glutamyl aminopeptidase MHJ_0125. Plasmin plays an important role in regulating the inflammatory response in the lungs of pigs infected with M. hyopneumoniae. We show that recombinant MHJ_0461 (rMHJ_0461) functions as a leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) with broad substrate specificity for leucine, alanine, phenylalanine, methionine and arginine and that MHJ_0461 resides on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. rMHJ_0461 also binds heparin, plasminogen and foreign DNA. Plasminogen bound to rMHJ_0461 was readily converted to plasmin in the presence of tPA. Computational modelling identified putative DNA and heparin-binding motifs on solvent-exposed sites around a large pore on the LAP hexamer. We conclude that MHJ_0461 is a LAP that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae.

  8. Immunization with recombinant leucine aminopeptidase showed protection against Fasciola gigantica in mice.

    PubMed

    Changklungmoa, Narin; Kueakhai, Pornanan; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Chaithirayanon, Kulathida; Chaichanasak, Pannigan; Preyavichyapugdee, Narin; Chantree, Pathanin; Sansri, Veerawat; Itagaki, Tadashi; Sobhon, Prasert

    2013-10-01

    Leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is expressed in all stages of Fasciola gigantica and, hence, is considered as a potential vaccine candidate. In this study, we have tested a vaccine potential of LAP and the types of immune responses it elicited in vaccinated mice. Recombinant F. gigantica leucine aminopeptidase (rFgLAP) was expressed in Escherichia coli, BL21 (DE3). The imprinting control region mice subcutaneously immunized with 50 μg of rFgLAP combined with Freund's adjuvant (n = 10) exhibited a significant reduction in worm recoveries when compared with non-immunized and Freund's adjuvant controls at 60.8 and 64.3%, respectively, and both T helper (Th)1 and Th2 humoral immune responses were elicited in the hosts as reflected by the levels of IgG1 and IgG2a, with Th2 predominating. The levels of IgG1- and IgG2a-specific antibodies to rFgLAP were inversely and significantly correlated with the numbers of worm recoveries. The rFgLAP-vaccinated mice showed significantly reduced levels of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase and liver damage. These indicated that rFgLAP has a potential as a vaccine candidate against F. gigantica, whose efficacy will be studied further in economic animals including cattle, sheep, and goat.

  9. A leucine zipper motif determines different functions in a DNA replication protein.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia de Viedma, D; Giraldo, R; Rivas, G; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Diaz-Orejas, R

    1996-01-01

    RepA is the replication initiator protein of the Pseudomonas plasmid pPS10 and is also able to autoregulate its own synthesis. Here we report a genetic and functional analysis of a leucine zipper-like (LZ) motif located at the N-terminus of RepA. It is shown that the LZ motif modulates the equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric forms of the protein and that monomers of RepA interact with sequences at the origin of replication, oriV, while dimers are required for interactions of RepA at the repA promoter. Further, different residues of the LZ motif are seen to have different functional roles. Leucines at the d positions of the putative alpha-helix are relevant in the formation of RepA dimers required for transcriptional autoregulation. They also modulate other RepA-RepA interactions that result in cooperative binding of protein monomers to the origin of replication. The residues at the b/f positions of the putative helix play no relevant role in RepA-RepA interactions. These residues do not affect RepA autoregulation but do influence replication, as demonstrated by mutants that, without affecting binding to oriV, either increase the host range of the plasmid or are inactive in replication. It is proposed that residues in b/f positions play a relevant role in interactions between RepA and host replication factors. Images PMID:8631313

  10. MHJ_0461 is a multifunctional leucine aminopeptidase on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jarocki, Veronica M.; Santos, Jerran; Tacchi, Jessica L.; Raymond, Benjamin B. A.; Deutscher, Ania T.; Jenkins, Cheryl; Padula, Matthew P.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidases are part of the arsenal of virulence factors produced by bacterial pathogens that inactivate host immune peptides. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced pathogen of swine that lacks the genetic repertoire to synthesize amino acids and relies on the host for availability of amino acids for growth. M. hyopneumoniae recruits plasmin(ogen) onto its cell surface via the P97 and P102 adhesins and the glutamyl aminopeptidase MHJ_0125. Plasmin plays an important role in regulating the inflammatory response in the lungs of pigs infected with M. hyopneumoniae. We show that recombinant MHJ_0461 (rMHJ_0461) functions as a leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) with broad substrate specificity for leucine, alanine, phenylalanine, methionine and arginine and that MHJ_0461 resides on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. rMHJ_0461 also binds heparin, plasminogen and foreign DNA. Plasminogen bound to rMHJ_0461 was readily converted to plasmin in the presence of tPA. Computational modelling identified putative DNA and heparin-binding motifs on solvent-exposed sites around a large pore on the LAP hexamer. We conclude that MHJ_0461 is a LAP that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:25589579

  11. Non-universal decoding of the leucine codon CUG in several Candida species.

    PubMed Central

    Ohama, T; Suzuki, T; Mori, M; Osawa, S; Ueda, T; Watanabe, K; Nakase, T

    1993-01-01

    It has been reported that CUG, a universal leucine codon, is read as serine in an asporogenic yeast, Candida cylindracea. The distribution of this non-universal genetic code in various yeast species was studied using an in vitro translation assay system with a synthetic messenger RNA containing CUG codons in-frame. It was found that CUG is used as a serine codon in six out of the fourteen species examined, while it is used for leucine in the remaining eight. The tRNA species responsible for the translation of codon CUG as serine was detected in all the six species in which CUG is translated as serine. The grouping according to the CUG codon assignments in these yeast species shows a good correlation with physiological classification by the chain lengths of the isoprenoid moiety of ubiquinone and the cell-wall sugar contained in the yeasts. The six Candida species examined in which CUG is used as serine belong to one distinct group in Hemiascomycetes. PMID:8371978

  12. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31

    SciTech Connect

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio; Reed, John C.; Pascual, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    A leucine-zipper with properties as apoptotic regulator in the ER has been crystallized. X-ray data to 2.5 Å resolution were collected, molecular replacement solutions were identified and refinement has been started. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160–Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 Å resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22/P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 Å. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  13. Requirement for lysosomal localization of mTOR for its activation differs between leucine and other amino acids.

    PubMed

    Averous, Julien; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Carraro, Valérie; Gourbeyre, Ophélie; Parry, Laurent; B'Chir, Wafa; Muranishi, Yuki; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Proud, Christopher G; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cell growth and metabolism. It controls many cell functions by integrating nutrient availability and growth factor signals. Amino acids, and in particular leucine, are among the main positive regulators of mTORC1 signaling. The current model for the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids involves the movement of mTOR to the lysosome mediated by the Rag-GTPases. Here, we have examined the control of mTORC1 signaling and mTOR localization by amino acids and leucine in serum-fed cells, because both serum growth factors (or, e.g., insulin) and amino acids are required for full activation of mTORC1 signaling. We demonstrate that mTORC1 activity does not closely correlate with the lysosomal localization of mTOR. In particular, leucine controls mTORC1 activity without any detectable modification of the lysosomal localization of mTOR, indicating that the signal(s) exerted by leucine is likely distinct from those exerted by other amino acids. In addition, knock-down of the Rag-GTPases attenuated the inhibitory effect of amino acid- or leucine-starvation on the phosphorylation of mTORC1 targets. Furthermore, data from cells where Rag expression has been knocked down revealed that leucine can promote mTORC1 signaling independently of the lysosomal localization of mTOR. Our data complement existing models for the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids and provide new insights into this important topic.

  14. Different effects on bone strength and cell differentiation in pre pubertal caloric restriction versus hypothalamic suppression.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R N; Safadi, F F; Barbe, M F; Del Carpio-Cano, Fe; Popoff, S N; Yingling, V R

    2011-10-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea and energy restriction during puberty affect peak bone mass accrual. One hypothesis suggests energy restriction alters hypothalamic function resulting in suppressed estradiol levels leading to bone loss. However, both positive and negative results have been reported regarding energy restriction and bone strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate energy restriction and hypothalamic suppression during pubertal onset on bone mechanical strength and the osteogenic capacity of bone marrow-derived cells in two models: female rats treated with gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonists (GnRH-a) or 30% energy restriction. At 23 days of age, female Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to three groups: control group (C, n=10), GnRH-a group (n=10), and Energy Restriction (ER, n=12) group. GnRH-a animals received daily injections for 27 days. The animals in the ER group received 70% of the control animals' intake. After sacrifice (50 days of age), body weight, uterine and muscle weights were measured. Bone marrow-derived stromal cells were cultured and assayed for proliferation and differentiation into osteoblasts. Outcome measures included bone strength, bone histomorphometry and architecture, serum IGF-1 and osteocalcin. GnRH-a suppressed uterine weight, decreased osteoblast proliferation, bone strength, trabecular bone volume and architecture compared to control. Elevated serum IGF-1 and osteocalcin levels and body weight were found. The ER model had an increase in osteoblast proliferation compared to the GnRH-a group, similar bone strength relative to body weight and increased trabecular bone volume in the lumbar spine compared to control. The ER animals were smaller but had developed bone strength sufficient for their size. In contrast, suppressed estradiol via hypothalamic suppression resulted in bone strength deficits and trabecular bone volume loss. In summary, our results support the hypothesis that during periods of

  15. Dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine regulation of hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression: Impact of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, P; Shrestha, P K; Briski, K P

    2015-04-30

    The brain astrocyte glycogen reservoir is a vital energy reserve and, in the cerebral cortex, subject among other factors to noradrenergic control. The ovarian steroid estradiol potently stimulates nerve cell aerobic respiration, but its role in glial glycogen metabolism during energy homeostasis or mismatched substrate supply/demand is unclear. This study examined the premise that estradiol regulates hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression during normo- and hypoglycemia in vivo through dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine (CA)-dependent mechanisms. Individual astrocytes identified in situ by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunolabeling were laser-microdissected from the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH), arcuate hypothalamic (ARH), and paraventricular hypothalamic (PVH) nuclei and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) of estradiol (E)- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) rats after insulin or vehicle injection, and pooled within each site. Stimulation [VMH, LHA] or suppression [PVH, ARH] of basal glycogen synthase (GS) protein expression by E was reversed in the former three sites by caudal fourth ventricular pretreatment with the CA neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). E diminished glycogen phosphorylase (GP) protein profiles by CA-dependent [VMH, PVH] or -independent mechanisms [LHA]. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) increased GS expression in the PVH in OVX+E, but reduced this protein in the PVH, ARH, and LHA in OVX+O. Moreover, IIH augmented GP expression in the VMH, LHA, and ARH in OVX+E and in the ARH in OVX+O, responses that normalized by 6-OHDA. Results demonstrate site-specific effects of E on astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme expression in the female rat hypothalamus, and identify locations where dorsomedial hindbrain CA input is required for such action. Evidence that E correspondingly increases and reduces basal GS and GP in the VMH and LHA, but augments the latter protein during IIH suggests that E regulates

  16. Activation of hypothalamic gono-like neurons in female rats during estrus☆

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Shaojun; Rong, Peijing; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, gonadal function is controlled by the activity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons, which control the secretion of adenohypophyseal and gonadal hormones. However, there are a number of unanswered questions in relation to gonadal function. It is currently unknown how erotogenic stimulation of the genitals influences the subpopulation of hypothalamic medial preoptic area neurons, antidromically identified as projecting to the median eminence at different periods of the estrous cycle. Additionally, the distinctiveness of hypothalamic medial preoptic area neurons, with respect to methods of feedback control by exogenous hormones, is also unknown. In this study, spontaneous discharges from individual neurons encountered within the medial preoptic area, gono-like neurons, were recorded extracellularly using glass microelectrodes. To confirm the cellular and histochemical properties of the recording units, antidromic stimulation was performed using a side-by-side bipolar stimulating electrode placed into the median eminence, alongside microiontophoretic injections of the conventional tracer, horseradish peroxidase. In addition, further immunohistochemical analyses were performed. Results showed that elevated gono-neuron activity was accompanied by increased background activity and greater responses to erotogenic stimuli during estrus. Application of clitoral traction stimulation resulted in increased activation of the gono-like neurons. This neuronal activity was noticeably inhibited by β-estradiol administration. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the presence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-reactive protein in hypothalamic cells in which electrophysiological recordings were taken. Thus, medial preoptic area neurons represent the subset of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons described from brain slices in vitro, and might serve as a useful physiological model to form the basis of future in vivo studies. PMID:25337091

  17. Hypothalamic responses to fasting indicate metabolic reprogramming away from glycolysis toward lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Poplawski, Michal M; Mastaitis, Jason W; Yang, Xue-Jun; Mobbs, Charles V

    2010-11-01

    Nutrient-sensitive hypothalamic neurons regulate energy balance and glucose homeostasis, but the molecular mechanisms mediating hypothalamic responses to nutritional state remain incompletely characterized. To address these mechanisms, the present studies used quantitative PCR to characterize the expression of a panel of genes the hypothalamic expression by nutritional status of which had been suggested by DNA microarray studies. Although these genes regulate a variety of function, the most prominent set regulate intermediary metabolism, and the overall pattern clearly indicated that a 48-h fast produced a metabolic reprogramming away from glucose metabolism and toward the utilization of alternative fuels, particularly lipid metabolism. This general reprogramming of intermediary metabolism by fasting was observed both in cortex and hypothalamus but most prominently in hypothalamus. The effect of fasting on the expression of these genes may be mediated by reduction in plasma glucose or glucose metabolism, rather than leptin, because they were generally recapitulated by hypoglycemia even in the presence of elevated insulin and in vitro by low glucose but were not recapitulated in ob/ob mice. These studies suggest that fasting reduces glucose metabolism and thus minimizes the production of hypothalamic malonyl-coenzyme A. However, because the reprogramming of glucose metabolism by fasting was also observed in cortex, this apparent substrate competition may mediate more general responses to nutritional deprivation, including those responsible for the protective effects of dietary restriction. The present studies also provide a large panel of novel glucose-regulated genes that can be used as markers of glucose action to address mechanisms mediating hypothalamic responses to nutritional state.

  18. Gelastic epilepsy and hypothalamic hamartomas: neuroanatomical analysis of brain lesions in 100 patients.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Josef; Le, Scheherazade; Foster, Brett L; Bourgeois, Blaise; Riviello, James J; Prenger, Erin; Saper, Clifford; Kerrigan, John F

    2011-10-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas present with isolated fits of ictal laughter (gelastic epilepsy) or a combination of gelastic and other types of seizures. Many of these patients also suffer from cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric comorbidities and precocious puberty. Although there is a large body of anecdotal evidence about hypothalamic hamartomas and gelastic seizures, many questions still remain to be answered. For instance, which specific hypothalamic regions are most affected by the location of hamartomas causing laughing versus other types of seizures? Does the neuroanatomical localization of the lesions differ in cases with only gelastic seizures or a combination of gelastic and other types of seizures? Does the location of the lesions correlate with the presence of precocious puberty, and does the type of lesion influence the severity or the type of seizures? In a retrospective review of clinical and structural neuroimaging data from 100 cases of gelastic epilepsy and hypothalamic hamartoma, we aimed to address these questions by analysing the clinical presentation and the neuroanatomical features of the hypothalamic lesions in these patients. Our findings suggest that in all 100 cases, lesions were centred at the level of the mammillary bodies in the posterior hypothalamus. Compared with the patients with pure gelastic seizures (n = 32), those with gelastic and other types of seizures (n = 68) had significantly longer duration of epilepsy (P < 0.001), whereas age of seizure onset, the volume of lesions and the proximity to the mammillary bodies were not different between the two groups. In contrast, patients with cognitive or developmental impairment and those with precocious puberty had significantly larger lesions involving the anterior and posterior hypothalamus.

  19. Hypothalamic neuronal histamine modulates febrile response but not anorexia induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Seiichi; Itateyama, Emi; Oka, Kyoko; Masaki, Takayuki; Sakata, Toshiie; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2005-05-01

    This study examined the contribution of hypothalamic neuronal histamine (HA) to the anorectic and febrile responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an exogenous pyrogen, and the endogenous pyrogens interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Intraperitoneal (ip) injection of LPS, IL-1beta, or TNF-alpha suppressed 24-hr cumulative food intake and increased rectal temperature in rats. To analyze the histaminergic contribution, rats were pretreated with intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of 2.44 mmol/kg or ip injection of 244 mmol/kg of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (FMH), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), to deplete neural HA. The depletion of neural HA augmented the febrile response to ip injection of LPS and IL-1beta and alleviated the anorectic response to ip injection of IL-1beta. However, the depletion of neural HA did not modify the LPS-induced anorectic response or TNF-alpha-induced febrile and anorectic responses. Consistent with these results, the rate of hypothalamic HA turnover, assessed by the accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), was elevated with ip injections of LPS and IL-1beta, but unaffected by TNF-alpha at equivalent doses. This suggests that (i) LPS and IL-1beta activate hypothalamic neural HA turnover; (ii) hypothalamic neural HA suppresses the LPS- and IL-1beta-induced febrile responses and accelerates the IL-1beta-induced anorectic response; and (iii) TNF-alpha modulates the febrile and anorectic responses via a neural HA-independent pathway. Therefore, hypothalamic neural HA is involved in the IL-1beta-dominant pathway, rather than the TNF-alpha-dominant pathway, preceding the systemic inflammatory response induced by exogenous pyrogens, such as LPS. Further research on this is needed.

  20. Remote effects of hypothalamic lesions in the prefrontal cortex of craniopharygioma patients.

    PubMed

    Ozyurt, Jale; Lorenzen, Anna; Gebhardt, Ursel; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Müller, Hermann L; Thiel, Christiane M

    2014-05-01

    Albeit histologically low grade (WHO I(o)) brain tumors, craniopharyngiomas and/or their surgical removal frequently affect the hypothalamus, amongst other brain regions at risk. Due to rich hypothalamic connections with prefrontal and limbic regions, hypothalamic injury may adversely affect neural substrates of emotion processing and higher cognitive control, including memory and executive functions. The current study is the first to investigate the consequences of hypothalamic involvement on neural substrates of emotional and cognitive functioning. Ten patients with childhood craniopharyngioma and known hypothalamic involvement and fifteen age- and intelligence matched control subjects (median age: 17.8 and 17.3 yrs.) were studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging and an emotional face recognition task. During encoding, participants were asked to classify neutral and emotional faces. In a subsequent recognition phase, participants had to recognize these old faces within a set of new faces. Behavioral performance was comparable between patients and controls. Neural activity revealed, however, differential recruitment of fronto-limbic brain regions during recognition. Patients exhibited an abnormal pattern of task-induced activation and deactivation in the anterior and posterior rostral medial prefrontal cortex and a higher functional coupling between anterior rostral medial prefrontal cortex and the thalamus. Additionally, we found a higher reactivity in the patients' amygdala to emotional relative to neutral faces when compared to healthy controls. Our data provide first evidence that hypothalamic damage impacts neural correlates of memory retrieval in medial prefrontal cortex, indicating a less efficient use of an area involved in executive control processes. We propose that the deactivation failure in the patients' anterior rostral medial prefrontal cortex is related to an increased coupling with the thalamus and reflects a reduced efficiency to

  1. HORIZON SENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-03-18

    With the aid of a DOE grant (No. DE-FC26-01NT41050), Stolar Research Corporation (Stolar) developed the Horizon Sensor (HS) to distinguish between the different layers of a coal seam. Mounted on mining machine cutter drums, HS units can detect or sense the horizon between the coal seam and the roof and floor rock, providing the opportunity to accurately mine the section of the seam most desired. HS also enables accurate cutting of minimum height if that is the operator's objective. Often when cutting is done out-of-seam, the head-positioning function facilitates a fixed mining height to minimize dilution. With this technology, miners can still be at a remote location, yet cut only the clean coal, resulting in a much more efficient overall process. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate the feasibility of horizon sensing on mining machines and demonstrate that Horizon Sensing can allow coal to be cut cleaner and more efficiently. Stolar's primary goal was to develop the Horizon Sensor (HS) into an enabling technology for full or partial automation or ''agile mining''. This technical innovation (R&D 100 Award Winner) is quickly demonstrating improvements in productivity and miner safety at several prominent coal mines in the United States. In addition, the HS system can enable the cutting of cleaner coal. Stolar has driven the HS program on the philosophy that cutting cleaner coal means burning cleaner coal. The sensor, located inches from the cutting bits, is based upon the physics principles of a Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA). When it is in proximity of the rock-coal interface, the RMPA impedance varies depending on the thickness of uncut coal. The impedance is measured by the computer-controlled electronics and then sent by radio waves to the mining machine. The worker at the machine can read the data via a Graphical User Interface, displaying a color-coded image of the coal being cut, and direct the machine appropriately. The Horizon Sensor

  2. Suppression of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal Axis by Maximum Androgen Blockade in a Patient with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takeshi; Endo, Itsuro; Ooguro, Yukari; Morimoto, Kana; Kurahashi, Kiyoe; Yoshida, Sumiko; Kuroda, Akio; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Abe, Masahiro; Fukumoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old Japanese man showed suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during maximum androgen blockade (MAB) therapy including chlormadinone acetate (CMA) for prostate cancer. After stopping the MAB therapy, both the basal ACTH level and the response to CRH recovered. While no reports have indicated that CMA suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients with prostate cancer, CMA has been shown to inhibit this axis in animals. These observations suggest that we must monitor the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients treated with CMA, especially under stressful conditions. PMID:27980263

  3. Leucine supplementation of a low-protein meal increases skeletal muscle and visceral tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs by stimulating mTOR-dependent translation initiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein synthesis and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) activation are increased in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs parenterally infused with amino acids. Leucine appears to be the most effective single amino acid to trigger these effects. To examine the response to enteral leucine supplementation...

  4. Leucine stimulates PPARβ/δ-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism with enhanced GLUT4 content and glucose uptake in myotubes.

    PubMed

    Schnuck, Jamie K; Sunderland, Kyle L; Gannon, Nicholas P; Kuennen, Matthew R; Vaughan, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Leucine stimulates anabolic and catabolic processes in skeletal muscle, however little is known about the effects of leucine on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activity. This work characterized the effects of 24-h leucine treatment on metabolic parameters and protein expression in cultured myotubes. Leucine significantly increased PPARβ/δ expression as well as markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to significantly increased mitochondrial content and oxidative metabolism in a PPARβ/δ-dependent manner. However, leucine-treated cells did not display significant alterations in uncoupling protein expression or oxygen consumed per relative mitochondrial content suggesting leucine-mediated increases in oxidative metabolism are a function of increased mitochondrial content and not altered mitochondrial efficiency. Leucine treatment also increased GLUT4 content and glucose uptake as well as PPARγ and FAS expression leading to increased total lipid content. Leucine appears to activate PPAR activity leading to increased mitochondrial biogenesis and elevated substrate oxidation, while simultaneously promoting substrate/lipid storage and protein synthesis.

  5. Differential effects of leucine on translation initiation factor activation and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle, renal and adipose tissues of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In adult rats, protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue increases in response to pharmacological doses of leucine (Leu) administered orally. In neonatal pigs, a physiological increase in plasma leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle without increasing hepatic protein...

  6. Amino acid availability and age affect the leucine stimulation of protein synthesis and eIF4F formation in muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that a physiological increase in plasma leucine for 60 and 120 min increases translation initiation factor activation in muscle of neonatal pigs. Although muscle protein synthesis is increased by leucine at 60 min, it is not maintained at 120 min, perhaps because of the decr...

  7. Chronic leucine supplementation of a low protein diet increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs through mTOR signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine acutely stimulates protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. We hypothesized that leucine supplementation of a low protein diet will enhance protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in the neonate for prolonged periods. Fasted 5-d-old pigs (n=6–8...

  8. Dose and Latency Effects of Leucine Supplementation in Modulating Glucose Homeostasis: Opposite Effects in Healthy and Glucocorticoid-Induced Insulin-Resistance States

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Nelo Eidy; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; de Siqueira-Filho, Mário Alves; Felitti, Vitor; Nicastro, Humberto; Bueno, Carlos; Lira, Fábio Santos; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Campos-Ferraz, Patrícia; Nunes, Maria Tereza; Seelaender, Marília; de Oliveira Carvalho, Carla Roberta; Blachier, François; Lancha, Antonio Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Dexamethasone (DEXA) is a potent immunosupressant and anti-inflammatory agent whose main side effects are muscle atrophy and insulin resistance in skeletal muscles. In this context, leucine supplementation may represent a way to limit the DEXA side effects. In this study, we have investigated the effects of a low and a high dose of leucine supplementation (via a bolus) on glucose homeostasis, muscle mass and muscle strength in energy-restricted and DEXA-treated rats. Since the leucine response may also be linked to the administration of this amino acid, we performed a second set of experiments with leucine given in bolus (via gavage) versus leucine given via drinking water. Leucine supplementation was found to produce positive effects (e.g., reduced insulin levels) only when administrated in low dosage, both via the bolus or via drinking water. However, under DEXA treatment, leucine administration was found to significantly influence this response, since leucine supplementation via drinking water clearly induced a diabetic state, whereas the same effect was not observed when supplied via the gavage. PMID:23363994

  9. A Novel Plant Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor Kinase Regulates the Response of Medicago truncatula Roots to Salt Stress[W

    PubMed Central

    de Lorenzo, Laura; Merchan, Francisco; Laporte, Philippe; Thompson, Richard; Clarke, Jonathan; Sousa, Carolina; Crespi, Martín

    2009-01-01

    In plants, a diverse group of cell surface receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs) plays a fundamental role in sensing external signals to regulate gene expression. Roots explore the soil environment to optimize their growth via complex signaling cascades, mainly analyzed in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, legume roots have significant physiological differences, notably their capacity to establish symbiotic interactions. These major agricultural crops are affected by environmental stresses such as salinity. Here, we report the identification of a leucine-rich repeat RLK gene, Srlk, from the legume Medicago truncatula. Srlk is rapidly induced by salt stress in roots, and RNA interference (RNAi) assays specifically targeting Srlk yielded transgenic roots whose growth was less inhibited by the presence of salt in the medium. Promoter-β-glucuronidase fusions indicate that this gene is expressed in epidermal root tissues in response to salt stress. Two Srlk-TILLING mutants also failed to limit root growth in response to salt stress and accumulated fewer sodium ions than controls. Furthermore, early salt-regulated genes are downregulated in Srlk-RNAi roots and in the TILLING mutant lines when submitted to salt stress. We propose a role for Srlk in the regulation of the adaptation of M. truncatula roots to salt stress. PMID:19244136

  10. Regulation of amino acid transport system L by amino acid availability in CHO-K1 cells. A special role for leucine.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Lobatón, C D; Oxender, D L

    1985-10-10

    Starvation of CHO-K1 cells for leucine leads to a 3-4-fold increase in transport system L activity, without modification of transport through systems A and ASC. The concentration of leucine must be below 10 microM before the enhancement of transport can be clearly seen. To achieve low concentrations of leucine such as 10 microM, extensive dialysis of fetal calf serum was required. The enhancement of transport was completed after 12-24 h of starvation and was fully reversed within 1 h of re-feeding with leucine. Starvation for isoleucine, valine or phenylalanine also produced an increase in system L transport activity, but the effect was only one half of that seen following leucine starvation.

  11. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM) to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Results Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E)9.5) contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia). Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5) give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. Conclusions We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly defined progenitor domains

  12. Chronic leucine supplementation improves lipid metabolism in C57BL/6J mice fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jun; Han, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jia-Ying; Tong, Xing; Yin, Xue-Bin; Yuan, Lin-Xi; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Leucine supplementation has been reported to improve lipid metabolism. However, lipid metabolism in adipose tissues and liver has not been extensively studied for leucine supplementation in mice fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet (HFCD). Design C57BL/6J mice were fed a chow diet, HFCD, HFCD supplemented with 1.5% leucine (HFCD+1.5% Leu group) or 3% leucine (HFCD+3% Leu group) for 24 weeks. The body weight, peritoneal adipose weight, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride in serum and liver, and serum adipokines were analyzed. In addition, expression levels of proteins associated with hepatic lipogenesis, adipocyte lipolysis, and white adipose tissue (WAT) browning were determined. Results Mice in the HFCD group developed obesity and deteriorated lipid metabolism. Compared with HFCD, leucine supplementation lowered weight gain and TC levels in circulation and the liver without changing energy intake. The decrease in body fat was supported by histological examination in the WAT and liver. Furthermore, serum levels of proinflammatory adipokines, such as leptin, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, were significantly decreased by supplemented leucine. At the protein level, leucine potently decreased the hepatic lipogenic enzymes (fatty acid synthase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase) and corresponding upstream proteins. In epididymal WAT, the reduced expression levels of two major lipases by HFCD, namely phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase, were reversed when leucine was supplemented. Uncoupling protein 1, β3 adrenergic receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor g coactivator-1α, and fibroblast growth factor 21 were involved in the thermogenic program and WAT browning. Leucine additionally upregulated their protein expression in both WAT and interscapular brown adipose tissue. Conclusion This study demonstrated that chronic leucine supplementation reduced the body weight and improved the lipid profile of

  13. Structural and functional analysis of two small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, fibromodulin and chondroadherin.

    PubMed

    Paracuellos, Patricia; Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Hohenester, Erhard

    2017-02-17

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are important regulators of extracellular matrix assembly and cell signalling. We have determined crystal structures at ~2.2Å resolution of human fibromodulin and chondroadherin, two collagen-binding SLRPs. Their overall fold is similar to that of the prototypical SLRP, decorin, but unlike decorin neither fibromodulin nor chondroadherin forms a stable dimer. A previously identified binding site for integrin α2β1 maps to an α-helix in the C-terminal cap region of chondroadherin. Interrogation of the Collagen Toolkits revealed a unique binding site for chondroadherin in collagen II, and no binding to collagen III. A triple-helical peptide containing the sequence GAOGPSGFQGLOGPOGPO (O is hydroxyproline) forms a stable complex with chondroadherin in solution. In fibrillar collagen I and II, this sequence is aligned with the collagen cross-linking site KGHR, suggesting a role for chondroadherin in cross-linking.

  14. Molecular Recognition of Muramyl Dipeptide Occurs in the Leucine-rich Repeat Domain of Nod2.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Mackenzie L; D'Ambrosio, Elizabeth A; Bahnson, Brian J; Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler

    2017-04-14

    Genetic mutations in the innate immune receptor nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing 2 (Nod2) have demonstrated increased susceptibility to Crohn's disease, an inflammatory bowel disease that is hypothesized to be accompanied by changes in the gut microbiota. Nod2 responds to the presence of bacteria, specifically a fragment of the bacterial cell wall, muramyl dipeptide (MDP). The proposed site of this interaction is the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain. Surface plasmon resonance and molecular modeling were used to investigate the interaction of the LRR domain with MDP. A functional and pure LRR domain was obtained from Escherichia coli expression in high yield. The LRR domain binds to MDP with high affinity, with a KD of 212 ± 24 nM. Critical portions of the receptor were determined by mutagenesis of putative binding residues. Fragment analysis of MDP revealed that both the peptide and carbohydrate portion contribute to the binding interaction.

  15. Studies on an L-leucine hydriodide semiorganic crystal for frequency conversion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, P.; Vimalan, M.; Anandan, P.; Bakiyaraj, G.; Kirubavathi, K.; Praveen, S. G.; Selvaraju, K.

    2016-03-01

    An L-leucine hydriodide semiorganic crystal has been synthesized and grown by a slow evaporation technique. The lattice parameters of the grown crystal have been confirmed using single-crystal x-ray diffractometry. Various functional groups present in the crystal were identified by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectral) assessment. The optical transmission percentage of the crystal was ascertained by UV-vis-near-infrared (NIR) studies. The thermal stability of the crystal was determined by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis curves. The mechanical behavior of the crystal was studied using the Vicker’s microhardness analysis. The dielectric properties of the crystal have been investigated for varying temperatures. The second-harmonic generation efficiency was measured by the Kurtz and Perry powder technique and the efficiency is comparable to that of potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate.

  16. Control of Neural Circuit Formation by Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Joris; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2014-01-01

    The function of neural circuits depends on the precise connectivity between populations of neurons. Increasing evidence indicates that disruptions in excitatory or inhibitory synapse formation or function lead to excitation/inhibition (E/I) imbalances and contribute to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing surface proteins have emerged as key organizers of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Distinct LRR proteins are expressed in different cell types and interact with key pre- and postsynaptic proteins. These protein interaction networks allow LRR proteins to coordinate pre- and postsynaptic elements during synapse formation and differentiation, pathway-specific synapse development, and synaptic plasticity. LRR proteins thus play a critical role in organizing synaptic connections into functional neural circuits, and their dysfunction may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25131359

  17. Structure of the OsSERK2 leucine-rich repeat extracellular domain

    PubMed Central

    McAndrew, Ryan; Pruitt, Rory N.; Kamita, Shizuo G.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Majumdar, Dipali; Hammock, Bruce D.; Adams, Paul D.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing integral membrane receptors that are involved in the regulation of development and immune responses in plants. It has recently been shown that rice SERK2 (OsSERK2) is essential for XA21-mediated resistance to the pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. OsSERK2 is also required for the BRI1-mediated, FLS2-mediated and EFR-mediated responses to brassinosteroids, flagellin and elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), respectively. Here, crystal structures of the LRR domains of OsSERK2 and a D128N OsSERK2 mutant, expressed as hagfish variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) fusions, are reported. These structures suggest that the aspartate mutation does not generate any significant conformational change in the protein, but instead leads to an altered interaction with partner receptors. PMID:25372696

  18. Structure of the OsSERK2 leucine-rich repeat extracellular domain.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Ryan; Pruitt, Rory N; Kamita, Shizuo G; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Majumdar, Dipali; Hammock, Bruce D; Adams, Paul D; Ronald, Pamela C

    2014-11-01

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing integral membrane receptors that are involved in the regulation of development and immune responses in plants. It has recently been shown that rice SERK2 (OsSERK2) is essential for XA21-mediated resistance to the pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. OsSERK2 is also required for the BRI1-mediated, FLS2-mediated and EFR-mediated responses to brassinosteroids, flagellin and elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), respectively. Here, crystal structures of the LRR domains of OsSERK2 and a D128N OsSERK2 mutant, expressed as hagfish variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) fusions, are reported. These structures suggest that the aspartate mutation does not generate any significant conformational change in the protein, but instead leads to an altered interaction with partner receptors.

  19. Assembly of Neuronal Connectivity by Neurotrophic Factors and Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Fernanda; Paratcha, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27555809

  20. The Arabidopsis ERECTA gene encodes a putative receptor protein kinase with extracellular leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Torii, K U; Mitsukawa, N; Oosumi, T; Matsuura, Y; Yokoyama, R; Whittier, R F; Komeda, Y

    1996-01-01

    Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta is one of the most popular ecotypes and is used widely for both molecular and genetic studies. It harbors the erecta (er) mutation, which confers a compact inflorescence, blunt fruits, and short petioles. We have identified five er mutant alleles from ecotypes Columbia and Wassilewskija. Phenotypic characterization of the mutant alleles suggests a role for the ER gene in regulating the shape of organs originating from the shoot apical meristem. We cloned the ER gene, and here, we report that it encodes a putative receptor protein kinases. The deduced ER protein contains a cytoplasmic protein kinase catalytic domain, a transmembrane region, and an extracellular domain consisting of leucine-rich repeats, which are thought to interact with other macromolecules. Our results suggest that cell-cell communication mediated by a receptor kinase has an important role in plant morphogenesis. PMID:8624444

  1. Structure of free radicals in irradiated acetyl-L-leucine single crystals at 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    Almanov, G.A.; Bogdanchikov, G.A.; Usov, O.M.

    1988-09-01

    By using the EPR method, two types of radicals are observed, which are formed in acetyl-L-leucine single crystals irradiated at 77K. These are alkyl type radicals (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/CCH/sub 2/CH(NHCOCH/sub 3/)COOH and peptide group radicals. When the crystals are defrozen to room temperatures, the radicals of the second type disappear without formation of paramagnetic particles. Two possible structures of the peptide group radicals were studied by the INDO method. On defreezing to room temperature, the alkyl group radical is retained, while the peptide radical disappears without formation of paramagnetic particles. For the protonated form of the anion-radical, a better agreement is observed between the theoretically calculated and the experimentally obtained HFI constants. The quantum chemical analysis of the possible structures of the peptide group radicals indicates that the formation of the protonated form of the anion-radical is energetically favorable.

  2. Leucine-Rich Repeat Transmembrane Proteins Instruct Discrete Dendrite Targeting in an Olfactory Map

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Weizhe; Zhu, Haitao; Potter, Christopher J.; Barsh, Gabrielle; Kurusu, Mitsuhiko; Zinn, Kai; Luo, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory systems utilize discrete neural pathways to process and integrate odorant information. In Drosophila, axons of first-order olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and dendrites of second-order projection neurons (PNs) form class-specific synaptic connections at ∼50 glomeruli. The mechanisms underlying PN dendrite targeting to distinct glomeruli in a 3-dimensional discrete neural map are unclear. Here we show that the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane protein Capricious (Caps) is differentially expressed in different classes of PNs. Loss- and gain-of-function studies indicate that Caps instructs the segregation of Caps-positive and negative PN dendrites to discrete glomerular targets. Moreover, Caps does not mediate homophilic interactions and regulates PN dendrite targeting independent of pre-synaptic ORNs. The closely related protein Tartan plays a partially redundant function with Capricious. These LRR proteins are likely part of a combinatorial cell-surface code that instructs discrete olfactory map formation. PMID:19915565

  3. Leucine-rich repeat transmembrane proteins instruct discrete dendrite targeting in an olfactory map.

    PubMed

    Hong, Weizhe; Zhu, Haitao; Potter, Christopher J; Barsh, Gabrielle; Kurusu, Mitsuhiko; Zinn, Kai; Luo, Liqun

    2009-12-01

    Olfactory systems utilize discrete neural pathways to process and integrate odorant information. In Drosophila, axons of first-order olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and dendrites of second-order projection neurons (PNs) form class-specific synaptic connections at approximately 50 glomeruli. The mechanisms underlying PN dendrite targeting to distinct glomeruli in a three-dimensional discrete neural map are unclear. We found that the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane protein Capricious (Caps) was differentially expressed in different classes of PNs. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies indicated that Caps instructs the segregation of Caps-positive and Caps-negative PN dendrites to discrete glomerular targets. Moreover, Caps-mediated PN dendrite targeting was independent of presynaptic ORNs and did not involve homophilic interactions. The closely related protein Tartan was partially redundant with Caps. These LRR proteins are probably part of a combinatorial cell-surface code that instructs discrete olfactory map formation.

  4. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) regulates multipotent neural progenitor proliferation.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ichiro; Paucar, Andres A; Bajpai, Ruchi; Dougherty, Joseph D; Zewail, Amani; Kelly, Theresa K; Kim, Kevin J; Ou, Jing; Groszer, Matthias; Imura, Tetsuya; Freije, William A; Nelson, Stanley F; Sofroniew, Michael V; Wu, Hong; Liu, Xin; Terskikh, Alexey V; Geschwind, Daniel H; Kornblum, Harley I

    2005-08-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) was previously identified in a screen for genes enriched in neural progenitors. Here, we demonstrate expression of MELK by progenitors in developing and adult brain and that MELK serves as a marker for self-renewing multipotent neural progenitors (MNPs) in cultures derived from the developing forebrain and in transgenic mice. Overexpression of MELK enhances (whereas knockdown diminishes) the ability to generate neurospheres from MNPs, indicating a function in self-renewal. MELK down-regulation disrupts the production of neurogenic MNP from glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive progenitors in vitro. MELK expression in MNP is cell cycle regulated and inhibition of MELK expression down-regulates the expression of B-myb, which is shown to also mediate MNP proliferation. These findings indicate that MELK is necessary for proliferation of embryonic and postnatal MNP and suggest that it regulates the transition from GFAP-expressing progenitors to rapid amplifying progenitors in the postnatal brain.

  5. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31.

    PubMed

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio; Reed, John C; Pascual, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160-Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 A resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6(1)22/P6(5)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 A. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  6. Enantioselective Friedel-Crafts reactions between phenols and N-tosylaldimines catalyzed by a leucine-derived bifunctional catalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Xing; Qu, Jin

    2012-06-04

    Enantioselective Friedel-Crafts reactions between phenols and N-tosylaldimines were developed using a bifunctional catalyst readily prepared from L-leucine. The chiral benzylic amine products were obtained in high yields (up to 96% yield) and good to high enantiomeric excesses (up to 95% ee).

  7. Introduction of a leucine half-zipper engenders multiple high-quality crystals of a recalcitrant tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Min; Shapiro, Ryan; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-03-01

    E. coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase is recalcitrant to crystallization. A group of leucine substitutions has transformed the protein. Although Escherichia coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase was among the first tRNA synthetases to be sequenced and extensively studied by functional analysis, it has proved to be recalcitrant to crystallization. This challenge remained even for crystallization of the catalytic fragment. By mutationally introducing three stacked leucines onto the solvent-exposed side of an α-helix, an engineered catalytic fragment of the synthetase was obtained that yielded multiple high-quality crystals and cocrystals with different ligands. The engineered α-helix did not form a leucine zipper that interlocked with the same α-helix from another molecule. Instead, using the created hydrophobic spine, it interacted with other surfaces of the protein as a leucine half-zipper (LHZ) to enhance the crystal lattice interactions. The LHZ made crystal lattice contacts in all crystals of different space groups. These results illustrate the power of introducing an LHZ into helices to facilitate crystallization. The authors propose that the method can be unified with surface-entropy reduction and can be broadly used for protein-surface optimization in crystallization.

  8. Leucine-enriched essential amino acid supplementation during moderate steady state exercise enhances postexercise muscle protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: The effects of essential amino acid (EAA) supplementation during moderate steady state (ie, endurance) exercise on postexercise skeletal muscle metabolism are not well described, and the potential role of supplemental leucine on muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and associated molecular re...

  9. Distinct Plasma Profile of Polar Neutral Amino Acids, Leucine, and Glutamate in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Obukhanych, Tetyana V.; Laval, Julie; Aronov, Pavel A.; Libove, Robin; Banerjee, Arpita Goswami; Parker, Karen J.; O'Hara, Ruth; Herzenberg, Leonard A.; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to examine plasma amino acid (AA) levels in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD, N = 27) and neuro-typically developing controls (N = 20). We observed reduced plasma levels of most polar neutral AA and leucine in children with ASD. This AA profile conferred significant post hoc power for discriminating…

  10. Leucine and alpha-Ketoisocaproic acid, but not norleucine, stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The branched-chain amino acid, leucine, acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of young pigs. However, the chemical structure responsible for this effect has not been identified. We have shown that the other branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine and valine, are ...

  11. Leucine supplementation stimulates protein synthesis and reduces degradation signal activation in muscle of newborn pigs during acute endotoxemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sepsis disrupts skeletal muscle proteostasis and mitigates the anabolic response to leucine (Leu) in muscle of mature animals. We have shown that Leu stimulates muscle protein synthesis (PS) in healthy neonatal piglets. To determine if supplemental Leu can stimulate PS and reduce protein degradation...

  12. Rapamycin blocks leucine-induced protein synthesis by suppressing mTORC1 activation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle in the neonate grows at a rapid rate due in part to an enhanced sensitivity to the postprandial rise in amino acids, particularly leucine (Leu). To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which Leu stimulates protein synthesis in neonatal muscle, overnight fasted 7-day-old piglets were...

  13. Pulsatile delivery of a leucine supplement during long-term continuous enteral feeding enhances lean growth in term neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal pigs are used as a model to study and optimize the clinical treatment of infants who are unable to maintain oral feeding. Using this model, we have previously shown that pulsatile administration of leucine during continuous feeding over 24 h via orogastric tube enhanced protein synthesis in...

  14. Estimation of activation energy from the survival yields: fragmentation study of leucine enkephalin and polyethers by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuki, Ákos; Shemirani, Ghazaleh; Nagy, Lajos; Antal, Borbála; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2013-07-01

    A simple collision model for multiple collisions occurring in quadrupole type mass spectrometers was derived and tested with leucine enkaphalin a common mass spectrometric standard with well-characterized properties. Implementation of the collision model and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) algorithm into a spreadsheet software allowed a good fitting of the calculated data to the experimental survival yield (SY) versus collision energy curve. In addition, fitting also ensured to estimate the efficiencies of the kinetic to internal energy conversion for Leucine enkephalin in quadrupole-time-of-flight and triple quadrupole instruments. It was observed that the experimental SY versus collision energy curves for the leucine enkephalin can be described by the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (RRK) formalism by reducing the total degrees of freedom (DOF) to about one-fifth. Furthermore, this collision model with the RRK formalism was used to estimate the critical energy (E(o)) of lithiated polyethers, including polyethylene glycol (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG), and polytetrahydrofurane (PTHF) with degrees of freedom similar to that of leucine enkephalin. Applying polyethers with similar DOF provided the elimination of the effect of DOF on the unimolecular reaction rate constant. The estimated value of E(o) for PEG showed a relatively good agreement with the value calculated by high-level quantum chemical calculations reported in the literature. Interestingly, it was also found that the E(o) values for the studied polyethers were similar.

  15. The small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans in tissue repair and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hultgårdh-Nilsson, Anna; Borén, Jan; Chakravarti, Shukti

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans consist of a protein core with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains, and have multiple roles in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Here we discuss the potential and known functions of a group of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans (SLRPs) in atherosclerosis. We focus on five SLRPs, decorin, biglycan lumican, fibromodulin, and PRELP, because these have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques or demonstrated to have a role in animal models of atherosclerosis. Decorin and biglycan are modified post translationally by substitution with chondroitin/dermatan sulfate GAGs, whereas lumican, fibromodulin, and PRELP have keratan sulfate side chains, and the core proteins have leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motifs that are characteristic of the LRR superfamily. The chondroitin/dermatan sulfate GAG side chains have been implicated in lipid retention in atherosclerosis. The core proteins are discussed here in the context of: (i) interactions with collagens and their implications in tissue integrity, fibrosis, and wound repair; and (ii) interactions with growth factors, cytokines, pathogen-associated molecular patterns, and cell surface receptors that impact normal physiology and disease processes such as inflammation, innate immune responses, and wound healing (i.e processes that are all important in plaque development and progression). Thus, studies of these SLRPs in the context of wound healing are providing clues about their functions that may be important in early stages of atherosclerosis to plaque vulnerability and cardiovascular disease at later stages. Understanding of signal transduction pathways regulated by the core protein interactions is leading to novel roles and therapeutic potential for these proteins in wound repair and atherosclerosis. PMID:26477596

  16. Metabolic labeling of leucine rich repeat kinases 1 and 2 with radioactive phosphate.

    PubMed

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Gao, Fangye; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2013-09-18

    Leucine rich repeat kinases 1 and 2 (LRRK1 and LRRK2) are paralogs which share a similar domain organization, including a serine-threonine kinase domain, a Ras of complex proteins domain (ROC), a C-terminal of ROC domain (COR), and leucine-rich and ankyrin-like repeats at the N-terminus. The precise cellular roles of LRRK1 and LRRK2 have yet to be elucidated, however LRRK1 has been implicated in tyrosine kinase receptor signaling, while LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In this report, we present a protocol to label the LRRK1 and LRRK2 proteins in cells with (32)P orthophosphate, thereby providing a means to measure the overall phosphorylation levels of these 2 proteins in cells. In brief, affinity tagged LRRK proteins are expressed in HEK293T cells which are exposed to medium containing (32)P-orthophosphate. The (32)P-orthophosphate is assimilated by the cells after only a few hours of incubation and all molecules in the cell containing phosphates are thereby radioactively labeled. Via the affinity tag (3xflag) the LRRK proteins are isolated from other cellular components by immunoprecipitation. Immunoprecipitates are then separated via SDS-PAGE, blotted to PVDF membranes and analysis of the incorporated phosphates is performed by autoradiography ((32)P signal) and western detection (protein signal) of the proteins on the blots. The protocol can readily be adapted to monitor phosphorylation of any other protein that can be expressed in cells and isolated by immunoprecipitation.

  17. Expression of small leucine-rich proteoglycans in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Syaidah, Rahimi; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Ramadhani, Dini; Jindatip, Depicha; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix and comprise a specific core protein substituted with covalently linked glycosaminoglycan chains. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are a major family of proteoglycans and have key roles as potent effectors in cellular signaling pathways. Research during the last two decades has shown that SLRPs regulate biological functions in many tissues such as skin, tendon, kidney, liver, and heart. However, little is known of the expression of SLRPs, or the characteristics of the cells that produce them, in the anterior pituitary gland. Therefore, we have determined whether SLRPs are present in rat anterior pituitary gland. We have used real-time reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction to analyze the expression of SLRP genes and have identified the cells that produce SLRPs by using in situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probe. We have clearly detected the mRNA expression of SLRP genes, and cells expressing decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, lumican, proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP), and osteoglycin are located in the anterior pituitary gland. We have also investigated the possible double-staining of SLRP mRNA and pituitary hormones, S100 protein (a marker of folliculostellate cells), desmin (a marker of capillary pericytes), and isolectin B4 (a marker of endothelial cells). Decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, lumican, PRELP, and osteoglycin mRNA have been identified in S100-protein-positive and desmin-positive cells. Thus, we conclude that folliculostellate cells and pericytes produce SLRPs in rat anterior pituitary gland.

  18. Diurnal pattern of the interrelationships among leucine oxidation, urea production, and hydrolysis in humans.

    PubMed

    el-Khoury, A E; Ajami, A M; Fukagawa, N K; Chapman, T E; Young, V R

    1996-09-01

    We investigated in six healthy adult men, who received an adequate intake of protein (1 g.kg-1.day-1), the relationship among urea production, excretion, and hydrolysis. At the end of a 6-day diet-adjustment period, subjects were studied using a 24-h continuous intravenous [1-13C]leucine and [15N,15N]urea tracer protocol (A. E. El-Khoury, N. K. Fukagawa, M. Sánchez, R. H. Tsay, R. E. Gleason, T. E. Chapman, and V. R. Young. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 59: 1000-1011, 1994) to determine rates of irreversible protein nitrogen loss and urea kinetics. By combining leucine and urea kinetic data, we found a significant degree of urea hydrolysis over the 24-h period but no evidence to support the thesis that there is a net retention or "salvage" of the urea nitrogen liberated. Our measurements revealed little or no urea hydrolysis during the fed 12-h period of the 24-h tracer protocol but substantial hydrolysis during the 12-h fasting phase. Furthermore, a mass balance model and calculations (APPENDIX) indicated that nitrogen salvage, if any, is quantitatively indistinguishable from insensible nitrogen losses and aggregate estimation errors, accounting for no more than 5% of the nitrogen intake. We conclude that urea hydrolysis, via the intestinal microflora, although representing a component of the overall cycles of nitrogen flow within the body, does not contribute via a net retention of amino nitrogen to the maintenance of body nitrogen homeostasis in healthy adults consuming an adequate diet.

  19. Comparative biochemical and functional properties of two leucine aminopeptidases of Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Mi; Ju, Hye-Lim; Ju, Jung-Won; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Kim, Tong-Soo; Bahk, Young-Yil; Hong, Sung-Jong; Na, Byoung-Kuk

    2012-01-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAP; EC 3.4.11.1) are a group of metalloexopeptidases, which catalyze the sequential removal of leucine amino acids from the N-termini of the polypeptides or proteins. In this study, we identified two novel genes that encode LAPs of Clonorchis sinensis (CsLAP1 and CsLAP2) and characterized their biochemical and functional properties. Multiple sequence alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences of CsLAP1 and CsLAP2 with those of other organisms revealed that typical metal-binding coordinating and active site residues for LAPs were well conserved in CsLAP1 and CsLAP2. Recombinant CsLAP1 and CsLAP2 showed similar biochemical properties such as pH optima at pH 8.0 and stability at neutral pHs. Both enzymes were specifically inhibited by bestatin and showed preferential substrate specificity for Leu-MCA. However, the enzymes differed in that they required different metal ions for maximum activity. Expressions of CsLAP1 and CsLAP2 were detected throughout the various developmental stages of C. sinensis, and their transcription levels increased gradually in accordance with the maturation of the parasite. Both enzymes were identified in soluble worm extract of C. sinensis, but not in excretory and secretory products. Immunolocalization studies showed that both enzymes were co-localized to the intestinal epithelial cells and gastrodermis of the parasite. These results collectively suggest that CsLAP1 and CsLAP2 are synthesized in the intestinal epithelial and gastrodermal cells of C. sinensis and may be involved in the final digestion of peptides that hydrolyzed within intestinal lumen followed by absorbed into gastrodermal cells of the parasite.

  20. Characterization of an N-glycosylated Bacillus subtilis leucine aminopeptidase expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Xi, Hongxing; Tian, Yaping; Zhou, Nandi; Zhou, Zhemin; Shen, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Aminopeptidase is an important flavorsome especially in protein hydrolysate debittering by removing hydrophobic amino acid residue at the N-terminal end. Besides, it is also applied to preparation of active peptides and analysis of protein sequence. In this study, leucine aminopeptidase from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris, a widely used heterologous protein expression host. Then it was purified and characterized. After methanol induction for 96 h, the aminopeptidase activity in culture supernatant reached 28.4 U ml(À1) , which was 7.1 times that of wild strain B. subtilis Zj016. The optimal temperature and pH of the purified recombinant enzyme were 60 °C and 8.5, respectively. The purified aminopeptidase was stable within 30-60 °C and pH 8.0-9.0. It was intensively inhibited by Ni(2β) , Ca(2β) , DL-dithiothreitol (DTT) and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), but activated by Co(2β) . The Km toward leucine-p-nitroanilines (Leu-pNA) of the enzyme was 0.97 mM. The sequence analysis of aminopeptidase indicated three potential N-glycosylation sites and it was further verified via MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Consequently, the N-glycosylated aminopeptidase exhibited higher thermostability and catalytic efficiency. The purified enzyme exhibited two bands through sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) while a single band can be identified when the enzyme was deglycosylated. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the secondary structure of recombinant aminopeptidase was similar to the wild-type.